WorldWideScience

Sample records for adolescent mental health

  1. Coping and Mental Health in Early Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plancherel, Bernard; Bolognini, Monique

    1995-01-01

    Focused on mental health and protective factors in early adolescence. Significant relations between coping strategies and mental health were found, which are different according to gender: girls invest in more social relations, negative feelings, and consumption habits; boys often use sense of humor, or practice a hobby or sport. (JBJ)

  2. Income Shocks and Adolescent Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Sarah; de Hoop, Jacobus; Ozler, Berk

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effects of a positive income shock on mental health among adolescent girls using evidence from a cash transfer experiment in Malawi. Offers of cash transfers strongly reduced psychological distress among baseline schoolgirls. However, these large beneficial effects declined with increases in the transfer amount offered to the…

  3. Mental Health Disorders. Adolescent Health Highlight. Publication #2013-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, David; Barry, Megan; Vaughn, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Mental disorders are diagnosable conditions characterized by changes in thinking, mood, or behavior (or some combination of these) that can cause a person to feel stressed out and impair his or her ability to function. These disorders are common in adolescence. This "Adolescent Health Highlight" presents the warning signs of mental disorders;…

  4. Cyberbullying and adolescent mental health: systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Mota Borges Bottino; Bottino, Cássio M. C.; Caroline Gomez Regina; Aline Villa Lobo Correia; Wagner Silva Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Cyberbullying is a new form of violence that is expressed through electronic media and has given rise to concern for parents, educators and researchers. In this paper, an association between cyberbullying and adolescent mental health will be assessed through a systematic review of two databases: PubMed and Virtual Health Library (BVS). The prevalence of cyberbullying ranged from 6.5% to 35.4%. Previous or current experiences of traditional bullying were associated with victims and perpetrator...

  5. School Mental Health Resources and Adolescent Mental Health Service Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jennifer Greif; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Alegria, Margarita; Costello, E. Jane; Gruber, Michael J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Leaf, Philip J.; Olin, Serene; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Although schools are identified as critical for detecting youth mental disorders, little is known about whether the number of mental health providers and types of resources that they offer influence student mental health service use. Such information could inform the development and allocation of appropriate school-based resources to…

  6. Adolescent mental health: Challenges with maternal noncompliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki A Nejtek

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Vicki A Nejtek, Sarah Hardy, Scott WinterUniversity of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, USAAbstract: The leading cause of suicide ideation, attempts, and completion in adolescents is persistent and unresolved parental conflict. National statistics show extremely high rates of childhood neglect and abuse are perpetrated most often by single mothers. Psychiatric disorders arising from maternal–child dysfunction are well-documented. However, resources to prevent offspring victimization are lacking. Here, we report maternal neglect of a 15-year-old male brought to the psychiatric emergency room for suicidal ideation. An inpatient treatment plan including pharmacotherapy, family therapy and psychological testing was initiated. The patient’s mother failed to attend clinic appointments or family therapy sessions. Clinician attempts to engage the mother in the treatment plan was met with verbal assaults, aggression, and threatening behavior. The patient decompensated in relation to the mother’s actions. Child Protective Services were contacted and a follow-up assessment with the patient and mother is pending. Psychiatric treatment of the mother may be a necessary intervention and prevention regimen for both the adolescent and the mother. Without consistent Child Protective Services oversight, medical and psychosocial follow-up, the prognosis and quality of life for this adolescent is considered very poor. Stringent mental health law and institutional policies are needed to adequately intercede and protect adolescents with mental illness.Keywords: adolescent, suicide, maternal treatment noncompliance, maternal neglect

  7. Early modifiable risk factors for childhood and adolescent mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Cherry

    2015-01-01

    Childhood and adolescent mental health is a major public health concern. Childhood behavioral problems and low self-esteem can predispose children to future depression. Mental health issues often emerge in adolescence making examination of potential early modifiable risk factors for these three mental health indicators crucial. Potential risk factors for mental health issues often reflect findings from Western settings where confounding by low socioeconomic position may occur, making it diffi...

  8. Cyberbullying and adolescent mental health: systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Mota Borges Bottino

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyberbullying is a new form of violence that is expressed through electronic media and has given rise to concern for parents, educators and researchers. In this paper, an association between cyberbullying and adolescent mental health will be assessed through a systematic review of two databases: PubMed and Virtual Health Library (BVS. The prevalence of cyberbullying ranged from 6.5% to 35.4%. Previous or current experiences of traditional bullying were associated with victims and perpetrators of cyberbullying. Daily use of three or more hours of Internet, web camera, text messages, posting personal information and harassing others online were associated with cyberbullying. Cybervictims and cyberbullies had more emotional and psychosomatic problems, social difficulties and did not feel safe and cared for in school. Cyberbullying was associated with moderate to severe depressive symptoms, substance use, ideation and suicide attempts. Health professionals should be aware of the violent nature of interactions occurring in the virtual environment and its harm to the mental health of adolescents.

  9. Cyberbullying and adolescent mental health: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottino, Sara Mota Borges; Bottino, Cássio M C; Regina, Caroline Gomez; Correia, Aline Villa Lobo; Ribeiro, Wagner Silva

    2015-03-01

    Cyberbullying is a new form of violence that is expressed through electronic media and has given rise to concern for parents, educators and researchers. In this paper, an association between cyberbullying and adolescent mental health will be assessed through a systematic review of two databases: PubMed and Virtual Health Library (BVS). The prevalence of cyberbullying ranged from 6.5% to 35.4%. Previous or current experiences of traditional bullying were associated with victims and perpetrators of cyberbullying. Daily use of three or more hours of Internet, web camera, text messages, posting personal information and harassing others online were associated with cyberbullying. Cybervictims and cyberbullies had more emotional and psychosomatic problems, social difficulties and did not feel safe and cared for in school. Cyberbullying was associated with moderate to severe depressive symptoms, substance use, ideation and suicide attempts. Health professionals should be aware of the violent nature of interactions occurring in the virtual environment and its harm to the mental health of adolescents. PMID:25859714

  10. Social Integration and the Mental Health of Black Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Theda; Joe, Sean; Shields, Joseph; Caldwell, Cleopatra H.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of family, school, and religious social contexts on the mental health of Black adolescents has been understudied. This study used Durkheim's social integration theory to examine these associations in a nationally representative sample of 1,170 Black adolescents, ages 13-17. Mental health was represented by positive and negative…

  11. Social integration and the mental health of Black adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, Theda; Joe, Sean; Shields, Joseph; Caldwell, Cleopatra Howard

    2014-01-01

    The influence of family, school, and religious social contexts on the mental health of Black adolescents has been understudied. This study used Durkheim’s Social Integration Theory to examine these associations in a nationally representative sample of 1,170 Black adolescents, ages 13-17. Mental health was represented by positive and negative psychosocial well-being indicators. Results showed that adolescents’ integration into family and school were related to better mental health. Additionall...

  12. Child and adolescent mental health emergency services in Macedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Releva, M; Boskovska, M; Apceva, A; Polazarevska, M; Novotni, A; Bonevski, D; Sargent, J

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of child and adolescent mental health emergency services in Macedonia since 1993. The evolution of services through the Mental Crisis Centre for Children and Adolescents, funded by the Open Society Institute, and located in six cities is outlined. The paper also defines traditional services, the nature of child mental health emergencies, the evaluation process, follow-up care and training and supervision. It concludes with concern that the mental health emergency system is not sufficient to meet the needs of the child and adolescent population, particularly in the face of the Kosovar refugee crisis. Recommendations for the future are made. PMID:11508566

  13. UNDERSTANDING INTERPERSONAL MALTREATMENT AND MENTAL HEALTH IN ADOLESCENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samvedna Sharma

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to assess the mental health and maltreatment among orphan and non-orphan schooling adolescents residing in Jammu city. A purposive sample of 200 school going adolescents (100 from orphan schools and 100 from non-orphan schools from Jammu,with an age range of 13-16 years was collected.Consent from guardians and assent from adolescents were taken. In conclusion, study demonstrated that the mental health of orphan and non – orphan adolescents fall in the poor spectrum as observed from the manual comparatively . The mean value of mental health of non orphan adolescent boys & girls is slightly better than mental health of orphan boys and girls.

  14. Parenting Style, Individuation, and Mental Health of Egyptian Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwairy, Marwan; Menshar, Kariman E.

    2006-01-01

    Three questionnaires that measure parenting style, adolescent-family connectedness, and mental health were administered to 351 Egyptian adolescents. Results show that in rural communities the authoritarian style is more predominant in the parenting of male adolescents, while the authoritative style is more predominant in the parenting of female…

  15. IMPACT OF INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC ON MENTAL HEALTH OF ADOLESCENTS

    OpenAIRE

    DINESH P. NAIK

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that music training causes improvements in several aspects of Mental Health. The researcher tested this hypothesis using a “pre-post” intervention study design, in which researcher measured adolescent's Mental Health. Initially 588 students from Senior College were selected for the present study. All were nineteen-to-twenty one year old. Pre testing sessions were conducted on several small groups. By using the Mithila Mental Health Statu...

  16. The Relationship of Parental Mental Health and Dietary Pattern With Adolescent Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesgarani, Mohsen; Hosseinbor, Mohsen; Shafiee, Shahla; Sarkoubi, Roghayeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Today, ensuring people’s health and well-being has become a concern for societies. Health status results from an interaction of an individuals’ various psychological, social, and physical aspects. Objectives This study aims to investigate the relationship of parental mental health and dietary pattern with adolescent mental health. Patients and Methods In this study, 250 high school students in Shiraz were selected using random cluster sampling. The samples were analyzed using the Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28). Results According to the findings, parental mental health explains 22% of the variance in children’s mental health, so that in simultaneous regression, physical dimensions, anxiety, social functioning, and depression predicted 13%, 24%, 11%, and 24% of the variance of criterion variables, respectively. No significant relationship was observed between dietary pattern and adolescent mental health dimensions. There was a significant negative relationship only between depression and vegetable intake. Moreover, fruit (r = 0.15, P < 0.05) and vegetable (r = 0.16, P < 0.05) intake had a significant relationship with parental mental health dimensions. Conclusions Parents’ mental health and their psychological characteristics can be related to children’s mental health and affect their dietary intake patterns. PMID:27218068

  17. The Relationship of Parental Mental Health and Dietary Pattern With Adolescent Mental Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesgarani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Today, ensuring people’s health and well-being has become a concern for societies. Health status results from an interaction of an individuals’ various psychological, social, and physical aspects. Objectives This study aims to investigate the relationship of parental mental health and dietary pattern with adolescent mental health. Patients and Methods In this study, 250 high school students in Shiraz were selected using random cluster sampling. The samples were analyzed using the Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28. Results According to the findings, parental mental health explains 22% of the variance in children’s mental health, so that in simultaneous regression, physical dimensions, anxiety, social functioning, and depression predicted 13%, 24%, 11%, and 24% of the variance of criterion variables, respectively. No significant relationship was observed between dietary pattern and adolescent mental health dimensions. There was a significant negative relationship only between depression and vegetable intake. Moreover, fruit (r = 0.15, P < 0.05 and vegetable (r = 0.16, P < 0.05 intake had a significant relationship with parental mental health dimensions. Conclusions Parents’ mental health and their psychological characteristics can be related to children’s mental health and affect their dietary intake patterns.

  18. Developing mental health mobile apps: Exploring adolescents' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Rachel; Dooley, Barbara; Fitzgerald, Amanda

    2016-06-01

    Mobile applications or 'apps' have significant potential for use in mental health interventions with adolescents. However, there is a lack of research exploring end users' needs from such technologies. The aim of this study was to explore adolescents' needs and concerns in relation to mental health mobile apps. Five focus groups were conducted with young people aged 15-16 years (N = 34, 60% male). Participants were asked about their views in relation to the use of mental health mobile technologies and were asked to give their responses to a mental health app prototype. Participants identified (1) safety, (2) engagement, (3) functionality, (4) social interaction, (5) awareness, (6) accessibility, (7) gender and (8) young people in control as important factors. Understanding end users' needs and concerns in relation to this topic will inform the future development of youth-oriented mental health apps that are acceptable to young people. PMID:25385165

  19. Mental Health Stigma among Adolescents: Implications for School Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranke, Derrick; Floersch, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated adolescents with a mental health diagnosis and their experience of stigma in schools. Forty adolescents between the ages of twelve and seventeen who met DSM-IV criteria for a psychiatric illness and who were prescribed psychiatric medication were selected. The Teen Subjective Experience of Medication Interview was used to…

  20. Minor depression during adolescence and mental health outcomes during adulthood

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey G. Johnson; Cohen, Patricia; Kasen, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Data from a community-based prospective longitudinal study were used to investigate the association of minor depressive disorder during adolescence with adverse mental health outcomes during adulthood. Structured diagnostic interviews were administered to a community-based sample of 755 individuals during adolescence and adulthood. Results indicated that minor depressive disorder during adolescence was associated with elevated risk for subsequent psychiatric disorders during adulthood, ...

  1. Prevalence and Correlates of Mental Disorders in Israeli Adolescents: Results from a National Mental Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbstein, Ilana; Mansbach-Kleinfeld, Ivonne; Levinson, Daphna; Goodman, Robert; Levav, Itzhak; Vograft, Itzik; Kanaaneh, Rasim; Ponizovsky, Alexander M.; Brent, David A.; Apter, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Background: The development of epidemiological instruments has enabled the assessment of mental disorders in youth in countries that plan policy according to evidence-based principles. The Israel Survey of Mental Health among Adolescents (ISMEHA) was conducted in 2004-2005 in a representative sample of 957 adolescents aged 14-17 and their mothers.…

  2. Addressing the Mental Health Needs of Pregnant and Parenting Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgkinson, Stacy; Beers, Lee; Southammakosane, Cathy; Lewin, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent parenthood is associated with a range of adverse outcomes for young mothers, including mental health problems such as depression, substance abuse, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Teen mothers are also more likely to be impoverished and reside in communities and families that are socially and economically disadvantaged. These circumstances can adversely affect maternal mental health, parenting, and behavior outcomes for their children. In this report, we provide an overview of th...

  3. Encouraging adolescents toward Mental Health Careers via Website Biographies

    OpenAIRE

    Willcockson, Irmi; Shankar, Prabhu R.V.; Cynthia L. Phelps; Johnson, Craig W.

    2003-01-01

    This project designed, developed, implemented and evaluated the effectiveness of an interactive, multi-media website designed to encourage adolescents to consider careers in mental health. This Web-based learning environment features biographies of mental health scientists. Evaluation is conducted in a systematic, structured way using cognitive achievement, usability (ease of use), and affective scales (e.g., fun to use) as outcome measures.

  4. Adolescent mental health: Challenges with maternal noncompliance

    OpenAIRE

    Vicki A Nejtek; Sarah Hardy; Scott Winter

    2010-01-01

    Vicki A Nejtek, Sarah Hardy, Scott WinterUniversity of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, USAAbstract: The leading cause of suicide ideation, attempts, and completion in adolescents is persistent and unresolved parental conflict. National statistics show extremely high rates of childhood neglect and abuse are perpetrated most often by single mothers. Psychiatric disorders arising from maternal–child dysfunction are well-documented. However, resources to prevent offsp...

  5. The life world of the adolescent with mental health problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Peens

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Adolescents are currently being more and more exposed to the expectations of parents, educators, health-workers/helpers and policy makers to meet the demands of society and conform to it. The perception arises that adults are not able to let the adolescent take responsibility for the HOW of his own life story, despite all the expectations and demands. Under the influence of the post-modernistic approach to science and the narrative therapy it appears that each person is an expert of his own life and that each person is responsible for the how and the writing and rewriting of his own life story. This means that even the adolescent with mental health problems is busy with the writing and rewriting of his life story till even unpleasant incidents and experiences gain new meaning. This demands from the adolescent with mental health problems to be actively involved with his treatment program while the therapist is a participating observer of the therapeutic events. A one-sided approach, where the therapist’s objectives and ideas make the difference in the treatment of adolescents with mental health problems, becomes redundant. An alternative approach is suggested where the adolescent with mental health problems becomes co-author of his own life story and his treatment program. In this research the researcher aimed to explore and describe the HOW of the life world of the adolescent with mental health problems. The utilization of the case-study format as research method enabled an in-depth, holistic description of the life world of the adolescent with mental health problems. The implementation of the strategies to ensure trustworthiness, as described by Guba was applied to ensure the validity and reliability of this study. Focus was specifically placed on the application of the strategy of cross validation. This implies that multiple datacollection sources, different experts, theories and respondents were utilized in the exploration of the life world

  6. Sexual Debut and Mental Health Among South Korean Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Sik

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the negative influence of sexual debut during adolescence on mental health outcomes. This article contributes to this literature by investigating whether sexual debut has negative effects on mental health among South Korean adolescents and whether the timing of adolescent sexual debut matters. Drawing on longitudinal data from a nationally representative survey, we first predicted mental health outcomes at one year after high school graduation using first sexual intercourse that had occurred before the outcomes were measured. In a second statistical model, adolescent sexual debut was defined as first coitus that had occurred before high school graduation. Sexual debut was associated with an increase in problematic aggressive behaviors for both genders. In contrast, only girls experienced a rise in depressive symptoms after becoming sexually active. For girls, having sex before high school graduation was correlated with worse mental health outcomes to the extent that sexual debut even enhanced the risk of suicidal ideation. We concluded that the negative effects of sexual activity among South Korean adolescents are attributable mainly to the sexually conservative atmosphere and gendered sexuality in that country. PMID:26457545

  7. Mental Health and Functional Outcomes of Maternal and Adolescent Reports of Adolescent Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Frances; Lifford, Kate J.; Thomas, Hollie V.; Thapar, Anita

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the value of maternal and self-ratings of adolescent depression by investigating the extent to which these reports predicted a range of mental health and functional outcomes 4 years later. The potential influence of mother's own depressed mood on her ratings of adolescent depression and suicidal ideation on adolescent outcome…

  8. Greek adolescents' views of people with mental illness through drawings: mental health education's impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellari, Evanthia; Lehtonen, Kimmo; Sourander, Andre; Kalokerinou-Anagnostopoulou, Athena; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2014-09-01

    People with mental illness are among the most stigmatized and discriminated against as a result of lack of knowledge among the public. Our study explored adolescents' perceptions of people with mental illness through drawings, described these perceptions, and tested the possible changes in perceptions after an educational mental health intervention. Drawings were collected before and after an educational mental health intervention from 59 Greek secondary school students. One group of participants served as the experimental group and received the educational mental health intervention. Content analysis of the drawings was used to analyze data. The drawings provided a clear understanding of adolescents' perceptions towards people with mental illness. After the educational mental health intervention the negative elements presenting the people with mental illness were less among the experimental group, while the drawings among the comparison group did not change. The findings support that educational mental health intervention can have a positive impact on adolescents' perceptions towards people with mental illness. Health professionals can use the findings of our study in order to develop and implement similar interventions. PMID:24382318

  9. Mental health care use in adolescents with and without mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörg, Frederike; Visser, Ellen; Ormel, Johan; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Hartman, Catharina A; Oldehinkel, Albertine J

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the proportion of adolescents with and without a psychiatric diagnosis receiving specialist mental health care and investigate their problem levels as well as utilization of other types of mental health care to detect possible over- and undertreatment. Care utilization data were linked to psychiatric diagnostic data of 2230 adolescents participating in the TRAILS cohort study, who were assessed biannually starting at age 11. Psychiatric diagnoses were established at the fourth wave by the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Self-, parent- and teacher-reported emotional and behavioral problems and self-reported mental health care use were assessed at all four waves. Of all diagnosed adolescents, 35.3 % received specialist mental health care. This rate increased to 54.5 % when three or more disorders were diagnosed. Almost a third (28.5 %) of specialist care users had no psychiatric diagnosis; teachers gave them relatively high ratings on attention and impulsivity subscales. Diagnosed adolescents without specialist mental health care also reported low rates of other care use. We found no indication of overtreatment. Half of the adolescents with three or more disorders do not receive specialist mental health care nor any other type of care, which might indicate unmet needs. PMID:26275772

  10. Adolescents leaving mental health or social care services: predictors of mental health and psychosocial outcomes one year later

    OpenAIRE

    Memarzia, Jessica; St Clair, Michelle C.; Owens, Matt; Goodyer, Ian M.; Dunn, Valerie J.

    2015-01-01

    Background UK service structure necessitates a transition out of youth services at a time of increased risk for the development and onset of mental disorders. Little is currently known about the mental health and psychosocial outcomes of leaving services at this time. The aim of this study was to determine predictors of mental health and social adjustment in adolescents leaving mental health or social care services. Methods A cohort (n?=?53) of 17 year olds were interviewed and ass...

  11. Mental health in adolescence: is America's youth flourishing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Corey L M

    2006-07-01

    A continuous assessment and a categorical diagnosis of the presence of mental health, described as flourishing, and the absence of mental health, characterized as languishing, are proposed and applied to data from the second wave of the Child Development Supplement (CDS-II) of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), in which a comprehensive set of subjective well-being items were administered to a sample of 1,234 youth ages 12-18. Flourishing was the most prevalent diagnosis among youth ages 12-14; moderate mental health was the most prevalent diagnosis among youth ages 15-18. Depressive symptoms decreased as mental health increased. Prevalence of conduct problems (arrested, skipped school, alcohol use, cigarette smoking, and marijuana use) also decreased and measures of psychosocial functioning (global self-concept, self-determination, closeness to others, and school integration) increased as mental health increased. Findings suggest the importance of positive mental health in future research on adolescent development. PMID:16981819

  12. Promoting mental health and healthy behaviors in adolescents: Studies on determinants and interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Bannink, Rienke

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__abstract__ A high percentage of adolescents suffer from mental health problems and many health-risk behaviors, such as excessive alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, and drug (mis)use, are acquired during adolescence. These mental health problems and health-risk behaviors often persist into adulthood, thereby affecting not only current health but also health later in life. Given the adverse short and long term effects of adolescents’ mental health problems and health-risk...

  13. Mental Health Service and Drug Treatment Utilization: Adolescents with Substance Use/Mental Disorders and Dual Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tyrone C.; Lo, Celia C.

    2010-01-01

    This research is a secondary data analysis of the impact of adolescents' mental/substance-use disorders and dual diagnosis on their utilization of drug treatment and mental health services. By analyzing the same teenagers who participated in the NIMH Methods for the Epidemiology of Child and Adolescent Mental Disorders (MECA) study, logistic…

  14. Trends and factors associated with mental health problems among children and adolescents in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, NoorAni; MuhdYusoff, Fadhli; Ratnasingam, Selva; Mohamed, Fauziah; Nasir, Nazrila Hairizan; MohdSallehuddin, Syafinaz; MahadirNaidu, Balkish; Ismail, Rohana; Aris, Tahir

    2014-01-01

    Studying trends in mental health morbidity will guide the planning of future interventions for mental and public health services. To assess the trends in mental health problems among children and adolescents aged 5 through 15 years in Malaysia from 1996 to 2011, data from the children's mental health component of three population-based surveys was analysed using a two-stage stratified sampling design. Mental health problems were assessed using the Reporting Questionnaire for Children. The pre...

  15. Adolescents' and parents' views of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, I; McNamara, N; Healy, M; Gower, C; Sarkar, M; McNicholas, F

    2015-10-01

    Service user involvement is essential for quality care in the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS). This study was conducted to explore adolescents' and parents' experiences of CAMHS in relation to accessibility, approachability and appropriateness. This study used a descriptive qualitative design, and focus groups and single interviews were conducted with adolescents (n = 15) and parents (n = 32) from three mental health clinics. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Accessing mental health services was a challenging experience for many parents and adolescents due to knowledge deficit, lack of information and limited availability of specialist services. Some parents and adolescents reported positive experiences while others reported negative experiences. They expressed a need for more information, involvement in decision making, flexible scheduling of appointments, school support and parent support groups. The nature and quality of the relationship with staff was critical to positive experience with the service; therefore, frequent changes of medical staff was disruptive. Mental health nurses can play a vital role in ensuring continuity, assessing adolescents' participation preferences and advocating for their information needs with other members of the interdisciplinary team. PMID:25977175

  16. Adolescent Mental Health: Selected Materials from the NCEMCH Reference Collection, April 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Arlington, VA.

    Items in this annotated bibliography deal with the mental health of adolescents and include materials for adolescents, parents, health educators, and health professionals. Resources cited include 11 videotapes and 64 publications dealing with the following topics: (1) teenage suicide; (2) mental illness in the family; (3) coping; (4) teenage…

  17. Suicide Ideation, Plan, and Attempt in the Mexican Adolescent Mental Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Guilherme; Benjet, Corina; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Orozco, Ricardo; Nock, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    The study examines data from the Mexican Adolescent Mental Health Survey to study the prevalence and risk factors for suicide ideation, plan, and attempt among Mexican adolescents. The results reveal patterns of the risk factors and suggest that intervention should focus on adolescents with mental disorders to effectively prevent suicides.

  18. Effects of a Unit in Mental Health on Rural Adolescents' Attitudes about Seeking Help and Concepts of Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esters, Irvin G.; And Others

    One factor thought to contribute to the underutilization of mental health services, especially among rural Americans, is the stigma attached to mental illness and the associated help seeking process. This study investigated the effects of an instructional unit on mental illness and related issues on rural adolescents' concept of mental illness and…

  19. Decline in physical activity during adolescence is not associated with changes in mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Van Dijk, Martin L; Savelberg, Hans H. C. M.; Verboon, Peter; Kirschner, Paul A.; de Groot, Renate H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The majority of studies investigating associations between physical activity and mental health in adolescents have been cross-sectional in design. Potential associations between physical activity and mental health may be better examined longitudinally as physical activity levels tend to decrease in adolescence. Few studies have investigated these associations longitudinally in adolescents and none by measuring physical activity objectively. Methods A total of 158 Dutch adolescents ...

  20. Mental Health Characteristics and Health-Seeking Behaviors of Adolescent School-Based Health Center Users and Nonusers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Gorette; Geierstanger, Sara; Soleimanpour, Samira; Brindis, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to compare the mental health risk profile and health utilization behaviors of adolescent school-based health center (SBHC) users and nonusers and discuss the role that SBHCs can play in addressing adolescent health needs. Methods: The sample included 4640 students in grades 9 and 11 who completed the…

  1. Implications of Comprehensive Mental Health Services Embedded in an Adolescent Obstetric Medical Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Bethany; Ranadive, Nikhil; Alaniz, Veronica; St John-Larkin, Celeste; Scott, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    Purpose Mental health issues in perinatal adolescents are well documented and studies have shown high rates of depressive disorders among this population. Treatment is challenging because pregnant adolescents are poorly adherent with mental health services. We describe a novel integrated mental health care program for pregnant and parenting adolescent mothers and their children. Methods The Colorado Adolescent Maternity Program (CAMP) is a comprehensive, multidisciplinary teen pregnancy and parenting medical home program serving an ethnically diverse and low socioeconomic status population in the Denver metro area. We describe the Healthy Expectations Adolescent Response Team (HEART), an embedded mental health care program focused on improving identification of mental health symptoms and increasing rates mental health treatment in adolescent mothers. Results From January 1, 2011-January 16 2014, 894 pregnant adolescents were enrolled in CAMP and 885 patients were screened for mental health issues. Prior to HEART's inception, 20 % of patients were identified as having mood symptoms in the postpartum period. Successful referrals to community mental health facilities occurred in only 5 % of identified patients. Following the creation of HEART, 41 % of patients were identified as needing mental health services. Nearly half of the identified patients (47 %) engaged in mental health treatment with the psychologist. Demographic factors including age, parity, ethnicity, and parent and partner involvement did not have a significant impact on treatment engagement. Trauma history was associated with lower treatment engagement. Conclusion Our findings suggest that an embedded mental health program in an adolescent obstetric and pediatric medical home is successful in improving identification and engagement in mental health treatment. Key components of the program include universal screening, intensive social work and case management involvement, and ready access to onsite

  2. Improving documentation of physical health investigations in an adolescent mental health inpatient unit

    OpenAIRE

    Horton, David

    2015-01-01

    Physical health investigations, such as blood tests, ECGs, and appropriate radiological tests, are essential in the assessment and management of many patients in inpatient mental health settings. This project took place in a 12-bed adolescent mental health unit in Swindon, UK, where on average at least two-thirds of patients have a diagnosed eating disorder. Multidisciplinary ward rounds provide an appropriate setting for discussion and documentation of physical investigations. Over a two-wee...

  3. Caretaker mental health and family environment factors are associated with adolescent psychiatric problems in a Vietnamese sample

    OpenAIRE

    Stratton, Kelcey Jane; Edwards, Alexis Christine; Overstreet, Cassie; Richardson, Lisa; Tran, Trinh Luong; Trung, Lam Tu; Tam, Nguyen Thanh; Tuan, Tran; Buoi, La Thi; Ha, Tran Thu; Thach, Tran Duc; Amstadter, Ananda Beth

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about risk factors for adolescent mental health in Vietnam. The present study investigated the relationship between caretaker mental health and adolescent mental health in a cross-sectional Vietnamese sample. Primary caretakers completed measures of their own mental distress and general health status using the Self-Reporting Questionnaire-20 (SRQ-20) as well as reports of adolescent mental health using the parent version of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). M...

  4. Adolescent Mental Health Literacy: Young People's Knowledge of Depression and Help Seeking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, John R.; Rapee, Ronald M.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the mental health literacy of a group of adolescents, with particular reference to their ability to recognize symptoms of depression in their peers. Respondents were 202 Australian adolescents (122 males, 80 females) aged 15-17 years. Their mental health literacy was examined through a questionnaire that presented them with…

  5. Severity of Victimization and Co-Occurring Mental Health Disorders among Substance Using Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, Bushra

    2012-01-01

    Background: Co-occurring mental health disorders are widespread among substance using adolescents. Severity of victimization may be an important factor in explaining co-occurrence of mental health problems among adolescents with substance misuse problems. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether severe victimization experiences…

  6. Mental Health Needs in Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities: Cross-Sectional Survey of a Service Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassiotis, A.; Turk, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Little research has been conducted on the mental health needs of adolescents with intellectual disability, despite the severity and rates of such needs being high throughout childhood and in adulthood. We have investigated the prevalence and predictors of mental health needs and service use in adolescents with intellectual…

  7. Psychiatric Disorders and Sexual Risk among Adolescents in Mental Health Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Larry K.; Hadley, Wendy; Stewart, Angela; Lescano, Celia; Whiteley, Laura; Donenberg, Geri; DiClemente, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between psychiatric disorders and sexual behaviors among adolescents receiving mental health treatment. Adolescents in mental health treatment have been found to have higher rates of HIV risk behavior than their peers, but data concerning the relationship between psychopathology and risk are inconsistent and…

  8. Unaccompanied adolescents seeking asylum : poorer mental health under a restrictive reception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijneveld, S.A.; de Boer, J.B.; Bean, T.; Korfker, D.G.

    2005-01-01

    We assessed the effects of a stringent reception policy on the mental health of unaccompanied adolescent asylum seekers by comparing the mental health of adolescents in a restricted campus reception setting and in a setting offering more autonomy (numbers [response rates]: 69 [93%] and 53 [69%], res

  9. Promoting Adolescent Help-Seeking for Mental Health Problems: Strategies for School-Based Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walcott, Christy M.; Music, Ajlana

    2012-01-01

    Extensive research suggests that adolescence is a critical developmental period, especially when it comes to factors that influence mental health problems. Systematic efforts to promote adolescent help-seeking are essential for improving long-term mental health outcomes. Defined as a "behavior of actively seeking help from other people,"…

  10. Scaling Up Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services in South Africa: Human Resource Requirements and Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Crick; Boyce, Gerard; Flisher, Alan J.; Kafaar, Zuhayr; Dawes, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Background: Children and adolescents with mental health problems have poor service cover in low- and middle-income countries. Little is known about the resources that would be required to provide child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) in these countries. The purpose of this study was to calculate the human resources and associated…

  11. Improving the Mental Health, Healthy Lifestyle Choices, and Physical Health of Hispanic Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Bernadette M.; Jacobson, Diana; Kelly, Stephanie; O'Haver, Judith; Small, Leigh; Mays, Mary Z.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Obesity and mental health disorders are 2 major public health problems in American adolescents, with prevalence even higher in Hispanic teens. Despite the rapidly increasing incidence and adverse health outcomes associated with overweight and mental health problems, very few intervention studies have been conducted with adolescents to…

  12. Use of Selected Nonmedication Mental Health Services by Adolescent Boys and Girls with Serious Emotional or Behavioral ....

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... behavioral difficulty and have received nonmedication mental health services in the past 6 months. Figure 1. Adolescents ... received both school and nonschool nonmedication mental health services. Approximately 21% of adolescents received school services only, ...

  13. The underlying mechanisms: An investigation of attachment and mentalization within adolescent severe and enduring mental ill health

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Background Regarding adolescence developmental psychopathology and the psychological correlates associated with the onset of severe and enduring mental health in adolescence, this thesis proposes that early attachment related experiences underlie the successful ability to regulate emotions, negotiate interpersonal interactions, assess and utilise social support and develop the necessary mentalizing skills for organizing and understanding both the self and others. Insecure attachment and po...

  14. Mental Health and Community Violence Among Adolescents in Indonesia (School-Based Study)

    OpenAIRE

    Utama, Budhi

    2014-01-01

    Research consistently reported that adolescents experienced high levels of exposure to community violence in the their life. There is a trend that adolescents in several cities in Indonesia exposed to violence in the community. The community violence among adolescents also affects their mental health problems. However, there are limited number of studies looking at the prevalence and association between exposure to community violence and mental health in developing countries such as Indonesia...

  15. Evaluating mental health difficulties and associated outcomes among HIV-positive adolescents in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Dorothy E; Turner, Elizabeth L; Shayo, Aisa M; Mmbaga, Blandina; Cunningham, Coleen K; O'Donnell, Karen

    2016-07-01

    AIDS-related mortality among HIV-positive adolescents has risen by 50% despite the scale up of antiretroviral therapy (ART). ART maladherence likely plays a role in the increase of AIDS-related deaths among adolescents and has shown to be associated with psychosocial and mental health difficulties. Addressing the specific mental health needs of HIV-positive adolescents is critical to ending the HIV epidemic. This cross-sectional study prospectively enrolled HIV-positive adolescents (12-24 years) in Moshi, Tanzania. A structured questionnaire was administered that included questions about home, school, adherence, and measures of stigma (Berger Stigma Scale) and mental health. Mental health measures included depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), emotional/behavioral difficulties (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire), and traumatic experiences/post-traumatic stress symptoms (The University of California Los Angeles-post-traumatic stress disorder-Reaction Index). Mental health difficulties were prevalent among HIV-positive adolescents and were associated with incomplete adherence and stigma. Resources are needed to reduce HIV stigma and address mental health among HIV-positive adolescents in low-resource settings. This will improve not only mental health, but may also improve ART adherence and virologic suppression, improving overall health of the individual and reducing the risk of HIV transmission to others. PMID:26837437

  16. Adolescent Mental Health Consumers' Self-Stigma: Associations with Parents' and Adolescents' Illness Perceptions and Parental Stigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Tally

    2010-01-01

    Currently, little is known about adolescents' self-stigma experiences as mental health (MH) treatment recipients. Hence, this study addresses the following two questions: (a) what are adolescents' and parents' perceptions of stigma and perceptions of the cause, controllability, and anticipated outcome (illness perceptions) of adolescents' MH…

  17. Mental health in primary care for adolescent parents

    OpenAIRE

    LePlatte, Dayna; Rosenblum, Katherine Lisa; Stanton, Emily; Miller, Nicole; Muzik, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Mental health care is important for everyone, especially teenagers. However, seeking mental health services may be challenging for teenagers, particularly when they are also parents. Offering mental health care in a safe, attractive and easily accessible manner, such as primary care, increases the chances that teenage parents will receive help. Comprehensive care models need to be established to address the many needs that at-risk young mothers and their children face. There are a number of p...

  18. Mental health disorders in child and adolescent survivors of post-war landmine explosions

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmati, Mohammad Ali; Shokoohi, Hamid; Masoumi, Mehdi; Khateri, Shahriar; Soroush, Mohammadreza; MODIRIAN, EHSAN; Poor Zamany Nejat Kermany, Mahtab; HOSSEINI, Maryam; Mousavi, Batool

    2015-01-01

    Background To describe the mental health status of 78 child and adolescent survivors of post-war landmine explosions. Methods Child and adolescent survivors of landmine explosions who were younger than 18 years old at the time of the study were identified and enrolled in this study. The mental health status of the participants was assessed by general health assessment and psychiatric examinations. Psychiatric assessment and diagnosis were undertaken using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual...

  19. A profile of child health, child and adolescent mental health and maternity services in England 2007.

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, Di; Parker, Ethna; Wistow, Richard; Dean, Richard; Thomson, Claire

    2007-01-01

    This is a report of the 2006/07 national child health, child and adolescent mental health service (CAMHS) and maternity services mapping exercise. This was the second year that child health and maternity service data was collected and the fifth year that the CAMHS exercise had been carried out. For the first time, data collection in these three areas was combined, underlining their joint aim to contribute to the monitoring of the implementation of the National Service Framework for Children, ...

  20. Mental Health and Self-Esteem of Institutionalized Adolescents Affected by Armed Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    War, Firdous Ahmad; Ved, Rifat Saroosh; Paul, Mohammad Altaf

    2016-04-01

    The primary purpose of this paper was to compare the epidemiology of mental health problems and self-esteem of conflict hit adolescents living in charitable seminaries with their counterparts brought up in natural homes. Substantive body of the literature illustrates the emotional and behavioral issues experienced by these adolescents. In this study, 27 adolescents from a charitable Muslim seminary and 30 adolescents from a regular school were recruited. Self-report measures and clinical interview were used to measure mental health and self-esteem. The findings indicate that adolescents in institution setting may not be having mental health and self-esteem-related issues when compared to adolescents living in intact by parent homes. While the authors acknowledge the limitations of the study, these findings need further research to examine the causes for these differences. PMID:25930059

  1. Empowering adolescents with life skills education in schools – School mental health program: Does it work?

    OpenAIRE

    Srikala, Bharath; Kishore, Kumar K. V.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Mental Health Promotion among adolescents in schools using life skills education (LSE) and teachers as life skill educators is a novel idea. Implementation and impact of the NIMHANS model of life skills education program studied. Materials and Methods: The impact of the program is evaluated at the end of 1 year in 605 adolescents from two secondary schools in comparison to 423 age, sex, socioeconomic status-matched adolescents from nearby schools not in the program. Results: The adolesce...

  2. Evaluating Mental Health Literacy and Adolescent Depression: What Do Teenagers "Know?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, John; Bruno, Michelle; Fernandes, Teresa E.

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of depression increases markedly during adolescence, yet many youth are not receiving the support that they need. One factor that has been speculated as contributing to low rates of care is a lack of mental health literacy about depression and viable sources of support. This pilot study focused on mental health literacy as it…

  3. Back and neck pain are related to mental health problems in adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Rees, Clare S; Smith, Anne J; O'Sullivan, Peter B; Kendall, Garth E; Straker, Leon M

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a high prevalence of mental health problems amongst adolescents. In addition there is a high prevalence of spinal pain in this population. Evidence suggests that these conditions are related. This study sought to extend earlier findings by examining the relationship between mental health problems as measured by the Child Behaviour Check List (CBCL) and the experience of back and neck pain in adolescents. Methods One thousand five hundred and eighty participants (mean age 1...

  4. Building Resilience on Adolescent Mental Health Associated with Emerging Risk and Protective Factors among Ethnic Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Arat, G

    2014-01-01

    A bulk of studies have focused on systematically catalogued risk and protective factors (e.g., parental monitoring, peer, neighborhood support) in terms of adolescent mental health status concerning resilience; however, they did not display any improvement regarding adolescent mental health, particularly in school-based interventions. Therefore, I suggested that whether other emerging factors (e.g., nutrition, physical activity) could be beneficial to promote effective school-based interventi...

  5. School mental health services: signpost for out-of-school service utilization in adolescents with mental disorders? : a nationally representative United States cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Marion Tegethoff; Esther Stalujanis; Angelo Belardi; Gunther Meinlschmidt

    2014-01-01

    Background: School mental health services are important contact points for children and adolescents with mental disorders, but their ability to provide comprehensive treatment is limited. The main objective was to estimate in mentally disordered adolescents of a nationally representative United States cohort the role of school mental health services as guide to mental health care in different out-of-school service sectors. Methods: Analyses are based on weighted data (N = 6483) fro...

  6. Adaptive Interventions in Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, Daniel; Chronis-Tuscano, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The treatment or prevention of child and adolescent mental health (CAMH) disorders often requires an individualized, sequential approach to intervention, whereby treatments (or prevention efforts) are adapted over time based on the youth's evolving status (e.g., early response, adherence). Adaptive interventions are intended to provide a replicable guide for the provision of individualized sequences of interventions in actual clinical practice. Recently, there has been great interest in the development of adaptive intervenions by investigators working in CAMH. The development of such replicable, real-world, individualized sequences of decision rules to guide the treatment or prevention of CAMH disorders represents an important "next step" in interventions research. The primary purpose of this special issue is to showcase some recent work on the science of adaptive interventions in CAMH. In this overview article, we review why individualized sequences of interventions are needed in CAMH, provide an introduction to adaptive interventions, briefly describe each of the articles included in this special issue, and describe some exciting areas of ongoing and future research. A hopeful outcome of this special issue is that it encourages other researchers in CAMH to pursue creative and significant research on adaptive interventions. PMID:27310565

  7. Mental health and illness in Boston's children and adolescents: one city's experience and its implications for mental health policy makers.

    OpenAIRE

    Hacker, K.; Drainoni, M. L.

    2001-01-01

    In 1999, the Boston Public Heath Commission used data from a variety of sources to explore the level of mental health disturbance in Boston's children and adolescents. Data for 1997 from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey showed that about 20% of Boston public high school students had ever experienced suicidal ideation, while approximately 10% had actually attempted suicide. About one in five teenage respondents to the Boston Youth Survey said they were frequently depressed. While females were mo...

  8. Religiosity and mental health of pre-adolescents with psychiatric problems and their parents : The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Jagt-Jelsma, W.; de Vries-Schot, M. R.; de Jong, Rint; Hartman, C. A.; Verhulst, F. C.; Klip, H.; van Deurzen, P. A. M.; Buitelaar, J. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the association between the religiosity of parents and pre-adolescents, and pre-adolescents' psychiatric problems. Method: In a clinic-referred cohort of 543 pre-adolescents at least once referred to a mental health outpatient clinic mental health problems were as

  9. Religiosity and mental health of pre-adolescents with psychiatric problems and their parents: the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagt-Jelsma, W. van der; Vries-Schot, M.R. de; Jong, R. de; Hartman, C.A.; Verhulst, F.C.; Klip, H.; Deurzen, P.A. van; Buitelaar, J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study investigated the association between the religiosity of parents and pre-adolescents, and pre-adolescents' psychiatric problems. METHOD: In a clinic-referred cohort of 543 pre-adolescents at least once referred to a mental health outpatient clinic mental health problems were as

  10. Brief report: Association between psychological sense of school membership and mental health among early adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaete, Jorge; Rojas-Barahona, Cristian A; Olivares, Esterbina; Araya, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    Mental health problems among adolescents are prevalent and are associated with important difficulties for a normal development during this period and later in life. Understanding better the risk factors associated with mental health problems may help to design and implement more effective preventive interventions. Several personal and family risk factors have been identified in their relationship to mental health; however, much less is known about the influence of school-related factors. One of these school factors is school belonging or the psychological sense of school membership. This is a well-known protective factor to develop good academic commitment, but it has been scarcely studied in its relationship to mental health. We explored this association in a sample of early adolescents and found that students who reported having a high level of school membership had lower mental health problems, even after controlling for several personal and family factors. PMID:27149432

  11. Pathways to care : help-seeking for child and adolescent mental health problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaanswijk, M.

    2005-01-01

    Although emotional and behavioural problems are relatively common in children and adolescents, they are rarely brought to the attention of general practitioners (GPs) or mental health professionals. The main aim of this study was to investigate the process of help-seeking for child and adolescent ps

  12. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Mental Health Service Use among Adolescents with Major Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Janet R.; Druss, Benjamin G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about racial/ethnic differences in the receipt of treatment for major depression in adolescents. This study examined differences in mental health service use in non-Hispanic white, black, Hispanic, and Asian adolescents who experienced an episode of major depression. Method: Five years of data (2004-2008) were pooled…

  13. Study of Delinquent, Diverted, and High-Risk Adolescent Girls: Implications for Mental Health Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffolo, Mary C.; Sarri, Rosemary; Goodkind, Sara

    2004-01-01

    This study examines risk and protective factors for delinquent, diverted, and high-risk adolescent girls to inform the development of effective mental health prevention and intervention programs. Delinquent, diverted, and high-risk adolescent girls (N = 159) involved or at risk of involvement with the juvenile justice system, who were receiving…

  14. Mental Health of Somali Adolescent Refugees: The Role of Trauma, Stress, and Perceived Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, B. Heidi; MacDonald, Helen Z.; Lincoln, Alisa K.; Cabral, Howard J.

    2008-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine relations between trauma exposure, post-resettlement stressors, perceived discrimination, and mental health symptoms in Somali adolescent refugees resettled in the U.S. Participants were English-speaking Somali adolescent refugees between the ages of 11 and 20 (N = 135) who had resettled in the U.S.…

  15. Child & Adolescent Mental Health Services - first annual report 2008

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2009-10-01

    This Annual Report provides the first comprehensive survey carried out on community CAMHS teams and includes preliminary data collected by The Health Research Board on the admission of young people under the age of 18 years to inpatient mental health facilities. As many measures in this report do not have historic comparators it provides a baseline foundation that will be built upon in subsequent years providing an indication of trends that cannot yet be drawn on the basis of this report. The next report will include day hospital, liaison and inpatient services. Subsequent reports will further extend the mapping of mental health services for young people.

  16. Suicidality, Bullying and Other Conduct and Mental Health Correlates of Traumatic Brain Injury in Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Ilie, Gabriela; Mann, Robert E.; Boak, Angela; Adlaf, Edward M.; Hamilton, Hayley; Asbridge, Mark; Rehm, Jürgen; Cusimano, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Our knowledge on the adverse correlates of traumatic brain injuries (TBI), including non-hospitalized cases, among adolescents is limited to case studies. We report lifetime TBI and adverse mental health and conduct behaviours associated with TBI among adolescents from a population-based sample in Ontario. Method and Findings Data were derived from 4,685 surveys administered to adolescents in grades 7 through 12 as part of the 2011 population-based cross-sectional Ontario Student Dr...

  17. Mental health trajectories from adolescence to adulthood: Language disorder and other childhood and adolescent risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lin; Brownlie, E B; Beitchman, Joseph H

    2016-05-01

    Longitudinal research on mental health development beyond adolescence among nonclinical populations is lacking. This study reports on psychiatric disorder trajectories from late adolescence to young adulthood in relation to childhood and adolescent risk factors. Participants were recruited for a prospective longitudinal study tracing a community sample of 5-year-old children with communication disorders and a matched control cohort to age 31. Psychiatric disorders were measured at ages 19, 25, and 31. Known predictors of psychopathology and two school-related factors specifically associated with language disorder (LD) were measured by self-reports and semistructured interviews. The LD cohort was uniquely characterized by a significantly decreasing disorder trajectory in early adulthood. Special education was associated with differential disorder trajectories between LD and control cohorts, whereas maltreatment history, specific learning disorder, family structure, and maternal psychological distress were associated with consistent trajectories between cohorts. From late adolescence to young adulthood, childhood LD was characterized by a developmentally limited course of psychiatric disorder; maltreatment was consistently characterized by an elevated risk of psychiatric disorder regardless of LD history, whereas special education was associated with significantly decreasing risk of psychiatric disorder only in the presence of LD. PMID:26611829

  18. A school intervention for mental health literacy in adolescents: effects of a non-randomized cluster controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Skre, Ingunn; Friborg, Oddgeir; Breivik, Camilla; Johnsen, Lars Inge; Arnesen, Yngvild; Wang, Catharina E.

    2013-01-01

    Background “Mental health for everyone” is a school program for mental health literacy and prevention aimed at secondary schools (13–15 yrs). The main aim was to investigate whether mental health literacy, could be improved by a 3-days universal education programme by: a) improving naming of symptom profiles of mental disorder, b) reducing prejudiced beliefs, and c) improving knowledge about where to seek help for mental health problems. A secondary aim was to investigate whether adolescent s...

  19. Chronic pain in adolescence and internalizing mental health disorders: a nationally representative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Melanie; Groenewald, Cornelius B; Beals-Erickson, Sarah E; Gebert, J Thomas; Palermo, Tonya M

    2016-06-01

    Chronic pain in childhood and adolescence has been shown to heighten the risk for depressive and anxiety disorders in specific samples in adulthood; however, little is known about the association between a wider variety of chronic pains and internalizing mental health disorders. Using nationally representative data, the objectives of this study were to establish prevalence rates of internalizing mental health disorders (anxiety and depressive disorders) among cohorts with or without adolescent chronic pain, and to examine whether chronic pain in adolescence is associated with lifetime history of internalizing mental health disorders reported in adulthood. Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) was used (N = 14,790). Individuals who had chronic pain in adolescence subsequently reported higher rates of lifetime anxiety disorders (21.1% vs 12.4%) and depressive disorders (24.5% vs 14.1%) in adulthood as compared with individuals without a history of adolescent chronic pain. Multivariate logistic regression confirmed that chronic pain in adolescence was associated with an increased likelihood of lifetime history of anxiety disorders (odds ratio: 1.33; 95% confidence interval: 1.09-1.63, P = 0.005) and depressive disorders (odds ratio: 1.38; confidence interval: 1.16-1.64, P < 0.001) reported in adulthood. Future research is needed to examine neurobiological and psychological mechanisms underlying these comorbidities. PMID:26901806

  20. The life world of the adolescent with mental health problems

    OpenAIRE

    T Peens; M. Poggenpoel

    2001-01-01

    Adolescents are currently being more and more exposed to the expectations of parents, educators, health-workers/helpers and policy makers to meet the demands of society and conform to it. The perception arises that adults are not able to let the adolescent take responsibility for the HOW of his own life story, despite all the expectations and demands. Under the influence of the post-modernistic approach to science and the narrative therapy it appears that each person is an expert of his own l...

  1. A focus on adolescence to reduce neurological, mental health and substance-use disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Leslie L; Grigorenko, Elena L; Boivin, Michael J; Rapa, Elizabeth; Stein, Alan

    2015-11-19

    Globally, there is a crucial need to prioritize research directed at reducing neurological, mental health and substance-use disorders in adolescence, which is a pivotal age for the development of self-control and regulation. In adolescence, behaviour optimally advances towards adaptive long-term goals and suppresses conflicting maladaptive short-lived urges to balance impulsivity, exploration and defiance, while establishing effective societal participation. When self-control fails to develop, violence, injury and neurological, mental health and substance-use disorders can result, further challenging the development of self-regulation and impeding the transition to a productive adulthood. Adolescent outcomes, positive and negative, arise from both a life-course perspective and within a socioecological framework. Little is known about the emergence of self-control and regulation in adolescents in low- and middle-income countries where enormous environmental threats are more common (for example, poverty, war, local conflicts, sex trafficking and slavery, early marriage and/or pregnancy, and the absence of adequate access to education) than in high-income countries and can threaten optimal neurodevelopment. Research must develop or adapt appropriate assessments of adolescent ability and disability, social inclusion and exclusion, normative development, and neurological, mental health and substance-use disorders. Socioecological challenges in low- and middle-income countries require innovative strategies to prevent mental health, neurological and substance-use disorders and develop effective interventions for adolescents at risk, especially those already living with these disorders and the consequent disability. PMID:26580322

  2. Peer-victimization and mental health problems in adolescents: are parental and school support protective?

    OpenAIRE

    Stadler, C.; Feifel, J.; Rohrmann, S; Vermeiren, R.R.J.M.; Poustka, F.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and effects of peer-victimization on mental health problems among adolescents. Parental and school support were assumed as protective factors that might interact with one another in acting as buffers for adolescents against the risk of peer-victimization. Besides these protective factors, age and gender were additionally considered as moderating factors. The Social and Health Assessment survey was conducted among 986 students aged 11-18 y...

  3. Is meditation conducive to mental well-being for adolescents? An integrative review for mental health nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Fung Kei Cheng, PhD

    2016-01-01

    Childhood mental health problems not only incur a financial burden but more importantly damages individual and family well-being, which compels mental care practitioners to search for solutions, among which meditation is a more economical method. This integrative review investigates the effectiveness of meditation on psychological problems for adolescents under age of 20 through different types of meditation, though mainly mindfulness-based modes. The 36 reviewed publications include quantita...

  4. Mental health resilience in the adolescent offspring of parents with depression: a prospective longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Collishaw, Stephan; Hammerton, Gemma; Mahedy, Liam; Sellers, Ruth; Owen, Michael J.; Craddock, Nicholas; Thapar, Ajay K; Harold, Gordon T.; Rice, Frances; Thapar, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Young people whose parents have depression have a greatly increased risk of developing a psychiatric disorder, but poor outcomes are not inevitable. Identification of the contributors to mental health resilience in young people at high familial risk is an internationally recognised priority. Our objectives were to identify protective factors that predict sustained good mental health in adolescents with a parent with depression and to test whether these contribute beyond wha...

  5. Mental health resilience in the adolescent offspring of parents with depression:a prospective longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Collishaw, Stephan; Hammerton, Gemma; Mahedy, Liam; Sellers, Ruth; Owen, Michael J.; Craddock, Nicholas; Thapar, Ajay K; Harold, Gordon T.; Rice, Frances; Thapar, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Background:Young people whose parents have depression have a greatly increased risk of developing a psychiatric disorder, but poor outcomes are not inevitable. Identification of the contributors to mental health resilience in young people at high familial risk is an internationally recognised priority. Our objectives were to identify protective factors that predict sustained good mental health in adolescents with a parent with depression and to test whether these contribute beyond what is exp...

  6. The discourse of professional identity in child and adolescent mental health services

    OpenAIRE

    Baldwin, Laurence James

    2008-01-01

    Background: Child and adolescent mental health teams have traditionally been constructed using multidisciplinary teams of different professions. Current workforce policy in mental health, however, stresses team function and the skills and competences required to fulfil that function which leads to a questioning of professional identity within those teams. Aims: This study aims therefore to define how professional identity is constructed in the policy discourse and amongst a sample of cur...

  7. Factors Promoting Mental Health of Adolescents Who Have a Parent with Mental Illness: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Loon, L. M. A.; Van De Ven, M. O. M.; Van Doesum, K. T. M.; Hosman, C. M. H.; Witteman, C. L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Children of parents with mental illness have an elevated risk of developing a range of mental health and psychosocial problems. Yet many of these children remain mentally healthy. Objective: The present study aimed to get insight into factors that protect these children from developing internalizing and externalizing problems. Methods:…

  8. Attitudes, Skills and Knowledge Change in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Workers Following AOD Screening and Brief Intervention Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Grant; Black, Stella; Dunbar, Lucy; Pulford, Justin; Wheeler, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Adolescent mental health workers are generally poor at identifying and treating co-existing alcohol and other drug (AOD) disorder. This study aimed to evaluate the utility and acceptability of an AOD screening and brief intervention (BI) training package delivered to child and adolescent mental health workers and its impact on relevant attitudes,…

  9. Mental health problems and educational attainment in adolescence: 9-Year follow-up of the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Veldman (Karin); U. Bültmann (Ute); R.E. Stewart (Roy); J. Ormel (Johan Hans); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); S.A. Reijneveld (Sijmen)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: This study examines if mental health problems at age 11 and changes in mental health problems between age 11 and 16 predict educational attainment of adolescents at age 19, overall and stratified by gender. Methods: Data from 1711 adolescents (76.8% from initial cohort) of th

  10. Mental health problems and educational attainment in adolescence : 9-year follow-up of the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, Karin; Bultmann, Ute; Stewart, Roy E.; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, Frank C.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study examines if mental health problems at age 11 and changes in mental health problems between age 11 and 16 predict educational attainment of adolescents at age 19, overall and stratified by gender. Methods: Data from 1711 adolescents (76.8% from initial cohort) of the Tracking A

  11. Childhood Family Instability and Mental Health Problems during Late Adolescence: A Test of Two Mediation Models--The TRAILS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Martin P.; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, Frank C.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.

    2012-01-01

    This study tested whether childhood family instability is associated with mental health problems during adolescence through continued family instability and/or through a preadolescent onset of mental health problems. This test use data from a prospective population cohort of 2,230 Dutch adolescents ("M" age = 11.09, "SD" = 0.56 at the initial…

  12. Brief Report: Need for Autonomy and Other Perceived Barriers Relating to Adolescents' Intentions to Seek Professional Mental Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Coralie J.; Deane, Frank P.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the relationship between belief-based barriers to seeking professional mental health care and help-seeking intentions in a sample of 1037 adolescents. From early adolescence to adulthood, for males and females, the need for autonomy was a strong barrier to seeking professional mental health care. Help-seeking fears were…

  13. Caretaker mental health and family environment factors are associated with adolescent psychiatric problems in a Vietnamese sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Kelcey Jane; Edwards, Alexis Christine; Overstreet, Cassie; Richardson, Lisa; Tran, Trinh Luong; Trung, Lam Tu; Tam, Nguyen Thanh; Tuan, Tran; Buoi, La Thi; Ha, Tran Thu; Thach, Tran Duc; Amstadter, Ananda Beth

    2014-12-15

    Little is known about risk factors for adolescent mental health in Vietnam. The present study investigated the relationship between caretaker mental health and adolescent mental health in a cross-sectional Vietnamese sample. Primary caretakers completed measures of their own mental distress and general health status using the Self-Reporting Questionnaire-20 (SRQ-20) as well as reports of adolescent mental health using the parent version of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Multivariate regression models were used to examine the relationships between the caretaker and adolescent health variables. The demographic factors of age, sex, ethnicity, religious affiliation, and household wealth status demonstrated significant relationships with SDQ subscale scores. Caretaker mental health was positively associated with adolescent mental health, and this association remained significant even after accounting for other relevant demographic variables and caretaker general health status. Understanding correlates of adolescent mental health difficulties may help identify youth and families at risk for developing psychiatric problems and inform mental health interventions in Vietnam. PMID:25204862

  14. An Overview of International Literature on School Interventions to Promote Mental Health and Well-being in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Fiandra, Teresa Di; Rampazzo, Lorenzo; Contu, Paolo; Preti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Mental disorders are the largest cause of the burden of disease in the world. Most of the burden affecting adult life has its onset during childhood and adolescence. The European Pact for Mental Health and Wellbeing calls for immediate action and investments in the mental health of children and adolescents. Schools may be the ideal location for promoting health and delivering healthcare services, since schools are a location where young people usually spend their daytime and so...

  15. Mining treatment termination data in an adolescent mental health service: a quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabito, D M

    2001-01-01

    This study utilizes available clinical information from client records to explore patterns of termination from mental health treatment among adolescents at an urban outpatient mental health center. The analysis focuses on how and why adolescents terminate from treatment and identifies variables associated with "acknowledged" and "unacknowledged" terminations. Findings indicate that termination was acknowledged infrequently, often a brief process that occurred almost as frequently by telephone as in the context of treatment. Contrary to "practice wisdom" concerning treatment termination, adolescents who "dropped out" without a "clinical process" reported considerably more engagement in treatment than those who acknowledged the termination of treatment. Recommendations for a more "open door" policy and a more flexible practice with adolescents are discussed. PMID:11837364

  16. Bullying Experiences of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service-users: A Pilot Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Dyer, Kevin; Teggart, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Victims and perpetrators of bullying experience a variety of psychological problems. The aim of the current pilot study was to explore the bullying experiences of Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMHS) service-users. The investigation was conducted as a cross-sectional survey at a community-based specialist CAMH service. A modified version of the Revised Olweus Bully/Victim Questionnaire was used to assess bullying experiences. Participants comprised an opportunity sample of 26 adolescent...

  17. Young Love: Romantic Concerns and Associated Mental Health Issues among Adolescent Help-Seekers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Price

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Over 50% of young people have dated by age 15. While romantic relationship concerns are a major reason for adolescent help-seeking from counselling services, we have a limited understanding of what types of relationship issues are most strongly related to mental health issues and suicide risk. This paper used records of 4019 counselling sessions with adolescents (10–18 years seeking help from a national youth counselling service for a romantic relationship concern to: (i explore what types and stage (pre, during, post of romantic concerns adolescents seek help for; (ii how they are associated with mental health problems, self-harm and suicide risk; and (iii whether these associations differ by age and gender. In line with developmental-contextual theory, results suggest that concerns about the initiation of relationships are common in early adolescence, while concerns about maintaining and repairing relationships increase with age. Relationship breakups were the most common concern for both male and female adolescents and for all age groups (early, mid, late adolescence. Data relating to a range of mental health issues were available for approximately half of the sample. Post-relationship concerns (including breakups were also more likely than pre- or during-relationship concerns to be associated with concurrent mental health issues (36.8%, self-harm (22.6% and suicide (9.9%. Results draw on a staged developmental theory of adolescent romantic relationships to provide a comprehensive assessment of relationship stressors, highlighting post-relationship as a particularly vulnerable time for all stages of adolescence. These findings contribute to the development of targeted intervention and support programs.

  18. Young Love: Romantic Concerns and Associated Mental Health Issues among Adolescent Help-Seekers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Megan; Hides, Leanne; Cockshaw, Wendell; Staneva, Aleksandra A; Stoyanov, Stoyan R

    2016-01-01

    Over 50% of young people have dated by age 15. While romantic relationship concerns are a major reason for adolescent help-seeking from counselling services, we have a limited understanding of what types of relationship issues are most strongly related to mental health issues and suicide risk. This paper used records of 4019 counselling sessions with adolescents (10-18 years) seeking help from a national youth counselling service for a romantic relationship concern to: (i) explore what types and stage (pre, during, post) of romantic concerns adolescents seek help for; (ii) how they are associated with mental health problems, self-harm and suicide risk; and (iii) whether these associations differ by age and gender. In line with developmental-contextual theory, results suggest that concerns about the initiation of relationships are common in early adolescence, while concerns about maintaining and repairing relationships increase with age. Relationship breakups were the most common concern for both male and female adolescents and for all age groups (early, mid, late adolescence). Data relating to a range of mental health issues were available for approximately half of the sample. Post-relationship concerns (including breakups) were also more likely than pre- or during-relationship concerns to be associated with concurrent mental health issues (36.8%), self-harm (22.6%) and suicide (9.9%). Results draw on a staged developmental theory of adolescent romantic relationships to provide a comprehensive assessment of relationship stressors, highlighting post-relationship as a particularly vulnerable time for all stages of adolescence. These findings contribute to the development of targeted intervention and support programs. PMID:27164149

  19. Improving documentation of physical health investigations in an adolescent mental health inpatient unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, David

    2015-01-01

    Physical health investigations, such as blood tests, ECGs, and appropriate radiological tests, are essential in the assessment and management of many patients in inpatient mental health settings. This project took place in a 12-bed adolescent mental health unit in Swindon, UK, where on average at least two-thirds of patients have a diagnosed eating disorder. Multidisciplinary ward rounds provide an appropriate setting for discussion and documentation of physical investigations. Over a two-week period, 22 electronic ward round entries were audited for any documentation of five common investigations - blood tests, ECG, MRI head, DEXA, and ovarian ultrasound. Blood tests were documented in 2/22 (9.1%), ECG, MRI head, DEXA, and ovarian ultrasound were documented in 0/22 (0%). Modifications were made to an electronic ward round template, to include headings for each of these investigations, with free-text boxes as well as drop-down boxes for the radiological tests. Following this, re-audit of 22 ward round entries over a two-week period showed documentation had hugely improved - blood tests were documented in 21/22 (95.5%), with ECG, MRI head, DEXA, and pelvis US all documented in 22/22 (100%). A further audit a month later showed these results were largely sustained. In conclusion, use of a simple, structured ward round template can hugely improve documentation of important physical investigations within mental health settings. PMID:26734411

  20. Mental Health Literacy: A Conceptual Framework for Future Inquiry into Child and Youth Care Professionals' Practice with Suicidal Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranahan, Patti

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge and beliefs about mental disorders; attitudes that promote help-seeking; knowledge of risk factors and causes, treatments and self-help, and professional help available are all elements of mental health literacy. The complexities of practice with suicidal adolescents and young people suffering from mental health concerns require…

  1. A prospective study of diet quality and mental health in adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felice N Jacka

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: A number of cross-sectional and prospective studies have now been published demonstrating inverse relationships between diet quality and the common mental disorders in adults. However, there are no existing prospective studies of this association in adolescents, the onset period of most disorders, limiting inferences regarding possible causal relationships. METHODS: In this study, 3040 Australian adolescents, aged 11-18 years at baseline, were measured in 2005-6 and 2007-8. Information on diet and mental health was collected by self-report and anthropometric data by trained researchers. RESULTS: There were cross-sectional, dose response relationships identified between measures of both healthy (positive and unhealthy (inverse diets and scores on the emotional subscale of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL, where higher scores mean better mental health, before and after adjustments for age, gender, socio-economic status, dieting behaviours, body mass index and physical activity. Higher healthy diet scores at baseline also predicted higher PedsQL scores at follow-up, while higher unhealthy diet scores at baseline predicted lower PedsQL scores at follow-up. Improvements in diet quality were mirrored by improvements in mental health over the follow-up period, while deteriorating diet quality was associated with poorer psychological functioning. Finally, results did not support the reverse causality hypothesis. CONCLUSION: This study highlights the importance of diet in adolescence and its potential role in modifying mental health over the life course. Given that the majority of common mental health problems first manifest in adolescence, intervention studies are now required to test the effectiveness of preventing the common mental disorders through dietary modification.

  2. Caught in a bad romance: adolescent romantic relationships and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, Brian

    2014-03-01

    Integrating insights from cultural sociology and identity theory, I explore the mental health consequences of adolescent romantic relationship inauthenticity--incongruence between thoughts/feelings and actions within romantic contexts. Applying sequence analysis to National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health data, I measure relationship inauthenticity by quantifying the extent to which the ordering of events of actual romantic relationships (e.g., holding hands, saying "I love you") diverges from the sequence of events within idealized relationship scripts among 5,316 adolescents. I then test its association with severe depression, suicide ideation, and suicide attempt. I find that romantic relationship inauthenticity is positively associated with the risk of all three markers of poor mental health, but only for girls. This study highlights the importance of gender and culture in determining how early romantic involvement influences psychological well-being. PMID:24578396

  3. Association between playing computer games and mental and social health among male adolescents in Iran in 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi, Mehrnoosh; RezaeiDehaghani, Abdollah; Mehrabi, Tayebeh; RezaeiDehaghani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: As adolescents spend much time on playing computer games, their mental and social effects should be considered. The present study aimed to investigate the association between playing computer games and the mental and social health among male adolescents in Iran in 2014. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study conducted on 210 adolescents selected by multi-stage random sampling. Data were collected by Goldberg and Hillier general health (28 items) and Kiez social hea...

  4. Positive Psychology and Adolescent Mental Health: False Promise or True Breakthrough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Thomas M.

    2004-01-01

    The emerging field of positive psychology has pledged to improve the mental health of American adolescents. Yet, without a principle-based conceptual foundation to guide its study of optimal youth functioning, positive psychology will ultimately fail to keep its promise. This paper suggests that the principles of Mind, Thought and Consciousness…

  5. Cultural Competence in Serving Children and Adolescents with Mental Health Problems. Factsheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Center for Mental Health Services.

    This factsheet discusses the goals and principles that govern the development of culturally competent mental health programs for children and adolescents and their families. Principles include: (1) the family is the consumer and usually the focus of treatment and services; (2) Americans with diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds may have a unique set…

  6. Looking Good, Sounding Good: Femininity Ideology and Adolescent Girls' Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolman, Deborah L.; Impett, Emily A.; Tracy, Allison J.; Michael, Alice

    2006-01-01

    This study used a feminist psychodynamic developmental framework to test the hypothesis that internalizing conventional femininity ideologies in two domains--inauthenticity in relationships and body objectification--is associated with early adolescent girls' mental health. One hundred forty-eight eighth-grade girls completed measures of femininity…

  7. Associations of Truancy, Perceived School Performance, and Mental Health with Alcohol Consumption among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtes, Muriel; Bannink, Rienke; Joosten-van Zwanenburg, Evelien; van As, Els; Raat, Hein; Broeren, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study examined associations of truancy, perceived school performance, and mental health with adolescents' week, weekend, and binge drinking. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1167 secondary school students of Dutch ethnicity (mean age, 15.9 years, SD?=?0.69). Alcohol consumption, truancy, perceived school…

  8. Childhood Adversities and Educational Attainment in Young Adulthood : The Role of Mental Health Problems in Adolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, Karin; Bultmann, Ute; Almansa, Josue; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to examine whether the association between childhood adversities and educational attainment in young adulthood can be explained by mental health problems in adolescence and whether associations and pathways differ for boys and girls. Methods: Data were used of 2,

  9. Relationships among Cyberbullying, School Bullying, and Mental Health in Taiwanese Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fong-Ching; Lee, Ching Mei; Chiu, Chiung-Hui; Hsi, Wen-Yun; Huang, Tzu-Fu; Pan, Yun-Chieh

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study examined the relationships among cyberbullying, school bullying, and mental health in adolescents. Methods: In 2010, a total of 2992 10th grade students recruited from 26 high schools in Taipei, Taiwan completed questionnaires. Results: More than one third of students had either engaged in cyberbullying or had been the…

  10. Adolescents and the internet: what mental health clinicians need to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafla, Malak; Carson, Nicholas J; DeJong, Sandra M

    2014-09-01

    The Internet's permeation into daily life has profoundly changed the practice of psychiatry with adolescents, who mobilize online social media and related technologies in their efforts to develop identity and "hang out" with peers. Technology offers both challenges and opportunities to mental health professionals working with teens. Practitioners will need a new skill-set, including keeping abreast of technological developments; professionally incorporating technology into clinical assessment and practice; identifying the negative impacts of technology on teens' physical and mental health and the particular vulnerabilities of at-risk patients in a digital world; and guiding patients and parents about interventions. Particular patient factors related to race/ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, mental health and trauma history, family culture, parenting style, and personality traits will need to be considered. This article provides an overview of the literature on adolescents and the Internet focusing on recent research on Internet and digital technologies used for social communication among youth. PMID:25070673

  11. Differential Effects of Support Providers on Adolescents' Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colarossi, Lisa G.; Eccles, Jacquelynne S.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the differential effects of parent, teacher, and peer social support on depression and self-esteem of 217 adolescents. Results indicate that female adolescents perceived significantly more support from friends than male adolescents did, whereas male adolescents perceived significantly more support from fathers. Self-esteem was…

  12. Is meditation conducive to mental well-being for adolescents? An integrative review for mental health nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fung Kei Cheng, PhD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Childhood mental health problems not only incur a financial burden but more importantly damages individual and family well-being, which compels mental care practitioners to search for solutions, among which meditation is a more economical method. This integrative review investigates the effectiveness of meditation on psychological problems for adolescents under age of 20 through different types of meditation, though mainly mindfulness-based modes. The 36 reviewed publications include quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods research, conducted in North America, Europe, and the Asia Pacific region, related to developmental disabilities, emotional problems, and mental illnesses. Outcomes indicate a decrease in self-harm thoughts, disruptive behaviour, stress, anxiety, impulsivity, and psychological distress; and improvements in self-control, quality of sleep, emotional regulation, executive function, anger management, and social competence, resulting in better academic performance, quality of life, mental wellness, and child-parent relationships. This review suggests the integration of meditation into physical activities, and music and art therapies, as well as randomised controlled trials to examine such synthesis of these disciplines. In conclusion, meditation is a potential curative and preventive measure, both low cost and non-intrusive, for the promotion of adolescent mental wellness. This sheds light on nurses who look after children with mental health.

  13. Acculturation and Latino adolescent mental health: integration of individual, environmental, and family influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Kathryn E; Gerdes, Alyson C

    2014-12-01

    In order to address the mental health disparities that exist for Latino adolescents in the United States, psychologists must understand specific factors that contribute to the high risk of mental health problems in Latino youth. Given the significant percentage of Latino youth who are immigrants or the children of immigrants, acculturation is a key factor in understanding mental health among this population. However, limitations in the conceptualization and measurement of acculturation have led to conflicting findings in the literature. Thus, the goal of the current review is to examine and critique research linking acculturation and mental health outcomes for Latino youth, as well as to integrate individual, environmental, and family influences of this relationship. An integrated theoretical model is presented and implications for clinical practice and future directions are discussed. PMID:24794635

  14. School mental health services: signpost for out-of-school service utilization in adolescents with mental disorders? A nationally representative United States cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Tegethoff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: School mental health services are important contact points for children and adolescents with mental disorders, but their ability to provide comprehensive treatment is limited. The main objective was to estimate in mentally disordered adolescents of a nationally representative United States cohort the role of school mental health services as guide to mental health care in different out-of-school service sectors. METHODS: Analyses are based on weighted data (N = 6483 from the United States National Comorbidity Survey Replication Adolescent Supplement (participants' age: 13-18 years. Lifetime DSM-IV mental disorders were assessed using the fully structured WHO CIDI interview, complemented by parent report. Adolescents and parents provided information on mental health service use across multiple sectors, based on the Service Assessment for Children and Adolescents. RESULTS: School mental health service use predicted subsequent out-of-school service utilization for mental disorders i in the medical specialty sector, in adolescents with affective (hazard ratio (HR = 3.01, confidence interval (CI = 1.77-5.12, anxiety (HR = 3.87, CI = 1.97-7.64, behavior (HR = 2.49, CI = 1.62-3.82, substance use (HR = 4.12, CI = 1.87-9.04, and eating (HR = 10.72, CI = 2.31-49.70 disorders, and any mental disorder (HR = 2.97, CI = 1.94-4.54, and ii in other service sectors, in adolescents with anxiety (HR = 3.15, CI = 2.17-4.56, behavior (HR = 1.99, CI = 1.29-3.06, and substance use (HR = 2.48, CI = 1.57-3.94 disorders, and any mental disorder (HR = 2.33, CI = 1.54-3.53, but iii not in the mental health specialty sector. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that in the United States, school mental health services may serve as guide to out-of-school service utilization for mental disorders especially in the medical specialty sector across various mental disorders, thereby

  15. Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel and act ... handle stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from ...

  16. Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel and act as ... stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from ...

  17. Mental health problems in adolescents with cochlear implants: Peer problems persist after controlling for additional handicaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eHuber

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the present multi-center study were to investigate the extent of mental health problems in adolescents with a hearing loss and cochlear implants (CIs in comparison to normal hearing (NH peers and to investigate possible relations between the extent of mental health problems of young CI users and hearing variables, such as age at implantation, or functional gain of CI. The survey included 140 adolescents with CI (mean age = 14.7, SD = 1.5 years and 140 NH adolescents (mean age = 14.8, SD = 1.4 years, their parents and teachers. Participants were matched by age, gender and social background. Within the CI group, 35 adolescents were identified as risk cases due to possible and manifest additional handicaps, and 11 adolescents were non-classifiable. Mental health problems were assessed with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ in the versions Self, Parent, and Teacher. The CI group showed significantly more Peer Problems than the NH group. When the CI group was split into a risk-group (35 risk cases and 11 non-classifiable persons and a non-risk group (n = 94, increased peer problems were perceived in both CI subgroups by adolescents themselves. However, no further differences between the CI non-risk group and the NH group were observed in any rater. The CI-risk group showed significantly more hyperactivity compared to the NH group and more hyperactivity and conduct problems compared to the CI non-risk group. Cluster analyses confirmed that there were significantly more adolescents with high problems in the CI-risk group compared to the CI non-risk group and the NH group. Adolescents with CI, who were able to understand speech in noise had significantly less difficulties compared to constricted CI users. Parents, teachers, and clinicians should be aware that CI users with additionally special needs may have mental health problems. However, peer problems were also experienced by CI adolescents without additional handicaps

  18. Parental Relations, Mental Health, and Delinquency in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Willy

    1994-01-01

    A shortened version of the Parental Bonding Instrument, used in a sample of Norwegian adolescents, aged 15-19, indicated that adolescents' perceptions of mothers' and fathers' care and control/overprotection were related to measures of both depression/anxiety and delinquency. Scores may indicate risks in a broad range of psychosocial problems.…

  19. Parenting Styles and Mental Health of Arab Gifted Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwairy, Marwan

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the parental styles and psychosocial adjustment of adolescents and the relationship between them in gifted as compared to nongifted Arab adolescents. Five scales --The Parental Authority Questionnaire, Child Attitude Toward Parents. Lipsitt's Self-Concept Scale for Children, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and The Psychological…

  20. Mental health problems in adolescence and the interpretation of unambiguous threat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie D Henry

    Full Text Available Aberrant threat perception has been linked to paranoia, anxiety and other mental health problems, and is widely considered to be a core, transdiagnostic feature of psychopathology. However, to date there has been only limited investigation of whether mental health problems are associated with a biased interpretation of stimuli that have explicit (as opposed to ambiguous connotations of threat. In the present study, 41 adolescents diagnosed with a mental illness and 45 demographically matched controls were asked to provide danger ratings of stimuli normatively rated as being either low or high in potential threat. All participants were also asked to complete background measures of cognitive function, mental health and wellbeing. The results indicated that the two groups did not differ in their capacity to discriminate between low and high threat stimuli, nor did they differ in the absolute level of threat that they attributed to these stimuli. However, for the control group, the overall level of threat perceived in facial stimuli was correlated with two important indices of mental health (depression and anxiety. No associations emerged in the clinical group. These data are discussed in relation to their potential implications for the role of aberrant threat perception in transdiagnostic models of mental health.

  1. Cross-national reliability of clinician-rated outcome measures in child and adolescent mental health services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanssen-Bauer, Ketil; Gowers, Simon; Aalen, Odd O;

    2007-01-01

    Clinician-rated measures are in extensive use as routine outcome measures in child and adolescent mental health services. We investigated cross-national differences and inter-rater reliability of the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Children and Adolescents (HoNOSCA), the Children's Global...

  2. Chronic Stress and Adolescents' Mental Health : Modifying Effects of Basal Cortisol and Parental Psychiatric History. The TRAILS Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandstra, Anna Roos E.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Nederhof, Esther; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; Dietrich, Andrea; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Ormel, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Large individual differences in adolescent mental health following chronic psychosocial stress suggest moderating factors. We examined two established moderators, basal cortisol and parental psychiatric history, simultaneously. We hypothesized that individuals with high basal cortisol, assumed to in

  3. Understanding Locally, Culturally, and Contextually Relevant Mental Health Problems among Rwandan Children and Adolescents Affected by HIV/AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Betancourt, Theresa Stichick; Rubin-Smith, Julia E; Beardslee, William Rigby; Stulac, Sara N.; Fayida, Ildephonse; Safren, Steven Alex

    2011-01-01

    In assessing the mental health of HIV/AIDS-affected children and adolescents in Sub-Saharan Africa, researchers often employ mental health measures developed in other settings. However, measures derived from standard Western psychiatric criteria are frequently based on conceptual models of illness or terminology that may or may not be an appropriate for diverse populations. Understanding local perceptions of mental health problems can aid in the selection or creation of appropriate measures. ...

  4. Teenage Pregnancy and Mental Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Corcoran

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the intersection between adolescent pregnancy and mental health. The research involving mental health risks for adolescent pregnancy and for parents who are teenagers are discussed. Depression and conduct disorder have emerged with the most attention. Research-based treatment of these disorders in adolescents is presented.

  5. Parent information evenings: filling a gap in Irish child and adolescent mental health services?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNicholas, F

    2010-02-01

    It is estimated that 20% of children experience psychological problems at any one time. 1 Child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) in Ireland are under-resourced. Recent economic downturn has hindered the possibility of increased funding to alleviative these deficits. It is now imperative that mental health professionals create innovative and cost effective solutions to promote positive mental health. Recent literature has focused on the benefits of self delivered parenting programmes, with minimal costs incurred. 2,3 Based on the developing evidence supporting self directed approaches, the Lucena Foundation has initiated a series of parent information evenings. These evenings are offered on a monthly basis, and are free to attend. To date 1,538 parents have attended. Feedback from parents has been very positive with 80.5% of them finding them useful or very useful.

  6. Relations of Personality to Substance Use Problems and Mental Health Disorder Symptoms in Two Clinical Samples of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battista, Susan R.; Pencer, Alissa; McGonnell, Melissa; Durdle, Heather; Stewart, Sherry H.

    2013-01-01

    There is a high overlap between substance misuse and mental health disorders in adolescents. Certain personality traits (i.e., sensation seeking, impulsivity, hopelessness, and anxiety sensitivity) may be related to increased risk for mental health symptoms and/or substance misuse. The current study examined the relationships between personality…

  7. Coping strategies among adolescents with chronic headache and mental health problems: a cross-sectional population-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Hartberg, Silje; Clench-Aas, Jocelyne; Raanaas, Ruth Kjærsti; Lundqvist, Christofer

    2015-01-01

    To examine prevalence of mental health problems among adolescents with chronic headache and compare internal and external coping strategies in young people with chronic headaches with and without mental health problems. This study is based on a cross-sectional survey undertaken in Akershus County in Norway. A total of 19,985 adolescents were included in the study, covering lower secondary and upper secondary students, aged 13–19 years. Chronic headache was measured with a single item question...

  8. The Mental Health Care Gap among Children and Adolescents: Data from an Epidemiological Survey from Four Brazilian Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiane S Paula; Isabel A. S. Bordin; Jair de Jesus Mari; Luciane Velasque; Rohde, Luis A.; Evandro S F Coutinho

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Worldwide, a minority of disordered children/adolescents receives mental health assistance. In order to improve service access, it is important to investigate factors that influence the process leading to receiving care. Data on frequency and barriers for mental health service use (MHSU) among Brazilian children/adolescents are extremely scarce and are needed to guide public policy. OBJECTIVES: To establish the frequency of MHSU among 6-to-16-year-old with psychiatric disorders ...

  9. The effect of acculturation and discrimination on mental health symptoms and risk behaviors among adolescent migrants in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakash, Ora; Nagar, Maayan; Shoshani, Anat; Zubida, Hani; Harper, Robin A

    2012-07-01

    This study examines the role of acculturation, perceived discrimination, and self-esteem in predicting the mental health symptoms and risk behaviors among 1.5 and second generation non-Jewish adolescents born to migrant families compared with native-born Jewish Israeli adolescents in Israel. Participants included n = 65 1.5 migrant adolescents, n = 60 second generation migrant adolescents, and n = 146 age, gender, and socioeconomic matched sample of native-born Jewish Israelis. Participants completed measures of acculturation pattern, perceived discrimination, and self-esteem as well as measures of mental health symptoms and risk behaviors. Results show that migrant adolescents across generations reported worse mental health symptoms compared with native-born Jewish Israelis. However, only the 1.5 generation migrants reported higher engagement in risk behaviors compared with second generation migrants and native-born Jewish Israelis. Our findings further showed that acculturation plays an important role in predicting the mental health status of migrant youth, with those characterized with integrated acculturative pattern reporting lower mental health symptoms compared with assimilated acculturation pattern. Importantly, contextual factors, such as higher perception of discrimination in the receiving culture as well as individual factors such as lower self-esteem and female gender were strongly associated with worse mental health symptoms. The findings manifest the complex relationship between contextual factors and individual level variables in the acculturative process of migrants as well as the importance of examining the effect of migration generation on mental health outcomes. PMID:22686145

  10. Adolescents with Depression Grown up : Education, Intimate Relationships, Mental Health, and Personality

    OpenAIRE

    Jonsson, Ulf

    2010-01-01

    Unipolar depression, estimated to be the leading contributor to burden of disease in middle- and high-income countries, often has an onset in adolescence. The disorder is associated with substantial role impairment and is highly recurrent. This raises questions about both subsequent mental health and social outcome. In order to shed light on this, a community sample of adolescents with depression and non-depressed peers was followed-up after 15 years. In 1991-93, first-year students in upper ...

  11. Adolescent Maternal Lifecourse Outcomes: Implications from an Integrated Mental Health Services Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth S. Russell

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Family intervention literature on adolescent parenting describes the pathways between outcomes for adolescent mothers and their children and the contexts of the pregnancy itself (e.g., poverty, low or no prenatal care, lower educational attainment. The aim of these descriptions is often to inform intervention designs that promote adaptive functioning for the child, the mother, and the dyad. Mental health services are an important component of many of these interventions; these services may be delivered by a clinician within the organization providing the intervention, or the organization may connect mothers with external mental health services in their communities. Using in-house clinicians rather than external providers may be beneficial by decreasing the high attrition rates common to this population. Although this service delivery approach is theoretically appealing, it has not been subject to rigorous empirical evaluation. In the current randomized study, we examine outcomes for teenage mothers based on two service delivery methods: Integrated Mental Health Services (IMHS and the Standard of Care (SoC which outsources clients’ mental health needs through community referrals. Information about the effectiveness of service delivery strategies can help program providers make decisions about how best to allocate limited funds to provide effective services.

  12. Parental Psychological Abuse toward children and Mental Health Problems in adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Iram Rizvi, Syeda Fariha; Najam, Najma

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Present study was conducted to explore the relationship between parental psychological abuse toward their children and mental health problems in adolescence. Method: Three hundred participants age range 13-17 years, (57% boys and 43% girls) participated in the study from both public and private high schools of Lahore. Psychological maltreatment experience scale (PMES) and Youth Self-Report(YSR) were used for assessment and diagnosis. Results: Findings revealed that psychological ab...

  13. Mental Health and Health Risk Behaviours of Homeless Adolescents and Youth: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppong Asante, Kwaku; Meyer-Weitz, Anna; Petersen, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Background: Homeless youth, as a vulnerable population are susceptible to various mental and health risk behaviours. However, less is known of the mental health status of these homeless youth and its role in risky sexual behaviours; neither do we understand the reasons homeless youth give for their engagement in various health risk behaviour.…

  14. Back and neck pain are related to mental health problems in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Sullivan Peter B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a high prevalence of mental health problems amongst adolescents. In addition there is a high prevalence of spinal pain in this population. Evidence suggests that these conditions are related. This study sought to extend earlier findings by examining the relationship between mental health problems as measured by the Child Behaviour Check List (CBCL and the experience of back and neck pain in adolescents. Methods One thousand five hundred and eighty participants (mean age 14.1 years from the Western Australian Pregnancy (Raine Study provided cross-sectional spinal pain and CBCL data. Results As predicted, there was a high prevalence of back and neck pain in this cohort. On the whole, females reported more mental health difficulties than males. There were strong relationships between the majority of symptom scales of the CBCL and back and neck pain. Scores on the CBCL were associated with higher odds of comorbid back and neck pain. Conclusions These findings strongly support the need to consider both psychological and pain symptoms when providing assessments and treatment for adolescents. Further research is required to inform causal models.

  15. A lot of mental illness starts in adolescence. Therefore should we shift some of the spending from adult to adolescent mental health services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, David

    2015-09-01

    In May 2015 the UK elected a new government. In election campaigns, health is one of the most important areas of debate and over the preceding 12 months, the state of child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) had held a particularly high profile in the media and in political debate. Many had suggested that the rate of mental illness starting in adolescence is increasing and that service provision is not of sufficient quality or scale to meet this need. A brief review of the sources for these statistics reveals that whilst this may be true, there is a dearth of accurate and up to date data on the scale of the need for CAMHS or the extent to which it is being met. Nonetheless, members of all parties claimed to support improvements in mental health service provision for children and adolescents through increases in funding. A key question for policy makers has therefore become, from where any additional funding might be derived. One suggestion has been that funding be transferred from spending on adult mental health services. The exact practical nature of such a policy is yet to be explored in detail by government or stakeholders. The primary purpose of the present discussion is therefore to consider the possible ethical implications of such a policy in principle. The discussion forms part of a wider and evolving political and professional discourse on society's and government's attitude towards mental illness, towards the balance of individual and societal needs and towards the balance between preventative and supportive interventions to improve health. PMID:26417740

  16. Adolescents´ voices : Mental health, self-esteem, sense of coherence, family functioning and life attitudes in Swedish and Greek Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Levidioti-Lekkou, Spyridoula

    2006-01-01

    Background: Several factors have been identified as related to mental health in adolescence, such as competences, behavioural/emotional problems, self-esteem, and sense of coherence. Studies also emphasise the importance of family func-tioning and cultural factors. Objectives: This study investigates and compares the mental health of adoles-cents in relation to family functioning and socio-cultural variables in Sweden and Greece. Furthermore, Swedish and Greek adolescents’ attitudes about lif...

  17. Mental health problems in deaf and severely hard of hearing children and adolescents: findings on prevalence, pathogenesis and clinical complexities, and implications for prevention, diagnosis and intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Gent, Tiejo van

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to expand the knowledge of mental health problems with deaf and severely hard of hearing children and adolescents in the following domains: 1. The prevalence of mental health problems; 2. Specific intra- and interpersonal aspects of pathogenesis; 3. characteristics of the hearing impaired population with severe mental health problems. The rate of mental health problems, especially of emotional problems, was increased in deaf adolescents of normal intelligence compare...

  18. Substance Use and Mental Health Problems as Predictors of HIV Sexual Risk Behaviors among Adolescents in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ronald G., Jr.; Auslander, Wendy F.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between substance use, mental health problems, and HIV sexual risk behaviors among a sample of foster care adolescents. Data were collected through structured baseline interviews with 320 adolescents (ages 15 to 18 years) who resided in foster care placements and participated in a larger evaluation study of an…

  19. Parenting styles and mental health of Palestinian-Arab adolescents in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwairy, Marwan

    2004-06-01

    The relationship between three parenting styles (authoritarian, permissive, and authoritative) and the mental health of Arab adolescents was tested. It was hypothesized that parenting style toward boys would differ from that towards girls, psychological adjustment of girls would differ from that of boys, and that the authoritarian style applied within the authoritarian Arab society is not associated with poor psychological adjustment. The Parental Authority Questionnaire, Child Attitude Toward Parents, Lipsitt's Self-Concept Scale for Children, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and the Psychological State Scale were administered to 431 Arab adolescents. Sex comparison revealed that the parenting style with regard to girls tends to be more authoritative and less authoritarian than with regard to boys. Girls scored higher than boys on identity disorder, anxiety disorder, and depression scales, whereas boys scored higher than girls on the behavior disorder scale. There was no significant relationship between the authoritarian parenting style and the mental health measures. A significant positive relationship exists between the authoritative parenting style and the mental health of children. Among boys, the permissive parenting style was associated with negative attitudes towards parents, lower self-esteem and increased identity, anxiety, phobia, depressive, and conduct disorders. It seems, therefore, that the effect of parenting style is culturally and gender dependent rather than universal. PMID:15446722

  20. Management of mental health disorders and central nervous system sequelae in HIV-positive children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Nassen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available HIV-positive children and adolescents are at increased risk of both central nervous system (CNS sequelae and mental disorders owing to a number of factors, including the impact of HIV infection on the brain, social determinants of health (e.g. poverty and orphanhood and psychosocial stressors related to living with HIV. Every effort should be made to identify perinatally HIV-infected children and initiate them on antiretroviral therapy early in life. HIV clinicians should ideally screen for mental health and neurocognitive problems, as part of the routine monitoring of children attending antiretroviral clinics. This guideline is intended as a reference tool for HIV clinicians to support the early identification, screening and management of mental health disorders and/or CNS impairment in children and adolescents. This guideline covers mental disorders (section 1 and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (section 2 among children and adolescents.  

  1. Measuring depression and stigma towards depression and mental health treatment among adolescents in an Arab-American community

    OpenAIRE

    Jaber, R.M.; Farroukh, M.; Ismail, M; Najda, J.; Sobh, H.; Hammad, A; Dalack, G.W.

    2014-01-01

    There has been limited research that has examined the prevalence of depression and attitudes towards depression and mental health treatment in Arab-American adolescents; we sought to assess these in a predominantly Arab-American community in metro Detroit. A health survey of adolescents aged 12–17 years was conducted (n=98). Participants were recruited from two local community organizations in Dearborn, MI. Depression was assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) Depression Scale...

  2. The mental health of adolescent school children: a comparison among Japan, Korea, and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houri, Daisuke; Nam, Eun Woo; Choe, Eun Hee; Min, Liu Zhong; Matsumoto, Kenji

    2012-09-01

    This study compared the mental health of adolescents in three countries in northeast Asia: Japan, South Korea, and China. The study sample included a total of 1,399 third graders at junior high schools: 632 from Yonago City and Tottori City in Japan, 377 from Wonju City in Korea, and 390 from Changchun City in China. Mental health was measured by the Ochanomizu University Health Examination, which includes mental health scales composed of somatic symptoms, eating disorders, depression, interpersonal relationships, powerlessness, and impulsiveness; self-resilience; familial relationships; friendships; a feeling of gloom during the previous month; current well-being; and counseling. The results of this study were as follows: first, Japanese students experienced more difficulties in interpersonal relationships and experienced more feelings of powerlessness than Korean and Chinese students. Korean students were vulnerable to somatic symptoms and impulsiveness, whereas Chinese students experienced more depression than Korean and Japanese students. Second, more female students were in the poor mental health group than male students. Third, Japanese female students ranked the lowest of all groups for the Resilience Index scores. Fourth, when in need of counseling, students solicited advice from teachers (classroom teachers, health teachers or club teachers) about their study-related problems, and asked for advice from friends regarding problems or worries about peer and family relations. However, a number of students received no counseling for their troubles. The study concluded that it is necessary to promote a healthy environment for students, with easy access to counseling from mental health care professionals. PMID:24802782

  3. Association of school, family, and mental health characteristics with suicidal ideation among Korean adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyu-Young; Choi, Yun-Jung

    2015-08-01

    In a cross-sectional research design, we investigated factors related to suicidal ideation in adolescents using data from the 2013 Online Survey of Youth Health Behavior in Korea. This self-report questionnaire was administered to 72,435 adolescents aged 13-18 years in middle and high school. School characteristics, family characteristics, and mental health variables were analyzed using descriptive statistics, χ(2) tests, and logistic regression. Both suicidal ideation and behavior were more common in girls. Suicidal ideation was most common in 11th grade for boys and 8th grade for girls. Across the sample, in logistic regression, suicidal ideation was predicted by low socioeconomic status, high stress, inadequate sleep, substance use, alcohol use, and smoking. Living apart from family predicted suicidal ideation in boys but not in girls. Gender- and school-grade-specific intervention programs may be useful for reducing suicidal ideation in students. PMID:25917791

  4. Physical constraint as psychological holding: Mental-health treatment for difficult and violent adolescents in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gansel, Yannis; Lézé, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    The phrase "Contraindre est thérapeutique"--constraining is therapeutic--underpins the principle of numerous interventions within the field of mental health in France, ranging from traditional psychiatric units to the courthouse to violence management and prevention of dangerousness. The treatment of violence in "difficult and violent adolescents" provides a paradigmatic and revealing example of this tendency. The aim of this article is to understand how the clinical category--contenir, or "to contain"--was formed and is used. The perspective taken is that of the political anthropology of mental health and the article combines a genealogical approach of the notion with a multisite ethnographical study (conducted between September 2008 and June 2012 in three facilities for adolescent care). This study will show how "psychological holding" is used to justify "physical constraint" in the treatment of adolescent crisis and violence. Furthermore, we will see how this "dirty work", delegated to front-line professionals (educators, social workers, nurses), is used within a moral economy of suffering that promotes care and control measures in a population largely from immigrant backgrounds, judged to be both potentially vulnerable and dangerous. PMID:26048583

  5. Promoting child and adolescent mental health in low and middle income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vikram; Flisher, Alan J; Nikapota, Anula; Malhotra, Savita

    2008-03-01

    Children and adolescents in low and middle income countries (LAMIC) constitute 35-50% of the population. Although the population in many such countries is predominantly rural, rapid urbanisation and social change is under way, with an increase in urban poverty and unemployment, which are risk factors for poor child and adolescent mental health (CAMH). There is a vast gap between CAMH needs (as measured through burden of disease estimates) and the availability of CAMH resources. The role of CAMH promotion and prevention can thus not be overestimated. However, the evidence base for affordable and effective interventions for promotion and prevention in LAMIC is limited. In this review, we briefly review the public health importance of CAM disorders in LAMIC and the specific issues related to risk and protective factors for these disorders. We describe a number of potential strategies for CAMH promotion which focus on building capacity in children and adolescents, in parents and families, in the school and health systems, and in the wider community, including structural interventions. Building capacity in CAMH must also focus on the detection and treatment of disorders for which the evidence base is somewhat stronger, and on wider public health strategies for prevention and promotion. In particular, capacity needs to be built across the health system, with particular foci on low-cost, universally available and accessible resources, and on empowerment of families and children. We also consider the role of formal teaching and training programmes, and the role for specialists in CAMH promotion. PMID:18093112

  6. Suicidality, bullying and other conduct and mental health correlates of traumatic brain injury in adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Ilie

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Our knowledge on the adverse correlates of traumatic brain injuries (TBI, including non-hospitalized cases, among adolescents is limited to case studies. We report lifetime TBI and adverse mental health and conduct behaviours associated with TBI among adolescents from a population-based sample in Ontario. METHOD AND FINDINGS: Data were derived from 4,685 surveys administered to adolescents in grades 7 through 12 as part of the 2011 population-based cross-sectional Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (OSDUHS. Lifetime TBI was defined as head injury that resulted in being unconscious for at least 5 minutes or being retained in the hospital for at least one night, and was reported by 19.5% (95%CI:17.3,21.9 of students. When holding constant sex, grade, and complex sample design, students with TBI had significantly greater odds of reporting elevated psychological distress (AOR = 1.52, attempting suicide (AOR = 3.39, seeking counselling through a crisis help-line (AOR = 2.10, and being prescribed medication for anxiety, depression, or both (AOR = 2.45. Moreover, students with TBI had higher odds of being victimized through bullying at school (AOR = 1.70, being cyber-bullied (AOR = 2.05, and being threatened with a weapon at school (AOR = 2.90, compared with students who did not report TBI. Students with TBI also had higher odds of victimizing others and engaging in numerous violent as well as nonviolent conduct behaviours. CONCLUSIONS: Significant associations between TBI and adverse internalizing and externalizing behaviours were found in this large population-based study of adolescents. Those who reported lifetime TBI were at a high risk for experiencing mental and physical health harms in the past year than peers who never had a head injury. Primary physicians should be vigilant and screen for potential mental heath and behavioural harms in adolescent patients with TBI. Efforts to prevent TBI during

  7. School context, friendship ties and adolescent mental health: A multilevel analysis of the Korean Youth Panel Survey (KYPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Harris Hyun-Soo

    2015-11-01

    Research on the social determinants of health suggests that interpersonal networks play a critical role in facilitating individual mental and physical well-being. Prior studies also indicate that ecological or contextual factors contribute to positive health outcomes. This study extends prior research by examining the factors associated with adolescent health in an Asian context. Based on the multilevel analysis of the Korean Youth Panel Survey (2006 & 2007), a longitudinal project funded by the Korean government, it investigates some of the key variables related to the mental health of Korean students. Much of previous research focuses on the functions of social capital. This study contributes to the social epidemiology literature by investigating the possible downside of network ties. Specifically, it asks whether having delinquent friends is associated with negative mental health experiences. In addition, little research has been conducted concerning the associations between adolescent health outcomes and school characteristics. This study moves in that direction by examining the relationship between mental well-being of students and a variety of school related variables (e.g., subjective attitude toward school and quality of relationship with peers and teachers). Hierarchical linear modeling shows that, among the social capital control variables, being properly integrated into the family and frequent peer interaction significantly add to mental health. At the individual (student) level only, ties to delinquent friends are negatively associated with mental health, while at both individual and contextual levels, school characteristics are positively related to adolescent subjective well-being. PMID:25960374

  8. The risk behaviors and mental health of detained adolescents: a controlled, prospective longitudinal study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To assess the behavioral risk factors and mental health needs of adolescents in juvenile detention centers (JDC. METHOD: A total of 238 boys aged 12-17 years was surveyed who had been admitted to a detention center and compared them with boys from the community (n = 238 matched for sex and age. We assessed behavioral risk factors and mental health problems by using the Youth Risk Behavior Survey questionnaire (YRBS and the Youth Self-Report questionnaire (YSR. RESULTS: Young offenders had significantly higher YRBS scores than controls for drug use (odds ratio (OR 5.16, 95% CI 2.27-7.84, sexual intercourse (OR, 2.51; 95% CI 1.55-2.90, irregular diet (4.78, 2.11-7.51, suicide attempts (1.96, 1.32-5.85, and physical fighting behavior (3.49, 1.60-7.07, but not for tobacco use, alcohol use, and high-risk cycling. Young offenders at the time of admission (6.61, 2.58-15.2, at 6 months (3.12, 1.81-10.1, and at 12 months (5.29, 1.98-13.3 reported statistically higher levels of total mental health problems than adolescents in a community sample. CONCLUSIONS: Young offenders have a high rate of mental and behavioral disorders. In the detention period, aggressive behavior, self-destructive/identity, and externalizing of problems improved while withdrawn, anxious or depressed, and internalizing of problems worsened.

  9. Chronic Adolescent Marijuana Use as a Risk Factor for Physical and Mental Health Problems in Young Adult Men

    OpenAIRE

    Bechtold, Jordan; Simpson, Theresa; White, Helene R.; Pardini, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    Some evidence suggests that youth who use marijuana heavily during adolescence may be particularly prone to health problems in later adulthood (e.g., respiratory illnesses, psychotic symptoms). However, relatively few longitudinal studies have prospectively examined the long-term physical and mental health consequences associated with chronic adolescent marijuana use. The present study used data from a longitudinal sample of Black and White young men to determine whether different development...

  10. The Impact of Acculturation Style and Acculturative Hassles on the Mental Health of Somali Adolescent Refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Alisa K; Lazarevic, Vanja; White, Matthew T; Ellis, B Heidi

    2016-08-01

    Refugee adolescents often immigrate to a new society because of experiences of persecution and trauma, which can have profound effects on their mental health. Once they immigrate, many refugees experience stressors related to resettlement and acculturation in the new society. The current study examined relationships among acculturation styles and hassles and the well-being of young refugees as well as the role of gender. Data were collected from 135 young refugees (M age = 15.39, SD = 2.2; 62 % male) from Somalia resettled in the United States The findings from our study indicate that in addition to trauma history, acculturative hassles and acculturation style impact the wellbeing of Somali refugee adolescents. These findings indicate the need to understand both past experiences as well as current challenges. Potential areas for intervention are discussed. PMID:26048358

  11. Correlates of mental health among Pakistani adolescents: an exploration of the interrelationship between attachment, parental bonding, social support, emotion regulation and cultural orientation using Structural Equation Modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Khalid, Amna

    2015-01-01

    Background Mental health of the adolescents is an important global public health concern as a leading cause of illness and disability not only for the adolescents, but also their family, and the community. In recent years the broader definition of mental health suggests an overall improved well-being as well as absence of illness. Despite the global recognition of the significance of adolescents’ mental health it remains a seriously neglected area in research and policy in P...

  12. Cyber and Traditional Bullying Victimization as a Risk Factor for Mental Health Problems and Suicidal Ideation in Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Rienke Bannink; Suzanne Broeren; van de Looij-Jansen, Petra M; de Waart, Frouwkje G.; Hein Raat

    2014-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To examine whether traditional and cyber bullying victimization were associated with adolescent's mental health problems and suicidal ideation at two-year follow-up. Gender differences were explored to determine whether bullying affects boys and girls differently. Methods: A two-year longitudinal study was conducted among first-year secondary school students (N = 3181). Traditional and cyber bullying victimization were assessed at baseline, whereas mental health status an...

  13. The effects of mental health symptoms and marijuana expectancies on marijuana use and consequences among at-risk adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Eric R.; Miles, Jeremy N. V.; Osilla, Karen Chan; Ewing, Brett A.; Hunter, Sarah B; D’Amico, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    Based on expectancy theory, adolescents at risk for mental health symptoms, such as those involved in the juvenile court system, may use marijuana due to the belief that use will attenuate anxiety and depressive symptoms. In a diverse sample of youth involved in the Santa Barbara Teen Court system (N = 193), we examined the association between mental health symptoms and marijuana expectancies on marijuana use and consequences. In general, stronger positive expectancies and weaker negative exp...

  14. Cyber and Traditional Bullying Victimization as a Risk Factor for Mental Health Problems and Suicidal Ideation in Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine whether traditional and cyber bullying victimization were associated with adolescent's mental health problems and suicidal ideation at two-year follow-up. Gender differences were explored to determine whether bullying affects boys and girls differently. Methods A two-year longitudinal study was conducted among first-year secondary school students (N = 3181). Traditional and cyber bullying victimization were assessed at baseline, whereas mental health status and suicidal ide...

  15. Cyber and traditional bullying victimization as a risk factor for mental health problems and suicidal ideation in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Bannink, Rienke; Broeren, Suzanne; van de Looij-Jansen, Petra; Waart, Frouwkje; Raat, Hein

    2014-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To examine whether traditional and cyber bullying victimization were associated with adolescent's mental health problems and suicidal ideation at two-year follow-up. Gender differences were explored to determine whether bullying affects boys and girls differently. Methods: A two-year longitudinal study was conducted among first-year secondary school students (N = 3181). Traditional and cyber bullying victimization were assessed at baseline, whereas mental health status an...

  16. Mental Health Literacy Among Late Adolescents in South India: What They Know and What Attitudes Drive Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorchukwu, Judith Miti; Sekaran, Varalakshmi Chandra; Nair, Sreekumaran; Ashok, Lena

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early recognition of mental health problems gives an individual the opportunity for better long-term outcomes if intervention is initiated early. Mental health literacy is a related concept which is increasingly seen as an important measure of the awareness and knowledge of mental health disorders. Aim and Objectives: This study aimed at assessing the mental health literacy, help-seeking behavior and beliefs and attitudes related to mental illnesses among adolescents attending preuniversity colleges. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among randomly selected preuniversity college students (n = 916). Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires. Data were computed using STATA. Analysis and interpretation were carried out using descriptives and Chi-square test. Results: Of the 916 respondents, 54.15% were male while 45.85% were female. The majority (78.60%) of the respondents ascribed to the Hindu religion, hailed largely from rural areas (57.21%) and were mostly studying in the 11th standard (72.49%). The percentage of mental health literacy among the respondents was very low, i.e., depression was identified by 29.04% and schizophrenia/psychosis was recognized by 1.31%. The study findings indicate that adolescents preferred reaching out more to informal sources including family members such as mothers than formal sources for self than for others indicating deeply prevalent stigmatizing attitudes toward mental health conditions. Conclusions: There is a need for immediate improvement in the knowledge of adolescents on mental health literacy which suggests that programs need to be developed such that adolescents can seek help from valid resources if the need were to arise and have appropriate knowledge on whom to approach for help.

  17. Mental health literacy among late adolescents in South India: What they know and what attitudes drive them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Miti Ogorchukwu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early recognition of mental health problems gives an individual the opportunity for better long-term outcomes if intervention is initiated early. Mental health literacy is a related concept which is increasingly seen as an important measure of the awareness and knowledge of mental health disorders. Aim and Objectives: This study aimed at assessing the mental health literacy, help-seeking behavior and beliefs and attitudes related to mental illnesses among adolescents attending preuniversity colleges. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among randomly selected preuniversity college students (n = 916. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires. Data were computed using STATA. Analysis and interpretation were carried out using descriptives and Chi-square test. Results: Of the 916 respondents, 54.15% were male while 45.85% were female. The majority (78.60% of the respondents ascribed to the Hindu religion, hailed largely from rural areas (57.21% and were mostly studying in the 11th standard (72.49%. The percentage of mental health literacy among the respondents was very low, i.e., depression was identified by 29.04% and schizophrenia/psychosis was recognized by 1.31%. The study findings indicate that adolescents preferred reaching out more to informal sources including family members such as mothers than formal sources for self than for others indicating deeply prevalent stigmatizing attitudes toward mental health conditions. Conclusions: There is a need for immediate improvement in the knowledge of adolescents on mental health literacy which suggests that programs need to be developed such that adolescents can seek help from valid resources if the need were to arise and have appropriate knowledge on whom to approach for help.

  18. Influence of psychosocial risk factors on the trajectory of mental health problems from childhood to adolescence: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatori Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Longitudinal epidemiological studies involving child/adolescent mental health problems are scarce in developing countries, particularly in regions characterized by adverse living conditions. We examined the influence of psychosocial factors on the trajectory of child/adolescent mental health problems (CAMHP over time. Methods A population-based sample of 6- to 13-year-olds with CAMHP was followed-up from 2002–2003 (Time 1/T1 to 2007–2008 (Time 2/T2, with 86 out of 124 eligible children/adolescents at T1 being reassessed at T2 (sample loss: 30.6%. Outcome: CAMHP at T2 according to the Child Behavior Checklist/CBCL’s total problem scale. Psychosocial factors: T1 variables (child/adolescent’s age, family socioeconomic status; trajectory of variables from T1 to T2 (child/adolescent exposure to severe physical punishment, mother exposure to severe physical marital violence, maternal anxiety/depression; and T2 variables (maternal education, child/adolescent’s social support and pro-social activities. Results Multivariate analysis identified two risk factors for child/adolescent MHP at T2: aggravation of child/adolescent physical punishment and aggravation of maternal anxiety/depression. Conclusions The current study shows the importance of considering child/adolescent physical punishment and maternal anxiety/depression in intervention models and mental health care policies.

  19. Improving adolescent mental health and resilience through a resilience-based intervention in schools: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Dray, Julia; Bowman, Jenny; Freund, Megan; Campbell, Elizabeth; Wolfenden, Luke; Hodder, Rebecca K.; Wiggers, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Research investigating the effectiveness of universal interventions to reduce the risk of mental health problems remains limited. Schools are a promising setting within which adolescents can receive interventions aimed at promoting their mental health. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a resilience-based prevention-focused intervention in reducing the risk of mental health problems among adolescents attending secondary school in socio-economically disadvantage...

  20. Associations between motor vehicle crashes and mental health problems: data from the National Survey of Adolescents-Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joah L; Rheingold, Alyssa A; Knowlton, Alice W; Saunders, Benjamin E; Kilpatrick, Dean G

    2015-02-01

    Motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) are a leading cause of physical injuries and mortality among children and adolescents in the United States. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between having an MVC and mental health outcomes, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and drug and alcohol misuse in a nationally representative sample of adolescents. A sample of 3,604 adolescents, aged 12-17 years, was assessed as part of the 2005 National Survey of Adolescents-Replication (NSA-R) study. Data were weighted according to the 2005 U.S. Census estimates. Within this sample, 10.2% of adolescents reported having at least 1 serious MVC. The prevalence of current PTSD and depression among adolescents having an MVC was 7.4% and 11.2%, respectively. Analyses revealed that an MVC among adolescents aged 15 years and younger was independently associated with depression (OR = 2.17) and alcohol abuse (OR = 2.36) after adjusting for other risk factors, including a history of interpersonal violence. Among adolescents aged 16 years and older, an MVC was associated only with alcohol abuse (OR = 2.08). This study was the first attempt to explore adverse mental health outcomes associated with MVCs beyond traumatic stress symptoms among adolescents in a nationally representative sample. PMID:25613484

  1. Physical Child Abuse and Teacher Harassment and Their Effects on Mental Health Problems Amongst Adolescent Bully-Victims in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Cheng-Fang; Ko, Chih-Hung; Liu, Tai-Ling; Hu, Huei-Fan

    2015-10-01

    This study compared physical child abuse and teacher harassment of bully-victims with other groups and examined their associations with mental health problems in bully-victims. For 6,160 adolescents, experiences of physical child abuse, teacher harassment, peer bullying, and six mental health problem indicators were assessed. Adolescents that had experienced physical child abuse and teacher harassment were more likely to be bully-victims but not neutral or pure victims. Adolescents who reported physical child abuse were more likely to be bully-victims but not pure bullies. Bully-victims that had experienced teacher harassment exhibited more severe depression and insomnia than did those without teacher harassment. Gender had moderating effects on the difference in physical child abuse between bully-victims and neutrals and on the association between physical child abuse and suicidality in bully-victims. Physical child abuse and teacher harassment should be considered when preventive and intervention programs are developed for adolescents. PMID:25300192

  2. Norwegian adolescents, physical activity and mental health: The Young-HUNT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Slettbakk Fløtnes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to examine the associations of physical activity, sport participation, and body composition on the risk of symptoms of mental health problems in a large population-based sample of Norwegian adolescents.Methods: Analyses were based on 4-year longitudinal data from the Young-HUNT studies in Norway among 2000 adolescents aged 13-19 years. We calculated relative risks of anxiety/depression symptoms, as well as of feeling downhearted and dissatisfied with life, in relation to various measures of physical activity, sports participation, anthropometric measures, and body image.Results: Overall, physical activity was inversely associated with the risk for anxiety/depression in boys (Ptrend, 0.02, but not in girls (P-trend, 0.34. Girls who considered themselves “very fat/chubby” had a higher risk than those who considered themselves as “about the same as others” (RR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.7, whereas in boys, the risk was highest for those who considered themselves as “thin/very thin” (RR, 1.7; 95% CI,1.1-2.7. Analysis of the risk of feeling downhearted or dissatisfied with life showed an inverse association for physical activity, both in girls and boys, and there was also a U-shaped association with body image.Conclusion: Physical activity was inversely related to risk of anxiety/depression in boys, but not in girls, and inversely related to the risk of feeling downhearted and dissatisfied with life in both genders. Body image was strongly associated with symptoms of anxiety/depression and measures of well-being, whereas body size showed no clear associations. These results suggest that self-perception of appearance are moreimportant for mental health in adolescents than the actual body composition, and that being physically active may be beneficial, especially among boys.

  3. Adolescent over-general memory, life events and mental health outcomes: Findings from a UK cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Crane, C.; Heron, J.; Gunnell, D; Lewis, G; Evans, J.; Williams, J M

    2015-01-01

    Previous research suggesting that over-general memory (OGM) may moderate the effect of life events on depressive symptoms and suicidality has sampled older adolescents or adults, or younger adolescents in high-risk populations, and has been conducted over relatively short follow-up periods. The authors examined the relationship between OGM at age 13 and life events and mental health outcomes (depression, self-harm, suicidal ideation and planning) at age 16 years within a sample of 5792 adoles...

  4. [Disparities in mental health associated with sexual orientation among Mexican adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Hernández, Luis; Valencia-Valero, Reyna Guadalupe

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to document disparities in mental health related to discrimination based on sexual orientation in Mexican adolescents. A representative national sample of secondary school students was analyzed. Criteria for homosexual orientation were having had a same-sex boyfriend or girlfriend and having had same-sex sexual relations. The events were: depression, low self-esteem, suicidal ideation, attempted suicide, smoking, alcohol abuse, and drug use. Teenagers with same-sex relationships or sexual relations had an increased risk of depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, attempted suicide, and alcohol abuse. These differences were particularly related to having experienced violence in the family and in school. Despite institutional and legal progress in acknowledging the rights of the lesbian, bisexual, and gay population, health inequities persist due to discrimination based on sexual orientation. PMID:25760174

  5. Posttraumatic stress symptoms and mental health services utilization in adolescents with social anxiety disorder and experiences of victimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gren-Landell, Malin; Aho, Nikolas; Carlsson, Elisabeth; Jones, Annica; Svedin, Carl Göran

    2013-03-01

    Recent findings from studies on adults show similarities between social anxiety disorder (SAD) and posttraumatic stress in the form of recurrent memories and intrusive and distressing images of earlier aversive events. Further, treatment models for SAD in adults have been successfully developed by using transdiagnostic knowledge on posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). Studies on adolescents are though missing. The present study aimed at exploring the association between PTSS and SAD in Swedish adolescents. A second aim was to study mental health services utilization in relation to these conditions. A total of 5,960 high-school students participated and reported on SAD, life time victimization, PTSS and mental health service utilization. Socially anxious adolescents reported significantly higher levels of PTSS than adolescents not reporting SAD and this difference was seen in victimized as well as non-victimized subjects. Contact with a school counselor was the most common mental health service utilization in subjects with SAD and those with elevated PTSS. In the prediction of contact with a CAP-clinic, significant odds ratios were found for a condition of SAD and elevated PTSS (OR = 4.88, 95% CI = 3.53-6.73) but not for SAD only. Screening of PTSS in adolescents with SAD is recommended. The service of school counselors is important in detecting and helping young people with SAD and elevated PTSS. Clinical studies on SAD and PTSS in adolescents could aid in modifying treatment models for SAD. PMID:23099817

  6. Mental health problems and educational attainment in adolescence: 9-year follow-up of the TRAILS study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Veldman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study examines if mental health problems at age 11 and changes in mental health problems between age 11 and 16 predict educational attainment of adolescents at age 19, overall and stratified by gender. METHODS: Data from 1711 adolescents (76.8% from initial cohort of the Tracking Adolescents' Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS, a Dutch prospective cohort study with 9 year follow-up, were used. Mental health problems (externalizing, internalizing and attention problems were measured by the Youth Self Report and the Child Behavior Checklist at ages 11 and 16. Difference scores for mental health problems between age 11 and 16 were calculated. Educational attainment was assessed at age 19. RESULTS: Externalizing, internalizing and attention problems at age 11 were significantly associated with low educational attainment at age 19 (crude model. When adjusted for demographic variables and the other mental health problems, only the association for attention problems remained significant (odds ratio (OR, 95% confidence interval: 3.19, 2.11-4.83. Increasing externalizing problems between age 11 and 16 also predicted low educational attainment at age 19 (OR 3.12, 1.83-5.32. Among girls, increasing internalizing problems between age 11 and 16 predicted low educational attainment (OR 2.21, 1.25-3.94. For boys, no significant association was found for increasing internalizing problems and low educational attainment. For increasing attention problems between age 11 and 16 no significant association with low educational attainment was found. CONCLUSIONS: Externalizing, internalizing and attention problems at age 11 and an increase of these problems during adolescence predicted low educational attainment at age 19. Early treatment of these mental health problems may improve educational attainment, and reduce socioeconomic health differences in adulthood.

  7. The Influence of Emotional Intelligence (EI) on Coping and Mental Health in Adolescence: Divergent Roles for Trait and Ability EI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sarah K.; Humphrey, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Theoretically, trait and ability emotional intelligence (EI) should mobilise coping processes to promote adaptation, plausibly operating as personal resources determining choice and/or implementation of coping style. However, there is a dearth of research deconstructing if/how EI impacts mental health via multiple coping strategies in adolescence.…

  8. Cyber and traditional bullying victimization as a risk factor for mental health problems and suicidal ideation in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Bannink (Rienke); S.M.L. Broeren (Suzanne); P.M. van de Looij-Jansen (Petra); F. de Waart (Frouwkje); H. Raat (Hein)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To examine whether traditional and cyber bullying victimization were associated with adolescent's mental health problems and suicidal ideation at two-year follow-up. Gender differences were explored to determine whether bullying affects boys and girls differently. Methods: A two

  9. Suicidal ideation, mental health problems, and social function in adolescents with eczema: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Jon A; Lien, Lars; Dalgard, Florence; Bjertness, Espen; Stern, Robert S

    2014-07-01

    There are few studies on psychosocial problems in adolescents with eczema. We performed a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study to explore the relationship of suicidal ideation, mental health problems, and social functioning with eczema. A total of 4,744 adolescents (18-19 years) were invited for the study, of whom 3,775 (80%) participated. The overall prevalence of current eczema was 9.7%. Among those with current eczema, 15.5% reported suicidal ideation compared with 9.1% among those without eczema, significantly associated in a multivariate model (odds ratio 1.87, 95% confidence interval 1.31-2.68). In a subgroup analyses, the prevalence of suicidal ideation in those with both eczema and itch was 23.8%, and was significantly associated, compared with those without eczema (3.57, 2.46-5.67). Eczema was associated with mental health problems assessed by the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (1.72, 1.21-2.45) and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist 10 (1.63, 1.23-2.16). Five questions assessed social function: feeling attached to family and friends; thriving at school; experiencing bullying; and romantic relationships. Boys with current eczema were less likely to have had romantic relationships (1.93, 1.21-3.08). Eczema in late adolescence is associated with suicidal ideation and mental health problems but rarely with social problems. Our findings point to the importance of addressing mental health issues in adolescents with eczema. PMID:24496238

  10. Perceptions of Vietnamese Fathers' Acculturation Levels, Parenting Styles, and Mental Health Outcomes in Vietnamese American Adolescent Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Peter V.

    2008-01-01

    Vietnamese adult and adolescent immigrants in the United States acculturate to the Western culture at different rates. Most Vietnamese parents tend to use the authoritarian parenting method in which dictatorial approaches are enforced, possibly leading to family conflicts and mental health issues. By means of the Suinn-Lew Asian Self-Identity…

  11. Cyber and traditional bullying victimization as a risk factor for mental health problems and suicidal ideation in adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rienke Bannink

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To examine whether traditional and cyber bullying victimization were associated with adolescent's mental health problems and suicidal ideation at two-year follow-up. Gender differences were explored to determine whether bullying affects boys and girls differently. METHODS: A two-year longitudinal study was conducted among first-year secondary school students (N = 3181. Traditional and cyber bullying victimization were assessed at baseline, whereas mental health status and suicidal ideation were assessed at baseline and follow-up by means of self-report questionnaires. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess associations between these variables while controlling for baseline problems. Additionally, we tested whether gender differences in mental health and suicidal ideation were present for the two types of bullying. RESULTS: There was a significant interaction between gender and traditional bullying victimization and between gender and cyber bullying victimization on mental health problems. Among boys, traditional and cyber bullying victimization were not related to mental health problems after controlling for baseline mental health. Among girls, both traditional and cyber bullying victimization were associated with mental health problems after controlling for baseline mental health. No significant interaction between gender and traditional or cyber bullying victimization on suicidal ideation was found. Traditional bullying victimization was associated with suicidal ideation, whereas cyber bullying victimization was not associated with suicidal ideation after controlling for baseline suicidal ideation. CONCLUSIONS: Traditional bullying victimization is associated with an increased risk of suicidal ideation, whereas traditional, as well as cyber bullying victimization is associated with an increased risk of mental health problems among girls. These findings stress the importance of programs aimed at reducing bullying

  12. Racial matching and adolescent self-disclosure of substance use and mental health symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureche, Daniel J; Smith, Douglas C; Davis, Jordan P; Tabb, Karen M

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining accurate assessment data from adolescents in treatment aids clinical decision making and facilitates more accurate outcome evaluations. However, findings could be biased due to underreported substance use and mental health symptoms. This article compares self-reports of youth in non-White matched client-assessor dyads and those in nonmatched dyads. There were no differences on self-reported substance use, but matched youth reported significantly fewer attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms versus the comparison group. One possible reason for these findings is the effect of in-group stereotype threat. Future studies should examine the potential effect that in-group stereotyping and perceived racism have on the therapeutic relationship. PMID:26422314

  13. Mental Health Changes and Its Predictors in Adolescents using the Path Analytic Model: A 7-Year Observational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Soltanian

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This 7-year observational study examines the hours of TV-watching, phone conversation with friends, using the internet, and physical activity as predictors of mental health among adolescents in south of Iran.At the baseline (in 2005, the participants were 2584 high school students in the 9th to 11th grade. At the baseline, 30% of the available participants (n = 775 were selected in the follow-up (2012 using convenience sampling method. This study used the path analysis to examine the predictors of mental health and to obtain direct, indirect and total effects of the independent variables.At the baseline (2005, female gender, internet use, maternal education, physical activity and father's education were associated with mental health (p<0.05. Baseline mental health, internet use and physical activity predicted mental health of the participants in the follow up (p<0.05.The findings of the study revealed that better mental health in later life is associated with better mental health at baseline, male gender, higher physical activity and phone communication with friends, and less use of the internet and TV.

  14. Play therapy as a mental health intervention for children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye, Nina

    2008-01-01

    Play therapy is a child-centred therapy for children between the ages of 3 and 16 years who have mental health and/or other difficulties. The play therapist works one to one with the child, allowing children to explore their inner emotional world in almost any way they choose in the play room. The therapist sets a few necessary behavioural limits in order to safeguard physical and emotional safety during the weekly sessions. Children from all kinds of families come for play therapy. Some have witnessed domestic violence, or experienced abuse or other trauma. Some have conflicted relationships with the parents or carers arising out of insecure attachment and/or other issues. Provided that the child has some level of symbolic play, play therapy has the potential to help. The other provisos are that the home environment is sufficiently supportive at a basic level, and that the parent or carer is willing to support therapy. Children typically have play therapy for between two and 12 months, depending on the complexity of their difficulties. Play therapists analyse sessions and track changes to determine when to plan the ending with the child. Play therapists come from a range of professions and undertake full-time or part-time training in play therapy leading to a post-qualifying diploma or Master's degree. Qualified play therapists work in, or undertake work for, Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) services, Children's Services (Social Care), schools, and voluntary sector agencies. PMID:18494427

  15. Association between playing computer games and mental and social health among male adolescents in Iran in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mehrnoosh; RezaeiDehaghani, Abdollah; Mehrabi, Tayebeh; RezaeiDehaghani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: As adolescents spend much time on playing computer games, their mental and social effects should be considered. The present study aimed to investigate the association between playing computer games and the mental and social health among male adolescents in Iran in 2014. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study conducted on 210 adolescents selected by multi-stage random sampling. Data were collected by Goldberg and Hillier general health (28 items) and Kiez social health questionnaires. The association was tested by Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and independent t-test. Computer games related factors such as the location, type, length, the adopted device, and mode of playing games were investigated. Results: Results showed that 58.9% of the subjects played games on a computer alone for 1 h at home. Results also revealed that the subjects had appropriate mental health and 83.2% had moderate social health. Results showed a poor significant association between the length of games and social health (r = −0.15, P = 0.03), the type of games and mental health (r = −0.16, P = 0.01), and the device used in playing games and social health (F = 0.95, P = 0.03). Conclusions: The findings showed that adolescents’ mental and social health is negatively associated with their playing computer games. Therefore, to promote their health, educating them about the correct way of playing computer games is essential and their parents and school authorities, including nurses working at schools, should determine its relevant factors such as the type, length, and device used in playing such games. PMID:27095988

  16. School difficulties in immigrant adolescent students and roles of socioeconomic factors, unhealthy behaviours, and physical and mental health.

    OpenAIRE

    Chau Kénora; Baumann Michèle; Kabuth Bernard; Chau Nearkasen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background School is a multi-cultural setting where students need social, material, physical, and mental resources to attain school achievement. But they are often lacking, especially for immigrant students. In an early adolescence context, this study assessed risk for school difficulties among European and non-European immigrants and the roles of socioeconomic characteristics, physical health, psychological health, social relationships, living environment, and unhealthy behaviours. ...

  17. Assessment of prevalence of domestic violence and mental health profile of adolescents exposed to domestic violence in an urban slum in Mumbai

    OpenAIRE

    Renuka C. Hiremath; Samadhan Prakashrao Debaje

    2014-01-01

    Background: Domestic violence in adolescent age group with prevalence of 22.5% is a major cause for causing depression and other behavioral changes. These changes caused due to domestic violence in adolescent age group may persist or worsen in later life as adult resulting in substance abuse or criminal mentality or depression or phobias. Purpose of current study was to assess the prevalence of domestic violence among the adolescents and to compare the mental health in terms of behavior, self...

  18. The mental health care gap among children and adolescents: data from an epidemiological survey from four Brazilian regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane S Paula

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Worldwide, a minority of disordered children/adolescents receives mental health assistance. In order to improve service access, it is important to investigate factors that influence the process leading to receiving care. Data on frequency and barriers for mental health service use (MHSU among Brazilian children/adolescents are extremely scarce and are needed to guide public policy. OBJECTIVES: To establish the frequency of MHSU among 6-to-16-year-old with psychiatric disorders from four Brazilian regions; and to identify structural/psychosocial/demographic barriers associated with child/adolescent MHSU. METHODS: Multicenter cross-sectional-study involving four towns from four out of five Brazilian regions. In each town, a representative sample of elementary public school students was randomly selected (sample: 1,721. Child/adolescent MHSU was defined as being seen by a psychologist/psychiatrist/neurologist in the previous 12 months. Standardized instruments measured: (1 children/adolescent characteristics [(1.1 Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children (K-SADS-PL-psychiatric disorders; (1.2 Ten Questions Screen-neurodevelopment problems; (1.3 two subtests of WISC-III-estimated IQ; (1.4 Academic Performance Test-school performance], (2 factors related to mothers/main caregivers (Self-Reporting Questionnaire-anxiety/depression, (3 family (Brazilian Research-Companies-Association's Questionnaire-SES. RESULTS: Only 19.8% of children/adolescents with psychiatric disorder have used mental health services in the previous 12 months. Multiple logistic regression modeling identified five factors associated with lower rates of MHSU (female gender, adequate school performance, mother/main caregiver living with a partner, lower SES, residing in deprived Brazilian regions regardless of the presence of any psychiatric disorders/neurodevelopmental problems. CONCLUSIONS: Only a small proportion of children/adolescents

  19. Mental health, protective factors and violence among male adolescents: A comparison between urban and rural school students in West Bengal

    OpenAIRE

    Amrita Samanta; Shuvankar Mukherjee; Santanu Ghosh; Aparajita Dasgupta

    2012-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted among 199 (104 urban, 95 rural) male students of classes VIII and IX, of two schools, in urban and rural areas of West Bengal to compare the prevalence of protective factors, mental health issues, and violence among the urban and rural adolescents using a self-administered questionnaire. Higher proportion of urban students than rural (67.3% vs. 62.5%) reported that their guardians understood their problems. Mental health issues like loneliness (17.3% vs. ...

  20. Common stressful life events and difficulties are associated with mental health symptoms and substance use in young adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Low Nancy CP

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stressful life events are associated with mood disorders in adults in clinical settings. Less described in the literature is the association between common life stressors and a wide range of psychopathology in young adolescents. This study uses a large non-clinical sample of young adolescents to describe the associations among worry or stress about common life events/difficulties, mental health and substance use. Methods Data on lifetime stress or worry about common life events/difficulties (i.e., romantic breakups, family disruption, interpersonal difficulties, and personal stress (health, weight, school work, symptoms of depression, conduct disorder symptoms, and substance use were collected from 1025 grade 7 students (mean age 12.9 years; 45% male. The association between each source of stress and each mental health and substance use indicator was modeled in separate logistic regression analyses. Results The proportion of adolescents reporting worry or stress ranged from 7% for new family to 53% for schoolwork. Romantic breakup stress was statistically significantly associated with all the mental health and substance use indicators except illicit drug use. Family disruption was statistically significantly associated with depression symptoms, marijuana use, and cigarette use. Interpersonal difficulties stress was statistically significantly associated with depression symptoms. All sources of personal stress were statistically significantly related to depression symptoms. In addition, health-related stress was inversely related to binge drinking. Conclusion Young adolescents may benefit from learning positive coping skills to manage worry or stress about common stressors and in particular, worry or stress related to romantic breakups. Appropriate management of mental health symptoms and substance use related to common stressful life events and difficulties may help reduce emerging psychopathology.

  1. Postpartum depression predicts offspring mental health problems in adolescence independently of parental lifetime psychopathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Tjitte; Bockting, Claudi L H; van Pampus, Mariëlle G; Ormel, Johan; Meijer, Judith L; Hartman, Catharina A; Burger, Huibert

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postpartum depression (PPD) follows 5-15% of the life births and forms a major threat to the child's mental health and psychosocial development. However, the nature, continuance, and mediators of the association of postpartum depression (PPD) with the child's mental health are not well u

  2. Children's Mental Health Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children’s Mental Health Surveillance What are childhood mental disorders? The term childhood mental disorder means all mental disorders that can be diagnosed and begin in childhood. Mental disorders among children are described ...

  3. Nutritional and lifestyle risk behaviors and their association with mental health and violence among Pakistani adolescents: results from the National Survey of 4583 individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Saadiyah; Shah, Nadia; Jawed, Nida; Inam, Sumera; Shafique, Kashif

    2015-01-01

    Background: Unhealthy behaviors are associated with mental health problems and violence in adolescents, yet their combined association has been understudied. Using the Global School Health Survey, this study examined the association between combined unhealthy behaviors (including fast food, soft drink, smoking, other tobacco products and physical inactivity) and anxiety, suicidal ideation and involvement in physical fight among Pakistani adolescents. Methods: Data were obtained from...

  4. Eating patterns and mental health problems in early adolescence – a cross-sectional study of 12–13-year-old Norwegian schoolchildren

    OpenAIRE

    Oellingrath, Inger Margaret; Svendsen, Martin Veel; Hestetun, Ingebjørg

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between eating patterns and mental health problems in young Norwegian adolescents (12–13 years of age). Design Cross-sectional study. Dietary information was reported by parents using a retrospective FFQ. Eating patterns were identified using principal component analysis. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire was used to measure mental health problems. The association between eating patterns and mental health problems was examined using multiple...

  5. Mental health problems in deaf and severely hard of hearing children and adolescents : findings on prevalence, pathogenesis and clinical complexities, and implications for prevention, diagnosis and intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gent, Tiejo van

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to expand the knowledge of mental health problems with deaf and severely hard of hearing children and adolescents in the following domains: 1. The prevalence of mental health problems; 2. Specific intra- and interpersonal aspects of pathogenesis; 3. characteristics of the h

  6. Violence against the adolescents of Kolkata: A study in relation to the socio-economic background and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Sibnath; Ray, Mrinalkanti; Bhattacharyya, Banhishikha; Sun, Jiandong

    2016-02-01

    This study attempts to understand the nature of violence suffered by the adolescents of Kolkata (erstwhile Calcutta) and to identify its relation with their socio-economic background and mental health variables such as anxiety, adjustment, and self-concept. It is a cross-sectional study covering a total of 370 adolescents (182 boys and 188 girls) from six higher secondary schools in Kolkata. The data was gathered by way of a semi-structured questionnaire and three standard psychological tests. Findings revealed that 52.4%, 25.1%, and 12.7% adolescents suffered psychological, physical, and sexual violence in the last year. Older adolescents (aged 17-18 years) suffered more psychological violence than the younger ones (15-16 years) (psexual violence or both. Whatever its nature is, violence leaves a scar on the mental health of the victims. Those who have been through regular psychological violence reported high anxiety, emotional adjustment problem, and low self-concept. Sexual abuse left a damaging effect on self-concept (pself-concept (p<0.05). This study stresses the need to provide individual counselling services to the maltreated adolescents of Kolkata so that their psychological traumas can heal and that they can move on in life with new hopes and dreams. PMID:26957328

  7. Refinement of an Organizational Skills Intervention for Adolescents with ADHD for Implementation by School Mental Health Providers

    OpenAIRE

    Langberg, Joshua M.; Vaughn, Aaron J.; Williamson, Pamela; Epstein, Jeffery N.; Girio-Herrera, Erin; Becker, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to modify, test, and refine the Homework, Organization, and Planning Skills (HOPS) intervention for adolescents with ADHD for use by school mental health (SMH) providers. Ten SMH providers from three school districts implemented the HOPS intervention with 11 middle school students with ADHD. Parent and teacher ratings of materials organization and homework management were collected pre- and post-intervention and treatment fidelity was assessed. SMH providers and t...

  8. Socio-economic differences in self-esteem of adolescents influenced by personality, mental health and social support

    OpenAIRE

    Veselska, Zuzana; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; Gajdosova, Beata; Orosova, Olga; van Dijk, Jitse P.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Previous studies indicate that self-esteem is lower among adolescents of low socio-economic status and is associated with a number of intrapersonal, interpersonal and socio-cultural factors. Evidence on the mechanisms by which these factors contribute to the connection between socio-economic status and developing self-esteem is incomplete, however. The purpose of this cross-sectional study is to assess whether personality, mental health and social support contribute to the relatio...

  9. Schooling Relates to Mental Health Problems in Adolescents with Cochlear Implants—Mediation by Hearing and Family Variables

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Maria; Pletzer, Belinda; Giourgas, Alexandros; Nickisch, Andreas; Kunze, Silke; Illg, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this multicenter study was to investigate whether schooling relates to mental health problems of adolescents with cochlear implants (CI) and how this relationship is mediated by hearing and family variables. One hundred and forty secondary school students with CI (mean age = 14.7 years, SD = 1.5), their hearing parents and teachers completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Additional audiological tests (speech comprehension tests in quiet and noise) were performed. ...

  10. Management of mental health disorders and central nervous system sequelae in HIV-positive children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    R Nassen; Donald, K; Walker, K.; S Paruk; M Vujovic; Duncan, W.; Laughton, B; B Moos

    2014-01-01

    HIV-positive children and adolescents are at increased risk of both central nervous system (CNS) sequelae and mental disorders owing to a number of factors, including the impact of HIV infection on the brain, social determinants of health (e.g. poverty and orphanhood) and psychosocial stressors related to living with HIV. Every effort should be made to identify perinatally HIV-infected children and initiate them on antiretroviral therapy early in life. HIV clinicians should ideally screen for...

  11. Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Health Care LGBT Health Media Use by Adolescents Mental Health Sexual & Reproductive Health Sports Medicine Substance Use Transition to Adult Care Related Organizations Adolescent and Young Adult Clinical Care Resources Resources for ...

  12. Mental health, protective factors and violence among male adolescents: a comparison between urban and rural school students in West Bengal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Amrita; Mukherjee, Shuvankar; Ghosh, Santanu; Dasgupta, Aparajita

    2012-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted among 199 (104 urban, 95 rural) male students of classes VIII and IX, of two schools, in urban and rural areas of West Bengal to compare the prevalence of protective factors, mental health issues, and violence among the urban and rural adolescents using a self-administered questionnaire. Higher proportion of urban students than rural (67.3% vs. 62.5%) reported that their guardians understood their problems. Mental health issues like loneliness (17.3% vs. 9.8%), worry (17.3% vs. 10.7%), and suicidal thoughts (19.2% vs. 14.1%) were higher among urban students. Physical fight (53.8% vs. 11.6%), bullying (46.4% vs. 17%), physical attack by family members (46% vs. 17%), and by teachers (53% vs. 10.7%) were all more in urban adolescents. Mental health- and violence-related issues were prevalent more among urban students than those among rural students in spite of having more protective factors suggesting the need of frequent supervision, monitoring, and support of adolescents. PMID:22910626

  13. Mental health, protective factors and violence among male adolescents: A comparison between urban and rural school students in West Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Samanta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was conducted among 199 (104 urban, 95 rural male students of classes VIII and IX, of two schools, in urban and rural areas of West Bengal to compare the prevalence of protective factors, mental health issues, and violence among the urban and rural adolescents using a self-administered questionnaire. Higher proportion of urban students than rural (67.3% vs. 62.5% reported that their guardians understood their problems. Mental health issues like loneliness (17.3% vs. 9.8%, worry (17.3% vs. 10.7%, and suicidal thoughts (19.2% vs. 14.1% were higher among urban students. Physical fight (53.8% vs. 11.6%, bullying (46.4% vs. 17%, physical attack by family members (46% vs. 17%, and by teachers (53% vs. 10.7% were all more in urban adolescents. Mental health- and violence-related issues were prevalent more among urban students than those among rural students in spite of having more protective factors suggesting the need of frequent supervision, monitoring, and support of adolescents.

  14. Preventing Filipino Mental Health Disparities: Perspectives from Adolescents, Caregivers, Providers, and Advocates

    OpenAIRE

    Javier, Joyce R.; Supan, Jocelyn; Lansang, Anjelica; Beyer, William; Kubicek, Katrina; Palinkas, Lawrence A.

    2014-01-01

    Filipino Americans are the second largest immigrant population and second largest Asian ethnic group in the U.S. Disparities in youth behavioral health problems and the receipt of mental health services among Filipino youth have been documented previously. However, few studies have elicited perspectives from community stakeholders regarding how to prevent mental health disparities among Filipino youth. The purpose of the current study is to identify intervention strategies f...

  15. A profile of children’s health services, child and adolescent mental health services and maternity services in England 2007/8.

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, Di; Devanney, Carol; Parker, Ethna; Wistow, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This report is the third in a series of profiles produced to report the results of the annual child health, child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) and maternity services mapping exercise in England. The 2007 exercise was carried out between 1st November 2007 and 28th February 2008 and it marked the third child health and maternity service mapping data collection and the sixth CAMHS mapping exercise. The report summarises the findings at a national level with some refe...

  16. Sexual attraction and trajectories of mental health and substance use during the transition from adolescence to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Belinda L

    2012-02-01

    Previous research suggests that sexual minority youth have poorer health-related outcomes than their heterosexual peers. The purpose of this study is to determine whether sexual orientation disparities in mental health and substance use increase, decrease, or remain the same during the transition from adolescence to adulthood. Data are from Waves 1-4 of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (n = 8,322; 55% female). Respondents were in grades 7-12 at Wave 1 and aged 24-32 at Wave 4. Latent growth curve modeling is used to compare the mental health and substance use trajectories of youth who consistently report heterosexual attraction versus those who consistently report lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB) attraction, those who report a transition to LGB attraction, and those who report a transition to heterosexual attraction. Among women and men, sexual orientation disparities in depressive symptoms and suicidal thoughts persist, but do not increase, during the transition from adolescence to adulthood. The same pattern is observed for disparities in smoking, heavy drinking, and marijuana use among women. Among men, disparities in substance use are only observed between those who report consistent heterosexual attraction and those who transition to heterosexual attraction. Disparities between these groups persist over time for heavy drinking and marijuana use but decrease over time for smoking. While this study finds evidence of numerous disparities in mental health and substance use outcomes during adolescence and young adulthood, particularly among young women, there is no indication that these disparities get larger over time. PMID:22076077

  17. The Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC) Conceptual Model to Promote Mental Health for Adolescents with ASD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shochet, Ian M; Saggers, Beth R; Carrington, Suzanne B; Orr, Jayne A; Wurfl, Astrid M; Duncan, Bonnie M; Smith, Coral L

    2016-06-01

    Despite an increased risk of mental health problems in adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), there is limited research on effective prevention approaches for this population. Funded by the Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism, a theoretically and empirically supported school-based preventative model has been developed to alter the negative trajectory and promote wellbeing and positive mental health in adolescents with ASD. This conceptual paper provides the rationale, theoretical, empirical and methodological framework of a multilayered intervention targeting the school, parents and adolescents on the spectrum. Two important interrelated protective factors have been identified in community adolescent samples, namely the sense of belonging (connectedness) to school and the capacity for self and affect regulation in the face of stress (i.e. resilience). We describe how a confluence of theories from social psychology, developmental psychology and family systems theory, along with empirical evidence (including emerging neurobiological evidence), supports the interrelationships between these protective factors and many indices of wellbeing. However, the characteristics of ASD (including social and communication difficulties, and frequently difficulties with changes and transitions, and diminished optimism and self-esteem) impair access to these vital protective factors. The paper describes how evidence-based interventions at the school level for promoting inclusive schools (using the Index for Inclusion) and interventions for adolescents and parents to promote resilience and belonging [using the Resourceful Adolescent Program (RAP)] are adapted and integrated for adolescents with ASD. This multisite proof-of-concept study will confirm whether this multilevel school-based intervention is promising, feasible and sustainable. PMID:27072681

  18. Teen Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worthless could be warning signs of a mental health problem. Mental health problems are real, painful, and sometimes severe. You ... things that could harm you or others Mental health problems can be treated. To find help, talk ...

  19. Mental health inequalities in adolescents growing up in post-apartheid South Africa: Cross-sectional survey, SHaW Study

    OpenAIRE

    Das-Munshi, Jayati; Lund, Crick; Mathews, Catherine; Clark, Charlotte; Rothon, Catherine; Stansfeld, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundSouth Africa is one of the most ‘unequal’ societies in the world. Despite apartheid ending more than 20 years ago, material inequalities remain interwoven with ethnic/racial inequalities. There is limited research on the prevalence/predictors of common mental disorders (CMD) among young people. Adolescence is a unique time-point during which intervention may lead to improved mental health and reduced social problems later. The study objective was to assess mental health disparities ...

  20. The Development of Compulsive Internet Use and Mental Health: A Four-Year Study of Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarrochi, Joseph; Parker, Philip; Sahdra, Baljinder; Marshall, Sarah; Jackson, Chris; Gloster, Andrew T.; Heaven, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Is compulsive Internet use (CIU) an antecedent to poor mental health, a consequence, or both? Study 1 used a longitudinal design to track the development of CIU and mental health in Grade 8 (N = 1,030 males, 1,038 females, M[subscript age] = 13.7), 9, 10, and 11. Study 2 extended Study 1 by examining the kinds of Internet behaviors most strongly…

  1. Development of a Positive Youth Development Program: Promoting the Mental Health of Stressful Adolescents Using Principles of Problem Solving Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T.L. Shek

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the proposal for the development, implementation, and evaluation of a positive youth development program that attempts to promote the mental health of stressful Chinese adolescents using principles of Problem Solving Therapy (PST. There are two general aims of PST: to help clients identify life difficulties and resolve them, as well as to teach them skills on how to deal with future problems. The proposed project will utilize the principles of PST as the guiding framework to run two mental health promotion courses for adolescents who are experiencing disturbing stressful responses and students who want to improve their stress management style. Both objective and subjective outcome evaluation strategies will be carried out to assess the effectiveness of the intervention to promote the psychological well-being in adolescents who are experiencing stress. A related sample proposal is described that can give social workers some insight on how to prepare a proposal for developing the Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programs.

  2. Mental health, personality, and parental rearing styles of adolescents with Internet addiction disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiuqin, Huang; Huimin, Zhang; Mengchen, Li; Jinan, Wang; Ying, Zhang; Ran, Tao

    2010-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the personality profiles of adolescent males with and without Internet addiction disorder (IAD), and to determine if IAD is associated with specific parental rearing behaviors. A total of 304 subjects (204 IAD positive and 100 IAD negative controls) completed three instruments: Symptom Checklist-90-revision (SCL-90-R), Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Revised (EPQ-R), and Egna Minnen av Barndoms Uppfostran--'My Memories of Upbringing' (EMBU). SCL-90-R profiles of adolescents with IAD revealed comparatively higher mean scores for all of the nine domains, and significantly higher scores for obsessive-compulsive, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, and paranoid ideation; the mean global symptom index of adolescents with IAD was also significantly higher by approximately 10%. EPQ profiles of adolescents with IAD showed that Internet-dependent individuals tended to exhibit a significantly lower degree of extraversion and a significantly higher degree of psychoticism when compared with the control group. EMBU profiles revealed that adolescents with IAD generally rated both maternal and paternal rearing practices as lacking in emotional warmth, being over-involved, rejecting, and punitive (mothers only). The results of this study confirm that IAD often occurs concurrently with mental symptoms and personality traits such as introversion and psychoticism. Adolescents with IAD consistently rated parental rearing behaviors as being over-intrusive, punitive, and lacking in responsiveness. These findings suggest that the influences of parenting style and family function are important factors in the development of Internet dependency. PMID:20712498

  3. A Family Affair: Job Loss and the Mental Health of Spouses and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Bubonya, Melisa; Cobb-Clark, Deborah A.; Wooden, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the impact of involuntary job loss on the mental health of family members. Estimates from fixed-effects panel data models, using panel data for Australia, provide little evidence of any negative spillover effect on the mental health of husbands as a result of their wives' job loss. The mental well-being of wives, however, declines following their husbands' job loss, but only if that job loss results in a sustained period of non-employment or if the couple experienced finan...

  4. Turbulent times: effects of turbulence and violence exposure in adolescence on high school completion, health risk behavior, and mental health in young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton-Jarrett, Renée; Hair, Elizabeth; Zuckerman, Barry

    2013-10-01

    Turbulent social environments are associated with health and developmental risk, yet mechanisms have been understudied. Guided by a life course framework and stress theory, this study examined the association between turbulent life transitions (including frequent residential mobility, school transitions, family structure disruptions, and homelessness) and exposure to violence during adolescence and high school completion, mental health, and health risk behaviors in young adulthood. Participants (n = 4834) from the U.S. National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 cohort were followed prospectively from age 12-14 years for 10 years. We used structural equation models to investigate pathways between turbulence and cumulative exposure to violence (CEV), and high school completion, mental health, and health risk behaviors, while accounting for early life socio-demographics, family processes, and individual characteristics. Results indicated that turbulence index was associated with cumulative exposure to violence in adolescence. Both turbulence index and cumulative exposure to violence were positively associated with higher health risk behavior, poorer mental health, and inversely associated with high school completion. These findings highlight the importance of considering the cumulative impact of turbulent and adverse social environments when developing interventions to optimize health and developmental trajectory for adolescents transitioning into adulthood. PMID:23063217

  5. Own and parental war experience as a risk factor for mental health problems among adolescents with an immigrant background: results from a cross sectional study in Oslo, Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Hauff Edvard; Haavet Ole; Oppedal Brit; Lien Lars; Thoresen Magne; Bjertness Espen

    2006-01-01

    Background An increasing proportion of immigrants to Western countries in the past decade are from war affected countries. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of war experience among adolescents and their parents and to investigate possible differences in internalizing and externalizing mental health problems between adolescents exposed and unexposed to own and parental war experience. Method ...

  6. One-Year Follow-Up of Suicidal Adolescents: Parental History of Mental Health Problems and Time to Post-Hospitalization Attempt

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Cheryl A.; Kerr, David C. R.; Passarelli, Michael N.; Foster, Cynthia Ewell; Merchant, Christopher R.

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study of recently hospitalized suicidal youth examined parental mental health history in addition to several indices of adolescent functioning as risk factors for time-to-suicide attempt over a 1-year period. Participants were 352 adolescents (253 girls, 99 boys; ages 13-17 years) who participated in self-report and interview…

  7. Depression screening and mental health outcomes in children and adolescents: a systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Thombs Brett D; Roseman Michelle; Kloda Lorie A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Depression is an important cause of disability among children and adolescents. Depression screening is one possible method for managing depression, and screening programs have been initiated in some school and medical settings. However, in 2005, the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care and the United Kingdom National Institute of Clinical Excellence did not recommend depression screening among children and adolescents. By contrast, in 2009, the United States Preve...

  8. Traditional Bullying and Cyberbullying among Swedish Adolescents : Gender differences and associations with mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Beckman, Linda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to study the differences between traditional bullying and cyberbullying among adolescents, focusing on gender, psychosomatic problems, and disability, and to gain insight into health staff’s experience of bullying in schools. The four studies in this thesis were based on surveys undertaken among 3,800 adolescents in Grades 7, 8 and 9 in Sweden, as well as focus groups of 16 people consisting of school social workers and school nurses. While almost no gender differenc...

  9. Strengthening the Paediatricians Project 2: The effectiveness of a workshop to address the Priority Mental Health Disorders of adolescence in low-health related human resource countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Paul SS

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paediatricians can be empowered to address the Priority Mental Health Disorders at primary care level. To evaluate the effectiveness of a collaborative workshop in enhancing the adolescent psychiatry knowledge among paediatricians. Methods A 3-day, 27-hours workshop was held for paediatricians from different regions of India under the auspices of the National Adolescent Paediatric Task Force of the Indian Academy of Paediatrics. A 5-item pretest-posttest questionnaire was developed and administered at the beginning and end of the workshop to evaluate the participants' knowledge acquisition in adolescent psychiatry. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed on an intention-to-participate basis. Results Forty-eight paediatricians completed the questionnaire. There was significant enhancement of the knowledge in understanding the phenomenology, identifying the psychopathology, diagnosing common mental disorder and selecting the psychotropic medication in the bivariate analysis. When the possible confounders of level of training in paediatrics and number of years spent as paediatrician were controlled, in addition to the above areas of adolescent psychiatry, the diagnostic ability involving multiple psychological concepts also gained significance. However, both in the bivariate and multivariate analyses, the ability to refer to appropriate psychotherapy remained unchanged after the workshop. Conclusions This workshop was effective in enhancing the adolescent psychiatry knowledge of paediatricians. Such workshops could strengthen paediatricians in addressing the priority mental health disorders at the primary-care level in countries with low-human resource for health as advocated by the World Health Organization. However, it remains to be seen if this acquisition of adolescent psychiatry knowledge results in enhancing their adolescent psychiatry practice.

  10. Does Interpersonal Psychotherapy improve clinical care for adolescents with depression attending a rural child and adolescent mental health service? Study protocol for a cluster randomised feasibility trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villanueva Elmer V

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression amongst adolescents is a costly societal problem. Little research documents the effectiveness of public mental health services in mapping this problem. Further, it is not clear whether usual care in such services can be improved via clinician training in a relevant evidence based intervention. One such intervention, found to be effective and easily learned amongst novice clinicians, is Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT. The study described in the current paper has two main objectives. First, it aims to investigate the impact on clinical care of implementing Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Adolescents for the treatment of adolescent depression within a rural mental health service compared with Treatment as Usual (TAU. The second objective is to record the process and challenges (i.e. feasibility, acceptability, sustainability associated with implementing and evaluating an evidence-based intervention within a community service. This paper outlines the study rationale and design for this community based research trial. Methods/design The study involves a cluster randomisation trial to be conducted within a Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service in rural Australia. All clinicians in the service will be invited to participate. Participating clinicians will be randomised via block design at each of four sites to (a training and delivery of IPT, or (b TAU. The primary measure of impact on care will be a clinically significant change in depressive symptomatology, with secondary outcomes involving treatment satisfaction and changes in other symptomatology. Participating adolescents with significant depressive symptomatology, aged 12 to 18 years, will complete assessment measures at Weeks 0, 12 and 24 of treatment. They will also complete a depression inventory once a month during that period. This study aims to recruit 60 adolescent participants and their parent/guardian/s. A power analysis is not indicated as an intra

  11. Parents' conceptualization of adolescents' mental health problems: who adopts a psychiatric perspective and does it make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Tally

    2011-02-01

    How parents give meaning to the problems of adolescents diagnosed with mental disorders and receiving treatment is likely related to important outcomes including parental well-being and commitment to treatment, as well as their own behaviors and reactions to their child. The aim of this cross-sectional, mixed-method study of 70 parents of adolescents receiving wraparound mental health services is to examine: (1) how parents conceptualize their child's MH problems; (2) factors related to parents' conceptualization of youths' problems using medical model terms; and (3) associations between parents' problem conceptualization and their emotional or coping responses to their child having psychiatric problem(s). Content analysis indicated that 54.3% of parents definitively conceptualized adolescents' problems using psychiatric terms, 37.1% reported uncertainty about the nature of their child's problems, and 8.6% gave alternative, non-psychiatric explanations for their child's problems. We found significant relationships between parents' problem conceptualization and their attitudes and experience with MH treatment, demographics, as well as with adolescents' clinical characteristics. Parents who conceptualized problems using psychiatric terminology were more likely to express sadness and pessimism relative to other parents, though there were no differences in expressions of worry, guilt, pragmatism and optimism by problem conceptualization. PMID:19847647

  12. Longitudinal changes in Chinese adolescent girls’ physical growth, social contexts and mental health during the transition from primary to junior high school

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Jia

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the longitudinal changes among a sample of early adolescent girls in China throughout their transition from primary to junior high school. Early adolescence is a time of multiple transitions and is associated with a range of mental health outcomes in Western literature. This study will be the first to examine developmental changes in early adolescence among Chinese girls. A sample of 425 Chinese girls completed a self‐report questionnaire at three time...

  13. Differential roles of childhood adversities and stressful war experiences in the development of mental health symptoms in post-war adolescents in northern Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Okello, James; De Schryver, Maarten; Musisi, Seggane; Broekaert, Eric; Derluyn, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have shown a relationship between stressful war experiences and mental health symptoms in children and adolescents. To date, no comprehensive studies on the role of childhood adversities have been conducted with war-exposed adolescents living in post-war, low-resource settings in Sub-Saharan Africa. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 551 school-going adolescents aged 13-21 years old was undertaken four years post-war in northern Uganda. Participants compl...

  14. Prevalence of bullying and aggressive behavior and their relationship to mental health problems among 12- to 15-year-old Norwegian adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Undheim, Anne Mari; Sund, Anne Mari

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between being bullied and aggressive behavior and self-reported mental health problems among young adolescents. A representative population sample of 2,464 young Norwegian adolescents (50.8% girls) aged 12–15 years was assessed. Being bullied was measured using three items concerning teasing, exclusion, and physical assault. Self-esteem was assessed by Harter’s self-perception profile for adolescents. Emotional and behavioral problems wer...

  15. A Qualitative Study of Mental Health Problems Among Orphaned Children and Adolescents in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, Shannon; Lucid, Leah; Murray, Laura; Bolton, Paul; Itemba, Dafrosa; Manongi, Rachel; Whetten, Kathryn

    2015-11-01

    Low- and middle-income countries have a high number of orphans, many of whom have unmet mental health needs. Effective mental health interventions are needed; however, it is necessary to understand how mental health symptoms and needs are perceived locally to tailor interventions and refine measurement of intervention effects. We used an existing rapid ethnographic assessment approach to identify mental health problems from the perspective of orphans and guardians to inform a subsequent randomized controlled trial of a Western-developed, evidence-based psychosocial intervention, Trauma-focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. Local Kiswahili-speaking interviewers conducted 73 free list interviews and 34 key informant interviews. Results identified both common cross-cultural experiences and symptoms as well as uniquely described symptoms (e.g., lacking peace, being discriminated against) not typically targeted by the intervention or included on standardized measures of intervention effects. We discuss implications for adapting mental health interventions in low- and middle-income countries and assessing effectiveness. PMID:26488916

  16. Mental Health and HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z) Hepatitis HIV Mental Health Mental Health Home Suicide Prevention Substance Abuse Military Sexual Trauma PTSD Research (MIRECC) Military Exposures Polytrauma Rehabilitation Spinal Cord Injury Telehealth Womens Health Issues Wellness Programs MyHealtheVet Nutrition Quitting Smoking ...

  17. Hepatitis C: Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z) Hepatitis HIV Mental Health Mental Health Home Suicide Prevention Substance Abuse Military Sexual Trauma PTSD Research (MIRECC) Military Exposures Polytrauma Rehabilitation Spinal Cord Injury Telehealth Womens Health Issues Wellness Programs MyHealtheVet Nutrition Quitting Smoking ...

  18. Facing adolescence and adulthood: the importance of mental health care in the global pediatric AIDS epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domek, Gretchen J

    2009-04-01

    With the increasing global accessibility of antiretrovirals, many HIV-positive children now face a future once thought impossible. As these children grow, they face unique psychosocial stressors that differ from any previous chronic or incurable childhood illness. Studies have already described an increased prevalence of mental health disorders among this population. In addition, other studies have illustrated the known future health consequences of adverse childhood experiences, similar but not related to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. This article connects these studies and predicts the grave future health consequences likely to be faced if pediatric mental health care is not addressed. Practical solutions are described that often go hand-in-hand with the current global scale-up of antiretroviral accessibility. These include scaling-up mental health services, educating communities, supporting school-based programs, promoting the role of nongovernmental organizations, and strengthening families and the community to provide a safe and secure home environment for children. HIV-positive children are likely to face future physical and psychological health consequences related to the psychosocial challenges they face as children if mental health care is not made a priority in the current global fight against AIDS. PMID:19363366

  19. Educator Mental Health Literacy: A Programme Evaluation of the Teacher Training Education on the Mental Health & High School Curriculum Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutcher, S.; Wei, Y.; McLuckie, A.; Bullock, L.

    2013-01-01

    Mental disorders make up close to one-third of the global burden of disease experienced during adolescence. Schools can play an important role in the promotion of positive mental health as well as an integral role in the pathways into mental health care for adolescents. In order for schools to effectively address the mental health problems of…

  20. Mental Health of Adults Treated in Adolescence with Scoliosis-Specific Exercise Program or Observed for Idiopathic Scoliosis

    OpenAIRE

    Maciej Płaszewski; Igor Cieśliński; Roman Nowobilski; Tomasz Kotwicki; Jacek Terech; Mariusz Furgał

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To examine general mental health in adult males and females, who in adolescence participated in a scoliosis-specific therapeutic exercise program or were under observation due to diagnosis of scoliosis. Design. Registry-based, cross-sectional study with retrospective data collection. Methods. Sixty-eight subjects (43 women) aged 30.10 (25–39) years, with mild or moderate scoliosis (11–36° Cobb angle), and 76 (38 women) nonscoliotic subjects, aged 30.11 (24–38) years, participated. ...

  1. Resilience and Its Association with Depression, Emotional and Behavioural Problems, and Mental Health Service Utilisation among Refugee Adolescents Living in South Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Ziaian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Despite the frequency of traumatic or stressful events experienced by refugee children and adolescents prior to migration and following resettlement, the majority do not experience mental health problems emphasising the critical nature of resilience. While a host of factors deemed to be protective of mental health in young refugees have been identified, there has been little research exploring the role of resilience as a distinct psychological construct. This study aimed to explore the nature of psychological resilience in refugee adolescents and the relationship between resilience and depression, other emotional and behavioural problems, and mental health service uptake. Method. One hundred and seventy multiethnic refugee adolescents aged 13–17 from South Australia were administered a survey comprising the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC, Children’s Depression Inventory (CDI, and Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ. Results. Females tended to have higher resilience, as did those adolescents who had been living in Australia longer. Adolescents suffering from depressive symptoms or other emotional or behavioural problems had lower resilience. There was little evidence of an association between resilience scores and exposure to trauma or service utilisation. Discussion. Fostering resilience may be critical to efforts to prevent or reduce mental health problems in refugee adolescents.

  2. A meta-analytic review on treatment dropout in child and adolescent outpatient mental health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. de Haan; A.E. Boon; J.T.V.M. de Jong; M. Hoeve; R.R.J.M. Vermeiren

    2013-01-01

    A large proportion (28% up to 75%) of the treatments in youth mental health care results in premature termination (dropout). It is important to gain knowledge of the determinants of dropout because it can have very severe consequences. The aim of our meta-analytic review was to provide an overview o

  3. Own and parental war experience as a risk factor for mental health problems among adolescents with an immigrant background: results from a cross sectional study in Oslo, Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauff Edvard

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing proportion of immigrants to Western countries in the past decade are from war affected countries. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of war experience among adolescents and their parents and to investigate possible differences in internalizing and externalizing mental health problems between adolescents exposed and unexposed to own and parental war experience. Method The study is based on a cross-sectional population-based survey of all 10th grade pupils in Oslo for two consecutive years. A total of 1,758 aadolescents were included, all with both parents born outside of Norway. Internalizing and externalizing mental health problems were measured by Hopkins Symptom Checklist-10 and subscales of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, respectively. Own and parental war experience is based on adolescent self-report. Results The proportion of adolescents with own war experience was 14% with the highest prevalence in immigrants from Eastern Europe and Sub-Saharan Africa. The proportion of parental war experience was 33% with Sub-Saharan Africa being highest. Adolescents reporting own war experience had higher scores for both internalizing and externalizing mental health problems compared to immigrants without war experience, but only externalizing problems reached statistically significant differences. For parental war experience there was a statistically significant relationship between parental war experience and internalizing mental health problems. The association remained significant after adjustment for parental educational level and adolescents' own war experience. Conclusion War exposure is highly prevalent among immigrants living in Oslo, Norway, both among adolescents themselves and their parents. Among immigrants to Norway, parental war experience appears to be stronger associated with mental health problems than adolescents own exposure to war experience.

  4. Good Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and to address the stigma associated with mental health. It provides information on the signs and symptoms of mental illness and solutions for preventing and coping with mental illness. Insomnia Fact Sheet - This fact sheet provides information on ...

  5. Journal abstracts from current research in the field of child and adolescent mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Debate RD, Kelley PG, Zwald M, Huberty J & Zhang Y (2009) Changes in psychosocial factors and physical activity frequency among third- to eighth-grade girls who participated in a developmentally focused youth sport program: A preliminary study. Journal of School Health 79(10): 474-484 Boyce JC, Mueller NB, Hogan-Watts M & Luke Douglas A (2009) Evaluating the strength of school tobacco policies: The development of a practical rating system. Journal of School Health 79(10): 495-504 Craine JL, Tanaka Teri A, Nishina A & Conger KJ (2009) Understanding adolescent delinquency: The role of older siblings' delinquency and popularity with peers. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly 55(4): 436-453 Rosales FJ, Reznick JS & Zeisel SH (2009) Understanding the role of nutrition in the rain and behavioural development of toddlers and pre-school children: Identifying methodological barriers. Nutritional Neuroscience 12(5): 190-202 Clemmens DA (2009) The Significance of motherhood for adolescents whose mothers have breast cancer. Oncology Nursing Forum 36(5): 571-577 Archambault I, Janosz M, Morizot J & Pagani L (2009) Adolescent behavioural, affective, and cognitive engagement in school: Relationship to dropout. Journal of School Health 79(9): 408-415 Denison JA, McCauley AP, Dunnett-Dagg WA, Lungu N & Sweat MD (2009) HIV testing among adolescents in Ndola, Zambia: How individual, relational, and environmental factors relate to demand. AIDS Education & Prevention 21(4): 314-324 Pollock JA & Halkitis PN (2009) Environmental factors in relation to unprotected sexual behaviour among gay, bisexual and other MSM. AIDS Education & Prevention 21(4): 340-355 Nippold MA, Mansfield TC, Billow JL & Tomblin JB (2009) Syntactic development in adolescents with a history of language impairments: A follow-up investigation. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology 18(3): 241-251 Sharaf AY, Thompson EA & Walsh E (2009) Protective effects of self-esteem and family support on suicide risk behaviours among

  6. Resilience and Its Association with Depression, Emotional and Behavioural Problems, and Mental Health Service Utilisation among Refugee Adolescents Living in South Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Tahereh Ziaian; Helena de Anstiss; Georgia Antoniou; Peter Baghurst; Michael Sawyer

    2012-01-01

    Background. Despite the frequency of traumatic or stressful events experienced by refugee children and adolescents prior to migration and following resettlement, the majority do not experience mental health problems emphasising the critical nature of resilience. While a host of factors deemed to be protective of mental health in young refugees have been identified, there has been little research exploring the role of resilience as a distinct psychological construct. This study aimed to explor...

  7. When Self-Reliance Is Not Safe: Associations between Reduced Help-Seeking and Subsequent Mental Health Symptoms in Suicidal Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Labouliere, Christa D.; Marjorie Kleinman; Gould, Madelyn S.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of suicidal adolescents have no contact with mental health services, and reduced help-seeking in this population further lessens the likelihood of accessing treatment. A commonly-reported reason for not seeking help is youths’ perception that they should solve problems on their own. In this study, we explore associations between extreme self-reliance behavior (i.e., solving problems on your own all of the time), help-seeking behavior, and mental health symptoms in a community sam...

  8. Common mental health disorders in children and adolescents in primary care: A survey of knowledge, skills and attitudes among general practitioners in a newly developed European country

    OpenAIRE

    Kurt Buhagiar; Cassar, Joseph R.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: General Practitioners (GPs) are generally the first point of contact for children and adolescents with mental health problems. This study investigates the confidence, beliefs, and knowledge of GPs regarding common mental health problems in youngsters. Methods: A self-designed questionnaire was distributed to nearly all registered GPs in a middle-income European country in order to address the aims of the study. Results: Response rate was 58%. Many GPs reported relat...

  9. Depressive symptoms, exposure to aggression and delinquency proneness in adolescence: Impact of two decades of war and political violence on adolescent mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejović-Milovančević Milica

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic experiences in Serbia in the last two decades have caused significant psychological consequences in children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between depressive symptoms, exposure to aggression and delinquency proneness among high school and elementary school students in Belgrade, Serbia. The participants were 899 students (51.8% were female with no prior treatment for psychological problems, with a mean age of 16.70±1.95. All used instruments were taken from the modified Social and Health Assessment (SAHA. Our findings show that delinquent behavior or exposure to delinquency was significantly related to depressive symptoms. The strongest predictors of depression were variables concerning legal consequences, affiliation with delinquent peers, victimization by community violence and peer victimization. This study confirmed a strong correlation between depression and exposure to violence. Identifying adolescents with depressive symptoms is important for prevention of serious mental health consequences.

  10. Mental Health Outcomes in US Children and Adolescents Born Prematurely or with Low Birthweight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal K. Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effects of prematurity (37 weeks of gestation and low birthweight (2500 g on mental health outcomes among US children aged 2–17 years. The 2011-2012 National Survey of Children’s Health ( = 95,677 was used to estimate prevalence of parent-reported mental health problems in children. Prevalence of mental disorders was 22.9% among children born prematurely, 28.7% among very-low-birth-weight (1500 g children, and 18.9% among moderately low-birth-weight (1500–2499 g children, compared with 15.5% in the general child population. Compared to those born full term, children born prematurely had 61% higher adjusted odds of serious emotional/behavioral problems, 33% higher odds of depression, and 58% higher odds of anxiety. Children born prematurely had 2.3 times higher odds of autism/ASD, 2.9 times higher odds of development delay, and 2.7 times higher odds of intellectual disability than term children. Very-low-birth-weight children had 3.2 times higher odds of autism/ASD, 1.7 times higher odds of ADD/ADHD, 5.4 times higher odds of development delay, and 4.4 times higher odds of intellectual disability than normal-birth-weight children. Social factors were significant predictors of mental disorders in both premature/low-birth-weight and term/normal-birth-weight children. Neurodevelopmental conditions accounted for the relationship between prematurity and depression/anxiety/conduct problems. Prematurity and low birthweight are significant risk factors for mental health problems among children.

  11. Problemas de saúde mental na adolescência: características familiares, eventos traumáticos e violência Mental health problems in adolescence: family characteristics, traumatic events and violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pereira da Cruz Benetti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A ocorrência de situações traumáticas, exposição à violência e características das relações parentais são fatores de risco para saúde mental. Este estudo procurou identificar as situações individuais, familiares e contextuais associadas às manifestações de problemas de saúde mental em adolescentes estudantes da região metropolitana de Porto Alegre, RS. Os instrumentos utilizados foram o Inventário de Eventos Estressores na Adolescência, Triagem da Exposição de Crianças à Violência na Comunidade, Inventário de Estilos Parentais e o Child Behavior Checklist- versão YRF. Participaram 245 adolescentes, sendo 114 (46,5% do sexo masculino com idade média de 16,02 anos (DP=1,83. A análise dos dados realizou-se através de estatística descritiva e inferencial para estimar os determinantes do diagnóstico clínico. Situações de violência, práticas parentais negativas e eventos traumáticos associaram-se ao diagnóstico clínico. Aponta-se a necessidade de implantação de ações preventivas e de atenção em saúde mental na infância e adolescência.The occurrence of traumatic events, exposure to violence and characteristics of parental relationship are risk factors associated to mental health. This study aimed to identify individual, family and contextual factors associated to the manifestation of mental health problems in a sample of adolescent students from the metropolitan region of the city of Porto Alegr e, RS. The instruments used were the Stressful Adolescence Events Inventory, Screening of Exposure to Community Violence, Parental Style Inventory and the Child Behavior Checklist- YRF version. Two hundred and forty five adolescents, of which 114 (46,5% male, mean age 16,02 (DP=1,83 participated in the study. Data analysis was done through descriptive and inferential statistics to estimate the determinants of clinical diagnostics. Violence situations, negative parenting practices and traumatic events were

  12. The impact of risk and protective factors on mental health and well-being-Austrian adolescents and migrant adolescents from war-affected countries

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    Anita Buchegger-Traxler

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: young persons are most strongly affected by displacement through political/military actions. This is also a European problem as well as an issue for the European Union. Applying the social-ecological model by Bronfenbrenner we concentrated on micro- and mesosystems of Austrian adolescents and migrant adolescents of war-affected countries.

    Methods: a questionnaire was administered to adolescents in Austria attending schools beyond the mandatory school age, yielding a sample of about 1 100 students from Austrian and immigrant background. We used analysis of variance to compare host and immigrant youth as well as regression analysis to assess the impact of risk and protective factors on youth outcomes.

    Results: we do find sex differences for protective factors and youth outcomes but few differences between immigrant and Austrian adolescents. Youth outcomes analysed were somatic symptoms, anxiety, depression, self-esteem, anti-social behaviour, substance use, and academic performance. Important risk factors turned out to be intergenerational conflict, exposure to violence, and social distance. Protective factors include family connectedness, parental monitoring, school connectedness, peer support, and neighbourhood attachment.

    Conclusions: the most important protective factor is school connectsdness. Social distance and intergenerational conflict are the dominant risk factors influencing youth outcomes. Our research leads to a better understanding of factors determining the well-being of adolescents and contributes to finding new approaches to prevent or cope with mental health problems of young immigrants. In particular it appears to be important to keep young persons in education and/or training since school connectedness influences mental health and well-being positively.

  13. Factors Contributing to the Utilization of Adult Mental Health Services in Children and Adolescents Diagnosed with Hyperkinetic Disorder

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    Hilario Blasco-Fontecilla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine whether age of First diagnosis, gender, psychiatric comorbidity, and treatment modalities (pharmacotherapy or psychotherapy at Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS moderate the risk of Adult Mental Health Services (AMHS utilization in patients diagnosed with hyperkinetic disorder at CAMHS. Methods. Data were derived from the Madrid Psychiatric Cumulative Register Study. The target population comprised 32,183 patients who had 3 or more visits at CAMHS. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to assess survival data. A series of logistic regression analyses were performed to study the role of age of diagnosis, gender, psychiatric comorbidity, and treatment modalities. Results. 7.1% of patients presented with hyperkinetic disorder at CAMHS. Compared to preschool children, children and adolescents first diagnosed with hyperkinetic disorder at CAMHS were more likely to use AMHS. Female gender and comorbidity with affective disorders, schizophrenia, schizotypal and delusional disorders increased the risk of use of AMHS. Pharmacological or combined treatment of hyperkinetic disorder diagnosed at CAMHS was associated with increased risk of use at AMHS. Conclusions. Older age of first diagnosis, female gender, psychiatric comorbidity, and pharmacological treatment at CAMHS are markers of risk for the transition from CAMHS to AMHS in patients with hyperkinetic disorder diagnosed at CAMHS.

  14. Smartphone Applications for Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovic, Ana; Vona, Pamela L; Santostefano, Antonella M; Ciaravino, Samantha; Miller, Elizabeth; Stein, Bradley D

    2016-07-01

    Many adolescents and adults do not seek treatment for mental health symptoms. Smartphone applications (apps) may assist individuals with mental health concerns in alleviating symptoms or increasing understanding. This study seeks to characterize apps readily available to smartphone users seeking mental health information and/or support. Ten key terms were searched in the Apple iTunes and Google Play stores: mental health, depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, bipolar, trauma, trauma in schools, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), child trauma, and bullying. A content analysis of the first 20 application descriptions retrieved per category was conducted. Out of 300 nonduplicate applications, 208 (70%) were relevant to search topic, mental health or stress. The most common purported purpose for the apps was symptom relief (41%; n = 85) and general mental health education (18%; n = 37). The most frequently mentioned approaches to improving mental health were those that may benefit only milder symptoms such as relaxation (21%; n = 43). Most app descriptions did not include information to substantiate stated effectiveness of the application (59%; n = 123) and had no mention of privacy or security (89%; n = 185). Due to uncertainty of the helpfulness of readily available mental health applications, clinicians working with mental health patients should inquire about and provide guidance on application use, and patients should have access to ways to assess the potential utility of these applications. Strategic policy and research developments are likely needed to equip patients with applications for mental health, which are patient centered and evidence based. PMID:27428034

  15. Health services utilization by school going Omani adolescents and youths with DSM IV mental disorders and barriers to service use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morsi Magdi M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent corpus of research suggests that psychiatric disorders amongst adolescents and youths are an emerging global challenge, but there is paucity of studies exploring health services utilization by this age group in Arab region. Aim This study focus on the health services utilization and the barriers among school going adolescents and youths with DSM IV disorders in the country Oman, whose population is predominantly youthful. Methods Representative sample of secondary school Omani adolescents and youths were concurrently interviewed for the (i presence of DSM IV mental disorders using the face-to-face interview, World Mental Health-Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WMH-CIDI, (ii tendency for health care utilization and (iii predictors of utilization with clinical and demographic background. Results The proportions of lifetime cases having ever made treatment contact are low, being 5.2% for any anxiety disorder and 13.2% for any mood disorder category. None of these anxiety cases made treatment contact in the year of onset of the disorder, and the median delay when they eventually made treatment contact is about 14 years. In any mood disorders category only 3.6% made contact within the 1st year of onset with the median delay in initial treatment contact is two years for the Bipolar disorder (broad, four years for Any Mood disorder and nine years for the Major Depressive Disorder group. Male gender is significantly associated with less likelihood of making treatment contact when suffering from Social phobia (p = 0.000, Major Depressive Disorder (p = 0.000 and Bipolar Disorder (p = 0.000. The younger cohorts of 14-16 years and 17-18 years of Social phobic made significantly less lifetime any treatment contact (p = 0.000. The 14-16 year olds were significantly less likely to make lifetime any treatment contact for Bipolar Mood disorder (p = 0.000, while the 17-18 group were 1.5 times more likely to do so. Over past

  16. Coping e saúde mental de adolescentes vestibulandos Coping and mental health in adolescents preparing for the Brazilian university entrance examination

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    Lorena Soares Dias e Silva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivo investigar o uso de estratégias de enfrentamento de problemas (coping por adolescentes vestibulandos e sua possível repercussão na saúde mental desses indivíduos. Participaram deste estudo 292 estudantes, sendo 59,6% mulheres e 38,0% homens com idades entre 16 e 19 anos (M = 17,09; DP = 0,71, contatados em escolas públicas, particulares e conveniadas, que declararam intenção de realizar o processo seletivo vestibular. Foram utilizados o Coping Response Inventory Youth Form (CRI-Y para avaliar as estratégias de coping e o Youth Self Report (YSR para avaliar as psicopatologias. O estudo demonstrou que os adolescentes avaliaram o vestibular como evento estressante, e aqueles que utilizaram mais estratégias de coping de aproximação para enfrentá-lo relataram menos psicopatologias. Os resultados deste estudo põem em evidência a relação entre vestibular como evento estressante e saúde mental dos adolescentes.This study aimed to investigate the use of coping strategies by adolescents preparing to take the Brazilian university entrance exam and its possible repercussion on their mental health. A total of 292 students participated in the study, 59.6% women and 38.0% men, aged between 16 and 19 years (M = 17.09; SD = 0.71, contacted in public, private, and private schools with state government covenant, who declared the intention to take the Brazilian university entrance exam. The Coping Response Inventory Youth Form (CRI-Y was used to assess coping strategies and the Youth Self Report (YSR to evaluate psychopathologies. The study demonstrated that the adolescents' appraise the Brazilian university entrance exam as a stressful event, and those who used more approach coping strategies reported less psychopathologies. The results of this study highlighted the relationship between the Brazilian university entrance exam as a stressful event and the adolescents' mental health.

  17. The effects of social connections on self-rated physical and mental health among internal migrant and local adolescents in Shanghai, China

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    Mao Zheng-hong

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background China is in the midst of history's largest flow of rural-urban migration in the world; a flow that includes growing numbers of children and adolescents. Their health status is an important public health issue. This study compares self-rated physical and mental health of migrant and local adolescents in China, and examines to what extent layered social connections account for health outcomes. Methods In 2010, we conducted a cross-sectional study among middle school students in Pudong New Area, Shanghai. Information about health status, social connections, and demographic factors were collected using a questionnaire survey. After controlling for sociodemographic factors, we used the t-test, Chi-square analysis, and a series of regression models to compare differences in health outcomes and explore the effects of social connections. Results Migrant adolescents reported significantly higher rates of good physical health. However, they also had significantly fewer social connections, lower self-esteem, and higher levels of depression than their native peers. Family cohesion was associated with depressive symptoms and low self-esteem among all adolescents; peer association and social cohesion played major roles in migrants' well-being. Gender, age, and socioeconomic (SES factors also affected adolescents' self-rated physical and mental health. Conclusions Self-rated data suggest that migrant adolescents enjoy a physical health advantage and a mental health disadvantage. Layered social connections, such as peer association and social cohesion, may be particularly important for migrants. A public health effort is required to improve the health status of migrant youth.

  18. The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral stress management training on mental health, social interaction and family function in adolescents of families with one Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) positive member*

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Keypour; Soroor Arman; Mohammad Reza Maracy

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated stress management training to improve mental health, social interaction and family function among adolescents of families with one Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) positive member. Methods: There were 34 adolescents (13-18 years old) with at least one family member living with HIV from whom finally 15 attended the study and participated in 8 weekly sessions of stress management training. The tests used in this study were: Strengths and Difficulties Quest...

  19. Defragmenting the System: Inter-Professional Collaboration for Meeting the Needs of Adolescents with Learning Disabilities and Mental Health Issues in British Columbia

    OpenAIRE

    Ireson, Scott Robert

    2013-01-01

    Mental health issues and learning disabilities are common problems faced by adolescents. The intersection of mental illness and learning disabilities leads to multiple complex problems that cannot be easily addressed by any single professional or agency. This report focuses on how schools and educators can play a role in improving cooperation for meeting the needs of these students. Many policies need to go into creating a well-established inter-professional collaboration framework. In-depth ...

  20. Health-related quality of life of children and adolescents with mental disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Weitkamp, Katharina; Daniels, Judith K.; Romer, Georg; Wiegand-Grefe, Silke

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim was to assess the association of internalising and externalising pathology with the child’s health-related quality of life (QoL), and to determine which child and environmental characteristics beyond pathology were related to poor QoL. Methods Data was obtained for 120 children and adolescents (aged 6 to 18) commencing outpatient psychotherapy treatment. Parents and children (aged 11 years and older) filled out questionnaires. QoL was measured with the KIDSCREEN-27. Results...

  1. Adolescent over-general memory, life events and mental health outcomes: Findings from a UK cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Catherine; Heron, Jon; Gunnell, David; Lewis, Glyn; Evans, Jonathan; Williams, J. Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research suggesting that over-general memory (OGM) may moderate the effect of life events on depressive symptoms and suicidality has sampled older adolescents or adults, or younger adolescents in high-risk populations, and has been conducted over relatively short follow-up periods. The authors examined the relationship between OGM at age 13 and life events and mental health outcomes (depression, self-harm, suicidal ideation and planning) at age 16 years within a sample of 5792 adolescents participating in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), approximately 3800 of whom had also provided data on depression and self-harm. There was no clear evidence of either direct or interactive effects of OGM at age 13 on levels of depression at age 16. Similarly there was no clear evidence of either direct or interactive effects of OGM on suicidal ideation and self-harm. Although there was some evidence that over-general autobiographical memory was associated with reduced risk of suicidal planning and increased risk of self-harm, these associations were absent when confounding variables were taken into account. The findings imply that although OGM is a marker of vulnerability to depression and related psychopathology in high-risk groups, this cannot be assumed to generalise to whole populations. PMID:25716137

  2. Adolescent over-general memory, life events and mental health outcomes: Findings from a UK cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Catherine; Heron, Jon; Gunnell, David; Lewis, Glyn; Evans, Jonathan; Williams, J Mark G

    2016-01-01

    Previous research suggesting that over-general memory (OGM) may moderate the effect of life events on depressive symptoms and suicidality has sampled older adolescents or adults, or younger adolescents in high-risk populations, and has been conducted over relatively short follow-up periods. The authors examined the relationship between OGM at age 13 and life events and mental health outcomes (depression, self-harm, suicidal ideation and planning) at age 16 years within a sample of 5792 adolescents participating in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), approximately 3800 of whom had also provided data on depression and self-harm. There was no clear evidence of either direct or interactive effects of OGM at age 13 on levels of depression at age 16. Similarly there was no clear evidence of either direct or interactive effects of OGM on suicidal ideation and self-harm. Although there was some evidence that over-general autobiographical memory was associated with reduced risk of suicidal planning and increased risk of self-harm, these associations were absent when confounding variables were taken into account. The findings imply that although OGM is a marker of vulnerability to depression and related psychopathology in high-risk groups, this cannot be assumed to generalise to whole populations. PMID:25716137

  3. Mental Health Literacy and Eating-Disordered Behavior: Beliefs of Adolescent Girls Concerning the Treatment of and Treatment-Seeking for Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mond, J. M.; Marks, P.; Hay, P. J.; Rodgers, B.; Kelly, C.; Owen, C.; Paxton, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    This research examined the "mental health literacy" of adolescents concerning eating-disordered behavior. A vignette describing a fictional 16-year old female meeting diagnostic criteria for bulimia nervosa was presented to 522 female high school students, followed by a series of questions concerning treatment of and treatment-seeking for the…

  4. Child and Adolescent Mental Health Research in the Context of Hurricane Katrina: An Ecological Needs-Based Perspective and Introduction to the Special Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, Carl F.; Overstreet, Stacy

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces the special section on child and adolescent mental health research in the context of Hurricane Katrina. We outline the purpose and intent of the special section and present an integrative perspective based on broad contextual theories of human development with which to think about the impact of disasters like Katrina. The…

  5. Prognosis after Adolescent Suicide Attempt: Mental Health, Psychiatric Treatment, and Suicide Attempts in a Nine-Year Follow-Up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groholt, Berit; Ekeberg, Oivind

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of mental health and suicidal behavior was examined 8 to 10 years after an adolescent suicide attempt. Of 71 persons, 79% had at least one psychiatric disorder (mean 1.7) at follow-up, most commonly depression (46%), personality disorder (46%), and anxiety disorder (42%). The stability of diagnoses was moderate. The suicide…

  6. Mental Health Services at Selected Private Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoof, Thomas J.; Sherwin, Tierney E.; Baggish, Rosemary C.; Tacy, Peter B.; Meehan, Thomas P.

    2004-01-01

    Private schools educate a significant percentage of US children and adolescents. Private schools, particularly where students reside during the academic year, assume responsibility for the health and well-being of their students. Children and adolescents experience mental health problems at a predictable rate, and private schools need a mechanism…

  7. Identifying Ethical Issues in Mental Health Research with Minors Adolescents: Results of a Delphi Study

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    Elisabeta Ioana Hiriscau

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Research with minors, especially for preventive purposes, e.g., suicide prevention, investigating risk or self-destructive behaviors such as deviance, drug abuse, or suicidal behavior, is ethically sensitive. We present a Delphi study exploring the ethical implications of the needs formulated by researchers in an international pre-conference who would benefit from ethics support and guidance in conducting Mental Health Research with minors. The resulting List of Ethical Issues (LEI was submitted to a 2-rounds Delphi process via the Internet, including 34 multidisciplinary experts. In the first round, the experts reviewed the LEI and completed a questionnaire. Results from this round were analyzed and grouped in nine categories comprising 40 items. In the second round, the experts had to agree/disagree with the needs expressed in the LEI leading to a final list of 25 ethical issues considered relevant for Mental Health Research with minors such as: confidentiality of the sensitive data, competence for consenting alone and risk of harm and stigma related to the methodology used in research. It was shown that studies like SEYLE (Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe trigger among researchers wishes to obtain specific recommendations helping to comply with standards for good practice in conducting research with minors.

  8. Identifying Ethical Issues in Mental Health Research with Minors Adolescents: Results of a Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiriscau, Elisabeta Ioana; Stingelin-Giles, Nicola; Wasserman, Danuta; Reiter-Theil, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Research with minors, especially for preventive purposes, e.g., suicide prevention, investigating risk or self-destructive behaviors such as deviance, drug abuse, or suicidal behavior, is ethically sensitive. We present a Delphi study exploring the ethical implications of the needs formulated by researchers in an international pre-conference who would benefit from ethics support and guidance in conducting Mental Health Research with minors. The resulting List of Ethical Issues (LEI) was submitted to a 2-rounds Delphi process via the Internet, including 34 multidisciplinary experts. In the first round, the experts reviewed the LEI and completed a questionnaire. Results from this round were analyzed and grouped in nine categories comprising 40 items. In the second round, the experts had to agree/disagree with the needs expressed in the LEI leading to a final list of 25 ethical issues considered relevant for Mental Health Research with minors such as: confidentiality of the sensitive data, competence for consenting alone and risk of harm and stigma related to the methodology used in research. It was shown that studies like SEYLE (Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe) trigger among researchers wishes to obtain specific recommendations helping to comply with standards for good practice in conducting research with minors. PMID:27187425

  9. Mental Health Utilization Among Diverse Parenting Young Couples

    OpenAIRE

    Albritton, Tashuna; Angley, Meghan; Gibson, Crystal; Sipsma, Heather; Kershaw, Trace

    2015-01-01

    Mental health issues often become apparent as adolescents emerge into young adulthood. The use of mental health services is low among adolescents and young adults, and use is particularly low among minorities. In this study, we examine mental health utilization among diverse young parenting couples. The sample consisted of 296 couples. We used the social–personal framework to examine personal, family, partner relationship, and environmental predictors for using mental health services. We used...

  10. Mental Health for Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abuse Anxiety disorders and PTSD Body image and eating disorders Depression Sexual health for men Urinary health for men ... abuse Anxiety disorders and PTSD Body image and eating disorders Depression Other mental health conditions include bipolar disorder , schizophrenia , ...

  11. Mental Health Services in School-Based Health Centers: Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bains, Ranbir Mangat; Diallo, Ana F.

    2016-01-01

    Mental health issues affect 20-25% of children and adolescents, of which few receive services. School-based health centers (SBHCs) provide access to mental health services to children and adolescents within their schools. A systematic review of literature was undertaken to review evidence on the effectiveness of delivery of mental health services…

  12. Mania Symptoms and HIV-Risk Behavior among Adolescents in Mental Health Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Angela J.; Theodore-Oklota, Christina; Hadley, Wendy; Brown, Larry K.; Donenberg, Geri; DiClemente, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    This study explored whether adolescents with elevated symptoms of mania (ESM+) engage in more HIV risk behaviors than those with other psychiatric disorders and examined factors associated with HIV risk behavior among ESM+ adolescents. Eight hundred forty adolescents (56% female, 58% African American, "M" age = 14.9 years) who received mental…

  13. Disaster mental health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henderson, Silja; Berliner, Peter; Elsass, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we focus on disaster mental health, particularly theoretical and research-based implications for intervention. The field of disaster mental health research is vast and impossible to cover in a single chapter, but we will visit central research, concepts, and understandings within...... disaster mental health and intervention, and refer to further literature where meaningful. We conclude the chapter with recommendations for further research....

  14. Are Mental Health Effects of Internet Use Attributable to the Web-Based Content or Perceived Consequences of Usage? A Longitudinal Study of European Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadlaczky, Gergö; Westerlund, Joakim; Wasserman, Danuta; Balazs, Judit; Germanavicius, Arunas; Machín, Núria; Meszaros, Gergely; Sarchiapone, Marco; Värnik, Airi; Varnik, Peeter; Westerlund, Michael; Carli, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Background Adolescents and young adults are among the most frequent Internet users, and accumulating evidence suggests that their Internet behaviors might affect their mental health. Internet use may impact mental health because certain Web-based content could be distressing. It is also possible that excessive use, regardless of content, produces negative consequences, such as neglect of protective offline activities. Objective The objective of this study was to assess how mental health is associated with (1) the time spent on the Internet, (2) the time spent on different Web-based activities (social media use, gaming, gambling, pornography use, school work, newsreading, and targeted information searches), and (3) the perceived consequences of engaging in those activities. Methods A random sample of 2286 adolescents was recruited from state schools in Estonia, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Questionnaire data comprising Internet behaviors and mental health variables were collected and analyzed cross-sectionally and were followed up after 4 months. Results Cross-sectionally, both the time spent on the Internet and the relative time spent on various activities predicted mental health (Peffects that were not fully accounted for by perceived consequences. The longitudinal analyses showed that sleep loss due to Internet use (ß=.12, 95% CI=0.05-0.19, P=.001) and withdrawal (negative mood) when Internet could not be accessed (ß=.09, 95% CI=0.03-0.16, Peffect on mental health in the long term. Perceived positive consequences of Internet use did not seem to be associated with mental health at all. Conclusions The magnitude of Internet use is negatively associated with mental health in general, but specific Web-based activities differ in how consistently, how much, and in what direction they affect mental health. Consequences of Internet use (especially sleep loss and withdrawal when Internet cannot be accessed) seem to predict mental

  15. Longitudinal trajectories of bicultural identity integration in recently immigrated Hispanic adolescents: Links with mental health and family functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Seth J; Unger, Jennifer B; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Benet-Martínez, Verónica; Meca, Alan; Zamboanga, Byron L; Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I; Des Rosiers, Sabrina E; Oshri, Assaf; Sabet, Raha F; Soto, Daniel W; Pattarroyo, Monica; Huang, Shi; Villamar, Juan A; Lizzi, Karina M; Szapocznik, José

    2015-12-01

    This study examined, in a sample of recently immigrated Hispanic adolescents in Miami and Los Angeles, the extent to which bicultural identity integration (BII; involving the ability to synthesise one's heritage and receiving cultural streams and to identify as a member of both cultures) is best understood as a developmental construct that changes over time or as an individual-difference construct that is largely stable over time. We were also interested in the extent to which these trajectories predicted mental health and family functioning. Recent-immigrant 9th graders (N = 302) were assessed 6 times from 9th to 12th grade. Latent class growth analyses using the first 5 timepoints identified 2 trajectory classes-one with lower BII scores over time and another with higher BII scores over time. Higher heritage and US identity at baseline predicted membership in the higher BII class. At the 6th study timepoint, lower BII adolescents reported significantly poorer self-esteem, optimism, prosocial behaviour and family relationships compared with their higher BII counterparts. These findings are discussed in terms of further research on the over-time trajectory of biculturalism, and on the need to develop interventions to promote BII as a way of facilitating well-being and positive family functioning. PMID:26212218

  16. Rural-urban migration patterns and mental health diagnoses of adolescents and young adults in British Columbia, Canada: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Angiulli Amedeo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of mental health problems early in life can increase the well-being of children and youth. Several studies have reported that youth who experience mental health disorders are also at a greater risk of developing psychopathological conditions later in life, suggesting that the ability of researchers and clinicians to identify mental health problems early in life may help prevent adult psychopathology. Using large-scale administrative data, this study examined whether permanent settlement and within-province migration patterns may be linked to mental health diagnoses among adolescents (15 to 19 years old, young adults (20 to 30 years old, and adults (30 years old and older who grew up in rural or urban communities or migrated between types of community (N = 8,502. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study of the impact of rural compared to urban residence and rural-urban provincial migration patterns on diagnosis of mental health. Conditional logistic regression models were run with the following International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision (ICD-9 mental health diagnoses as the outcomes: neurotic disorders, personality disorder, acute reaction to stress, adjustment reaction, depression, alcohol dependence, and nondependent drug abuse. Analyses were conducted controlling for paternal mental health and sociodemographic characteristics. Results Mental health diagnoses were selectively associated with stability and migration patterns. Specifically, adolescents and young adults who were born in and grew up in the same rural community were at lower risk of being diagnosed with acute reaction to stress (OR = 0.740 and depression (OR = 0.881 compared to their matched controls who were not born in and did not grow up in the same rural community. Furthermore, adolescents and young adults migrating between rural communities were at lower risk of being diagnosed with adjustment reaction (OR = 0.571 than

  17. School difficulties in immigrant adolescent students and roles of socioeconomic factors, unhealthy behaviours, and physical and mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chau Kénora

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background School is a multi-cultural setting where students need social, material, physical, and mental resources to attain school achievement. But they are often lacking, especially for immigrant students. In an early adolescence context, this study assessed risk for school difficulties among European and non-European immigrants and the roles of socioeconomic characteristics, physical health, psychological health, social relationships, living environment, and unhealthy behaviours. Methods This cross-sectional study included 1,559 middle-school adolescents from north-eastern France, who completed a self-administered questionnaire including socioeconomic characteristics (gender, age, family structure, father’s occupation, and family income, WHO-Quality of life (measuring the four dimensions physical health, psychological health, social relationships, and living environment, unhealthy behaviours (last-30-day uses of tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, and other illicit drugs and no regular sports/physical activities, grade repetition, low school performance ( Results Grade repetition affected 14.8% of students, low school performance 8.2%, and school dropout ideation 3.9%. European immigrants had a higher risk for grade repetition only with a gender-age-adjusted odds ratio (OR of 2.44, vs. French students. This odds ratio decreased to 1.76 (contribution 47% with further adjustment for all confounders (family structure, father’s occupation, family income, physical health, psychological health, social relationships, living environment, and unhealthy behaviours. Non-European immigrants had a statistically higher risk for all grade repetition, low school performance, and school dropout ideation with ORs of 3.29, 3.02, and 3.42, respectively vs. French students. These odds ratios decreased to 1.76, 1.54, and 1.54, respectively (contributions 66%, 73%, and 78% with further adjustment for all confounders. Conclusions Compared with French students

  18. [Sleep disorders among adolescents--a major problem in mental health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapasalo-Pesu, Kirsi-Maria; Karukivi, Max

    2012-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are common in adolescents. The etiologies include biological, environmental, and sociocultural factors. The structure of sleep changes during adolescence, and it is easy for adolescents to stay awake. Sleep deprivation causes psychiatric symptoms. On the other hand, many psychiatric disorders cause secondary insomnia. The primary care is sleep hygiene counselling and behavioural therapy. If the sleep disorder is secondary, treatment of the primary disorder is the most important help. The scientific data of pharmacological management of insomnia of adolescent is thin. Melatonin might be worth a try, since there is scientific data of its effectiveness and safety. PMID:23342478

  19. Problemas de saúde mental e tabagismo em adolescentes do sul do Brasil Problemas de salud mental y tabaquismo en adolescentes del sur de Brasil Mental health problems and smoking among adolescents from Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M B Menezes

    2011-08-01

    tabaquismo de 3,3 (IC95% 2,5;4,2. Posterior al ajuste para sexo, edad, color de la piel, renta familiar, escolaridad de la madre, grupo de amigos fumadores, trabajo en el último año, repitencia escolar, actividad física de ocio y uso experimental de bebida alcohólica, disminuyó a 1,7 (IC95% 1,2;2,3 entre aquellos con problemas de salud mental. CONCLUSIONES: Problemas de salud mental en la adolescencia pueden tener relación con el consumo de tabaco.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the association between mental health problems and smoking in adolescents. METHODS: A total of 4,325 adolescents aged 15 from the 1993 birth cohort of the city of Pelotas, Southern Brazil, was studied. Smoking was defined as having smoked one or more cigarettes in the previous 30 days. Mental health was assessed according to the total score of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Score > 20 points was considered positive. Data were analyzed using Poisson regression with adjustment for robust variance. RESULTS: Smoking prevalence was 6.0% and about 30% of the adolescents presented some mental health problem. In the crude analysis, the prevalence ratio for smoking was 3.3 (95%CI 2.5; 4.2. After the adjusted analysis (for sex, age, skin color, family income, mother's level of schooling, group of friends who smoke, employment in the previous year, school failure, physical activity during leisure time and experimental use of alcohol, it decreased to 1.7 (95%CI 1.2; 2.3 among those with mental health problem. CONCLUSIONS: Mental health problems in adolescence may be related to tobacco consumption.

  20. Women and mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Unaiza Niaz

    2016-01-01

    Issues related to the mental health of women are a priority these days. Many international organisations working in the field of psychiatry are having sections on it now. This approach can go a long way in the improvement of the available mental health services for this population.

  1. Sleep and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size Email Print Share Sleep Tips for Children's Mental Health Page Content ​​​Sleep has become a casualty of ... MPH, FAAP Last Updated 5/23/2016 Source Mental Health, Naturally: The Family Guide to Holistic Care for ...

  2. Rural Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorders. What are some of the benefits of integration of mental health services into primary care in a rural community? ... benefits both the patient and the provider. The integration, or even the co-location, of mental health services with primary care services can also help ...

  3. Mental Health and Conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Baingana, Florence

    2003-01-01

    Addressing mental health is gradually being recognized as an important development issue, especially in the case of conflict-affected countries. Although mental health issues have received increased attention in post-conflict settings, there has been a tendency to implicitly assume that the impact of trauma caused by mass violence (i) may be transitory and non-disabling, and (ii) that inte...

  4. Adolescent Gender-Role Identity and Mental Health: Gender Intensification Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priess, Heather A.; Lindberg, Sara M.; Hyde, Janet Shibley

    2009-01-01

    Gender intensification, an increased pressure for adolescents to conform to culturally sanctioned gender roles, has been posited as an explanation for the emergence of the gender difference in depression. This longitudinal study assessed whether 410 individuals became more stereotypical in their gender-role identity across adolescence and whether…

  5. Adolescents' Pregnancy Intentions, Wantedness, and Regret: Cross-Lagged Relations with Mental Health and Harsh Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, Patricia L.; Chien, Nina C.; Barber, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    The authors used cross-lagged analyses to examine the across-time influences on and consequences of adolescents' pregnancy intentions, wantedness, and regret. One hundred pregnant Latina adolescents were studied during pregnancy and at 6 and 12 months postpartum. The results revealed 4 main findings: (a) similar to what has been found in adult…

  6. Women's Sports Media, Self-Objectification, and Mental Health in Black and White Adolescent Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Kristen; Fredrickson, Barbara L.

    2003-01-01

    Considers that sports media exposure may be linked to female adolescents' body perceptions. Tests this relationship from the perspective of objectification theory. Finds that self-objectification appears to be as problematic for adolescent girls as for college women, regardless of race or body mass. Focuses on self-objectification in adolescents…

  7. Developing Principles for Best Practice in Expanded School Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weist, Mark D.; Sander, Mark A.; Walrath, Christine; Link, Benjaman; Nabors, Laura; Adelsheim, Steve; Moore, Elizabeth; Jennings, Jenni; Carrillo, Kristine

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of activities of a federally funded national center for school mental health, review of literature on principles for best practice in child and adolescent mental health and school health, and consultation with national experts and family members, a set of 10 principles for best practice in school mental health was developed. A survey…

  8. Starting from scratch: the Development of the Adolescent Quality of Life- Mental Health Scale (AQOL-MHS)

    OpenAIRE

    Chavez, Ligia; Mir, Karen; Canino, Glorisa

    2012-01-01

    This article documents the initial development of a Spanish mental health quality of life (QOL) instrument based on the adolescents’ own assessment of important domains to their QOL. Using a grounded theory approach, we targeted five mental health disorders: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Conduct Disorder (CD), Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD), Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD).

  9. Intrinsic religiousness and spirituality as predictors of mental health and positive psychological functioning in Latter-Day Saint adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Peter W; Allen, G E Kawika; Fischer, Lane; Richards, P Scott; Morgan, David T; Potts, Richard W

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the relationships between religiousness and spirituality and various indicators of mental health and positive psychosocial functioning in three separate samples of college students. A total of 898 students at Brigham Young University participated in the three studies. The students ranged in age from 17 to 26 years old, with the average age of 20.9 across all three samples. Our results indicate that intrinsic religiousness, spiritual maturity, and self-transcendence were significantly predictive of better mental health and positive functioning, including lower levels of depression, anxiety, and obsessive-compulsiveness, and higher levels of global self-esteem, identity integration, moral self-approval, and meaning in life. Intrinsic religiousness was not predictive of shame, perfectionism, and eating disorder symptoms. These findings are consistent with many prior studies that have found religiousness and spirituality to be positively associated with better mental health and positive psychosocial functioning in adolescents and young adults. PMID:25854319

  10. Looking after your mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2010-01-01

    This leaflet outlines the signs of poor mental health and suggests steps that people can take to promote good mental health. It advises people to talk to someone if they feel that they may have a mental health problem.

  11. Pilot of Te Tomokanga: A Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service Evaluation Tool for an Indigenous Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahu McClintock

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe acceptability of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS to Indigenous peoples is little studied. There has been a lack of evaluation tools able to take account of the more holistic approach to the attainment of mental health that characterises Māori, the Indigenous population of Aotearoa (New Zealand. This study aimed to develop such an instrument and establish some of its psychometric properties. Then, to use the measure to establish whānau (family or caregiver views on desirable CAMHS characteristics.MethodA self-administered survey, Te Tomokanga, was developed by modifying a North American questionnaire, the Youth Services Survey for Families (YSS-F. The intent of the tool was to record whānau experiences and views on service acceptability.The Te Tomokanga survey is unique in that it incorporates questions designed to examine CAMHS delivery in light of the Whare Tapa Whā[1], a Māori comprehensive model of health with a focus on whānau involvement and culturally responsive services. This mail or telephone survey was completed by a cohort of 168 Māori whānau. Their children had been referred to one of the three types of CAMHS, mainstream, bicultural, and kaupapa Māori[2], of the District Health Board (DHBs in the Midland health region, Aotearoa. The Midland health region is an area with a large Māori population with high levels of social deprivation.ResultsThe Te Tomokanga instrument was shown to have a similar factor structure to the North American questionnaire from which it had been derived. It identified issues relevant to Māori whānau satisfaction with CAMHS. The work supports the concept that Māori desire therapeutic methods consistent with the Whare Tapa Whā, such as whānau involvement and the importance of recognising culture and spirituality.The participants were generally positive about the services they received from the three different CAMHS types, which shows good acceptability of CAMHS for

  12. Perception of stress level, trunk appearance, body function and mental health in females with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis treated conservatively: a longitudinal analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Misterska, Ewa; Glowacki, Maciej; Latuszewska, Joanna; Adamczyk, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In the presented study, we aimed to assess changes over time in the perception of trunk deformity, body function, stress level and mental health in females with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) who were treated conservatively with a Cheneau brace, taking the Trunk Appearance Perception Scale (TAPS), Scoliosis Research Society-22 (SRS-22) and Bad Sobberheim Stress Questionnaires (BSSQ) criteria of evaluation into consideration. Methods The study design was comprised of three quest...

  13. The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral stress management training on mental health, social interaction and family function in adolescents of families with one Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV positive member

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Keypour

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study evaluated stress management training to improve mental health, social interaction and family function among adolescents of families with one Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV positive member. Methods: There were 34 adolescents (13-18 years old with at least one family member living with HIV from whom finally 15 attended the study and participated in 8 weekly sessions of stress management training. The tests used in this study were: Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (self and parent report, General Health Questionnare-28 (GHQ-28 and Family Assessment Device (FAD, conducted before, after and three months after the intervention. The collected data were analyzed by repeated measure test using SPSS software (Version 18.0. Results: Adolescents with one HIV positive family member showed high level of emotional problem (40% and conduct problem (33.3%. There was a significant difference between before, after and 3months after intervention based on GHQ-28 mean scores and FAD mean sores (p < 0.001. There was a significant difference between mean scores of peers′ relationship based on SDQ (self report and parents report forms before and after intervention, but there was no significant difference between mean scores of pro social behavior based on SDQ (self report and parents report forms in all three stages (before, after and three months after intervention. Conclusions: Stress management training is effective in improving mental health, family function and social interaction among adolescents living with parents infected with HIV/AIDS.

  14. Life Stressors as Mediators of the Relation Between Socioeconomic Position and Mental Health Problems in Early Adolescence : The TRAILS Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amone-P'Olak, K.; Ormel, J.; Huisman, Martijn; Verhulst, F.C.; Oldehinkel, A.J.; Burger, Huib

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Life stressors and family socioeconomic position have often been associated with mental health status. The aim of the present study is to contribute to the understanding of the pathways from low socioeconomic position and life stressors to mental problems. Method: In a cross-sectional ana

  15. Previous maltreatment and present mental health in a high-risk adolescent population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greger, Hanne Klæboe; Myhre, Arne Kristian; Lydersen, Stian; Jozefiak, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Childhood maltreatment is known to increase the risk of future psychiatric disorders. In the present study, we explored the impact of experienced maltreatment on the prevalence and comorbidity of psychiatric disorders in a high-risk population of adolescents in residential care units. We also studied the impact of poly-victimization. The participants of the study were adolescents in residential care units in Norway (n=335, mean age 16.8 years, girls 58.5%). A diagnostic interview (Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Assessment Interview) was used, yielding information about previous maltreatment (witnessing violence, victim of family violence, community violence, sexual abuse) and DSM-IV diagnoses present in the last three months. Exposure to maltreatment was reported by 71%, and in this group, we found significantly more Asperger's syndrome (AS) (p=.041), conduct disorder (CD) (p=.049), major depressive disorder (MDD) (p=.001), dysthymia (p=.030), general anxiety disorder (GAD) (psuicide (p=.006). We found significantly more comorbid disorders in the maltreated group. Poly-victimization was studied by constructing a scale comprised of witnessing violence, victim of family violence, victim of sexual abuse and household dysfunction. We found that poly-victimization was associated with significantly increased risk of MDD, GAD, AS, CD, and having attempted suicide (padolescent population, and that trauma informed care is essential for adolescents in residential youth care. PMID:26003821

  16. Children and Adolescents' Attitudes toward Seeking Help from Professional Mental Health Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Mauro, Jennifer M.; Williams, Dahra Jackson

    2013-01-01

    Counseling services are only likely to be effective if individuals are willing to seek help. Although much of the research on youth help-seeking has focused on adolescents, few studies have examined this in regard to children. Constant comparison analysis of focus group discussions revealed differences based on age and gender. Knowledge, sources…

  17. Mental Health, School Problems, and Social Networks: Modeling Urban Adolescent Substance Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    This study tested a mediation model of the relationship with school problems, social network quality, and substance use with a primary care sample of 301 urban adolescents. It was theorized that social network quality (level of risk or protection in network) would mediate the effects of school problems, accounting for internalizing problems and…

  18. Relationship Violence among Adolescent Mothers: Frequency, Dyadic Nature, and Implications for Relationship Dissolution and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, Stephanie; Lewis, Jessica; Ethier, Kathleen; Kershaw, Trace; Ickovics, Jeannette R.

    2005-01-01

    This article examines whether the frequency, dyadic nature, and potential implications of relationship violence differ in parenting (n=163) and nulliparous (i.e., never given birth; n=165) adolescent females from low-income, urban communities. We found the frequency and dyadic nature of violence did not differ between parental status groups. Over…

  19. Reading Problems, Attentional Deficits, and Current Mental Health Status in Adjudicated Adolescent Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Natalie; Langhinrichsen-Rohling, Jennifer; Shelley-Tremblay, John

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of reading problems and self-reported symptoms of attentional deficits in a sample of adjudicated adolescent males (N = 101) aged 12 to 18 years who were residing in an alternative sentencing residential program. Thirty-four percent of the youth had reading problems while only 9% of the boys had self-reported…

  20. Reducing HIV-related risk and mental health problems through a client-centred psychosocial intervention for vulnerable adolescents in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Nrupa; Vu, Lung; Kay, Lynnette; Habtamu, Kassahun; Kalibala, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ethiopia is experiencing an increasingly urban HIV epidemic, alongside a rise in urban adolescent migration. Adolescent migrants are often confronted by unique social challenges, including living in a difficult environment, abuse and mental health problems. These issues can increase adolescents’ vulnerability to HIV and compromise their capacity to protect themselves and others from HIV. We piloted and assessed the effects of a targeted psychosocial intervention to reduce mental health problems and improve HIV-related outcomes among migrant adolescents in Addis Ababa. Methods A pre- and post-comparison design was used in a cohort of 576 female and 154 male migrant adolescents aged 15 to 18 years in Addis Ababa receiving services from two service delivery organizations, Biruh Tesfa and Retrak. We implemented a three-month client-centred, counsellor-delivered psychosocial intervention, based on findings from formative research among the same target population, to address participants’ increased vulnerability to HIV. The intervention package comprised individual, group and creative arts therapy counselling sessions. Key outcome indicators included anxiety, depression, aggressive behaviour, attention problems, social problems, knowledge of HIV, safer sex practices and use of sexual health services. Longitudinal data analysis (McNemar test and random effects regression) was used to assess changes over time in key indicators by gender. Results For females, aggressive behaviour decreased by 60% (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 0.4 (0.25 to 0.65)) and any mental health problem decreased by 50% (AOR: 0.5 (0.36 to 0.81)) from baseline to end line. In addition, knowledge of HIV increased by 60% (AOR: 1.6 (1.08 to 2.47)), knowledge of a place to test for HIV increased by 70% (AOR: 1.7 (1.12 to 2.51)) and HIV testing increased by 80% (AOR: 1.8 (1.13 to 2.97)). For males, HIV knowledge increased by 110% (AOR: 2.1 (1.1 to 3.94)), knowledge of a place to test for HIV

  1. Reducing HIV-related risk and mental health problems through a client-centred psychosocial intervention for vulnerable adolescents in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nrupa Jani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ethiopia is experiencing an increasingly urban HIV epidemic, alongside a rise in urban adolescent migration. Adolescent migrants are often confronted by unique social challenges, including living in a difficult environment, abuse and mental health problems. These issues can increase adolescents’ vulnerability to HIV and compromise their capacity to protect themselves and others from HIV. We piloted and assessed the effects of a targeted psychosocial intervention to reduce mental health problems and improve HIV-related outcomes among migrant adolescents in Addis Ababa. Methods: A pre- and post-comparison design was used in a cohort of 576 female and 154 male migrant adolescents aged 15 to 18 years in Addis Ababa receiving services from two service delivery organizations, Biruh Tesfa and Retrak. We implemented a three-month client-centred, counsellor-delivered psychosocial intervention, based on findings from formative research among the same target population, to address participants’ increased vulnerability to HIV. The intervention package comprised individual, group and creative arts therapy counselling sessions. Key outcome indicators included anxiety, depression, aggressive behaviour, attention problems, social problems, knowledge of HIV, safer sex practices and use of sexual health services. Longitudinal data analysis (McNemar test and random effects regression was used to assess changes over time in key indicators by gender. Results: For females, aggressive behaviour decreased by 60% (adjusted odds ratio (AOR: 0.4 (0.25 to 0.65 and any mental health problem decreased by 50% (AOR: 0.5 (0.36 to 0.81 from baseline to end line. In addition, knowledge of HIV increased by 60% (AOR: 1.6 (1.08 to 2.47, knowledge of a place to test for HIV increased by 70% (AOR: 1.7 (1.12 to 2.51 and HIV testing increased by 80% (AOR: 1.8 (1.13 to 2.97. For males, HIV knowledge increased by 110% (AOR: 2.1 (1.1 to 3.94, knowledge of a place to test

  2. What Is Mental Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What To Look For Anxiety Disorders Behavioral Disorders Eating Disorders Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders Mood Disorders ... Experiencing severe mood swings that cause problems in relationships Having persistent thoughts and memories you can’t ...

  3. Women's Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a group that has the same age, race, religion, cultural background as you, or one that speaks ... mental health problems, like depression or having a history of trauma or abuse. If you or someone ...

  4. Positive mental health and mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Heather

    2014-09-01

    Based on the Mental Health Continuum Short Form administered in the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey - Mental Health (CCHS-MH), the percentages of Canadians aged 15 or older classified as having flourishing, moderate or languishing mental health were 76.9%, 21.6% and 1.5%, respectively. Compared with estimates for other countries, a higher percentage of Canadians were flourishing. In accordance with the complete mental health model, mental health was also assessed in combination with the presence or absence of mental illness (depression; bipolar disorder; generalized anxiety disorder; alcohol, cannabis or other drug abuse or dependence). An estimated 72.5% of Canadians (19.8 million) were classified as having complete mental health; that is they were flourishing and did not meet the criteria for any of the six past 12-month mental or substance use disorders included in the CCHS-MH. Age, marital status, socio-economic status, spirituality and physical health were associated with complete mental health. Men and women were equally likely to be in complete mental health. PMID:25229895

  5. Adolescents with a Childhood Experience of Parental Divorce: A Longitudinal Study of Mental Health and Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storksen, Ingunn; Roysamb, Espen; Moum, Torbjorn; Tambs, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    This is a prospective Norwegian study of a group of adolescents with an experience of parental divorce or separation (n=413) and a comparison group without this experience (n=1758). Mean age at T1 was 14.4 years and mean age at T2 was 18.4 years. Parental divorce was prospectively associated with a relative change in anxiety and depression,…

  6. Identity Styles, Mental Health and Socio-economic Status of Iranian Late Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Alireza Ghorbani; Haslinda Binti Abdullah; Sakineh Jomenia

    2012-01-01

    This study examines identity formation among Golestan’s late adolescents. Its findings indicate that 94.3% of participants have not experienced an identity crisis. A majority of respondents 33.8% reflected the diffuse-avoidant identity style. No significant difference in identity style exists between late adolescent’smales and females. There isa significant difference in identity styles between different age groups. Comparative consequences showed that there isn't significant difference betwe...

  7. Mental health of adolescents who abuse psychoactive substances in Enugu, Nigeria - A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igwe Wilson C

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association between psychiatric morbidity and substance abuse among adolescent has been reported. However prevalence and pattern of such dysfunctions are unknown in our environment. Aims To determine the prevalence of psychosocial dysfunction and depressive symptoms among adolescents who abuse substance and also note the influence of socio-demographic factors and type of substance on the pattern of dysfuction. Method A cross-sectional study was carried out among 900 adolescents selected from 29 secondary schools in Enugu metropolis. A multi-stage sampling procedure was used to select the students. The student drug use questionnaire was used to screen respondents for substance abuse. Those who were abusing substance and matched controls (non substance abusers were assessed for psychiatric symptoms using the 35-item Paediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC and the Zung Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS. Social classification was done using the parental educational attainment and occupation. Result A total of 290 students were current substance abusers. The substances most commonly abused were alcohol (31.6%, cola nitida (kola nut (20.7% and coffee (15.7%. Using the PSC scale, 70 (24.1% subjects compared to 29 (10.7% of the controls had scores in the morbidity range of ≥ 28 for psychosocial dysfuction. This was statistically significant (χ2 = 17.57 p = 0.001. Fifty-four subjects (18.6% had scores in the morbidity range of ≥ 50 for depressive symptoms using the Zung SDS compared to 21 (7.7% of controls. This was statistically significant (χ2 = 14.43, p = 0.001. Prevalence of dysfunction was not significantly related to age in both subjects and controls (χ2 = 4.62, p = 0.010, χ2 = 4.8, p = 0.10 respectively. Also using both scales, there was no significant relationship between psychosocial dysfunction and gender or social class in both subjects and control. The prevalence of dysfuction using both scales was significantly higher

  8. Asthma is more prevalent in elite swimming adolescents despite better mental and physical health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romberg, K; Tufvesson, E; Bjermer, L

    2012-06-01

    An increased risk of developing asthma has been reported among swimmers exposed to chloramine in pool arenas. The aim of the present study was to compare the prevalence of asthma and respiratory symptoms among elite aspiring swimmers compared with age-matched controls with different degrees of physical activity. We also aimed to relate these findings to mental and psychosocial factors. One hundred and one elite swimmers and 1628 age-matched controls answered a questionnaire containing questions about respiratory symptoms, lifestyle factors, mental and physical well-being. The controls were divided into three different groups according to the degree of physical activity, no physical activity, recreational training and elite training. Swimmers reported significantly more asthma symptoms, with 36.6% having physician-diagnosed asthma, compared with 16.2% among the controls. Use of regular medication was more common (14.9% vs 8.0%) and more swimmers reported an exacerbation of their asthma during the previous 12 months (16.8%) vs (5.8%) for the controls. Despite an increased prevalence of asthma symptoms, the swimmers reported best physical performance and best mental and physical well-being. They also had a healthier lifestyle without smoking and low alcohol consumption. PMID:20807384

  9. Prevalence of childhood and early adolescence mental disorders among children attending primary health care centers in Mosul, Iraq: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Jawadi Asma A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children and adolescents are more vulnerable to the affects of war and violence than adults. At the time of initiation of this study, nothing was known about the prevalence of childhood and early adolescence mental disorders. The aim of the present study is to measure the point prevalence of mental disorders among children of 1–15 years age in the city of Mosul, Iraq. Methods A cross-sectional study design was adopted. Four primary health care centers were chosen consecutively as a study setting. The subjects of the present study were mothers who came to the primary health care center for vaccination of their children. The chosen mothers were included by systematic sampling randomization. All children (aged 1–15 that each mother had were considered in the interview and examination. Results Out of 3079 children assessed, 1152 have childhood mental disorders, giving a point prevalence of 37.4%, with a male to female ratio of to 1.22:1. The top 10 disorders among the examined children are post-traumatic stress disorder (10.5%, enuresis (6%, separation anxiety disorder (4.3%, specific phobia (3.3% stuttering and refusal to attend school (3.2% each, learning and conduct disorders (2.5% each, stereotypic movement (2.3% and feeding disorder in infancy or early childhood (2.0%. Overall, the highest prevalence of mental disorders was among children 10–15 years old (49.2% while the lowest was among 1–5 year olds (29.1%. Boys are more affected than girls (40.2% and 33.2%, respectively. Conclusion Childhood mental disorders are a common condition highly prevalent amongst the children and early adolescents in Mosul. Data from the present study mirrors the size of the problem in local community. Several points deserve attention, the most important of which include giving care at the community level, educating the public on mental health, involving communities and families, monitoring community mental health indicators, and

  10. Effects of Early Childhood Peer Relationships on Adolescent Mental Health: A 6- to 8-Year Follow-Up Study in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyoung Min; Shin, Yun Mi; Park, Kyung Soon

    2016-01-01

    Objective Peer relationships are one of the important factors in children's development. The present study examines the relationship between the effects of early peer relationships and adolescent psychological adjustment. Methods The first survey took place from 1998 to 2000, and a follow-up assessment obtained data in 2006, as the original participants reached 13–15 years of age. The first assessment used the Korean version of the Child Behavior Checklist (K-CBCL) and simple questions about peer relationships to evaluate the participants. The follow-up assessment administered the Korean Youth Self Report (K-YSR). Results Children's peer relationships have longitudinal effects on mental health and adjustment. Children who had qualitative peer-relation problems were more likely to exhibit internalizing problems as adolescents. Conclusion Children who have poor peer relationships might become more vulnerable to emotional problems and social adjustment as adolescents. PMID:27482238

  11. Modelling the relationship between obesity and mental health in children and adolescents: findings from the Health Survey for England 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Summerbell Carolyn D

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A number of studies have reported significant associations between obesity and poor psychological wellbeing in children but findings have been inconsistent. Methods: This study utilised data from 3,898 children aged 5-16 years obtained from the Health Survey for England 2007. Information was available on Body Mass Index (BMI, parental ratings of child emotional and behavioural health (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, self-reported physical activity levels and sociodemographic variables. A multilevel modelling approach was used to allow for the clustering of children within households. Results: Curvilinear relationships between both internalising (emotional and externalising (behavioural symptoms and adjusted BMI were observed. After adjusting for potential confounders the relationships between obesity and psychological adjustment (reported externalising and internalising symptoms remained statistically significant. Being overweight, rather than obese, had no impact on overall reported mental health. 17% of children with obesity were above the suggested screening threshold for emotional problems, compared to 9% of non-obese children. Allowing for clustering and potential confounding variables children classified as obese had an odds ratio (OR of 2.13 (95% CI 1.39 to 3.26 for being above the screening threshold for an emotional disorder compared to non-obese young people. No cross-level interactions between household income and the relationships between obesity and internalising or externalising symptoms were observed. Conclusions: In this large, representative, UK-based community sample a curvilinear association with emotional wellbeing was observed for adjusted BMI suggesting the possibility of a threshold effect. Further research could focus on exploring causal relationships and developing targeted interventions.

  12. Mental Health of Young Refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Teena M; Durand, Simone C

    2015-12-01

    Children and adolescents exposed to violence and upheaval of war and relocation are at high risk of developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Rates of PTSD among refugee children may exceed 50%. Additional stressors encountered while adjusting to host cultures add another layer of difficulty. Most refugee children struggling with symptoms of PTSD or depression are never linked with appropriate mental health care resources. Psychiatric nurses can serve a critical function in the identification and treatment of refugee children experiencing PTSD and depression. PMID:26653091

  13. Self-Rated Mental Health, School Adjustment, and Substance Use in Hard-of-Hearing Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Brunnberg, Elinor; Boström, Margareta Lindén; Berglund, Mats

    2007-01-01

    This survey, “Life and Health—Young People 2005,” included all 15/16-year-old adolescents in mainstream schools in the county of Örebro, Sweden. Just students with a slight/mild or moderate hearing loss were included. There were 56 (1.9%) “hard-of-hearing (HH) students with multiple disabilities,” 93 (3.1%) students who were “just HH,” 282 (9.7%) students with some “other disability than HH,” and 2,488 (85.2%) students with “no disability.” “HH with multiple disabilities” reported considerabl...

  14. Atheism and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Rob

    2010-01-01

    The exploration of the impact of religiosity on mental health is an enduring, if somewhat quiet, tradition. There has been virtually no exploration, however, of the influence of atheism on mental health. Though not a "religion," atheism can be an orienting worldview that is often consciously chosen by its adherents, who firmly believe in the "truth" of atheism-a phenomenon known as "positive atheism." Atheism, especially positive atheism, is currently enjoying something of a renaissance in the Western liberal democracies-a trend often referred to as the "new atheism." I argue that atheism, especially positive atheism, should be treated as a meaningful sociocultural variable in the study of mental health. I argue that atheism (just like theism) is an appropriate domain of study for social and cultural psychiatrists (and allied social scientists) interested in exploring socio-environmental stressors and buffers relating to mental health. Specifically, I argue that (1) atheism needs to be accurately measured as an individual-level exposure variable, with the aim of relating that variable to psychiatric outcomes, (2) there needs to be greater systematic investigation into the influence of atheism on psychiatry as an institution, and (3) the relation of atheism to mental health needs to be explored by examining atheistic theory and its practical application, especially as it relates to the human condition, suffering, and concepts of personhood. PMID:20415634

  15. Mentalization-Based Treatment for Self-Harm in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossouw, Trudie I.; Fonagy, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We examined whether mentalization-based treatment for adolescents (MBT-A) is more effective than treatment as usual (TAU) for adolescents who self-harm. Method: A total of 80 adolescents (85% female) consecutively presenting to mental health services with self-harm and comorbid depression were randomly allocated to either MBT-A or TAU.…

  16. Mental Health Treatement Facilities Locator

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — An online resource for locating mental health treatment facilities and programs supported by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)....

  17. Mental health informatics

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Insu; Yellowlees, Peter; Diederich, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces approaches that have the potential to transform the daily practice of psychiatrists and psychologists. This includes the asynchronous communication between mental health care providers and clients as well as the automation of assessment and therapy. Speech and language are particularly interesting from the viewpoint of psychological assessment. For instance, depression may change the characteristics of voice in individuals and these changes can be detected by a special form of speech analysis. Computational screening methods that utilise speech and language can detect subtle changes and alert clinicians as well as individuals and caregivers. The use of online technologies in mental health, however, poses ethical problems that will occupy concerned individuals, governments and the wider public for some time. Assuming that these ethical problems can be solved, it should be possible to diagnose and treat mental health disorders online (excluding the use of medication).

  18. Adolescent mental health and academic functioning: empirical support for contrasting models of risk and vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucier-Greer, Mallory; O'Neal, Catherine W; Arnold, A Laura; Mancini, Jay A; Wickrama, Kandauda K A S

    2014-11-01

    Adolescents in military families contend with normative stressors that are universal and exist across social contexts (minority status, family disruptions, and social isolation) as well as stressors reflective of their military life context (e.g., parental deployment, school transitions, and living outside the United States). This study utilizes a social ecological perspective and a stress process lens to examine the relationship between multiple risk factors and relevant indicators of youth well-being, namely depressive symptoms and academic performance, as well as the mediating role of self-efficacy (N = 1,036). Three risk models were tested: an additive effects model (each risk factor uniquely influences outcomes), a full cumulative effects model (the collection of risk factors influences outcomes), a comparative model (a cumulative effects model exploring the differential effects of normative and military-related risks). This design allowed for the simultaneous examination of multiple risk factors and a comparison of alternative perspectives on measuring risk. Each model was predictive of depressive symptoms and academic performance through persistence; however, each model provides unique findings about the relationship between risk factors and youth outcomes. Discussion is provided pertinent to service providers and researchers on how risk is conceptualized and suggestions for identifying at-risk youth. PMID:25373055

  19. When self-reliance is not safe: associations between reduced help-seeking and subsequent mental health symptoms in suicidal adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labouliere, Christa D; Kleinman, Marjorie; Gould, Madelyn S

    2015-04-01

    The majority of suicidal adolescents have no contact with mental health services, and reduced help-seeking in this population further lessens the likelihood of accessing treatment. A commonly-reported reason for not seeking help is youths' perception that they should solve problems on their own. In this study, we explore associations between extreme self-reliance behavior (i.e., solving problems on your own all of the time), help-seeking behavior, and mental health symptoms in a community sample of adolescents. Approximately 2150 adolescents, across six schools, participated in a school-based suicide prevention screening program, and a subset of at-risk youth completed a follow-up interview two years later. Extreme self-reliance was associated with reduced help-seeking, clinically-significant depressive symptoms, and serious suicidal ideation at the baseline screening. Furthermore, in a subset of youth identified as at-risk at the baseline screening, extreme self-reliance predicted level of suicidal ideation and depressive symptoms two years later even after controlling for baseline symptoms. Given these findings, attitudes that reinforce extreme self-reliance behavior may be an important target for youth suicide prevention programs. Reducing extreme self-reliance in youth with suicidality may increase their likelihood of appropriate help-seeking and concomitant reductions in symptoms. PMID:25837350

  20. When Self-Reliance Is Not Safe: Associations between Reduced Help-Seeking and Subsequent Mental Health Symptoms in Suicidal Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa D. Labouliere

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The majority of suicidal adolescents have no contact with mental health services, and reduced help-seeking in this population further lessens the likelihood of accessing treatment. A commonly-reported reason for not seeking help is youths’ perception that they should solve problems on their own. In this study, we explore associations between extreme self-reliance behavior (i.e., solving problems on your own all of the time, help-seeking behavior, and mental health symptoms in a community sample of adolescents. Approximately 2150 adolescents, across six schools, participated in a school-based suicide prevention screening program, and a subset of at-risk youth completed a follow-up interview two years later. Extreme self-reliance was associated with reduced help-seeking, clinically-significant depressive symptoms, and serious suicidal ideation at the baseline screening. Furthermore, in a subset of youth identified as at-risk at the baseline screening, extreme self-reliance predicted level of suicidal ideation and depressive symptoms two years later even after controlling for baseline symptoms. Given these findings, attitudes that reinforce extreme self-reliance behavior may be an important target for youth suicide prevention programs. Reducing extreme self-reliance in youth with suicidality may increase their likelihood of appropriate help-seeking and concomitant reductions in symptoms.

  1. Homophobic Name-Calling Among Secondary School Students and Its Implications for Mental Health

    OpenAIRE

    Collier, Kate L.; Bos, Henny M.W.; Sandfort, Theo G. M.

    2012-01-01

    Although homophobic verbal victimization has been associated with negative mental health outcomes, little actually is known about its general prevalence and relationship to mental health among adolescents. In addition, the relationship of homophobic name-calling to mental health in gender non-conforming adolescents is not well understood. This study examined the relationship between homophobic verbal victimization and mental health in adolescents, accounting for their sexual orientation and l...

  2. The association between attachment and mental health symptoms among school-going adolescents in northern Uganda: the moderating role of war-related trauma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Okello

    Full Text Available The association between attachment and mental health symptoms in adolescents in a post-conflict low resource setting has not been documented.We investigated the relationship between parent and peer attachment and posttraumatic stress, depression and anxiety symptoms in a sample of 551 adolescents aged 13-21 years old. Attachment quality was assessed using the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment (IPPA. Post-traumatic stress, depression and anxiety symptoms were assessed using the Impact of Events Scale Revised (IESR and Hopkins Symptom Checklist for Adolescents (HSCL-37A respectively. Gender differences in attachment relationships were determined using independent t-tests. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess whether attachment relationships were independently associated with posttraumatic stress, depression and anxiety symptoms. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted to explore the moderating role of war-related trauma.Our analyses revealed gender differences in attachment to parents, with males reporting stronger attachment than females. Parental attachment was protective against depression and anxiety symptoms but not posttraumatic stress symptoms after adjusting for potential confounders. Alienation by parents was independently associated with an increase in these mental health symptoms while peer attachment was not associated with any of these symptoms. However, in situations of severe trauma, our analyses showed that peer attachment was significantly protective against post-traumatic stress symptoms.Secure parental attachment is associated with better psychosocial adjustment in adolescents affected by war. Further, adolescents with secure peer attachment relationships in situations of severe war trauma may be less likely to develop posttraumatic stress symptoms. Interventions to enhance peer support in this post conflict setting would benefit this vulnerable population.

  3. Mental Health Inequalities in Adolescents Growing Up in Post-Apartheid South Africa: Cross-Sectional Survey, SHaW Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayati Das-Munshi

    Full Text Available South Africa is one of the most 'unequal' societies in the world. Despite apartheid ending more than 20 years ago, material inequalities remain interwoven with ethnic/racial inequalities. There is limited research on the prevalence/predictors of common mental disorders (CMD among young people. Adolescence is a unique time-point during which intervention may lead to improved mental health and reduced social problems later. The study objective was to assess mental health disparities in a representative sample of adolescents growing up in South Africa.Cross-sectional associations of race/ethnicity and material disadvantage with CMD and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD were assessed in a stratified random sample representative of school-attendees, aged 14-15 years, in a large metropolitan area of Cape Town. Validated instruments assessed mental disorders; these included: Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (PTSD; Short Moods and Feelings Questionnaire (depression; Zung self-rated anxiety scale (anxiety. Self-ascribed ethnicity was determined using procedures similar to the South African census and previous national surveys.Response rate was 88% (1034 of 1169 individuals. Adolescents experienced a high prevalence of depression (41%, anxiety (16% and PTSD (21%. A gradient between material disadvantage and CMD/ PTSD was evident across all ethnic/racial groups. Respondents self-identifying as 'black' or 'coloured' were disadvantaged across most indicators. After adjusting for confounders, relative to white children, relative risk (RR of CMD in black children was 2.27 (95% CI:1.24, 4.15 and for PTSD was RR: 2.21 (95% CI:1.73, 2.83. Relative risk of CMD was elevated in children self-identifying as 'coloured' (RR: 1.73, 95% CI:1.11, 2.70. Putative mediators (violence, racially motivated bullying, social support, self-esteem partially accounted for differences in CMD and fully for PTSD.Adolescent mental health inequalities in Cape Town are associated with

  4. Mental Health Inequalities in Adolescents Growing Up in Post-Apartheid South Africa: Cross-Sectional Survey, SHaW Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das-Munshi, Jayati; Lund, Crick; Mathews, Catherine; Clark, Charlotte; Rothon, Catherine; Stansfeld, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background South Africa is one of the most ‘unequal’ societies in the world. Despite apartheid ending more than 20 years ago, material inequalities remain interwoven with ethnic/racial inequalities. There is limited research on the prevalence/predictors of common mental disorders (CMD) among young people. Adolescence is a unique time-point during which intervention may lead to improved mental health and reduced social problems later. The study objective was to assess mental health disparities in a representative sample of adolescents growing up in South Africa. Methods Cross-sectional associations of race/ethnicity and material disadvantage with CMD and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) were assessed in a stratified random sample representative of school-attendees, aged 14–15 years, in a large metropolitan area of Cape Town. Validated instruments assessed mental disorders; these included: Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (PTSD); Short Moods and Feelings Questionnaire (depression); Zung self-rated anxiety scale (anxiety). Self-ascribed ethnicity was determined using procedures similar to the South African census and previous national surveys. Results Response rate was 88% (1034 of 1169 individuals). Adolescents experienced a high prevalence of depression (41%), anxiety (16%) and PTSD (21%). A gradient between material disadvantage and CMD/ PTSD was evident across all ethnic/racial groups. Respondents self-identifying as ‘black’ or ‘coloured’ were disadvantaged across most indicators. After adjusting for confounders, relative to white children, relative risk (RR) of CMD in black children was 2.27 (95% CI:1.24, 4.15) and for PTSD was RR: 2.21 (95% CI:1.73, 2.83). Relative risk of CMD was elevated in children self-identifying as ‘coloured’ (RR: 1.73, 95% CI:1.11, 2.70). Putative mediators (violence, racially motivated bullying, social support, self-esteem) partially accounted for differences in CMD and fully for PTSD. Conclusions Adolescent mental

  5. The Parent Participation Engagement Measure (PPEM): Reliability and Validity in Child and Adolescent Community Mental Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haine-Schlagel, Rachel; Roesch, Scott C; Trask, Emily V; Fawley-King, Kya; Ganger, William C; Aarons, Gregory A

    2016-09-01

    Parent participation in community-based child mental health services is an important yet understudied process associated with treatment effectiveness. This paper describes the development and psychometrics of the Parent Participation Engagement Measure in a sample of 1374 parents and 563 youth receiving publicly-funded mental health services. Analyses indicated excellent internal consistency, and model fit indices/factor loadings supported a one-factor model. Convergent and discriminant validity were supported, although some coefficients were modest in magnitude. Psychometric results were consistent for Caucasian versus Hispanic, parent versus youth, and English versus Spanish-language respondents. The clinical and research utility of this measure are discussed. PMID:26520104

  6. Competence and authority : adolescent treatment refusals for physical and mental health conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Cave, Emma

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between competence and authority in relation to medical treatment refusals. Comparing provisions directed at adults and young people, the author explores the options before the court if a test case (called for by the British Medical Association and the Department of Health) is brought before the court to determine the extent of the minor's autonomy rights to be involved in or make medical treatment decisions of common law. At present, the common law righ...

  7. Is Sexual Behavior Healthy for Adolescents? A Conceptual Framework for Research on Adolescent Sexual Behavior and Physical, Mental, and Social Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilenko, Sara A.; Lefkowitz, Eva S.; Welsh, Deborah P.

    2014-01-01

    Although research has increasingly emphasized how adolescent sexual behavior may be associated with aspects of health beyond unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, no current theoretical or conceptual model fully explains associations between sexual behavior and multiple facets of health. We provide a conceptual model that…

  8. Lifestyle and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Mental health professionals have significantly underestimated the importance of lifestyle factors (a) as contributors to and treatments for multiple psychopathologies, (b) for fostering individual and social well-being, and (c) for preserving and optimizing cognitive function. Consequently, therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLCs) are underutilized…

  9. Teen Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or out of control Use alcohol or drugs Exercise, diet and/or binge-eat obsessively Hurt other people or destroy property Do reckless things that could harm you or others Mental health problems can be treated. To find help, talk ...

  10. Teen Mothers' Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SmithBattle, Lee; Freed, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Psychological distress is common in teen mothers. High rates of distress are attributed to teen mothers' childhood adversities and the challenges of parenting in the context of chronic stress, cumulative disadvantage, and limited social support. We describe the prevalence of psychological distress in teen mothers; what is known about its origins and impact on mothers and children; factors that promote teen mothers' mental health and resilience; and the many barriers that make it difficult to obtain traditional mental healthcare. We also briefly review the few studies that test interventions to improve teen mothers' mental health. Because barriers to traditional mental health treatment are ubiquitous and difficult to remedy, the second article in this two-part series calls for nurses in healthcare settings, schools, and home visiting programs to screen pregnant and parenting teens for adverse childhood experiences and psychological distress, and to integrate strength-based and trauma-based principles into their practice. Creating a supportive setting where past traumas and psychological distress are addressed with skill and sensitivity builds upon teen mothers' strengths and their aspirations to be the best parents they can be. These approaches facilitate the long-term health and development of mother and child. PMID:26474475

  11. Mental health service use for adolescents' internalizing problems: A comparison between four ethnic groups in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulp, E.E.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the current thesis was to increase our understanding of the ethnic differences in mental health service use for adolescents’ internalizing problems. In the first part of the thesis, we examined whether questionnaires assessing adolescents’ internalizing problems could be validly use

  12. Personal Reflections on the Development of an Integrated Service Delivery for Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sam; Gilliland, David; Mayhew, Kathy; Wilson, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the issue of how to develop a greater level of integration across the continuum services to young people with mental health difficulties. Reference is made to the strategic guidance offered by key documents and a pilot project is described, which attempted to link services across providers including a specialist Child and…

  13. Comparative Healthcare: Mental health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Elizabeth Cottrell

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn the fourth in this series of ‘comparative healthcare’ medical practitioners explore the approach to mentalillness in Bangladesh and the UK respectively. Differences and similarities in treatment regimens are illustratedwith reference to patients with varying degrees of mental illness. Mental illness poses the greatest challenge inhealth care as national investment in services often reflects cultural attitudes and norms. While the authorsdescribe very similar approaches to the diagnosis and management of severe psychotic illness there are strikingdifferences in the availability of support services for people with substance abuse and those with relapsingconditions. The involvement and co-operation of the family is particularly important in Bangladesh wherecomprehensive access to mental health services is very limited. Private alcohol and drug detoxification centresare available although many are expensive and such treatment may effectively be denied to all but the wealthiestpeople. In the UK all people with serious and enduring mental illness are entered onto a register and thereforeflagged for follow up at least once a year. General Practitioners, working within the nationally funded healthservice have been remunerated since 2003 for maintaining the register. In contrast in the absence of a casemanagementbased psychiatric follow-up framework in Bangladesh, a general practitioner and treatingpsychiatrist would need to formulate a management plan involving recognition of clinical warning signs by thefamily. Indeed the co-operation and support of the patient’s family is of paramount importance in maintainingoutpatient appointments when supporting people with mental health problems in Bangladesh. Finally weemphasise that the views expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect health policy orpractice in their respective countries. Nonetheless we believe they offer a valuable perspective on mental healthissues and

  14. Mental Health Treatment Program Locator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... County or Zip By Name Other Links State Mental Health Agencies Frequently Asked Questions Links Comments or Questions ... a Facility in Your State To locate the mental health treatment programs nearest you, find your State on ...

  15. Mental health and healthy lifestyle

    OpenAIRE

    Busch, Markus; Hapke, Ulfert; Mensink, Gert

    2011-01-01

    This issue focuses on mental health and the connection with a healthy lifestyle. Data of the German Health Update 2009 (GEDA) show at last that a healthy lifestyle leads to less mental impairments (e.g. depression).

  16. Adolescência e saúde mental: revisão de artigos brasileiros publicados em periódicos nacionais Adolescence and mental health: a review of the Brazilian literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Pereira da Cruz Benetti

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi realizar uma revisão da publicação nacional de artigos científicos no período de 1995-2005 sobre as situações prioritárias de saúde mental na adolescência, definidas pela Organização Mundial da Saúde, tais como depressão, ansiedade, abuso de substâncias, transtorno de conduta, transtornos alimentares, psicoses, maus-tratos e violência. Foram identificados 971 resumos nas bases de dados LILACS, MEDLINE, Index Psi e SciELO utilizando-se descritores associados ao tema. Após seleção segundo critérios, foram analisados 267 resumos científicos conforme área de produção, ano, foco, delineamento metodológico e principais resultados. A seguir, foram feitas análises qualitativas dos principais resultados. Verificou-se que a produção brasileira tem aumentado nos últimos anos e que a maioria dos trabalhos está voltada para a identificação do problema, e em menor número para o desenvolvimento de estratégias de intervenção e prevenção.The objective of this work was to review the Brazilian scientific literature from 1995 to 2005 on mental health in adolescence, considering the priorities identified by the World Health Organization (depression, anxiety, substance abuse, behavioral disorders, eating disorders, psychosis, child abuse, and violence. 971 abstracts were identified in the LILACS, MEDLINE, INDEXPsi, and SciELO databases, using descriptors associated with the themes. After selection according to specified criteria, 267 abstracts were analyzed by year, focus, methodological design, and principal conclusions. A qualitative analysis was performed on the main findings. Brazilian publications in this area have increased in the last five years. The majority of the articles aimed to identify the problem, while a smaller proportion dealt with the development of intervention and prevention strategies.

  17. Mental Health Utilization Among Diverse Parenting Young Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albritton, Tashuna; Angley, Meghan; Gibson, Crystal; Sipsma, Heather; Kershaw, Trace

    2015-09-01

    Mental health issues often become apparent as adolescents emerge into young adulthood. The use of mental health services is low among adolescents and young adults, and use is particularly low among minorities. In this study, we examine mental health utilization among diverse young parenting couples. The sample consisted of 296 couples. We used the social-personal framework to examine personal, family, partner relationship, and environmental predictors for using mental health services. We used the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model to assess actor and partner effects on mental health utilization. We also examined moderator effects for gender and internalizing and externalizing behaviors. We found that being female, being White, higher income, more conduct problems, and less anxious romantic attachment predicted mental health utilization. Significant moderator effects included depression × gender, depression × medical insurance, and stress × Latino. Implications for community mental health practice include conducting mental health assessments during medical visits and systematic mental health follow-up for individuals and couples with identified mental health and support needs. Future research should include married couples and the spouse's influence on mental health use and examine relevant parenting factors that may also predict mental health utilization among couples. PMID:26163272

  18. National Institute of Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... September More Headed Back to School? Add some mental health education to your agenda. Learn about how mental conditions ... the Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health, which focus on training, research, and methodology. More Men’s Health Month Did ...

  19. Common mental health disorders in children and adolescents in primary care: A survey of knowledge, skills and attitudes among general practitioners in a newly developed European country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Buhagiar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: General Practitioners (GPs are generally the first point of contact for children and adolescents with mental health problems. This study investigates the confidence, beliefs, and knowledge of GPs regarding common mental health problems in youngsters. Methods: A self-designed questionnaire was distributed to nearly all registered GPs in a middle-income European country in order to address the aims of the study. Results: Response rate was 58%. Many GPs reported relatively low confidence on a number of issues, including diagnosis (70.0%, initiating management (86.6%, assessing the child-caregiver relationship (72.0% and the ability to distinguish between normal and pathological behavioural problems (75.1%. However, GPs showed greater inclination to conduct follow-up care after assessment by specialist services (53.5%. Few GPs considered psychosocial interventions to play a role in the treatment of anxiety disorders (18.5%, hyperkinetic disorders (24.2%, depression (22.9% and disruptive behaviour disorders (18.5% and this largely came from younger GPs (p < 0.001. Conclusions: Confidence of GPs in the management of youngsters with mental health problems is generally low. They may require significant back-up from specialist services in the form of both training and clinical collaboration.

  20. Co-Occurring Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and Firesetting Among At-Risk Adolescents: Experiences of Negative Life Events, Mental Health Problems, Substance Use, and Suicidality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Alicia; Hasking, Penelope; Martin, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Co-occurring internalizing and externalizing problem behaviors in adolescence typically marks more severe psychopathology and poorer psychosocial functioning than engagement in a single problem behavior. We examined the negative life events, emotional and behavioral problems, substance use, and suicidality of school-based adolescents reporting both non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and repetitive firesetting, compared to those engaging in either behavior alone. Differences in NSSI characteristics among self-injurers who set fires, compared to those who did not, were also assessed. A total of 384 at-risk adolescents aged 12-18 years (58.8% female) completed self-report questionnaires measuring NSSI, firesetting, and key variables of interest. Results suggest that adolescents who both self-injure and deliberately set fires represent a low-prevalence but distinct high-risk subgroup, characterized by increased rates of interpersonal difficulties, mental health problems and substance use, more severe self-injury, and suicidal behavior. Implications for prevention and early intervention initiatives are discussed. PMID:26214360

  1. Adaptation and mental-hygienic characteristics of internally displaced adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Maksimović Miloš; Kocijančić Radojka; Backović Dušan; Ille Tatjana; Paunović Katarina

    2005-01-01

    The change in socio-economic status, drastic decrease in living standards, war, and the introduction of sanctions to our country were complicated in addition by a large number of internally displaced people from Kosovo, which culminated with the 1999 NATO bombing. The aim of this investigation was to estimate the influence of internal displacement on the adaptation and mental health of adolescents. The investigation was conducted on 238 adolescents, comprising a control group of 206 adolescen...

  2. [Mental Health and relationships].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivacow, Miguel Alejo

    2012-01-01

    After acknowledging that the diversity of cultural, historical and theoretical perspectives has given place to multiple definitions of mental health, the author circumscribes the goal of this article to reflecting on mental health from the viewpoint of human relationships in intersubjective milieux. The basic assumption that guides this paper is that the subject's psychic structure is constituted and developed in a relational matrix. Conceptualized in a relational context, the individual's mental health needs to take into account each member's developmental stage and asymmetrical position in a relationship. In the theoretical and therapeutic approach proposed here, drive renunciation, negative pacts, and intersubjective work are described as basic concepts in the analysis of relational links. Drive renunciation is defined as the operation that excludes certain drives derivatives from explicit relational interchange in order to maintain the structure and stability of the relationship. Negative pacts are defined as the configurations of reciprocal libidinal investments that give form to drive renunciation. The concept of intersubjective work places the emphasis on the interaction of the poles of the relationship, on how what one does influences the other's response. Thus, in the therapeutic context, intersubjective work accounts for each member's processes of symbolization and working through in the interchange and reciprocal impact of each member on the transformation of the relationship. Finally, the complexities around the formulation of therapeutic goals are emphasized and the occasional need of an interdisciplinary therapeutic plan is highlighted. PMID:22880195

  3. Item-Level Discordance in Parent and Adolescent Reports of Parenting Behavior and Its Implications for Adolescents' Mental Health and Relationships with Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurizi, Laura K.; Gershoff, Elizabeth T.; Aber, J. Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of discordance between parents' and children's ratings of the child's mental health symptoms or of parenting behavior until recently has been treated as a problem of reliability. More recent work has sought to identify factors that may influence discordance, yet much remains to be learned about why informants' ratings of…

  4. Postpartum Mental Health among Young Women

    OpenAIRE

    Amr MA; Balaha M; Al Moghannum M

    2012-01-01

    Background: A number of studies have highlighted the physical health problems associated with adolescent pregnancy in Saudi Arabia , However there were few studies dealing with the postpartum psychiatric disorders .The study aims to determine the prevalence of postpartum psychological distress and to evaluate the associated risk factors in a sample of primigravid young women in Al Ahsa region, Saudi Arabia. Methods: We assessed the prevalence of postnatal mental health in 190 young mothers at...

  5. What Is Infant Mental Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osofsky, Joy D.; Thomas, Kandace

    2012-01-01

    Unfortunately, the term "infant mental health" can be confusing for some people because it may be understood as translating into "mental illness." Others may not appreciate that babies and toddlers have the capacity to experience complex emotions. The Guest Editors of this issue of the Journal explore the meaning of infant mental health.

  6. Analysis on rural adolescents' mental health in Henan%河南省农村青少年心理健康现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴翠平; 娄晓民; 梁利花; 戈文洋; 季士治; 游新

    2011-01-01

    目的 了解农村校外青少年与在校青少年心理健康状况.为农村学校心理健康干预工作提供参考.方法 选取河南省2个县13~18岁430名农村校外青少年和198名在校青少年作为研究对象,采用症状自评量表(SCL-90)进行调查.结果 农村校外青少年和在校青少年心理问题阳性检出率分别为14.2%和29.3%,轻度不良反应检出率分别为33.5%和47.0%,中度及以上不良反应检出率分别为5.1%和12.1%;校外青少年SCL-90总分(124.55±33.84)低于在校青少年(142.42±41.59);2组青少年各因子分排序前4位的因子均为强迫症状、人际关系敏感、敌对和抑郁;女性各因子分和总分均高于男性(P值均<0.05).结论 相对于在校青少年,校外青少年心理状况较好;农村青少年不良反应症状主要表现为强迫、人际关系敏感、敌对和抑郁;男性心理状况好于女性.%Objective To understand the mental health status of adolescents out-of-school and in-school, and to explore the differences between them.Methods Totally 430 adolescents out-of-school and 198 adolescents in-school aged 13-18 were investigated with SCL -90.Results The detection rates of psychological problems in out-of-school and in-school adolescents were 14.2% and 29.3%.The detection rates of mild and moderate and above adverse responses in out-of-school and in-school adolescents were 33.5%, 47.0%, 5.1% and 12.1% respectively.The total scores of SCL -90 in out-of-school( 124.55 ±33.84) was lower than in-school adolescents( 142.42 ±41.59).The four leading factors of SCL -90 were compulsion, interpersonal sensitivity, hostility and depression in all the adolescents.The scores of SCL- 90 in females were higher than that in males ( P < 0.05 ).Conclusion The detection rates of psychological problems in out-of-school adolescents are lower than that of in-school adolescents.The main adverse reactions in adolescents are compulsion, interpersonal sensitivity

  7. Setting priorities for global mental health research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Tomlinson

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To set investment priorities in global mental health research and to propose a more rational use of funds in this under-resourced and under-investigated area. METHODS: Members of the Lancet Mental Health Group systematically listed and scored research investment options on four broad classes of disorders: schizophrenia and other major psychotic disorders, major depressive disorder and other common mental disorders, alcohol abuse and other substance abuse disorders, and the broad class of child and adolescent mental disorders. Using the priority-setting approach of the Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative, the group listed various research questions and evaluated them using the criteria of answerability, effectiveness, deliverability, equity and potential impact on persisting burden of mental health disorders. Scores were then weighted according to the system of values expressed by a larger group of stakeholders. FINDINGS: The research questions that scored highest were related to health policy and systems research, where and how to deliver existing cost-effective interventions in a low-resource context, and epidemiological research on the broad categories of child and adolescent mental disorders or those pertaining to alcohol and drug abuse questions. The questions that scored lowest related to the development of new interventions and new drugs or pharmacological agents, vaccines or other technologies. CONCLUSION: In the context of global mental health and with a time frame of the next 10 years, it would be best to fill critical knowledge gaps by investing in research into health policy and systems, epidemiology and improved delivery of cost-effective interventions.

  8. Comprehensive School Mental Health: An Integrated "School-Based Pathway to Care" Model for Canadian Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yifeng; Kutcher, Stan; Szumilas, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    Adolescence is a critical period for the promotion of mental health and the treatment of mental disorders. Schools are well-positioned to address adolescent mental health. This paper describes a school mental health model, "School-Based Pathway to Care," for Canadian secondary schools that links schools with primary care providers and mental…

  9. Mental health literacy about depression and schizophrenia among Swedish teenagers: a vignette study

    OpenAIRE

    Tartani, Evaggelia

    2011-01-01

    Although the prevalence of mental pathology is high, public’s mental health literacy (i.e. knowledge about mental disorders) has not been examined to a great extent. The main purpose of this study was to examine mental health literacy concerning depression and schizophrenia in a setting of adolescents in Sweden. A secondary aim was to explore stigmatizing attitudes towards mentally ill and levels of altruism among adolescents regarding help-seeking behavior. The present study employed qualita...

  10. Adolescent and School Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Curriculum Analysis Tool (HECAT) HECAT FAQs Health Education Teacher Training Manual Publications, Journal Articles, and Resources Sexual Risk Behavior Guidelines & Resources Adolescent Health Publications & Resources Additional Protective Factors Resources Journal ...

  11. Immigrant Mental Health and Unemployment

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Kennedy

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this research is to assess whether stress associated with the transition to a new country combined with additional stress arising from unemployment affects the mental health of immigrants. I use the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Australia (LSIA) to examine the effect of labour force status on the mental health of immigrants. By using a rich longitudinal data set, I am able to control for individual immigrant differences whilst examining whether changes in mental health...

  12. Evolving society and mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Dipesh Bhagabati; Anil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Numerous issues related to culture, occupation, gender, caste, and health, to name a few, have faced harshness of society from time immemorial. Reasons are debatable, ranging from somewhat understandable to completely unacceptable. There is no doubt that society is dynamic and it has changed its view on many of the issues with passing time. Mental health is one such issue which society has neglected for quite a long time. Even today, mental health and mentally ill people face stigma and discr...

  13. 同性恋者精神健康相关问题%MENTAL HEALTH CONDITION OF GAY AND LESBIAN IN ADULTS AND ADOLESCENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨峘; 张亚林

    2011-01-01

    When one's sexual orientation absolutely or mainly pointed to the same sex, this phenomenon called homosexuality. People with same sexual orientation faced much more pressure and discrimination, but they hardly been accepted by our society and barely got social support. They were also often been connected with negative social events while few people concern their mental health. Adolescents with same sex orientation were especially vulnerable groups, because they were in important period of both growth and sexual orientation improvement. This article is trying to discuss the epidemiology and mental health problems of these people, and overview their mental health condition.%某一个体的性欲完全或主要指向同性时,这一现象和个体分别称同性恋和同性恋者.同性恋作为客观存在的事实依然很难被人们接受,同性恋者也常常受到歧视,面临着比主流人群更多的压力,却很少能得到社会支持.人们总是将这部分人群与不良的社会现象联系起来,却很少关注他们的精神健康状况.尤其是青少年同性恋者,作为处于生长发育关键时期并有着非主流的性取向的特殊人群,更是值得关注的弱势群体.本文试图通过对同性恋者和青少年同性恋者的流行学及其精神卫生相关问题进行综述,以现其精神健康状况.

  14. 集体外伤后儿童心理健康随访研究%Mental Health of Adolescents Suffered from Traumatic Asphyxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵映敏; 陈沛文

    2001-01-01

    目的:探讨集体外伤后患儿的心理健康状况。方法:使用症状自评量表(SCL-90)、艾森克个性测量问卷(EPQ)、于外伤窒息后1周、6周、10周、16周、34周对44例外伤性窒息患儿的心理健康状况进行跟踪调查,精神创伤后应激障碍(PTSD)按CCMD-2-R标准进行诊断。结果:全部患儿外伤后均有不同程度的应激反应,1周内有19例患儿、6周时有10例患儿符合PTSD诊断,其中8例患儿于34周后恢复正常。结论:外伤性窒息治疗中应重视对患儿精神状态的观察,对有心理障碍者应及时进行适当处理。%Objective: To explore the effect of traumatic asphyxia on mental health of adolescents. Method: Forty-four adolescents were assessed with Styles Questionnaire (SCL-90), Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ) after one week, 6 weeks, 10 weeks, 16 weeks and 34 weeks of asphyxia. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) was diagnosed according to CCMD-2-R. Results: All 44 adolescents suffered from traumatic asphyxia had some psychiatric symptoms. Nineteen of them fulfilled the symptomatic criterta of DTSD in the first week,10 of them were diagnosed as PTSD at the 6th week,8 of the them returned to normal after 34 weeks. Conclusion: Mental health of adolescents suffered from traumatic asphyxia need our attention.

  15. Mental health of deaf people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellinger, Johannes; Holzinger, Daniel; Pollard, Robert

    2012-03-17

    Deafness is a heterogeneous condition with far-reaching effects on social, emotional, and cognitive development. Onset before language has been established happens in about seven per 10,000 people. Increased rates of mental health problems are reported in deaf people. Many regard themselves as members of a cultural minority who use sign language. In this Review, we describe discrepancies between a high burden of common mental health disorders and barriers to health care. About a quarter of deaf individuals have additional disabilities and a high probability of complex mental health needs. Research into factors affecting mental health of deaf children shows that early access to effective communication with family members and peers is desirable. Improved access to health and mental health care can be achieved by provision of specialist services with professionals trained to directly communicate with deaf people and with sign-language interpreters. PMID:22423884

  16. Does school social capital modify socioeconomic inequality in mental health?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line; Koushede, Vibeke; Vinther-Larsen, Mathilde;

    2015-01-01

    It seems that social capital in the neighbourhood has the potential to reduce socioeconomic differences in mental health among adolescents. Whether school social capital is a buffer in the association between socioeconomic position and mental health among adolescents remains uncertain. The aim of...... this study is therefore to examine if the association between socioeconomic position and emotional symptoms among adolescents is modified by school social capital. The Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Methodology Development Study 2012 provided data on 3549 adolescents aged 11-15 in two...... school classes characterised by high and moderate trust, there were no statistically significant differences in emotional symptoms between high and low socioeconomic groups. Although further studies are needed, this cross-sectional study suggests that school social capital may reduce mental health...

  17. Multidisciplinary mental health teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, M; Rosen, A; Shankar, R

    1995-01-01

    This study surveyed current practice amongst 91 Indian and Australian staff working within multidisciplinary mental health teams, looking at leadership skills, conflict resolution and therapeutic abilities. Length of training was associated with management skills, though these skill were more developed by psychiatric nurses and occupational therapists working in community settings. Hospital settings involved less consensual decision-making than community teams. Psychiatric nurses spent most time in clinical work, and occupational therapists were rated as less skilled in the therapeutic activities assessed than any other profession. Psychiatrists and clinical psychologists undertook most research. The activities assessed in this study could be undertaken by a team comprising psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses and social workers, with clinical psychologists employed where possible, especially for research or service evaluation. PMID:8847199

  18. Physiotherapy students’ mental health assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Gesouli-Voltyraki –E.; Charisi E.; Papastergiou D.; Κostopoulou S.; Borou A.; Alverti V.; Avlakiotis K.; Spanos S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Educational environment has a serious impact on students’ mental health. Few data are available on mental health of Physiotherapy students. Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess the mental heath of students in a tertiary Physiotherapy Department during the 3rd years of studies. Material and methods: 80 males and females physiotherapy students of the 5th and 6th semester of a tertiary Physiotherapy Department filled in the GHQ-28 questionnaire. Comparisons between groups w...

  19. Sufism and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizamie, S Haque; Katshu, Mohammad Zia Ul Haq; Uvais, N A

    2013-01-01

    Human experience in, health and disease, always has a spiritual dimension. pirituality is accepted as one of the defining determinants of health and it no more remains a sole preserve of religion and mysticism. In recent years, pirituality has been an area of research in neurosciences and both in the nderstanding of psychiatric morbidity and extending therapeutic interventions it seems to be full of promises. Sufism has been a prominent spiritual tradition in Islam deriving influences from major world religions, such as, Christianity and Hinduism and contributing substantially toward spiritual well-being of a large number of people within and outside Muslim world. Though Sufism started in early days of Islam and had many prominent Sufis, it is in the medieval period it achieved great height culminating in many Sufi orders and their major proponents. The Sufism aims communion with God through spiritual realization; soul being the agency of this communion, and propounding the God to be not only the cause of all existence but the only real existence. It may provide a vital link to understand the source of religious experience and its impact on mental health. PMID:23858257

  20. International Students and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes-Mewett, Helen; Sawyer, Anne-Maree

    2016-01-01

    Since the early 2000s, reports of increased rates of mental ill health among young people worldwide have received much attention. Several studies indicate a greater incidence of mental health problems among tertiary students, compared with the general population, and higher levels of anxiety, in particular, among international students compared…

  1. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reighley, Joan

    A description is provided of a course, "Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing," designed to teach students at Level 3 of a two-year college nursing program about the role of the nurse in a psychiatric setting and about concepts of mental health and psychiatric disorders, using both classroom and clinical instruction. The first section of the course…

  2. Mental Health Care: Who's Who

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Pediatrician Newsletters Symptom Checker Apps E-Magazine Our Mission Our Mission Our Mission AAP in ... used to measure a young person’s intellect and psychological health. All of the mental health counselors listed ...

  3. Women and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experience symptoms of mental disorders at times of hormone change, such as perinatal depression , premenstrual dysphoric disorder, and perimenopause-related depression. When it comes to other mental disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder , research has not found differences ...

  4. Profiles of family-focused adverse experiences through childhood and early adolescence: The ROOTS project a community investigation of adolescent mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Joe

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adverse family experiences in early life are associated with subsequent psychopathology. This study adds to the growing body of work exploring the nature and associations between adverse experiences over the childhood years. Methods Primary carers of 1143 randomly recruited 14-year olds in Cambridgeshire and Suffolk, UK were interviewed using the Cambridge Early Experiences Interview (CAMEEI to assess family-focused adversities. Adversities were recorded retrospectively in three time periods (early and later childhood and early adolescence. Latent Class Analysis (LCA grouped individuals into adversity classes for each time period and longitudinally. Adolescents were interviewed to generate lifetime DSM-IV diagnoses using the K-SADS-PL. The associations between adversity class and diagnoses were explored. Results LCA generated a 4-class model for each time period and longitudinally. In early childhood 69% were allocated to a low adversity class; a moderate adversity class (19% showed elevated rates of family loss, mild or moderate family discord, financial difficulties, maternal psychiatric illness and higher risk for paternal atypical parenting; a severe class (6% experienced higher rates on all indicators and almost exclusively accounted for incidents of child abuse; a fourth class, characterised by atypical parenting from both parents, accounted for the remaining 7%. Class membership was fairly stable (~ 55% over time with escape from any adversity by 14 years being uncommon. Compared to those in the low class, the odds ratio for reported psychopathology in adolescents in the severe class ranged from 8 for disruptive behaviour disorders through to 4.8 for depressions and 2.0 for anxiety disorders. Only in the low adversity class did significantly more females than males report psychopathology. Conclusions Family adversities in the early years occur as multiple rather than single experiences. Although some children escape

  5. Disaster management: Mental health perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Bada Math

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Disaster mental health is based on the principles of ′preventive medicine′ This principle has necessitated a paradigm shift from relief centered post-disaster management to a holistic, multi-dimensional integrated community approach of health promotion, disaster prevention, preparedness and mitigation. This has ignited the paradigm shift from curative to preventive aspects of disaster management. This can be understood on the basis of six ′R′s such as Readiness (Preparedness, Response (Immediate action, Relief (Sustained rescue work, Rehabilitation (Long term remedial measures using community resources, Recovery (Returning to normalcy and Resilience (Fostering. Prevalence of mental health problems in disaster affected population is found to be higher by two to three times than that of the general population. Along with the diagnosable mental disorders, affected community also harbours large number of sub-syndromal symptoms. Majority of the acute phase reactions and disorders are self-limiting, whereas long-term phase disorders require assistance from mental health professionals. Role of psychotropic medication is very limited in preventing mental health morbidity. The role of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT in mitigating the mental health morbidity appears to be promising. Role of Psychological First Aid (PFA and debriefing is not well-established. Disaster management is a continuous and integrated cyclical process of planning, organising, coordinating and implementing measures to prevent and to manage disaster effectively. Thus, now it is time to integrate public health principles into disaster mental health.

  6. Nutritional Factors Affecting Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, So Young; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Arang; Lee, Hee Jae; Choi, Hyun Jin

    2016-01-01

    Dietary intake and nutritional status of individuals are important factors affecting mental health and the development of psychiatric disorders. Majority of scientific evidence relating to mental health focuses on depression, cognitive function, and dementia, and limited evidence is available about other psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. As life span of human being is increasing, the more the prevalence of mental disorders is, the more attention rises. Lists of suggested nutritional components that may be beneficial for mental health are omega-3 fatty acids, phospholipids, cholesterol, niacin, folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12. Saturated fat and simple sugar are considered detrimental to cognitive function. Evidence on the effect of cholesterol is conflicting; however, in general, blood cholesterol levels are negatively associated with the risk of depression. Collectively, the aims of this review are to introduce known nutritional factors for mental health, and to discuss recent issues of the nutritional impact on cognitive function and healthy brain aging.

  7. Nutritional Factors Affecting Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, So Young; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Arang; Lee, Hee Jae; Choi, Hyun Jin; Yang, Soo Jin

    2016-07-01

    Dietary intake and nutritional status of individuals are important factors affecting mental health and the development of psychiatric disorders. Majority of scientific evidence relating to mental health focuses on depression, cognitive function, and dementia, and limited evidence is available about other psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. As life span of human being is increasing, the more the prevalence of mental disorders is, the more attention rises. Lists of suggested nutritional components that may be beneficial for mental health are omega-3 fatty acids, phospholipids, cholesterol, niacin, folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12. Saturated fat and simple sugar are considered detrimental to cognitive function. Evidence on the effect of cholesterol is conflicting; however, in general, blood cholesterol levels are negatively associated with the risk of depression. Collectively, the aims of this review are to introduce known nutritional factors for mental health, and to discuss recent issues of the nutritional impact on cognitive function and healthy brain aging. PMID:27482518

  8. Nepal mental health country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, S K; Pokharel, A; Ojha, S P; Pradhan, S N; Chapagain, G

    2004-01-01

    The Kingdom of Nepal is situated in the heart of Asia, between its two big neighbours China and India. Nepal is home to several ethnic groups. The majority of the 23 million population reside in the countryside. Although figures on many of the health and socio-economic indicators are non-existing, some existing ones show gradual improvement over the years. However the figures for illiteracy and infant mortality are still one of the highest in the world. As per GDP, and population living below the poverty line and per capita income, Nepal still remains one of the poorest countries in the world. Despite this, it provides shelter to thousands of Bhutanese refugees in its land. Frequent natural disasters and recent violent conflicts in Nepal have further added hardship to life. Less than 3% of the national budget is allocated to the health sector. Mental health receives insignificant attention. The Government spends about 1% of the health budget on mental health. There is no mental health act and the National Mental Health Policy formulated in 1997 is yet to be fully operational. Mental ill health is not much talked about because of the stigma attached. The roles of the legal and insurance systems are almost negligible. The financial burden rests upon the family. The traditional/religious healing methods still remain actively practiced, specifically in the field of mental health. The service, comprising little more than two-dozen psychiatrists along with a few psychiatric nurses and clinical psychologists (mainly practicing in modern health care facilities) has started showing its impact--however this is limited to specific urban areas. The majority of the modern health care facilities across the country are devoid of a mental health facility. The main contextual challenges for mental health in Nepal are the provision of adequate manpower, spreading the services across the country, increasing public awareness and formulating and implementing an adequate policy. PMID

  9. Mental Health and Education Decisions

    OpenAIRE

    Cornaglia, Francesca; Crivellaro, Elena; McNally, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Mental health problems - and depression in particular - have been rising internationally. The link between poor mental health and poor educational outcomes is particularly interesting in the case of the UK which has a low international ranking both on measures of child wellbeing and the probability of early drop-out from the labour market and education. We study this issue using a large longitudinal study of a recent cohort of teenagers in England. We use the General Health Questionnaire to d...

  10. A map of mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Smithies, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive picture of mental health services in England, including staffing and expenditure, and the number of people in need and the number treated. Historically, this information has been split across sub-sections of the health and social services; and the readily available information often appeared to give inconsistent answers. This paper brings together and interprets the available evidence to provide a single coherent map of mental health need and services, from...

  11. Refugees and mental health interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Guribye, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    This thesis focuses on refugees and mental health interventions. A literature review and 24 months of participant observation among Tamil refugee parents in Norway form the basis of the findings presented here. The first study is concerned with refugees and public mental health services in Norway. Many refugees may have difficulties trusting professional helpers within the bureaucratically organized public health care system, replacing these services with relationships to other...

  12. Adaptation and mental-hygienic characteristics of internally displaced adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimović Miloš

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The change in socio-economic status, drastic decrease in living standards, war, and the introduction of sanctions to our country were complicated in addition by a large number of internally displaced people from Kosovo, which culminated with the 1999 NATO bombing. The aim of this investigation was to estimate the influence of internal displacement on the adaptation and mental health of adolescents. The investigation was conducted on 238 adolescents, comprising a control group of 206 adolescents from Belgrade and 32 internally displaced adolescents from Kosovo. A specific questionnaire regarding habits, behavior, and psychosomatic state was used, as well as the Cornell Medical Index and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Internally displaced adolescents from Kosovo exhibited greater difficulties in adapting and had worse school records than adolescents from Belgrade, one year after the change in their location. Immediately after the NATO bombing, both groups reacted in the same way: they often talked about the events they had survived, they were afraid of the sounds of alarm sirens and of airplanes, and in addition had similar dreams (no statistical variation between the groups. Emotional disturbances, one year after the bombing, were not observed in 40.6% of adolescents from Kosovo, compared to the figure of 74.8% for adolescents from Belgrade. Adolescents from Belgrade consumed alcohol significantly more often: 75.7% compared to 56.3% for adolescents from Kosovo. In addition, 20.4% of adolescents from Belgrade consumed psychoactive substances compared to 6.3% of adolescents from Kosovo. There was no significant difference between the examined groups in the total scores on the scale for neuroticism. All in all, the girls from both examined groups displayed neurotic tendencies more frequently than the boys.

  13. [Adaptation and mental-hygienic characteristics of internally displaced adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimović, Milos; Kocijancić, Radojka; Backović, Dusan; Ille, Tatjana; Paunović, Katarina

    2005-01-01

    The change in socio-economic status, drastic decrease in living standards, war, and the introduction of sanctions to our country were complicated in addition by a large number of internally displaced people from Kosovo, which culminated with the 1999 NATO bombing. The aim of this investigation was to estimate the influence of internal displacement on the adaptation and mental health of adolescents. The investigation was conducted on 238 adolescents, comprising a control group of 206 adolescents from Belgrade and 32 internally displaced adolescents from Kosovo. A specific questionnaire regarding habits, behaviour, and psychosomatic state was used, as well as the Cornell Medical Index and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Internally displaced adolescents from Kosovo exhibited greater difficulties in adapting and had worse school records than adolescents from Belgrade, one year after the change in their location. Immediately after the NATO bombing, both groups reacted in the same way: they often talked about the events they had survived, they were afraid of the sounds of alarm sirens and of aeroplanes, and in addition had similar dreams (no statistical variation between the groups). Emotional disturbances, one year after the bombing, were not observed in 40.6% of adolescents from Kosovo, compared to the figure of 74.8% for adolescents from Belgrade. Adolescents from Belgrade consumed alcohol significantly more often: 75.7% compared to 56.3% for adolescents from Kosovo. In addition, 20.4% of adolescents from Belgrade consumed psychoactive substances compared to 6.3% of adolescents from Kosovo. There was no significant difference between the examined groups in the total scores on the scale for neuroticism. All in all, the girls from both examined groups displayed neurotic tendencies more frequently than the boys. PMID:16392285

  14. Smoking and adolescent health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Hee

    2011-10-01

    With the Westernization and opening of our society, adolescents' smoking is increasing and being popularized. Many adolescents start smoking at an early age out of curiosity and venturesomeness, and earlier start of smoking makes it more difficult to quit smoking. Adolescents' habitual smoking not only becomes a gateway to all kinds of substance abuse but also causes various health problems including upper respiratory infection, immature lung development, reduced maximum vital capacity, and lung cancer. Therefore, it is quite important to prevent adolescents from smoking. The lowering of adolescents' smoking rate cannot be achieved only through social restrictions such as stereotyped education on the harms of smoking and ID checking. In order to lower adolescents' smoking rate substantially, each area of society should develop standardized programs and make related efforts. As adolescents' smoking is highly influenced by home environment or school life, it is necessary to make efforts in effective education and social reinforcement in school, to establish related norms, and to execute preventive education using peer groups. When these efforts are spread throughout society in cooperation with homes and communities, they will be helpful to protect adolescents' health and improve their quality of life. PMID:22232621

  15. A Proposed Framework for Preventing Perfectionism and Promoting Resilience and Mental Health among Vulnerable Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flett, Gordon L.; Hewitt, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that perfectionism is highly prevalent among children and adolescents, and perfectionism can be quite destructive in terms of its links with anxiety, depression, and suicide. In this article, we provide an overview of recent research illustrating the costs and consequences of perfectionism among children and adolescents. We…

  16. Adolescents and Mental Health Treatments: Reviewing the Evidence to Discern Common Themes for Clinicians and Areas for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Timothy A.; Oxman, Lisa N.

    2007-01-01

    Adolescence and young adulthood is a time of rapid development. Although many people successfully negotiate this period, some do not. In this paper the evidence for the treatment of some of the most important adolescent psychological problems is considered. The problem areas of depression, anxiety disorders, conduct disorders, attention deficit…

  17. Acculturation, Internalizing Mental Health Symptoms, and Self-Esteem: Cultural Experiences of Latino Adolescents in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smokowski, Paul R.; Bacallao, Martica L.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation examined acculturation risk factors and cultural assets, internalizing behavioral problems, and self-esteem in 323 Latino adolescents living in North Carolina. Multiple regression analyses revealed two risk factors--perceived discrimination and parent-adolescent conflict--as highly significant predictors of adolescent…

  18. Mental Health Services for Children and Adolescents with Learning Disabilities: A Review of Research on Experiences of Service Users and Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Myrthe; Downie, Helen; Kidd, Gill; Fitzsimmons, Lorna; Gibbs, Susie; Melville, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Background: Children and young people with learning disabilities experience high rates of mental health problems. Methods: The present study reviewed the literature on mental health services for children with learning disabilities, to identify known models of service provision and what has been experienced as effective or challenging in providing…

  19. Childhood family instability and mental ealth problems during late adolescence : a test of two mediation models-The TRAILS Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Martin P.; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, Frank C.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.

    2012-01-01

    This study tested whether childhood family instability is associated with mental health problems during adolescence through continued family instability and/or through a preadolescent onset of mental health problems. This test use data from a prospective population cohort of 2,230 Dutch adolescents

  20. Protocol for: Sheffield Obesity Trial (SHOT: A randomised controlled trial of exercise therapy and mental health outcomes in obese adolescents [ISRCNT83888112

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright Neil P

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While obesity is known to have many physiological consequences, the psychopathology of this condition has not featured prominently in the literature. Cross-sectional studies have indicated that obese children have increased odds of experiencing poor quality of life and mental health. However, very limited trial evidence has examined the efficacy of exercise therapy for enhancing mental health outcomes in obese children, and the Sheffield Obesity Trial (SHOT will provide evidence of the efficacy of supervised exercise therapy in obese young people aged 11–16 years versus usual care and an attention-control intervention. Method/design SHOT is a randomised controlled trial where obese young people are randomised to receive; (1 exercise therapy, (2 attention-control intervention (involving body-conditioning exercises and games that do not involve aerobic activity, or (3 usual care. The exercise therapy and attention-control sessions will take place three times per week for eight weeks and a six-week home programme will follow this. Ninety adolescents aged between 11–16 years referred from a children's hospital for evaluation of obesity or via community advertisements will need to complete the study. Participants will be recruited according to the following criteria: (1 clinically obese and aged 11–16 years (Body Mass Index Centile > 98th UK standard (2 no medical condition that would restrict ability to be active three times per week for eight weeks and (3 not diagnosed with insulin dependent diabetes or receiving oral steroids. Assessments of outcomes will take place at baseline, as well as four (intervention midpoint and eight weeks (end of intervention from baseline. Participants will be reassessed on outcome measures five and seven months from baseline. The primary endpoint is physical self-perceptions. Secondary outcomes include physical activity, self-perceptions, depression, affect, aerobic fitness and BMI.

  1. Women Veterans and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they: Have a past mental health problem (like depression or anxiety) Experience a very severe or life-threatening trauma Were sexually assaulted Were injured during the event Had a severe reaction at the time of ...

  2. Mental Health and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program Grants Other Grants Planning and Evaluation Grantee Best Practices Black/African American Asthma Cancer Chronic Liver Disease Diabetes Heart Disease Hepatitis HIV/AIDS Immunizations Infant Heath & Mortality Mental Health Obesity Organ and Tissue Donation Stroke Stay Connected ...

  3. Mental Health and Asian Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program Grants Other Grants Planning and Evaluation Grantee Best Practices Asian American Asthma Cancer Chronic Liver Disease Diabetes Heart Disease Hepatitis HIV/AIDS Immunizations Infant Heath & Mortality Mental Health Obesity Organ and Tissue Donation Stroke Stay Connected ...

  4. Substance Abuse and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... More Drugs and Alcohol Tobacco Learn More Substance Abuse and Mental Health Drugs and Alcohol Did you ... related topics from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) Free Resources for parents and ...

  5. Difficulties of familes in caring for children and adolescents with mental disorders: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campelo, Lany Leide de Castro Rocha; Costa, Sarah Maria Esequiel; Colvero, Luciana de Almeida

    2014-08-01

    Objective To identify the difficulties of families with children and/or adolescents with mental disorder. Method This is an integrative review. In December 2013, an electronic search was performed on Latin American Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences databases (LILACS) and on Electronic Medicus Index of the National Library of Medicine (MEDLINE) indexed in the Health Virtual Library (BVS) using a combination of descriptors and boolean operators as follows: mental disorders and child or adolescent and caregivers and/not health staff. Results 557 studies were identified, of which 15 were selected for this study. The findings indicated difficulties related to the care for or to interaction with children/adolescents with mental disorder. Conclusion The studies revealed difficulties related to everyday practices of care and feelings expressed during care practices, as well as in relationships with children or adolescents with mental disorder. PMID:25517854

  6. Difficulties of familes in caring for children and adolescents with mental disorders: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lany Leide de Castro Rocha Campelo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To identify the difficulties of families with children and/or adolescents with mental disorder. Method This is an integrative review. In December 2013, an electronic search was performed on Latin American Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences databases (LILACS and on Electronic Medicus Index of the National Library of Medicine (MEDLINE indexed in the Health Virtual Library (BVS using a combination of descriptors and boolean operators as follows: mental disorders and child or adolescent and caregivers and/not health staff. Results 557 studies were identified, of which 15 were selected for this study. The findings indicated difficulties related to the care for or to interaction with children/adolescents with mental disorder. Conclusion The studies revealed difficulties related to everyday practices of care and feelings expressed during care practices, as well as in relationships with children or adolescents with mental disorder.

  7. Food Insecurity and Rural Adolescent Personal Health, Home, and Academic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanafelt, Amy; Hearst, Mary O.; Wang, Qi; Nanney, Marilyn S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Food-insecure (FIS) adolescents struggle in school and with health and mental health more often than food-secure (FS) adolescents. Rural communities experience important disparities in health, but little is known about rural FIS adolescents. This study aims to describe select characteristics of rural adolescents by food-security…

  8. The Waterford mental health survey

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Alan; Keenleyside, Mairi; Fitzhenry, Mark; et al.

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of the Waterford Mental Health Survey was to document the prevalence of co-morbid personality disorders in a sample of inpatients and outpatients attending the HSE mental health service in Waterford and outline the implications of this for service development. Between July 2011 and June 2014, 100 inpatients and 99 outpatients were evaluated with the Structured Clinical Interviews for DSM-IV axis I and II disorders, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, the Global Assessmen...

  9. Evolving society and mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipesh Bhagabati

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerous issues related to culture, occupation, gender, caste, and health, to name a few, have faced harshness of society from time immemorial. Reasons are debatable, ranging from somewhat understandable to completely unacceptable. There is no doubt that society is dynamic and it has changed its view on many of the issues with passing time. Mental health is one such issue which society has neglected for quite a long time. Even today, mental health and mentally ill people face stigma and discrimination in their family, society, and at their workplace. People do not feel comfortable talking about mental health, even if they know that there cannot be any health without a healthy mind. But, as Albert Einstein has said “learn from yesterday, live for today, and hope for tomorrow”, everything is not lost. The mentally ill patients who were once abandoned and left on their own have now started to get humane care and attention. This article discusses this very pertinent topic of changing society and mental health.

  10. No Mental Health without Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisely, Steve

    2016-05-01

    The poor physical health faced by people with mental illness has been the subject of growing attention, but there has been less focus on the issue of oral health even though it is an important part of physical health. This article discusses the two-way association between oral and mental health. In one direction, the prospect of dental treatment can lead to anxiety and phobia. In the other, many psychiatric disorders, such as severe mental illness, affective disorders, and eating disorders, are associated with dental disease: These include erosion, caries, and periodontitis. Left untreated, dental diseases can lead to teeth loss such that people with severe mental illness have 2.7 times the likelihood of losing all their teeth, compared with the general population. Possible interventions include oral health assessments using standard checklists that can be completed by nondental personnel, help with oral hygiene, management of iatrogenic dry mouth, and early dental referral. PMID:27254802

  11. 出生次序对青少年心理健康的影响%The Effects of Birth Order on Adolescent Mental Health

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚文进; 方欣; 陆绮君; 黎建斌

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨不同出生次序对青少年心理健康的影响.方法 采用中学生心理健康量表(MHT)调查了广州市207名青少年,并使用单因素方差分析和多重比较探讨不同出生次序对青少年心理健康各维度的影响.结果 不同出生次序的青少年在孤独倾向、自责倾向、身体症状和冲动倾向4个心理健康维度上差异显著(F=8.233,35.559;P<0.01和F=2.731,2.668;P<0.05).进一步多重比较结果表明,独生子女孤独倾向显著高于其他组,长子自责倾向显著高于其他组(LSD检验,P<0.01);次子身体症状明显高于长子组和独生子女组,幼子和独生子女冲动倾向显著高于次子组(LSD检验,P<0.05).结论 不同的出生次序青少年心理健康状况差异明显,学校应该有的放矢,关注不同群体青少年的心理薄弱方面.%Objective To explore the effect of birth order on mental health development of adolescents. Methods A total of 207 adolescents in Guangzhou were investigated with MHT. Results There were significant differences in loneliness , self -blame tendencies, physical symptoms and impulsive tendencies(F=8. 233.35. 559,P<0. 01,F=2. 731,2. 668;P<0. 05)among different order of adolescent. All in,the only-child' lonely was significantly higher than other groups,the self-blame of the eldest son was significantly higher than other groups(LSD-test ,P<0. 01) (the physical symptoms of the second son was significantly higher than the eldest son and only child (LSD-test,P<0. 05)sthe lastest son and the only-child impulsive tendencies were significantly higher than the second son (LSD-test, P<0. 05). Conclusion Different birth order differences in adolescent mental health significantly, the school should be targeted to different groups concerned about the psychological areas of weakness.

  12. Adolescent Offenders with Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisso, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the author points out that youth with mental disorders make up a significant subgroup of youth who appear in U.S. juvenile courts. And he notes that juvenile justice systems today are struggling to determine how best to respond to those youths' needs, both to safeguard their own welfare and to reduce re-offending and its…

  13. Socio-economic differences in health among Slovak adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geckova, A.M.; van Dijk, J.P.; Zezula, I.; Tuinstra, J.; Groothoff, J.W.; Post, Doeke

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To explore socio-economic health differences among Slovak adolescents. Methods: Socio-economic differences in health (psychological health: GHQ-12, vitality and mental health scale of RAND, experienced health complaints, chronic illness, use of medicines, self-reported health, self-perce

  14. The impact of risk and protective factors on mental health and well-being-Austrian adolescents and migrant adolescents from war-affected countries

    OpenAIRE

    Anita Buchegger-Traxler; Ulrike Sirsch

    2012-01-01

    Background: young persons are most strongly affected by displacement through political/military actions. This is also a European problem as well as an issue for the European Union. Applying the social-ecological model by Bronfenbrenner we concentrated on micro- and mesosystems of Austrian adolescents and migrant adolescents of war-affected countries.

    Methods: a questionnaire was administered to adolescents in...

  15. ERICA: prevalence of common mental disorders in Brazilian adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Claudia S; Abreu, Gabriela de Azevedo; dos Santos, Debora França; Menezes, Paulo Rossi; de Carvalho, Kenia Mara Baiocchi; Cunha, Cristiane de Freitas; de Vasconcellos, Mauricio Teixeira Leite; Bloch, Katia Vergetti; Szklo, Moyses

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the prevalence of common mental disorders in Brazilian adolescent students, according to geographical macro-regions, school type, sex, and age. METHODS We evaluated 74,589 adolescents who participated in the Cardiovascular Risk Study in Adolescents (ERICA), a cross-sectional, national, school-based study conducted in 2013-2014 in cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants. A self-administered questionnaire and an electronic data collector were employed. The presence of common mental disorders was assessed using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). We estimated prevalence and 95% confidence intervals of common mental disorders by sex, age, and school type, in Brazil and in the macro-regions, considering the sample design. RESULTS The prevalence of common mental disorders was of 30.0% (95%CI 29.2-30.8), being higher among girls (38.4%; 95%CI 37.1-39.7) when compared to boys (21.6%; 95%CI 20.5-22.8), and among adolescents who were from 15 to 17 years old (33.6%; 95%CI 32.2-35.0) compared to those aged between 12 and 14 years (26.7%; 95%CI 25.8-27.6). The prevalence of common mental disorders increased with age for both sexes, always higher in girls (ranging from 28.1% at 12 years to 44.1% at 17 years) than in boys (ranging from 18.5% at 12 years to 27.7% at 17 years). We did not observe any significant difference by macro-region or school type. Stratified analyses showed higher prevalence of common mental disorders among girls aged from 15 to 17 years of private schools in the North region (53.1; 95%CI 46.8-59.4). CONCLUSIONS The high prevalence of common mental disorders among adolescents and the fact that the symptoms are often vague mean these disorders are not so easily identified by school administrators or even by health services. The results of this study can help the proposition of more specific prevention and control measures, focused on highest risk subgroups. PMID:26910549

  16. Dangerousness and mental health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, J L

    2008-04-01

    Mental health policy development in the UK has become increasingly dominated by the assumed need to prevent violence and alleviate public concerns about the dangers of the mentally ill living in the community. Risk management has become the expected focus of contemporary mental health services, and responsibility has increasingly been devolved to individual service professionals when systems fail to prevent violence. This paper analyses the development of mental health legislation and its impact on services users and mental health professionals at the micro level of service delivery. Historical precedence, media influence and public opinion are explored, and the reification of risk is questioned in practical and ethical terms. The government's newest proposals for compulsory treatment in the community are discussed in terms of practical efficacy and therapeutic impact. Dangerousness is far from being an objectively observable phenomenon arising from clinical pathology, but is a formulation of what is partially knowable through social analysis and unknowable by virtue of its situation in individual psychic motivation. Risk assessment can therefore never be completely accurate, and the solution of a 'better safe than sorry' approach to mental health policy is ethically and pragmatically flawed. PMID:18307647

  17. Cyberbullying among male adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: prevalence, correlates, and association with poor mental health status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Cheng-Fang; Chou, Wen-Jiun; Liu, Tai-Ling; Ko, Chih-Hung; Yang, Pinchen; Hu, Huei-Fan

    2014-12-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the prevalence rates and multilevel correlates of cyberbullying victims and perpetrators among male adolescents diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in Taiwan. The relationships between cyberbullying involvement and depression, anxiety, and suicidality were also examined. The experiences of cyberbullying victimization and perpetration in 251 male adolescents with ADHD were assessed. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the correlates of cyberbullying victims and perpetrators. The relationships between cyberbullying involvement and depression, anxiety, and suicidality were examined using multiple regression analysis. A total of 48 (19.1%) and 36 (14.3%) participants reported that they were cyberbullying victims or perpetrators, respectively. Those who had increased age and a higher parental occupational socioeconomic status, and reported more severe traditional passive bullying victimization were more likely to be cyberbullying victims. Those who had increased age and combined-type ADHD, and reported lower BAS reward responsiveness, more severe Internet addiction and more severe traditional passive bullying perpetration were more likely to be cyberbullying perpetrators. Cyberbullying victims reported more severe depression and suicidality than those who were not cyberbullying victims. A high proportion of male adolescents with ADHD are involved in cyberbullying. Clinicians, educational professionals, and parents of adolescents should monitor the possibility of cyberbullying involvement among male adolescents with ADHD who exhibit the cyberbullying correlates identified in this study. PMID:25241113

  18. Assessment of Mental Symptoms and Risk Factors in Children and Adolescents Who Admitted to the Child-Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Yöntem Fidan T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The results of the studies investigating the positive and negative factors which affect the mental health were important for developing protective, new and effective programs in prevention from psychiatric disorders.The aim of this study is to determine the demographic features, symptom distribution of children and adolescents in this region.Methods: 632 child and adolescents who attended to Karadeniz Technical University Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic between 01 January 20...

  19. Mental health problems in health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koinis Ar.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: For the vast majority of nurses and doctors, the choice of their profession, represents a successful career, even though this isn’t a fact for everyone. For some of them reflects a journey into despair. A significant number of doctors and nurses, suffers from serious mental illness.Materials and Methods: It is conducted literature review of published journals from scientific databases such as Medline, Pub Med, Scholar Google, for the period 1985-2010, using keywords and combination of them: "health professionals", "psychiatric morbidity", "effects of stress on mental health "," mental disorders " Literature Review: There are researches in population health professionals, more often to doctors and nurses / only three, referred to mental illnesses mainly burnout, depression, anxiety disorders, alcoholism, and suicide and the effect thereof on the quality of life. Total of 215 studies were found and 48 of the were reviewed for this study.Conclusions: It is obvious from the literature, that mental health problems of the health professionals are not treated promptly or with the appropriate efficiency. The reasons associated with the stigma of mental illness by illness, the subsequent denial, the misconceived professional solidarity, culture of " medical omnipotence " for physicians. Τhe timeless trend of occupational health and diagnoses to self treated their health problems , even if the knowledge on specific issues are almost non-existent.

  20. Perspectives of pupils, parents, and teachers on mental health problems among Vietnamese secondary school pupils

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Dat Tan; Dedding, Christine; Pham, Tam Thi; Bunders, Joske

    2013-01-01

    Background Secondary school can be a stressful period for adolescents, having to cope with many life changes. Very little research has been conducted on the mental health status of secondary school pupils in South East Asian countries, such as Vietnam. The study aimed to explore perceptions of mental health status, risk factors for mental health problems and strategies to improve mental health among Vietnamese secondary school students. Methods A qualitative design was used to address the mai...

  1. The clinical effectiveness of a brief consultation and advisory approach compared to treatment as usual in child and adolescent mental health services.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGarry, Joan

    2008-07-01

    A brief consultation and advice (BCA) approach to dealing with routine referrals was introduced into a child and adolescent mental health service (CAMHS) over an 18-month period. This is a time-limited, client-centred and solution-focused approach to dealing with common non-complex referrals. The model proposes that all families are seen for an initial \\'consultation\\' appointment followed by a maximum of two further appointments. A randomized controlled study compared the clinical effectiveness of BCA treatment with treatment as usual (TAU) over a 6-month period. The parents of children referred to CAMHS were eligible to participate if their child was deemed \\'non-complex\\'. Ethical approval was granted by the relevant ethics committee. Families who consented to participate in the study were randomly allocated to either the BCA or TAU group. Sixty children enrolled in the study. Both groups showed improvements on a number of variables at 3 months post treatment, but only those receiving BCA showed continued improvement at 6 months. Participants in both groups showed high levels of satisfaction with the treatment received. Participants in the TAU group expressed dissatisfaction with long waiting times and had a higher drop out rate than the BCA treatment group. During the time frame studied, the introduction of the BCA approach did not lead to a decrease in overall mean waiting time. These results and the usefulness of a BCA model are discussed.

  2. The PATS Peer Support Program: Prevention/Early Intervention for Adolescents Who Have a Parent with Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, John; Bond, Lyndal; O'Brien, Matt; Forer, Danielle; Davies, Liz

    2008-01-01

    PATS (Paying Attention to Self) is a peer support program for adolescent children of parents with a diagnosed mental illness. The program aims to promote positive mental health, reduce the likelihood of mental health difficulties, increase young people's coping skills and empower them to meet their own and their families' needs. PATS combines peer…

  3. Integrating physical and mental health promotion strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Palma, Jessica Anne

    2010-01-01

    While health is defined as ‘a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being’, physical and mental health have traditionally been separated. This paper explores the question: How can physical and mental health promotion strategies be integrated and addressed simultaneously? A literature review on why physical and mental health are separated and why these two areas need to be integrated was conducted. A conceptual framework for how to integrate physical and mental health promotion st...

  4. Television and the promotion of mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Milošević Ljiljana

    2011-01-01

    Current media campaigns, realized within national campaigns and actions on mental health prevention and promotion, are considered in this paper, in the context of expert public relation, as well as the whole society, towards mental health. Mental health promotion is determined as a range of activities by which individuals, community and society are being enabled to take control over mental health determinants and to improve it, but also as an action for improvement of mental health posi...

  5. Development of Mental Health Indicators in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Hyeree; Ahn, Dong Hyun; Song, Jinhee; Hwang, Tae Yeon; Roh, Sungwon

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Promoting mental health and preventing mental health problems are important tasks for international organizations and nations. Such goals entail the establishment of active information networks and effective systems and indicators to assess the mental health of populations. This being said, there is a need in Korea develop ways to measure the state of mental health in Korea. Methods: This paper reviews the mental health indicator development policies and practices of seven organiza...

  6. Psychological Effects of a Suicide Prevention Curriculum on Adolescents' Levels of Stress, Anxiety, and Hopelessness: Implications for Mental Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbert, Kathy L.; Berry, Gordon L.

    Suicide is currently the third leading cause of death among teenagers between the ages of 15 and 19 years in the United States. Some of the psychological variables which may be indicators of adolescent suicidal risk are a longstanding history of stress, anxiety, depression, and hopelessness. This study examined the effects of a senior high school…

  7. The Third Rail of Family Systems: Sibling Relationships, Mental and Behavioral Health, and Preventive Intervention in Childhood and Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Mark E.; Solmeyer, Anna R.; McHale, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Sibling relationships are an important context for development, but are often ignored in research and preventive interventions with youth and families. In childhood and adolescence, siblings spend considerable time together, and siblings' characteristics and sibling dynamics substantially influence developmental trajectories and outcomes. This…

  8. Latino Adolescents' Mental Health: Exploring the Interrelations among Discrimination, Ethnic Identity, Cultural Orientation, Self-Esteem, and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umana-Taylor, Adriana J.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.

    2007-01-01

    Guided by a risk and resilience framework, the current study used cross-sectional data to examine the degree to which Latino adolescents' (N=274; M age=16.3; 47.1% female) self-esteem, ethnic identity, and cultural orientations mediated or moderated the relation between perceived discrimination and depressive symptoms. Utilizing a multiple group…

  9. Socio-economic differences in self-esteem of adolescents influenced by personality, mental health and social support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veselska, Zuzana; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; Gajdosova, Beata; Orosova, Olga; van Dijk, Jitse P.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Previous studies indicate that self-esteem is lower among adolescents of low socio-economic status and is associated with a number of intrapersonal, interpersonal and socio-cultural factors. Evidence on the mechanisms by which these factors contribute to the connection between socio-econ

  10. The Effects of Changes in Racial Identity and Self-Esteem on Changes in African American Adolescents' Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandara, Jelani; Gaylord-Harden, Noni K.; Richards, Maryse H.; Ragsdale, Brian L.

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the unique effects of racial identity and self-esteem on 259 African American adolescents' depressive and anxiety symptoms as they transitioned from the 7th to 8th grades (ages 12-14). Racial identity and self-esteem were strongly correlated with each other for males but not for females. For both males and females, an increase…

  11. The Social and Economic Risk Factors of Mental Disorders of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislitsyna, Ol'ga Anatol'evna

    2010-01-01

    Attention to problems of health has traditionally been focused on problems of physical health, in spite of very clear signs that the number of cases of impaired health of a psychosocial and mental character is rising. According to estimates of the World Health Organization (WHO), as many as 20 percent of children and adolescents suffer from…

  12. Development and evaluation of a youth mental health community awareness campaign – The Compass Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Harris Meredith G; McGorry Patrick D; Wright Annemarie; Jorm Anthony F; Pennell Kerryn

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Early detection and treatment of mental disorders in adolescents and young adults can lead to better health outcomes. Mental health literacy is a key to early recognition and help seeking. Whilst a number of population health initiatives have attempted to improve mental health literacy, none to date have specifically targeted young people nor have they applied the rigorous standards of population health models now accepted as best practice in other health areas. This paper...

  13. Stigmatization and mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Gulsum Ozge Doganavsargil Baysal

    2013-01-01

    Stigmatizasyon represent a chronic negative interaction with the environment that most of people with a of diagnosis mental disorders. Different types of stigma may have harmful effects. Poor psychological well being, poor quality of life and poor self esteem are related stigmatization. In this article, definition and mechanism of stigmatization, influenced factors and consequences of stigmatization are reviewed. Stigmatization is a modifiable environmental risk factor. Integrating approaches...

  14. Protocol for: Sheffield Obesity Trial (SHOT): A randomised controlled trial of exercise therapy and mental health outcomes in obese adolescents [ISRCNT83888112

    OpenAIRE

    Wright Neil P; Copeland Robert J; Daley Amanda J; Wales Jerry KH

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background While obesity is known to have many physiological consequences, the psychopathology of this condition has not featured prominently in the literature. Cross-sectional studies have indicated that obese children have increased odds of experiencing poor quality of life and mental health. However, very limited trial evidence has examined the efficacy of exercise therapy for enhancing mental health outcomes in obese children, and the Sheffield Obesity Trial (SHOT) will provide e...

  15. The Relationship Between Mental Health Problems, Acculturative Stress, and Academic Performance in Latino English Language Learner Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Albeg, Loren Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Latino adolescents, especially English language learners (ELLs) are considered to be a highly vulnerable group in our schools today. Despite their apparent need for additional social-emotional and academic learning (SEAL) supports, there is very little research to inform the type of cultural modifications (if any) needed to make SEAL interventions more appropriate for this population. Accordingly, this study focused on identifying the effects of acculturative stress (a culturally specific str...

  16. Posttraumatic stress symptoms and mental health services utilization in adolescents with social anxiety disorder and experiences of victimization

    OpenAIRE

    Gren-Landell, Malin; Aho, Nikolas; Carlsson, Elisabeth; Jones, Annica; Svedin, Carl Göran

    2012-01-01

    Recent findings from studies on adults show similarities between social anxiety disorder (SAD) and posttraumatic stress in the form of recurrent memories and intrusive and distressing images of earlier aversive events. Further, treatment models for SAD in adults have been successfully developed by using transdiagnostic knowledge on posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). Studies on adolescents are though missing. The present study aimed at exploring the association between PTSS and SAD in Swedi...

  17. Mental health pathways linking maltreatment to interpersonal revictimization during adolescence for girls in the child welfare system

    OpenAIRE

    Auslander, Wendy; Myers Tlapek, Sarah; Threlfall, Jennifer Mary; Edmond, Tonya; Dunn, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    This study compares the association of histories of childhood emotional, physical, and sexual abuse, and physical neglect with revictimization among adolescent girls, and investigates the role of posttraumatic stress and symptoms of depression as mediators. Participants were 234 girls aged 12 to 19 years, who have been involved with the child welfare system in a Midwestern urban area. Data were collected from baseline surveys of a trauma-focused group program to which the participants were re...

  18. Zambia mental health country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeya, John; Chazulwa, Roy; Mayeya, Petronella Ntambo; Mbewe, Edward; Magolo, Lonia Mwape; Kasisi, Friday; Bowa, Annel Chishimba

    2004-01-01

    This country profile for Zambia was compiled between 1998 and 2002. The objectives of the exercise were to first of all avail policymakers, other key decision makers and leaders in Zambia, information about mental health in Zambia in order to assist policy and services development. Secondly, to facilitate comparative analyses of mental health services between countries. The work involved formation of a core group of experts who coordinated the collection of information from the various organizations in Zambia. The information was later shared to a broad spectrum of stakeholders for consensus. A series of focus group discussions (FGDs) supplemented the information collected. There are various factors that contribute to mental health in Zambia. It is clear from the Zambian perspective that social, demographic, economic, political, environmental, cultural and religious influences affect the mental health of the people. With a population of 10.3 million and annual growth rate of 2.9%, Zambia is one of the most urbanized countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Poverty levels stood at 72.9% in 1998. In terms of unemployment, the most urbanized provinces, Lusaka (the capital city), and the copper-belt are the most affected. The gross domestic product (GDP) is US$3.09 billion dollars while per capita income is US$300. The total budget allocation for health in the year 2002 was 15% while the proportion of the GDP per capita expenditure for health was 5.6%. The HIV/AIDS prevalence rates stand at 20% among the reproductive age group 15-49 years. Political instability and wars in neighbouring states has resulted in an influx of refugees. Environmental factors affecting the country include natural and man-made disasters such as floods and drought, mine accidents, and deforestation. To a large extent in Zambia, people who are mentally ill are stigmatized, feared, scorned at, humiliated and condemned. However, caring for mental ill health in old age is positively perceived. It is

  19. Using Relationship Enhancement Therapy with an Adolescent with Serious Mental Illness and Substance Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accordino, Michael P.; Keat, Donald B., II; Guerney, Bernard G., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Relationship Enhancement (RE) therapy can be a useful intervention for adolescents with serious mental illness and their family members. This article reviews the basic concepts and effectiveness of RE therapy and illustrates how it is implemented. Presents a case example and discusses implications for research and mental health counseling.…

  20. Incidence of eating disorder beheviors in child and adolescent´s mental health unit H.G. Cuidad Real year 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Tejeda Serrano

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The Children´s Mental Health Unit is the ambulatory reference device for the evaluation and treatment of mental disorders in children (0-18 years. One role of nursing is to collect and analyze epidemiological data on the unit. Within the social upheavals that have aroused more interest in the recent past are the eating disorders (ED, which often pose a challenge in the care capacity of the devices of Mental Health that may be overwhelmed, not only the greater number of patients in recent years, but above all for the welfare needs of these patients.

  1. Leadership and mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; Deacon, Maureen; Jackson, Debra

    2011-01-01

    This discussion paper argues for the critical importance of successful leadership for effective mental health nursing, observing that nursing leadership has long been regarded problematically by the profession. Using empirical and theoretical evidence we debate what leadership styles and strategies are most likely to result in effective, recovery-orientated mental health nursing. Models of transformational and distributed leadership are found to be highly congruent with mental health nursing values, yet the literature suggests it is a type of leadership more often desired than experienced. We note how the scholarly literature tends to ignore the "elephant in the room" that is organizational power, and we question whether transformational leadership pursued within a specific clinical context can influence beyond those confines. Nevertheless it is within these contexts that consumers experience nursing, effective or otherwise, thus we should advocate what is known about effective leadership wherever it is required. PMID:21932925

  2. Physiotherapy students’ mental health assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesouli-Voltyraki –E.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Educational environment has a serious impact on students’ mental health. Few data are available on mental health of Physiotherapy students. Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess the mental heath of students in a tertiary Physiotherapy Department during the 3rd years of studies. Material and methods: 80 males and females physiotherapy students of the 5th and 6th semester of a tertiary Physiotherapy Department filled in the GHQ-28 questionnaire. Comparisons between groups were performed using the non parametric Mann-Whitney-U test at significance level of p=0.05. Results: Physiotherapy students’ mean age was 21.77±2.42 years old. The majority of the sample were women (47 participants, 58.7%. 50% of students had a total GHQ -28 score >5, indicating high levels of distress, with anxiety and insomnia being major problems. No statistically significant differences were traced between men and women, although women had a higher total score in comparison with men (median values: 5 vs 3 respectively. Conclusions: Physiotherapy students’ mental health and especially female physiotherapy students’ mental health appears substantially burdened. Anxiety and insomnia are major problem for students of Physiotherapy.

  3. Online social networking and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantic, Igor

    2014-10-01

    During the past decade, online social networking has caused profound changes in the way people communicate and interact. It is unclear, however, whether some of these changes may affect certain normal aspects of human behavior and cause psychiatric disorders. Several studies have indicated that the prolonged use of social networking sites (SNS), such as Facebook, may be related to signs and symptoms of depression. In addition, some authors have indicated that certain SNS activities might be associated with low self-esteem, especially in children and adolescents. Other studies have presented opposite results in terms of positive impact of social networking on self-esteem. The relationship between SNS use and mental problems to this day remains controversial, and research on this issue is faced with numerous challenges. This concise review focuses on the recent findings regarding the suggested connection between SNS and mental health issues such as depressive symptoms, changes in self-esteem, and Internet addiction. PMID:25192305

  4. Mental Health and Heart Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American Heart area Search by State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) ... Smoking Tips for Friends and Family of Quitters Workplace Health Employer Resources Workplace Health Index Recognition & Awards ...

  5. Stigmatization and mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulsum Ozge Doganavsargil Baysal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Stigmatizasyon represent a chronic negative interaction with the environment that most of people with a of diagnosis mental disorders. Different types of stigma may have harmful effects. Poor psychological well being, poor quality of life and poor self esteem are related stigmatization. In this article, definition and mechanism of stigmatization, influenced factors and consequences of stigmatization are reviewed. Stigmatization is a modifiable environmental risk factor. Integrating approaches against stigma in treatment may represent cost-effective way to reduce the risk of relapse and poor outcome occasioned by chronic exposure to stigma. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(2.000: 239-251

  6. Online Peer-to-Peer Support for Young People With Mental Health Problems: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Kathina; Farrer, Louise; Gulliver, Amelia; Griffiths, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    Background Adolescence and early adulthood are critical periods for the development of mental disorders. Online peer-to-peer communication is popular among young people and may improve mental health by providing social support. Previous systematic reviews have targeted Internet support groups for adults with mental health problems, including depression. However, there have been no systematic reviews examining the effectiveness of online peer-to-peer support in improving the mental health of a...

  7. Child Abuse and Mental Disorders in Iranian Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Pirdehghan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Child abuse is a serious social health problem all over the world with important adverse effects. Objectives The aim of this study was to extend our understanding of the relation between mental disorders and child abuse. Materials and Methods The study was designed as a cross-sectional survey on 700 students in secondary schools using multiple cluster sampling in Yazd, Iran in 2013. We applied 2 self reported questionnaires: DASS (depression anxiety stress scales-42 for assessing mental disorders (anxiety, stress and depression and a standard self-reported valid and reliable questionnaire for recording child abuse information in neglect, psychological, physical and sexual domains. The collected data was analyzed using SPSS software. P-values < 0.05 were considered as significant. Results There was a statically significant correlation between mental disorder and child abuse score (Spearman rho: 0.2; P-value < 0.001. The highest correlations between mental disorders and child abuse were found in psychological domain, Spearman’s rho coefficients were 0.46, 0.41 and 0.36 for depression, anxiety and stress respectively (P-value < 0.001. Based on the results of logistic regression for mental disorder, females, last born adolescents and subjects with drug or alcohol abuser parents had mental disorder odds of 3, 0.4 and 1.9 times compared to others; and severe psychological abuse, being severely neglected and having sexual abuse had odds 90, 1.6 and 1.5 respectively in another model. Conclusions Programming for mandatory reporting of child abuse by physicians and all health care givers e.g. those attending schools or health centers, in order to prevent or reduce its detrimental effects is useful and success in preventing child abuse could lead to reductions in the prevalence of mental disorders.

  8. [Adolescents with mental disorders while serving time and being subjected to socio-educative measures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilarins, Natália Pereira Gonçalves

    2014-03-01

    This article examines how adolescent offenders with mental disorders are treated by socio-educative internment treatment. These adolescents come under the aegis of medicine and justice in a contradictory relationship between full protection, vulnerability of a developing person with a mental disorder and a juvenile delinquency offense. In this respect, the legal punishment prevails to the detriment of health care. After approval of the research project by an Ethics Research Committee, field research was conducted in the Youth Detention Unit of the Pilot Plan of the Brazilian Federal District. Data were collected through research of documents involving 35 medical records of adolescent users of psychotropic drugs in 2010, as well as participant observation and semi-structured interviews with professionals from the Youth Detention Unit and adolescent judiciary. In the review of the care provided to adolescent offenders with mental disorders under the childhood and youth policy and the mental health policy, it was revealed that the mental health care provided in the Youth Detention Unit or in the external mental health care services involved the prescription of medication. PMID:24714903

  9. Adolescents with mental disorders while serving time and being subjected to socio-educative measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Pereira Gonçalves Vilarins

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article examines how adolescent offenders with mental disorders are treated by socio-educative internment treatment. These adolescents come under the aegis of medicine and justice in a contradictory relationship between full protection, vulnerability of a developing person with a mental disorder and a juvenile delinquency offense. In this respect, the legal punishment prevails to the detriment of health care. After approval of the research project by an Ethics Research Committee, field research was conducted in the Youth Detention Unit of the Pilot Plan of the Brazilian Federal District. Data were collected through research of documents involving 35 medical records of adolescent users of psychotropic drugs in 2010, as well as participant observation and semi-structured interviews with professionals from the Youth Detention Unit and adolescent judiciary. In the review of the care provided to adolescent offenders with mental disorders under the childhood and youth policy and the mental health policy, it was revealed that the mental health care provided in the Youth Detention Unit or in the external mental health care services involved the prescription of medication.

  10. Vitamin D deficiency and psychotic features in mentally ill adolescents: A cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Gracious Barbara L; Finucane Teresa L; Friedman-Campbell Meriel; Messing Susan; Parkhurst Melissa N

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Vitamin D deficiency is a re-emerging epidemic, especially in minority populations. Vitamin D is crucial not only for bone health but for proper brain development and functioning. Low levels of vitamin D are associated with depression, seasonal affective disorder, and schizophrenia in adults, but little is known about vitamin D and mental health in the pediatric population. Methods One hundred four adolescents presenting for acute mental health treatment over a 16-month pe...

  11. [The health of adolescents in Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Pierre-André; Ambresin, Anne-Emmanuelle

    2013-09-01

    The available data on adolescent health, weather statistics of mortality, hospital-based information or the one originating from health survey identify five main sources of concern: mental health problems, intentional and unintentional violence, chronic conditions including obesity and eating disorders, and negative consequences linked with risky sexual behavior and substance misuse. The responses to these issues lie in two ares, the one of health care and the one of prevention/health promotion. Access to health care must be improved, using the adolescent friendly framework, which stresses the importance of accessibility, flexibility, network approaches and effectiveness. Preventive activities encompass not only mere information in specific areas such as sexuality or psychoactive substance, but must also address the acquisition of life skills as well as the improvement of the environment. Structural measures such as the ones governing traffic of vehicles, those impacting on the school climate or those involving community health measures targeting vulnerable population have proven effective. PMID:24005070

  12. Adolescentes em sofrimento psíquico e a política de saúde mental infanto-juvenil Adolescentes en sufrimiento psíquico y la política de salud mental infanto-juvenil Adolescents in psychological distress and mental health policy for children and youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Christine Moura dos Santos

    2011-01-01

    review of published articles about the mental health of adolescents in Brazil, between January 2005 and April 2010. The keywords used in LILACS and SciELO databases were: mental health, adolescents, care, and outcomes of care. Thirty-five articles were analyzed, using the technique of content analysis. Studies show it is essential to recognize that the adolescent suffering psychologically is a subject and that he lives in a subjective context. In this way, the proposals of transformation will not have the necessary reach to the needs and demands of those individuals without an effective articulation between the diverse sectors, health care workers, patients and family. In this debate, there are few publications that discuss the new experiences, the dimension of the clinical act, expanded clinics or the output of the care in the attention to the mental health of these subjects.

  13. Children's Mental Health. Beginnings Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, Ilse Elisabeth; Haugen, Kirsten; Cohen, Alan; Levin, Diane E.

    2003-01-01

    Presents four articles discussing mental health issues that pertain to early childhood education: "Granting Children Their Emotions" (Ilse Elisabeth Plattner); "Double Vision: Parent and Professional Perspectives on Our Family's Year in Crisis" (Kirsten Haugen); "Coping with Stress and Surviving Challenging Times" (Alan Cohen); and "When the World…

  14. The Workplace and Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Karin Domnick

    1986-01-01

    Findings of the Canadian Mental Health and the Workplace Project are that (1) the quality of interpersonal relations in the workplace is a major factor in emotional well-being and (2) work must be balanced with other parts of one's life. These findings imply the need for social support networks and alternative work patterns. (SK)

  15. Mental Health Service Delivery Systems and Perceived Qualifications of Mental Health Service Providers in School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Decia Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Latest research on the mental health status of children indicates that schools are key providers of mental health services (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2003). The push for school mental health services has only increased as stakeholders have begun to recognize the significance of sound mental health as an essential part of…

  16. Mental Health Mobile Apps: From Infusion to Diffusion in the Mental Health Social System

    OpenAIRE

    East, Marlene Lynette; Havard, Byron C

    2015-01-01

    The roles of mental health educators and professionals in the diffusion of mental health mobile apps are addressed in this viewpoint article. Mental health mobile apps are emerging technologies that fit under the broad heading of mobile health (mHealth). mHealth, encompassed within electronic health (eHealth), reflects the use of mobile devices for the practice of public health. Well-designed mental health mobile apps that present content in interactive, engaging, and stimulating ways can pro...

  17. Disaster management: Mental health perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Suresh Bada Math; Maria Christine Nirmala; Sydney Moirangthem; Naveen C Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Disaster mental health is based on the principles of ‘preventive medicine’ This principle has necessitated a paradigm shift from relief centered post-disaster management to a holistic, multi-dimensional integrated community approach of health promotion, disaster prevention, preparedness and mitigation. This has ignited the paradigm shift from curative to preventive aspects of disaster management. This can be understood on the basis of six ‘R’s such as Readiness (Preparedness), Response (Immed...

  18. Domestic Violence and Children's Mental Health. Data Trends #116

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, 2005

    2005-01-01

    "Data Trends" reports present summaries of research on mental health services for children and adolescents and their families. The article summarized in this "Data Trends" presents the results of a study of 40,636 children entering the Illinois domestic violence service system over a five-year period. The results of this study of more than forty…

  19. What Every Child Needs for Good Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teen Eating Disorders Teen Depression and Suicide Teen Self-esteem Feeling Good About Yourself Teen Stress: A Guide to Surviving Stress SOURCES “Facts for Families," America Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry “Children’s and Adolescent’s Mental Health," US Dept. ...

  20. Promoting Teen Mothers' Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Patricia; SmithBattle, Lee

    2016-01-01

    In this second article in a two-part series, we call for the integration of strengths-based and trauma-informed care into services for teen mothers. Nurses working with teen mothers in health clinics, schools and home visiting programs can play a pivotal role in promoting their mental health. Many teen mothers have high levels of psychological distress and histories of adverse experiences that cannot be ignored, and cannot solely be addressed by referral to mental health services. Nurses must be prepared to assess for trauma and be open to listening to teen mothers' experiences. Principles of strengths-based and trauma-informed care are complementary and can be integrated in clinical services so that teen mothers' distress is addressed and their strengths and aspirations are supported. Potential screening tools, interviewing skills and basic strategies to alleviate teen mothers' distress are discussed. PMID:26909721

  1. Cannabis Use and Mental Health Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Jan C. van Ours & Jenny Williams

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates whether cannabis use leads to worse mental health. To do so, we account for common unobserved factors a ecting mental health and cannabis consumption by modeling mental health jointly with the dynamics of cannabis use. Our main nding is that using cannabis increases the likelihood of mental health problems, with current use having a larger e ect than past use. The estimates suggest a dose response relationship between the frequency of recent cannabis use and the probab...

  2. Cannabis Use and Mental Health Problems

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates whether cannabis use leads to worse mental health. To do so, we account for common unobserved factors affecting mental health and cannabis consumption by modeling mental health jointly with the dynamics of cannabis use. Our main finding is that using cannabis increases the likelihood of mental health problems, with current use having a larger effect than past use. The estimates suggest a dose response relationship between the frequency of recent cannabis use and the pr...

  3. An Ecological Approach to Promoting Early Adolescent Mental Health and Social Adaptation: Family-Centered Intervention in Public Middle Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stormshak, Elizabeth A.; Connell, Arin M.; Veronneau, Marie-Helene; Myers, Michael W.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Kavanagh, Kathryn; Caruthers, Allison S.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the impact of the Family Check-Up (FCU) and linked intervention services on reducing health-risk behaviors and promoting social adaptation among middle school youth. A total of 593 students and their families were randomly assigned to receive either the intervention or middle school services as usual. Forty-two percent of…

  4. Mental Health Need and Access to Mental Health Services by Youths Involved with Child Welfare: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Barbara J.; Phillips, Susan D.; Wagner, H. Ryan; Barth, Richard P.; Kolko, David J.; Campbell, Yvonne; Landsverk, John

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed the relationship between the need for and use of mental health services among a nationally representative sample of children who were investigated by child welfare agencies after reported maltreatment. Method: Data were collected at study entry into the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being and were…

  5. Saúde mental de cuidadores de abrigos para adolescentes com transtornos psiquiátricos ou neurológicos Mental health of caregivers working at shelters for adolescents with psychiatric or neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara Cristina Muniz Bastos Moraes

    2012-11-01

    communications, which allowed categories to be defined. It was found that the conditions, organization, and work processes at the shelters are adverse and cause risks to the professionals' mental health, since they are unprepared to perform this work, in particular with patients suffering from psychiatric and neurological disorders, conditions that cause great distress among caregivers. Finally, it was fund that there is a need to provide training and permanent clinical supervision at the shelters based on the principles of psychosocial rehabilitation. Additionally, it is also necessary to drive greater integration among the tasks carried out at the shelters and those of the remaining special protection networks created for these adolescents.

  6. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Response, and Recovery Health Care and Health Systems Integration Health Disparities Health Financing Health Information Technology HIV, AIDS, and Viral Hepatitis Homelessness and Housing Laws, Regulations, and Guidelines Mental and Substance Use Disorders Prescription Drug Misuse and ...

  7. What characterizes persons with poor mental health?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Illemann; Davidsen, Michael; Kjøller, Mette;

    2014-01-01

    CHARACTERIZE MEN AND WOMEN WITH POOR MENTAL HEALTH THE PRESENT FINDINGS SUPPORT THE NOTION THAT BOTH SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHICS AND LIFESTYLE FACTORS ARE INDEPENDENTLY RELATED WITH POOR MENTAL HEALTH WE SUGGEST TAKING INTO ACCOUNT ALL THESE AREAS OF LIFE WHEN PLANNING ACTIVITIES TO PREVENT POOR MENTAL HEALTH AND WHEN...

  8. An Ecological Approach to Promoting Early Adolescent Mental Health and Social Adaptation: Family-Centered Intervention in Public Middle Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Stormshak, Elizabeth A.; Connell, Arin M.; Véronneau, Marie-Hélène; MYERS, MICHAEL W.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Kavanagh, Kathryn; Caruthers, Allison S.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the impact of the Family Check-Up (FCU) and linked intervention services on reducing health-risk behaviors and promoting social adaptation among middle school youth. A total of 593 students and their families were randomly assigned to receive either the intervention or middle school services as usual. Forty-two percent of intervention families engaged in the service and received the FCU. Using complier average causal effect analyses, engagement in the intervention moderate...

  9. Relationship Between Mental Health and Family Function, Teacher-Student Relations and Five-Factor Personality of Adolescents%家庭学校环境、人格与青少年心理健康

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷榕; 锁媛; 李彩娜

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship of adolescents' mental health, family function, teacher-student relations and five-factor personality. Methods: A total of 931 junior and senior middle school students in Xi'an city were surveyed by SCL-90, Family Function Questionnaire, Teacher-Student Relationship Inventory and Five-Factor Personality Inventory. Results: ①Adolescents' general level of mental health were good, compared with national norm. The mental health of male and senior middle school students' was significantly worse than that of female and junior middle school students. ②Except Openness, there were significant correlations among five-factor personality, teacher-student relations, and family function and all factors of mental health. ③Mental health problems could be significantly predicted by conflict of teacher-student relations, conflict and harmony and parental attention of family function, and emotionality; and negatively predicted by extroversion of Five-Factor personality. Conclusion: Family function, teacher-student relationship and personality can significantly predict mental health.%目的:考察初、高中青少年心理健康的基本情况及家庭、学校环境和个体人格因素与青少年心理健康的关系.方法:采用家庭功能评价量表、师生关系问卷、人格五因素问卷和SCL-90对西安市四所普通中学的931名初、高中生进行综合考察.结果:①男生和初中生的心理健康状况显著差于女生和高中生.②除人格的开放性外,人格五因素、师生关系和家庭功能的不同维度与心理健康各因子间相关显著.③回归分析表明,师生关系的冲突性、家庭功能的矛盾冲突维度、人格的情绪性、外向性、宜人性能显著预测心理问题.结论:青少年心理健康状况总体良好,家庭功能、师生关系、人格可以显著的预测青少年的心理健康.

  10. Mental health-related stigma in health care and mental health-care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Claire; Noblett, Jo; Parke, Hannah; Clement, Sarah; Caffrey, Alison; Gale-Grant, Oliver; Schulze, Beate; Druss, Benjamin; Thornicroft, Graham

    2014-11-01

    This Review considers the evidence for mental-health-related stigma in health-care and mental-health-care settings. Do mental-health-care and other health-care professionals stigmatise people using their services? If so, what are the effects on quality of mental and physical health care? How can stigma and discrimination in the context of health care be reduced? We show that the contact mental-health-care professionals have with people with mental illness is associated with positive attitudes about civil rights, but does not reduce stigma as does social contact such as with friends or family members with mental illness. Some evidence suggests educational interventions are effective in decreasing stigma especially for general health-care professionals with little or no formal mental health training. Intervention studies are needed to underpin policy; for instance, to decrease disparity in mortality associated with poor access to physical health care for people with mental illness compared with people without mental illness. PMID:26361202

  11. Arab Adolescents: Health, Gender, and Social Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermeyer, Carla Makhlouf; Bott, Sarah; Sassine, Anniebelle J

    2015-09-01

    This article reviews the evidence about adolescent health in the Arab world, against the background of social, economic, and political change in the region, and with a particular focus on gender. For the literature review, searches were conducted for relevant articles, and data were drawn from national population- and school-based surveys and from the Global Burden of Disease project. In some parts of the Arab world, adolescents experience a greater burden of ill health due to overweight/obesity, transport injuries, cardiovascular and metabolic conditions, and mental health disorders than those in other regions of the world. Poor diets, insufficient physical activity, tobacco use, road traffic injuries, and exposure to violence are major risk factors. Young men have higher risks of unsafe driving and tobacco use and young women have greater ill-health due to depression. Several features of the social context that affect adolescent health are discussed, including changing life trajectories and gender roles, the mismatch between education and job opportunities, and armed conflict and interpersonal violence. Policy makers need to address risk factors behind noncommunicable disease among adolescents in the Arab region, including tobacco use, unhealthy diets, sedentary lifestyles, unsafe driving, and exposure to violence. More broadly, adolescents need economic opportunity, safe communities, and a chance to have a voice in their future. PMID:25770651

  12. Public Health Surveillance for Mental Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsie J. Freeman, MD, MPH

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Public health systems have relied on public health surveillance to plan health programs, and extensive surveillance systems exist for health behaviors and chronic disease. Mental health has used a separate data collection system that emphasizes measurement of disease prevalence and health care use. In recent years, efforts to integrate these systems have included adding chronic disease measures to the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys and depression measures to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; other data collection systems have been similarly enhanced. Ongoing challenges to integration include variations in interview protocols, use of different measures of behavior and disease, different interval reference periods, inclusion of substance abuse disorders, dichotomous vs continuous variables, and approaches to data collection. Future directions can address linking surveillance efforts more closely to the needs of state programs, increasing child health measurements in surveys, and improving knowledge dissemination from survey analyses.

  13. Mental health services system research: the National Institute of Mental Health program.

    OpenAIRE

    Taube, C A; Burns, B J

    1988-01-01

    There is a critical need for research to examine the changing mental health services system, to evaluate major innovations in the provision of mental health treatment, and to remove existing barriers to comprehensive and cost-effective care. To achieve these aims, collaboration is needed among government agencies, mental health services programs, academic institutions, and the private sector. The National Institute of Mental Health supports research and research training on the mental health ...

  14. Enhancing early engagement with mental health services by young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burns J

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Jane Burns, Emma Birrell Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre, Abbotsford, VIC, Australia Abstract: International studies have shown that the prevalence of mental illness, and the fundamental contribution it make to the overall disease burden, is greatest in children and young people. Despite this high burden, adolescents and young adults are the least likely population group to seek help or to access professional care for mental health problems. This issue is particularly problematic given that untreated, or poorly treated, mental disorders are associated with both short- and long-term functional impairment, including poorer education and employment opportunities, potential comorbidity, including drug and alcohol problems, and a greater risk for antisocial behavior, including violence and aggression. This cycle of poor mental health creates a significant burden for the young person, their family and friends, and society as a whole. Australia is enviably positioned to substantially enhance the well-being of young people, to improve their engagement with mental health services, and – ultimately – to improve mental health. High prevalence but potentially debilitating disorders, such as depression and anxiety, are targeted by the specialized youth mental health service, headspace: the National Youth Mental Health Foundation and a series of Early Psychosis Prevention and Intervention Centres, will provide early intervention specialist services for low prevalence, complex illnesses. Online services, such as ReachOut.com by Inspire Foundation, Youthbeyondblue, Kids Helpline, and Lifeline Australia, and evidence-based online interventions, such as MoodGYM, are also freely available, yet a major challenge still exists in ensuring that young people receive effective evidence-based care at the right time. This article describes Australian innovation in shaping a comprehensive youth mental health system, which is informed by an evidence

  15. Mental health among students of pedagogical universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malinauskas R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with questions of mental health among students of pedagogical universities. There were analysed differences in the level of mental health among sporting and non-sporting students. Two methods were used in the inquiry. Stepanov's questionnaire was used to estimate the level of mental health, Gundarov's questionnaire was used to evaluate psychical satisfaction. The sample consisted of 263 sporting students (athletes and 288 non-sporting students. Results have shown that the level of mental health among sporting students was higher than the level of mental health among non-sporting students.

  16. Rural mental health: neither romanticism nor despair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainer, J; Chesters, J

    2000-06-01

    This paper explores the relationship between rural places and mental health. It begins with a definition of mental health and an outline of the data that have led to the current concern with promoting positive mental health. We then consider aspects of rural life and place that contribute to positive mental health or increase the likelihood of mental health problems. Issues identified include environment, place, gender identity, violence and dispossession and the influence of the effects of structural changes in rural communities. The paper concludes with a discussion of some of the determinants of resilience in rural places, including social connectedness, valuing diversity and economic participation. PMID:11249401

  17. Contemporary Perspectives on Spirituality and Mental Health

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma Pulkit; Charak Ruby; Sharma Vibha

    2009-01-01

    The paper strives to elucidate the complex yet intimate relation between spirituality and mental health from contemporary perspectives. The diverse and constantly evolving views that spiritualists and mental health professionals have held toward each other over last century are discussed with special accent on the transpersonal spiritual framework within psychology. The role of spirituality in promoting mental health and alleviating mental illness is highlighted. The paper is concluded with a...

  18. Empirical evidence about recovery and mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Slade, Mike; Longden, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    Background Two discourses exist in mental health research and practice. The first focuses on the limitations associated with disability arising from mental disorder. The second focuses on the possibilities for living well with mental health problems. Discussion This article was prompted by a review to inform disability policy. We identify seven findings from this review: recovery is best judged by experts or using standardised assessment; few people with mental health problems recover; if a p...

  19. The Road to Self-Efficacy: A Discussion of Generic Training in Mental Health Competencies for Educational Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Dave

    2009-01-01

    This discussion aims to consider the value of training educational professionals in mental health competencies. Primary Mental Health Workers working in the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service have traditionally used a consultation model when working with schools. In this article I consider moving the emphasis away from consultancy work,…

  20. The health of Swiss adolescents and its implications for training of health professionals in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meynard, Anne; Rutishauser, Christoph; Thomi, Mirjam; Stronski Huwiler, Suzanne M

    2016-08-01

    Swiss adolescents generally enjoy satisfying life conditions. Nonetheless, violence, suicide and mental health are the main concerns together with injuries, chronic conditions and eating disorders. Adolescents still face barriers to access the care they need. Adequate training can improve practitioners' skills when dealing with adolescents. The last two decades have seen the development of innovative adolescent health units and networks in various regions of Switzerland as well as research and public health programmes. Training programmes in adolescent health (continuous medical education, post-graduate or pre-graduate) for physicians and nurses are developing but still patchy in Switzerland. Adolescent health is not a sub-specialty as such. Efforts have to be made in order to link with professional associations and institutions to implement adolescent health curricula more efficiently. PMID:26124048

  1. Two Sides of the Same Coin: Cannabis Dependence and Mental Health Problems in Help-Seeking Adolescent and Young Adult Outpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, Melissa M.; Battisti, Robert A.; Copeland, Jan; Hermens, Daniel F.; Hickie, Ian B.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to delineate the psychiatric profile of cannabis dependent young people (14-29 years old) with mental health problems (N = 36) seeking treatment via a research study. To do so, the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Childhood Diagnoses were…

  2. Long-Term Mental Health among Low-Income, Minority Women Following Exposure to Multiple Natural Disasters in Early and Late Adolescence Compared to Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Marni B.; Harville, Emily W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: High impact experiences following a natural disaster have been shown to influence later psychopathology. Individual-level factors such as age may also contribute to a disaster's impact on mental health, though it is unclear whether young age confers a protective effect or represents a period of increased risk as compared to adulthood.…

  3. Tackling the health and mental health effects of domestic and sexual violence and abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Itzin, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    This document sets out a programme of work to equip services and professionals to identify and respond to the health and mental health needs of individuals affected by domestic violence, childhood sexual abuse, rape, oblique sexual assault and sexual exploitation including children, adolescents, and adults, both victims and abusers, male and female.

  4. Television and the promotion of mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Ljiljana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Current media campaigns, realized within national campaigns and actions on mental health prevention and promotion, are considered in this paper, in the context of expert public relation, as well as the whole society, towards mental health. Mental health promotion is determined as a range of activities by which individuals, community and society are being enabled to take control over mental health determinants and to improve it, but also as an action for improvement of mental health position on individual and social value scale. Characteristics and approach to mental health protection of citizens in Serbia are introduced in the paper, with reference to high incidence and prevalence of mental health disorders, as well as actual challenges to mental health of individuals, but also to modern society. Outcomes of the Survey: „Radio and television and prevention of addictive diseases“, realized by the Radio-television of Serbia for the purpose of establishing informative-educational role of electronic media in the field of health, are also considered. Project „Mental Capital and Wellbeing“ and TV campaign for mental health promotion, realized in England, are quoted as an illustration of necessary strategic and multidisciplinary approach to mental health promotion, in which media represent an important complementary strategy.

  5. Defendants with Intellectual Disabilities and Mental Health Diagnoses: Faring in a Mental Health Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, M. M.; Griggs, M.; Dykens, E. M.; Hodapp, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Begun in the late 1990s, mental health courts are specialty criminal courts developed to address the needs of persons with mental illness. Methods: As many persons with intellectual disabilities (IDs) may overlap in the mental health court system, we used mental health court records to examine the phenomenology and outcomes of 224…

  6. States Pass Diverse Slate of Mental Health Legislation in 2013. Mental Health: 2013 Legislative Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Recent violence in schools and on college campuses has brought into sharp focus the need to address mental health issues in educational settings. Getting students with mental health problems the help they need, without stigmatizing mental illness, may help prevent future tragedies. Children with mental health problems face a host of challenges,…

  7. Why focus on mental health systems?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minas Harry

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The global situation for people with mental illness – in developing and developed countries – is dire. Legislative and human rights protections are frequently lacking. Mental health budgets are inadequate. There are insufficient numbers of skilled policy makers, managers and clinicians. Communities are poorly informed about mental health and illness and not well organised for purposes of advocacy. In most of the world, mental health services are inaccessible or of poor quality. Most people who would benefit from psychiatric treatment and rehabilitation do not have affordable access to such services. Leadership – at all levels – for mental health system development needs to be greatly strengthened. While mental health research attention and funds are devoted predominantly to neuroscience and clinical research, we believe that the highest global mental health research priority is mental health systems research. There is an urgent need to focus on the development of effective, appropriate, affordable mental health services. The evidence base for such development is currently weak. The International Journal of Mental Health Systems aims to stimulate greater attention to the central importance of building functioning mental health systems. Rapid publication and global reach through open access will make this journal a resource for all those who wish to contribute to such development.

  8. NIMH Support of Rural Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutner, Michael; Windle, Charles

    1991-01-01

    The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) aims to improve mental health services by funding research projects and research centers. NIMH also supports state planning, protection of and advocacy for the mentally ill, disaster relief, professional training, and public information programs. (DM)

  9. Mental Health Counseling: A Stakeholder's Manifesto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Edward S.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the original dreams of the founders of the American Mental Health Counselors Association; looks at history and comments on the state of mental health counseling as it has struggled to evolve as a profession. Urges those in the counseling profession to consider an acquisitions and mergers corporate mentality to ensure and enhance the…

  10. Fertility treatment and risk of childhood and adolescent mental disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Bjørn; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Hvidtjørn, Dorte;

    2013-01-01

    To assess the mental health of children born after fertility treatment by comparing their risk of mental disorders with that of spontaneously conceived children.......To assess the mental health of children born after fertility treatment by comparing their risk of mental disorders with that of spontaneously conceived children....

  11. 青少年自我分化水平及其与心理健康的关系%Adolescent self differentiation level and relationship with mental health

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽萍; 王静; 郝正玮; 赵雅宁

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the correlation between adolescent self differentiation level and mental health.Methods:The 540 teenagers at the age of 13~18 year residing in 3 communities in Tangshan city were taken as the research objects.The general self differentiation scale and symptom Checklist 90 (SCL 90)were used to evaluate,combined with the understanding of teenagers on the knowledge of mental health to analyze the rela-tionship between self differentiation level and psychological health.Results:The adolescents with normal men-tal health state in high self differentiation group and low level group were respectively 91.6% and 84.8%,the adolescents with abnormal psychological problems accounted for 8.4% and 15.2% and the difference was statis-tically significant between both groups(P <0.05);there was statistically significant difference in somatization, compulsion,interpersonal relationship sensitivity,depression,anxiety and hostility score between both groups(P <0.05);the adolescents mental health knowledge awareness rate was 40.1%~ 55.5% and 14.0%~27.2% in both groups,and the difference was statistically significant(P <0.05).Conclusion:High self differentiation level was conducive to understand adolescent health knowledge and promote the mental health of teenagers.%[目的]分析青少年自我分化水平与心理健康的相关性。[方法]以540名常居唐山市市内3个社区的13岁~18岁的青少年作为研究对象,采用一般自我分化量表和症状自评量表(SCL 90)测评,结合青少年对心理健康知识的了解情况分析自我分化水平与心理健康的关系。[结果]自我分化程度高、低水平组青少年心理健康水平正常状态者分别为91.6%和84.8%,有异常心理问题者分别占8.4%和15.2%,两组差异有统计学意义(P <0.05);自我分化高、低水平组青少年的躯体化、强迫、人际关系敏感、抑郁、焦虑、敌对评分差异有统计学意义(P <0.05);自我分化程度高、

  12. Contemporary perspectives on spirituality and mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Pulkit

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper strives to elucidate the complex yet intimate relation between spirituality and mental health from contemporary perspectives. The diverse and constantly evolving views that spiritualists and mental health professionals have held toward each other over last century are discussed with special accent on the transpersonal spiritual framework within psychology. The role of spirituality in promoting mental health and alleviating mental illness is highlighted. The paper is concluded with an increasing need to integrate spirituality within the mental health field albeit there are several impediments in achieving the same, which need to be worked through circumspectly.

  13. Contemporary perspectives on spirituality and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pulkit; Charak, Ruby; Sharma, Vibha

    2009-01-01

    The paper strives to elucidate the complex yet intimate relation between spirituality and mental health from contemporary perspectives. The diverse and constantly evolving views that spiritualists and mental health professionals have held toward each other over last century are discussed with special accent on the transpersonal spiritual framework within psychology. The role of spirituality in promoting mental health and alleviating mental illness is highlighted. The paper is concluded with an increasing need to integrate spirituality within the mental health field albeit there are several impediments in achieving the same, which need to be worked through circumspectly. PMID:21938086

  14. Mental health problems and speech development in toddlers with physical illnesses

    OpenAIRE

    Marković Jasminka; Romić Teodora

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Mental health problems develop more and more frequently in children and adolescents. Children with physical illnesses are at a particular risk of developing associated mental health problems and it is important to study this association in order to detect and treat these problems on time. This study was aimed at determining whether there were differences in the presence of mental health problems and delayed speech development in children with ...

  15. Step-Up: Promoting Youth Mental Health and Development in Inner-City High Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Alicea, Stacey; Pardo, Gisselle; Conover, Kelly; Gopalan, Geetha; McKay, Mary

    2011-01-01

    African American and Latino youth who reside in inner-city communities are at heightened risk for compromised mental health, as their neighborhoods are too often associated with serious stressors, including elevated rates of poverty, substance abuse, community violence, as well as scarce youth-supportive resources, and mental health care options. Many aspects of disadvantaged urban contexts have the potential to thwart successful youth development. Adolescents with elevated mental health need...

  16. The Role of Religion and Stress in Sexual Identity and Mental Health Among LGB Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Page, Matthew J. L.; Lindahl, Kristin M.; Malik, Neena M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated religious stress, gay-related stress, sexual identity, and mental health outcomes in lesbian, gay and bisexual adolescents and emerging adults. The model examined negative LGB identity as a mediator of the relationships between a) religious stress and mental health, and b) gay-related stress and mental health. The data indicated that negative LGB identity fully accounted for both relationships. Findings suggest that a negative sense of sexual identity for LGB youth hel...

  17. Accessibility of adolescent health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Richter

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Adolescents represent a large proportion of the population. As they mature and become sexually active, they face more serious health risks. Most face these risks with too little factual information, too little guidance about sexual responsibility and multiple barriers to accessing health care. A typical descriptive and explanatory design was used to determine what the characteristics of an accessible adolescent health service should be. Important results and conclusions that were reached indicate that the adolescent want a medical doctor and a registered nurse to be part of the health team treating them and they want to be served in the language of their choice. Family planning, treatment of sexually transmitted diseases and psychiatric services for the prevention of suicide are services that should be included in an adolescent accessible health service. The provision of health education concerning sexual transmitted diseases and AIDS is a necessity. The service should be available thought out the week (included Saturdays and within easy reach. It is recommended that minor changes in existing services be made, that will contribute towards making a health delivery service an adolescent accessible service. An adolescent accessible health service can in turn make a real contribution to the community’s efforts to improve the health of its adolescents and can prove to be a rewarding professional experience to the health worker.

  18. American Christian Engagement With Mental Health and Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinghorn, Warren A

    2016-01-01

    Although religious belief and practice are relevant to mental health outcomes, many clinicians lack knowledge of particular religious traditions required to make informed judgments about referral to and collaboration with faith-based organizations and clinicians. This Open Forum examines five diverse American Christian approaches to mental health and mental illness-pastoral care and counseling, biblical counseling, integrationism, Christian psychology, and the work of the Institute for the Psychological Sciences--that are relevant for contemporary mental health service delivery. Each of these movements is briefly described and placed in historical, conceptual, and organizational context. Knowledge of the diverse and varied terrain of American Christian engagement with mental health care can inform clinicians' interactions with faith-based providers, clarify opportunities for responsible collaboration, and provide important insight into religious subcultures with faith-based concerns about contemporary psychiatric care. PMID:26369885

  19. Exploring the Contributions of School Belonging to Complete Mental Health Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffa, Kathryn; Dowdy, Erin; Furlong, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Considering the many positive outcomes associated with adolescents' sense of school belonging, including psychological functioning, it is possible that including an assessment of school belonging within a complete mental health screening process could contribute to the prediction of students' future mental health status. This exploratory study…

  20. Smoking and adolescent health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-hee Park

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available With the Westernization and opening of our society, adolescents’ smoking is increasing and being popularized. Many adolescents start smoking at an early age out of curiosity and venturesomeness, and earlier start of smoking makes it more difficult to quit smoking. Adolescents’ habitual smoking not only becomes a gateway to all kinds of substance abuse but also causes various health problems including upper respiratory infection, immature lung development, reduced maximum vital capacity, and lung cancer. Therefore, it is quite important to prevent adolescents from smoking. The lowering of adolescents’ smoking rate cannot be achieved only through social restrictions such as stereotyped education on the harms of smoking and ID checking. In order to lower adolescents’ smoking rate substantially, each area of society should develop standardized programs and make related efforts. As adolescents’ smoking is highly influenced by home environment or school life, it is necessary to make efforts in effective education and social reinforcement in school, to establish related norms, and to execute preventive education using peer groups. When these efforts are spread throughout society in cooperation with homes and communities, they will be helpful to protect adolescents’ health and improve their quality of life.

  1. Child and Adolescent Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... long time after a loss or death Uses alcohol or drugs Exercises, diets and/or binge-eats obsessively Hurts other people or destroys property Has low or no energy Smokes, drinks, or use drugs Feels like he or she can’t control own emotions Has thoughts of suicide Harms her/himself, such ...

  2. Cyberbullying and adolescent mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keita; Asaga, Reiko; Sourander, Andre; Hoven, Christina W; Mandell, Donald

    2012-01-01

    The rapid growth of electronic and computer-based communication and information sharing during the past decade has dramatically changed social interactions, especially among teenagers. Cyberbullying has emerged as a new form of bullying and harassment, and it has been shown to possess different ramifications from traditional school-yard bullying. This problem has emerged in nations worldwide. Cyber victims have reported various emotional and behavioral symptoms, along with school-related problems. This paper reviews international cross-sectional studies relating to the definition, prevalence, age, and gender differences inherent in cyberbullying. Psychosocial and risk factors associated with cyberbullying are also addressed. Prevention and intervention strategies for school officials and parents are suggested. Healthcare providers, policy makers, and families must be ever-mindful of the grave dangers cyberbullying poses to youths. Longitudinal studies are warranted to assess the psychological risk factors of cyberbullying. PMID:22909909

  3. Holistic Health: Does It Really Include Mental Health?

    OpenAIRE

    Kimberly K. McClanahan; Marlene B. Huff; Hatim A. Omar

    2006-01-01

    Holistic health, incorporating mind and body as equally important and unified components of health, is a concept utilized in some health care arenas in the United States (U.S.) over the past 30 years. However, in the U.S., mental health is not seen as conceptually integral to physical health and, thus, holistic health cannot be realized until the historical concept of mind-body dualism, continuing stigma regarding mental illness, lack of mental health parity in insurance, and inaccurate publi...

  4. Enhancing early engagement with mental health services by young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Jane; Birrell, Emma

    2014-01-01

    International studies have shown that the prevalence of mental illness, and the fundamental contribution it make to the overall disease burden, is greatest in children and young people. Despite this high burden, adolescents and young adults are the least likely population group to seek help or to access professional care for mental health problems. This issue is particularly problematic given that untreated, or poorly treated, mental disorders are associated with both short- and long-term functional impairment, including poorer education and employment opportunities, potential comorbidity, including drug and alcohol problems, and a greater risk for antisocial behavior, including violence and aggression. This cycle of poor mental health creates a significant burden for the young person, their family and friends, and society as a whole. Australia is enviably positioned to substantially enhance the well-being of young people, to improve their engagement with mental health services, and - ultimately - to improve mental health. High prevalence but potentially debilitating disorders, such as depression and anxiety, are targeted by the specialized youth mental health service, headspace: the National Youth Mental Health Foundation and a series of Early Psychosis Prevention and Intervention Centres, will provide early intervention specialist services for low prevalence, complex illnesses. Online services, such as ReachOut.com by Inspire Foundation, Youthbeyondblue, Kids Helpline, and Lifeline Australia, and evidence-based online interventions, such as MoodGYM, are also freely available, yet a major challenge still exists in ensuring that young people receive effective evidence-based care at the right time. This article describes Australian innovation in shaping a comprehensive youth mental health system, which is informed by an evidence-based approach, dedicated advocacy and, critically, the inclusion of young people in service design, development, and ongoing evaluation to

  5. Promoting and Protecting Mental Health as Flourishing: A Complementary Strategy for Improving National Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Corey L. M.

    2007-01-01

    This article summarizes the conception and diagnosis of the mental health continuum, the findings supporting the two continua model of mental health and illness, and the benefits of flourishing to individuals and society. Completely mentally healthy adults--individuals free of a 12-month mental disorder and flourishing--reported the fewest missed…

  6. Doing things together: adolescent health and family rituals

    OpenAIRE

    Compan, E; Moreno, J.; Ruiz, M; Pascual, E.

    2002-01-01

    Study objectives: (1) To describe the union and life cycle of family rituals, such as specific habits of sharing daily meals, special events or other family activities, and (2) to analyse the relation between the practice of family rituals and the use by adolescents of mental health related ambulatory care services. Design: A cross sectional study. Setting: A public mental health care outpatient clinic, secondary educational centres and Alicante University (School of Social Workers and Nursin...

  7. New Developments in Mental Health and Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Fazenda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The community mental health model implies a bio‐psycho‐social perspective of mental health/illness issues, as well as a set of values that advocate equity in service access, community treatment, respect for human rights, a recovery vision, promotion of independent living, social integration and user and family participation. In accordance with the priorities set by the European Union, mental health services must guarantee that these principles are applied in the prevention, treatment, rehabilitation and promotion of mental health. Inter‐sector cooperation is an essential part of developing transversal policies that ensure society’s involvement in mental health promotion. Advances in community mental health in‐ dicate the relevance of considering human rights both in policy development and in practice, of the recovery perspective and of the need to promote the participation of user and carer organizations.

  8. Pilot mental health: expert working group recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Following a March 27, 2012, incident in which a pilot of a major commercial airline experienced a serious disturbance in his mental health, the Aerospace Medical Association formed an Ad Hoc Working Group on Pilot Mental Health. The working group met several times and analyzed current medical standards for evaluating pilot mental health. The result of the working group was a letter sent to the FAA and other organizations worldwide interested in medical standards. The Committee found that it is neither productive nor cost effective to perform extensive psychiatric evaluations as part of the routine pilot aeromedical assessment. However it did recommend greater attention be given to mental health issues by aeromedical examiners, especially to the more common and detectable mental health conditions and life stressors that can affect pilots and flight performance. They encouraged this through increased education and global recognition of the importance of mental health in aviation safety. PMID:23316549

  9. Alternative interventions for young men's mental health

    OpenAIRE

    McGale, Nadine

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of this thesis was to explore the effectiveness and acceptability of alternative interventions for facilitating help-seeking and improving the mental health of young adult males. Based on recommendations for innovative ways to develop interventions that facilitate mental health help-seeking specific to men (Addis & Mahalik, 2003), the interventions employed in this thesis integrate exercise and psychotherapeutic strategies, and make use of sport as a vehicle for mental health pr...

  10. Robotics Technology in Mental Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Riek, Laurel D.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the existing and future use of robotics and intelligent sensing technology in mental health care. While the use of this technology is nascent in mental health care, it represents a potentially useful tool in the practitioner's toolbox. The goal of this chapter is to provide a brief overview of the field, discuss the recent use of robotics technology in mental health care practice, explore some of the design issues and ethical issues of using robots in this space, and fi...

  11. Challenges in mental health nursing: current opinion

    OpenAIRE

    Sabella, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Donna Sabella, Theresa Fay-Hillier College of Nursing and Health Professions, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: The current mental health care system in the US continues to struggle with providing adequate care and services to all that require it due to limited resources, biases from both other professions and the public, and the complexities of treatment of many of those individuals or populations that suffer from mental illness. Mental health nurses, also referred to as ps...

  12. Educating occupational therapists for mental health practice

    OpenAIRE

    Craik, C.; Austin, C

    2000-01-01

    The last of four elements of the Mental Health Project, established by the College of Occupational Therapists to produce a position paper on the way ahead for research, education and practice in occupational therapy in mental health (Craik et al 1998a), focused on educating occupational therapy students to work in mental health. First, the views of practitioners about their pre-registration education were derived from one component of the practitioners' survey (Craik et al 1998b). One hun...

  13. Mental health training program for community mental health staff in Guangzhou, China: effects on knowledge of mental illness and stigma

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jie; Li, Juan; Huang, Yuanguang; THORNICROFT, GRAHAM

    2014-01-01

    Background In order to reduce the huge treatment gap in mental health, WHO has called for integrating mental health into primary care. The purposes of this study are to provide a training course to improve the community mental health staff’s knowledge of mental health and reduce stigma related to mental illness, as well as to evaluate the impact of this training on knowledge and stigma. Methods The training intervention was a one day course for community mental health staff in Guangzhou, Chin...

  14. “THE ASSOCIATION OF INTERNET USAGE WITH MENTAL HEALTH AMONG ADOLESCENCE”

    OpenAIRE

    Nimbalkar M. R.

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to know the association of internet usage with mental health among adolescence. To achieve the goal of the study, a sample of 60 junior college students was selected those are using internet. Internet usage was measured by ‘Internet Addiction Test’ (IAT) prepared by Dr. Kemberly Young and Mental Health of adolescences was measured by ‘Mental Health Test’ (MHT) prepared by Anadkumar and Giridhar P. Thakur. Pearson correlation-coefficient was calculated for data a...

  15. Psychopathology and functional impairment among patients attending an adolescent health clinic: Implications for healthcare model reform

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Sushila; Subramanian, Balakrishnan; Russell, Paul Swamidhas Sudhakar

    2008-01-01

    Background In developing countries, primary health care facilities, such as adolescent health clinics, are frequently the first contact for an adolescent with a health professional for a myriad of health problems including mental health issues. Psychopathology is prevalent among adolescents, and causes significant educational, occupational and social impairment. The presence of psychopathology with impairment requires the development of treatment models to address both of these components. We...

  16. Promoting mental health and preventing mental illness in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, S.; Jenkins, R; Burch, T.; Nasir, L.C.; Fisher, B; Giotaki, G.; Gnani, S; Hertel, L; Marks, M.; Mathers, N.; Millington-Sanders, C.; D. Morris; Ruprah-Shah, B.; Stange, K.; Thomas, P

    2016-01-01

    This paper calls for the routine integration of mental health promotion and prevention into UK General Practice in order to reduce the burden of mental and physical disorders and the ensuing pressure on General Practice. The proposals & the resulting document (https://ethicscharity. files.wordpress.com/2015/09/rcgp_keymsg_150925_v5.pdf) arise from an expert ‘Think Tank’ convened by the London Journal of Primary Care, Educational Trust for Health Improvement through Cognitive Strategies (ETHIC...

  17. Mental health first aid training for high school teachers: a cluster randomized trial

    OpenAIRE

    Jorm Anthony F; Kitchener Betty A; Sawyer Michael G; Scales Helen; Cvetkovski Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Mental disorders often have their first onset during adolescence. For this reason, high school teachers are in a good position to provide initial assistance to students who are developing mental health problems. To improve the skills of teachers in this area, a Mental Health First Aid training course was modified to be suitable for high school teachers and evaluated in a cluster randomized trial. Methods The trial was carried out with teachers in South Australian high scho...

  18. Holistic health: does it really include mental health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClanahan, Kimberly K; Huff, Marlene B; Omar, Hatim A

    2006-01-01

    Holistic health, incorporating mind and body as equally important and unified components of health, is a concept utilized in some health care arenas in the United States (U.S.) over the past 30 years. However, in the U.S., mental health is not seen as conceptually integral to physical health and, thus, holistic health cannot be realized until the historical concept of mind-body dualism, continuing stigma regarding mental illness, lack of mental health parity in insurance, and inaccurate public perceptions regarding mental illness are adequately addressed and resolved. Until then, mental and physical health will continue to be viewed as disparate entities rather than parts of a unified whole. We conclude that the U.S. currently does not generally incorporate the tenets of holistic health in its view of the mental and physical health of its citizens, and provide some suggestions for changing that viewpoint. PMID:17370005

  19. Holistic Health: Does It Really Include Mental Health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly K. McClanahan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Holistic health, incorporating mind and body as equally important and unified components of health, is a concept utilized in some health care arenas in the United States (U.S. over the past 30 years. However, in the U.S., mental health is not seen as conceptually integral to physical health and, thus, holistic health cannot be realized until the historical concept of mind-body dualism, continuing stigma regarding mental illness, lack of mental health parity in insurance, and inaccurate public perceptions regarding mental illness are adequately addressed and resolved. Until then, mental and physical health will continue to be viewed as disparate entities rather than parts of a unified whole. We conclude that the U.S. currently does not generally incorporate the tenets of holistic health in its view of the mental and physical health of its citizens, and provide some suggestions for changing that viewpoint.

  20. Strategies for coping with stress as predictors of mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Kamile Bahar Aydın

    2010-01-01

    Problem Statement: According to the relevant literature, strategies for coping with stress affect adolescent’s mental and physical health, school attendance and adaptation, academic achievement. If strategies for coping with stress suggested by Csikszentmihalyi are taught to adolescents, a more effective use of psychic energy and thus an increase in subjective experience quality can be achieved.Purpose of the Study: The aim of this study is to examine whether strategies coping with stre...

  1. Refugee children: mental health and effective interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacione, Laura; Measham, Toby; Rousseau, Cécile

    2013-02-01

    The mental health consequences of war and other forms of organized violence for children represent a serious global public health issue. Much of the research on the mental health of war-affected civilians has focused on refugees who have sought asylum in high-income countries and face the dual stress of a traumatic past and resettlement. This review will focus on the mental health of refugee children who have fled war as well as interventions to both prevent and treat adverse mental health outcomes. While war can have devastating mental health consequences, children raised in the midst of armed conflict also display resilience. Effective interventions for refugee children will be discussed both in terms of prevention and treatment of psychopathology, with a focus on recent developments in the field. PMID:23307563

  2. Gender Differences in the Longitudinal Impact of Exposure to Violence on Mental Health in Urban Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zona, Kate; Milan, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    There is evidence of gender differences in psychopathology during adolescence, but little research has investigated gender differences in trauma-related symptoms. Exposure to violence is a commonly experienced potentially traumatic event among urban adolescents, and the few studies examining gender differences in its mental health impact have…

  3. Mental health expectancy--the European perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagger, C; Ritchie, K; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik;

    1998-01-01

    The increase in life expectancy observed over the last decade has particular relevance for mental health conditions of old age, such as dementia. Although mental disorders have been estimated to be responsible for 60% of all disabilities, until recently population health indicators such as health...... expectancies have concentrated on calculating disability-free life expectancy based on physical functioning. In 1994, a European Network for the Calculation of Health Expectancies (Euro-REVES) was established, one of its aims being the development and promotion of mental health expectancies. Such indicators...

  4. Unemployment Impairs Mental Health: Meta-Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Karsten I.; Moser, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    The effect of unemployment on mental health was examined with meta-analytic methods across 237 cross-sectional and 87 longitudinal studies. The average overall effect size was d = 0.51 with unemployed persons showing more distress than employed persons. A significant difference was found for several indicator variables of mental health (mixed…

  5. Mental Health of Students. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of School Nurses (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that mental health is as critical to academic success as physical well-being. School nurses play a vital role in the school community by promoting positive mental health development in students through school/community-based programs and curricula. As members of…

  6. Marketing and Community Mental Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferniany, Isaac W.; Garove, William E.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests that a marketing approach can be applied to community mental health centers. Marketing is a management orientation of providing services for, not to, patients in a systematic manner, which can help mental health centers improve services, strengthen community image, achieve financial independence and aid in staff recruitment. (Author)

  7. Positive Mental Health; measurement, relevance and implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, Sanne

    2012-01-01

    The professionalization of psychology yielded many advantages, but also led to a main focus on psychopathology in mental health care. This thesis investigated an additional positive approach to mental health, focusing on positive feelings and life satisfaction (emotional well-being) and optimal func

  8. Young People's Perceptions of Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Claire; Hill, Malcolm; Secker, Jenny

    2000-01-01

    Examined 12- to 14-year-olds' understanding of mental health and illness, responses to negative feelings, and perceived differences between themselves and adults. Found that the term "mental health" was little understood. Relationships with family and friends were considered a positive influence. Youth, especially boys, reported unsophisticated…

  9. Spirituality and Mental Health among Homeless Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, David R.; Moser, Stephanie E.; Shafer, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Mothers are one of the fastest growing segments of the homeless population in the United States. Although mental health problems often contribute to homelessness, little is known about the factors that affect mothers' mental health. To help identify protective factors, this longitudinal study examined the relationship between spirituality and…

  10. Global mental health and neuroscience: potential synergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Dan J; He, Yanling; Phillips, Anthony; Sahakian, Barbara J; Williams, John; Patel, Vikram

    2015-02-01

    Global mental health has emerged as an important specialty. It has drawn attention to the burden of mental illness and to the relative gap in mental health research and services around the world. Global mental health has raised the question of whether this gap is a developmental issue, a health issue, a human rights issue, or a combination of these issues-and it has raised awareness of the need to develop new approaches for building capacity, mobilising resources, and closing the research and treatment gap. Translational neuroscience has also advanced. It comprises an important conceptual approach to understanding the neurocircuitry and molecular basis of mental disorders, to rethinking how best to undertake research on the aetiology, assessment, and treatment of these disorders, with the ultimate aim to develop entirely new approaches to prevention and intervention. Some apparent contrasts exist between these fields; global mental health emphasises knowledge translation, moving away from the bedside to a focus on health systems, whereas translational neuroscience emphasises molecular neuroscience, focusing on transitions between the bench and bedside. Meanwhile, important opportunities exist for synergy between the two paradigms, to ensure that present opportunities in mental health research and services are maximised. Here, we review the approaches of global mental health and clinical neuroscience to diagnosis, pathogenesis, and intervention, and make recommendations for facilitating an integration of these two perspectives. PMID:26359754

  11. Community Mental Health Clinic Cost Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Healthcare Cost Report Information System (HCRIS) Dataset - Community Mental Health Center (CMHC). This data was reported on form CMS-2088-92. The data in this...

  12. Mental health screening in jails

    OpenAIRE

    Gagnon, Nathalie C.

    2009-01-01

    More than seven million individuals were admitted to North American jails in 2007, many with a serious mental disorder. Mentally disordered inmates are at an increase risk for self-harm and suicide, victimization and institutional disruption. The large number of mentally disordered inmates and the limited resources available in correctional settings make the proper identification of mentally disordered inmates difficult but critical. Legal and professional standards require jails to screen ev...

  13. [The sainsbury centre for mental health: forensic mental health services in England and wales].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, M; Duggan, S

    2008-06-01

    The Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health (SCMH) is a charity founded in 1985 by Gatsby Charitable Foundation. The SCMH works to improve the quality of life for people with mental health problems by influencing policy and practice in mental health and related services. Working to improve the quality of mental health care for people in prison is one of SCMH main work theme. This paper describes some epidemiological aspects of mental health situation of prisoners in England and Wales and the available forensic facilities to manage this kind of patients in prison. PMID:23128315

  14. Impact of organisational change on mental health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bamberger, Simon Grandjean; Vinding, Anker Lund; Larsen, Anelia; Nielsen, Peter; Fonager, Kirsten; Nielsen, René Nesgaard; Ryom, Pia; Omland, Øyvind

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge combining MeSH search terms for exposure and outcome. The criterion for inclusion was original data on exposure to organisational change with mental health problems as outcome. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies were included. We found in 11 out of 17 studies, an association between......Although limited evidence is available, organisational change is often cited as the cause of mental health problems. This paper provides an overview of the current literature regarding the impact of organisational change on mental health. A systematic search in PUBMED, PsychInfo and Web of...... organisational change and elevated risk of mental health problems was observed, with a less provident association in the longitudinal studies. Based on the current research, this review cannot provide sufficient evidence of an association between organisational change and elevated risk of mental health problems...

  15. Reflections on psychiatry and international mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Herrman

    2013-01-01

    Achieving adequate support for mental health in any country requires a unified approach. Strong links between psychiatrists, community leaders and patients and families that are based on negotiation and respect, are vital for progress. When strong partnerships exist, they can contribute to community understanding and advancement of psychiatry. This is the first step towards scaling up good quality care for those living with mental illnesses, preventing illnesses in those at risk, and promoting mental health through work with other community sectors. Partnerships are needed to support education and research in psychiatry, and improvements in quality of care wherever psychiatry is practiced, including primary health and community mental health services, hospitals and private practice. There are important roles for psychiatry in building the strength of organisations that champion the advocacy and support roles of service users and family carers, and encouraging partnerships for mental health promotion in the community.

  16. Health-related Physical Fitness in Children with Mental Retardation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazel Bazyar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Human health is highly dependent on the condition of health-related physical fitness and particularly body composition. Adolescence is unique in this regard, especially when the adolescents are mentally retarded, about whom information on physical fitness is limited. Thus, the objective of this paper was to study the components of health-related physical fitness with emphasis on body composition and weight gain and loss in mentally retarded students of Roodbar. Statistical sample included 91 mentally retarded male students with mean age of 13.44±1.56, mean height of 167±6.97, and mean IQ of 68.7±7.8. Physical fitness components were assessed using modified Brockport Physical Fitness Test (BPFT including cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition (by calculation of body mass index. The results indicated that in terms of body mass index, 40% of participants were underweight, 10% were overweight, and 10% were obese. In addition, body fat percentage was high in 11.9% of subjects and very high in 13% of them. The mean aerobic power of mentally retarded boys aged 12-14 was measured 31.5% (ml/kg/min, indicating 25% and 35% lower physical fitness, respectively, compared to their normal peers and the reference values. The present study revealed that a significant proportion of mentally retarded adolescents in Roodbar are suffering from either underweight or overweight. Moreover, their physical fitness in all components is not desirable compared to their normal peers.

  17. Urban and rural immigrant Latino youths' and adults' knowledge and beliefs about mental health resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Carolyn Marie; Gilchrist, Lauren; Vazquez, Gabriela; Leite, Amy; Raymond, Nancy

    2011-06-01

    Immigrant Latino youth experience mental health problems in the U.S. Cultural beliefs and knowledge may influence help-seeking behaviors. Two hundred thirty-four immigrant Latino respondents between 12 and 44 years of age completed a questionnaire assessing knowledge of and cultural beliefs regarding mental health resources for adolescents, symptoms, and help-seeking. Multivariate analyses showed that rural respondents were significantly less likely to know of mental health resources than urban-based immigrant Latinos. Knowledge and belief outcomes were also affected by age, gender, and length of time living in the community. Immigrant Latinos appear willing to seek professional help for mental health problems but may not know how to access this type of care, or may lack available services. Future research to inform interventions that increase awareness of accessible mental health services is suggested. Findings support systems-level changes including increased availability of culturally-specific mental health services, especially in rural areas. PMID:20835762

  18. New directions for community mental health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, M F

    1987-01-01

    Community Mental Health Centers and other quasi-public authorities are operating within a larger health market characterized by the rapid unfolding of a number of key trends in consumer behavior, provider supply, and financing. Each of these trends, though not readily apparent, is strongly reflected in the specialty mental health sector. Mental health managers are faced with fundamental choices about the direction of their respective organizations and the adequacy of their resources to proceed. Mr. Kipp outlines the market dynamics at issue, describes three basic alternatives, and offers some guidelines for management in charting a course. PMID:10287206

  19. Psychometric properties of a Mental Health Team Development Audit Tool.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Roncalli, Silvia

    2013-02-01

    To assist in improving team working in Community Mental Health Teams (CMHTs), the Mental Health Commission formulated a user-friendly but yet-to-be validated 25-item Mental Health Team Development Audit Tool (MHDAT).

  20. Benefit of joint response in a mental health crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Andrew Lancaster writes in Mental Health Practice about the critical role mobile crisis teams (MCTs) can play in delivering a joint response from the police and mental health services to people in a mental health crisis. PMID:27461336