WorldWideScience

Sample records for admissible initial states

  1. Initial time singularities and admissible initial states for a system of coupled scalar fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baacke, Juergen [Technische Univ. Dortmund (Germany). Fakultaet Physik; Kevlishvili, Nina [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); GAS, Tbilisi (Georgia). Andronikashvili Inst. of Physics

    2009-10-15

    We discuss the problem of initial states for a system of coupled scalar fields out of equilibrium in the one-loop approximation. The fields consist of classical background fields, taken constant in space, and quantum fluctuations. If the initial state is the adiabatic vacuum, i.e., the ground state of a Fock space of particle excitations that diagonalize the mass matrix, the energy-momentum tensor is infinite at t=0, its most singular part behaves as 1/t. When the system is coupled to gravity this presents a problem that we solve by a Bogoliubov transformation of the naive initial state. As a side result we also discuss the canonical formalism and the adiabatic particle number for such a system. Most of the formalism is presented for Minkowksi space. Embedding the system and its dynamics into a flat FRW universe is straightforward and we briefly address the essential modifications. (orig.)

  2. Initial time singularities and admissible initial states for a system of coupled scalar fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baacke, Juergen; Kevlishvili, Nina; GAS, Tbilisi

    2009-10-01

    We discuss the problem of initial states for a system of coupled scalar fields out of equilibrium in the one-loop approximation. The fields consist of classical background fields, taken constant in space, and quantum fluctuations. If the initial state is the adiabatic vacuum, i.e., the ground state of a Fock space of particle excitations that diagonalize the mass matrix, the energy-momentum tensor is infinite at t=0, its most singular part behaves as 1/t. When the system is coupled to gravity this presents a problem that we solve by a Bogoliubov transformation of the naive initial state. As a side result we also discuss the canonical formalism and the adiabatic particle number for such a system. Most of the formalism is presented for Minkowksi space. Embedding the system and its dynamics into a flat FRW universe is straightforward and we briefly address the essential modifications. (orig.)

  3. Pattern of Medical Admissions at Enugu State University of Science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Technology Teaching Hospital, Parklane, Enugu, 2Department of Community Medicine, University of Nigeria Teaching. Hospital, Ituku/Ozalla ... A review of medical admissions into the Enugu State University of Science and Technology. Teaching .... Cord lesions, rabies, Guilliane Barré syndrome, motor neuron disease and ...

  4. Pattern of medical admissions at Enugu state university of science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of medical admissions at Enugu state university of science and technology teaching hospital: a 5 year review. ... The diseases encountered most were diabetes mellitus‑735/3,865 (19.1%), hypertension/congestive cardiac failure‑703/3,865 (18.2%), strokes‑614/3,865 (15.9%) and human immunodeficiency virus ...

  5. Setting up pre-admission visits for children undergoing day surgery: a practice development initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Maria; Cummins, Ann; Kelleher, Ann

    2010-06-01

    The hospital experience can bring about a range of negative emotions for children. The literature clearly states that children who are prepared for surgery recover faster and have fewer negative effects. Pre-admission programmes seek to prepare children (and their parents) for surgery. This paper describes in detail how a pre-admission programme was established for children and their families who were scheduled for day case surgery.

  6. SIRS score on admission and initial concentration of IL-6 as severe acute pancreatitis outcome predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoric, Pavle; Pavle, Gregoric; Sijacki, Ana; Ana, Sijacki; Stankovic, Sanja; Sanja, Stankovic; Radenkovic, Dejan; Dejan, Radenkovic; Ivancevic, Nenad; Nenad, Ivancevic; Karamarkovic, Aleksandar; Aleksandar, Karamarkovic; Popovic, Nada; Nada, Popovic; Karadzic, Borivoje; Borivoje, Karadzic; Stijak, Lazar; Stefanovic, Branislav; Branislav, Stefanovic; Milosevic, Zoran; Zoran, Milosević; Bajec, Djordje; Djordje, Bajec

    2010-01-01

    Early recognition of severe form of acute pancreatitis is important because these patients need more agressive diagnostic and therapeutical approach an can develope systemic complications such as: sepsis, coagulopathy, Acute Lung Injury (ALI), Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS), Multiple Organ Failure (MOF). To determine role of the combination of Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) score and serum Interleukin-6 (IL-6) level on admission as predictor of illness severity and outcome of Severe Acute Pancreatitis (SAP). We evaluated 234 patients with first onset of SAP appears in last twenty four hours. A total of 77 (33%) patients died. SIRS score and serum IL-6 concentration were measured in first hour after admission. In 105 patients with SIRS score 3 and higher, initial measured IL-6 levels were significantly higher than in the group of remaining 129 patients (72 +/- 67 pg/mL, vs 18 +/- 15 pg/mL). All nonsurvivals were in the first group, with SIRS score 3 and 4 and initial IL-6 concentration 113 +/- 27 pg/mL. The values of C-reactive Protein (CRP) measured after 48h, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II) score on admission and Ranson score showed the similar correlation, but serum amylase level did not correlate significantly with Ranson score, IL-6 concentration and APACHE II score. The combination of SIRS score on admission and IL-6 serum concentration can be early, predictor of illness severity and outcome in SAP.

  7. State nuclear initiatives in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, P.L.; Stoiber, C.R.

    1977-01-01

    The paper deals with State nuclear initiatives regarding the role of nuclear power in the energy future of the United States. The question of whether and under what circumstances nuclear facilities should be used to generate electricity was put to the popular vote in several States in 1976. Some general principles of Federal-State relations are discussed with specific reference to nuclear regulations. The initiative mechanism itself is described as well as its legal form and background. The parallel developments in the State and Federal legislative consideration of nuclear issues is reviewed and the suggested reasons for the defeat of the proposals in the seven States concerned are discussed. Finally, the author draws some conclusions on the effects of the 1976 initiatives on future decision-making in the US on energy policy in general and nuclear power in particular. (NEA) [fr

  8. Data Sharing Between Providers and Quality Initiatives Eliminate Unnecessary Nursing Home Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Ryan J; Singal, Bonita M; Urquhart, Andrew G; Masini, Michael A; Hallstrom, Brian R

    2017-05-01

    The Michigan Arthroplasty Registry Collaborative Quality Initiative (MARCQI) has monitored discharge disposition, after total hip and knee arthroplasties, since inception in 2012 and found the standardized risk of extended care facility (ECF) placement to be highly variable between hospitals. The variation in standardized risks of ECF placement among MARCQI member sites was reported to the collaborative. At the May 2, 2014 quarterly meeting, a quality initiative was started, emphasizing the wide variability between hospitals, the contribution of hospital and surgeon to that variability using median odds ratios, and the need for outlier hospitals to initiate quality improvement (QI) processes. Patients from 29 hospitals that were members of MARCQI before the intervention were included in this analysis. We compared standardized risks before and after the intervention in the entire cohort, and for 3 hospitals that implemented institution-specific QI projects. We report changes in ECF placement, length of stay, emergency room visits, and readmissions over time. This study includes 31,347 patients before and 20,879 patients after the implementation of the quality initiative. The range in standardized risk dropped from 9.4%-46.1% to 9.4%-32.4% and the average dropped from 23.0% to 19.6%. Three outlier hospitals decreased their absolute risk of ECF placement by 12.2%, 8.9%, and 12.4% after QI, without increases in adverse outcomes. Discharge to ECF after primary hip and knee arthroplasties is highly variable and influenced by hospital and surgeon practices. Hospital-level QI measures can decrease ECF admissions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Nonimmigrant Admissions - Annual Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  10. Application of the Constrained Admissible Region Multiple Hypothesis Filter to Initial Orbit Determination of a Break-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelecy, Tom; Shoemaker, Michael; Jah, Moriba

    2013-08-01

    A break-up in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is simulated for 10 objects having area-to-mass ratios (AMR's) ranging from 0.1-10.0 m2/kg. The Constrained Admissible Region Multiple Hypothesis Filter (CAR-MHF) is applied to determining and characterizing the orbit and atmospheric drag parameters (CdA/m) simultaneously for each of the 10 objects with no a priori orbit or drag information. The results indicate that CAR-MHF shows promise for accurate, unambiguous and autonomous determination of the orbit and drag states.

  11. THE ADMISSION OF NEWLY CREATED STATES TO THE MEMBERSHIP OF THE UNITED NATIONS: THE CASE OF REPUBLIC OF MACEDONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milorad Petreski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The international law which regulates the formation, functioning and legal capacity of international organizations, and also the international law in the United Nations system, are always relevant and subject to progressive development, because the international relations are in constant dynamics. Each newly created state has one major foreign policy goal during its first years of formation or after obtaining independence – admission to the membership of the United Nations. That is because the decision of admission to the membership of the UN guarantees the country’s statehood which can no longer be questioned. The country becomes part of a global community of nations – the international community. Therefore, the present paper is a qualitative research regarding the admission of new states to the international community, and the decision-making process concerning the admission of new Member States to the UN.

  12. The effect of gun control laws on hospital admissions for children in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Jun; Lane, Rebecca S; Blass, Lawrence W; Perez, Eduardo A; Sola, Juan E

    2016-10-01

    Gun control laws vary greatly between states within the United States. We hypothesized that states with strict gun laws have lower mortality and resource utilization rates from pediatric firearms-related injury admissions. Kids' Inpatient Database (1997-2012) was searched for accidental (E922), self-inflicted (E955), assault (E965), legal intervention-related (E970), or undetermined circumstance (E985) firearm injuries. Patients were younger than 20 years and admitted for their injuries. Case incidence trends were examined for the study period. Propensity score-matched analyses were performed using 38 covariates to compare outcomes between states with strict or lenient gun control laws. Overall, 38,424 cases were identified, with an overall mortality of 7%. Firearm injuries were most commonly assault (64%), followed by accidental (25%), undetermined circumstance (7%), or self-inflicted (3%). A small minority involved military-grade weapons (0.2%). Most cases occurred in lenient gun control states (48%), followed by strict (47%) and neutral (6%).On 1:1 propensity score-matched analysis, in-hospital mortality by case was higher in lenient (7.5%) versus strict (6.5%) states, p = 0.013. Lenient states had a proportionally higher rate of accidental (31%) and self-inflicted injury (4%) versus strict states (17% and 1.6%, respectively), p gun control contributes not only to worse outcomes per case, but also to a more significant and detrimental impact on public health. Epidemiologic study, level III.

  13. Does the United States Naval Academy Admissions Board Evaluate an Applicant's Moral Values? If So, How?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clemans, Craig C

    2005-01-01

    .... This study explored that assumption. Through the literature review, this study examined the Admission Board's charter, each step of the admissions process and the practice used for evaluating an applicant's moral values...

  14. Initial States: IR and Collinear Divergences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavelle, Martin; McMullan, David

    2007-01-01

    The standard approach to the infra-red problem is to use the Bloch-Nordsieck trick to handle soft divergences and the Lee-Nauenberg (LN) theorem for collinear singularities. We show that this is inconsistent in the presence of massless initial particles. Furthermore, we show that using the LN theorem with such initial states introduces a non-convergent infinite series of diagrams at any fixed order in perturbation theory

  15. Reducing hospital admissions of healthy children with functional constipation: a quality initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneau, Mark; Mutyala, Ramakrishna; Sandweiss, David; Harnsberger, Janet; Varier, Raghu; Pohl, John F; Allen, Lauren; Thackeray, Callie; Zobell, Sarah; Maloney, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Functional constipation (FC) is a common medical problem in children, with minimal risk of long-term complications. We determined that a large number of children were being admitted to our children's hospital for FC in which there was no neurological or anatomical cause. Our hospital experienced a patient complication in which a patient died after inpatient treatment of FC. Subsequently, we developed a standardised approach to determine when paediatric patients needed hospitalisation for FC, as well as to develop a regimented outpatient therapeutic approach for such children to prevent hospitalisation. Our quality improvement initiative resulted in a large decrease in the number of children with FC admitted into the hospital as well as a decrease in the number of children needing faecal disimpaction in the operating room. Our quality improvement process can be used to decrease hospitalisations, decrease healthcare costs and improve patient care for paediatric FC.

  16. Hindcasting to measure ice sheet model sensitivity to initial states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aschwanden

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Validation is a critical component of model development, yet notoriously challenging in ice sheet modeling. Here we evaluate how an ice sheet system model responds to a given forcing. We show that hindcasting, i.e. forcing a model with known or closely estimated inputs for past events to see how well the output matches observations, is a viable method of assessing model performance. By simulating the recent past of Greenland, and comparing to observations of ice thickness, ice discharge, surface speeds, mass loss and surface elevation changes for validation, we find that the short term model response is strongly influenced by the initial state. We show that the thermal and dynamical states (i.e. the distribution of internal energy and momentum can be misrepresented despite a good agreement with some observations, stressing the importance of using multiple observations. In particular we identify rates of change of spatially dense observations as preferred validation metrics. Hindcasting enables a qualitative assessment of model performance relative to observed rates of change. It thereby reduces the number of admissible initial states more rigorously than validation efforts that do not take advantage of observed rates of change.

  17. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  18. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  19. Nonimmigrant Admissions - Fiscal Year 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  20. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  1. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  2. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  3. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  4. Nonimmigrant Admission: Fiscal Year 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  5. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  6. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  7. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  8. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  9. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  10. Final Report: Multi-State Sharing Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begoli, Edmon [ORNL; Boehmann, Brant [ORNL; DeNap, Frank A [ORNL

    2012-04-01

    In 2003 a joint effort between the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the U.S. Department of Justice created state and metropolitan intelligence fusion centers. These fusion centers were an effort to share law enforcement, disaster, and terrorism related information and intelligence between state and local jurisdictions and to share terrorism related intelligence between state and local law enforcement agencies and various federal entities. In 2006, DHS commissioned the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to establish and manage a groundbreaking program to assist local, state, and tribal leaders in developing the tools and methods required to anticipate and forestall terrorist events and to enhance disaster response. This program, called the Southeast Region Research Initiative (SERRI), combines science and technology with validated operational approaches to address regionally unique requirements and suggest regional solutions with the potential for national application. In 2009, SERRI sponsored the Multistate Sharing Initiative (MSSI) to assist state and metropolitan intelligence fusion centers with sharing information related to a wider variety of state interests than just terrorism. While these fusion centers have been effective at sharing data across organizations within their respective jurisdictions, their organizational structure makes bilateral communication with federal entities convenient and also allows information to be further disbursed to other local entities when appropriate. The MSSI-developed Suspicious Activity Report (SAR) sharing system allows state-to-state sharing of non-terrorism-related law enforcement and disaster information. Currently, the MSSI SAR system is deployed in Alabama, Kentucky, Tennessee, and South Carolina. About 1 year after implementation, cognizant fusion center personnel from each state were contacted to ascertain the status of their MSSI SAR systems. The overwhelming response from these individuals was that the MSSI

  11. Kennesaw State University Classroom Technology Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHaney, Jane; Wallace, Deborah; Taylor, Beverley

    The purpose of the Kennesaw State University (KSU) Coca Cola/Board of Regents Classroom Technology Initiative was to develop preservice and inservice teachers' expertise in educational technology such as computers, presentation software, and multimedia and to teach educators to apply those skills to content instruction. Project goals were to…

  12. Trends in state prison admission of offenders with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley-Engen, Mindy S; Cuddeback, Gary S; Gayman, Mathew D; Morrissey, Joseph P; Mancuso, David

    2010-12-01

    This study examined whether the proportion as well as the number of prisoners with behavioral health disorders have increased in recent years. Among 41,440 persons admitted to Washington State prisons from 1998 through 2006, this study estimated numbers and proportions of behavioral health disorders diagnosed while persons were in the community or in prison. There was a 44% increase in persons admitted with a diagnosed co-occurring substance use disorder between 1998 (N=477) and 2005 (N=686); this increase dropped to 27% by 2006 (N=604). Ratewise, increases in the annual proportion of persons admitted with co-occurring disorders were much smaller, ranging from approximately .2% to 2.6%. The growth in the numbers of prisoners with serious mental illness and co-occurring substance use disorders was not due primarily to increases in admission base rates. Nevertheless, more treatment resources will be needed in prisons to meet growing mental health care needs, and more community-based resources will be needed to ensure continuity of treatment and successful community reentry.

  13. LPRS by State, County, Country of Birth and Major Class of Admission 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — These tables offer county-level data for the top 200 counties of residence of new LPRs by major class of admission and by country of birth. OIS assigns county of...

  14. Short term effects of particle exposure on hospital admissions in the Mid-Atlantic states: a population estimate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itai Kloog

    Full Text Available Many studies report significant associations between PM(2.5 (particulate matter <2.5 micrometers and hospital admissions. These studies mostly rely on a limited number of monitors which introduces exposure error, and excludes rural and suburban populations from locations where monitors are not available, reducing generalizability and potentially creating selection bias.Using prediction models developed by our group, daily PM(2.5 exposure was estimated across the Mid-Atlantic (Washington D.C., and the states of Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia, New York and West Virginia. We then investigated the short-term effects of PM(2.5exposures on emergency hospital admissions of the elderly in the Mid-Atlantic region.We performed case-crossover analysis for each admission type, matching on day of the week, month and year and defined the hazard period as lag01 (a moving average of day of admission exposure and previous day exposure.We observed associations between short-term exposure to PM(2.5 and hospitalization for all outcomes examined. For example, for every 10-µg/m(3 increase in short-term PM(2.5 there was a 2.2% increase in respiratory diseases admissions (95% CI = 1.9 to 2.6, and a 0.78% increase in cardiovascular disease (CVD admission rate (95% CI = 0.5 to 1.0. We found differences in risk for CVD admissions between people living in rural and urban areas. For every10-µg/m(3 increase in PM(2.5 exposure in the 'rural' group there was a 1.0% increase (95% CI = 0.6 to 1.5, while for the 'urban' group the increase was 0.7% (95% CI = 0.4 to 1.0.Our findings showed that PM(2.5 exposure was associated with hospital admissions for all respiratory, cardio vascular disease, stroke, ischemic heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admissions. In addition, we demonstrate that our AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth based exposure models can be successfully applied to epidemiological studies investigating the health

  15. Predicting Freshman Grade Point Average From College Admissions Test Scores and State High School Test Scores

    OpenAIRE

    Koretz, Daniel; Yu, C; Mbekeani, Preeya Pandya; Langi, M.; Dhaliwal, Tasminda Kaur; Braslow, David Arthur

    2016-01-01

    The current focus on assessing “college and career readiness” raises an empirical question: How do high school tests compare with college admissions tests in predicting performance in college? We explored this using data from the City University of New York and public colleges in Kentucky. These two systems differ in the choice of college admissions test, the stakes for students on the high school test, and demographics. We predicted freshman grade point average (FGPA) from high school GPA an...

  16. Initial state radiation experiment at MAMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihovilovič, M.; Merkel, H. [Institut für Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Johann-Joachim-Becher-Weg 45, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: A1-Collaboration

    2013-11-07

    In an attempt to contribute further insight into the discrepancy between the Lamb shift and elastic scattering determinations of the proton charge radius, a new experiment at MAMI is underway, aimed at measuring proton form-factors at very low momentum transfers by using a new technique based on initial state radiation. This paper reports on first findings of the pilot measurement performed in 2010, whose main goal was to check the feasibility of the proposed experiment and to recognize and overcome potential obstacles before running the full experiment in 2013.

  17. An analytic initial-state parton shower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilian, W. [Siegen Univ. (Germany). Dept. Physik; Reuter, J.; Schmidt, S.; Wiesler, D. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    We present a new algorithm for an analytic parton shower. While the algorithm for the final-state shower has been known in the literature, the construction of an initial-state shower along these lines is new. The aim is to have a parton shower algorithm for which the full analytic form of the probability distribution for all branchings is known. For these parton shower algorithms it is therefore possible to calculate the probability for a given event to be generated, providing the potential to reweight the event after the simulation. We develop the algorithm for this shower including scale choices and angular ordering. Merging to matrix elements is used to describe high-energy tails of distributions correctly. Finally, we compare our results with those of other parton showers and with experimental data from LEP, Tevatron and LHC. (orig.)

  18. An analytic initial-state parton shower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilian, W.

    2011-12-01

    We present a new algorithm for an analytic parton shower. While the algorithm for the final-state shower has been known in the literature, the construction of an initial-state shower along these lines is new. The aim is to have a parton shower algorithm for which the full analytic form of the probability distribution for all branchings is known. For these parton shower algorithms it is therefore possible to calculate the probability for a given event to be generated, providing the potential to reweight the event after the simulation. We develop the algorithm for this shower including scale choices and angular ordering. Merging to matrix elements is used to describe high-energy tails of distributions correctly. Finally, we compare our results with those of other parton showers and with experimental data from LEP, Tevatron and LHC. (orig.)

  19. Non-traumatic incidental findings in patients undergoing whole-body computed tomography at initial emergency admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroczek, Eduard K; Wieners, Gero; Steffen, Ingo; Lindner, Tobias; Streitparth, Florian; Hamm, Bernd; Maurer, Martin H

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the number, localisation and importance of non-traumatic incidental findings (IFs) in patients with suspected or obvious multiple trauma undergoing whole-body CT (WBCT) in a level-1 trauma centre. Between January 2009 and December 2013, a total of 2440 patients with trauma undergoing WBCT at admission to a level-1 trauma centre of a university hospital were retrospectively analysed, through imaging IFs unrelated to trauma with the radiological reports. All IFs were grouped into four categories according to their clinical relevance. Category 1: urgent treatment or further clarification needed; category 2: further examination and follow-up within 3-6 months required; category 3: findings with no immediate consequences for the treatment of the patient but of potential relevance in the future; category 4: harmless findings. Altogether, 5440 IFs in 2440 patients (1735 male, 705 female; mean age 45.1 years) were documented. In 204 patients (8.4%) urgent category 1 findings were reported, 766 patients (31.4%) had category 2 findings, 1236 patients (50.7%) had category 3 findings and 1173 patients (48.1%) had category 4 findings. Most IFs were detected in the abdomen/pelvis (42.5%). 602 (24.7%) of the patients had no IFs. WBCT scans of unrelated trauma patients demonstrate a high rate of IF. A substantial percentage (8.4%) of patients had urgent category 1IFs and a high percentage (31.4%) had category 2 IFs requiring a follow-up. This high number of patients with polytrauma undergoing WBCT, having IFs of high relevance, poses a major challenge for the level-1 trauma centre in the acute and postacute management of these patients. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. How many schools adopt interviews during the student admission process across the health professions in the United States of America?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Greer; Startsman, Laura F; Bankston, Karen; Michaels, Julia; Danek, Jennifer C; Fair, Malika

    2016-01-01

    Health profession schools use interviews during the admissions process to identify certain non-cognitive skills that are needed for success in diverse, inter-professional settings. This study aimed to assess the use of interviews during the student admissions process across health disciplines at schools in the United States of America in 2014. The type and frequency of non-cognitive skills assessed were also evaluated. Descriptive methods were used to analyze a sample of interview rubrics collected as part of a national survey on admissions in the health professions, which surveyed 228 schools of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, and public health. Of the 228 schools, 130 used interviews. The most desirable non-cognitive skills from 34 schools were identified as follows: communication skills (30), motivation (22), readiness for the profession (17), service (12), and problem-solving (12). Ten schools reported using the multiple mini-interview format, which may indicate potential for expanding this practice. Disparities in the use of interviewing across health professions should be verified to help schools adopt interviews during student admissions processes.

  1. Post-Affirmative Action: A Phenomenological Study of Admission Initiatives by Chief Diversity Officers to Support Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gichuru, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the experiences of chief diversity officers (CDOs) and how they enhanced admission of minority students in the post-affirmative action era. Six chief diversity officers, who played a pivotal leadership role in diversity of their respective campuses, described their experiences. Using…

  2. Admissions Standards and the Use of Key Marketing Techniques by United States' Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldgehn, Leslie A.

    1989-01-01

    A survey of admissions deans and directors investigated the use and perceived effectiveness of 15 well-known marketing techniques: advertising, advertising research, a marketing plan, market positioning, market segmentation, marketing audit, marketing research, pricing, program and service accessibility, program development, publicity, target…

  3. Predicting Persistence and Withdrawal of Open Admissions Students at Virginia State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambe, Joseph T.

    1984-01-01

    A study of persistence/dropout among open admissions college students found: (1) accurate predictions cannot be made for individual students at the time of matriculation; and (2) it is possible to predict that about 80 percent of future groups will fall in the persist category after two semesters, 51 percent after four semesters. (CMG)

  4. Predicting Freshman Grade Point Average From College Admissions Test Scores and State High School Test Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Koretz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The current focus on assessing “college and career readiness” raises an empirical question: How do high school tests compare with college admissions tests in predicting performance in college? We explored this using data from the City University of New York and public colleges in Kentucky. These two systems differ in the choice of college admissions test, the stakes for students on the high school test, and demographics. We predicted freshman grade point average (FGPA from high school GPA and both college admissions and high school tests in mathematics and English. In both systems, the choice of tests had only trivial effects on the aggregate prediction of FGPA. Adding either test to an equation that included the other had only trivial effects on prediction. Although the findings suggest that the choice of test might advantage or disadvantage different students, it had no substantial effect on the over- and underprediction of FGPA for students classified by race-ethnicity or poverty.

  5. Grover's quantum search algorithm for an arbitrary initial mixed state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biham, Eli; Kenigsberg, Dan

    2002-01-01

    The Grover quantum search algorithm is generalized to deal with an arbitrary mixed initial state. The probability to measure a marked state as a function of time is calculated, and found to depend strongly on the specific initial state. The form of the function, though, remains as it is in the case of initial pure state. We study the role of the von Neumann entropy of the initial state, and show that the entropy cannot be a measure for the usefulness of the algorithm. We give few examples and show that for some extremely mixed initial states (carrying high entropy), the generalized Grover algorithm is considerably faster than any classical algorithm

  6. The Dependence of Chimera States on Initial Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yue-E; Li Hai-Hong

    2015-01-01

    A chimera state consisting of both coherent and incoherent groups is a fascinating spatial pattern in non-locally coupled identical oscillators. It is thought that random initial conditions hardly evolve to chimera states. In this work, we study the dependence of chimera states on initial conditions. We show that random initial conditions may lead to chimera states and the chance of realizing chimera states becomes increasing when the model parameters are moving away from the boundary of their stable regime. (paper)

  7. Newborns Referred for Therapeutic Hypothermia: Association between Initial Degree of Encephalopathy and Severity of Brain Injury (What About the Newborns with Mild Encephalopathy on Admission?).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne-Loranger, Maude; Sheppard, Megan; Ali, Nabeel; Saint-Martin, Christine; Wintermark, Pia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article was to describe the severity of brain injury and/or mortality in a cohort of newborns referred for therapeutic hypothermia, in relation to the degree of encephalopathy on admission, and to especially look at the ones with initial mild encephalopathy. Term newborns with perinatal depression referred to our neonatal intensive care unit for possible hypothermia treatment from 2008 to 2012 were enrolled prospectively. The modified Sarnat score on admission was correlated with severity of brain injury on brain imaging and/or autopsy. A total of 215 newborns were referred for possible cooling. Sixty percent (128/215) were cooled. Most of the not-cooled newborns with an available brain magnetic resonance imaging (85% = 50/59) had an initial mild encephalopathy, and 40% (20/50) developed brain injury. Some cooled newborns had an initial mild encephalopathy (12% = 13/108); only 31% (4/13) developed brain injury. Our results demonstrated that several newborns with an initial mild encephalopathy developed subsequent brain injury, especially when they were not cooled. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. The State of the NIH BRAIN Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroshetz, Walter; Gordon, Joshua; Adams, Amy; Beckel-Mitchener, Andrea; Churchill, James; Farber, Gregory; Freund, Michelle; Gnadt, Jim; Hsu, Nina; Langhals, Nicholas; Lisanby, Sarah; Liu, Guoying; Peng, Grace; Ramos, Khara; Steinmetz, Michael; Talley, Edmund; White, Samantha

    2018-06-19

    The BRAIN Initiative® arose from a grand challenge to "accelerate the development and application of new technologies that will enable researchers to produce dynamic pictures of the brain that show how individual brain cells and complex neural circuits interact at the speed of thought." The BRAIN Initiative is a public-private effort focused on the development and use of powerful tools for acquiring fundamental insights about how information processing occurs in the central nervous system. As the Initiative enters its fifth year, NIH has supported over 500 principal investigators, who have answered the Initiative's challenge via hundreds of publications describing novel tools, methods, and discoveries that address the Initiative's seven scientific priorities. We describe scientific advances produced by individual labs, multi-investigator teams, and entire consortia that, over the coming decades, will produce more comprehensive and dynamic maps of the brain, deepen our understanding of how circuit activity can produce a rich tapestry of behaviors, and lay the foundation for understanding how its circuitry is disrupted in brain disorders. Much more work remains to bring this vision to fruition, and NIH continues to look to the diverse scientific community, from mathematics, to physics, chemistry, engineering, neuroethics, and neuroscience, to ensure that the greatest scientific benefit arises from this unique research Initiative. Copyright © 2018 the authors.

  9. Political initiative needed in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollister, K.

    1979-01-01

    The financing of nuclear power stations in the United States is in trouble mainly because of the long lead times caused by licensing. It will again become feasible when legislation reduces the construction time to eight years or less. The overriding need to protect the dollar by reducing oil imports, will lead the US Government to embrace nuclear power openly. (U.K.)

  10. Diversity among Equals: Educational Opportunity and the State of Affirmative Admissions in New England. Charting Educational Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelen, Stephen P.; Berger, Joseph B.; Crosson, Patricia H.

    This report reviews the practice of Affirmative Admissions as a strategy for achieving diversity within New England colleges and universities. It shows how educational leaders perceive Affirmative Admissions, the nature of regional Affirmative Admissions policies, and the numbers of student affected by current enrollment strategies. This report is…

  11. Evaluating U.S. States climate change initiatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, P

    2004-07-01

    This paper evaluates sub-federal efforts to mitigate climate change in the United States through a range of climate-relevant initiatives, identifying principal trends and detailing climate-relevant initiatives in several states. These strategies include renewable electricity mandates, State and regional greenhouse gas emissions inventories, mandatory greenhouse gas emissions reporting, State greenhouse gas emissions caps, greenhouse gas emissions reductions from motor vehicles, and greenhouse gas emissions cap-and-trade programs for electric generation in several States. Many municipalities in the United States are also pursuing a range of climate-relevant initiatives, those actions are beyond the scope of this paper, but it should be noted they also influence state and national consideration of climate-relevant initiatives in the United States. (author)

  12. Evaluating U.S. States climate change initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, P.

    2004-01-01

    This paper evaluates sub-federal efforts to mitigate climate change in the United States through a range of climate-relevant initiatives, identifying principal trends and detailing climate-relevant initiatives in several states. These strategies include renewable electricity mandates, State and regional greenhouse gas emissions inventories, mandatory greenhouse gas emissions reporting, State greenhouse gas emissions caps, greenhouse gas emissions reductions from motor vehicles, and greenhouse gas emissions cap-and-trade programs for electric generation in several States. Many municipalities in the United States are also pursuing a range of climate-relevant initiatives, those actions are beyond the scope of this paper, but it should be noted they also influence state and national consideration of climate-relevant initiatives in the United States. (author)

  13. Organized Labor's Participation in State Workplace Literacy Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Anthony R.

    The literature shows that state federations of labor should be, and many are, actively involved in current state literacy initiatives. The United States must develop a coherent and comprehensive system of lifetime education. This will require a greater commitment of public and private resources to education and training. Too many employers are…

  14. Initial state with shear in peripheral heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magas, V. K.; Gordillo, J.; Strottman, D.; Xie, Y. L.; Csernai, L. P.

    2018-06-01

    In the present work we propose a new way of constructing the initial state for further hydrodynamic simulation of relativistic heavy ion collisions based on Bjorken-like solution applied streak by streak in the transverse plane. Previous fluid dynamical calculations in Cartesian coordinates with an initial state based on a streak by streak Yang-Mills field led for peripheral higher energy collisions to large angular momentum, initial shear flow and significant local vorticity. Recent experiments verified the existence of this vorticity via the resulting polarization of emitted Λ and Λ ¯ particles. At the same time parton cascade models indicated the existence of more compact initial state configurations, which we are going to simulate in our approach. The proposed model satisfies all the conservation laws, including conservation of a strong initial angular momentum, which is present in noncentral collisions. As a consequence of this large initial angular momentum we observe the rotation of the whole system as well as the fluid shear in the initial state, which leads to large flow vorticity. Another advantage of the proposed model is that the initial state can be given in both [t,x,y,z] and [τ ,x ,y ,η ] coordinates and thus can be tested by all 3+1D hydrodynamical codes which exist in the field.

  15. Extended superposed quantum-state initialization using disjoint prime implicants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, David; Perkowski, Marek

    2009-01-01

    Extended superposed quantum-state initialization using disjoint prime implicants is an algorithm for generating quantum arrays for the purpose of initializing a desired quantum superposition. The quantum arrays generated by this algorithm almost always use fewer gates than other algorithms and in the worst case use the same number of gates. These improvements are achieved by allowing certain parts of the quantum superposition that cannot be initialized directly by the algorithm to be initialized using special circuits. This allows more terms in the quantum superposition to be initialized at the same time which decreases the number of gates required by the generated quantum array.

  16. Making initiatives resonate: how can non-state initiatives advance national contributions under the UNFCCC?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermwille, Lukas

    2018-01-01

    The international governance landscape on climate change mitigation is increasingly complex across multiple governance levels. Climate change mitigation initiatives by non-state stakeholders can play an important role in governing global climate change. The article addresses the relationship between

  17. Efficacy versus Equity: What Happens When States Tinker With College Admissions in a Race-Blind Era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Sandra E.; Cortes, Kalena E.; Lincove, Jane Arnold

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the efficacy and equity of college admissions criteria by estimating the effect of multiple measures of college readiness on college performance in the context of race-blind automatic admissions policies. We take advantage of a unique institutional feature of the Texas higher education system to control for selection into…

  18. Preventing intensive care admissions for sepsis in tropical Africa (PICASTA): an extension of the international pediatric global sepsis initiative: an African perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollach, Gregor; Namboya, Felix

    2013-07-01

    The Global Sepsis Initiative recommends prevention of sepsis through immunizations, vitamins, breast feeding, and other important interventions. In our study, we consider a second set of proposals for preventing intensive care admissions for sepsis in tropical Africa, which have been specifically designed to further prevent ICU admissions for sepsis in the group A nation hospital setting. To reduce admissions with severe sepsis in an ICU of a group A nation through the identification of challenges leading to preventable, foreseeable, or nosocomial sepsis specific to our setting. Malawi is one of the poorest countries in the world. Lacking the ability to comply with standard sepsis treatment, we conducted over 4 years several studies, audits, and surveys to identify challenges leading to preventable pediatric sepsis in our setting. We developed a method to identify malnourished children through a "gatekeeper" in the theaters without any equipment, tried to implement the World Health Organization's Safe Surgery Campaign checklist, evaluated our educational courses for the districts to improve the quality of referrals, looked into the extreme fasting times discovered in our hospital, trained different cadres in the districts to deal with peripartal and posttraumatic sepsis, and identified the needs in human resources to deal with pediatric sepsis in our setting. Six foci were identified as promising to work on in future. Focus 1: Preventing elective operations and procedures in malnourished children in the hospital and in the district: 134 of 145 nurses (92.4%) and even 25 of 31 African laymen (80.6%) were able to identify malnourished children with their own fingers. Focus 2: Preventing sepsis-related problems in emergencies through the implementation of the Safe Surgery Campaign checklist: only 100 of 689 forms (14.5%) were filled in due to challenges in ownership, communication responsibility, and time constraints. Focus 3: Preventing sepsis through the reduction

  19. Prior knowledge processing for initial state of Kalman filter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suzdaleva, Evgenia

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 3 (2010), s. 188-202 ISSN 0890-6327 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP201/06/P434 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Kalman filtering * prior knowledge * state-space model * initial state distribution Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory Impact factor: 0.729, year: 2010 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2009/AS/suzdaleva-prior knowledge processing for initial state of kalman filter.pdf

  20. Influence of initial state distortion in ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciappina, M F [CONICET and Departamento de FIsica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, 8000 BahIa Blanca (Argentina); Cravero, W R [CONICET and Departamento de FIsica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, 8000 BahIa Blanca (Argentina); Garibotti, C R [CONICET and Division Colisiones Atomicas, Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    2004-05-28

    We have studied the influence of initial state distortion in a single ionization by ion impact. We have taken a continuum distorted wave type distortion and by taking up to the first order in its asymptotic series expansion we build an eikonal-spherical distortion. In this way the influence of each term in the transition amplitude can be stated. This approximation can be considered an intermediate one between the eikonal initial state and the continuum distorted wave approaches for initial state distortion. We have computed doubly differential cross sections for helium ionization by protons and highly charged ions at high and intermediate impact energy. We have also discussed the contribution of the different terms in electron energy spectra, specially in the vicinity of ECC peak. Very good agreement is found with the available experimental data.

  1. Influence of initial state distortion in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciappina, M F; Cravero, W R; Garibotti, C R

    2004-01-01

    We have studied the influence of initial state distortion in a single ionization by ion impact. We have taken a continuum distorted wave type distortion and by taking up to the first order in its asymptotic series expansion we build an eikonal-spherical distortion. In this way the influence of each term in the transition amplitude can be stated. This approximation can be considered an intermediate one between the eikonal initial state and the continuum distorted wave approaches for initial state distortion. We have computed doubly differential cross sections for helium ionization by protons and highly charged ions at high and intermediate impact energy. We have also discussed the contribution of the different terms in electron energy spectra, specially in the vicinity of ECC peak. Very good agreement is found with the available experimental data

  2. 3D glasma initial state for relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenke, Björn; Schlichting, Sören

    2016-01-01

    We extend the impact-parameter-dependent Glasma model to three dimensions using explicit small-x evolution of the two incoming nuclear gluon distributions. We compute rapidity distributions of produced gluons and the early-time energy momentum tensor as a function of space-time rapidity and transverse coordinates. Finally, we study rapidity correlations and fluctuations of the initial geometry and multiplicity distributions and make comparisons to existing models for the three-dimensional initial state.

  3. The United States initiative for international radioactive source management (ISRM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naraine, N.; Karhnak, J.

    1999-01-01

    The United States takes seriously the potential problems from uncontrolled radioactive sources. To address these problems, the United States Department of State is leading the development of an initiative for International Radioactive Source Management (ISRM). The Department of State, through a number of Federal and state agencies, regulatory bodies and private industry, will endeavor to provide coordinated support to the international community, particularly through IAEA, to assist in the development and implementation of risk-based clearance levels to support import/export of radioactive contaminated metals and the tracking, management, identification, remediation, and disposition of 'lost sources' entering nation states and targeted industries. The United States believes that the international control of radioactive sources is critical in avoiding wide-spread contamination of the world metal supply. Thus the initiative has four objectives: (1) Protect sources from becoming lost (Tracking management); (2) Identify primary locations where sources have been lost (Stop future losses); (3) Locate lost sources (monitor and retrieve); and (4) Educate and train (deploy knowledge and technology). A number of efforts already underway in the United States support the overall initiative. The EPA has provided a grant to the Conference of Radiation Program Control Directors (CRCPD) to develop a nation-wide program for the disposition of orphaned radioactive sources. This program now has internet visibility and a toll-free telephone number to call for assistance in the disposal of sources. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the Department of Energy (DOE), and other government agencies as well as private companies are assisting CRCPD in this program. The NRC has begun a program to improve control of radioactive sources in the United States, and also intends to promulgate a regulation defining conditions for the release of materials from licensed facilities. The DOE is

  4. The Florida State Initial Teacher Certification Test: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Charles M.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the development of the art certification examination which was designed for the Florida State Initial Teacher Certification Test. Discusses problems of subjectivity, content, and question format. Suggests criteria which can guide the development of viable college art education programs that can adequately prepare teachers in the areas of…

  5. State-of-the-Art in Open Courseware Initiatives Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladoiu, Monica

    2011-01-01

    We survey here the state-of-the-art in open courseware initiatives worldwide. First, the MIT OpenCourseWare project is overviewed, as it has been the real starting point of the OCW movement. Usually, open courseware refers to a free and open digital publication of high quality university level educational materials that are organized as courses,…

  6. United States policy initiatives in promoting the RERTR program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, David G.

    1996-01-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program has been successful in furthering efforts to reduce and eventually eliminate highly enriched uranium (HEU) from international commerce. Three key policy initiatives are underway to further promote the RERTR program. The first initiative is implementation of a new nuclear weapons nonproliferation policy concerning foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel. Under this policy, the United States will accept over the next 13 years research reactor spent fuel from 41 countries that have converted or plan to convert to use LEU fuels. The second initiative is to pursue cooperative efforts to expand the RERTR program to new regions of the globe, including Russia and China. The third initiative is to restart the advanced LEU fuels development program at the Argonne National Laboratory in order to increase the number of reactors that can convert to use LEU without significant detriment to their performance

  7. Electronic cigarette initiation among minority youth in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammig, Bart; Daniel-Dobbs, Page; Blunt-Vinti, Heather

    2017-05-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarette) use among youth is a pressing public health issue, with prevalence of use surpassing that of tobacco cigarettes. While research concerning e-cigarettes has proliferated in recent years, there is a dearth of information regarding those whose first exposure to tobacco products was an e-cigarette. To examine factors associated with e-cigarette initiation among minority youth in the United States. Data on minority students in middle and high schools in the United States derived from the 2014 National Youth Tobacco Survey (NYTS) were sampled (weighted N = 27,294,454). We examined e-cigarette initiation among minority youth using logistic regression models to identify related factors. In 2014, 736,158 minority youth were e-cigarette initiators. Odds of e-cigarette initiation was highest among Hispanic youth [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.70; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.60-4.56]. Exposure to e-cigarette advertising (AOR = 1.64; 95% CI = 1.07-2.50), perceptions of little to no harm (AOR = 7.08; 95% CI = 4.03-12.46), and believing e-cigarettes were less addictive than tobacco (AOR = 2.15; 95% CI = 1.52-3.02) were associated with e-cigarette initiation. Odds of initiating e-cigarette use was highest among Hispanic youth. Among minority youth, e-cigarette initiation was associated with perceptions of harm and addiction potential, as well as exposure to e-cigarette advertising. Therefore, prevention efforts targeting minority youth who are at risk of becoming e-cigarette initiators may benefit by incorporating these factors into prevention campaigns.

  8. Initial angular momentum state in pp annihilation at rest

    CERN Document Server

    Bizzarri, R

    1972-01-01

    The author shows that no quantitative statement on the relative importance of initial P-states in pp annihilation can be made. Annihilations in flight indicate that P-wave annihilation into K/sub 1 //sup 0/K/sub 1//sup 0/ is inhibited while annihilation into pi pi is enhanced and might suggest a P-wave contamination approximately 10%. The observatory of the final state K/sub 1//sup 0/K/sub 1//sup 0/n from annihilations at rest indicates that the depression of the K/sub 1//sup 0/K/sub 1//sup 0/ final state is not so important and suggests a P-wave contamination smaller than 4%. Furthermore the successes obtained in the analysis of various final states on the assumption of S-wave annihilation are hard to reconcile with a P-wave contribution bigger than approximately 5%. (20 refs).

  9. Initial-State Graviton Radiation in Quantum Black Hole Production

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2262067

    2017-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation of quantum black hole production in the ATLAS experiment that allows for graviton radiation in the initial state is discussed and studied. It is concluded that, using trapped surface calculations and graviton emission, a black hole signal would be significant for Planck scales up to 4.5 TeV given a proton-proton luminosity of 37 fb$^{-1}$ in the 13 TeV LHC configuration.

  10. Design, production and initial state of the canister

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cederqvist, Lars; Johansson, Magnus; Leskinen, Nina; Ronneteg, Ulf

    2010-12-15

    The report is included in a set of Production reports, presenting how the KBS-3 repository is designed, produced and inspected. The set of reports is included in the safety report for the KBS-3 repository and repository facility.The report provides input on the initial state of the canisters to the assessment of the long-term safety, SR-Site. The initial state refers to the properties of the engineered barriers once they have been finally placed in the KBS-3 repository and will not be further handled within the repository facility. In addition, the report provides input to the operational safety report, SR-Operation, on how the canisters shall be handled and disposed. The report presents the design premises and reference design of the canister and verifies the conformity of the reference design to the design premises. The production methods and the ability to produce canisters according to the reference design are described. Finally, the initial state of the canisters and their conformity to the reference design and design premises are presented

  11. Design, production and initial state of the canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederqvist, Lars; Johansson, Magnus; Leskinen, Nina; Ronneteg, Ulf

    2010-12-01

    The report is included in a set of Production reports, presenting how the KBS-3 repository is designed, produced and inspected. The set of reports is included in the safety report for the KBS-3 repository and repository facility.The report provides input on the initial state of the canisters to the assessment of the long-term safety, SR-Site. The initial state refers to the properties of the engineered barriers once they have been finally placed in the KBS-3 repository and will not be further handled within the repository facility. In addition, the report provides input to the operational safety report, SR-Operation, on how the canisters shall be handled and disposed. The report presents the design premises and reference design of the canister and verifies the conformity of the reference design to the design premises. The production methods and the ability to produce canisters according to the reference design are described. Finally, the initial state of the canisters and their conformity to the reference design and design premises are presented

  12. Design, production and initial state of the closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-12-01

    The report is included in a set of Production reports, presenting how the KBS-3 repository is designed, produced and inspected. The production reports are included in the safety report for the KBS-3 repository and repository facility. The report provides input on the initial state of the closure and plugs in underground openings other than deposition tunnels for the assessment of the long-term safety, SR-Site. The initial state refers to the properties of the engineered barriers once they have been finally placed in the KBS-3 repository and will not be further handled within the repository facility. In addition, the report provides some input to the operational safety report, SR-Operation, on how the closure and plugs shall be handled and installed. The report presents the design premises and reference designs of the closure and plugs and verifies their conformity to the design premises. It also briefly deals with the production of the closure and plugs. Finally, the initial state of the closure and plugs and their conformity to the reference designs and design premises are presented

  13. Initial state regulation of investor-owned utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savitski, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines state initiation of public service (or utility) commission regulation of investor-owned utilities (IOUs) using an economic theory of regulation. The decision to regulate IOUs is assumed to have depended on the strength of competing interest groups, e.g. consumers and producers, and on institutional factors, e.g. whether commissioners were appointed or elected. Regulators, which then had jurisdiction over IOU rates, are assumed to have been optimizing agents. The potential benefits of regulation, in turn, translated into pressure to initiate regulation. To test this, a hazard model is applied to state-level data. On the demand side of the regulation market, the distribution of federal power and population density were unrelated, while a set of time dummies was positively related to the probability that a state initiated regulation. On the supply side, the fraction of the population that was urban and whether the governor was Republican or not were positively and negatively related to this probability

  14. Design, construction and initial state of the underground openings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-12-15

    The report is included in a set of Production reports, presenting how the KBS-3 repository is designed, produced and inspected. The set of reports is included in the safety report for the KBS-3 repository and repository facility. The report provides input on the initial state of the underground openings for the assessment of the long-term safety, SR-Site. The initial state refers to the properties of the underground openings at final disposal, backfilling or closure. In addition, the report provides input to the operational safety report, SR-Operation, on how the underground openings shall be constructed and inspected. The report presents the design premises and the methodology applied to design the underground openings and adapt them the to the site conditions so that they conform to the design premises. It presents the reference design at Forsmark and its conformity to the design premises. It also describes the reference methods to be applied to construct and inspect the different kinds of underground openings. Finally, the initial state of the underground openings and its conformity to the design premises is presented

  15. Design, construction and initial state of the underground openings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-12-01

    The report is included in a set of Production reports, presenting how the KBS-3 repository is designed, produced and inspected. The set of reports is included in the safety report for the KBS-3 repository and repository facility. The report provides input on the initial state of the underground openings for the assessment of the long-term safety, SR-Site. The initial state refers to the properties of the underground openings at final disposal, backfilling or closure. In addition, the report provides input to the operational safety report, SR-Operation, on how the underground openings shall be constructed and inspected. The report presents the design premises and the methodology applied to design the underground openings and adapt them the to the site conditions so that they conform to the design premises. It presents the reference design at Forsmark and its conformity to the design premises. It also describes the reference methods to be applied to construct and inspect the different kinds of underground openings. Finally, the initial state of the underground openings and its conformity to the design premises is presented

  16. Design, production and initial state of the closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-12-15

    The report is included in a set of Production reports, presenting how the KBS-3 repository is designed, produced and inspected. The production reports are included in the safety report for the KBS-3 repository and repository facility. The report provides input on the initial state of the closure and plugs in underground openings other than deposition tunnels for the assessment of the long-term safety, SR-Site. The initial state refers to the properties of the engineered barriers once they have been finally placed in the KBS-3 repository and will not be further handled within the repository facility. In addition, the report provides some input to the operational safety report, SR-Operation, on how the closure and plugs shall be handled and installed. The report presents the design premises and reference designs of the closure and plugs and verifies their conformity to the design premises. It also briefly deals with the production of the closure and plugs. Finally, the initial state of the closure and plugs and their conformity to the reference designs and design premises are presented

  17. Design, production and initial state of the buffer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerjesson, Lennart; Gunnarsson, David; Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Jonsson, Esther

    2010-12-15

    The report is included in a set of Production reports, presenting how the KBS-3 repository is designed, produced and inspected. The set of reports is included in the safety report for the KBS-3 repository and repository facility. The report provides input on the initial state of the buffer for the assessment of the long-term safety, SR-Site. The initial state refers to the properties of the engineered barriers once they have been finally placed in the KBS-3 repository and will not be further handled within the repository facility. In addition, the report provides input to the operational safety report, SR-Operation, on how the buffer shall be handled and installed. The report presents the design premises and reference design of the buffer and verifies the conformity of the reference design to the design premises. It also describes the production of the buffer, from excavation and delivery of buffer material to installation in the deposition hole. Finally, the initial state of the buffer and its conformity to the reference design and design premises is presented

  18. 32 CFR 575.2 - Admission; general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.2 Admission; general. (a) In one major respect, the requirements for admission to the United States Military Academy differ from the normal requirements for admission to a civilian college or university; each candidate must obtain an official nomination to the Academy. The young person...

  19. Initial state report for the safety assessment SR-Can

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pers, Karin (ed.) [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-10-15

    A comprehensive description of the initial state of the engineered parts of the repository system is one of the main bases for the safety assessment. There is no obvious definition of the time of the initial state. For the engineered part of their repository system, the time of deposition is a natural starting point and the initial state in SR-Can is, therefore, defined as the state at the time of deposition for the engineered barrier system. The initial state of the engineered parts of the repository system is largely obtained from the design specifications of the repository, including allowed tolerances or allowance for deviations. Also the manufacturing, excavation and control methods have to be described in order to adequately discuss and handle hypothetical initial states outside the allowed limits in the design specifications. It should also be noted that many parts of the repository system are as yet not finally designed, there can be many changes in the future. The design and technical solutions presented here are representative of the current stage of development. The repository system is based on the KBS-3 method, in which copper canisters with a cast iron insert containing spent nuclear fuel are surrounded by bentonite clay and deposited at 400-700 m depth in saturated granitic rock. The facility design comprises rock caverns, tunnels, deposition positions etc. Deposition tunnels are linked by tunnels for transport and communication and shafts for ventilation. One ramp and five shafts connect the surface facility to the underground repository. The ramp is used for heavy and bulky transports and the shafts are for utility systems and for transport of excavated rock, backfill and staff. For the purposes of the safety assessment, the engineered parts of the repository system have been sub-divided into a number of components or sub-systems. These are: The fuel, (also including cavities in the canister since strong interactions between the two occur if the

  20. Initial state report for the safety assessment SR-Can

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pers, Karin

    2006-10-01

    A comprehensive description of the initial state of the engineered parts of the repository system is one of the main bases for the safety assessment. There is no obvious definition of the time of the initial state. For the engineered part of their repository system, the time of deposition is a natural starting point and the initial state in SR-Can is, therefore, defined as the state at the time of deposition for the engineered barrier system. The initial state of the engineered parts of the repository system is largely obtained from the design specifications of the repository, including allowed tolerances or allowance for deviations. Also the manufacturing, excavation and control methods have to be described in order to adequately discuss and handle hypothetical initial states outside the allowed limits in the design specifications. It should also be noted that many parts of the repository system are as yet not finally designed, there can be many changes in the future. The design and technical solutions presented here are representative of the current stage of development. The repository system is based on the KBS-3 method, in which copper canisters with a cast iron insert containing spent nuclear fuel are surrounded by bentonite clay and deposited at 400-700 m depth in saturated granitic rock. The facility design comprises rock caverns, tunnels, deposition positions etc. Deposition tunnels are linked by tunnels for transport and communication and shafts for ventilation. One ramp and five shafts connect the surface facility to the underground repository. The ramp is used for heavy and bulky transports and the shafts are for utility systems and for transport of excavated rock, backfill and staff. For the purposes of the safety assessment, the engineered parts of the repository system have been sub-divided into a number of components or sub-systems. These are: The fuel, (also including cavities in the canister since strong interactions between the two occur if the

  1. Promoting Inclusive Holistic Graduate Admissions in Educational Leadership Preparation Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa Boske

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Aspiring and practicing school leaders often identify graduate degrees as playing a significant role in achieving educational access and engaging in building, district-wide, regional, state, and national decision-making regarding practice and policy impacting marginalized populations in K–12 U.S. schools. The rationale behind initiating discourse on graduate student involvement grows out of current policy and reform initiatives requiring increased accountability for improved student performance, especially for children from predetermined “subgroups” due to race, class, native language, and ability (i.e., emotional, social, cognitive, and physical. The call for more deliberate involvement in understanding graduate admissions also arises in regard to student attrition and retention concerns. Faculty often play an under-examined role as gatekeepers throughout the admissions process. The way in which they understand graduate requirements, holistic evaluation, and merit affords opportunities to positively address significant implications for racial equity and diversity in graduate education. To understand faculty reliance upon graduate admissions criteria that undermine espoused university strategic plans, college-level diversity goals, and programmatic decision-making, four professors across the U.S. explore graduate admissions processes and the significance of implementing holistic admissions criteria. We present a holistic graduate admissions conceptual model for school leadership preparation programs to consider when increasing equity and access for minoritized candidates.

  2. Creating cat states in one-dimensional quantum walks using delocalized initial states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Gao, Fei; Goyal, Sandeep K; Sanders, Barry C; Simon, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Cat states are coherent quantum superpositions of macroscopically distinct states and are useful for understanding the boundary between the classical and the quantum world. Due to their macroscopic nature, cat states are difficult to prepare in physical systems. We propose a method to create cat states in one-dimensional quantum walks using delocalized initial states of the walker. Since the quantum walks can be performed on any quantum system, our proposal enables a platform-independent realization of the cat states. We further show that the linear dispersion relation of the effective quantum walk Hamiltonian, which governs the dynamics of the delocalized states, is responsible for the formation of the cat states. We analyze the robustness of these states against environmental interactions and present methods to control and manipulate the cat states in the photonic implementation of quantum walks. (paper)

  3. Turning State Data and Research into Information: An Example from Washington State's Student Achievement Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, David; Seppanen, Loretta; Stephens, Deborah; Stewart, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    This chapter discusses Washington State's Student Achievement Initiative, a new performance funding system for community and technical colleges. Its purposes are to improve public accountability by more accurately describing what students achieve from enrolling in state colleges each year and provide incentives through financial rewards to…

  4. Initial-state parton shower kinematics for NLO event generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odaka, Shigeru; Kurihara, Yoshimasa

    2007-01-01

    We are developing a consistent method to combine tree-level event generators for hadron collision interactions with those including one additional QCD radiation from the initial-state partons, based on the limited leading-log (LLL) subtraction method, aiming at an application to NLO event generators. In this method, a boundary between non-radiative and radiative processes necessarily appears at the factorization scale (μ F ). The radiation effects are simulated using a parton shower (PS) in non-radiative processes. It is therefore crucial in our method to apply a PS which well reproduces the radiation activities evaluated from the matrix-element (ME) calculations for radiative processes. The PS activity depends on the applied kinematics model. In this paper we introduce two models for our simple initial-state leading-log PS: a model similar to the 'old' PYTHIA-PS and a p T -prefixed model motivated by ME calculations. PS simulations employing these models are tested using W-boson production at LHC as an example. Both simulations show a smooth matching to the LLL subtracted W+1 jet simulation in the p T distribution of W bosons, and the summed p T spectra are stable against a variation of μ F , despite that the p T -prefixed PS results in an apparently harder p T spectrum. (orig.)

  5. Mathematics Admission Test Remarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ideon Erge

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Since 2014, there have been admission tests in mathematics for applicants to the Estonian University of Life Sciences for Geodesy, Land Management and Real Estate Planning; Civil Engineering; Hydraulic Engineering and Water Pollution Control; Engineering and Technetronics curricula. According to admission criteria, the test must be taken by students who have not passed the specific mathematics course state exam or when the score was less than 20 points. The admission test may also be taken by those who wish to improve their state exam score. In 2016, there were 126 such applicants of whom 63 took the test. In 2015, the numbers were 129 and 89 and in 2014 150 and 47 accordingly. The test was scored on scale of 100. The arithmetic average of the score was 30.6 points in 2016, 29.03 in 2015 and 18.84 in 2014. The test was considered to be passed with 1 point in 2014 and 20 points in 2015 and 2016. We analyzed test results and gave examples of problems which were solved exceptionally well or not at all.

  6. The renormalization of collective states and the improper initial or final states in NFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bes, D.R.; Dussel, G.G.; Perazzo, R.P.J.; Sofia, H.M.

    1978-01-01

    The collective lines in a given diagram are renormalized by including higher order processes. The problem is cast into the form of a conventional linear algebraic matrix equation that allows a simple treatment of the normalization conditions. It is shown that the states entering in the renormalization of the phonons become improper initial or final states, if dressed phonons are used in the intermediate states. A simple extension of this argument allows one to justify one of the rules given in the formulation of the NFT. (Auth.)

  7. Using systems thinking in state health policymaking: an educational initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minyard, Karen J; Ferencik, Rachel; Ann Phillips, Mary; Soderquist, Chris

    2014-06-01

    In response to limited examples of opportunities for state policymakers to learn about and productively discuss the difficult, adaptive challenges of our health system, the Georgia Health Policy Center developed an educational initiative that applies systems thinking to health policymaking. We created the Legislative Health Policy Certificate Program - an in-depth, multi-session series for lawmakers and their staff - concentrating on building systems thinking competencies and health content knowledge by applying a range of systems thinking tools: behavior over time graphs, stock and flow maps, and a system dynamics-based learning lab (a simulatable model of childhood obesity). Legislators were taught to approach policy issues from the big picture, consider changing dynamics, and explore higher-leverage interventions to address Georgia's most intractable health challenges. Our aim was to determine how we could improve the policymaking process by providing a systems thinking-focused educational program for legislators. Over 3 years, the training program resulted in policymakers' who are able to think more broadly about difficult health issues. The program has yielded valuable insights into the design and delivery of policymaker education that could be applied to various disciplines outside the legislative process.

  8. Open Admissions: Expanding Educational Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Jeanette Ann; Powell, Philip Edward

    1971-01-01

    A report on initial results of the open admissions policy (City University of New York) concludes that significant numbers of high risk students can make progress toward a degree. Program modifications are suggested as a response to the learning needs of these students. (Author/CJ)

  9. Initial-state interactions, factorization, and the Drell-Yan process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodwin, G.T.; Brodsky, S.J.; Lepage, G.P.

    1981-12-01

    It is shown that initial state interactions violate the factorization conjecture for the Drell-Yan process order by order in perturbation theory. Also, the effects of elastic and inelastic initial state interactions on the observed cross sections are discussed

  10. Initial state fluctuations and final state correlations: status and open questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adare, Andrew; Luzum, Matthew; Petersen, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    The recent appreciation of the importance of event-by-event fluctuations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions has lead to a large amount of diverse theoretical and experimental activity. In particular, there is significant interest in understanding the fluctuations in the initial stage of a collision, how exactly these fluctuations are propagated through the system evolution, and how they are manifested in correlations between measured particles. In order to address these questions a workshop was organized on ‘initial state fluctuations and final state correlations’, held at ECT* in Trento, Italy during the week of 2–6 July 2012. The goal was to collect recent work in order to provide a coherent picture of the current status of our understanding, to identify important questions that remain open, and to set a course for future research. Here we report the outcome of the presentations and discussions, focusing on the most important conclusions. (comment)

  11. Admissions and Plebe Year Data as Indicators of Academic Success in Engineering Majors at the United States Naval Academy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kristof, Nicholas

    2002-01-01

    This research analyzes the relationship between academic success in high school and at the freshman collegiate level and academic performance in engineering majors at the United States Naval Academy (USNA...

  12. Initial state fluctuations and final state correlations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzum, Matthew; Petersen, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    We review the phenomenology and theory of bulk observables in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, focusing on recent developments involving event-by-event fluctuations in the initial stages of a heavy-ion collision, and how they manifest in observed correlations. We first define the relevant observables and show how each measurement is related to underlying theoretical quantities. Then we review the prevailing picture of the various stages of a collision, including the state-of-the-art modeling of the initial stages of a collision and subsequent hydrodynamic evolution, as well as hadronic scattering and freeze-out in the later stages. We then discuss the recent results that have shaped our current understanding and identify the challenges that remain. Finally, we point out open issues and the potential for progress in the field. (topical review)

  13. 78 FR 62415 - Refugee Admissions for Fiscal Year 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-21

    ... October 2, 2013 Refugee Admissions for Fiscal Year 2014 Memorandum for the Secretary of State In... authorize the following actions: The admission of up to 70,000 refugees to the United States during fiscal... with Federal refugee resettlement assistance under the Amerasian immigrant admissions program, as...

  14. Small Island States Green Energy Initiative. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khattak, Nasir [Climate Inst., Washington, DC (United States)

    1999-10-15

    This report covers the activities carried out during a one year period from 7/15/99 to 7/15/00 as part of the Small Islands Green Energy Initiative. The three activities were: 1) Energy Ministerial conference in the Caribbean; 2) Training session on renewable energy for utility engineers; and 3) Case studies compilation on renewable energy in the Caribbean.

  15. Multi-State Initiatives---Agriculture Security Preparedness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gordon, Ellen

    2004-01-01

    ... to protect the nation's food security. The National Homeland Security Strategy puts states on the front lines in the war against terrorism including the struggle to secure the agriculture industry from potentially devastating attack...

  16. State and Local Initiatives: Your Bridge to Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Resources (Brochure)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, K.

    2001-01-01

    A brochure for local and state policymakers, informing them about the State and Local Initiatives team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The brochure outlines the benefits of using renewables and energy efficiency, the benefits of using the State and Local Initiatives team as a liaison to the wealth of information at NREL, and some of the services and resources available

  17. Maternal outcomes of term breech presentation delivery: impact of successful external cephalic version in a nationwide sample of delivery admissions in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiniger, Carolyn F; Lyell, Deirdre J; Tsen, Lawrence C; Butwick, Alexander J; Shachar, BatZion; Callaghan, William M; Creanga, Andreea A; Bateman, Brian T

    2016-07-08

    We aimed to define the frequency and predictors of successful external cephalic version in a nationally-representative cohort of women with breech presentations and to compare maternal outcomes associated with successful external cephalic version versus persistent breech presentation. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, a United States healthcare utilization database, we identified delivery admissions between 1998 and 2011 for women who had successful external cephalic version or persistent breech presentation (including unsuccessful or no external cephalic version attempt) at term. Multivariable logistic regression identified patient and hospital-level factors associated with successful external cephalic version. Maternal outcomes were compared between women who had successful external cephalic version versus persistent breech. Our study cohort comprised 1,079,576 delivery admissions with breech presentation; 56,409 (5.2 %) women underwent successful external cephalic version and 1,023,167 (94.8 %) women had persistent breech presentation at the time of delivery. The rate of cesarean delivery was lower among women who had successful external cephalic version compared to those with persistent breech (20.2 % vs. 94.9 %; p external cephalic version were also less likely to experience several measures of significant maternal morbidity including endometritis (adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR) = 0.36, 95 % Confidence Interval (CI) 0.24-0.52), sepsis (aOR = 0.35, 95 % CI 0.24-0.51) and length of stay > 7 days (aOR = 0.53, 95 % CI 0.40-0.70), but had a higher risk of chorioamnionitis (aOR = 1.83, 95 % CI 1.54-2.17). Overall a low proportion of women with breech presentation undergo successful external cephalic version, and it is associated with significant reduction in the frequency of cesarean delivery and a number of measures of maternal morbidity. Increased external cephalic version use may be an important approach to mitigate the high rate of

  18. Peadiatric social admission

    OpenAIRE

    Carter Anand, Janet

    2009-01-01

    The phenomenon of paediatric social admission describes the hospitalisation of children for medicallynon- urgent and/or social reasons. Much of the research in this field has been in relation to avoidable admissions which have been identified, studied and condoned based on strict medical criteria. Such research has tended to mask the significance of social factors and the commonplace practice of Paediatric Social Admission. This paper examines decision making from the perspective of the healt...

  19. The operations of quantum logic gates with pure and mixed initial states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun-Liang; Li, Che-Ming; Hwang, Chi-Chuan; Ho, Yi-Hui

    2011-04-07

    The implementations of quantum logic gates realized by the rovibrational states of a C(12)O(16) molecule in the X((1)Σ(+)) electronic ground state are investigated. Optimal laser fields are obtained by using the modified multitarget optimal theory (MTOCT) which combines the maxima of the cost functional and the fidelity for state and quantum process. The projection operator technique together with modified MTOCT is used to get optimal laser fields. If initial states of the quantum gate are pure states, states at target time approach well to ideal target states. However, if the initial states are mixed states, the target states do not approach well to ideal ones. The process fidelity is introduced to investigate the reliability of the quantum gate operation driven by the optimal laser field. We found that the quantum gates operate reliably whether the initial states are pure or mixed.

  20. Digital preservation initiatives in the United States: a summary

    OpenAIRE

    Marcum, Deanna

    2003-01-01

    General presentation on how digital preservation issues are being faced in the United States of America. Special reference to the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program, that is found at the Library of Congress, and aims to implement a national strategy for the long-term preservation of digital content.

  1. Effectiveness of pre-admission data and letters of recommendation to predict students who will need professional behavior intervention during clinical rotations in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalee Engelhard

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at finding the value of letters of recommendation in predicting professional behavior problems in the clinical portion of a Doctor of Physical Therapy program learning cohorts from 2009-2014 in the United States. De-identified records of 137 Doctor of Physical Therapy graduates were examined by the descriptive statistics and comparison analysis. Thirty letters of recommendation were investigated based on grounded theory from 10 student applications with 5 randomly selected students of interest and 5 non-students of interest. Critical thinking, organizational skills, and judgement were statistically significant and quantitative differentiating characteristics. Qualitatively, significant characteristics of the student of interest included effective communication and cultural competency. Meanwhile, those of nonstudents of interest included conflicting personality descriptor, commitment to learning, balance, teamwork skills, potential future success, compatible learning skills, effective leadership skills, and emotional intelligence. Emerged significant characteristics did not consistently match common non-professional behavior issues encountered in clinic. Pre-admission data and letters of recommendation appear of limited value in predicting professional behavior performance in clinic.

  2. An Admissions Officer's Credentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Marilee Jones has resigned as a dean of admissions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology after admitting that she had misrepresented her academic degrees when first applying to work at the university in 1979. As one of the nation's most prominent admissions officers--and a leader in the movement to make the application process less…

  3. A Stunning Admission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Few people set out to become admissions counselors, say people in the profession. But the field is requiring skills that are more demanding and varied than ever. And at a time when universities are looking especially hard at the bottom line, people in admissions need to constantly learn new things and make themselves indispensable. Counselors…

  4. Advice on Admissions Transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Government Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency, 2018

    2018-01-01

    Admissions transparency means that prospective domestic undergraduate students can easily find good quality admissions information that allows them to compare courses and providers and make informed study choices. In October 2016 the Higher Education Standards Panel (HESP) made recommendations to achieve greater transparency in higher education…

  5. Unusual initial and final state effects in quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, C.A.

    1990-12-01

    We have constructed fundamental test which can be used to probe discrete symmetries, and their possible violations, in the required ''new physics'' beyond the standard model. In a recent paper for applications at an e + e - collider, we have proposed a simple test for ''maximal P -- maximal C'' violation in the Z degree → τ 1 - τ 1 + coupling. For τ minus-plus → π minus-plus ν, for example, this test is based on an azimuthal correlation function I(φ e , φ) where the azimuthal angles are defined relative to the final π 1 - . For e - e + collisions in the Γ or J/Ψ regions, I(φ e , φ) can be used to test for a complex phase in the γ* → τ - τ + coupling. In other research programs, we are continuing to investigate our proposal that partons be identified with nearly degenerate, coherent quark-gluon ''jet'' states, and have proven a completeness relation for the q-analogue of the unusual coherent states

  6. New results on initial state & quarkonia with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Tapia Araya, Sebastian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Weak bosons do not interact strongly with the dense and hot medium formed in the nuclear collisions, thus should be sensitive to the nuclear modification of parton distribution functions (nPDFs). The in-medium modification of heavy quarkonium states plays an important role in studying the hot and dense medium formed in the larger collision systems. The ATLAS detector, optimized for searching new physics in proton-proton collisions, is especially well equipped to measure Z, W bosons and quakonium in the high occupancy environment produced in heavy-ion collisions. We will present recent results on the Z boson and quarkonia yields as a function of centrality, transverse momentum and rapidity, from the ATLAS experiment.

  7. Moving State Marine SINS Initial Alignment Based on High Degree CKF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Gang Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new moving state marine initial alignment method of strap-down inertial navigation system (SINS is proposed based on high-degree cubature Kalman filter (CKF, which can capture higher order Taylor expansion terms of nonlinear alignment model than the existing third-degree CKF, unscented Kalman filter and central difference Kalman filter, and improve the accuracy of initial alignment under large heading misalignment angle condition. Simulation results show the efficiency and advantage of the proposed initial alignment method as compared with existing initial alignment methods for the moving state SINS initial alignment with large heading misalignment angle.

  8. A Novel Flood Forecasting Method Based on Initial State Variable Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of initial state variables on flood forecasting accuracy by using conceptual hydrological models is analyzed in this paper and a novel flood forecasting method based on correction of initial state variables is proposed. The new method is abbreviated as ISVC (Initial State Variable Correction. The ISVC takes the residual between the measured and forecasted flows during the initial period of the flood event as the objective function, and it uses a particle swarm optimization algorithm to correct the initial state variables, which are then used to drive the flood forecasting model. The historical flood events of 11 watersheds in south China are forecasted and verified, and important issues concerning the ISVC application are then discussed. The study results show that the ISVC is effective and applicable in flood forecasting tasks. It can significantly improve the flood forecasting accuracy in most cases.

  9. Undergraduate Admissions | NSU

    Science.gov (United States)

    . Continuing Education Financial Aid Career Development Regional Campuses International Affairs Veterans Admissions Honors College Experiential Education Study Abroad Research Opportunities Career Preparation SharkLink California Disclosure International Affairs Undergraduate Advising Career Development Libraries at

  10. Investigating approaches to diversity in a national survey of physics doctoral degree programs: The graduate admissions landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Geoff; Chari, Deepa; Hodapp, Theodore

    2017-12-01

    Graduate admissions play a critical gatekeeping role in the physics community not only because they select students who are allowed to begin their graduate studies, but also because they influence how students perceive graduate school, and in some cases whether or not they will even choose to apply. In conjunction with the APS Bridge Program, we conducted a national survey of graduate directors (and related faculty) of physics Ph.D. programs in the United States to explore graduate admissions practices. Our focus was on criteria used in determining admissions, mechanisms through which graduate applicants are handled, and how student representation considerations are incorporated into admissions (if at all). We report here on existing graduate admission practices in physics departments and highlight some critical issues for understanding barriers for diversifying graduate physics, including the use of GRE scores (and the relative importance placed on them). We find that the use of a minimum GRE score for admission, a practice in opposition to recommendations made by the tests designers, is reported to be used in many departments (more than one in three). We also find letters of recommendation to be highly valued in admissions decisions. Our data describe various initiatives at the institutional or individual level to increase gender diversity in admissions. A sizable number of departments also express a latent demand for greater numbers of students from traditionally marginalized racial or ethnic groups, but simultaneously report a lack of such applicants.

  11. Feasibility study for improved steady-state initialization algorithms for the RELAP5 computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulsen, M.P.; Peterson, C.E.; Katsma, K.R.

    1993-04-01

    A design for a new steady-state initialization method is presented that represents an improvement over the current method used in RELAP5. Current initialization methods for RELAP5 solve the transient fluidflow balance equations simulating a transient to achieve steady-state conditions. Because the transient solution is used, the initial conditions may change from the desired values requiring the use of controllers and long transient running times to obtain steady-state conditions for system problems. The new initialization method allows the user to fix thermal-hydraulic values in volumes and junctions where the conditions are best known and have the code compute the initial conditions in other areas of the system. The steady-state balance equations and solution methods are presented. The constitutive, component, and specialpurpose models are reviewed with respect to modifications required for the new steady-state initialization method. The requirements for user input are defined and the feasibility of the method is demonstrated with a testbed code by initializing some simple channel problems. The initialization of the sample problems using, the old and the new methods are compared

  12. Genital Herpes - Initial Visits to Physicians' Offices, United States, 1966-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Archive Data & Statistics Sexually Transmitted Diseases Figure 48. Genital Herpes — Initial Visits to Physicians’ Offices, United States, 1966 – ... Statistics page . NOTE : The relative standard errors for genital herpes estimates of more than 100,000 range from ...

  13. Revivals and entanglement from initially entangled mixed states of a damped Jaynes-Cummings model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rendell, R.W.; Rajagopal, A.K.

    2003-01-01

    An exact density matrix of a phase-damped Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM) with entangled Bell-like initial states formed from a model two-state atom and sets of adjacent photon number states of a single-mode radiation field is presented. The entanglement of the initial states and the subsequent time evolution is assured by finding a positive lower bound on the concurrence of local 2x2 projections of the full 2x∞ JCM density matrix. It is found that the time evolution of the lower bound of the concurrence systematically captures the corresponding collapse and revival features in atomic inversion, relative entropies of atomic and radiation, mutual entropy, and quantum deficit. The atom and radiation subsystems exhibit alternating sets of collapses and revivals in a complementary fashion due to the initially mixed states of the atom and radiation employed here. This is in contrast with the result obtained when the initial state of the dissipationless system is a factored pure state of the atom and radiation, where the atomic and radiation entropies are necessarily the same. The magnitudes of the entanglement lower bound and the atomic and radiation revivals become larger as both the magnitude and phase of the Bell-like initial state contribution increase. The time evolution of the entropy difference of the total system and that of the radiation subsystem exhibit negative regions called 'supercorrelated' states which do not appear in the atomic subsystem. Entangled initial states are found to enhance this supercorrelated feature. Finally, the effect of phase damping is to randomize both the subsystems for asymptotically long times. It may be feasible to experimentally investigate the results presented here using the Rabi oscillation methods of microwave and optical cavity quantum electrodynamics since pure photon number states have recently been produced and observed

  14. Autobiographically recalled emotional states impact forward gait initiation as a function of motivational direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawver, Bradley; Hass, Chris J; Park, Kyoungshin D; Janelle, Christopher M

    2014-12-01

    The impact of self-generated affective states on self-initiated motor behavior remains unspecified. The purpose of the current study was to determine how self-generated emotional states impact forward gait initiation. Participants recalled past emotional experiences (anger, fear, happy, sad, and neutral), "relived" those emotional memories before gait initiation (GI), and then walked ∼4 m across the laboratory floor. Kinetic and kinematic data revealed GI characteristics consistent with a motivational direction hypothesis. Specifically, participants produced greater posterior-lateral displacement and velocity of their center of pressure (COP) during the initial phase of GI after self-generation of happy and anger emotional states relative to sad ones. During the second phase of GI, greater medial displacement of COP was found during the happy condition compared with sad, greater velocity was occasioned during happy and angry trials compared with sad, and greater velocity was exhibited after happy compared with fear memories. Finally, greater anterior velocity was produced by participants during the final phase of GI for happy and angry memories compared with sad ones. Steady state kinetic and kinematic data when recalling happy and angry memories (longer, faster, and more forceful stepping behavior) followed the anticipatory postural adjustments noted during GI. Together the results from GI and steady state gait provide robust evidence that self-generated emotional states impact forward gait behavior based on motivational direction. Endogenous manipulations of emotional states hold promise for clinical and performance interventions aimed at improving self-initiated movement.

  15. Initial state dependence of nonlinear kinetic equations: The classical electron gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetti, M.C.; Cohen, E.G.D.; Dorfman, J.R.; Kirkpatrick, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    The method of nonequilibrium cluster expansion is used to study the decay to equilibrium of a weakly coupled inhomogeneous electron gas prepared in a local equilibrium state at the initial time, t=0. A nonlinear kinetic equation describing the long time behavior of the one-particle distribution function is obtained. For consistency, initial correlations have to be taken into account. The resulting kinetic equation-differs from that obtained when the initial state of the system is assumed to be factorized in a product of one-particle functions. The question of to what extent correlations in the initial state play an essential role in determining the form of the kinetic equation at long times is discussed. To that end, the present calculations are compared wih results obtained before for hard sphere gases and in general with strong short-range forces. A partial answer is proposed and some open questions are indicated

  16. An Exploratory Study of Pre-Admission Predictors of Hardiness and Retention for United States Military Academy Cadets Using Regression Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Character in Sports Index CV Cross Validation FAS Faculty Appraisal Score FFM Five-Factor Model, also known as the “Big Five” GAM... FFM ). USMA does not allow personality testing as a selection tool. However, perhaps we may discover whether pre-admission information can predict...characteristic, and personality factors as described by the Five Factor Model ( FFM ) to determine their effect on one’s academic performance at USMA (Clark

  17. Role of initial coherence on entanglement dynamics of two qubit X states

    Science.gov (United States)

    V, Namitha C.; Satyanarayana, S. V. M.

    2018-02-01

    Bipartite entanglement is a necessary resource in most processes in quantum information science. Decoherence resulting from the interaction of the bipartite system with environment not only degrades the entanglement, but can result in abrupt disentanglement, known as entanglement sudden death (ESD). In some cases, a subsequent revival of entanglement is also possible. ESD is an undesirable feature for the state to be used as a resource in applications. In order to delay or avoid ESD, it is necessary to understand its origin. In this work we investigate the role of initial coherence on entanglement dynamics of a spatially separated two qubit system in a common vacuum reservoir with dipolar interaction. We construct two classes of X states, namely, states with one photon coherence (X 1) and states with two photon coherence (X 2). Considering them as initial states, we study entanglement dynamics under Markov approximation. We find for states in X 1, ESD time, revival time and time over which the state remains disentangled increase with increase in coherence. On the other hand for states in X 2, with increase in coherence ESD time increases, revival time remains same and time of disentanglement decreases. Thus, states with two photon coherence are better resources for applications since their entanglement is robust against decoherence compared to states with one photon coherence.

  18. Environment and initial state engineered dynamics of quantum and classical correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Cheng-Zhi, E-mail: czczwang@outlook.com; Li, Chun-Xian; Guo, Yu; Lu, Geng-Biao; Ding, Kai-He

    2016-11-15

    Based on an open exactly solvable system coupled to an environment with nontrivial spectral density, we connect the features of quantum and classical correlations with some features of the environment, initial states of the system, and the presence of initial system–environment correlations. Some interesting features not revealed before are observed by changing the structure of environment, the initial states of system, and the presence of initial system–environment correlations. The main results are as follows. (1) Quantum correlations exhibit temporary freezing and permanent freezing even at high temperature of the environment, for which the necessary and sufficient conditions are given by three propositions. (2) Quantum correlations display a transition from temporary freezing to permanent freezing by changing the structure of environment. (3) Quantum correlations can be enhanced all the time, for which the condition is put forward. (4) The one-to-one dependency relationship between all kinds of dynamic behaviors of quantum correlations and the initial states of the system as well as environment structure is established. (5) In the presence of initial system–environment correlations, quantum correlations under local environment exhibit temporary multi-freezing phenomenon. While under global environment they oscillate, revive, and damp, an explanation for which is given. - Highlights: • Various interesting behaviors of quantum and classical correlations are observed in an open exactly solvable model. • The important effects of the bath structure on quantum and classical correlations are revealed. • The one-to-one correspondence between the type of dynamical behavior of quantum discord and the initial state is given. • Quantum correlations are given in the presence of initial qubits–bath correlations.

  19. Environment and initial state engineered dynamics of quantum and classical correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Cheng-Zhi; Li, Chun-Xian; Guo, Yu; Lu, Geng-Biao; Ding, Kai-He

    2016-01-01

    Based on an open exactly solvable system coupled to an environment with nontrivial spectral density, we connect the features of quantum and classical correlations with some features of the environment, initial states of the system, and the presence of initial system–environment correlations. Some interesting features not revealed before are observed by changing the structure of environment, the initial states of system, and the presence of initial system–environment correlations. The main results are as follows. (1) Quantum correlations exhibit temporary freezing and permanent freezing even at high temperature of the environment, for which the necessary and sufficient conditions are given by three propositions. (2) Quantum correlations display a transition from temporary freezing to permanent freezing by changing the structure of environment. (3) Quantum correlations can be enhanced all the time, for which the condition is put forward. (4) The one-to-one dependency relationship between all kinds of dynamic behaviors of quantum correlations and the initial states of the system as well as environment structure is established. (5) In the presence of initial system–environment correlations, quantum correlations under local environment exhibit temporary multi-freezing phenomenon. While under global environment they oscillate, revive, and damp, an explanation for which is given. - Highlights: • Various interesting behaviors of quantum and classical correlations are observed in an open exactly solvable model. • The important effects of the bath structure on quantum and classical correlations are revealed. • The one-to-one correspondence between the type of dynamical behavior of quantum discord and the initial state is given. • Quantum correlations are given in the presence of initial qubits–bath correlations.

  20. Forensic human identification in the United States and Canada: a review of the law, admissible techniques, and the legal implications of their application in forensic cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holobinko, Anastasia

    2012-10-10

    Forensic human identification techniques are successful if they lead to positive personal identification. However, the strongest personal identification is of no use in the prosecution--or vindication--of an accused if the associated evidence and testimony is ruled inadmissible in a court of law. This review examines the U.S. and Canadian legal rulings regarding the admissibility of expert evidence and testimony, and subsequently explores four established methods of human identification (i.e., DNA profiling, forensic anthropology, forensic radiography, forensic odontology) and one complementary technique useful in determining identity, and the legal implications of their application in forensic cases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Chimera states and the interplay between initial conditions and non-local coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalle, Peter; Sawicki, Jakub; Zakharova, Anna; Schöll, Eckehard

    2017-03-01

    Chimera states are complex spatio-temporal patterns that consist of coexisting domains of coherent and incoherent dynamics. We study chimera states in a network of non-locally coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators. We investigate the impact of initial conditions in combination with non-local coupling. Based on an analytical argument, we show how the coupling phase and the coupling strength are linked to the occurrence of chimera states, flipped profiles of the mean phase velocity, and the transition from a phase- to an amplitude-mediated chimera state.

  2. Primordial non-Gaussianities in single field inflationary models with non-trivial initial states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami, Sina; Flanagan, Éanna É., E-mail: sb933@cornell.edu, E-mail: eef3@cornell.edu [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We compute the non-Gaussianities that arise in single field, slow roll inflationary models arising from arbitrary homogeneous initial states, as well as subleading contributions to the power spectrum. Non Bunch-Davies vacuum initial states can arise if the transition to the single field, slow roll inflation phase occurs only shortly before observable modes left the horizon. They can also arise from new physics at high energies that has been integrated out. Our general result for the bispectrum exhibits several features that were previously seen in special cases.

  3. Teacher Education Admission Criteria as Measure of Preparedness for Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Catherine; Childs, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between commonly used admission criteria, found in a one-year, post Bachelor's degree, initial, teacher education program, and the preparedness of teacher candidates in mathematics for independent teaching. The admission criteria used in this study were grade point average (GPA) and a written profile. The…

  4. Extracting Information about the Initial State from the Black Hole Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochan, Kinjalk; Padmanabhan, T

    2016-02-05

    The crux of the black hole information paradox is related to the fact that the complete information about the initial state of a quantum field in a collapsing spacetime is not available to future asymptotic observers, belying the expectations from a unitary quantum theory. We study the imprints of the initial quantum state contained in a specific class of distortions of the black hole radiation and identify the classes of in states that can be partially or fully reconstructed from the information contained within. Even for the general in state, we can uncover some specific information. These results suggest that a classical collapse scenario ignores this richness of information in the resulting spectrum and a consistent quantum treatment of the entire collapse process might allow us to retrieve much more information from the spectrum of the final radiation.

  5. Classification of cyclic initial states and geometric phase for the spin-j system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skrynnikov, N.R.; Zhou, J.; Sanctuary, B.C. [Dept. of Chem., McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    1994-09-21

    Quantum states which evolve cyclically in their projective Hilbert space give rise to a geometric (or Aharonov-Anandan) phase. An aspect of primary interest is stable cyclic behaviour as realized under a periodic Hamiltonian. The problem has been handled by use of time-dependent transformations treated along the lines of Floquet's theory as well as in terms of exponential operators with a goal to examine the variety of initial states exhibiting cyclic behaviour. A particular case of special cyclic initial states is described which is shown to be important for nuclear magnetic resonance experiments aimed at the study of the effects of the geometric phase. An example of arbitrary spin j in a precessing magnetic field and spin j=1 subject to both axially symmetric quadrupolar interaction and a precessing magnetic field are presented. The invariant (Kobe's) geometric phase is calculated for special cyclic states. (author)

  6. Admissibility and hyperbolicity

    CERN Document Server

    Barreira, Luís; Valls, Claudia

    2018-01-01

    This book gives a comprehensive overview of the relationship between admissibility and hyperbolicity. Essential theories and selected developments are discussed with highlights to applications. The dedicated readership includes researchers and graduate students specializing in differential equations and dynamical systems (with emphasis on hyperbolicity) who wish to have a broad view of the topic and working knowledge of its techniques. The book may also be used as a basis for appropriate graduate courses on hyperbolicity; the pointers and references given to further research will be particularly useful. The material is divided into three parts: the core of the theory, recent developments, and applications. The first part pragmatically covers the relation between admissibility and hyperbolicity, starting with the simpler case of exponential contractions. It also considers exponential dichotomies, both for discrete and continuous time, and establishes corresponding results building on the arguments for exponent...

  7. Existing and Proposed Child Find Initiatives in One State's Part C Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Nicole Megan; Gallagher, Peggy A.; Green, Katherine B.

    2013-01-01

    Despite a Child Find mandate in IDEA, early detection and screening of infants and toddlers with special needs continues to remain an area in need of improvement. The authors sought to better understand existing and proposed outreach initiatives in one state's Part C Early Intervention (EI) program that ranks among the lowest nationally in the…

  8. A Discussion of Change Theory, System Theory, and State Designed Standards and Accountability Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, Larry; Christy, W. Keith

    This brief paper is a presentation that preceeded another case of considering the ongoing dialogue on the advantages and disadvantages of centralized and decentralized school-improvement processes. It attempts to raise a number of questions about the relationship between state-designed standards and accountability initiatives and change and…

  9. First study of the interference between initial and final state radiation at the Z resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barate, R; Barbi, M S; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Blyth, S; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Bosworth, S; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brillault, L; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerrito, L; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Dufour, Y; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Ershaidat, N; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Ferrer, A; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gibbs, M; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Novák, M; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Petrovykh, M; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Pindo, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Rybin, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Waldner, F; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zuberi, R; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1996-01-01

    The interference between initial and final state radiation in the process \\eemm\\ at $\\sqs \\approx \\MZ$ has been studied by measuring the forward-backward asymmetry as a function of the acoplanarity angle between the final state muons. The interference is expected to be sensitive to the space-time separation of the initial and final state radiation. The measured asymmetry distribution has been compared to theoretical predictions using the \\KORALZ\\ generator, with and without ørdalph\\ interference. The magnitude of the interference between initial and $ \\pm 0.06 $ (syst.) \\GeV} . \\end{center} has been extracted. The interpretation of this result is discussed. There is an additional uncertainty in the estimate of \\GZ\\ from as yet uncalculated higher order interference terms. By assuming a value of \\GZ\\ consistent with the world average, the data were used to estimate the size of these uncalculated corrections. The interference between initial and final state radiation in the process \\eemm\\ at \\sqs \\approx \\MZ h...

  10. Cooperative Lamb shift and the cooperative decay rate for an initially detuned phased state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedberg, Richard; Manassah, Jamal T.

    2010-01-01

    The cooperative Lamb shift (CLS) is hard to measure because in samples much larger than a resonant wavelength it is much smaller, for an initially prepared resonantly phased state, than the cooperative decay rate (CDR). We show, however, that if the phasing of the initial state is detuned so that the spatial wave vector is k 1 congruent with k 0 ±O((1/R)) (where k 0 =ω 0 /c is the resonant frequency), the CLS grows to 'giant' magnitudes making it comparable to the CDR. Moreover, for certain controlled values of detuning, the initial CDR becomes small so that the dynamical Lamb shift (DLS) can be measured over a considerable period of time.

  11. Exploring associations between state education initiatives and teachers' sleep: A social-ecological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishiro, Kaori; Farley, Amy N; Kellemen, Marie; Swoboda, Christopher M

    2017-10-01

    Social policies that are not specifically aimed at impacting health can still have health consequences. State education reforms, such as standardized testing and stringent accountability for schools and teachers, may affect teacher health by changing their working conditions. This study explores associations between state education initiatives and teachers' sleep, an important predictor of productivity and chronic health conditions. The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2013 and 2014 data sets provided sleep and demographic data for 7836 teachers in 29 states in the United States. We linked the teacher data to state education reform data from the U.S. Department of Education. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) of reporting inadequate sleep (i.e., state education policies after adjusting for demographic characteristics. Teachers had significantly higher odds of reporting inadequate sleep if their state financed professional development, sanctioned or rewarded schools based on student performance, and regulated classroom materials for state-wide common core standards (ORs ranging from 1.25 to 1.84). More strictly defined inadequate sleep (states to implement reforms through regulations and legislations, was also associated with inadequate sleep (OR = 1.41, p state education policies may have impacts on teacher sleep. Consequences of education reform for teacher health deserve more attention. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Non-Vacuum Initial States for Cosmological Perturbations of Quantum-Mechanical Origin

    CERN Document Server

    Martín, J; Sakellariadou, M; Martin, Jerome; Riazuelo, Alain; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2000-01-01

    In the context of inflation, non-vacuum initial states for cosmological perturbations that possess a built in scale are studied. It is demonstrated that this assumption leads to a falsifiable class of models. The question of whether they lead to conflicts with the available observations is addressed. For this purpose, the power spectrum of the Bardeen potential operator is calculated and compared with the CMBR anisotropies measurements and the redshift surveys of galaxies and clusters of galaxies. Generic predictions of the model are: a high first acoustic peak, the presence of a bump in the matter power spectrum and non-Gaussian statistics. The details are controlled by the number of quanta in the non-vacuum initial state. Comparisons with observations show that there exists a window for the free parameters such that good agreement between the data and the theoretical predictions is possible. However, in the case where the initial state is a state with a fixed number of quanta, it is shown that this number c...

  13. An implicit steady-state initialization package for the RELAP5 computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulsen, M.P.; Peterson, C.E.; Odar, F.

    1995-08-01

    A direct steady-state initialization (DSSI) method has been developed and implemented in the RELAP5 hydrodynamic analysis program. It provides a means for users to specify a small set of initial conditions which are then propagated through the remainder of the system. The DSSI scheme utilizes the steady-state form of the RELAP5 balance equations for nonequilibrium two-phase flow. It also employs the RELAP5 component models and constitutive model packages for wall-to-phase and interphase momentum and heat exchange. A fully implicit solution of the linearized hydrodynamic equations is implemented. An implicit coupling scheme is used to augment the standard steady-state heat conduction solution for steam generator use. It solves the primary-side tube region energy equations, heat conduction equations, wall heat flux boundary conditions, and overall energy balance equation as a coupled system of equations and improves convergence. The DSSI method for initializing RELAP5 problems to steady-state conditions has been compared with the transient solution scheme using a suite of test problems including; adiabatic single-phase liquid and vapor flow through channels with and without healing and area changes; a heated two-phase test bundle representative of BWR core conditions; and a single-loop PWR model

  14. An information model of a centralized admission campaign in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the work is to structure individual application environments of the information model of a centralized admission campaign in higher education institutions in Russia by modifying the corresponding structure of the Federal information system supporting state final examination and admission procedures. , The ...

  15. 19 CFR 210.31 - Requests for admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requests for admission. 210.31 Section 210.31 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION INVESTIGATIONS OF UNFAIR PRACTICES IN IMPORT TRADE ADJUDICATION AND ENFORCEMENT Discovery and Compulsory Process § 210.31 Requests for admission. (a...

  16. Characteristics of Pregnant Teen Substance Abuse Treatment Admissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment admission (“other female teen admissions”). Note that TEDS is a census of all admissions to treatment facilities reported to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) by State substance abuse agencies. IN BRIEF X X Between 2007 and 2010, about 57,000 ...

  17. 77 FR 3152 - New Mexico: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation-by-Reference of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-23

    ... relations, Penalties, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Water pollution control, Water supply... Mexico: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation-by-Reference of State Hazardous.... SUMMARY: During a review of New Mexico's regulations, the EPA identified a variety of State-initiated...

  18. Deterministic Electrical Charge-State Initialization of Single Nitrogen-Vacancy Center in Diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Doi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Apart from applications in classical information-processing devices, the electrical control of atomic defects in solids at room temperature will have a tremendous impact on quantum devices that are based on such defects. In this study, we demonstrate the electrical manipulation of individual prominent representatives of such atomic solid-state defects, namely, the negative charge state of single nitrogen-vacancy defect centers (NV^{−} in diamond. We experimentally demonstrate, deterministic, purely electrical charge-state initialization of individual NV centers. The NV centers are placed in the intrinsic region of a p-i-n diode structure that facilitates the delivery of charge carriers to the defect for charge-state switching. The charge-state dynamics of a single NV center were investigated by time-resolved measurements and a nondestructive single-shot readout of the charge state. Fast charge-state switching rates (from negative to neutrally charged defects, which are greater than 0.72 ± 0.10  μs^{−1}, were realized. Furthermore, in no-operation mode, the realized charge states were stable for presumably much more than 0.45 s. We believe that the results obtained are useful not only for ultrafast electrical control of qubits, long T_{2} quantum memory, and quantum sensors associated with single NV centers but also for classical memory devices based on single atomic storage bits working under ambient conditions.

  19. Modulation of Soil Initial State on WRF Model Performance Over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Haile; Jin, Qinjian; Yi, Bingqi; Mullendore, Gretchen L.; Zheng, Xiaohui; Jin, Hongchun

    2017-11-01

    The soil state (e.g., temperature and moisture) in a mesoscale numerical prediction model is typically initialized by reanalysis or analysis data that may be subject to large bias. Such bias may lead to unrealistic land-atmosphere interactions. This study shows that the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) dramatically underestimates soil temperature and overestimates soil moisture over most parts of China in the first (0-10 cm) and second (10-25 cm) soil layers compared to in situ observations in July 2013. A correction based on the global optimal dual kriging is employed to correct CFSR bias in soil temperature and moisture using in situ observations. To investigate the impacts of the corrected soil state on model forecasts, two numerical model simulations—a control run with CFSR soil state and a disturbed run with the corrected soil state—were conducted using the Weather Research and Forecasting model. All the simulations are initiated 4 times per day and run 48 h. Model results show that the corrected soil state, for example, warmer and drier surface over the most parts of China, can enhance evaporation over wet regions, which changes the overlying atmospheric temperature and moisture. The changes of the lifting condensation level, level of free convection, and water transport due to corrected soil state favor precipitation over wet regions, while prohibiting precipitation over dry regions. Moreover, diagnoses indicate that the remote moisture flux convergence plays a dominant role in the precipitation changes over the wet regions.

  20. Initial state dependence of low-energy electron emission in fast ion atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshammer, R.; Schmitt, W.; Kollmus, H.; Ullrich, J.; Fainstein, P.D.; Hagmann, S.

    1999-06-01

    Single and multiple ionization of Neon and Argon atoms by 3.6 MeV/u Au 53+ impact has been explored in kinematically complete experiments. Doubly differential cross sections for low-energy electron emission have been obtained for defined charge state of the recoiling target ion and the receding projectile. Observed target specific structures in the electron continuum are attributable to the nodal structure of the initial bound state momentum distribution. The experimental data are in excellent accord with CDW-EIS single ionization calculations if multiple ionization is considered appropriately. (orig.)

  1. Deterministic integer multiple firing depending on initial state in Wang model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Yong [Institute of Nonlinear Dynamics, MSSV, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)]. E-mail: yxie@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Xu Jianxue [Institute of Nonlinear Dynamics, MSSV, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Jiang Jun [Institute of Nonlinear Dynamics, MSSV, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2006-12-15

    We investigate numerically dynamical behaviour of the Wang model, which describes the rhythmic activities of thalamic relay neurons. The model neuron exhibits Type I excitability from a global view, but Type II excitability from a local view. There exists a narrow range of bistability, in which a subthreshold oscillation and a suprathreshold firing behaviour coexist. A special firing pattern, integer multiple firing can be found in the certain part of the bistable range. The characteristic feature of such firing pattern is that the histogram of interspike intervals has a multipeaked structure, and the peaks are located at about integer multiples of a basic interspike interval. Since the Wang model is noise-free, the integer multiple firing is a deterministic firing pattern. The existence of bistability leads to the deterministic integer multiple firing depending on the initial state of the model neuron, i.e., the initial values of the state variables.

  2. Deterministic integer multiple firing depending on initial state in Wang model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Yong; Xu Jianxue; Jiang Jun

    2006-01-01

    We investigate numerically dynamical behaviour of the Wang model, which describes the rhythmic activities of thalamic relay neurons. The model neuron exhibits Type I excitability from a global view, but Type II excitability from a local view. There exists a narrow range of bistability, in which a subthreshold oscillation and a suprathreshold firing behaviour coexist. A special firing pattern, integer multiple firing can be found in the certain part of the bistable range. The characteristic feature of such firing pattern is that the histogram of interspike intervals has a multipeaked structure, and the peaks are located at about integer multiples of a basic interspike interval. Since the Wang model is noise-free, the integer multiple firing is a deterministic firing pattern. The existence of bistability leads to the deterministic integer multiple firing depending on the initial state of the model neuron, i.e., the initial values of the state variables

  3. Vibrating sample magnetometer 2D and 3D magnetization effects associated with different initial magnetization states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald E. Lukins

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Differences in VSM magnetization vector rotation associated with various initial magnetization states were demonstrated. Procedures and criteria were developed to select sample orientation and initial magnetization states to allow for the combination of two different 2D measurements runs (with the same field profiles to generate a dataset that can be representative of actual 3D magnetization rotation. Nickel, cast iron, and low moment magnetic tape media were used to demonstrate these effects using hysteresis and remanent magnetization test sequences. These results can be used to generate 2D and 3D magnetic properties to better characterize magnetic phenomena which are inherently three dimensional. Example applications are magnetic tape-head orientation sensitivity, reinterpretation of 3D coercivity and other standard magnetic properties, and multi-dimensional shielding effectiveness.

  4. Attosecond Charge Migration with TDDFT: Accurate Dynamics from a Well-Defined Initial State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Adam; Hernandez, Samuel; Mauger, François; Abanador, Paul M; LaMaster, Daniel J; Gaarde, Mette B; Schafer, Kenneth J; Lopata, Kenneth

    2017-09-07

    We investigate the ability of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to capture attosecond valence electron dynamics resulting from sudden X-ray ionization of a core electron. In this special case the initial state can be constructed unambiguously, allowing for a simple test of the accuracy of the dynamics. The response following nitrogen K-edge ionization in nitrosobenzene shows excellent agreement with fourth-order algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC(4)) results, suggesting that a properly chosen initial state allows TDDFT to adequately capture attosecond charge migration. Visualizing hole motion using an electron localization picture (ELF), we provide an intuitive chemical interpretation of the charge migration as a superposition of Lewis dot resonance structures.

  5. Coherence Evolution and Transfer Supplemented by Sender's Initial-State Restoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fel'dman, E. B.; Zenchuk, A. I.

    2017-12-01

    The evolution of quantum coherences comes with a set of conservation laws provided that the Hamiltonian governing this evolution conserves the spin-excitation number. At that, coherences do not intertwist during the evolution. Using the transmission line and the receiver in the initial ground state we can transfer the coherences to the receiver without interaction between them, although the matrix elements contributing to each particular coherence intertwist in the receiver's state. Therefore we propose a tool based on the unitary transformation at the receiver side to untwist these elements and thus restore (at least partially) the structure of the sender's initial density matrix. A communication line with two-qubit sender and receiver is considered as an example of implementation of this technique.

  6. A harmonic transition state theory model for defect initiation in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delph, T J; Cao, P; Park, H S; Zimmerman, J A

    2013-01-01

    We outline here a model for the initiation of defects in crystals based upon harmonic transition state theory (hTST). This model combines a previously developed model for zero-temperature defect initiation with a multi-dimensional hTST model that is capable of accurately predicting the effects of temperature and loading rate upon defect initiation. The model has several features that set it apart from previous efforts along these lines, most notably a straightforward method of determining the energy barrier between adjacent equilibrium states that does not depend upon a priori information concerning the nature of the defect. We apply the model to two examples, triaxial stretching of a perfect fcc crystal and nanoindentation of a gold substrate. Very good agreement is found between the predictions of the model and independent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Among other things, the model predicts a strong dependence of the defect initiation behavior upon the loading parameter. A very attractive feature of this model is that it is valid for arbitrarily slow loading rates, in particular loading rates achievable in the laboratory, and suffers from none of the limitations in this regard inherent in MD simulations. (paper)

  7. Dynamical initial-state model for relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chun; Schenke, Björn

    2018-02-01

    We present a fully three-dimensional model providing initial conditions for energy and net-baryon density distributions in heavy-ion collisions at arbitrary collision energy. The model includes the dynamical deceleration of participating nucleons or valence quarks, depending on the implementation. The duration of the deceleration continues until the string spanned between colliding participants is assumed to thermalize, which is either after a fixed proper time, or a fluctuating time depending on sampled final rapidities. Energy is deposited in space time along the string, which in general will span a range of space-time rapidities and proper times. We study various observables obtained directly from the initial-state model, including net-baryon rapidity distributions, two-particle rapidity correlations, as well as the rapidity decorrelation of the transverse geometry. Their dependence on the model implementation and parameter values is investigated. We also present the implementation of the model with 3+1-dimensional hydrodynamics, which involves the addition of source terms that deposit energy and net-baryon densities produced by the initial-state model at proper times greater than the initial time for the hydrodynamic simulation.

  8. Robust method for determining steady state initial values for MSS plant models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringham, M.R.; Carlson, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Results of an EPRI sponsored project (RP 2504-3 amend i) demonstrated that the methodology embodied in the existing System Performance and Analysis Code (SPANC) can be employed to provide initial values for MSS plant models. An EASY5 version of the TMI plant two loop approximation with primary coolant flow recirculation through a failed pump was selected for demonstration purposes. The project entailed replacing the 1967 ASME steam properties in SPANC with the simplified MSS functions. The MSS component models were then recast into equivalent steady state models compatible with the SPANC executive system. A special input routine was written to modify the MSS data to the SPANC data format. The accuracy of the obtained initial values was approximately four significant figures, sufficient to converge on the EASY5 steady state algorithms. Convergence is relatively insensitive to the initial guess in SPANC and are obtained at a computer cost of approximately two minutes on the UNIVAC 1100/60. Since plant configuration is established by data input in SPANC, it can easily be altered to provide initial values for an MMS simulation of all TMI type plants

  9. Design, production and initial state of the backfill and plug in deposition tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerjesson, Lennart; Gunnarsson, David; Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Jonsson, Esther

    2010-12-15

    The report is included in a set of Production reports, presenting how the KBS-3 repository is designed, produced and inspected. The set of reports is included in the safety report for the KBS-3 repository and repository facility. The report provides input on the initial state of the backfill and plug in deposition tunnels for the assessment of the long-term safety, SR-Site. The initial state refers to the properties of the engineered barriers once they have been finally placed in the KBS-3 repository and will not be further handled within the repository facility. In addition, the report provides input to the operational safety report, SR-Operation, on how the backfill and plug shall be handled and installed. The report presents the design premises and reference designs of the backfill and plug in deposition tunnels and verifies their conformity to the design premises. It also describes the production of the backfill from excavation and delivery of backfill material to installation in the deposition tunnel, and gives an outline of the installation of the plug. Finally, the initial states of the backfill and plug and their conformity to the reference designs and design premises are presented

  10. Nonflexible Lie-admissible algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myung, H.C.

    1978-01-01

    We discuss the structure of Lie-admissible algebras which are defined by nonflexible identities. These algebras largely arise from the antiflexible algebras, 2-varieties and associator dependent algebras. The nonflexible Lie-admissible algebras in our discussion are in essence byproducts of the study of nonassociative algebras defined by identities of degree 3. The main purpose is to discuss the classification of simple Lie-admissible algebras of nonflexible type

  11. Connecticut State University System Initiative for Nanotechnology-Related Equipment, Faculty Development and Curriculum Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadbridge, Christine C. [Southern Connecticut State University

    2013-03-28

    DOE grant used for partial fulfillment of necessary laboratory equipment for course enrichment and new graduate programs in nanotechnology at the four institutions of the Connecticut State University System (CSUS). Equipment in this initial phase included variable pressure scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis capability [at Southern Connecticut State University]; power x-ray diffractometer [at Central Connecticut State University]; a spectrophotometer and spectrofluorimeter [at Eastern Connecticut State University; and a Raman Spectrometer [at Western Connecticut State University]. DOE's funding was allocated for purchase and installation of this scientific equipment and instrumentation. Subsequently, DOE funding was allocated to fund the curriculum, faculty development and travel necessary to continue development and implementation of the System's Graduate Certificate in Nanotechnology (GCNT) program and the ConnSCU Nanotechnology Center (ConnSCU-NC) at Southern Connecticut State University. All of the established outcomes have been successfully achieved. The courses and structure of the GCNT program have been determined and the program will be completely implemented in the fall of 2013. The instrumentation has been purchased, installed and has been utilized at each campus for the implementation of the nanotechnology courses, CSUS GCNT and the ConnSCU-NC. Additional outcomes for this grant include curriculum development for non-majors as well as faculty and student research.

  12. Applicability of initial stress measurement methods to Horonobe Siliceous rocks and initial stress state around Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanada, Hiroyuki; Niunoya, Sumio; Matsui, Hiroya; Fujii, Yoshiaki

    2009-01-01

    Understanding initial stress condition in deep underground is important for such construction as rock cavern for geological disposal of HLW and underground power plant. Neogene sedimentary rock is widely distributed in Japan. There are only a few studies of initial stress measurement in Neogene sedimentary rock mass in Japan due to difficulty of measurement. Evaluation of initial stress condition around Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory Project was carried out in order to understand initial stress condition and applicability of AE, DSCA and hydraulic fracturing (HF) methods to Neogene sedimentary rock. Initial stress values obtained from AE method is smaller than overburden pressure due to time dependency of Kaizer effect. It would be difficult to use AE method as initial stress measurement method for Horonobe Siliceous rocks. Principal stress values by DSCA are similar to those by HF tests. Directions of maximum horizontal principal stresses are approximately in E-W and corresponded to HF results. In HF, rod type and wire-line type systems were compared. Workability of rod type was much better than wire-line type. However, re-opening pressure were not able to be precisely measured in case of rod type system due to the large compliance of the packers and rods. Horizontal maximum and minimum principal stresses increase linearly in HF results. Deviatoric stress is acting at shallow depth. Initial stress condition approaches hydrostatic condition with depth. Direction of maximum horizontal principal stress was in E-W direction which was similar to tectonic movement around Horonobe URL by triangular surveying. (author)

  13. Canada-United States-Mexico Trilateral Cooperation on Childhood Obesity Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Rabadán-Diehl

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Childhood obesity is an important public health problem that affects countries in the Americas. In 2014, Pan American Health Organization (PAHO Member States agreed on a Plan of Action for the Prevention of Obesity in Children and Adolescents in an effort to address the impact of this disorder in the Americas region. The interventions laid out in this regional plan are multi-faceted and require multi-sectoral partnerships. Building on a strong history of successful trilateral collaboration, Canada, Mexico, and the United States formed a partnership to address the growing epidemic of childhood obesity in the North American region. This collaborative effort, known as the Trilateral Cooperation on Childhood Obesity Initiative, is the first initiative in the region to address chronic noncommunicable diseases by bringing together technical and policy experts, with strong leadership and support from the secretaries and ministers of health. The Initiative’s goals include increasing levels of physical activity and reducing sedentary behavior through 1 increased social mobilization and citizen engagement, 2 community- based outreach, and 3 changes to the built (man-made environment. This article describes the background and development process of the Initiative; specific goals, activities, and actions achieved to date; and opportunities and next steps. This information may be useful for those forming other partnerships designed to address childhood obesity or other complex public health challenges in the region.

  14. A quality improvement approach to cognitive assessment on hospice admission: could we use the 4AT or Short CAM?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Lucy; Spiller, Juliet Anne

    2017-01-01

    Background Prevalence studies show that 13%-42% of patients admitted to specialist palliative care inpatient units have delirium. Symptoms of delirium are often subtle and easily missed, or misdiagnosed as fatigue or depression, and so the use of a screening tool could improve early identification and management of delirium and lead to improved outcomes. Patients admitted to hospices are often frail and tired, therefore a quick and easy-to-use method of cognitive assessment is essential. Methods A quality improvement (QI) approach (PDSA: Plan, Do, Study, Act) was used to improve screening for delirium on admission to a hospice unit. A baseline measure was taken of the rate of performance of cognitive assessment on admission. Five PDSA cycles were then undertaken which involved implementing change and then evaluating results through auditing case notes and interviewing staff. Results The first cycle determined staff preference between two cognitive assessment methods: the Short Confusion Assessment Method and the four 'A's Test (4AT). Two further PDSA cycles embedded the 4AT (the preferred tool) into the admission process, establishing it as a usable tool in the hospice setting for up to 92% of admissions. A subsequent cycle showing poor sustainability prompted staff education and changes to admission documentation, resulting in an increase in cognitive assessment being performed, from 50% to 76%. Conclusion The 4AT is a usable tool in the hospice inpatient setting to assess patients' cognitive state on admission and can easily be incorporated into the admission process. The QI approach highlighted the need to link staff awareness of their use of the screening tool with perceived improvements in the treatment of delirium, which prompted the creation and implementation of a 'Delirium Checklist'. Some initial lack of sustainability was addressed by staff education and changes to the admission paperwork to ensure compliance with the use of the 4AT and sustained

  15. Patterns of opioid initiation at first visits for pain in United States primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundkur, Mallika L; Rough, Kathryn; Huybrechts, Krista F; Levin, Raisa; Gagne, Joshua J; Desai, Rishi J; Patorno, Elisabetta; Choudhry, Niteesh K; Bateman, Brian T

    2018-05-01

    The primary objective of this study was to characterize variation in patterns of opioid prescribing within primary care settings at first visits for pain, and to describe variation by condition, geography, and patient characteristics. 2014 healthcare utilization data from Optum's Clinformatics™ DataMart were used to evaluate individuals 18 years or older with an initial presentation to primary care for 1 of 10 common pain conditions. The main outcomes assessed were (1) the proportion of first visits for pain associated with an opioid prescription fill and (2) the proportion of opioid prescriptions with >7 days' supply. We identified 205 560 individuals who met inclusion criteria; 9.1% of all visits were associated with an opioid fill, ranging from 4.1% (headache) to 28.2% (dental pain). Approximately half (46%) of all opioid prescriptions supplied more than 7 days, and 10% of prescriptions supplied ≥30 days. We observed a 4-fold variation in rates of opioid initiation by state, with highest rates of prescribing in Alabama (16.6%) and lowest rates in New York (3.7%). In 2014, nearly half of all patients filling opioid prescriptions received more than 7 days' of opioids in an initial prescription. Policies limiting initial supplies have the potential to substantially impact opioid prescribing in the primary care setting. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure: Multiple layers of emitters and multiple initial states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huff, W.R.A.; Kellar, S.A.; Moler, E.J.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA; Chen, Y.; Wu, H.; Shirley, D.A.; Hussain, Z.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) has been applied to experimental systems involving multiple layers of emitters and non-s core-level photoemission in an effort to broaden the utility of the technique. Most of the previous systems have been comprised of atomic or molecular overlayers adsorbed onto a single-crystal, metal surface and the photoemission data were taken from an s atomic core-level in the overlayer. For such a system, the acquired ARPEFS data is dominated by the p o final state wave backscattering from the substrate atoms and is well understood. In this study, we investigate ARPEFS as a surface-region structure determination technique when applied to experimental systems comprised of multiple layers of photoemitters and arbitrary initial state core-level photoemission. Understanding the data acquired from multiple layers of photoemitters is useful for studying multilayer interfaces, ''buried'' surfaces, and clean crystals in ultra- high vacuum. The ability to apply ARPEFS to arbitrary initial state core-level photoemission obviously opens up many systems to analysis. Efforts have been ongoing to understand such data in depth. We present clean Cu(111) 3s, 3p, and 3d core-level, normal photoemission data taken on a high resolution soft x-ray beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, California and clean Ni(111) 3p normal photoemission data taken at the National Synchrotron Light Source in Upton, New York, USA

  17. STATE CONTROL OF THE REPUBLIC OF BELARUS: INITIAL STAGE OF ORGANIZATION AND DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sakovich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available  The paper considers  the initial stage of organization and development of the first State control organ of the independent Belarus – Control Chamber of the Republic of Belarus on the basis of scientific grounds of control theory of economic systems. Scientific and methodologically considered organizational and coordination approaches to the activity of the Control Chamber have promoted to  higher intensity and efficiency of financial and economic control in the initial period of the activity of new control organ and  the activity of all control organs of the Republic has taken systemized and perfectly oriented character. Such approaches have made it possible to stabilize macro-economic situation in the Republic and strengthen its economic security. The Control Chamber through highly-qualified personal, created and practically introduced methodological principles of control activity, international cooperation experience and finally high efficiency of practical control activity has made its historical contribution in formation of fundamentals of  the State Control in Belarus.13th of March 1992 is the day when the Law “About Control Chamber of the Republic of Belarus” has been enacted by the Supreme Council of the Republic of Belarus and this day is to considered as the Day of State Control foundation in the Republic of Belarus.  

  18. Initiation of arcing on tungsten surface exposed to steady state He plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajita, Shin; Noiri, Yasuyuki; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2015-09-01

    Arcing was initiated in steady state helium plasmas by negatively biasing a tungsten electrode to around -500 V. On the tungsten electrode, nanostructures were grown by the plasma irradiation. In this study, we characterized the property of the initiated arcing by measuring the temporal evolutions of the electrode potential and the arc current. The ignition frequency and duration of arcing were presented from the potential measurements; the arc duration was in the range of changing the biasing voltage. The behavior of arc spots was observed with a fast framing camera. It was shown that the spots split frequently, and sometimes, they run on the surface independently. From the fluctuation of the arc current, the fractal feature of arcing was revealed.

  19. Balance control during gait initiation: State-of-the-art and research perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiou, Eric; Caderby, Teddy; Delafontaine, Arnaud; Fourcade, Paul; Honeine, Jean-Louis

    2017-11-18

    It is well known that balance control is affected by aging, neurological and orthopedic conditions. Poor balance control during gait and postural maintenance are associated with disability, falls and increased mortality. Gait initiation - the transient period between the quiet standing posture and steady state walking - is a functional task that is classically used in the literature to investigate how the central nervous system (CNS) controls balance during a whole-body movement involving change in the base of support dimensions and center of mass progression. Understanding how the CNS in able-bodied subjects exerts this control during such a challenging task is a pre-requisite to identifying motor disorders in populations with specific impairments of the postural system. It may also provide clinicians with objective measures to assess the efficiency of rehabilitation programs and better target interventions according to individual impairments. The present review thus proposes a state-of-the-art analysis on: (1) the balance control mechanisms in play during gait initiation in able bodied subjects and in the case of some frail populations; and (2) the biomechanical parameters used in the literature to quantify dynamic stability during gait initiation. Balance control mechanisms reviewed in this article included anticipatory postural adjustments, stance leg stiffness, foot placement, lateral ankle strategy, swing foot strike pattern and vertical center of mass braking. Based on this review, the following viewpoints were put forward: (1) dynamic stability during gait initiation may share a principle of homeostatic regulation similar to most physiological variables, where separate mechanisms need to be coordinated to ensure stabilization of vital variables, and consequently; and (2) rehabilitation interventions which focus on separate or isolated components of posture, balance, or gait may limit the effectiveness of current clinical practices.

  20. Moving science into state child and adolescent mental health systems: Illinois' evidence-informed practice initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starin, Amy C; Atkins, Marc S; Wehrmann, Kathryn C; Mehta, Tara; Hesson-McInnis, Matthew S; Marinez-Lora, A; Mehlinger, Renee

    2014-01-01

    In 2005, the Illinois State Mental Health Authority embarked on an initiative to close the gap between research and practice in the children's mental health system. A stakeholder advisory council developed a plan to advance evidence informed practice through policy and program initiatives. A multilevel approach was developed to achieve this objective, which included policy change, stakeholder education, and clinician training. This article focuses on the evidence-informed training process designed following review of implementation research. The training involved in-person didactic sessions and twice-monthly telephone supervision across 6 cohorts of community based clinicians, each receiving 12 months of training. Training content initially included cognitive behavioral therapy and behavioral parent training and was adapted over the years to a practice model based on common element concepts. Evaluation based on provider and parent report indicated children treated by training clinicians generally showed superior outcomes versus both a treatment-as-usual comparison group for Cohorts 1 to 4 and the statewide child population as a whole after 90 days of care for Cohorts 5 to 6. The results indicated primarily moderate to strong effects for the evidence-based training groups. Moving a large public statewide child mental health system toward more effective services is a complex and lengthy process. These results indicate training of community mental health providers in Illinois in evidence-informed practice was moderately successful in positively impacting child-level functional outcomes. These findings also influenced state policy in committing resources to continuing the initiative, even in difficult economic times.

  1. Optimal admission to higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albæk, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    that documents the relevance of theory and illustrates how to apply optimal admission procedures. Indirect gains from optimal admission procedures include the potential for increasing entire cohorts of students' probability of graduating with a higher education degree, thereby increasing the skill level...

  2. False confessions, expert testimony, and admissibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Clarence; Weiss, Kenneth J; Pouncey, Claire

    2010-01-01

    The confession of a criminal defendant serves as a prosecutor's most compelling piece of evidence during trial. Courts must preserve a defendant's constitutional right to a fair trial while upholding the judicial interests of presenting competent and reliable evidence to the jury. When a defendant seeks to challenge the validity of that confession through expert testimony, the prosecution often contests the admissibility of the expert's opinion. Depending on the content and methodology of the expert's opinion, testimony addressing the phenomenon of false confessions may or may not be admissible. This article outlines the scientific and epistemological bases of expert testimony on false confession, notes the obstacles facing its admissibility, and provides guidance to the expert in formulating opinions that will reach the judge or jury. We review the 2006 New Jersey Superior Court decision in State of New Jersey v. George King to illustrate what is involved in the admissibility of false-confession testimony and use the case as a starting point in developing a best-practice approach to working in this area.

  3. Initial states in integrable quantum field theory quenches from an integral equation hierarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.X. Horváth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of determining the initial state of integrable quantum field theory quenches in terms of the post-quench eigenstates. The corresponding overlaps are a fundamental input to most exact methods to treat integrable quantum quenches. We construct and examine an infinite integral equation hierarchy based on the form factor bootstrap, proposed earlier as a set of conditions determining the overlaps. Using quenches of the mass and interaction in Sinh-Gordon theory as a concrete example, we present theoretical arguments that the state has the squeezed coherent form expected for integrable quenches, and supporting an Ansatz for the solution of the hierarchy. Moreover we also develop an iterative method to solve numerically the lowest equation of the hierarchy. The iterative solution along with extensive numerical checks performed using the next equation of the hierarchy provides a strong numerical evidence that the proposed Ansatz gives a very good approximation for the solution.

  4. Solid and liquid Equation of state for initially porous aluminum where specific heat is constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Jerry W.; Lemar, E. R.; Brown, Mary

    2011-06-01

    A porous solid's initial state is off the thermodynamic surface of the non-porous solid to start with but when pressure is high enough to cause total pore collapse or crush up, then the final states are on the condensed matter thermodynamic surfaces. The Hugoniot for the fully compacted solid is above the Principle Hugoniot with pressure, temperature and internal energy increased at a given v. There are a number of ways to define this hotter Hugoniot, which can be referenced to other thermodynamic paths on this thermodynamic surface. The choice here was to use the Vinet isotherm to define a consistent thermodynamic surface for the solid and melt phase of 6061 aluminum where specific heat is constant for the P-v-T space of interest. Analytical equations are developed for PH and TH.

  5. Electron momentum spectroscopy of aniline taking account of nuclear dynamics in the initial electronic ground state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farasat, M; Golzan, M M; Shojaei, S H R; Morini, F; Deleuze, M S

    2016-01-01

    The electronic structure, electron binding energy spectrum and (e, 2e) momentum distributions of aniline have been theoretically predicted at an electron impact energy of 1.500 keV on the basis of Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamical simulations, in order to account for thermally induced nuclear motions in the initial electronic ground state. Most computed momentum profiles are rather insensitive to thermally induced alterations of the molecular structure, with the exception of the profiles corresponding to two ionization bands at electron binding energies comprised between ∼10.0 and ∼12.0 eV (band C) and between ∼16.5 and ∼20.0 eV (band G). These profiles are found to be strongly influenced by nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state, especially in the low momentum region. The obtained results show that thermal averaging smears out most generally the spectral fingerprints that are induced by nitrogen inversion. (paper)

  6. Initial states in integrable quantum field theory quenches from an integral equation hierarchy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horváth, D.X., E-mail: esoxluciuslinne@gmail.com [MTA-BME “Momentum” Statistical Field Theory Research Group, Budafoki út 8, 1111 Budapest (Hungary); Department of Theoretical Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budafoki út 8, 1111 Budapest (Hungary); Sotiriadis, S., E-mail: sotiriad@sissa.it [SISSA and INFN, Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); Takács, G., E-mail: takacsg@eik.bme.hu [MTA-BME “Momentum” Statistical Field Theory Research Group, Budafoki út 8, 1111 Budapest (Hungary); Department of Theoretical Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budafoki út 8, 1111 Budapest (Hungary)

    2016-01-15

    We consider the problem of determining the initial state of integrable quantum field theory quenches in terms of the post-quench eigenstates. The corresponding overlaps are a fundamental input to most exact methods to treat integrable quantum quenches. We construct and examine an infinite integral equation hierarchy based on the form factor bootstrap, proposed earlier as a set of conditions determining the overlaps. Using quenches of the mass and interaction in Sinh-Gordon theory as a concrete example, we present theoretical arguments that the state has the squeezed coherent form expected for integrable quenches, and supporting an Ansatz for the solution of the hierarchy. Moreover we also develop an iterative method to solve numerically the lowest equation of the hierarchy. The iterative solution along with extensive numerical checks performed using the next equation of the hierarchy provides a strong numerical evidence that the proposed Ansatz gives a very good approximation for the solution.

  7. NNSA's next generation safeguards initiative to define an effective state system of accounting and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, Rebecca S.; Sunshine, Alexander; Matthews, Caroline; Frazer, Sarah; Matthews, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    The International Nuclear Safeguards and Engagement Program (INSEP), the international outreach component of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), is a collaborative program that endeavors to strengthen international safeguards at all stages of nuclear development. One of the critical ways the program achieves this objective is through working with partners to increase the effectiveness of the State System of Accountancy for and Control of Nuclear Materials (SSAC) - the essential elements of national, regulatory and facility safeguards competencies that work as a system to provide the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the world the full assurance of the state's adherence to its safeguards agreements. INSEP provides assistance in developing a state's SSAC in a number of areas, from developing national legislation governing the possession and use of nuclear material to working with nuclear facility operators to developing good practices in waste management. INSEP has collaborated with foreign partners in peaceful nuclear applications for over two decades, but recently, it has focused its efforts on strengthening SSACs due to the growth of nuclear power worldwide, particularly in countries with limited nuclear infrastructures. This new area of focus has prompted INSEP to develop a model of SSAC competencies that will serve not only as a structure for its engagement with partner states, but also as a means to facilitate coordination with other states that provide training and assistance, and as a mechanism for evaluating the effectiveness of its work in reaching its intended objectives. While this model uses as its starting point the requirements on a State that are presented in the Comprehensive Safeguards Agreement and the Additional Protocol, it is not, in itself, a requirements document or guidance for implementing requirements. It is rather an analysis of what capabilities will be needed in a State to be able to meet requirements and to

  8. Post-prior discrepancies in the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state approximation for ion-helium ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciappina, M F [CONICET and Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Cravero, W R [CONICET and Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Garibotti, C R [CONICET and Division Colisiones Atomicas, Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    2003-09-28

    We have explored post-prior discrepancies within continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state theory for ion-atom ionization. Although there are no post-prior discrepancies when electron-target initial and final states are exact solutions of the respective Hamiltonians, discrepancies do arise for multielectronic targets, when a hydrogenic continuum with effective charge is used for the final electron-residual target wavefunction. We have found that the prior version calculations give better results than the post version, particularly for highly charged projectiles. We have explored the reasons for this behaviour and found that the prior version shows less sensitivity to the choice of the final state. The fact that the perturbation potentials operate upon the initial state suggests that the selection of the initial bound state is relatively more important than the final continuum state for the prior version.

  9. 78 FR 17281 - Notice of Public Meeting on FY 2014 U.S. Refugee Admissions Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8241] Notice of Public Meeting on FY 2014 U.S. Refugee Admissions Program There will be a meeting on the President's FY 2014 U.S. Refugee Admissions Program on.... Refugee Admissions Program. Persons wishing to attend this meeting must notify the Bureau of Population...

  10. Semi-inclusive B->K(K*)X decays with initial bound state effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Xiao-Gang; Jin, Changhao; Ma, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of the initial b quark bound state for the semi-inclusive decays B->K(K * )X are studied using light cone expansion and heavy quark effective theory methods. We find that the initial bound state effects on the branching ratios and CP asymmetries are small. In the light cone expansion approach, the CP-averaged branching ratios are increased by about 2% with respect to the free b-quark decay. For {bar B} 0 ->K - (K *- )X, the CP-averaged branching ratios are sensitive to the phase γ and the CP asymmetry can be as large as 7% (14%), whereas for B - ->{bar K} 0 ({bar K} *0 )X the CP-averaged branching ratios are not sensitive to γ and the CP asymmetries are small ( -4 [(0.25 - 2.0)x10 -4 ] for {bar B} 0 ->K - (K *- )X and (0.77 - 0.84)x10 -4 [(0.67 - 0.74)x10 -4 ] for B - ->{bar K} 0 ({bar K} *0 )X, depending on the value of the CP violating phase γ. In the heavy quark effective theory approach, we find that the branching ratios are decreased by about 10% and the CP asymmetries are not affected. These predictions can be tested in the near future

  11. Exploiting jet binning to identify the initial state of high-mass resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Markus A.; Liebler, Stefan; Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.; Tackmann, Frank J.; Tackmann, Kerstin; Zeune, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    If a new high-mass resonance is discovered at the Large Hadron Collider, model-independent techniques to identify the production mechanism will be crucial to understand its nature and effective couplings to Standard Model particles. We present a powerful and model-independent method to infer the initial state in the production of any high-mass color-singlet system by using a tight veto on accompanying hadronic jets to divide the data into two mutually exclusive event samples (jet bins). For a resonance of several hundred GeV, the jet binning cut needed to discriminate quark and gluon initial states is in the experimentally accessible range of several tens of GeV. It also yields comparable cross sections for both bins, making this method viable already with the small event samples available shortly after a discovery. Theoretically, the method is made feasible by utilizing an effective field theory setup to compute the jet cut dependence precisely and model independently and to systematically control all sources of theoretical uncertainties in the jet binning, as well as their correlations. We use a 750 GeV scalar resonance as an example to demonstrate the viability of our method.

  12. Exploiting jet binning to identify the initial state of high-mass resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, Markus A.; Liebler, Stefan; Tackmann, Frank J.; Tackmann, Kerstin; Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.; Zeune, Lisa

    2016-05-01

    If a new high-mass resonance is discovered at the Large Hadron Collider, model-independent techniques to identify the production mechanism will be crucial to understand its nature and effective couplings to Standard Model particles. We present a powerful and model-independent method to infer the initial state in the production of any high-mass color-singlet system by using a tight veto on accompanying hadronic jets to divide the data into two mutually exclusive event samples (jet bins). For a resonance of several hundred GeV, the jet binning cut needed to discriminate quark and gluon initial states is in the experimentally accessible range of several tens of GeV. It also yields comparable cross sections for both bins, making this method viable already with the small event samples available shortly after a discovery. Theoretically, the method is made feasible by utilizing an effective field theory setup to compute the jet cut dependence precisely and model-independently and to systematically control all sources of theoretical uncertainties in the jet binning, as well as their correlations. We use a 750 GeV scalar resonance as an example to demonstrate the viability of our method.

  13. RECREATION MONITORING OF RESOURCE CONDITIONS IN THE KRONOTSKY STATE NATURAL BIOSPHERE PRESERVE (KAMCHATKA: AN INITIAL ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Zavadskaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes assessment and monitoring program which has been designed and initiated for monitoring recreational impacts in some wildernesses areas of Kamchatka. The framework of the recreational assessment was tested through its application in a case study conducted during the summer 2008 in the Kronotsky State Natural Biosphere Preserve (the Kamchatka peninsula, Russia. The overall objective of the case study was to assess the existing campsite and trail recreation impacts and to establish a network of key sites for the subsequent long-term impact monitoring. The detailed assessment of different components of natural complexes of the Kronotsky State Natural Preserve and the obtained maps of their ecological conditions showed that some sites had been highly disturbed. The results of these works have given rise to a concern that the intensive use of these areas would make an unacceptable impact on the nature. Findings of our initial work corroborate the importance of founding wilderness management programs on knowledge about the trail and campsite impacts and emphasize the necessity of adopting the recreational assessment and monitoring framework to the practice of decision-making.

  14. Sector activities and lessons learned around initial implementation of the United States national physical activity plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, Kelly R; Satinsky, Sara B

    2014-08-01

    National plans are increasingly common but infrequently evaluated. The 2010 United States National Physical Activity Plan (NPAP) provided strategies to increase population levels of physical activity. This paper describes (i) the initial accomplishments of the NPAP sector teams, and (ii) results from a process evaluation to determine how the sectors operated, their cross-sector collaboration, challenges encountered, and positive experiences. During 2011, a quarterly reporting system was developed to capture sector-level activities. A year-end interview derived more detailed information. Interviews with 12 sector leads were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed for common themes. The 6 sectors worked on goals from the implementation plan that focused broadly on education, promotion, intervention, policy, collaboration, and evaluation. Through year-end interviews, themes were generated around operations, goal setting, and cross-sector collaboration. Challenges to the NPAP work included lack of funding and time, the need for marketing and promotion, and organizational support. Positive experiences included collaboration, efficiency of work, enhanced community dynamic, and accomplishments toward NPAP goals. These initial results on the NPAP sector teams can be used as a baseline assessment for future monitoring. The lessons learned may be useful to other practitioners developing evaluations around state- or national-level plans.

  15. Influence of the initial state of carbon nanotubes on their colloidal stability under natural conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwyzer, Irene; Kaegi, Ralf; Sigg, Laura; Magrez, Arnaud; Nowack, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    The colloidal stability of dry and suspended carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the presence of amphiphilic compounds (i.e. natural organic matter or surfactants) at environmentally realistic concentrations was investigated over several days. The suspensions were analyzed for CNT concentration (UV-vis spectroscopy), particle size (nanoparticle tracking analysis), and CNT length and dispersion quality (TEM). When added in dry form, around 1% of the added CNTs remained suspended. Pre-dispersion in organic solvent or anionic detergent stabilized up to 65% of the added CNTs after 20 days of mild shaking and 5 days of settling. The initial state of the CNTs (dry vs. suspended) and the medium composition hence are critical determinants for the partitioning of CNTs between sediment and the water column. TEM analysis revealed that single suspended CNTs were present in all suspensions and that shaking and settling resulted in a fractionation of the CNTs with shorter CNTs remaining predominantly in suspension. - Highlights: → Individually suspended CNTs are present under environment relevant conditions. → The number of suspended CNTs varies depending on the medium composition. → Surfactants at environmental concentrations have no suspending effect on dry CNTs. → Pre-dispersed CNTs are more stable in suspension than dry CNTs. - The colloidal stability of CNTs varies a lot depending on the initial state of the CNTs (dry vs. pre-dispersed), the applied dispersant for pre-suspension, and the composition of the medium.

  16. Variational data assimilation for the optimized ozone initial state and the short-time forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-Y. Park

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we apply the four-dimensional variational (4D-Var data assimilation to optimize initial ozone state and to improve the predictability of air quality. The numerical modeling systems used for simulations of atmospheric condition and chemical formation are the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model and the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model. The study area covers the capital region of South Korea, where the surface measurement sites are relatively evenly distributed. The 4D-Var code previously developed for the CMAQ model is modified to consider background error in matrix form, and various numerical tests are conducted. The results are evaluated with an idealized covariance function for the appropriateness of the modified codes. The background error is then constructed using the NMC method with long-term modeling results, and the characteristics of the spatial correlation scale related to local circulation are analyzed. The background error is applied in the 4D-Var research, and a surface observational assimilation is conducted to optimize the initial concentration of ozone. The statistical results for the 12 h assimilation periods and the 120 observatory sites show a 49.4 % decrease in the root mean squared error (RMSE, and a 59.9 % increase in the index of agreement (IOA. The temporal variation of spatial distribution of the analysis increments indicates that the optimized initial state of ozone concentration is transported to inland areas by the clockwise-rotating local circulation during the assimilation windows. To investigate the predictability of ozone concentration after the assimilation window, a short-time forecasting is carried out. The ratios of the RMSE (root mean squared error with assimilation versus that without assimilation are 8 and 13 % for the +24 and +12 h, respectively. Such a significant improvement in the forecast accuracy is obtained solely by using the optimized initial state. The potential

  17. Scalable approximate policies for Markov decision process models of hospital elective admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, George; Lizotte, Dan; Hoey, Jesse

    2014-05-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of using stochastic simulation methods for the solution of a large-scale Markov decision process model of on-line patient admissions scheduling. The problem of admissions scheduling is modeled as a Markov decision process in which the states represent numbers of patients using each of a number of resources. We investigate current state-of-the-art real time planning methods to compute solutions to this Markov decision process. Due to the complexity of the model, traditional model-based planners are limited in scalability since they require an explicit enumeration of the model dynamics. To overcome this challenge, we apply sample-based planners along with efficient simulation techniques that given an initial start state, generate an action on-demand while avoiding portions of the model that are irrelevant to the start state. We also propose a novel variant of a popular sample-based planner that is particularly well suited to the elective admissions problem. Results show that the stochastic simulation methods allow for the problem size to be scaled by a factor of almost 10 in the action space, and exponentially in the state space. We have demonstrated our approach on a problem with 81 actions, four specialities and four treatment patterns, and shown that we can generate solutions that are near-optimal in about 100s. Sample-based planners are a viable alternative to state-based planners for large Markov decision process models of elective admissions scheduling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Numerical simulation of laser shock in the presence of the initial state due to welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julan, Emricka

    2014-01-01

    Surface treatments as laser shock peening offer the possibility to reduce tensile stresses or to generate compressive stresses in order to prevent crack initiation or reduce crack growth rate in particular in the areas where tension weld residual stresses are present. Laser shock peening may be applied on different metallic components to prevent stress corrosion cracking of Inconel 600 and high cycle thermal fatigue of austenitic stainless steels. The main aim of the PhD thesis is to develop the numerical simulation of laser peening. In the first section, axisymmetrical and 3D numerical models for one or several pulses have been developed in Code Aster and Europlexus softwares. These models were validated by experimental tests carried out in PIMM-ENSAM laboratory. Parameters identification of Johnson-Cook constitutive law was carried out for Inconel 600 at high strain rates. Moreover a new test was proposed which allowed proving the isotropic behavior of Inconel 600 at high strain rates. A modification of the Johnson-Cook constitutive law was also proposed, to take into account in a new way the sensitivity of the law to high strain rates. The second section of the thesis concerns a study on the effect of an initial state of welding on residual stresses after application of laser peening. We could conclude that this initial state has no strong influence on final residual stresses. Finally, a qualitative study on the effect of strain hardening induced by laser peening on fatigue life of stainless steels was undertaken, which shows the advantage of laser peening on shot peening due to smaller strain hardening created by laser peening. (author)

  19. Relativistic and noise effects on multiplayer Prisoners' dilemma with entangling initial states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, H.; Rashidi, S. S.

    2017-11-01

    Three-players Prisoners' dilemma (Alice, Bob and Colin) is studied in the presence of a single collective environment effect as a noise. The environmental effect is coupled with final states by a particular form of Kraus operators K_0 and K_1 through amplitude damping channel. We introduce the decoherence parameter 0≤p≤1 to the corresponding noise matrices, in order to controling the rate of environment influence on payoff of each players. Also, we consider the Unruh effect on the payoff of player, who is located at a noninertial frame. We suppose that two players (Bob and Colin) are in Rindler region I from Minkowski space-time, and move with same uniform acceleration (r_b=r_c) and frequency mode. The game is begun with the classical strategies cooperation ( C) and defection ( D) accessible to each player. Furthermore, the players are allowed to access the quantum strategic space ( Q and M). The quantum entanglement is coupled with initial classical states by the parameter γ \\in [0,π /2]. Using entangled initial states by exerting an unitary operator \\hat{J} as entangling gate, the quantum game (competition between Prisoners, as a three-qubit system) is started by choosing the strategies from classical or quantum strategic space. Arbitrarily chosen strategy by each player can lead to achieving profiles, which can be considered as Nash equilibrium or Pareto optimal. It is shown that in the presence of noise effect, choosing quantum strategy Q results in a winning payoff against the classical strategy D and, for example, the strategy profile ( Q, D, C) is Pareto optimal. We find that the unfair miracle move of Eisert from quantum strategic space is an effective strategy for accelerated players in decoherence mode (p=1) of the game.

  20. Initiation and continuation of long-acting reversible contraception in the United States military healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiles, Daniel P; Roberts, Timothy A; Klein, David A

    2016-09-01

    Long-acting reversible contraception is more effective for pregnancy prevention than shorter-acting contraceptive methods and has the potential to reduce healthcare disparities and costs. However, long-acting reversible contraception is underused in the United States. One population of interest is beneficiaries of the United States military healthcare system who have access to universal healthcare, including no-cost, no-copay contraception with unlimited method switching, and comprise a large, actual use cohort. Efforts to increase long-acting reversible contraception initiation and continuation in this population may improve health outcomes and mitigate the profound consequences of unintended or mistimed pregnancy on readiness and cost to the military. We aimed to determine long-acting reversible contraception initiation and continuation rates among the diverse population with universal healthcare who are enrolled in the US military healthcare system. This study is a retrospective cohort of >1.7 million women, aged 14-40 years, who were enrolled in the US military healthcare system, TRICARE Prime, between October 2009 and September 2014. Individuals were assessed for long-acting reversible contraception initiation and continuation with the use of medical billing records. Method continuation and factors that were associated with early method discontinuation were evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier estimator and Cox proportional hazard models. During the study dates, 188,533 women initiated long-acting reversible contraception. Of these, 74.6% women selected intrauterine contraceptives. Method initiation rates remained relatively stable (41.7-50.1/1000 women/year) for intrauterine methods, although the rate for subdermal implants increased from 6.1-23.0/1000 women/year. In analysis of women who selected intrauterine contraceptives, 61.2% continued their method at 36 months, and 48.8% continued at 60 months. Among women who selected the implant, 32.0% continued their

  1. Bending Priorities: a Study in Policy Framing. State of Michigan’s Brownfield Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard HULA

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the political process bywhich the state of Michigan successfully crafted andimplemented such a brownfield initiative. Althoughthe primary focus here is on the experience of asingle state, the lessons to be learned from thiscase have national and international implicationsbecause Michigan is a leader in brownfieldprograms. The paper begins with a review of thegeneral policy context in which state brownfieldpolicy is made. Particular attention is given tothe widespread dissatisfaction of a variety ofstakeholders with long dominant federal programsin the area of environmental cleanups. The secondsection outlines a number of fundamental legislativeand administrative changes that have beenimplemented in Michigan environmental policyover the past decade. Section three reviews thebroad literature on issue framing and considershow it might help identify the specific mechanismsby which the innovative brownfield program wasadopted. The final section provides an informal testof elements of the issue-framing model by exploringin some detail the convergence of public opinionwith key elements of the innovative policy, andwhether there was any significant shift in publicopinion over time.

  2. Calculation of free-energy differences from computer simulations of initial and final states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummer, G.; Szabo, A.

    1996-01-01

    A class of simple expressions of increasing accuracy for the free-energy difference between two states is derived based on numerical thermodynamic integration. The implementation of these formulas requires simulations of the initial and final (and possibly a few intermediate) states. They involve higher free-energy derivatives at these states which are related to the moments of the probability distribution of the perturbation. Given a specified number of such derivatives, these integration formulas are optimal in the sense that they are exact to the highest possible order of free-energy perturbation theory. The utility of this approach is illustrated for the hydration free energy of water. This problem provides a quite stringent test because the free energy is a highly nonlinear function of the charge so that even fourth order perturbation theory gives a very poor estimate of the free-energy change. Our results should prove most useful for complex, computationally demanding problems where free-energy differences arise primarily from changes in the electrostatic interactions (e.g., electron transfer, charging of ions, protonation of amino acids in proteins). copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  3. On the importance of an accurate representation of the initial state of the system in classical dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vela, A.

    2000-05-01

    A definition of a quantum-type phase-space distribution is proposed in order to represent the initial state of the system in a classical dynamics simulation. The central idea is to define an initial quantum phase-space state of the system as the direct product of the coordinate and momentum representations of the quantum initial state. The phase-space distribution is then obtained as the square modulus of this phase-space state. The resulting phase-space distribution closely resembles the quantum nature of the system initial state. The initial conditions are sampled with the distribution, using a grid technique in phase space. With this type of sampling the distribution of initial conditions reproduces more faithfully the shape of the original phase-space distribution. The method is applied to generate initial conditions describing the three-dimensional state of the Ar-HCl cluster prepared by ultraviolet excitation. The photodissociation dynamics is simulated by classical trajectories, and the results are compared with those of a wave packet calculation. The classical and quantum descriptions are found in good agreement for those dynamical events less subject to quantum effects. The classical result fails to reproduce the quantum mechanical one for the more strongly quantum features of the dynamics. The properties and applicability of the phase-space distribution and the sampling technique proposed are discussed.

  4. Interference between initial and final state radiation in a QCD medium

    CERN Document Server

    Armesto, Nestor; Martinez, Mauricio; Mehtar-Tani, Yacine; Salgado, Carlos A.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the color coherence pattern between initial and final state radiation in the presence of a QCD medium. We derive the medium-induced gluon spectrum of an "asymptotic" parton which suffers a hard scattering and subsequently crosses the medium. The angular distribution of the induced gluon spectrum is modified when one includes interference terms between the incoming and the outgoing parton at finite angle between them. The coherent, incoherent and soft limits of the medium-induced gluon spectrum are studied. In the soft limit, we provide a simple and intuitive probabilistic picture which could be of interest for Monte Carlo implementations. The configuration studied here may have phenomenological consequences in high energy nuclear collisions.

  5. Polarization control of spontaneous emission for rapid quantum-state initialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLoreto, C. S.; Rangan, C.

    2017-04-01

    We propose an efficient method to selectively enhance the spontaneous emission rate of a quantum system by changing the polarization of an incident control field, and exploiting the polarization dependence of the system's spontaneous emission rate. This differs from the usual Purcell enhancement of spontaneous emission rates as it can be selectively turned on and off. Using a three-level Λ system in a quantum dot placed in between two silver nanoparticles and a linearly polarized, monochromatic driving field, we present a protocol for rapid quantum state initialization, while maintaining long coherence times for control operations. This process increases the overall amount of time that a quantum system can be effectively utilized for quantum operations, and presents a key advance in quantum computing.

  6. Comment on ‘Initial states of qubit–environment models leading to conserved quantities’

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, C F

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Gardas and Dajka (2013 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 46 235301) proposed a theoretical scheme on how to prepare a proper initial state of a composite qubit–boson system which could assure no energy exchange between the two subsystems. For illustration, they applied the proposed scheme to both the Jaynes–Cummings model and the multi-photon Rabi model. However, it has already been rigorously proven that the k-photon Rabi model for k > 2 does not have eigenstates in the Hilbert space spanned by the eigenstates of the corresponding k-photon Jaynes–Cummings model and that the two-photon Rabi model has a discrete eigenenergy spectrum with normalizable eigenstates only if the coupling strength is smaller than a critical value. Hence, the proposed theoretical scheme is not applicable to the multi-photon Rabi model. (comment)

  7. Initial and Final State Interaction Effects in Small-x Quark Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Bo-Wen; Yuan, Feng

    2010-08-30

    We study the initial and final state interaction effects in the transverse momentum dependent parton distributions in the small-x saturation region. In particular, we discuss the quark distributions in the semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan lepton pair production and dijet-correlation processes in pA collisions. We calculate the quark distributions in the scalar-QED model and then extend to the color glass condensate formalism in QCD. The quark distributions are found universal between the DIS and Drell-Yan processes. On the other hand, the quark distribution from the qq'-->qq' channel contribution to the dijet-correlation process is not universal. However, we find that it can be related to the quark distribution in DIS process by a convolution with the normalized unintegrated gluon distribution in the CGC formalism in the large Nc limit.

  8. Holistic Admissions in Nursing: We Can Do This.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Greer; Clark, Angela; Bankston, Karen; Danek, Jennifer; Fair, Malika; Michaels, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Research shows that holistic admissions review practices can increase diversity across students without decreasing the workforce preparedness and academic success of students. Therefore, many disciplines have readily adopted the widespread use of holistic admissions review. Despite its proven effectiveness in addressing student diversity, nursing has been slow to implement holistic admissions review. The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of the barriers to implementing holistic admissions review in nursing and the feasibility of adopting holistic admissions review across nursing programs. A biphasic qualitative research study was conducted with nursing deans from across the United States. Qualitative data collection consisted of two phases of focus group discussions conducted over a 3-month period. The qualitative data were analyzed using content analysis. The categories and subcategories identified in Phase 1 informed the discussion in Phase 2. One overarching category from Phase 1 was identified, which was the lack of nursing schools' knowledge regarding holistic admissions review. Four subcategories also identified in Phase 1 included the need for better dissemination of evidence, the need for additional support from university leaders and administrators, the need for legal guidance to facilitate implementation of holistic admissions review, and ensuring appropriate resources to support the holistic admissions review process. Three categories emerged in Phase 2, which included everyone's buy-in is required, the need for a model, and a need for training. The adoption of holistic admissions review in nursing may be feasible. However, certain barriers need to be overcome so that nursing schools can successfully take on this process. Therefore, five recommendations have been developed to assist nursing schools in the implementation of holistic admissions review. These recommendations include increasing knowledge and understanding of holistic

  9. Holistic Admissions in Nursing: We Can Do This

    Science.gov (United States)

    GLAZER, GREER; CLARK, ANGELA; BANKSTON, KAREN; DANEK, JENNIFER; FAIR, MALIKA; MICHAELS, JULIA

    2016-01-01

    Research shows that holistic admissions review practices can increase diversity across students without decreasing the workforce preparedness and academic success of students. Therefore, many disciplines have readily adopted the widespread use of holistic admissions review. Despite its proven effectiveness in addressing student diversity, nursing has been slow to implement holistic admissions review. The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of the barriers to implementing holistic admissions review in nursing and the feasibility of adopting holistic admissions review across nursing programs. A biphasic qualitative research study was conducted with nursing deans from across the United States. Qualitative data collection consisted of two phases of focus group discussions conducted over a 3-month period. The qualitative data were analyzed using content analysis. The categories and subcategories identified in Phase 1 informed the discussion in Phase 2. One overarching category from Phase 1 was identified, which was the lack of nursing schools’ knowledge regarding holistic admissions review. Four subcategories also identified in Phase 1 included the need for better dissemination of evidence, the need for additional support from university leaders and administrators, the need for legal guidance to facilitate implementation of holistic admissions review, and ensuring appropriate resources to support the holistic admissions review process. Three categories emerged in Phase 2, which included everyone’s buy-in is required, the need for a model, and a need for training. The adoption of holistic admissions review in nursing may be feasible. However, certain barriers need to be overcome so that nursing schools can successfully take on this process. Therefore, five recommendations have been developed to assist nursing schools in the implementation of holistic admissions review. These recommendations include increasing knowledge and understanding of

  10. A new approach for evaluating water hammer including the initial state of pressurization of the installation and fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kaless

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The water hammer phenomenon is well known since the 19th century, while its mathematical formulation, by means of differential equations, is due to works of researchers such us Allievi (1903 and others from the beginning of the 20th century. The equations found in the technical publications produce a strange water hammer when the initial condition is defined assuming an incompressible fluid and a rigid pipe. The correct solution requires solving the water hammer equations for the initial state. When the finite difference method is applied, the initial state is solved by means of a set of non-linear equations. A novel approach is proposed including the initial state of pressurization into the governing equations and hence simplifying the calculus of the initial conditions. Furthermore, a critical reading of the deduction of the equations is done pointing out conceptual inconsistencies and proposing corrections.

  11. Planning an organizational wellness initiative at a multi-state social service agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J Jay; Grise-Owens, Erlene; Addison, Donia; Marshall, Midaya; Trabue, Donna; Escobar-Ratliff, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Increasingly, organizations in general, and social service organizations, specifically, are recognizing the importance of planning and evaluating organizational wellness initiatives. Yet, few participatory models for carrying out these aims exist. For this study, researchers utilized concept mapping (CM) to explicate a conceptual framework for planning, and subsequently evaluating, a wellness initiative at a multi-state social service organization. CM is a participatory approach that analyzes qualitative data via multi-dimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analyses. Outputs include a number of visual depictions that allow researchers to explore complex relationships among sets of the data. Results from this study indicated that participants (N=64), all of whom were employees of the agency, conceptualized organizational wellness via an eight-cluster solution, or Concept Map. Priority areas of this framework, specifically importance and feasibility, were also explored. After a brief review of pertinent literature, this article explicates the CM methodology utilized in this study, describes results, discusses lessons learned, and identifies apt areas for future research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Overview of the Common Core State Standard initiative and educational reform movement from the vantage of speech-language pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staskowski, Maureen

    2012-05-01

    Educational reform is sweeping the country. The adoption and the implementation of the Common Core State Standards in almost every state are meant to transform education. It is intended to update the way schools educate, the way students learn, and to ultimately prepare the nation's next generation for the global workplace. This article will describe the Common Core State Standard initiative and the underlying concerns about the quality of education in the United States as well as the opportunities this reform initiative affords speech-language pathologists. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  13. Smoking Initiation Among Young Adults in the United States and Canada, 1998-2010: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Freedman, Kit S.; Nelson, Nanette M.; Feldman, Laura L.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Young adults have the highest smoking rate of any age group in the United States and Canada, and recent data indicate that they often initiate smoking as young adults. The objective of this study was to systematically review peer-reviewed articles on cigarette smoking initiation and effective prevention efforts among young adults. Methods We searched 5 databases for research articles published in English between 1998 and 2010 on smoking initiation among young adults (aged 18-25) ...

  14. Healthy hospital food initiatives in the United States: time to ban sugar sweetened beverages to reduce childhood obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Wojcicki, Janet M

    2013-01-01

    While childhood obesity is a global problem, the extent and severity of the problem in United States, has resulted in a number of new initiatives, including recent hospital initiatives to limit the sale of sweetened beverages and other high calorie drinks in hospital vending machines and cafeterias. These proposed policy changes are not unique to United States, but are more comprehensive in the number of proposed hospitals that they will impact. Meanwhile, however, it is advised, that these i...

  15. Australian - US initiative to construct a silicon-based solid state quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.G.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The ability of a quantum computer to carry out calculations at the atomic level by manipulation of superpositions of quantum states is expected to provide massive parallel processing leading to unprecedented computing power in applications of commercial and national significance. An overview will be given of the Australian-US initiative to construct a (nuclear spin) solid state quantum computer (SSQC) based on a precise array of 31 P dopants (nuclear spin I = 1/2) embedded in isotopically-pure 28 Si (I=0). The main goals with respect to the engineering of a SSQC prototype are the construction and characterisation of a 2-qubit device that will form the fundamental building block of a scalable, silicon-based QC and development of an 'industrial' fabrication method which constitutes a blueprint for a practical large-scale QC. Fabrication of the SSQC prototype, and its readout and control, is being approached through proving experiments on a series of test structures achievable in the near-term. I will also outline the research programs of the Special Research Centre for Quantum Computer Technology, which involves some 50 researchers at the Universities of New South Wales, Queensland and Melbourne, and how these programs link in to the projects conducted by our partner investigators at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In the first six months of research at the Centre, we are close to achieving our three year objectives

  16. High Penetration Solar PV Deployment Sunshine State Solar Grid Initiative (SUNGRIN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meeker, Rick [Nhu Energy, Inc., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Steurer, Mischa [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Faruque, MD Omar [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Langston, James [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Schoder, Karl [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Ravindra, Harsha [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Hariri, Ali [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Moaveni, Houtan [New York Power Authority (NYPA), New York (United States); University of Central Florida, Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (Unitied States); Click, Dave [ESA Renewables, LLC, Sanford, FL (United States); University of Central Florida, Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Reedy, Bob [University of Central Florida, Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2015-05-31

    The report provides results from the Sunshine State Solar Grid Initiative (SUNGRIN) high penetration solar PV deployment project led by Florida State University’s (FSU) Center for Advanced Power Systems (CAPS). FSU CAPS and industry and university partners have completed a five-year effort aimed at enabling effective integration of high penetration levels of grid-connected solar PV generation. SUNGRIN has made significant contributions in the development of simulation-assisted techniques, tools, insight and understanding associated with solar PV effects on electric power system (EPS) operation and the evaluation of mitigation options for maintaining reliable operation. An important element of the project was the partnership and participation of six major Florida utilities and the Florida Reliability Coordinating Council (FRCC). Utilities provided details and data associated with actual distribution circuits having high-penetration PV to use as case studies. The project also conducted foundational work supporting future investigations of effects at the transmission / bulk power system level. In the final phase of the project, four open-use models with built-in case studies were developed and released, along with synthetic solar PV data sets, and tools and techniques for model reduction and in-depth parametric studies of solar PV impact on distribution circuits. Along with models and data, at least 70 supporting MATLAB functions have been developed and made available, with complete documentation.

  17. The French-German initiative for Chernobyl. Programme 1 safety state of the sarcophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretzsch, G.; Roloff, R.; Roloff, R.; Artmann, A. [Gesellschaft fur Anlagenund Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) (Germany); Lhomme, V. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Berberich, G. [Erftstadt-Gymnich (Germany); Selesnew, A

    2005-07-01

    The data collected and processed within the framework of the French-German Initiative are an excellent basis for the intended specialist application at the Chernobyl Centre as well as for an extended use in connection with the restoration of the Sarcophagus as part of the 'Shelter Implementation Plan' performed under the auspices of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. The major goals of the S.I.P. are the stabilisation of the existing Sarcophagus and the erection of a New Safe Confinement (N.S.C.) around the already existing Sarcophagus, the degasifier wing and the turbine building.This N.S.C. is to safely confine the radioactive materials for at least 100 years and is to allow their retrieval from inside if need be as well as the dismantling of the old structure.In addition, the database can be used for obtaining information needed for project descriptions, safety analysis reports, etc. The Ukrainian safety authority S.N.R.C.U. (State Nuclear Regulatory Committee of Ukraine) and its technical safety organisation, the State Scientific-Technical Center (S.S.T.C.), have also signaled their interest in using the database.Further information on the F.G.I. and on the 'Radioecology and Health Programmes' can be found at: www.fgi1-chernobyl.de.vu; www.grs.de, www.irsn.fr; www.fgi.icc.gov.ua. (N.C.)

  18. GeoBolivia the initiator Spatial Data Infrastructure of the Plurinational State of Bolivia's Node

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina Rodriguez, Raul Fernando; Lesage, Sylvain

    2014-05-01

    Started in 2011, the GeoBolivia project (www.geo.gob.bo)aims at building the Spatial Data Infrastructure of the Plurinational State of Bolivia (IDE-EPB by its Spanish initials), as an effort of the Vice Presidency of the State to give an open access to the public geographic information of Bolivia. The first phase of the project has already been completed. It consisted in implementing an infrastructure and a geoportal for accessing the geographic information through WMS, WFS, WCS and CSW services. The project is currently in its second phase dedicated to decentralizing the structure of IDE-EPB and promoting its use throughout the Bolivian State. The whole platform uses free software and open standards. As a complement, an on-line training module was developed to undertake the transfer of the knowledge the project generated. The main software components used in the SDI are: gvSIG, QGis, uDig as GIS desktop clients; PostGreSQL and PostGIS as geographic database management system; geOrchestra as a framework containing the GeoServer map server, the GeoNetwork catalog server and the OpenLayers and Mapfish GIS webclient; MapServer as a map server for generating OpenStreetMap tiles; Debian as operating system; Apache and Tomcat as web servers. Keywords: SDI, Bolivia, GIS, free software, catalog, gvSIG, QGIS, uDig, geOrchestra, OpenLayers, Mapfish, GeoNetwork, MapServer, GeoServer, OGC, WFS, WMS, WCS, CSW, WMC.

  19. The trauma patient in hemorrhagic shock: how is the C-priority addressed between emergency and ICU admission?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiniger Sigune

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trauma is the leading cause of death in young people with an injury related mortality rate of 47.6/100,000 in European high income countries. Early deaths often result from rapidly evolving and deteriorating secondary complications e.g. shock, hypoxia or uncontrolled hemorrhage. The present study assessed how well ABC priorities (A: Airway, B: Breathing/Ventilation and C: Circulation with hemorrhage control with focus on the C-priority including coagulation management are addressed during early trauma care and to what extent these priorities have been controlled for prior to ICU admission among patients arriving to the ER in states of moderate or severe hemorrhagic shock. Methods A retrospective analysis of data documented in the TraumaRegister of the ‘Deutsche Gesellschaft für Unfallchirurgie’ (TR-DGU® was conducted. Relevant clinical and laboratory parameters reflecting status and basic physiology of severely injured patients (ISS ≥ 25 in either moderate or severe shock according to base excess levels (BE -2 to -6 or BE  Results A total of 517 datasets was eligible for analysis. Upon ICU admission shock was reversed to BE > -2 in 36.4% and in 26.4% according to the subgroups. Two of three patients with initially moderate shock and three out of four patients with severe shock upon ER arrival were still in shock upon ICU admission. All patients suffered from coagulation dysfunction upon ER arrival (Quick’s value ≤ 70%. Upon ICU admission 3 out of 4 patients in both groups still had a disturbed coagulation function. The number of patients with significant thrombocytopenia had increased 5-6 fold between ER and ICU admission. Conclusion The C-priority including coagulation management was not adequately addressed during primary survey and initial resuscitation between ER and ICU admission, in this cohort of severely injured patients.

  20. Smoking initiation among young adults in the United States and Canada, 1998-2010: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Kit S; Nelson, Nanette M; Feldman, Laura L

    2012-01-01

    Young adults have the highest smoking rate of any age group in the United States and Canada, and recent data indicate that they often initiate smoking as young adults. The objective of this study was to systematically review peer-reviewed articles on cigarette smoking initiation and effective prevention efforts among young adults. We searched 5 databases for research articles published in English between 1998 and 2010 on smoking initiation among young adults (aged 18-25) living in the United States or Canada. We extracted the following data from each study selected: the measure of initiation used, age range of initiation, age range of study population, data source, target population, sampling method, and sample size. We summarized the primary findings of each study according to 3 research questions and categories of data (eg, sociodemographic) that emerged during the data extraction process. Of 1,072 identified studies, we found 27 articles that met our search criteria, but several included a larger age range of initiation (eg, 18-30, 18-36) than we initially intended to include. Disparities in young adult smoking initiation existed according to sex, race, and educational attainment. The use of alcohol and illegal drugs was associated with smoking initiation. The risk of smoking initiation among young adults increased under the following circumstances: exposure to smoking, boredom or stress while serving in the military, attending tobacco-sponsored social events while in college, and exposure to social norms and perceptions that encourage smoking. Effective prevention efforts include exposure to counter-marketing, denormalization campaigns, taxation, and the presence of smoke-free policies. Much remains to be learned about young adult smoking initiation, particularly among young adults in the straight-to-work population. Dissimilar measures of smoking initiation limit our knowledge about smoking initiation among young adults. We recommend developing a standardized

  1. Positive XPS binding energy shift of supported Cu{sub N}-clusters governed by initial state effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, S.; Peredkov, S. [Technische Universität Berlin, IOAP, Strasse des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Al-Hada, M. [Department of Physics, College of Education and Linguistics, University of Amran (Yemen); Neeb, M., E-mail: matthias.neeb@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Wilhelm-Conrad-Röntgen-Campus Adlershof, Elektronenspeicherring BESSY II, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Eberhardt, W. [Technische Universität Berlin, IOAP, Strasse des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); DESY, Center for Free Electron Laser Science (CFEL), Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Size dependent initial and final state effects of mass-selected deposited clusters. • Initial state effect dominates positive XPS shift in supported Cu-clusters. • Size dependent Coulomb correlation shift in the Auger final state of Cu cluster. • Size-dependent Auger parameter analysis. • Positive XPS shift differs from negative surface core level shift in crystalline copper. - Abstract: An initial state effect is established as origin for the positive 2p core electron binding energy shift found for Cu{sub N}-clusters supported by a thin silica layer of a p-doped Si(1 0 0) wafer. Using the concept of the Auger parameter and taking into account the usually neglected Coulomb correlation shift in the Auger final state (M{sub 4,5}M{sub 4,5}) it is shown that the initial state shift is comparable to the measured XPS shift while the final state relaxation shift contributes only marginally to the binding energy shift. The cluster results differ from the negative surface core-level shift of crystalline copper which has been explained in terms of a final state relaxation effect.

  2. The Preliminary GAMMA Code Thermal hydraulic Analysis for the Steady State of HTR-10 Initial Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Ji Su; Lim, Hong Sik; Lee, Won Jae

    2006-07-15

    This report describes the preliminary thermalhydraulic analysis of HTR-10 steady state full power initial core to provide a benchmark calculation of VHTGR(Very High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors) safety analysis code of GAMMA(GAs Multicomponent Mixture Analysis). The input data of GAMMA code are produced for the models of fluid block, wall block, radiation heat transfer and each component material properties in HTR-10 reactor. The temperature and flow distributions of HTR-10 steady state 10 MW{sub th} full power initial core are calculated by GAMMA code with boundary conditions of total reactor inlet flow rate of 4.32 kg/s, inlet temperature of 250 .deg. C, inlet pressure of 3 MPa, outlet pressure of 2.992 MPa and the fixed temperature at RCCS water cooling tube of 50 .deg C. The calculation results are compared with the measured solid material temperatures at 22 fixed instrumentation positions in HTR-10. The wall temperature distribution in pebble bed core shows that the minimum temperature of 358 .deg. C is located at upper core, a higher temperature zone than 829 .deg. C is located at the inner region of 0.45 m radius at the bottom of core centre, and the maximum wall temperature is 897 .deg. C. The wall temperatures linearly decreases at radially and axially farther side from the bottom of core centre. The maximum temperature of RPV is 230 .deg. C, and the maximum values of fuel average temperature and TRISO centreline temperature are 907 .deg. C and 929 .deg. C, respectively and they are much lower than the fuel temperature limitation of 1230 .deg. C. The comparsion between the GAMMA code predictions and the measured temperature data shows that the calculation results are very close to the measured values in top and side reflector region, but a great difference is appeared in bottom reflector region. Some measured data are abnormally high in bottom reflector region, and so the confirmation of data is necessary in future. Fifteen of twenty two data have a

  3. 44 CFR 68.9 - Admissible evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Admissible evidence. 68.9 Section 68.9 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... admissible. (b) Documentary and oral evidence shall be admissible. (c) Admissibility of non-expert testimony...

  4. Moving the Barricades to Physical Activity: A Qualitative Analysis of Open Streets Initiatives Across the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyler, Amy A; Hipp, J Aaron; Lokuta, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Ciclovía, or Open Streets initiatives, are events where streets are opened for physical activity and closed to motorized traffic. Although the initiatives are gaining popularity in the United States, little is known about planning and implementing them. The goals of this paper are to explore the development and implementation of Open Streets initiatives and make recommendations for increasing the capacity of organizers to enhance initiative success. Phenomenology with qualitative analysis of structured interviews was used. Study setting was urban and suburban communities in the United States. Study participants were organizers of Open Streets initiatives in U.S. cities. Using a list of 47 events held in 2011, 27 lead organizers were interviewed by telephone about planning, implementation, and lessons learned. The interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed. A phenomenologic approach was used, an initial coding tool was developed after reviewing a sample of transcripts, and constant comparative coding methodology was applied. Themes and subthemes were generated from codes. The most common reasons for initiation were to highlight or improve health and transportation. Most initiatives aimed to reach the general population, but some targeted families, children, or specific neighborhoods. Getting people to understand the concept of Open Streets was an important challenge. Other challenges included lack of funding and personnel, and complex logistics. These initiatives democratize public space for citizens while promoting physical activity, social connectedness, and other broad agendas. There are opportunities for the research community to contribute to the expanse and sustainability of Open Streets, particularly in evaluation and dissemination.

  5. Opening a Side-Gate: Engaging the Excluded in Chilean Higher Education through Test-Blind Admission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koljatic, Mladen; Silva, Monica

    2013-01-01

    The article describes a test-blind admission initiative in a Chilean research university aimed at expanding the inclusion of talented, albeit educationally and socially disadvantaged, students. The outcomes of the test-blind admission cohort were compared with those of students admitted via the regular admission procedure to the same academic…

  6. Technical progress report. Private sector initiatives between the United States and Japan. January 1992 - December 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    OAK A271 This annual report for calendar year 1992 describes the efforts performed under the Private Sector Initiatives contract. The report also describes those efforts that have continued with private funding after being initiated under this contract

  7. Technical progress report. Private sector initiatives between the United States and Japan. January 1990 - December 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    OAK A271 This annual report for calendar year 1990 describes the efforts performed under the Private Sector Initiatives contract. The report also describes those efforts that have continued with private funding after being initiated under this contract

  8. HIPAA, HIPAA, Hooray?: Current Challenges and Initiatives in Health Informatics in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Sanjaya

    2008-01-01

    A review of the current challenges, trends and initiatives around the various regulations as related to Health Informatics in the United States is presented. A summary of the functions in a workflow-based approach organized into the process and compliance for HIPAA, secure email and fax communications interfaces, e-prescriptions and patient safety and the health information technology savings claims versus costs follows: HIPAA compliance is complex; data interoperability and integration remains difficult.Email and faxing is possible with current over-the-shelf technologies within the purview of the HIPAA Security and Privacy rule.Integration of e-prescribing and NPI data is an area where health informatics can make a real difference.Medical errors remain high.There are no real savings yet from the usage of health information technologies; the costs for implementation remain high, and the business model has not evolved to meet the needs.Health Information Technology (Health IT) projects continue to have a significant failure rate; Open Source technologies are a viable alternative both for cost reduction and scalability. A discussion on the macro view of health informatics is also presented within the context of healthcare models and a comparison of the U.S. system against other countries.

  9. Multiparticle Collectivity from Initial State Correlations in High Energy Proton-Nucleus Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusling, Kevin; Mace, Mark; Venugopalan, Raju

    2018-01-01

    Qualitative features of multiparticle correlations in light-heavy ion (p +A ) collisions at RHIC and LHC are reproduced in a simple initial state model of partons in the projectile coherently scattering off localized domains of color charge in the heavy nuclear target. These include (i) the ordering of the magnitudes of the azimuthal angle n th Fourier harmonics of two-particle correlations vn{2 }, (ii) the energy and transverse momentum dependence of the four-particle Fourier harmonic v2{4 }, and (iii) the energy dependence of four-particle symmetric cumulants measuring correlations between different Fourier harmonics. Similar patterns are seen in an Abelian version of the model, where we observe v2{2 }>v2{4 }≈v2{6 }≈v2{8 } of two, four, six, and eight particle correlations. While such patterns are often interpreted as signatures of collectivity arising from hydrodynamic flow, our results provide an alternative description of the multiparticle correlations seen in p +A collisions.

  10. Azimuthal anisotropies and initial-state fluctuations from SPS to LHC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Milosevic, Jovan

    2016-01-01

    The $v_{3}$ coefficient, obtained using the PbAu data from the CERES detector at the top SPS energy, is presented. The $v_{2}$ is measured over a $p_{T}$ range up to 100 GeV/c in PbPb collisions collected with the CMS detector. The $v_{2}\\{2\\}$ of charged and strange particles emitted in pp collisions shows a mass ordering effect. The $v_{2}\\{4\\}$ and $v_{2}\\{6\\}$ are comparable to the $v_{2}\\{2\\}$, and thus supports the collective nature of the long-range correlations in high-multiplicity pp collisions at 13~TeV. Principle Component Analysis (PCA) of two-particle harmonics ($V_{n\\Delta}$) is studied in PbPb and high-multiplicity pPb collisions at the LHC. The factorization breaking of the $V_{n\\Delta}$ can be attributed to the effect of initial-state fluctuations (ISF). Using a PCA, the $V_{n\\Delta}$ are characterized through the leading and sub-leading modes. The leading modes are essentially equivalent to the $v_{n}\\{2\\}$. The sub-leading modes represent the largest sources of factorization breaking.

  11. HIPAA, HIPAA, Hooray? Current Challenges and Initiatives in Health Informatics in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjaya Joshi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of the current challenges, trends and initiatives around the various regulations as related to Health Informatics in the United States is presented.A summary of the functions in a workflow-based approach organized into the process and compliance for HIPAA, secure email and fax communications interfaces, e-prescriptions and patient safety and the health information technology savings claims versus costs follows: * HIPAA compliance is complex; data interoperability and integration remains difficult. * Email and faxing is possible with current over-the-shelf technologies within the purview of the HIPAA Security and Privacy rule. * Integration of e-prescribing and NPI data is an area where health informatics can make a real difference. * Medical errors remain high. * There are no real savings yet from the usage of health information technologies; the costs for implementation remain high, and the business model has not evolved to meet the needs. * Health Information Technology (Health IT projects continue to have a significant failure rate; Open Source technologies are a viable alternative both for cost reduction and scalability.A discussion on the macro view of health informatics is also presented within the context of healthcare models and a comparison of the U.S. system against other countries.

  12. Initial state effects on the cosmic microwave background and trans-Planckian physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, Kevin; Lowe, David A.

    2003-01-01

    There exists a one complex parameter family of de Sitter invariant vacua, known as α vacua. In the context of slow roll inflation, we show that all but the Bunch-Davies vacuum generates unacceptable production of high energy particles at the end of inflation. As a simple model for the effects of trans-Planckian physics, we go on to consider non-de Sitter invariant vacua obtained by patching modes in the Bunch-Davies vacuum above some momentum scale M c , with modes in an α vacuum below M c . Choosing M c near the Planck scale M Pl , we find acceptable levels of hard particle production, and corrections to the cosmic microwave perturbations at the level of HM Pl /M c 2 , where H is the Hubble parameter during inflation. More general initial states of this type with H c Pl can give corrections to the spectrum of cosmic microwave background perturbations at order 1. The parameter characterizing the α vacuum during inflation is a new cosmological observable

  13. Cell-State Transitions Regulated by SLUG Are Critical for Tissue Regeneration and Tumor Initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Phillips

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Perturbations in stem cell activity and differentiation can lead to developmental defects and cancer. We use an approach involving a quantitative model of cell-state transitions in vitro to gain insights into how SLUG/SNAI2, a key developmental transcription factor, modulates mammary epithelial stem cell activity and differentiation in vivo. In the absence of SLUG, stem cells fail to transition into basal progenitor cells, while existing basal progenitor cells undergo luminal differentiation; together, these changes result in abnormal mammary architecture and defects in tissue function. Furthermore, we show that in the absence of SLUG, mammary stem cell activity necessary for tissue regeneration and cancer initiation is lost. Mechanistically, SLUG regulates differentiation and cellular plasticity by recruiting the chromatin modifier lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1 to promoters of lineage-specific genes to repress transcription. Together, these results demonstrate that SLUG plays a dual role in repressing luminal epithelial differentiation while unlocking stem cell transitions necessary for tumorigenesis.

  14. Penn State geoPebble system: Design,Implementation, and Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina, J. V.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Bilen, S. G.; Fleishman, A.; Burkett, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Penn State geoPebble system is a new network of wirelessly interconnected seismic and GPS sensor nodes with flexible architecture. This network will be used for studies of ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland, as well as to investigate mountain glaciers. The network will consist of ˜150 geoPebbles that can be deployed in a user-defined spatial geometry. We present our design methodology, which has enabled us to develop these state-of- the art sensors using commercial-off-the-shelf hardware combined with custom-designed hardware and software. Each geoPebble is a self- contained, wirelessly connected sensor for collecting seismic measurements and position information. Key elements of each node encompasses a three-component seismic recorder, which includes an amplifier, filter, and 24- bit analog-to-digital converter that can sample up to 10 kHz. Each unit also includes a microphone channel to record the ground-coupled airwave. The timing for each node is available from GPS measurements and a local precision oscillator that is conditioned by the GPS timing pulses. In addition, we record the carrier-phase measurement of the L1 GPS signal in order to determine location at sub-decimeter accuracy (relative to other geoPebbles within a few kilometers radius). Each geoPebble includes 16 GB of solid-state storage, wireless communications capability to a central supervisory unit, and auxiliary measurements capability (including tilt from accelerometers, absolute orientation from magnetometers and temperature). A novel aspect of the geoPebble is a wireless charging system for the internal battery (using inductive coupling techniques). The geoPebbles include all the sensors (geophones, GPS, microphone), communications (WiFi), and power (battery and charging) internally, so the geoPebble system can operate without any cabling connections (though we do provide an external connector so that different geophones can be used). We report initial field-deployment results and

  15. Report on the Trilateral Initiative. IAEA verification of weapon-origin material in the Russian Federation and the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shea, Thomas E.

    2001-01-01

    Just over five years ago, the Trilateral Initiative was launched to investigate the technical, legal and financial issues associated with IAEA verification of weapon-origin fissile material in the Russian Federation and the United States. Since then, the Joint Working Group has developed concepts and equipment suitable for such a verification mission, anticipating that the States would submit classified forms of fissile material to IAEA verification under new agreements developed for this purpose. This article summarizes the accomplishments to date and identifies the future steps foreseen under the Trilateral Initiative. As there is no legal commitment on the Parties to this Initiative as yet, the issues considered are still changing. Since it was launched, the Initiative has been given a sense of importance and weight, raising the expectations of the international community. The Final Document of the 2000 Conference on the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), for example, under the review of Article VI of the Treaty, includes the statement to 'complete and implement the Trilateral Initiative'. It was launched following independent statements by the President of the United States beginning in 1993, and by the President of the Russian Federation in 1996. It is an Initiative between the IAEA, the Russian Federation and the United States that is in the context of Article VI of the NPT. The intention is to examine the technical, legal and financial issues associated with IAEA verification of weapon origin and other fissile material released from defense programmes in those two countries

  16. Canada-United States-Mexico Trilateral Cooperation on Childhood Obesity Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabadán-Diehl, Cristina; Safdie, Margarita; Rodin, Rachel

    2016-08-01

    Childhood obesity is an important public health problem that affects countries in the Americas. In 2014, Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) Member States agreed on a Plan of Action for the Prevention of Obesity in Children and Adolescents in an effort to address the impact of this disorder in the Americas region. The interventions laid out in this regional plan are multi-faceted and require multi-sectoral partnerships. Building on a strong history of successful trilateral collaboration, Canada, Mexico, and the United States formed a partnership to address the growing epidemic of childhood obesity in the North American region. This collaborative effort, known as the Trilateral Cooperation on Childhood Obesity Initiative, is the first initiative in the region to address chronic noncommunicable diseases by bringing together technical and policy experts, with strong leadership and support from the secretaries and ministers of health. The Initiative's goals include increasing levels of physical activity and reducing sedentary behavior through 1) increased social mobilization and citizen engagement, 2) community- based outreach, and 3) changes to the built (man-made) environment. This article describes the background and development process of the Initiative; specific goals, activities, and actions achieved to date; and opportunities and next steps. This information may be useful for those forming other partnerships designed to address childhood obesity or other complex public health challenges in the region. RESUMEN La obesidad infantil es un problema de salud pública importante que afecta a los países de las Américas. En el 2014, los Estados Miembros de la Organización Panamericana de la Salud (OPS) acordaron un Plan de acción para la prevención de la obesidad en la niñez y la adolescencia con el fin de hacer frente a las repercusiones de este trastorno en la Región de las Américas. Las intervenciones que componen este plan regional son multifacéticas y

  17. Optimal Admission to Higher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albæk, Karsten

    This paper constructs higher education admission rules that maximise graduation rates and thus increase the skill level of the work force. An application shows that students with a low level in mathematics in secondary school ought to find it easier to be admitted to an economics programme than...... to law or psychology programmes, even though economics is the most difficult programme from which to graduate without a strong background in mathematics. Indirect gains from optimal admission include the potential of making whole cohorts of students more able to graduate with a higher education degree....

  18. General Practitioners and Involuntary Admission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Britta; Lomborg, Kirsten; Engberg, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Background: In many countries, medical authorities are responsible for involuntary admissions of mentally ill patients. Nonetheless, very little is known about GPs' experiences with involuntary admission. Aim: The aim of the present study was to explore GP's experiences from participating....... They felt that sectioning patients was unpleasant, and felt nervous, but experienced relief and professional satisfaction if things went well. The GPs experienced the doctor-patient relationship to be at risk, but also reported that it could be improved. GPs felt that they were not taken seriously...

  19. Measures of Last Resort: Assessing Strategies for State-Initiated Turnarounds. Linking State and Local School Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochim, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) puts responsibility for improving student outcomes back where some say it has always belonged--under states' purview. No longer will prescriptive federal requirements dictate how states should identify, support, and turn around the lowest-performing schools and districts. Instead, states are empowered to craft…

  20. Association Between Direct-to-Consumer Advertising and Testosterone Testing and Initiation in the United States, 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, J Bradley; Kim, Yoonsang; Alexander, G Caleb; Emery, Sherry L

    2017-03-21

    Testosterone initiation increased substantially in the United States from 2000 to 2013, especially among men without clear indications. Direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) also increased during this time. To investigate associations between televised DTCA and testosterone testing and initiation in the United States. Ecologic study conducted in designated market areas (DMAs) in the United States. Monthly testosterone advertising ratings were linked to DMA-level testosterone use data from 2009-2013 derived from commercial insurance claims. Associations between DTCA and testosterone testing, initiation, and initiation without recent baseline tests were estimated using Poisson generalized estimating equations. Monthly Nielsen ratings for testosterone DTCA in the 75 largest DMAs. (1) Rates of new serum testosterone testing; (2) rates of testosterone initiation (in-office injection, surgical implant, or pharmacy dispensing) for all testosterone products combined and for specific brands; and (3) rates of testosterone initiation without recent serum testosterone testing. Of 17 228 599 commercially insured men in the 75 DMAs, 1 007 990 (mean age, 49.6 [SD, 11.5] years) had new serum testosterone tests and 283 317 (mean age, 51.8 [SD, 11.3] years) initiated testosterone treatment. Advertising intensity varied by geographic region and time, with the highest intensity seen in the southeastern United States and with months ranging from no ad exposures to a mean of 13.6 exposures per household. Nonbranded advertisements were common prior to 2012, with branded advertisements becoming more common during and after 2012. Each household advertisement exposure was associated with a monthly increase in rates of new testosterone testing (rate ratio [RR], 1.006; 95% CI, 1.004-1.008), initiation (RR, 1.007; 95% CI, 1.004-1.010), and initiation without a recent test (RR, 1.008; 95% CI, 1.002-1.013). Mean absolute rate increases were 0.14 tests (95% CI, 0.09-0.19), 0.05 new

  1. A medical admission unit reduces duration of hospital stay and number of readmissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vork, Jan C; Brabrand, Mikkel; Folkestad, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Political initiatives promoting a more efficient emergency admission process have triggered a reorganisation of the Danish health system with a view to creating fewer and larger admission units counting more experienced physicians. At our hospital, a medical admission unit (MAU) was established. ...... present the effect of this on the length of hospital stay, mortality rates and the number of readmissions for the last year with the previous structure and the first year of the new MAU structure....

  2. Above-threshold ionization in multicenter molecules: The role of the initial state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Noslen; Chacón, Alexis; Pisanty, Emilio; Ortmann, Lisa; Landsman, Alexandra S.; Picón, Antonio; Biegert, Jens; Lewenstein, Maciej; Ciappina, Marcelo F.

    2018-03-01

    A possible route to extract electronic and nuclear dynamics from molecular targets with attosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution is to employ recolliding electrons as "probes." The recollision process in molecules is, however, very challenging to treat using ab initio approaches. Even for the simplest diatomic systems, such as H2, today's computational capabilities are not enough to give a complete description of the electron and nuclear dynamics initiated by a strong laser field. As a consequence, approximate qualitative descriptions are called to play an important role. In this paper we extend the work presented in Suárez et al. [N. Suárez, A. Chacón, J. A. Pérez-Hernández, J. Biegert, M. Lewenstein, and M. F. Ciappina, High-order-harmonic generation in atomic and molecular systems, Phys. Rev. A 95, 033415 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevA.95.033415] to three-center molecular targets. Additionally, we incorporate a more accurate description of the molecular ground state, employing information extracted from quantum chemistry software packages. This step forward allows us to include, in a detailed way, both the molecular symmetries and nodes present in the high-occupied molecular orbital. We are able, on the one hand, to keep our formulation as analytical as in the case of diatomics and, on the other hand, to still give a complete description of the underlying physics behind the above-threshold ionization process. The application of our approach to complex multicenter—with more than three centers—targets appears to be straightforward.

  3. LibQUAL+® and the Information Commons Initiative at Buffalo State College: 2003 to 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene J. Harvey

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To examine the effect of a transition to an information commons model of service organization on perceptions of library service quality. In 2003, the E. H. Butler Library at Buffalo State College began development of an Information Commons, which included moving the computing help desk to the library, reorganizing the physical units in the library around functional service areas, and moving the reference desk to the lobby.Methods – In 2003, 2006, and 2009, the library administered the LibQUAL+ survey, which measures the relationship between perceived library service delivery and library user satisfaction. The 2003 survey was conducted before the implementation of the Information Commons Initiative. Analyses of variance were conducted to compare the effect of the service changes on users’ perceptions of library service quality between the three data collection points, as well as to explore differences between undergraduate and graduate students. Results – The analyses revealed significant differences between the three data points, with significantly more positive perceptions of library service quality in 2006 and 2009 than in 2003. Comparisons between 2006 and 2009 were not statistically significant. In 2003, no significant differences were found between undergraduate and graduate students’ perceptions. However, in 2006, undergraduate students perceived higher levels of service quality after the development of the Information Commons than graduate students. This difference was maintained in 2009.Conclusion – The Information Commons has become a popular place for new programming, exhibits, workshops, and cultural events on campus. The library staff and administration have regained the respect of the campus community, as well as an appreciation for user-driven input and feedback and for ongoing assessment and evaluation.

  4. SIP Controlled Admission and Preemption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babiarz, J.; Chan, K.; Karagiannis, Georgios; Eardley, P

    2006-01-01

    This framework defines a method of providing Explicit Congestion Control to real-time inelastic traffic like voice and video through the use of session admission control and preemption mechanisms. This approach uses the Pre-Congestion Notification Marking (PCN) [1] mechanism. PCN marking is deployed

  5. Admission to selective schools, alphabetically

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurajda, Štěpán; Münich, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 6 (2010), s. 1100-1109 ISSN 0272-7757 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:MSM0021620846 Keywords : admissions to school * alphabetical order * order effects Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.066, year: 2010

  6. Personal Qualities and College Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingham, Warren W.; Breland, Hunter M.

    The extent to which personal and academic factors are important in college admission decisions was studied in 1978, based on data on 25,000 applicants to 9 colleges (Colgate University, Williams College, Ohio Wesleyan University, Kenyon College, Kalamazoo College, Occidental College, Hartwick College, University of Richmond, and Bucknell…

  7. Admission haematological abnormalities and postoperative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admission haematological abnormalities and postoperative outcomes in neonates with acute surgical conditions in Alexandria, Egypt. HL Wella, SMM Farahat. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals ...

  8. Interim initial state report for the safety assessment SR-Can

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pers, Karin (ed.) [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-07-01

    A thorough description of the initial state of the engineered parts of the repository system is one of the main bases for the SR-Can safety assessment. The initial state refers to the state at the time of deposition for the spent fuel and the engineered barriers and the natural, undisturbed state at the time of beginning of excavation for the repository for the geosphere and the biosphere. The repository system is based on the KBS-3 method, where copper canisters with a cast iron insert containing spent nuclear fuel are surrounded by bentonite clay and deposited at approximately 500 m depth in saturated, granitic rock. For the purpose of the safety assessment the engineered portion of the repository system has been divided into a number of consecutive barriers or sub-systems. The importance of a particular feature for safety has influenced the resolution into components. In principle, components close to the source term and those that play an important role for safety are treated in more detail than more peripheral components. For the option with 40 years of reactor operation, the quantity of BWR fuel is estimated at 7200 tonnes and the quantity of PWR fuel at 2300 tonnes. The fuel burn-up may vary from 15 MWd/kgU up to 60 MWd/kg. Geometric aspects of the fuel cladding tubes of importance in the safety assessment are, as a rule, handled sufficiently pessimistically in analyses of radionuclide transport that differences between different fuel types are irrelevant. The relative differences in radionuclide inventory with respect to burn-up are small. Deviations in inventory and deviating or damaged fuel are not considered in the SR-Can interim reporting but will be handled in the final reporting of SR-Can. The canister consists of an inner container, the insert of cast iron and an outer shell of copper. The cast iron insert provides mechanical stability and the copper shell protects against corrosion in the repository environment. The copper shell is 5 cm thick and

  9. Interim initial state report for the safety assessment SR-Can

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pers, Karin

    2004-07-01

    A thorough description of the initial state of the engineered parts of the repository system is one of the main bases for the SR-Can safety assessment. The initial state refers to the state at the time of deposition for the spent fuel and the engineered barriers and the natural, undisturbed state at the time of beginning of excavation for the repository for the geosphere and the biosphere. The repository system is based on the KBS-3 method, where copper canisters with a cast iron insert containing spent nuclear fuel are surrounded by bentonite clay and deposited at approximately 500 m depth in saturated, granitic rock. For the purpose of the safety assessment the engineered portion of the repository system has been divided into a number of consecutive barriers or sub-systems. The importance of a particular feature for safety has influenced the resolution into components. In principle, components close to the source term and those that play an important role for safety are treated in more detail than more peripheral components. For the option with 40 years of reactor operation, the quantity of BWR fuel is estimated at 7200 tonnes and the quantity of PWR fuel at 2300 tonnes. The fuel burn-up may vary from 15 MWd/kgU up to 60 MWd/kg. Geometric aspects of the fuel cladding tubes of importance in the safety assessment are, as a rule, handled sufficiently pessimistically in analyses of radionuclide transport that differences between different fuel types are irrelevant. The relative differences in radionuclide inventory with respect to burn-up are small. Deviations in inventory and deviating or damaged fuel are not considered in the SR-Can interim reporting but will be handled in the final reporting of SR-Can. The canister consists of an inner container, the insert of cast iron and an outer shell of copper. The cast iron insert provides mechanical stability and the copper shell protects against corrosion in the repository environment. The copper shell is 5 cm thick and

  10. The Last State to Grant Nurse Practitioners DEA Licensure: An Education Improvement Initiative on the Florida Prescription Drug Monitoring Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellams, Joni R; Maye, John P

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) now have prescriptive authority for controlled substances in all 50 states in the United States. Florida, the last state to grant NPs DEA licensure, has been wrought with prescription diversion practices for a number of years as pill mills, doctor shopping, and overprescribing proliferated. Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMPs) help curb drug diversion activity and play a key role in reducing the abuse of controlled substances. The primary objective of this education improvement initiative was to increase knowledge of actively licensed NPs in the state of Florida regarding the state's PDMP. The main themes included the drug abuse problem, description and progression of the PDMP, and how to use the Florida PDMP. Upon approval from the institutional review board, this education improvement initiative gauged NP knowledge of the PDMP and main themes before and after an educational PowerPoint intervention. A pretest/posttest questionnaire was administered for assessment of all knowledge questions. One hundred forty-five NPs with active advanced registered NP licenses in Florida completed both the pretest and posttest questionnaires. Descriptive statistics and paired t tests were used for statistical significance testing. Knowledge of the PDMP and the main themes of the education improvement initiative significantly increased (p < .001) from pretest to posttest results. This education improvement initiative had positive effects for NPs on the knowledge of the Florida PDMP and the main themes. This indicated that Florida NPs are able to acquire greater comprehension of the PDMP by an education intervention.

  11. Setting ART initiation targets in response to changing guidelines: The importance of addressing both steady-state and backlog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Catherine; Naidoo, Nicolette P; Venter, W D Francois; Jaffer, Ambereen; Barker, Pierre M

    2014-05-12

    Target setting is useful in planning, assessing and improving antiretroviral treatment (ART) programmes. In the past 4 years, the ART initiation environment has been transformed due to the change in eligibility criteria (starting ART at a CD4+ count ART. To describe and illustrate the use of a target-setting model for estimating district-based targets in the era of an expanding ART programme and changing CD4+ count thresholds for ART initiation. Using previously described models and data for annual new HIV infections, we estimated both steady-state need for ART initiation and backlog in a North West Province district, accounting for the shift in eligibility. Comparison of actual v. targeted ART initiations was undertaken. The change in CD4+ count threshold adds a once-off group of newly eligible patients to the pool requiring ART - the backlog. The steady-state remains unchanged as it is determined by the annual rate of new HIV infections in previous years. The steady-state need for the district was 639 initiations/month, and the backlog was ~15,388 patients. After the shift in eligibility in September 2011, the steady-state target was exceeded over several months with some backlog addressed. Of the total backlog for this district, 72% remains to be cleared. South Africa has two pools of patients who need ART: the steady-state of HIV-infected patients entering the programme each year, determined by historical infection rates; and the backlog created by the shift in eligibility. The healthcare system needs to build long- term capacity to meet the steady-state need for ART and additional capacity to address the backlog.

  12. Peripheral atherectomy practice patterns in the United States from the Vascular Quality Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Sathish; Flahive, Julie M; Arous, Edward J; Judelson, Dejah R; Aiello, Francesco A; Schanzer, Andres; Simons, Jessica P

    2018-06-21

    Peripheral atherectomy has been shown to have technical success in single-arm studies, but clinical advantages over angioplasty and stenting have not been demonstrated, leaving its role unclear. We sought to describe patterns of atherectomy use in a real-world U.S. cohort to understand how it is currently being applied. The Vascular Quality Initiative was queried to identify all patients who underwent peripheral vascular intervention from January 2010 to September 2016. Descriptive statistics were performed to analyze demographics of the patients, comorbidities, indication, treatment modalities, and lesion characteristics. The intermittent claudication (IC) and critical limb ischemia (CLI) cohorts were analyzed separately. Of 85,605 limbs treated, treatment indication was IC in 51% (n = 43,506) and CLI in 49% (n = 42,099). Atherectomy was used in 15% (n = 13,092) of cases, equivalently for IC (15%; n = 6674) and CLI (15%; n = 6418). There was regional variation in use of atherectomy, ranging from a low of 0% in one region to a high of 32% in another region. During the study period, there was a significant increase in the proportion of cases that used atherectomy (11% in 2010 vs 18% in 2016; P < .0001). Compared with nonatherectomy cases, those with atherectomy use had higher incidence of prior peripheral vascular intervention (IC, 55% vs 43% [P < .0001]; CLI, 47% vs 41% [P < .0001]), greater mean number of arteries treated (IC, 1.8 vs 1.6 [P < .0001]; CLI, 2.1 vs 1.7 [P < .0001]), and lower proportion of prior leg bypass (IC, 10% vs 14% [P < .0001]; CLI, 11% vs 17% [P < .0001]). There was lower incidence of failure to cross the lesion (IC, 1% vs 4% [P < .0001]; CLI, 4% vs 7% [P < .0001]) but higher incidence of distal embolization (IC, 1.9% vs 0.8% [P < .0001]; CLI, 3.0% vs 1.4% [P < .0001]) and, in the CLI cohort, arterial perforation (1.4% vs 1.0%; P = .01). Despite a lack of evidence for atherectomy over angioplasty and stenting, its use has

  13. Rural-urban differences in breastfeeding initiation in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, P Johnelle

    2010-05-01

    Research has noted a rural disadvantage in breastfeeding initiation; however, most previous research has been based on nonrepresentative samples and has been limited in its ability to compare racial/ethnic differences in breastfeeding initiation based on residential location. This research fills this gap by examining a nationally representative sample of births using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) to explore associations between rural-urban residence and maternal race/ethnicity on breastfeeding initiation. Results indicate that associations observed for rural-urban breastfeeding initiation differ based on maternal race/ethnicity and poverty status. These patterns likely reflect differences in economic resources, work environments, and social support among rural minority postpartum women.

  14. Metrics, Dollars, and Systems Change: Learning from Washington State's Student Achievement Initiative to Design Effective Postsecondary Performance Funding Policies. A State Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Davis; Shulock, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The Student Achievement Initiative (SAI), adopted by the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges in 2007, is one of a growing number of performance funding programs that have been dubbed "performance funding 2.0." Unlike previous performance funding models, the SAI rewards colleges for students' intermediate…

  15. Patient admission planning using Approximate Dynamic Programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshof, P.J.H.; Mes, Martijn R.K.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Hans, Elias W.

    2016-01-01

    Tactical planning in hospitals involves elective patient admission planning and the allocation of hospital resource capacities. We propose a method to develop a tactical resource allocation and patient admission plan that takes stochastic elements into consideration, thereby providing robust plans.

  16. Puberty menorrhagia Requiring Inpatient Admission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AH Khosla

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Puberty menorrhagia is a significant health problem in adolescent age group and severe cases may require admission and blood transfusion. Aim of this study was to evaluate the causes, associated complications and management of puberty menorrhagia. METHODS: Hospital records of all patients of puberty menorrhagia requiring admission were analyzed for etiology, duration since menarche, duration of bleeding, investigation profile and management. RESULTS: There were 18 patients of puberty menorrhagia requiring hospital admission. Etiology was anovulatory bleeding in 11 patients, bleeding disorders in five which included idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura in three and one each with Von-Willebrand disease and leukemia. Two patients had hypothyroidism as the cause. Fourteen patients presented with severe anaemia and required blood transfusion. All except one responded to oral hormonal therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Puberty menorrhagia can be associated with severe complications and requiring blood transfusion. Although most common cause is anovulation but bleeding disorder, other medical condition and other organic causes must be ruled out in any patient of Puberty menorrhagia. KEYWORDS: anovulation, bleeding disorder, puberty, menorrhagia, anaemia.

  17. Adapting Child Care Market Price Surveys to Support State Quality Initiatives. White Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branscome, Kenley

    2016-01-01

    Recent changes to the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) require a state's child care market price survey to: (1) be statistically valid and reliable and (2) reflect variations in the cost of child care services by geographic area, type of provider, and age of child. States may use an alternative methodology for setting payment rates--such as…

  18. Taxing Pennsylvania: A Family-Focused Overview of Pennsylvania Taxes. State Fiscal Analysis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children, Harrisburg.

    Noting that a state's tax policies have direct impact on a family's ability to feed, clothe, house, educate, and care for its children, this report presents an overview of taxes in the state of Pennsylvania. The report is presented in five sections. Section 1 presents the argument that it is necessary to understand the rule driving the revenue…

  19. Electronic cigarette use and conventional cigarette smoking initiation among youth, United States, 2015-2016

    OpenAIRE

    Satomi Odani; Kristy Marynak; Brian Armour; Israel Agaku

    2018-01-01

    Background Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are the most commonly used tobacco product among U.S youth. We used cross-sectional, nationally representative data of U.S. middle and high school students to examine the association between e-cigarette use and cigarette smoking initiation. Methods Data were from the 2015 and 2016 National Youth Tobacco Surveys, a school-based survey of U.S. 6 th -12 th graders (pooled N=38,386). Questions on current age and age at initiation of dif...

  20. Gender difference in early initiation of methamphetamine use among current methamphetamine users in Muse, Northern Shan State, Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Yu Mon; Saw, Thu Nandar; Yasuoka, Junko; Chan, Nyein; Kham, Nang Pann Ei; Khine, Wint; Cho, Su Myat; Jimba, Masamine

    2017-05-08

    Globally, methamphetamine (MA) use is a significant public health concern due to unprecedented health effects of its use. However, gender similarities and differences in early age of MA initiation and its risk factors among current MA users have been understudied in a developing country setting. A community-based, cross-sectional study was conducted using a computer assisted self-interviewing program from January to March 2013 in Muse, Northern Shan State, Myanmar. A total of 1362 (775 male and 587 female) self-reported current MA users aged between 18 and 35 years were recruited using respondent-driven sampling. Two gender-stratified multiple logistic regression models (models I and II) were done for analysis. For similarities, 73.0% of males and 60.5% of females initiated MA before their 18th birthday. The early age of MA initiation was positively associated with the reasons and places of the first time MA use among both genders. For differences, males [hazard ratio 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.18-1.54] had a significantly higher risk than females to initiate MA at earlier age. Among male users, participants who had bisexual/homosexual preferences were more likely to initiate MA use earlier. In contrast, female users who exchanged sex for money and/or drugs were more likely to initiate MA in earlier age. More than 60.0% of male and female participants initiated MA use early; however, males initiated use earlier than females. Although similarities were found among both genders, differences found in key risk factors for early age MA initiation suggest that gender-specific, MA prevention programs are urgently needed in Myanmar.

  1. Role of the atmospheric mean state on the initiation of the Madden-Julian oscillation in a tropical channel model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Pallav; Zhang, Chidong [University of Miami, RSMAS/MPO, Miami, FL (United States); Moncrieff, Mitchell W.; Dudhia, Jim; Caron, Julie M.; Bruyere, Cindy [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Ruby Leung, L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Tropical channel models, defined as models that are global in the zonal direction but bounded in the meridional direction, are particularly useful for simulating the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) and understanding its physical and dynamical basis. Influences from the extratropics through the lateral boundaries have been found to be essential to the reproduction of the initiation of certain MJO events. This led to a hypothesis that multi-year simulations using a tropical channel model would reproduce reasonable MJO statistics under the influence of prescribed lateral boundary conditions derived from global reanalyses. Interestingly, the MJO statistics in such a multi-year simulation by a high-resolution tropical channel model are not better than those from global climate models. The error in the atmospheric mean state is found to be a possible reason for the poor MJO statistics in the simulation. Nevertheless, even with a large error in the mean state, the multi-year simulation captures two MJO events previously found to be initiated by extratropical influences. However, the model does not reproduce a third event, whose initiation is not directly influenced by the extratropics. This implies that in the absence of dynamical interactions between the MJO and the lateral boundary conditions, the error in the mean state could be sufficient to prevent the MJO initiation. To explore this third MJO event further, a series of sensitivity tests are conducted. These tests show that the simulation of this event is neither critically influenced by the cumulus parameterization employed, nor the initial conditions when the model is integrated 2 weeks prior to the MJO initiation. The model captures this event when the MJO signal is already present in the initial conditions. The use of high-resolution sea surface temperature does not improve the simulation of the third MJO event. A higher-resolution nested domain covering the Indo-Pacific warm pool region and including a cloud

  2. 78 FR 58546 - State System Development Initiative (SSDI) Grant Program; Single-Case Deviation From Competition...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... Development Initiative (SSDI) Grant Program; Single- Case Deviation From Competition Requirements AGENCY...). ACTION: Notice of Single-Case Deviation from Competition Requirements for the Maternal and Child Health... and quality data that is timely. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Intended Recipient of the Award...

  3. Subtraction with hadronic initial states at NLO: an NNLO-compatible scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, Gábor

    2009-05-01

    We present an NNLO-compatible subtraction scheme for computing QCD jet cross sections of hadron-initiated processes at NLO accuracy. The scheme is constructed specifically with those complications in mind, that emerge when extending the subtraction algorithm to next-to-next-to-leading order. It is therefore possible to embed the present scheme in a full NNLO computation without any modifications.

  4. Subtraction with hadronic initial states at NLO: an NNLO-compatible scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somogyi, Gabor

    2009-01-01

    We present an NNLO-compatible subtraction scheme for computing QCD jet cross sections of hadron-initiated processes at NLO accuracy. The scheme is constructed specifically with those complications in mind, that emerge when extending the subtraction algorithm to next-to-next-to-leading order. It is therefore possible to embed the present scheme in a full NNLO computation without any modifications.

  5. Increasing seat belt use through state-level demonstration projects : a compendium of initial findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    This report summarizes the efforts and results from four of six State-level demonstration projects supported with cooperative agreements from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. The projects were intended to increase seat belt use sta...

  6. Predicting respiratory hospital admissions in young people with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Amanda Marie; Bear, Natasha; Blair, Eve; Langdon, Katherine; Moshovis, Lisa; Steer, Kellie; Wilson, Andrew C

    2018-03-19

    To determine the early predictors of respiratory hospital admissions in young people with cerebral palsy (CP). A 3-year prospective cohort study using linked data. Children and young people with CP, aged 1 to 26 years. Self-reported and carer-reported respiratory symptoms were linked to respiratory hospital admissions (as defined by the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision codes) during the following 3 years. 482 participants (including 289 males) were recruited. They were aged 1 to 26 years (mean 10 years, 10 months; SD 5 years, 11 months) at the commencement of the study, and represented all Gross Motor Function Classification Scale (GMFCS) levels. During the 3-year period, 55 (11.4%) participants had a total of 186 respiratory hospital admissions, and spent a total of 1475 days in hospital. Statistically significant risk factors for subsequent respiratory hospital admissions over 3 years in univariate analyses were GMFCS level V, at least one respiratory hospital admission in the year preceding the survey, oropharyngeal dysphagia, seizures, frequent respiratory symptoms, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, at least two courses of antibiotics in the year preceding the survey, mealtime respiratory symptoms and nightly snoring. Most risk factors for respiratory hospital admissions are potentially modifiable. Early identification of oropharyngeal dysphagia and the management of seizures may help prevent serious respiratory illness. One respiratory hospital admission should trigger further evaluation and management to prevent subsequent respiratory illness. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Electronic cigarette use and conventional cigarette smoking initiation among youth, United States, 2015-2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satomi Odani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes are the most commonly used tobacco product among U.S youth. We used cross-sectional, nationally representative data of U.S. middle and high school students to examine the association between e-cigarette use and cigarette smoking initiation. Methods Data were from the 2015 and 2016 National Youth Tobacco Surveys, a school-based survey of U.S. 6 th -12 th graders (pooled N=38,386. Questions on current age and age at initiation of different tobacco products were used to assess temporality. The study included 35,775 students who had never smoked conventional cigarettes five years before the survey (i.e., baseline, including never-smokers and those who first smoked < 5 years ago. Baseline never smokers were classified by e-cigarette use status into: (1 those who ever used e-cigarettes on/before or without ever smoking cigarettes; or (2 those who had never used e-cigarettes, or started only after initiating cigarette smoking. The outcome variables were cigarette smoking at pre-determined periods: any time within the past 5 years; past 1 year; past 6 months; past 30 days; and past 7 days. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR were calculated using multivariable logistic regression. The models controlled for socio-demographic characteristics and use of smokeless tobacco, cigars, and hookah on/before cigarette smoking initiation. Results Among baseline never cigarette smokers, 17.4% used e-cigarettes, and 16.7% initiated cigarette smoking within the past 5 years. Those who used e-cigarettes on/before ever smoking cigarettes had higher odds of smoking cigarettes than those who did not at all periods assessed: any time within the past 5 years (AOR=2.61; past 1 year (AOR=3.18, past 6 months (AOR=2.59, past 30 days (AOR=1.75, and past 7 days (AOR=1.38 (all p< 0.05. Conclusions These cross-sectional findings reveal that e-cigarette use was associated with conventional cigarette smoking initiation among U.S. youth

  8. Admission Test and Pregnancy Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Akhavan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The admission test (AT has been carried out for many years, but there are still debates about the prognostic value of the test. Therefore, we aimed to examine the value of the AT in predicting the adverse outcome in neonates. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 425 pregnant women with normal vaginal delivery were studied between2009 and 2014at Vali-e-Asr Hospital. Based on the results, the women were divided into 2groups of normal and abnormal ATs. All the patients were followed up until the birth of their baby, when the status of mother and neonate was determined. The main outcomes of the study were cesarean rate, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU admission, fetus demise, neonatal acidosis, and Apgar score. The independent t-test, chi-square test, Fisher exact test, and logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. The data were analyzed using SPSS (version 17. Results: Of 425 pregnant women studied, 142 (33.4% had abnormal ATs with a mean age of 29 (±4.5 years. Multivariate analysis showed that an abnormal AT was able to predict the incidence of cesarean section, intrauterine growth restriction, turned cord, and Apgar<7, but it could not predict neonatal death and hypoxia. Conclusion: The AT was shown to be a useful screening test with risk factors such as oligohydramnios, bloody amniotic fluid, meconium amniotic fluid, intrauterine growth restriction, and turned cord. Additionally, the test was also able to predict NICU admission and the need for cesarean section, but it could not predict the occurrence of neonatal death.

  9. Time evolution of one-dimensional gapless models from a domain wall initial state: stochastic Loewner evolution continued?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, Pasquale; Hagendorf, Christian; Doussal, Pierre Le

    2008-01-01

    We study the time evolution of quantum one-dimensional gapless systems evolving from initial states with a domain wall. We generalize the path integral imaginary time approach that together with boundary conformal field theory allows us to derive the time and space dependence of general correlation functions. The latter are explicitly obtained for the Ising universality class, and the typical behavior of one- and two-point functions is derived for the general case. Possible connections with the stochastic Loewner evolution are discussed and explicit results for one-point time dependent averages are obtained for generic κ for boundary conditions corresponding to stochastic Loewner evolution. We use this set of results to predict the time evolution of the entanglement entropy and obtain the universal constant shift due to the presence of a domain wall in the initial state

  10. The influence of initial state fluctuations on heavy quark energy loss in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Shanshan; Bass, Steffen A; Huang, Yajing; Qin, Guang-You

    2015-01-01

    We study the effects of initial state fluctuations on the dynamical evolution of heavy quarks inside a quark–gluon plasma (QGP) created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The evolution of heavy quarks in QGP matter is described utilizing a modified Langevin equation that incorporates the contributions from both collisional and radiative energy loss. The spacetime evolution of the fireball medium is simulated with a (2 + 1)-dimensional viscous hydrodynamic model. We find that when the medium traversed by the heavy quark contains a fixed amount of energy, heavy quarks tend to lose more energy for greater fluctuations of the medium density. This may result in a larger suppression of heavy flavor observables in a fluctuating QGP matter than in a smooth one. The possibility of using hard probes to infer the information of initial states of heavy-ion collisions is discussed. (paper)

  11. Is the hypothesis about a low entropy initial state of the Universe necessary for explaining the arrow of time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Sheldon; Tumulka, Roderich; Zanghı, Nino

    2016-07-01

    According to statistical mechanics, microstates of an isolated physical system (say, a gas in a box) at time t0 in a given macrostate of less-than-maximal entropy typically evolve in such a way that the entropy at time t increases with |t -t0| in both time directions. In order to account for the observed entropy increase in only one time direction, the thermodynamic arrow of time, one usually appeals to the hypothesis that the initial state of the Universe was one of very low entropy. In certain recent models of cosmology, however, no hypothesis about the initial state of the Universe is invoked. We discuss how the emergence of a thermodynamic arrow of time in such models can nevertheless be compatible with the above-mentioned consequence of statistical mechanics, appearances to the contrary notwithstanding.

  12. Meeting a Forensic Podiatry Admissibility Challenge: A Daubert Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirenberg, Michael

    2016-05-01

    This article is an introduction to the United States Supreme Court's standard of admissibility of forensic evidence and testimony at trial, known as the Daubert standard, with emphasis on how this standard applies to the field of forensic podiatry. The author, a forensic podiatrist, provided law enforcement with evidence tying a bloody sock-clad footprint found at the scene of a homicide to the suspect. In 2014, the author testified at a pretrial hearing, known as "a Daubert hearing," to address the admissibility of this evidence in court. This was the first instance of forensic podiatry being the primary subject of a Daubert hearing. The hearing resulted in the court ordering this evidence admissible. The expert's testimony contributed to the suspect's conviction. This article serves as a reference for forensic podiatrists and experts in similar fields that involve impression evidence, providing evidentiary standards and their impact on expert evidence and testimony. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. Correlates of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination initiation and completion among 18-26 year olds in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjei Boakye, Eric; Lew, Daphne; Muthukrishnan, Meera; Tobo, Betelihem B; Rohde, Rebecca L; Varvares, Mark A; Osazuwa-Peters, Nosayaba

    2018-04-30

    To examine correlates of HPV vaccination uptake in a nationally representative sample of 18-26-year-old adults. Young adults aged 18-26 years were identified from the 2014 and 2015 National Health Interview Survey (n = 7588). Survey-weighted multivariable logistic regression models estimated sociodemographic factors associated with HPV vaccine initiation (≥1 dose) and completion (≥3 doses). Approximately 27% of study participants had initiated the HPV vaccine and 16% had completed the HPV vaccine. Participants were less likely to initiate the vaccine if they were men [(adjusted odds ratio) 0.19; (95% confidence interval) 0.16-0.23], had a high school diploma (0.40; 0.31-0.52) or less (0.46; 0.32-0.64) vs. college graduates, and were born outside the United States (0.52; 0.40-0.69). But, participants were more likely to initiate the HPV if they visited the doctor's office 1-5 times (2.09; 1.56-2.81), or ≥ 6 times (1.86; 1.48-2.34) within the last 12 months vs. no visits. Odds of completing HPV vaccine uptake followed the same pattern as initiation. And after stratifying the study population by gender and foreign-born status, these variables remained statistically significant. In our nationally representative study, only one out of six 18-26 year olds completed the required vaccine doses. Men, individuals with high school or less education, and those born outside the United States were less likely to initiate and complete the HPV vaccination. Our findings suggest that it may be useful to develop targeted interventions to promote HPV vaccination among those in the catch-up age range.

  14. Study of the reaction e(+)e(-) -> psi(2S)pi(+)pi(-) via initial-state radiation at BABAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; de Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Gioi, L. Li; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Buenger, C.; Gruenberg, O.; Leddig, T.; Schroeder, H.; Vo, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Vasseur, G.; Ysche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Sevilla, M. Franco; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.

    2014-01-01

    We study the process e+e−→ψ(2S)π+π− with initial-state-radiation events produced at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy collider. The data were recorded with the BABAR detector at center-of-mass energies at and near the Υ(nS) (n=2,3,4) resonances and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 520  fb−1. We

  15. THE JUDGE'S PROBATIVE INITIATIVE: CONTRASTS AND LIMITATIONS FROM THE LEGAL-CONSTITUTIONAL PARADIGM OF LAWFUL DEMOCRATIC STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Alves Noberto Soares

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article will reflect on the production of proof by the judge, in the context of Criminal Procedure, according to the rules presents in the brazilian legal system. Therefore, the critcial incursions will take into account the technical constructions expressed from the legal and constitutional paradigm of Lawful Democratic State, in order to counter the currently permissive system that confers, to judging agent, the probative initiative.

  16. The influence of normal fault on initial state of stress in rock mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajduś Antoni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of original state of stress in rock mass is a very difficult task for rock mechanics. Yet, original state of stress in rock mass has fundamental influence on secondary state of stress, which occurs in the vicinity of mining headings. This, in turn, is the cause of the occurrence of a number of mining hazards, i.e., seismic events, rock bursts, gas and rock outbursts, falls of roof. From experience, it is known that original state of stress depends a lot on tectonic disturbances, i.e., faults and folds. In the area of faults, a great number of seismic events occur, often of high energies. These seismic events, in many cases, are the cause of rock bursts and damage to the constructions located inside the rock mass and on the surface of the ground. To estimate the influence of fault existence on the disturbance of original state of stress in rock mass, numerical calculations were done by means of Finite Element Method. In the calculations, it was tried to determine the influence of different factors on state of stress, which occurs in the vicinity of a normal fault, i.e., the influence of normal fault inclination, deformability of rock mass, values of friction coefficient on the fault contact. Critical value of friction coefficient was also determined, when mutual dislocation of rock mass part separated by a fault is impossible. The obtained results enabled formulation of a number of conclusions, which are important in the context of seismic events and rock bursts in the area of faults.

  17. The influence of normal fault on initial state of stress in rock mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajduś, Antoni; Cała, Marek; Tajduś, Krzysztof

    2016-03-01

    Determination of original state of stress in rock mass is a very difficult task for rock mechanics. Yet, original state of stress in rock mass has fundamental influence on secondary state of stress, which occurs in the vicinity of mining headings. This, in turn, is the cause of the occurrence of a number of mining hazards, i.e., seismic events, rock bursts, gas and rock outbursts, falls of roof. From experience, it is known that original state of stress depends a lot on tectonic disturbances, i.e., faults and folds. In the area of faults, a great number of seismic events occur, often of high energies. These seismic events, in many cases, are the cause of rock bursts and damage to the constructions located inside the rock mass and on the surface of the ground. To estimate the influence of fault existence on the disturbance of original state of stress in rock mass, numerical calculations were done by means of Finite Element Method. In the calculations, it was tried to determine the influence of different factors on state of stress, which occurs in the vicinity of a normal fault, i.e., the influence of normal fault inclination, deformability of rock mass, values of friction coefficient on the fault contact. Critical value of friction coefficient was also determined, when mutual dislocation of rock mass part separated by a fault is impossible. The obtained results enabled formulation of a number of conclusions, which are important in the context of seismic events and rock bursts in the area of faults.

  18. 77 FR 19408 - Notice of Public Meeting on FY 2013 U.S. Refugee Admissions Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice: 7836] Notice of Public Meeting on FY 2013 U.S. Refugee Admissions Program There will be a meeting on the President's FY 2013 U.S. Refugee Admissions Program on Tuesday, May 1, 2012 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Refugee Processing Center, 1401...

  19. 76 FR 19176 - Notice of Public Meeting on FY 2012 Refugee Admissions Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice: 7409] Notice of Public Meeting on FY 2012 Refugee Admissions Program There will be a meeting on the President's FY 2012 U.S. Refugee Admissions Program on Thursday, May 12, 2011 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Refugee Processing Center, 1401...

  20. 75 FR 20031 - Notice of Public Meeting on FY 2011 Refugee Admissions Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 6954] Notice of Public Meeting on FY 2011 Refugee Admissions Program There will be a meeting on the President's FY 2011 Refugee Admissions Program on Tuesday, May 4, 2010 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Refugee Processing Center, 1401 Wilson...

  1. 22 CFR 40.61 - Aliens present without admission or parole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aliens present without admission or parole. 40.61 Section 40.61 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH... Immigration Violators § 40.61 Aliens present without admission or parole. INA 212(a)(6)(A)(i) does not apply...

  2. Analysis of Institutional Competitiveness of Junior High Schools through the Admission Test to High School Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armendáriz, Joyzukey; Tarango, Javier; Machin-Mastromatteo, Juan Daniel

    2018-01-01

    This descriptive and correlational research studies 15,658 students from 335 secondary schools in the state of Chihuahua, Mexico, through the results of the examination of admission to high school education (National High School Admission Test--EXANI I from the National Assessment Center for Education--CENEVAL) on logical-mathematical and verbal…

  3. Recruiting Undocumented Students: A Qualitative Analysis of College Admissions Counselors' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Erwin

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study explored nine admissions counselors' experiences with undocumented students at a public, four-year university in the state of Maryland. Findings suggest that admissions staff may confuse which policies apply for DACA vs DREAMers, a strategic recruitment plan does not exist to actively recruit undocumented students, and…

  4. How to Fund Homeland Security without Federal Dollars: State and Local Funding of Homeland Security Initiatives in Light of Decreased Support by the Federal Government

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emler, Jay S

    2008-01-01

    .... This thesis, therefore, examined alternatives states and local units of government might use to fund homeland security initiatives, ranging from conventional alternatives such as, asset forfeiture...

  5. Sustainability for the Americas Initiative: Land Design Institute, Ball State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. L. Motloch; Pedro Pacheco; Eloy F. Jr. Casagrande

    2006-01-01

    The Ball State University Land Design Institute (LDI) pursues ecologically and culturally sustainable land design through education, research, outreach, and demonstration. LDI seeks to lead communities (local, regional, global) to sustainable futures. It connects communities and sustainability experts to optimize education about land management, planning, and design...

  6. 77 FR 10663 - Due Date of Initial Application Requirements for State Home Construction Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... aggregate, or by the private sector, of $100 million or more (adjusted annually for inflation) in any given year. This rule would have no such effect on State, local, and tribal governments, or on the private... anomalously high number of applications. We acknowledge that the ARRA increased the 2010 workload but maintain...

  7. 9 CFR 56.10 - Initial State response and containment plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... committee, regular meetings, and exercises, including coordination with any tribal governments that may be... monitoring activities in control zones; (12) If vaccination is considered as an option, a written plan for...) Public awareness and education programs regarding avian influenza. (b) If a State is designated a U.S...

  8. Initial measurement of assets produced in Bulgarian companies – current state and ways for improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mincho Minev

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The initial evaluation of the production is one of the most complex tasks that accounting specialists face in their practice. The quality of the accounting information provided to the various internal and external users depends to a great extent on the way in which this task is resolved. In this article, using the results of an undertaken research, the practice of leading Bulgarian companies will be analyzed with regard to the costing of their production. The main purpose is to make recommendations for optimizing the process of costing in Bulgarian companies and to increase the quality of the accounting information produced as a result of this process.

  9. Resting state functional connectivity changes in adults with developmental stuttering: an initial sLORETA study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen eJoos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stuttering is defined as speech characterized by verbal dysfluencies, but should not be seen as an isolated speech disorder, but as a generalized sensorimotor timing deficit due to impaired communication between speech related brain areas. Therefore we focused on resting state brain activity and functional connectivity.Method: We included 11 patients with developmental stuttering and 11 age matched controls. To objectify stuttering severity and the impact on the quality of life (QoL, we used the Dutch validated Test for Stuttering Severity-Readers (TSS-R and the Overall Assessment of the Speaker’s Experience of Stuttering (OASES, respectively. Furthermore, we used standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA analyses to look at resting state activity and functional connectivity differences and their correlations with the TSS-R and OASES.Results: No resting state activity differences were identified in comparison to fluently speaking controls or in correlation with stuttering severity or QoL measures. Significant alterations in resting state functional connectivity were found, predominantly interhemispheric, i.e. a decreased functional connectivity for high frequency oscillations (beta and gamma between motor speech areas (BA44 and 45 and the contralateral premotor (BA 6 and motor (BA 4 areas. A positive correlation was found between functional connectivity at low frequency oscillations (theta and alpha and stuttering severity, while a mixed increased and decreased functional connectivity at low and high frequency oscillations correlated with QoL.Discussion: PWS are characterized by decreased high frequency interhemispheric functional connectivity between motor speech, premotor and motor areas in the resting state, while higher functional connectivity in the low frequency bands indicates more severe speech disturbances, suggesting that increased interhemispheric and right sided functional connectivity is

  10. Admissibility of appeals in atomic energy law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rengeling, H.W.

    1981-01-01

    Using two decisions made by the Federal Court of Administration on the Whyl reactor on July 17, 1980, and on the Stade reactor on December 22, 1980, which he considers as having at least an orientation effect, the author examines the admissibility of appeals filed according to the Atomic Energy Law. For substantiating the appeal, he discusses rules of law that protect third parties and the complainant's obligation to substantiate the appeal. In view of the preclusion of objectives, he differentiates between 'forfeiture' preclusion and 'validity' preclusion. In his view, the above-mentioned decisions produce effects that are to the benefit of the constitutional state and the necessary further development of economy and technology. (HSCH) [de

  11. Admissible invariant distributions on reductive

    CERN Document Server

    Harish-Chandra; Paul J Sally, Jr

    1999-01-01

    Harish-Chandra presented these lectures on admissible invariant distributions for p-adic groups at the Institute for Advanced Study in the early 1970s. He published a short sketch of this material as his famous "Queen's Notes". This book, which was prepared and edited by DeBacker and Sally, presents a faithful rendering of Harish-Chandra's original lecture notes. The main purpose of Harish-Chandra's lectures was to show that the character of an irreducible admissible representation of a connected reductive p-adic group G is represented by a locally summable function on G. A key ingredient in this proof is the study of the Fourier transforms of distributions on \\mathfrak g, the Lie algebra of G. In particular, Harish-Chandra shows that if the support of a G-invariant distribution on \\mathfrak g is compactly generated, then its Fourier transform has an asymptotic expansion about any semisimple point of \\mathfrak g. Harish-Chandra's remarkable theorem on the local summability of characters for p-adic groups was ...

  12. Admission Criteria for MBA Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Dakduk

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a review of studies on admission criteria for MBA programs. The method consisted in a literary review based on a systematic search in international databases (Emerald, ABI/INFORM Global, ProQuest Education Journals, ProQuest European Business, ProQuest Science Journal, ProQuest Research Library, ProQuest Psychology Journals, ProQuest Social Science Journals and Business Source Complete of studies published from January 1990 to December 2013, which explore the academic performance of students or graduates of MBA programs. A quantitative review was performed. Results show that most researchers studied relations between GMAT (Graduate Management Admission Test and UGPA (Undergraduate Grade Point Average as predictors of GGPA (Graduate Grade Point Average. On the other hand, work experience and personal traits (such as personality, motivation, learning strategies, self-efficacy beliefs and achievement expectations and their relation with GGPA had been less studied, and results are not consistent enough to consider them valid predictors of student performance at this time.

  13. Initial clinical experience with dedicated ultra fast solid state cardiac gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aland, Nusrat; Lele, V.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: To analyze the imaging and diagnostic performance of new dedicated ultra fast solid state detector gamma camera and compare it with standard dual detector gamma camera in myocardial perfusion imaging. Material and Methods: In total 900 patients underwent myocardial perfusion imaging between 1st February 2010 and 29th August 2010 either stress/rest or rest/stress protocol. There was no age or gender bias (there were 630 males and 270 females). 5 and 15 mCi of 99m Tc - Tetrofosmin/MIBI was injected for 1st and 2nd part of the study respectively. Waiting period after injection was 20 min for regular stress and 40 min for pharmacological stress and 40 min after rest injection. Acquisition was performed on solid state detector gamma camera for a duration of 5 min and 3 min for 1st and 2nd part respectively. Interpretation of myocardial perfusion was done and QGS/QPS protocol was used for EF analysis. Out of these, 20 random patients underwent back to back myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging on standard dual detector gamma camera on same day. There was no age or gender bias (there were 9 males, 11 females). Acquisition time was 20 min for each part of the study. Interpretation was done using Autocard and EF analyses with 4 DM SPECT. Images obtained were then compared with those of solid state detector gamma camera. Result: Good quality and high count myocardial perfusion images were obtained with lesser amount of tracer activity on solid state detector gamma camera. Obese patients also showed good quality images with less tracer activity. As compared to conventional dual detector gamma camera images were brighter and showed better contrast with solid state gamma camera. Right ventricular imaging was better seen. Analyses of diastolic dysfunction was possible with 16 frame gated studies with solid state gamma camera. Shorter acquisition time with comfortable position reduced possibility of patient motion. All cardiac views were obtained with no movement of the

  14. Estimating the state of a geophysical system with sparse observations: time delay methods to achieve accurate initial states for prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Zhe; Rey, Daniel; Ye, Jingxin; Abarbanel, Henry D. I.

    2017-01-01

    The problem of forecasting the behavior of a complex dynamical system through analysis of observational time-series data becomes difficult when the system expresses chaotic behavior and the measurements are sparse, in both space and/or time. Despite the fact that this situation is quite typical across many fields, including numerical weather prediction, the issue of whether the available observations are "sufficient" for generating successful forecasts is still not well understood. An analysis by Whartenby et al. (2013) found that in the context of the nonlinear shallow water equations on a β plane, standard nudging techniques require observing approximately 70 % of the full set of state variables. Here we examine the same system using a method introduced by Rey et al. (2014a), which generalizes standard nudging methods to utilize time delayed measurements. We show that in certain circumstances, it provides a sizable reduction in the number of observations required to construct accurate estimates and high-quality predictions. In particular, we find that this estimate of 70 % can be reduced to about 33 % using time delays, and even further if Lagrangian drifter locations are also used as measurements.

  15. United States Air Force Research Initiation Program for 1987. Volume 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-01

    University of - 7 N. Carolina A&T State Univ. - I Dillard University - 1 N. Carolina-Greensboro, Univ - I Drury College - 1 Northwestern University - 1...Specialty: Educational Psychology Specialty: Management Science Dr. Michael Matthews Dr. Charles Lance (1986) Drury College University of Georgia...Molecular Biology of the Cell, pp 611-668, 918-947, Garland Publishing Company, Inc. New York, 1983. 2. Anderson, Colin , Manual for the Examination of

  16. Estimating Renewable Energy Economic Potential in the United States: Methodology and Initial Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Austin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Beiter, Philipp [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heimiller, Donna [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Davidson, Carolyn [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Denholm, Paul [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Melius, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lopez, Anthony [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hettinger, Dylan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mulcahy, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Porro, Gian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The report describes a geospatial analysis method to estimate the economic potential of several renewable resources available for electricity generation in the United States. Economic potential, one measure of renewable generation potential, is defined in this report as the subset of the available resource technical potential where the cost required to generate the electricity (which determines the minimum revenue requirements for development of the resource) is below the revenue available in terms of displaced energy and displaced capacity.

  17. [Supervision of junior doctors and allocation of work tasks regarding admissions and further treatment of acute admitted patients.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkestad, Lars; Brabrand, Mikkel; Hallas, Peter

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: It is being debated whether medical staff working at the emergency departments with acute admission services dealing with medical patients have the required professional competence level. It has not previously been documented which doctors see the acute admissions initially at emerg......INTRODUCTION: It is being debated whether medical staff working at the emergency departments with acute admission services dealing with medical patients have the required professional competence level. It has not previously been documented which doctors see the acute admissions initially...... for help from a senior colleague. Udgivelsesdato: 2010-May-31...

  18. Oxidation under electron bombardment. A tool for studying the initial states of silicon oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carriere, B.; Deville, J.P.; El Maachi, A.

    1987-06-01

    The exciting beam of an Auger electron spectrometer has been used to monitor the oxidation of silicon single crystals at room temperature and very low pressures of oxygen (approx. 10/sup -7/ Torr). This process allows us to build ultra-thin layers of silica on silicon (down to 30 A) but it is mostly used to investigate the mechanisms of the initial stages of oxidation. Auger spectra recorded continuously during the oxidation process provide information on (1) the nature of the silicon-oxygen chemical bonds which are interpreted through fine structure in the Auger peak, and (2) the kinetics of oxide formation which are deduced from curves of Auger signal versus time. An account is given of the contribution of these Auger studies to the description of the intermediate oxide layer during the reaction between silicon and oxygen and the influence of surface structural disorder, induced mainly by argon-ion bombardment, is discussed in terms of reactivity and oxide coverage.

  19. Effects of Lycopene on the Initial State of Atherosclerosis in New Zealand White (NZW) Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Mario; Fechner, Mandy; Kalkowski, Janine; Fröhlich, Kati; Trautmann, Anne; Böhm, Volker; Liebisch, Gerhard; Lehneis, Stefan; Schmitz, Gerd; Ludwig, Antje; Baumann, Gert; Stangl, Karl; Stangl, Verena

    2012-01-01

    Background Lycopene is the main carotenoid in tomatoes, where it is found in high concentrations. Strong epidemiological evidence suggests that lycopene may provide protection against cardiovascular diseases. We therefore studied the effects of lycopene on diet-induced increase in serum lipid levels and the initiation of atherosclerosis in New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. Methodology/Principal Findings The animals, divided into four groups of 9 animals each, were fed either a standard diet, a high-cholesterol diet containing 0.5% cholesterol, a high-cholesterol diet containing placebo beadlets, or a high-cholesterol diet plus 5 mg/kg body weight/day of lycopene (in the form of lycopene beadlets), for a period of 4 weeks. We found significantly elevated lycopene plasma levels in the animal group treated with lycopene beadlets. Compared to the high-cholesterol and the placebo group, this was associated with a significant reduction of 50% in total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol serum levels in the lycopene group. The amount of cholesteryl ester in the aorta was significantly decreased by lycopene. However, we did not observe a significant decrease in the extent of aortic surface lipid accumulation in the lycopene group. In addition, no differences in the intima-media thickness among groups were observed. Endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent vasodilation in isolated rabbit aortic and carotid rings did not differ among any of the animal groups. Conclusions Lycopene supplementation for 4 weeks increased lycopene plasma levels in the animals. Although we found strongly reduced total and LDL cholesterol serum levels as well as significantly lower amounts of cholesteryl ester in the aortae in the lycopene-treated group, no significant differences in initial lesions in the aortae were detected. PMID:22295112

  20. State and local fiscal impacts associated with nuclear energy centers: some initial considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjornstad, D.J.

    1976-04-01

    The concept of the nuclear energy center is designed to consolidate a number of electrical power reactors and/or related fuel cycle activities on a single site. Such a siting strategy would concentrate a great deal of economic activity in one area and, as a consequence, generate significant impacts on state and local governments by increasing tax bases and public service demands and by altering intergovernmental fiscal relations. This study was designed to place rough empirical measures on relevant impact variables and to highlight areas for which a need for further research was indicated.

  1. Healthy hospital food initiatives in the United States: time to ban sugar sweetened beverages to reduce childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcicki, Janet M

    2013-06-01

    While childhood obesity is a global problem, the extent and severity of the problem in United States, has resulted in a number of new initiatives, including recent hospital initiatives to limit the sale of sweetened beverages and other high calorie drinks in hospital vending machines and cafeterias. These proposed policy changes are not unique to United States, but are more comprehensive in the number of proposed hospitals that they will impact. Meanwhile, however, it is advised, that these initiatives should focus on banning sugar sweetened beverages, including sodas, 100% fruit juice and sports drinks, from hospital cafeterias and vending machines instead of limiting their presence, so as to ensure the success of these programs in reducing the prevalence of childhood obesity. If US hospitals comprehensively remove sugar sweetened beverages from their cafeterias and vending machines, these programs could subsequently become a model for efforts to address childhood obesity in other areas of the world. Hospitals should be a model for health care reform in their communities and removing sugar sweetened beverages is a necessary first step. ©2013 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. A three axis turntable's online initial state measurement method based on the high-accuracy laser gyro SINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chunfeng; Wei, Guo; Wang, Qi; Xiong, Zhenyu; Wang, Qun; Long, Xingwu

    2016-10-01

    As an indispensable equipment in inertial technology tests, the three-axis turntable is widely used in the calibration of various types inertial navigation systems (INS). In order to ensure the calibration accuracy of INS, we need to accurately measure the initial state of the turntable. However, the traditional measuring method needs a lot of exterior equipment (such as level instrument, north seeker, autocollimator, etc.), and the test processing is complex, low efficiency. Therefore, it is relatively difficult for the inertial measurement equipment manufacturers to realize the self-inspection of the turntable. Owing to the high precision attitude information provided by the laser gyro strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) after fine alignment, we can use it as the attitude reference of initial state measurement of three-axis turntable. For the principle that the fixed rotation vector increment is not affected by measuring point, we use the laser gyro INS and the encoder of the turntable to provide the attitudes of turntable mounting plat. Through this way, the high accuracy measurement of perpendicularity error and initial attitude of the three-axis turntable has been achieved.

  3. Control quantum evolution speed of a single dephasing qubit for arbitrary initial states via periodic dynamical decoupling pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ya-Ju; Tan, Qing-Shou; Kuang, Le-Man

    2017-03-08

    We investigate the possibility to control quantum evolution speed of a single dephasing qubit for arbitrary initial states by the use of periodic dynamical decoupling (PDD) pulses. It is indicated that the quantum speed limit time (QSLT) is determined by initial and final quantum coherence of the qubit, as well as the non-Markovianity of the system under consideration during the evolution when the qubit is subjected to a zero-temperature Ohmic-like dephasing reservoir. It is shown that final quantum coherence of the qubit and the non-Markovianity of the system can be modulated by PDD pulses. Our results show that for arbitrary initial states of the dephasing qubit with non-vanishing quantum coherence, PDD pulses can be used to induce potential acceleration of the quantum evolution in the short-time regime, while PDD pulses can lead to potential speedup and slow down in the long-time regime. We demonstrate that the effect of PDD on the QSLT for the Ohmic or sub-Ohmic spectrum (Markovian reservoir) is much different from that for the super-Ohmic spectrum (non-Markovian reservoir).

  4. The Effect of a State Department of Education Teacher Mentor Initiative on Science Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Stephen L.; Wallace, Carolyn S.

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a southern state's department of education program to improve science achievement through embedded professional development of science teachers in the lowest performing schools. The Science Mentor Program provided content and inquiry-based coaching by teacher leaders to science teachers in their own classrooms. The study analyzed the mean scale scores for the science portion of the state's high school graduation test for the years 2004 through 2007 to determine whether schools receiving the intervention scored significantly higher than comparison schools receiving no intervention. The results showed that all schools achieved significant improvement of scale scores between 2004 and 2007, but there were no significant performance differences between intervention and comparison schools, nor were there any significant differences between various subgroups in intervention and comparison schools. However, one subgroup, economically disadvantaged (ED) students, from high-level intervention schools closed the achievement gap with ED students from no-intervention schools across the period of the study. The study provides important information to guide future research on and design of large-scale professional development programs to foster inquiry-based science.

  5. Overcoming a limitation of deterministic dense coding with a nonmaximally entangled initial state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdon, P. S.; Gerjuoy, E.

    2010-01-01

    Under two-party deterministic dense coding, Alice communicates (perfectly distinguishable) messages to Bob via a qudit from a pair of entangled qudits in pure state |Ψ>. If |Ψ> represents a maximally entangled state (i.e., each of its Schmidt coefficients is √(1/d)), then Alice can convey to Bob one of d 2 distinct messages. If |Ψ> is not maximally entangled, then Ji et al. [Phys. Rev. A 73, 034307 (2006)] have shown that under the original deterministic dense-coding protocol, in which messages are encoded by unitary operations performed on Alice's qudit, it is impossible to encode d 2 -1 messages. Encoding d 2 -2 messages is possible; see, for example, the numerical studies by Mozes et al. [Phys. Rev. A 71, 012311 (2005)]. Answering a question raised by Wu et al. [Phys. Rev. A 73, 042311 (2006)], we show that when |Ψ> is not maximally entangled, the communications limit of d 2 -2 messages persists even when the requirement that Alice encode by unitary operations on her qudit is weakened to allow encoding by more general quantum operators. We then describe a dense-coding protocol that can overcome this limitation with high probability, assuming the largest Schmidt coefficient of |Ψ> is sufficiently close to √(1/d). In this protocol, d 2 -2 of the messages are encoded via unitary operations on Alice's qudit, and the final (d 2 -1)-th message is encoded via a non-trace-preserving quantum operation.

  6. Heterogeneity of change in state affect following insulin therapy initiation in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruszczyńska Ewa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to explore heterogeneity of change in state affect following the introduction of insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes. State affect was assessed twice among 305 patients: just before the introduction of insulin therapy and at 1-month follow-up. Latent class growth modeling showed that negative affect (NA increased in 78% of the sample, whereas positive affect (PA improved in only 17% of the participants. On the basis of cross-tabulation of these changes a 4-class model of emotional response to the new treatment was obtained. The largest subgroup of participants (57% manifested “threat response”, i.e. moderate-stable PA with increase in NA. Participants in the “challenge response” subgroup (11.8% showed increases in both NA and PA. The third class (10.2% characterized by “no response”, had low-stable NA and moderate-stable PA. The smallest “stress response” subgroup (9.8% showed increase in NA and high-stable PA. Gender, age and education level were significant covariates of group membership. Thus, the findings revealed heterogeneous emotional response to the new treatment, which may be of clinical relevance for improving diabetic patients’ adjustment through a more individual, person-centered approach.

  7. Estimating Renewable Energy Economic Potential in the United States. Methodology and Initial Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Austin; Beiter, Philipp; Heimiller, Donna; Davidson, Carolyn; Denholm, Paul; Melius, Jennifer; Lopez, Anthony; Hettinger, Dylan; Mulcahy, David; Porro, Gian

    2016-08-01

    This report describes a geospatial analysis method to estimate the economic potential of several renewable resources available for electricity generation in the United States. Economic potential, one measure of renewable generation potential, may be defined in several ways. For example, one definition might be expected revenues (based on local market prices) minus generation costs, considered over the expected lifetime of the generation asset. Another definition might be generation costs relative to a benchmark (e.g., a natural gas combined cycle plant) using assumptions of fuel prices, capital cost, and plant efficiency. Economic potential in this report is defined as the subset of the available resource technical potential where the cost required to generate the electricity (which determines the minimum revenue requirements for development of the resource) is below the revenue available in terms of displaced energy and displaced capacity. The assessment is conducted at a high geospatial resolution (more than 150,000 technology-specific sites in the continental United States) to capture the significant variation in local resource, costs, and revenue potential. This metric can be a useful screening factor for understanding the economic viability of renewable generation technologies at a specific location. In contrast to many common estimates of renewable energy potential, economic potential does not consider market dynamics, customer demand, or most policy drivers that may incent renewable energy generation.

  8. Comparing Indications for Cardiovascular Admissions into a Nigerian and an Israeli Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukpabi, Ogba Joseph; Uwanurochi, Kelechukwu

    2017-01-01

    Background: Changing epidemiologic profile with increase in cardiovascular risk factors is well documented in literature. Our study sought to see how this is reflected in cardiovascular admissions into medical wards of a Nigerian and an Israeli hospital. Objective: To compare the range and pattern of cardiovascular admissions encountered in a Nigerian hospital and an Israel hospital. Methods: This was a retrospective study of admission records of patients admitted into both Federal Medical Centre (FMC), Umuahia, Abia State, Nigeria, and Sheba Medical Centre, Israel. Results: Ischemic heart disease (IHD) was the most prevalent among the Israeli hospital's admissions but ranks very low as an indication for admission in Nigeria. The most common causes of admission in Nigeria were hypertension and heart failure (HF). The spectrum of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) was very limited in the Nigerian hospital, indicating disparity in diagnostic capacity. Conclusion: There were more patients with CVD as a cause of medical admission in the Israel hospital as compared to the Nigerian hospital. Hypertension and HF were prevalent indications for CVD in FMC, Umuahia, Nigeria, while hypertension and IHD were the prevalent indications for admission in Sheba Medical Centre, Israel. Future studies are needed to monitor spectrum and frequency of cardiovascular admissions in view of evolving epidemiological transition in developing countries. PMID:28469120

  9. Training initiatives for essential obstetric care in developing countries: a 'state of the art' review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, S; Murray, S F

    2000-12-01

    Increased international awareness of the need to provide accessible essential or emergency obstetric and newborn care in developing countries has resulted in the recognition of new training needs and in a number of new initiatives to meet those needs. This paper reviews experience in this area so far. The first section deals with some of the different educational approaches and teaching methods that have now been employed, ranging from the traditional untheorized 'chalk and talk', to competency-based training, to theories of adult learning, problem solving and transferable skills. The second section describes a range of different types of indicators and data sources (learner assessments, user and community assessments, trainer assessments and institutional data) that have been used in the assessment of the effectiveness of such training. The final section of the paper draws together some of the lessons. It considers evaluation design issues such as the inclusion of medium and long term evaluation, the importance of methods that allow for the detection of iatrogenic effects of training, and the roles of community randomized trials and 'before, during and after' studies. Issues identified for the future include comparative work, how to keep training affordable, and where training ought to lie on the continuum between straightforward technical skills acquisition and the more complex learning processes required for demanding professional work.

  10. United States-Mexico cross-border health insurance initiatives: Salud Migrante and Medicare in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Bustamante, Arturo; Laugesen, Miriam; Caban, Mabel; Rosenau, Pauline

    2012-01-01

    While U.S. health care reform will most likely reduce the overall number of uninsured Mexican-Americans, it does not address challenges related to health care coverage for undocumented Mexican immigrants, who will remain uninsured under the measures of the reform; documented low-income Mexican immigrants who have not met the five-year waiting period required for Medicaid benefits; or the growing number of retired U.S. citizens living in Mexico, who lack easy access to Medicare-supported services. This article reviews two promising binational initiatives that could help address these challenges-Salud Migrante and Medicare in Mexico; discusses their prospective applications within the context of U.S. health care reform; and identifies potential challenges to their implementation (legal, political, and regulatory), as well as the possible benefits, including coverage of uninsured Mexican immigrants, and their integration into the U.S. health care system (through Salud Migrante), and access to lower-cost Medicare-supported health care for U.S. retirees in Mexico (Medicare in Mexico).

  11. Implementation and initial test result of a prototype solid state modulator for pulsed magnetron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dake, Vishal; Mangalvedekar, H.A.; Tillu, Abhijit; Dixit, Kavita P.; Sarukte, Hemant

    2014-01-01

    A solid-state modulator rated for 50 kV, 120A, 4μs and 250 Hz has been designed. The discharging circuit of the modulator is being tested at ∼ 33 kV, 40-80A, at a maximum pulse repetition rate of 30 pps. The paper discusses development and testing of prototype discharging circuit on resistive load and magnetron. The technique used for measurement of pulse transformer leakage inductance, distributed capacitance and stray primary circuit series inductance will also be discussed in detail. It is necessary to have Energy Storage Capacitors with low ESL for these applications (ESL < 40 nH). The method used for evaluating the ESL of locally available metalized polypropylene capacitors will also be presented. (author)

  12. Implementation and initial test result of a prototype solid state modulator for pulsed magnetron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dake, Vishal; Mangalvedekar, H.A., E-mail: vishaldake90@gmail.com [Veermata Jijabai Technological Institute, Mumbai (India); Tillu, Abhijit; Dixit, Kavita P.; Sarukte, Hemant [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2014-07-01

    A solid-state modulator rated for 50 kV, 120A, 4μs and 250 Hz has been designed. The discharging circuit of the modulator is being tested at ∼ 33 kV, 40-80A, at a maximum pulse repetition rate of 30 pps. The paper discusses development and testing of prototype discharging circuit on resistive load and magnetron. The technique used for measurement of pulse transformer leakage inductance, distributed capacitance and stray primary circuit series inductance will also be discussed in detail. It is necessary to have Energy Storage Capacitors with low ESL for these applications (ESL < 40 nH). The method used for evaluating the ESL of locally available metalized polypropylene capacitors will also be presented. (author)

  13. Precursor state of oxygen molecules on the Si(001) surface during the initial room-temperature adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eunkyung; Chang, Yun Hee; Kim, Yong-Sung; Koo, Ja-Yong; Kim, Hanchul

    2012-10-01

    The initial adsorption of oxygen molecules on Si(001) is investigated at room temperature. The scanning tunneling microscopy images reveal a unique bright O2-induced feature. The very initial sticking coefficient of O2 below 0.04 Langmuir is measured to be ˜0.16. Upon thermal annealing at 250-600 °C, the bright O2-induced feature is destroyed, and the Si(001) surface is covered with dark depressions that seem to be oxidized structures with -Si-O-Si- bonds. This suggests that the observed bright O2-induced feature is an intermediate precursor state that may be either a silanone species or a molecular adsorption structure.

  14. Chinese Policy in Post-Soviet States. «One Belt — One Road Initiative»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya M. Borisova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Former Soviet Union countries is of special interest for China. Russian influence in former republics has been declining since the Soviet Union collapsed. China used these changes to start developing of bilateral relations with Central Asia states, as a first priority, and continued with Ukraine, Belorussia, South Caucasus governments. Former Soviet countries’ course to weaken Russian influence helped Chinese policy to be promoted. It has altered from bitty steps to concerted course in the region. China began to play a major role in the trade and economic development of Central Asia, supporting its policy with political mechanisms. To strengthen its positions, Beijing proposed its “One belt - one road” strategic initiative, which consists of two major projects : Silk Road Economic Belt and the 21st Century Maritime Silk Route Economic Belt. These projects involve almost all of the former soviet states, of which Central Asian countries play a major part. This world region is seen in China as a platform for invading European markets, and it also provides a way to avoid trespassing of the Russian borders. In the context of Chinese “One road — one belt” initiative, there is a great concern of the cooperation with EAEU project. EAEU is aimed to provide coordinated unified economic policy with state-members, to guarantee the free movement of goods, capital and labour. Moscow sees its initiative as an instrument for construction of economic and political structure in the region, same as Beijing does. Possibility of two global projects coexistence, which can be distinguished as competitive, is a problem to be solved.   

  15. Oxidation State of Iron in the Izu-Bonin Arc Initial Magma and Its Influence Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Arculus, R. J.; Brandl, P. A.; Hamada, M.; Savov, I. P.; Zhu, S.; Hickey-Vargas, R.; Tepley, F. J., III; Meffre, S.; Yogodzinski, G. M.; McCarthy, A.; Barth, A. P.; Kanayama, K.; Kusano, Y.; Sun, W.

    2014-12-01

    The redox state of mantle-derived magmas is a controversial issue, especially whether island arc basalts are more oxidized than those from mid-ocean ridges. Usually, arc magmas have higher Fe3+/Fe2+ and calculated oxygen fugacity (fO2) than mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB). It is the high fO2 of arc magma that apparently delays onset of sulfide fractionation and sequestration of precious/base metals thereby facilitating the formation of many giant gold-copper deposits typically associated with subduction zones. But due to a paucity of Fe3+/Fe2+ data for primary mantle-derived arc magmas, the cause for high fO2 of these magma types is still controversial; causes may include inter alia subduction-released oxidized material addition to the mantle wedge source of arc magma, partial melting of subducted slab, and redox changes occurring during ascent of the magma. Fortunately, IODP expedition 351 drilling at IODP Site U1438 in the Amami-Sankaku Basin of the northwestern Philipine Sea, adjacent to the proto-Izu-Bonin Arc at the Kyushu-Palau Ridge (KPR), recovered not only volcaniclastics derived from the inception of Izu-Bonin Mariana (IBM) arc in the Eocene, but also similar materials for the Arc's subsequent evolution through to the Late Oligocene and abandonment of the KPR as a remnant arc. Samples of the pre-Arc oceanic crustal basement were also recovered enabling us to determine the fO2of the mantle preceding arc inception. As the oxidation state of iron in basaltic glass directly relates to the fO2 , the Fe3+/∑Fe ratio [Fe3+/(Fe3++ Fe2+)] of basaltic glass are quantified by synchrotron-facilitated micro X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy to reflect its fO2. Fe K-edge µ-XANES spectra were recorded in fluorescence mode at Beamline 15U1, Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). Synthetic silicate glass with known Fe3+/∑Fe ratio was used in data handling. The experimental results as well as preliminary data from IODP Expedition 351

  16. Prediction of Emergency Department Hospital Admission Based on Natural Language Processing and Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xingyu; Kim, Joyce; Patzer, Rachel E; Pitts, Stephen R; Patzer, Aaron; Schrager, Justin D

    2017-10-26

    To describe and compare logistic regression and neural network modeling strategies to predict hospital admission or transfer following initial presentation to Emergency Department (ED) triage with and without the addition of natural language processing elements. Using data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS), a cross-sectional probability sample of United States EDs from 2012 and 2013 survey years, we developed several predictive models with the outcome being admission to the hospital or transfer vs. discharge home. We included patient characteristics immediately available after the patient has presented to the ED and undergone a triage process. We used this information to construct logistic regression (LR) and multilayer neural network models (MLNN) which included natural language processing (NLP) and principal component analysis from the patient's reason for visit. Ten-fold cross validation was used to test the predictive capacity of each model and receiver operating curves (AUC) were then calculated for each model. Of the 47,200 ED visits from 642 hospitals, 6,335 (13.42%) resulted in hospital admission (or transfer). A total of 48 principal components were extracted by NLP from the reason for visit fields, which explained 75% of the overall variance for hospitalization. In the model including only structured variables, the AUC was 0.824 (95% CI 0.818-0.830) for logistic regression and 0.823 (95% CI 0.817-0.829) for MLNN. Models including only free-text information generated AUC of 0.742 (95% CI 0.731- 0.753) for logistic regression and 0.753 (95% CI 0.742-0.764) for MLNN. When both structured variables and free text variables were included, the AUC reached 0.846 (95% CI 0.839-0.853) for logistic regression and 0.844 (95% CI 0.836-0.852) for MLNN. The predictive accuracy of hospital admission or transfer for patients who presented to ED triage overall was good, and was improved with the inclusion of free text data from a patient

  17. Maitra-Burke example of initial-state dependence in time-dependent density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holas, A.; Balawender, R.

    2002-01-01

    In a recent paper, Maitra and Burke [Phys. Rev. A 63, 042501 (2001); 64, 039901(E) (2001)] have given an interesting and instructive example that illustrates a specific feature of the time-dependent density-functional theory--the dependence of the reconstructed time-dependent potential not only on the electron density, but also on the initial state of the system. However, a concise form of its presentation by these authors is insufficient to reveal all its peculiarities. Our paper represents a very detailed study of this valuable example, intended to facilitate a better understanding and appreciation

  18. Initial-State Radiation Measurement of the e+e- -> pi+pi-pi+pi- Cross Section

    CERN Document Server

    Lees, J.P.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V.E.; Buzykaev, A.R.; Druzhinin, V.P.; Golubev, V.B.; Kravchenko, E.A.; Onuchin, A.P.; Serednyakov, S.I.; Skovpen, Yu.I.; Solodov, E.P.; Todyshev, K.Yu.; Yushkov, A.N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A.J.; Mandelkern, M.; Stoker, D.P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J.W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G.M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T.M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J.D.; West, C.A.; Eisner, A.M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W.S.; Martinez, A.J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B.A.; Seiden, A.; Cheng, C.H.; Doll, D.A.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K.T.; Hitlin, D.G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F.C.; Rakitin, A.Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M.S.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B.T.; Sokoloff, M.D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P.C.; Ford, W.T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J.G.; Wagner, S.R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W.H.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M.J.; Schubert, K.R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P.J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I.M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M.R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C.L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A.J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F.U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H.M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P.D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P.K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W.T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Rubin, A.E.; Gritsan, A.V.; Guo, Z.J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A.M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M.H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D.J.; Wright, D.M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C.A.; Coleman, J.P.; Fry, J.R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Payne, D.J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A.J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, David Norvil; Davis, C.L.; Denig, A.G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Alwyn, K.E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R.J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G.D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D.A.; Simi, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P.M.; Robertson, S.H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D.J.; Nguyen, X.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H.L.; Jessop, C.P.; Knoepfel, K.J.; LoSecco, J.M.; Wang, W.F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N.B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G.R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M.A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J.J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A.J.S.; Telnov, A.V.; Anulli, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M.A.; Piredda, G.; Bunger, C.; Grunberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schroder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E.O.; Wilson, F.F.; Emery, S.; de Monchenault, G.Hamel; Vasseur, G.; Y\\`, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D.J.; Bartoldus, R.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M.R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G.P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R.C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B.G.; Gabareen, A.M.; Graham, M.T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W.R.; Kelsey, M.H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M.L.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H.L.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Muller, D.R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A.A.; Schindler, R.H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M.K.; Va'vra, J.; Wagner, A.P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W.J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D.H.; Wulsin, H.W.; Yarritu, A.K.; Young, C.C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M.V.; White, R.M.; Wilson, J.R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S.J.; Bellis, M.; Benitez, J.F.; Burchat, P.R.; Miyashita, T.S.; Alam, M.S.; Ernst, J.A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D.R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S.M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J.L.; Ruland, A.M.; Schilling, C.J.; Schwitters, R.F.; Wray, B.C.; Izen, J.M.; Lou, X.C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Choi, H.H.F.; King, G.J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M.J.; Nugent, I.M.; Roney, J.M.; Sobie, R.J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T.J.; Harrison, P.F.; Latham, T.E.; Puccio, E.M.T.; Band, H.R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    We study the process e+e- -> pi+pi-pi+pi-gamma, with a photon emitted from the initial-state electron or positron, using 454.3 fb^-1 of data collected with the BABAR detector at SLAC, corresponding to approximately 260,000 signal events. We use these data to extract the non-radiative sigma(e+e- ->pi+pi-pi+pi-) cross section in the energy range from 0.6 to 4.5 Gev. The total uncertainty of the cross section measurement in the peak region is less than 3%, higher in precision than the corresponding results obtained from energy scan data.

  19. Coordinating across scales: Building a regional marsh bird monitoring program from national and state Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriver, G.W.; Sauer, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    Salt marsh breeding bird populations (rails, bitterns, sparrows, etc.) in eastern North America are high conservation priorities in need of site specific and regional monitoring designed to detect population changes over time. The present status and trends of these species are unknown but anecdotal evidence of declines in many of the species has raised conservation concerns. Most of these species are listed as conservation priorities on comprehensive wildlife plans throughout the eastern U.S. National Wildlife Refuges, National Park Service units, and other wildlife conservation areas provide important salt marsh habitat. To meet management needs for these areas, and to assist regional conservation planning, survey designs are being developed to estimate abundance and population trends for these breeding bird species. The primary purpose of this project is to develop a hierarchical sampling frame for salt marsh birds in Bird Conservation Region (BCR) 30 that will provide the ability to estimate species population abundances on 1) specific sites (i.e. National Parks and National Wildlife Refuges), 2) within states or regions, and 3) within BCR 30. The entire breeding range of Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed and Coastal Plain Swamp sparrows are within BCR 30, providing an opportunity to detect population trends within the entire breeding ranges of two priority species.

  20. Redox States of Initial Atmospheres Outgassed on Rocky Planets and Planetesimals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Laura [Arizona State University, School of Earth and Space Exploration, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Fegley, Bruce Jr., E-mail: lschaefer@asu.edu [Planetary Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2017-07-10

    The Earth and other rocky planets and planetesimals in the solar system formed through the mixing of materials from various radial locations in the solar nebula. This primordial material likely had a range of oxidation states as well as bulk compositions and volatile abundances. We investigate the oxygen fugacity produced by the outgassing of mixtures of solid meteoritic material, which approximate the primitive nebular materials. We find that the gas composition and oxygen fugacity of binary and ternary mixtures of meteoritic materials vary depending on the proportion of reduced versus oxidized material, and also find that mixtures using differentiated materials do not show the same oxygen fugacity trends as those using similarly reduced but undifferentiated materials. We also find that simply mixing the gases produced by individual meteoritic materials together does not correctly reproduce the gas composition or oxygen fugacity of the binary and ternary mixtures. We provide tabulated fits for the oxygen fugacities of all of the individual materials and binary mixtures that we investigate. These values may be useful in planetary formation models, models of volatile transport on planetesimals or meteorite parent bodies, or models of trace element partitioning during metal-silicate fractionation.

  1. Global assessments of the state of the marine environment: Contemporary initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bewers, J.M.; Boelens, R.G.V.

    1999-01-01

    A large number of assessments of regional marine areas have been conducted in recent years for a variety of purposes. Periodic reviews of the state of the marine environment have been undertaken by the United Nations Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection (GESAMP). The most recent of these global assessments was published in 1990. The international adoption of a Global Programme of Action for the Protection of the Marine Environment from Land-Based Activities in 1995 has led to additional demand for regional assessments and a global review. The regional assessments are either completed or in train largely through mechanisms associated with the UNEP Regional Seas Programme. The global assessment has been assigned to GESAMP and incorporated into its plans for the preparation of a new global review to be completed in the year 2002. The Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, (IOC) the Scientific Committee for Oceanic Research (SCOR) and the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE) are collaborating in a review of ocean science. The Global Environment Facility (GEF) recently approved funding for a 'Global International Waters Assessment' (GIWA) partly as a means of determining priorities within its International Waters Portfolio. This paper outlines the nature of, and contemporary activities within, these various assessments. (author)

  2. Librarian-initiated HIV/AIDS prevention intervention program outcome in rural communities in Oyo State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajuwon, G A; Komolafe-Opadeji, H O; Ikhizama, B

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to meet the HIV/AIDS information and service needs of citizens living in selected rural, underserved communities in Oyo State, Nigeria. This was a librarian-initiated intervention program (pre-post) study of heads of rural households in Oyo State. A questionnaire was used for pre- and post-intervention assessment. The education covered knowledge about HIV/AIDS, routes of transmission, prevention strategies, and attitude toward persons living with HIV. It increased participants' knowledge about AIDS and improved attitude toward those living with HIV. Provision and dissemination of information on HIV/AIDS through librarians to rural settlers is an important prevention strategy and librarians can make major contributions.

  3. Definition and initial validation of a Lupus Low Disease Activity State (LLDAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklyn, Kate; Lau, Chak Sing; Navarra, Sandra V; Louthrenoo, Worawit; Lateef, Aisha; Hamijoyo, Laniyati; Wahono, C Singgih; Chen, Shun Le; Jin, Ou; Morton, Susan; Hoi, Alberta; Huq, Molla; Nikpour, Mandana; Morand, Eric F

    2016-09-01

    Treating to low disease activity is routine in rheumatoid arthritis, but no comparable goal has been defined for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We sought to define and validate a Lupus Low Disease Activity State (LLDAS). A consensus definition of LLDAS was generated using Delphi and nominal group techniques. Criterion validity was determined by measuring the ability of LLDAS attainment, in a single-centre SLE cohort, to predict non-accrual of irreversible organ damage, measured using the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics Damage Index (SDI). Consensus methodology led to the following definition of LLDAS: (1) SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI)-2K ≤4, with no activity in major organ systems (renal, central nervous system (CNS), cardiopulmonary, vasculitis, fever) and no haemolytic anaemia or gastrointestinal activity; (2) no new lupus disease activity compared with the previous assessment; (3) a Safety of Estrogens in Lupus Erythematosus National Assessment (SELENA)-SLEDAI physician global assessment (scale 0-3) ≤1; (4) a current prednisolone (or equivalent) dose ≤7.5 mg daily; and (5) well tolerated standard maintenance doses of immunosuppressive drugs and approved biological agents. Achievement of LLDAS was determined in 191 patients followed for a mean of 3.9 years. Patients who spent greater than 50% of their observed time in LLDAS had significantly reduced organ damage accrual compared with patients who spent less than 50% of their time in LLDAS (p=0.0007) and were significantly less likely to have an increase in SDI of ≥1 (relative risk 0.47, 95% CI 0.28 to 0.79, p=0.005). A definition of LLDAS has been generated, and preliminary validation demonstrates its attainment to be associated with improved outcomes in SLE. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. An Analysis of Current Energy Policy Initiatives in New Mexico. What are the Potential Impacts to the State's Water Resources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klise, G. T.; Hart, W. E.; Kobos, P. H.; Malczynski, L. A.; Tidwell, V. C.

    2008-12-01

    Population in New Mexico is increasing rapidly with recent projections showing that the state will add more than 1 million people by 2035. This growth will create a demand for additional energy and water supplies that have yet to be developed. New Mexico currently exports about 50% of the energy generated within the state to neighboring states, and existing power plants predominately utilize traditional fossil fuels such as coal, oil and natural gas. Because traditional electric generation technologies utilize large quantities of water, New Mexico can also be seen as exporting water for the benefit of electricity consumed in neighboring states. As it is, both surface water and groundwater supplies are stretched thin and these internal and external stresses stemming from population growth will have a substantial impact on the state's water resources. In 2004, the Governor laid out a plan to make New Mexico a "Clean Energy State" by implementing renewable portfolio standards, developing renewable energy transmission infrastructure, creating an alternative energy innovation fund and creating state specific tax credits for renewable energy production and manufacturing. Recent work in the National Energy-Water Roadmap has pointed out that certain renewable sources of energy utilize less water than traditional power plants, and technological fixes to existing power plants will result in less water consumption. If New Mexico carries out its energy initiative, what will be the impacts to the state's water resources? Will it be possible to meet competing demands for this water? These questions and others will be analyzed in a decision-support tool that can look at the connection between both the physical and economic systems to see what the tradeoffs might be as a result of specific policy decisions. The ability to plan for future energy needs and understanding potential impacts to the state's limited water resources will be an invaluable tool for decision-makers in New

  5. 64 Percent of Asian and Pacific Islander Treatment Admissions Name Alcohol as Their Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data Spotlight May 28, 2013 64 Percent of Asian and Pacific Islander Treatment Admissions Name Alcohol as ... common problem in the United States. 1 When Asians and Pacific Islanders (APIs) go to treatment, alcohol ...

  6. Emergency department admissions are more profitable than non-emergency department admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Philip L; Lemanski, Michael; Smithline, Howard A; Tomaszewski, Andrew; Mayforth, Janice A

    2009-02-01

    We compare the contribution margin per case per hospital day of emergency department (ED) admissions with non-ED admissions in a single hospital, a 600-bed, academic, tertiary referral, Level I trauma center with an annual ED census of 100,000. This was a retrospective comparison of the contribution margin per case per day for ED and non-ED inpatient admissions for fiscal years 2003, 2004, and 2005 (October 1 through September 30). Contribution margin is defined as net revenue minus total direct costs; it is then expressed per case per hospital day. Service lines are a set of linked patient care services. Observation admissions and outpatient services are not included. Resident expenses (eg, salary and benefits) and revenue (ie, Medicare payment of indirect medical expenses and direct medical expenses) are not included. Overhead expenses are not included (eg, building maintenance, utilities, information services support, administrative services). For fiscal year 2003 through fiscal year 2005, there were 51,213 ED and 57,004 non-ED inpatient admissions. Median contribution margin per day for ED admissions was higher than for non-ED admissions: ED admissions $769 (interquartile range $265 to $1,493) and non-ED admissions $595 (interquartile range $178 to $1,274). Median contribution margin per day varied by site of admissions, by diagnosis-related group, by service line, and by insurance type. In summary, ED admissions in our institution generate a higher contribution margin per day than non-ED admissions.

  7. The Trilateral Initiative: IAEA Verification of Weapon-Origin Plutonium in the Russian Federation and the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shea, T.E.

    2015-01-01

    One year following the indefinite extension of the NPT, the IAEA, the United States and the Russian Federation entered into a cooperative effort aimed at creating a verification system under which the IAEA could accept and monitor nuclear warheads or nuclear warhead components in relation to the Article VI commitments of both States. Over a six year period, through 98 trilateral events, substantial progress was made on verification arrangements and technologies that could enable the IAEA to carry out such a mission, without gaining access to design or manufacturing secrets associated with nuclear weapons. Substantial progress was made on defining the approaches at lead facilities in the two States. The Board of Governors was looking forward to having the Agency undertake such a mission, and the 2000 NPT Review Conference called for the completion and implementation of the Trilateral Initiative. Then elections changed the leadership in both States and the incoming Administrations decided to end the effort, call it a success, and walk away. This presentation will summarize the creation, history, accomplishments, unresolved issues, consider the legacy and suggest four steps that might now be taken. (author)

  8. Confronting the categories: Equitable admissions without apartheid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I offer a critical-race-standpoint as an alternative conceptual orientation and method for transformative admissions committed to racial redress that is socially just. I conclude that admissions criteria should encompass the lived realities of inequality and be informed by a conception of humanism as critique. This requires ...

  9. Decline in adolescent treatment admissions for methamphetamine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and objectives. The purpose of this report is to describe the changing trends in adolescent treatment admissions for methamphetamine in Cape Town, and to discuss possible implications. Method. Data were collected on admissions for drug abuse treatment through a regular monitoring system involving drug ...

  10. Asians in Higher Education: Conflicts over Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoachlander, E. Gareth; Brown, Cynthia L.

    1989-01-01

    Many Asian Americans believe that the admissions policies of many selective colleges are unfair to them. Demographic trends and the resultant political activity are discussed. The admissions policies and practices that Asian Americans consider objectionable are examined and some policy options are offered. (MLW)

  11. Service philosophies for hospital admission planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adan, I.J.B.F.; Vissers, J.M.H.; Vissers, J.M.H.; Beech, R.

    2005-01-01

    The ‘traditional’ service philosophy underlying hospital admission planning has been one of optimising the use of scarce hospital resources without paying much attention to the level of service offered to patients. As patients nowadays do not accept long waiting times for hospital admission, it

  12. Lexical Profiles of Thailand University Admission Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherngchawano, Wirun; Jaturapitakkul, Natjiree

    2014-01-01

    University Admission Tests in Thailand are important documents which reflect Thailand's education system. To study at a higher education level, all students generally need to take the University Admission Tests designed by the National Institute of Educational Testing Service (NIETS). For the English test, vocabulary and reading comprehension is…

  13. Assessing academic potential for university admission: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Biographical Questionnaire (BQ) has been used in the Faculty of Humanities at the University of the Witwatersrand since the mid-80s, to identify potential to succeed at university among applicants who have not met the requirements for automatic admission. As the key instrument in a special admissions process, the

  14. Seasonal variations in hospital admissions for mania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medici, Clara Reece; Vestergaard, Claus Høstrup; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan

    2016-01-01

    in summer. Higher admission rates were associated with more sunshine, more ultraviolet radiation, higher temperature and less snow but were unassociated with rainfall. We did not find a secular trend in the seasonal pattern. Finally, neither gender nor admission status impacted on the overall seasonal...

  15. Admissions 2015 Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2015-02-02

    Feb 2, 2015 ... advertisement that will appear in Employment News dated 14th February 2015 and also our website: www.iisc.ernet.in/admissions. Online submission of application be made by accessing the IISc website www.iisc.ernet.in/admissions for all the programmes. IMPORTANT DATES. Website opening and ...

  16. Initiation of a Marinoan Snowball Earth in a state-of-the-art atmosphere-ocean general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Voigt

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the initiation of a Marinoan Snowball Earth (~635 million years before present with the state-of-the-art atmosphere-ocean general circulation model ECHAM5/MPI-OM. This is the most sophisticated model ever applied to Snowball initiation. A comparison with a pre-industrial control climate shows that the change of surface boundary conditions from present-day to Marinoan, including a shift of continents to low latitudes, induces a global-mean cooling of 4.6 K. Two thirds of this cooling can be attributed to increased planetary albedo, the remaining one third to a weaker greenhouse effect. The Marinoan Snowball Earth bifurcation point for pre-industrial atmospheric carbon dioxide is between 95.5 and 96% of the present-day total solar irradiance (TSI, whereas a previous study with the same model found that it was between 91 and 94% for present-day surface boundary conditions. A Snowball Earth for TSI set to its Marinoan value (94% of the present-day TSI is prevented by doubling carbon dioxide with respect to its pre-industrial level. A zero-dimensional energy balance model is used to predict the Snowball Earth bifurcation point from only the equilibrium global-mean ocean potential temperature for present-day TSI. We do not find stable states with sea-ice cover above 55%, and land conditions are such that glaciers could not grow with sea-ice cover of 55%. Therefore, none of our simulations qualifies as a "slushball" solution. While uncertainties in important processes and parameters such as clouds and sea-ice albedo suggest that the Snowball Earth bifurcation point differs between climate models, our results contradict previous findings that Snowball Earth initiation would require much stronger forcings.

  17. Patient participation in medication safety during an acute care admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTier, Lauren; Botti, Mari; Duke, Maxine

    2015-10-01

    Patient participation in medication management during hospitalization is thought to reduce medication errors and, following discharge, improve adherence and therapeutic use of medications. There is, however, limited understanding of how patients participate in their medication management while hospitalized. To explore patient participation in the context of medication management during a hospital admission for a cardiac surgical intervention of patients with cardiovascular disease. Single institution, case study design. The unit of analysis was a cardiothoracic ward of a major metropolitan, tertiary referral hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Multiple methods of data collection were used including pre-admission and pre-discharge patient interviews (n = 98), naturalistic observations (n = 48) and focus group interviews (n = 2). All patients had changes made to their pre-operative cardiovascular medications as a consequence of surgery. More patients were able to list and state the purpose and side-effects of their cardiovascular medications at pre-admission than prior to discharge from hospital. There was very little evidence that nurses used opportunities such as medication administration times to engage patients in medication management during hospital admission. Failure to engage patients in medication management and provide opportunities for patients to learn about changes to their medications has implications for the quality and safety of care patients receive in hospital and when managing their medications once discharged. To increase the opportunity for patients to participate in medication management, a fundamental shift in the way nurses currently provide care is required. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. [Evaluation of hospital admissions: admission guidelines implementation in a pediatric emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Manuel; Warshawsky, Sheila S; Rosen, Shirley; Barak, Nurit; Press, Joseph

    2004-10-01

    To develop and implement locally tailored pediatric admission guidelines for use in a pediatric emergency department and evaluate the appropriateness of admissions based on these guidelines. Our Study was based on the development of admission guidelines by senior physicians, using the Delphi Consensus Process, for use in the Pediatric Emergency Department (PED) at Soroka University Medical Center (Soroka). We evaluated the appropriateness of admissions to the pediatric departments of Soroka on 33 randomly selected days in 1999 and 2000 prior to guideline implementation and 30 randomly selected days in 2001, after guideline implementation. A total of 1037 files were evaluated. A rate of 12.4% inappropriate admissions to the pediatric departments was found based on locally tailored admission guidelines. There was no change in the rate of inappropriate admissions after implementation of admission guidelines in PED. Inappropriate admissions were associated with age above 3 years, hospital stay of two days or less and the season. The main reasons for evaluating an admission as inappropriate were that the admission did not comply with the guidelines and that the case could be managed in an ambulatory setting. There were distinctive differences in the characteristics of the Bedouin and Jewish populations admitted to the pediatric departments, although no difference was found in the rate of inappropriate admissions between these populations. Patient management in Soroka PED is tailored to the conditions of this medical center and to the characteristics of the population it serves. The admission guidelines developed reflect these special conditions. Lack of change in the rate of inappropriate admissions following implementation of the guidelines indicates that the guidelines reflect the physicians' approach to patient management that existed in Soroka PED prior to guideline implementation. Hospital admission guidelines have a role in the health management system; however

  19. Importance of Performance Measurement and MCH Epidemiology Leadership to Quality Improvement Initiatives at the National, State and Local Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Kristin M; Gavin, Loretta; Moran, John W; Kroelinger, Charlan D; Vladutiu, Catherine J; Goodman, David A; Sappenfield, William M

    2016-11-01

    Purpose In recognition of the importance of performance measurement and MCH epidemiology leadership to quality improvement (QI) efforts, a plenary session dedicated to this topic was presented at the 2014 CityMatCH Leadership and MCH Epidemiology Conference. This paper summarizes the session and provides two applications of performance measurement to QI in MCH. Description Performance measures addressing processes of care are ubiquitous in the current health system landscape and the MCH community is increasingly applying QI processes, such as Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles, to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of systems impacting MCH populations. QI is maximally effective when well-defined performance measures are used to monitor change. Assessment MCH epidemiologists provide leadership to QI initiatives by identifying population-based outcomes that would benefit from QI, defining and implementing performance measures, assessing and improving data quality and timeliness, reporting variability in measures throughout PDSA cycles, evaluating QI initiative impact, and translating findings to stakeholders. MCH epidemiologists can also ensure that QI initiatives are aligned with MCH priorities at the local, state and federal levels. Two examples of this work, one highlighting use of a contraceptive service performance measure and another describing QI for peripartum hemorrhage prevention, demonstrate MCH epidemiologists' contributions throughout. Challenges remain in applying QI to complex community and systems-level interventions, including those aimed at improving access to quality care. Conclusion MCH epidemiologists provide leadership to QI initiatives by ensuring they are data-informed and supportive of a common MCH agenda, thereby optimizing the potential to improve MCH outcomes.

  20. Regional, State, and Local Initiatives in Nanotechnology: Report of the National Nanotechnology Initiative Workshop, April 1-3, 2009, Oklahoma City, OK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    nanotechnology to generate more student curiosity regarding STEM topics and STEM careers, nanotechnology could also turn out to be a significant...imperative to be proactive about disposal and recycling of nanomaterials and products containing nanomaterials. These initiatives, programs, and

  1. Integrating a Patient-Controlled Admission Program Into Mental Health Hospital Service: A Multicenter Grounded Theory Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Trine; Bliksted, Vibeke Fuglsang; Mehlsen, Mimi Yung

    2018-01-01

    Patient-controlled admissions (PCAs) enable mental health patients by means of a contract to initiate an admission at a mental health hospital unit without using traditional admission procedures. This study was part of a 3-year Danish multicenter project, and we explored how mental health...... the mental health professionals strived to integrate PCA into clinical practice. The process was motivated by the idea of establishing a partnership with patients and involved two interrelated strategies to manage (a) the patient-related duties and (b) the admission contracts. The professionals moved from...

  2. Fundamental structural characteristics of planar granular assemblies: Self-organization and scaling away friction and initial state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Takashi; Blumenfeld, Raphael

    2017-03-01

    The microstructural organization of a granular system is the most important determinant of its macroscopic behavior. Here we identify the fundamental factors that determine the statistics of such microstructures, using numerical experiments to gain a general understanding. The experiments consist of preparing and compacting isotropically two-dimensional granular assemblies of polydisperse frictional disks and analyzing the emergent statistical properties of quadrons—the basic structural elements of granular solids. The focus on quadrons is because the statistics of their volumes have been found to display intriguing universal-like features [T. Matsushima and R. Blumenfeld, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 098003 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.098003]. The dependence of the structures and of the packing fraction on the intergranular friction and the initial state is analyzed, and a number of significant results are found. (i) An analytical formula is derived for the mean quadron volume in terms of three macroscopic quantities: the mean coordination number, the packing fraction, and the rattlers fraction. (ii) We derive a unique, initial-state-independent relation between the mean coordination number and the rattler-free packing fraction. The relation is supported numerically for a range of different systems. (iii) We collapse the quadron volume distributions from all systems onto one curve, and we verify that they all have an exponential tail. (iv) The nature of the quadron volume distribution is investigated by decomposition into conditional distributions of volumes given the cell order, and we find that each of these also collapses onto a single curve. (v) We find that the mean quadron volume decreases with increasing intergranular friction coefficients, an effect that is prominent in high-order cells. We argue that this phenomenon is due to an increased probability of stable irregularly shaped cells, and we test this using a herewith developed free cell analytical model

  3. Fundamental structural characteristics of planar granular assemblies: Self-organization and scaling away friction and initial state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Takashi; Blumenfeld, Raphael

    2017-03-01

    The microstructural organization of a granular system is the most important determinant of its macroscopic behavior. Here we identify the fundamental factors that determine the statistics of such microstructures, using numerical experiments to gain a general understanding. The experiments consist of preparing and compacting isotropically two-dimensional granular assemblies of polydisperse frictional disks and analyzing the emergent statistical properties of quadrons-the basic structural elements of granular solids. The focus on quadrons is because the statistics of their volumes have been found to display intriguing universal-like features [T. Matsushima and R. Blumenfeld, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 098003 (2014)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.112.098003]. The dependence of the structures and of the packing fraction on the intergranular friction and the initial state is analyzed, and a number of significant results are found. (i) An analytical formula is derived for the mean quadron volume in terms of three macroscopic quantities: the mean coordination number, the packing fraction, and the rattlers fraction. (ii) We derive a unique, initial-state-independent relation between the mean coordination number and the rattler-free packing fraction. The relation is supported numerically for a range of different systems. (iii) We collapse the quadron volume distributions from all systems onto one curve, and we verify that they all have an exponential tail. (iv) The nature of the quadron volume distribution is investigated by decomposition into conditional distributions of volumes given the cell order, and we find that each of these also collapses onto a single curve. (v) We find that the mean quadron volume decreases with increasing intergranular friction coefficients, an effect that is prominent in high-order cells. We argue that this phenomenon is due to an increased probability of stable irregularly shaped cells, and we test this using a herewith developed free cell

  4. Economic and energy impacts from participation in the regional greenhouse gas initiative: A case study of the State of Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, Matthias; Gabriel, Steven A.; Palmer, Karen L.; Burtraw, Dallas; Paul, Anthony; Chen, Yihsu; Hobbs, Benjamin F.; Irani, Daraius; Michael, Jeffrey; Ross, Kim M.; Conklin, Russell; Miller, Julia

    2008-01-01

    Tradable emissions allowance systems to reduce carbon emissions are increasingly promoted as means to mitigate climate change. This paper briefly reviews the application of such systems at the global, regional, and corporate scales. Given the recent expansion of cap-and-trade systems at the regional level, the paper concentrates on energy and economic implications at that level, using the decision of the State of Maryland, USA, to join the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative as an illustration. The paper presents the results of an analysis of the implications for technology choice, generation capacity, energy reliability, and cost to ratepayers of that decision, combining a national electricity market model with a regional model that includes market power and an economic impact model. The results suggest several issues that will be key to the acceptability and effectiveness of cap-and-trade systems for regional climate change mitigation policy, including rules for distribution of allowances and subsidies for energy efficiency programs. (author)

  5. Economic and energy impacts from participation in the regional greenhouse gas initiative: A case study of the State of Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Matthias [Center for Integrative Environmental Research, Division of Research, University of Maryland, 2101 Van Munching Hall, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Environmental Policy Program, School of Public Policy, University of Maryland, MD (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, A. James Clark School of Engineering, University of Maryland, MD (United States); Gabriel, Steven A. [Center for Integrative Environmental Research, Division of Research, University of Maryland, 2101 Van Munching Hall, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, A. James Clark School of Engineering, University of Maryland, MD (United States); Applied Mathematics and Scientific Computation Program, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, MD (United States); Palmer, Karen L.; Burtraw, Dallas; Paul, Anthony [Resources for the Future, Washington, DC (United States); Chen, Yihsu [School of Engineering, Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts, University of California, Merced, CA (United States); Hobbs, Benjamin F. [Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, MD (United States); Irani, Daraius [Regional Economic Studies Institute, Towson University, Towson, Maryland, MD (United States); Michael, Jeffrey [Eberhardt School of Business, University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA (United States); Ross, Kim M. [Center for Integrative Environmental Research, Division of Research, University of Maryland, 2101 Van Munching Hall, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Conklin, Russell; Miller, Julia [Center for Integrative Environmental Research, Division of Research, University of Maryland, 2101 Van Munching Hall, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Environmental Policy Program, School of Public Policy, University of Maryland, MD (United States)

    2008-06-15

    Tradable emissions allowance systems to reduce carbon emissions are increasingly promoted as means to mitigate climate change. This paper briefly reviews the application of such systems at the global, regional, and corporate scales. Given the recent expansion of cap-and-trade systems at the regional level, the paper concentrates on energy and economic implications at that level, using the decision of the State of Maryland, USA, to join the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative as an illustration. The paper presents the results of an analysis of the implications for technology choice, generation capacity, energy reliability, and cost to ratepayers of that decision, combining a national electricity market model with a regional model that includes market power and an economic impact model. The results suggest several issues that will be key to the acceptability and effectiveness of cap-and-trade systems for regional climate change mitigation policy, including rules for distribution of allowances and subsidies for energy efficiency programs. (author)

  6. Initial state q q g correlations as a background for the chiral magnetic effect in collision of small systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael; Skokov, Vladimir

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by understanding the background to chiral magnetic effect in proton-nucleus collisions from first principles, we compute the three particle correlation in the projectile wave function. We extract the correlations between two quarks and one gluon in the framework of the color glass condensate. This is related to the same-charge correlation of the conventional observable for the chiral magnetic effect. We show that there are two different contributions to this correlation function. One contribution is rapidity-independent and as such can be identified with the pedestal; while the other displays rather strong rapidity dependence. The pedestal contribution and the rapidity-dependent contribution at large rapidity separation between the two quarks result in the negative same charge correlations, while at small rapidity separation the second contribution changes sign. We argue that the computed initial state correlations might be partially responsible for the experimentally observed signal in proton-nucleus collisions.

  7. Accident analyses in nuclear power plants following external initiating events and in the shutdown state. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeffler, Horst; Kowalik, Michael; Mildenberger, Oliver; Hage, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The work which is documented here provides the methodological basis for improvement of the state of knowledge for accident sequences after plant external initiating events and for accident sequences which begin in the shutdown state. The analyses have been done for a PWR and for a BWR reference plant. The work has been supported by the German federal ministry BMUB under the label 3612R01361. Top objectives of the work are: - Identify relevant event sequences in order to define characteristic initial and boundary conditions - Perform accident analysis of selected sequences - Evaluate the relevance of accident sequences in a qualitative way The accident analysis is performed with the code MELCOR 1.8.6. The applied input data set has been significantly improved compared to previous analyses. The event tree method which is established in PSA level 2 has been applied for creating a structure for a unified summarization and evaluation of the results from the accident analyses. The computer code EVNTRE has been applied for this purpose. In contrast to a PSA level 2, the branching probabilities of the event tree have not been determined with the usual accuracy, but they are given in an approximate way only. For the PWR, the analyses show a considerable protective effect of the containment also in the case of beyond design events. For the BWR, there is a rather high probability for containment failure under core melt impact, but nevertheless the release of radionuclides into the environment is very limited because of plant internal retention mechanisms. This report concludes with remarks about existing knowledge gaps and with regard to core melt sequences, and about possible improvements of the plant safety.

  8. Optimal initiation of electronic excited state mediated intramolecular H-transfer in malonaldehyde by UV-laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandipati, K. R.; Singh, H.; Nagaprasad Reddy, S.; Kumar, K. A.; Mahapatra, S.

    2014-12-01

    Optimally controlled initiation of intramolecular H-transfer in malonaldehyde is accomplished by designing a sequence of ultrashort (~80 fs) down-chirped pump-dump ultra violet (UV)-laser pulses through an optically bright electronic excited [ S 2 ( π π ∗)] state as a mediator. The sequence of such laser pulses is theoretically synthesized within the framework of optimal control theory (OCT) and employing the well-known pump-dump scheme of Tannor and Rice [D.J. Tannor, S.A. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 83, 5013 (1985)]. In the OCT, the control task is framed as the maximization of cost functional defined in terms of an objective function along with the constraints on the field intensity and system dynamics. The latter is monitored by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The initial guess, laser driven dynamics and the optimized pulse structure (i.e., the spectral content and temporal profile) followed by associated mechanism involved in fulfilling the control task are examined in detail and discussed. A comparative account of the dynamical outcomes within the Condon approximation for the transition dipole moment versus its more realistic value calculated ab initio is also presented.

  9. Implementation of PWR steady state self-initialization feature into RELAP4/MOD6/U4/J3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuo

    1987-07-01

    A PWR steady state self-initialization feature has been implemented into the RELAP4/MOD6/U4/J3 code which is an improved version of RELAP4/MOD6 and can analyze not only large break but also small break LOCA in LWRs. This feature is originated from RELAP4/MOD7 which is the most updated released version of RELAP4 from INEL. Several FORTRAN subroutines in MOD7 related to this feature were transplanted into MOD6/U4/J3 with some improvements, which were the modification of method to take a balance of heat transfer between primary and secondary side at SG-U tubes, and to make it possible to nodalize secondary side of SG as multi-node. Advantages realized by implementation of this option are saving of time in initializaing a new model and an assurance of steady state and self consistency of input data in a small break LOCA analysis of a PWR. (author)

  10. ZFHX4 interacts with the NuRD core member CHD4 and regulates the glioblastoma tumor initiating cell state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, Yakov; Kim, Dohoon; Zheng, Siyuan; Whyte, Warren A.; Bansal, Mukesh; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Gopal, Shuba; Theisen, Matthew A.; Bilodeau, Steve; Thiru, Prathapan; Muffat, Julien; Yilmaz, Omer H.; Mitalipova, Maya; Woolard, Kevin; Lee, Jeongwu; Nishimura, Riko; Sakata, Nobuo; Fine, Howard A.; Carpenter, Anne E.; Silver, Serena J.; Verhaak, Roel G. W.; Califano, Andrea; Young, Richard A.; Ligon, Keith L.; Mellinghoff, Ingo K.; Root, David E.; Sabatini, David M.; Hahn, William C.; Chheda, Milan G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Glioblastomas (GBM) harbor subpopulations of therapy-resistant tumor initiating cells (TICs) that are self-renewing and multipotent. To understand the regulation of the TIC state, we performed an image-based screen for genes regulating GBM TIC maintenance and identified ZFHX4, a 397-kDa transcription factor. ZFHX4 is required to maintain TIC-associated and normal human neural precursor cell phenotypes in vitro, suggesting that ZFHX4 regulates differentiation, and its suppression increases glioma-free survival in intracranial xenografts. ZFHX4 interacts with CHD4, a core member of the NuRD (nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase) complex. ZFHX4 and CHD4 bind to overlapping sets of genomic loci and control similar gene expression programs. Using expression data derived from GBM patients, we found that ZFHX4 significantly affects CHD4-mediated gene expression perturbations, which defines ZFHX4 as a master regulator of CHD4. These observations define ZFHX4 as a regulatory factor that links the chromatin remodeling NuRD complex and the GBM TIC state. PMID:24440720

  11. Health care resource utilization before and after perampanel initiation among patients with epilepsy in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faught, Edward; Laliberté, François; Wang, Zhixiao; Barghout, Victoria; Haider, Batool; Lejeune, Dominique; Germain, Guillaume; Choi, Jiyoon; Wagh, Aneesha; Duh, Mei Sheng

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in health care resource utilization following the initiation of perampanel for the treatment of epilepsy in the United States. Health care claims from Symphony Health's Integrated Dataverse database between December 2012 and November 2015 were analyzed. Patients newly initiated on perampanel, having ≥1 epilepsy (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] code 345.xx, ICD-10-CM code G40.xxx) or nonfebrile convulsion (ICD-9-CM code 780.39, ICD-10-CM code R56.9) diagnosis, and having ≥6 months of baseline and observation periods were included. Patients <12 years old at perampanel initiation were excluded. Of the 2,508 perampanel patients included in the study, the mean [median] (±standard deviation [SD]) age was 35.8 [34] (±16.0) years and 56.2% were female. The mean [median] (±SD) observation duration was 459.8 [462] (±146.3) days in the postperampanel period. The postperampanel period was associated with significantly lower rates of all health care resource utilization outcomes than the pre-period. For the post- versus pre-period, perampanel users had 42.3 versus 53.8 overall hospitalizations per 100 person-years (rate ratio [RR] = 0.80, p < 0.001) and 1,240.2 versus 1,343.8 outpatient visits per 100 person-years (RR = 0.91, p < 0.001). Epilepsy-related hospitalizations and outpatient visits were 25.2 versus 33.6 per 100 person-years (RR = 0.76, p < 0.001) and 327.0 versus 389.0 per 100 person-years (RR = 0.84, p < 0.001), respectively. Additionally, a significantly lower rate of status epilepticus in the post-period (1.8 events per 100 person-years) was observed compared to the pre-period (4.4 events per 100 person-years; RR = 0.43, p < 0.001). The monthly time trend of hospitalizations showed an increasing trend leading up to the initiation of perampanel, after which the hospitalizations decreased steadily. Use of perampanel for the treatment of epilepsy was

  12. Marketing in Admissions: The Information System Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, O. Douglas; Timmerman, Ed

    1982-01-01

    A marketing information system approach for college admissions is outlined that includes objectives, information needs and sources, a data collection format, and information evaluation. Coordination with other institutional information systems is recommended. (MSE)

  13. Alphabetical order effects in school admissions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurajda, Štěpán; Münich, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 4 (2016), s. 483-498 ISSN 0267-1522 Institutional support: PRVOUK-P23 Keywords : admissions * alphabetical order * order effects Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.033, year: 2016

  14. Causes of Hospital Admissions in Domus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov Benthien, Kirstine; Nordly, Mie; von Heymann-Horan, Annika

    2018-01-01

    CONTEXT: Avoidable hospital admissions are important negative indicators of quality of end-of-life care. Specialized palliative care (SPC) may support patients remaining at home. OBJECTIVES: Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate if SPC at home could prevent hospital admissions...... in patients with incurable cancer. METHODS: These are secondary results of Domus: a randomized controlled trial of accelerated transition to SPC with psychological intervention at home (Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01885637). Participants were patients with incurable cancer and limited antineoplastic treatment...... significantly in overall potentially avoidable admissions. Both groups felt mostly safe about their place of care. CONCLUSION: The intervention did not prevent hospital admissions. Likely, any intervention effects were outweighed by increased identification of problems in the intervention group leading...

  15. Inappropriate Intensive Care Unit admissions: Nigerian doctors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-04

    Dec 4, 2015 ... Background: Nonclinical factors are said to influence decisions to admit patients into the ... admissions per year did not affect possible steps in the setting of a full ICU. ... hospital management, patient's family, threat of legal.

  16. Weathering the storm: nurses' satisfaction with a mobile admission nurse service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkbride, Geri; Floyd, Valerie; Tate, Cheryl; Wendler, M Cecilia

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate nurses' satisfaction with, and perceptions of, a practice innovation introducing a Mobile Admission Nurse service. Staff nurses identified that the admission process, while crucial to initiating safe and appropriate acute care, can be disruptive and interfere with care in progress. A pilot project implementing the role of a Mobile Admission Nurse was introduced to address this need. A self-developed web-based survey was administered to a convenience sample of 104 RNs who had used the services during the pilot project. Staff nurses (n = 78) reported a chaotic, demanding work environment within which the admission process disrupts the flow of care. The Mobile Admission Nurse helped them in 'weathering the storm', which was the overarching theme that emerged during data analysis. Having an admission nurse complete the admission process steadied workflow processes for nurses. Improved patient safety and increased staff and family satisfaction were also reported. The strongly positive feedback led to expansion of the service. Proactively redesigning work processes, using a structured theoretical model such as the (Plan-Do-Study-Act) PDSA approach, may improve outcomes in a chaotic practice environment. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Coerced hospital admission and symptom change--a prospective observational multi-centre study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Kallert

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Coerced admission to psychiatric hospitals, defined by legal status or patient's subjective experience, is common. Evidence on clinical outcomes however is limited. This study aimed to assess symptom change over a three month period following coerced admission and identify patient characteristics associated with outcomes. METHOD: At study sites in 11 European countries consecutive legally involuntary patients and patients with a legally voluntary admission who however felt coerced, were recruited and assessed by independent researchers within the first week after admission. Symptoms were assessed on the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. Patients were re-assessed after one and three months. RESULTS: The total sample consisted of 2326 legally coerced patients and 764 patients with a legally voluntary admission who felt coerced. Symptom levels significantly improved over time. In a multivariable analysis, higher baseline symptoms, being unemployed, living alone, repeated hospitalisation, being legally a voluntary patient but feeling coerced, and being initially less satisfied with treatment were all associated with less symptom improvement after one month and, other than initial treatment satisfaction, also after three months. The diagnostic group was not linked with outcomes. DISCUSSION: On average patients show significant but limited symptom improvements after coerced hospital admission, possibly reflecting the severity of the underlying illnesses. Social factors, but not the psychiatric diagnosis, appear important predictors of outcomes. Legally voluntary patients who feel coerced may have a poorer prognosis than legally involuntary patients and deserve attention in research and clinical practice.

  18. Competing feedbacks drive state transitions during initial catchment evolution: Examples from post-mining landscape and ecosystems evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Christoph; Wolfgang, Schaaf; Werner, Gerwin

    2014-05-01

    Within the context of severely disturbed landscapes with little or no ecological memory, such as post-mining landscapes, we propose a simple framework that explains the catchment evolution as a result of competing feedbacks influenced by the initial conditions and the atmospheric drivers such as rainfall intermittency and intensity. The first stage of the evolution is dominated by abiotic feedbacks triggered by rainfall and subsequent fluid flow causing particle mobilisation on the surface and in the subsurface leading to flow concentration or in some instances to densification of surface and subsurface substrates. Subsequently, abiotic-biotic feedbacks start to compete in the sense that biological activity generally stabilizes substrate by preventing particle mobilisation and hence contribute to converting the substrate to a habitat. We suggest that these competing feedbacks may generate alternative stable states in particular under semi-arid and arid climatic conditions, while in temperate often energy limited environments biological process "outcompete" abiotic processes leading to a stable state, in particular from the water balance point of view for comparable geomorphic situations. To illustrate this framework, we provide examples from post-mining landscapes, in which soil, water and vegetation was monitored. In case of arid regions in Australia, we provide evidence that the initial conditions of a mine waste disposal "locked" the system into a state that was limited by water and nutrient storage capacity while at the same time it was stable from a geomorphic point of view for the observation period. The cause of the system to be locked in, is the very high hydraulic conductivity of the substrate, that has not undergone any changes during the first years. In contrast to this case study, we illustrate how this framework explains the evolution of an artificial catchment (Hühnerwasser Catchment) in Lusatia (150 km southeast of Berlin, Germany). During the

  19. The lack of effects of zinc and nitric oxide in initial state of pilocarpine-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyan, Behzat; Jensen, Morten Skovgaard; Danscher, Gorm

    2007-07-01

    In this study we investigated whether intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of L-NAME (a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) or CaEDTA (an extracellular zinc chelator) or the combination of the two could affect the initial phase of pilocarpine induced (2 h) seizures. Two groups of rats were used. Animals from both groups were given with i.c.v. injections of either saline (10 microl), L-NAME (150 microg/10 microl), CaEDTA (100 mM/10 microl) or L-NAME and CaEDTA. One group received pilocarpine HCl (380 mg/kg i.p.) the other served as control. Pilocarpine HCl was injected intraperitoneally 10 min later. The behavior of the animals was observed for 2h and the intensity of their seizures was scored. The rats were then sacrificed and their brains were removed and analyzed for zinc ions by using the immersion autometallography and the TSQ fluorescence staining. All the animals which received pilocarpine HCl developed seizures. Despite treatment with L-NAME and/or CaEDTA we found that the latency and the intensity of seizures were similar in both groups investigated. The distribution of stainable zinc ions and the intensity of staining in hippocampus were not affected by pilocarpine and found unchanged after L-NAME and/or CaEDTA injections in both the control animals and the pilocarpine treated animals. The data suggest that the nitric oxide system and zinc ions do not affect pilocarpine-induced seizures in their initial state.

  20. Clinical Predictors of Intensive Care Unit Admission for Asthmatic Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hasan Kargar Maher

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionChildren with severe asthma attack are a challenging group of patients who could be difficult to treat and leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Asthma attack severity is qualitatively estimated as mild, moderate and severe attacks and respiratory failure based on conditions such as respiration status, feeling of dyspnea, and the degree of unconsciousness. part of which are subjective rather than objective. We investigated clinical findings as predictors of severe attack and probable requirement for Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU admission.Materials and MethodsIn a cross sectional and analytical study 120 patients with asthma attack were enrolled from April 2010 to April 2014 (80 admitted in the ward and 40 in pediatric intensive care unit. Predictors of PICU admission were investigated regarding to initial heart rate(HR, respiratory rate (RR, Arterial Oxygen Saturation(SaO2 and PaCo2 and clinically evident cyanosis.ResultsInitial heart rate(p-value=0.02, respiratory rate (p-value=0.03, Arterial Oxygen Saturation(p-value=0.02 and PaCo2(p-value=0.03 and clinically evident cyanosis were significantly different in two groups(Ward admitted and PICU admittedConclusion There was a significant correlation between initial vital sign and blood gas analysis suggesting usefulness of these factors as predictors of severe asthma attack and subsequent clinical course.

  1. Technical progress report. Private sector initiatives between the United States and Japan. January 1989 - December 1989; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This annual report for calendar year 1989 describes the efforts performed under the Private Sector Initiatives contract. The report also describes those efforts that have continued with private funding after being initiated under this contract

  2. Technical progress report. Private sector initiatives between the United States and Japan. January 1991 - December 1991; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This annual report for calendar year 1991 describes the efforts performed under the Private Sector Initiatives contract. The report also describes those efforts that have continued with private funding after being initiated under this contract

  3. Effect of initial-state target polarization on the single ionization of helium by 1-keV electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Shi-Yan; Ma Xiao-Yan; Li Xia; Miao Xiang-Yang; Jia Xiang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    We report new results of triple differential cross sections for the single ionization of helium by 1-KeV electron impact at the ejection energy of 10 eV. Investigations have been made for both the perpendicular plane and the plane perpendicular to the momentum transfer geometries. The present calculation is based on the three-Coulomb wave function. Here we have also incorporated the effect of target polarization in the initial state. A comparison is made between the present calculation with the results of other theoretical methods and a recent experiment [Dürr M, Dimopoulou C, Najjari B, Dorn A, Bartschat K, Bray I, Fursa D V, Chen Z, Madison D H and Ullrich J 2008 Phys. Rev. A 77 032717]. At an impact energy of 1 KeV, the target polarization is found to induce a substantial change of the cross section for the ionization process. We observe that the effect of target polarization plays a dominant role in deciding the shape of triple differential cross sections. (atomic and molecular physics)

  4. Transport processes associated with the initial elevated concentrations of Chernobyl radioactivity in surface air in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.J.; Haagenson, P.L.; Reiss, N.M.

    1989-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of radioactivity from the Chernobyl accident were encountered in the surface air over the United States along the east coast and in the north-west on 9 and 10 May 1986. The nearly simultaneous arrival of radioactive debris at widely separated locations resulted from different paths being taken by the debris released at different times during the course of the accident. Debris released during the explosion at the Chernobyl reactor was transported across the Arctic, within the lower troposphere, and zonally across Asia and the North Pacific Ocean, within the mid-troposphere. This debris descended into the planetary boundary layer along the east coast of the US. The descent was associated with a quasi-stationary cyclone located over the western North Atlantic Ocean. Debris that had a different composition of radioactivity was released from the damaged reactor during the week immediately following the initial explosion. This debris was then transported zonally across Asia and the North Pacific Ocean within the planetary boundary layer and lower troposphere and was swept into the north-western US. (author)

  5. An Investigation of the Awareness and Use of Open Access Initiative at the Federal Polytechnic, Offa, Kwara State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issa, A.O.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the information environment of lecturers in Federal Polytechnic, Offa, Kwara State, Nigeria, in relation to their information seeking behavior, extent of use of the polytechnic library, perceptions of the resources and services of the library, level of awareness and extent of use of the open access model of scholarly communications, as well as the challenges of accessing and using information resources. It adopted the survey research method, using a questionnaire for data collection, while the descriptive statistics method was used to analyse the data, using tabular presentation and simple percentages. From a population of 280 lecturers for the study, a purposive sample of 164 was drawn. The findings showed that the lecturers' information needs are focused on online use; they hardly use the polytechnic library due to their perceptions of the resources and services of the library. They are, to a greater extent, aware of open access initiatives, but do not publish in open access outlets, while various challenges affect their access and use of information resources for teaching and research. A recommendation was made, among others, that the polytechnic management should pay more critical attention to the library especially in the areas of adequate, current and comprehensive collections on all the programmes of the institution, as well as the provision of wireless internet services on the campus through a public-private partnership arrangement.

  6. GR@PPA 2.8: Initial-state jet matching for weak-boson production processes at hadron collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odaka, Shigeru; Kurihara, Yoshimasa

    2012-04-01

    The initial-state jet matching method introduced in our previous studies has been applied to the event generation of single W and Z production processes and diboson (WW, WZ and ZZ) production processes at hadron collisions in the framework of the GR@PPA event generator. The generated events reproduce the transverse momentum spectra of weak bosons continuously in the entire kinematical region. The matrix elements (ME) for hard interactions are still at the tree level. As in previous versions, the decays of weak bosons are included in the matrix elements. Therefore, spin correlations and phase-space effects in the decay of weak bosons are exact at the tree level. The program package includes custom-made parton shower programs as well as ME-based hard interaction generators in order to achieve self-consistent jet matching. The generated events can be passed to general-purpose event generators to make the simulation proceed down to the hadron level. Catalogue identifier: ADRH_v3_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADRH_v3_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 112 146 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 596 667 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran; with some included libraries coded in C and C++ Computer: All Operating system: Any UNIX-like system RAM: 1.6 Mega bytes at minimum Classification: 11.2 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADRH_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 175 (2006) 665 External routines: Bash and Perl for the setup, and CERNLIB, ROOT, LHAPDF, PYTHIA according to the user's choice. Does the new version supersede the previous version?: No, this version supports only a part of the processes included in the previous versions. Nature of problem: We

  7. 32 CFR 776.66 - Bar admission and disciplinary matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bar admission and disciplinary matters. 776.66... ADVOCATE GENERAL Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.66 Bar admission and disciplinary matters. (a) Bar admission and disciplinary matters. A covered attorney, in connection with any application for bar admission...

  8. The Pattern of Surgical Admissions in University of Nigeria Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The digestive system and genitourinary systems were the most commonly affected systems. Emergency admission accounted for 18.1% of all surgical admissions while elective admissions accounted for the rest. Conclusion: More detailed research on the pattern of admissions is important in planning and should be carried ...

  9. Structural Transition and Antibody Binding of EBOV GP and ZIKV E Proteins from Pre-Fusion to Fusion-Initiation State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lappala

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Membrane fusion proteins are responsible for viral entry into host cells—a crucial first step in viral infection. These proteins undergo large conformational changes from pre-fusion to fusion-initiation structures, and, despite differences in viral genomes and disease etiology, many fusion proteins are arranged as trimers. Structural information for both pre-fusion and fusion-initiation states is critical for understanding virus neutralization by the host immune system. In the case of Ebola virus glycoprotein (EBOV GP and Zika virus envelope protein (ZIKV E, pre-fusion state structures have been identified experimentally, but only partial structures of fusion-initiation states have been described. While the fusion-initiation structure is in an energetically unfavorable state that is difficult to solve experimentally, the existing structural information combined with computational approaches enabled the modeling of fusion-initiation state structures of both proteins. These structural models provide an improved understanding of four different neutralizing antibodies in the prevention of viral host entry.

  10. Time to inpatient rehabilitation hospital admission and functional outcomes of stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Camicia, Michelle; Terdiman, Joe; Hung, Yun-Yi; Sandel, M Elizabeth

    2011-04-01

    To study the association of time to inpatient rehabilitation hospital (IRH) admission and functional outcomes of patients who have had a stroke. A retrospective cohort study. A regional IRH. Moderately (n = 614) and severely (n = 1294) impaired patients who had a stroke who were admitted to the facility between 2002 and 2006. Not applicable. Change in total, motor, and cognitive Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scores between IRH admission and discharge. After controlling for patient demographics and initial medical conditions and functional status, shorter periods from stroke onset to IRH admission were significantly associated with greater functional gains for these patients during IRH hospitalization. Moderately impaired patients achieved a greater total FIM gain when admitted to an IRH within 21 days of stroke. Severely impaired patients showed a gradient relationship between time to IRH admission and total FIM gain, with significantly different functional gain if admitted to an IRH within 30 and 60 days after stroke diagnosis. Results of multiple regression analysis also showed that age, race/ethnicity, side of stroke, history of a previous stroke, functional measures at IRH admission, IRH length of stay, and selected medications were associated with total, motor, and cognitive FIM score changes. In addition, certain factors such as older age, diagnosis of a hemorrhagic stroke or a previous history of stroke, and initial functional status were associated with longer periods between diagnosis and admission to an IRH after the stroke occurred. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that earlier transfer to an IRH may lead to better functional improvement after stroke. However, certain factors such as age, race/ethnicity, initial medical conditions and functional status, and length of stay at an IRH contributed to functional gain. Factors affecting the time to IRH admission also were addressed. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Physical Medicine

  11. The therapeutic relationship after psychiatric admission.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Roche, Eric

    2014-03-01

    The therapeutic relationship is one of the most central and important factors in the treatment of mental health disorders. A better therapeutic relationship is associated with service engagement, medication adherence, and satisfaction with services. This study aimed to compare the demographic and clinical factors associated with the therapeutic relationship in voluntarily and involuntarily admitted psychiatric service users. We found that individuals who had been admitted involuntarily, who had a diagnosis of a psychotic disorder, and who reported higher levels of perceived pressures on admission were more likely to have a poorer therapeutic relationship with their consultant psychiatrist. Greater levels of insight and treatment satisfaction, together with higher levels of procedural justice experienced on admission, were associated with a better therapeutic relationship. We found that the level of perceived coercion on admission was not related to the therapeutic relationship. Targeted interventions to improve the therapeutic relationship, particularly for involuntarily admitted service users, are discussed.

  12. Determination of the effects of initial glucose on the production of ?-amylase from Penicillium sp. under solid-state and submerged fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Ertan (?nceo?lu), Figen; Balkan, Bilal; Yark?n, Zehra

    2014-01-01

    The effects of catabolite repression of initial glucose on the synthesis of ?-amylase from Penicillium chrysogenum and Penicillium griseofulvum were investigated under solid-state fermentation (SSF) and submerged fermentation (SmF) systems. The results obtained from either fermentation were compared with each other. In the SmF system, initial glucose concentration above 10?mg/mL completely repressed the production of ?-amylase from P. chrysogenum and P. griseofulvum. However, the repression i...

  13. Approaches to quality improvement in nursing homes: Lessons learned from the six-state pilot of CMS's Nursing Home Quality Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Kissam, Stephanie; Gifford, David; Parks, Peggy; Patry, Gail; Palmer, Laura; Wilkes, Linda; Fitzgerald, Matthew; Petrulis, Alice Stollenwerk; Barnette, Leslie

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background In November 2002, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) launched a Nursing Home Quality Initiative that included publicly reporting a set of Quality Measures for all nursing homes in the country, and providing quality improvement assistance to nursing homes nationwide. A pilot of this initiative occurred in six states for six months prior to the launch. Methods Review and analysis of the lessons learned from the six Quality Improvement Organizations (QIOs) tha...

  14. Admission levels of serum Gc-globulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiødt, F V; Bondesen, S; Petersen, I

    1996-01-01

    Gc-globulin scavenges actin released from necrotic hepatocytes to the extracellular space. In 77 patients with fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) (excluding patients treated with liver transplantation), admission levels of serum Gc-globulin and degree of complexing with monomeric actin (complex ratio...... in the same range as the KCH criteria. An advantage of Gc-globulin is that it gives an estimate of the outcome already on admission. Acute liver transplantation should be considered in FHF patients with Gc-globulin less than 100 mg/L....

  15. Admission Control Techniques for UMTS System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kejik

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Universal mobile telecommunications system (UMTS is one of the 3rd generation (3G cell phone technologies. The capacity of UMTS is interference limited. Radio resources management (RRM functions are therefore used. They are responsible for supplying optimum coverage, ensuring efficient use of physical resources, and providing the maximum planned capacity. This paper deals with admission control techniques for UMTS. An own UMTS simulation program and several versions of proposed admission control algorithms are presented in this paper. These algorithms are based on fuzzy logic and genetic algorithms. The performance of algorithms is verified via simulations.

  16. Preventable Admissions on a General Medicine Service: Prevalence, Causes and Comparison with AHRQ Prevention Quality Indicators-A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Krishna K; Vakharia, Nirav; Pile, James; Howell, Erik H; Rothberg, Michael B

    2016-06-01

    Rates of preventable admissions will soon be publicly reported and used in calculating performance-based payments. The current method of assessing preventable admissions, the Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Preventable Quality Indicators (PQI) rate, is drawn from claims data and was originally designed to assess population-level access to care. To identify the prevalence and causes of preventable admissions by attending physician review and to compare its performance with the PQI tool in identifying preventable admissions. Cross-sectional survey. General medicine service at an academic medical center. Consecutive inpatient admissions from December 1-15, 2013. Survey of inpatient attending physicians regarding the preventability of the admissions, primary contributing factors and feasibility of prevention. For the same patients, the PQI tool was applied to determine the claims-derived preventable admission rate. Physicians rated all 322 admissions and classified 122 (38 %) as preventable, of which 31 (25 %) were readmissions. Readmissions were more likely to be rated preventable than other admissions (49 % vs. 35 %, p = 0.04). Application of the AHRQ PQI methodology identified 75 (23 %) preventable admissions. Thirty-one admissions (10 %) were classified as preventable by both methods, and the majority of admissions considered preventable by the AHRQ PQI method (44/78) were not considered preventable by physician assessment (K = 0.04). Of the preventable admissions, physicians assigned patient factors in 54 (44 %), clinician factors in 36 (30 %) and system factors in 32 (26 %). A large proportion of admissions to a general medicine service appeared preventable, but AHRQ's PQI tool was unable to identify these admissions. Before initiation of the PQI rate for use in pay-for-performance programs, further study is warranted.

  17. Predicting Appropriate Admission of Bronchiolitis Patients in the Emergency Department: Rationale and Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang; Stone, Bryan L; Johnson, Michael D; Nkoy, Flory L

    2016-03-07

    In young children, bronchiolitis is the most common illness resulting in hospitalization. For children less than age 2, bronchiolitis incurs an annual total inpatient cost of $1.73 billion. Each year in the United States, 287,000 emergency department (ED) visits occur because of bronchiolitis, with a hospital admission rate of 32%-40%. Due to a lack of evidence and objective criteria for managing bronchiolitis, ED disposition decisions (hospital admission or discharge to home) are often made subjectively, resulting in significant practice variation. Studies reviewing admission need suggest that up to 29% of admissions from the ED are unnecessary. About 6% of ED discharges for bronchiolitis result in ED returns with admission. These inappropriate dispositions waste limited health care resources, increase patient and parental distress, expose patients to iatrogenic risks, and worsen outcomes. Existing clinical guidelines for bronchiolitis offer limited improvement in patient outcomes. Methodological shortcomings include that the guidelines provide no specific thresholds for ED decisions to admit or to discharge, have an insufficient level of detail, and do not account for differences in patient and illness characteristics including co-morbidities. Predictive models are frequently used to complement clinical guidelines, reduce practice variation, and improve clinicians' decision making. Used in real time, predictive models can present objective criteria supported by historical data for an individualized disease management plan and guide admission decisions. However, existing predictive models for ED patients with bronchiolitis have limitations, including low accuracy and the assumption that the actual ED disposition decision was appropriate. To date, no operational definition of appropriate admission exists. No model has been built based on appropriate admissions, which include both actual admissions that were necessary and actual ED discharges that were unsafe. The

  18. Admission to acute care hospitals for adolescent substance abuse: a national descriptive analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chisolm Deena J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of alcohol and illicit drugs by adolescents remains a problem in the U.S. Case identification and early treatment can occur within a broad variety of healthcare and non-healthcare settings, including acute care hospitals. The objective of this study is to describe the extent and nature of adolescent admissions to the acute inpatient setting for substance abuse (SA. We use the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ 2000 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids Inpatient Database (HCUP-KID which includes over 2.5 million admissions for youth age 20 and under to 2,784 hospitals in 27 states in the year 2000. Specifically, this analysis estimates national number of admissions, mean total charges, and mean lengths of stay for adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 admitted to an acute care hospital for the following diagnostic categories from the AHRQ's Clinical Classifications Software categories: "alcohol-related mental disorders" and "substance-related mental disorders". Frequency and percentage of total admissions were calculated for demographic variables of age, gender and income and for hospital characteristic variables of urban/rural designation and children's hospital designation. Results SA admissions represented 1.25 percent of adolescent admissions to acute care hospitals. Nearly 90 percent of the admission occurred in non-Children's hospitals. Most were for drug dependence (38% or non-dependent use of alcohol or drugs (35%. Costs were highest for drug dependence admissions. Nearly half of admissions had comorbid mental health diagnoses. Higher rates of admission were seen in boys, in older adolescents, and in "self-pay" patients. Alcohol and drug rehabilitation/detoxification, alone or in combination with psychological and psychiatric evaluation and therapy, was documented for 38 percent of admissions. Over 50 percent of cases had no documentation of treatment specific to substance use behavior

  19. Effect of advanced age and vital signs on admission from an ED observation unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caterino, Jeffrey M; Hoover, Emily M; Moseley, Mark G

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective was to determine the relationship between advanced age and need for admission from an emergency department (ED) observation unit. The secondary objective was to determine the relationship between initial ED vital signs and admission. We conducted a prospective, observational cohort study of ED patients placed in an ED-based observation unit. Multivariable penalized maximum likelihood logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of need for hospital admission. Age was examined continuously and at a cutoff of 65 years or more. Vital signs were examined continuously and at commonly accepted cutoffs.We additionally controlled for demographics, comorbid conditions, laboratory values, and observation protocol. Three hundred patients were enrolled, 12% (n = 35) were 65 years or older, and 11% (n = 33) required admission. Admission rates were 2.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.07%-14.9%) in older adults and 12.1% (95% CI, 8.4%-16.6%) in younger adults. In multivariable analysis, age was not associated with admission (odds ratio [OR], 0.30; 95% CI, 0.05-1.67). Predictors of admission included systolic pressure 180 mm Hg or greater (OR, 4.19; 95% CI, 1.08-16.30), log Charlson comorbidity score (OR, 2.93; 95% CI, 1.57-5.46), and white blood cell count 14,000/mm(3) or greater (OR, 11.35; 95% CI, 3.42-37.72). Among patients placed in an ED observation unit, age 65 years or more is not associated with need for admission. Older adults can successfully be discharged from these units. Systolic pressure 180 mm Hg or greater was the only predictive vital sign. In determining appropriateness of patients selected for an ED observation unit, advanced age should not be an automatic disqualifying criterion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of advanced age and vital signs on admission from an emergency department observation unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caterino, Jeffrey M.; Hoover, Emily; Moseley, Mark G.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The primary objective was to determine the relationship between advanced age and need for admission from an emergency department (ED) observation unit. The secondary objective was to determine the relationship between initial ED vital signs and admission. Methods We conducted a prospective, observational cohort study of ED patients placed in an ED-based observation unit. Multivariable penalized maximum likelihood logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of need for hospital admission. Age was examined continuously and at a cutoff of ≥65 years. Vital signs were examined continuously and at commonly accepted cutoffs. We additionally controlled for demographics, co-morbid conditions, laboratory values, and observation protocol. Results Three hundred patients were enrolled, 12% (n=35) ≥65 years old and 11% (n=33) requiring admission. Admission rates were 2.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.07-14.9%) in older adults and 12.1% (95% CI, 8.4-16.6%) in younger adults. In multivariable analysis, age was not associated with admission (odds ratio [OR] 0.30, 95% CI 0.05-1.67). Predictors of admission included: systolic pressure ≥180 mmHg (OR 4.19, 95% CI 1.08-16.30), log Charlson co-morbidity score (OR 2.93, 95% CI 1.57-5.46), and white blood cell count ≥14,000/mm3 (OR11.35, 95% CI 3.42-37.72). Conclusions Among patients placed in an ED observation unit, age ≥65 years is not associated with need for admission. Older adults can successfully be discharged from these units. Systolic pressure≥180 mmHg was the only predictive vital sign. In determining appropriateness of patients selected for an ED observation unit, advanced age should not be an automatic disqualifying criterion. PMID:22386358

  1. Effect of Medicaid disease management programs on emergency admissions and inpatient costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Matthew S

    2013-08-01

    To determine the impact of state Medicaid diabetes disease management programs on emergency admissions and inpatient costs. National InPatient Sample sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Project for the years from 2000 to 2008 using 18 states. A difference-in-difference methodology compares costs and number of emergency admissions for Washington, Texas, and Georgia, which implemented disease management programs between 2000 and 2008, to states that did not undergo the transition to managed care (N = 103). Costs and emergency admissions were extracted for diabetic Medicaid enrollees diagnosed in the reform and non-reform states and collapsed into state and year cells. In the three treatment states, the implementation of disease management programs did not have statistically significant impacts on the outcome variables when compared to the control states. States that implemented disease management programs did not achieve improvements in costs or the number of emergency of admissions; thus, these programs do not appear to be an effective way to reduce the burden of this chronic disease. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  2. Analysis of the medication reconciliation process conducted at hospital admission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Beatriz Contreras Rey

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the outcomes of a medication reconciliation process at admission in the hospital setting. To assess the role of the Pharmacist in detecting reconciliation errors and preventing any adverse events entailed. Method: A retrospective study was conducted to analyze the medication reconciliation activity during the previous six months. The study included those patients for whom an apparently not justified discrepancy was detected at admission, after comparing the hospital medication prescribed with the home treatment stated in their clinical hospital records. Those patients for whom the physician ordered the introduction of home medication without any specification were also considered. In order to conduct the reconciliation process, the Pharmacist prepared the best pharmacotherapeutical history possible, reviewing all available information about the medication the patient could be taking before admission, and completing the process with a clinical interview. The discrepancies requiring clarification were reported to the physician. It was considered that the reconciliation proposal had been accepted if the relevant modification was made in the next visit of the physician, or within 24-48 hours maximum; this case was then labeled as a reconciliation error. For the descriptive analysis, the Statistics® SPSS program, version 17.0, was used. Outcomes: 494 medications were reconciled in 220 patients, with a mean of 2.25 medications per patient. More than half of patients (59.5% had some discrepancy that required clarification; the most frequent was the omission of a medication that the patient was taking before admission (86.2%, followed by an unjustified modification in dosing or way of administration (5.9%. In total, 312 discrepancies required clarification; out of these, 93 (29.8% were accepted and considered as reconciliation errors, 126 (40% were not accepted, and in 93 cases (29,8% acceptance was not relevant due to a change in

  3. Communication dated 23 June 2009 received from the Permanent Mission of the United States of America with regard to Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism Plenary Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a communication dated 23 June 2009 from the Permanent Mission of the United States of America transmitting the 16 June 2009 message from President Barack Obama to the Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism (GICNT) Plenary Meeting held in the Hague on 16-17 June 2009. As requested in that communication, the abovementioned message is herewith circulated for the information of all Member States

  4. Alphabetical order effects in school admissions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurajda, Štěpán; Münich, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 4 (2016), s. 483-498 ISSN 0267-1522 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP402/12/G130 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : admissions * alphabetical order * order effects Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.033, year: 2016

  5. Admission predictability of children with acute asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maan Alherbish

    2018-01-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Decision of admission could be made to many children with moderate-to-severe acute asthma at the 2nd h of ED stay based on their total PAS. OS and RR should be part of any scoring system to evaluate acute asthma in children.

  6. Test-Based Admission to Selective Universities:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jens-Peter

    2016-01-01

    This article examines whether the existence of a secondary higher education admission system honouring more qualitative and extra-curricular merits has reduced the social class gap in access to highly sought-after university programmes in Denmark. I use administrative data to examine differences...

  7. Differential Prediction Generalization in College Admissions Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguinis, Herman; Culpepper, Steven A.; Pierce, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "differential prediction generalization" in the context of college admissions testing. Specifically, we assess the extent to which predicted first-year college grade point average (GPA) based on high-school grade point average (HSGPA) and SAT scores depends on a student's ethnicity and gender and whether this…

  8. Tricyclic antidepressant overdose necessitating ICU admission ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) overdose necessitating intensive care unit (ICU) admission remains a significant problem in the Western Cape. In this retrospective study, we reviewed the course of life-threatening TCA overdose in our centre to identify potential prognostic indicators. TCA levels >1 000 ng/ml were associated ...

  9. 28 CFR 54.220 - Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN...) Admissions to educational institutions prior to June 24, 1973, are not covered by these Title IX regulations... §§ 54.300 through 54.310, each administratively separate unit shall be deemed to be an educational...

  10. 43 CFR 4.1141 - Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... readily obtainable by him is insufficient to enable him to admit or deny. (d) The party who has requested... pending action only and is not an admission by him for any other purpose nor may it be used against him in...

  11. Perceptions of veterinary admissions committee members of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Veterinary admission committees are asked to create and implement a fair, reliable, and valid system to select the candidates most likely to succeed in veterinary school from a large pool of applicants. Although numerous studies have explored grade point average (GPA) as a predictive value of later academic success, ...

  12. Can advanced paramedics in the field diagnose patients and predict hospital admission?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cummins, Niamh Maria

    2013-02-13

    BACKGROUND: Accurate patient diagnosis in the prehospital environment is essential to initiate suitable care pathways. The advanced paramedic (AP) is a relatively recent role in Ireland, and refers to a prehospital practitioner with advanced life-support skills and training. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to compare the diagnostic decisions of APs with emergency medicine (EM) physicians, and to investigate if APs, as currently trained, can predict the requirement for hospital admission. METHODS: A prospective study was initiated, whereby each emergency ambulance call received via the statutory 999 system was recorded by the attending AP. The AP was asked to provide a clinical diagnosis for each patient, and to predict if hospital admission was required. The data was then cross-referenced with the working diagnosis of the receiving emergency physician and the hospital admission records. RESULTS: A total of 17 APs participated in the study, and 1369 emergency calls were recorded over a 6-month period. Cases where a general practitioner attended the scene were excluded from the concordance analysis. Concordance with the receiving emergency physician represents 70% (525\\/748) for all cases of AP diagnosis, and is mirrored with 70% (604\\/859) correct hospital admission predictions. CONCLUSIONS: AP diagnosis and admission prediction for emergency calls is similar to other emergency medical services systems despite the relative recency of the AP programme in Ireland. Recognition of non-concordance case types may identify priorities for AP education, and drive future AP practice in areas such as \\'treat and refer\\'.

  13. Retrospective Evaluation of the Short-Term Sustainability of the Locally Grown Produce Initiative of the Hunger Prevention and Nutrition Assistance Program in New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allsopp, Marie A K; Hosler, Akiko S

    2018-03-27

    The Hunger Prevention and Nutrition Assistance Program (HPNAP) is a New York State Department of Health program. The HPNAP improves nutritional quality of food available at food banks, food pantries, soup kitchens, and emergency shelters through contractual relationships to fund the purchase, delivery, storage, and service of nutritious food. To determine whether a one-time fiscal stimulus of the Locally Grown Produce Initiative to HPNAP contractors in 2012-2013 would result in a short-term sustainable increase in the proportion of dollars spent on New York State Grown (NYSG) produce. Quasi-experimental, nonequivalent control group design. We analyzed New York State Department of Health administrative data regarding expenditures on all produce and NYSG produce by HPNAP contractors. New York State. The proportion of dollars spent on NYSG produce during 2011-2012 (preintervention) and 2013-2014 (postintervention) was compared between HPNAP food bank contractors (recipients of stimulus money, n = 8) and non-food bank contractors (nonrecipients, n = 34) using nonparametric methods. The HPNAP Locally Grown Produce Initiative was associated with an increased proportion of NYSG produce spending by food bank contractors that received a fiscal stimulus 1 year later. Upstate food banks had the largest increase (median 31.6%) among all HPNAP contractors. The results of this study revealed that the Locally Grown Produce Initiative fiscal stimulus had a positive, year-long and statewide effect on the proportion of expenditure on NYSG produce by food banks. We hope that the initial success seen in New York State may encourage other states to adopt similar initiatives in future.

  14. The FDA Unapproved Drugs Initiative: An Observational Study of the Consequences for Drug Prices and Shortages in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ravi; Dhruva, Sanket S; Fox, Erin R; Ross, Joseph S

    2017-10-01

    Hundreds of drug products are currently marketed in the United States without approval from the FDA. The 2006 Unapproved Drugs Initiative (UDI) requires manufacturers to remove these drug products from the market or obtain FDA approval by demonstrating evidence of safety and efficacy. Once the FDA acts against an unapproved drug, fewer manufacturers remain in the market, potentially enabling drug price increases and greater susceptibility to drug shortages. There is a need for systematic study of the UDI's effect on prices and shortages of all targeted drugs. To examine the clinical evidence for approval and association with prices and shortages of previously unapproved prescription drugs after being addressed by the UDI. Previously unapproved prescription drugs that faced UDI regulatory action or with at least 1 product that received FDA approval through manufacturers' voluntary compliance with the UDI between 2006 and 2015 were identified. The clinical evidence was categorized as either newly conducted clinical trials or use of previously published literature and/or bioequivalence studies to demonstrate safety and efficacy. We determined the change in average wholesale price, presence of shortage, and duration of shortage for each drug during the 2 years before and after UDI regulatory action or approval through voluntary compliance. Between 2006 and 2015, 34 previously unapproved prescription drugs were addressed by the UDI. Nearly 90% of those with a drug product that received FDA approval were supported by literature reviews or bioequivalence studies, not new clinical trial evidence. Among the 26 drugs with available pricing data, average wholesale price during the 2 years before and after voluntary approval or UDI action increased by a median of 37% (interquartile range [IQR] = 23%-204%; P Innovation; from the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association to better understand medical technology evidence generation; from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to

  15. Influence of solitons in the initial state on chaos in the driven damped sine-Gordon system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, A R; Fesser, K; Lomdahl, P S; Trullinger, S E

    1983-01-01

    The appearance of chaos in the a.c. driven, damped sine-Gordon equation is studied numerically. Several transitions from periodic to chaotic behavior are investigated in detail for flat initial conditions. Spatial structures (breather, kink) in the initial conditions smooth out many of these transitions and give rise to an interesting symbiosis of time and spatial intermittency. This symbiosis appears to be due to the competition between the background tendency towards chaos and the system's preference to maintain a spatial pattern. The way that this competition is relieved is also found to depend very strongly on symmetry in the initial conditions.

  16. Unilateral initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on arms control which is generally thought of in terms of formal negotiations with an opponent, with the resulting agreements embodied in a treaty. This is not surprising, since arms control discussions between opponents are both important and politically visible. There are, however, strong reasons for countries to consider and frequently take unilateral initiatives. To do so is entirely consistent with the established major precepts of arms control which state that arms control is designed to reduce the risk of war, the costs of preparing for war, and the death and destruction if war should come. Unilateral initiatives on what weapons are purchased, which ones are eliminated and how forces are deployed can all relate to these objectives. There are two main categories of motives for unilateral initiatives in arms control. In one category, internal national objectives are the dominant, often sole, driving force; the initiative is undertaken for our own good

  17. Librarian-Initiated Publications Discovery: How Do Digital Depository Librarians Discover and Select Web-Based Government Publications for State Digital Depositories?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Shiou; Eschenfelder, Kristin R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of librarian initiated publications discovery (LIPD) in U.S. state digital depository programs using the OCLC Digital Archive to preserve web-based government publications for permanent public access. This paper describes a model of LIPD processes based on empirical investigations of four OCLC DA-based digital…

  18. L2 vs. L3 Initial State: A Comparative Study of the Acquisition of French DPs by Vietnamese Monolinguals and Cantonese-English Bilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Yan-Kit Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    This paper compares the initial state of second language acquisition (L2A) and third language acquisition (L3A) from the generative linguistics perspective. We examine the acquisition of the Determiner Phrase (DP) by two groups of beginning French learners: an L2 group (native speakers of Vietnamese who do not speak any English) and an L3 group…

  19. Evidence of the Adoption and Implementation of a Statewide Childhood Obesity Prevention Initiative in the New York State WIC Program: The "NY Fit WIC" Process Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhobo, Jackson P.; Egglefield, Katherine; Edmunds, Lynn S.; Shackman, Gene

    2012-01-01

    Process evaluations are critical in determining whether outcome evaluations are warranted. This study assessed the extent to which a childhood obesity prevention initiative, "NY Fit WIC", was adopted and implemented by the New York State Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC). Process data came from…

  20. Programs of Study as a State Policy Mandate: A Longitudinal Study of the South Carolina Personal Pathways to Success Initiative. Technical Appendix B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Cathy; Drew, Sam F.; Withington, Cairen; Griffith, Cathy; Swiger, Caroline M.; Mobley, Catherine; Sharp, Julia L.; Stringfield, Samuel C.; Stipanovic, Natalie; Daugherty, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    This Technical Appendix discusses how researchers from the National Research Center for Career and Technical Education (NRCCTE) conducted the five-year longitudinal study of South Carolina's Personal Pathway to Success initiative, which was authorized by the state's Education and Economic Development Act (EEDA) in 2005, and how they defined and…

  1. Programs of Study as a State Policy Mandate: A Longitudinal Study of the South Carolina Personal Pathways to Success Initiative. Final Technical Report: Major Findings and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Cathy; Drew, Sam F.; Withington, Cairen; Griffith, Cathy; Swiger, Caroline M.; Mobley, Catherine; Sharp, Julia L.; Stringfield, Samuel C.; Stipanovic, Natalie; Daugherty, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    This is the final technical report from the National Research Center for Career and Technical Education's (NRCCTE's) five-year longitudinal study of South Carolina's Personal Pathway to Success initiative, which was authorized by the state's Education and Economic Development Act (EEDA) in 2005. NRCCTE-affiliated researchers at the National…

  2. Whose Knowledge, Whose Values? The Contribution of Local Knowledge to Education Policy Processes: A Case Study of Research Development Initiatives in the Small State of Saint Lucia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Keith; Crossley, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This paper draws upon a case study of education in the small Caribbean state of Saint Lucia (population 154,000) to examine how local knowledge and values can influence the education policy process. It is argued that recent research development initiatives have strengthened the ability of Saint Lucia to mediate international education agendas to…

  3. Real-World Characteristics and Treatment Patterns in Patients with Urticaria Initiating Omalizumab in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xuehua; Kavati, Abhishek; Wertz, Debra; Huang, Qing; Wang, Liya; Willey, Vincent J; Stephenson, Judith J; Ortiz, Benjamin; Paknis, Brandee; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Beck, Lisa A

    2017-12-19

    Omalizumab is indicated for the management of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) in patients aged 12 years or older with persistent hives that are not adequately controlled by H1 antihistamines. While its safety and efficacy in CIU patients have been evaluated in multiple clinical trials, real-world use of omalizaumab in CIU has not been well characterized. To assess demographics, clinical characteristics, and treatment patterns of CIU patients who initiated omalizumab to better understand the usage of this agent in CIU management in the real world. This retrospective cohort study used medical and pharmacy claims data in the United States from the HealthCore Integrated Database to identify patients with CIU newly treated with omalizumab (≥ 4 omalizumab claims within 6 months of the initial claim) between March 21, 2014, and October 31, 2015 (study intake period). The index date was defined as the date of the first claim for omalizumab during the study intake period. Demographic and clinical characteristics were described for patients treated with omalizumab, as were treatment patterns associated with omalizumab and concomitant medications associated with CIU treatment. Descriptive and inferential statistics were reported. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to examine omalizumab treatment patterns. This study included 298 omalizumab-treated patients (mean [SD] age of 43.5 [13.64] years; 70.8% female); approximately 84% were seen by an allergist/immunologist. All patients had ≥ 12 months of continuous enrolment and a subset of 138 patients had ≥ 18 months of follow-up. For patients with ≥ 12 months of post-index follow-up, 12.1% (n = 36), 28.5% (n = 85), and 32.9% (n = 98) discontinued omalizumab within the 6-month, 12-month, and the entire post-index periods (mean 530 days), respectively; the mean number of days patients were continuously treated with omalizumab was 443.1 (95% CI = 425.0-461.3); the probabilities of continuous treatment (95% CI) were 0.879 (0

  4. Correlates of Initiation of Treatment for Chronic Hepatitis C Infection in United States Veterans, 2004-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi V Gundlapalli

    Full Text Available We describe the rates and predictors of initiation of treatment for chronic hepatitis C (HCV infection in a large cohort of HCV positive Veterans seen in U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA facilities between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2009. In addition, we identify the relationship between homelessness among these Veterans and treatment initiation. Univariate and multivariable Cox Proportional Hazards regression models with time-varying covariates were used to identify predictors of initiation of treatment with pegylated interferon alpha plus ribavirin. Of the 101,444 HCV treatment-naïve Veterans during the study period, rates of initiation of treatment among homeless and non-homeless Veterans with HCV were low and clinically similar (6.2% vs. 7.4%, p<0.0001. For all U.S. Veterans, being diagnosed with genotype 2 or 3, black or other/unknown race, having Medicare or other insurance increased the risk of treatment. Veterans with age ≥50 years, drug abuse, diabetes, and hemoglobin < 10 g/dL showed lower rates of treatment. Initiation of treatment for HCV in homeless Veterans is low; similar factors predicted initiation of treatment. Additionally, exposure to treatment with medications for diabetes predicted lower rates of treatment. As newer therapies become available for HCV, these results may inform further studies and guide strategies to increase treatment rates in all U.S. Veterans and those who experience homelessness.

  5. The Predictive Validity of using Admissions Testing and Multiple Mini-interviews in Undergraduate University Admissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makransky, Guido; Havmose, Philip S.; Vang, Maria Louison

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive validity of a two-step admissions procedure that included a cognitive ability test followed by multiple mini-interviews (MMI) used to assess non-cognitive skills compared to a grade-based admissions relative to subsequent drop-out rates...... and academic achievement after one and two years of study. The participants consisted of the entire population of 422 psychology students who were admitted to the University of Southern Denmark between 2010 and 2013. The results showed significantly lower drop-out rates after the first year of study, and non......-significant lower drop-out rates after the second year of study for the admission procedure that included the assessment of non-cognitive skills though the MMI. Furthermore, this admission procedure resulted in a significant lower risk of failing the final exam after the first and second year of study, compared...

  6. Local Medicaid home- and community-based services spending and nursing home admissions of younger adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kali S; Keohane, Laura; Mor, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    We used fixed-effect models to examine the relationship between local spending on home- and community-based services (HCBSs) for cash-assisted Medicaid-only disabled (CAMOD) adults and younger adult admissions to nursing homes in the United States during 2001 through 2008, with control for facility and market characteristics and secular trends. We found that increased CAMOD Medicaid HCBS spending at the local level is associated with decreased admissions of younger adults to nursing homes. Our findings suggest that states' efforts to expand HCBS for this population should continue.

  7. Effect of the final-state interaction on the initial core-hole lifetime: the case of the 4s-hole lifetime of Sn metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Masahide

    2003-01-01

    The first theoretical study of the effect of the final-state interaction on the initial core-hole lifetime is presented. The 4s-hole lifetime width of Sn metal is calculated by an ab-initio atomic many-body theory (Green's function method). When the final-state interaction in the 4p4d two-hole state, created by the 4s -1 -4p -1 4d -1 εf super Coster-Kronig (CK) transition of the initial 4s hole, is explicitly taken into account, the ab-initio atomic many-body calculation of the 4s-hole X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectrum of Sn atom can provide excellent agreement with experiment in both the 4s-hole energy and the 4s-hole lifetime width. Otherwise, the many-body calculation underestimates considerably the 4s-hole lifetime width. The 4p4d two-hole state interacts strongly with the 4d triple-hole state by the 4p -1 4d -1 -4d -3 εf super CK transition. The interaction affects greatly the initial 4s-hole lifetime width

  8. Treatment Patterns and Associated Health Care Costs Before and After Treatment Initiation Among Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Patients in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Charles D; Ozbay, A Burak; Lazarus, Howard M; Riehle, Ellen; Montejano, Leslie B; Lenhart, Gregory; White, R James

    2018-02-13

    -month post-index period with any inpatient admission decreased, 42% versus 30% (P < 0.001). In addition, PAH-related inpatient admissions decreased in the 6-month post-index period from 7% to 3% (P < 0.001). After treatment initiation, patients' nonpharmacy medical costs decreased from $48,200 (SD = $117,686) to $33,962 (SD = $90,294; P < 0.001), mainly attributable to reduced inpatient costs. However, total average medical costs including pharmacy costs remained comparable after treatment initiation (pre-index period = $51,455 vs. post-index period = $53,923; P = 0.213). This study found that while patients' PAH-related pharmacy costs increased after treatment initiation, the increase was offset by reduced inpatient utilization; therefore, total health care costs remained constant. While the majority of patients in this study were treated with monotherapy, the recently completed AMBITION study indicated that initial combination therapy with ambrisentan plus tadalafil reduced PAH-related hospitalizations compared with initial monotherapy with either of these agents. Future cost analyses of patients treated with combination therapy will be required to determine the economic effect of initial combination therapy. This study was sponsored and funded by Gilead Sciences. Ozbay is an employee of Gilead Sciences. At the time that this project and manuscript were developed, Lazarus was an employee of Gilead Sciences and may own stock/stock options. Riehle, Montejano, and Lenhart are employees of Truven Health Analytics, an IBM company, which received funding from Gilead Sciences to conduct this study. Burger and White do research with, and are paid consultants for, Gilead Sciences; they do not own equity and received no personal compensation for the work here. Burger also reports consultancy and advisory board work for Actelion Pharmaceuticals and grants from Gilead Sciences, Actelion Pharmaceuticals, Bayer, and United Therapeutics. Study concept and design were contributed by

  9. Admission Systems and Student Mobility: A Proposal for an EU-Wide Registry for University Admission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecile Hoareau McGrath

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Europe’s higher education systems are struggling to respond to the established mass demand for higher education, especially given the proportional decline in available resources per student and, more generally the demand for an ever longer education and reduction of the population of working age due to demographic decline. In addition, growing student mobility puts pressure on admission systems to set up relevant procedures for applicants who wish to enter a country. Admission systems to higher education constitute one key element in the mitigation of these challenges. Admissions can regulate student flows, and play a key role in guaranteeing the acquisition of skills in higher education by matching student profiles to their desired courses of study. This article puts European admission systems in perspective. The issue of regulation of student mobility is topical, given the broader and salient discussion on migration flows in Europe. The article uses international comparisons with systems such as the US, Australia and Japan, to provide a critical overview of the role of admission systems in an often overlooked but yet fundamental part of the European Higher Education Area, namely student mobility. The paper also argues for the creation of an information-sharing EU registry on admissions practices for mobile students.

  10. An intervention to improve care and reduce costs for high-risk patients with frequent hospital admissions: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostrowski Shannon

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A small percentage of high-risk patients accounts for a large proportion of Medicaid spending in the United States, which has become an urgent policy issue. Our objective was to pilot a novel patient-centered intervention for high-risk patients with frequent hospital admissions to determine its potential to improve care and reduce costs. Methods Community and hospital-based care management and coordination intervention with pre-post analysis of health care utilization. We enrolled Medicaid fee-for-service patients aged 18-64 who were admitted to an urban public hospital and identified as being at high risk for hospital readmission by a validated predictive algorithm. Enrolled patients were evaluated using qualitative and quantitative interview techniques to identify needs such as transportation to/advocacy during medical appointments, mental health/substance use treatment, and home visits. A community housing partner initiated housing applications in-hospital for homeless patients. Care managers facilitated appropriate discharge plans then worked closely with patients in the community using a harm reduction approach. Results Nineteen patients were enrolled; all were male, 18/19 were substance users, and 17/19 were homeless. Patients had a total of 64 inpatient admissions in the 12 months before the intervention, versus 40 in the following 12 months, a 37.5% reduction. Most patients (73.3% had fewer inpatient admissions in the year after the intervention compared to the prior year. Overall ED visits also decreased after study enrollment, while outpatient clinic visits increased. Yearly study hospital Medicaid reimbursements fell an average of $16,383 per patient. Conclusions A pilot intervention for high-cost patients shows promising results for health services usage. We are currently expanding our model to serve more patients at additional hospitals to see if the pilot's success can be replicated. Trial registration

  11. HPV vaccination initiation after the routine-recommended ages of 11–12 in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel C. Beachler

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since 2006, routine HPV vaccination has been recommended for females aged 11–12 in the US. However not much is known about the extent of and factors associated with HPV vaccination after the ages of 11–12. Methods: Provider-verified data on 8710 females aged 13–17 were analyzed from the 2013 NIS-Teen survey. 2013 Data was utilized since it was the first year one can fully evaluate the age at vaccination through age 17 for females who could receive the HPV vaccine at age 11. Results: Among HPV vaccinated females who were 17 in 2013, 47% (95% CI=43–50% received their first dose after age 12, and 24% (95% CI=21–26% received their first dose after age 14. The HPV vaccine was more likely to be initiated later than the meningococcal and Tdap vaccines (p<0.05, and later HPV vaccine initiation was more common among those having a more highly educated mother and those not receiving a check-up/well visit between the ages of 11 and 12 in adjusted analyses (p-values<0.05. Females initiating the HPV vaccine late were more likely to not receive three doses (RR=1.90, 95% CI=1.76–2.04. Conclusions: HPV vaccination is commonly initiated after the age of 12 in the US, which could limit the vaccine׳s population-level effectiveness. Keywords: HPV vaccines, Late initiation, Vaccination, NIS-Teen

  12. An audit of aerodynamic loss in a double entry turbine under full and partial admission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, Peter, E-mail: peter.newton03@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Copeland, Colin, E-mail: c.copeland@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Martinez-Botas, Ricardo, E-mail: r.botas@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Seiler, Martin, E-mail: martin.a.seiler@ch.abb.com [ABB Turbo Systems Ltd., Baden (Switzerland)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A study of the loss inside a mixed flow, double entry turbocharger turbine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both full and partial admission conditions are discussed and compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Under partial admission the rotor wheel was found to act in a fully unsteady manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inter-space region was a major area of loss generation under partial admission. - Abstract: The current study investigates the sources of loss inside a mixed flow, double entry turbocharger turbine under steady inlet conditions in both full and partial admission. Under normal on-engine operation, it is likely that both limbs in a double entry device will be fed by exhaust pulsations which are out of phase meaning that the turbine will spend most or all of the time with unbalanced flow through each limb. In the extreme case one limb will be flowing whilst the other is stagnant, this is the partial admission condition. Even under steady state inlet conditions, unequal admission is an important effect to study on the way to fully understanding pulsed operation of a double entry device. This paper presents 3D computational analyses of the flow inside a double entry turbine under both full and partial admission. The computational results are compared to experimental results of and . The distribution of loss within the turbine is evaluated for each computational condition by means of entropy production. In the full admission case the most significant area of loss was found to be in the tip region. Under the partial admission condition the flow regime is very different. In this case the rotor wheel was found to be acting in a fully unsteady manner, with the flow being unable to reach a fully developed state throughout the flowing section of the volute. The most significant area of entropy generation in the partial admission case was associated with interaction of the flows in each sector of the volute, this

  13. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  14. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1994)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  15. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2008)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  16. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2003)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  17. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  18. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  19. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1999)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  20. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1997)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  1. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2000)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  2. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  3. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  4. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1998)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  5. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2007)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  6. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1993)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  7. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1995)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  8. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1996)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  9. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  10. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1992)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  11. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2001)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  12. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  13. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  14. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  15. Admission Hyperglycemia and Clinical Outcome in Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, Susanna M.; Hiltunen, Sini; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Peters, Guusje M.; Silvis, Suzanne M.; Haapaniemi, Elena; Kruyt, Nyika D.; Putaala, Jukka; Coutinho, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Admission hyperglycemia is associated with poor clinical outcome in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Admission hyperglycemia has not been investigated in patients with cerebral venous thrombosis. Methods-Consecutive adult patients with cerebral venous thrombosis were included

  16. Multiple conformational states of DnaA protein regulate its interaction with DnaA boxes in the initiation of DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Meera J; Bhatia, Lavesh; Yilmaz, Gulden; Biswas-Fiss, Esther E; Biswas, Subhasis B

    2017-09-01

    DnaA protein is the initiator of genomic DNA replication in prokaryotes. It binds to specific DNA sequences in the origin of DNA replication and unwinds small AT-rich sequences downstream for the assembly of the replisome. The mechanism of activation of DnaA that enables it to bind and organize the origin DNA and leads to replication initiation remains unclear. In this study, we have developed double-labeled fluorescent DnaA probes to analyze conformational states of DnaA protein upon binding DNA, nucleotide, and Soj sporulation protein using Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). Our studies demonstrate that DnaA protein undergoes large conformational changes upon binding to substrates and there are multiple distinct conformational states that enable it to initiate DNA replication. DnaA protein adopted a relaxed conformation by expanding ~15Å upon binding ATP and DNA to form the ATP·DnaA·DNA complex. Hydrolysis of bound ATP to ADP led to a contraction of DnaA within the complex. The relaxed conformation of DnaA is likely required for the formation of the multi-protein ATP·DnaA·DNA complex. In the initiation of sporulation, Soj binding to DnaA prevented relaxation of its conformation. Soj·ADP appeared to block the activation of DnaA, suggesting a mechanism for Soj·ADP in switching initiation of DNA replication to sporulation. Our studies demonstrate that multiple conformational states of DnaA protein regulate its binding to DNA in the initiation of DNA replication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [Philanthropic general hospitals: a new setting for psychiatric admissions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrobla, Cristina; Botega, Neury José

    2006-12-01

    To understand the process that led Brazilian philanthropic general hospitals to implement psychiatric units and to describe the main characteristics and therapeutic approaches of these services. Ten institutions in three Brazilian states (Minas Gerais, São Paulo e Santa Catarina) were assessed in 2002. Forty-three semi-structured interviews were carried out with health professionals who worked at the hospitals to collect data on service implementation process, therapeutic approaches and current situation. The interviews were audio-recorded and their content was analyzed. There was no mental hospital in the cities where the institutions were located. In five hospitals, psychiatric patients were admitted to general medical wards because there was no psychiatric unit. The therapeutic approach in six hospitals was based on psychopharmacological treatment. Due to lack of resources and more appropriate therapeutic planning, the admission of patients presenting psychomotor agitation increases resistance against psychiatric patients in general hospitals. Financial constraints regarding laboratory testing is still a challenge. There is no exchange between local authorities and hospital administrators of these institutions that are compelled to exceed the allowed number of admissions to meet the demand of neighboring cities. The need for mental health care to local populations combined with individual requests of local authorities and psychiatrists made possible the implementation of psychiatric units in these localities. In spite of the efforts and flexibility of health professional working in these institutions, there are some obstacles to be overcome: resistance of hospital community against psychiatric admissions, financial constraints, limited professional training in mental health and the lack of a therapeutic approach that goes beyond psychopharmacological treatment alone.

  18. THE OBJECT OF THE ADMISSION OF GUILT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin NEDELCU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at studying how elements of negotiated justice specific to common law systems entered into the Romanian criminal procedural law system. It particularly deals with the admission of guilt and about one of its most controversial aspects – the object of recognition. The research concludes that what is recognized within this simplified procedure it is the deed and not its legal classification given by the criminal prosecution bodies.

  19. Perceived coercion in voluntary hospital admission.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donoghue, Brian

    2014-01-30

    The legal status of service users admitted to psychiatric wards is not synonymous with the level of coercion that they can perceive during the admission. This study aimed to identify and describe the proportion of individuals who were admitted voluntarily but experienced levels of perceived coercion comparable to those admitted involuntarily. Individuals admitted voluntarily and involuntarily to three psychiatric hospitals were interviewed using the MacArthur Admission Experience Interview and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV diagnoses. One hundered sixty-one individuals were interviewed and 22% of the voluntarily admitted service users had levels of perceived coercion similar to that of the majority of involuntarily admitted service users. Voluntarily admitted service users who experienced high levels of perceived coercion were more likely to have more severe psychotic symptoms, have experienced more negative pressures and less procedural justices on admission. Individuals brought to hospital under mental health legislation but who subsequently agreed to be admitted voluntarily and those treated on a secure ward also reported higher levels of perceived coercion. It needs to be ensured that if any service user, whether voluntary or involuntary, experiences treatment pressures or coercion that there is sufficient oversight of the practice, to ensure that individual\\'s rights are respected.

  20. Determination of the effects of initial glucose on the production of α-amylase from Penicillium sp. under solid-state and submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertan İnceoğlu, Figen; Balkan, Bilal; Yarkın, Zehra

    2014-01-02

    The effects of catabolite repression of initial glucose on the synthesis of α-amylase from Penicillium chrysogenum and Penicillium griseofulvum were investigated under solid-state fermentation (SSF) and submerged fermentation (SmF) systems. The results obtained from either fermentation were compared with each other. In the SmF system, initial glucose concentration above 10 mg/mL completely repressed the production of α-amylase from P. chrysogenum and P . griseofulvum . However, the repression in the SSF system was not complete, even when the glucose level was raised to 160 mg/g.

  1. Child-Initiated Pedagogies: Moving toward Democratically Appropriate Practices in Finland, England, Estonia, and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinos, Jarmo; Robertson, Leena; Barbour, Nancy; Pukk, Maarika

    2016-01-01

    The Convention on the Rights of the Child calls for children to be treated as human beings with a distinct set of rights, instead of as passive objects of care. They can and should be agents in their own lives. Child-initiated pedagogy recognizes this by respecting children's individual and collective views, interests, and motivations.…

  2. Discrete-Time Local Value Iteration Adaptive Dynamic Programming: Admissibility and Termination Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qinglai; Liu, Derong; Lin, Qiao

    In this paper, a novel local value iteration adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) algorithm is developed to solve infinite horizon optimal control problems for discrete-time nonlinear systems. The focuses of this paper are to study admissibility properties and the termination criteria of discrete-time local value iteration ADP algorithms. In the discrete-time local value iteration ADP algorithm, the iterative value functions and the iterative control laws are both updated in a given subset of the state space in each iteration, instead of the whole state space. For the first time, admissibility properties of iterative control laws are analyzed for the local value iteration ADP algorithm. New termination criteria are established, which terminate the iterative local ADP algorithm with an admissible approximate optimal control law. Finally, simulation results are given to illustrate the performance of the developed algorithm.In this paper, a novel local value iteration adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) algorithm is developed to solve infinite horizon optimal control problems for discrete-time nonlinear systems. The focuses of this paper are to study admissibility properties and the termination criteria of discrete-time local value iteration ADP algorithms. In the discrete-time local value iteration ADP algorithm, the iterative value functions and the iterative control laws are both updated in a given subset of the state space in each iteration, instead of the whole state space. For the first time, admissibility properties of iterative control laws are analyzed for the local value iteration ADP algorithm. New termination criteria are established, which terminate the iterative local ADP algorithm with an admissible approximate optimal control law. Finally, simulation results are given to illustrate the performance of the developed algorithm.

  3. 49 CFR 1114.3 - Admissibility of business records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Admissibility of business records. 1114.3 Section... § 1114.3 Admissibility of business records. Any writing or record, whether in the form of an entry in a... be admissible as evidence thereof if it appears that it was made in the regular course of business...

  4. Early Admissions at Selective Colleges. NBER Working Paper No. 14844

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Christopher; Levin, Jonathan D.

    2009-01-01

    Early admissions is widely used by selective colleges and universities. We identify some basic facts about early admissions policies, including the admissions advantage enjoyed by early applicants and patterns in application behavior, and propose a game-theoretic model that matches these facts. The key feature of the model is that colleges want to…

  5. Scheduling admissions and reducing variation in bed demand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, R.; Out, P.

    2011-01-01

    Variability in admissions and lengths of stay inherently leads to variability in bed occupancy. The aim of this paper is to analyse the impact of these sources of variability on the required amount of capacity and to determine admission quota for scheduled admissions to regulate the occupancy

  6. Epidemiological factors in admissions for diarrhoea in 6 - 60-month ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To describe the diarrhoea admissions and the influencing factors in 6 - 60-month-old children at Morogoro Regional Hospital. Design. A retrospective descriptive study of the type of diarrhoea, patient age, home address, nutritional status, diagnosed infection, month of admission, admission duration and outcome ...

  7. Pattern of non-communicable diseases among medical admissions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical admissions due to non-communicable diseases were carefully selected and analyzed. There were 1853 cases of various non-communicable diseases out of a total medical admission of 3294 constituting 56.2% of total medical admissions. Diseases of the cardiovascular, endocrine and renal systems were the most ...

  8. Unanticipated Admission Following Outpatient Rotator Cuff Repair: An Analysis of 18,061 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Joseph A; Durand, Wesley M; Johnson, Joey P; Goodman, Avi D; Owens, Brett D; Daniels, Alan H

    2018-05-01

    The objective of this investigation was to examine the characteristics that place patients at risk for unanticipated inpatient admission after outpatient arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. This retrospective cohort study used the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data sets from years 2012 to 2015. Patients were included in the study based on the presence of a primary Current Procedural Terminology code for rotator cuff repair (23410, 23412, 23420, and 29827). Only outpatient, nonemergent, and elective procedures performed on patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists classification of 4 or less were considered. The primary outcome variable was admission after outpatient surgery (defined as length of initial hospital stay >0). This study examined risk factors for unanticipated admission following rotator cuff repair, finding that age of 65 years or older, female sex, hypertension, body mass index of 35 kg/m 2 or greater, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification of 2 or greater, and open surgical technique were significant predictors of admission, whereas monitored anesthesia care and regional anesthesia were associated with decreased odds of admission. Identifying patients with these characteristics will be critical in risk adjusting the anticipated cost of the episode of care in outpatient rotator cuff repair. [Orthopedics. 2018; 41(3):164-168.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Exploring unplanned ICU admissions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlayen, Annemie; Verelst, Sandra; Bekkering, Geertruida E; Schrooten, Ward; Hellings, Johan; Claes, Nerée

    Adverse events are unintended patient injuries or complications that arise from healthcare management resulting in death, disability or prolonged hospital stay. Adverse events that require critical care are a considerable financial burden to the healthcare system. Medical record review seems to be a reliable method for detecting adverse events. To synthesize the best available evidence regarding the estimates of the incidence and preventability of adverse events that necessitate intensive care admission; to determine the type and consequences (patient harm, mortality, length of ICU stay and direct medical costs) of these adverse events. MEDLINE (from 1966 to present), EMBASE (from 1974 to present) and CENTRAL (version 1-2010) were searched for studies reporting on unplanned admissions to intensive care units (ICUs). Databases of reports, conference proceedings, grey literature, ongoing research, relevant patient safety organizations and two journals were searched for additional studies. Reference lists of retrieved papers were searched and authors were contacted in an attempt to find any further published or unpublished work. Only quantitative studies that used chart review for the detection of adverse events requiring intensive care admission were considered for eligibility. Studies that were published in the English, Dutch, German, French or Spanish language were included. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. 28 studies in the English language and one study in French were included. Of these, two were considered duplicate publications and therefore 27 studies were reviewed. Meta-analysis of the data was not appropriate due to statistical heterogeneity between studies; therefore, results are presented in a descriptive way. Studies were categorized according to the population and the providers of care. 1) The majority of the included studies investigated unplanned intensive care admissions after

  10. Fall related hospital admissions among seniors in Poland in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczak-Stec, Elzbieta; Goryński, Paweł

    2013-01-01

    hospitalizations (31.4%) resulted from femur fracture (14 356 hospitalizations). Women are more likely to suffer from a femur fracture. A comparison of results of research conducted, among other countries, in the United States, The Netherlands, and Denmark, as well as Polish demographic prognosis, has shown that an increase of fall related hospital admissions among senior citizens is to be expected in Poland in oncoming years.

  11. Patient Health Goals Elicited During Home Care Admission: A Categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockolow, Paulina; Radhakrishnan, Kavita; Chou, Edgar Y; Wojciechowicz, Christine

    2017-11-01

    Home care agencies are initiating "patient health goal elicitation" activities as part of home care admission planning. We categorized elicited goals and identified "clinically informative" goals at a home care agency. We examined patient goals that admitting clinicians documented in the point-of-care electronic health record; conducted content analysis on patient goal data to develop a coding scheme; grouped goal themes into codes; assigned codes to each goal; and identified goals that were in the patient voice. Of the 1,763 patient records, 16% lacked a goal; only 15 goals were in a patient's voice. Nurse and physician experts identified 12 of the 20 codes as clinically important accounting for 82% of goal occurrences. The most frequent goal documented was safety/falls (23%). Training and consistent communication of the intent and operationalization of patient goal elicitation may address the absence of patient voice and the less than universal recording of home care patients' goals.

  12. Approaches to quality improvement in nursing homes: Lessons learned from the six-state pilot of CMS's Nursing Home Quality Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmer Laura

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In November 2002, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS launched a Nursing Home Quality Initiative that included publicly reporting a set of Quality Measures for all nursing homes in the country, and providing quality improvement assistance to nursing homes nationwide. A pilot of this initiative occurred in six states for six months prior to the launch. Methods Review and analysis of the lessons learned from the six Quality Improvement Organizations (QIOs that led quality improvement efforts in nursing homes from the six pilot states. Results QIOs in the six pilot states found several key outcomes of the Nursing Home Quality Initiative that help to maximize the potential of public reporting to leverage effective improvement in nursing home quality of care. First, public reporting focuses the attention of all stakeholders in the nursing home industry on achieving good quality outcomes on a defined set of measures, and creates an incentive for partnership formation. Second, publicly reported quality measures motivate nursing home providers to improve in certain key clinical areas, and in particular to seek out new ways of changing processes of care, such as engaging physicians and the medical director more directly. Third, the lessons learned by QIOs in the pilot of this Initiative indicate that certain approaches to providing quality improvement assistance are key to guiding nursing home providers' desire and enthusiasm to improve towards a using a systematic approach to quality improvement. Conclusion The Nursing Home Quality Initiative has already demonstrated the potential of public reporting to foster collaboration and coordination among nursing home stakeholders and to heighten interest of nursing homes in quality improvement techniques. The lessons learned from this pilot project have implications for any organizations or individuals planning quality improvement projects in the nursing home setting.

  13. Environmental pollutants and stroke-related hospital admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Luiz Fernando Costa; Francisco, Juliana B; Patto, Marielle Beatriz R; Antunes, Angélica M

    2012-07-01

    Some effects of environmental pollution on human health are known, especially those affecting the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. The current study aimed to estimate these effects on the production of hospital admissions for stroke. This was an ecological study using hospital admissions data in São José dos Campos, São Paulo State, Brazil, with diagnosis of stroke, from January 1, 2007, to April 30, 2008. The target pollutants were particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, and ozone. Use of a Poisson linear regression model showed that same-day exposure to particulate matter was associated with hospitalization for stroke (RR = 1.013; 95%CI: 1.001-1.025). An increase of 10 µg/m(3) in this pollutant increased the risk of hospitalization by 12% (RR = 1.137; 95%CI: 1.014-1.276). In the multi-pollutant model, it was thus possible to identify particulate matter as associated with hospitalization for stroke in a medium-sized city like São José dos Campos.

  14. Measurement of the e(+)e(-) -> pi(+)pi(-)pi(0)pi(0) cross section using initial-state radiation at BABAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Brown, D. N.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Fritsch, M.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Vazquez, W. Panduro; Chao, D. S.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Rohrken, M.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rotondo, M.; Zallo, A.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Lacker, H. M.; Bhuyan, B.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Robertson, S. H.; Dey, B.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cheaib, R.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Posocco, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Buenger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Gruenberg, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Luitz, S.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Kowalewski, R.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Prepost, R.

    2017-01-01

    The process e+e−→π+π−2π0γ is investigated by means of the initial-state radiation technique, where a photon is emitted from the incoming electron or positron. Using 454.3  fb−1 of data collected around a center-of-mass energy of √s=10.58  GeV by the BABAR experiment at SLAC, approximately 150000

  15. Availability of Pre-Admission Information to Prospective Graduate Students in Speech-Language Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekieli Koay, Mary Ellen; Lass, Norman J.; Parrill, Madaline; Naeser, Danielle; Babin, Kelly; Bayer, Olivia; Cook, Megan; Elmore, Madeline; Frye, Rachel; Kerwood, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    An extensive Internet search was conducted to obtain pre-admission information and acceptance statistics from 260 graduate programmes in speech-language pathology accredited by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) in the United States. ASHA is the national professional, scientific and credentialing association for members and…

  16. Speaking in Tongues: Can International Graduate Students Read International Graduate Admissions Materials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Zachary W.

    2017-01-01

    A recent Educational Testing Services report (2016) found that international graduate students with a TOEFL score of 80--the minimum average TOEFL score for graduate admission in the United States--usually possess reading subscores of 20, equating to a 12th-grade reading comprehension level. However, one public flagship university's international…

  17. Institutional Planning: What Role for Directors of Student Admissions and Financial Aid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, John R.

    1976-01-01

    According to the director of Higher Education Management Services for the New York State Education Department, the offices of admissions and student financial aid have long been excluded from the institutional planning process. In an era of projected enrollment declines and increased competition, these offices need to assume a critical new role.…

  18. Perceptions of admission committee members: some aspects on individual admission to dental education at Karolinska Institutet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röding, Karin

    2005-08-01

    The aim of the study was to generate an overall impression of the admission committee's (AC) perspective on individualised admission procedures, derived from some perceived experience of the individual committee members using semi-structured interviews. Qualitative research was used and data were collected by use of interviews. The results show that the committee members are highly committed to the task and try to identify desirable, non-cognitive attributes in the applicants, such as motivation, empathy, drive, and tenacity: 'emotional intelligence'. The committee members were of the opinion that it was possible to identify these attributes in an applicant. The AC further believes that the admissions procedure influences academic achievements because students regard themselves as specially selected and therefore aspire to higher achievements.

  19. A Professional Learning Community for the New Teacher Professionalism: The Case of a State-Led Initiative in Singapore Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daphnee; Lee, Wing On

    2013-01-01

    This paper seeks to explore the empirical fit of two PLC models, using Singapore as a case. Insights emerged from documentary analyses and interviews with state-affiliated agents from the Academy of Singapore Teachers. The proposed DuFour--Fullan model, despite policy aspirations, remains largely DuFour-predominant in practice. Aspirations for a…

  20. Evaluation of a Statewide Initiative in the United States to Prevent/Reduce Sexual Harassment in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weist, Mark D.; Bryant, Yaphet U.; Dantzler, Joyce; Martin, Saran; D'Amico, Marie; Griffith, Brian; Gallun, Betsy

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify best practices in the implementation of school-based sexual violence prevention education. Design/methodology/approach: A three-phase plan was implemented to evaluate the Sexual Harassment/Assault Prevention Project (SHAPP) in one state in the USA. First, a structured review of the prevention…

  1. OMERACT/OARSI initiative to define states of severity and indication for joint replacement in hip and knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gossec, Laure; Hawker, Gillian; Davis, Aileen M

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Time to theoretical indication of joint replacement surgery has been proposed as a primary outcome for potential structure-modifying interventions for osteoarthritis (OA). The objectives of this OMERACT/OARSI Working Group were to identify pain, physical function, and structure states ...

  2. Hematologic, hepatic, renal, and lipid laboratory monitoring after initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy in the United States, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanik, Elizabeth L; Napravnik, Sonia; Ryscavage, Patrick; Eron, Joseph J; Koletar, Susan L; Moore, Richard D; Zinski, Anne; Cole, Stephen R; Hunt, Peter; Crane, Heidi M; Kahn, James; Mathews, William C; Mayer, Kenneth H; Taiwo, Babafemi O

    2013-06-01

    We assessed laboratory monitoring after combination antiretroviral therapy initiation among 3678 patients in a large US multisite clinical cohort, censoring participants at last clinic visit, combination antiretroviral therapy change, or 3 years. Median days (interquartile range) to first hematologic, hepatic, renal, and lipid tests were 30 (18-53), 31 (19-56), 33 (20-59), and 350 (96-1106), respectively. At 1 year, approximately 80% received more than 2 hematologic, hepatic, and renal tests consistent with guidelines. However, only 40% received 1 or more lipid tests. Monitoring was more frequent in specific subgroups, likely reflecting better clinic attendance or clinician perception of higher susceptibility to toxicities.

  3. Professional perspectives on systemic barriers to admission avoidance: learning from a system dynamics study of older people's admission pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Bronagh; Lattimer, Valerie; Wintrup, Julie; Brailsford, Sally

    2015-06-01

    There is debate worldwide about the best way to manage increased healthcare demand within ageing populations, particularly rising rates of unplanned and avoidable hospital admissions. To understand health and social care professionals' perspectives on barriers to admission avoidance throughout the admissions journey, in particular: the causes of avoidable admissions in older people; drivers of admission and barriers to use of admission avoidance strategies; and improvements to reduce unnecessary admissions. A qualitative framework analysis of interview data from a System dynamics (SD) modelling study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twenty health and social care professionals with experience of older people's admissions. The interviews were used to build understanding of factors facilitating or hindering admission avoidance across the admissions system. Data were analysed using framework analysis. Three overarching themes emerged: understanding the needs of the patient group; understanding the whole system; and systemwide access to expertise in care of older people. There were diverse views on the underlying reasons for avoidable admissions and recognition of the need for whole-system approaches to service redesign. Participants recommended system redesign that recognises the specific needs of older people, but there was no consensus on underlying patient needs or specific service developments. Access to expertise in management of older and frailer patients was seen as a barrier to admission avoidance throughout the system. Providing access to expertise and leadership in care of frail older people across the admissions system presents a challenge for service managers and nurse educators but is seen as a prerequisite for effective admission avoidance. System redesign to meet the needs of frail older people requires agreement on causes of avoidable admission and underlying patient needs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Implementing competency based admissions at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrigan, Noreen; Akabas, Myles H; Betzler, Thomas F; Castaldi, Maria; Kelly, Mary S; Levy, Adam S; Reichgott, Michael J; Ruberman, Louise; Dolan, Siobhan M

    2016-01-01

    The Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Einstein) was founded in 1955 during an era of limited access to medical school for women, racial minorities, and many religious and ethnic groups. Located in the Bronx, NY, Einstein seeks to educate physicians in an environment of state-of-the-art scientific inquiry while simultaneously fulfilling a deep commitment to serve its community by providing the highest quality clinical care. A founding principle of Einstein, the basis upon which Professor Einstein agreed to allow the use of his name, was that admission to the student body would be based entirely on merit. To accomplish this, Einstein has long used a 'holistic' approach to the evaluation of its applicants, actively seeking a diverse student body. More recently, in order to improve its ability to identify students with the potential to be outstanding physicians, who will both advance medical knowledge and serve the pressing health needs of a diverse community, the Committee on Admissions reexamined and restructured the requirements for admission. These have now been categorized as four 'Admissions Competencies' that an applicant must demonstrate. They include: 1) cocurricular activities and relevant experiences; 2) communication skills; 3) personal and professional development; and 4) knowledge. The purpose of this article is to describe the process that resulted in the introduction and implementation of this competency based approach to the admission process.

  5. Using Lean Management to Reduce Emergency Department Length of Stay for Medicine Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaudeen, Nazima; Vashi, Anita; Breckenridge, Julia S; Haji-Sheikhi, Farnoosh; Wagner, Sarah; Posley, Keith A; Asch, Steven M

    The practice of boarding admitted patients in the emergency department (ED) carries negative operational, clinical, and patient satisfaction consequences. Lean tools have been used to improve ED workflow. Interventions focused on reducing ED length of stay (LOS) for admitted patients are less explored. To evaluate a Lean-based initiative to reduce ED LOS for medicine admissions. Prospective quality improvement initiative performed at a single university-affiliated Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) medical center from February 2013 to February 2016. We performed a Lean-based multidisciplinary initiative beginning with a rapid process improvement workshop to evaluate current processes, identify root causes of delays, and develop countermeasures. Frontline staff developed standard work for each phase of the ED stay. Units developed a daily management system to reinforce, evaluate, and refine standard work. The primary outcome was the change in ED LOS for medicine admissions pre- and postintervention. ED LOS at the intervention site was compared with other similar VA facilities as controls over the same time period using a difference-in-differences approach. ED LOS for medicine admissions reduced 26.4%, from 8.7 to 6.4 hours. Difference-in-differences analysis showed that ED LOS for combined medicine and surgical admissions decreased from 6.7 to 6.0 hours (-0.7 hours, P = .003) at the intervention site compared with no change (5.6 hours, P = .2) at the control sites. We utilized Lean management to significantly reduce ED LOS for medicine admissions. Specifically, the development and management of standard work were key to sustaining these results.

  6. The importance of initial-final state correlations for the formation of fragments in heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gossiaux, P.B. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 44 - Nantes (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et des Technologies Associees]|[National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab., East Lansing, MI (United States); Aichelin, J. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 44 - Nantes (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et des Technologies Associees

    1997-12-31

    Using quantum molecular dynamics simulations, the formation of fragments in symmetric reactions is investigated between beam energies of E = 30 A MeV and 600 A MeV. After a comparison with existing data some observables relevant to tackle equilibration are investigated. None of our simulations gives evidence that the system passes through a state of equilibrium. The production mechanisms are also investigated. (K.A.). 35 refs.

  7. Initial Development and Testing of a State-of-the-Art Method to Quantify Hydrologic Model Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    H. Teller , and E. Teller . 1953. Equation of state calculations by fast computing machines . J Chem Phys, 21: 1087-1092. Skahill, B. E. 2012. Practice...of DE-MC sampler burn-in, a hybrid semi- automated approach was implemented, consistent with available guidance regarding practical application of...treatment of jump proposal dimensions that are out of bounds, and a hybrid, heuristic, semi- automated approach for assessing convergence of the DE-MC

  8. United States of America activities relative to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiative: Records management for deep geologic repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, P.J.

    1997-03-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted consultant and advisory meetings to prepare a Technical Document which is intended to provide guidance to all IAEA Member States (otherwise known as countries) that are currently planning, designing, constructing or operating a deep or near surface geological repository for the storage and protection of vitrified high-level radioactive waste, spent fuel waste and TRU-waste (transuranic). Eleven countries of the international community are presently in various stages of siting, designing, or constructing deep geologic repositories. Member States of the IAEA have determined that the principle safety of such completed and operation sites must not rely solely on long term institutional arrangements for the retention of information. It is believed that repository siting, design, operation and postoperation information should be gathered, managed and retained in a manner that will provide information to future societies over a very long period of time. The radionuclide life is 10,000 years thus the retention of information must outlive current societies, languages, and be continually migrated to new technology to assure retrieval. This presentation will provide an overview of the status of consideration and implementation of these issues within the United States efforts relative to deep geologic repository projects.

  9. United States of America activities relative to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiative: Records management for deep geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted consultant and advisory meetings to prepare a Technical Document which is intended to provide guidance to all IAEA Member States (otherwise known as countries) that are currently planning, designing, constructing or operating a deep or near surface geological repository for the storage and protection of vitrified high-level radioactive waste, spent fuel waste and TRU-waste (transuranic). Eleven countries of the international community are presently in various stages of siting, designing, or constructing deep geologic repositories. Member States of the IAEA have determined that the principle safety of such completed and operation sites must not rely solely on long term institutional arrangements for the retention of information. It is believed that repository siting, design, operation and postoperation information should be gathered, managed and retained in a manner that will provide information to future societies over a very long period of time. The radionuclide life is 10,000 years thus the retention of information must outlive current societies, languages, and be continually migrated to new technology to assure retrieval. This presentation will provide an overview of the status of consideration and implementation of these issues within the United States efforts relative to deep geologic repository projects

  10. All-Cause Hospital Admissions Among Older Adults After a Natural Disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Sue Anne; Abir, Mahshid; Choi, HwaJung; Cooke, Colin; Iwashyna, Theodore

    2017-08-05

    We characterize hospital admissions among older adults for any cause in the 30 days after a significant natural disaster in the United States. The main outcome was all-cause hospital admissions in the 30 days after natural disaster. Separate analyses were conducted to examine all-cause hospital admissions excluding the 72 hours after the disaster, ICU admissions, all-cause inhospital mortality, and admissions by state. A self-controlled case series analysis using the 2011 Medicare Provider and Analysis Review was conducted to examine exposure to natural disaster by elderly adults located in zip codes affected by tornadoes during the 2011 southeastern superstorm. Spatial data of tornado events were obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Severe Report database, and zip code data were obtained from the US Census Bureau. All-cause hospital admissions increased by 4% for older adults in the 30 days after the April 27, 2011, tornadoes (incidence rate ratio 1.04; 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.07). When the first 3 days after the disaster that may have been attributed to immediate injuries were excluded, hospitalizations for any cause also remained higher than when compared with the other 11 months of the year (incidence rate ratio 1.04; 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.07). There was no increase in ICU admissions or inhospital mortality associated with the natural disaster. When data were examined by individual states, Alabama, which had the highest number of persons affected, had a 9% increase in both hospitalizations and ICU admissions. When all time-invariant characteristics were controlled for, this natural disaster was associated with a significant increase in all-cause hospitalizations. This analysis quantifies acute care use after disasters through examining all-cause hospitalizations and represents an important contribution to building models of resilience-the ability to recover from a disaster-and hospital surge capacity

  11. Vaccine-Preventable Admissions to an Irish Paediatric Intensive Care

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doyle, Y

    2017-05-01

    In the Republic of Ireland, the schedule of state-funded immunisation for children is comprehensive and includes diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, pneumococcus, hepatitis B, meningococcus C, haemophilus B, polio, measles, rubella and mumps. Varicella and meningococcal B vaccines are commercially available but are not currently funded by the government. Each of the illnesses preventable by these vaccines can cause substantial morbidity, and rarely mortality, in infants and children. Our PICU continues to see serious illness due to avoidable infection. There were 39 admissions in a 4 year period, with 34 children surviving to discharge. Nine children were infected with pneumococcus, with 4 deaths. There was one case of pertussis, causing death. Most infections occurred in previously healthy children. These preventable conditions represent a significant burden on children, families, and on social and healthcare resources

  12. Admissible perturbations and false instabilities in PT -symmetric quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Znojil, Miloslav

    2018-03-01

    One of the most characteristic mathematical features of the PT -symmetric quantum mechanics is the explicit Hamiltonian dependence of its physical Hilbert space of states H =H (H ) . Some of the most important physical consequences are discussed, with emphasis on the dynamical regime in which the system is close to phase transition. Consistent perturbation treatment of such a regime is proposed. An illustrative application of the innovated perturbation theory to a non-Hermitian but PT -symmetric user-friendly family of J -parametric "discrete anharmonic" quantum Hamiltonians H =H (λ ⃗) is provided. The models are shown to admit the standard probabilistic interpretation if and only if the parameters remain compatible with the reality of the spectrum, λ ⃗∈D(physical ) . In contradiction to conventional wisdom, the systems are then shown to be stable with respect to admissible perturbations, inside the domain D(physical ), even in the immediate vicinity of the phase-transition boundaries ∂ D(physical ) .

  13. Triumph of hope over experience: learning from interventions to reduce avoidable hospital admissions identified through an Academic Health and Social Care Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhams, Victoria; de Lusignan, Simon; Mughal, Shakeel; Head, Graham; Debar, Safia; Desombre, Terry; Hilton, Sean; Al Sharifi, Houda

    2012-06-10

    Internationally health services are facing increasing demands due to new and more expensive health technologies and treatments, coupled with the needs of an ageing population. Reducing avoidable use of expensive secondary care services, especially high cost admissions where no procedure is carried out, has become a focus for the commissioners of healthcare. We set out to identify, evaluate and share learning about interventions to reduce avoidable hospital admission across a regional Academic Health and Social Care Network (AHSN). We conducted a service evaluation identifying initiatives that had taken place across the AHSN. This comprised a literature review, case studies, and two workshops. We identified three types of intervention: pre-hospital; within the emergency department (ED); and post-admission evaluation of appropriateness. Pre-hospital interventions included the use of predictive modelling tools (PARR - Patients at risk of readmission and ACG - Adjusted Clinical Groups) sometimes supported by community matrons or virtual wards. GP-advisers and outreach nurses were employed within the ED. The principal post-hoc interventions were the audit of records in primary care or the application of the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP) within the admission ward. Overall there was a shortage of independent evaluation and limited evidence that each intervention had an impact on rates of admission. Despite the frequency and cost of emergency admission there has been little independent evaluation of interventions to reduce avoidable admission. Commissioners of healthcare should consider interventions at all stages of the admission pathway, including regular audit, to ensure admission thresholds don't change.

  14. Timely initiation of breastfeeding and associated factors among mothers in Motta town, East Gojjam zone, Amhara regional state, Ethiopia, 2015: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewabe, Tilahun

    2016-10-19

    Timely initiation of breastfeeding within one hour after birth and exclusive breastfeeding is recommended for the first six months of infant life along with continuation of breastfeeding up to two years. Timely initiation of breastfeeding has the potential to prevent 22 % of neonatal deaths. The objective of this study was to assess timely initiation of breastfeeding and associated factors among mothers who have infants less than six months of age in Motta town, East Gojjam, Amhara Regional State, Ethiopia. Community based quantitative cross-sectional study was conducted from April 7, 2015 to May 7, 2015. Simple random sampling technique was applied after taking all registered mothers who have infants less than 6 months old from local health extension workers of each kebele. A total of 423 mothers with infant less than six month old were included in this study. The data was collected from all four Kebeles using interviewer administered questionnaire. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to present the data. Both bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with timely initiation breastfeeding. Prevalence of timely initiation of breastfeeding was78.8 % [95 % CL: 74.88 %, 82.72 %]. Mothers who gave birth to their infant in a health institution [AOR = 3.486(1.253, 9.700)], birthed vaginally [AOR = 5.722(3.134, 11.246)] and didn't give prelacteal food [AOR = 4.627(2.095, 10.220)] were more likely to initiate breastfeeding early than their counterparts. Prevalence of timely initiation of breastfeeding in the study area was 78.8 %. Place of delivery, mode of delivery and prelactal feeding were the independent predictors of timely initiation of breastfeeding. Recommendations to increase timely initiation of breastfeeding were: encouraging mothers to deliver their child in a health institution, minimizing caesarean delivery as much as possible and educating mothers and community as a whole

  15. Improving student-perceived benefit of academic advising within education of occupational and physical therapy in the United States: a quality improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Lisa J; Parish, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Academic advising is a key role for faculty in the educational process of health professionals; however, the best practice of effective academic advising for occupational and physical therapy students has not been identified in the current literature. The purpose of this quality improvement initiative was to assess and improve the faculty/student advisor/advisee process within occupational and physical therapy programs within a school of allied health professions in the United States in 2015. A quality improvement initiative utilizing quantitative and qualitative information was gathered via survey focused on the assessment and improvement of an advisor/advisee process. The overall initiative utilized an adaptive iterative design incorporating the plan-do-study-act model which included a three-step process over a one year time frame utilizing 2 cohorts, the first with 80 students and the second with 88 students. Baseline data were gathered prior to initiating the new process. A pilot was conducted and assessed during the first semester of the occupational and physical therapy programs. Final information was gathered after one full academic year with final comparisons made to baseline. Defining an effective advisory program with an established framework led to improved awareness and participation by students and faculty. Early initiation of the process combined with increased frequency of interaction led to improved student satisfaction. Based on student perceptions, programmatic policies were initiated to promote advisory meetings early and often to establish a positive relationship. The policies focus on academic advising as one of proactivity in which the advisor serves as a portal which the student may access leading to a more successful academic experience.

  16. Improving student-perceived benefit of academic advising within education of occupational and physical therapy in the United States: a quality improvement initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa J. Barnes

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Academic advising is a key role for faculty in the educational process of health professionals; however, the best practice of effective academic advising for occupational and physical therapy students has not been identified in the current literature. The purpose of this quality improvement initiative was to assess and improve the faculty/student advisor/advisee process within occupational and physical therapy programs within a school of allied health professions in the United States in 2015. A quality improvement initiative utilizing quantitative and qualitative information was gathered via survey focused on the assessment and improvement of an advisor/advisee process. The overall initiative utilized an adaptive iterative design incorporating the plan-do-study-act model which included a three-step process over a one year time frame utilizing 2 cohorts, the first with 80 students and the second with 88 students. Baseline data were gathered prior to initiating the new process. A pilot was conducted and assessed during the first semester of the occupational and physical therapy programs. Final information was gathered after one full academic year with final comparisons made to baseline. Defining an effective advisory program with an established framework led to improved awareness and participation by students and faculty. Early initiation of the process combined with increased frequency of interaction led to improved student satisfaction. Based on student perceptions, programmatic policies were initiated to promote advisory meetings early and often to establish a positive relationship. The policies focus on academic advising as one of proactivity in which the advisor serves as a portal which the student may access leading to a more successful academic experience.

  17. Students Selection for University Course Admission at the Joint Admissions Board (Kenya) Using Trained Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabwoba, Franklin; Mwakondo, Fullgence M.

    2011-01-01

    Every year, the Joint Admission Board (JAB) is tasked to determine those students who are expected to join various Kenyan public universities under the government sponsorship scheme. This exercise is usually extensive because of the large number of qualified students compared to the very limited number of slots at various institutions and the…

  18. Same admissions tools, different outcomes: a critical perspective on predictive validity in three undergraduate medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Daniel; Friedman, Tim; Pearce, Jacob

    2013-12-27

    Admission to medical school is one of the most highly competitive entry points in higher education. Considerable investment is made by universities to develop selection processes that aim to identify the most appropriate candidates for their medical programs. This paper explores data from three undergraduate medical schools to offer a critical perspective of predictive validity in medical admissions. This study examined 650 undergraduate medical students from three Australian universities as they progressed through the initial years of medical school (accounting for approximately 25 per cent of all commencing undergraduate medical students in Australia in 2006 and 2007). Admissions criteria (aptitude test score based on UMAT, school result and interview score) were correlated with GPA over four years of study. Standard regression of each of the three admissions variables on GPA, for each institution at each year level was also conducted. Overall, the data found positive correlations between performance in medical school, school achievement and UMAT, but not interview. However, there were substantial differences between schools, across year levels, and within sections of UMAT exposed. Despite this, each admission variable was shown to add towards explaining course performance, net of other variables. The findings suggest the strength of multiple admissions tools in predicting outcomes of medical students. However, they also highlight the large differences in outcomes achieved by different schools, thus emphasising the pitfalls of generalising results from predictive validity studies without recognising the diverse ways in which they are designed and the variation in the institutional contexts in which they are administered. The assumption that high-positive correlations are desirable (or even expected) in these studies is also problematised.

  19. Shock initiation sensitivity and Hugoniot-based equation of state of Composition B obtained using in situ electromagnetic gauging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, L L; Bartram, B D; Sheffield, S A; Gustavsen, R L; Brown, G W; Sandstrom, M M; Giambra, A M; Dattelbaum, D M; Handley, C A

    2014-01-01

    A series of gas gun-driven plate impact experiments were performed on vacuum melt-cast Composition B to obtain new Hugoniot states and shock sensitivity (run-distance-to-detonation) information. The Comp B (ρ 0 = 1.713 g/cm 3 ) consisted of 59.5% RDX, 39.5% TNT, and 1% wax, with ∼ 6.5% HMX in the RDX. The measured Hugoniot states were found to be consistent with earlier reports, with the compressibility on the shock adiabat softer than that of a 63% RDX material reported by Marsh.[4] The shock sensitivity was found to be more sensitive (shorter run distance to detonation at a given shock input condition) than earlier reports for Comp B-3 and a lower density (1.68-1.69 g/cm 3 ) Comp B formulation. The reactive flow during the shock-to-detonation transition was marked by heterogeneous, hot spot-driven growth both in and behind the leading shock front.

  20. Admission characteristics, diagnoses and outcomes of HIV-infected patients registered in an ambulatory HIV-care programme in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siika, A M; Ayuo, P O; Sidle, Mwangi J E; Wools-Kaloustian, K; Kimaiyo, S N; Tierney, W M

    2008-11-01

    To determine admissions diagnosis and outcomes of HIV-infected patients attending AMPATH ambulatory HIV-care clinics. Prospective cohort study. Academic Model for Prevention and Treatment of HIV/ AIDS (AMPATH) ambulatory HIV-care clinic in western Kenya. Between January 2005 and December 2006, 495 HIV-infected patients enrolled in AMPATH were admitted. Median age at admission was 38 years (range: 19-74), 62% females, 375 (76%) initiated cART a median 56 days (range: 1-1288) before admission. Majority (53%) had pre-admission CD4 counts 200 cells/ml. Common admissions diagnoses were: tuberculosis (27%); pneumonia (15%); meningitis (11%); diarrhoea (11%); malaria (6%); severe anaemia (4%); and toxoplasmosis (3%). Deaths occurred in 147 (30%) patients who enrolled at AMPATH a median 44 days (range: 1-711) before admission and died a median 41 days (range: 1-713) after initiating cART. Tuberculosis (27%) and meningitis (14%) were the most common diagnoses in the deceased. Median admission duration was six days (range: 1-30) for deceased patients and eight days (range: 1-44) for survivors (P=0.0024). Deceased patients enrolled in AMPATH or initiated cART more recently, had lower CD4 counts and were more frequently lost to follow-up than survivors (P<0.05 for each comparison). Initiation of cART before admission and clinic appointment adherence were independent predictors of survival. Although high mortality rate is seen in HIV-infected in-patients, those initiating cART before admission were more likely to survive.

  1. The State-of-the-Art of Collaborative Technologies for Initial Vocational Education: A Systematic Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beat A. Schwendimann

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Future workplaces require collaboration skills in which members of different work communities use technologies to solve complex problems. Vocational education and training (VET programs need to meet the challenge to prepare students to be part of a competent workforce. Particularly initial vocational education is under pressure to develop learners’ collaboration skills and abilities. To date, however, no attempt has been made to perform a comprehensive review of the use of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL technologies across different vocational education settings to account for contextual factors of VET. In this systematic review, 26 published studies were analyzed with respect to their demographics, research methodology, use of technology, and measured outcomes. This review illuminates that research on CSCL still leaves the vocational learning context as an under-represented field of study. At the same time, technologies offer a range of new types of learning possibilities for vocational education. As the direct result of that development, vocational education is increasingly taking place in new technology-enhanced learning settings. Education can benefit from the opportunities of CSCL technologies, but on the other hand, such technologies create new challenges for facilitating vocational learning. Therefore, this review also identifies three topic areas specific to vocational learning (collaborative writing-to-learn, simulations and game-like solutions, and tangible objects and enumerates desirable lines for future research.

  2. The International Thymic Malignancy Interest Group thymic initiative: a state-of-the-art study of thymic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detterbeck, Frank; Korst, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Thymic malignancies are relatively rare tumors. A general lack of knowledge, misconceptions about benignancy, confusion about the definition of terms, and variability in reporting of outcomes have further hampered progress in these diseases. The International Thymic Malignancy Interest Group has emerged to counter these challenges and has brought together a worldwide multidisciplinary community determined to improve outcomes for these patients. Although the organization is young (initiated in 2010), major early accomplishments have created a foundation and infrastructure for scientific research. These include consensus definitions of terms, an unprecedented global database, development of practical clinical resources and, together with the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, development of proposals for the first formal stage classification of these malignant tumors. Many articles have been published or are under way, and a second phase of projects building on the early success is proceeding. The greatest accomplishment of the International Thymic Malignancy Interest Group lies in the establishment of an open culture of collaboration and the engagement of a broad group of individuals united by a common mission. It is a testament to what can be achieved, despite ongoing and inherent challenges, by determination and a collective effort. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The advanced fuel cycle initiative: the future path for advanced spent fuel treatment and transmutation research in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herczeg, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) has invested over USD 100 million in transmutation research and development over the past three years. The programme has evolved from an accelerator based transmutation programme to a multi-tier reactor and accelerator based programme. These changes have resulted in a significant re-focus of the research and development programme as well as a name change to reflect the new direction. The Advanced Accelerator Application (AAA) programme is now renamed the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Research completed by the AAA programme in Fiscal Year 2002 points to a multi-phased AFCI Programme consisting of two elements that would be conducted in parallel as part of an integrated research effort: an intermediate-term technology element (AFCI Series One), which emphasises advanced technical enhancements to the current commercial nuclear power infrastructure; and a long term technology element (AFCI Series Two), which will require the introduction of next-generation nuclear energy systems to reduce the toxicity of nuclear waste. (author)

  4. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Saarland, Germany: a statewide admission prevalence screening study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Herrmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The screening of hospital admission patients for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is of undisputed value in controlling and reducing the overall MRSA burden; yet, a concerted parallel universal screening intervention throughout all hospitals of an entire German Federal State has not yet been performed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: During a four-week period, all 24 acute care hospitals of the State of Saarland participated in admission prevalence screening. Overall, 436/20,027 screened patients revealed MRSA carrier status (prevalence, 2.2/100 patients with geriatrics and intensive care departments associated with highest prevalence (7.6/100 and 6.3/100, respectively. Risk factor analysis among 17,975 admission patients yielded MRSA history (OR, 4.3; CI₉₅ 2.7-6.8, a skin condition (OR, 3.2; CI₉₅ 2.1-5.0, and/or an indwelling catheter (OR, 2.2; CI₉₅ 1.4-3.5 among the leading risks. Hierarchical risk factor ascertainment of the six risk factors associated with highest odd's ratios would require 31% of patients to be laboratory screened to allow for detection of 67% of all MRSA positive admission patients in the State. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: State-wide admission prevalence screening in conjunction with risk factor ascertainment yields important information on the distribution of the MRSA burden for hospitals, and allows for data-based decisions on local or institutional MRSA screening policies considering risk factor prevalence and expected MRSA identification rates.

  5. Fluorescent lamp recycling initiatives in the United States and a recycling proposal based on extended producer responsibility and product stewardship concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Geraldo Tr; Chang, Shoou-Yuh

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of mercury-containing lamp (MCL) recycling initiatives currently available in the world, especially in the United States. The majority of MCLs contain mercury which is a neurotoxin, a persistent pollutant in the environment, and can bioaccumulate in the food chain. Although there are some recycling options in the United States, collection rates are still at 23% of all potential used MCLs. This shows that citizens are either indifferent to or unaware of the recycling alternatives. On the other hand, MCL recycling seems not to be a cost-effective process and, for this reason, in the United States, take-back programmes are still sponsored only by consumers or municipalities. A few retailers have recently initiated limited take-back alternatives and manufacturers have not yet supported financially any consistent recycling alternative in the country. Considering successful experiences, this paper makes a suggestion for an MCL recycling system based on the concepts of extended producer responsibility and product stewardship. A manufacturer-importer advance recycling fee is proposed to finance the collection and recycling system while a MCL-energy recycling fee supported by the energy sector creates a lamp refund process. 'PRO Lamp', a producer responsibility organization, will manage the entire system through a widespread public-private agreement.

  6. Precursor States of Brain Tumor Initiating Cell Lines Are Predictive of Survival in Xenografts and Associated with Glioblastoma Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Cusulin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, brain-tumor-initiating cells (BTICs with cancer stem cell characteristics have been identified and proposed as primordial cells responsible for disease initiation, recurrence, and therapeutic resistance. However, the extent to which individual, patient-derived BTIC lines reflect the heterogeneity of GBM remains poorly understood. Here we applied a stem cell biology approach and compared self-renewal, marker expression, label retention, and asymmetric cell division in 20 BTIC lines. Through cluster analysis, we identified two subgroups of BTIC lines with distinct precursor states, stem- or progenitor-like, predictive of survival after xenograft. Moreover, stem and progenitor transcriptomic signatures were identified, which showed a strong association with the proneural and mesenchymal subtypes, respectively, in the TCGA cohort. This study proposes a different framework for the study and use of BTIC lines and provides precursor biology insights into GBM.

  7. Assistance to Oil and Gas State Agencies and Industry through Continuation of Environmental and Production Data Management and a Water Regulatory Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunewald, Ben; Arthur, Dan; Langhus, Bruce; Gillespie, Tom; Binder, Ben; Warner, Don; Roberts, Jim; Cox, D.O.

    2002-05-31

    This grant project was a major step toward completion of the Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS) project. Additionally the project addresses the needs identified during the projects initial phases. By implementing this project, the following outcomes were sought: (1) State regulatory agencies implemented more formalized environmental risk management practices as they pertain to the production of oil and gas, and injection via Class II wells. (2) Enhancement of oil and gas production by implementing a management system supporting the saving of abandoned or idle wells located in areas with a relatively low environmental risk of endangering underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) in a particular state. (3) Verification that protection of USDWs is adequate and additional restrictions of requirements are not necessary in areas with a relatively low environmental risk. (4) Standardization of data and information maintained by state regulatory agencies and decrease the regulatory cost burden on producers operating in multiple states, and (5) Development of a system for electronic data transfer among operators and state regulatory agencies and reduction of overall operator reporting burdens.

  8. The Economics of an Admissions Holding Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, Kraftin E; Martin, Richard

    2017-06-01

    With increasing attention to the actual cost of delivering care, return-on-investment calculations take on new significance. Boarded patients in the emergency department (ED) are harmful to clinical care and have significant financial opportunity costs. We hypothesize that investment in an admissions holding unit for admitted ED patients not only captures opportunity cost but also significantly lowers direct cost of care. This was a three-phase study at a busy urban teaching center with significant walkout rate. We first determined the true cost of maintaining a staffed ED bed for one patient-hour and compared it to alternative settings. The opportunity cost for patients leaving without being seen was then conservatively estimated. Lastly, a convenience sample of admitted patients boarding in the ED was observed continuously from one hour after decision-to-admit until physical departure from the ED to capture a record of every interaction with a nurse or physician. Personnel costs per patient bed-hour were $58.20 for the ED, $24.80 for an inpatient floor, $19.20 for the inpatient observation unit, and $10.40 for an admissions holding area. An eight-bed holding unit operating at practical capacity would free 57.4 hours of bed space in the ED and allow treatment of 20 additional patients. This could yield increased revenues of $27,796 per day and capture opportunity cost of $6.09 million over 219 days, in return for extra staffing costs of $218,650. Analysis of resources used for boarded patients was determined by continuous observation of a convenience sample of ED-boarded patients, which found near-zero interactions with both nursing and physicians during the boarding interval. Resource expense per ED bed-hour is more than twice that in non-critical care inpatient units. Despite the high cost of available resources, boarded non-critical patients receive virtually no nursing or physician attention. An admissions holding unit is remarkably effective in avoiding the

  9. Quality of life before surgical ICU admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelha, Fernando J; Santos, Cristina C; Barros, Henrique

    2007-11-12

    Examining the quality of life (QOL) of patients before ICU admission will allow outcome variables to be compared and analyzed in relation to it. The objective of this study was to analyze QOL of patients before admission to a surgical ICU and to study its relationship to outcome and to the baseline characteristics of the patients. All adult patients consecutively admitted to the surgical ICU between November 2004 and April 2005, who underwent non-cardiac surgery, were enrolled in this observational and prospective study. The following patient characteristics were recorded: age, gender, body mass index, ASA physical status, type and magnitude of surgical procedure, length of stay (LOS), in ICU and in hospital, mortality, Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS), history of co-morbidities and quality of life survey score (QOLSS). The relationships between QOLSS and ICU variables and outcome were evaluated. The relationship between the total QOLSS and each variable or outcome was assessed by multiple linear regression. One hundred eighty seven patients completed the study. The preadmission QOLSS of the patients studied was 4.43 +/- 4.90; 28% of patients had a normal quality of life (0 points), 38% had between 1 and 5 points (considered mild deterioration), 21% had between 6 and 10 points (moderate deterioration), 10% had between 11 and 15 points (considered major deterioration) and 3% had more than 15 points (severe limitation of quality of life). A worse preadmission QOLSS was associated with higher SAPS II scores, with older patients (age> 65 years) and with ASA physical status (ASA III/IV). Total QOLSS was significantly worse in elderly patients and in patients with co-morbidities and in patients more severely ill at ICU admission. Patients who died in the ICU and in hospital had worse QOLSS scores compared to those who survived. However, no statistical differences in QOLSS were found in relation to longer ICU stays (ICU LOS). Preadmission QOL correlates with

  10. Quality of life before surgical ICU admission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros Henrique

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Examining the quality of life (QOL of patients before ICU admission will allow outcome variables to be compared and analyzed in relation to it. The objective of this study was to analyze QOL of patients before admission to a surgical ICU and to study its relationship to outcome and to the baseline characteristics of the patients. Methods: All adult patients consecutively admitted to the surgical ICU between November 2004 and April 2005, who underwent non-cardiac surgery, were enrolled in this observational and prospective study. The following patient characteristics were recorded: age, gender, body mass index, ASA physical status, type and magnitude of surgical procedure, length of stay (LOS, in ICU and in hospital, mortality, Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS, history of co-morbidities and quality of life survey score (QOLSS. The relationships between QOLSS and ICU variables and outcome were evaluated. The relationship between the total QOLSS and each variable or outcome was assessed by multiple linear regression. Results: One hundred eighty seven patients completed the study. The preadmission QOLSS of the patients studied was 4.43 ± 4.90; 28% of patients had a normal quality of life (0 points, 38% had between 1 and 5 points (considered mild deterioration, 21% had between 6 and 10 points (moderate deterioration, 10% had between 11 and 15 points (considered major deterioration and 3% had more than 15 points (severe limitation of quality of life. A worse preadmission QOLSS was associated with higher SAPS II scores, with older patients (age> 65 years and with ASA physical status (ASA III/IV. Total QOLSS was significantly worse in elderly patients and in patients with co-morbidities and in patients more severely ill at ICU admission. Patients who died in the ICU and in hospital had worse QOLSS scores compared to those who survived. However, no statistical differences in QOLSS were found in relation to longer ICU stays

  11. The Economics of an Admissions Holding Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kraftin E. Schreyer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: With increasing attention to the actual cost of delivering care, return-on-investment calculations take on new significance. Boarded patients in the emergency department (ED are harmful to clinical care and have significant financial opportunity costs. We hypothesize that investment in an admissions holding unit for admitted ED patients not only captures opportunity cost but also significantly lowers direct cost of care. Methods: This was a three-phase study at a busy urban teaching center with significant walkout rate. We first determined the true cost of maintaining a staffed ED bed for one patient-hour and compared it to alternative settings. The opportunity cost for patients leaving without being seen was then conservatively estimated. Lastly, a convenience sample of admitted patients boarding in the ED was observed continuously from one hour after decision-to-admit until physical departure from the ED to capture a record of every interaction with a nurse or physician. Results: Personnel costs per patient bed-hour were $58.20 for the ED, $24.80 for an inpatient floor, $19.20 for the inpatient observation unit, and $10.40 for an admissions holding area. An eight-bed holding unit operating at practical capacity would free 57.4 hours of bed space in the ED and allow treatment of 20 additional patients. This could yield increased revenues of $27,796 per day and capture opportunity cost of $6.09 million over 219 days, in return for extra staffing costs of $218,650. Analysis of resources used for boarded patients was determined by continuous observation of a convenience sample of ED-boarded patients, which found near-zero interactions with both nursing and physicians during the boarding interval. Conclusion: Resource expense per ED bed-hour is more than twice that in non-critical care inpatient units. Despite the high cost of available resources, boarded non-critical patients receive virtually no nursing or physician attention. An

  12. Structure preserving transformations for Newtonian Lie-admissible equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrijn, F.

    1979-01-01

    Recently, a new formulation of non-conservative mechanics has been presented in terms of Hamilton-admissible equations which constitute a generalization of the conventional Hamilton equations. The algebraic structure entering the Hamilton-admissible description of a non-conservative system is that of a Lie-admissible algebra. The corresponding geometrical treatment is related to the existence of a so-called symplectic-admissible form. The transformation theory for Hamilton-admissible systems is currently investigated. The purpose of this paper is to describe one aspect of this theory by identifying the class of transformations which preserve the structure of Hamilton-admissible equations. Necessary and sufficient conditions are established for a transformation to be structure preserving. Some particular cases are discussed and an example is worked out

  13. Electronic coupling between photo-excited stacked bases in DNA and RNA strands with emphasis on the bright states initially populated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen (Baggesen), Lisbeth Munksgård; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2013-01-01

    . In this review paper, we focus on the bright states initially populated and discuss their nature based on information obtained from systematic absorption and circular dichroism experiments on single strands of different lengths. Our results from the last five years are compared with those from other groups......, and are discussed in the context of successive deexcitation schemes. Pieces to the puzzle have come from different experiments and theory but a complete description has yet to emerge. As such the story about DNA/RNA photophysical decay mechanisms resembles the tale about the blind men and the elephant where all see...

  14. Mortality associated with delays between clinic entry and ART initiation in resource-limited-settings: results of a transition-state model

    Science.gov (United States)

    HOFFMANN, Christopher J; LEWIS, James J; DOWDY, David W; FIELDING, Katherine L; GRANT, Alison D; MARTINSON, Neil A; CHURCHYARD, Gavin J; CHAISSON, Richard E

    2013-01-01

    Objective Estimate the mortality impact of delay in antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation from the time of entry-into-care. Design A state-transition Markov process model. This technique allows for assessing mortality before and after ART initiation associated with delays in ART initiation among a general population of ART eligible patients without conducting a randomized trial. Methods We used patient-level data from three South African cohorts to determine transition probabilities for pre-ART CD4 count changes and pre-ART and on-ART mortality. For each parameter we generated probabilities and distributions for Monte Carlo simulations with one week cycles to estimate mortality 52 weeks from clinic entry. Results We estimated an increase in mortality from 11.0% to 14.7% (relative increase of 34%) with a 10 week delay in ART for patients entering care with our pre-ART cohort CD4 distribution. When we examined low CD4 ranges, the relative increase in mortality delays remained similar; however, the absolute increase in mortality rose. For example, among patients entering with CD4 count 50–99 cells/mm3, 12 month mortality increased from 13.3% with no delay compared to 17.0% with a 10 week delay and 22.9% with a 6 month delay. Conclusions Delays in ART initiation, common in routine HIV programs, can lead to important increases in mortality. Prompt ART initiation for patients entering clinical care and eligible for ART, especially those with lower CD4 counts, could be a relatively low cost approach with a potential marked impact on mortality. PMID:23392457

  15. Mortality associated with delays between clinic entry and ART initiation in resource-limited settings: results of a transition-state model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Christopher J; Lewis, James J; Dowdy, David W; Fielding, Katherine L; Grant, Alison D; Martinson, Neil A; Churchyard, Gavin J; Chaisson, Richard E

    2013-05-01

    To estimate the mortality impact of delay in antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation from the time of entry into care. A state-transition Markov process model. This technique allows for assessing mortality before and after ART initiation associated with delays in ART initiation among a general population of ART-eligible patients without conducting a randomized trial. We used patient-level data from 3 South African cohorts to determine transition probabilities for pre-ART CD4 count changes and pre-ART and on-ART mortality. For each parameter, we generated probabilities and distributions for Monte Carlo simulations with 1-week cycles to estimate mortality 52 weeks from clinic entry. We estimated an increase in mortality from 11.0% to 14.7% (relative increase of 34%) with a 10-week delay in ART for patients entering care with our pre-ART cohort CD4 distribution. When we examined low CD4 ranges, the relative increase in mortality delays remained similar; however, the absolute increase in mortality rose. For example, among patients entering with CD4 count 50-99 cells per cubic millimeter, 12-month mortality increased from 13.3% with no delay compared with 17.0% with a 10-week delay and 22.9% with a 6-month delay. Delays in ART initiation, common in routine HIV programs, can lead to important increases in mortality. Prompt ART initiation for patients entering clinical care and eligible for ART, especially those with lower CD4 counts, could be a relatively low-cost approach with a potential marked impact on mortality.

  16. Effect of the Smoke-Free Illinois Act on casino admissions and revenue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauras, John A; Chaloupka, Frank J; Moor, Gregg; Henderson, Patricia Nez; Leischow, Scott J

    2018-01-19

    As part of the Smoke-Free Illinois Act, smoking on the gambling floors of all commercial casinos in Illinois became prohibited. This study examined the effects of the Smoke-Free Illinois Act on casino admissions per-capita and real per-capita adjusted gross receipts using 18 years of data (10 years before and 8 years after the Illinois law went into effect). We employed a difference-in-difference regression technique using monthly data for the states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa and Missouri and control for numerous determinants expected to affect casino admissions and revenue. The Smoke-free Illinois Act was found not to be a statistically significant determinant of per-capita casino admissions and of real per-capita gross adjusted receipts in all the models we estimated. The estimates from this study clearly indicated that the Illinois law that banned smoking in casinos has had no significant negative economic consequences for casinos in terms of per-capita admissions or revenues. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Admission criteria and diversity in medical school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Neill, Lotte; Vonsild, Maria; Wallstedt, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    on other attributes. To explore the social mix of the two tracks, we obtained information on social indices associated with educational attainment in Denmark (ethnic origin, father’s education, mother’s education, parenthood, parents live together, parent on benefit). Result: Selection strategy (grade......Introduction: The underrepresentation of students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds in medical education is an important social issue. There is currently little evidence about whether changes in admission strategy could increase the diversity of medical students. Denmark introduced an “attribute...... of students admitted via the two tracks between the years 2002-2007. Method: This prospective cohort study included 1074 medical students admitted between the years 2002-2007 to the University of Southern Denmark (USD) medical school. Of these, 454 were admitted by grade-based selection and 620 were selected...

  18. Recurrent Admissions for Diabetic Foot Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ang CL

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot complications are a significant source of morbidity and mortality. Patients who undergo recurrent admissions for the same diabetic foot problems represent a difficult subgroup to treat. From July 2007 to June 2008, there were 38 such patients who were admitted recurrently. Eighteen patients (47% were re-admitted because of previous refusal of surgical treatment. Eighteen patients (47% received treatment as necessary but were still readmitted for recurrent infection at the same wound site. Assessment of patients’ compliance to outpatient treatment was found to be generally lacking. As a significant proportion were re-admitted because of previous refusal of surgery, a trained counselor may be suitable in counselling patients for debridement or amputation surgery.

  19. Initial-state-radiation production of D{sub s} Mesons and high precision measurements of D{sub s}1(2536) at Babar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roney, Michael [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center - SLAC, National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025-7015 (United States); Izen, Joseph Michael [University of Texas at Dallas, Department of Physics, EC 36, 800 West Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080-3021 (United States)

    2010-07-01

    A search for charmonium and other new states is performed in a study of exclusive initial-state-radiation production of D{sub s}{sup +}D{sub s}{sup -}, D{sub s}{sup *+}D{sub s}{sup -}, and D{sub s}{sup *+}D{sub s}{sup *-} events from electron-positron annihilations at a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 525 fb{sup -1} recorded by the BaBar experiment at the PEP-II storage ring. We also study the decay width and the mass of the D{sub s}1(2536) meson with high precision via the decay channel D{sub s}1(2536){yields}D{sup +*} K{sup 0}{sub s} using 384 fb{sup -1} of data recorded by the BABAR experiment. (author)

  20. Pesticides in streams of the United States : initial results from the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Steven J.; Gilliom, Robert J.; Capel, Paul D.

    1999-01-01

    Water samples from 58 rivers and streams across the United States were analyzed for pesticides as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey. The sampling sites represent 37 diverse agricultural basins, 11 urban basins, and 10 basins with mixed land use. Forty-six pesticides and pesticide degradation products were analyzed in approximately 2,200 samples collected from 1992 to 1995. The target compounds account for approximately 70 percent of national agricultural use in terms of the mass of pesticides applied annually. All the target compounds were detected in one or more samples. Herbicides generally were detected more frequently and at higher concentrations than insecticides. Nationally, 11 herbicides, 1 herbicide degradation product, and 3 insecticides were detected in more than 10 percent of samples. The number of target compounds detected at each site ranged from 7 to 37. The herbicides atrazine, metolachlor, prometon, and simazine were detected most frequently; among the insecticides, carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, and diazinon were detected the most frequently. Distinct differences in pesticide occurrence were observed in streams draining the various agricultural settings. Relatively high levels of several herbicides occurred as seasonal pulses in corn-growing areas. Several insecticides were frequently detected in areas where the dominant crops consist of orchards and vegetables. The number of pesticides detected and their concentrations were lower in wheat-growing areas than in most other agricultural areas. In most urban areas, the herbicides prometon and simazine and the insecticides carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, and malathion were commonly detected. Concentrations of pesticides rarely exceeded standards and criteria established for drinking water, but some pesticides commonly exceeded criteria established for the protection of aquatic life.

  1. Duration of Adulthood Overweight, Obesity, and Cancer Risk in the Women's Health Initiative: A Longitudinal Study from the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melina Arnold

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available High body mass index (BMI has become the leading risk factor of disease burden in high-income countries. While recent studies have suggested that the risk of cancer related to obesity is mediated by time, insights into the dose-response relationship and the cumulative impact of overweight and obesity during the life course on cancer risk remain scarce. To our knowledge, this study is the first to assess the impact of adulthood overweight and obesity duration on the risk of cancer in a large cohort of postmenopausal women.Participants from the observational study of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI with BMI information from at least three occasions during follow-up, free of cancer at baseline, and with complete covariate information were included (n = 73,913. Trajectories of BMI across ages were estimated using a quadratic growth model; overweight duration (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2, obesity duration (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, and weighted cumulative overweight and obese years, which take into account the degree of overweight and obesity over time (a measure similar to pack-years of cigarette smoking, were calculated using predicted BMIs. Cox proportional hazard models were applied to determine the cancer risk associated with overweight and obesity duration. In secondary analyses, the influence of important effect modifiers and confounders, such as smoking status, postmenopausal hormone use, and ethnicity, was assessed. A longer duration of overweight was significantly associated with the incidence of all obesity-related cancers (hazard ratio [HR] per 10-y increment: 1.07, 95% CI 1.06-1.09. For postmenopausal breast and endometrial cancer, every 10-y increase in adulthood overweight duration was associated with a 5% and 17% increase in risk, respectively. On adjusting for intensity of overweight, these figures rose to 8% and 37%, respectively. Risks of postmenopausal breast and endometrial cancer related to overweight duration were much more pronounced in women

  2. Paid family leave's effect on hospital admissions for pediatric abusive head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klevens, Joanne; Luo, Feijun; Xu, Likang; Peterson, Cora; Latzman, Natasha E

    2016-12-01

    Paediatric abusive head trauma (AHT) is a leading cause of fatal child maltreatment among young children. Current prevention efforts have not been consistently effective. Policies such as paid parental leave could potentially prevent AHT, given its impacts on risk factors for child maltreatment. To explore associations between California's 2004 paid family leave (PFL) policy and hospital admissions for AHT, we used difference-in-difference analyses of 1995-2011 US state-level data before and after the policy in California and seven comparison states. Compared with seven states with no PFL policies, California's 2004 PFL showed a significant decrease in AHT admissions in both <1 and <2-year-olds. Analyses using additional data years and comparators could yield different results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Decreasing Psychiatric Admission Wait Time in the Emergency Department by Facilitating Psychiatric Discharges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Pamela R; Harpin, Scott

    2015-12-01

    Limited capacity in a psychiatric unit contributes to long emergency department (ED) admission wait times. Regulatory and accrediting agencies urge hospitals nationally to improve patient flow for better access to care for all types of patients. The purpose of the current study was to decrease psychiatric admission wait time from 10.5 to 8 hours and increase the proportion of patients discharged by 11 a.m. from 20% to 50%. The current study compared pre- and post-intervention data. Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles aimed to improve discharge processes and timeliness through initiation of new practices. Admission wait time improved to an average of 5.1 hours (t = 3.87, p = 0.006). The proportion of discharges occurring by 11 a.m. increased to 46% (odds ratio = 3.42, p planning processes and timeliness in a psychiatric unit significantly decreased admission wait time from the ED, improving access to psychiatric care. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Analysis of factors influencing admission to intensive care following convulsive status epilepticus in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tirupathi, Sandya

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify clinical features and therapeutic decisions that influence admission to the Intensive Care unit (ICU) in children presenting with convulsive status epilepticus (CSE). METHODS: We evaluated 47 admissions with status epilepticus to a tertiary paediatric hospital A&E over a three year period (2003-2006). Following initial management 23 episodes required admission to ICU and 24 were managed on a paediatric ward. We compared clinical, demographic data and compliance with our CSE protocol between the ICU and ward groups. RESULTS: Median age at presentation in the ICU group was 17 months (range 3 months-11 years) compared to 46 months in the ward group (range 3 months-10 years). Fifty per cent of patients in both groups had a previous history of seizures. Median duration of pre-hospital seizure activity was 30 min in both groups. More than two doses of benzodiazepines were given as first line medication in 62% of the ICU group and 33% of the ward group. Among children admitted to ICU with CSE, 26% had been managed according to the CSE protocol, compared to 66% of children who were admitted to a hospital ward. Febrile seizures were the most common aetiology in both groups. CONCLUSION: Younger age at presentation, administration of more than two doses of benzodiazepines and deviation from the CSE protocol appear to be factors which influence admission of children to ICU. Recognition of pre-hospital administration of benzodiazepines and adherence to therapeutic guidelines may reduce the need for ventilatory support in this group.

  5. Physician Networks and Ambulatory Care-sensitive Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalino, Lawrence P; Pesko, Michael F; Ryan, Andrew M; Nyweide, David J; Iwashyna, Theodore J; Sun, Xuming; Mendelsohn, Jayme; Moody, James

    2015-06-01

    Research on the quality and cost of care traditionally focuses on individual physicians or medical groups. Social network theory suggests that the care a patient receives also depends on the network of physicians with whom a patient's physician is connected. The objectives of the study are: (1) identify physician networks; (2) determine whether the rate of ambulatory care-sensitive hospital admissions (ACSAs) varies across networks--even different networks at the same hospital; and (3) determine the relationship between ACSA rates and network characteristics. We identified networks by applying network detection algorithms to Medicare 2008 claims for 987,000 beneficiaries in 5 states. We estimated a fixed-effects model to determine the relationship between networks and ACSAs and a multivariable model to determine the relationship between network characteristics and ACSAs. We identified 417 networks. Mean size: 129 physicians; range, 26-963. In the fixed-effects model, ACSA rates varied significantly across networks: there was a 46% difference in rates between networks at the 25th and 75th performance percentiles. At 95% of hospitals with admissions from 2 networks, the networks had significantly different ACSA rates; the mean difference was 36% of the mean ACSA rate. Networks with a higher percentage of primary-care physicians and networks in which patients received care from a larger number of physicians had higher ACSA rates. Physician networks have a relationship with ACSAs that is independent of the physicians in the network. Physician networks could be an important focus for understanding variations in medical care and for intervening to improve care.

  6. RETURN OF THE KING: TIME-SERIES PHOTOMETRY OF FO AQUARII’S INITIAL RECOVERY FROM ITS UNPRECEDENTED 2016 LOW STATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littlefield, Colin; Garnavich, Peter; Kennedy, Mark R.; Aadland, Erin [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN (United States); Terndrup, Donald M.; Calhoun, Grace V.; Holoien, Thomas [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Callanan, Paul [Department of Physics, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Abe, Lyu; Bendjoya, Philippe; Rivet, Jean-Pierre; Vernet, David; Devogèle, Maxime [Université Côte d’Azur, OCA, CNRS, Laboratoire Lagrange, Nice (France); Shappee, Benjamin [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Heras, Teófilo Arranz [Observatorio Las Pegueras de Navas de Oro (Segovia) (Spain); Bonnardeau, Michel [MBCAA Observatory, Le Pavillon, F-38930 Lalley (France); Cook, Michael [AAVSO, Newcastle Observatory, Newcastle, Ontario (Canada); Coulter, Daniel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Debackère, André [LCOGT, Monistrol sur Loire (France); Dvorak, Shawn [AAVSO, Rolling Hill Observatory, Lake County, Florida (United States); and others

    2016-12-10

    In 2016 May, the intermediate polar FO Aqr was detected in a low state for the first time in its observational history. We report time-resolved photometry of the system during its initial recovery from this faint state. Our data, which includes high-speed photometry with cadences of just 2 s, show the existence of very strong periodicities at 22.5 and 11.26 minutes, equivalent to the spin–orbit beat frequency and twice its value, respectively. A pulse at the spin frequency is also present but at a much lower amplitude than is normally observed in the bright state. By comparing our power spectra with theoretical models, we infer that a substantial amount of accretion was stream-fed during our observations, in contrast to the disk-fed accretion that dominates the bright state. In addition, we find that FO Aqr’s rate of recovery has been unusually slow in comparison to rates of recovery seen in other magnetic cataclysmic variables, with an e -folding time of 115 ± 7 days. The recovery also shows irregular variations in the median brightness of as much as 0.2 mag over a 10-day span. Finally, we show that the arrival times of the spin pulses are dependent upon the system’s overall brightness.

  7. RETURN OF THE KING: TIME-SERIES PHOTOMETRY OF FO AQUARII’S INITIAL RECOVERY FROM ITS UNPRECEDENTED 2016 LOW STATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littlefield, Colin; Garnavich, Peter; Kennedy, Mark R.; Aadland, Erin; Terndrup, Donald M.; Calhoun, Grace V.; Holoien, Thomas; Callanan, Paul; Abe, Lyu; Bendjoya, Philippe; Rivet, Jean-Pierre; Vernet, David; Devogèle, Maxime; Shappee, Benjamin; Heras, Teófilo Arranz; Bonnardeau, Michel; Cook, Michael; Coulter, Daniel; Debackère, André; Dvorak, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    In 2016 May, the intermediate polar FO Aqr was detected in a low state for the first time in its observational history. We report time-resolved photometry of the system during its initial recovery from this faint state. Our data, which includes high-speed photometry with cadences of just 2 s, show the existence of very strong periodicities at 22.5 and 11.26 minutes, equivalent to the spin–orbit beat frequency and twice its value, respectively. A pulse at the spin frequency is also present but at a much lower amplitude than is normally observed in the bright state. By comparing our power spectra with theoretical models, we infer that a substantial amount of accretion was stream-fed during our observations, in contrast to the disk-fed accretion that dominates the bright state. In addition, we find that FO Aqr’s rate of recovery has been unusually slow in comparison to rates of recovery seen in other magnetic cataclysmic variables, with an e -folding time of 115 ± 7 days. The recovery also shows irregular variations in the median brightness of as much as 0.2 mag over a 10-day span. Finally, we show that the arrival times of the spin pulses are dependent upon the system’s overall brightness.

  8. Evolution of microstructure and residual stress on L1{sub 0} ordering in FePt thin films with different initial stress states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, S.N., E-mail: pmami.hsiao@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Yuan, F.T. [iSentek Ltd., Advanced Sensor Laboratory, New Taipei City 221, Taiwan (China); Chen, S.K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Sun, A.C. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Jungli 320, Taiwan (China); Su, S.H.; Chiu, K.F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China)

    2016-01-15

    We have characterized the dependence of microstructure, and internal strain/stress on L1{sub 0} ordering in 40 nm thick FePt films with different initial stresses. The microstructural and crystallographic results indicate that defect annihilation and grain growth induced an increase in tensile stress of ~1 GPa before extensive L1{sub 0} ordering. The induced tensile stress can efficiently facilitate the nucleation of L1{sub 0} phase owing to that the volume expansion of L1{sub 0} ordering and atomic rearrangement neutralizes the tensile stress. If the as-deposited FePt film has a highly compressive state, the induced tensile stress will be canceled out and ordering is retarded, which results in a higher ordering temperature. - Highlights: • Microstructure-stress connection in FePt films was studied. • Initial stress alters microstructure and stress evolution during annealing. • Densification induces tensile stress of ~1 GPa before extensive L1{sub 0} ordering. • Induced tensile stress can efficiently facilitate the nucleation of L1{sub 0} phase. • Compressively initial stress results in a higher ordering temperature .

  9. Assisted admissions? A national survey of general practitioner experience of involuntary admissions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, M

    2011-10-01

    The 2001 Mental Health Act introduced in 2006, changed how a patient is admitted involuntarily to a psychiatric unit. This paper reports on a national survey of general practitioners\\' experience implementing the Act. Five hundred and sixty eight (568) GPs completed the survey. Twenty five percent (25%) of respondants had not used it. When used, twenty four percent (24%) report that it takes seven hours or more to complete an admission. Fifty percent (50%) of respondents are confident to complete the necessary paperwork. Overall GPs are dissatisfied with arrangements for transport of patients (mean Likert score 3.5), primarily due to the time delay. GPs believe this places risk on the patient, family and GP. Only thirty-three percent (33%) of respondents feel that the Mental Health Act has improved the patient, GP and family experience of involuntary admission.

  10. Trends in substance use admissions among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhatre, Sumedha; Cook, Ratna; Mallik, Eshita; Jayadevappa, Ravishankar

    2017-08-22

    Substance abuse is a growing, but mostly silent, epidemic among older adults. We sought to analyze the trends in admissions for substance abuse treatment among older adults (aged 55 and older). Treatment Episode Data Set - Admissions (TEDS-A) for period between 2000 and 2012 was used. The trends in admission for primary substances, demographic attributes, characteristics of substance abused and type of admission were analyzed. While total number of substance abuse treatment admissions between 2000 and 2012 changed slightly, proportion attributable to older adults increased from 3.4% to 7.0%. Substantial changes in the demographic, substance use pattern, and treatment characteristics for the older adult admissions were noted. Majority of the admissions were for alcohol as the primary substance. However there was a decreasing trend in this proportion (77% to 64%). The proportion of admissions for following primary substances showed increase: cocaine/crack, marijuana/hashish, heroin, non-prescription methadone, and other opiates and synthetics. Also, admissions for older adults increased between 2000 and 2012 for African Americans (21% to 28%), females (20% to 24%), high school graduates (63% to 75%), homeless (15% to 19%), unemployed (77% to 84%), and those with psychiatric problems (17% to 32%).The proportion of admissions with prior history of substance abuse treatment increased from 39% to 46% and there was an increase in the admissions where more than one problem substance was reported. Ambulatory setting continued to be the most frequent treatment setting, and individual (including self-referral) was the most common referral source. The use of medication assisted therapy remained low over the years (7% - 9%). The changing demographic and substance use pattern of older adults implies that a wide array of psychological, social, and physiological needs will arise. Integrated, multidisciplinary and tailored policies for prevention and treatment are necessary to

  11. Temperature effects on hospital admissions for kidney morbidity in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yu-Kai; Wang, Yu-Chun; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Lu, Chensheng

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to associate hospital admissions of kidney diseases with extreme temperature and prolonged heat/cold events in 7 regions of Taiwan. Methods: Age-specific ( 10 , O 3 , and NO 2 ) and potential confounders. Results: We observed a V or J-shape association between daily average temperatures and the RR estimates for hospital admissions of kidney diseases in Taiwan. The lowest risk for hospital admissions of kidney diseases was found at around 25 °C, and risk increased as temperatures deviated from 25 °C. The pooled cumulative 8-day RR for all ages of population of the 7 study areas were 1.10 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01, 1.19) at 18 °C and 1.45 (95% CI: 1.27, 1.64) at 30 °C. High temperature has more profound influence on hospital admission of kidney diseases than low temperature. Temperature risks for hospital admissions were similar between younger (< 65 years) and elderly (65 + years) population. This study observed no significant effects of prolonged heat extremes on hospital admissions of kidney diseases. Conclusions: The heat effect for kidney morbidities leading to hospital admission was more significant than that of the cold temperature. This study did not find the age-dependent relative risks for temperature associating with hospital admissions of kidney diseases. - Highlights: ► V or J-shaped association was observed between daily temperatures and hospital admissions for renal diseases in Taiwan. ► The pooled relative risks accounting for 8 days of lag for the 7 study areas were 1.1 at 18 °C and 1.46 at 30 °C. ► There is no difference of the relative risk estimates for hospital admissions between younger and elderly population. ► We found significant protective effects of hospital admissions for prolonged cold extremes, but not for heat extremes

  12. Free text adversity statements as part of a contextualised admissions process: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Lysa E; Anderson, Stephanie Ann; Dowell, Johnathan S

    2018-04-02

    Medical schools globally are encouraged to widen access and participation for students from less privileged backgrounds. Many strategies have been implemented to address this inequality, but much still needs to be done to ensure fair access for all. In the literature, adverse circumstances include financial issues, poor educational experience and lack of professional-status parents. In order to take account of adverse circumstances faced by applicants, The University of Dundee School of Medicine offers applicants the opportunity to report circumstances which may have resulted in disadvantage. Applicants do this by completing a free text statement, known as an 'adversity statement', in addition to the other application information. This study analysed adversity statements submitted by applicants during two admissions cycles. Analysis of content and theme was done to identify the information applicants wished to be taken into consideration, and what range of adverse circumstances individuals reported. This study used a qualitative approach with thematic analysis to categorise the adversity statements. The data was initially analysed to create a coding framework which was then applied to the whole data set. Each coded segment was then analysed for heterogeneity and homogeneity, segments merged into generated themes, or to create sub-themes. The data set comprised a total of 384 adversity statements. These showed a wide range of detail involving family, personal health, education and living circumstances. Some circumstances, such as geographical location, have been identified and explored in previous research, while others, such as long term health conditions, have had less attention in the literature. The degree of impact, the length of statement and degree of detail, demonstrated wide variation between submissions. This study adds to the debate on best practice in contextual admissions and raises awareness of the range of circumstances and impact applicants wish to

  13. Prediction of core level binding energies in density functional theory: Rigorous definition of initial and final state contributions and implications on the physical meaning of Kohn-Sham energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo Bellafont, Noèlia; Bagus, Paul S; Illas, Francesc

    2015-06-07

    A systematic study of the N(1s) core level binding energies (BE's) in a broad series of molecules is presented employing Hartree-Fock (HF) and the B3LYP, PBE0, and LC-BPBE density functional theory (DFT) based methods with a near HF basis set. The results show that all these methods give reasonably accurate BE's with B3LYP being slightly better than HF but with both PBE0 and LCBPBE being poorer than HF. A rigorous and general decomposition of core level binding energy values into initial and final state contributions to the BE's is proposed that can be used within either HF or DFT methods. The results show that Koopmans' theorem does not hold for the Kohn-Sham eigenvalues. Consequently, Kohn-Sham orbital energies of core orbitals do not provide estimates of the initial state contribution to core level BE's; hence, they cannot be used to decompose initial and final state contributions to BE's. However, when the initial state contribution to DFT BE's is properly defined, the decompositions of initial and final state contributions given by DFT, with several different functionals, are very similar to those obtained with HF. Furthermore, it is shown that the differences of Kohn-Sham orbital energies taken with respect to a common reference do follow the trend of the properly calculated initial state contributions. These conclusions are especially important for condensed phase systems where our results validate the use of band structure calculations to determine initial state contributions to BE shifts.

  14. Impact of sacubitril/valsartan on heart failure admissions: insights from real-world patient prescriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Pieter; Lambeets, Seppe; Lau, Chirikwah; Dupont, Matthias; Mullens, Wilfried

    2018-06-17

    Sacubitril/valsartan reduced heart failure (HF)-admissions and cardiovascular mortality in the PARADIGM-HF-trial. However, real-world patients are often frailer and less able to tolerate high doses of sacubitril/valsartan. We performed a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients prescribed sacubitril/valsartan in a single tertiary HF-clinic between December 2016 and January 2018. HF-admissions were assessed in a paired fashion, comparing the amount of antecedent HF-episodes with incident HF-episodes after the initiation. Baseline risk for adverse events was assessed by the EMPHASIS-HF-risk-score Results: A total of 201-HF-patients were retrospectively identified (age = 68 ± 11 years, ejection fraction = 29 ± 8%). Real world patients were older, had higher serum creatinine and a higher New-York Heart-Association (NYHA)-class (p sacubitril/valsartan a total of 23-individual patients experienced at least one HF-episodes. Over the same time period preceding initiation of sacubitril/valsartan, 51 individual patients experienced a HF-episodes (p Sacubitril/valsartan significantly reduced the rate of incident vs. antecedent HF-admissions, in patients with low or high baseline NYHA-class (II vs. III and IV; p value = 0.019 respectively p = .004) or patients with an EMPHASIS-HF risk score below or above the mean (p = .002 respectively p = .016). Patients older than 75-years exhibited a trend towards HF-reduction. Higher doses of sacubitril/valsartan were associated with more reduction in incident versus antecedent HF-episodes. Despite being frailer and older, real-world patients exhibit a significant and early reduction in incident HF-hospitalisations following initiation of sacubitril/valsartan. Higher doses might be associated with more reduction in HF-admissions, underscoring the importance of dose uptitration.

  15. Regional Comparison of Enteral Nutrition-Related Admission Policies in Skilled Nursing Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgermaster, Marissa; Slattery, Eoin; Islam, Nafeesa; Ippolito, Paul R; Seres, David S

    2016-06-01

    Nursing home admission policies are one driver of increased and earlier gastrostomy placement, a procedure that is not always medically or ethically indicated among patients needing short-term nutrition support. This important clinical decision should be based upon patient prognosis, goals, and needs. We compared nursing home enteral nutrition-related admission policies in New York City and other regions of the United States. We also explored motivations for these policies. We conducted a telephone survey with skilled nursing facility administrators in New York City and a random sample of facilities throughout the United States about enteral nutrition-related admission policies. Survey data were matched with publically available data about facility characteristics from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The relationship between facility location and admission policies was described with regression models. Reasons for these policies were thematically analyzed. New York City nursing homes were significantly less likely to admit patients with nasogastric feeding tubes than were nursing homes nationwide, after we controlled for facility characteristics (odds ratio = 0.111; 95% CI, 0.032-0.344). Reasons for refusing nasogastric tubes fell into 5 categories: safety, capacity, policy, perception of appropriate level of care, and patient quality of life. Our findings indicate that enteral nutrition-related admission policies vary greatly between nursing homes in New York City and nationwide. Many administrators cited safety and policy as factors guiding their institutional policies and practices, despite a lack of evidence. This gap in research, practice, and policy has implications for quality and cost of care, length of hospital stay, and patient morbidity and mortality. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  16. Review of road traffic accident admissions in a Nigerian tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Road traffic accident remains a leading cause of trauma and admissions to the accidents and emergency units of most hospitals. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern and epidemiological characteristics of trauma admissions to the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital. Methods: This ...

  17. Primary and Secondary Selection Tools in an Optometry Admission Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spafford, Marlee M.

    2000-01-01

    A five-year evaluation of the admissions decision process at the University of Waterloo (Ontario) School of Optometry found that when primary tools (i.e., university grades, Optometry Admission Test scores) did not differentiate candidates, there was an increased emphasis on secondary tools (i.e., interview, autobiographic sketch, prerequisite…

  18. The Use of Criminal History Information in College Admissions Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Matthew W.; Runyan, Carol W.; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I.

    2014-01-01

    To understand the potential public health and social justice implications of criminal background screening on college admissions, we examined postsecondary institutions' reasons for collecting or not collecting applicants' criminal justice information. We invited heads of admissions from 300 randomly sampled postsecondary institutions to complete…

  19. Increase in childhood asthma admissions in an urbanising population

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. In South Africa, rapid urbanisation has increased the risk of childhood asthma. This report reviews the pattern of asthma admissions to the Paediatric Department of Ga-Rankuwa Hospital, South Africa, from 1986 to 1996. Design. Inpatient admission data were reviewed for 1986- 1996. A detailed analysis of the ...

  20. Patient mix optimisation in hospital admission planning: a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adan, I.J.B.F.; Vissers, J.M.H.

    2002-01-01

    Admissions planning decides on the number of patients admitted for a specialty each day, but also on the mix of patients admitted. Within a specialty different categories of patients can be distinguished on behalf of their requirement of resources. The type of resources required for an admission may