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Sample records for administration rectal

  1. Plasma concentrations of clonazepam after single rectal administration.

    OpenAIRE

    Rylance, G W; Poulton, J; Cherry, R C; Cullen, R E

    1986-01-01

    Clonazepam was administered rectally to six children aged 1.4 to 4.7 years in a dose of 0.05 mg/kg and to five children aged 1.4 to 4.1 years in a dose of 0.1 mg/kg. Plasma concentrations indicate that it is rapidly absorbed, and it may therefore be an alternative to rectal administration of diazepam in continuing convulsions.

  2. Population Pharmacokinetics of Morphine and Morphine-6-Glucuronide following Rectal Administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brokjær, Anne; Kreilgaard, Mads; Olesen, Anne Estrup;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To safely and effectively administer morphine as liquid formulation via the rectal route, a thorough understanding of the pharmacokinetics is warranted. The aims were: 1) to develop a population pharmacokinetic model of liquid rectal morphine and morphine-6-glucoronide (M6G), 2) to...... chromatographic method. Modelling was performed using NONMEM 7.2 and the first order conditional estimation method with interaction. RESULTS: A two compartment distribution model with one absorption transit compartment for rectal administration and systemic clearance from the central compartment best described...

  3. Rectal drug administration in adults: how, when, why.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Michael

    Administering medication per rectum can be the most appropriate route for some patients may not always be considered by health professionals. Cultural sensitivities, as well as misinformation regarding insertion methods, may be barriers to the practice. This article explains how the rectal route functions in drug absorption, clarifies when this route is appropriate to use and outlines the steps nurses should follow to prepare patients adequately and safely to carry out the procedure. PMID:27071237

  4. Pharmacokinetics and plasma concentrations of acetylsalicylic acid after intravenous, rectal, and intragastric administration to horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, Ted A; Brown, Murray P; Gronwall, Ronald R; Casey, Matthew F; Meritt, Kelly A

    2003-10-01

    Six healthy adult horses (5 mares and 1 stallion) were given a single dose of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), 20 mg/kg of body weight, by intravenous (IV), rectal, and intragastric (IG) routes. Serial blood samples were collected via jugular venipuncture over a 36-h period, and plasma ASA and salicylic acid (SA) concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. After IV administration, the mean elimination rate constant of ASA (+/- the standard error of the mean) was 1.32 +/- 0.09 h(-1), the mean elimination half-life was 0.53 +/- 0.04 h, the area under the plasma concentration-versus-time curve (AUC) was 2555 +/- 98 microg x min/mL, the plasma clearance was 472 +/- 18.9 mL/h/kg, and the volume of distribution at steady state was 0.22 +/- 0.01 L/kg. After rectal administration, the plasma concentration of ASA peaked at 5.05 +/- 0.80 microg/mL at 0.33 h, then decreased to undetectable levels by 4 h; the plasma concentration of SA peaked at 17.39 +/- 5.46 microg/mL at 2 h, then decreased to 1.92 +/- 0.25 microg/mL by 36 h. After rectal administration, the AUC for ASA was 439.4 +/- 94.55 microg x min/mL and the bioavailability was 0.17 +/- 0.037. After IG administration, the plasma concentration of ASA peaked at 1.26 +/- 0.10 microg/mL at 0.67 h, then declined to 0.37 +/- 0.37 microg/mL by 36 h; the plasma concentration of SA peaked at 23.90 +/- 4.94 microg/mL at 4 h and decreased to 0.85 +/- 0.31 microg/mL by 36 h. After IG administration, the AUC for ASA was 146.70 +/- 24.90 microg x min/mL and the bioavailability was 0.059 +/- 0.013. Administration of a single rectal dose of ASA of 20 mg/kg to horses results in higher peak plasma ASA concentrations and greater bioavailability than the same dose given IG. Plasma ASA concentrations after rectal administration should be sufficient to inhibit platelet thromboxane production, and doses lower than those suggested for IG administration may be adequate. PMID:14620867

  5. PHARMACOKINETICS OF A SINGLE DOSE OF METRONIDAZOLE AFTER RECTAL ADMINISTRATION IN CAPTIVE ASIAN ELEPHANTS (ELEPHAS MAXIMUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Samantha J; Siegal-Willott, Jessica L; Ziegler, Jessie; Lee, Elizabeth; Tell, Lisa; Murray, Suzan

    2016-03-01

    Metronidazole is a nitroimidazole antibacterial and antiprotozoal drug with bacteriocidal activity against a broad range of anaerobic bacteria. It is a recognized treatment for elephants diagnosed with anaerobic bacterial infection or protozoal disease or exhibiting signs of colonic impaction, diarrhea, and colic. This study evaluated the pharmacokinetics of rectally administered metronidazole (15 mg/kg) in five adult female Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Serum samples were collected from each animal for 96 hr after rectal administration of metronidazole. Serum concentrations of metronidazole and its primary metabolite, hydroxymetronidazole, were measured via ultraperformance liquid chromatography. Data were analyzed via a noncompartmental pharmacokinetic approach. Results indicated that serum levels of metronidazole were quantifiable at the 0.25 hr time point and absent in all elephants by the 96 hr time point. The serum peak concentration (mean ± SD, 13.15 ± 2.59 μg/ml) and area under the curve from time 0 to infinity (mean ± SD, 108.79 ± 24.77 hr × μg/ml) were higher than that reported in domestic horses after similar usage. Concurrently, the time of maximum serum concentration (mean ± SD, 1.2 ± 0.45 hr) and terminal elimination half-life (harmonic mean ± pseudo-SD, 7.85 ± 0.93 hr) were longer when compared to equine reports. Rectal administration of metronidazole was well tolerated and rapidly absorbed in all study elephants. Based on the findings in this study, metronidazole administered at a single dose of 15 mg/kg per rectum in the Asian elephant is likely to result in serum concentrations above 4 μg/ml for 8 hr and above 2 μg/ml for 24 hr after treatment is administered. Dosing recommendations should reflect the mean inhibitory concentration of metronidazole for each pathogen. PMID:27010257

  6. Rectal administration of d-alpha tocopherol for active ulcerative colitis: A preliminary report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seyed Amir Mirbagheri; Behtash Ghazi Nezami; Solmaz Assa; Mannan Hajimahmoodi

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anti-oxidant and anti-neutrophil recruitment effects of rectal d-alpha (d-α) tocopherol administration on mild and moderately active ulcerative colitis (UC).METHODS: Fifteen patients with mild and moderately active ulcerative colitis were enrolled in an open-label study of d-α tocopherol enema (8000 U/d) for 12 wk. All patients were receiving concomitant therapy with 5-aminosalicylic acid derivatives (5-ASA) and/or immunomodulator medications. Endoscopic evaluation was performed at baseline and after 4th and 12th weeks. Disease activity was measured with the Mayo disease activity index (DAI) and remission was defined as DAI of≤2 with no blood in stool. Clinical response was defined as a DAI reduction of≥2.RESULTS: At the end of 12th week, the average DAI score significantly decreased compared to the beginning of the study (2.3±0.37 vs 8±0.48, P < 0.0001). One patient was withdrawn after 3 wk for being unavailable to follow-up. On the 4th week of therapy, 12 patients showed clinical response, 3 of whom (21.4%) achieving remission. After 12 wk, all 14 patients responded clinically to the therapy and remission was induced in 9 of them (64%). No patient reported adverse events or was hospitalized due to worsened disease activity.CONCLUSION: This preliminary report suggests that rectal d-α tocopherol may represent a novel therapy for mild and moderately active UC. The observed results might be due to the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties of vitamin E.

  7. Kinetics and dosimetry of iodine-131-labelled antibody fragments after local administration in patients with rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 11 patients with rectal cancer, a mixture of F(ab')2 fragments of anti-carcinomembryonic antigen and anti-CA 19.9 labelled with a diagnostic dose of iodine-131 (3-10 MBq) was administered submucosally around the tumour. In this study, the local kinetics in and the dose to the rectal wall, the whole body kinetics and the effective dose equivalent are presented. Initially, about 50% of the plasma activity was due to free 131I. After 4 h, the plasma activity was almost completely protein bound (86%). Maximum plasma activity was observed after the 2nd day. In the first 24 h, 14% of the injected dose was excreted in the urine and within 4 days about half of the administered activity. The absorbed radiation dose to the rectal wall was estimated to be 0.2 Gy/MBq. The dose to the bone marrow was 0.2 mGy/MBq or 0.4 mGy/MBq, assuming a homogeneous tracer distribution or equal blood and bone marrow activity concentrations, respectively. The effective dose equivalent is 1.9 mSv/MBq. We conclude that the theoretical advantages of the local administration of 131I-labelled antibodies for diagnostic purposes in patients with rectal cancer are not limited by our dosimetric data. Nevertheless, we advocate the use of other radiolabels with more appropriate imaging qualities and probably a lower radiation burden. (orig./MG)

  8. Low bioavailability of ergotamine tartrate after oral and rectal administration in migraine sufferers.

    OpenAIRE

    Ibraheem, J J; Paalzow, L; Tfelt-Hansen, P

    1983-01-01

    Fifteen migraine patients were administered 2 mg ergotamine tartrate in a partial cross-over design as a single, oral tablet, rectal suppository and rectal solution. Eight of these patients were in a previous investigation given 0.5 mg ergotamine tartrate intravenously. The blood samples were taken up to 54 h after oral and suppository while it was followed for only 3 h after rectal solution. The chemical analysis was performed by applying h.p.l.c. method with a limit of sensitivity of 0.1 ng...

  9. Plasma paracetamol concentrations and pharmacokinetics following rectal administration in neonates and young infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing; O'Brien, K; Morton, N S;

    1999-01-01

    Despite widespread use in children pharmacokinetic data about paracetamol are relatively scarce, not the least in the youngest age groups. This study aimed to describe plasma paracetamol concentrations and pharmacokinetics of a single rectal paracetamol dose in neonates and young infants....

  10. Review of the clinical pharmacokinetics of artesunate and its active metabolite dihydroartemisinin following intravenous, intramuscular, oral or rectal administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Chang-Sik

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Artesunate (AS is a clinically versatile artemisinin derivative utilized for the treatment of mild to severe malaria infection. Given the therapeutic significance of AS and the necessity of appropriate AS dosing, substantial research has been performed investigating the pharmacokinetics of AS and its active metabolite dihydroartemisinin (DHA. In this article, a comprehensive review is presented of AS clinical pharmacokinetics following administration of AS by the intravenous (IV, intramuscular (IM, oral or rectal routes. Intravenous AS is associated with high initial AS concentrations which subsequently decline rapidly, with typical AS half-life estimates of less than 15 minutes. AS clearance and volume estimates average 2 - 3 L/kg/hr and 0.1 - 0.3 L/kg, respectively. DHA concentrations peak within 25 minutes post-dose, and DHA is eliminated with a half-life of 30 - 60 minutes. DHA clearance and volume average between 0.5 - 1.5 L/kg/hr and 0.5 - 1.0 L/kg, respectively. Compared to IV administration, IM administration produces lower peaks, longer half-life values, and higher volumes of distribution for AS, as well as delayed peaks for DHA; other parameters are generally similar due to the high bioavailability, assessed by exposure to DHA, associated with IM AS administration (> 86%. Similarly high bioavailability of DHA (> 80% is associated with oral administration. Following oral AS, peak AS concentrations (Cmax are achieved within one hour, and AS is eliminated with a half-life of 20 - 45 minutes. DHA Cmax values are observed within two hours post-dose; DHA half-life values average 0.5 - 1.5 hours. AUC values reported for AS are often substantially lower than those reported for DHA following oral AS administration. Rectal AS administration yields pharmacokinetic results similar to those obtained from oral administration, with the exceptions of delayed AS Cmax and longer AS half-life. Drug interaction studies conducted with oral AS

  11. Azathioprine pharmacokinetics after intravenous, oral, delayed release oral and rectal foam administration.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Os, E C; Zins, B J; Sandborn, W J; Mays, D C; Tremaine, W J; Mahoney, D W; Zinsmeister, A R; Lipsky, J J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: 6-Mercaptopurine and its prodrug azathioprine are effective medications for refractory inflammatory bowel disease. However, use of these drugs has been limited by concerns about their toxicity. Colonic delivery of azathioprine may reduce its systemic bioavailability and limit toxicity. AIM: To determine the bioavailability of 6-mercaptopurine after administration of azathioprine via three colonic delivery formulations. METHODS: Twenty four healthy human subjects each received 50 m...

  12. Morphine Rectal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rectal morphine is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Morphine is in a class of medications called opiate ( ... Rectal morphine comes as a suppository to insert in the rectum. It is usually inserted every 4 hours. Use ...

  13. A phase II randomized study of topical intrarectal administration of amifostine for the prevention of acute radiation-induced rectal toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouloulias, V.E. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Aretaieion Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Athens Medical School, Athens (Greece); Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical Univ. of Athens, Athens (Greece); Center of Radiation Oncology, YGEIA Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens, Athens (Greece); Kouvaris, J.R.; Kokakis, J.D.; Antypas, C.; Mallas, E.; Vosdoganis, S.P.; Vlahos, L.J. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Aretaieion Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Athens Medical School, Athens (Greece); Pissakas, G. [Radiotherapy Dept., Agios Savvas Anticancer Hospital, Athens (Greece); Matsopoulos, G. [Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical Univ. of Athens, Athens (Greece); Michopoulos, S. [Gastroenterology Unit, Alexandra General Hospital, Athens (Greece); Kostakopoulos, A. [Urology Dept., Sismanoglio Hospital, Univ. of Athens Medical School, Athens (Greece)

    2004-09-01

    Purpose: to investigate the cytoprotective effect of intrarectal amifostine administration on acute radiation-induced rectal toxicity. Patients and methods: 67 patients with T1b-2 NO MO prostate cancer were randomized to receive amifostine intrarectally (group A, n - 33) or not (group B, n = 34) before irradiation. Therapy was delivered using a four-field technique with three-dimensional conformal planning. In group A, 1,500 mg amifostine was administered intrarectally as an aqueous solution in a 40-ml enema. Two different toxicity scales were used: EORTC/RTOG rectal and urologic toxicity criteria along with a Subjective-RectoSigmoid (S-RS) scale based on the endoscopic terminology of the World Organization for Digestive Endoscopy. Objective measurements with rectosigmoidoscopy were performed at baseline and 1-2 days after the completion of radiotherapy. The area under curve for the time course of mucositis (RTOG criteria) during irradiation represented the mucositis index (MI). Results: intrarectal amifostine was feasible and well tolerated without any systemic or local side effects. According to the RTOG toxicity scale, five out of 33 patients showed grade 1 mucositis in group A versus 15 out of 34 patients with grade 1/2 in group B (p = 0.026). Mean rectal MI was 0.3 {+-} 0.1 in group A versus 2.2 {+-} 0.4 in group B (p < 0.001), while S-RS score was 3.9 {+-} 0.5 in group A versus 6.3 {+-} 0.7 in group B (p < 0.001). The incidence of urinary toxicity was the same in both groups. Conclusion: intrarectal administration of amifostine seems to have a cytoprotective efficacy in acute radiation-induced rectal mucositis. Further randomized studies are needed for definitive therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  14. Radioprotective effect of local administration of lysine-vasopressin and triglycyl-lysine-vasopressin on the rectal mucosa in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactions from the rectal mucosa often give rise to troublesome side-effects during and after radiotherapy in the pelvic region. Local vasoconsriction in the rectal mucosa will cause an ischemia which will decrease the sensitivity of the mucosal cells to radiation and thereby these side-effects can be reduced. Triglycyl-lysine-vasopressin applied rectally in 1% Blanose solution gave in the present study significant radioprotection of the rectal mucosa in the doses of 0.8, 1.6, and 3.2 mg. These doses are, however, very high. Triglycyl-lysine-vasopressin in 1.2% Natrosol solution in a dose of 128 μg did not show any certain protective effects. However lysine-vasopressin in 1.2% Natrosol solution in a dose of 16 μg gave significant radioprotection of the rectal mucosa. This dose level has in a previous study not given any significant effects on the systemic circulation. Lysine-vasopressin in Natrosol solution seems to be a suitable combination for further studies. (orig.)

  15. Radioprotective effect of local administration of lysine-vasopressin and triglycyl-lysine-vasopressin on the rectal mucosa in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjelkengren, G. [Depts. of Experimental Medicine, Oncology and Pathology, MalmoeUniv. Hospital (Sweden); Aronsen, K.F. [Depts. of Experimental Medicine, Oncology and Pathology, MalmoeUniv. Hospital (Sweden); Augustsson, N.E. [Depts. of Experimental Medicine, Oncology and Pathology, MalmoeUniv. Hospital (Sweden); Borgstroem, S. [Depts. of Experimental Medicine, Oncology and Pathology, MalmoeUniv. Hospital (Sweden); Lindstroem [Depts. of Experimental Medicine, Oncology and Pathology, MalmoeUniv. Hospital (Sweden); Nylander, G. [Depts. of Experimental Medicine, Oncology and Pathology, MalmoeUniv. Hospital (Sweden)

    1995-12-31

    Reactions from the rectal mucosa often give rise to troublesome side-effects during and after radiotherapy in the pelvic region. Local vasoconsriction in the rectal mucosa will cause an ischemia which will decrease the sensitivity of the mucosal cells to radiation and thereby these side-effects can be reduced. Triglycyl-lysine-vasopressin applied rectally in 1% Blanose solution gave in the present study significant radioprotection of the rectal mucosa in the doses of 0.8, 1.6, and 3.2 mg. These doses are, however, very high. Triglycyl-lysine-vasopressin in 1.2% Natrosol solution in a dose of 128 {mu}g did not show any certain protective effects. However lysine-vasopressin in 1.2% Natrosol solution in a dose of 16 {mu}g gave significant radioprotection of the rectal mucosa. This dose level has in a previous study not given any significant effects on the systemic circulation. Lysine-vasopressin in Natrosol solution seems to be a suitable combination for further studies. (orig.).

  16. Diazepam Rectal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the syringe tip into the rectum until the rim is snug against the rectal opening. Slowly count ... Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

  17. Bioavailability of rectally administered carbamazepine mixture.

    OpenAIRE

    Neuvonen, P J; Tokola, O.

    1987-01-01

    The relative bioavailability of carbamazepine mixture was studied after oral and rectal administration to healthy subjects. The absorption was significantly slower after the rectal than after the oral route but the total bioavailability was similar provided the mixture was not defaecated within 2 h of administration. We conclude that carbamazepine can be administered rectally, e.g. to postoperative patients in doses corresponding with oral doses.

  18. Modulation of the rheological and mucoadhesive properties of thermosensitive poloxamer-based hydrogels intended for the rectal administration of quinine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffi, A A; Agnely, F; Ponchel, G; Grossiord, J L

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this work was to formulate and characterize thermosensitive gels based on poloxamer 407, a thermosensitive polymer, and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC), a bioadhesive polymer, intended for the rectal delivery of quinine in children. In order to avoid the macroscopic phase separation between the two polymers it was necessary to add propanediol-1,2. After the formulation of stable ternary systems, their rheological properties were studied as a function of temperature. It was thus possible to obtained the gelation temperature of the systems as well as their elastic modulus, G', at 37 degrees C. It appeared that HPMC in the presence of propanediol-1,2 had a synergistic effect on the gelation of poloxamer 407. Tests on the rabbit rectal mucous membrane, founded on a technique of traction of the adhesive/adhered joint, made it possible to characterize the bioadhesive properties of the gels by measuring the work of adhesion, W, and the maximum detachment force, F(max). Over small concentration ranges of poloxamer and HPMC, very important variations of the viscoelastic and mucoadhesives properties were observed. It was shown that the viscoelastic and the bioadhesive properties were tightly correlated. Indeed, an empirical equivalence relation was established between the shear frequency and the rate of deformation in traction and allowed to describe all our samples by a master curve. This master curve would make it possible to predict the values of W at various rates of traction by the simple non-destructive measurement of the elastic modulus, G', at an equivalent shear frequency. PMID:16356700

  19. Bisacodyl Rectal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rectal bisacodyl is used on a short-term basis to treat constipation. It also is used to empty the bowels before surgery and certain medical procedures. Bisacodyl is in a class of medications called stimulant laxatives. It works by increasing activity of the intestines ...

  20. Review of the clinical pharmacokinetics of artesunate and its active metabolite dihydroartemisinin following intravenous, intramuscular, oral or rectal administration

    OpenAIRE

    Shin Chang-Sik; Jung Donald; Borghini-Fuhrer Isabelle; Duparc Stephan; Morris Carrie A; Fleckenstein Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Artesunate (AS) is a clinically versatile artemisinin derivative utilized for the treatment of mild to severe malaria infection. Given the therapeutic significance of AS and the necessity of appropriate AS dosing, substantial research has been performed investigating the pharmacokinetics of AS and its active metabolite dihydroartemisinin (DHA). In this article, a comprehensive review is presented of AS clinical pharmacokinetics following administration of AS by the intravenous (IV), ...

  1. 中药盆腔宁直肠给药治疗慢性盆腔炎的疗效评价%Treatment Evaluation of Treating Chronic Pelvic Inflammatory Disease by Rectal Administration of Penqiangning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温洁

    2012-01-01

    Objective; To evaluate the clinical effect of treating chronic pelvic inflammatory disease by rectal administration of Penqiangning and the improvement of the marital quality. Methods: To divide 61 patients into two groups randomly, 33cases in the treating group were given rectal administration of Penqiangning. They were given the treatment of 3 ~ Sdays after their menstruations, one dose a day, using 14days, and totally 3courses of treatment. 28 cases in the control group were given rectal administration of 16, 0000units Genlamicin plus 0.9% 100ml normal sodium, also totally 3courses of treatment. Results: Both two treatments could relieve pain obviously. The value of the pain scores by using Traditional Chinese Medicine declined 2. 71 after the treatment, and the value of the pain scores declined 3. 19of the control group. There was no difference between the two groups. Conclusion: Treating chronic pelvic inflammatory disease by rectal administration of Penqiangning is more safe on the premise of relieving pain, improving the quality of life and the marriage%目的:评价中药盆腔宁保留灌肠对缓解慢性盆腔炎疼痛的临床疗效以及婚姻质量的改善情况.方法:将61例慢性盆腔炎患者按随机化原则分成两组,治疗组33例给予中药盆腔宁保留灌肠,经净后3~5天每日1剂,连用14天,共3个疗程;对照组28例给予生理盐水100ml+庆大霉素16万单位灌肠治疗,共3个疗程.结果:中医或西医治疗疼痛均有明显缓解作用,中医治疗组治疗前后疼痛评分下降2.71,对照组下降3.19,两组比较,差异不具有统计学意义(P>0.05).结论:中药盆腔宁保留灌肠治疗慢性盆腔炎在具有缓解疼痛,改善生活质量及婚姻质量等明确疗效的前提下,安全性更优.

  2. 硫酸吗啡控释片直肠、阴道给药治疗女性癌痛的疗效%Therapeutie Effects of Rectal and Vaginal Administration of Morphine Sulfate in Female Cancer Pain Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈惠琴; 胡祎; 刘忆菁; 龚晓桃

    2011-01-01

    目的 比较硫酸吗啡控释片(商品名:美施康定)直肠、阴道给药治疗女性癌痛的临床疗效.方法 将入选的97例口服给药困难的女性癌痛患者按随机数字表法分成两组,直肠给药组48例,阴道给药组49例,两组均给予硫酸吗啡控释片,1次/12 h,并在用药过程中根据疼痛缓解程度调整剂量;5 d后比较两组镇痛效果、不良反应发生率、硫酸吗啡控释片用量以及治疗前后生活质量评分变化情况.结果 硫酸吗啡控释片直肠、阴道给药治疗中重度癌痛女性总有效率分别为93 8%和91 7%,组间比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);两组生活质量治疗后均有提高,差异有统计学意义,但组间比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);阴道给药组便秘发生率较直肠给药组明显降低,硫酸吗啡控释片用量少(P<0.05).结论 对于各种原因所致不能口服或直肠给药的女性癌痛患者,阴道给药是一种安全、有效、简便的给药途径.%Objective To compare the clinical efficacy of rectal and vaginal administration of morphine sulfate in female cancer pain management.Methods Ninety-seven female patients with difficulty in oral administration of morphine sulfate were randomized into rectal administration group(n=48) and vaginal administration group(n=49).The patients in the two groups were treated by vaginal administration or rectum administration per 12 hour.The dose was adjusted according to pain relief levels during medication.After five days' treatment, comparisons were conducted on the efficacy, the incidence of adverse reactions,the dosage of morphine sulfate controlled-release tablets and the scores of quality of life(QOL) before and after surgery.Results The total efficacy rate of rectum administration and vaginal administration for moderate-severe female cancer pain were 93.8 % and 91.7 % respectively,with no significant difference between two groups(P>0.05).The quality of life was significantly

  3. Rectal dexmedetomidine in rats: evaluation of sedative and mucosal effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Hanci

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In this study, we investigated the anesthetic and mucosal effects of the rectal application of dexmedetomidine to rats. METHODS: Male Wistar albino rats weighing 250-300 g were divided into four groups: Group S (n = 8 was a sham group that served as a baseline for the normal basal values; Group C (n = 8 consisted of rats that received the rectal application of saline alone; Group IPDex (n = 8 included rats that received the intraperitoneal application of dexmedetomidine (100 µg kg-1; and Group RecDex (n = 8 included rats that received the rectal application of dexmedetomidine (100 µg kg-1. For the rectal drug administration, we used 22 G intravenous cannulas with the stylets removed. We administered the drugs by advancing the cannula 1 cm into the rectum, and the rectal administration volume was 1 mL for all the rats. The latency and anesthesia time (min were measured. Two hours after rectal administration, 75 mg kg-1 ketamine was administered for intraperitoneal anesthesia in all the groups, followed by the removal of the rats' rectums to a distal distance of 3 cm via an abdominoperineal surgical procedure. We histopathologically examined and scored the rectums. RESULTS: Anesthesia was achieved in all the rats in the Group RecDex following the administration of dexmedetomidine. The onset of anesthesia in the Group RecDex was significantly later and of a shorter duration than in the Group IPDEx (p < 0.05. In the Group RecDex, the administration of dexmedetomidine induced mild-moderate losses of mucosal architecture in the colon and rectum, 2 h after rectal inoculation. CONCLUSION: Although 100 µg kg-1 dexmedetomidine administered rectally to rats achieved a significantly longer duration of anesthesia compared with the rectal administration of saline, our histopathological evaluations showed that the rectal administration of 100 µg kg-1 dexmedetomidine led to mild-moderate damage to the mucosal structure of the

  4. Whole-body MRI with assessment of hepatic and extraabdominal enhancement after administration of gadoxetic acid for staging of rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: In TNM staging of rectal cancer by MRI, unspecific extracellular contrast agent Gd-DTPA is established for extrahepatic and vascular enhancement whereas liver-specific gadoxetic acid has proven high accurate detection of liver metastasis. Purpose: To compare intraindividually the qualification and quantification of enhancement in liver parenchyma, abdominal, pulmonary, and pelvic vessels between gadoxetic acid and Gd-DTPA. Material and Methods: Sixteen patients with histologically proven rectal carcinoma (mean age 62.9 years) were imaged twice by MRI. For pretherapeutic staging 10 ml gadoxetic acid (mean dose 0.032 mmol Gd/kg body weight) and for restaging after neoadjuvant therapy Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol Gd/kg body weight) were administered. The liver was acquired in arterial-dominant and portal venous phases, the thorax and pelvis were depicted in venous phases using three-dimensional T1-weighted sequences. Contrast enhancement was rated by two independent readers and compared by means of multinomial regression analysis using generalized estimating equations. Signal-to-noise ratios were compared by two-sided paired t-tests. Results: Overall contrast enhancement was rated sufficient for diagnosis in all examinations and both contrast agents. Vascular enhancement was rated comparable with exception of the aorta, the peripheral intrahepatic veins, and the central lung vessels (p 0.0182, p = 0.0053, p = 0.0083, in favor of Gd-DTPA). Quantitative evaluation revealed no statistically significant differences in parenchymal and vascular signal-to-noise ratios with exception of the aorta, and the central pulmonary artery (67.4 vs. 89.3; p = 0.0421, 44.5 vs. 59.5; p = 0.0446 respectively, in favor of Gd-DTPA). Conclusion: The contrast enhancement after gadoxetic acid is comparable to Gd-DTPA and appears suitable for comprehensive TNM-staging by combining high accurate liver-specific phases with efficacious vascular enhancement in the different anatomic regions

  5. Rectal culture (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rectal culture test is performed by inserting a cotton swab in the rectum. The swab is rotated gently, and withdrawn. A smear of the swab is placed in culture media to encourage the growth of microorganisms. The ...

  6. Understanding Minor Rectal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are the possible causes of minor rectal bleeding? Hemorrhoids Anal fissures Proctitis (inflammation of the rectum) Polyps ... can be cured if detected early. What are hemorrhoids? Hemorrhoids (also called piles) are swollen blood vessels ...

  7. Stages of Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Age and family history can affect the risk of rectal cancer. Anything ... to flow from the body to a collection bag. After the cancer is removed, the surgeon will ...

  8. Effects of glucose ingestion on hepatic hemodynamics in patients with liver disease by per-rectal portal scintigraphy using sup 99m TcO sub 4 sup - (direct intramural administration of radioisotope method)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tetsuka, Isando; Ohe, Takashi; Harada, Takashi (Dokkyo Univ., Mibu, Tochigi (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-01-01

    Effect of glucose (225 ml, 300 kcal) ingestion on hepatic hemodynamics was studied in ten patients with liver cirrhosis and eight patients with non cirrhotic liver disease by per-rectal portal scintigraphy using {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} (direct intramural administration of radioisotope method). Initial portal blood flow index (IP) and collateral index (CI) were calculated from the time activity curve of heart and liver. The value of IP was not significantly changed between before and after glucose ingestion in cases of liver cirrhosis (before: 0.0160{+-}0.0016, after: 0.0204{+-}0.0106). In cases of non cirrhotic liver disease, the value of IP was significantly increased after glucose ingestion (before: 0.0381{+-}0.0145, after: 0.0544{+-}0.0194, p<0.02). These findings suggested increase in portal blood flow via inferior mesenteric vein to the cardiac blood flow. The value of CI before glucose ingestion was significantly increased in cases of liver cirrhosis (0.751{+-}0.156) compared with that in cases of non cirrhotic liver disease (0.517{+-}0.122), but no significant difference in values after glucose ingestion was found between these two groups. (author).

  9. Efecto de la administración de indometacina rectal sobre los niveles séricos de amilasa posteriores a colangiopancreatografía retrógrada endoscópica y su impacto en la aparición de episodios de pancreatitis secundaria Effect of the rectal administration of indomethacin on amylase serum levels after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and its impact on the development of secondary pancreatitis episodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Montaño Loza

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: hiperamilasemia y pancreatitis aguda representan las complicaciones mayores más frecuentes posteriores a colangiopancreatografía retrógrada endoscópica (CPRE, apareciendo en 1-30% de los casos. Objetivo: determinar la incidencia de hiperamilasemia y pancreatitis posterior a CPRE y evaluar la utilidad de indometacina rectal para la prevención de estos. Material y métodos: ensayo clínico controlado. Durante un periodo de 12 meses se incluyeron 150 pacientes. Estos fueron divididos en grupo de estudio (n = 75, a quienes se administró indometacina rectal 100 mg 2 horas previas al procedimiento, y control (n = 75 que recibió glicerina. Dos horas posteriores a la CPRE se determinó el nivel de amilasa sérica y se clasificaron en: 0 ≤ 150 UI/l, 1 = 151-599 UI/l, 2 ≥ 600 UI/l. Los episodios de pancreatitis clínica se cuantificaron y clasificaron de acuerdo a los criterios de Ranson. Resultados: distribución por género: 100 mujeres y 50 hombres. Edad media: 55,37 ± 18,0 para el grupo de estudio y 51,1 ± 17,0 para el control. El diagnóstico de patología benigna se presentó en 56 (74,7% casos del grupo de estudio y 59 (78,7% del control. Posterior al procedimiento, 13 (17,3% pacientes del grupo experimental y 28 (37,3% del control desarrollaron hiperamilasemia (p 600 UI/l en 3 pacientes del grupo de estudio y 10 del control (p = 0,001. Se detectó pancreatitis leve en 5,3% de los pacientes del grupo de estudio y 16% del control (p Background: hyperamylasemia and acute pancreatitis represent the most frequent major complication after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP, developing in 1-30% of cases. Objective: to determine the incidence of hyperamylasemia and acute pancreatitis after ERCP, and to assess the utility of rectal indomethacin to prevent these events. Material and methods: a randomized clinical trial. During a 12-month period 150 patients were included. They were divided up into a study group

  10. Rectal absorption of homatropine [14C] methylbromide in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homatropine [14C]methylbromide (HMB-14C) was administered to rats by intramuscular injection, oral gavage and rectal suppository. Plasma concentrations of 14C were measured over the subsequent 12 h. Peak plasma concentrations were higher and achieved more rapidly after rectal administration than by other routes whether HMB-14C was administered in a water-soluble suppository base or in aqueous solution. Twelve h after the suppositories were inserted and retained 28% of the 14C had been excreted in the urine while 56% remained in the large intestine. Unlabelled HMB, given in rectal suppositories to anaesthetized rats, caused prompt blockade of the effects of vagal stimulation on pulse rate and of intravenous acetylcholine on blood pressure. These results confirm the rapid rectal absorption of the drug. (author)

  11. Administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogen handler om den praksis, vi kalder administration. Vi er i den offentlige sektor i Danmark hos kontorfolkene med deres sagsmapper, computere, telefoner,, lovsamlinger,, retningslinier og regneark. I bogen udfoldes en mangfoldighed af konkrete historier om det administrative arbejde fra...... forskellige områder i den offentlige sektor. Hensigten er at forstå den praksis og faglighed der knytter sig til det administrative arbejde...

  12. Rectal Diclofenac Versus Rectal Paracetamol: Comparison of Antipyretic Effectiveness in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Haji Rezaei, Mostafa; Aalinezhad, Marzieh; Sarami, Golbahareh; Rangraz, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background Fever is the most common complaint in pediatric medicine and its treatment is recommended in some situations. Paracetamol is the most common antipyretic drug, which has serious side effects such as toxicity along with its positive effects. Diclofenac is one of the strongest non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) drugs, which has received little attention as an antipyretic drug. Objectives This study was designed to compare the antipyretic effectiveness of the rectal form of Paracetamol and Diclofenac. Patients and Methods This double-blind controlled clinical trial was conducted on 80 children aged six months to six years old. One group was treated with rectal Paracetamol suppositories at 15 mg/kg dose and the other group received Diclofenac at 1 mg/kg by rectal administration (n = 40). Rectal temperature was measured before and one hour after the intervention. Temperature changes in the two groups were compared. Results The average rectal temperature in the Paracetamol group was 39.6 ± 1.13°C, and 39.82 ± 1.07°C in the Diclofenac group (P = 0.37). The average rectal temperature, one hour after the intervention, in the Paracetamol and the Diclofenac group was 38.39 ± 0.89°C and 38.95 ± 1.09°C, respectively (P = 0.02). Average temperature changes were 0.65 ± 0.17°C in the Paracetamol group and 1.73 ± 0.69°C in the Diclofenac group (P < 0.001). Conclusions In the first one hour, Diclofenac suppository is able to control the fever more efficient than Paracetamol suppositories. PMID:26889398

  13. [Laparoscopic rectal resection technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthuber, M; Kriening, B; Schrempf, M; Geißler, B; Märkl, B; Rüth, S

    2016-07-01

    The quality of radical oncological operations for patients with rectal cancer determines the rate of local recurrence and long-term survival. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced tumors, a standardized surgical procedure for rectal tumors less than 12 cm from the anus with total mesorectal excision (TME) and preservation of the autonomous nerve system for sexual and bladder function have significantly improved the oncological results and quality of life of patients. The TME procedure for rectal resection has been performed laparoscopically in Germany for almost 20 years; however, no reliable data are available on the frequency of laparoscopic procedures in rectal cancer patients in Germany. The rate of minimally invasive procedures is estimated to be less than 20 %. A prerequisite for using the laparoscopic approach is implicit adherence to the described standards of open surgery. Available data from prospective randomized trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses indicate that in the early postoperative phase the generally well-known positive effects of the minimally invasive approach to the benefit of patients can be realized without any long-term negative impact on the oncological results; however, the results of many of these studies are difficult to interpret because it could not be confirmed whether the hospitals and surgeons involved had successfully completed the learning curve. In this article we would like to present our technique, which we have developed over the past 17 years in more than 1000 patients. Based on our experiences the laparoscopic approach can be highly recommended as a suitable alternative to the open procedure. PMID:27277556

  14. UFT (tegafur-uracil) in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casado, E; Pfeiffer, P; Feliu, J; González-Barón, M; Vestermark, L; Jensen, Helle Anita

    2008-01-01

    abstracts relating to clinical studies of UFT in the treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Pre- and postoperative studies carried out in patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent disease were included. RESULTS: The combination of UFT and radiotherapy was effective and well tolerated in the......BACKGROUND: Major achievements in the treatment of localised rectal cancer include the development of total mesorectal excision and the perioperative administration of radiotherapy in combination with continuous infusion (CI) 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). This multimodal approach has resulted in extended...... survival and lower local relapse rates, with the potential for sphincter-preserving procedures. However, CI 5-FU is inconvenient for patients and is costly. Oral fluoropyrimidines like UFT (tegafur-uracil) offer a number of advantages over 5-FU. METHODS: We undertook a review of published articles and...

  15. Breast metastases from rectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia; FANG Yu; LI Ang; LI Fei

    2011-01-01

    Metastases to the breast from extramammary neoplasms are very rare, constituting 2.7% of all malignant breast tumours. The most common primary tumor metastatic to the breast is primary breast cancer. Rectal cancer metastasizing to the breast is extremely rare. We report a case of aggressive rectal carcinoma with metastasis to the breast.

  16. MRI of rectal stromal tumour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Claus; Lindebjerg, Jan; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2012-01-01

    aware of for the rectal multidisciplinary team. On suspicion of GIST, patients should be referred to a sarcoma centre. The diagnosis of rectal GIST can be suggested on MRI by the presence of a well-defined heterogeneously large mass with a necrotic center associated with a prominent extra...

  17. Rectal carcinoids: a systematic review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDermott, Frank D

    2014-07-01

    Rectal carcinoids are increasing in incidence worldwide. Frequently thought of as a relatively benign condition, there are limited data regarding optimal treatment strategies for both localized and more advanced disease. The aim of this study was to summarize published experiences with rectal carcinoids and to present the most current data.

  18. Rectal injuries following radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rectal injuries following radiation therapy were reviewed. Primary diseases in which radiation injuries appeared were described, and local injuries in the neibouring organs such as the small intestine, the bladder, the uterus, and the vagina were also referred to. Classification, frequency, fistulation, radiation necrosis, x-ray findings and occurrence time of rectal and sigmoid colonic injuries were reported. As occurrence factors of radiation injuries, total dose, measurement of dose, stage of primary disease, and history of laparatomy were mentioned. Countermeasures for reducing rectal injuries and treatment methods of local injuries were also described. (Serizawa, K.)

  19. General Information about Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Age and family history can affect the risk of rectal cancer. Anything ... to flow from the body to a collection bag. After the cancer is removed, the surgeon will ...

  20. Treatment Option Overview (Rectal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Age and family history can affect the risk of rectal cancer. Anything ... to flow from the body to a collection bag. After the cancer is removed, the surgeon will ...

  1. Rectal cancer: Possibilities of MRI in detection of local recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miučin-Vukadinović Ivana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Treatment of rectal cancer, which includes periodic evaluations, may lead to earlier identification of recurrent local infiltration. Differentiation between local recurrence and other post radiation changes is frequently rather difficult. Pelvic MR examination was performed in 30 patients (20 men, 10 women at the Institute of oncology, Sremska Kamenica. All patients underwent surgical resection of rectal cancer at the same institution. Preoperative or postoperative radiation therapy was administrated in 29 patients (93%. Criteria for detection of local recurrent tumors were based on morphologic changes, such as the presence of tumor infiltration, size increase of the mass and the change of the mass shape. Recurrent tumor infiltration was detected in 50% patents. Tumors of low differentiation histological type was predominantly found within 10 months after surgery, while moderately differentiated and high differentiated types were detected within 20 months and after 20 months after resection, respectively. Pelvic MR examination represents important diagnostic modality for recurrent rectal cancer identification.

  2. Rectal examination in general practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Hennigan, T W; Franks, P. J.; Hocken, D. B.; Allen-Mersh, T. G.

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate factors influencing a general practitioner's decision to do a rectal examination in patients with anorectal or urinary symptoms. DESIGN--Postal questionnaire survey. SETTING--General practices in inner London and Devon. SUBJECTS--859 General practitioners, 609 (71%) of whom returned the questionnaire. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Number of rectal examinations done each month; the indication score, derived from answers to a question asking whether the respondent would do a ...

  3. Meta-analysis of Rectal Administration of Morphine Sulfate Controlled-release Tablets in the Treatment of Terminal Cancerous Pain%硫酸吗啡控释片直肠给药治疗晚期癌痛的Meta分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄秋明; 李俊

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the differences and safety in curative effect of morphine sulfate controlled-release tablets on terminal cancerous pain by rectal administration and oral administration. Method : Two authors collected domestic related literature databases and evaluated the quality of the included studies independently. The data were quantified by meta-analysis to review adverse drug reactions. Result:A total of 10 articles with 888 cases of cancerous pain were included in the analysis, which showed no significant difference ( P =0.58) for the two ways of administration: OR ( random) = 1. 15 , 95 % CI (0. 70 , 1. 89 ) . They also showed that the occurrence rate of adverse reactions of the rectal administration seemed similar to that of the oral administration in constipation , dizziness . drowsiness , difficult expectoration, dysuria, etc. But was lower in nausea and vomiting, which could be tolerated by patients given in 10 to 60mg dosage. Conclu sion : The existing evidence suggests that the currative efficacy of the rectal and oral administration of the controlled-release morphine sulfate tablets was equivalent in terms of analgesic efficacy and adverse reactions. However. the curative effect and safety of rectal administration should be further evaluated by high quality RCTs and pharmacokinetic trial due to the limited quality of the included studies.%目的:评价硫酸吗啡控释片直肠给药与口服给药治疗癌痛的疗效差异及安全性.方法:两名作者独立收集国内相关数据库文献资料,运用Meta分析方法对资料进行定量综合评价.结果:共有10篇文献,888例癌痛患者纳入分析,两种给药途径总有效率的差别无统计学意义[OR=1.15,95%CI(0.70,1.89),P=0.58];硫酸吗啡控释片直肠给药与口服给药相比,除恶心呕吐等胃肠道反应发生率较口服给药要小以外,在便秘、头晕嗜睡、排痰困难、排尿困难等方面的发生率与口服给药相当,在10~60 mg剂量范

  4. Early rectal stenosis following stapled rectal mucosectomy for hemorrhoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuster Anja

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the last years, stapled rectal mucosectomy (SRM has become a widely accepted procedure for second and third degree hemorrhoids. One of the delayed complications is a stenosis of the lower rectum. In order to evaluate the specific problem of rectal stenosis following SRM we reviewed our data with special respect to potential predictive factors or stenotic events. Methods A retrospective analysis of 419 consecutive patients, which underwent SRM from December 1998 to August 2003 was performed. Only patients with at least one follow-up check were evaluated, thus the analysis includes 289 patients with a mean follow-up of 281 days (±18 days. For statistic analysis the groups with and without stenosis were evaluated using the Chi-Square Test, using the Kaplan-Meier statistic the actuarial incidence for rectal stenosis was plotted. Results Rectal stenosis was observed in 9 patients (3.1%, eight of these stenoses were detected within the first 100 days after surgery; the median time to stenosis was 95 days. Only one patient had a rectal stenosis after more than one year. 8 of the 9 patients had no obstructive symptoms, however the remaining patients complained of obstructive defecation and underwent surgery for transanal strictureplasty with electrocautery. A statistical analysis revealed that patients with stenosis had significantly more often prior treatment for hemorrhoids (p Conclusion Rectal stenosis is an uncommon event after SRM. Early stenosis will occur within the first three months after surgery. The majority of the stenoses are without clinical relevance. Only one of nine patients had to undergo surgery for a relevant stenosis. The predictive factor for stenosis in the patient-characteristics is previous interventions for hemorrhoids, severe postoperative pain might also predict rectal stenosis.

  5. Bupivacaine administered intrathecally versus rectally in the management of intractable rectal cancer pain in palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak I

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Iwona Zaporowska-Stachowiak,1,2 Grzegorz Kowalski,3 Jacek Łuczak,2 Katarzyna Kosicka,4 Aleksandra Kotlinska-Lemieszek,3 Maciej Sopata,3 Franciszek Główka4 1Chair and Department of Pharmacology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 2Palliative Medicine In-patient Unit, University Hospital of Lord's Transfiguration, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 3Palliative Medicine Chair and Department, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 4Department of Physical Pharmacy and Pharmacokinetics, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland Background: Unacceptable adverse effects, contraindications to and/or ineffectiveness of World Health Organization step III "pain ladder" drugs causes needless suffering among a population of cancer patients. Successful management of severe cancer pain may require invasive treatment. However, a patient's refusal of an invasive procedure necessitates that clinicians consider alternative options. Objective: Intrathecal bupivacaine delivery as a viable treatment of intractable pain is well documented. There are no data on rectal bupivacaine use in cancer patients or in the treatment of cancer tenesmoid pain. This study aims to demonstrate that bupivacaine administered rectally could be a step in between the current treatment options for intractable cancer pain (conventional/conservative analgesia or invasive procedures, and to evaluate the effect of the mode of administration (intrathecal versus rectal on the bupivacaine plasma concentration.Cases: We present two Caucasian, elderly inpatients admitted to hospice due to intractable rectal/tenesmoid pain. The first case is a female with vulvar cancer, and malignant infiltration of the rectum/vagina. Bupivacaine was used intrathecally (0.25–0.5%, 1–2 mL every 6 hours. The second case is a female with ovarian cancer and malignant rectal infiltration. Bupivacaine was adminstered rectally (0.05–0.1%, 100 m

  6. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer This page ... and rectal cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Colon Cancer Avastin (Bevacizumab) Bevacizumab Camptosar ( ...

  7. DNA level in mucous membrane cell nuclei in rectal cancer during preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microspectrophotometric study was made of DNA in cell nuclei of the normal mucous membrane and rectal tumors in 47 patients prior to and after irradiation at doses of 20, 40 and 36 Gy together with the administration of 7 g of 5-FU. Rectal adenocarcinoma is characterized by polyploidy, an increase in the ''DNA accumulation index'' that grows with a decrease in the dgree of tumor differentiation. A slightly raised ''DNA accumulation index'' is noted in the unchanged rectal mucosa after radio- and chemotherapy, signs of noticeable poly- and heteroploidy of the nuclei of the preserved cells were established in adenocarcinomas

  8. IQGAP1 in rectal adenocarcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Susanne; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hammer, Emilie;

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of rectal adenocarcinoma includes total mesorectal excision, which is preceded by radiochemotherapy (RCT) in cases of advanced disease. The response to RCT varies from total tumor regression to no effect but this heterogeneous response is unexplained. However, both radiation and treatment...... with 5-fluorouracil may induce treatment resistance through upregulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. IQGAP1 is a scaffold protein that appears to be essential to MAPK signaling in cancers. We have therefore studied IQGAP1 protein expression in rectal adenocarcinomas before...

  9. About the Therapy of Laryngotracheitis (Croup): Significance of Rectal Dosage Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beubler, Eckhard; Dittrich, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are drugs of choice for treatment of laryngotracheitis (croup). They may be administered orally as tablets or juice, locally as inhalation or rectally as suppository or capsule. If doctors decide to use a rectal administration for practical reasons, it is obvious from a pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic point of view that prednisolone capsules have an earlier and stronger anti-inflammatory effect than a prednisone suppository. PMID:26021412

  10. Thrombosed hemorrhoid mimicking rectal carcinoma at CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Chetrit, E.; Bar-Ziv, J. (Dept. of Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel))

    1992-09-01

    A 46-year-old male with cirrhosis and portal hypertension complained of lower pelvic pain. CT of the rectum raised a strong suspicion of a rectal tumor. However, rectal examination, anoscopy, direct rectoscopy, and, unfortunately, post-mortem dissection, failed to confirm its existence. Nevertheless, large flat hemorrhoids were evident. Review of the patient's chart disclosed the presence of large thrombosed hemorrhoids detected by rectal examination prior to the CT examination. It is suggested that rectal hemorrhoids be included in the differential diagnosis of rectal tumor shown by CT in patients with portal hypertension. (orig.).

  11. Thrombosed hemorrhoid mimicking rectal carcinoma at CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 46-year-old male with cirrhosis and portal hypertension complained of lower pelvic pain. CT of the rectum raised a strong suspicion of a rectal tumor. However, rectal examination, anoscopy, direct rectoscopy, and, unfortunately, post-mortem dissection, failed to confirm its existence. Nevertheless, large flat hemorrhoids were evident. Review of the patient's chart disclosed the presence of large thrombosed hemorrhoids detected by rectal examination prior to the CT examination. It is suggested that rectal hemorrhoids be included in the differential diagnosis of rectal tumor shown by CT in patients with portal hypertension. (orig.)

  12. Penile metastasis from rectal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murhekar K

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Penile metastases are infrequent and often originate from genitor-urinary organs including bladder and prostate. In the present communication, we report an unusual case of penile metastasis from rectal adenocarcinoma. Though uncommon, this presentation is not unknown. A review of literature of penile metastases in colorectal cancers is also summarized here.

  13. Rectal premedication in pediatric anesthesia: midazolam versus ketamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshirian N

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Premedication is widely used in pediatric anesthesia to reduce emotional trauma and ensure smooth induction. The rectal route is one of the most commonly accepted means of drug administration. The aim of our study was to investigate and compare the efficacy of rectally administered midazolam versus that of ketamine as a premedication in pediatric patients.Methods: We performed a prospective randomized double-blinded clinical trial in 64 children, 1 to 10 years of age, randomly allocated into two groups. The midazolam group received 0.5 mg/kg rectal midazolam and the ketamine group received 5 mg/kg rectal ketamine. The preoperative sedation scores were evaluated on a three-point scale. The anxiolysis and mask acceptance scores were evaluated separately on a four-point scale, with ease of parental separation, based on the presence or lack of crying, evaluated on a two-point scale. Results: Neither medication showed acceptable sedation (>75%, with no significant difference in sedation score between the two groups (P=0.725. Anxiolysis and mask acceptance using either midazolam or ketamine were acceptable, with  midazolam performing significantly better than ketamine (P=0.00 and P=0.042, respectively. Ease of parental separation was seen in both groups without significant difference (P=0.288 and no major adverse effects, such as apnea, occurred in either group.Conclusions: Rectal midazolam is more effective than ketamine in anxiolysis and mask acceptance. Although they both can ease separation anxiety in children before surgery, we found neither drug to be acceptable for sedation.

  14. Post hemorrhoidectomy pain control: rectal Diclofenac versus Acetaminophen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahimi M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Anal surgeries are prevalent, but they didn't perform as outpatient surgeries because of concerns about postoperative pain. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of rectal acetaminophen and diclofenac on postoperative analgesia after anal surgeries in adult patients. "nMethods: In a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study 60 ASA class I or II scheduled for haemorrhoidectomy, anal fissure or fistula repair, were randomized (with block randomization method to receive either a single dose of 650 mg rectal acetaminophen (n=20, 100 mg rectal diclofenac (n=20 or placebo suppositories (n=20 after the operation. The severity of pain, time to first request of analgesic agent after administration of suppositories and complications were compared between three groups. Pain scores were evaluated in patients by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS in 0 (after complete consciousness in recovery, 2, 4, 12 and 24 hours after surgery. The period between administration of the suppositories and the patients' first request to receive analgesic was compared between groups. "nResults: Pain scores were lower significantly in rectal diclofenac than the other groups. The period between administration of the suppositories and the patients' first request to receive analgesic in diclofenac group was 219±73 minutes, was significantly longer compared with placebo (153±47 minutes and acetaminophen (178±64 minutes groups. No complications were reported. "nConclusions: Diclofenac suppository is more effective than acetaminophen suppository in post hemorrhoidectomy pain management.

  15. Novel chronotherapeutic rectal aminophylline delivery system for therapy of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiohira, Hideo; Fujii, Makiko; Koizumi, Naoya; Kondoh, Masuo; Watanabe, Yoshiteru

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new chronotherapeutic pharmaceutical preparation as a sustained-release suppository for prevention and therapeutic use against bronchial asthma in the early morning. Sustained-release hollow-type (SR-HT) suppositories using sodium alginate (Alg-Na), sodium polyacrylate (PANa) or polyacrylate-PANa co-polymer (PA-PANa) as gelling polymers (gel agent) were prepared and pharmaceutical characteristics of these suppositories were investigated. Type A SR-HT suppositories comprised a suppository shell prepared with oleaginous base and containing aminophylline only or aminophylline with Alg-Na or PANa in the cavity (hollow space). Type B SR-HT suppositories comprised a suppository shell prepared with oleaginous base and gel agent (30%), with aminophylline in the hollow space. In drug-release studies, the acrylate polymer-containing suppositories showed linearity of delayed release rate, providing significantly decreased the highest concentration of theophylline in plasma (C(max)) and delayed the time required to reach C(max) (t(max)) and the mean residence time (MRT) after rectal administrated in rabbits. In particular, suppositories containing PA-PANa maintained significantly higher theophylline concentrations than control suppositories at 12h after rectal administration. Furthermore, histopathological examination indicated that these suppositories using acrylate polymers did not result in rectal lesions. The SR-HT suppository, particularly using PA-PANa as a gel agent, may thus be useful against nocturnal symptoms of asthma. In this study, we confirmed new formulation of sustained-release suppository for chronotherapy of theophylline using oily base material in combination with polymer such as PA-PANa. The hollow-type suppository containing oleaginous base and hydrophilic polymer in the shell could be useful device for rectal administration of various drugs with prolongation of plasma concentration. PMID:19555748

  16. Sleeping position and rectal temperature.

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, S A; Anderson, E.S.; Lodemore, M; Rawson, D.; Wailoo, M P

    1991-01-01

    The effects of sleeping position upon body temperature were assessed by continuous monitoring of rectal temperature in 137 babies sleeping at home under conditions chosen by their parents. There were three groups of subjects: (1) normal babies aged 12-22 weeks whose temperature rhythms were developed, (2) normal babies aged 6-12 weeks who were developing their night time temperature rhythms, and (3) babies the night after diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus immunisation, whose temperature rhyt...

  17. [Rectal resection with colo-anal anastomosis for ergotamine-induced rectal stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panis, Y; Valleur, P; Kleinmann, P; Willems, G; Hautefeuille, P

    1990-01-01

    Anorectal ulcers due to ergotamine suppositories are extremely rare. We report the first case of rectal stenosis following regular abuse of ergotamine suppositories which required rectal resection and coloanal anastomosis, despite stopping the intoxication 1 year previously. The rectal eversion during the perineal procedure allowed a low anastomosis to be performed, on the dentate line. One year later, the functional result was considered to be good, demonstrating the place of coloanal anastomosis in benign rectal pathology. PMID:2100123

  18. Advances in Multidisciplinary Treatment of Rectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Changlin; Hongqin SUN; Yang, Yang

    2009-01-01

    To summarize the advances in the multidisciplinary treatment of rectal cancer and to analyze the existing problems and development prospects. The full text database retrieval system of MEDLINE and the periodicals of CHKD were searched. The words “rectal cancer, diagnosis, surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, targeted therapy, analysis” were used as key words for retrieval of literature concerning the values and clinical significance of rectal cancer multidisciplinary treatment from January, 2...

  19. Chemoradiotherapy response in recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficacy of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in recurrent versus primary rectal cancer has not been investigated. We compared radiological downsizing between primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT and determined the optimal size reduction threshold for response validated by survival outcomes. The proportional change in tumor length for primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT was compared using the independent sample t-test. Overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan–Meier product limit method and differences between survival for tumor size reduction thresholds of 30% (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors [RECIST]), 40%, and 50% after CRT in primary and recurrent rectal cancer groups. A total of 385 patients undergoing CRT were analyzed, 99 with recurrent rectal cancer and 286 with primary rectal cancer. The mean proportional reduction in maximum craniocaudal length was significantly higher for primary rectal tumors (33%) compared with recurrent rectal cancer (11%) (P < 0.01). There was no difference in OS for either primary or recurrent rectal cancer when ≤30% or ≤40% definitions were used. However, for both primary and recurrent tumors, significant differences in median 3-year OS were observed when a RECIST cut-off of 50% was used. OS was 99% versus 77% in primary and 100% versus 42% in recurrent rectal cancer (P = 0.002 and P = 0.03, respectively). Only patients that demonstrated >50% size reduction showed a survival benefit. Recurrent rectal cancer appears radioresistant compared with primary tumors for tumor size after CRT. Further investigation into improving/intensifying chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer is justified

  20. Rectal function following prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Quality of life following therapeutic intervention for carcinoma of the prostate gland has not been well documented. In particular, a paucity of data has been published regarding bowel function following prostate brachytherapy. This study evaluated late bowel function in 209 consecutive prostate brachytherapy patients via a one-time questionnaire administered 16-55 months postimplant. Materials and Methods: Two hundred nineteen consecutive patients underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy from April 1995 through February 1998 using either 125I or 103Pd for clinical T1c-T3a carcinoma of the prostate gland. Of the 219 patients, 7 had expired. Of the remaining 212 patients (median follow-up, 28 months), each patient was mailed a self-administered questionnaire (10 questions) with a prestamped return envelope; 209 (98.6%) surveys were returned. Clinical parameters evaluated for bowel dysfunction included patient age, diabetes, hypertension, history of tobacco consumption, clinical T-stage, elapsed time since implant, and prostate ultrasound volume. Treatment parameters included utilization of neoadjuvant hormonal manipulation, utilization of moderate dose external beam radiation therapy prior to implantation, choice of isotope (125I vs. 103Pd), rectal dose (average, median and maximum doses), total implanted seed strength, values of the minimum dose received by 90% of the prostate gland (D90), and the percent prostate volume receiving 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed minimum peripheral dose (V100, V150 and V200, respectively). Because detailed baseline bowel function was not available for these patients, a cross-sectional survey was performed in which 30 newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients of comparable demographics served as controls. Results: The total rectal function scores for the brachytherapy and control patients were 4.3 and 1.6, respectively, out of a total 27 points (p 103Pd resulted in lower radiation doses to the rectum, the choice of

  1. Rectal cancer surgery: volume-outcome analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, Emmeline

    2010-12-01

    There is strong evidence supporting the importance of the volume-outcome relationship with respect to lung and pancreatic cancers. This relationship for rectal cancer surgery however remains unclear. We review the currently available literature to assess the evidence base for volume outcome in relation to rectal cancer surgery.

  2. Treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, RA; Nieuwenhuijzen, GAP; Martijn, H; Rutten, HJT; Hospers, GAP; Wiggers, T

    2004-01-01

    Historically, locally advanced rectal cancer is known for its dismal prognosis. The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer is subject to continuous change due to development of new and better diagnostic tools, radiotherapeutic techniques, chemotherapeutic agents and understanding of the subject

  3. Severe rectal complications after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Some investigators have reported severe rectal complications after brachytherapy. Due to the low number of such events, their relationship to dosimetric parameters has not been well characterized. Methods and materials: A total of 3126 patients were treated with low dose rate brachytherapy from 1998 through 2010. 2464 had implant alone, and 313 had implant preceded by 44–46 Gy supplemental external beam radiation (EBRT). Post-implant dosimetry was based on a CT scan obtained on the day of implant, generally within 30 min of the procedure. Every patient’s record was reviewed for occurrence of rectal complications. Results: Eight of 2464 patients (0.32%) treated with brachytherapy alone developed a radiation-related rectal fistula. Average prostatic and rectal dose parameters were moderately higher for fistula patients than for patients without a severe rectal complication. For instance, the average R100 was 1.2 ± 0.75 cc for fistula patients, versus 0.37 ± 0.88 cc for non-fistula patients. However, the fistula patients’ values were well within the range of values for patients without a rectal complication. Four patients had some attempt at repair or reconstruction, but long-term functional outcomes were not favorable. Conclusions: Rectal fistulas are a very uncommon potential complication of prostate brachytherapy, which can occur even in the setting of acceptable day 0 rectal doses. Their occurrence is not easily explained by standard dosimetric or clinical factors

  4. The Morphologic Assessment of Rectal Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Ran Kim

    2014-04-01

    Conclusions: Endoscopic features such as hyperemic change, polypoid lesions, irregular contours, and surface ulcers with tumor size ≥10 mm in diameter are associated with metastasis in rectal NETs. In particular, atypical endoscopic features including hyperemic change, and surface ulcer with tumor size ≥10 mm in diameter may help to predict the risk of metastasis of rectal NETs.

  5. Plasma concentrations after high-dose (45 mg.kg-1) rectal acetaminophen in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, C J; McCormack, J P; Reichert, C C; Marsland, C P

    1995-11-01

    Although the recommended dose of rectal acetaminophen (25-30 mg.kg-1) is twice that for oral administration (10-15 mg.kg-1), the literature justifies the use of a higher dose when acetaminophen is administered via the rectal route. We measured venous plasma acetaminophen concentrations resulting from 45 mg.kg-1 of rectal acetaminophen in ten ASA 1, 15 kg paediatric patients undergoing minor surgery with a standardized anaesthetic. After induction of anaesthesia, a single 650 mg suppository (Abenol, SmithKline Beecham Pharma Inc.) was administered rectally. Plasma was sampled at t = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240 min in the first five patients and at t = 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, 300, 420 min in the subsequent five. Acetaminophen plasma concentrations were determined using a TDxFLx fluorescence polarization immunoassay (Abbott Laboratories, Toronto, Ontario). The maximum plasma concentration was 88 +/- 39 mumol.L-1 (13 +/- 6 micrograms.ml-1) and the time of peak plasma concentration was 198 +/- 70 min (mean +/- SD). At 420 min, the mean plasma concentration was 46 +/- 18 mumol.L-1 (7.0 +/- 0.9 micrograms.ml-1). No plasma concentrations associated with toxicity (> 800 mumol.L-1) were identified. A 45 mg.kg-1 rectal dose of acetaminophen resulted in peak plasma concentrations comparable with those resulting from 10-15 mg.kg-1 of oral acetaminophen at three hours after suppository insertion. It is concluded that the delayed and erratic absorption of acetaminophen after rectal administration leads to unpredictable plasma concentrations. Rectal acetaminophen will not be consistently effective for providing rapid onset of analgesia in children. PMID:8590508

  6. Comparative of Therapeutic Efficacy of Oxycodone Hydrochloride Sustained-release Tablets vs. Morphine Sulfate Sustained-release Tablets for Severe Cancer Pain Control with Rectal Administration%盐酸羟考酮缓释片与硫酸吗啡缓释片直肠给药控制重度癌性疼痛的疗效比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕箭; 杨梅英; 沈季元; 王建华; 毛睿

    2012-01-01

    目的:比较盐酸羟考酮缓释片与硫酸吗啡缓释片经直肠给药治疗重度癌性疼痛的疗效和不良反应.方法:将102例伴有中、重度疼痛的癌症患者随机分为A组(50例)与B组(52例),分别经直肠给予盐酸羟考酮缓释片和硫酸吗啡缓释片,比较2组药物起效时间、癌痛类型和药品不良反应的差异.结果:A组患者治疗1、3h时的疼痛与B组同期比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),2组内脏痛和躯体痛比较差异分别有统计学意义(P<0.05),2组的不良反应如恶心、呕吐、便秘比较分别有显著性差异(P<0.05),A组均优于B组.结论:盐酸羟考酮缓释片经直肠给药控制重度癌性疼痛,安全、有效、简便.%OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy and adverse drug reactions of oxycodone hydrochloride sustained-release tablets (Oxycontin, Oxycodone hydrochloride prolonged-release tablets) and Morphine sulfate sustained-release tablets (MS Contin, Morphine sulfate) with rectal administration in the treatment of severe cancer pain. METHODS: Clinical information of 102 cases of moderate to severe cancer pain were analyzed, and they were divided into 2 groups. 50 cases were given oxycodone hydrochloride sustained-release tablets with rectal administration group A and 52 cases were given morphine sulfate sustained-release tablets group B. The differences of onset time, the type of cancer pain and side effects were compared between 2 groups. RESULTS: There was statistical significance in the difference of cancer pain between 2 groups, after 1 h and 3 h treatment (P<0.05), there were statistical significance in the differences of visceral pain and somatic pain between 2 groups (P<0.05) ; there were significant differences in adverse drug reactions between 2 groups, such as nausea, vomiting, constipation (P<0.05), and group A was better than group B. CONCLUSION: As for non-hospitalized patients, dying patients and not oral due to various reasons, transrectal

  7. Interstitial irradiation of rectal carcinoma with rectal template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Nishiyama, Kinji; Tanaka, Ken; Nakanishi, Makoto; Inoue, Takehiro (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1984-06-01

    Using Iridium-192 wires through a rectal template after Syed, interstitial brachytherapy was conducted in a patient with inoperable adenocarcinoma of the rectum. A 67-year-old man with constipation and change in the stool caliber underwent external radiotherapy (4,000cGy/4W) to the whole pelvis including the perineum, followed by interstitial implant using a template, at the Department of Radiology, Osaka University Hospital. Marked tumor regression, marked circumferential fibrosis and a remarkable decline of CEA titers (pre-RT: 35.8ng/ml, post-RT: 6.2ng/ml) were observed until 7 months post-RT. The domestic production of Iridium-192 wires has made possible the intergrated use of brachytherapy in the perineal region in Japan.

  8. Interstitial irradiation of rectal carcinoma with rectal template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using Iridium-192 wires through a rectal template after Syed, interstitial brachytherapy was conducted in a patient with inoperable adenocarcinoma of the rectum. 67-year-old man with constipation and change in the stool caliber underwent external radiotherapy (4,000cGy/4W) to the whole pelvis including the perineum, followed by interstitial implant using a template, at the Department of Radiology, Osaka University Hospital. Marked tumor regression, marked circumferential fibrosis and a remarkable decline of CEA titers (pre-RT: 35.8ng/ml, post-RT: 6.2ng/ml) were observed until 7 months post-RT. The domestic production of Iridium-192 wires has made possible the intergrated use of brachytherapy in the perineal region in Japan. (author)

  9. High-Resolution MRI in Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution MRI is the best method of assessing the relation of the rectal tumor with the potential circumferential resection margin (CRM). Therefore it is currently considered the method of choice for local staging of rectal cancer. The primary surgery of rectal cancer is total mesorectal excision (TME), which plane of dissection is formed by the mesorectal fascia surrounding mesorectal fat and rectum. This fascia will determine the circumferential margin of resection. At the same time, high resolution MRI allows adequate pre-operative identification of important prognostic risk factors, improving the selection and indication of therapy for each patient. This information includes, besides the circumferential margin of resection, tumor and lymph node staging, extramural vascular invasion and the description of lower rectal tumors. All these should be described in detail in the report, being part of the discussion in the multidisciplinary team, the place where the decisions involving the patient with rectal cancer will take place. The aim of this study is to provide the information necessary to understand the use of high resolution MRI in the identification of prognostic risk factors in rectal cancer. The technical requirements and standardized report for this study will be describe, as well as the anatomical landmarks of importance for the total mesorectal excision (TME), as we have said is the surgery of choice for rectal cancer. (authors)

  10. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  11. Rectal Duplication Cyst: A Rare Cause of Rectal Prolapse in a Toddler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushbakht, Samreen; ul Haq, Anwar

    2015-12-01

    Rectal duplication cysts are rare congenital anomalies. They constitute only 4% of the total gastrointestinal anomalies. They usually present in childhood. The common presenting symptoms are mass or pressure effects like constipation, tenesmus, urinary retention, local infection or bleeding due to presence of ectopic gastric mucosa. We are reporting a rare presenting symptom of rectal duplication cyst in a 4-year-old boy/toddler who presented with rectal prolapse. He also had bleeding per rectum. Rectal examination revealed a soft mass palpable in the posterior rectal wall. CT scan showed a cystic mass in the posterior wall of the rectum. It was excised trans-anally and the postoperative recovery was uneventful. Biopsy report showed rectal duplication cyst. PMID:26691370

  12. Evidences in multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last 10 years, a number of important European randomized published studies investigated the optimal management of rectal cancer. In order to define an evidence-based approach of the clinical practice based, an international consensus conference was organized in Italy under the endorsement of European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO) and European Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ESTRO). The aim of this article is to present highlights of multidisciplinary rectal cancer management and to compare the conclusions of the international conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Treatment: looking for an European Consensus' (EURECA-CC2) with the new National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. (authors)

  13. MRI staging of low rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shihab, Oliver C.; Heald, Richard J. [Pelican Cancer Foundation, North Hampshire Hospital, Basingstoke (United Kingdom); Moran, Brendan J. [Colorectal Research Unit, North Hampshire Hospital, Basingstoke (United Kingdom); Quirke, Philip [St James' s Hospital, Leeds Institute for Molecular Medicine, Leeds (United Kingdom); Brown, Gina [Royal Marsden Hospital, Department of Radiology, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-15

    Low rectal tumours, especially those treated by abdominoperineal excision (APE), have a high rate of margin involvement when compared with tumours elsewhere in the rectum. Correct surgical management to minimise this rate of margin involvement is reliant on highly accurate imaging, which can be used to plan the planes of excision. In this article we describe the techniques for accurate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment and a novel staging system for low rectal tumours. Using this staging system it is possible for the radiologist to demonstrate accurately tumour-free planes for surgical excision of low rectal tumours. (orig.)

  14. MRI staging of low rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low rectal tumours, especially those treated by abdominoperineal excision (APE), have a high rate of margin involvement when compared with tumours elsewhere in the rectum. Correct surgical management to minimise this rate of margin involvement is reliant on highly accurate imaging, which can be used to plan the planes of excision. In this article we describe the techniques for accurate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment and a novel staging system for low rectal tumours. Using this staging system it is possible for the radiologist to demonstrate accurately tumour-free planes for surgical excision of low rectal tumours. (orig.)

  15. Transvaginal ultrasonography of rectal endometriosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egekvist, Anne Gisselmann; Seyer-Hansen, Mikkel; Forman, Axel

    Objectives: The aim of this present study was to evaluate the interobserver variation of transvaginal ultrasonographic measurements of endometriosis infiltrating the rectosigmoid wall. Methods: Transvaginal ultrasonography was performed independently by two observers. Observer 1 had several years...... of experience in ultrasonography while observer 2 was a medical student with no prior experience in ultrasonography or endometriosis. In 24 patient length, width and depth of endometriosis infiltrating the rectosigmoid bowel was measured. The differences between the observers were analysed by Bland...... ultrasonography for a relatively short period gives comparable scanning results between the two observers. It seems that transvaginal ultrasound could be used as a diagnostic tool for rectal endometriosis in most departments. However, the irregular morphology of the lesions makes the measurements very complex...

  16. The intervention effect of rectal administration of Baclofen combined with comprehensive rehabilitation on the spastic state in the recovery period of stroke%巴氯酚直肠给药配合综合康复对脑卒中恢复期偏瘫痉挛状态的干预效应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨贵青

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore more effective ways to improve hemiplegia spasticity of stroke in the recovery period. Methods 100 subjects were given Baclofen rectal administration (retention enema) + comprehensive rehabilitation measures in the treatment of muscle spasticity on the basis of the implementation of the conventional treatment of neurology and stable conditions and physical signs. The dose was once 15 mg in the first day, then with an increase of 5-10 mg per day, the enema of 14 d was a course of treatment, for three courses. The comprehensive rehabilitation measures included good limb placed to maintain joint mobility, ease of body movement to control the static stretch around the cramps, muscle spasms, passive movement and massage. The effects were evaluated before treatment and after treatment of 32 d. Results 32 d after treatment compared with before treatment, the patient's muscle tone to improve the situation had a significant difference (P < 0.01). Muscle tone after treatment showed significant improvement, and gradually returned to normal; the results of the ADL score also had a significant difference (P < 0.01), and prompt patients after treatment of 32 d, the activities of daily living improved significantly. Conclusion Rectal administration of Baclofen with comprehensive rehabilitation training is helpful for the neurological rehabilitation of stroke patients and can improve the prognosis of stroke patients with hemiplegia spasm.%目的 探讨改善脑卒中恢复期偏瘫痉挛状态更为有效的方法.方法 100例研究对象在实施神经内科常规治疗以及病情和生命体征稳定的情况下,采用巴氯酚直肠给药(即保留灌肠)+综合康复措施治疗肌痉挛状态.用药第1天剂量为15 mg/次,然后每天增加5~10 mg,灌肠14 d为1个疗程,连续治疗3个疗程.综合康复措施具体内容包括良肢位的摆放、保持关节的活动度、缓解身体运动控制点周围痉挛、肌肉痉挛的静态牵拉、

  17. How useful is rectal endosonography in the staging of rectal cancer?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taylan; Kav; Yusuf; Bayraktar

    2010-01-01

    It is essential in treating rectal cancer to have adequate preoperative imaging,as accurate staging can influence the management strategy,type of resection,and candidacy for neoadjuvant therapy.In the last twenty years,endorectal ultrasound(ERUS) has become the primary method for locoregional staging of rectal cancer.ERUS is the most accurate modality for assessing local depth of invasion of rectal carcinoma into the rectal wall layers(T stage) .Lower accuracy for T2 tumors is commonly reported,which could ...

  18. Low Rectal Cancer Study (MERCURY II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Colorectal Neoplasms; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Rectal Diseases

  19. Wind sock deformity in rectal atresia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rectal atresia is a rare anorectal deformity. It usually presents with neonatal obstruction and it is often a complete membrane or severe stenosis. Windsock deformity has not been reported in rectal atresia especially, having been missed for 2 years. A 2-year-old girl reported only a severe constipation despite having a 1.5-cm anal canal in rectal examination with scanty discharge. She underwent loop colostomy and loopogram, which showed a wind sock deformity of rectum with mega colon. The patient underwent abdominoperineal pull-through with good result and follow-up. This is the first case of the wind sock deformity in rectal atresia being reported after 2 years of age. (author)

  20. Treatment Options by Stage (Rectal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Age and family history can affect the risk of rectal cancer. Anything ... to flow from the body to a collection bag. After the cancer is removed, the surgeon will ...

  1. Wind sock deformity in rectal atresia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseini Seyed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rectal atresia is a rare anorectal deformity. It usually presents with neonatal obstruction and it is often a complete membrane or severe stenosis. Windsock deformity has not been reported in rectal atresia especially, having been missed for 2 years. A 2-year-old girl reported only a severe constipation despite having a 1.5-cm anal canal in rectal examination with scanty discharge. She underwent loop colostomy and loopogram, which showed a wind sock deformity of rectum with mega colon. The patient underwent abdominoperineal pull-through with good result and follow-up. This is the first case of the wind sock deformity in rectal atresia being reported after 2 years of age.

  2. Screening paediatric rectal forms of azithromycin as an alternative to oral or injectable treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauss, Tina; Gaudin, Karen; Gaubert, Alexandra; Ba, Boubakar; Tagliaferri, Serena; Fawaz, Fawaz; Fabre, Jean-Louis; Boiron, Jean-Michel; Lafarge, Xavier; White, Nicholas J; Olliaro, Piero L; Millet, Pascal

    2012-10-15

    The aim of this study was to identify a candidate formulation for further development of a home or near-home administrable paediatric rectal form of a broad-spectrum antibiotic - specially intended for (emergency) use in tropical rural settings, in particular for children who cannot take medications orally and far from health facilities where injectable treatments can be given. Azithromycin, a broad-spectrum macrolide used orally or intravenously for the treatment of respiratory tract, skin and soft tissue infections, was selected because of its pharmacokinetic and therapeutic properties. Azithromycin in vitro solubility and stability in physiologically relevant conditions were studied. Various pharmaceutical forms, i.e. rectal suspension, two different rectal gels, polyethylene glycol (PEG) suppository and hard gelatin capsule (HGC) were assessed for in vitro dissolution and in vivo bioavailability in the rabbit. Azithromycin PEG suppository appears to be a promising candidate. PMID:22868232

  3. MicroRNA in rectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Azizian, Azadeh; Gruber, Jens; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Gaedcke, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    In rectal cancer, one of the most common cancers worldwide, the proper staging of the disease determines the subsequent therapy. For those with locally advanced rectal cancer, a neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is recommended before any surgery. However, response to CRT ranges from complete response (responders) to complete resistance (non-responders). To date we are not able to separate in advance the first group from the second, due to the absence of a valid biomarker. Therefore all pati...

  4. Administration of methohexital for pediatric outpatient dentistry.

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, M. J.; Griswold, J. D.; Rosenberg, M

    1990-01-01

    Rectally administered methohexital is a safe, effective sedative to ameliorate the stress of the surgical experience for the uncooperative child. The rapid onset, relatively short duration, and patient acceptance of this technique make it applicable for many pediatric outpatient procedures. Induction doses of 20-30 mg/kg of a 10% methohexital solution can produce sleep in 7-8 minutes. In some situations, the rectal route of administration has advantages over more commonly used techniques.

  5. Comparison between Preoperative Rectal Diclofenac Plus Paracetamol and Diclofenac Alone for PostoperativePain of Hysterectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saghar Samimi Sede

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available To detect whether the preoperative combined administration of rectal diclofenac and paracetamol is superior to placebo or rectal diclofenac alone for pain after abdominal hysterectomy.Ninety female patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA physical status I-II, scheduled for abdominal hysterectomy were recruited to this double blind trial and were randomized to receive one of three modalities before surgery: rectal combination of diclofenac and paracetamol, rectal diclofenac alone or rectal placebo alone which were given as a suppository one hour prior to surgery. The primary outcomes were visual analogue pain scores measured at 0, 0.5, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 24 hours after surgery and the time of first administration and also total amount of morphine used in the first 24 hour after surgery. A 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS was used to assess pain intensity at rest.In patients receiving the combination of diclofenac and paracetamol total dose of morphine used in the first 24 hour after surgery was significantly lower (13.9 ± 2.7 mg compared to diclofenac group (16.8± 2.8 mg and placebo group (20.1 ± 3.6 mg (p<0.05. VAS pain score was significantly lower in combination group compared to other groups all time during first 24 hours (p<0.05. There had been a significant difference between combination group and the two other groups in terms of the first request of morphine (p<0.05.According to our study Patients who receive the rectal diclofenac-paracetamol combination experience significantly a lower pain scale in the first 24 hour after surgery compared with patients receiving diclofenac or placebo alone. Their need to supplementary analgesic is significantly later and lower compared to placebo and diclofenac alone.

  6. Digital rectal examination and transrectal ultrasonography in staging of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael; Kronborg, Ole; Fenger, Claus

    1994-01-01

    Staging of rectal carcinoma before surgical treatment was performed in a prospective blind study, comparing digital rectal exploration and transrectal linear ultrasonography (TRUS) with the resulting pathological examination. TRUS underestimated depth of penetration in 3 of 33 patients and overes...... surgery for cure....

  7. Importance of Preoperative Rectal Ultrasound and CT in Rectal Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The reason of high mortality of colorectal carcinoma is above all the fact, that majority of diseases are detected in progressive stage. Radical change in this unfavorable mortality rate can be achieved only by targeted search for early stages of the disease. Early diagnostics consists in rectoscopy and colonoscopy. Regarding X-ray methods it is X-ray irigography. Regarding CT examinations it is CT irigography, virtual colonoscopy. Another examination can be USG examination of abdomen and endo sonographic examination of rectum. Materials and methods: In the period from June 2006 to December 2010, in 60 patients out of the total number 106 examined patients, tumorous affection of rectum CT examination of pelvis and abdomen separately or pelvisand abdomen at one session was made in 3186 patients. In 115 patients we discovered malign tumorous illness of colon. Metastatic affection in the form of distant metastases was proven n 63 patients. 403 patients had CT irigography examination. In 77 out of them we diagnosed colon carcinoma. CT colonoscopy did not discover in our group of 30 patients examined the presence of colon carcinoma. Results: In the group of 60 patients who were diagnosed rectal carcinoma, in 29 patients expansive infiltrative affection was evaluated in endorectal sonography, histologically confirmed in 28 patients - 96,5 %, expansive affection in 41 patients with histological verification in 100 %. With CT we diagnosed 52 expansive tumorous processes, histologically confirmed in 47 patients - 90,38 %. In 63 patients expansive infiltrative process was evaluated, histologically confirmed in 52 patients 82,53 %. In total of 115 examinations there was conformance with histological examination in 99 patients - 86,08 %. In CT irigography we diagnosed colon tumour in 77 patients. Expansive growth was evaluated in 40 patients, histologically confirmed in 37 patients - 92,5 %. Expansive infiltrative expansion was evaluated in 37 patients, with

  8. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and pathological complete response in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Linda; Fichera, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    The management of rectal cancer has evolved significantly in the last few decades. Significant improvements in local disease control were achieved in the 1990s, with the introduction of total mesorectal excision and neoadjuvant radiotherapy. Level 1 evidence has shown that, with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) the rates of local recurrence can be lower than 6% and, as a result, neoadjuvant CRT currently represents the accepted standard of care. This approach has led to reliable tumor down-staging, with 15-27% patients with a pathological complete response (pCR)-defined as no residual cancer found on histological examination of the specimen. Patients who achieve pCR after CRT have better long-term outcomes, less risk of developing local or distal recurrence and improved survival. For all these reasons, sphincter-preserving procedures or organ-preserving options have been suggested, such as local excision of residual tumor or the omission of surgery altogether. Although local recurrence rate has been stable at 5-6% with this multidisciplinary management method, distal recurrence rates for locally-advanced rectal cancers remain in excess of 25% and represent the main cause of death in these patients. For this reason, more recent trials have been looking at the administration of full-dose systemic chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting (in order to offer early treatment of disseminated micrometastases, thus improving control of systemic disease) and selective use of radiotherapy only in non-responders or for low rectal tumors smaller than 5 cm. PMID:26290512

  9. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy for lower rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murotani, Masahiro; Tsujinaka, Toshimasa; Takami, Motohisa [Toyonaka Municipal Hospital, Osaka (Japan)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    To identify appropriate candidates with rectal cancer for preoperative chemoradiation therapy, the local recurrence rate and clinicopathological characteristics of 232 patients with rectal cancer undergoing curative resection in our department were investigated. The local recurrence rates were 3.8%, 10.8% and 16.5% in the Rs, Ra and Rb lesions, respectively. Regarding lower (Rb) rectal cancer, depth of lesion (>a{sub 1}) and nodal metastasis consisted of high factors for local recurrence. Basing on these results, entery criteria for preoperative chemoradiation therapy were established, and concurrent chemoradiation therapy with fluorouracil and cisplatin was delivered preoperatively in 9 primary cases of locally advanced rectal cancer and 3 cases with local recurrence. A partial response was obtained in 7 of 12 cases with a response rate of 58%, size-reduction of the distant metastatic lesions was found in 2 cases, and clinical symptoms were improved in all cases. The histological responses of the 6 resected cases were Grade 2 in 2 cases and Grade 1b in 4 cases. The toxicities of this chemoradiation regimen were well tolerable. As a postoperative complication, infection of the perineal wound was most frequent. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy with the present regimen would be a useful adjuvant treatment for advanced lower rectal cancer. (author)

  10. Only Half of Rectal Cancer Patients Get Recommended Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158339.html Only Half of Rectal Cancer Patients Get Recommended Treatment: ... therapy for rectal cancer in the United States, only slightly more than half of patients receive it, ...

  11. Tricyclic antidepressant overdose: an unusual method of administration

    OpenAIRE

    Barton, Marc; Harris, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Drug poisoning as a result of tricyclic antidepressant overdose is frequently encountered in emergency departments and is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity. The usual route of administration is oral. Here we report the case of a 42-year-old man with a history of depression who had taken a large overdose of amitriptyline by the rectal route. This case highlights the management difficulties that arose as a result of rectal administration of the drug and possible ways in which treat...

  12. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Neil; Brown, Gina

    2008-01-01

    Detailed preoperative staging using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables the selection of patients that require preoperative therapy for tumour regression. This information can be used to instigate neoadjuvant therapy in those patients with poor prognostic features prior to disturbing the tumour bed and potentially disseminating disease. The design of trials incorporating MR assessment of prognostic factors prior to therapy has been found to be of value in assessing treatment modalities and outcomes that are targeted to these preoperative prognostic subgroups and in providing a quantifiable assessment of the efficacy of particular chemoradiation treatment protocols by comparing pre-treatment MR staging with post therapy histology assessment. At present, we are focused on achieving clear surgical margins of excision (CRM) to avoid local recurrence. We recommend that all patients with rectal cancer should undergo pre-operative MRI staging. Of these, about half will have good prognosis features (T1-T3b, N0, EMVI negative, CRM clear) and may safely undergo primary total mesorectal excision. Of the remainder, those with threatened or involved margins will certainly benefit from pre-operative chemoradiotherapy with the aim of downstaging to permit safe surgical excision. In the future, our ability to recognise features predicting distant failure, such as extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) may be used to stratify patients for neo-adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in an effort to prevent distant relapse. The optimal pre-operative treatment regimes for these patients (radiotherapy alone, systemic chemotherapy alone or combination chemo-radiotherapy) is the subject of current and future trials. PMID:17957502

  13. Californium-252 brachytherapy for anal and ano-rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surgery has historically been the standard treatment for anal, ano-rectal and rectal carcinoma but is prone to local or regional failure. Over the past 15 years there has been increasing interest in and success with radiation therapy and combined chemoradiotherapy for treatment of anal and ano-rectal cancers. Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with external beam teletherapy has been investigated for anal and ano-rectal lesions at the Univ. of Kentucky with encouraging results

  14. Masquerading Mycobacterium: Rectal Growth or Tuberculosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabajit Choudhury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 37-year old male presented to us with history of lower abdominal pain for 6 months. His physical examination revealed a rectal mass of approximately 1centimeter. He was investigated for possible rectal growth with sigmoidoscopy and biopsy. The histopathological examination (HPE showed a non-specific chronic inflammation in the tissue from the mass. Another tissue from the mass was sent for polymerase chain reaction (PCR for tuberculosis, which turned out to be positive. The patient was started on standard anti tubercular (ATT regimen and responded completely to the treatment. We discuss the patient and review some of the available literature on the topic and discuss the issue of considering a diagnosis of tuberculosis in cases with rectal mass specially when it has become a major public health issue with increasing number of HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus infected patients.

  15. Anorectal function orientated surgery for rectal prolapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until quite recently, rectal prolapse was regarded as being a simple condition to treat. Surgical control of the prolapse was largely regarded as a successful outcome. However, recent detailed clinical assessment indicate that many patients have a rectal prolapse which is successfully controlled by surgical operation, yet suffer severe symptoms of disordered defecation, which either persists, or develops as a result of operative treatment. Difficulty with rectal evacuation, persistent incontinence and continuing mucus discharge are recognized as important, despite successful repair of the prolapse itself. There are two major theory of the pathology; circumferential intussusception and sliding hernia. However, many other multifarious factors are concomitant with the condition. These factors often need to be balanced against one another. Usually, a single surgical procedure will not be able to solve the problems. Therefore, the choice of treatment tailored for the individual patient. (author)

  16. MRI Findings of Rectal Submucosal Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hon Soul; Kim, Joo Hee; Lim, Joon Seok; Choi, Jin Young; Chung, Yong Eun; Park, Mi Suk; Kim, Myeong Jin; Kim, Ki Whang; Kim, Sang Kyum [Yonsei University Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Rectal submucosal lesions encompass a wide variety of benign and malignant tumors involving the rectum. With optical colonoscopy, any mass-like protrusion covered by normal mucosa, whether the underlying process is intramural or extramural in origin, may be reported as a submucosal lesion. Whereas the assessment of submucosal lesions may be limited with performing optical colonoscopy, cross-sectional imaging such as CT, transrectal ultrasonography and MRI allows the evaluation of perirectal tissues and pelvic organs in addition to the entire thickness of the rectum, and so this is advantageous for the assessment of rectal submucosal tumors. Among these, MRI is the best investigative modality for soft tissue characterization. Therefore, knowledge of the MRI features of rectal submucosal tumors can help achieve accurate preoperative diagnoses and facilitate the appropriate management.

  17. Rectal cancer treatment: Improving the picture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Multidisciplinary approach for rectal cancer treatment is currently well defined. Nevertheless, new and promising advances are enriching the portrait. Since the US NIH Consensus in the early 90's some new characters have been added. A bird's-eye view along the last decade shows the main milestones in the development of rectal cancer treatment protocols. New drugs, in combination with radiotherapy are being tested to increase response and tumor control outcomes. However, therapeutic intensity is often associated with toxicity. Thus, innovative strategies are needed to create a better-balanced therapeutic ratio. Molecular targeted therapies and improved technology for delivering radiotherapy respond to the need for accuracy and precision in rectal cancer treatment.

  18. Assessment of T staging and mesorectal fascia status using high-resolution MRI in rectal cancer with rectal distention

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Sheng-Xiang; Zeng, Meng-Su; Xu, Jian-Ming; Qin, Xin-Yu; Chen, Cai-Zhong; Li, Ren-Chen; Hou, Ying-Yong

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the accuracy of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using phased-array coil for preoperative assessment of T staging and mesorectal fascia infiltration in rectal cancer with rectal distention.

  19. Primary Transanal Management of Rectal Atresia in a Neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, Braiek; A, Ksia; I, Krichen; S, Belhassen; K, Maazoun; S, Ben Youssef; N, Kechiche; M, Mekki; A, Nouri

    2016-01-01

    Rectal atresia (RA) with a normal anus is a rare anomaly. We describe a case of rectal atresia in a newborn male presenting with an abdominal distension and failure of passing meconium. The rectal atresia was primarily operated by transanal route. PMID:27123404

  20. The influence of hormone therapies on colon and rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Lidegaard, Øjvind; Keiding, Niels; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Kjær, Susanne Krüger

    2016-05-01

    Exogenous sex hormones seem to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Little is known about the influence of different types or durations of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on colorectal cancer risk. A nationwide cohort of women 50-79 years old without previous cancer (n = 1,006,219) were followed 1995-2009. Information on HT exposures was from the National Prescription Register and updated daily, while information on colon (n = 8377) and rectal cancers (n = 4742) were from the National Cancer Registry. Potential confounders were obtained from other national registers. Poisson regression analyses with 5-year age bands included hormone exposures as time-dependent covariates. Use of estrogen-only therapy and combined therapy were associated with decreased risks of colon cancer (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.77, 95 % confidence interval 0.68-0.86 and 0.88, 0.80-0.96) and rectal cancer (0.83, 0.72-0.96 and 0.89, 0.80-1.00), compared to never users. Transdermal estrogen-only therapy implied more protection than oral administration, while no significant influence was found of regimen, progestin type, nor of tibolone. The benefit of HT was stronger for long-term hormone users; and hormone users were at lower risk of advanced stage of colorectal cancer, which seems supportive for a causal association between hormone therapy and colorectal cancer. PMID:26758900

  1. Using of modified irrigoscopy in the diagnosis of rectal prolaps and rectal intussusception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colonic X-ray findings in 39 patients with rectal prolapse are presented. Of them, 20 and 19 patients were found to have internal and external rectal prolapse, respectively. Studies were conducted by the modified irrigoscopy developed by the State Coloproctology Research Center, Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, to explore the anatomic and functional status of the rectum and the fundus of the pelvis in patients with impaired defecation. The X-ray sign of circular invagination with oral enterography for external rectal prolapse could show associated changes, including enterocele and sigmocele

  2. Cyclical rectal bleeding in colorectal endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, M D; Hodby, K J; van Merwyk, A J; Glancy, R J

    1989-12-01

    Three case reports of cyclical rectal bleeding in endometriosis affecting rectum and sigmoid colon emphasize the close relationship between such cyclical bleeding and intestinal endometriosis. The cause of bleeding, however, is still unclear. The predilection of endometriotic deposits for the outer layers of the bowel wall suggests that mucosal involvement is not a prerequisite for rectal bleeding. The frequent absence of identifiable intramural haemorrhage casts doubt on the premise that intestinal endometriotic deposits 'menstruate'. The cause may simply be a transient tear in normal mucosa due to swelling of an underlying endometriotic deposit at the time of menstruation. PMID:2597100

  3. Clinical study on treatment of rectal carcinoma with Chinese herbal medicine and high dose fluorouracil emulsion via rectal infusion.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晨光

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of rectal infusion of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) plus high dose fluorouracil emulsion in treating rectal carcinoma. Methods: 86 patients of rectal carcinoma were randomly divided into CHM plus chemotherapy group and single chemotherapy group, and the

  4. Hemangioma colorretal Colon rectal hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Batista Pinheiro Barreto

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available O hemangioma colorretal (HCR é uma lesão vascular benigna rara, com manifestação clínica geralmente entre 5 e 25 anos de idade. Faz parte do diagnóstico diferencial das causas de hemorragia digestiva baixa, sendo confundido, na maioria das vezes, com entidades mais comuns, como hemorróidas e doenças inflamatórias intestinais. O retardo do diagnóstico ocorre freqüentemente devido ao desconhecimento da doença, com taxas de mortalidade alcançando 40 a 50% na presença de sangramento importante. O caso relatado é de uma paciente de 17 anos de idade, admitida no Serviço de Colo-proctologia do Hospital Universitário - HUUFMA, em setembro de 2005, com anemia e sangramento retal, desde a infância, de forma intermitente e não dolorosa. Apresentado sua história clínica e propedêutica diagnóstica, realizada por meio de exames laboratoriais, endoscopia digestiva alta, colonoscopia e arteriografia de mesentéricas e ilíacas internas. O tratamento cirúrgico realizado foi retossigmoidectomia convencional com anastomose colorretal baixa, com boa evolução pós-operatória, tendo o exame histopatológico da peça cirúrgica ressecada, confirmado o diagnostico.The colon and rectum hemangioma is a rare benign vascular lesion, with clinical features usually between 5 and 25 years of age. It is included in the differential diagnose of the lower digestive bleeding causes, and has been frequently misdiagnosed with other more common entities, like hemorrhoids and bowel inflammatory disease. The late diagnose occurs usually because of the rarity of the disease, with mortality rates reaching 40 to 50% in presence of severe bleeding. We report a case of a 17 years old girl who was admitted at the Coloproctology Service of the Academic Hospital - HUUFMA, in September 2005, with anemia and intermittent rectal bleeding since childhood. Laboratorial findings included laboratorial exams, GI endoscopy, colonoscopy and arteriography of mesenteric and

  5. Rectal motility after sacral nerve stimulation for faecal incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, H B; Worsøe, J; Krogh, K;

    2010-01-01

    Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is effective against faecal incontinence, but the mode of action is obscure. The aim of this study was to describe the effects of SNS on fasting and postprandial rectal motility. Sixteen patients, 14 women age 33-73 (mean 58), with faecal incontinence of various...... contractions, total time with cyclic rectal contractions, the number of aborally and orally propagating contractions, the number of anal sampling reflexes or rectal wall tension during contractions. Postprandial changes in rectal tone were significantly reduced during SNS (P < 0.02). Before SNS, median rectal...

  6. Expression and role of Tie-2 in rectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of Tie-2 in rectal carcinoma and its relationship with invasion and metastasis in rectal carcinoma.Materials S-P immunohistochemical assay was used to detect the expression of Tie-2 in 40 cases of rectal carcinoma and 10 cases of normal rectal tissues.Results Tie-2 was mainly localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus of vascular endothelial cells in cancerous tissues and partly in the cytoplasm of some cancerous cells.The expression of Tie-2 in rectal carcinoma was signi...

  7. Comfort During Digital Rectal Examination - Patient Preference*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dziki Łukasz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The sex and age of the physician performing the digital rectal examination (DRE procedure is one of the parameters influencing patients’ comfort. It is postulated that the stress related to DRE during admission to the surgical ward may affect the compliance.

  8. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for advanced lower rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in combination with radiation of 30 Gy and chemotherapy with oral uracil-tegafur for 14 patients with advanced lower rectal carcinoma was performed. Tumors were located at RaRb in 5 cases, RbRa in 2, Rb in 3, and RbP in 4 with a mean diameter of 3.8 cm. Preoperative lymphnodes were diagnosed as cN0 in 8 cases, cN1 (metastases of perirectal nodes) in 4, cN1 (perirectal and along superior rectal artery nodes) in 1, and cN3 (perirectal and lateral nodes) in 1. Efficacy for primary carcinomas was evaluated as Partial Response in 9 cases, Stable Disease in 5 and perirectal nodes were down-sized in 4 without down-sizing of either along superior rectal artery nodes or lateral nodes. Margins of primary carcinomas to anal verge were prolonged in 7 cases with a mean prolongation of 0.81 cm. Autonomic nerve-preserving resections with lymphadenectomy of perirectal and along superior rectal artery nodes were performed. Histopathologically efficacy for primary tumors was diagnosed to as not effective in 9 cases, partially effective in 5, and all lymphnodes were combined with necroses and fibrosis. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is safe for preserving autonomic nerves and serves to preserve the sphincter. A forthcoming study with more appropriate radiation, chemotherapy and lymphadenectomy is being considered. (author)

  9. Effect of rectal distension on abdominal girth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, B; Ogliari, C; Basilisco, G

    2004-08-01

    It has been postulated that a viscerosomatic reflex activated by gut distension and inhibiting abdominal wall muscle tone may be one of the mechanisms underlying functional abdominal distension. Any demonstration of such a reflex has to take into account the fact that gut distension may increase abdominal girth as a result of volume displacement. As biomechanical and sensory rectal responses vary at different rates of rectal distension, we hypothesized that different rates of rectal distension might reveal different changes in abdominal girth. Abdominal girth was continuously recorded in 14 healthy subjects using a previously validated extensometer. The rectal distensions were made in a randomized order at rates of 100 mL min(-1) or 10 mL min(-1) up to 150 mL, and sham distensions were used as controls. An increase in abdominal girth was observed at the end of both distensions (P

  10. Current management of locally recurrent rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Bak; Laurberg, Søren; Holm, Thorbjörn

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: A review of the literature was undertaken to provide an overview of the surgical management of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC) after the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME). Method: A systematic literature search was undertaken using PubMed, Embase, Web of...

  11. Ergotamine-induced solitary rectal ulcer.

    OpenAIRE

    Shpilberg, O; Ehrenfeld, M.; Abramowich, D.; Samra, Y.; Bat, L.

    1990-01-01

    A rare case of ergotamine-induced solitary rectal ulcer is described in a 41 year old woman who used high doses of ergotamine tartrate-containing suppositories for severe migraine headaches. Complete recovery of the ulcer was noticed after cessation of treatment with the suppositories. The relevant literature is discussed.

  12. Management of synchronous rectal and prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, D O

    2012-11-01

    Although well described, there is limited published data related to management on the coexistence of prostate and rectal cancer. The aim of this study was to describe a single institution\\'s experience with this and propose a treatment algorithm based on the best available evidence.

  13. Rectal cancer radiotherapy: Towards European consensus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose. During the first decade of the 21st century several important European randomized studies in rectal cancer have been published. In order to help shape clinical practice based on best scientific evidence, the International Conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Treatment: Looking for an European Consensus' (EURECA-CC2) was organized. This article summarizes the consensus about imaging and radiotherapy of rectal cancer and gives an update until May 2010. Methods. Consensus was achieved using the Delphi method. Eight chapters were identified: epidemiology, diagnostics, pathology, surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, treatment toxicity and quality of life, follow-up, and research questions. Each chapter was subdivided by topic, and a series of statements were developed. Each committee member commented and voted, sentence by sentence three times. Sentences which did not reach agreement after voting round no 2 were openly debated during the Conference in Perugia (Italy) December 2008. The Executive Committee scored percentage consensus based on three categories: 'large consensus', 'moderate consensus', 'minimum consensus'. Results. The total number of the voted sentences was 207. Of the 207, 86% achieved large consensus, 13% achieved moderate consensus, and only three (1%) resulted in minimum consensus. No statement was disagreed by more than 50% of members. All chapters were voted on by at least 75% of the members, and the majority was voted on by >85%. Considerable progress has been made in staging and treatment, including radiation treatment of rectal cancer. Conclusions. This Consensus Conference represents an expertise opinion process that may help shape future programs, investigational protocols, and guidelines for staging and treatment of rectal cancer throughout Europe. In spite of substantial progress, many research challenges remain

  14. Quality of care indicators in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetter, P; Ceelen, W; Danse, E; Haustermans, K; Jouret-Mourin, A; Kartheuser, A; Laurent, S; Mollet, G; Nagy, N; Scalliet, P; Van Cutsem, E; Van Den Eynde, M; Van de Stadt, J; Van Eycken, E; Van Laethem, J L; Vindevoghel, K; Penninckx, F

    2011-09-01

    Quality of health care is a hot topic, especially with regard to cancer. Although rectal cancer is, in many aspects, a model oncologic entity, there seem to be substantial differences in quality of care between countries, hospitals and physicians. PROCARE, a Belgian multidisciplinary national project to improve outcome in all patients with rectum cancer, identified a set of quality of care indicators covering all aspects of the management of rectal cancer. This set should permit national and international benchmarking, i.e. comparing results from individual hospitals or teams with national and international performances with feedback to participating teams. Such comparison could indicate whether further improvement is possible and/or warranted. PMID:22103052

  15. Transanal Evisceration Caused by Rectal Laceration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Sánchez, María Teresa; Richart Aznar, Jose Manuel; Martí Martínez, Eva María; Martínez-Abad, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Transrectal evisceration caused by colorectal injury is an unusual entity. This pathology is more frequent in elderly patients and it is usually produced spontaneously. Rectal prolapse is the principal predisposing factor. An 81-year-old woman was taken to the hospital presenting exit of intestinal loops through the anus. After first reanimation measures, an urgent surgery was indicated. We observed the absence of almost every small intestine loop in the abdominal cavity; these had been moved to the pelvis. After doing the reduction, a 3 to 4 cm linear craniocaudal perforation in upper rectum was objectified, and Hartmann's procedure was performed. We investigated and knew that she frequently manipulate herself to extract her faeces. The fast preoperative management avoided a fatal conclusion or an extensive intestinal resection. Reasons that make us consider rectal self-injury as the etiologic factor are explained. PMID:24639971

  16. Evidence and research in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main evidences of epidemiology, diagnostic imaging, pathology, surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and follow-up are reviewed to optimize the routine treatment of rectal cancer according to a multidisciplinary approach. This paper reports on the knowledge shared between different specialists involved in the design and management of the multidisciplinary ESTRO Teaching Course on Rectal Cancer. The scenario of ongoing research is also addressed. In this time of changing treatments, it clearly appears that a common standard for large heterogeneous patient groups have to be substituted by more individualised therapies based on clinical-pathological features and very soon on molecular and genetic markers. Only trained multidisciplinary teams can face this new challenge and tailor the treatments according to the best scientific evidence for each patient

  17. Management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laterza, Liboria; Cecinato, Paolo; Guido, Alessandra; Mussetto, Alessandro; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2013-11-01

    Pelvic radiation disease is one of the major complication after radiotherapy for pelvic cancers. The most commonly reported symptom is rectal bleeding which affects patients' quality of life. Therapeutic strategies for rectal bleeding are generally ignored and include medical, endoscopic, and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. Most cases of radiation-induced bleeding are mild and self-limiting, and treatment is normally not indicated. In cases of clinically significant bleeding (i.e. anaemia), medical therapies, including stool softeners, sucralfate enemas, and metronidazole, should be considered as first-line treatment options. In cases of failure, endoscopic therapy, mainly represented by argon plasma coagulation and hyperbaric oxygen treatments, are valid and complementary second-line treatment strategies. Although current treatment options are not always supported by high-quality studies, patients should be reassured that treatment options exist and success is achieved in most cases if the patient is referred to a dedicated centre. PMID:24101202

  18. Importance of surgical margins in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkai Krishnamurty, Devi; Wise, Paul E

    2016-03-01

    Distal resection margin (DRM) and circumferential resection margin (CRM) are two important considerations in rectal cancer management. Although guidelines recommend a 2 cm DRM, studies have shown that a shorter DRM is adequate, especially in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Standardization of total mesorectal excision has greatly improved quality of CRM. Although more patients are undergoing sphincter-saving procedures, abdominoperineal resection is indicated for very distal tumors, and pelvic exenteration is often necessary for tumors involving pelvic organs. PMID:27094456

  19. MicroRNA in rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizian, Azadeh; Gruber, Jens; Ghadimi, B Michael; Gaedcke, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    In rectal cancer, one of the most common cancers worldwide, the proper staging of the disease determines the subsequent therapy. For those with locally advanced rectal cancer, a neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is recommended before any surgery. However, response to CRT ranges from complete response (responders) to complete resistance (non-responders). To date we are not able to separate in advance the first group from the second, due to the absence of a valid biomarker. Therefore all patients receive the same therapy regardless of whether they reap benefits. On the other hand almost all patients receive a surgical resection after the CRT, although a watch-and-wait procedure or an endoscopic resection might be sufficient for those who responded well to the CRT. Being highly conserved regulators of gene expression, microRNAs (miRNAs) seem to be promising candidates for biomarkers. Many studies have been analyzing the miRNAs expressed in rectal cancer tissue to determine a specific miRNA profile for the ailment. Unfortunately, there is only a small overlap of identified miRNAs between different studies, posing the question as to whether different methods or differences in tissue storage may contribute to that fact or if the results simply are not reproducible, due to unknown factors with undetected influences on miRNA expression. Other studies sought to find miRNAs which correlate to clinical parameters (tumor grade, nodal stage, metastasis, survival) and therapy response. Although several miRNAs seem to have an impact on the response to CRT or might predict nodal stage, there is still only little overlap between different studies. We here aimed to summarize the current literature on rectal cancer and miRNA expression with respect to the different relevant clinical parameters. PMID:27190581

  20. Primary rectal melanoma - a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somak Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common site for malignant melanoma is skin, then eye and third is anorectal region. Primary anorectal malignant melanoma is still very uncommon. It is usually very aggressive and presents with altered bowel habit and rectal bleeding. Proctoscopy shows non-pigmented or lightly pigmented polypoid lesion. Histopathology is confirmatory. Early radical excision is mandatory. A 56 year-old female was presented with malignant melanoma of the lower third of rectum. We report this case for its rarity.

  1. Intraoperative radiotherapy in primary rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the results of several studies intraoperative radiotherapy seems to influence local control for primary rectal cancer in UICC-Stage II / III positively, though recommendations in therapy cannot be given as studies of high evidence level do not exist. As IORT is rarely available and makes patient recruitment difficult, prospective randomised trials have not been carried out yet. This emphasizes the importance of non-randomised trials for an evaluation of IORT. A comparison of 21 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who had been treated with intraoperative radiation therapy and 21 similar cases without an application of IORT could not show any significant improvements in prognosis (recurrences, metastases and disease-specific survival). Nevertheless the employment of intraoperative radiation showed a trend in improvement of local control. This hast been shown by several other studies before. Thus the application of IORT in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer is considered a useful part in multimodal treatment and should further be evaluated in specialized centres. In case-control studies 1:1-matching leads to a good comparability of groups and renders conclusions of high internal validity possible. To gain a sufficient power, this type of trials should however primarily be carried out by centres with a high number of cases.

  2. Function-preserving surgery for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When total mesorectal excision (TME) is accurately performed, dysfunction, theoretically, does not occur. However, there are differences among individuals in the running patterns and the volumes of nerve fibers, and if obesity or a narrow pelvis is present, nerve identification is difficult. Currently, the rate of urinary dysfunction after rectal surgery ranges from 33% to 70%. Many factors other than nerve preservation play a role in minor incontinence. Male sexual function shows impotence rates ranging from 20% to 46%, while 20%-60% of potent patients are unable to ejaculate. In women, information on sexual function is not easily obtained, and there are more unknown aspects than in men. As urinary, sexual, and defecation dysfunction due to adjuvant radiotherapy have been reported to occur at a high frequency, the creation of a protocol that enables analysis of long-term functional outcome will be essential for future clinical trials. In the treatment of rectal cancer, surgeon-related factors are extremely important, not only in achieving local control but also in preserving function. This article reviews findings from recent studies investigating urinary, sexual, and defecation dysfunction after rectal cancer surgery and discusses questions to be studied in the future. (author)

  3. Rectal Sedation with Thiopental in Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: to determine the effectiveness of a rectal sedation protocol with sodium thiopental in children undergoing diagnostic imaging studies in a level-four-complexity health care facility. Materials and Methods: this case series observational study was developed between the months of January and March 2004 in the Fundacion clinica Valle del Lili. All pediatric patients between the ages of three months and eight years of age who underwent an imaging study were included. A dose of 25-40 mg/kg of sodium thiopental was administered rectally. Successful sedation was defined as one that allowed the successful completion of the study with the least number of motion artifacts. The features of the sedation and the adverse effects were evaluated. Results: the study population included 103 children with a median age of two years. The imaging studies were successfully concluded in 97% of the patients. The average total time until complete awakening was 2.9 hours. With respect to the interruption of sedation, we found statistically significant differences between the children who were kept awake the night before the procedure and those who were not. The most common adverse effect was diarrhea, which was recorded in 13 patients. Five of the patients required a supplemental dose of the sedative. There were two cases of increased salivation and one of vomiting, yet they resolved spontaneously. Conclusions: this rectal sodium thiopental protocol is a safe and effective procedure for the completion of diagnostic imaging studies in the pediatric population at our health care center.

  4. Value of protective stoma in rectal cancer surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Fratrić Ivana; Radovanović Zoran; Radovanović Dragana; Vicko Ferenc; Petrović Tomislav; Nikin Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Anastomotic leakage is the most serious surgical complication in rectal surgery. The aim of this study was to find out whether a protective stoma was capable of lowering the rate of clinical anastomotic leakage and to evaluate the rate of anastomotic leakages requiring re-surgery. Material and Methods. A retrospective study included a sample of 149 consecutive patients with rectal cancer who had undergone elective rectal resection with primary ...

  5. Rapid Dissemination of SIV Follows Multisite Entry after Rectal Inoculation

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro dos Santos, Patricia; Rancez, Magali; Prétet, Jean-Luc; Michel-Salzat, Alice; Messent, Valérie; Bogdanova, Anna; Couëdel-Courteille, Anne; Souil, Evelyne; Cheynier, Rémi; Butor, Cécile

    2011-01-01

    Receptive ano-rectal intercourse is a major cause of HIV infection in men having sex with men and in heterosexuals. Current knowledge of the mechanisms of entry and dissemination during HIV rectal transmission is scarce and does not allow the development of preventive strategies. We investigated the early steps of rectal infection in rhesus macaques inoculated with the pathogenic isolate SIVmac251 and necropsied four hours to nine days later. All macaques were positive for SIV. Control macaqu...

  6. Preserving the superior rectal artery in laparoscopic [correction of laparoscopis] anterior resection for complete rectal prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignjatovic, D; Bergamaschi, R

    2002-01-01

    Anterior resection for the treatment of full thickness rectal prolapse has been around for over four decades. 1 However, its use has been limited due to fear of anastomotic leakage and related morbidity. It has been shown that high anterior resection is preferable to its low counterpart as the latter increases complication rates. 2 Although sparing the inferior mesenteric artery in sigmoid resection for diverticular disease has been shown to decrease leak rates in a randomized setting, 3 vascular division is current practice. We shall challenged this current practice of dividing the mesorectum in anterior resection for complete rectal prolapse developing a technique that allows the preservation of the superior rectal artery. PMID:12587465

  7. Low rectal cancer : aspects of surgical techniques and treatment results

    OpenAIRE

    Anderin, Claes

    2012-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the 7th most common form of cancer in Sweden, both for men and women. About one third of all patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have a low tumour (i.e. 0-5 cm from the anal verge). Abdominoperineal excision (APE) is the most common surgical procedure in low rectal cancer, performed in approximately 80% of patients. While oncological outcomes in rectal cancer have improved in recent decades, the outcome after APE has remained poor and local recurrence rates have been report...

  8. Conservative treatment of premature rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: The largest radical resections in rectal cancer with significant morbidity and mortality (Urinary dysfunction, sexual dysfunction, permanent colostomy, etc.), on certain occasions and with high selectivity, they can be avoided with the implementation of local resections. Our intention is to assess the results of conservative treatment of rectal cancer early. Material and Methods: Between 01.01.89 and 31.12.09 14 consecutive patients were treated carriers rectal adenocarcinoma who had never received prior cancer treatment and a second simultaneous showed no neoplasia. The age of the patients presented a range between 44 and 72 years with a mean of 60.4 years; sex similarly partitioned and according to ECOG performance status was 0≤2. All patients were operated through a anal resection of which 4 were performed a submucosal tumor excision (T1) and 10 excision was entire rectal wall and tumor invaded the muscularis propria (T2). For this one type of surgery patients were selected the following criteria: tumor ≤6 cm. the anal verge, size ≤3 cm., GH I-II, vegetative, mobile, and T1-2, N0 by EER. After intervention, the pathological examination of the surgical specimen showed that 4 patients GH III, lymphovascular invasion and / or peri neural, or close surgical margins (+) (≤3 mm.) And T3, so underwent Miles operation (March 1 T1 and T2). Subsequently the rest of the patients (10) underwent concomitant radio chemotherapy. Radiation therapy was similar all using megavoltage photons (CO-60, 18mV) to the entire pelvic volume in a normofraccionamiento to complete 50.40 Gy (1.8 Gy / 28) using multiple fields (box technique). Chemotherapy was prepared 5FU + LV in the first patient (4), in following (4) was used 5FU continuous infusion (1st and 5th week) and the remaining (2) Capecitabine. Follow up was complete. Results: In our sample we extract local failure was 4 (29%), distant failure 3 (20%) and two local and distant failures (14%) so it follows that

  9. Is rectal MRI beneficial for determining the location of rectal cancer with respect to the peritoneal reflection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An objective method for determining the location of the cancer with respect to peritoneal reflection would be helpful to decide the treatment modality for rectal cancer. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy and usefulness of rectal MRI to determine spatial relations between the peritoneal reflection and rectal cancer and to compare these with operative findings. Patients that underwent a rectal cancer operation after a rectal MRI check between November 2008 and June 2010 were considered for the study. The patients that received preoperative concurrent chemoradiation or trans-anal local excision were excluded. Fifty-four patients constituted the study cohort. By comparing surgical and radiologic findings, the accuracy for predicting tumour location in relation to the peritoneal reflection by rectal MRI in all patients was 90.7%. In terms of tumour location in relation to peritoneal reflection, the accuracy of rectal MRI was 93.5% in patients with a tumour located above the peritoneal reflection, 90.0% in patients with a tumour located on the peritoneal reflection, and 84.6% in patients with a tumour located below the peritoneal reflection (p=0.061). When the cohort was subdivided by gender, body mass index (BMI), operative findings, or tumour size, no significant difference was observed among subgroups. Rectal MRI could be a useful tool for evaluating the relation between rectal cancer and peritoneal reflection especially when tumour size is less than 8cm. Rectal MRI can provide information regarding the location of rectal cancer in relation to the peritoneal reflection for treatment planning purposes

  10. A pilot study of topical intrarectal application of amifostine for prevention of late radiation rectal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    rectal wall. No visible mucosal edema, ulcerations, or strictures were noted. No significant differences were found between the proctoscopy findings at 9 and 18 months. Four patients (14%) developed symptoms suggestive of radiation damage that, on sigmoidoscopy, proved to be secondary to unrelated processes. These included preexisting nonspecific proctitis (n=1), diverticular disease of the sigmoid colon (n=1), rectal polyp (n=1), and ulcerative colitis (n=1). Symptoms developed significantly more often in patients receiving 500-1000 mg than in patients receiving 1500-2500 mg amifostine (7 [50%] of 14 vs. 2 [15%] of 13, p=0.0325, one-sided chi-square test). Conclusion: Intrarectal application of amifostine is feasible and well tolerated. Systemic absorption of amifostine and its metabolites is negligible, and close monitoring of patients is not required with rectal administration. Proctoscopy is superior to symptom score as a method of assessing radiation damage of the rectal wall. The preliminary efficacy data are encouraging, and further clinical studies are warranted

  11. Laparoscopic versus open surgery for rectal cancer (COLOR II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Pas, Martijn Hgm; Haglind, Eva; Cuesta, Miguel A;

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery as an alternative to open surgery in patients with rectal cancer has not yet been shown to be oncologically safe. The aim in the COlorectal cancer Laparoscopic or Open Resection (COLOR II) trial was to compare laparoscopic and open surgery in patients with rectal cancer....

  12. Single-port laparoscopic rectal surgery - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lolle, Ida; Rosenstock, Steffen; Bulut, Orhan

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Single-port laparoscopic surgery (SPLS) for colonic disease has been widely described, whereas data for SPLS rectal resection are sparse. This review aimed to evaluate the feasibility, safety and complication profile of SPLS for rectal diseases. METHODS: A systematic literature search...

  13. VMAT planning study in rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the dosimetric differences among fixed field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (SA-VMAT) and double-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (DA-VMAT) plans in rectal cancer. Fifteen patients with rectal cancer previously treated with IMRT in our institution were selected for this study. For each patient, three plans were generated with the planning CT scan: one using a fixed beam IMRT, and two plans using the VMAT technique: SA-VMAT and DA-VMAT. Dose prescription to the PTV was 50 Gy in 2 Gy per fraction. Dose volume histograms (DVH) for the target volume and the organs at risk (small bowel, bladder, femoral heads and healthy tissue) were compared for these different techniques. Monitor units (MU) and delivery treatment time were also reported. DA-VMAT achieved the highest minimum planning target volume (PTV) dose and the lowest maximal dose, resulting in the most homogeneous PTV dose distribution. DA-VMAT also yielded the best CI, although the difference was not statistically significant. Between SA-VMAT and IMRT, the target dose coverage was largely comparable; however, SA-VMAT was able to achieve a better V95 and V107. VMAT showed to be inferior to IMRT in terms of organ at risk sparing, especially for the small bowel. Compared with IMRT, DA-VMAT increased the V15 of small bowel nearly 55 cc. The MU and treatment delivery time were significantly reduced by the use of VMAT techniques. VMAT is a new radiation technique that combines the ability to achieve highly conformal dose distributions with highly efficient treatment delivery. Considering the inferior role of normal tissue sparing, especially for small bowel, VMAT need further investigation in rectal cancer treatment

  14. Rectal Plasmocytoma: cases report and literature revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma cell neoplasia occur in the malignant transformation of the early cell β precursors and plasma cells may group together in isolation in bones and other soft tissues without systemic manifestations; they are called plasmocytomas. Plasmocytomas outside the marrow are a rare presentation of plasma cell neoplasia. Only l % of these tumors present outside the bone marrow, two cases of rectal plasmocytoma are discussed, one of which was treated by pelvic radiotherapy and the other with surgical resection; at the time or this publication, neither shows any evidence of systemic disease

  15. High resolution MRI via endorectal coil. Results in rectal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    10 volunteers and in 31 patients with suspected rectal tumors were examined. In 17 patients (n=17) with rectal carcinoma, of which 15 subsequently underwent radical surgery, the preoperatively obtained tumor stage was compared with histology. In 12 patients (n=12) with rectal adenoma (severe and medium graded epithelial dysplasias according to the WHO) who underwent endoscopy the results of the endorectal surface coil examination were compared with endoscopy and histology. In 4 patients (n=4) with large rectal adenomas the surface coil was used before and as follow-up after endoscopic electro laser resection and the absence of adenoma after therapy also in the deeper layers of the rectal wall could be confirmed. Visualization of anatomical structures of rectum and adjacent structures is improved by the use of the endorectal surface coil. The diagnosis of carcinoma and adenoma of the rectum and the documentation of the exact extension can be reached with high accuracy (85%). (orig./MG)

  16. Anatomo surgical study on radical mesorectum excision in rectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro A. Gorodner

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of surgical anatomy of the mesorectum is essential for cancer surgery in rectal cancer. Radical mesorectal excision allows an appropriate surgery, preserving the pelvic nerves of the autonomic system, preventing postsurgical morbidity. The aim of this paper is to describe the anatomy of the mesorectum as a cornerstone to achieve a careful and detailed technique on rectal cancer surgery. 10 (ten adult formalized cadavers were dissected (nine male and one female specimen. Anatomical elements, both nervous and vascular were explored, in order to recognize those elements that should be preserved in rectal cancer surgery with radical mesorectal excision. The dissection of corpses may be an experimental model to test this type of cancer surgery. Samples were photographed and compared with those made in vivo. Rectal resection with its corresponding mesorectum, accordingly to the location of the tumor improves survival of patients with rectal cancer. Knowledge of the anatomy of the pelvic neurovascular elements significantly reduces postsurgical morbidity.

  17. Exacerbation of Dermatomyositis with Recurrence of Rectal Cancer: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Yuka; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Shimura, Tadanobu; Fujikawa, Hiroyuki; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Junichiro; Toiyama, Yuji; Tanaka, Koji; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) is a rare idiopathic inflammatory myopathy characterized by cutaneous and muscle manifestations. The association between DM and malignancy has been well recognized for many years. The clinical course of paraneoplastic DM may be affected by malignancies, although the cause and effect relationship between exacerbation of DM and cancer progression is uncertain. Herein, we report a 44-year-old woman who presented with progressive DM associated with rectal cancer. After curative resection of rectal cancer, DM symptoms resolved. Three months after surgery, blood test surveillance showed elevation of serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels, although the patient remained asymptomatic. One month later she had a DM flare-up, and multiple lung and liver metastases were found. She immediately underwent cancer chemotherapy with prednisolone therapy for DM. However, her condition deteriorated and she was unable to swallow. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was constructed, allowing alimentation and oral delivery, which made it possible to keep her on chemotherapy. She had remarkable response for unresectable metastases 8 weeks after the administration of chemotherapy. Seven months after onset of recurrence, her condition improved considerably and she had stable disease. Moreover, she can now eat food of soft consistency. Our case provides further support for the clinical importance of cancer chemotherapy for patients who have progressive DM and unresectable rectal cancer. PMID:26668568

  18. Exacerbation of Dermatomyositis with Recurrence of Rectal Cancer: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Nagano

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dermatomyositis (DM is a rare idiopathic inflammatory myopathy characterized by cutaneous and muscle manifestations. The association between DM and malignancy has been well recognized for many years. The clinical course of paraneoplastic DM may be affected by malignancies, although the cause and effect relationship between exacerbation of DM and cancer progression is uncertain. Herein, we report a 44-year-old woman who presented with progressive DM associated with rectal cancer. After curative resection of rectal cancer, DM symptoms resolved. Three months after surgery, blood test surveillance showed elevation of serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels, although the patient remained asymptomatic. One month later she had a DM flare-up, and multiple lung and liver metastases were found. She immediately underwent cancer chemotherapy with prednisolone therapy for DM. However, her condition deteriorated and she was unable to swallow. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was constructed, allowing alimentation and oral delivery, which made it possible to keep her on chemotherapy. She had remarkable response for unresectable metastases 8 weeks after the administration of chemotherapy. Seven months after onset of recurrence, her condition improved considerably and she had stable disease. Moreover, she can now eat food of soft consistency. Our case provides further support for the clinical importance of cancer chemotherapy for patients who have progressive DM and unresectable rectal cancer.

  19. Conservative management of anal and rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of irradiation in the management of anal and rectal cancer has changed during the past ten years. In small epidermoid carcinomas of the anal canal (T1 T2) irradiation is in most departments considered the primary treatment, giving a 5-year survival rate of between 60 and 80% with good sphincter preservation. Even in larger tumors, irradiation can still offer some chance of cure without colostomy. Surgery remains the basic treatment of rectal cancer but irradiation is used in association with surgery in many cases. Radiotherapy is of value in the conservative management of cancer of the rectum in three situations: In small polypoid cancers contact X-ray therapy can give local control in about 90%. In cancers of the middle rectum, preoperative external irradiation may increase the chances of restorative surgery and reduce the risk of local relapse. In inoperable patients, external radiotherapy and/or intracavitary irradiation may cure some patients with infiltrating tumors (T2 T3) without colostomy. (orig.)

  20. The solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: diagnosis with defecography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goei, R; Baeten, C; Janevski, B; van Engelshoven, J

    1987-11-01

    The solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is an uncommon entity consisting of a rectal abnormality caused by straining during defecation and characterized by specific histologic changes. Endoscopy may show single or multiple ulcers or a preulcerative phase consisting of mucosal thickening. Findings on barium enema may be normal or nonspecific, consisting of a thickened valve of Houston, nodularity, and rectal stricture. Pathologic changes consist of replacement of the lamina propria by fibroblasts and smooth muscle fibers with marked hypertrophy of the muscularis mucosae. In five patients with histologically proved solitary rectal ulcer syndrome, defecography was performed to evaluate the accompanying defecation disorder. Two patients showed the spastic pelvic floor syndrome, characterized by failure of relaxation of the pelvic floor musculature during straining. In the remaining three, defecography showed an infolding of the rectal wall toward the rectal lumen increasing gradually to form an intussusception. The results indicate that defecography is useful to show the underlying disorder of defecation in the solitary rectal ulcer syndrome. PMID:3499797

  1. Comparison of rectal volume definition techniques and their influence on rectal toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy: a dose-volume analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the impact of four different rectum contouring techniques and rectal toxicities in patients with treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Clinical and dosimetric data were evaluated for 94 patients who received a total dose 3DCRT of 70 Gy, and rectal doses were compared in four different rectal contouring techniques: the prostate-containing CT sections (method 1); 1 cm above and below the planning target volume (PTV) (method 2); 110 mm starting from the anal verge (method 3); and from the anal verge to the sigmoid flexure (method 4). The percentage of rectal volume receiving RT doses (30–70 Gy) and minimum, mean rectal doses were assessed. Median age was 69 years. Percentage of rectal volume receiving high doses (≥ 70 Gy) were higher with the techniques that contoured smaller rectal volumes. In methods 2 and 3, the percentage of rectal volume receiving ≥ 70 Gy was significantly higher in patients with than without rectal bleeding (method 2: 30.8% vs. 22.5%, respectively (p = 0.03); method 3: 26.9% vs. 18.1%, respectively (p = 0.006)). Mean rectal dose was significant predictor of rectal bleeding only in method 3 (48.8 Gy in patients with bleeding vs. 44.4 Gy in patients without bleeding; p = 0.02). Different techniques of rectal contouring significantly influence the calculation of radiation doses to the rectum and the prediction of rectal toxicity. Rectal volume receiving higher doses (≥ 70 Gy) and mean rectal doses may significantly predict rectal bleeding for techniques contouring larger rectal volumes, as was in method 3

  2. Comparison of rectal volume definition techniques and their influence on rectal toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy: a dose-volume analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz Melek

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the impact of four different rectum contouring techniques and rectal toxicities in patients with treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT. Methods Clinical and dosimetric data were evaluated for 94 patients who received a total dose 3DCRT of 70 Gy, and rectal doses were compared in four different rectal contouring techniques: the prostate-containing CT sections (method 1; 1 cm above and below the planning target volume (PTV (method 2; 110 mm starting from the anal verge (method 3; and from the anal verge to the sigmoid flexure (method 4. The percentage of rectal volume receiving RT doses (30–70 Gy and minimum, mean rectal doses were assessed. Results Median age was 69 years. Percentage of rectal volume receiving high doses (≥ 70 Gy were higher with the techniques that contoured smaller rectal volumes. In methods 2 and 3, the percentage of rectal volume receiving ≥ 70 Gy was significantly higher in patients with than without rectal bleeding (method 2: 30.8% vs. 22.5%, respectively (p = 0.03; method 3: 26.9% vs. 18.1%, respectively (p = 0.006. Mean rectal dose was significant predictor of rectal bleeding only in method 3 (48.8 Gy in patients with bleeding vs. 44.4 Gy in patients without bleeding; p = 0.02. Conclusion Different techniques of rectal contouring significantly influence the calculation of radiation doses to the rectum and the prediction of rectal toxicity. Rectal volume receiving higher doses (≥ 70 Gy and mean rectal doses may significantly predict rectal bleeding for techniques contouring larger rectal volumes, as was in method 3.

  3. Differences in microbial signatures between rectal mucosal biopsies and rectal swabs

    OpenAIRE

    Araújo-Pérez, Félix; Amber N McCoy; Okechukwu, Charles; Carroll, Ian M.; Smith, Kevin M.; Jeremiah, Kim; Sandler, Robert S.; Asher, Gary N; Keku, Temitope O

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence the microbiota of the large bowel may influence the risk of developing colorectal cancer as well as other diseases including type-1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel diseases and irritable bowel syndrome. Current sampling methods to obtain microbial specimens, such as feces and mucosal biopsies, are inconvenient and unappealing to patients. Obtaining samples through rectal swabs could prove to be a quicker and relatively easier method, but it is unclear if swabs are an ad...

  4. Benign (solitary) ulcer of the rectum - another cause for rectal stricture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapa, H.J.; Smith, H.J.; Dickinson, T.A.

    1981-01-15

    Benign rectal ulcer syndrome is an uncommon cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients may present with mild, often recurrent, rectal bleeding frequently ascribed to hemorrhoids. Barium enema may be normal during the early, nonulcerative phase of proctitis. Single (or multiple) ulcers with or without rectal stricture are the hallmarks of the radiographic diagnosis. Radiologic demonstration of the ulcer(s) is not required, however, for the diagnosis. Benign rectal ulcer should be included in the differential diagnosis of benign-appearing rectal strictures.

  5. The rational design and development of a dual chamber vaginal/rectal microbicide gel formulation for HIV prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Anthony S; Nugent, Sean T; Peters, Jennifer J; Katz, David F; Shelter, Cory M; Dezzutti, Charlene S; Boczar, Ashlee D; Buckheit, Karen W; Buckheit, Robert W

    2015-08-01

    The DuoGel™ was developed for safe and effective dual chamber administration of antiretroviral drugs to reduce the high incidence of HIV transmission during receptive vaginal and anal intercourse. The DuoGel™s containing IQP-0528, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), were formulated from GRAS excipients approved for vaginal and rectal administration. The DuoGel™s were evaluated based upon quantitative physicochemical and biological evaluations defined by a Target Product Profile (TPP) acceptable for vaginal and rectal application. From the two primary TPP characteristics defined to accommodate safe rectal administration three DuoGel™ formulations (IQB3000, IQB3001, and IQB3002) were developed at pH 6.00 and osmolality ⩽400mmol/kg. The DuoGel™s displayed no in vitro cellular or bacterial toxicity and no loss in viability in ectocervical and colorectal tissue. IQB3000 was removed from consideration due to reduced NNRTI delivery (∼65% reduction) and IQB3001 was removed due to increase spread resulting in leakage. IQB3002 containing IQP-0528 was defined as our lead DuoGel™ formulation, possessing potent activity against HIV-1 (EC50=10nM). Over 12month stability evaluations, IQB3002 maintained formulation stability. This study has identified a lead DuoGel™ formulation that will safely deliver IQP-0528 to prevent sexual HIV-1 transmission in the vagina and rectum. PMID:26093158

  6. Significance of thermoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ike, Hideyuki; Fukano, Masahiko; Yamaguchi, Sigeki [Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    1997-05-01

    In patients with rectal cancer, results of 27 cases receiving thermoradiotherapy and of 68 cases, radiotherapy before operation were compared with those of 119 cases receiving expanded radical operation. Radiotherapy was done with 10 MV X-ray generated by linear-accelerator at 2.0 Gy x 5/week and 60 Gy in total. Hyperthermotherapy was performed with the capacitive heating method with 8 MHz radiofrequency (Thermotoron RF8) twice/week x 5. Every thermotherapy was done for 40 min at 42degC-43degC within 1 hr after the radiotherapy. Good results were observed in cases whose cancer was disappeared by either preoperative therapy. However, results in survival and recurrence rates were not always improved when compared with those receiving surgery alone. (K.H.)

  7. 'Microerosions' in rectal biopsies in Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1984-01-01

    Small (less than 1 mm), superficial erosions ('microerosions') have been observed stereo-microscopically in surface-stained rectal biopsies in Crohn's disease (CD). Biopsy specimens from 97 patients with CD, 225 with ulcerative colitis (UC), and a control material of 161 patients were investigated...... exclusively. Granulomas were identified in 62% of the biopsies with microerosions and by examination of two consecutive biopsies from each of these patients, in 85% indicating a positive correlation. In patients with microerosions and a primary diagnosis of UC, granulomas were found in 38% and by examination...... of two biopsies in 54%. Patients with granulomas and a few other patients were reclassified as CD, but there still remained some patients with microerosions, who most probably had UC. In conclusion, microerosions are observed mainly in CD with colonic involvement. There is a high incidence of...

  8. [Organ preserving strategies for rectal cancer treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrely, V; Denost, Q; Amestoy, F; Célérier, B; Smith, D; Rullier, A; Rullier, É

    2015-10-01

    For rectal cancers, the current standard of care consists of chemoradiation followed by radical surgery with total mesorectal excision. Oncologic results are good, especially regarding local recurrence rates, but at the cost of high morbidity rates and poor anorectal, urinary and sexual function results. Since chemoradiation yields 15 to 25% pathological complete response, the role of radical surgery is questioned for patients presenting with good response after chemoradiation and two organ preservation strategies have been offered: watch and wait strategy and local excision strategy. The aim of this review is to give the results of organ preservation after chemoradiotherapy series and to highlight different questions regarding initial patient's selection, complete clinical response definition, risk of mesorectal nodal involvement, follow-up modalities as well as oncologic and functional results. PMID:26278990

  9. Expression and clinical significance of cellular prion protein in rectal cancer and adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-ping LI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To determine the expressions of cellular prion protein (PrPC in normal rectal mucosa, rectal adenoma and rectal carcinoma tissues, and to study the relationship of PrPC with development and progression of rectal carcinoma. Methods Immunohistochemical method (SP method was used to determine the expressions of PrPC in rectal carcinoma (60 samples, rectal adenoma (20 samples and normal rectal mucosa (20 samples, and the correlations between the expression of PrPC in rectal carcinoma tissue, and clinical pathological parameters including sex, tumor differentiation, clinical stages, lymph node metastasis, etc. were analyzed. Results PrPC was expressed in normal rectal mucosa, rectal adenoma and rectal carcinoma tissues. The positive rate of PrPC expression in rectal carcinoma (65% was significantly higher than that in rectal adenoma (35% and normal rectal mucosa (15% with statistical significance (P0.05. Conclusion PrPC may play an important role in the process of development, progression and metastasis of rectal carcinoma. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.07.12

  10. Efficiency of Non-Contrast-Enhanced Liver Imaging Sequences Added to Initial Rectal MRI in Rectal Cancer Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene-hyuk Kwon

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to estimate the value of addition of liver imaging to initial rectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI for detection of liver metastasis and evaluate imaging predictors of a high risk of liver metastasis on rectal MRI.We enrolled 144 patients who from October 2010 to May 2013 underwent rectal MRI with T2-weighted imaging (T2WI and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI (b values = 50, 500, and 900 s/mm2 of the liver and abdominopelvic computed tomography (APCT for the initial staging of rectal cancer. Two reviewers scored the possibility of liver metastasis on different sets of liver images (T2WI, DWI, and combined T2WI and DWI and APCT and reached a conclusion by consensus for different analytic results. Imaging features from rectal MRI were also analyzed. The diagnostic performances of CT and an additional liver scan to detect liver metastasis were compared. Multivariate logistic regression to determine independent predictors of liver metastasis among rectal MRI features and tumor markers was performed. This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board, and the requirement for informed consent was waived.All sets of liver images were more effective than APCT for detecting liver metastasis, and DWI was the most effective. Perivascular stranding and anal sphincter invasion were statistically significant for liver metastasis (p = 0.0077 and p = 0.0471, while extramural vascular invasion based on MRI (mrEMVI was marginally significant (p = 0.0534.The addition of non-contrast-enhanced liver imaging, particularly DWI, to initial rectal MRI in rectal cancer patients could facilitate detection of liver metastasis without APCT. Perivascular stranding, anal sphincter invasion, and mrEMVI detected on rectal MRI were important imaging predictors of liver metastasis.

  11. Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer operated for cure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sune Høirup; Harling, Henrik; Kirkeby, Lene Tschemerinsky;

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in the Western world. Apart from surgery - which remains the mainstay of treatment for resectable primary tumours - postoperative (i.e., adjuvant) chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based regimens is now the standard treatment...... in Dukes´ C (TNM stage III) colon tumours i.e. tumours with metastases in the regional lymph nodes but no distant metastases. In contrast, the evidence for recommendations of adjuvant therapy in rectal cancer is sparse. In Europe it is generally acknowledged that locally advanced rectal tumours receive...... preoperative (i.e., neoadjuvant) downstaging by radiotherapy (or chemoradiotion), whereas in the US postoperative chemoradiotion is considered the treatment of choice in all Dukes´ C rectal cancers. Overall, no universal consensus exists on the adjuvant treatment of surgically resectable rectal carcinoma...

  12. [Rectal prolapse revealing a tumor: The role of abdominal ultrasound].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bequet, E; Stiennon, L; Lhomme, A; Piette, C; Hoyoux, C; Rausin, L; Guidi, O

    2016-07-01

    Rectal prolapse is rare in children and usually benign. However, there are various diseases that can be associated with it, such as cystic fibrosis or other causes of increased abdominal pressure. Here, we review the various underlying conditions that pediatricians or pediatric gastroenterologists should consider in the case of rectal prolapse. We report on three cases of children with a rectal prolapse and intra-abdominal tumors. Current recommendations and practice do not include a systematic check via abdominal imaging in cases of rectal prolapse. However, in some situations, imaging is indicated to detect a possible expansive process. Thus, in the presence of recurrent prolapse or of associated urinary or neurological signs, imaging is justified so as to allow for an early diagnosis and treatment of these neoplasms. Given its lack of radiation exposure and good sensitivity in children, ultrasound imaging is the first choice. PMID:27265581

  13. Rectal bacteriotherapy for recurrent Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvede, M; Tinggaard, M; Helms, M

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is one of the most common nosocomial infections. Among other alternatives to standard treatment with vancomycin for recurrent infection are faecal microbiota transplantation and rectal bacteriotherapy with a fixed mixture of intestinal bacterial strains isolated from...

  14. Laparoscopic resection for low rectal cancer: evaluation of oncological efficacy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Diarmaid C

    2011-09-01

    Laparoscopic resection of low rectal cancer poses significant technical difficulties for the surgeon. There is a lack of published follow-up data in relation to the surgical, oncological and survival outcomes in these patients.

  15. Gastric or rectal instillation of short-chain fatty acids stimulates epithelial cell proliferation of small and large intestine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Hirofumi; Shineha, Ryuzaburo; Satomi, Susumu; Sakata, Takashi

    2002-05-01

    Short-chain fatty acids stimulate gut epithelial cell proliferation in vivo, although the difference between oral and rectal routes is unknown. Accordingly, we examined the effect of oral or rectal administration of these acids. We instilled a mixture of acetic acid, propionic acid, and n-butyric acid (150, 60, and 60 mmol/liter, respectively; pH 6.5) or saline (270 mM, pH 6.5) into the stomach (2 ml) or rectum (1 ml) three times daily for five days in rats fed an elemental diet. We measured crypt cell production rate of the jejunum, ileum, and distal colon of these rats. The crypt cell production rate of these segments was higher in rats with gastric or rectal instillation of short-chain fatty acids than in saline controls. The rectal route was slightly more effective than the gastric route. The above results indicated that the instillation of short-chain fatty acids orally or rectally stimulated gut epithelial cell proliferation. PMID:12018914

  16. Higher rectal temperatures in co-sleeping infants.

    OpenAIRE

    Tuffnell, C S; Petersen, S A; Wailoo, M P

    1996-01-01

    The effect on deep body temperature of infants co-sleeping (with either or both parents) is investigated in this case control study. Overnight continuous recordings of rectal temperature were made from 34 babies co-sleeping with one or both parents throughout the night and 34 infants matched for age, feeding regimen, parental smoking, thermal environment, sleeping position, and sex who slept alone. The co-sleeping infants had significantly higher rectal temperatures from two hours after bedti...

  17. RECTAL DUPLICATION CYST IN PREVIOUS ANORECTAL MALFORMATION AND DOWN SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Burgio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI tract duplications are rare congenital malformations. Most of them occur in the ileum and only 1-5%, of all duplication, were in the rectum. Different clinical features including chronic constipation, rectal prolapsed or polips. We report on a 4-years-old girl with Down syndrome and anorectal malformation (ARM who was found to have a rectal duplication cyst.

  18. Direct costs of radiotherapy for rectal cancer: a microcosting study

    OpenAIRE

    Hanly, Paul; Céilleachair, Alan Ó; Skally, Máiréad; O’Neill, Ciaran; Sharp, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy provides significant benefits in terms of reducing risk of local recurrence and death from rectal cancer. Despite this, up-to-date cost estimates for radiotherapy are lacking, potentially inhibiting policy and decision-making. Our objective was to generate an up-to-date estimate of the cost of traditional radiotherapy for rectal cancer and model the impact of a range of potential efficiency improvements. Methods Microcosting methods were used to estimate total direct r...

  19. Functional MR imaging for response prediction in rectal cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Intven, M.P.W.

    2015-01-01

    The standard of care treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer is neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by total mesorectal excision. In recent years, organ-sparing treatments, instead of standard total mesorectal excision, are gradually introduced in the treatment of rectal cancer for patients with good response after neoadjuvant therapy. However, patient selection for organ-sparing treatments is still challenging as no optimal restaging modality is available after neoadjuvant chemoradiatio...

  20. MRI in children following surgery for anal and rectal atresia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MRI of the pelvis was performed in 17 children following surgical correction of anal and rectal atresias and in five children without ano-rectal malformations. A muscle score was used to characterize the muscles of the pelvic floor and their relationship to the rectum. There was close agreement between the MRI muscle score and clinical continence. MRI provided additional information that should improve continence following conservative and surgical treatment. (orig.)

  1. Ultrastructural pathology of the rectal mucosa in Shigella dysentery.

    OpenAIRE

    Mathan, M M; Mathan, V I

    1986-01-01

    Colonocyte damage in the rectal mucosa in shigellosis is the result of bacterial invasion and leads to ulceration. Additional factors in colonocyte damage may be the Shigella cytotoxin and, especially in colonic crypt cells, bacterial endotoxin. A vascular lesion was present in the lamina propria of the rectal mucosa, which resembled endothelial damage secondary to bacterial endotoxins. In patients with longer duration of symptoms, relative vascular insufficiency, activated lymphocytes, eosin...

  2. Congenital cystic polypoid rectal hamartoma in a newborn foal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkel, B; Shokek, A B; Wilkins, P A

    2004-11-01

    A neonatal foal with signs of rectal bleeding was diagnosed with an intraluminal rectal mass and intussusception on surgical exploration of the abdomen. Histologically, the mass consisted of cystic spaces lined by simple columnar epithelium with numerous goblet cells and was surrounded by thin bands of smooth muscle in a myxomatous stroma. Although the mass shared similarities with retrorectal cystic hamartoma (tailgut cyst) and juvenile polyps, described in human medicine, location and histologic findings were not entirely consistent with either condition. PMID:15557082

  3. The rectal cancer microRNAome - microRNA expression in rectal cancer and matched normal mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaedcke, Jochen; Grade, Marian; Camps, Jordi;

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: miRNAs play a prominent role in a variety of physiologic and pathologic biologic processes, including cancer. For rectal cancers, only limited data are available on miRNA expression profiles, whereas the underlying genomic and transcriptomic aberrations have been firmly established. We...... therefore, aimed to comprehensively map the miRNA expression patterns of this disease. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Tumor biopsies and corresponding matched mucosa samples were prospectively collected from 57 patients with locally advanced rectal cancers. Total RNA was extracted, and tumor and mucosa mi......RNA expression profiles were subsequently established for all patients. The expression of selected miRNAs was validated using semi-quantitative real-time PCR. RESULTS: Forty-nine miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed (log(2)-fold difference >0.5 and P < 0.001) between rectal cancer and normal rectal...

  4. Rectal toxicity after intensity modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Which rectal dose volume constraints should we use?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: To define rectal dose volume constraints (DVC) to prevent ⩾grade2 late rectal toxicity (LRT) after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer (PC). Material and methods: Six hundred thirty-seven PC patients were treated with primary (prostate median dose: 78 Gy) or postoperative (prostatic bed median dose: 74 Gy (adjuvant)–76 Gy (salvage)) IMRT while restricting the rectal dose to 76 Gy, 72 Gy and 74 Gy respectively. The impact of patient characteristics and rectal volume parameters on ⩾grade2 LRT was determined. DVC were defined to estimate the 5% and 10% risk of developing ⩾grade2 LRT. Results: The 5-year probability of being free from ⩾grade2 LRT, non-rectal blood loss and persisting symptoms is 88.8% (95% CI: 85.8–91.1%), 93.4% (95% CI: 91.0–95.1%) and 94.3% (95% CI: 92.0–95.9%) respectively. There was no correlation with patient characteristics. All volume parameters, except rectal volume receiving ⩾70 Gy (R70), were significantly correlated with ⩾grade2 LRT. To avoid 10% and 5% risk of ⩾grade2 LRT following DVC were derived: R40, R50, R60 and R65 <64–35%, 52–22%, 38–14% and 5% respectively. Conclusion: Applying existing rectal volume constraints resulted in a 5-year estimated risk of developing late ⩾grade2 LRT of 11.2%. New rectal DVC for primary and postoperative IMRT planning of PC patients are proposed. A prospective evaluation is needed

  5. Alternative procedure to shorten rectal barostat procedure for the assessment of rectal compliance and visceral perception: a feasibility study

    OpenAIRE

    Vanhoutvin, S.A.L.W.; Troost, F. J; Kilkens, T. O. C.; Lindsey, P. J.; Jonkers, D.M.A.E.; Venema, K.; Masclee, A.; Brummer, R-J M

    2012-01-01

    Background Barostat methodology is widely used for assessing visceral perception. Different barostat protocols are described with respect to the measurement of rectal compliance and visceral perception. The choice of protocols affects the duration, which is normally 60–90 min, and accuracy of the procedure. This study aimed to shorten the procedure by using the semi-random distension protocol for both compliance and visceral perception measurement and a correction based on rectal capacity (RC...

  6. Alternative procedure to shorten rectal barostat proecure for the assessment of rectal compliance and visceral perception: a feasibility study

    OpenAIRE

    Vanhoutvin, S.A.; Troost, F. J; Kilkens, T.O.; Lindsey, P. J.; Jonkers, D.M.; Venema, K.; Masclee, A.; Brummer, R J

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Barostat methodology is widely used for assessing visceral perception. Different barostat protocols are described with respect to the measurement of rectal compliance and visceral perception. The choice of protocols affects the duration, which is normally 60-90 min, and accuracy of the procedure. This study aimed to shorten the procedure by using the semi-random distension protocol for both compliance and visceral perception measurement and a correction based on rectal capacity (R...

  7. Limited segmental rectal resection in the treatment of deeply infiltrating rectal endometriosis: 10 years’ experience from a tertiary referral unit

    OpenAIRE

    English, James, Jr.; Sajid, Muhammad S; Lo, Jenney; Hudelist, Guy; Baig, Mirza K.; Miles, William A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The management of symptomatic rectal endometriosis is a challenging condition that may necessitate limited stripping or limited segmental anterior rectal resection (LSARR) depending upon the extent and severity of the disease. Objective. To report the efficacy of LSARR in terms of pain, quality of life and short- and long-term complications—in particular, those pertaining to bowel function. Methods. The case notes of all patients undergoing LSARR were reviewed. The analysed variab...

  8. Geometric modeling, functional parameter calculation, and visualization of the in-vivo distended rectal wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Clifton R.; Manduca, Armando; Camp, Jon J.; Fletcher, Joel G.; Robb, Richard A.; Bharucha, Adil E.

    2006-03-01

    The rectum can distend to accommodate stool, and contracts in response to distention during defecation. Rectal motor dysfunctions are implicated in the pathophysiology of functional defecation disorders and fecal incontinence. These rectal motor functions can be studied by intra-luminal measurements of pressure by manometry, or combined with volume during rectal balloon distention. Pressure-volume (p-v) relationships provide a global index of rectal mechanical properties. However, balloon distention alone does not measure luminal radius or wall thickness, which are necessary to compute wall tension and stress respectively. It has been suggested that the elastic modulus, which is the linear slope of the stress-strain relationship, is a more accurate measure of wall stiffness. Also, measurements of compliance may not reflect differences in rectal diameter between subjects prior to inflation, and imaging is necessary to determine if, as has been suggested, rectal pressure-volume relationships are affected by extra-rectal structures. We have developed a technique to measure rectal stress:strain relationships in humans, by simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during rectal balloon distention. After a conditioning distention, a rectal balloon was distended with water from 0 to 400 ml in 50 ml steps, and imaged at each step with MRI. The fluid filled balloon was segmented from each volume, the phase-ordered binary volumes were transformed into a geometric characterization of the inflated rectal surface. Taken together with measurements of balloon pressure and of rectal wall thickness, this model of the rectal surface was used to calculate regional values of curvature, tension, strain, and stress for the rectum. In summary, this technique has the unique ability to non-invasively measure the rectal stress:strain relationship and also determine if rectal expansion is limited by extra-rectal structures. This functional information allows the direct clinical analysis

  9. Effects of acarbose on fecal nutrients, colonic pH, and short-chain fatty acids and rectal proliferative indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, P R; Atillasoy, E; Lindenbaum, J; Ho, S B; Lupton, J R; McMahon, D; Moss, S F

    1996-09-01

    Acarbose, an alpha-glycosidase inhibitor, treats diabetes mellitus by delaying the digestion and intestinal absorption of dietary carbohydrates. In effective doses, acarbose induces some passage of carbohydrates into the colon. The effect of such chronic carbohydrate transfer on colonic structure and function is unknown. We studied the effects of 1 year of acarbose administration in diabetes mellitus on fecal energy, protein, and fat, including short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) output, fecal pH, and several metabolizing bacterial species. Changes in colonic histology and epithelial cell proliferation were investigated in rectal biopsies. Fecal macronutrient output was unaffected by acarbose, but pH decreased and total SCFA, butyrate, and acetate output were markedly greater. Breath hydrogen output increased after acarbose, but digoxin-metabolizing bacteria and diacylglycerol (DAG) production were unaltered. Compared with the control, acarbose did not induce hyperplasia or change rectal proliferation. However, total fecal SCFA and butyrate output correlated inversely with proliferation in the rectal upper crypt-a biomarker of risk for colonic neoplasia. In conclusion, long-term acarbose administration does not adversely affect colonic function or fecal nutrient output. If increased fecal SCFA and butyrate reduces upper-crypt proliferation, then acarbose may reduce the risk of colonic neoplasia. PMID:8781308

  10. Preserving the superior rectal artery in laparoscopic sigmoid resection for complete rectal prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, R; Lovvik, K; Marvik, R

    2004-01-01

    Sigmoid resection is indicated in the treatment of complete rectal prolapse (CRP) in patients with prolonged colorectal transit time (CTT). Its use however has been limited due to fear of anastomotic leakage. This study challenges the current practice of dividing the mesorectum by prospectively evaluating the impact of sparing the superior rectal artery (SRA) on leak rates after laparoscopic sigmoid resection (LSR) for CRP. During 30 months data on 33 selected patients with CRP were prospectively collected. Three patients were withdrawn from the analysis, as they had neither resection nor anastomosis. Twenty-nine women and one man (median age 55 range 21-83 years) underwent LSR with preservation of SRA for a median CRP of 8 (3-15) cm. There were 20 ASA I and 10 ASA II patients. Ten patients had undergone previous surgery. Four patients complained of dyschezia, whereas incontinence was present in 26 patients. Anal ultrasound showed isolated internal sphincter defects in two patients. Four young adults (21-32 years) had normal CTT, whereas 26 older patients had a median CTT of 5 (4-6) days. Defecography demonstrated 10 enteroceles, two sigmoidoceles, and one rectal hernia through the levator ani muscle. Mortality was nil. Median operating room time was 180 (120-330) min, suprapubic incision length 5 (3-7) cm, estimated blood loss 150 (50-500) ml, specimen length 20 (12-45) cm, solid food resumption 3 (1-6) days, and length of stay 4.5 (2-7) days. Thirty-day complications were not related to anastomosing and occurred in 20% of the patients. Although the evidence provided by the present study suggests that sparing SRA has a favorable impact on anastomotic leak rates, these nonrandomized results need further evaluation. The division of the mesorectum at the rectosigmoid junction seems not necessary, and its sparing should therefore be considered as it may contain anastomotic leak rates. PMID:15771289

  11. Intersphincteric Resection for Low Rectal Cancer – Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russu Cristian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical treatment for low rectal cancer represents a challenge: to perform a radical resection and to preserve the sphincter’s function. We report a case of intersphincteric resection in a combined multimodality treatment for low rectal cancer, with good oncologic and functional outcome. Case presentation: We report a case of a 73 years old woman admitted in April 2014 in surgery, for low rectal cancer. The diagnostic was established by colonoscopy and malignancy confirmed by biopsy. Complete imaging was done using computed tomography and magnetic resonance to establish the exact stage of the disease. The interdisciplinary individualized treatment began with radiotherapy (total dose of 50 Gy, administered in 25 fractions followed by surgery after eight weeks. We performed intersphincteric rectal resection by a modified Schiessel technique. There were no postoperative complications and the oncologic and functional results were very good at one year follow up. Conclusions: Intersphincteric resection, in this selected case of low rectal cancer, represented an efficient surgical treatment, with good functional results and quality of life for the patient. A multidisciplinary team is an invaluable means of assessing and further managing the appropriate, tailored to the case, treatment in the aim of achieving best results.

  12. Patterns of metastasis in colon and rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihimäki, Matias; Hemminki, Akseli; Sundquist, Jan; Hemminki, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Investigating epidemiology of metastatic colon and rectal cancer is challenging, because cancer registries seldom record metastatic sites. We used a population based approach to assess metastatic spread in colon and rectal cancers. 49,096 patients with colorectal cancer were identified from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Registry. Metastatic sites were identified from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Rectal cancer more frequently metastasized into thoracic organs (OR = 2.4) and the nervous system (1.5) and less frequently within the peritoneum (0.3). Mucinous and signet ring adenocarcinomas more frequently metastasized within the peritoneum compared with generic adenocarcinoma (3.8 [colon]/3.2 [rectum]), and less frequently into the liver (0.5/0.6). Lung metastases occurred frequently together with nervous system metastases, whereas peritoneal metastases were often listed with ovarian and pleural metastases. Thoracic metastases are almost as common as liver metastases in rectal cancer patients with a low stage at diagnosis. In colorectal cancer patients with solitary metastases the survival differed between 5 and 19 months depending on T or N stage. Metastatic patterns differ notably between colon and rectal cancers. This knowledge should help clinicians to identify patients in need for extra surveillance and gives insight to further studies on the mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27416752

  13. Lamellipodin-Deficient Mice: A Model of Rectal Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Cassandra L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Shen, Zeli; Drees, Frauke; Ge, Zhongming; Feng, Yan; Chen, Xiaowei; Gong, Guanyu; Nagar, Karan K.; Wang, Timothy C.; Gertler, Frank B.; Fox, James G.

    2016-01-01

    During a survey of clinical rectal prolapse (RP) cases in the mouse population at MIT animal research facilities, a high incidence of RP in the lamellipodin knock-out strain, C57BL/6-Raph1tm1Fbg (Lpd-/-) was documented. Upon further investigation, the Lpd-/- colony was found to be infected with multiple endemic enterohepatic Helicobacter species (EHS). Lpd-/- mice, a transgenic mouse strain produced at MIT, have not previously shown a distinct immune phenotype and are not highly susceptible to other opportunistic infections. Predominantly male Lpd-/- mice with RP exhibited lesions consistent with invasive rectal carcinoma concomitant to clinically evident RP. Multiple inflammatory cytokines, CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) populations, and epithelial cells positive for a DNA damage biomarker, H2AX, were elevated in affected tissue, supporting their role in the neoplastic process. An evaluation of Lpd-/- mice with RP compared to EHS-infected, but clinically normal (CN) Lpd-/- animals indicated that all of these mice exhibit some degree of lower bowel inflammation; however, mice with prolapses had significantly higher degree of focal lesions at the colo-rectal junction. When Helicobacter spp. infections were eliminated in Lpd-/- mice by embryo transfer rederivation, the disease phenotype was abrogated, implicating EHS as a contributing factor in the development of rectal carcinoma. Here we describe lesions in Lpd-/- male mice consistent with a focal inflammation-induced neoplastic transformation and propose this strain as a mouse model of rectal carcinoma. PMID:27045955

  14. Sexual Function in Males After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Knowledge of sexual problems after pre- or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) with 50 Gy for rectal cancer is limited. In this study, we aimed to compare self-rated sexual functioning in irradiated (RT+) and nonirradiated (RT-) male patients at least 2 years after surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Male patients without recurrence at the time of the study. The International Index of Erectile Function, a self-rated instrument, was used to assess sexual functioning, and serum levels of serum testosterone were measured. Results: Questionnaires were returned from 241 patients a median of 4.5 years after surgery. The median age was 67 years at survey. RT+ patients (n = 108) had significantly poorer scores for erectile function, orgasmic function, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction with sex life compared with RT- patients (n = 133). In multiple age-adjusted analysis, the odds ratio for moderate-severe erectile dysfunction in RT+ patients was 7.3 compared with RT- patients (p <0.001). Furthermore, erectile dysfunction of this degree was associated with low serum testosterone (p = 0.01). Conclusion: RT for rectal cancer is associated with significant long-term effects on sexual function in males.

  15. Bladder and rectal complications following radiotherapy for cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One-hundred and thirty-two patients with cervix carcinoma who were treated with whole pelvis irradiation and two intracavitary applications had bladder and rectal dosimetry during brachytherapy with contrast agents placed into the bladder and rectum prior to orthogonal simulator radiographs. Doses were computer calculated at points A and B, F (bladder), R1 (rectum), and R2 (rectosigmoid). Late occurring bladder and rectal complications were graded on a severity scale of 1 to 3, and 14% had grade 2 or 3 injuries (9% developed fistulas). Statistical evaluation of the data showed that severe bladder and rectal injuries occur more commonly in stage IIIA and IIIB disease and in those receiving high external beam doses (5000 rad +). Analysis of variance tests revealed a significant correlation of brachytherapy dose to points R1 and R2 with severe rectal injuries but there was not a correlation of dose to F with bladder injuries. Nor was there correlation of injuries with dose to point A or the milligram-hour dose. We conclude that our technique for rectal dosimetry is adequate but that an improved technique of bladder dosimetry is needed. Also, when combining whole pelvis irradiation with two intracavitary applications (4000 rad to point A), the whole pelvis dose should probably not exceed 4000-4500 rad

  16. Toward Restored Bowel Health in Rectal Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steineck, Gunnar; Schmidt, Heike; Alevronta, Eleftheria; Sjöberg, Fei; Bull, Cecilia Magdalena; Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    As technology gets better and better, and as clinical research provides more and more knowledge, we can extend our ambition to cure patients from cancer with restored physical health among the survivors. This increased ambition requires attention to grade 1 toxicity that decreases quality of life. It forces us to document the details of grade 1 toxicity and improve our understanding of the mechanisms. Long-term toxicity scores, or adverse events as documented during clinical trials, may be regarded as symptoms or signs of underlying survivorship diseases. However, we lack a survivorship nosology for rectal cancer survivors. Primarily focusing on radiation-induced side effects, we highlight some important observations concerning late toxicity among rectal cancer survivors. With that and other data, we searched for a preliminary survivorship-disease nosology for rectal cancer survivors. We disentangled the following survivorship diseases among rectal cancer survivors: low anterior resection syndrome, radiation-induced anal sphincter dysfunction, gut wall inflammation and fibrosis, blood discharge, excessive gas discharge, excessive mucus discharge, constipation, bacterial overgrowth, and aberrant anatomical structures. The suggested survivorship nosology may form the basis for new instruments capturing long-term symptoms (patient-reported outcomes) and professional-reported signs. For some of the diseases, we can search for animal models. As an end result, the suggested survivorship nosology may accelerate our understanding on how to prevent, ameliorate, or eliminate manifestations of treatment-induced diseases among rectal cancer survivors. PMID:27238476

  17. Changing practice of rectal cancer surgery in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To describe the presentation and pathology of rectal cancer, and to evaluate the local experience after total meso rectal excision at a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan. Methodology: A retrospective study of two hundred cases of carcinoma rectum that had undergone total meso rectal excision at Liaquat University Hospital Jamshoro Pakistan was carried out from January 1998 to December 2007.The cases were admitted through outpatient and emergency departments. The demographic details of each patient and variables such as clinical presentation, tumor location, Dukes staging, TNM staging, operations and complications were recorded on proformas. Each patient was followed up at two months for one year, every four months for three years and annually thereafter. Results: Male to female ratio being almost equal 1.6:1, Age ranged from 14-70 years. Site of tumor at upper one third 25%, middle one third 30% and lower one third 45%. Majority of patients (more than 62%) were in Dukes B Group.There were no postoperative deaths, complications occurred in a total of 59 (29.5%) patients, which were mostly colostomy related (13.0%). The abdominal wound infection 5%, anastomotic dehiscence 1.0%, urinary tract infection 5%, and impotence occurred in 1.5%. In 20% patients local recurrence was detected. Conclusion: Total meso rectal excision is a safe and feasible technique for rectal cancer surgery with acceptable perioperative morbidity and adequate local disease control. (author)

  18. Quantitative analysis of methylation of genomic loci in early-stage rectal cancer predicts distant recurrence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat, M.F. de; Velde, C.J. van de; Werff, M.P. van der; Putter, H.; Umetani, N.; Klein-Kranenbarg, E.M.; Turner, R.R.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Bilchik, A.; Tollenaar, R.A.; Hoon, D.S.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: There are no accurate prognostic biomarkers specific for rectal cancer. Epigenetic aberrations, in the form of DNA methylation, accumulate early during rectal tumor formation. In a preliminary study, we investigated absolute quantitative methylation changes associated with tumor progression

  19. Improved quality of care for patients undergoing an abdominoperineal excision for rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokkerink, G.M.J.; Buijs, E.F.; Ruijter, W. de; Rosman, C.; Sietses, C.; Strobel, R.; Heisterkamp, J.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Bremers, A.J.A.; Wilt, J.H.W. de

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: New diagnostics, the emergence of total mesorectal excision and neoadjuvant treatments have improved outcome for patients with rectal cancer. Patients with distal rectal cancer undergoing an abdominoperineal excision seem to do worse compared to those treated with sphinctersparing tech

  20. Indication for radiotherapy in rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surgery and radiotherapy complete each other in local control of suffering from rectal carcinoma. A radiotherapeutic effect on tumor is secured often. The adjuvant radiotherapy is the most interesting indication, though the most controversial as present too. Analysing all data and with experiences of an own irradiation study we have not any doubt that the indication is qualified for a combined therapy, if the therapeutic aim with priority is to prevent a local relapse as the most frequent and complaintful form of therapeutic failure. In this problem, radical irradiation forms, as pre- and accumulating irradiation (sandwich-technique) and after-irradiation, render superior to an exclusive preirradiation. In result of this tudy we practise a preirradiation of 25 Gy with immediately following operation and an accumulating irradiation to 50 Gy in proved high-risk-stage (T≥3N0M0.TxN1-3M0). If there is a primary local incurability by tumor invasion into the neighbourhood a pre-irradiation is done with 50Gy and following explorative laparatomy within 4-6 weeks. Nearly 60% of these tumors become operably after thast. Likewise we practise in unirradiated patients with locoregional tumor recurrence. Also here the exstirpation quote of recurred tumor can be doubled approximately. The 5-years-survival is 20-30% in both indication groups. In patients with general or systematic incurability, that a stoma construction is required in, we carry out a transanal tumor reduction and irradiate with 50Gy after that. Especially this therapeutic principle has proved its worth in patients that are past eighty. Here with acceptable living quality and avoiding a stoma construction a survival can be reached that corresponds to the statistical survival of this stage of life. (orig.)

  1. [Current MRI staging of rectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wietek, B M; Kratt, T

    2012-11-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is the second most prevalent cause for cancer, and has very variable outcomes. Advancements in surgery, the change from adjuvant to neo-adjuvant radio-chemo-therapies as well as in clinical diagnostics have improved the prognosis for patients in a multi-modal therapy concept. An accurate primary staging including a reliable prediction of the circumferential resection margin (CRM) has established MR Imaging (MRI) beside intraluminal endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). MRI facilitates the selection of patients likely to benefit from a preoperative therapy, especially in cases of unfavorable factors. Currently the relationship of the tumor to the mesorectal fascia has become a more important prognostic factor than the T-staging, particularly for surgical therapy. In addition further prognostic factors like the depth of infiltration into the perirectal fat and the extramural venous infiltration (EMVI) have important impact on therapy and prognosis. High resolution MRI has proved useful in clarifying the relationship between the tumor and the mesorectal fascia, which represents the CRM at the total mesorectal excision (TME) especially in the upper and middle third. Preoperative evaluation of the other prognostic factors as well as the nodal status is still difficult. It is used increasingly not only for primary staging but also progressively for the monitoring of neoadjuvant therapy. The addition of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is an interesting option for the improvement of response evaluation. The following overview provides an introduction of MRI diagnosis as well as its importance for the evaluation of the clinically relevant prognostic factors leading to an improvement of therapy and prognosis of patients with rectal carcinoma. PMID:22893486

  2. Risk factors of circumferential resection margin involvement in the patients with extraperitoneal rectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Sung Jin; Shin, Jin Yong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Currently, circumferential resection margins (CRM) are used as a clinical endpoint in studies on the prognosis of rectal cancer. Although the concept of a circumferential resection margin in extraperitoneal rectal cancer differs from that in intraperitoneal rectal cancer due to differences in anatomical and biologic behaviors, previous reports have provided information on CRM involvement in all types of rectal cancer including intraperitoneal lesions. Therefore, the aim of this study ...

  3. Assessment of T staging and mesorectal fascia status using high-resolution MRI in rectal cancer with rectal distention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-Xiang Rao; Meng-Su Zeng; Jian-Ming Xu; Xin-Yu Qin; Cai-Zhong Chen; Ren-Chen Li; Ying-Yong Hou

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the accuracy of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using phased-array coil for preoperative assessment of T staging and mesorectal fascia infiltration in rectal cancer with rectal distention.METHODS: In a prospective study of 67 patients with primary rectal cancer, high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (in-plane resolution, 0.66 × 0.56)with phased-array coil were performed for T-staging and measurement of distance between the tumor and the mesorectal fascia. The assessment of MRI was compared with postoperative histopathologic findings. Sensitivity,specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were evaluated.RESULTS: The overall magnetic resonance accuracy was 85.1% for T staging and 88% for predicting mesorectal fascia involvement. Magnetic resonance sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value,and negative predictive value was 70%, 97.9%, 89.6%,93.3% and 88.5% for ≤ T2 tumors, 90.5%, 76%,85.1%, 86.4% and 82.6% for T3 tumors, 100%, 95.2%,95.5%, 62.5% and 100% for T4 tumors, and 80%,90.4%, 88%, 70.6% and 94% for predicting mesorectal fascia involvement, respectively.CONCLUSION: High-resolution MRI enables accurate preoperative assessment for T staging and mesorectal fascia infiltration in rectal cancer with rectal distention.

  4. Comparison between two perineal procedures for treatment of rectal prolaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mohamed Abozid, Nabila Mohamed A. Shams, , Yahia Hassan

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The optimal surgical procedures for the management of rectal prolapse is still under debate so comparison between two operations were done in our series. Eighteen patients with complete rectal prolaps were treated surgically through the perineum they were divided into two groups. First group were treated by recto-segmoidectomy and levatroplasty to fortify the pelvic floor, the second group were treated by rectopexy using prolene mesh and levetroplasty to fortify the pelvic floor, the mesh was inserted between the rectum and sacrum and fixed through perineal incision. The recurrence rate !""#$$!%$ &significant difference in hospital stay among both groups. Also there were no other cases of postoperative complications such as anastomotic leak or stricture, affection of the bladder dysfunction in both groups. Aim of work The aim of this work was to compare the short-term outcome of two different perineal operative procedures in patients with full thickness rectal prolaps.

  5. Treatment of advanced rectal cancer after renal transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Yi Liu; Xiao-Bo Liang; Yao-Ping Li; Yi Feng; Dong-Bo Liu; Wen-Da Wang

    2011-01-01

    Renal transplantation is a standard procedure for end-stage renal disease today. Due to immunosuppressive drugs and increasing survival time after renal trans-plantation, patients with transplanted kidneys carry an increased risk of developing malignant tumors. In this case report, 3 patients with advanced rectal can-cer after renal transplantation for renal failure were treated with anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection plus total mesorectal excision, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. One patient eventually died of metastasized cancer 31 mo after therapy, although his organ grafts functioned well until his death. The other 2 patients were well during the 8 and 21 mo follow-up periods after rectal resection. We therefore strongly argue that patients with advanced rectal cancer should receive standard oncology treatment, including opera-tion and adjuvant treatment after renal transplantation. Colorectal cancer screening in such patients appears justified.

  6. Rectal cancer in pregnancy: A diagnostic and therapeutic challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The occurrence of colorectal cancer during pregnancy is rare and is associated with diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Herein, we report such a case of rectal cancer in pregnancy and review the literature. Case report: A 31-year-old multiparous, pregnant woman, in the 20th week of gestation, presented with rectal bleeding progressing to spasmodic abdominal pain and right flank vague pain. A flexible recto sigmoidoscopy showed a large ulcerative mass located in the recto sigmoid junction, 15 cm away from anal verge. Imaging studies and biopsy proved it to be rectal adenocarcinoma with single liver metastasis. The patient’s pregnancy was terminated and neoadjuvant therapy followed by curative surgery was performed. She is currently receiving adjuvant systemic therapy to eradicate potential micro metastatic disease. Conclusion: This case suggests that colorectal cancer can mimic the signs and the symptoms of pregnancy and tends to present at an advanced stage in pregnant women.

  7. Ultrasound tomography in the diagnosis of rectal carcinoma relapses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of ultrasonography in 616 patients after radical surgery of rectal carcinomas are committed. In the first group, patients with clinical symptoms of a relapse, the method detected tumors in 146 (80.2%) of 182 patients. The error rate was 12.1. In the second group, patients with unfavourable postoperative prognosis, ultrasound follow-up detected relapses previous to their clinical manifestation in 73 (16.8%) of 434 patients. The method turned out to be effective even for the detection of small (less than 3 cm) recurrences after rectal exstirpation. For intraintestinal recurrences after rectal resection ultrasonography can determine the degree of infiltration outside the organ. Real-time scans can prevent some of the errors that occur with compound scans. (author)

  8. [Robot-assisted rectal surgery: hype or progress?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, T; Egberts, J E; Schafmayer, C; Aselmann, H

    2016-07-01

    Minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer has undergone a significant evolution during the last decades and has become the standard approach in specialized centers with better short-term and comparable oncological outcome to open surgery. The laparoscopic approach remains challenging and has various inherent technical challenges particularly associated with rectal cancer resection. Robotic colorectal surgery using the da Vinci® surgical system has been successfully introduced into clinical practice during recent years and provides specific technical advantages. Studies have shown that the robotic approach in colorectal surgery is safe and feasible with comparable results. It is associated with low conversion rates, more R0 situations for low rectal cancer with larger tumors and more neoadjuvant treatment compared to standard laparoscopy. Robot-assisted surgery is an attractive development of minimally invasive surgery and should also be further evaluated with mandatory monitoring of outcome parameters in registries in Germany. PMID:27334630

  9. Neorectal hyposensitivity after neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer has a detrimental effect on long-term anorectal function and quality of life, additional to that observed after rectal resection. The exact physiological mechanisms for the excess impairment remain unknown. We aimed to investigate neorectal and anal sphincter properties in patients treated with neoadjuvant therapy (NT) prior to total mesorectal excision (TME). Material and methods: Sixteen patients (NT+ patients) were examined by multimodal neorectal stimulation and standard anorectal physiological testing. Data were compared to the results of 23 patients, who underwent TME without NT (NT− patients). Results: NT+ patients had elevated sensory thresholds to heat (median temperature, 60 vs. 55 °C; p 2O; p = 0.05). Conclusions: Pelvic radiotherapy causes neorectal hyposensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimuli in patients receiving NT prior to TME surgery for rectal cancer, possibly due to impaired afferent nerve function

  10. Rare case of huge rectal and uterovaginal prolapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha M. Laddad

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A case of combined genital prolapse and rectal prolapse in a 60-year-old multipara is reported. The treatment of mixed prolapse remains surgical and should be treated the genital prolapse by vaginal hysterectomy with pelvic floor repair and the rectal prolapse by means of the Delorme operation. The mortality and morbidity rates are zero if this operation is used and the relapse rate is only 8 to 11% for the rectal prolapse. It would appear that the two approaches are rarely associated by the authors and would seem to be interesting to reconsider this question by indicating mixed treatment of the two prolapses whenever possible. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2013; 2(2.000: 237-239

  11. Critical appraisal of laparoscopic vs open rectal cancer surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Winson Jianhong; Chew, Min Hoe; Dharmawan, Angela Renayanti; Singh, Manraj; Acharyya, Sanchalika; Loi, Carol Tien Tau; Tang, Choong Leong

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the long-term clinical and oncological outcomes of laparoscopic rectal resection (LRR) and the impact of conversion in patients with rectal cancer. METHODS: An analysis was performed on a prospective database of 633 consecutive patients with rectal cancer who underwent surgical resection. Patients were compared in three groups: Open surgery (OP), laparoscopic surgery, and converted laparoscopic surgery. Short-term outcomes, long-term outcomes, and survival analysis were compared. RESULTS: Among 633 patients studied, 200 patients had successful laparoscopic resections with a conversion rate of 11.1% (25 out of 225). Factors predictive of survival on univariate analysis include the laparoscopic approach (P = 0.016), together with factors such as age, ASA status, stage of disease, tumor grade, presence of perineural invasion and vascular emboli, circumferential resection margin oncologic outcomes when compared to OP. Laparoscopic conversion does not confer a worse prognosis. PMID:27358678

  12. Rectal bleeding after hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Correlation between clinical and dosimetric parameters and the incidence of grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence and severity of rectal bleeding after high-dose hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer, and to explore the factors affecting the incidence of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding. Methods and materials: The data of 52 patients who had been treated by external beam RT for localized prostate cancer between 1999 and 2002 were analyzed. All the patients had received hypofractionated external beam RT to a total dose of 69 Gy in 3-Gy fractions, three fractions weekly. The clinical and dosimetric factors affecting the incidence of Grade 2 or worse late rectal bleeding were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. The effect of the percentage of the whole rectal volume receiving 30%, 50%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed radiation dose (V30, V50, V80, and V90, respectively) on the incidence of rectal bleeding was evaluated. Results: Of the 52 patients, 13 (25%) developed Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding. One patient who needed laser coagulation and blood transfusion for the treatment of rectal bleeding was classified as having Grade 3 rectal bleeding. The median time to the development of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding was 11 months. The results of the univariate analysis revealed that the presence of a history of diabetes mellitus (p 30 ≥ 60%, V50 ≥ 40% (p 80 ≥ 25%, and V90 ≥ 15% (p < 0.001) were statistically significant risk factors for the occurrence of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding. The results of the multivariate analysis revealed that a history of diabetes mellitus was the most statistically significant risk factor for the occurrence of rectal bleeding after hypofractionated RT for prostate cancer (p < 0.05). Conclusion: A history of diabetes mellitus was the most statistically significant risk factor for the occurrence of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding after high-dose hypofractionated RT, although dosimetric factors were also closely associated with the risk of rectal bleeding

  13. Correction of rectal sacculation through lateral resection in dogs with perineal hernia - technique description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C. Moraes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of perineal hernias in dogs during routine clinical surgery is frequent. The coexistence of rectal diseases that go undiagnosed or are not correctly treated can cause recurrence and postoperative complications. The objective of this report is to describe a surgical technique for treatment of rectal sacculation through lateral resection in dogs with perineal hernia, whereby restoring the rectal integrity.

  14. The Clinical Utility of Rectal Gas Distension F-18 FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Suk; Lim, Seok Tae; Jeong, Young Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of rectal gas distension F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging for the differentiation of the rectal focal uptake lesions. Twenty four patients (M:F=11:13, Age 62.8{+-}12.4 years) underwent rectal gas distension F-18 FDG PET/CT, prospectively: initial image at 50-60 min after the intravenous injection of F-18 FDG and rectal distension image after the infusion of air through the anus. Focally increased uptake lesions on initial images but disappeared on rectal distension images defined a physiological uptake. For the differential evaluation of persistent focal uptake lesions on rectal distension images, colonoscopy and histopathologic examination were performed. Among the 24 patients, 27 lesions of focal rectal uptake were detected on initial images of F-18 FDG PET/CT. Of these, 7 lesions were able to judge with physiological uptake because the focal increased uptake disappeared from rectal distension image. Remaining 3 lesions were non-rectal lesions (2 lesions: rectovesical space, 1 lesion: uterine myoma). Among 17 lesions which was showed persistent increased uptake in rectal distension image, 15 lesions were confirmed as the malignant tumor (SUVmax=15.9{+-}6.8) and 2 lesions were confirmed as the benign lesions including adenoma and inflammatory disease. The rectal distension F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging could be an important noninvasive method for the differentiation of malignant and benign focal rectal uptake lesions including physiologic uptake.

  15. Quality of life after rectal resection for cancer, with or without permanent colostomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pachler, Jørn; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2012-01-01

    For almost one hundred years abdominoperineal excision has been the standard treatment of choice for rectal cancer. With advances in the techniques for rectal resection and anastomosis, anterior resection with preservation of the sphincter function has become the preferred treatment for rectal ca......, patients having sphincter-preserving operations may experience symptoms affecting their quality of life that are different from stoma-patients....

  16. Human Collagen Injections to Reduce Rectal Dose During Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: The continuing search for interventions, which address the incidence and grade of rectal toxicities associated with radiation treatment of prostate cancer, is a major concern. We are reporting an investigational trial using human collagen to increase the distance between the prostate and anterior rectal wall, thereby decreasing the radiation dose to the rectum. Methods: This is a pilot study evaluating the use of human collagen as a displacing agent for the rectal wall injected before starting a course of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Using a transperineal approach, 20 mL of human collagen was injected into the perirectal space in an outpatient setting. Computerized IMRT plans were performed pre- and postcollagen injection, and after a patient completed their radiotherapy, to determine radiation dose reduction to the rectum associated with the collagen injection. Computed tomography scans were performed 6 months and 12 months after completing their radiotherapy to evaluate absorption rate of the collagen. All patients were treated with IMRT to a dose of 75.6 Gy to the prostate. Results: Eleven patients were enrolled into the study. The injection of human collagen in the outpatient setting was well tolerated. The mean separation between the prostate and anterior rectum was 12.7 mm. The mean reduction in dose to the anterior rectal wall was 50%. All men denied any rectal symptoms during the study. Conclusions: The transperineal injection of human collagen for the purpose of tissue displacement is well tolerated in the outpatient setting. The increased separation between the prostate and rectum resulted in a significant decrease in radiation dose to the rectum while receiving IMRT and was associated with no rectal toxicities.

  17. Microstructure imaging of human rectal mucosa using multiphoton microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, N R; Chen, J X; Zhuo, S M; Zheng, L Q; Jiang, X S [Institute of Laser and Optoelectronics Technology, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Photonics Technology, Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine of Ministry of Education, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou (China); Chen, G [Department of Pathology, Fujian Provincial Tumor Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Yan, J, E-mail: chenjianxin@fjnu.edu.cn, E-mail: ynjun@yahoo.com [Department of Surgery, Fujian Provincial Tumor Hospital, Fuzhou (China)

    2011-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has high resolution and sensitivity. In this study, MPM was used to image microstructure of human rectal mucosa. The morphology and distribution of the main components in mucosa layer, absorptive cells and goblet cells in the epithelium, abundant intestinal glands in the lamina propria and smooth muscle fibers in the muscularis mucosa were clearly monitored. The variations of these components were tightly relevant to the pathology in gastrointestine system, especially early rectal cancer. The obtained images will be helpful for the diagnosis of early colorectal cancer.

  18. Per-rectal portal scintigraphy in chronic liver diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portal circulation has been evaluated by per-rectal portal scintigraphy in 21 controls and in 30 pts affected by chronic liver diseases. Tc99m-pertechnetate (10 mci) was given through a Nelaton's catheter in the upper rectum; a per-rectal portal shunt index (SI) was calculated. A relevant overlap is evident between controls and CHP pts; no overlap exists between controls and B or C graded cirrhosis. We conclude that the technique may be suggested to monitor the course of chronic liver diseases and different therapeutic regimens. (orig.)

  19. Rectal fist insertion. An unusual form of sexual behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shook, L L; Whittle, R; Rose, E F

    1985-12-01

    Rectal fist insertion (fist fucking) is an uncommon and potentially dangerous sexual practice. This is usually a homosexual activity, but can also be a heterosexual or an autoerotic practice. One known death has been reported associated with rectal fist insertion, in which the complications of anal and colonic tears and bleeding had occurred (see Editor's note). The possibility of drug overdose is also probable, as drugs and alcohol are commonly introduced into the rectum to promote sphincter relaxation and to ease the discomfort of anal dilatation. PMID:4072987

  20. Comparison of the Occurrence of Transportation-associated Fever in 2 Years Old Thoroughbreds before and after Introduction of Prophylactic Marbofloxacin Administration

    OpenAIRE

    ENDO, Yoshiro; TSUCHIYA, Takeru; Akiyama, Kentaro; TAKEBE, Naoya; NAKAI, Kenji; KOROSUE, Kenji; ISHIMARU, Mutsuki; TSUZUKI, Nao; HOBO, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to reveal the preventive effect of marbofloxacin (MRFX) administration just before transportation, we compared the occurrence of transportation-associated fever before and after introduction of MRFX administration. After the introduction of prophylactic MRFX administration, the rectal temperatures of horses after transportation were significantly lower than before the introduction of MRFX administration (P

  1. Health-Related Quality of Life after surgery for primary advanced rectal cancer and recurrent rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Henriette Vind; Jess, Per; Laurberg, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Aim: A review of the literature was undertaken to provide an overview of Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) after surgery for primary advanced or recurrent rectal cancer and to outline proposals for future HRQoL studies in this area. Method: A systematic literature search was undertaken. Only...... studies concerning surgery for primary advanced or recurrent rectal cancer and describing methods used for measuring HRQoL were considered. Results Seven studies were identified including two prospective longitudinal, three cross-sectional and two based on qualitative data. Global quality of life...... time of impaired HRQoL and also if this is different after surgery for locally advanced or recurrent disease than after total mesorectal excision used for earlier tumours.. Conclusion Several aspects of HRQoL are impaired for a variable time after treatment for locally advanced or recurrence of rectal...

  2. Benign (solitary) ulcer of the rectum - another cause for rectal stricture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benign rectal ulcer syndrome is an uncommon cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients may present with mild, often recurrent, rectal bleeding frequently ascribed to hemorrhoids. Barium enema may be normal during the early, nonulcerative phase of proctitis. Single (or multiple) uclers with or without rectal stricture are the hallmarks of the radiographic diagnosis. Radiologic demonstration of the ulcer(s) is not required, however, for the diagnosis. Benign rectal ulcer should be included in the differential diagnosis of benign-appearing rectal strictures. (orig.)

  3. Association between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and human rectal tumor or liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guohong Jiang; Limin Lun; Liyuan Cong

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in rectal carcinoma and hepatocarcinoma genesis. Methods: The PAHs in the human rectal cancer and liver cancer tissues, the adjacent tissues and homologous tissues without rectal cancer or liver cancer were extracted by ultrasonic wave. The extracts were then cleaned up and enriched by solid phase extraction, analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence spectroscopy. Results: Four kinds of PAHs were detected in human rectal and hepatic tissues. The contents of pyrene, 2-methylanthracene and benzo (a) pyrene in both rectal cancer tissues and adjacent homologous tissues were higher than rectal tissues without rectal cancer, the differences were statistically significant (P 0.05). The differences of the content of each PAHs between rectal cancer and adjacent tissue were not significant (P > 0.05). The contents of the four PAHs in the three kinds of liver tis-sues were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Conclusion: PAHs are found in human rectal tissues or hepatic tissues. The contents of PAHs in human rectal tissue may have an effect on the occurrence of human rectal cancer while the contents of PAHs in human hepatic tissues may have not ones.

  4. Rectal angiolipoma: A case report and review of literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sabite Kacar; Sedef Kuran; Tulay Temucin; Bulent Odemis; Nilufer Karadeniz; Nurgul Sasmaz

    2007-01-01

    Angiolipoma is a rare vascular variant of the benign lipomatous tumors and is generally seen in subcutaneous tissues. We report a 70-year-old female with abdominal distension not related to rectal small polypoid mass with peduncule described as angiolipoma by histologically,and review the literature.

  5. Treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer: Controversies and questions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atthaphorn Trakarnsanga; Suthinee Ithimakin; Martin R Weiser

    2012-01-01

    Rectal cancers extending through the rectal wall,or involving locoregional lymph nodes (T3/4 or N1/2),have been more difficult to cure.The confines of the bony pelvis and the necessity of preserving the autonomic nerves makes surgical extirpation challenging,which accounts for the high rates of local and distant relapse in this setting.Combined multimodality treatment for rectal cancer stage Ⅱ and Ⅲ was recommended from National Institute of Health consensus.Neoadjuvant chemoradiation using fluoropyrimidine-based regimen prior to surgical resection has emerged as the standard of care in the United States.Optimal time of surgery after neoadjuvant treatment remained unclear and prospective randomized controlled trial is ongoing.Traditionally,6-8 wk waiting period was commonly used.The accuracy of studies attempting to determine tumor complete response remains problematic.Currently,surgery remains the standard of care for rectal cancer patients following neoadjuvant chemoradiation,whereas observational management is still investigational.In this article,we outline trends and controversies associated with optimal pre-treatment staging,neoadjuvant therapies,surgery,and adjuvant therapy.

  6. Whither papillon? Future directions for contact radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, J; Gerard, J P; Sun Myint, A;

    2007-01-01

    Although contact radiotherapy was developed 70 years ago, and is highly effective with cure rates of over 90% for early rectal cancer, there are few centres that offer this treatment today. One reason is the lack of replacement of ageing contact X-ray machines, many of which are now over 30 years...

  7. Sexual function in females after radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Knowledge about female sexual problems after pre- or postoperative (chemo-)radiotherapy and radical resection of rectal cancer is limited. The aim of this study was to compare self-rated sexual functioning in women treated with or without radiotherapy (RT+ vs. RT?), at least two years after surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and materials. Female patients diagnosed from 1993 to 2003 were identified from a national database, the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Eligible patients were without recurrence or metastases at the time of the study. The Sexual function and Vaginal Changes Questionnaire (SVQ) was used to measure sexual functioning. Results. Questionnaires were returned from 172 of 332 invited and eligible women (52%). The mean age was 65 years (range 42-79) and the time since surgery for rectal cancer was 4.5 years (range 2.6-12.4). Sexual interest was not significantly impaired in RT+ (n=62) compared to RT? (n=110) women. RT+ women reported more vaginal problems in terms of vaginal dryness (50% vs. 24%), dyspareunia (35% vs. 11%) and reduced vaginal dimension (35% vs. 6%) compared with RT? patients; however, they did not have significantly more worries about their sex life. Conclusion. An increased risk of dyspareunia and vaginal dryness was observed in women following surgery combined with (chemo-)radiotherapy compared with women treated with surgery alone. Further research is required to determine the effect of adjuvant therapy on female sexual function

  8. Laparoscopic surgery for lower rectal cancer with neoadjuvant preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) is an accepted standard treatment for low rectal advanced cancer to improve the local control in western countries. Recently laparoscopy has been recognized as an excellent tool from a view point of its magnification. Therefore, we have performed many laparoscopic surgeries for locally advanced rectal cancer after NACRT, We evaluated our results in this study. We studied 100 patients underwent surgery for locally advanced low rectal cancer after NACRT. Rate of sphincter preserving surgery was 74%. Rate of laparoscopic surgery was 95%. Positive distal resection margins were not identified in all patients. Positive circumferencial resection margins were identified in only two patients. The pathological complete response rate was 15%. The rate of postoperative complications was 15%. Complications were as follows: wound infection (9%), pelvic abscess (2%), ileus (2%) and others (2%), however without mortality. Anastomotic leakage was not observed in all cases, even though we routinely created diverting stoma. Laparoscopic surgery for low rectal cancer after NACRT is considered to be a safe and feasible procedure. (author)

  9. Multicenter evaluation of rectal cancer reimaging post neoadjuvant (MERRION) therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanly, Ann M

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of reimaging rectal cancer post-CRT (chemoradiotherapy) with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the pelvis for local staging and computed tomography of thorax, abdomen, and pelvis (CT TAP) to identify distant metastases.

  10. Single-Access Laparoscopic Rectal Surgery Is Technically Feasible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siripong Sirikurnpiboon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Single-access laparoscopic surgery (SALS has been successfully introduced for colectomy surgery; however, for mid to low rectum procedures such as total mesorectal excision, it can be technically complicated. In this study, we introduced a single-access technique for rectum cancer operations without the use of other instruments. Aims. To show the short-term results of single-access laparoscopic rectal surgery in terms of pathologic results and immediate complications. Settings and Design. Prospective study. Materials and Methods. We selected middle rectum to anal canal cancer patients to undergo single-access laparoscopic rectal resection for rectal cancer. All patients had total mesorectal excisions. An umbilical incision was made for the insertion of a single multichannel port, and a mesocolic window was created to identify the inferior mesenteric artery and vein. Total mesorectal excision was performed. There were no perioperative complications. The mean operative time was 269 minutes; the median hospital stay was 7 days; the mean wound size was 5.5 cm; the median number of harvested lymph nodes was 15; and all patients had intact mesorectal capsules. Statistical Analysis Used. Mean, minimum–maximum. Conclusion. Single-access laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer is feasible while oncologic principles and patient safety are maintained.

  11. Rectal Sensitivity in Diabetes Patients with Symptoms of Gastroparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirik Søfteland

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In a clinical setting, diabetic autonomic complications (cardiac, gastrointestinal, urogenital, etc. are often handled as separate entities. We investigated rectal sensitivity to heat, mechanical distension, and electrical stimulations in 20 patients with diabetes and symptoms of gastroparesis, to evaluate the extent of visceral neuronal damage. Furthermore, to evaluate the relation between the nervous structures we examined gastric emptying and cardiac autonomic function with the hypothesis being an association between these. We found that 60% of patients had delayed gastric empting. Rectal hyposensitivity was a general finding as they tolerated 67% higher thermal, 42% more mechanical, and 33% higher electrical current intensity compared to healthy controls. In patients, most heart rate variability parameters were reduced; they reported significantly more gastrointestinal symptoms and a reduced quality of life in all SF-36 domains. Shortened RR interval correlated with reduced rectal temperature sensitivity, and gastric retention rate was negatively associated with symptoms of nausea and vomiting. To conclude, in these patients with signs and symptoms of diabetic gastroparesis, rectal sensitivity was reduced, and heart rate variability was impaired. Thus, we suggest regarding diabetic autonomic neuropathy as a diffuse disorder. Symptoms of widespread autonomic dysfunction and sensory disorders should be expected and treated in these patients.

  12. Patient factors may predict anastomotic complications after rectal cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana M. Hayden

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Our study identifies preoperative anemia as possible risk factor for anastomotic leak and neoadjuvant chemoradiation may lead to increased risk of complications overall. Further prospective studies will help to elucidate these findings as well as identify amenable factors that may decrease risk of anastomotic complications after rectal cancer surgery.

  13. CT colonography with rectal iodine tagging: Feasibility and comparison with oral tagging in a colorectal cancer screening population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • In the group receiving rectal tagging, mean per-polyp sensitivity, specificity were 96.1% and 95.3%; while in the group receiving oral tagging, mean per-polyp sensitivity, specificity were 89.4% and 95.8%. The difference between the two groups was not statistically significant (p = 0.549). • Rectal tagging can be an effective alternative to oral tagging. • Rectal tagging allowed greater patient acceptance and lower overall examination time. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate feasibility, diagnostic performance, patient acceptance, and overall examination time of CT colonography (CTC) performed through rectal administration of iodinated contrast material. Materials and methods: Six-hundred asymptomatic subjects (male:female = 270:330; mean 63 years) undergoing CTC for colorectal cancer screening on an individual basis were consecutively enrolled in the study. Out of them, 503 patients (group 1) underwent CTC with rectal tagging, of which 55 had a total of 77 colonic lesions. The remaining 97 patients (group 2) were randomly selected to receive CTC with oral tagging of which 15 had a total of 20 colonic lesions. CTC findings were compared with optical colonoscopy, and per-segment image quality was visually assessed using a semi-quantitative score (1 = poor, 2 = adequate, 3 = excellent). In 70/600 patients (11.7%), CTC was performed twice with both types of tagging over a 5-year follow-up cancer screening program. In this subgroup, patient acceptance was rated via phone interview two weeks after CTC using a semi-quantitative scale (1 = poor, 2 = fair, 3 = average, 4 = good, 5 = excellent). Results: Mean per-polyp sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of CTC with rectal vs oral tagging were 96.1% (CI95% 85.4 ÷ 99.3%) vs 89.4% (CI95% 65.4 ÷ 98.1%), 95.3% (CI95% 90.7 ÷ 97.8%) vs 95.8% (CI95% 87.6 ÷ 98.9%), 86.0% (CI95% 73.6 ÷ 93.3) vs 85.0% (CI95% 61.1 ÷ 96.0%), and 98.8% (CI95% 95.3 ÷ 99.8%) vs 97.2% (CI95% 89.4 ÷ 99

  14. CT colonography with rectal iodine tagging: Feasibility and comparison with oral tagging in a colorectal cancer screening population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri, Emanuele, E-mail: emanuele.neri@med.unipi.it [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology – Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa (Italy); Mantarro, Annalisa; Faggioni, Lorenzo; Scalise, Paola; Bemi, Pietro; Pancrazi, Francesca [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology – Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa (Italy); D’Ippolito, Giuseppe [Federal University of São Paulo – Sena Madureira 1500 – Vila Mariana, UNIFESP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bartolozzi, Carlo [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology – Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • In the group receiving rectal tagging, mean per-polyp sensitivity, specificity were 96.1% and 95.3%; while in the group receiving oral tagging, mean per-polyp sensitivity, specificity were 89.4% and 95.8%. The difference between the two groups was not statistically significant (p = 0.549). • Rectal tagging can be an effective alternative to oral tagging. • Rectal tagging allowed greater patient acceptance and lower overall examination time. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate feasibility, diagnostic performance, patient acceptance, and overall examination time of CT colonography (CTC) performed through rectal administration of iodinated contrast material. Materials and methods: Six-hundred asymptomatic subjects (male:female = 270:330; mean 63 years) undergoing CTC for colorectal cancer screening on an individual basis were consecutively enrolled in the study. Out of them, 503 patients (group 1) underwent CTC with rectal tagging, of which 55 had a total of 77 colonic lesions. The remaining 97 patients (group 2) were randomly selected to receive CTC with oral tagging of which 15 had a total of 20 colonic lesions. CTC findings were compared with optical colonoscopy, and per-segment image quality was visually assessed using a semi-quantitative score (1 = poor, 2 = adequate, 3 = excellent). In 70/600 patients (11.7%), CTC was performed twice with both types of tagging over a 5-year follow-up cancer screening program. In this subgroup, patient acceptance was rated via phone interview two weeks after CTC using a semi-quantitative scale (1 = poor, 2 = fair, 3 = average, 4 = good, 5 = excellent). Results: Mean per-polyp sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of CTC with rectal vs oral tagging were 96.1% (CI{sub 95%} 85.4 ÷ 99.3%) vs 89.4% (CI{sub 95%} 65.4 ÷ 98.1%), 95.3% (CI{sub 95%} 90.7 ÷ 97.8%) vs 95.8% (CI{sub 95%} 87.6 ÷ 98.9%), 86.0% (CI{sub 95%} 73.6 ÷ 93.3) vs 85.0% (CI{sub 95%} 61.1 ÷ 96.0%), and 98.8% (CI{sub 95

  15. TAMIS for rectal tumors: advancements of a new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rega, Daniela; Pace, Ugo; Niglio, Antonello; Scala, Dario; Sassaroli, Cinzia; Delrio, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    TAMIS allows transanal excision of rectal lesions by the means of a single-incision access port and traditional laparoscopic instruments. This technique represents a promising treatment of rectal neoplasms since it guarantees precise dissection and reproducible approaches. From May 2010 to September 2015, we performed excisions of rectal lesions in 55 patients using a SILS port. The pre-operative diagnosis was 26 tumours, 26 low and high grade displasias and 3 other benign neoplasias. 11 patients had a neoadjuvant treatment. Pneumorectum was established at a pressure of 15-20 mmHg CO2 with continuous insufflation, and ordinary laparoscopic instruments were used to perform full thickness resection of rectal neoplasm with a conventional 5-mm 30° laparoscopic camera. The average operative time was 78 min. Postoperative recovery was uneventful in 53 cases: in one case a Hartmann procedure was necessary at two postoperative days due to an intraoperative intraperitoneal perforation; in another case, a diverting colostomy was required at the five postoperative days due to an intraoperative perforation of the vaginal wall. Unclear resection margins were detected in six patients: thereafter five patients underwent radical surgery; the other patient was unfit for radical surgery, but is actually alive and well. Patients were discharged after a median of 3 days. Transanal minimally invasive surgery is an advanced transanal platform that provides a safe and effective method for low rectal tumors. The feasibility of TAMIS also for malignant lesions treated in a neoadjuvant setting could be cautiously evaluated in the future. PMID:27052544

  16. p53 expression in human rectal tissue after radiotherapy: upregulation in normal mucosa versus functional loss in rectal carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In vitro, ionizing radiation of epithelial cells leads to upregulation of wild-type p53 and subsequent induction of p21waf1. The effect of radiotherapy (RT) on the expression of these proteins in patients is unknown. We assessed the influence of RT on the expression of p53 and p21waf1 in normal mucosa and rectal carcinomas in vivo. Methods: Tumor and normal tissue samples were derived from rectal cancer patients randomized in a clinical trial in which the value of preoperative RT was evaluated. p53 and p21waf1 expression was determined in 51 irradiated and 52 nonirradiated patients using immunohistochemistry. Results: In normal mucosa, both p53 and p21waf1 were strongly upregulated after RT compared with the expression in unirradiated normal tissue (p waf1 was found in the irradiated vs. nonirradiated group. In the few rectal tumors with wild-type p53, induction of p53 after RT did not necessarily lead to upregulation of p21waf1. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that in normal mucosa, a functional p53-p21waf1 pathway is present, whereas in tumor cells it is defective in almost all cases because of either p53 mutation or down- or upstream disruption in tumors with wild-type p53. Therefore, we believe that the role of p53 expression as a single prognostic marker in rectal cancer needs reconsideration

  17. Effect of rectal enemas on rectal dosimetric parameters during high-dose-rate vaginal cuff brachytherapy. A prospective trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabater, Sebastia; Andres, Ignacio; Sevillano, Marimar; Berenguer, Roberto; Aguayo, Manuel; Villas, Maria Victoria [Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Albacete (CHUA), Department of Radiation Oncology, Albacete (Spain); Gascon, Marina; Arenas, Meritxell [Hospital Universitari Sant Joan, Department of Radiation Oncology, Reus (Spain); Rovirosa, Angeles; Camacho-Lopez, Cristina [University of Barcelona, IDIBAPS, Gynecological Cancer Unit, Radiation Oncology Department, ICMHO, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate the effects of rectal enemas on rectal doses during postoperative high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCB). This prospective trial included 59 patients. Two rectal cleansing enemas were self-administered before the second fraction, and fraction 1 was considered the basal status. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) values were generated for the rectum and correlated with rectal volume variation. Statistical analyses used paired and unpaired t-tests. Despite a significant 15 % reduction in mean rectal volume (44.07 vs. 52.15 cc, p = 0.0018), 35.6 % of patients had larger rectums after rectal enemas. No significant rectal enema-related DVH differences were observed compared to the basal data. Although not statistically significant, rectal cleansing-associated increases in mean rectal DVH values were observed: D{sub 0.1} {sub cc}: 6.6 vs. 7.21 Gy; D{sub 1} {sub cc}: 5.35 vs. 5.52 Gy; D{sub 2} {sub cc}: 4.67 vs. 4.72 Gy, before and after rectal cleaning, respectively (where D{sub x} {sub cc} is the dose to the most exposed x cm {sup 3}). No differences were observed in DVH parameters according to rectal volume increase or decrease after the enema. Patients whose rectal volume increased also had significantly larger DVH parameters, except for D{sub 5} {sub %}, D{sub 25} {sub %}, and D{sub 50} {sub %}. In contrast, in patients whose rectal volume decreased, significance was only seen for D{sub 25} {sub %} and D{sub 50} {sub %} (D{sub x} {sub %} dose covering x % of the volume). In the latter patients, nonsignificant reductions in D{sub 2} {sub cc}, D{sub 5} {sub cc} and V{sub 5} {sub Gy} (volume receiving at least 5 Gy) were observed. The current rectal enemas protocol was ineffective in significantly modifying rectal DVH parameters for HDR-VCB. (orig.) [German] Beurteilung der Auswirkungen von rektalen Dosen waehrend postoperativer High-Dose-Rate-(HDR-)Brachytherapie an der Scheidenmanschette (''vaginal cuff brachytherapy'', VCB). An

  18. A COMPARISON OF RECTAL DICLOFENAC WITH CAUDAL LEVOBUPIVACAINE FOR POST OPERATIVE PAIN RELIEF IN CHILDREN FOLLOWING LOWER ABDOMINAL OPERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya De

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience. . Adequate pain relief reduces the stress response and pain relief through epidural route. Caudal epidural analgesia is very commonly practiced technique in children with levobupivacaine. Rectal administration of diclofenac in children is safe and convenient route and su s tained action of this drug provides analgesia in early and late post - operative period. AIMS: The aim of the study is to compare post - operative analgesic effect of rectal diclofenac with caudal levobupivacaine. MATERIALS AND METHODS : Hundred children were a llocated randomly in two groups in equal numbers using generated randomisation chart. All the patients underwent general anaesthesia. At the conclusion of surgery group A (n=50 received caudal injection of 1ml/kg of 0.25% levobupivacaine. The patients we re put left lateral and 23 gauge 25 mm long , short bevelled needle was used for this purpose. Group B (N=50 received a suppository of diclofenac sodium 2.5mg/kg. All anaesthesia , caudal block and suppository insertion was performed by the same anaesthet ist. No information on the method of analgesia or the study group to which the children belong was given to the ward nurse for post - operative observation. Syr. Paracetamol was as post - operative rescue analgesic as 15 mg/kg orally. The ward nurse assessed pain according to the observer pain scale. Assessment was undertaken in four occasions , 1 , 3 and 6 hours post operatively and overnight. If the patient were comfortable without any complain , they were discharged in the in following morning after completion of 24 hours. RESULT AND ANALYSIS: Statistical analysis of the data for pain and use of post - operative analgesic was done by chi - square test analysis with yati’s correction. Intergroup comparision of parametricv data were made by using student un paired t test. P<0.05 was considered to be significant.100 patients were grouped as Group C

  19. Morphology of the middle rectal arteries. A study of 30 cadaveric dissections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiDio, L J; Diaz-Franco, C; Schemainda, R; Bezerra, A J

    1986-01-01

    The middle rectal arteries were studied in 30 cadavers of adult and older individuals (29 Caucasians and one Negro) of both sexes (15 males and 15 females). The middle rectal artery was present in 56.7% of the cases, bilaterally (36.7%) or unilaterally (20%), originating from the internal pudendal (40%), inferior gluteal (26.7%), internal iliac (16.8%), and less frequently from other pelvic branches. The average external diameter of the middle rectal artery was found to be 1.7 mm, its average length about 7 cm, and the point of penetration in the rectal wall about 6 cm (average) superior to the anus. The most frequent sites of the rectal wall pierced by the middle rectal arteries were the anterior (50% of the cases) and posterior (45%) quadrants of the rectum, whether isolated or combined (43.3%). These anatomical features justify, when needed and possible, the preservation of the middle rectal artery in surgical interventions on related organs. The term middle rectal arteries in Nomina Anatomica should be changed to inferior rectal arteries and indented under internal pudendal artery; the current term inferior rectal arteries should be changed to anal arteries to follow the already adopted division of the terminal intestine into rectum and anal canal. PMID:3107146

  20. The Prognostic Value of Circumferential Resection Margin Involvement in Patients with Extraperitoneal Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Woo; Shin, Jin Yong; Oh, Sung Jin; Park, Jong Kwon; Yu, Hyeon; Ahn, Min Sung; Bae, Ki Beom; Hong, Kwan Hee; Ji, Yong Il

    2016-04-01

    The prognostic influence of circumferential resection margin (CRM) status in extraperitoneal rectal cancer probably differs from that of intraperitoneal rectal cancer because of its different anatomical and biological behaviors. However, previous reports have not provided the data focused on extraperitoneal rectal cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the prognostic significance of the CRM status in patients with extraperitoneal rectal cancer. From January 2005 to December 2008, 248 patients were treated for extraperitoneal rectal cancer and enrolled in a prospectively collected database. Extraperitoneal rectal cancer was defined based on tumors located below the anterior peritoneal reflection, as determined intraoperatively by a surgeon. Cox model was used for multivariate analysis to examine risk factors of recurrence and mortality in the 248 patients, and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of recurrence and mortality in 135 patients with T3 rectal cancer. CRM involvement for extraperitoneal rectal cancer was present in 29 (11.7%) of the 248 patients, and was the identified predictor of local recurrence, overall recurrence, and death by multivariate Cox analysis. In the 135 patients with T3 cancer, CRM involvement was found to be associated with higher probability of local recurrence and mortality. In extraperitoneal rectal cancer, CRM involvement is an independent risk factor of recurrence and survival. Based on the results of the present study, it seems that CRM involvement in extraperitoneal rectal cancer is considered an indicator for (neo)adjuvant therapy rather than conventional TN status. PMID:27097629

  1. Pelvic lymphoscintigraphy: contribution to the preoperative staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preservation of the lower rectal sphincters has been the main concern of colorectal surgeons in an attempt to avoid colostomy. Various proposed procedures contradict the oncological principles of the operation's radicality, especially pelvic lymphadenectomy. Prior knowledge of this space is therefore, an important factor in choosing the operative technique: radical (amputation), or conservative. The introduction of ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have provided preoperative information about the anatomic nature of the region. The morphological and functional study supplied by lymphoscintigraphy of this space supplements the data furnished by the other imaging techniques. The objective of this prospective of this prospective study was threefold: to standardize lymphoscintigraphy, to differentiate patients with rectal cancer from those with other coloproctological diseases and to asses the lymphonodal involvement in the former by utilizing the anatomopathological and surgical correlation. The study included 60 patients with various coloproctological diseases seen on the Department of Gastroentorology, Hospital da Clinicas, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, from September 1990 to August 1993. Thirty were cases of rectal cancer and the remainder were other colorectal diseases. The method consisted of injecting 0.5 of a dextran solution market with radioactive technetium in the perineal region and obtaining images by a gamma camera. In the rectal cancer patients, the tracer progresses unilaterally or is absent; in the others, it is bilateral and symmetrical, although its progress may be slow. The statistical data demonstrated that in rectal cancer, lymphoscintigraphy asseses the nodal involvement approximaltely as that obtained by the sun of the anatomapathological and surgical findings. Based on the results, the following conclusioons were possible: lymphoscintigraphy is a standardized, painless and harmless test that can be

  2. Balloon-Occluded Antegrade Transvenous Sclerotherapy to Treat Rectal Varices: A Direct Puncture Approach to the Superior Rectal Vein Through the Greater Sciatic Foramen Under CT Fluoroscopy Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rectal varices occur in 44.5 % of patients with ectopic varices caused by portal hypertension, and 48.6 % of these patients are untreated and followed by observation. However, bleeding occurs in 38 % and shock leading to death in 5 % of such patients. Two patients, an 80-year-old woman undergoing treatment for primary biliary cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A) and a 63-year-old man with class C hepatic cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A), in whom balloon-occluded antegrade transvenous sclerotherapy was performed to treat rectal varices are reported. A catheter was inserted by directly puncturing the rectal vein percutaneously through the greater sciatic foramen under computed tomographic fluoroscopy guidance. In both cases, the rectal varices were successfully treated without any significant complications, with no bleeding from rectal varices after embolization

  3. Balloon-Occluded Antegrade Transvenous Sclerotherapy to Treat Rectal Varices: A Direct Puncture Approach to the Superior Rectal Vein Through the Greater Sciatic Foramen Under CT Fluoroscopy Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Yasuyuki, E-mail: onoyasy@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Kariya, Shuji, E-mail: kariyas@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Nakatani, Miyuki, E-mail: nakatanm@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Yoshida, Rie, E-mail: yagir@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Kono, Yumiko, E-mail: kohnoy@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Kan, Naoki, E-mail: kanna@takii.kmu.ac.jp; Ueno, Yutaka, E-mail: uenoyut@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Komemushi, Atsushi, E-mail: komemush@takii.kmu.ac.jp; Tanigawa, Noboru, E-mail: tanigano@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp [Kansai Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Rectal varices occur in 44.5 % of patients with ectopic varices caused by portal hypertension, and 48.6 % of these patients are untreated and followed by observation. However, bleeding occurs in 38 % and shock leading to death in 5 % of such patients. Two patients, an 80-year-old woman undergoing treatment for primary biliary cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A) and a 63-year-old man with class C hepatic cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A), in whom balloon-occluded antegrade transvenous sclerotherapy was performed to treat rectal varices are reported. A catheter was inserted by directly puncturing the rectal vein percutaneously through the greater sciatic foramen under computed tomographic fluoroscopy guidance. In both cases, the rectal varices were successfully treated without any significant complications, with no bleeding from rectal varices after embolization.

  4. Rectal cancer treatment and outcome in the elderly: an audit based on the Swedish rectal cancer registry 1995–2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limited information is available regarding the effect of age on choice of surgical and oncological treatment for rectal cancer. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of age on treatment and outcome of rectal cancer. We utilized data in the Swedish Rectal Cancer Registry (SRCR) from patients treated for rectal cancer in Sweden in 1995–2004. A total of 15,104 patients with rectal cancer were identified, 42.4% of whom were 75 years or older. Patients ≥75 years were less likely to have distant metastases than younger patients (14.8% vs. 17.8%, P < 0.001), and underwent abdominal tumor resection less frequently (68.5% vs. 84.4%, P < 0.001). Of 11,725 patients with abdominal tumor resection (anterior resection [AR], abdominoperineal excision [APE], and Hartmann's procedure [HA]), 37.4% were ≥75 years. Curative surgery was registered for 85.0% of patients ≥ 75 years and for 83.9% of patients < 75 years, P = 0.11. Choice of abdominal operation differed significantly between the two age groups for both curative and non-curative surgery, The frequency of APE was similar in both age groups (29.5% vs. 28.6%), but patients ≥75 years were more likely to have HA (16.9% vs. 4.9%) and less likely to have preoperative radiotherapy (34.3vs. 67.2%, P < 0.001). The relative survival rate at five years for all patients treated with curative intent was 73% (70–75%) for patients ≥75 years and 78% (77–79%) for patients < 75 years of age. Local recurrence rate was 9% (8–11%) for older and 8% (7–9%) for younger patients. Treatment of rectal cancer is influenced by patient's age. Future studies should include younger and older patients alike to reveal whether or not age-related differences are purposive. Local recurrence following surgery for low tumors and quality of life aspects deserve particular attention

  5. Treatment tactics in patient with rectal cancer complicating ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Barsukov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A successful treatment of a young patient with a 15-year anamnesis of ulcerative colitis, who has been diagnosed with rectal cancer, is presented in this case report. A non-standard surgical intervention has been performed following all principles of oncologic surgery. A subtotal colectomy has been performed with ultra-low anterior resection of rectum. Ascendoanal anastomosis has been performed forming the neo-rectum. There were no complications in postoperative period. Considering disease stage (T3N1M0 adjuvant XELOX was administered for 6 months along with 2 cycles of prophylactic treatment with 5-aminosalycilic acid. During 2-years follow-up there are no signs of rectal cancer and ulcerative colitis progression. After pelvic electrostimulation defecation frequency decreased to 3–4 times per day, a patient has complete social rehabilitation.

  6. Diagnostics and therapy of rectal and anal carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of rectal and anal carcinomas is often reached too late, although the diagnostic possibilities are very good. The surgery of the rectal carcinoma (in regard to the growth and widespread of the tumour) consists of local excision, anterior resection or abdominoperineal extirpation. The 5-year survival rate of out patients (according to the staging) ranges between 47 and 78%. In case of anal carcinoma a radical operation is possible only, if the tumour is not widespread and without advanced metastases. In such a case it is sometimes possible to perform a continent resection. The radiotherapy is indicated in advanced cases with metastases, or as curative method in tumours which are radio-sensitive. This combined surgical and radiological therapy has given in our patients a 5-year survival rate of 64%. (orig./MG)

  7. Wild Banana Seed Phytobezoar Rectal Impaction Causing Intestinal Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Feng Yih; Heng, Sophia Si Ling; Asilah, Siti Mohd Desa; Adila, Irene Nur Ibrahim; Tan, Yew Eng; Chong, Hock Chin

    2016-08-01

    Wild banana (Musa acuminata subsp. microcarpa) seed phytobezoar rectal impaction in adult is a rare entity. Here, we report a 75-year-old male with dementia who presented with lower abdominal pain, per-rectal bleeding and overflow faecal incontinence. Our investigation discovered a large wild banana seed phytobezoar impacted in the rectum causing intestinal obstruction, stercoral ulcer and faecal overflow incontinence. In this article, we discuss the patient's clinical findings, imaging and management. The culprit plant was identified and depicted. This may be the first report of its kind. Public consumption of these wild bananas should be curtailed. It is hoped that this report would increase the awareness of such condition and its identification. PMID:27574355

  8. Rectal cancer survival in the Nordic countries and Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, J.; Engholm, G.; Ehrnrooth, E.;

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present detailed population-based survival estimates four patients with a rectal adenocarcinoma, using cancer register data supplemented with clinical data. Based oil cancer register data. differences in rectal cancer survival have been reported between countries ill...... Europe. Variation ill the distribution of stage at diagnosis. initial therapy including surgical technique, and comorbidity are possible explanatory factors. Adenocarcinomas in the rectum. diagnosed in 1997 and identified in the national cancer registries in the Nordic countries and Scotland were...... Norway, Sweden and Scotland. Danish men hall the highest rate of excess deaths in the first six months after diagnosis. Stage adjusted, the elevated relative excess mortality decreased and after six months the excess mortality rates were the same in all countries. The poor 5-year relative survival in...

  9. Rectal cancer survival in the Nordic countries and Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Joakim; Engholm, Gerda; Ehrnrooth, Eva;

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present detailed population-based survival estimates for patients with a rectal adenocarcinoma, using cancer register data supplemented with clinical data. Based on cancer register data, differences in rectal cancer survival have been reported between countries in...... Europe. Variation in the distribution of stage at diagnosis, initial therapy including surgical technique, and comorbidity are possible explanatory factors. Adenocarcinomas in the rectum, diagnosed in 1997 and identified in the national cancer registries in the Nordic countries and Scotland were included......, Sweden and Scotland. Danish men had the highest rate of excess deaths in the first six months after diagnosis. Stage adjusted, the elevated relative excess mortality decreased and after six months the excess mortality rates were the same in all countries. The poor 5-year relative survival in Danish men...

  10. Preoperative staging and treatment options in T1 rectal adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, Gunnar; Endreseth, Birger H; Isaksen, Vidar; Kjellmo, Ase; Tveit, K.M.; Nesbakken, Arild

    2009-01-01

    risk patients with high-risk T1 cancers should be offered rectum resection, but old and comorbid patients with high-risk T1 cancers should be treated individually according to objective criteria as age, physical performance as well as patient's preference. All patients treated for cure with local......Background. Major rectal resection for T1 rectal cancer offers more than 95% cancer specific five-year survival to patients surviving the first 30 days after surgery. A significant further improvement by development of the surgical technique may not be possible. Improvements in the total survival....... Results. Local treatment of T1 cancers combined with close follow-up, early salvage surgery or later radical resection of local recurrences or with chemo-radiation may lead to fewer severe complications and comparable, or even better, long-term survival. Accurate preoperative staging and careful selection...

  11. Multidisciplinary Teams in the Management of Rectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Obias, Vincent J.; Reynolds, Harry L.

    2007-01-01

    A myriad of advances in the treatment of rectal cancer have been achieved over the last few decades. The introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) has resulted in significant improvements in local recurrence. Surgical education on the technique has made it the standard of care. Radiation and chemotherapy combined with TME have improved results even further with stage II and III cancers. Sphincter-sparing techniques, reservoir procedures, local treatment advances, minimally invasive tech...

  12. Atypical Phimosis Secondary to a Preputial Metastasis from Rectal Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Goris Gbenou, Maximilien C.; Wahidy, Tawfik; Llinares, Karine; Cracco, Dominique; Perrot, Alain; Riquet, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Background Cutaneous metastases from colorectal cancer are uncommon, accounting for 6.5% of all secondary skin lesions. They occur in advanced disease. The most common site is the abdomen. The penis is a rare site. Case Report We report the case of a 79-year-old patient who presented, two years after rectocolectomy for a rectal adenocarcinoma, obstructive renal failure secondary to a presacral recurrence, as well as symptomatic phimosis associated with papulonodules invading the penis, scrotu...

  13. Metachronous penile metastasis from rectal cancer after total pelvic exenteration

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Yuta; Shida, Dai; Nasu, Keiichi; Matsunaga, Hiroki; Warabi, Masahiro; Inoue, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    Despite its abundant vascularization and extensive circulatory communication with neighboring organs, metastases to the penis are a rare event. A 57-year-old male, who had undergone total pelvic exenteration for rectal cancer sixteen months earlier, demonstrated an abnormal uptake within his penis by positron emission tomography/computed tomography. A single elastic nodule of the middle penis shaft was noted deep within Bucks fascia. No other obvious recurrent site was noted except the penile...

  14. Rectal dose reduction with IMRT for prostate radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose escalation in radiation therapy has led to increased control rates with some clinical trial evidence that rectal toxicity may be reduced when using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) over 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for dose-escalated prostate radiotherapy. However, IMRT for prostate patients is not yet standard in many Australian radiation oncology centres. This study investigates dosimetric changes that can be observed between IMRT and 3DCRT in prostate radiotherapy. Fifteen patients were selected for analysis. Two target definitions were investigated – prostate-only and prostate plus seminal vesicles (p + SVs). A five-field 3DCRT and seven-field IMRT plan were created for each patient and target definition. The planning target volume coverage was matched for both plans. Doses to the rectum, bladder and femoral heads were compared using dose volume histograms. The rectal normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) were calculated and compared for the 3DCRT and IMRT plans. The delivery efficiency was investigated. The IMRT plans resulted in reductions in the V25, V50, V60, V70 and V75 Gy values for both the prostate-only and p + SVs targets. Rectal NTCP was reduced with IMRT for three different sets of model parameters. The reductions in rectal dose and NTCP were much larger for the p + SVs target. Delivery of IMRT plans was less efficient than for 3DCRT plans. IMRT resulted in superior plans based on dosimetric and biological endpoints. The dosimetric gains with IMRT were greater for the more complex p + SVs target. The gains made came at the cost of decreased delivery efficiency.

  15. The effect of hysterectomy on ano-rectal physiology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, J L

    2012-02-03

    Hysterectomy is associated with severe constipation in a subgroup of patients, and an adverse effect on colonic motility has been described in the literature. The onset of irritable bowel syndrome and urinary bladder dysfunction has also been reported after hysterectomy. In this prospective study, we investigated the effect of simple hysterectomy on ano-rectal physiology and bowel function. Thirty consecutive patients were assessed before and 16 weeks after operation. An abdominal hysterectomy was performed in 16 patients, and a vaginal procedure was performed in 14. The parameters measured included the mean resting, and maximal forced voluntary contraction anal pressures, the recto-anal inhibitory reflex, and rectal sensation to distension. In 8 patients, the terminal motor latency of the pudendal nerve was assessed bilaterally. Pre-operatively, 8 patients were constipated. This improved following hysterectomy in 4, worsened in 2, and was unchanged in 2. Symptomatology did not correlate with changes in manometry. Although, the mean resting pressure was reduced after hysterectomy (57 mmHg-53 mmHg, P = 0.0541), the maximal forced voluntary contraction pressure was significantly decreased (115 mmHg-105 mmHg, P = 0.029). This effect was more pronounced in those with five or more previous vaginal deliveries (P = 0.0244, n = 9). There was no significant change in the number of patients with an intact ano-rectal inhibitory reflex after hysterectomy. There was no change in rectal sensation to distension, and the right and left pudendal nerve terminal motor latencies were unaltered at follow-up. Our results demonstrate that hysterectomy causes a decrease in the maximal forced voluntary contraction and pressure, and this appears to be due to a large decrease in a small group of patients with previous multiple vaginal deliveries.

  16. Efficacy of rectal misoprostol for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirteimouri, Masoumeh; Tara, Fatemeh; Teimouri, Batool; Sakhavar, Nahid; Vaezi, Afsaneh

    2013-01-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage is an important cause of maternal morbidity and mortality after delivery. Active management of postpartum hemorrhage by an uterotonic drug decreases the rate of postpartum hemorrhage. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of rectal misoprostol for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage. This double blind randomized clinical trial was performed on full term pregnant women candidate for vaginal delivery, referred to Zahedan Imam Ali Hospital during 2008-2009. They were randomly divided into two groups of rectal misoprostol and oxytocin. The women in misoprostol group received 400 μg rectal misoprostol after delivery and the women in oxytocin group received 3 IU oxytocin in 1 L ringer serum, intravenously. Rate of bleeding, need to any surgery interventions, rate of transfusion and changes in hemoglobin and hematocrite were compared between two groups. A total of 400 patients (200 cases in misoprostol group and 200 in oxytocin group) entered to the study. Rate of bleeding > 500 cc was significantly higher in oxytocin group than misoprostol group (33% vs. 19%) (p = 0.005). Also, need to excessive oxytocin for management of postpartum hemorrhage was significantly lower in misoprostol group than oxytocin group (18% vs. 30%) (p = 0.003). Decrease in hematocrite was significantly more observed in oxytocin group than misoprostol group (mean decrease of hematocrite was 1.3 ± 1.6 in misoprostol group and 1.6 ± 2.2 in oxytocin group). Two groups were similar in terms of side-effects. Rectal misoprostol as an uterotonic drug can decrease postpartum hemorrhage and also can prevent from decrease of hemoglobin as compared to oxytocin. PMID:24250623

  17. Efficacy of Rectal Misoprostol for Prevention of Postpartum Hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Mirteimouri, Masoumeh; Tara, Fatemeh; Teimouri, Batool; Sakhavar, Nahid; Vaezi, Afsaneh

    2013-01-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage is an important cause of maternal morbidity and mortality after delivery. Active management of postpartum hemorrhage by an uterotonic drug decreases the rate of postpartum hemorrhage. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of rectal misoprostol for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage. This double blind randomized clinical trial was performed on full term pregnant women candidate for vaginal delivery, referred to Zahedan Imam Ali Hospital during 2008-2009. They...

  18. Female urogenital dysfunction following total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Ashraf

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of Total Mesorectal Excision (TME on sexual function in the male is well documented. However, there is little literature in female patients. The aim of this study was to review the pelvic autonomic nervous anatomy in the female and to perform a retrospective audit of urinary and sexual function in women following surgery for rectal cancer where TME had been performed. Urogenital dysfunction was assessed through interview and questionnaire. Method Twenty-three questionnaires, eighteen returned, were sent to women with a mean age 65.5 yrs (range 34–86. All had undergone total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer between 1998–2001. Mean follow-up was 18.8 months (range 3–35. Results Preoperatively 5/18 (28% were sexually active, 3/18 (17% of patients described urinary frequency and nocturia and 7/18 (39% described symptoms of stress incontinence prior to surgery. Postoperatively all sexually active patients remained active although all described some discomfort with penetration. Two of the patients sexually active described reduced libido secondary to the stoma. Postoperative urinary symptoms developed with 59% reporting the development of nocturia, 18% developed stress incontinence and one patient required a permanent catheter. Of those with symptoms, 80% persisted longer than three months from surgery. Symptoms were predominant in those patients with low rectal cancers, particularly those undergoing abdomino-perineal excision and in those who had previously undergone abdominal hysterectomy. Conclusion The treatment of rectal cancer involves surgery to the pelvic floor. Despite nerve preservation this is associated with the development of worsening nocturia and stress incontinence. This is most marked in those patients who had previously undergone a hysterectomy. Further studies are warranted to assess the interaction with previous gynaecological surgery.

  19. Robotic anterior resection of rectal cancer: technique and early outcome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Xiao-hui; SHEN Di; LI Rong; LI Song-yan; NING Ning; ZHAO Yun-shan; ZOU Zhen-yu

    2013-01-01

    Background The Da Vinci system is a newly developed device for colorectal surgery.With advanced stereoscopic vision,lack of tremor,and the ability to rotate the instruments surgeons find that robotic systems are ideal laparoscopic tools.Since conventional laparoscopic total mesorectal excision is a challenging procedure,we have sought to assess the utility of the Da Vinci robotic system in anterior resections for rectal cancer.Methods Between November 2010 and December 2011,a total of 22 patients affected by rectal cancer were operated on with robotic technique,using the Da Vinci robot.Data regarding the outcome and pathology reports were prospectively collected in a dedicated database.Results There were no conversions to open surgery and no postoperative mortality of any patient.Mean operative time was (220±46) minutes (range,152-286 minutes).The median number of lymph nodes harvested was (14.6±6.5) (range,8-32),and the circumferential margin was negative in all cases.The distal margin was (2.6±1.2) cm (range,1.0-5.5 cm).The mean length of hospital stay was (7.8+2.6) days (range,7.0-13.0 days).Macroscopic grading of the specimen was complete in 19 cases and neady complete in three patients.Conclusions Robotic anterior resection for rectal surgery is safe and feasible in experienced hands.Outcome and pathology findings are comparable with those observed in open and laparoscopy procedures.This technique may facilitate minimally invasive radical rectal surgery.

  20. Colorectal anastomosis dehiscence following radical surgical operation for rectal carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Trifunović Bratislav; Delić Jovan; Mirković Darko; Jovanović Milan; Kršić Jovan; Zarić Zoran

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aim. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the biggest health problems of modern humanity, especially in highly developed countries. In Serbia about 3,200 patients suffer from CRC, out of whom about 1,100 patients suffer from rectal cancer (RC), while about 2,100 patients suffer from other colon segments cancer. The aim of the study was to show the incidence genesis of one of the possible early postoperative complications regarding dehiscence of the colorectal anastomosis (CRA) w...

  1. Post hemorrhoidectomy pain control: rectal Diclofenac versus Acetaminophen

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimi M; Makarem J; Maktobi M

    2009-01-01

    "nBackground: Anal surgeries are prevalent, but they didn't perform as outpatient surgeries because of concerns about postoperative pain. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of rectal acetaminophen and diclofenac on postoperative analgesia after anal surgeries in adult patients. "nMethods: In a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study 60 ASA class I or II scheduled for haemorrhoidectomy, anal fissure or fistula repair, were randomized (with block...

  2. Synchronous Collision Neuroendocrine Tumor and Rectal Adenocarcinoma: a Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jie-gao; Zhang, Zhong-Tao; WU, GUO-CONG; Han, Wei; Wang, Kang-Li

    2015-01-01

    Collision tumors are thought to arise from the accidental meeting of two independent tumors. Adenocarcinoma is the most common malignant rectal tumor, while neuroendocrine tumor (NET) is relatively rare. Due to the endoscopy and reporting, the overall incidence of NETs was increasing recently but still less than 1 per 100,000. This means that a combination of an adenocarcinoma and NET is a very rare finding and an actual collision of these tumors even more so. We report here a highly unusual ...

  3. The immunohistochemical demonstration of Helicobacter pylori in rectal ectopia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Corrigan, Mark Anthony

    2009-08-01

    The finding of heterotopic gastric mucosa in the rectum is rare, with less than 40 reported cases in the literature. A condition of unknown etiology, several hypotheses exist including infectious and congenital. We report a case of ectopic gastric tissue in the rectum of a 47-year-old female, and her subsequent clinical course. Furthermore for the first time, we present immunohistologic evidence of the presence of Helicobacter pylori in rectal ectopic gastric tissue.

  4. Preoperative staging and radiotherapy in rectal cancer surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Pollack, Johan

    2006-01-01

    Background: Rectal cancer affects approximately 2 000 people in Sweden every year. The overall survival rate is approximately 50% after five years. During the last decades the survival has increased and the local recurrence rate has declined. This can be attributed to improved surgical techniques and introduction of preoperative radiotherapy. The improved surgical technique includes specimen oriented surgery and introduction of the total mesorectal excision-technique (TME). ...

  5. Preoperative chemoradiation using oral capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Capecitabine (Xeloda) is a new orally administered fluoropyrimidine carbamate that was rationally designed to exert its effect by tumor-selective activation. We attempted to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of preoperative chemoradiation using capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between July 1999 and March 2001, 45 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3/T4 or N+) were treated with preoperative chemoradiation. Radiation of 45 Gy/25 fractions was delivered to the pelvis, followed by a 5.4 Gy/3 fractions boost to the primary tumor. Chemotherapy was administered concurrent with radiotherapy and consisted of 2 cycles of 14-day oral capecitabine (1650 mg/m2/day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m2/day), each of which was followed by a 7-day rest period. Surgery was performed 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Results: Thirty-eight patients received definitive surgery. Primary tumor and node downstaging occurred in 63% and 90% of patients, respectively. The overall downstaging rate, including both primary tumor and nodes, was 84%. A pathologic complete response was achieved in 31% of patients. Twenty-one patients had tumors located initially 5 cm or less from the anal verge; among the 18 treated with surgery, 72% received sphincter-preserving surgery. No Grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicities developed. Other Grade 3 toxicities were as follows: hand-foot syndrome (7%), fatigue (4%), diarrhea (4%), and radiation dermatitis (2%). Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that preoperative chemoradiation with capecitabine is a safe, well-tolerated, and effective neoadjuvant treatment modality for locally advanced rectal cancer. In addition, this preoperative treatment has a considerable downstaging effect on the tumor and can increase the possibility of sphincter preservation in distal rectal cancer

  6. Laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery: Where do we stand?

    OpenAIRE

    Krane, Mukta K; Fichera, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Large comparative studies and multiple prospective randomized control trials (RCTs) have reported equivalence in short and long-term outcomes between the open and laparoscopic approaches for the surgical treatment of colon cancer which has heralded widespread acceptance for laparoscopic resection of colon cancer. In contrast, laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) for the treatment of rectal cancer has been welcomed with significantly less enthusiasm. While it is likely that patients wi...

  7. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: demographic, clinical, endoscopic and histological panorama

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the demographic, clinical, endoscopic and histological spectrum of Solitary Rectal Ulcer Syndrome (SRUS). Study Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Medical Unit-III, Civil Hospital Karachi (CHK) and Ward 7, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre (JPMC), Karachi, from January 2009 to June 2012. Methodology: Patients with SRUS, based on characteristic endoscopic and histological findings, were enrolled. Patients were excluded if they had other causes of the rectal lesions (neoplasm, infection, inflammatory bowel disease, and trauma). Endoscopically, lesions were divided on the basis of number (solitary or multiple) and appearance (ulcerative, polypoidal/nodular or erythematous mucosa). Demographic, clinical and endoscopic characteristics of subjects were evaluated. Results: Forty-four patients met the inclusion criteria; 21 (47.7%) were females and 23 (52.3%) were males with overall mean age of 33.73 ±13.28 years. Symptom-wise 41 (93.2%) had bleeding per rectum, 39 (88.6%) had mucous discharge, 34 (77.3%) had straining, 34 (77.3%) had constipation, 32 (72.7%) had tenesmus, 5 (11.4%) had rectal prolapse and 2 (4.5%) had fecal incontinence. Twelve (27.27%) patients presented with hemoglobin less 10 gm/dl, 27 (61.36%) with 10 - 12 gm/dl and 05 (11.36%) subjects had hemoglobin more than 12 gm/dl. Endoscopically, 26 (59.1%) patients had mucosal ulceration, 11 (25.0%) had mucosal ulceration with polypoid characteristics; while only polypoid features were found in 7 (15.9%) subjects. Conclusion: Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome affects adults of both genders with diverse clinical presentation and nonspecific endoscopic features. (author)

  8. Metachronous penile metastasis from rectal cancer after total pelvic exenteration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuta Kimura; Dai Shida; Keiichi Nasu; Hiroki Matsunaga; Masahiro Warabi; Satoru Inoue

    2012-01-01

    Despite its abundant vascularization and extensive circulatory communication with neighboring organs,metastases to the penis are a rare event.A 57-yearold male,who had undergone total pelvic exenteration for rectal cancer sixteen months earlier,demonstrated an abnormal uptake within his penis by positron emission tomography/computed tomography.A single elastic nodule of the middle penis shaft was noted deep within Bucks fascia.No other obvious recurrent site was noted except the penile lesion.Total penectomy was performed as a curative resection based on a diagnosis of isolated penile metastasis from rectal cancer.A histopathological examination revealed an increase of well differentiated adenocarcinoma in the corpus spongiosum consistent with his primary rectal tumor.The immunohistochemistry of the tumor cells demonstrated positive staining for cytokeratin 20 and negative staining for cytokeratin 7,which strongly supported a diagnosis of penile metastasis from the rectum.The patient is alive more than two years without any recurrence.

  9. GLUT-1 expression and response to chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brophy, Sarah

    2009-12-15

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is used in locally advanced rectal cancer to reduce local recurrence and improve operability, however a proportion of tumors do not undergo significant regression. Identification of predictive markers of response to chemoradiotherapy would improve patient selection and may allow response modification by targeting of specific pathways. The aim of this study was to determine whether expression of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) and p53 in pretreatment rectal cancer biopsies was predictive of tumor response to chemoradiotherapy. Immunohistochemical staining for GLUT-1 and p53 was performed on 69 pretreatment biopsies and compared to tumor response in the resected specimen as determined by the tumor regression grade (TRG) scoring system. GLUT-1 expression was significantly associated with reduced response to chemoradiotherapy and increasing GLUT expression correlated with poorer response (p=0.02). GLUT-1 negative tumors had a 70% probability of good response (TRG3\\/4) compared to a 31% probability of good response in GLUT-1 positive tumors. GLUT-1 may be a useful predictive marker of response to chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer.

  10. Rectal Duplication%直肠重复畸形

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张道荣; 牟弦琴; 李振东; 李恭才; 王修忠; 代蕊霜

    1983-01-01

    @@ 我们两院近10年来共收治先天性直肠重复畸形17例(其中河北医学院11例,西安医学院6例).均经手术及病理证实.现总结如下:临床资料本组男性6例,女性11例,最小年龄4天,最大年龄14岁.%This paper reports 17 cases of rectal duplication. There were 6 males and 11rectal duplications were divided into three bordered by a common wall.9 patients in this series were found to have this condition.a rectovestitubular fistula.B.Pararectal duplication.The duplicated bowel lies near elliptical in shape and filled with fluid.In Complicated rectal duplication.The dupticated bowel is located at the perineum near the abnormal anus and is usually associated with hypospadia.Two cases were of this type.between the duplicated bowel and normal rectum must be partially resected at the distal end.The rectovestitubular fistula should be repaired at the same time.Pararectal duplication can be completely resected.resect the duplicated bowel from perineum but leave the genital anomaly for later treatment.

  11. Rectal swabs for analysis of the intestinal microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andries E Budding

    Full Text Available The composition of the gut microbiota is associated with various disease states, most notably inflammatory bowel disease, obesity and malnutrition. This underlines that analysis of intestinal microbiota is potentially an interesting target for clinical diagnostics. Currently, the most commonly used sample types are feces and mucosal biopsy specimens. Because sampling method, storage and processing of samples impact microbiota analysis, each sample type has its own limitations. An ideal sample type for use in routine diagnostics should be easy to obtain in a standardized fashion without perturbation of the microbiota. Rectal swabs may satisfy these criteria, but little is known about microbiota analysis on these sample types. In this study we investigated the characteristics and applicability of rectal swabs for gut microbiota profiling in a clinical routine setting in patients presenting with various gastro-intestinal disorders. We found that rectal swabs appeared to be a convenient means of sampling the human gut microbiota. Swabs can be performed on demand, whenever a patient presents; swab-derived microbiota profiles are reproducible, whether they are gathered at home by patients or by medical professionals in an outpatient setting and may be ideally suited for clinical diagnostics and large-scale studies.

  12. Reirradiation of locally recurrent rectal cancer: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Many patients with rectal cancer receive radiotherapy as a component of primary multimodality treatment. Although local recurrence is infrequent, reirradiation may be needed to improve resectability and outcomes. This systematic review investigated the effects of reirradiation in terms of feasibility, toxicity, and long-term outcomes. Methods: A Medline, Embase and Cochrane search resulted in 353 titles/abstracts. Ten publications describing seven prospective or retrospective studies were included, presenting results of 375 patients reirradiated for rectal cancer. Results: Median initial radiation dose was 50.4 Gy, median 8–30 months before reirradiation. Reirradiation was mostly administered using hyperfractionated (1.2–1.5 Gy twice-daily) or 1.8 Gy once-daily chemoradiotherapy. Median total dose was 30–40 Gy to the gross tumour volume with 2–4 cm margins. Median survival was 39–60 months in resected patients and 12–16 months in palliative patients. Good symptomatic relief was reported in 82–100%. Acute toxicity with diarrhoea was reported in 9–20%, late toxicity was insufficiently reported. Conclusions: Reirradiation of rectal cancer to limited volumes is feasible. When curative resection is possible, the goal is radical resection and long-term survival, and hyperfractionated chemoradiotherapy should be preferred to limit late toxicity. Reirradiation yielded good symptomatic relief in palliative treatment

  13. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome presenting as polypoid mass lesions in a young girl

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is a rare condition in children. We report a case of SRUS in an 8-year old Saudi girl who presented with recurrent rectal bleeding, intermittent mucosal prolapse, and passage of mucus per rectum. Colonoscopy revealed multiple polypoid mass lesions with histopathological features of SRUS. The polypoid variant of SRUS is very rare in children and may be confused with rectal malignant or inflammatory conditions.

  14. What Are the Best Questionnaires To Capture Anorectal Function After Surgery in Rectal Cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Tina Yen-Ting; Emmertsen, Katrine J.; Laurberg, Søren

    2014-01-01

    With enhanced surgical techniques and neoadjuvant therapy in rectal cancer, survivorship issues are at the forefront of clinical practice and research. More and more patients are living with altered bowel habits following rectal cancer surgery. Sound assessment of anorectal function after rectal cancer surgery is the foundation for the continuing effort to explore the adverse effects of such surgery on bowel function, as well as for working towards reducing these effects. The quality of the a...

  15. Complexities of abdominoperineal surgery: synchronous resection of an ano-rectal adenocarcinoma and pelvic schwannoma

    OpenAIRE

    Higgin, Ryan P.C.; Glaysher, Michael A.; Zeidan, Bashir A.; Miles, Andrew J.G.

    2014-01-01

    Abdominoperineal resection (APR) is indicated for low rectal/ano-rectal cancers. It necessitates fastidious pelvic dissection posing certain operative difficulties. We present the surgical challenges in a unique case of a patient presenting with a low rectal adenocarcinoma and a synchronous pelvic schwannomas, both requiring resection. A 71-year-old gentleman presented for surveillance colonoscopy following previous excision of colonic polyps. This investigation revealed a polypoid mass at th...

  16. The Effect of Preceding Biopsy on Complete Endoscopic Resection in Rectal Carcinoid Tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang Pyo; Sung, In-Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Sun-Young; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan Sup

    2014-01-01

    Biopsy of rectal carcinoid tumor is commonly taken before endoscopic resection. However the preceding biopsy can inhibit complete resection by causing blurred tumor border and fibrosis of the tissue. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of preceding biopsy on complete endoscopic resection in rectal carcinoid tumor. It was also determined if rectal carcinoid tumors can be macroscopically distinguished by endoscopy. We reviewed retrospectively the records of patients with re...

  17. A clinical study of metastasized rectal cancer treatment: assessing a multimodal approach

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Michaela; Holmqvist, Annica; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Albertsson, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Metastasized rectal cancer has long been considered incurable. During recent years, the treatment of rectal cancer patients has been improved, and nowadays, a subgroup of patients might even be cured. The aim of this study was to investigate the optimal timing of treatment in a multimodal therapy schedule in order to see whether the addition of bevacizumab (Avastin) to conventional chemotherapy was effective. The study included 39 patients with metastatic rectal cancer between 2009 and 2011, ...

  18. Quantification of organ motion during chemoradiotherapy of rectal cancer using cone-beam computed tomography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chong, Irene

    2011-11-15

    There has been no previously published data related to the quantification of rectal motion using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) during standard conformal long-course chemoradiotherapy. The purpose of the present study was to quantify the interfractional changes in rectal movement and dimensions and rectal and bladder volume using CBCT and to quantify the bony anatomy displacements to calculate the margins required to account for systematic (Σ) and random (σ) setup errors.

  19. Short-term outcomes after laparoscopic surgery following preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Byong Hyon; Lee, Kyung Ha; Park, Jun Beom; Song, Min Sang; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Jin Soo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The safety and the feasibility of performing laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) have not yet been established. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and the safety of laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery performed after preoperative CRT. Methods We enrolled 124 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer. Of these patients, 56 received preoperative CRT (CRT group), whereas 68 did not (non-CRT...

  20. The role of the robotic technique in minimally invasive surgery in rectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bianchi, Paolo Pietro; Luca, Fabrizio; Petz, Wanda; Valvo, Manuela; Cenciarelli, Sabine; Zuccaro, Massimiliano; Biffi, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery is feasible, oncologically safe, and offers better short-term outcomes than traditional open procedures in terms of pain control, recovery of bowel function, length of hospital stay, and time until return to working activity. Nevertheless, laparoscopic techniques are not widely used in rectal surgery, mainly because they require a prolonged and demanding learning curve that is available only in high-volume and rectal cancer surgery centres experienced in minimally ...

  1. Local excision for early rectal cancer: transanal endoscopic microsurgery and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Althumairi, Azah A.; Gearhart, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of treatment for early stage rectal cancer is to optimize oncologic control while minimizing the long-term impact of treatment on quality of life. The standard of care treatment for most stage I and II rectal cancers is radical surgery alone, specifically total mesorectal excision (TME). For early rectal cancers, this procedure is usually curative but can have a substantial impact on quality of life, including the possibility of permanent colostomy and the potential for short and lon...

  2. A new instrument for rectal suction biopsy in the diagnosis of Hirschsprung′s disease: Triple rectal suction biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barlas Meral

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A new instrument for suction rectal biopsy in infants suspected of having Hirschsprung′s disease is described that can be completely dismantled, physically cleaned, lubricated, and heat sterilised. Triple rectal suction biopsy instrument with the patent application, which involves (0.5 cm diameter suction of mucosa and sub-mucosa and provides taking three different biopsies within a 2 cm distant from each other with a single shot, instead of only one or taking a full layer biopsy under general anesthesia for the diagnosis of Hirschsprung disease. As a preliminary study, in the 36 and 12 biopsy materials taken from the rabbits and children, respectively, it was found that mucosa and sub-mucosa were sufficient and in all of the cross sections, parasympathetic nerve fibers, and ganglion cells were existed. A successful biopsy was usually achieved and no complications occurred.

  3. Complex rectal polyps: other treatment modalities required when offering a transanal endoscopic microsurgery service.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Joyce, Myles R

    2011-09-01

    Complex rectal polyps may present a clinical challenge. The study aim was to assess different treatment modalities required in the management of patients referred for transanal endoscopic microsurgery.

  4. Clinical and therapeutic considerations of rectal lymphoma: A case report and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yilmaz Bilsel; Emre Balik; Sumer Yamaner; Dursun Bugra

    2005-01-01

    Primary rectal lymphoma is a rare presentation of gastrointestinal lymphomas. Its clinical presentation is indistinguishable from that of rectal carcinoma. Although surgical resection is often technically feasible, optimal therapy for colorectal lymphoma has not yet been identified.We report a case of primary rectal lymphoma (nonHodgkin's large cell lymphoma of type B) with high-grade features that disappeared completely after chemoradiotherapy. This case underlines that primary treatment with systemic chemotherapy and involved-field radiotherapy can be successful for rectal lymphoma, with surgery reserved for complications and chemotherapy failures.

  5. Social inequalities in stage at diagnosis of rectal but not in colonic cancer: a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, B L; Osler, M; Harling, Henrik; Colorectal Cancer Group, Danish; Jørgensen, Torben

    2008-01-01

    among colon cancer patients. The social gradient found in rectal cancer patients was significantly different from the lack of association found among colon cancer patients. There are socioeconomic inequalities in the risk of being diagnosed with distant metastasis of a rectal, but not a colonic, cancer...... reduction in the risk of being diagnosed with distant metastasis was seen in elderly rectal cancer patients with high income, living in owner-occupied housing and living with a partner. Among younger rectal cancer patients, a reduced risk was seen in those having long education. No social gradient was found....... The different risk profile of these two cancers may reflect differences in symptomatology....

  6. Rectal complications in carcinoma of the uterine cervix by RALS-therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between July 1979 and January, 1980, we treated 24 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix with RALS-TRON-20B, using the rapid processing system of pretreatment dose calculation. The incidence of rectal complications (3/24) was the same as that of a historical control group (5/28). According to ROC curve analysis, 5 rectal complications were related to the measured rectal dose, not to the point A dose or mg-hrs. Our findings suggest that hemorrhagic tendency, syphilis and diabetes mellitus influence the rectal complications. (author)

  7. Correlation of chromosomal instability, telomere length and telomere maintenance in microsatellite stable rectal cancer: a molecular subclass of rectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Boardman

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Colorectal cancer (CRC tumor DNA is characterized by chromosomal damage termed chromosomal instability (CIN and excessively shortened telomeres. Up to 80% of CRC is microsatellite stable (MSS and is historically considered to be chromosomally unstable (CIN+. However, tumor phenotyping depicts some MSS CRC with little or no genetic changes, thus being chromosomally stable (CIN-. MSS CIN- tumors have not been assessed for telomere attrition. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: MSS rectal cancers from patients ≤50 years old with Stage II (B2 or higher or Stage III disease were assessed for CIN, telomere length and telomere maintenance mechanism (telomerase activation [TA]; alternative lengthening of telomeres [ALT]. Relative telomere length was measured by qPCR in somatic epithelial and cancer DNA. TA was measured with the TRAPeze assay, and tumors were evaluated for the presence of C-circles indicative of ALT. p53 mutation status was assessed in all available samples. DNA copy number changes were evaluated with Spectral Genomics aCGH. RESULTS: Tumors were classified as chromosomally stable (CIN- and chromosomally instable (CIN+ by degree of DNA copy number changes. CIN- tumors (35%; n=6 had fewer copy number changes (<17% of their clones with DNA copy number changes than CIN+ tumors (65%; n=13 which had high levels of copy number changes in 20% to 49% of clones. Telomere lengths were longer in CIN- compared to CIN+ tumors (p=0.0066 and in those in which telomerase was not activated (p=0.004. Tumors exhibiting activation of telomerase had shorter tumor telomeres (p=0.0040; and tended to be CIN+ (p=0.0949. CONCLUSIONS: MSS rectal cancer appears to represent a heterogeneous group of tumors that may be categorized both on the basis of CIN status and telomere maintenance mechanism. MSS CIN- rectal cancers appear to have longer telomeres than those of MSS CIN+ rectal cancers and to utilize ALT rather than activation of telomerase.

  8. INTERSPHINCTERIC TOTAL PROCTECTOMY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF LOW RECTAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Montori

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of lower rectal cancer is still controversial. A multidisciplinary approach is recommended. There are a lot of surgical techniques for lower rectal cancer (abdomino-perineal rectal resection, nerve sparing technique, total mesorectal excision, intersphincteric total proctectomy, trans-anal anastomosis etc.. In this paper it is presented the intersphincteric total proctectomy. The key points for sphincter preservation surgery are: a good knowledge of anal function pathophysiology, 2 cm distal adequate margin (or 1 cm for neo-adjuvant treated patients, total mesorectal excision, colo-anal anastomosis, nerve sparing proctectomy. The colo-anal anastomosis is the last step of the intersphincteric total proctectomy. Neo-adjuvant therapy is also indicated. The selection criteria and the technique of intersphincteric total proctectomy is presented. Between 1987-2002 this procedure was made at 120 patients with lower rectal cancer. The postoperative specific complications were: pelvic peritonitis (n=1 and anal stenosis (n=4. No anastomotic leak was encountered. 9 patients were classified in stage 0, 48 in stage I, 26 in stage II and 37 in stage III (UICC clasification. The 5 years survival rate was 97.4% for stages 0 and I, 71.3% for stages II and III. The functional results revealed a good continence in 77.5%, incontinence of liquid stools in 12.5%, incontinence for flatus in 7.5%, local recurrence in 2.5% and sexual or urological disfunction in 5%. Conclusions: Preoperative radiotherapy and sphincter preservation surgery (intersphincteric proctectomy provide good control of distal rectal cancer. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy seems to improve oncologic results with minimal additional morbidity. Our 6-8 week post-radiotherapy interval maximizes tumor shrinkage reducing the risks of radiation-induced complications. Intersphincteric proctectomy according to our experience reduces post-operative complications and risk of local

  9. Administrating Solr

    CERN Document Server

    Mohan, Surendra

    2013-01-01

    A fast-paced, example-based guide to learning how to administrate, monitor, and optimize Apache Solr.""Administrating Solr"" is for developers and Solr administrators who have a basic knowledge of Solr and who are looking for ways to keep their Solr server healthy and well maintained. A basic working knowledge of Apache Lucene is recommended, but this is not mandatory.

  10. Administrative Synergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Kimberly Kappler; Weckstein, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    One of the biggest obstacles to overcome in creating and sustaining an administrative professional learning community (PLC) is time. Administrators are constantly deluged by the tyranny of the urgent. It is a Herculean task to carve out time for PLCs, but it is imperative to do so. In this article, the authors describe how an administrative PLC…

  11. Quality of life of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer: anterior rectal resection with colorectal anastomosis versus abdominoperineal excision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Gabriela Aniţei

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite advances in neoadjuvant treatment, rectal resection remains the gold-standard treatment for rectal cancer. AIM: The aim of this study was to assess the benefits of anal sphincter preservation and to compare the quality of life in terms of functional outcome in long term survivors who underwent low (or ultra low anterior resection with total mesorectal excision to patients with abdominoperineal excision for locally advanced rectal cancer with neoadjuvant therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 319 patients who underwent surgery for rectal cancer from 2006 to 2011. Quality of life in 69 eligible patients with preoperative treatment and rectal resection with total mesorectal excision was assessed using the EORTC QLQ C 30 and EORTC QLQ CR29 questionnaires. We evaluated the overall status of quality of life and functional status of these patients symptoms scale. High score for functional scores shows better function whereas high symptom score shows more problems. Results were compared for patients with anal sphincter preservation (SP, 20 patients versus abdominoperineal excision (APE, 49 patients using t-Student test for independent samples. RESULTS: The median follow up in 69 patients was 32 months (range 11-74 months, 32±2,3SD. Quality of life for our group is significantly higher than the reference EORTC population (P < 0.001. Physical functioning (P = 0.050, cognitive functioning (P = 0.039, emotional functioning (P = 0.006, physical and social functioning (P = 0.005, constipation (P = 0.018, body image (P = 0.003, abdominal pain (P = 0.004, embarrassment (P = 0.003 were significantly better for patients with SP. There was no significant differences in the general symptoms of the radiochemotherapy treatment (mouth dryness, hair loss, flavor. Most of the symptom scales like sexual interest, impotence, dyspareunia, diarrhoea did not differ. APE patients suffered more from anxiety (P = 0

  12. Administrative Circulars

    CERN Multimedia

    Département des Ressources humaines

    2004-01-01

    Administrative Circular N° 2 (Rev. 2) - May 2004 Guidelines and procedures concerning recruitment and probation period of staff members This circular has been revised. It cancels and replaces Administrative Circular N° 2 (Rev. 1) - March 2000. Administrative Circular N° 9 (Rev. 3) - May 2004 Staff members contracts This circular has been revised. It cancels and replaces Administrative Circular N° 9 (Rev. 2) - March 2000. Administrative Circular N° 26 (Rev. 4) - May 2004 Procedure governing the career evolution of staff members This circular has also been revised. It Administrative Circulars Administrative Circular N° 26 (Rev. 3) - December 2001 and brings up to date the French version (Rev. 4) published on the HR Department Web site in January 2004. Operational Circular N° 7 - May 2004 Work from home This circular has been drawn up. Operational Circular N° 8 - May 2004 Dealing with alcohol-related problems...

  13. SU-E-T-280: Reconstructed Rectal Wall Dose Map-Based Verification of Rectal Dose Sparing Effect According to Rectum Definition Methods and Dose Perturbation by Air Cavity in Endo-Rectal Balloon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Dosimetric effect and discrepancy according to the rectum definition methods and dose perturbation by air cavity in an endo-rectal balloon (ERB) were verified using rectal-wall (Rwall) dose maps considering systematic errors in dose optimization and calculation accuracy in intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) for prostate cancer patients. Methods: When the inflated ERB having average diameter of 4.5 cm and air volume of 100 cc is used for patient, Rwall doses were predicted by pencil-beam convolution (PBC), anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA), and AcurosXB (AXB) with material assignment function. The errors of dose optimization and calculation by separating air cavity from the whole rectum (Rwhole) were verified with measured rectal doses. The Rwall doses affected by the dose perturbation of air cavity were evaluated using a featured rectal phantom allowing insert of rolled-up gafchromic films and glass rod detectors placed along the rectum perimeter. Inner and outer Rwall doses were verified with reconstructed predicted rectal wall dose maps. Dose errors and extent at dose levels were evaluated with estimated rectal toxicity. Results: While AXB showed insignificant difference of target dose coverage, Rwall doses underestimated by up to 20% in dose optimization for the Rwhole than Rwall at all dose range except for the maximum dose. As dose optimization for Rwall was applied, the Rwall doses presented dose error less than 3% between dose calculation algorithm except for overestimation of maximum rectal dose up to 5% in PBC. Dose optimization for Rwhole caused dose difference of Rwall especially at intermediate doses. Conclusion: Dose optimization for Rwall could be suggested for more accurate prediction of rectal wall dose prediction and dose perturbation effect by air cavity in IMRT for prostate cancer. This research was supported by the Leading Foreign Research Institute Recruitment Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea

  14. Administrative Reform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plum, Maja

    Through the example of a Danish reform of educational plans in early childhood education, the paper critically addresses administrative educational reforms promoting accountability, visibility and documentation. Drawing on Foucaultian perspectives, the relation between knowledge and governing...... administrative technology, tracing how the humanistic values of education embed and are embedded within ‘the professional nursery teacher' as an object and subject of administrative practice. Rather than undermining the humanistic potential of education, it is argued that the technology of accounting, in this...

  15. Influence of Obesity on Anastomotic Leakage After Anterior Rectal Resectionperformed Due to Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piecuch Jerzy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Anterior resection for rectal cancer carries the risk of serious complications, especially fistulas at the site of anastomosis. Numerous factors have been shown to impact anastomotic leakage. The results of studies on the influence of obesity on the frequency of anastomotic leakage after rectal resection performed due to cancer have been contradictory.

  16. Laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer: a single-centre experience of 120 cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Good, Daniel W

    2011-10-01

    For colorectal surgeons, laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery poses a new challenge. The defence of the questionable oncological safety tempered by the impracticality of the long learning curve is rapidly fading. As a unit specialising in minimally invasive surgery, we have routinely undertaken rectal cancer surgery laparoscopically since 2005.

  17. Systematic review of outcomes after intersphincteric resection for low rectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, S T

    2012-05-01

    For a select group of patients proctectomy with intersphincteric resection (ISR) for low rectal cancer may be a viable alternative to abdominoperineal resection, with good oncological outcomes while preserving sphincter function. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the current evidence regarding oncological outcomes, morbidity and mortality, and functional outcomes after ISR for low rectal cancer.

  18. Lactate concentrations in the rectal lumen in patients in early septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Michael; Tenhunen, J.; Wiis, J.; Waldau, T; Lauritsen, A.O.; Thornberg, K.; Joensen, H; Perner, A.

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we observed that rectal luminal lactate was higher in non-survivors compared with survivors of severe sepsis or septic shock persisting >24 h. The present study was initiated to further investigate this tentative association between rectal luminal lactate and mortality in a larger...... population of patients in early septic shock....

  19. Analysis of clinical factors for pathological complete response after preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical factors associated with pathological complete response (pCR) after preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data of 116 patients with rectal cancer, who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by radical surgery from January 2009 to December 2012. All patients received pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (50 Gy/25 fractions) with concurrent fluorouracil based chemotherapy and then underwent radical surgery 4-8 weeks later. The clinical factors associated with pCR or non-pCR were analyzed by Logistic regression. Results: Of the 116 patients, 20 (17.2%) achieved a pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The univariate analysis showed that percentage of circumference of the rectal tube invaded by the tumor, preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level, T stage, N stage, distance from the anal verge, degree of tumor differentiation, and maximum tumor diameter were associated with pCR or non-pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. The multivariate analysis revealed that percentage of circumference of the rectal tube invaded by the tumor, preoperative serum CEA level,and T stage were predictive factors for pCR or non-pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. Conclusions: Non-circumferential tumor (percentage of circumference of the rectal tube invaded by the tumor <75 %), low CEA level, and early T stage before treatment may be associated with pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. (authors)

  20. Problems and personal preferences in the therapy of rectal and anal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three modalities of treatment for rectal cancer are radiotherapy chemotherapy and surgery. The problems in the therapy of rectal and anal cancers are discussed. For maximum benefit a combination of pre-operative irradiation and chemotherapy followed by surgery and if needed continued post-operative irradiation therapy is recommended. (author)

  1. Pharmacokinetics and analgesic effects of intravenous propacetamol vs rectal paracetamol in children after major craniofacial surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Sandra A.; Van Dijk, Monique; Van Leeuwen, Pim; Searle, Susan; Anderson, Brian J.; Tibboel, Dick; Mathot, Ron A. A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The pharmacokinetics and analgesic effects of intravenous and rectal paracetamol were compared in nonventilated infants after craniofacial surgery in a double-blind placebo controlled study. Methods: During surgery all infants (6 months-2 years) received a rectal loading dose of 40 mg.kg

  2. The "liver-first approach" for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and synchronous liver metastases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, C.; Pool, A.E. van der; Nuyttens, J.J.; Planting, A.S.; Eggermont, A.M.M.; Wilt, J.H.W. de

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study was designed to investigate the outcome of "the liver-first" approach in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and synchronous liver metastases. METHODS: Patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and synchronous liver metastases were primarily treated for their liver me

  3. Level of arterial ligation in rectal cancer surgery: Low tie preferred over high tie. A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Lange (Marilyne); M. Buunen (Mark); C.J.H. van de Velde (Cornelis)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractConsensus does not exist on the level of arterial ligation in rectal cancer surgery. From oncologic considerations, many surgeons apply high tie arterial ligation (level of inferior mesenteric artery). Other strategies include ligation at the level of the superior rectal artery, just cau

  4. High tie versus low tie in rectal surgery: comparison of anastomotic perfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komen, N.; Slieker, J.; Kort, P. de; Wilt, J.H. de; Harst, E. van der; Coene, P.P.; Gosselink, M.P.; Tetteroo, G.; Graaf, E. de; Beek, T. van; Toom, R. den; Bockel, W. van; Verhoef, C.; Lange, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Both "high tie" (HT) and "low tie" (LT) are well-known strategies in rectal surgery. The aim of this study was to compare colonic perfusion after HT to colonic perfusion after LT. METHODS: Patients undergoing rectal resection for malignancy were included. Colonic perfusion was measured with

  5. VEGF concentrations in tumour arteries and veins from patients with rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werther, Kim; Bülow, Steffen; Hesselfeldt, Peter; Jespersen, Niels Frode Kragh; Svendsen, Mads Nordahl; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    This pilot study investigated the hypothesis that the tumour itself is the source of the elevated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations which are often observed in peripheral blood from patients with rectal cancer. Twenty-four consecutive patients with primary rectal cancer wer...

  6. Balloon dilatation of post-surgical ano-rectal strictures in two infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilder, W.M.; Melhem, R.E.

    1989-08-01

    Balloon dilatation of ano-rectal strictures offers an alternative to surgical repair of such lesions. This procedure has been described in higher colonic strictures secondary to necrotizing enterocolitis in infants but not in post-surgical ano-rectal strictures. Two cases of successful balloon dilatation are reported. Anal sphincter injury resulting in fecal incontinence, as previously reported, did not occur. (orig.).

  7. Results of preoperative chemoradiotherapy in low rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study explored the anal sphincter-saving rate and down-staging rate after preoperative chemoradiotherapy for treating lower rectal cancer. We also explored the prognosis of the patients who refused surgery after preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Thirty seven patients with histologically proven lower rectal cancer who underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. In each case, the tumor location was 0 to 5 cm from the anal verge, and curative resection of the cancer with performing a sphincter-saving procedure was not feasible before chemoradiotherapy. In each case, the staging examinations, including biopsy, were done before starting radiotherapy and this was repeated at 1 month after radiation therapy. After chemoradiotherapy, among the 37 included patients, 56.8% and 32.4% were down staged to the T stage and N stage, respectively, when comparing the post radiotherapy stage with pre-radiotherapy stage. Twenty five patients underwent complete resection of cancer at 6 weeks after radiotherapy: eleven, eight and six patients underwent abdominoperineal resection, low anterior resection and local excision, respectively. The sphincter-saving rate among the 24 completely resected cases was 54.2%. Twelve patients refused surgery after radiotherapy. Among 6 patients who refused surgery with biopsy-proven complete remission after chemoradiotherapy, 5 patients were alive without disease at a median follow up period of 31 months, and only 1 patient had local failure. For lower rectal cancer, a high sphincter-saving rate was accomplished with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. The prognosis of the patients who refused surgery with biopsy proven complete remission after chemoradiotherapy was good and these patients need to be kept under close surveillance

  8. Preoperative infusional chemoradiation therapy for stage T3 rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate preoperative infusional chemoradiation for patients with operable rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy using infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), (300 mg/m2/day) together with daily irradiation (45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks) was administered to 77 patients with clinically Stage T3 rectal cancer. Endoscopic ultrasound confirmed the digital rectal exam in 63 patients. Surgery was performed approximately 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation therapy and included 25 abdominoperineal resections and 52 anal-sphincter-preserving procedures. Results: Posttreatment tumor stages were T1-2, N0 in 35%, T3 N0 in 25%, and T1-3, N1 in 11%; 29% had no evidence of tumor. Local tumor control after chemoradiation was seen in 96% (74 out of 77); 2 patients had recurrent disease at the anastomosis site and were treated successfully with abdominoperineal resection. Overall, pelvic control was obtained in 99% (76 out of 77). The survival after chemoradiation was higher in patients without node involvement than in those having node involvement (p = n.s.). More patients with pathologic complete responses or only microscopic foci survived than did patients who had gross residual tumor (p = 0.07). The actuarial survival rate was 83% at 3 years; the median follow-up was 27 months, with a range of 3 to 68 months. Acute, perioperative, and late complications were not more numerous or more severe with chemoradiation therapy than with traditional radiation therapy (XRT) alone. Conclusions: Excellent treatment response allowed two-thirds of the patients to have an anal-sphincter-sparing procedure. Gross residual disease in the resected specimen indicates a poor prognosis, and therapies specifically targeting these patients may improve survival further

  9. Phase II Study of Preoperative Helical Tomotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To explore the efficacy and toxicity profile of helical tomotherapy in the preoperative treatment of patients with rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: Twenty-four patients with T3/T4 rectal cancer were included in this nonrandomized noncontrolled study. A dose of 46 Gy in daily fractions of 2 Gy was delivered to the presacral space and perineum if an abdominoperineal resection was deemed necessary. This dose was increased by a simultaneous integrated boost to 55.2 Gy when the circumferential resection margin was less than 2 mm on magnetic resonance imaging. Acute toxicity was evaluated weekly. Metabolic response was determined in the fifth week after the end of radiotherapy by means of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scan. A metabolic response was defined as a decrease in maximal standardized uptake value of more than 36%. Results: The mean volume of small bowel receiving more than 15 Gy and mean bladder dose were 227 ml and 20.8 Gy in the no-boost group and 141 ml and 21.5 Gy in the boost group. Only 1 patient developed Grade 3 enteritis. No other Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed. Two patients developed an anastomotic leak within 30 days after surgery. The metabolic response rate was 45% in the no-boost group compared with 77% in the boost group. All except 1 patient underwent an R0 resection. Conclusions: Helical tomotherapy may decrease gastrointestinal toxicity in the preoperative radiotherapy of patients with rectal cancer. A simultaneous integrated radiation boost seems to result in a high metabolic response rate without excessive toxicity

  10. Generic Planning Target Margin for Rectal Cancer Treatment Setup Variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To calculate the generic planning target margin (GPTM) for patients receiving radiation therapy (RT) for rectal cancer placed in a prone position with a customized cradle for small-bowel exclusion. Methods and Materials: A total of 25 consecutive rectal cancer patients were treated for 25 or 28 fractions in a prone position using a cradle to maximize small bowel exclusion. Treatment planning computed tomography (CT) scans were used to create orthogonally digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) for portal image registration, which were compared with daily portal images from an electronic portal-imaging device (EPID). Translation values needed to align the DRRs and EPIDs were recorded for the superior to inferior (SI), right to left (RL), and anterior to posterior (AP) directions, and used to calculate the GPTM using the four-parameter model. Age, weight, and body mass index were tested compared with the setup variation using a Pearson correlation and a t test for significance. Gender versus setup variation was compared with a t test. Results: A total of 1,723 EPID images were reviewed. The GPTM was 10 mm superior, 8 mm inferior, 7 mm RL and 10 mm AP. Age and gender were unrelated to setup variation. Weight was significantly associated with systematic AP variation (p < 0.05). BMI was significantly associated with systematic SI (p < 0.05) and AP (p < 0.01) variation and random RL variation (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The GPTM for rectal cancer is asymmetric with a maximum of 10 mm in the superior, anterior and posterior dimensions. Body mass index may effect setup variation. Research using advanced treatment planning should include these margins in the planning target volume definition.

  11. Causes and outcomes of emergency presentation of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comber, Harry; Sharp, Linda; de Camargo Cancela, Marianna; Haase, Trutz; Johnson, Howard; Pratschke, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Emergency presentation of rectal cancer carries a relatively poor prognosis, but the roles and interactions of causative factors remain unclear. We describe an innovative statistical approach which distinguishes between direct and indirect effects of a number of contextual, patient and tumour factors on emergency presentation and outcome of rectal cancer. All patients diagnosed with rectal cancer in Ireland 2004-2008 were included. Registry information, linked to hospital discharge data, provided data on patient demographics, comorbidity and health insurance; population density and deprivation of area of residence; tumour type, site, grade and stage; treatment type and optimality; and emergency presentation and hospital caseload. Data were modelled using a structural equation model with a discrete-time survival outcome, allowing us to estimate direct and mediated effects of the above factors on hazard, and their inter-relationships. Two thousand seven hundred and fifty patients were included in the analysis. Around 12% had emergency presentations, which increased hazard by 80%. Affluence, private patient status and being married reduced hazard indirectly by reducing emergency presentation. Older patients had more emergency presentations, while married patients, private patients or those living in less deprived areas had fewer than expected. Patients presenting as an emergency were less likely to receive optimal treatment or to have this in a high caseload hospital. Apart from stage, emergency admission was the strongest determinant of poor survival. The factors contributing to emergency admission in this study are similar to those associated with diagnostic delay. The socio-economic gradient found suggests that patient education and earlier access to endoscopic investigation for public patients could reduce emergency presentation. PMID:27087482

  12. Metformin use and improved response to therapy in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locally advanced rectal cancer is commonly treated with chemoradiation prior to total mesorectal excision (TME). Studies suggest that metformin may be an effective chemopreventive agent in this disease as well as a possible adjunct to current therapy. In this study, we examined the effect of metformin use on pathologic complete response (pCR) rates and outcomes in rectal cancer. The charts of 482 patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated from 1996 to 2009 with chemoradiation and TME were reviewed. Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (range 19.8–63). Nearly, all patients were treated with concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy (98%) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy (81.3%). Patients were categorized as nondiabetic (422), diabetic not taking metformin (40), or diabetic taking metformin (20). No significant differences between groups were found in clinical tumor classification, nodal classification, tumor distance from the anal verge or circumferential extent, pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen level, or pathologic differentiation. pCR rates were 16.6% for nondiabetics, 7.5% for diabetics not using metformin, and 35% for diabetics taking metformin, with metformin users having significantly higher pCR rates than either nondiabetics (P = 0.03) or diabetics not using metformin (P = 0.007). Metformin use was significantly associated with pCR rate on univariate (P = 0.05) and multivariate (P = 0.01) analyses. Furthermore, patients taking metformin had significantly increased disease-free (P = 0.013) and overall survival (P = 0.008) compared with other diabetic patients. Metformin use is associated with significantly higher pCR rates as well as improved survival. These promising data warrant further prospective study

  13. Pelvic inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor mimicking a rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lídia Roque-Ramos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 50-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department with large bowel obstruction and anemia. The initial imaging study suggested an inoperable rectal tumor with involvement of surrounding structures. In this paper, we discuss the diagnostic work-up of this patient with a diagnosis of pelvic/perirectal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT. IMT is a rare tumor with intermediate malignant potential that frequently mimics clinical and imaging features of malignancy. Additionally, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a pelvic IMT that regressed without surgical excision.

  14. Effect of nicotine on rectal mucus and mucosal eicosanoids.

    OpenAIRE

    Zijlstra, F.J.; Srivastava, E D; Rhodes, M.; van Dijk, A P; Fogg, F; Samson, H J; Copeman, M; Russell, M. A.; Feyerabend, C; Williams, G T

    1994-01-01

    Because ulcerative colitis is largely a disease of non-smokers and nicotine may have a beneficial effect on the disease, the effect of nicotine on rectal mucosa in rabbits was examined. Nicotine was given subcutaneously by an Alzet mini-pump in doses of 0.5, 1.25, and 2 mg/kg/day for 14 days to three groups of eight animals and compared with eight controls. Mean (SD) serum nicotine concentrations (ng/ml) were 3.5 (1.1), 8.8 (2.3), and 16.2 (5.2) respectively in the treated groups. The thickne...

  15. Intratumoral Heterogeneity of MicroRNA Expression in Rectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Haahr Mellergaard Eriksen; Rikke Fredslund Andersen; Boye Schnack Nielsen; Flemming Brandt Sørensen; Ane Lindegaard Appelt; Anders Jakobsen; Torben Frøstrup Hansen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An increasing number of studies have investigated microRNAs (miRNAs) as potential markers of diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. So far, agreement between studies has been minimal, which may in part be explained by intratumoral heterogeneity of miRNA expression. The aim of the present study was to assess the heterogeneity of a panel of selected miRNAs in rectal cancer, using two different technical approaches. Materials and Methods The expression of the investigated miRNAs was an...

  16. Giant Rectal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Dickhoff

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Giant gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs of the rectum are rare and often difficult to remove surgically. At the time metastases are found, GISTs are considered to be incurable and until recently no adequate therapy was of any value for these patients. Recently, imatinib was introduced: a signal transducing inhibitor acting specifically on the KIT-tyrosine kinase, which can be used to downsize giant GIST (neo-adjuvant before surgery or induce stable disease in case of metastases with few minor side-effects. Two patients with giant rectal GIST are presented, one of which was treated before the imatinib era, the other when imatinib was available.

  17. Aspects of diverting stoma and ERAS in rectal cancer surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Anderin, Kajsa

    2016-01-01

    Annually, nearly 2000 patients are diagnosed with rectal cancer in Sweden. To date, the only known curative treatment is surgery and low anterior resection (LAR) is the operation of choice for tumours in the middle rectum. However, LAR has a high risk for short and long-term morbidity where one of the most severe complications is anastomotic leakage (AL). Since a diverting loop ileostomy has been shown to reduce the risk of early AL after LAR, nearly all patients in Sweden are currently diver...

  18. The early response of p53-dependent proteins during radiotherapy in human rectal carcinoma and in adjacent normal tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stift, A; Prager, G; Selzer, E; Widder, J; Kandioler, D; Friedl, J; Teleky, B; Herbst, F; Wrba, F; Bergmann, M

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the activation of the p53 pathway and the induction of apoptosis during preoperative radiotherapy in normal human rectal tissue and in rectal carcinoma. Twelve patients with rectal cancer of the lower third were enrolled in this study. Tumor specimens and adj

  19. Irinotecan-Eluting Beads in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer That Has Spread to the Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-22

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  20. VRC01 antibody protects against vaginal and rectal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus 1 in hu-BLT mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming; Li, Yue; Yuan, Zhe; Lu, Wuxun; Kang, Guobin; Fan, Wenjin; Li, Qingsheng

    2016-09-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) represent a new generation of antiviral agents for the prevention and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection. A better understanding of the in vivo efficacy of HIV-1 bNAbs, such as VRC01, in preventing mucosal transmission of HIV-1 has important implications for HIV-1 vaccine design. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of passively transferred VRC01 antibody in preventing HIV-1 vaginal and rectal transmission in humanized bone marrow/liver/thymus mice (hu-BLT mice). Mice were subcutaneously injected with VRC01 IgG, and 24 hours later, they were challenged intravaginally or intrarectally with HIV-1Ada. All hu-BLT mice receiving VRC01 IgG antibody were aviremic at 2 weeks after intravaginal (n = 3) or intrarectal (n = 6) challenge as measured by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. In contrast, mice receiving control IgG all became infected. By 5 and 6 weeks post-challenge, some of VRC01 aviremic mice in both the intravaginal and intrarectal challenge groups became viremic. Our results suggest that VRC01 antibody can be protective against HIV-1 vaginal and rectal transmission; however, a single administration of VRC01 cannot completely prevent mucosal infection. PMID:27343044

  1. [A patient with unresectable progressive advanced rectal cancer maintained in a state of remission by using combination therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Yohei; Baba, Hironobu; Mitsuoka, Akito; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Sanada, Takahiro; Baba, Hiroyuki; Goseki, Narihide; Hodotsuka, Masanori; Sano, Tomohiko

    2012-11-01

    We report the case of a patient with unresectable progressive advanced rectal cancer, who has been able to maintain a good quality of life because of combination therapy, including chemoradiotherapy. A 52-year-old woman was diagnosed with progressive locally advanced rectal cancer and invasion of the adnexa of the uterus and the left ureter. No distant metastasis was detected. Colostomy was performed, followed by chemoradiotherapy combined with S-1; then, mFOLFOX6 +bevacizumab (BV) therapy was administered. Aggravation of bilateral hydronephrosis was detected upon completion of 2 courses of treatment, and therefore, percutaneous nephrostomy of the right kidney was performed. After the patient underwent 20 courses of treatment, imaging showed a reduction in the size of the lesion, and the CEA level returned to normal. Later, remission was sustained by sLV5FU2+BV therapy and oral administration of S-1. As a result, we were able to remove the nephrostomy tube from the right kidney in February 2011. Four years after initiation of the treatment, the patient has shown no indication of recurrence. PMID:23267933

  2. Surgical management of a retro-rectal cystic hamartoma (tailgut cyst) using a trans-rectal approach: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Kildušis, Edvinas; Samalavičius, Narimantas Evaldas

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Retro-rectal cystic hamartoma (tailgut cyst) is a rare congenital developmental lesion arising from post-natal primitive gut remnants in the retro-rectal space. The rarity of the lesion and its anatomical position usually leads to difficulty in diagnosis and surgical management. Complete surgical resection remains the cornerstone of treatment. A dozen or so surgical approaches have been described in the literature to date to make the operation as simple as possible, but the trans...

  3. Local recurrence of rectal cancer: MR imaging before and after oral superparamagnetic particles vs contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to compare three imaging strategies for the diagnosis of local recurrence of rectal cancer: (a) MR imaging; (b) MR imaging after administration of enteral superparamagnetic particles (Ferristene); and (c) contrast-enhanced CT. Seventeen patients with previous surgery for rectal cancer were examined, 12 patients with local tumour recurrence in the pelvis and 5 patients with postoperative changes. Pelvic multi-coil MR imaging before and after oral administration of superparamagnetic contrast medium [Abdoscan (Ferristene USAN), Nycomed-Amersham, Lidingoe, Sweden] as well as abdominal and pelvic CT was performed in all patients. The examinations were independently evaluated by three different radiologists. The general effect of the oral MR contrast medium, the delineation of normal and pathological structures as well as confidence in the diagnosis were registered on a visual analog scale (VAS). The diagnosis according to MR before and after oral contrast medium, and CT, was compared, in 16 patients, with the final diagnosis which was verified by biopsy (n = 3), surgery (n = 6), clinical follow-up (n = 4) and by follow-up with MR or CT (n = 3). No significant improvement in MR image quality was found after enteral contrast medium. The post-contrast MR diagnosis was not changed in any of the patients. The diagnosis on MR correlated with the final diagnosis in 12 of 16 patients (sensitivity 91 %, accuracy 62 %) and the diagnosis on CT in 11 of 16 patients (sensitivity 82 %, accuracy 56 %). The radiologists' ''confidence'' in the diagnosis and the degree of accordance with the final diagnosis did not score higher on MR after than before oral contrast administration; however, the accordance with the final diagnosis scored better on MR than on CT. No advantages of orally administered superparamagnetic contrast medium were observed in the examined patient group. Magnetic resonance is preferable to CT in diagnosing local tumour recurrence. (orig.)

  4. Administrative Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarity, Augustus C., III; Maulding, Wanda

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how all four facets of administrative ecology help dispel the claims about the "impossibility" of the superintendency. These are personal ecology, professional ecology, organizational ecology, and community ecology. Using today's superintendency as an administrative platform, current literature describes a preponderance of…

  5. Molecular targeted treatment and radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) inhibitors confer clinical benefit in metastatic colorectal cancer when combined with chemotherapy. An emerging strategy to improve outcomes in rectal cancer is to integrate biologically active, targeted agents as triple therapy into chemoradiation protocols. Material and methods: cetuximab and bevacizumab have now been incorporated into phase I-II studies of preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. The rationale of these combinations, early efficacy and toxicity data, and possible molecular predictors for tumor response are reviewed. Computerized bibliographic searches of Pubmed were supplemented with hand searches of reference lists and abstracts of ASCO and ASTRO meetings. Results: the combination of cetuximab and CRT can be safely applied without dose compromises of the respective treatment components. Disappointingly low rates of pathologic complete remission have been noted in several phase II studies. The K-ras mutation status and the gene copy number of EGFR may predict tumor response. The toxicity pattern (radiation-induced enteritis, perforations) and surgical complications (wound healing, fistula, bleeding) observed in at least some of the clinical studies with bevacizumab and CRT warrant further investigations. Conclusion: longer follow-up (and, finally, randomized trials) is needed to draw any firm conclusions with respect to local and distant failure rates, and toxicity associated with these novel treatment approaches. (orig.)

  6. Robotic Versus Laparoscopic Resection for Mid and Low Rectal Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Bulent; Yuksel, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The current study was conducted to determine whether robotic low anterior resection (RLAR) has real benefit over laparoscopic low anterior resection (LLAR) in terms of surgical and early oncologic outcomes. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 35 RLARs and 28 LLARs, performed for mid and low rectal cancers, from January 2013 through June 2015. Results: A total of 63 patients were included in the study. All surgeries were performed successfully. The clinicopathologic characteristics were similar between the 2 groups. Compared with the laparoscopic group, the robotic group had less intraoperative blood loss (165 vs. 120 mL; P < .05) and higher mean operative time (252 vs. 208 min; P < .05). No significant differences were observed in the time to flatus passage, length of hospital stay, and postoperative morbidity. Pathological examination of total mesorectal excision (TME) specimens showed that both circumferential resection margin and transverse (proximal and distal) margins were negative in the RLAR group. However, 1 patient each had positive circumferential resection margin and positive distal transverse margin in the LLAR group. The mean number of harvested lymph nodes was 27 in the RLAR group and 23 in the LLAR group. Conclusions: In our study, short-term outcomes of robotic surgery for mid and low rectal cancers were similar to those of laparoscopic surgery. The quality of TME specimens was better in the patients who underwent robotic surgery. However, the longer operative time was a limitation of robotic surgery. PMID:27081292

  7. Prognostic Aspects of DCE-MRI in Recurrent Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore whether pre-reoperative dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI findings correlate with clinical outcome in patients who undergo surgical treatment for recurrent rectal carcinoma. A retrospective study of DCE-MRI in patients with recurrent rectal cancer was performed after obtaining an IRB waiver. We queried our PACS from 1998 to 2012 for examinations performed for recurrent disease. Two radiologists in consensus outlined tumour regions of interest on perfusion images. We explored the correlation between Ktrans, Kep, Ve, AUC90 and AUC180 with time to re-recurrence of tumour, overall survival and resection margin status. Univariate Cox PH models were used for survival, while univariate logistic regression was used for margin status. Among 58 patients with pre-treatment DCE-MRI who underwent resection, 36 went directly to surgery and 18 had positive margins. Ktrans (0.55, P = 0.012) and Kep (0.93, P = 0.04) were inversely correlated with positive margins. No significant correlations were noted between Ktrans, Kep, Ve, AUC90 and AUC180 and overall survival or time to re-recurrence of tumour. Ktrans and Kep were significantly associated with clear resection margins; however overall survival and time to re-recurrence were not predicted. Such information might be helpful for treatment individualisation and deserves further investigation. (orig.)

  8. A study on preoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A research for preoperative radio-therapy on advanced rectal cancer by statistical analysis was performed. The objects of study were 60 cases of preoperative radiation group and 63 cases of non-radiation group, amounting to 123 cases which were examined as stage III and IV by pathological diagnosis. As background factors, in regard to age, sex, location, major axis of tumor, pathological type, depth of invasion, lymphnode metastasis, factor of ly and factor of v, there could not be found significant differences between the two groups except in major axis of tumor. As for the survival rate based on Kaplan-Meier method, preoperative radiation group showed more improvement than nonradiation group by 17.1 % in 5-years survival and 23.6 % in 10-year survival (p = 0.05). By categorical multiple regress on analysis, preoperative radio-therapy turned out to be the factor which improved prognosis. By categorical canonical discriminant analysis, it turned out preoperative radio-therapy lowered the fatality rate and raised the survival rate at the third year after the operation. By regression models of life table analysis in Cox, it turned out it was preoperative radio-therapy that was the factor which made the most important contribution to prognosis. These facts mentioned above confirmed the efficacy of preoperative radio-therapy having an effect on rectal cancer at stage III and IV and proved preoperative radio-therapy to be a satisfactory adjuvant therapy. (author)

  9. Preoperative rectal cancer staging with phased-array MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We retrospectively reviewed magnetic resonance (MR) images of 96 patients with diagnosis of rectal cancer to evaluate tumour stage (T stage), involvement of mesorectal fascia (MRF), and nodal metastasis (N stage). Our gold standard was histopathology. All studies were performed with 1.5-T MR system (Symphony; Siemens Medical System, Erlangen, Germany) by using a phased-array coil. Our population was subdivided into two groups: the first one, formed by patients at T1-T2-T3, N0, M0 stage, whose underwent MR before surgery; the second group included patients at Tx N1 M0 and T3-T4 Nx M0 stage, whose underwent preoperative MR before neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and again 4-6 wks after the end of the treatment for the re-staging of disease. Our gold standard was histopathology. MR showed 81% overall agreement with histological findings for T and N stage prediction; for T stage, this rate increased up to 95% for pts of group I (48/96), while for group II (48/96) it decreased to 75%. Preoperative MR prediction of histologically involved MRF resulted very accurate (sensitivity 100%; specificity 100%) also after chemoradiation (sensitivity 100%; specificity 67%). Phased-array MRI was able to clearly estimate the entire mesorectal fat and surrounding pelvic structures resulting the ideal technique for local preoperative rectal cancer staging

  10. Synchronous collision neuroendocrine tumor and rectal adenocarcinoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jie-Gao; Zhang, Zhong-Tao; Wu, Guo-Cong; Han, Wei; Wang, Kang-Li

    2015-04-01

    Collision tumors are thought to arise from the accidental meeting of two independent tumors. Adenocarcinoma is the most common malignant rectal tumor, while neuroendocrine tumor (NET) is relatively rare. Due to the endoscopy and reporting, the overall incidence of NETs was increasing recently but still less than 1 per 100,000. This means that a combination of an adenocarcinoma and NET is a very rare finding and an actual collision of these tumors even more so. We report here a highly unusual case of a 64-year-old woman who had collision tumors composed of a primary rectal adenocarcinoma and NET showing a "side by side" pattern. Resection margins are free of both the tumors. The postoperative course was uneventful. The patient underwent a protocol CT scan at 3 months after surgery, which did not show any recurrence. Both the malignant adenocarcinoma and the NET would make a great influence in the rest lifetime and a follow up will be continued, although the CT did not show any recurrence until now. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of such an occurrence. PMID:25972691

  11. Molecular targeted treatment and radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquardt, Friederike; Roedel, Franz; Capalbo, Gianni; Weiss, Christian; Roedel, Claus [Dept. of Radiation Therapy, Univ. of Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Background: EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) inhibitors confer clinical benefit in metastatic colorectal cancer when combined with chemotherapy. An emerging strategy to improve outcomes in rectal cancer is to integrate biologically active, targeted agents as triple therapy into chemoradiation protocols. Material and methods: cetuximab and bevacizumab have now been incorporated into phase I-II studies of preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. The rationale of these combinations, early efficacy and toxicity data, and possible molecular predictors for tumor response are reviewed. Computerized bibliographic searches of Pubmed were supplemented with hand searches of reference lists and abstracts of ASCO and ASTRO meetings. Results: the combination of cetuximab and CRT can be safely applied without dose compromises of the respective treatment components. Disappointingly low rates of pathologic complete remission have been noted in several phase II studies. The K-ras mutation status and the gene copy number of EGFR may predict tumor response. The toxicity pattern (radiation-induced enteritis, perforations) and surgical complications (wound healing, fistula, bleeding) observed in at least some of the clinical studies with bevacizumab and CRT warrant further investigations. Conclusion: longer follow-up (and, finally, randomized trials) is needed to draw any firm conclusions with respect to local and distant failure rates, and toxicity associated with these novel treatment approaches. (orig.)

  12. Irradiation with carbon ions for locally recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A female patient in her 70s underwent an abdominoperineal resection and bilateral lymph node dissection for advanced lower rectal cancer. The patient did not receive neoadjuvant therapy. In the Japanese classification of colorectal carcinoma (8th Edition), the tumor was a moderately differentiated type 2 adenocarcinoma, and was 4.5 cm in size. Histologically, the tumor was considered to be Stage 3b (T3N0M0). She received no adjuvant chemotherapy. After 39 months, pelvic computed tomography (CT) revealed a 29 mm tumor in the right pelvic wall. The patient declined surgery for recurrence so radiotherapy was planned. First, chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 was administered for 4 courses to reduce tumor size. Consequently, irradiation with carbon ions was given to the site of recurrence at a total dose of 74 GyE in 37 fractions. There were no severe complications. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level decreased to the lower limit of the normal range from a maximum of 4.9, and no progression of the recurrent tumor was detected on CT for approximately 4 years. Systemic chemotherapy followed by irradiation with carbon ions may be effective for recurrent rectal cancer. (author)

  13. Comparação da eficácia de doses iguais de acetaminofeno retal e oral em crianças Comparison of antipyretic effectiveness of equal doses of rectal and oral acetaminophen in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigha Akhavan Karbasi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar uma dose de acetaminofeno oral e retal e avaliar a aceitabilidade do acetaminofeno retal, uma vez que o acetaminofeno oral e retal é amplamente usado como agente antipirético em crianças com febre e a eficiência comparativa dessas duas preparações não está bem estabelecida. MÉTODOS: Neste estudo prospectivo de grupos paralelos, foram incluídas 60 crianças admitidas na emergência ou clínica ambulatorial pediátrica em um hospital terciário, com idade entre 6 meses e 6 anos e com temperatura retal acima de 39 °C. Os pacientes foram distribuídos aleatoriamente em dois grupos de mesmo tamanho. O grupo 1 recebeu 15 mg/kg de acetaminofeno retal, e o grupo 2 recebeu a mesma dose oralmente. A temperatura foi registrada no tempo zero e 1 e 3 horas após administração da droga. RESULTADOS: No primeiro grupo, a redução média de temperatura, 1 e 3 horas após administração do acetaminofeno, foi de 1,07±0,16 (p 0,05. CONCLUSÃO: As preparações oral e retal de acetaminofeno têm eficácia antipirética equivalente em crianças. A via retal mostrou ser tão aceitável quanto a oral entre os pais.OBJECTIVE: To compare a dose of oral and rectal acetaminophen and to evaluate acceptability of rectal acetaminophen, since oral and rectal acetaminophen is widely used as an antipyretic agent in febrile children and the comparative effectiveness of these two preparations is not well established. METHODS: In this prospective parallel group designed study, 60 children who presented to the emergency department or outpatient pediatric clinic at a tertiary hospital and aged from 6 months to 6 years with rectal temperature over 39 °C were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to two equal-sized groups. Group 1 received 15 mg/kg acetaminophen rectally and group 2 received the same dose orally. Temperature was recorded at baseline and 1 and 3 hours after drug administration. RESULTS: In the first group, mean decrease in

  14. Administrative Reform

    OpenAIRE

    Beh, LooSee

    2007-01-01

    This paper seeks to develop an understanding of the issues that public administrators should strive to provide in ethical practices and governance thus allowing distinctive administrative and social traditions that each country possess to flourish. Significant changes and continuities in the realm of government in contemporary China and Malaysia will be drawn upon. Recent developments have brought a sense of urgency in contrast to complacency with the status quo. This paper reviews pertinent ...

  15. Offentlig administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Elof Nellemann; Rehr, Preben René

    En undervisningsbog der henvender sig til administrationsbacheloruddannelsen. Kapitlerne er inddelt efter modulerne på uddannelsen og indeholder derfor elementer af administration, forvaltning, økonomistyring, innovation, samfundsvidenskabelige metoder og politisk styrede organisationer.......En undervisningsbog der henvender sig til administrationsbacheloruddannelsen. Kapitlerne er inddelt efter modulerne på uddannelsen og indeholder derfor elementer af administration, forvaltning, økonomistyring, innovation, samfundsvidenskabelige metoder og politisk styrede organisationer....

  16. SAT administrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SAT Administrator is the Information System for Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training Program Design. It supports the design of training programs in the following phases: job analysis; task analysis; competency analysis; task competency association; definition of learning objectives to competencies; training program design; definition of test items. The general structure of the database and management software supports application of the SAT Administrator in any nuclear power installation

  17. Hirschsprung′s disease: Role of rectal suction biopsy - data on 216 specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Zillur

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The diagnosis of Hirschsprung′s disease (HD is dependent on the histological study of rectal ganglion cells, and an open rectal biopsy was the mainstay that required general anaesthesia (GA and carried risk of postoperative rectal bleeding. Suction rectal biopsy later gained wide acceptance and became the choice as there is no requirement of GA and virtual absence of any complications. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of the histological findings of 216 rectal suction biopsies studied from 2005 to 2009. Results: There were 143 male and 73 female children. 196 (90.7% children were within 1 year of age. Among 216 rectal suction biopsies 181 (83.80% were aganglionic, 27 (12.5% were ganglionic and 8 (3.7% were inadequate. Majority of patients were of less than 1 year of age (94.47%. Conclusions : The rectal suction biopsy is a bed side procedure, safe, cheap and time saving. There is high degree of accuracy, simplicity and absence of complications.

  18. Advantages of the robotic approach to deep infiltrating rectal endometriosis: because less is more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Sergio Eduardo Alonso; Seid, Victor Edmond; Marques, Renato Moretti; Gomes, Mariano Tamura Vieira

    2016-06-01

    For symptomatic deep infiltrating endometriosis, surgery is often required to achieve symptom relief and restore fertility. A minimally invasive approach using laparoscopy is considered the gold standard. However, specific limitations of the laparoscopic approach deep in the pelvis keep challenging even surgeons with a solid experience with minimally invasive techniques. Robotic surgery has the potential to compensate for technical drawbacks inherent in conventional laparoscopic surgery, such as limited degree of freedom, two-dimensional vision, and the fulcrum effect. In the present report, we aim at demonstrating the central role of robotic surgery for deep infiltrating endometriosis, with special emphasis in the ability to practice organ (rectal) preservation. A 45-year-old white female with a 4-month history of chronic pelvic pain, dyschezia, and dysmenorrhea, refractory to hormonal therapy was referred to our unit. MRI findings were diagnostic of deep infiltrating endometriosis (retrocervical and rectovaginal) extending to the anterior rectal serosal layer (partial-thickness rectal invasion). Using a fully robotic approach, appropriate dissection of the rectovaginal septum and of the extraperitoneal rectum followed by complete excision of the endometriotic rectal nodule with organ (rectal) preservation was undertaken. It is our belief that using a robotic approach, the potential to boost rectal preservation might be established. Moreover, it is possible that in many cases, a robotic operation may allow the surgeon to perform the intervention with greater accuracy and comfort. As a result, more patients with deep infiltrating endometriosis may benefit from rectal sparing procedures. PMID:27072152

  19. Allelotyping identification of genomic alterations in rectal chromosomally unstable tumors without preoperative treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous studies reported genomic alterations in colorectal human tumors but few focused on rectal tumors with the specification of preoperative-treated or untreated tumors. The goals of this study were to list chromosome allelic imbalances and correlate their frequency with tumor progression and to identify potential molecular markers of progression in rectal chromosomally unstable tumors without preoperative treatment. Genomic alterations of 57 rectal tumors assessed by allelotyping targeting 33 chromosomal loci, were clusterised and compared to those of 151 left colon tumors. Clustering separated the rectal tumors without preoperative treatment into three subtypes according to the allelic imbalance frequency and genomic alteration associations. The tumors without preoperative treatment displayed a significantly higher allelic imbalance frequency (54%) than the tumors with preoperative treatment (33%), suggesting that treatment could target highly altered tumor clones. Interestingly, the survival analysis identified three potential prognostic molecular survival markers, D1S197, D5S430, and D14S65, for tumors without preoperative treatment. Based on the genomic status of 33 chromosomal loci, we observed that rectal tumors without preoperative treatment segregate according to the global allelic imbalance frequency but without correlation to the tumor progression. Moreover, the detailed associations of alterations in rectal tumors are different from those described in colon tumors suggesting that rectal and left tumors should be considered as separate entities. Finally, potential prognostic genomic molecular markers for survival are proposed which status could specify the clinical course of the tumors

  20. Rectal Dose-Volume Differences Using Proton Radiotherapy and a Rectal Balloon or Water Alone for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe dose-volume values with the use of water alone vs. a rectal balloon (RB) for the treatment of prostate cancer with proton therapy. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 30 proton plans for 15 patients who underwent CT and MRI scans with an RB or water alone. Simulation was performed with a modified MRI endorectal coil and an RB with 100 mL of water or water alone. Doses of 78-82 gray equivalents were prescribed to the planning target volume. The two groups were compared for three structures: rectum, rectal wall (RW), and rectal wall 7 cm (RW7) at the level of the planning target volume. Results: Rectum and RW volumes radiated to low, intermediate, and high doses were small: rectum V10, 33.7%; V50, 17.3%; and V70, 10.2%; RW V10, 32.4%; V50, 20.4%; and V70, 14.6%. The RB effectively increased the rectal volume for all cases (139.8 ± 44.9 mL vs. 217.7 ± 32.2 mL (p 5% was seen for the RB in 5 of 15 cases, for a benefit of 9.2% ± 2.3% compared with 2.4% ± 1.3% for the remaining 10 cases (p < 0.001). Similar benefit was seen for the rectal wall. No benefit was seen for doses ≥70 gray equivalents for the rectum, RW, or RW7. No benefit of ≤1% was seen with an RB in 46% for the rectum V70 and in 40% for the rectal wall V70. Conclusions: Rectum and rectal wall doses with proton radiation were low whether using water or an RB. Selected patients will have a small but significant advantage with an RB; however, water alone was well tolerated and will be an alternative for most patients

  1. Predictive Factors and Management of Rectal Bleeding Side Effects Following Prostate Cancer Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Jeremy G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Stone, Nelson N. [Department of Urology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Stock, Richard G., E-mail: Richard.Stock@mountsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To report on the incidence, nature, and management of rectal toxicities following individual or combination brachytherapy following treatment for prostate cancer over a 17-year period. We also report the patient and treatment factors predisposing to acute ≥grade 2 proctitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 2752 patients were treated for prostate cancer between October 1990 and April 2007 with either low-dose-rate brachytherapy alone or in combination with androgen depletion therapy (ADT) or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and were followed for a median of 5.86 years (minimum 1.0 years; maximum 19.19 years). We investigated the 10-year incidence, nature, and treatment of acute and chronic rectal toxicities following BT. Using univariate, and multivariate analyses, we determined the treatment and comorbidity factors predisposing to rectal toxicities. We also outline the most common and effective management for these toxicities. Results: Actuarial risk of ≥grade 2 rectal bleeding was 6.4%, though notably only 0.9% of all patients required medical intervention to manage this toxicity. The majority of rectal bleeding episodes (72%) occurred within the first 3 years following placement of BT seeds. Of the 27 patients requiring management for their rectal bleeding, 18 underwent formalin treatment and nine underwent cauterization. Post-hoc univariate statistical analysis revealed that coronary artery disease (CAD), biologically effective dose, rectal volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose (RV100), and treatment modality predict the likelihood of grade ≥2 rectal bleeding. Only CAD, treatment type, and RV100 fit a Cox regression multivariate model. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy is very well tolerated and rectal bleeding toxicities are either self-resolving or effectively managed by medical intervention. Treatment planning incorporating adjuvant ADT while minimizing RV100 has yielded the best toxicity-free survival following

  2. Synchronous rectal and prostate cancer – The impact of MRI on incidence and imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturludóttir, Margrét, E-mail: margret.sturludottir@karolinska.se [Department of Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Solna (Sweden); Martling, Anna, E-mail: anna.martling@ki.se [Center of Surgical Gastroenterology, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Solna (Sweden); Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Solna (Sweden); Carlsson, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.carlsson@ki.se [Department of Urology, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Solna (Sweden); Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Solna (Sweden); Blomqvist, Lennart, E-mail: lennart.k.blomqvist@ki.se [Department of Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Solna (Sweden); Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Solna (Sweden)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •Prostate and rectal cancers are two of the most common cancers in male. •Synchronous diagnosis of prostate and rectal cancer is a rare identity. •Strong increase in the synchronous diagnosis likely due to improved diagnostic methods. •Pre-treatment MRI for rectal cancer has led to increased synchronous diagnosis. -- Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the incidence of synchronous diagnosis of rectal and prostate cancer and to identify how the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for preoperative staging of rectal cancer has affected the incidence. Methods: Regional data from the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry and the Regional Cancer Registry in Stockholm-Gotland area (two million inhabitants) between the years 1995–2011 were used. Patients were included when the rectal cancer was diagnosed prior to the prostate cancer. Medical records and pre-treatment MRI were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Of 29,849 patients diagnosed with either disease, synchronous diagnosis was made in 29 patients (0.1%). Two patients were diagnosed in the years 1995–1999, seven patients between the years 2000–2005 and 20 patients between the years 2006–2011. The most common presentation, for the prostate cancer was incidental finding during staging for rectal cancer, n = 20, and of those led MRI to the diagnosis in 14 cases. At retrospective review, all patients had focal lesions in the prostate on MRI and patients with higher suspicion of malignancy on MRI had more locally advanced disease. Conclusion: Synchronous rectal and prostate cancer are a rare entity, but a strong increase in synchronous diagnosis is seen which may be attributed to improved diagnostic methods, including the use of pre-treatment MRI in routine work-up for rectal cancer.

  3. Synchronous rectal and prostate cancer – The impact of MRI on incidence and imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Prostate and rectal cancers are two of the most common cancers in male. •Synchronous diagnosis of prostate and rectal cancer is a rare identity. •Strong increase in the synchronous diagnosis likely due to improved diagnostic methods. •Pre-treatment MRI for rectal cancer has led to increased synchronous diagnosis. -- Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the incidence of synchronous diagnosis of rectal and prostate cancer and to identify how the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for preoperative staging of rectal cancer has affected the incidence. Methods: Regional data from the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry and the Regional Cancer Registry in Stockholm-Gotland area (two million inhabitants) between the years 1995–2011 were used. Patients were included when the rectal cancer was diagnosed prior to the prostate cancer. Medical records and pre-treatment MRI were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Of 29,849 patients diagnosed with either disease, synchronous diagnosis was made in 29 patients (0.1%). Two patients were diagnosed in the years 1995–1999, seven patients between the years 2000–2005 and 20 patients between the years 2006–2011. The most common presentation, for the prostate cancer was incidental finding during staging for rectal cancer, n = 20, and of those led MRI to the diagnosis in 14 cases. At retrospective review, all patients had focal lesions in the prostate on MRI and patients with higher suspicion of malignancy on MRI had more locally advanced disease. Conclusion: Synchronous rectal and prostate cancer are a rare entity, but a strong increase in synchronous diagnosis is seen which may be attributed to improved diagnostic methods, including the use of pre-treatment MRI in routine work-up for rectal cancer

  4. Results of preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sang Gyu; Kim, Su Ssan; Bae, Hoon Sik [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    We performed a retrospective non-randomized clinical study of locally advanced rectal cancer, to evaluate the anal sphincter preservation rates, down staging rates and survival rates of preoperative chemoradiotherapy. From January 2002 to December 2005, patients with pathologically confirmed rectal cancer with clinical stage T2 or higher, or patients with lymph node metastasis were enrolled in this study. A preoperative staging work-up was conducted in 36 patients. All patients were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy, and curative resection was performed for 26 patients at Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital. Radiotherapy treatment planning was conducted with the use of planning CT for all patients. A total dose of 45.0 {approx} 52.2 Gy conventionally fractionated three-dimensional radiotherapy was delivered to the whole pelvis. Chemotherapy was given at the first and fifth week of radiation therapy with continuous infusion i.v. 5-FU (Fluorouracil) and LV (Leucovorine). Surgical resection was performed 2 to 4 weeks after the completion of the chemoradiotherapy regimen. The complete resection rate with negative resection margin was 100% (26/26). However, a pathologically complete response was not seen after curative resection. Surgery was done by LAR (low anterior resection) in 23 patients and APR (abdomino-perineal resection) in 3 patients. The sphincter preservation rate was 88.5% (23/26), down staging of the tumor occurred in 12 patients (46.2%) and down-sizing of the tumor occurred in 19 patients (73%). Local recurrence after surgical resection developed in 1 patient, and distant metastasis developed in 3 patients. The local recurrence free survival rate, distant metastasis free survival rate, and progression free survival rate were 96.7%, 87% and 83.1%, respectively. Treatment related toxicity was minimal except for one grade 3, one grade 4 anemia, one grade 3 leukopenia, and one grade 3 ileus. Preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally

  5. PET/CT diagnostic of colo-rectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Objective: Presenting the advantages of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/ CT) examination, using the radiotracer fluorure 18-deoxyglucose (FDG) in colo-rectal cancer diagnostic. Basics of the method will be also presented. Introduction: FDG PET/CT is recognized as the most efficient diagnostic imaging weapon in colorectal cancer, enable too comprehend all the 3 targets needed for staging of colo-rectal cancers: 1)Detection and evaluation of primary tumor (T) and recurrence; 2) Lymphadenopathy (N); 3)Metastatic disease (M). Assessment of treatment response during and after therapy, follow up and radiotherapy planning are also indications for PET/CT. There are two essential advantages of the method: 1)The whole body examination; 2)The complementary morphological information offered by CT and functional information offered by PET. Material and methods: Study of a total of 394 patients diagnosed with colo-rectal cancer of the total of 4125 investigated by PET/CT in Diagnosztika Pozitron center of Oradea, between 01.06.2008 - 06.06.2012. All cases had documented preoperative or postoperative histopathologic evaluation. We used a Siemens Biograph 16 device and only FDG as radiotracer, injected intravenously at a dose of 0.1-0.15 mCi /kg. Standard protocol of examination was performed at 60 minutes after FDG injection. CT acquisition consists of 'low dose' from vertex to thighs, followed by PET acquisition in 7 to 8 beds. Results: We followed the performance of PET/CT diagnostic in staging and restaging of colorectal cancer compared with other imaging methods. 141 patients had negative examinations. 107 patients were diagnosed with locally recurrent lesions, lymphadenopathy and/ or metastases. Compared with the results of previous imaging new metabolically active lesions were detected in 87 patients by PET/CT and suspected lesions were denied in 48 patients. Significant clinically cases are presented. Conclusions: The data obtained by PET

  6. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy and colonic J-pouch anal anastomosis for lower rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed colonic J-pouch anal anastomosis in 61 patients with rectal cancer located <4 cm from the anal verge. Surgical and oncological results were evaluated in multimodality therapy for advanced rectal cancer. According to Wexner's score, 7% of patients were fully continent, 71% had acceptable function with minor continence problems, and 22% were incontinent. No patients required intermittent self-catheterization during follow-up. After a median follow-up of 49 months, there was only 1 case of local recurrence after surgery. Our surgical approach irrespective of internal sphincter resection produces satisfactory functional and oncological results in multimodality therapy using preoperative chemoradiotherapy for lower rectal cancer. (author)

  7. Impact of bowel dysfunction on quality of life after sphincter-preserving resection for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmertsen, Katrine; Laurberg, Solveig; Jess, Per

    2013-01-01

    Bowel dysfunction after sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer is a common complication, with the potential to affect quality of life (QoL) strongly. The aim of this study was to examine the extent of bowel dysfunction and impact on health-related QoL after curative sphincter-preserving r......Bowel dysfunction after sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer is a common complication, with the potential to affect quality of life (QoL) strongly. The aim of this study was to examine the extent of bowel dysfunction and impact on health-related QoL after curative sphincter......-preserving resection for rectal cancer....

  8. Proteogenomic characterization of human colon and rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bing; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jing; Liu, Qi; Shi, Zhiao; Chambers, Matthew C.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Shaddox, Kent F.; Kim, Sangtae; Davies, Sherri; Wang, Sean; Wang, Pei; Kinsinger, Christopher; Rivers, Robert; Rodriguez, Henry; Townsend, Reid; Ellis, Matthew; Carr, Steven A.; Tabb, David L.; Coffey, Robert J.; Slebos, Robbert; Liebler, Daniel

    2014-09-18

    We analyzed proteomes of colon and rectal tumors previously characterized by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and performed integrated proteogenomic analyses. Protein sequence variants encoded by somatic genomic variations displayed reduced expression compared to protein variants encoded by germline variations. mRNA transcript abundance did not reliably predict protein expression differences between tumors. Proteomics identified five protein expression subtypes, two of which were associated with the TCGA "MSI/CIMP" transcriptional subtype, but had distinct mutation and methylation patterns and associated with different clinical outcomes. Although CNAs showed strong cis- and trans-effects on mRNA expression, relatively few of these extend to the protein level. Thus, proteomics data enabled prioritization of candidate driver genes. Our analyses identified HNF4A, a novel candidate driver gene in tumors with chromosome 20q amplifications. Integrated proteogenomic analysis provides functional context to interpret genomic abnormalities and affords novel insights into cancer biology.

  9. Ossification of a rectal tumor: an uncommon finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smajda, Stanislas; Danse, Etienne; Mertens de Wilmars, Maud; Humblet, Yves; Kartheuser, Alex; Jouret-Mourin, Anne

    2015-12-01

    The authors report the case of a 29-year-old woman with partially calcified stage cT4N2M0 mucoid adenocarcinoma of the mid-rectum. Concomitant neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy was administered. Preoperative CT scan and MRI demonstrated stable disease with a marked increase of its mineralized component. Histology confirmed a mucoid adenocarcinoma with ossified matrix. Osteocytes were identified in the tumor. TNM (5th edition) staging was ypT3N2M1. This case illustrates heterotopic ossification of a rectal tumor, a fairly uncommon finding. The mechanism of heterotopic bone formation within gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma has not been fully elucidated. The impact of this particular feature on patient outcome is unknown. PMID:26712056

  10. Rectal carcinosarcoma: A case report and review of literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimitrios Konstantinos Tsekouras; Stylianos Katsaragakis; Dimitrios Theodorou; Georgia Kafiri; Fotis Archontovasilis; Panagiotis Giannopoulos; Panagiotis Drimousis; John Bramis

    2006-01-01

    A 60-years old male was admitted to our department for investigation of constipation and hypogastric discomfort intensified during defecation of a few weeks duration.The cause proved to be a rectal carcinosarcoma that was treated by abdominoperineal resection and postoperative chemo-radiotherapy. The patient died 6 months later due to hepatic failure, showing evidence of disseminated disease. In general colonic carcinosarcomas constitute a rare category of malignant neoplasms whose nature is still incompletely understood. No specific treatment guidelines exist. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment and regardless of the addition of adjuvant therapy the prognosis is very poor. Systematic genetic analysis may be the clue for understanding the pathogenesis of these mysterious tumors.

  11. Anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer: risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, C A; Andreasen, A H; Jørgensen, Torben;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to identify risk factors for clinical anastomotic leakage (AL) after anterior resection for rectal cancer in a consecutive national cohort. METHOD: All patients with an initial first diagnosis of colorectal adenocarcinoma were prospectively registered in a national...... database. The register included 1495 patients who had had a curative anterior resection between May 2001 and December 2004. The association of a number of patient- and procedure-related factors with clinical AL after anterior resection was analysed in a cohort design. RESULTS: Anastomotic leakages occurred...... in 163 (11%) patients. In a multivariate analysis, the risk of AL was significantly increased in patients with tumours located below 10 cm from the anal verge if no faecal diversion was undertaken (OR 5.37 5 cm (tumour level from anal verge), 95% CI 2.10-13.7, OR 3.57 7 cm, CI 1.81-7.07 and OR 1...

  12. Rectal bleeding in a 4-month-old boy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of bleeding Meckel's diverticulum is described in an infant. A 4-month-old boy was seen initially with a 24-hour history of painless hematochezia. His parents had noted two episodes of maroon-colored stool that did not appear to be associated with any abdominal distress. His medical history was unremarkable, with normal growth and development. Physical examination revealed a well-nourished, well-hydrated infant in no apparent distress. Vital signs were normal. Rectal examination revealed no masses, but bright-red blood was noted on the examining finger. Findings from the remainder of the examination were normal. An upright roentgenogram of the abdomen was obtained and demonstrated no abnormalities. The abdominal technetium scan was abnormal. An exploratory laparotomy was performed later on the day of admission

  13. Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis after fluorouracil chemotherapy for rectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenji Mimatsu; Takatsugu Oida; Atsushi Kawasaki; Hisao Kano; Youichi Kuboi; Osamu Aramaki; Sadao Amano

    2008-01-01

    Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI) is a relatively rare condition characterized by intraluminal gas in the gastrointestinal tract.Several chemotherapeutic agents have been reported to be associated with PCI,although fluorouracil-related PCI is extremely rare.We report a case of a 76-year old man who received adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer with fluorouracil (FU) and leucovorin (LV).After 1 cycle of the treatment,he presented with diarrhea and abdominal pain.Abdominal radiogram revealed the presence of free air under the diaphragm and intramural gas in the intestine.Laparotomy was performed,showing a suspected diagnosis of perforation in the gastrointestinal tract.Intraoperative findings revealed penumatosis of the intestine without evidence of perforation.He was treated supportively and his symptoms improved.In conclusion,we should consider the possibility of PCI occurring in patients with malignancies during chemotherapy treatment.

  14. Cytomegalovirus colitis mimicking rectal carcinoma in an immunocompetent elderly woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidlovskii, Elena; Deroux, Alban; Bernard, Sylvain; Couturier, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis is uncommon in immunocompetent patients, despite a high seroprevalence rate of CMV in the general population. CMV infection has been described in individuals with compromised immune systems: in AIDS, under corticosteroid and immune modulating treatment, with cancer or haematological malignancies. Its most frequent clinical presentation is a necrotising ulcerative form; pseudotumoural CMV colitis has been described as highly exceptional. We report a case of CMV colitis mimicking rectal carcinoma in an immunocompetent elderly woman. The immunosenescence and protein-energy malnutrition increase incidence and severity of infectious diseases in elderly individuals. Immunosenescence may affect all aspects of immunity; severe protein malnutrition modifies mostly cellular immunity, growing susceptibility to infections. PMID:27166009

  15. The Results of Postoperative Radiation Therapy in the Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Despite apparently complete resection of cancer of the rectum, local recurrence rate was high. Radiation therapy has been used either alone or in combination with chemotherapy as an adjunct to surgery to reduce the risk of recurrence. This study was designed to evaluate the prognostic factors, survival rate and local recurrence rate of the rectal cancer who had received postoperative radiation therapy by retrospective analysis. Method: From 1982 to 1990, 63 patients with cancer of the rectum surgically staged as B2 or C disease received postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy after curative resection of tumor for cure. Postoperative radiation therapy was given to the whole pelvis (mean dose: 5040 cGy in 5-6weeks) and perineum was included in irradiated field in case of abdominoperineal resection. Results: Three-year actuarial survival rate was 73.2% overall, 87.7% in stage B2+3 and 62.9% in stage C2+3. Three-year disease-free survival rate was 69.5% overall, 87.7% in stage B2+3 and 56.8% in stage C2+3. Three-year disease-free survival rate in anterior resection was 77.8% and 44.4% in abdominoperineal resection. The local recurrence rate was 15.9% and distant failure rate was 20.6%. Severe late complication was small bowel obstruction in 6 patients and surgery was required in 4 patients (6.3%). The prognostic factors were stage (p=0.0221) and method of surgery(p=0.0414) (anterior resection vs abdominoperineal resection). Conclusion: This study provides evidence supporting the use of postoperative radiation therapy for reducing the local recurrence rate in patients who have had curative resection of rectal cancer with involvement of perirectal fat or regional nodes or both (stage B2 and C)

  16. The Results of Postoperative Radiation Therapy in the Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Ja [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-02-15

    Purpose: Despite apparently complete resection of cancer of the rectum, local recurrence rate was high. Radiation therapy has been used either alone or in combination with chemotherapy as an adjunct to surgery to reduce the risk of recurrence. This study was designed to evaluate the prognostic factors, survival rate and local recurrence rate of the rectal cancer who had received postoperative radiation therapy by retrospective analysis. Method: From 1982 to 1990, 63 patients with cancer of the rectum surgically staged as B2 or C disease received postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy after curative resection of tumor for cure. Postoperative radiation therapy was given to the whole pelvis (mean dose: 5040 cGy in 5-6weeks) and perineum was included in irradiated field in case of abdominoperineal resection. Results: Three-year actuarial survival rate was 73.2% overall, 87.7% in stage B2+3 and 62.9% in stage C2+3. Three-year disease-free survival rate was 69.5% overall, 87.7% in stage B2+3 and 56.8% in stage C2+3. Three-year disease-free survival rate in anterior resection was 77.8% and 44.4% in abdominoperineal resection. The local recurrence rate was 15.9% and distant failure rate was 20.6%. Severe late complication was small bowel obstruction in 6 patients and surgery was required in 4 patients (6.3%). The prognostic factors were stage (p=0.0221) and method of surgery(p=0.0414) (anterior resection vs abdominoperineal resection). Conclusion: This study provides evidence supporting the use of postoperative radiation therapy for reducing the local recurrence rate in patients who have had curative resection of rectal cancer with involvement of perirectal fat or regional nodes or both (stage B2 and C)

  17. “Fast Track” nasogastric decompression of rectal cancer surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ka Li; Zongguang Zhou; Zengrong Chen; Yi Zhang; Cun Wang

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the application of fast track (FT) nasogastric decompression in patients who underwent anterior resection of rectal cancer.A randomized control trial was performed comparing the group with the fast track treatment (n =57) and the group with traditional nasogastric decompression (n =84).Preoperative characteristics and postoperative recovery indices were recorded and analyzed.The results indicate no significant differences in gender (P =0.614),age (P =0.653),tumor location (P =0.113),and TNM stages (P =0.054) were observed between the 2 groups.The differences in the type of resection,anastomosis,and adoption of protective colostomy were all not significant between the FT and the traditional group.During the first 24 hours after surgery,the volume of nasogastric drainage averaged 197 ml in the FT group and 155 ml in the traditional group (P =0.197).The initiation of test-meal (P =0.000),semiliquid diet (P =0.002),and ordinary diet (P =0.008)were all significantly shorter in the FT group.Furthermore,compared with the other group,the patients in the FT group enjoyed earlier removal of the abdominal drainage,urinary catheter,and shorter hospital stays (P =0.000).Based on a correlation test,the duration of nasogastric decompression is related to the time of test-meal and semiliquid diet.The routine usage of nasogastric decompression in rectal surgery is unnecessary.The fast track procedure might help in facilitating postoperative functional and diet recovery,reducing the time of catheterization,and shortening hospital stay.

  18. Neoadjuvant Treatment Strategies for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollins, S; Sebag-Montefiore, D

    2016-02-01

    Improved surgical technique plus selective preoperative radiotherapy have decreased rectal cancer pelvic local recurrence from, historically, 25% down to about 5-10%. However, this improvement has not reduced distant metastatic relapse, which is the main cause of death and a key issue in rectal cancer management. The current standard is local pelvic treatment (surgery ± preoperative radiotherapy) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, depending on resection histology. For circumferential resection margin (CRM)-threatened cancer on baseline magnetic resonance imaging, downstaging long-course preoperative chemoradiation (LCPCRT) is generally used. However, for non-CRM-threatened disease, varying approaches are currently adopted in the UK, including straight to surgery, short-course preoperative radiotherapy and LCPCRT. Clinical trials are investigating intensification of concurrent chemoradiation. There is also increasing interest in investigating preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) as a way of exposing micro-metastatic disease to full-dose systemic chemotherapy as early as possible and potentially reducing metastatic relapse. Phase II trials suggest that this strategy is feasible, with promising histological response and low rates of tumour progression during NAC. Phase III trials are needed to determine the benefit of NAC when added to standard therapy and also to determine if it can be used instead of neoadjuvant radiotherapy-based schedules. Although several measures of neoadjuvant treatment response assessment based on imaging or pathology are promising predictive biomarkers for long-term survival, none has been validated in prospective phase III studies. The phase III setting will enable this, also providing translational opportunities to examine molecular predictors of response and survival. PMID:26645661

  19. Sulphation of colonic and rectal mucin in inflammatory bowel disease: reduced sulphation of rectal mucus in ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raouf, A H; Tsai, H H; Parker, N; Hoffman, J; Walker, R J; Rhodes, J M

    1992-11-01

    1. Normal colonic mucin is heavily sulphated and this increases its resistance to degradation by bacterial enzymes. Any defect in mucus sulphation could therefore be important in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. 2. Rectal biopsies taken at colonoscopy from patients with ulcerative colitis (n = 9), patients with Crohn's disease (n = 6) and control subjects (n = 16) were cultured for 24 h in the presence of N-[3H]acetylglucosamine and [35S]sulphate. Mucin was then extracted and purified, and the ratio of [35S]sulphate to N-[3H]acetylglucosamine incorporated into pure mucin was assessed. 3. The ratio of [35S]sulphate to N-[3H]acetylglucosamine incorporated into mucin was significantly reduced in rectal biopsies taken from patients with ulcerative colitis (0.463, 0.305-0.703, geometric mean and 95% confidence intervals) compared with control subjects (0.857, 0.959-1.111, P < 0.01). In patients with Crohn's disease the reduction in this ratio (0.559, 0.378-0.829) did not quite reach statistical significance (P = 0.06). There was no difference between the ratio of [35S]sulphate to N-[3H]acetylglucosamine incorporated into mucin in Crohn's disease and that in ulcerative colitis (P = 0.26). 4. In control subjects the ratio of [35S]sulphate to N-[3H]acetylglucosamine incorporated into mucin was higher in the rectal biopsies (0.882, 0.618-1.022) than in their paired proximal colonic biopsies (0.602, 0.421-0.861; P < 0.01), but this regional variation was not observed in either ulcerative colitis (rectum: 0.450, 0.262-0.773; right colon: 0.470, 0.321-0.690, P = 0.3) or Crohn's disease (rectum: 0.459, 0.260-0.815; right colon: 0.492, 0.260-0.929, P = 0.8).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1335401

  20. Eficacia analgésica del citrato de fentanilo oral transmucosa en el dolor rectal irruptivo de pacientes oncológicos Analgesic efficacy of oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate in rectal breakthrough pain in oncologic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. López

    2010-02-01

    considerar para el alivio del dolor irruptivo de otras causas en pacientes ambulatorios oncológicos y no oncológicos.Objective: Breakthrough pain is a little-known entity that is infrequently diagnosed and consequently inadequately evaluated and treated. In particular, cancer patients can experience rectal defecation breakthrough pain due to the tumor, the side effects of treatment (surgery, radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy or both. Recently, a new system of administration has been developed, oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate (OTFC; Actiq®, which is a highly efficient method for rapid onset of analgesia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of OTFC as an analgesic for a highly specific subgroup of cancer patients. Patients and methods: We retrospectively reviewed 10 cancer patients treated with OTFC for rectal defecation breakthrough pain not previously treated with opioids between January 2006 and July 2009 in our Radiotherapy Service. Patients reporting rectal pain in consultations were evaluated by a Visual Analog Scale (VAS (0-10. Results: The mean breakthrough pain VAS score was reduced from 7 (range 5-9 before OTFC to 1.9 (range 1-3 after the treatment. All patients reported pain control with a dose of 200 µg of OTFC except two patients who required progressive doses of 400 and 600 µg, respectively. The degree of patient satisfaction was excellent-good in 90% of the patients. No patients reported undesirable effects related to the use of OTFC. Conclusions: Although our series is small and our results are therefore preliminary, we can recommend OTFC as the ideal analgesic due to its speed of onset and safety in the treatment of rectal defecation breakthrough pain. OTFC is easy and comfortable to administer and is short lasting. This option can be used by patients outside the home, thus preserving their independence. OTFC can be considered for the relief of breakthrough pain of other etiologies (oncological and non-oncological in outpatients.

  1. ADMINISTRATIVE CLIMATE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BRUCE, ROBERT L.; CARTER, G.L., JR.

    IN THE COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, STYLES OF LEADERSHIP PROFOUNDLY AFFECT THE QUALITY OF THE SERVICE RENDERED. ACCORDINGLY, MAJOR INFLUENCES ON ADMINISTRATIVE CLIMATE AND EMPLOYEE PRODUCTIVITY ARE EXAMINED IN ESSAYS ON (1) SOURCES OF JOB SATISFACTION AND DISSATISFACTION, (2) MOTIVATIONAL THEORIES BASED ON JOB-RELATED SATISFACTIONS AND NEEDS,…

  2. Database Administrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Pam

    2010-01-01

    The Internet and electronic commerce (e-commerce) generate lots of data. Data must be stored, organized, and managed. Database administrators, or DBAs, work with database software to find ways to do this. They identify user needs, set up computer databases, and test systems. They ensure that systems perform as they should and add people to the…

  3. Rectal cancer staging: Multidetector-row computed tomography diagnostic accuracy in assessment of mesorectal fascia invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Ippolito, Davide; Drago, Silvia Girolama; Franzesi, Cammillo Talei; Fior, Davide; Sironi, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) as compared with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in identifying mesorectal fascia (MRF) invasion in rectal cancer patients.

  4. The utility of digital rectal examination in estimating prostate volume in a rural hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E I Udeh

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Estimation of prostate volume by digital rectal examination is reliable. This is very important in an environment where esoteric laboratory facilities are not readily available, and the clinician has to depend mainly on his clinical acumen.

  5. International preoperative rectal cancer management: staging, neoadjuvant treatment, and impact of multidisciplinary teams.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Augestad, Knut M

    2010-11-01

    Little is known regarding variations in preoperative treatment and practice for rectal cancer (RC) on an international level, yet practice variation may result in differences in recurrence and survival rates.

  6. Mechanism of rectal contraction mediated by sympathetic efferents from rectoanal pelvic afferents in guinea pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neya,Toshiaki

    1984-02-01

    Full Text Available In guinea pigs whose pelvic nerves were bilaterally sectioned, afferent stimulation of rectoanal branches of the pelvic nerve (PAS could produce an intense contraction in the rectum similar to propulsive contractions elicited during defecation. The mechanism of this reflex was analyzed. Rectal contraction by PAS was abolished after transecting the spinal cord at T13 or sectioning the lumbar splanchnic nerves (LSN or lumbar colonic nerves (LCN, but was unaffected by severing the intermesenteric and hypogastric nerves. Rectal contraction induced by PAS was abolished peripherally by atropine, guanethidine or yohimbine, while propranolol had no affect. Yohimbine antagonized the inhibitory effect of LSN or LCN stimulation on atropine-sensitive rectal contractions. It may, therefore, be concluded that PAS blocks the inhibition, by LCN efferents acting through alpha-adrenoreceptors, of cholinergic neurons in the myenteric plexus, thus facilitating recto-rectal propulsive contractions initiated by the defecation reflex.

  7. Identification of a quantitative MINT locus methylation profile predicting local regional recurrence of rectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat, M.F. de; Velde, C.J. van de; Benard, A.; Putter, H.; Morreau, H.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Meershoek Klein-Kranenbarg, E.; Graaf, E.J. de; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Hoon, D.S.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Risk assessment for locoregional disease recurrence would be highly valuable in preoperative treatment planning for patients undergoing primary rectal tumor resection. Epigenetic aberrations such as DNA methylation have been shown to be significant prognostic biomarkers of disease outcome.

  8. Endoclipping treatment of life-threatening rectal bleeding after prostate biopsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Panagiotis Katsinelos,; Jannis Kountouras,; Georgios Dimitriadis,; Grigoris Chatzimavroudis,; Christos Zavos,; Ioannis Pilpilidis,; George Paroutoglou,; George Germanidis,; Kostas Mimidis

    2009-01-01

    Rectal bleeding is frequently seen in patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided multiple biopsy of the prostate, but is usually mild and stops spontaneously. We report what is believed to be the first case of life-threatening rectal bleeding following this procedure, which was successfully treated by endoscopic intervention through placement of three clips on the sites of bleeding. This case emphasizes endoscopic intervention associated with endoclipping as a safe and effective method to achieve hemostasis in massive rectal bleeding after prostate biopsy. Additionally, current data on the complications of the TRUS-guided multiple biopsy of the prostate and the options for treating fulminant rectal bleeding, a consequence of this procedure, are described.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging for the clinical management of rectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beets-Tan, Regina G H; Lambregts, Doenja M J; Maas, Monique; Bipat, Shandra; Barbaro, Brunella; Caseiro-Alves, Filipe; Curvo-Semedo, Luís; Fenlon, Helen M; Gollub, Marc J; Gourtsoyianni, Sofia; Halligan, Steve; Hoeffel, Christine; Kim, Seung Ho; Laghi, Andrea; Maier, Andrea; Rafaelsen, Søren R; Stoker, Jaap; Taylor, Stuart A; Torkzad, Michael R; Blomqvist, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop guidelines describing a standardised approach regarding the acquisition, interpretation and reporting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for clinical staging and restaging of rectal cancer. METHODS: A consensus meeting of 14 abdominal imaging experts from the European...

  10. Reduced Circumferential Resection Margin Involvement in Rectal Cancer Surgery: Results of the Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gietelink, L.; Wouters, M.W.; Tanis, P.J.; Deken, M.M.; Berge, M.G. Ten; Tollenaar, R.A.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Noo, M.E. de

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The circumferential resection margin (CRM) is a significant prognostic factor for local recurrence, distant metastasis, and survival after rectal cancer surgery. Therefore, availability of this parameter is essential. Although the Dutch total mesorectal excision trial raised awareness ab

  11. Transabdominal ultrasound measurement of rectal diameter is dependent on time to defecation in constipated children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modin, Line; Dalby, Kasper; Walsted, Anne-Mette;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study whether diurnal variations and time in relation to defecation has to be taken into account when measurements of rectal diameter are used to determine faecal impaction in constipated children. METHODS: Repeated ultrasound measures of rectal diameter were performed in 28 children (14...... relation between defecation and changes in rectal diameter in both healthy children and constipated children during maintenance treatment.Asking for defecation signals before scanning should be considered a routine question, and a positive answer should cause postponement of the scan......., there were no difference between groups (2 pm (P = 0.103)/5 pm (P = 0.644) ). Only in the constipated group, rectal diameter exceeded 3 cm without the patients feeling the urge to defecate. CONCLUSION: We found no independent daily variation in either group without relation to defecation. There was a...

  12. A multidisciplinary clinical treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer complicated with rectovesical fistula: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Tiancheng

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Rectal cancer with rectovesical fistula is a rare and difficult to treat entity. Here, we describe a case of rectal cancer with rectovesical fistula successfully managed by multimodality treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case report in the literature. Case presentation A 51-year-old Chinese man was diagnosed as having rectal cancer accompanied by rectovesical fistula. He underwent treatment with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy combined with total pelvic excision and adjuvant chemotherapy, as recommended by a multimodality treatment team. Post-operative pathology confirmed the achievement of pathological complete response. Conclusions This case suggests that a proactive multidisciplinary treatment is needed to achieve complete cure of locally advanced rectal cancer even in the presence of rectovesical fistula.

  13. Rectal complication after remote afterloading intracavitary therapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teshima, T.; Chatani, M.; Hata, K.; Inoue, Ta.; Inoue, To.; Suzuki, T.

    1985-06-01

    From August 1978 through December 1980, 119 patients of previously untreated carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated using RALS, remote afterloading high dose rate intracavitary therapy at our department. The data from 92 out of 119 patients were available for analysis of rectal complication. The incidence of major rectal complications was only 2% (2/92). Uni- and multivariate analyses were used based on the external criterion variable of rectal complication which included even minor injuries. By using these methods, it was clearly indicated that these factors such as TDF of rectum, Z-coordinate of weighted geometric center (WGC-Z), the dose of whole pelvic irradiation, history of chemotherapy and Treponema pallidum hemoagglutination test (TPHA) were important for occurrence of rectal complication. According to discriminant score, 71 out of 92 cases (77%) could be correctly discriminated.

  14. Rectal complication after remote afterloading intracavitary therapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From August 1978 through December 1980, 119 patients of previously untreated carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated using RALS, remote afterloading high dose rate intracavitary therapy at our department. The data from 92 out of 119 patients were available for analysis of rectal complication. The incidence of major rectal complications was only 2% (2/92). Uni- and multivariate analyses were used based on the external criterion variable of rectal complication which included even minor injuries. By using these methods, it was clearly indicated that these factors such as TDF of rectum, Z-coordinate of weighted geometric center (WGC-Z), the dose of whole pelvic irradiation, history of chemotherapy and Treponema pallidum hemoagglutination test (TPHA) were important for occurrence of rectal complication. According to discriminant score, 71 out of 92 cases (77%) could be correctly discriminated. (orig.)

  15. Dosimetry of intracavitary applications in carcinoma of the cervix: rectal dose analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), in its Report-38, has given certain recommendations regarding the specifications of bladder and rectal reference points in the intracavitary treatment of carcinoma of the cervix. Conforming to this report, 182 intracavitary applications performed in stage I and II cervix cases were analyzed. In 113 applications, the maximum rectal dose was found to be in a point on the anteroposterior line drawn through the centre of colpostat sources. However, for our type of applications, the point on the anteroposterior line drawn through the lower end of the uterine tube seldom gets maximum dose. In addition, it was observed that there are other dose points than the ICRU reference point receiving doses close to maximum dose. It was concluded that doses to multiple rectal reference points should be recorded, in addition to the ICRU-defined rectal reference point

  16. Choroidal metastasis from early rectal cancer: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuyoshi Tei

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: This is the first report of choroidal metastasis from early rectal cancer. We consider it important to enforce systemic chemotherapy in addition to radiotherapy for choroidal metastasis from colorectal cancer.

  17. Genomic profiling of rectal adenoma and carcinoma by array-based comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Zhi-Zhou

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Early detection and early therapy are important for the control of death caused by rectal cancer. The present study aims to investigate the genomic alterations in rectal adenoma and carcinoma. Methods We detected the genomic changes of 8 rectal adenomas and 8 carcinomas using array CGH. Then 14 genes were selected for analyzing the expression between rectal tumor and paracancerous normal tissues as well as from adenoma to carcinoma by real-time PCR. The expression of GPNMB and DIS3 were further investigated in rectal adenoma and carcinoma tissues by immunohistochemistry. Results We indentified ten gains and 22 losses in rectal adenoma, and found 25 gains and 14 losses in carcinoma. Gains of 7p21.3-p15.3, 7q22.3-q32.1, 13q13.1-q14.11, 13q21.1-q32.1, 13q32.2-q34, 20p11.21 and 20q11.23-q12 and losses of 17p13.1-p11.2, 18p11.32-p11.21 and 18q11.1-q11.2 were shared by both rectal adenoma and carcinoma. Gains of 1q, 6p21.33-p21.31 and losses of 10p14-p11.21, 14q12-q21.1, 14q22.1-q24.3, 14q31.3-q32.1, 14q32.2-q32.32, 15q15.1-q21.1, 15q22.31 and 15q25.1-q25.2 were only detected in carcinoma but not in adenoma. Copy number and mRNA expression of EFNA1 increased from rectal adenoma to carcinoma. C13orf27 and PMEPA1 with increased copy number in both adenoma and carcinoma were over expressed in rectal cancer tissues. Protein and mRNA expression of GPNMB was significantly higher in cancer tissues than rectal adenoma tissues. Conclusion Our data may help to identify the driving genes involved in the adenoma-carcinoma progression.

  18. Case report of radiation-induced rectal cancer at the site of a rectal ulcer 33 years after radiation treatment for uterine cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The patient was a 79-year-old woman who presented with abnormal bowel movements as the chief complaint. Her medical history included radiation therapy (details including dose unclear) for uterine cancer at 46 years of age. At 64 years of age, she had undergone regular endoscopic examination of the lower digestive tract because of abnormal bowel movements. In the first biopsy of the rectal ulcer region, rectal cancer was diagnosed as a well-differentiated adenoma, and an abdominoperineal resection of the rectum was performed. The pathological findings indicated mucinous carcinoma (mp, ly1, v0). We report the case of radiation-induced rectal cancer. In the course of observations after radiation therapy, it is necessary to take secondary cancer into consideration and record the observations accordingly. (author)

  19. Studies of prognostic and functional outcomes in surgery for rectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, Mikael

    2003-01-01

    The order of priorities in surgery for rectal cancer are firstly to achieve local control and cure from the disease, secondly to minimise perioperative discomfort and complications, and thirdly to obtain the best possible bowel function. Rectal tumours can be removed with local surgery but most common are abdominal procedures with or without a permanent or temporary stoma. There is still considerable postoperative morbidity (20- 50%) and mortality (1-4%). The intestinal ...

  20. Relation between rectal sensation and anal function in normal subjects and patients with faecal incontinence.

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, W M; Read, N W; Miner, P B

    1990-01-01

    The relation between sensory perception of rapid balloon distension of the rectum and the motor responses of the rectum and external and internal anal sphincters in 27 normal subjects and 16 patients with faecal incontinence who had impaired rectal sensation but normal sphincter pressures was studied. In both patients and normal subjects, the onset and duration of rectal sensation correlated closely with the external anal sphincter electrical activity (r = 0.8, p less than 0.0001) and with re...

  1. Prognostic Value of MicroRNAs in Preoperative Treated Rectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Azadeh Azizian; Ingo Epping; Frank Kramer; Peter Jo; Markus Bernhardt; Julia Kitz; Gabriela Salinas; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Marian Grade; Tim Beißbarth; B. Michael Ghadimi; Jochen Gaedcke

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with locally advanced rectal cancer are treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection. Despite similar clinical parameters (uT2-3, uN+) and standard therapy, patients’ prognoses differ widely. A possible prediction of prognosis through microRNAs as biomarkers out of treatment-naïve biopsies would allow individualized therapy options. Methods: Microarray analysis of 45 microdissected preoperative biopsies from patients with rectal cancer was pe...

  2. Metachronous Bilateral Isolated Adrenal Metastasis from Rectal Adenocarcinoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Jabir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of adrenal metastasis from colorectal cancer in a 54-year-old woman. Nine months after resection for advanced rectal carcinoma, a computed tomography scan revealed bilateral adrenal metastasis. The level of serum carcinoembryonic antigen was normal. A bilateral adrenalectomy was performed after chemotherapy. Histopathological examination showed adenocarcinoma, compatible with metastasis from the rectal cancer. Adrenal metastasis should be considered in the patients’ follow-up for colorectal cancer.

  3. Prognostic Nomograms for Predicting Survival and Distant Metastases in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Junjie Peng; Ying Ding; Shanshan Tu; Debing Shi; Liang Sun; Xinxiang Li; Hongbin Wu; Sanjun Cai

    2014-01-01

    Aim To develop prognostic nomograms for predicting outcomes in patients with locally advanced rectal cancers who do not receive preoperative treatment. Materials and Methods A total of 883 patients with stage II–III rectal cancers were retrospectively collected from a single institution. Survival analyses were performed to assess each variable for overall survival (OS), local recurrence (LR) and distant metastases (DM). Cox models were performed to develop a predictive model for each endpoint...

  4. Pathologic Assessment of Rectal Carcinoma after Neoadjuvant Radio(chemo)therapy: Prognostic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Monirath Hav; Louis Libbrecht; Liesbeth Ferdinande; Karen Geboes; Piet Pattyn; Cuvelier, Claude A.

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant radio(chemo)therapy is increasingly used in rectal cancer and induces a number of morphologic changes that affect prognostication after curative surgery, thereby creating new challenges for surgical pathologists, particularly in evaluating morphologic changes and tumour response to preoperative treatment. Surgical pathologists play an important role in determining the many facets of rectal carcinoma patient care after neoadjuvant treatment. These range from proper handling of macr...

  5. Anorectal function and outcomes after transanal minimally invasive surgery for rectal tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Karakayali, Feza Y; Tugan Tezcaner; Gokhan Moray

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transanal endoscopic microsurgery is a minimally invasive technique that allows full-thickness resection and suture closure of the defect for large rectal adenomas, selected low-risk rectal cancers, or small cancers in patients who have a high risk for major surgery. Our aim, in the given prospective study was to report our initial clinical experience with TAMIS, and to evaluate its effects on postoperative anorectal functions. Materials and Methods: In 10 patients treated with TA...

  6. The comparison of the effect of intrathecal levobupivacaine and bupivacaine for ano-rectal surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Göksu, Hüseyin; Çelik, Feyzi; Yıldırım, Zeynep B.; Tüfek, Adnan; Karaman, Haktan; Kavak, Gönül Ö.; Doğan, Erdal

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Spinal anesthesia is widely used for ano-rectal surgery. We aimed to compare the anesthetic potencies and hemodynamic effects of levobupivacaine and bupivacaine with fentanil intrathecally administered in patients undergoing ano-rectal surgery. Materials and methods: After Dicle University Medical Faculty Research Hospital ethical committee approval and written consent of the patients who underwent anorectal surgery were obtained, sixty patients between the ages of 18-65 with ...

  7. Analysis of POSSUM score and postoperative morbidity in patients with rectal cancer undergoing surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Valenti, V.; Hernandez-Lizoain, J.L. (José Luis); J. Baixauli; Pastor, C.; Martinez-Regueira, F. (Fernando); Beunza, J J; Aristu, J. (Javier); J.A. Cienfuegos

    2009-01-01

    The Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Mortality and morbidity (POSSUM) and later modifications (P-POSSUM y CR-POSSUM) have been used to predict morbidity and mortality rates among patients with rectal cancer undergoing surgery. These calculations need some adjustment, however. The aim of this study was to assess the applicability of POSSUM to a group of patients with rectal cancer undergoing surgery, analysing surgic...

  8. Variation in treatment modalities, costs and outcomes of rectal cancer patients in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Herman, Krzysztof J.; Komorowski, Andrzej L.; Wysocki, Wojciech M.; Tabor, Jacek; Herman, Roman M.; Śliwczyński, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study To evaluate outcome, costs and treatment differences in rectal cancer patients between various regions in Poland. Material and methods Data from the Polish National Health Fund of all patients with rectal cancer diagnosed and treated between 2005 and 2007 were analyzed. Overall, relative 5-year survival and the percentage of patients receiving chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery were analyzed. The possible influence of cost of treatment per patient and mean number of recta...

  9. Diagnostic value of endorectal ultrasonography for rectal carcinoma: A meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yonghe Zhou; Wei Shao; Wei Lu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the diagnosis efficacy of endorectal ultrasonography (ERUS) for rectal carcinoma. Materials and Methods: We searched all the published articles about ERUS in evaluation of rectal carcinoma in the electronic databases. The pooled diagnosis sensitivity, specificity, diagnosis odds ratio, a positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) were calculated by MetaDiSc-1.4 so...

  10. Case report: locoregional (perineum and inguinal) recurrence after treatment of rectal cancer by low anterior resection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Rong; ZHANG Li

    2013-01-01

    This report presents a case of perineal and inguinal recurrence and metastasis after treatment of rectal cancer by low anterior resection. A 57-year-old Chinese woman was diagnosed with rectal cancer in September 2008. The tumor and metastasis were recurrent many times in the perineum and inguinal regions from first diagnosis to October 2011. Twelve surgeries were performed and several nodules were removed. Adjuvant radiation therapy and chemotherapy were also carried out. Pathological analys...

  11. Differences in survival between colon and rectal cancer from SEER data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chien Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about colorectal cancer or colon and rectal cancer. Are they the same disease or different diseases? OBJECTIVES: The aim of this epidemiology study was to compare the features of colon and rectal cancer by using recent national cancer surveillance data. DESIGN AND SETTING: Data included colorectal cancer (1995-2008 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER database. Only adenocarcinoma was included for analysis. PATIENTS: A total of 372,130 patients with a median follow-up of 32 months were analyzed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean survival of patients with the same stage of colon and rectal cancer was evaluated. RESULTS: Around 35% of patients had stage information. Among them, colon cancer patients had better survival than those with rectal cancer, by a margin of 4 months in stage IIB. In stage IIIC and stage IV, rectal cancer patients had better survival than colon cancer patients, by about 3 months. Stage IIB colorectal cancer patients had a poorer prognosis than those with stage IIIA and IIIB colorectal cancer. After adjustment of age, sex and race, colon cancer patients had better survival than rectal cancer of stage IIB, but in stage IIIC and IV, rectal cancer patients had better survival than colon cancer. LIMITATIONS: The study is limited by its retrospective nature. CONCLUSION: This was a population-based study. The prognosis of rectal cancer was not worse than that of colon cancer. Local advanced colorectal cancer had a poorer prognosis than local regional lymph node metastasis. Stage IIB might require more aggressive chemotherapy, and no less than that for stage III.

  12. Optimal Treatment Strategy in Rectal Cancer Surgery: Should We Be Cowboys or Chickens?

    OpenAIRE

    Snijders, Heleen S.; van Leersum, Nicoline J.; Henneman, Daan; de Vries, Alexander C.; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Stiggelbout, Anne M; Wouters, Michel W. J. M.; Dekker, Jan Willem T.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Surgeons and hospitals are increasingly accountable for their postoperative complication rates, which may lead to risk adverse treatment strategies in rectal cancer surgery. It is not known whether a risk adverse strategy leads to providing better care. In this study, the association between the strategy of hospitals regarding defunctioning stoma construction and postoperative outcomes in rectal cancer treatment was evaluated. Methods Population-based data of the Dutch ...

  13. Proposed Rectal Dose Constraints for Patients Undergoing Definitive Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Although several institutions have reported rectal dose constraints according to threshold toxicity, the plethora of trials has resulted in multiple, confusing dose-volume histogram recommendations. A set of standardized, literature-based constraints for patients undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer would help guide the practice of prostate RT. The purpose of this study was to develop these constraints, demonstrate that they are achievable, and assess the corresponding rectal toxicity. Methods and Materials: An extensive literature search identified eight key studies relating dose-volume histogram data to rectal toxicity. A correction factor was developed to address differences in the anatomic definition of the rectum across studies. The dose-volume histogram constraints recommended by each study were combined to generate the constraints. The data from all patients treated with definitive intensity-modulated RT were then compared against these constraints. Acute rectal toxicity was assessed. Results: A continuous, proposed rectal dose-constraint curve was generated. Intensity-modulated RT not only met this constraint curve, but also was able to achieve at least 30-40% lower dose to the rectum. The preliminary clinical results were also positive: 50% of patients reported no acute bowel toxicity, 33% reported Grade 1 toxicity, and 17% reported Grade 2 toxicity. No patients reported Grade 3-4 acute rectal toxicity. Conclusions: In this study, we developed a set of proposed rectal dose constraints. This allowed for volumetric assessment of the dose-volume relationship compared with single dose-volume histogram points. Additional research will be performed to validate this threshold as a class solution for rectal dose constraints

  14. Late rectal toxicity after conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer (I): multivariate analysis and dose-response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to use the outcome of a dose escalation protocol for three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) of prostate cancer to study the dose-response for late rectal toxicity and to identify anatomic, dosimetric, and clinical factors that correlate with late rectal bleeding in multivariate analysis. Methods and Materials: Seven hundred forty-three patients with T1c-T3 prostate cancer were treated with 3D-CRT with prescribed doses of 64.8 to 81.0 Gy. The 5-year actuarial rate of late rectal toxicity was assessed using Kaplan-Meier statistics. A retrospective dosimetric analysis was performed for patients treated to 70.2 Gy (52 patients) or 75.6 Gy (119 patients) who either exhibited late rectal bleeding (RTOG Grade 2/3) within 30 months after treatment (i.e., 70.2 Gy--13 patients, 75.6 Gy--36 patients) or were nonbleeding for at least 30 months (i.e., 70.2 Gy--39 patients, 75.6 Gy--83 patients). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was performed to correlate late rectal bleeding with several anatomic, dosimetric, and clinical variables. Results: A dose response for ≥ Grade 2 late rectal toxicity was observed. By multivariate analysis, the following factors were significantly correlated with ≥ Grade 2 late rectal bleeding for patients prescribed 70.2 Gy: 1) enclosure of the outer rectal contour by the 50% isodose on the isocenter slice (i.e., Iso50) (p max (p max

  15. Nomogram to predict ypN status after chemoradiation in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jwa, E; Kim, J. H.; HAN, S; Park, J-h; Lim, S-B; Kim, J. C.; Hong, Y S; Kim, T. W.; Yu, C. S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pelvic lymph node (LN) status after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is an important indicator of oncologic outcome in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to develop a nomogram to predict LN status after preoperative CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer patients. Methods: The nomogram was developed in a training cohort (n=891) using logistic regression analyses and validated in a validation cohort (n=258) from a prospectively registered...

  16. Surgical Margins and Short-Term Results of Laparoscopic Total Mesorectal Excision for Low Rectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Qingqiang; Xiu, Peng; Qi, Xiaolong; Yi, Guoping; Xu, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The confines of the narrow bony pelvis make laparoscopic surgery more challenging in the treatment of low rectal cancer. Macroscopic evaluation of the completeness of the mesorectum provides detailed information about the quality of surgery. This study was performed to observe the short-term outcomes and evaluate the macroscopic quality of specimens acquired from laparoscopic total mesorectal excision versus open total mesorectal excision in patients with low rectal...

  17. Effect of prebiotic or probiotic supplementation and ileo rectal anastomosis on intestinal morphology of weaned piglets

    OpenAIRE

    Lordelo, M.M.; Marinho, M.C.; Pinho, M.A.; Mascarenhas, R.D.; F.C. Silva; Cunha, L.F.; Freire, J.P.B.

    2007-01-01

    Forty eight 21 days old piglets were used to compare the effect of prebiotic or probiotic supplementation and ileo rectal anastomosis on the morphology of the small intestine. Half of the piglets were maintained intact and the other half was subjected to an ileo rectal anastomosis (IRA). Each group of piglets received one of the following diets: 1) basal diet (C), 2) basal diet supplemented with a Xylo-oligosaccharide (XOS), 3) basal diet supplemented with a Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SC) and ...

  18. Do all locally advanced rectal cancers require radiation? A review of literature in the modern era

    OpenAIRE

    Vonk, David T; Hazard, Lisa J

    2010-01-01

    Potentially curable rectal cancer is primarily treated with surgical resection. Adjuvant or neoadjuvant radiotherapy is often utilized for patients deemed to be at unacceptable risk for local recurrence. The purpose of this article is to review the pertinent literature and elucidate the role of radiotherapy in patients with an intermediate risk of local recurrence. The addition of chemoradiotherapy is recommended in the majority of patients with transmural or node positive rectal cancer. Howe...

  19. Choroidal metastasis from early rectal cancer: Case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsuyoshi Tei; Masaki Wakasugi; Hiroki Akamatsu

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Choroidal metastasis from colorectal cancer is rare, and there have been no reported cases of such metastasis from early colorectal cancer. We report a case of choroidal metastasis from early rectal cancer. PRESENTATION OF CASE: A 61 year-old-man experienced myodesopsia in the left eye 2 years and 6 months after primary rectal surgery for early cancer, and was diagnosed with left choroidal metastasis and multiple lung metastases. Radiotherapy was initiated for the left eye an...

  20. Ozone Therapy in the Management of Persistent Radiation-Induced Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardino Clavo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Persistent radiation-induced proctitis and rectal bleeding are debilitating complications with limited therapeutic options. We present our experience with ozone therapy in the management of such refractory rectal bleeding. Methods. Patients (n=12 previously irradiated for prostate cancer with persistent or severe rectal bleeding without response to conventional treatment were enrolled to receive ozone therapy via rectal insufflations and/or topical application of ozonized-oil. Ten (83% patients had Grade 3 or Grade 4 toxicity. Median follow-up after ozone therapy was 104 months (range: 52–119. Results. Following ozone therapy, the median grade of toxicity improved from 3 to 1 (p<0.001 and the number of endoscopy treatments from 37 to 4 (p=0.032. Hemoglobin levels changed from 11.1 (7–14 g/dL to 13 (10–15 g/dL, before and after ozone therapy, respectively (p=0.008. Ozone therapy was well tolerated and no adverse effects were noted, except soft and temporary flatulence for some hours after each session. Conclusions. Ozone therapy was effective in radiation-induced rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients without serious adverse events. It proved useful in the management of rectal bleeding and merits further evaluation.

  1. Early Proctoscopy is a Surrogate Endpoint of Late Rectal Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ippolito, Edy; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Digesu, Cinzia; Deodato, Francesco [Radiotherapy Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura Giovanni Paolo II, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Macchia, Gabriella, E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.it [Radiotherapy Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura Giovanni Paolo II, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Pirozzi, Giuseppe Antonio [Endoscopy Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura Giovanni Paolo II, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Cilla, Savino [Medical Physics Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura Giovanni Paolo II, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Cuscuna, Daniele; Di Lallo, Alessandra [Urology Unit, General Hospital A. Cardarelli, Campobasso (Italy); Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Mantini, Giovanna [Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Rome (Italy); Pacelli, Fabio [Surgery Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura Giovanni Paolo II, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa [Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Rome (Italy); Ingrosso, Marcello [Endoscopy Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura Giovanni Paolo II, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe [Radiotherapy Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura Giovanni Paolo II, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Rome (Italy)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To predict the grade and incidence of late clinical rectal toxicity through short-term (1 year) mucosal alterations. Methods and Materials: Patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated with curative or adjuvant radiotherapy underwent proctoscopy a year after the course of radiotherapy. Mucosal changes were classified by the Vienna Rectoscopy Score (VRS). Late toxicity data were analyzed according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparison between prognosis groups was performed by log-rank analysis. Results: After a median follow-up time of 45 months (range, 18-99), the 3-year incidence of grade {>=}2 rectal late toxicity according to the criteria of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group was 24%, with all patients (24/24; 100%) experiencing rectal bleeding. The occurrence of grade {>=}2 clinical rectal late toxicity was higher in patients with grade {>=}2 (32% vs. 15 %, p = 0.02) or grade {>=}3 VRS telangiectasia (47% vs. 17%, p {<=} 0.01) and an overall VRS score of {>=}2 (31% vs. 16 %, p = 0.04) or {>=}3 (48% vs. 17%, p = 0.01) at the 1-year proctoscopy. Conclusions: Early proctoscopy (1 year) predicts late rectal bleeding and therefore can be used as a surrogate endpoint for late rectal toxicity in studies aimed at reducing this frequent complication.

  2. Early Proctoscopy is a Surrogate Endpoint of Late Rectal Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To predict the grade and incidence of late clinical rectal toxicity through short-term (1 year) mucosal alterations. Methods and Materials: Patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated with curative or adjuvant radiotherapy underwent proctoscopy a year after the course of radiotherapy. Mucosal changes were classified by the Vienna Rectoscopy Score (VRS). Late toxicity data were analyzed according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparison between prognosis groups was performed by log-rank analysis. Results: After a median follow-up time of 45 months (range, 18–99), the 3-year incidence of grade ≥2 rectal late toxicity according to the criteria of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group was 24%, with all patients (24/24; 100%) experiencing rectal bleeding. The occurrence of grade ≥2 clinical rectal late toxicity was higher in patients with grade ≥2 (32% vs. 15 %, p = 0.02) or grade ≥3 VRS telangiectasia (47% vs. 17%, p ≤ 0.01) and an overall VRS score of ≥2 (31% vs. 16 %, p = 0.04) or ≥3 (48% vs. 17%, p = 0.01) at the 1-year proctoscopy. Conclusions: Early proctoscopy (1 year) predicts late rectal bleeding and therefore can be used as a surrogate endpoint for late rectal toxicity in studies aimed at reducing this frequent complication.

  3. Prospective comparison between two different magnetic resonance defecography techniques for evaluating pelvic floor disorders: air-balloon versus gel for rectal filling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francesca, Maccioni; Najwa, Al Ansari; Valeria, Buonocore; Fabrizio, Mazzamurro; Carlo, Catalano [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Policlinico Umberto I Hospital, Rome (Italy); Marileda, Indinnimeo; Massimo, Mongardini [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Surgical Sciences, Policlinico Umberto I Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    to prospectively compare two rectal filling techniques for dynamic MRI of pelvic floor disorders (PFD). Twenty-six patients with PFD underwent the two techniques during the same procedure, one based on rectal placement of a balloon-catheter filled with saline and air insufflation (air-balloon technique or AB); another based on rectal filling with 180 cc of gel (gel-filling technique or GF). The examinations were compared for assessment and staging of PFD, including rectal-descent, rectocele, cystocele, colpocele, enterocele, rectal invagination. Surgery and clinical examinations were the gold standard. AB showed sensitivity of 96 % for rectal descent, 100 % for both rectocele and colpocele, 86 % for rectal invagination and 100 % for enterocele; understaged 11 % of rectal descents and 19 % of rectoceles. GF showed sensitivity of 100 % for rectal descent, 91 % for rectocele, 83 % for colpocele, 100 % for rectal invagination and 73 % for enterocele; understaged 3.8 % of rectal descent and 11.5 % of rectoceles. Both techniques showed 100 % of specificity. Agreement between air-balloon and gel filling was 84 % for rectal descent, 69 % for rectocele, 88 % for rectal invagination, 84 % for enterocele, 88 % for cystocele and 92 % for colpocele. Both techniques allowed a satisfactory evaluation of PFD. The gel filling was superior for rectal invagination, the air-balloon for rectocele and anterior/middle compartment disorders. (orig.)

  4. Treatment and prognosis of patients with late rectal bleeding after intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation proctitis after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) differs from that seen after pelvic irradiation in that this adverse event is a result of high-dose radiation to a very small area in the rectum. We evaluated the results of treatment for hemorrhagic proctitis after IMRT for prostate cancer. Between November 2004 and February 2010, 403 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IMRT at 2 institutions. Among these patients, 64 patients who developed late rectal bleeding were evaluated. Forty patients had received IMRT using a linear accelerator and 24 by tomotherapy. Their median age was 72 years. Each patient was assessed clinically and/or endoscopically. Depending on the severity, steroid suppositories or enemas were administered up to twice daily and Argon plasma coagulation (APC) was performed up to 3 times. Response to treatment was evaluated using the Rectal Bleeding Score (RBS), which is the sum of Frequency Score (graded from 1 to 3 by frequency of bleeding) and Amount Score (graded from 1 to 3 by amount of bleeding). Stoppage of bleeding over 3 months was scored as RBS 1. The median follow-up period for treatment of rectal bleeding was 35 months (range, 12–69 months). Grade of bleeding was 1 in 31 patients, 2 in 26, and 3 in 7. Nineteen of 45 patients (42%) observed without treatment showed improvement and bleeding stopped in 17 (38%), although mean RBS did not change significantly. Eighteen of 29 patients (62%) treated with steroid suppositories or enemas showed improvement (mean RBS, from 4.1 ± 1.0 to 3.0 ± 1.8, p = 0.003) and bleeding stopped in 9 (31%). One patient treated with steroid enema 0.5-2 times a day for 12 months developed septic shock and died of multiple organ failure. All 12 patients treated with APC showed improvement (mean RBS, 4.7 ± 1.2 to 2.3 ± 1.4, p < 0.001) and bleeding stopped in 5 (42%). After adequate periods of observation, steroid suppositories/enemas are expected to be effective. However, short

  5. Treatment and prognosis of patients with late rectal bleeding after intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takemoto Shinya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation proctitis after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT differs from that seen after pelvic irradiation in that this adverse event is a result of high-dose radiation to a very small area in the rectum. We evaluated the results of treatment for hemorrhagic proctitis after IMRT for prostate cancer. Methods Between November 2004 and February 2010, 403 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IMRT at 2 institutions. Among these patients, 64 patients who developed late rectal bleeding were evaluated. Forty patients had received IMRT using a linear accelerator and 24 by tomotherapy. Their median age was 72 years. Each patient was assessed clinically and/or endoscopically. Depending on the severity, steroid suppositories or enemas were administered up to twice daily and Argon plasma coagulation (APC was performed up to 3 times. Response to treatment was evaluated using the Rectal Bleeding Score (RBS, which is the sum of Frequency Score (graded from 1 to 3 by frequency of bleeding and Amount Score (graded from 1 to 3 by amount of bleeding. Stoppage of bleeding over 3 months was scored as RBS 1. Results The median follow-up period for treatment of rectal bleeding was 35 months (range, 12–69 months. Grade of bleeding was 1 in 31 patients, 2 in 26, and 3 in 7. Nineteen of 45 patients (42% observed without treatment showed improvement and bleeding stopped in 17 (38%, although mean RBS did not change significantly. Eighteen of 29 patients (62% treated with steroid suppositories or enemas showed improvement (mean RBS, from 4.1 ± 1.0 to 3.0 ± 1.8, p = 0.003 and bleeding stopped in 9 (31%. One patient treated with steroid enema 0.5-2 times a day for 12 months developed septic shock and died of multiple organ failure. All 12 patients treated with APC showed improvement (mean RBS, 4.7 ± 1.2 to 2.3 ± 1.4, p  Conclusions After adequate periods of observation, steroid suppositories

  6. Reduced folate and serum vitamin metabolites in patients with rectal carcinoma: an open-label feasibility study of pemetrexed with folic acid and vitamin B12 supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffregen, Clemens C; Odin, Elisabeth A; Carlsson, Göran U; Kurlberg, Göran K; Björkqvist, Hillevi G; Tångefjord, Maria T; Gustavsson, Bengt G

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of this single-center, open-label, phase II study were to evaluate (a) the feasibility and safety of neoadjuvant administration of pemetrexed with oral folic acid and vitamin B12 (FA/B12) in newly diagnosed patients with resectable rectal cancer and (b) intracellular and systemic vitamin metabolism. Patients were treated with three cycles of pemetrexed (500 mg/m, every 3 weeks) and FA/B12 before surgery. The reduced folates tetrahydrofolate, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate were evaluated from biopsies in tumor tissue and in adjacent mucosa. Serum levels of homocysteine, cystathionine, and methylmalonic acid were also measured. All 37 patients received three cycles of pemetrexed; 89.2% completed their planned dosage within a 9-week feasibility time frame. Neither dose reductions nor study drug-related serious adverse events were reported. Reduced folate levels were significantly higher in tumor tissue compared with adjacent mucosa at baseline. After FA/B12 administration, tissue levels of reduced folates increased significantly and remained high during treatment in both tumor and mucosa until surgery. Serum levels of cystathionine increased significantly compared with baseline after FA/B12 administration, but then decreased, fluctuating cyclically during pemetrexed therapy. Homocysteine and methylmalonic acid levels decreased significantly after FA/B12 administration, and remained below baseline levels during the study. These results indicate that administration of three neoadjuvant cycles of single-agent pemetrexed, every 3 weeks, with FA/B12 in patients with resectable rectal cancer is feasible and tolerable. Tissue and serum vitamin metabolism results demonstrate the influence of pemetrexed and FA/B12 on vitamin metabolism and warrant further study. PMID:26825869

  7. A social ecology of rectal microbicide acceptability among young men who have sex with men and transgender women in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Peter A.; Surachet Roungprakhon; Suchon Tepjan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: With HIV-incidence among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Bangkok among the highest in the world, a topical rectal microbicide would be a tremendous asset to prevention. Nevertheless, ubiquitous gaps between clinical trial efficacy and real-world effectiveness of existing HIV preventive interventions highlight the need to address multi-level factors that may impact on rectal microbicide implementation. We explored the social ecology of rectal microbicide acceptability among MS...

  8. Radiographic findings of post-operative double stapled trans anal rectal resection (STARR) in patient with obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longo's procedure of double stapled trans anal rectal resection (STARR) has been evocated as surgical treatment of the obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS) in patients with rectal mucosal prolapse. The aim of this study was to investigate the post-interventional findings of this technique, to help radiologist in knowledge of the changed morphology of the rectal lumen, also in attempt to recognize some potential related complications

  9. Accuracy of High-Resolution MRI with Lumen Distention in Rectal Cancer Staging and Circumferential Margin Involvement Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Iannicelli, Elsa; Di Renzo, Sara; ferri, mario; Pilozzi, Emanuela; Di Girolamo, Marco; Sapori, Alessandra; Ziparo, Vincenzo; David, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with lumen distention for rectal cancer staging and circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement prediction. Materials and Methods Seventy-three patients with primary rectal cancer underwent high-resolution MRI with a phased-array coil performed using 60-80 mL room air rectal distention, 1-3 weeks before surgery. MRI results were compared to postoperative histopathological findings. The overall MRI T staging accuracy...

  10. Risk Factors of Permanent Stomas in Patients with Rectal Cancer after Low Anterior Resection with Temporary Stomas

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chul Min; Huh, Jung Wook; Park, Yoon Ah; Cho, Yong Beom; Kim, Hee Cheol; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Woo Yong; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to identify risk factors influencing permanent stomas after low anterior resection with temporary stomas for rectal cancer. Materials and Methods A total of 2528 consecutive rectal cancer patients who had undergone low anterior resection were retrospectively reviewed. Risk factors for permanent stomas were evaluated among these patients. Results Among 2528 cases of rectal cancer, a total of 231 patients had a temporary diverting stoma. Among these cases, 217 ...

  11. Prevalence of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria on Rectal Swabs and Factors Affecting Resistance to Antibiotics in Patients Undergoing Prostate Biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jong Beom; Jung, Seung Il; Hwang, Eu Chang; Kwon, Dong Deuk

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria on rectal swabs in patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy and the factors affecting resistance to antibiotics were evaluated. Materials and Methods Two hundred twenty-three men who underwent TRUS-guided prostate biopsy from November 2011 to December 2012 were retrospectively evaluated. Rectal swabs were cultured on MacConkey agar to identify antibiotic-resistant bacteria in rectal flora before TRUS-guide...

  12. Tympanic, Infrared Skin, and Temporal Artery Scan Thermometers Compared with Rectal Measurement in Children: A Real-Life Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Karel Allegaert, MD, PhD; Kristina Casteels, MD, PhD; Ilse van Gorp, RN; Guy Bogaert, MD, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Body temperature measurement in children is of clinical relevance. Although rectal measurement is the gold standard, less invasive tools have become available. We aimed to describe the accuracy of tympanic, infrared skin, or temporal artery scan thermometers compared with rectal measurement to reflect core temperature. Methods: Rectal (Filac 3000; Covidien, Mechelen, Belgium), tympanic (AccuSystem Genius2 Typmanic Infrared Ear Thermometer, Covidien, Mechelen, Belgium), tempor...

  13. ERAS protocol in laparoscopic surgery for colonic versus rectal carcinoma: are there differences in short-term outcomes?

    OpenAIRE

    Pędziwiatr, Michał; Pisarska, Magdalena; Kisielewski, Michał; Major, Piotr; Mydlowska, Anna; Rubinkiewicz, Mateusz; Winiarski, Marek; Budzyński, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Most of the studies concerning enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocols in colorectal surgery include heterogeneous groups of patients undergoing open or laparoscopic surgery, both due to colonic and rectal cancer, thus creating a potential bias. The data investigating the differences between patients operated for either colonic or rectal cancer are sparse. The aim of the study was to compare short-term outcomes of laparoscopic surgery for colonic and rectal cancer with ERAS protocol....

  14. Robotic Versus Laparoscopic Surgery for Rectal Cancer after Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy: Case-Matched Study of Short-Term Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yong Sok; Kim, Min Jung; Park, Sung Chan; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Dae Yong; Chang, Hee Jin; Nam, Byung-Ho; Oh, Jae Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Robotic surgery is expected to have advantages over laparoscopic surgery; however, there are limited data regarding the feasibility of robotic surgery for rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Therefore, we evaluated the short-term outcomes of robotic surgery for rectal cancer. Materials and Methods Thirty-three patients with cT3N0-2 rectal cancer after preoperative CRT who underwent robotic low anterior resection (R-LAR) between March 2010 and January 2012 were ma...

  15. Intratumoral Heterogeneity of MicroRNA Expression in Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Rikke Fredslund; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Appelt, Ane Lindegaard; Jakobsen, Anders; Hansen, Torben Frøstrup

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An increasing number of studies have investigated microRNAs (miRNAs) as potential markers of diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. So far, agreement between studies has been minimal, which may in part be explained by intratumoral heterogeneity of miRNA expression. The aim of the present study was to assess the heterogeneity of a panel of selected miRNAs in rectal cancer, using two different technical approaches. Materials and Methods The expression of the investigated miRNAs was analysed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH) in tumour specimens from 27 patients with T3-4 rectal cancer. From each tumour, tissue from three different luminal localisations was examined. Inter- and intra-patient variability was assessed by calculating intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Correlations between RT-qPCR and ISH were evaluated using Spearman’s correlation. Results ICCsingle (one sample from each patient) was higher than 50% for miRNA-21 and miRNA-31. For miRNA-125b, miRNA-145, and miRNA-630, ICCsingle was lower than 50%. The ICCmean (mean of three samples from each patient) was higher than 50% for miRNA-21(RT-qPCR and ISH), miRNA-125b (RT-qPCR and ISH), miRNA-145 (ISH), miRNA-630 (RT-qPCR), and miRNA-31 (RT-qPCR). For miRNA-145 (RT-qPCR) and miRNA-630 (ISH), ICCmean was lower than 50%. Spearman correlation coefficients, comparing results obtained by RT-qPCR and ISH, respectively, ranged from 0.084 to 0.325 for the mean value from each patient, and from -0.085 to 0.515 in the section including the deepest part of the tumour. Conclusion Intratumoral heterogeneity may influence the measurement of miRNA expression and consequently the number of samples needed for representative estimates. Our findings with two different methods suggest that one sample is sufficient for adequate assessment of miRNA-21 and miRNA-31, whereas more samples would improve the assessment of miRNA-125b, miRNA-145, and miRNA-630

  16. Radiofrequency thermal treatment with chemoradiotherapy for advanced rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Hisanori; Motegi, Masahiko; Osawa, Kiyotaka; Okonogi, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Atsushi; Andou, Yoshitaka; Asao, Takayuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Takeo; Ogoshi, Kyoji

    2016-05-01

    We previously reported that patients with a clinical complete response (CR) following radiofrequency thermal treatment exhibit significantly increased body temperature compared with other groups, whereas patients with a clinical partial response or stable disease depended on the absence or presence of output limiting symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation among treatment response, Hidaka radiofrequency (RF) output classification (HROC: termed by us) and changes in body temperature. From December 2011 to January 2014, 51 consecutive rectal cancer cases were included in this study. All patients underwent 5 RF thermal treatments with concurrent chemoradiation. Patients were classified into three groups based on HROC: with ≤9, 10-16, and ≥17 points, calculated as the sum total points of five treatments. Thirty-three patients received surgery 8 weeks after treatment, and among them, 32 resected specimens were evaluated for histological response. Eighteen patients did not undergo surgery, five because of progressive disease (PD) and 13 refused because of permanent colostomy. We demonstrated that good local control (ypCR + CR + CRPD) was observed in 32.7% of cases in this study. Pathological complete response (ypCR) was observed in 15.7% of the total 51 patients and in 24.2% of the 33 patients who underwent surgery. All ypCR cases had ≥10 points in the HROC, but there were no patients with ypCR among those with ≤9 points in the HROC. Standardization of RF thermal treatment was performed safely, and two types of patients were identified: those without or with increased temperatures, who consequently showed no or some benefit, respectively, for similar RF output thermal treatment. We propose that the HROC is beneficial for evaluating the efficacy of RF thermal treatment with chemoradiation for rectal cancer, and the thermoregulation control mechanism in individual patients may be pivotal in predicting the response to RF

  17. Prevention of vaginal and rectal herpes simplex virus type 2 transmission in mice: mechanism of antiviral action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceña-Diez, Rafael; Vacas-Córdoba, Enrique; García-Broncano, Pilar; de la Mata, FJ; Gómez, Rafael; Maly, Marek; Muñoz-Fernández, Mª Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Topical microbicides to stop sexually transmitted diseases, such as herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), are urgently needed. The emerging field of nanotechnology offers novel suitable tools for addressing this challenge. Our objective was to study, in vitro and in vivo, antiherpetic effect and antiviral mechanisms of several polyanionic carbosilane dendrimers with anti-HIV-1 activity to establish new potential microbicide candidates against sexually transmitted diseases. Plaque reduction assay on Vero cells proved that G2-S16, G1-S4, and G3-S16 are the dendrimers with the highest inhibitory response against HSV-2 infection. We also demonstrated that our dendrimers inhibit viral infection at the first steps of HSV-2 lifecycle: binding/entry-mediated events. G1-S4 and G3-S16 bind directly on the HSV-2, inactivating it, whereas G2-S16 adheres to host cell-surface proteins. Molecular modeling showed that G1-S4 binds better at binding sites on gB surface than G2-S16. Significantly better binding properties of G1-S4 than G2-S16 were found in an important position for affecting transition of gB trimer from G1-S4 prefusion to final postfusion state and in several positions where G1-S4 could interfere with gB/gH–gL interaction. We demonstrated that these polyanionic carbosilan dendrimers have a synergistic activity with acyclovir and tenofovir against HSV-2, in vitro. Topical vaginal or rectal administration of G1-S4 or G2-S16 prevents HSV-2 transmission in BALB/c mice in values close to 100%. This research represents the first demonstration that transmission of HSV-2 can be blocked by vaginal/rectal application of G1-S4 or G2-S16, providing a step forward to prevent HSV-2 transmission in humans. PMID:27274240

  18. Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for the Complete Resection of the Rectal Remnant Mucosa in a Patient With Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Koyu; Fujita, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman underwent prophylactic subtotal colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) 18 years ago. She underwent 5 transanal endoscopic microsurgeries for rectal remnant polyps, and was referred for the treatment of rectal remnant polyp recurrence. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was performed to remove multiple polypoid lesions that circumferentially extended throughout the rectal remnant with lesions spreading onto the anastomotic site. The rectal remnant mucosa was resected in 2 pieces without complication. Specimens showed high-grade adenoma but no malignancy. Follow-up colonoscopy showed no recurrence. PMID:27144195

  19. Administrative decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reviews relevant administrative decisions that have been taken in various countries during the last semester of 1999 and the first one of 2000. In Argentina, an inter-ministerial commission has been settled to examine the prospects of completing the construction of the Atucha-2 unit. In Sweden, an agreement has been signed between Sydkraft, Vattenfall and the Swedish government on a compensation plan for the early shutdown of the Barsebaeck unit 1. In Switzerland, the government of the canton of Bern has rejected a constitutional initiative requesting the shutdown of the Muehleberg nuclear power plant. (A.C.)

  20. Automatically-generated rectal dose constraints in intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Taejin; Kim, Yong Nam; Kim, Soo Kon; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Park, Soah; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Han, Taejin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Meyeon; Kim, Kyoung-Joo; Bae, Hoonsik; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-06-01

    The dose constraint during prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization should be patient-specific for better rectum sparing. The aims of this study are to suggest a novel method for automatically generating a patient-specific dose constraint by using an experience-based dose volume histogram (DVH) of the rectum and to evaluate the potential of such a dose constraint qualitatively. The normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) of the rectum with respect to V %ratio in our study were divided into three groups, where V %ratio was defined as the percent ratio of the rectal volume overlapping the planning target volume (PTV) to the rectal volume: (1) the rectal NTCPs in the previous study (clinical data), (2) those statistically generated by using the standard normal distribution (calculated data), and (3) those generated by combining the calculated data and the clinical data (mixed data). In the calculated data, a random number whose mean value was on the fitted curve described in the clinical data and whose standard deviation was 1% was generated by using the `randn' function in the MATLAB program and was used. For each group, we validated whether the probability density function (PDF) of the rectal NTCP could be automatically generated with the density estimation method by using a Gaussian kernel. The results revealed that the rectal NTCP probability increased in proportion to V %ratio , that the predictive rectal NTCP was patient-specific, and that the starting point of IMRT optimization for the given patient might be different. The PDF of the rectal NTCP was obtained automatically for each group except that the smoothness of the probability distribution increased with increasing number of data and with increasing window width. We showed that during the prostate IMRT optimization, the patient-specific dose constraints could be automatically generated and that our method could reduce the IMRT optimization time as well as maintain the

  1. Preliminary analysis of risk factors for late rectal toxicity after helical tomotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to examine risk factors for late rectal toxicity for localized prostate cancer patients treated with helical tomotherapy (HT). The patient cohort of this retrospective study was composed of 241 patients treated with HT and followed up regularly. Toxicity levels were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading scale. The clinical and dosimetric potential factors increasing the risk of late rectal toxicity, such as age, diabetes, anticoagulants, prior abdominal surgery, prescribed dose, maximum dose of the rectum, and the percentage of the rectum covered by 70 Gy (V70), 60 Gy (V60), 40 Gy (V40) and 20 Gy (V20) were compared between ≤ Grade 1 and ≥ Grade 2 toxicity groups using the Student's t-test. Multivariable logistic regression analysis of the factors that appeared to be associated with the risk of late rectal toxicity (as determined by the Student's t-test) was performed. The median follow-up time was 35 months. Late Grade 2-3 rectal toxicity was observed in 18 patients (7.4%). Age, the maximum dose of the rectum, V70 and V60 of the ≥ Grade 2 toxicity group were significantly higher than in those of the ≤ Grade 1 toxicity group (P=0.00093, 0.048, 0.0030 and 0.0021, respectively). No factor was significant in the multivariable analysis. The result of this study indicates that the risk of late rectal toxicity correlates with the rectal volume exposed to high doses of HT for localized prostate cancer. Further follow-up and data accumulation may establish dose-volume modeling to predict rectal complications after HT. (author)

  2. Investigation of rectal complication after RALS-therapy for uterine cervix cancer using multivariate analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rectal injury is one of the major side effects after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix. According to our previous reports, the cases of rectal complication were mainly related to the measured rectal dose in half of patients, and the other causes were related to the following factors; such as diabetes mellitus, hemorrhagic tendency, syphilis and so on. Concerning to rectal complication, these factors were investigated by means of the discriminant analysis, one of the multivariate analyses, in this paper. Twenty-eight factors as to radiation dose, laboratory tests and physical condition of patients were analyzed. From August 1978 through January 1980, 52 cases of previously untreated carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated using RALS, remotely controlled high dose rate intracavitary radiotherapy, at our department. The data from 49 out of 52 cases were available for the discriminant analysis. By m eans of this analysis, it was found that these factors, such as the dose of whole pelvic irradiation, Point A dose of RALS, measured rectal dose by RALS, WGC-Z and TPHA were important factors for occurence of rectal complication. According to the discriminant score, 46 out of 49 cases (94 %) could be correctly discriminated. There were two cases of false positive and one false negative. Form February 1980 through July 1980, 27 cases of previously untreated carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated at our department. The obtained discriminant function was applied to these 27 cases, and 24 out of 27 cases (89 %) were correctly predicted. There were two cases of false positive, and one of false negative. Discriminant analysis is useful for the prediction of rectal complication after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix. (J.P.N.)

  3. Drug Combinations in Preoperative Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Carvalho, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    Preoperative radiotherapy has an accepted role in reducing the risk of local recurrence in locally advanced resectable rectal cancer, particularly when the circumferential resection margin is breached or threatened, according to magnetic resonance imaging. Fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiation can obtain a significant down-sizing response and a curative resection can then be achieved. Approximately, 20% of the patients can also obtain a pathological complete response, which is associated with less local recurrences and increased survival. Patients who achieve a sustained complete clinical response may also avoid radical surgery. In unresectable or borderline resectable tumors, around 20% of the patients still fail to achieve a sufficient down-staging response with the current chemoradiation schedules. Hence, investigators have aspired to increase pathological complete response rates, aiming to improve curative resection rates, enhance survival, and potentially avoid mutilating surgery. However, adding additional cytotoxic or biological agents have not produced dramatic improvements in outcome and often led to excess surgical morbidity and higher levels of acute toxicity, which effects on compliance and in the global efficacy of chemoradiation. PMID:27238473

  4. Hypoxia expression in radiation-induced late rectal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor hypoxia and angiogenesis have been studied extensively. However, the relation between normal tissue injury and hypoxia is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of hypoxia on radiation-induced late rectal injury in mice. The rectum of C57BL/6N mice was irradiated locally with a single dose of 25 Gy and the following experiments were performed including hematoxylin-eosin (H.E.) staining, azan staining, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Radiation-induced fibrotic changes were observed from 14 days and reached the peak 30 days after irradiation. The expression of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and endothelial cell marker CD31 increased significantly with the formation of fibrosis induced by irradiation compared with unirradiated control. In addition, the maximum expression of TGF-β1, HIF-1α and VEGF was found at 14, 30 and 90 days after irradiation, respectively. The temporal changes of cytokines were consistent with the dynamic change of fibrosis. Our data suggests that late normal tissue injury involved various cytokines including hypoxia-induced angiogenic cytokines. These results may have important implications in the understanding of radiation-induced late normal tissue injury. (author)

  5. The endo-rectal probe prototype for the TOPEM project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musico, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    The TOPEM project was funded by INFN with the aim of studying the design of a TOF-PET system dedicated to prostate imaging. During last year a big effort was put into building the prototype of the endo-rectal probe from all point of view: mechanical, thermal, electrical. A dedicated integrated circuit was adopted to have the minimum dimensions: the TOFPET ASIC. The system is composed by a LYSO pixellated crystal which is seen by a 128 SiPM matrix on both surfaces: this permits Depth Of Interaction (DOI) measurement. The 4 needed ASICs are handled by a FPGA board which transmits the acquired data over an UDP connection. The external container was made using 3-D printing technology: internal channels on the external surface permit the flowing of controlled temperature (≈35 °C) water. Electronic components power is dissipated using an internal air flow kept at lower temperature (≈20 °C). The probe is MR compatible: a dedicated small antenna can be accommodated in the container. This will permit simultaneous imaging in MRI and PET systems.

  6. Postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy for rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postoperative combined modality therapy with radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil (5FU) chemotherapy is an effective adjuvant approach that reduces locoregional and distant metastatic disease in patients with high-risk rectal carcinoma. However, this approach results in a treatment regimen of at least 6 months' duration. The present prospective study investigates the integration of radiotherapy and 5FU chemotherapy in a protocol designed to minimize toxicity and reduce the overall treatment time. A total of 40 patients with TNM stage 11 or 111 disease receives postoperative radiotherapy at four fractions per week with weekly 5FU bolus injections delivered on the fifth non radiotherapy day. Patients also received systemic chemotherapy with leucovorin both before and after pelvic irradiation, with the total treatment duration extending for only 18 weeks. Patients were able to complete radiotherapy in 90% of cases, while the delivery of full-dose chemotherapy was achievable in the vast majority. The incidence of haematologic and gastrointestinal toxicities requiring the cessation of treatment was acceptable. With a median follow-up of 20.9 months among surviving patients, the estimated progression-free and overall survival at 2 years were 71% and 79%, respectively. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  7. Framework for 3D TransRectal Ultrasound

    CERN Document Server

    Mozer, Pierre; Chevreau, G; Daanen, Vincent; Moreau-Gaudry, Alexandre; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2008-01-01

    Prostate biopsies are mainly performed under 2D TransRectal UltraSound (TRUS) control by sampling the prostate according to a predefined pattern. In case of first biopsies, this pattern follows a random systematic plan. Sometimes, repeat biopsies can be needed to target regions unsampled by previous biopsies or resample critical regions (for example in case of cancer expectant management or previous prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia findings). From a clinical point of view, it could be useful to control the 3D spatial distribution of theses biopsies inside the prostate. Modern 3D-TRUS probes allow acquiring high-quality volumes of the prostate in few seconds. We developed a framework to track the prostate in 3D TRUS images. It means that if one acquires a reference volume at the beginning of the session and another during each biopsy, it is possible to determine the relationship between the prostate in the reference and the others volumes by aligning images. We used this tool to evaluate the ability of a si...

  8. Antipyretic therapy. Comparison of rectal and oral paracetamol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keinänen, S; Hietula, M; Similä, S; Kouvalainen, K

    1977-08-17

    The absorption of paracetamol from syrup, tablet and two different suppository bases was compared in six adult volunteers using urinary excretion measurements. The total amount of paracetamol and its metabolites excreted and the peak excretion rates were lower from the suppository bases than from the oral dosage forms. Absorption was a little better from a polyethylene glycol suppository base than from a triglyceride base. The antipyretic efficacy of a paracetamol syrup and suppository at a dose of 10 mg/kg was compared in 30 children between the age of 4 months and 12 years, who had infections and a rectal temperature above 38.5 degrees C. Both dosage forms produced a significant decrease in temperature, the greatest fall being about 2 hours earlier with the oral dosage form. The syrup also seemed to be significantly (p less than 0.05) more effective (maximum fall of temperature 1.58 degrees C) in reducing fever than the suppository, which produced its greatest fall of temperature (1.24 degrees C) six hours after insertion of the suppository. From the practical point of view both forms can be regarded as safe and effective antipyretics. PMID:332506

  9. The Role of Postoperative Pelvic Radiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Yong Chan; Kim, Jae Sung; Yun, Hyong Geun; Ha, Sung Whan; Park, Charn Il [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-06-15

    To evaluate the role of postoperative pelvic radiation therapy in rectal cancer, a retrospective analysis was done on 189 patients with modified Astler-Coller stages B2+3, C1, and C2+3 who were treated from February 1979 to June 1986. Forty-seven patients were staged as B2+3, 17 as C1, and 125 as C2+3. As a curative resection, 41 received low anterior resection, 143 received abdomino-perineal resection, and five received pelvic exenteration. The survival and disease-free survival rates of the total patients at five year were 45.3% and 44.1%, respectively. The stage was an important prognostic factor for survival and disease-free survival: the survival rates at five year were 55.7% in B2+3, 65.7% in C1, and 36.4% in C2+3, respectively (p<0.01). The liver was the most frequently involved organ of recurrence followed by the lung and the perineum. The patients who received low anterior resection achieved better disease-free survival but were more prone to late radiation bowel morbidities than those who received abdominoperineal resection. Postoperative pelvic radiation therapy proved to be effective in locoregional disease control but did not prevent the appearance of distant metastasis, which was of major concern in advanced stages. Patterns of treatment failure, and factors relating to radiation morbidity are discussed, and therapeutic options for better results are proposed.

  10. The Role of Postoperative Pelvic Radiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the role of postoperative pelvic radiation therapy in rectal cancer, a retrospective analysis was done on 189 patients with modified Astler-Coller stages B2+3, C1, and C2+3 who were treated from February 1979 to June 1986. Forty-seven patients were staged as B2+3, 17 as C1, and 125 as C2+3. As a curative resection, 41 received low anterior resection, 143 received abdomino-perineal resection, and five received pelvic exenteration. The survival and disease-free survival rates of the total patients at five year were 45.3% and 44.1%, respectively. The stage was an important prognostic factor for survival and disease-free survival: the survival rates at five year were 55.7% in B2+3, 65.7% in C1, and 36.4% in C2+3, respectively (p<0.01). The liver was the most frequently involved organ of recurrence followed by the lung and the perineum. The patients who received low anterior resection achieved better disease-free survival but were more prone to late radiation bowel morbidities than those who received abdominoperineal resection. Postoperative pelvic radiation therapy proved to be effective in locoregional disease control but did not prevent the appearance of distant metastasis, which was of major concern in advanced stages. Patterns of treatment failure, and factors relating to radiation morbidity are discussed, and therapeutic options for better results are proposed

  11. Biomarkers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) is currently treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Although approximately 45% of patients respond to neoadjuvant therapy with T-level downstaging, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond. Molecular biomarkers have been investigated for their ability to predict outcome in LARC treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation. A literature search using PubMed resulted in the initial assessment of 1,204 articles. Articles addressing the ability of a biomarker to predict outcome for LARC treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation were included. Six biomarkers met the criteria for review: p53, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), thymidylate synthase, Ki-67, p21, and bcl-2/bax. On the basis of composite data, p53 is unlikely to have utility as a predictor of response. Epidermal growth factor receptor has shown promise as a predictor when quantitatively evaluated in pretreatment biopsies or when EGFR polymorphisms are evaluated in germline DNA. Thymidylate synthase, when evaluated for polymorphisms in germline DNA, is promising as a predictive biomarker. Ki-67 and bcl-2 are not useful in predicting outcome. p21 needs to be further evaluated to determine its usefulness in predicting outcome. Bax requires more investigation to determine its usefulness. Epidermal growth factor receptor, thymidylate synthase, and p21 should be evaluated in larger prospective clinical trials for their ability to guide preoperative therapy choices in LARC.

  12. Two cases of rectal cancer accompanied with radiation colitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents two cases of rectal cancer accompanied with radiation colitis. Case 1 was a 53-year-old woman, who had a history of undergoing radiation therapy for a uterine cervical cancer 11 years before. She was seen at the hospital because of constipation and pointed out a IIa-like lesion on the rectum by colonoscopy. Abdominoperineal resection was performed. The surgical specimen showed the IIa-like lesion on the rectum. Pathological findings revealed well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical staining of p53 showed positive cells in atrophic glands. Case 2 was a 62-year-old woman complaining of diarrhea. There was a previous history of receiving radiation therapy for a uterine cancer 20 years before. Colonoscopy showed a Borrmann type 2 cancer on the rectum. Abdominoperineal resection was performed. Histological findings revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma invading to the propria muscle. The features of radiation colitis were observed around the cancer in the two cases which provided a clue to diagnose the lesions with radiation-induced cancer. (author)

  13. Quality of life after surgery for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavaruzzi, Teresa; Giandomenico, Francesca; Del Bianco, Paola; Lotto, Lorella; Perin, Alessandro; Pucciarelli, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Patients' health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is now considered a relevant clinical outcome. This study systematically reviewed articles published in the last 5 years, focusing on the impact of rectal cancer treatment on patients' HRQoL. Of the 477 articles retrieved, 56 met the inclusion criteria. The most frequently reported comparisons were between surgical procedures (21 articles), especially between sphincter-preserving and non-sphincter preserving surgery or between stoma and stoma-free patients (13 articles), and between multimodality therapies (11 articles). Additionally, twelve articles compared patients' and healthy controls' HRQoL as primary or secondary aim. The majority of the studies were observational (84 %), controlled (66 %), cross-sectional (54 %), prospective (100 %), with a sample of more than 100 patients (59 %), and with more than 60 % of patients treated with neoadjuvant therapy (50 %). The most frequently used instruments were the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 (QLQ-C30), its colorectal cancer specific module QLQ-CR38, and the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36 items questionnaire. Findings from the included articles are summarised and commented, with a special focus on the comparison between surgical treatments, between irradiated and not-irradiated patients, and between patients and the general population. PMID:25103003

  14. Development of HIV-1 rectal-specific microbicides and colonic tissue evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezzutti, Charlene S; Russo, Julie; Wang, Lin; Abebe, Kaleab Z; Li, Jie; Friend, David R; McGowan, Ian M; Rohan, Lisa C

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is structurally and functionally different from the vagina. Thus, the paradigm of topical microbicide development and evaluation has evolved to include rectal microbicides (RMs). Our interest was to create unique RM formulations to safely and effectively deliver antiretroviral drugs to mucosal tissue. RMs were designed to include those that spread and coat all surfaces of the rectum and distal colon rapidly (liquid) and those that create a deformable, erodible barrier and remain localized at the administration site (gel). Tenofovir (TFV) (1%) was formulated as an aqueous thermoreversible fluid and a carbopol-based aqueous hydrogel. Lipid-based liquid and gel formulations were prepared for UC781 (0.1%) using isopropyl myristate and GTCC (Caprylic/Capric Triglycerides), respectively. Formulations were characterized for pH, viscosity, osmolality, and drug content. Pre-clinical testing incorporated ex vivo colonic tissue obtained through surgical resections and flexible sigmoidoscopy (flex sig). As this was the first time using tissue from both sources side-by-side, the ability to replicate HIV-1 was compared. Efficacy of the RM formulations was tested by applying the products with HIV-1 directly to polarized colonic tissue and following viral replication. Safety of the formulations was determined by MTT assay and histology. All products had a neutral pH and were isoosmolar. While HIV-1BaL and HIV-1JR-CSF alone and in the presence of semen had similar replication trends between surgically resected and flex sig tissues, the magnitude of viral replication was significantly better in flex sig tissues. Both TFV and UC781 formulations protected the colonic tissue, regardless of tissue source, from HIV-1 and retained tissue viability and architecture. Our in vitro and ex vivo results show successful formulation of unique RMs. Moreover, the results of flex sig and surgically resected tissues were comparable suggesting the incorporation of both in

  15. Development of HIV-1 rectal-specific microbicides and colonic tissue evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene S Dezzutti

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal tract is structurally and functionally different from the vagina. Thus, the paradigm of topical microbicide development and evaluation has evolved to include rectal microbicides (RMs. Our interest was to create unique RM formulations to safely and effectively deliver antiretroviral drugs to mucosal tissue. RMs were designed to include those that spread and coat all surfaces of the rectum and distal colon rapidly (liquid and those that create a deformable, erodible barrier and remain localized at the administration site (gel. Tenofovir (TFV (1% was formulated as an aqueous thermoreversible fluid and a carbopol-based aqueous hydrogel. Lipid-based liquid and gel formulations were prepared for UC781 (0.1% using isopropyl myristate and GTCC (Caprylic/Capric Triglycerides, respectively. Formulations were characterized for pH, viscosity, osmolality, and drug content. Pre-clinical testing incorporated ex vivo colonic tissue obtained through surgical resections and flexible sigmoidoscopy (flex sig. As this was the first time using tissue from both sources side-by-side, the ability to replicate HIV-1 was compared. Efficacy of the RM formulations was tested by applying the products with HIV-1 directly to polarized colonic tissue and following viral replication. Safety of the formulations was determined by MTT assay and histology. All products had a neutral pH and were isoosmolar. While HIV-1BaL and HIV-1JR-CSF alone and in the presence of semen had similar replication trends between surgically resected and flex sig tissues, the magnitude of viral replication was significantly better in flex sig tissues. Both TFV and UC781 formulations protected the colonic tissue, regardless of tissue source, from HIV-1 and retained tissue viability and architecture. Our in vitro and ex vivo results show successful formulation of unique RMs. Moreover, the results of flex sig and surgically resected tissues were comparable suggesting the incorporation

  16. Endoscopic findings of rectal mucosal damage after pelvic radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma: correlation of rectal mucosal damage with radiation dose and clinical symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Gyu; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    To describe chronic rectal mucosal damage after pelvic radiotherapy (RT) for cervical cancer and correlate these findings with clinical symptoms and radiation dose. Thirty-two patients who underwent pelvic RT were diagnosed with radiation-induced proctitis based on endoscopy findings. The median follow-up period was 35 months after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and intracavitary radiotherapy (ICR). The Vienna Rectoscopy Score (VRS) was used to describe the endoscopic findings and compared to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) morbidity score and the dosimetric parameters of RT (the ratio of rectal dose calculated at the rectal point [RP] to the prescribed dose, biologically effective dose [BED] at the RP in the ICR and EBRT plans, {alpha}/{beta} = 3). Rectal symptoms were noted in 28 patients (rectal bleeding in 21 patients, bowel habit changes in 6, mucosal stools in 1), and 4 patients had no symptoms. Endoscopic findings included telangiectasia in 18 patients, congested mucosa in 20, ulceration in 5, and stricture in 1. The RP ratio, BEDICR, BEDICR+EBRT was significantly associated with the VRS (RP ratio, median 76.5%; BEDICR, median 37.1 Gy3; BEDICR+EBRT, median 102.5 Gy3; p < 0.001). The VRS was significantly associated with the EORTC/RTOG score (p = 0.038). The most prevalent endoscopic findings of RT-induced proctitis were telangiectasia and congested mucosa. The VRS was significantly associated with the EORTC/RTOG score and RP radiation dose.

  17. Administrative building

    OpenAIRE

    Vokatá, Kateřina

    2015-01-01

    The task of my master´s thesis was to work up a project and a check of a bearing steel construction the multi-storey office building with a garage in Brno. The building is composed of five storey office section and two storey of garage. Ground dimension of administrative part is 38,8m x 35m with distance of pillars 7m,6m and 6,4m. The structural height of floor is 3,5m.Garage is designed with dimensions 36m x 24,8m with structural height of floor 3,5m. Distance of pillars is 5,6m, 6,4m and 7,...

  18. ADMINISTRATIVE CIRCULARS

    CERN Multimedia

    Division des ressources humaines

    2000-01-01

    N° 2 (Rev. 1) - March 2000Guidelines and procedures concerning recruitment and probation period of staff membersN° 9 (Rev. 2) - March 2000Staff members contractsN° 16 (Rev. 2) - January 2000TrainingN° 30 (Rev. 1) - January 2000Indemnities and reimbursements upon taking up appointment and termination of contractN° 32 - February 2000Principles and procedures governing complaints of harassmentThese circular have been amended (No 2, N° 9, N° 16 and N° 30) or drawn up (N° 32).Copies are available in the Divisional Secretariats.Note:\tAdministrative and operational circulars, as well as the lists of those in force, are available for consultation in the server SRV4_Home in the Appletalk zone NOVELL (as GUEST or using your Novell username and password), volume PE Division Data Disk.The Word files are available in the folder COM, folder Public, folder ADM.CIRC.docHuman Resources DivisionTel. 74128

  19. Late rectal toxicity: dose-volume effects of conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric, anatomic, and clinical factors that correlate with late rectal toxicity after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the dose-volume histograms and clinical records of 163 Stage T1b-T3c prostate cancer patients treated between 1992 and 1999 with 3D-CRT, to a total isocenter dose of 74-78 Gy at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The median follow-up was 62 months (range 24-102). All late rectal complications were scored using modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force criteria. The 6-year toxicity rate was assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis and the log-rank test. A univariate proportional hazards regression model was used to test the correlation between Grade 2 or higher toxicity and the dosimetric, anatomic, and clinical factors. In a multivariate regression model, clinical factors were added to the dosimetric and anatomic variables to determine whether they significantly altered the risk of developing late toxicity. Results: At 6 years, the rate of developing Grade 2 or higher late rectal toxicity was 25%. A significant volume effect was observed at rectal doses of 60, 70, 75.6, and 78 Gy, and the risk of developing rectal complications increased exponentially as greater volumes were irradiated. Although the percentage of rectal volume treated correlated significantly with the incidence of rectal complications at all dose levels (p3 of the rectum. Of the clinical variables tested, only a history of hemorrhoids correlated with rectal toxicity (p=0.003). Multivariate analysis showed that the addition of hemorrhoids increased the risk of toxicity for each dosimetric variable found to be significant on univariate analysis (p<0.05 for all comparisons). Conclusion: Dose-volume histogram analyses clearly indicated a volume effect on the probability of developing late rectal complications

  20. Comparison of methods for calculating rectal dose after 125I prostate brachytherapy implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare several different methods of calculating the rectal dose and examine how accurately they represent rectal dose surface area measurements and, also, their practicality for routine use. Methods and Materials: This study comprised 55 patients, randomly selected from 295 prostate brachytherapy patients implanted at the Vancouver Cancer Center between 1998 and 2000. All implants used a nonuniform loading of 0.33 mCi (NIST-99) 125I seeds and a prescribed dose of 144 Gy. Pelvic CT scans were obtained for each patient ∼30 days after implantation. For the purposes of calculating the rectal dose, several structures were contoured on the CT images: (1) a 1-mm-thick anterior rectal wall, (2) the anterior half rectum, and (3) the whole rectum. Point doses were also obtained along the anterior rectal surface. The thin wall contour provided a surrogate for a dose-surface histogram (DSH) and was our reference standard rectal dose measurement. Alternate rectal dose measurements (volume, surface area, and length of rectum receiving a dose of interest [DOI] of ≥144 Gy and 216 Gy, as well as point dose measures) were calculated using several methods (VariSeed software) and compared with the surrogate DSH measure (SADOI). Results: The best correlation with SA144Gy was the dose volumes (whole or anterior half rectum) (R = 0.949). The length of rectum receiving ≥144 Gy also correlated well with SA144Gy (R ≥0.898). Point dose measures, such as the average and maximal anterior dose, correlated poorly with SA144Gy (R ≤0.649). The 216-Gy measurements supported these results. In addition, dose-volume measurements were the most practical (∼6 min/patient), with our surrogate DSH the least practical (∼20 min/patient). Conclusion: Dose-volume measurements for the whole or anterior half rectum, because they were the most practical measures and best represented the DSH measurements, should be considered a standard method of reporting the rectal dose when

  1. Ovarian cycle approach by rectal temperature and fecal progesterone in a female killer whale, Orcinus orca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuda, Satoshi; Kakizoe, Yuka; Kanda, Koji; Sengoku, Tomoko; Fukumoto, Yohei; Adachi, Itsuki; Watanabe, Yoko; Doi, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to validate the measurements of body temperature and fecal progesterone concentrations as minimally invasive techniques for assessing ovarian cycle in a single sexually mature female killer whale. Rectal temperature data, fecal and blood samples were collected in the dorsal position using routine husbandry training on a voluntary basis. The correlations between rectal temperature and plasma progesterone concentration and between fecal and plasma progesterone concentrations were investigated. Fecal progesterone metabolites were identified by a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and enzyme immunoassay. Plasma progesterone concentrations (range: 0.2-18.6 ng/ml) and rectal temperature (range: 35.3-35.9°C) changed cyclically, and cycle lengths were an average (±SD) of 44.9±4.0 days (nine cycles) and 44.6±5.9 days (nine cycles), respectively. Rectal temperature positively correlated with the plasma progesterone concentrations (r=0.641, P<0.01). There was a visual trend for fecal progesterone profiles to be similar to circulating plasma progesterone profiles. Fecal immunoreactive progestagen analysis resulted in a marked immunoreactive peak of progesterone. The data from the single killer whale indicate that the measurement of rectal temperature is suitable for minimally invasive assessment of the estrous cycle and monitoring the fecal progesterone concentration is useful to assess ovarian luteal activity. PMID:20648568

  2. Oncologic outcomes of primary and post-irradiated early stage rectal cancer: A retrospective cohort study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang—ZhengDu; Yong—ChunChen; YongCai; Wei—ChengXue.; JinGU

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the oncologic outcomes of primary and post-irradiated early stage rectal cancer and the effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer patients. METHODS: Eighty-four patients with stage Ⅰ rectal cancer after radical surgery were studied retrospectively and divided into ypstage Ⅰ group (n = 45) and pstage Ⅰ group (n = 39), according to their preoperative radiation, and compared by univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: The median follow-up time of patients was 70 mo. No significant difference was observed in diseaseprogression between the two groups. The 5-year disease-free survival rate was 84.4% and 92.3%, respectively (P = 0.327) and the 5-year overall survival rate was 88.9% and 92.3%, respectively, for the two groups (P = 0.692). The disease progression was not significantly associated with the pretreatment clinical stage in ypstage Ⅰ group. The 5-year disease progression rate was 10.5% and 19.2%, respectively, for the patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy and for those who rejected chemotherapy in the ypstage Ⅰ group (P = 0.681). CONCLUSION: The oncologic outcomes of primary and post-irradiated early stage rectal cancer are similar. Patients with ypstage Ⅰ rectal cancer may slightly benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy.

  3. Endoscopically observable white nodule caused by distal intramural lymphatic spread of rectal cancer: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsumura Ayako

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This report describes a case of rectal cancer with endoscopically observable white nodules caused by distal intramural lymphatic spread. A 57-year-old female presented to our hospital with frequent diarrhea and hemorrhoids. Computed tomography showed bilateral ovarian masses and three hepatic tumors diagnosed as rectal cancer metastases, and also showed multiple lymph node involvement. The patient was preoperatively diagnosed with stage IV rectal cancer. Colonoscopy demonstrated that primary rectal cancer existed 15 cm from the anal verge and that there were multiple white small nodules on the anal side of the primary tumor extending to the dentate line. Biopsies of the white spots were performed, and they were identified as adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent Hartmann’s procedure because of the locally advanced primary tumor. The white nodules were ultimately diagnosed as being caused by intramural lymphatic spreading because lymphatic permeation was strongly positive at the surrounding area. Small white nodules near a primary rectal cancer should be suspected of being intramural spreading. Endoscopic detection of white nodules may be useful for the diagnosis of distal intramural spread.

  4. Current status of laparoscopic and robotic ventral mesh rectopexy for external and internal rectal prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Iersel, Jan J; Paulides, Tim J C; Verheijen, Paul M; Lumley, John W; Broeders, Ivo A M J; Consten, Esther C J

    2016-06-01

    External and internal rectal prolapse with their affiliated rectocele and enterocele, are associated with debilitating symptoms such as obstructed defecation, pelvic pain and faecal incontinence. Since perineal procedures are associated with a higher recurrence rate, an abdominal approach is commonly preferred. Despite the description of greater than three hundred different procedures, thus far no clear superiority of one surgical technique has been demonstrated. Ventral mesh rectopexy (VMR) is a relatively new and promising technique to correct rectal prolapse. In contrast to the abdominal procedures of past decades, VMR avoids posterolateral rectal mobilisation and thereby minimizes the risk of postoperative constipation. Because of a perceived acceptable recurrence rate, good functional results and low mesh-related morbidity in the short to medium term, VMR has been popularized in the past decade. Laparoscopic or robotic-assisted VMR is now being progressively performed internationally and several articles and guidelines propose the procedure as the treatment of choice for rectal prolapse. In this article, an outline of the current status of laparoscopic and robotic ventral mesh rectopexy for the treatment of internal and external rectal prolapse is presented. PMID:27275090

  5. Local recurrence after curative resection for rectal carcinoma: The role of surgical resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jung-A; Huh, Jung Wook; Kim, Hee Cheol; Park, Yoon Ah; Cho, Yong Beom; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Woo Yong; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2016-07-01

    Local recurrence of rectal cancer is difficult to treat, may cause severe and disabling symptoms, and usually has a fatal outcome. The aim of this study was to document the clinical nature of locally recurrent rectal cancer and to determine the effect of surgical resection on long-term survival.A retrospective review was conducted of the prospectively collected medical records of 2485 patients with primary rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent radical resection between September 1994 and December 2008.In total, 147 (5.9%) patients exhibited local recurrence. The most common type of local recurrence was lateral recurrence, whereas anastomotic recurrence was the most common type in patients without preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Tumor location with respect to the anal verge significantly affected the local recurrence rate (P CRM (P = 0.001, RR = 12.939, 95% CI = 2.906-57.604), combined distant metastases (P = 0.001, RR = 2.086, 95% CI = 1.352-3.218), and nonsurgical resection of recurrent tumor (P < 0.001, RR = 4.865, 95% CI = 2.586-9.153).In conclusion, the clinical outcomes of local recurrence after curative resection of rectal cancer are diverse. Surgical resection of locally recurrent rectal cancer should be considered as an initial treatment, especially in patients with less advanced tumors and axial recurrence. PMID:27399067

  6. A rectal balloon catheter as internal immobilization device for conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: As known from the literature, prostate motion depends on different bladder and/or rectum fillings. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of a rectum balloon catheter, used as an internal immobilization device, on prostate and rectum motion during the treatment course. Moreover we have analysed if the balloon enables an increase of the distance between the prostate and the posterior rectum wall. Results: An increase of the distance between the prostate and the posterior rectal wall of 8 mm was observed at the base of the prostate when using the rectum balloon. Moreover prostate motion in the ventrodorsal direction ≥4 mm (1 SD) was reduced from 6/10 patients (60%) to 1/10 patients (10%) using the rectal balloon. In general, deviations in the latero-lateral and cranio-caudal directions were less (mean ≤ 2 mm, 1 SD), no difference between both examination series (with and without balloon) was observed. Conclusion: Rectal balloon catheter offers a possibility to reduce prostate motion and rectum filling variations during treatment course. In addition it enables an increase in the distance between prostate and posterior rectal wall, which could enable an improved protection of the posterior rectal wall. (orig./AJ)

  7. Assessment of rectal distention in radiotherapy of prostate cancer using daily megavoltage CT image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Assessment of rectal distention in a group of patients who are not receiving daily rectum emptying procedures during a course of prostate cancer radiotherapy to investigate which patients could benefit from daily rectum emptying. Methods and materials: Eighteen patients underwent daily megavoltage CT (MVCT) scanning with positioning based on bony anatomy. Emptying the rectum was only performed before planning CT and not during the actual treatment. The rectal average cross-sectional area (CSA) was determined on the MVCTs. The relative CSA (CSArel) was defined as CSA on MVCT / CSA on planning CT. Additional prostate soft tissue matching was performed to verify the influence of rectal distention on prostate motion. Results: Two distinct subgroups could be defined a posteriori. One group had a limited and stable rectal distention with a CSA (mean ± SD) of 6.6 ± 2.1 cm2, in contrast with a second group with large and variable rectal filling with a CSA of 9.5 ± 3.7 cm2 (p rel of 1.35 of the first 3 days as cut-off value allowed for a correct a priori classification of 90% and 85% of the patients from groups 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusion: Based on a few measurements of the CSA by daily MVCT imaging at the first days of treatment, rectum emptying may be omitted in part of the patients

  8. Anorectal function and outcomes after transanal minimally invasive surgery for rectal tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feza Y Karakayali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transanal endoscopic microsurgery is a minimally invasive technique that allows full-thickness resection and suture closure of the defect for large rectal adenomas, selected low-risk rectal cancers, or small cancers in patients who have a high risk for major surgery. Our aim, in the given prospective study was to report our initial clinical experience with TAMIS, and to evaluate its effects on postoperative anorectal functions. Materials and Methods: In 10 patients treated with TAMIS for benign and malignant rectal tumors, preoperative and postoperative anorectal function was evaluated with anorectal manometry and Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score. Results: The mean distance of the tumors from the anal verge was 5.6 cm, and mean tumor diameter was 2.6 cm. All resection margins were tumor free. There was no difference in preoperative and 3-week postoperative anorectalmanometry findings; only mean minimum rectal sensory volume was lower at 3 weeks after surgery. The Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score was normal in all patients except one which resolved by 6 weeks after surgery.The mean postoperative follow-up was 28 weeks without any recurrences. Conclusion: Transanal minimally invasive surgery is a safe and effective procedure for treatment of rectal tumors and can be performed without impairing anorectal functions.

  9. Quantitative analysis of rectal cancer by spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To quantify OCT images of rectal tissue for clinic diagnosis, the scattering coefficient of the tissue is extracted by curve fitting the OCT signals to a confocal single model. A total of 1000 measurements (half and half of normal and malignant tissues) were obtained from 16 recta. The normal rectal tissue has a larger scattering coefficient ranging from 1.09 to 5.41 mm−1 with a mean value of 2.29 mm−1 (std:±0.32), while the malignant group shows lower scattering property and the values ranging from 0.25 to 2.69 mm−1 with a mean value of 1.41 mm−1 (std:±0.18). The peri-cancer of recta has also been investigated to distinguish the difference between normal and malignant rectal tissue. The results demonstrate that the quantitative analysis of the rectal tissue can be used as a promising diagnostic criterion of early rectal cancer, which has great value for clinical medical applications. (paper)

  10. Chloride secretagogues stimulate inositol phosphate formation in shark rectal gland tubules cultured in suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecay, T.W.; Valentich, J.D. (Univ. of Texas Medical School, Houston (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Neuroendocrine activation of transepithelial chloride secretion by shark rectal gland cells is associated with increases in cellular cAMP, cGMP, and free calcium concentrations. We report here on the effects of several chloride secretagogues on inositol phosphate formation in cultured rectal gland tubules. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), atriopeptin (AP), and ionomycin increase the total inositol phosphate levels of cultured tubules, as measured by ion exchange chromatography. Forskolin, a potent chloride secretagogue, has no effect on inositol phosphate formation. The uptake of {sup 3}H-myo-inositol into phospholipids is very slow, preventing the detection of increased levels of inositol trisphosphate. However, significant increases in inositol monophosphate (IP1) and inositol biphosphate (IP2) were measured. The time course of VIP- and AP-stimulated IP1 and IP2 formation is similar to the effects of these agents on the short-circuit current responses of rectal gland monolayer cultures. In addition, aluminum fluoride, an artificial activator of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, stimulates IP1 and IP2 formation. We conclude that rectal gland cells contain VIP and AP receptors coupled to the activation of phospholipase C. Coupling may be mediated by G-proteins. Receptor-stimulated increases in inositol phospholipid metabolism is one mechanism leading to increased intracellular free calcium concentrations, an important regulatory event in the activation of transepithelial chloride secretion by shark rectal gland epithelial cells.

  11. Late rectal symptoms and quality of life after conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: This study was carried out in order to analyze the prevalence of late rectal and anal symptoms after conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer and to assess their association with quality of life. Patients and methods: Two-hundred and forty nine patients were interviewed at 24-111 months after definitive conformal radiation therapy of localized prostate cancer with a median dose of 70 Gy. Rectal symptoms and fecal incontinence were evaluated with standardized questionnaires. Quality of life was assessed with the EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire-C30 and the prostate cancer module PR25. Results: Rectal symptoms were mostly intermittent. Daily symptoms occurred in ≤5% of the patients. Incontinence was mostly mild with only 3% of the patients reporting daily incontinence episodes. Quality of life was comparable to that of the male German general population except that cognitive functioning and diarrhea were worse in the study population and pain was worse in the reference population. Global quality of life was associated with fecal incontinence, fecal urge, tenesmus, therapy for rectal symptoms and hormonal therapy for biochemical/clinical recurrence. Conclusions: Rectal symptoms and fecal incontinence after conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer are mostly intermittent. Fecal incontinence, fecal urge and tenesmus are associated with lower global quality of life levels

  12. Sphincter preservation in distal CT2N0 rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is usually not indicated for cT2N0 rectal cancer. Abdominoperineal resection is the standard treatment for distal rectal tumors. The aim of the study was to evaluate the actual sphincter-preservation rate in patients with distal cT2N0 rectal cancer given neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Data were retrospectively collected for all patients who were diagnosed with distal cT2N0 rectal cancer at a tertiary medical center in 2000–2008 and received chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery (5–7 weeks later). Thirty-three patients (22 male) of median age 65 years (range, 32–88) were identified. Tumor distance from the anal verge ranged from 0 to 5 cm. R0 resection with sphincter preservation was accomplished in 22 patients (66%), with a 22% pathological complete response rate. Median follow-up time was 62 months (range 7–120). There were no local failures. Crude disease-free and overall survival were 82% and 86%, respectively. Factors associated with sphincter preservation were tumor location (OR = 0.58, p = 0.02, 95% CI = 0.37-0.91) and pathological downstaging (OR = 7.8, p = 0.02, 95% CI = 1.35-45.85). Chemoradiotherapy was well tolerated. High rates of sphincter preservation can be achieved after preoperative chemoradiotherapy for distal cT2N0 rectal cancer, with tolerable toxicity, without compromising oncological outcome

  13. Livin expression is an independent factor in rectal cancer patients with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was aimed to investigate the expression significance of Livin in relation to radiotherapy (RT), clinicopathological and biological factors of rectal cancer patients. This study included 144 primary rectal cancer patients who participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Tissue microarray samples from the excised primary rectal cancers, normal mucosa and lymph node metastases were immunostained with Livin antibody. The proliferation of colon cancer cell lines SW620 and RKO was assayed after Livin knock-down. The expression of Livin was significantly increased from adjacent (P = 0.051) or distant (P = 0.028) normal mucosa to primary tumors. 15.4% (2/13) and 39.7% (52/131) patients with Livin-negative and positive tumors died at 180 months after surgery, and the difference tended to be statistically significant (P = 0.091). In multivariate analyses, the difference achieved statistical significance, independent of TNM stage, local and distant recurrence, grade of differentiation, gender, and age (odds ratio = 5.09, 95% CI: 1.01-25.64, P = 0.048). The in vitro study indicated colon cancer cells with Livin knock-down exhibited decreased proliferation compared with controls after RT. The expression of Livin was was independently related to survival in rectal cancer patients, suggesting Livin as a useful prognostic factor for rectal cancer patients

  14. Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding after low anterior resection for middle rectal cancer -case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mircea Beuran; Ionut Negoi; Sorin Paun; Valentina Negoita; Bogdan Stoica; Ioan Tanase; Mihaela Vartic; Ruxandra Irina Negoi; Sorin Hostiuc

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To emphasize the value of emergency diagnostic angiography and angioembolization in massive postoperative bleeding. Methods:A case report was presented and electronic search of U.S. National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, Google Scholar, ISI Web of Knowledge, to identify original articles and reviews about the subject. Results: A 55 year-old male patient was addmited for rectal bleeding. ECOG index=2, digital rectal examination revealed the inferior pole of a middle rectal tumor. Colonoscopy exam validated the presence of a middle rectal tumor, 8 cm from the anal verge. CT scan showed rectal wall thickening up to 3 cm, that extends 9 cm proximally, whit infiltration of the perirectal fatty tissue and multiple enlarged lymph nodes up to 12 mm in dimension. There was a laparoscopic converted to open approach, with low anterior resection of the rectum and total mesorectal excision, an end to end stapled colorectal anastomosis and protective loop ileostomy. In the 5th postoperative day a massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding occured, with hypovolemic shock and a decrease in hemoglobin. Emergency angiography was performed. This revealed active bleeding from an internal iliac branch that was successfully angioembolized. Conclusions: Angiography with angioembolization is an effective tool in emergency setting, avoiding the morbidity and associated mortality of a surgical reinervention. In early postoperative hemorrhages, only a rapid clinical recognition, a personalized diagnostic workup and an agressive intervention may offer the patient the best chances for cure.

  15. Predictive Factors Study Of Rectal Bleeding Radical Radiotherapy In Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Objective: To determine clinical, para clinical or to predict dosimetric the occurrence of rectal bleeding after radical radiotherapy as primary treatment prostate cancer in patients treated at the National Cancer Institute (Inca) dimensional external beam radiation. Materials and Methods: From July 2008 to July 2011 132 patients were recruited, 86 of which met followed for 12 months. Side effect was recorded gastrointestinal track at different times of the patient with classifications RTOG / EORTC ( Radiation Therapy Oncology Group / European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer) and SOMA / LENT also used a questionnaire specifically built and tested by the Italian cooperative group. results were correlated with clinical parameters (PSA, Gleason score, clinical T, class risk, hypertension, and diabetes) and dosimetric ( treatment volume, volume rectum, total dose, maximum dose to the rectum mean dose to the rectum) to assess the correlation thereof with the occurrence of rectal bleeding. Results: In a cut to 12 months follow-up, there is a relationship between the appearance bleeding with time. The mean dose to the rectum and the initial PSA showed significance in correlation with the occurrence of rectal bleeding, with a p of 0.01 and 0.54 respectively. Conclusions: The rectal side effect is one of the major side effects both acute and chronic prostate radiotherapy in the present study has failed to demonstrate a correlation between two factors predictive identified as potentially priori significant the occurrence of rectal bleeding, as the initial PSA and the mean dose to the rectum

  16. Impact of diabetes on oncologic outcome of colorectal cancer patients: colon vs. rectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Y Jeon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate the impact of diabetes on outcomes in colorectal cancer patients and to examine whether this association varies by the location of tumor (colon vs. rectum. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study includes 4,131 stage I-III colorectal cancer patients, treated between 1995 and 2007 (12.5% diabetic, 53% colon, 47% rectal in South Korea. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to determine the prognostic influence of DM on survival endpoints. RESULTS: Colorectal cancer patients with DM had significantly worse disease-free survival (DFS [hazard ratio (HR 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.00-1.37] compared with patients without DM. When considering colon and rectal cancer independently, DM was significantly associated with worse overall survival (OS (HR: 1.46, 95% CI: 1.11-1.92, DFS (HR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.15-1.84 and recurrence-free survival (RFS (HR: 1.32, 95% CI: 0.98-1.76 in colon cancer patients. No association for OS, DFS or RFS was observed in rectal cancer patients. There was significant interaction of location of tumor (colon vs. rectal cancer with DM on OS (P = 0.009 and DFS (P = 0.007. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that DM negatively impacts survival outcomes of patients with colon cancer but not rectal cancer.

  17. Rectal cancer: the influence of tumor proliferation on response to preoperative irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Regression of rectal carcinoma after preoperative irradiation is variable, likely reflecting differences in the physical and biologic properties of these tumors. This study examines the association between the pathologic response of rectal cancer after irradiation and its pretreatment proliferative state as assayed by the activity of the proliferative dependent antigens (Ki-67, PCNA) and mitotic counts. Methods and Materials: One hundred and twenty-two patients with locally advanced rectal cancer received preoperative irradiation followed by surgery. Pretreatment tumor biopsies were scored for the extent of Ki-67 and PCNA immunostaining and the number of mitoses per 10 high-powered fields. Postirradiation surgical specimens were examined for extent of residual disease. Results: The tumors of 38 of 122 patients (31%) exhibited marked pathologic downstaging (no residual tumor or cancer confined to the rectal wall) after preoperative irradiation. Two features were associated with the likelihood of marked pathologic regression after preoperative irradiation: tumor proliferative activity and lesion size. When stratified by lesion size, marked tumor regression occurred most frequently in smaller tumors with high Ki-67, PCNA, and mitotic activity compared to larger tumors with lower Ki-67, PCNA, and mitotic activity. Intermediate downstaging rates were seen for small or large tumors with moderate Ki-67, PCNA, and mitotic activity. Conclusion: Tumor Ki-67, PCNA, and mitotic activity predicts the likelihood of response to irradiation, which may aid in formulating treatment policies for patients with rectal cancer

  18. Decreased tumor cell proliferation as an indicator of the effect of preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Rectal cancer is a common malignancy, with significant local recurrence and death rates. Preoperative radiotherapy and refined surgical technique can improve local control rates and disease-free survival. Purpose: To investigate the relationship between the tumor growth fraction in rectal cancer measured with Ki-67 and the outcome, with and without short-term preoperative radiotherapy. Method: Ki-67 (MIB-1) immunohistochemistry was used to measure tumor cell proliferation in the preoperative biopsy and the surgical specimen. Materials: Specimens from 152 patients from the Southeast Swedish Health Care region were included in the Swedish rectal cancer trial 1987-1990. Results: Tumors with low proliferation treated with preoperative radiotherapy had a significantly reduced recurrence rate. The influence on death from rectal cancer was shown only in the univariate analysis. Preoperative radiotherapy of tumors with high proliferation did not significantly improve local control and disease-free survival. The interaction between Ki-67 status and the benefit of radiotherapy was significant for the reduced recurrence rate (p=0.03), with a trend toward improved disease-free survival (p=0.08). In the surgery-alone group, Ki-67 staining did not significantly correlate with local recurrence or survival rates. Conclusion: Many Ki-67 stained tumor cells in the preoperative biopsy predicts an increased treatment failure rate after preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer

  19. The association of rectal equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) to late rectal toxicity in locally advanced cervical cancer patients who were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy in Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University

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    Tharavichtikul, Ekkasit; Chitapanarux, Taned; Chakrabandhu, Somvilai; Klunklin, Pitchayaponne; Onchan, Wimrak; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Chitapanarux, Imjai [Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand); Meungwong, Pooriwat [Lampang Cancer Hospital, Lampang (Thailand); Traisathit, Patrinee [Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand); Galalae, Razvan [aculty of Medicine, Christian-Albrechts University at Kiel, Kiei (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    To evaluate association between equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2) to rectal point dose and gastrointestinal toxicity from whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) and intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) in cervical cancer patients who were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy in Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University. Retrospective study was designed for the patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, treated by radical radiotherapy from 2004 to 2009 and were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy. The cumulative doses of WPRT and ICBT to the maximally rectal point were calculated to the EQD2 and evaluated the association of toxicities. Thirty-nine patients were evaluated for late rectal toxicity. The mean cumulative dose in term of EQD2 to rectum was 64.2 Gy. Grade 1 toxicities were the most common findings. According to endoscopic exam, the most common toxicities were congested mucosa (36 patients) and telangiectasia (32 patients). In evaluation between rectal dose in EQD2 and toxicities, no association of cumulative rectal dose to rectal toxicity, except the association of cumulative rectal dose in EQD2 >65 Gy to late effects of normal tissue (LENT-SOMA) scale > or = grade 2 (p = 0.022; odds ratio, 5.312; 95% confidence interval, 1.269-22.244). The cumulative rectal dose in EQD2 >65 Gy have association with > or = grade 2 LENT-SOMA scale.

  20. Colorectal anastomosis dehiscence following radical surgical operation for rectal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifunović Bratislav

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the biggest health problems of modern humanity, especially in highly developed countries. In Serbia about 3,200 patients suffer from CRC, out of whom about 1,100 patients suffer from rectal cancer (RC, while about 2,100 patients suffer from other colon segments cancer. The aim of the study was to show the incidence genesis of one of the possible early postoperative complications regarding dehiscence of the colorectal anastomosis (CRA with a group of patients suffering from RC and operated by using sphincter-saving procedures, in the period from 1993 to 2007, and then to compare the incidence genesis of these complications with those in the published series of the reporting colorectal institutions. Methods. The research included 242 patients radically operated on for RC in a 15-year period using some of sphincter-saving procedures following by a careful analysis of the symptoms of subclinical dehyscencias not solved with the reintervention as well as of the clinically evidented dehyscencias mostly solved by reoperation. Results. With 22 (9.1% patients in the first 10 postoperative days there were early postoperative symptoms of CRA dehiscence. In 6 (2.47% of the patients there were subclinical signs of raised body temperature, less quantity of feces content, and after the conservative treatment they ended in spontaneous process of rehabilitation. In 16 (6.61% patients there was clinically evidented anastomosis dehiscence followed by abundant drainage of feces content, signs of local peritonitis, pelvic sepsis, so we had to undertake surgical intervention. Conclusion. Comparing the results of a few tenths of published studies with our results we proved that performing and operative technique of colorectal anastomosis in the patients suffered and radically surgically treated for RC, is quite adequate with the operative technique in reporting world institutions that are engaged in surgical treatment

  1. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Resectable Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The management of resectable rectal cancer continues to be guided by clinical trials and advances in technique. Although surgical advances including total mesorectal excision continue to decrease rates of local recurrence, the management of locally advanced disease (T3-T4 or N+) benefits from a multimodality approach including neoadjuvant concomitant chemotherapy and radiation. Circumferential resection margin, which can be determined preoperatively via MRI, is prognostic. Toxicity associated with radiation therapy is decreased by placing the patient in the prone position on a belly board, however for patients who cannot tolerate prone positioning, IMRT decreases the volume of normal tissue irradiated. The use of IMRT requires knowledge of the patterns of spreads and anatomy. Clinical trials demonstrate high variability in target delineation without specific guidance demonstrating the need for peer review and the use of a consensus atlas. Concomitant with radiation, fluorouracil based chemotherapy remains the standard, and although toxicity is decreased with continuous infusion fluorouracil, oral capecitabine is non-inferior to the continuous infusion regimen. Additional chemotherapeutic agents, including oxaliplatin, continue to be investigated, however currently should only be utilized on clinical trials as increased toxicity and no definitive benefit has been demonstrated in clinical trials. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every two years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment

  2. Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab, Oxaliplatin, 5-Fluorouracil, and Radiation for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dipetrillo, Tom; Pricolo, Victor; Lagares-Garcia, Jorge; Vrees, Matt; Klipfel, Adam; Cataldo, Tom; Sikov, William; McNulty, Brendan; Shipley, Joshua; Anderson, Elliot; Khurshid, Humera; Oconnor, Brigid; Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E.; Radie-Keane, Kathy; Husain, Syed [Brown University Oncology Group, Providence, RI (United States); Safran, Howard, E-mail: hsafran@lifespan.org [Brown University Oncology Group, Providence, RI (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and pathologic complete response rate of induction bevacizumab + modified infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) 6 regimen followed by concurrent bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and radiation for patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients received 1 month of induction bevacizumab and mFOLFOX6. Patients then received 50.4 Gy of radiation and concurrent bevacizumab (5 mg/kg on Days 1, 15, and 29), oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}/week for 6 weeks), and continuous infusion 5-FU (200 mg/m{sup 2}/day). Because of gastrointestinal toxicity, the oxaliplatin dose was reduced to 40 mg/m{sup 2}/week. Resection was performed 4-8 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Results: The trial was terminated early because of toxicity after 26 eligible patients were treated. Only 1 patient had significant toxicity (arrhythmia) during induction treatment and was removed from the study. During chemoradiation, Grade 3/4 toxicity was experienced by 19 of 25 patients (76%). The most common Grade 3/4 toxicities were diarrhea, neutropenia, and pain. Five of 25 patients (20%) had a complete pathologic response. Nine of 25 patients (36%) developed postoperative complications including infection (n = 4), delayed healing (n = 3), leak/abscess (n = 2), sterile fluid collection (n = 2), ischemic colonic reservoir (n = 1), and fistula (n = 1). Conclusions: Concurrent oxaliplatin, bevacizumab, continuous infusion 5-FU, and radiation causes significant gastrointestinal toxicity. The pathologic complete response rate of this regimen was similar to other fluorouracil chemoradiation regimens. The high incidence of postoperative wound complications is concerning and consistent with other reports utilizing bevacizumab with chemoradiation before major surgical resections.

  3. Penile metastases treated with partial glansectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy 5 years after an initial diagnosis of rectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    McGuinness, Luke Aidan; Floyd, M S; Lucky, M; Parr, N J

    2013-01-01

    A 61-year-old man with recurrent rectal carcinoma was referred to the urology clinic with two penile lesions. These had negatively affected his quality of life and he underwent a radical circumcision and proximal glansectomy with reconstruction. This case report examines the clinical presentation and surgical treatment of rectal carcinoma metastasising to the penis.

  4. Induction chemotherapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin followed by chemoradiotherapy before total mesorectal excision in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, J.V.; Larsen, F O; Rasch, L;

    2012-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiation in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer has no impact on overall survival (OS) and distant recurrences. The aim of the study was to evaluate local downstaging, toxicity and long-term outcome in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer after induction therapy...

  5. Pulmonary Metastasis from Rectal Cancer on Chest CT Is Correlated with 3T MRI Primary Tumor Location

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the association between the incidence of pulmonary metastasis on chest CT and the location of the primary tumor on rectal MRI. One hundred and nine consecutive patients with rectal adenocarcinoma underwent chest CT and 3T rectal MRI. Two radiologists classified the tumor on MRI as an upper (> 10 cm from the anal verge), mid (5-10 cm), or lower rectal tumor (< 5 cm) by consensus. All chest CT scans were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of metastasis. We used Fisher's exact test to evaluate the correlation between the incidence of pulmonary metastasis with the location of the rectal cancer and the Mantel-Haenszel test to control for local tumor stage. We only included the 60 patients with upper (n = 26) or lower (n = 34) rectal cancer, because of the complicated venous drainage system of the mid rectum. Among these, 9 (15%) showed evidence of pulmonary metastasis on chest CT and almost all (89%, 8/9) patients had lower rectal cancer. The incidence of pulmonary metastasis between the two groups was statistically different (p < 0.05) when local tumor stage was controlled. The incidence of pulmonary metastasis was significantly higher for lower than upper rectal cancers when the T-stage of the tumor was accounted for.

  6. Tympanic, Infrared Skin, and Temporal Artery Scan Thermometers Compared with Rectal Measurement in Children: A Real-Life Assessment

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    Karel Allegaert, MD, PhD

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: All noninvasive techniques underperformed compared with rectal measurement. The temporal artery scan deviations were smallest, but all noninvasive techniques overestimate lower temperatures and underestimate higher temperatures compared with rectal measurement. In our hands, temporal artery scan measurement seems to be second best, but not yet ideal.

  7. RECTAL MISOPROSTOL VERSUS INTRAMUSCULAR OXYTOCIN FOR PREVENTION OF POST - PARTUM HAEMORRHAGE

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    Nidhi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Post - partum haemorrhage is a common cause of maternal mortality in developing countries. The present study was conducted to study the efficacy and safety of rectal misoprostol versus IM oxytocin for prevention of PPH in Dr. RPGMC , Tanda , Dist. Kangra , H. P. METHODS: Women were randomized to receive either 600 microgram rectal misoprostol tablet ( G roup A or 10 unit oxytocin ( G roup B .The parameters studied were incidence of PPH, amount of blood loss, duration of third stage of labour, incidence of side effects, pre and post - delivery haemoglobin and use of additional uterotonics. CONCLUSION: Rectal misoprostol was found to be as effective as IM oxytocin for preventing post - partum haemorrhage and is recommended to be used as an uterotonic agent to manage third stage o f labour routinely.

  8. The fine structure of the rectal pads of Zorotypus caudelli Karny (Zoraptera, Insecta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallai, R; Mercati, D; Mashimo, Y; Machida, R; Beutel, R G

    2016-07-01

    The rectal pads of a species of the controversial polyneopteran order Zoraptera were examined using histological sections and TEM micrographs. Six pads are present along the thin rectal epithelium. Each pad consists of a few large principal cells surrounded by flattened junctional cells, which extend also beneath the principal cells. The cells are lined by a thin apical cuticle. No basal cells and no cavity have been observed beneath the pad. Principal cells have a regular layer of apical microvilli and are joined by intercellular septate junctions, which are interrupted by short dilatations of the intercellular space. At these levels the two adjacent plasma membranes are joined by short zonulae adhaerentes. In the cytoplasm, a rich system of strict associations between lateral plasma membranes and mitochondria forms scalariform junctions. Rectal pads share ultrastructural features with similar excretory organs of several neopteran groups, in particular with Blattodea (roaches and termites) and Thysanoptera, and are involved in fluid reabsorption and ion regulation. PMID:27368527

  9. Results of external beam irradiation for rectal carcinomas locally recurrent after local excision or electrocoagulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outcome of 42 patients who developed locally recurrent rectal carcinoma after initial local excision or electrocoagulation was presented. Five patients received combined surgery and radiotherapy (XRT). The remaining 37 patients were managed by XRT alone. The overall 5 years actuarial survival and local control rates were 21 and 22 percent, respectively. For patients who received XRT alone, the 5 year actuarial survival and local control rates were 20 and 15 percent, resp. The corresponding figures were 35 and 40 percent for patients who received a total XRT dose of 50 Gy or more. One patient who underwent combined treatment developed rectal and bladder incontinence requiring surgery. For patients with rectal recurrence after initial conservative surgery, XRT is an alternative to abdominoperipheral resection if major resection is contraindicated. (author). 13 refs.; 2 tabs

  10. High-dose chemoradiotherapy and watchful waiting for distal rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Pløen, John; Harling, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abdominoperineal resection is the standard treatment for patients with distal T2 or T3 rectal cancers; however, the procedure is extensive and mutilating, and alternative treatment strategies are being investigated. We did a prospective observational trial to assess whether high......-dose chemoradiotherapy and watchful waiting might be a safe alternative to abdominoperineal resection for patients with distal rectal cancer. FUNDING: CIRRO-The Lundbeck Foundation Center for Interventional Research in Radiation Oncology and The Danish Council for Strategic Research.......-dose radiotherapy with concomitant chemotherapy followed by observation (watchful waiting) was successful for non-surgical management of low rectal cancer. METHODS: Patients with primary, resectable, T2 or T3, N0-N1 adenocarcinoma in the lower 6 cm of the rectum were given chemoradiotherapy (60 Gy in 30 fractions...

  11. The outcome of rectal cancer after early salvage TME following TEM compared with primary TME

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levic, K; Bulut, O; Hesselfeldt, P;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) allows locally complete resection of early rectal cancer as an alternative to conventional radical surgery. In case of unfavourable histology after TEM, or positive resection margins, salvage surgery can be performed. However, it is unclear...... if the results are equivalent to primary treatment with total mesorectal excision (TME). The aim of this retrospective study was to determine whether there is a difference in outcome between patients who underwent early salvage resection with TME after TEM, and those who underwent primary TME for rectal cancer......-73) for patients after primary TME. CONCLUSIONS: No difference was found in outcome between patients with rectal cancer undergoing salvage TME after TEM, those undergoing primary TME. In selected patients, TEM can therefore be chosen as a primary treatment, since failure of treatment and subsequent conventional...

  12. The outcome of rectal cancer after early salvage TME following TEM compared with primary TME

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulut, O; Levic, K; Hesselfeldt, P;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) allows locally complete resection of early rectal cancer as an alternative to conventional radical surgery. In case of unfavourable histology after TEM, or positive resection margins, salvage surgery can be performed. However, it is unclear...... if the results are equivalent to primary treatment with total mesorectal excision (TME). The aim of this retrospective study was to determine whether there is a difference in outcome between patients who underwent early salvage resection with TME after TEM, and those who underwent primary TME for rectal cancer......-73) for patients after primary TME. CONCLUSIONS: No difference was found in outcome between patients with rectal cancer undergoing salvage TME after TEM, those undergoing primary TME. In selected patients, TEM can therefore be chosen as a primary treatment, since failure of treatment and subsequent conventional...

  13. Comparative examination of various rectal tubes and contrast media for the reduction of intussusceptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrodynamic influence of different rectal tube sizes, contrast media, and heights of the fluid column on hydrostatic reduction of intussusception was analyzed in vitro. Enemas were performed in dead rabbits to compare the filling speed of bowel with a liquid and a gaseous contrast medium. For hydrostatic reduction, tubing and rectal tube with a large caliber and a low viscosity contrast medium achieved a higher filling speed of colon and are expected to provide a higher force of reduction on the intussusceptum. A rectal tube with a large caliber can be more useful than an increase of the column height. Filling bowel with carbon dioxide was approximately 7 times faster than with meglumine sodium diatrizoate. Theoretical considerations allow the hypothesis that a gaseous medium provides a faster and steadier reduction than a liquid. (orig.)

  14. CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF 50 RECTAL CANCER CASES DIAGNOSED AS ADENOMA IN BIOPSY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BU Zhao-de; LI Zi-yu; XIE Yu-quan; JI Jia-fu; SU Xiang-qian

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinicopathological characteristics of rectal cancer diagnosed as adenoma in biopsy. Methods: 50 rectal cancer cases diagnosed as adenoma in biopsy were analyzed retrospectively in this study by comparing the biopsy and postoperative pathology. Results: Among these 50 patients, biopsy pathology showed 26% (13/50) adenoma with mild dysplasia, 30% (15/50) adenoma with moderate dysplasia, and 44% (22/50) adenoma with severe dysplasia. In 8 cases, the adenomas were smaller than 2cm. On postoperatively surgical pathology, only 10 cases were carcinoma-in-situ, while 40 cases were invasive cancer. Conclusion: Special emphasis should be taken to biopsy-negative rectal adenomas and those smaller than 2cm.

  15. [Total rectal prolapse in young adults. Apropos of 10 cases in Africans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribault, L; Gournier, J P

    1988-12-01

    The authors described their African experience on the basis of ten cases of total rectal prolapse in the young adult and child. Total rectal prolapse and internal procidentia fall within the general context of disorders of rectal mechanics. In most instances, such forced prolapse occurs in young individuals who are usually muscular and used to difficult work. Nevertheless, defecation efforts in these chronically constipated patients play a significant role. Furthermore, there is frequently a concomitant presence of a megadolichosigmoid colon. In all cases treatment was surgical, involving rectopexy at the promontory using strips of fascia lata or even peritoneum. The post-operative course was in all cases uneventful with no recurrences and the routine prescription of adjuvant treatment for constipation. PMID:3230110

  16. Rectal stenosis in pigs associated with Salmonella Typhimurium and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Terumi Negrão Watanabe

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Rectal stricture is an acquired annular fibrous constriction of the rectum that results from a variety of chronic necrotizing enteric diseases. In pigs, it is in most cases a sequel of Salmonella infection. Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 is a known pathogen causing immunosuppression in pigs worldwide. PCV2 infected pigs may be predisposed to salmonellosis. In this report, rectal stenosis was observed in 160 pigs from a herd that experienced an outbreak of enteric salmonellosis over a 4-month period. Distension of the abdominal wall and diarrhea were the main clinical signs observed. Five animals were analyzed showing annular cicatrization of the rectal wall 5.0-7.0 cm anterior to the anorectal junction and Salmonella-positive immunostaining in the large intestine. Salmonella Typhimurium was isolated from fragments of the large intestine. Porcine circovirus type 2 antigen was observed in the mesenteric lymph-node in 4 pigs and in the large intestine in 3 pigs.

  17. Preoperative CT versus diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the liver in patients with rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Michael P; Løgager, Vibeke B; Skjoldbye, Bjørn;

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in the world and liver metastases are seen in up to 19% of patients with colorectal cancers. Detection of liver metastases is not only vital for sufficient treatment and survival, but also for a better estimation of prognosis....... The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of diffusion weighted MRI of the liver as part of a combined MR evaluation of patients with rectal cancers and compare it with the standard preoperative evaluation of the liver with CT. Methods. Consecutive patients diagnosed with rectal cancers were....... The current standard preoperative evaluation with CT-scan results in disadvantages like missed metastases and futile operations. We recommend that patients with rectal cancer, who are scheduled for MR of the rectum, should have a DWMR of the liver performed at the same time....

  18. Surgery for Locally Advanced T4 Rectal Cancer: Strategies and Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helewa, Ramzi M; Park, Jason

    2016-06-01

    Locally advanced T4 rectal cancer represents a complex clinical condition that requires a well thought-out treatment plan and expertise from multiple specialists. Paramount in the management of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer are accurate preoperative staging, appropriate application of neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatments, and, above all, the provision of high-quality, complete surgical resection in potentially curable cases. Despite the advanced nature of this disease, extended and multivisceral resections with clear margins have been shown to result in good oncological outcomes and offer patients a real chance of cure. In this article, we describe the assessment, classification, and multimodality treatment of primary locally advanced T4 rectal cancer, with a focus on surgical planning, approaches, and outcomes. PMID:27247535

  19. Tratamento de metástases hepáticas de carcinoma colo-rectal

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Rui Miguel Rua Filipe

    2009-01-01

    O carcinoma colo-rectal é responsável por mais de 75% das metástases hepáticas, sendo a segunda maior causa de morte por doença neoplásica nos EUA. Aproximadamente 50% dos pacientes com carcinoma colo-rectal desenvolvem metástases hepáticas ao longo da evolução da doença. A ressecção hepática é o tratamento de eleição na metastização hepática de carcinoma colo-rectal, dado que permite um aumento da sobrevida aos 5 anos entre 26 a 49%, sendo a única opção terapêutica que pode levar à cura. A h...

  20. Prevention of SIV rectal transmission and priming of T cell responses in macaques after local pre-exposure application of tenofovir gel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Cranage

    2008-08-01

    protected from infection (n = 6 or had modified virus outcomes (n = 2, while all untreated macaques and three of four macaques given placebo gel were infected, as were two of three animals receiving tenofovir gel after challenge. Moreover, analysis of lymphoid tissues post mortem failed to reveal sequestration of SIV in the protected animals. We found a strong positive association between the concentration of tenofovir in the plasma 15 min after rectal application of gel and the degree of protection in the six animals challenged with virus at this time point. Moreover, colorectal explants from non-SIV challenged tenofovir-treated macaques were resistant to infection ex vivo, whereas no inhibition was seen in explants from the small intestine. Tissue-specific inhibition of infection was associated with the intracellular detection of tenofovir. Intriguingly, in the absence of seroconversion, Gag-specific gamma interferon (IFN-gamma-secreting T cells were detected in the blood of four of seven protected animals tested, with frequencies ranging from 144 spot forming cells (SFC/10(6 PBMC to 261 spot forming cells (SFC/10(6 PBMC. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that colorectal pretreatment with ARV drugs, such as tenofovir, has potential as a clinically relevant strategy for the prevention of HIV transmission. We conclude that plasma tenofovir concentration measured 15 min after rectal administration may serve as a surrogate indicator of protective efficacy. This may prove to be useful in the design of clinical studies. Furthermore, in vitro intestinal explants served as a model for drug distribution in vivo and susceptibility to virus infection. The finding of T cell priming following exposure to virus in the absence of overt infection is provocative. Further studies would reveal if a combined modality microbicide and vaccination strategy is feasible by determining the full extent of local immune responses induced and their protective potential.

  1. Random Forests to Predict Rectal Toxicity Following Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ospina, Juan D. [LTSI, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); INSERM, U1099, Rennes (France); Escuela de Estadística, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Medellín, Medellín (Colombia); Zhu, Jian [LTSI, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Laboratory of Image Science and Technology, Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Department of Radiation Physics, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Centre de Recherche en Information Biomédical Sino-Français, Rennes (France); Chira, Ciprian [Département de Radiothérapie, Centre Eugène Marquis, Rennes (France); Bossi, Alberto [Département de Radiothérapie, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Delobel, Jean B. [Département de Radiothérapie, Centre Eugène Marquis, Rennes (France); Beckendorf, Véronique [Département de Radiothérapie, Centre Alexis Vautrin, Nancy (France); Dubray, Bernard [Département de Radiothérapie, CRLCC Henri Becquerel, Rouen (France); Lagrange, Jean-Léon [Département de Radiothérapie, Hôpital Henri Mondor, Créteil (France); Correa, Juan C. [Escuela de Estadística, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Medellín, Medellín (Colombia); and others

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To propose a random forest normal tissue complication probability (RF-NTCP) model to predict late rectal toxicity following prostate cancer radiation therapy, and to compare its performance to that of classic NTCP models. Methods and Materials: Clinical data and dose-volume histograms (DVH) were collected from 261 patients who received 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer with at least 5 years of follow-up. The series was split 1000 times into training and validation cohorts. A RF was trained to predict the risk of 5-year overall rectal toxicity and bleeding. Parameters of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model were identified and a logistic regression model was fit. The performance of all the models was assessed by computing the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results: The 5-year grade ≥2 overall rectal toxicity and grade ≥1 and grade ≥2 rectal bleeding rates were 16%, 25%, and 10%, respectively. Predictive capabilities were obtained using the RF-NTCP model for all 3 toxicity endpoints, including both the training and validation cohorts. The age and use of anticoagulants were found to be predictors of rectal bleeding. The AUC for RF-NTCP ranged from 0.66 to 0.76, depending on the toxicity endpoint. The AUC values for the LKB-NTCP were statistically significantly inferior, ranging from 0.62 to 0.69. Conclusions: The RF-NTCP model may be a useful new tool in predicting late rectal toxicity, including variables other than DVH, and thus appears as a strong competitor to classic NTCP models.

  2. PROX1 is involved in progression of rectal neuroendocrine tumors, NETs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernman, Juha; Kallio, Pauliina; Hagström, Jaana; Välimäki, Matti J; Haapasalo, Hannu; Alitalo, Kari; Arola, Johanna; Haglund, Caj

    2015-09-01

    PROX1 is a homeobox transcription factor involved in the development of the lens, liver and heart and found upregulated in colorectal cancers. We studied PROX1 expression by immunohistochemistry in rectal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Approximately 10 to 15 % of gastroenteropancreatic NETs occur in the rectum, and some may metastasize. Yet little is known about the molecular pathogenesis of rectal NETs or their metastasis propensity. The objectives were to find out whether PROX1 plays a role in progression of rectal NETs and whether it has value as prognostic marker. In grading of rectal NETs, we applied the WHO 2010 classification. We carried out immunohistochemical staining of PROX1 on 72 primary tumors and six metastases and evaluated nuclear positivity in each tumor. Correlation between PROX1 expression, metastasis and patient survival was then assessed. Annexin A1, a downstream target of PROX1, was immunohistochemically assessed in 18 tumors. PROX1 protein was detected in about half of the tumors, with stronger expression in metastasized cases. PROX1 expression correlated with tumor metastasis and patient prognosis. Annexin A1 was negative in most of the high-grade tumors correlating strongly with grade and metastatic potential. Our results indicate that immunohistochemical detection of PROX1 correlates with a more malignant phenotype in rectal NETs. High PROX1 expression was associated with increased metastatic potential and poor patient survival but not as strongly as grade by the WHO 2010 classification. PROX1 may be involved in progression of rectal NETs as a part of the Wnt pathway. PMID:26063416

  3. Altered rectal sensory response induced by balloon distention in patients with functional abdominal pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudaira Miwako

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS has chronic unexplained abdominal pain and is similar to the psychiatric diagnosis of somatoform pain disorder. A patient with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS also has chronic unexplained abdominal pain, and rectal hypersensitivity is observed in a majority of the patients. However, no reports have evaluated the visceral sensory function of FAPS precisely. We aimed to test the hypothesis that FAPS would show altered visceral sensation compared to healthy controls or IBS. The present study determined the rectal perceptual threshold, intensity of sensation using visual analogue scale (VAS, and rectal compliance in response to rectal balloon distention by a barostat in FAPS, IBS, and healthy controls. Methods First, the ramp distention of 40 ml/min was induced and the thresholds of discomfort, pain, and maximum tolerance (mmHg were measured. Next, three phasic distentions (60-sec duration separated by 30-sec intervals of 10, 15 and 20 mmHg were randomly loaded. The subjects were asked to mark the VAS in reference to subjective intensity of sensation immediately after each distention. A pressure-volume relationship was determined by plotting corresponding pressures and volumes during ramp distention, and the compliance was calculated over the linear part of the curve by calculating from the slope of the curve using simple regression. Results Rectal thresholds were significantly reduced in IBS but not in FAPS. The VAS ratings of intensity induced by phasic distention (around the discomfort threshold of the controls were increased in IBS but significantly decreased in FAPS. Rectal compliance was reduced in IBS but not in FAPS. Conclusion An inconsistency of visceral sensitivity between lower and higher pressure distention might be a key feature for understanding the pathogenesis of FAPS.

  4. Random Forests to Predict Rectal Toxicity Following Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To propose a random forest normal tissue complication probability (RF-NTCP) model to predict late rectal toxicity following prostate cancer radiation therapy, and to compare its performance to that of classic NTCP models. Methods and Materials: Clinical data and dose-volume histograms (DVH) were collected from 261 patients who received 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer with at least 5 years of follow-up. The series was split 1000 times into training and validation cohorts. A RF was trained to predict the risk of 5-year overall rectal toxicity and bleeding. Parameters of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model were identified and a logistic regression model was fit. The performance of all the models was assessed by computing the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results: The 5-year grade ≥2 overall rectal toxicity and grade ≥1 and grade ≥2 rectal bleeding rates were 16%, 25%, and 10%, respectively. Predictive capabilities were obtained using the RF-NTCP model for all 3 toxicity endpoints, including both the training and validation cohorts. The age and use of anticoagulants were found to be predictors of rectal bleeding. The AUC for RF-NTCP ranged from 0.66 to 0.76, depending on the toxicity endpoint. The AUC values for the LKB-NTCP were statistically significantly inferior, ranging from 0.62 to 0.69. Conclusions: The RF-NTCP model may be a useful new tool in predicting late rectal toxicity, including variables other than DVH, and thus appears as a strong competitor to classic NTCP models

  5. Multimodal pre/intra-operative radiotherapy for T3-T4 rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many randomized clinical trials comparing multimodal preoperative radio/chemoradiotherapy with surgery alone revealed that preoperative multimodal therapy reduced local recurrence in rectal cancer significantly. We compared the outcomes between 166 patients who received multimodal therapy [RT group] and 86 patients who received surgery alone [S group]. The RT group revealed significantly better disease-free survival and overall survival than the S group. The local recurrence only was significantly reduced in the RT group. Patients who showed good response to preoperative radiotherapy revealed good prognosis. There was no significant difference in the morbidity between the two groups. Above results suggested the benefit of preoperative multimodal therapy for locally advanced rectal cancer. (author)

  6. The prognostic value of tumour regression grade following neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for rectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abdul-Jalil, K I

    2014-01-01

    To date, there is no uniform consensus on whether tumour regression grade (TRG) is predictive of outcome in rectal cancer. Furthermore, the lack of standardization of TRG grading is a major source of variability in published studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of TRG in a cohort of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT). In addition to the Mandard TRG, we utilized four TRG systems modified from the Mandard TRG system and applied them to the cohort to assess which TRG system is most informative.

  7. Vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms, dietary promotion of insulin resistance, and colon and rectal cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Maureen A Murtaugh; Sweeney, Carol; Ma, Khe-Ni; Potter, John D.; Caan, Bette J.; Wolff, Roger K.; Slattery, Martha L.

    2006-01-01

    Biomarkers of individual susceptibility: field studies. Biomarker: vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms Effect studied: colon and rectal cancer risk. Tissue/biological material/sample size: colon, rectum. Method of analysis: genotyping of the VDR gene Study design: case-control studyStudy size: colon cancer (1,698 cases and 1,861 controls); rectal cancer (752 cases and 960 controls) Impact on outcome (including dose-response): The lowest colon cancer risk was observed with the Ff/ff Fo...

  8. Preoperative cobalt60 irradiation delays the healing of rectal anastomoses in rats

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The healing of colorectal anastomoses after irradiation therapy continues to be a major concern. The authors evaluated the healing of rectal anastomoses in a rat model after a preoperative 500-cGy dose of cobalt60 irradiation. Thirty-six male Wistar rats were divided into two equal groups: control (group A), and irradiation group (group B). Group B received a single 500-cGy dose of irradiation, and a rectal resection and end-to-end anastomosis was performed in both groups on the 7th day after...

  9. Possible benefits of robot-assisted rectal cancer surgery regarding urological and sexual dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm Andersen, Malene; Pommergaard, H-C; Gögenür, I

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Robot-assisted surgery for rectal cancer may result in lower rates of urogenital dysfunction compared with laparoscopic surgery. A systematic review was conducted of studies reporting urogenital dysfunction after robot-assisted rectal cancer surgery. METHOD: PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane...... months' follow-up [MD -2.59 (-4.25, -0.94),] P = 0.002] and 6 months' follow-up [MD -3.06 (-4.53, -1.59), P = 0.0001] were better after robot-assisted than laparoscopic surgery. CONCLUSION: Although there were few data and no randomized controlled trials the results of the review suggested that robot...

  10. Rectal cancer presenting tumor thrombosis in the inferior vena cava and common iliac vein: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Sun Jung; Park, Seong Jin; Lee, Hae Kyung; Yi, Boem Ha; Park, Sung Il; Hong, Soo Jin; Kim, Hee Kyung; Park, Jeong Mi [Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    We report the radiologic findings of a rectal carcinoma case with tumor thrombus in the inferior vana cava and left common iliac vein of a 48-year-old woman. The patient complained of swelling in the left leg and consequently underwent a lymphoscintigraphy, CT venography, abdominal CT, PET-CT, pelvis MRI, and ultrasound doppler. The rectal cancer was determined via a colonoscopy. The tissue biopsy of tumor thrombus in the IVC was done during insertion of IVC filter and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma was revealed by pathology.

  11. Estimation of Rectal Dose Using Daily Megavoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Deformable Image Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The actual dose delivered to critical organs will differ from the simulated dose because of interfractional organ motion and deformation. Here, we developed a method to estimate the rectal dose in prostate intensity modulated radiation therapy with consideration to interfractional organ motion using daily megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MVCBCT). Methods and Materials: Under exemption status from our institutional review board, we retrospectively reviewed 231 series of MVCBCT of 8 patients with prostate cancer. On both planning CT (pCT) and MVCBCT images, the rectal contours were delineated and the CT value within the contours was replaced by the mean CT value within the pelvis, with the addition of 100 Hounsfield units. MVCBCT images were rigidly registered to pCT and then nonrigidly registered using B-Spline deformable image registration (DIR) with Velocity AI software. The concordance between the rectal contours on MVCBCT and pCT was evaluated using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The dose distributions normalized for 1 fraction were also deformed and summed to estimate the actual total dose. Results: The DSC of all treatment fractions of 8 patients was improved from 0.75±0.04 (mean ±SD) to 0.90 ±0.02 by DIR. Six patients showed a decrease of the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) from total dose compared with treatment plans. Although the rectal volume of each treatment fraction did not show any correlation with the change in gEUD (R2=0.18±0.13), the displacement of the center of gravity of rectal contours in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction showed an intermediate relationship (R2=0.61±0.16). Conclusion: We developed a method for evaluation of rectal dose using DIR and MVCBCT images and showed the necessity of DIR for the evaluation of total dose. Displacement of the rectum in the AP direction showed a greater effect on the change in rectal dose compared with the rectal volume

  12. Predictors of Pathologic Complete Response in Rectal Cancer Patients Undergoing Total Mesorectal Excision After Preoperative Chemoradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Yoon Dae; Kim, Woo Ram; Park, Seung Wan; Cho, Min Soo; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard of care for patients with stage II and III rectal cancer. This strategy leads to pathologic complete response (pCR) in a significant number of patients. Factors predictive of pCR are currently being extensively investigated. The aim of this study was to analyze clinical factors that might be predictive of pCR. This study was a retrospective analysis of rectal cancer patients from January 2004 through December 2012. A total of 332 s...

  13. Phylogeny and resistance profiles of HIV-1 POL sequences from rectal biopsies and blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katzenstein, T L; Petersen, A B; Storgaard, M;

    2010-01-01

    The phylogeny and resistance profiles of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences were compared among six patients with HIV-1 who had received numerous treatments. RNA and DNA fractions were obtained from concurrent blood and rectal biopsy...... samples. Phylogenetic trees and resistance profiles showed that the rectal mucosa and the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) harbored different HIV-1 strains. The resistance-associated mutations found in each strain corresponded to the treatment history of the patients. The resistance mutations...

  14. Robot-assisted rectopexy is a safe and feasible option for treatment of rectal prolapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Camilla; Jakobsen, Henrik Loft; Gögenur, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Rectal prolapse is seen in up to one in 100 elderly women and results in symptoms such as incontinence, mucus secretion and constipation. The aim of this study was to present short- and longterm outcomes after robot-assisted rectopexy in patients with rectal prolapse. MATERIAL AND......%). The mean age at surgery was 72 years (28-93 years). The mean duration of surgery was 123 min. (70-245 min.). The median length of stay in hospital was 4.1 days (0-15 days). There was one procedure-related complication (small-bowel obstruction) resulting in reoperation. At the time of follow-up, two...

  15. Magnetic Resonance (MR) rectography in diagnostics of small-size rectal neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usova, AV; Frolova, IG; Trukhacheva, NG; Cheremisina, OV; Afanas'ev, SG

    2016-02-01

    Purpose was the assessment of diagnostic efficiency of MR-rectography in diagnostics of small-size rectal neoplasms. 12 patients with polyps and small tumors of a rectum are examined, the size of detected neoplasms varied in the range 3-18 mm. Native MRI and MRI with retrograde contrasting by ultrasonic gel was carried out. Results of MRI are compared with results of videocolonoscopy. Sensitivity of native MRT was 24%, MR- rectography was 88%. MR-rectography can be used in diagnostics of small-size rectal neoplasms.

  16. ROLE OF HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION

    OpenAIRE

    UDAYSINH R. MANEPATIL

    2013-01-01

    Hospital administration is the management of the hospital as a business. The administration is made up of medical and health services managers (sometimes called health care executives and health care administrators) and assistant administrators. Administrations range in size and the duties of the administrator depends on the size of the administration.

  17. Feasibility of mesorectal vascular invasion in predicting early distant metastasis in patients with stage T3 rectal cancer based on rectal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the feasibility of mesorectal vascular invasion (MVI) in predicting early distant metastasis developed within 1 year of diagnosis of T3 rectal cancer using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Sixty-five patients with T3 rectal cancer (early metastasis, n = 28; non-metastasis, n = 37) were enrolled in this study. Early distant metastases developed in 28 patients (liver, n = 15; lung, n = 9; both, n = 4). Logistic regression was used to determine the independent predictors for early distant metastasis. In univariate analysis, tumour location, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), lymphovascular invasion (LVI), MRI-detected MVI, and mesorectal fat infiltration (MFI) (odds ratio [OR], 4.533, 9.583, 5.539, 27.046, and 5.539, respectively) were associated with early distant metastasis. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that MVI (OR, 29.949; P < 0.002) and LVI (OR, 6.684; P = 0.033) were independent factors for early distant metastasis. Specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) of MVI (94.59 %, and 89.47 %, respectively) were significantly higher than those of LVI (64.86 %, and 61.76 %), but sensitivity and negative predictive value were not significantly different between MVI (60.71 %, and 76.09 %) and LVI (75.00 %, and 77.42 %). While sensitivity of MRI-detected MVI was equal to that of CEA in predicting early distant metastasis from T3 rectal cancer, specificity and PPV may be improved by assessing MVI. (orig.)

  18. Clinical Outcome of Laparoscopic Intersphincteric Resection Combined with Transanal Rectal Dissection for T3 Low Rectal Cancer in Patients with a Narrow Pelvis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimihiko Funahashi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to analyze the safety and feasibility of laparoscopic intersphincteric resection (ISR combined with transanal rectal dissection (TARD for T3 low rectal cancer in a narrow pelvis. Methods. We studied 20 patients with a narrow pelvis of median body mass index 25.3 (16.9–31.2. Median observation period was 23.6 months (range 12.2–56.7. Results. Partial, subtotal, and total ISR was performed in 15, 1, and 4 patients, respectively. Median duration of TARD was 83 min (range 43–135. There were no major complications perioperatively or postoperatively. Surgical margins were histologically free of tumor cells in all patients, and there was no local recurrence. Excluding urgency, frequency of bowel movements, and incontinence status improved gradually after stoma closure. Conclusion. Laparoscopic ISR combined with TARD is technically feasible for selective T3 low rectal cancer in patients with a narrow pelvis.

  19. Feasibility of mesorectal vascular invasion in predicting early distant metastasis in patients with stage T3 rectal cancer based on rectal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Chul; Kim, Jai Keun; Lee, Jei Hee [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myeong-Jin [Yonsei University Health system, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Institute of Gastroenterology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Bae [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sung Jae [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Gastroenterology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of mesorectal vascular invasion (MVI) in predicting early distant metastasis developed within 1 year of diagnosis of T3 rectal cancer using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Sixty-five patients with T3 rectal cancer (early metastasis, n = 28; non-metastasis, n = 37) were enrolled in this study. Early distant metastases developed in 28 patients (liver, n = 15; lung, n = 9; both, n = 4). Logistic regression was used to determine the independent predictors for early distant metastasis. In univariate analysis, tumour location, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), lymphovascular invasion (LVI), MRI-detected MVI, and mesorectal fat infiltration (MFI) (odds ratio [OR], 4.533, 9.583, 5.539, 27.046, and 5.539, respectively) were associated with early distant metastasis. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that MVI (OR, 29.949; P < 0.002) and LVI (OR, 6.684; P = 0.033) were independent factors for early distant metastasis. Specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) of MVI (94.59 %, and 89.47 %, respectively) were significantly higher than those of LVI (64.86 %, and 61.76 %), but sensitivity and negative predictive value were not significantly different between MVI (60.71 %, and 76.09 %) and LVI (75.00 %, and 77.42 %). While sensitivity of MRI-detected MVI was equal to that of CEA in predicting early distant metastasis from T3 rectal cancer, specificity and PPV may be improved by assessing MVI. (orig.)

  20. WRAP53 is an independent prognostic factor in rectal cancer- a study of Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expression of WRAP53 protein has oncogenic properties and it is up regulated in several types of tumors. We examined expression of WRAP53 protein in rectal cancers and analyzed its relationship to the response to preoperative radiotherapy and patient survival. The WRAP53 protein was examined by immunohistochemistry in normal mucosa, primary tumors and lymph node metastases from 143 rectal cancer patients participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Frequency of WRAP53 protein expression was increased in primary rectal cancer compared to the normal mucosa (p < 0.05). In non-radiotherapy group positive WRAP53 in primary tumors (p = 0.03, RR, 3.73, 95% CI, 1.13-11.89) or metastases (p = 0.01, RR, 4.11, 95% CI, 1.25-13.14), was associated with poor prognosis independently of stages and differentiations. In radiotherapy group, positive WRAP53 in the metastasis correlated with better survival (p = 0.04). An interaction analysis showed that the correlations of WRAP53 with the prognostic significance with and without radiotherapy in the metastasis differed (p = 0.01). In the radiotherapy group, expression of WRAP53 in metastases gave a better outcome (p = 0.02, RR, 0.32, 95% CI, 0.13-0.84), and an interaction analysis showed significance between the two groups (p = 0.01). WRAP53 may be a new biomarker used to predict prognosis and to select suitable patients for preoperative radiotherapy

  1. Administrative Appeals and ADR in Danish Administrative Law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Inger Marie; Gøtze, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Administrative Appeals, review, administrative tribunals, ombudsman, alternative dispute resolution......Administrative Appeals, review, administrative tribunals, ombudsman, alternative dispute resolution...

  2. Reirradiation, surgery and IORT for recurrent rectal cancer in previously irradiated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 11 patients with recurrent rectal cancer who had been previously irradiated were treated with preoperative reirradiation (median dose 30 Gy), surgery and IORT. This treatment was related with high morbidity, a short pain-free survival (5 months) and poor local control (27% after 3 years), although some patients have long-term distant control and survival

  3. Prostate Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy: Injection of Hyaluronic Acid to Better Preserve The Rectal Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapet, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.chapet@chu-lyon.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Udrescu, Corina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Devonec, Marian [Department of Urology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Tanguy, Ronan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Sotton, Marie-Pierre [Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Enachescu, Ciprian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Colombel, Marc [Department of Urology, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon (France); Azria, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Val d' Aurelle, Montpellier (France); Jalade, Patrice [Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Ruffion, Alain [Department of Urology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) between the rectum and the prostate for reducing the dose to the rectal wall in a hypofractionated irradiation for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In a phase 2 study, 10 cc of HA was injected between the rectum and prostate. For 16 patients, the same intensity modulated radiation therapy plan (62 Gy in 20 fractions) was optimized on 2 computed tomography scans: CT1 (before injection) and CT2 (after injection). Rectal parameters were compared: dose to 2.5 cc (D2.5), 5 cc (D5), 10 cc (D10), 15 cc (D15), and 20 cc (D20) of rectal wall and volume of rectum covered by the 90% isodose line (V90), 80% (V80), 70% (V70), 60% (V60), and 50% (V50). Results: The mean V90, V80, V70, V60, and V50 values were reduced by 73.8% (P<.0001), 55.7% (P=.0003), 43.0% (P=.007), 34% (P=.002), and 25% (P=.036), respectively. The average values of D2.5, D5, D10, D15, and D20 were reduced by 8.5 Gy (P<.0001), 12.3 Gy (P<.0001), 8.4 Gy (P=.005), 3.7 Gy (P=.026), and 1.2 Gy (P=.25), respectively. Conclusions: The injection of HA significantly limited radiation doses to the rectal wall.

  4. Clinical outcome in 520 consecutive Danish rectal cancer patients treated with short course preoperative radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L H; Altaf, R; Harling, H; Jensen, M; Laurberg, S; Muhic, A; Vestermark, L; Jakobsen, A; Bülow, S; Jess, Danish Colorectal Cancer Group, Per

    2010-01-01

    T3 or T4 and 41% of the local recurrences occurred in patients with a fixed tumour at surgery. CONCLUSION: This study confirms data from randomised studies that the short course 5 x 5 Gy regime is a feasible treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer even when applied in a population outside...

  5. Prostate Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy: Injection of Hyaluronic Acid to Better Preserve The Rectal Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) between the rectum and the prostate for reducing the dose to the rectal wall in a hypofractionated irradiation for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In a phase 2 study, 10 cc of HA was injected between the rectum and prostate. For 16 patients, the same intensity modulated radiation therapy plan (62 Gy in 20 fractions) was optimized on 2 computed tomography scans: CT1 (before injection) and CT2 (after injection). Rectal parameters were compared: dose to 2.5 cc (D2.5), 5 cc (D5), 10 cc (D10), 15 cc (D15), and 20 cc (D20) of rectal wall and volume of rectum covered by the 90% isodose line (V90), 80% (V80), 70% (V70), 60% (V60), and 50% (V50). Results: The mean V90, V80, V70, V60, and V50 values were reduced by 73.8% (P<.0001), 55.7% (P=.0003), 43.0% (P=.007), 34% (P=.002), and 25% (P=.036), respectively. The average values of D2.5, D5, D10, D15, and D20 were reduced by 8.5 Gy (P<.0001), 12.3 Gy (P<.0001), 8.4 Gy (P=.005), 3.7 Gy (P=.026), and 1.2 Gy (P=.25), respectively. Conclusions: The injection of HA significantly limited radiation doses to the rectal wall

  6. Remission of Unresectable Lung Metastases from Rectal Cancer After Herbal Medicine Treatment: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungsuk; Lee, Sanghun

    2016-01-01

    Lung metastasis is frequent in rectal cancer patients and has a poor prognosis, with an expected three-year survival rate of about 10%. Though western medicine has made great strides in the curative resection of liver metastases, resection of lung metastases has lagged far behind. Many preclinical studies have suggested that herbal treatments block metastasis, but few clinical studies have addressed this topic. We present the case of a 57-year-old Asian male with lung metastases from rectal cancer. He first underwent resection of the primary lesion (stage IIA, T3N0M0) and six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. Unfortunately, lung metastases were confirmed about one year later. Palliative chemotherapy was begun, but his disease continued to progress after three cycles and chemotherapy was halted. The patient was exclusively treated with herbal medicine-standardized allergen-removed Rhus verniciflua stokes extract combined with Dokhwaljihwang-tang (Sasang constitutional medicine in Korea). After seven weeks of herbal medicine treatment, the lung metastases were markedly improved. Regression of lung metastases has continued; also, the patient's rectal cancer has not returned. He has been receiving herbal medicine for over two years and very few side effects have been observed. We suggest that the herbal regimen used in our patient is a promising candidate for the treatment of lung metastases secondary to rectal cancer, and we hope that this case stimulates further investigation into the efficacy of herbal treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer patients. PMID:27198037

  7. Study shows colon and rectal tumors constitute a single type of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The pattern of genomic alterations in colon and rectal tissues is the same regardless of anatomic location or origin within the colon or the rectum, leading researchers to conclude that these two cancer types can be grouped as one, according to The Cancer

  8. Multidisciplinary team conferences promote treatment according to guidelines in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brännström, Fredrik; Kroll Bjerregaard, Jon; Winbladh, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multidisciplinary team (MDT) conferences have been introduced into standard cancer care, though evidence that it benefits the patient is weak. We used the national Swedish Rectal Cancer Register to evaluate predictors for case discussion at a MDT conference and its impact on treatment...... radiotherapy. These results indirectly support the introduction into clinical practice of discussing all rectal cancer patients at MDT conferences, not least those being treated at low-volume hospitals.......BACKGROUND: Multidisciplinary team (MDT) conferences have been introduced into standard cancer care, though evidence that it benefits the patient is weak. We used the national Swedish Rectal Cancer Register to evaluate predictors for case discussion at a MDT conference and its impact on treatment....... MATERIAL AND METHODS: Of the 6760 patients diagnosed with rectal cancer in Sweden between 2007 and 2010, 78% were evaluated at a MDT. Factors that influenced whether a patient was discussed at a preoperative MDT conference were evaluated in 4883 patients, and the impact of MDT evaluation on the...

  9. Total mesorectal excision for mid and low rectal cancer: Laparoscopic vs robotic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feroci, Francesco; Vannucchi, Andrea; Bianchi, Paolo Pietro; Cantafio, Stefano; Garzi, Alessia; Formisano, Giampaolo; Scatizzi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare the short- and long-term outcomes of laparoscopic and robotic surgery for middle and low rectal cancer. METHODS: This is a retrospective study on a prospectively collected database containing 111 patients who underwent minimally invasive rectal resection with total mesorectal excision (TME) with curative intent between January 2008 and December 2014 (robot, n = 53; laparoscopy, n = 58). The patients all had a diagnosis of middle and low rectal adenocarcinoma with stage I-III disease. The median follow-up period was 37.4 mo. Perioperative results, morbidity a pathological data were evaluated and compared. The 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were calculated and compared. RESULTS: Patients were comparable in terms of preoperative and demographic parameters. The median surgery time was 192 min for laparoscopic TME (L-TME) and 342 min for robotic TME (R-TME) (P robotic group patients (8 d for L-TME and 6 d for R-TME, P robotic group (18 for R-TME, 11 for L-TME, P robotic technique showed some advantages in rectal surgery that should be validated by further studies. PMID:27053852

  10. Negative impact of pretreatment anemia on local control after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and surgery for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although anemia is considered to be a contributor to intra-tumoral hypoxia and tumor resistance to ionizing radiation in cancer patients, the impact of pretreatment anemia on local control after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) and surgery for rectal cancer remains unclear. We reviewed the records of 247 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were treated with NACRT followed by curative-intent surgery. The patients with anemia before NACRT (36.0%, 89/247) achieved less pathologic complete response (pCR) than those without anemia (p = 0.012). The patients with pretreatment anemia had worse 3-year local control than those without pretreatment anemia (86.0% vs. 95.7%, p = 0.005). Multivariate analysis showed that pretreatment anemia (p = 0.035), pathologic tumor and nodal stage (p = 0.020 and 0.032, respectively) were independently significant factors for local control. Pretreatment anemia had negative impacts on pCR and local control among patients who underwent NACRT and surgery for rectal cancer. Strategies maintaining hemoglobin level within normal range could potentially be used to improve local control in rectal cancer patients.

  11. Sphincter preservation for distal rectal cancer--a goal worth achieving at all costs?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mulsow, Jürgen

    2011-02-21

    To assess the merits of currently available treatment options in the management of patients with low rectal cancer, a review of the medical literature pertaining to the operative and non-operative management of low rectal cancer was performed, with particular emphasis on sphincter preservation, oncological outcome, functional outcome, morbidity, quality of life, and patient preference. Low anterior resection (AR) is technically feasible in an increasing proportion of patients with low rectal cancer. The cost of sphincter preservation is the risk of morbidity and poor functional outcome in a significant proportion of patients. Transanal and endoscopic surgery are attractive options in selected patients that can provide satisfactory oncological outcomes while avoiding the morbidity and functional sequelae of open total mesorectal excision. In complete responders to neo-adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, a non-operative approach may prove to be an option. Abdominoperineal excision (APE) imposes a permanent stoma and is associated with significant incidence of perineal morbidity but avoids the risk of poor functional outcome following AR. Quality of life following AR and APE is comparable. Given the choice, most patients will choose AR over APE, however patients following APE positively appraise this option. In striving toward sphincter preservation the challenge is not only to achieve the best possible oncological outcome, but also to ensure that patients with low rectal cancer have realistic and accurate expectations of their treatment choice so that the best possible overall outcome can be obtained by each individual.

  12. Sphincter preservation for distal rectal cancer--a goal worth achieving at all costs?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mulsow, Jurgen

    2012-02-01

    To assess the merits of currently available treatment options in the management of patients with low rectal cancer, a review of the medical literature pertaining to the operative and non-operative management of low rectal cancer was performed, with particular emphasis on sphincter preservation, oncological outcome, functional outcome, morbidity, quality of life, and patient preference. Low anterior resection (AR) is technically feasible in an increasing proportion of patients with low rectal cancer. The cost of sphincter preservation is the risk of morbidity and poor functional outcome in a significant proportion of patients. Transanal and endoscopic surgery are attractive options in selected patients that can provide satisfactory oncological outcomes while avoiding the morbidity and functional sequelae of open total mesorectal excision. In complete responders to neo-adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, a non-operative approach may prove to be an option. Abdominoperineal excision (APE) imposes a permanent stoma and is associated with significant incidence of perineal morbidity but avoids the risk of poor functional outcome following AR. Quality of life following AR and APE is comparable. Given the choice, most patients will choose AR over APE, however patients following APE positively appraise this option. In striving toward sphincter preservation the challenge is not only to achieve the best possible oncological outcome, but also to ensure that patients with low rectal cancer have realistic and accurate expectations of their treatment choice so that the best possible overall outcome can be obtained by each individual.

  13. A new method of assessing the surgical margin in rectal carcinoma—using nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lianhuang; Chen, Zhifen; Kang, Deyong; Deng, Tongxin; Jiang, Liwei; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Xing; Jiang, Weizhong; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Guan, Guoxian; Chi, Pan; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, surgical resection is still the most effective treatment strategy for rectal carcinoma and one of the most important factors affecting whether the operation is successful or not is the surgical margin determination, especially in the distal rectal carcinoma which should take the sphincter-preserving issue into consideration. However, until recently no reliable evaluation method has been developed for this purpose. There are some shortcomings in intraoperative negative surgical margin assessment such as either lack of enough detailed information of biological tissues or the fact that it is time-consuming. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM)—nonlinear optical microscopy, which is based on the nonlinear optical process two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), has the ability to label freely and noninvasively visualize tissue micro-architecture at the sub-cellular level. The advantage of providing high contrast and high resolution biomedical image in real time makes MPM have a wide range of applications in life sciences. In this study, we introduced MPM to identify the boundary between normal and abnormal rectal tissues. MPM images clearly exhibit biological tissue microstructure and its morphological changes in the regions of our interest, which enable it to determine the surgical margin in rectal carcinoma. It can be foreseen that once MPM imaging system is used in clinical examination, it will greatly improve the accuracy of surgical resection.

  14. Giant sigmoid diverticulum with coexisting metastatic rectal carcinoma: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sasi, Walid

    2010-01-01

    Giant diverticulum of the colon is a rare but clinically significant condition, usually regarded as a complication of an already existing colonic diverticular disease. This is the first report of a giant diverticulum of the colon with a co-existing rectal carcinoma.

  15. Negative impact of pretreatment anemia on local control after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and surgery for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hye Bin; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2012-09-15

    Although anemia is considered to be a contributor to intra-tumoral hypoxia and tumor resistance to ionizing radiation in cancer patients, the impact of pretreatment anemia on local control after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) and surgery for rectal cancer remains unclear. We reviewed the records of 247 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were treated with NACRT followed by curative-intent surgery. The patients with anemia before NACRT (36.0%, 89/247) achieved less pathologic complete response (pCR) than those without anemia (p = 0.012). The patients with pretreatment anemia had worse 3-year local control than those without pretreatment anemia (86.0% vs. 95.7%, p = 0.005). Multivariate analysis showed that pretreatment anemia (p = 0.035), pathologic tumor and nodal stage (p = 0.020 and 0.032, respectively) were independently significant factors for local control. Pretreatment anemia had negative impacts on pCR and local control among patients who underwent NACRT and surgery for rectal cancer. Strategies maintaining hemoglobin level within normal range could potentially be used to improve local control in rectal cancer patients.

  16. ORGAN-SPARING SURGERY FOR RECTAL CANCER: EVOLUTION, CURRENT TRENDS, AND PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Tamrazov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the main stages of the development of sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. An historical look at this issue from the standpoint of research of past years in our country and abroad, as well as analysis of current sphincter-preserving surgery and future directions in this area.

  17. Ezrin expression in rectal cancer predicts time to development of local recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jörgren, Fredrik; Nilbert, Mef; Rambech, Eva; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Lindmark, Gudrun

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Improved outcome after rectal cancer surgery requires identification of novel risk factors of tumour recurrence in order to personalise therapy, that is, enhanced selection of high-risk patients to additional radiochemotherapy or intensified follow-up. In several tumour types, including ...

  18. Consequence of Restaging After Neoadjuvant Treatment for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, Cees; Tjalma, J. J. J.; Hospers, G. A. P.; Van Geldere, D.; de Groot, J.W.B.; Wiegman, E. M.; Van't Veer-ten Kate, M.; Havenith, M. G.; Vecht, J.; Beukema, J. C.; Kats-Ugurlu, G.; Mahesh, S V K; van Etten, B.; Havenga, Klaas; Burgerhof, J. G. M.; de Groot, D. J. A.; Cappel, W. H. de Vos Tot Nederveen

    2015-01-01

    Locally advanced rectal cancer is customarily treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by a total mesorectal excision. During the course of CRT, previously non-detectable distant metastases can appear. Therefore, a restaging CT scan of the chest and abdomen was performed prior to su

  19. Surgical treatment for rectal cancer: An international perspective on what the medical gastroenterologist needs to know

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rolv-Ole Lindsetmo; Yong-Geul Joh; Conor P Delaney

    2008-01-01

    Rectal cancer accounts for one third of all colorectal cancers.The age adjusted death rates from colorectal cancer have declined over recent decades due to a combination of colorectal cancer screening,improved diagnostic tests,improved standardized surgical technique,improved medical support,neoadjuvant chemotherapies and radiation treatment or combinations of these.Because of complex treatment algorithms,use of multidisciplinary teams in the management of rectal cancer patients has also been popularized.Medical gastroenterologists performing colonoscopies are frequently the first health care provider to raise the suspicion of a rectal cancer.Although the diagnosis depends on histological confirmation,the endoscopic presentation is almost diagnostic in many cases.In order to meet the patient's immediate needs for information,it is important that the endoscopist has knowledge about the investigations and treatment options that will be required for their patient.The aim of this paper is to describe the modern preoperative investigations and operative procedures commonly offered to rectal cancer patients taking into account perspectives of three colorectal surgeons,practicing in the USA,Europe and Asia.

  20. Evaluation of a rabbit rectal VX2 carcinoma model using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Mei Liang; Guang-Yu Tang; Ying-Sheng Cheng; Bi Zhou

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To establish a rabbit rectal VX2 carcinoma model for the study of rectal carcinoma. METHODS: A suspension of VX2 cells was injected into the rectum wall under the guidance of X-ray fluoroscopy. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to observe tumor growth and metastasis at different phases. Pathological changes and spontaneous survival time of the rabbits were recorded. RESULTS: Two weeks after VX2 cell implantation, the tumor diameter ranged 4.1-5.8 mm and the success implantation rate was 81.8%. CT scanning showed low-density foci of the tumor in the rectum wall, while enhanced CT scanning demonstrated asymmetrical intensification in tumor foci. MRI scanning showed a low signal of the tumor on T1-weighted imaging and a high signal of the tumor on T2-weighted imaging. Both types of signals were intensified with enhanced MRI. Metastases to the liver and lung could be observed 6 wk after VX2 cell implantation, and a large area of necrosis appeared in the primary tumor. The spontaneous survival time of rabbits with cachexia and multiple organ failure was about 7 wk after VX2 cell implantation. CONCLUSION: The rabbit rectal VX2 carcinoma model we established has a high stability, and can be used in the study of rectal carcinoma.