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Sample records for adjuvanted swine origin

  1. Poly I:C adjuvanted inactivated swine influenza vaccine induces heterologous protective immunity in pigs.

    Thomas, Milton; Wang, Zhao; Sreenivasan, Chithra C; Hause, Ben M; Gourapura J Renukaradhya; Li, Feng; Francis, David H; Kaushik, Radhey S; Khatri, Mahesh

    2015-01-15

    Swine influenza is widely prevalent in swine herds in North America and Europe causing enormous economic losses and a public health threat. Pigs can be infected by both avian and mammalian influenza viruses and are sources of generation of reassortant influenza viruses capable of causing pandemics in humans. Current commercial vaccines provide satisfactory immunity against homologous viruses; however, protection against heterologous viruses is not adequate. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of an intranasal Poly I:C adjuvanted UV inactivated bivalent swine influenza vaccine consisting of Swine/OH/24366/07 H1N1 and Swine/CO/99 H3N2, referred as PAV, in maternal antibody positive pigs against an antigenic variant and a heterologous swine influenza virus challenge. Groups of three-week-old commercial-grade pigs were immunized intranasally with PAV or a commercial vaccine (CV) twice at 2 weeks intervals. Three weeks after the second immunization, pigs were challenged with the antigenic variant Swine/MN/08 H1N1 (MN08) and the heterologous Swine/NC/10 H1N2 (NC10) influenza virus. Antibodies in serum and respiratory tract, lung lesions, virus shedding in nasal secretions and virus load in lungs were assessed. Intranasal administration of PAV induced challenge viruses specific-hemagglutination inhibition- and IgG antibodies in the serum and IgA and IgG antibodies in the respiratory tract. Importantly, intranasal administration of PAV provided protection against the antigenic variant MN08 and the heterologous NC10 swine influenza viruses as evidenced by significant reductions in lung virus load, gross lung lesions and significantly reduced shedding of challenge viruses in nasal secretions. These results indicate that Poly I:C or its homologues may be effective as vaccine adjuvants capable of generating cross-protective immunity against antigenic variants/heterologous swine influenza viruses in pigs.

  2. Modern adjuvants do not enhance the efficacy of an inactivated African swine fever virus vaccine preparation.

    Blome, Sandra; Gabriel, Claudia; Beer, Martin

    2014-06-30

    African swine fever (ASF) is among the most devastating viral diseases of pigs. In recent years, the disease has spread alarmingly. Despite intensive research activities, promising vaccine candidates are still lacking. For this reason, a study was undertaken to re-assess inactivated ASFV preparations with state-of-the-art adjuvants. Inactivated preparations of ASF virus (ASFV) "Armenia08" were adjuvanted with either Polygen™ or Emulsigen(®)-D, respectively, and used to immunize six weaner pigs two times with a three-week interval. Six weeks after the first immunization, animals were challenged with the homologues highly virulent ASFV. Although ASFV-specific antibodies were detectable in all but one vaccinated animal prior to challenge, no protective effect of immunization was observed. All animals developed acute-lethal ASF and had to be euthanized within eleven days post challenge. A slightly accelerated clinical course in vaccinees could even indicate an antibody dependent enhancement, which could also influence efficacy of other vaccine approaches.

  3. Characterization of a novel oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant for swine influenza virus and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccines.

    Galliher-Beckley, A; Pappan, L K; Madera, Rachel; Burakova, Y; Waters, A; Nickles, M; Li, X; Nietfeld, J; Schlup, J R; Zhong, Q; McVey, S; Dritz, S S; Shi, J

    2015-06-01

    Vaccines consisting of subunit or inactivated bacteria/virus and potent adjuvants are widely used to control and prevent infectious diseases. Because inactivated and subunit antigens are often less antigenic than live microbes, a growing need exists for the development of new and improved vaccine adjuvants that can elicit rapid and long-lasting immunity. Here we describe the development and characterization of a novel oil-in-water emulsion, OW-14. OW-14 contains low-cost plant-based emulsifiers and was added to antigen at a ratio of 1:3 with simple hand mixing. OW-14 was stable for prolonged periods of time at temperatures ranging from 4 to 40°C and could be sterilized by autoclaving. Our results showed that OW-14 adjuvanted inactivated swine influenza viruses (SIV; H3N2 and H1N1) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyo) vaccines could be safely administered to piglets in two doses, three weeks apart. Injection sites were monitored and no adverse reactions were observed. Vaccinated pigs developed high and prolonged antibody titers to both SIV and M. hyo. Interestingly, antibody titers were either comparable or greater than those produced by commercially available FluSure (SIV) or RespiSure (M. hyo) vaccines. We also found that OW-14 can induce high antibody responses in pigs that were vaccinated with a decreased antigen dose. This study provides direct evidence that we have developed an easy-to-use and low-cost emulsion that can act as a powerful adjuvant in two common types of swine vaccines.

  4. It is not just AIV: From avian to swine-origin influenza virus

    GAO George F; SUN YePing

    2010-01-01

    @@ In March and early April 2009, a new swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) emerged in Mexico and the United States.The virus spreads worldwide by human-to-human transmission.Within a few weeks, it reached a pandemic level.The virus is a novel reassorment virus.It contains gene fragments of influenza virus of swine, avian and human emerged from a triple reassortant virus circulating in North American swine.The source triple-reassortant itself comprised genes derived from avian (PB2 and PA), human H3N2 (PB1) and classical swine (HA, NP and NS) lineages.In contrast, the NA and M gene segments have their origin in the Eurasian avian-like swine H1N1 lineage (Figure 1).

  5. Origins of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic in swine in Mexico.

    Mena, Ignacio; Nelson, Martha I; Quezada-Monroy, Francisco; Dutta, Jayeeta; Cortes-Fernández, Refugio; Lara-Puente, J Horacio; Castro-Peralta, Felipa; Cunha, Luis F; Trovão, Nídia S; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Rambaut, Andrew; van Bakel, Harm; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2016-06-28

    Asia is considered an important source of influenza A virus (IAV) pandemics, owing to large, diverse viral reservoirs in poultry and swine. However, the zoonotic origins of the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic virus (pdmH1N1) remain unclear, due to conflicting evidence from swine and humans. There is strong evidence that the first human outbreak of pdmH1N1 occurred in Mexico in early 2009. However, no related swine viruses have been detected in Mexico or any part of the Americas, and to date the most closely related ancestor viruses were identified in Asian swine. Here, we use 58 new whole-genome sequences from IAVs collected in Mexican swine to establish that the swine virus responsible for the 2009 pandemic evolved in central Mexico. This finding highlights how the 2009 pandemic arose from a region not considered a pandemic risk, owing to an expansion of IAV diversity in swine resulting from long-distance live swine trade.

  6. The avian-origin H3N2 canine influenza virus has limited replication in swine

    A genetically and antigenically distinct H3N2 canine influenza of avian-origin was detected in March of 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. A subsequent outbreak was reported with over 1,000 dogs in the Midwest affected. The potential for canine-to-swine transmission was unknown. Experimental infection in pi...

  7. Viral meningitis epidemics and a single, recent, recombinant and anthroponotic origin of swine vesicular disease virus

    Bruhn, Christian Anders Wathne; Nielsen, Sandra Cathrine Abel; Samaniego Castruita, Jose Alfredo;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) is a close relative of the human Enterovirus B serotype, coxsackievirus B5. As the etiological agent of a significant emergent veterinary disease, several studies have attempted to explain its origin. However, several key questions r...... stating that SVDV originated through co-infection, recombination, and a single anthroponotic event, during large viral meningitis epidemics around 1960/1961 involving the ancestral serotypes. The exact geographical origin of SVDV may remain untestable due to historical aspects....

  8. Adjuvant effects of invariant NKT cell ligand potentiates the innate and adaptive immunity to an inactivated H1N1 swine influenza virus vaccine in pigs.

    Dwivedi, Varun; Manickam, Cordelia; Dhakal, Santosh; Binjawadagi, Basavaraj; Ouyang, Kang; Hiremath, Jagadish; Khatri, Mahesh; Hague, Jacquelyn Gervay; Lee, Chang Won; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J

    2016-04-15

    Pigs are considered as the source of some of the emerging human flu viruses. Inactivated swine influenza virus (SwIV) vaccine has been in use in the US swine herds, but it failed to control the flu outbreaks. The main reason has been attributed to lack of induction of strong local mucosal immunity in the respiratory tract. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell is a unique T cell subset, and activation of iNKT cell using its ligand α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) has been shown to potentiate the cross-protective immunity to inactivated influenza virus vaccine candidates in mice. Recently, we discovered iNKT cell in pig and demonstrated its activation using α-GalCer. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of an inactivated H1N1 SwIV coadministered with α-GalCer intranasally against a homologous viral challenge. Our results demonstrated the potent adjuvant effects of α-GalCer in potentiating both innate and adaptive immune responses to SwIV Ags in the lungs of pigs, which resulted in reduction in the lung viral load by 3 logs compared to without adjuvant. Immunologically, in the lungs of pigs vaccinated with α-GalCer an increased virus specific IgA response, IFN-α secretion and NK cell-cytotoxicity was observed. In addition, iNKT cell-stimulation enhanced the secretion of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-12) and reduced the production of immunosuppressive cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β) in the lungs of pigs⋅ In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time iNKT cell adjuvant effects in pigs to SwIV Ags through augmenting the innate and adaptive immune responses in the respiratory tract.

  9. Viral meningitis epidemics and a single, recent, recombinant and anthroponotic origin of swine vesicular disease virus

    Bruhn, Christian Anders Wathne; Nielsen, Sandra Cathrine Abel; Samaniego Castruita, Jose Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) is a close relative of the human Enterovirus B serotype, coxsackievirus B5. As the etiological agent of a significant emergent veterinary disease, several studies have attempted to explain its origin. However, several key questions...... remain, including the full biological ancestry of the virus, and its geographical and temporal origin. METHODOLOGY: We sequenced near-complete genomes of 27 SVDV and 13 coxsackievirus B5 samples, all originally isolated between 1966 and 2006, and analysed these in conjunction with existing sequences...... and historical information. RESULTS: While analyses incorporating 24 additional near-complete SVDV genomic sequences indicate clear signs of within-SVDV recombination, all 51 SVDV isolates remain monophyletic. This supports a hypothesis of a single anthroponotic transfer origin. Analysis of individual coding...

  10. Intradermal vaccination with un-adjuvanted sub-unit vaccines triggers skin innate immunity and confers protective respiratory immunity in domestic swine.

    Le Luduec, Jean-Benoît; Debeer, Sabine; Piras, Fabienne; Andréoni, Christine; Boudet, Florence; Laurent, Philippe; Kaiserlian, Dominique; Dubois, Bertrand

    2016-02-10

    Intradermal (ID) vaccination constitutes a promising approach to induce anti-infectious immunity. This route of immunization has mostly been studied with influenza split-virion vaccines. However, the efficacy of ID vaccination for sub-unit vaccines in relation to underlying skin innate immunity remains to be explored for wider application in humans. Relevant animal models that more closely mimic human skin immunity than the widely used mouse models are therefore necessary. Here, we show in domestic swine, which shares striking anatomic and functional properties with human skin, that a single ID delivery of pseudorabies virus (PRV) glycoproteins without added adjuvant is sufficient to trigger adaptive cellular and humoral immune responses, and to confer protection from a lethal respiratory infection with PRV. Analysis of early events at the skin injection site revealed up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine genes, recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes and accumulation of inflammatory DC. We further show that the sustained induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes results from the combined effects of skin puncture, liquid injection in the dermis and viral antigens. These data highlight that immune protection against respiratory infection can be induced by ID vaccination with a subunit vaccine and reveal that adjuvant requirements are circumvented by the mechanical and antigenic stress caused by ID injection, which triggers innate immunity and mobilization of inflammatory DC at the immunization site. ID vaccination with sub-unit vaccines may thus represent a safe and efficient solution for protection against respiratory infections in swine and possibly also in humans, given the similarity of skin structure and function in both species.

  11. Swine-origin influenza-virus-induced acute lung injury:Novel or classical pathogenesis?

    Naoyoshi; Maeda; Toshimitsu; Uede

    2010-01-01

    Influenza viruses are common respiratory pathogens in humans and can cause serious infection that leads to the development of pneumonia.Due to their hostrange diversity,genetic and antigenic diversity,and potential to reassort genetically in vivo,influenza A viruses are continual sources of novel influenza strains that lead to the emergence of periodic epidemics and outbreaks in humans.Thus,newly emerging viral diseases are always major threats to public health.In March 2009,a novel influenza virus suddenly emerged and caused a worldwide pandemic.The novel pandemic influenza virus was genetically and antigenically distinct from previous seasonal human influenza A/H1N1 viruses;it was identified to have originated from pigs,and further genetic analysis revealed it as a subtype of A/H1N1,thus later called a swine-origin influenza virus A/H1N1.Since the novel virus emerged,epidemiological surveys and research on experimental animal models have been conducted,and characteristics of the novel influenza virus have been determined but the exact mechanisms of pulmonary pathogenesis remain to be elucidated.In this editorial,we summa-rize and discuss the recent pandemic caused by the novel swine-origin influenza virus A/H1N1 with a focus on the mechanism of pathogenesis to obtain an insight into potential therapeutic strategies.

  12. Distribution of sialic acid receptors and influenza A viruses of avian and swine origin and in experimentally infected pigs

    Trebbien, Ramona; Larsen, Lars Erik; Viuff, Birgitte M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Pigs are considered susceptible to influenza A virus infections from different host origins because earlier studies have shown that they have receptors for both avian (sialic acid-alpha-2,3-terminal saccharides (SAalpha- 2,3)) and swine/human (SA-alpha-2,6) influenza viruses in the up......Background: Pigs are considered susceptible to influenza A virus infections from different host origins because earlier studies have shown that they have receptors for both avian (sialic acid-alpha-2,3-terminal saccharides (SAalpha- 2,3)) and swine/human (SA-alpha-2,6) influenza viruses...

  13. First report of multiresistance gene cfr in Enterococcus species casseliflavus and gallinarum of swine origin.

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Yang; Dai, Lei; Wu, Congming; Shen, Jianzhong

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence and genetic environment of the multiresistance gene cfr in Enterococcus species of swine origin. Twenty-five cfr-carrying Enterococcus isolates were collected from swine in Beijing, Guangzhou, and Shandong, China. The isolates consist of 24 Enterococcus casseliflavus and one Enterococcus gallinarum isolate, and exhibited six SmaI PFGE patterns. The cfr gene was located on plasmids in all isolates except E. casseliflavus En83, in which cfr was located on the chromosomal DNA. The cfr gene environments in most of these isolates contain DNA sequences similar to pEF-01, which was first found in Enterococcus. However, inverse PCR analysis suggested that the cfr-carrying circular forms might be different from pEF-01. The circular forms in Eg51 and its transconjugant, and En23, En10, and En94 are similar to the circular form in pEF-01, except for the truncated IS1216, which is replaced by a transposase of the IS256 family in En24. The cfr circular form could not be detected in either En77 or En83, and the same cfr-carrying segments of ∼ 10 kb had only 3500bp of sequence similar to pEF-01. This is the first report of cfr gene in E. casseliflavus and E. gallinarum. The potential dissemination of the multidrug resistance gene amongst different bacterial species, especially in enterococci of human and animal origins, is concerning and should be closely monitored.

  14. Reassortment Networks and the evolution of pandemic H1N1 swine-origin influenza.

    Bokhari, Shahid H; Pomeroy, Laura W; Janies, Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    Prior research developed Reassortment Networks to reconstruct the evolution of segmented viruses under both reassortment and mutation. We report their application to the swine-origin pandemic H1N1 virus (S-OIV). A database of all influenza A viruses, for which complete genome sequences were available in Genbank by October 2009, was created and dynamic programming was used to compute distances between all corresponding segments. A reassortment network was created to obtain the minimum cost evolutionary paths from all viruses to the exemplar S-OIV A/California/04/2009. This analysis took 35 hours on the Cray Extreme Multithreading (XMT) supercomputer, which has special hardware to permit efficient parallelization. Six specific H1N1/H1N2 bottleneck viruses were identified that almost always lie on minimum cost paths to S-OIV. We conjecture that these viruses are crucial to S-OIV evolution and worthy of careful study from a molecular biology viewpoint. In phylogenetics, ancestors are typically medians that have no functional constraints. In our method, ancestors are not inferred, but rather chosen from previously observed viruses along a path of mutation and reassortment leading to the target virus. This specificity and functional constraint render our results actionable for further experiments in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Distribution of sialic acid receptors and influenza A viruses of avian and swine origin and in experimentally infected pigs

    Trebbien, Ramona; Larsen, Lars Erik; Viuff, Birgitte M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Pigs are considered susceptible to influenza A virus infections from different host origins because earlier studies have shown that they have receptors for both avian (sialic acid-alpha-2,3-terminal saccharides (SAalpha- 2,3)) and swine/human (SA-alpha-2,6) influenza viruses...... in the upper respiratory tract. Furthermore, experimental and natural infections in pigs have been reported with influenza A virus from avian and human sources. Methods: This study investigated the receptor distribution in the entire respiratory tract of pigs using specific lectins Maackia Amurensis (MAA) I......, and II, and Sambucus Nigra (SNA). Furthermore, the predilection sites of swine influenza virus (SIV) subtypes H1N1 and H1N2 as well as avian influenza virus (AIV) subtype H4N6 were investigated in the respiratory tract of experimentally infected pigs using immunohistochemical methods. Results: SIV...

  16. Detection of swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) viruses using a paired surface plasma waves biosensor

    Su, Li-Chen; Chang, Ying-Feng; Li, Ying-Chang; Hsieh, Jo-Ping; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Chou, Chien

    2010-08-01

    In order to enhance the sensitivity of conventional rapid test technique for the detection of swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) viruses (S-OIVs), we used a paired surface plasma waves biosensor (PSPWB) based on SPR in conjunction with an optical heterodyne technique. Experimentally, PSPWB showed a 125-fold improvement at least in the S-OIV detection as compared to conventional enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, the detection limit of the PSPWB for the S-OIV detection was enhanced 250-fold in buffer at least in comparison with that of conventional rapid influenza diagnostic test.

  17. Swine-Origin Influenza A Outbreak 2009 at Shinshu University, Japan

    Washizuka Shinsuke

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A worldwide outbreak of swine flu H1N1 pandemic influenza occurred in April 2009. To determine the mechanism underlying the spread of infection, we prospectively evaluated a survey implemented at a local university. Methods Between August 2009 and March 2010, we surveyed 3 groups of subjects: 2318 children in six schools attached to the Faculty of Education, 11424 university students, and 3344 staff members. Subjects with influenza-like symptoms who were diagnosed with swine flu at hospitals or clinics were defined as swine flu patients and asked to make a report using a standardized form. Results After the start of the pandemic, a total of 2002 patients (11.7% were registered in the survey. These patients included 928 schoolchildren (40.0%, 1016 university students (8.9%, and 58 staff members (1.7%. The incidence in schoolchildren was significantly higher than in the other 2 groups (P Conclusion Schoolchildren and university students are vulnerable to swine flu, suggesting that avoidance of close contact, especially among these young people, may be effective way in controlling future severe influenza pandemics, especially at educational institutions.

  18. A simple Pichia pastoris fermentation and downstream processing strategy for making recombinant pandemic Swine Origin Influenza a virus Hemagglutinin protein.

    Athmaram, T N; Singh, Anil Kumar; Saraswat, Shweta; Srivastava, Saurabh; Misra, Princi; Kameswara Rao, M; Gopalan, N; Rao, P V L

    2013-02-01

    The present Influenza vaccine manufacturing process has posed a clear impediment to initiation of rapid mass vaccination against spreading pandemic influenza. New vaccine strategies are therefore needed that can accelerate the vaccine production. Pichia offers several advantages for rapid and economical bulk production of recombinant proteins and, hence, can be attractive alternative for producing an effective influenza HA based subunit vaccine. The recombinant Pichia harboring the transgene was subjected to fed-batch fermentation at 10 L scale. A simple fermentation and downstream processing strategy is developed for high-yield secretory expression of the recombinant Hemagglutinin protein of pandemic Swine Origin Influenza A virus using Pichia pastoris via fed-batch fermentation. Expression and purification were optimized and the expressed recombinant Hemagglutinin protein was verified by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blot and MALDI-TOF analysis. In this paper, we describe a fed-batch fermentation protocol for the secreted production of Swine Influenza A Hemagglutinin protein in the P. pastoris GS115 strain. We have shown that there is a clear relationship between product yield and specific growth rate. The fed-batch fermentation and downstream processing methods optimized in the present study have immense practical application for high-level production of the recombinant H1N1 HA protein in a cost effective way using P. pastoris.

  19. Molecular epidemiology of novel swine origin influenza virus (S-OIV from Gwalior, India, 2009

    Shukla Jyoti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The H1N1pandemic virus is a newly emergent human influenza A virus that is closely related to a number of currently circulating pig viruses in the 'classic North American' and 'Eurasian' swine influenza virus lineages and thus referred as S-OIV. Since the first reports of the virus in humans in April 2009, H1N1 virus has spread to 168 countries and overseas territories. India also witnessed severe H1N1 pandemic virus epidemic with considerable morbidity and mortality in different parts starting from May 2009. Findings The suspected swine flu outbreak from Gwalior India during October- December 2009 was confirmed through S-OIV HA gene specific RT-LAMP and real time RT-PCR. Positive samples through CDC real time and Lamp assay were further processed for isolation of the virus. Full HA gene sequencing of the H1N1 isolates of Gwalior, India revealed 99% homology with California and other circulating novel swine flu viruses. Three major changes were observed at nucleotide level, while two major amino acid shifts were observed at the position C9W and I30M corresponding to the ORF with prototype strain. The HA gene sequence phylogeny revealed the circulation of two genetically distinct lineages belonging to Clade VII and Clade I of S-OIV. Conclusions Our findings also supported the earlier report about circulation of mixed genogroups of S-OIV in India. Therefore continuous monitoring of the genetic makeup of this newly emergent virus is essential to understand its evolution within the country.

  20. Genetic Analysis of Influenza A/H1N1 of Swine Origin Virus (SOIV) Circulating in Central and South America

    Sovero, Merly; Garcia, Josefina; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto; Gomez, Jorge; Aleman, Washington; Chicaiza, Wilson; Barrantes, Melvin; Sanchez, Felix; Jimenez, Mirna; Comach, Guillermo; de Rivera, Ivette Lorenzana; Barboza, Alma; Aguayo, Nicolas; Kochel, Tadeusz

    2010-01-01

    Since the first detection of swine origin virus (SOIV) on March 28, 2009, the virus has spread worldwide and oseltamivir-resistant strains have already been identified in the past months. Here, we show the phylogenetic analysis of 63 SOIV isolates from eight countries in Central and South America, and their sensitivity to oseltamivir. PMID:20810843

  1. Impact of information on intentions to vaccinate in a potential epidemic: Swine-origin Influenza A (H1N1).

    Chanel, Olivier; Luchini, Stéphane; Massoni, Sébastien; Vergnaud, Jean-Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Vaccination campaigns to prevent the spread of epidemics are successful only if the targeted populations subscribe to the recommendations of health authorities. However, because compulsory vaccination is hardly conceivable in modern democracies, governments need to convince their populations through efficient and persuasive information campaigns. In the context of the swine-origin A (H1N1) 2009 pandemic, we use an interactive study among the general public in the South of France, with 175 participants, to explore what type of information can induce change in vaccination intentions at both aggregate and individual levels. We find that individual attitudes to vaccination are based on rational appraisal of the situation, and that it is information of a purely scientific nature that has the only significant positive effect on intention to vaccinate.

  2. Computer-aided assessment of pulmonary disease in novel swine-origin H1N1 influenza on CT

    Yao, Jianhua; Dwyer, Andrew J.; Summers, Ronald M.; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2011-03-01

    The 2009 pandemic is a global outbreak of novel H1N1 influenza. Radiologic images can be used to assess the presence and severity of pulmonary infection. We develop a computer-aided assessment system to analyze the CT images from Swine-Origin Influenza A virus (S-OIV) novel H1N1 cases. The technique is based on the analysis of lung texture patterns and classification using a support vector machine (SVM). Pixel-wise tissue classification is computed from the SVM value. The method was validated on four H1N1 cases and ten normal cases. We demonstrated that the technique can detect regions of pulmonary abnormality in novel H1N1 patients and differentiate these regions from visually normal lung (area under the ROC curve is 0.993). This technique can also be applied to differentiate regions infected by different pulmonary diseases.

  3. Crystal structure of swine major histocompatibility complex class I SLA-1 0401 and identification of 2009 pandemic swine-origin influenza A H1N1 virus cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope peptides.

    Zhang, Nianzhi; Qi, Jianxun; Feng, Sijia; Gao, Feng; Liu, Jun; Pan, Xiaocheng; Chen, Rong; Li, Qirun; Chen, Zhaosan; Li, Xiaoying; Xia, Chun; Gao, George F

    2011-11-01

    The presentation of viral epitopes to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA I) is crucial for swine immunity. To illustrate the structural basis of swine CTL epitope presentation, the first SLA crystal structures, SLA-1 0401, complexed with peptides derived from either 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) swine-origin influenza A virus (S-OIV(NW9); NSDTVGWSW) or Ebola virus (Ebola(AY9); ATAAATEAY) were determined in this study. The overall peptide-SLA-1 0401 structures resemble, as expected, the general conformations of other structure-solved peptide major histocompatibility complexes (pMHC). The major distinction of SLA-1 0401 is that Arg(156) has a "one-ballot veto" function in peptide binding, due to its flexible side chain. S-OIV(NW9) and Ebola(AY9) bind SLA-1 0401 with similar conformations but employ different water molecules to stabilize their binding. The side chain of P7 residues in both peptides is exposed, indicating that the epitopes are "featured" peptides presented by this SLA. Further analyses showed that SLA-1 0401 and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I HLA-A 0101 can present the same peptides, but in different conformations, demonstrating cross-species epitope presentation. CTL epitope peptides derived from 2009 pandemic S-OIV were screened and evaluated by the in vitro refolding method. Three peptides were identified as potential cross-species influenza virus (IV) CTL epitopes. The binding motif of SLA-1 0401 was proposed, and thermostabilities of key peptide-SLA-1 0401 complexes were analyzed by circular dichroism spectra. Our results not only provide the structural basis of peptide presentation by SLA I but also identify some IV CTL epitope peptides. These results will benefit both vaccine development and swine organ-based xenotransplantation.

  4. Chest Radiographic Findings of Novel Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in Children

    Bae, So Young; Hong, Eun Sook; Paik, Sang Hyun; Park, Seong Jin; Cha, Jang Gyu; Lee, Hae Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Yun Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    To analyze chest radiographic findings in children infected with laboratory confirmed novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus. Three hundred seventy-two out of 2,014 children with laboratory confirmed H1N1 infection and who also underwent a chest radiograph from September to November 2009 were enrolled in this study. Patients were divided into in-patients, out-patients, and patients with co-infections and further subdivided into with underlying disease and without underlying disease as well as age (<2 years old, 2-5 years, 5-10 years, 10-18 years old). The initial radiographs were evaluated for radiographic findings and the anatomic distribution of abnormalities. The initial radiographs were abnormal in 154 (41.39%) patients. The predominant radiographic findings were peribronchial wall opacity found in 85 (22.84%) patients and hyperinflation observed in 69 (18.54%) patients. Further, 75 (71.42%) patients exhibited central predominance and the right lower lung zone was also commonly involved. There were statistically significant differences in the radiological findings between in-patient and out-patient groups. However, there were no significant differences in the radiographic findings between in-patients and the co-infection group with respect the presence of underlying disease and age. Initial radiographs of children with laboratory confirmed H1N1 virus were abnormal in 41.39% of cases. The common radiographic findings included peribronchial opacities, hyperinflation, lower lung zonal distribution, and central predominance

  5. Immunization of pigs with an attenuated pseudorabies virus recombinant expressing the haemagglutinin of pandemic swine origin H1N1 influenza A virus.

    Klingbeil, Katharina; Lange, Elke; Teifke, Jens P; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Fuchs, Walter

    2014-04-01

    Pigs can be severely harmed by influenza, and represent important reservoir hosts, in which new human pathogens such as the recent pandemic swine-origin H1N1 influenza A virus can arise by mutation and reassortment of genome segments. To obtain novel, safe influenza vaccines for pigs, and to investigate the antigen-specific immune response, we modified an established live-virus vaccine against Aujeszky's disease of swine, pseudorabies virus (PrV) strain Bartha (PrV-Ba), to serve as vector for the expression of haemagglutinin (HA) of swine-origin H1N1 virus. To facilitate transgene insertion, the genome of PrV-Ba was cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome. HA expression occurred under control of the human or murine cytomegalovirus immediate early promoters (P-HCMV, P-MCMV), but could be substantially enhanced by synthetic introns and adaptation of the codon usage to that of PrV. However, despite abundant expression, the heterologous glycoprotein was not detectably incorporated into mature PrV particles. Replication of HA-expressing PrV in cell culture was only slightly affected compared to that of the parental virus strain. A single immunization of pigs with the PrV vector expressing the codon-optimized HA gene under control of P-MCMV induced high levels of HA-specific antibodies. The vaccinated animals were protected from clinical signs after challenge with a related swine-origin H1N1 influenza A virus, and challenge virus shedding was significantly reduced.

  6. Immunization with the Haemophilus ducreyi hemoglobin receptor HgbA with adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A protects swine from a homologous but not a heterologous challenge.

    Fusco, William G; Afonina, Galyna; Nepluev, Igor; Cholon, Deborah M; Choudhary, Neelima; Routh, Patricia A; Almond, Glenn W; Orndorff, Paul E; Staats, Herman; Hobbs, Marcia M; Leduc, Isabelle; Elkins, Christopher

    2010-09-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiological agent of chancroid, has a strict requirement for heme, which it acquires from its only natural host, humans. Previously, we showed that a vaccine preparation containing the native hemoglobin receptor HgbA purified from H. ducreyi class I strain 35000HP (nHgbAI) and administered with Freund's adjuvant provided complete protection against a homologous challenge. In the current study, we investigated whether nHgbAI dispensed with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), an adjuvant approved for use in humans, offered protection against a challenge with H. ducreyi strain 35000HP expressing either class I or class II HgbA (35000HPhgbAI and 35000HPhgbAII, respectively). Pigs immunized with the nHgbAI/MPL vaccine were protected against a challenge from homologous H. ducreyi strain 35000HPhgbAI but not heterologous strain 35000HPhgbAII, as evidenced by the isolation of only strain 35000HPhgbAII from nHgbAI-immunized pigs. Furthermore, histological analysis of the lesions showed striking differences between mock-immunized and nHgbAI-immunized animals challenged with strains 35000HPhgbAI but not those challenged with strain 35000HPhgbAII. Mock-immunized pigs were not protected from a challenge by either strain. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) activity of the nHgbAI/MPL antiserum was lower than the activity of antiserum from animals immunized with the nHgbAI/Freund's vaccine; however, anti-nHgbAI from both studies bound whole cells of 35000HPhgbAI better than 35000HPhgbAII and partially blocked hemoglobin binding to nHgbAI. In conclusion, despite eliciting lower antibody ELISA activity than the nHgbAI/Freund's, the nHgbAI/MPL vaccine provided protection against a challenge with homologous but not heterologous H. ducreyi, suggesting that a bivalent HgbA vaccine may be needed.

  7. Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) isolates of swine origin form robust biofilms.

    Nicholson, Tracy L; Shore, Sarah M; Smith, Tara C; Frana, Timothy S; Fraena, Timothy S

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization of livestock animals is common and prevalence rates for pigs have been reported to be as high as 49%. Mechanisms contributing to the persistent carriage and high prevalence rates of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) strains in swine herds and production facilities have not been investigated. One explanation for the high prevalence of MRSA in swine herds is the ability of these organisms to exist as biofilms. In this report, the ability of swine LA-MRSA strains, including ST398, ST9, and ST5, to form biofilms was quantified and compared to several swine and human isolates. The contribution of known biofilm matrix components, polysaccharides, proteins and extracellular DNA (eDNA), was tested in all strains as well. All MRSA swine isolates formed robust biofilms similar to human clinical isolates. The addition of Dispersin B had no inhibitory effect on swine MRSA isolates when added at the initiation of biofilm growth or after pre-established mature biofilms formed. In contrast, the addition of proteinase K inhibited biofilm formation in all strains when added at the initiation of biofilm growth and was able to disperse pre-established mature biofilms. Of the LA-MRSA strains tested, we found ST398 strains to be the most sensitive to both inhibition of biofilm formation and dispersal of pre-formed biofilms by DNaseI. Collectively, these findings provide a critical first step in designing strategies to control or eliminate MRSA in swine herds.

  8. Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA isolates of swine origin form robust biofilms.

    Tracy L Nicholson

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA colonization of livestock animals is common and prevalence rates for pigs have been reported to be as high as 49%. Mechanisms contributing to the persistent carriage and high prevalence rates of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA strains in swine herds and production facilities have not been investigated. One explanation for the high prevalence of MRSA in swine herds is the ability of these organisms to exist as biofilms. In this report, the ability of swine LA-MRSA strains, including ST398, ST9, and ST5, to form biofilms was quantified and compared to several swine and human isolates. The contribution of known biofilm matrix components, polysaccharides, proteins and extracellular DNA (eDNA, was tested in all strains as well. All MRSA swine isolates formed robust biofilms similar to human clinical isolates. The addition of Dispersin B had no inhibitory effect on swine MRSA isolates when added at the initiation of biofilm growth or after pre-established mature biofilms formed. In contrast, the addition of proteinase K inhibited biofilm formation in all strains when added at the initiation of biofilm growth and was able to disperse pre-established mature biofilms. Of the LA-MRSA strains tested, we found ST398 strains to be the most sensitive to both inhibition of biofilm formation and dispersal of pre-formed biofilms by DNaseI. Collectively, these findings provide a critical first step in designing strategies to control or eliminate MRSA in swine herds.

  9. Detection and quantification of classical swine fever virus in air samples originating from infected pigs and experimentally produced aerosols

    Weesendorp, E.; Landman, W.J.M.; Stegeman, A.; Loeffen, W.L.A.

    2008-01-01

    During epidemics of classical swine fever (CSF), neighbourhood infections occurred where none of the 'traditional' routes of transmission like direct animal contact, swill feeding, transport contact or transmission by people could be identified. A hypothesized route of virus introduction for these h

  10. Detection and quantification of classical swine fever virus in air samples originating from infected pigs and experimentally produced aerosols

    Weesendorp, E.; Landman, W.J.M.; Stegeman, J.A.; Loeffen, W.L.A.

    2008-01-01

    During epidemics of classical swine fever (CSF), neighbourhood infections occurred where none of the ‘traditional’ routes of transmission like direct animal contact, swill feeding, transport contact or transmission by people could be identified. A hypothesized route of virus introduction for these h

  11. Introduction of a Novel Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1 Virus into Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 2009

    Swati Kumar

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available On 17 April 2009, novel swine origin influenza A virus (S-OIV cases appeared within the United States. Most influenza A diagnostic assays currently utilized in local clinical laboratories do not allow definitive subtype determination. Detailed subtype analysis of influenza A positive samples in our laboratory allowed early confirmation of a large outbreak of S-OIV in southeastern Wisconsin (SEW. The initial case of S-OIV in SEW was detected on 28 April 2009. All influenza A samples obtained during the 16 week period prior to 28 April 2009, and the first four weeks of the subsequent epidemic were sub typed. Four different multiplex assays were employed, utilizing real time PCR and end point PCR to fully subtype human and animal influenza viral components. Specific detection of S-OIV was developed within days. Data regarding patient demographics and other concurrently circulating viruses were analyzed. During the first four weeks of the epidemic, 679 of 3726 (18.2% adults and children tested for influenza A were identified with S-OIV infection. Thirteen patients (0.34% tested positive for seasonal human subtypes of influenza A during the first two weeks and none in the subsequent 2 weeks of the epidemic. Parainfluenza viruses were the most prevalent seasonal viral agents circulating during the epidemic (of those tested, with detection rates of 12% followed by influenza B and RSV at 1.9% and 0.9% respectively. S-OIV was confirmed on day 2 of instituting subtype testing and within 4 days of report of national cases of S-OIV. Novel surge capacity diagnostic infrastructure exists in many specialty and research laboratories around the world. The capacity for broader influenza A sub typing at the local laboratory level allows timely and accurate detection of novel strains as they emerge in the community, despite the presence of other circulating viruses producing identical illness. This is likely to become increasingly important given the need for

  12. Pneumonia in novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus infection: High-resolution CT findings

    Li Ping, E-mail: pinglee_2000@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 246 Xue Fu Road, Harbin 150086 (China); Su Dongju, E-mail: hyd_sdj@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Respiratory, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 246 Xue Fu Road, Harbin 150086 (China); Zhang Jifeng, E-mail: zjf2005520@163.com [Department of Radiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 246 Xue Fu Road, Harbin 150086 (China); Xia Xudong, E-mail: xiaxd888@163.com [Department of Radiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 246 Xue Fu Road, Harbin 150086 (China); Sui Hong, E-mail: suisuihong@126.com [Department of Statistics, Harbin Medical University, 240 Xue Fu Road, Harbin 150086 (China); Zhao Donghui, E-mail: yhwoooooo@yahoo.com.cn [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of Heilongjiang, 187 Xiang An Street, Harbin 150036 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to review the initial high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings in pneumonia patients with presumed/laboratory-confirmed novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) infection and detect pneumonia earlier. Materials and methods: High-resolution CT (HRCT) findings of 106 patients with presumed/laboratory-confirmed novel S-OIV (H1N1) infection were reviewed. The 106 patients were divided into two groups according to the serious condition of the diseases. The pattern (consolidation, ground-glass, nodules, and reticulation), distribution, and extent of abnormality on the HRCT were evaluated in both groups. The dates of the onset of symptoms of the patients were recorded. Results: The predominant CT findings in the patients at presentation were unilateral or bilateral multifocal asymmetric ground-glass opacities alone (n = 29, 27.4%), with unilateral or bilateral consolidation (n = 50, 47.2%). The consolidation had peribronchovascular and subpleural predominance. The areas of consolidation were found mainly in the posterior, middle and lower regions of the lungs. Reticular opacities were found in 6 cases of the initial MDCT scan. The extent of disease was greater in group 1 patients requiring advanced mechanical ventilation, with diffuse involvement in 19 patients (63.3%) of group 1 patients, and only 15/76 (19.7%) of group 2 patients (p < 0.01, {chi}{sup 2} test). 20 cases (19%) of the 106 patients had small bilateral or unilateral pleural effusions. None had evidence of hilar or mediastinal lymph node enlargement on CT performed at admission or later. Conclusions: The most common radiographic and CT findings in patients with S-OIV infection are unilateral or bilateral ground-glass opacities with or without associated focal or multifocal areas of consolidation. On HRCT, the ground-glass opacities had a predominant peribronchovascular and subpleural distribution. CT plays an important role in the early recognition of severe S

  13. 9 CFR 93.505 - Certificate for swine.

    2010-01-01

    ... freedom from the said diseases of the district of origin only: And provided further, That in the case of... disease of the district of origin only. For domestic swine, the certificate shall also show that the entire region of origin is free of African swine fever and swine vesicular disease and that, for 60...

  14. Differences in X-chromosome transcriptional activity and cholesterol metabolism between placentae from swine breeds from Asian and Western origins.

    Steve R Bischoff

    Full Text Available To gain insight into differences in placental physiology between two swine breeds noted for their dissimilar reproductive performance, that is, the Chinese Meishan and white composite (WC, we examined gene expression profiles of placental tissues collected at 25, 45, 65, 85, and 105 days of gestation by microarrays. Using a linear mixed model, a total of 1,595 differentially expressed genes were identified between the two pig breeds using a false-discovery rate q-value ≤0.05. Among these genes, we identified breed-specific isoforms of XIST, a long non-coding RNA responsible X-chromosome dosage compensation in females. Additionally, we explored the interaction of placental gene expression and chromosomal location by DIGMAP and identified three Sus scrofa X chromosomal bands (Xq13, Xq21, Xp11 that represent transcriptionally active clusters that differ between Meishan and WC during placental development. Also, pathway analysis identified fundamental breed differences in placental cholesterol trafficking and its synthesis. Direct measurement of cholesterol confirmed that the cholesterol content was significantly higher in the Meishan versus WC placentae. Taken together, this work identifies key metabolic pathways that differ in the placentae of two swine breeds noted for differences in reproductive prolificacy.

  15. Efficacy of vaccination with different combinations of MF59-adjuvanted and nonadjuvanted seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines against pandemic H1N1 (2009) influenza virus infection in ferrets.

    van den Brand, Judith M A; Kreijtz, Joost H C M; Bodewes, Rogier; Stittelaar, Koert J; van Amerongen, Geert; Kuiken, Thijs; Simon, James; Fouchier, Ron A M; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rappuoli, Rino; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Osterhaus, Albert D M E

    2011-03-01

    Serum antibodies induced by seasonal influenza or seasonal influenza vaccination exhibit limited or no cross-reactivity against the 2009 pandemic swine-origin influenza virus of the H1N1 subtype (pH1N1). Ferrets immunized once or twice with MF59-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine exhibited significantly reduced lung virus titers but no substantial clinical protection against pH1N1-associated disease. However, priming with MF59-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine significantly increased the efficacy of a pandemic MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine against pH1N1 challenge. Elucidating the mechanism involved in this priming principle will contribute to our understanding of vaccine- and infection-induced correlates of protection. Furthermore, a practical consequence of these findings is that during an emerging pandemic, the implementation of a priming strategy with an available adjuvanted seasonal vaccine to precede the eventual pandemic vaccination campaign may be useful and life-saving.

  16. Molecular characterization of African swine fever virus isolates originating from outbreaks in the Russian Federation between 2007 and 2011.

    Malogolovkin, Alexander; Yelsukova, Alexandra; Gallardo, Carmina; Tsybanov, Sodnom; Kolbasov, Denis

    2012-08-17

    African swine fever is one of the most important viral diseases of pigs and which caused significant economic damage on the pig production worldwide. Nowadays, it is still present on the African continent, in Transcaucasus countries (TCC), on Island of Sardinia and in Russia. Outbreaks of the disease have been reported in Russia for the last four years, affected especially the Southern Federal District of the country. Since 2010, a new outbreak area has been observed in the Northwestern Federal District. In order to study the evolution of African swine fever virus (ASFV) isolates, strains were collected in the Russian Federation from 2007 to 2011 and investigated by means of partial sequencing and fragment length polymorphism. In detail, 7 variable regions, namely B646L, E183L, I196L, B602L, I73R/I329R, I78R/I215L and KP86R were investigated. Phylogenetic analyses revealed 100% nucleotide identity of B646L and E183L gene sequences of all examined isolates. All isolates formed one genetic cluster within genotype II. Moreover, no amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was observed for B602L, I196L, I73R/I329R, and I78R/I215L genes. The flanking primers used to amplify the KP86R gene failed to amplify a product in all the isolates. The obtained data strongly suggests that only one ASFV virus variant caused the outbreaks from 2007 to 2011 in the territory of the Russian Federation.

  17. Early assessment of anxiety and behavioral response to novel swine-origin influenza A(H1N1.

    James Holland Jones

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Since late April, 2009, a novel influenza virus A (H1N1, generally referred to as the "swine flu," has spread around the globe and infected hundreds of thousands of people. During the first few days after the initial outbreak in Mexico, extensive media coverage together with a high degree of uncertainty about the transmissibility and mortality rate associated with the virus caused widespread concern in the population. The spread of an infectious disease can be strongly influenced by behavioral changes (e.g., social distancing during the early phase of an epidemic, but data on risk perception and behavioral response to a novel virus is usually collected with a substantial delay or after an epidemic has run its course. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report the results from an online survey that gathered data (n = 6,249 about risk perception of the Influenza A(H1N1 outbreak during the first few days of widespread media coverage (April 28-May 5, 2009. We find that after an initially high level of concern, levels of anxiety waned along with the perception of the virus as an immediate threat. Overall, our data provide evidence that emotional status mediates behavioral response. Intriguingly, principal component analysis revealed strong clustering of anxiety about swine flu, bird flu and terrorism. All three of these threats receive a great deal of media attention and their fundamental uncertainty is likely to generate an inordinate amount of fear vis-a-vis their actual threat. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that respondents' behavior varies in predictable ways. Of particular interest, we find that affective variables, such as self-reported anxiety over the epidemic, mediate the likelihood that respondents will engage in protective behavior. Understanding how protective behavior such as social distancing varies and the specific factors that mediate it may help with the design of epidemic control strategies.

  18. 9 CFR 94.12 - Pork and pork products from regions where swine vesicular disease exists.

    2010-01-01

    ... from the swine vesicular disease free region of origin to the processing establishment in the swine... swine vesicular disease free region of origin specifying that the pork or pork product involved... where swine vesicular disease exists. 94.12 Section 94.12 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND...

  19. An equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) vectored H1 vaccine protects against challenge with swine-origin influenza virus H1N1.

    Said, Abdelrahman; Damiani, Armando; Ma, Guanggang; Kalthoff, Donata; Beer, Martin; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2011-12-29

    In 2009, a novel swine-origin H1N1 influenza A virus (S-OIV), antigenically and genetically divergent from seasonal H1N1, caused a flu pandemic in humans. Development of an effective vaccine to limit transmission of S-OIV in animal reservoir hosts and from reservoir hosts to humans and animals is necessary. In the present study, we constructed and evaluated a vectored vaccine expressing the H1 hemagglutinin of a recent S-OIV isolate using equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) as the delivery vehicle. Expression of the recombinant protein was demonstrated by immunofluorescence and western blotting and the in vitro growth properties of the modified live vector were found to be comparable to those of the parental virus. The EHV-1-H1 vaccine induced an influenza virus-specific antibody response when inoculated into mice by both the intranasal and subcutaneous routes. Upon challenge infection, protection of vaccinated mice could be demonstrated by reduction of clinical signs and faster virus clearance. Our study shows that an EHV-1-based influenza H1N1 vaccine may be a promising alternative for protection against S-OIV infection.

  20. Protection of pigs against pandemic swine origin H1N1 influenza A virus infection by hemagglutinin- or neuraminidase-expressing attenuated pseudorabies virus recombinants.

    Klingbeil, Katharina; Lange, Elke; Blohm, Ulrike; Teifke, Jens P; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Fuchs, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Influenza is an important respiratory disease of pigs, and may lead to novel human pathogens like the 2009 pandemic H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus (SoIV). Therefore, improved influenza vaccines for pigs are required. Recently, we demonstrated that single intranasal immunization with a hemagglutinin (HA)-expressing pseudorabies virus recombinant of vaccine strain Bartha (PrV-Ba) protected pigs from H1N1 SoIV challenge (Klingbeil et al., 2014). Now we investigated enhancement of efficacy by prime-boost vaccination and/or intramuscular administration. Furthermore, a novel PrV-Ba recombinant expressing codon-optimized N1 neuraminidase (NA) was included. In vitro replication of this virus was only slightly affected compared to parental virus. Unlike HA, the abundantly expressed NA was efficiently incorporated into PrV particles. Immunization of pigs with the two PrV recombinants, either singly or in combination, induced B cell proliferation and the expected SoIV-specific antibodies, whose titers increased substantially after boost vaccination. After immunization of animals with either PrV recombinant H1N1 SoIV challenge virus replication was significantly reduced compared to PrV-Ba vaccinated or naïve controls. Protective efficacy of HA-expressing PrV was higher than of NA-expressing PrV, and not significantly enhanced by combination. Despite higher serum antibody titers obtained after intramuscular immunization, transmission of challenge virus to naïve contact animals was only prevented after intranasal prime-boost vaccination with HA-expressing PrV-Ba.

  1. Using routine surveillance data to estimate the epidemic potential of emerging zoonoses: application to the emergence of US swine origin influenza A H3N2v virus.

    Simon Cauchemez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prior to emergence in human populations, zoonoses such as SARS cause occasional infections in human populations exposed to reservoir species. The risk of widespread epidemics in humans can be assessed by monitoring the reproduction number R (average number of persons infected by a human case. However, until now, estimating R required detailed outbreak investigations of human clusters, for which resources and expertise are not always available. Additionally, existing methods do not correct for important selection and under-ascertainment biases. Here, we present simple estimation methods that overcome many of these limitations. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Our approach is based on a parsimonious mathematical model of disease transmission and only requires data collected through routine surveillance and standard case investigations. We apply it to assess the transmissibility of swine-origin influenza A H3N2v-M virus in the US, Nipah virus in Malaysia and Bangladesh, and also present a non-zoonotic example (cholera in the Dominican Republic. Estimation is based on two simple summary statistics, the proportion infected by the natural reservoir among detected cases (G and among the subset of the first detected cases in each cluster (F. If detection of a case does not affect detection of other cases from the same cluster, we find that R can be estimated by 1-G; otherwise R can be estimated by 1-F when the case detection rate is low. In more general cases, bounds on R can still be derived. CONCLUSIONS: We have developed a simple approach with limited data requirements that enables robust assessment of the risks posed by emerging zoonoses. We illustrate this by deriving transmissibility estimates for the H3N2v-M virus, an important step in evaluating the possible pandemic threat posed by this virus. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  2. In silico characterization of the functional and structural modules of the hemagglutinin protein from the swine-origin influenza virus A (H1N1)-2009

    Christopher; VAVRICKA; GAO; George; F

    2010-01-01

    The 2009 swine-origin influenza virus (S-OIV,H1N1 subtype) has developed into a new pandemic influenza as announced by the World Health Organization.In order to uncover clues about the determinants for virulence and pathogenicity of the virus,we characterized the functional modules of the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA),the most important protein in molecular epidemiology and pathogenesis of influenza viruses.We analyzed receptor binding sites,basic patch,neutralization antibody epitopes and T cell epitopes in the HA protein of the current S-OIV according to the corresponding functional and structural modules previously characterized in other H1 HA molecules or HA molecules of other subtypes.We compared their differences and similarities systematically.Based on the amino acids defined as the functional and structural modules,the HA protein of 2009 S-OIV should specifically bind to the human 2,6-receptor.The D225G/E mutation in HA,which is found in some isolates,may confer dual binding specificity to the 2,3and 2,6-receptor based on previously reported work.This HA variant contains two basic patches,one of which results in increased basicity,suggesting enhanced membrane fusion function.The 2009 S-OIV HA also has an extra glycosylation site at position 276.Four of the five antibody neutralization epitopes identified in A/RP/8/34(H1N1) were exposed,but the other was hidden by a glycosylation site.The previously identified cytotoxic T cell epitopes in various HA molecules were summarized and their corresponding sequences in 2009 S-OIV HA were defined.These results are critical for understanding the pathogenicity of the virus and host immune response against the virus.

  3. Use of inactivated E.Coli enterotoxins to enhance respiratory mucosal adjuvanticity during vaccination in swine

    In order to augment responses to respiratory vaccines in swine, various adjuvants were intranasally co-administered with an antigen to pigs. Detoxified E. coli enterotoxins LTK63 and LTR72 enhanced mucosal and systemic immunity to the model peptide, exhibiting their efficacy as mucosal adjuvants for...

  4. Multi drug resistance of campylobacter jejuni and campylobacter coli to tested antibiotics in strains originating from humans, poultry and swine

    Tambur Zoran Ž.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermophilic Campylobacter are among the most common cause of bacterial enteritis in humans. Food animals are considered one of the most important sources of Campylobacter causing infections in man. Campylobacter infection is clinically mild and resolves spontaneously. In severe or long-lasting cases, treatment with antibiotics is necessary. Resistance of Campylobacter spp. to drugs used in treatment of infection is a matter of concern. The aim of this paper is to determine presence of multi drug resistant strains of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli isolated from animals and man. Material for testing was obtained by scraping the cecum surface from boilers, pig cecum and colon, and human feces. For isolation Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli microaerophilic conditions, temperature of 42°C and antibiotic supplement were required to inhibit the growth of other intestinal bacteria. In this research, for sensitivity testing of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli three different methods were used: disc diffusion test, E-test, and dilution agar method. A total of 55 strains of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. Out of the total, 24 strains originated from man, 16 from broilers were isolated, and 15 from pigs. Multidrug resistance was determined in cases when the strains were resistant to two or more antibiotics. Applying E-test, we detected that the largest number of Campylobacter jejuni were multi drug resistant to two antibiotics (41.2%, and three antibiotics (11.8%. Applying disc diffusion method it was detected that 5.9% of Campylobacter jejuni from man was resistant to four tested antibiotics. Applying all three methods, it was detected that the largest number of Campylobacter strains was resistant to two antibiotics and three antibiotics. Applying disc diffusion method it was detected that 50% of Campylobacter coli strains from pigs were resistant to three tested antibiotics.

  5. Assessment of efficacy and safety of various adjuvant formulations with a total soluble extract of Trichinella spiralis

    Aucouturier J.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Trichinellosis, a re-emerging zoonosis in several countries and pig, is the main species responsible for its transmission to human. Vaccination of swine could be an alternative to prevent the risk of human contamination. In order to develop an efficient and safe inactivate vaccine, the choice of the adjuvant is an important issue. The aim of this study was to develop and select potent and safe adjuvants by screening them in an experimental model with a crude soluble antigen from L1 muscular larvae (ML of Trichinella spiralis (Ts. The efficacy was checked by the quantification of specific antibody levels. Specific and non-specific IgE antibody levels were also assessed. Safety was checked by the assessment of the local reaction at the injection site.Various Montanide® ISA adjuvant formulations including water in oil, oil in water and multiphasic emulsions, but also nanoparticles or microbeads were tested. The results clearly showed differences between the antibody responses induced by the adjuvants and demonstrated the necessity to use an adjuvant to obtain a specific IgG (IgG1or lgG2a response directed against the total soluble extract of Ts. All the formulations enhanced the humoral immune response. The origin of the oil contained in the emulsions played an important role on the efficacy. Indeed emulsions based on mineral oils were more efficient than those based on metabolisable oils. However it was linked with stronger local reactions. Multiphasic and oil in water emulsions but also nanoparticles failed to induce 1gG2a antibody levels. Microbeads and water in oil formulations based on mineral oils were more efficient. This experimentation allowed then the selection of several adjuvants which efficacy will be further Investigated by a challenge test and an analysis of the cellular populations involved in the mechanism of the immune response.

  6. Dissemination of plasmid-encoded AmpC β-lactamases in antimicrobial resistant Salmonella serotypes originating from humans, pigs and the swine environment.

    Keelara, Shivaramu; Thakur, Siddhartha

    2014-09-17

    The aim of this study was to characterize and determine the inter-serovar exchange of AmpC β-lactamase conferring plasmids isolated from humans, pigs and the swine environment. Plasmids isolated from a total of 21 antimicrobial resistant (AMR) Salmonella isolates representing human clinical cases (n=6), pigs (n=6) and the swine farm environment (n=9) were characterized by replicon typing and restriction digestion, inter-serovar transferability by conjugation, and presence of AmpC β-lactamase enzyme encoding gene blaCMY-2 by southern hybridization. Based on replicon typing, the majority (17/21, 81%) of the plasmids belonged to the I1-Iγ Inc group and were between 70 and 103kb. The potential for inter-serovar plasmid transfer was further confirmed by the PCR detection of AMR genes on the plasmids isolated from trans-conjugants. Plasmids from Salmonella serovars Anatum, Ouakam, Johannesburg and Typhimurium isolated from the same cohort of pigs and their environment and S. Heidelberg from a single human clinical isolate had identical plasmids based on digestion with multiple restriction enzymes (EcoRI, HindIII and PstI) and southern blotting. We demonstrated likely horizontal inter-serovar exchange of plasmid-encoding AmpC β-lactamases resistance among MDR Salmonella serotypes isolated from pigs, swine farm environment and clinical human cases. This study provides valuable information on the role of the swine farm environment and by extension other livestock farm environments, as a potential reservoir of resistant bacterial strains that potentially transmit resistance determinants to livestock, in this case, swine, humans and possibly other hosts by horizontal exchange of plasmids.

  7. High-resolution computed tomography findings of swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) infection: comparison with scrub typhus

    Jo, Bang Sil; Lee, In Jae; Lee, Kwanseop [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: ijlee2003@medimail.co.kr; Im, Hyoung June [Dept. of Occupational Medicine, Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Background. Swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) infection and scrub typhus, also known as tsutsugamushi disease can manifest as acute respiratory illnesses, particularly during the late fall or early winter, with similar radiographic findings, such as a predominance of ground-glass opacity (GGO). Purpose. To differentiate S-OIV infection from scrub typhus using high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Material and Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the HRCT findings of 14 patients with S-OIV infection and 10 patients with scrub typhus. We assessed the location, cross-sectional distribution, and the presence of a peribronchovascular distribution of GGO and consolidations on HRCT. We also assessed the presence of interlobular septal thickening, bronchial wall thickening, pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, pleural effusion, and mediastinal or axillary lymph node enlargement. Results. Scrub typhus was more common than S-OIV in elderly patients (P < 0.001). The monthly incidences of S-OIV and scrub typhus infection reached a peak between October and November. About 86% of S-OIV patients and 80% of scrub typhus patients presented with GGO. About 67% of the GGO lesions in S-OIV had a peribronchovascular distribution, but this was absent in scrub typhus (P = 0.005). Consolidation (93% vs. 10%, P < 0.001) and bronchial wall thickening (43% vs. 0%, P = 0.024) were more frequent in S-OIV infection than scrub typhus. Interlobular septal thickening (90% vs. 36%, P = 0.013) and axillary lymphadenopathy (90% vs. 0%, P < 0.001) were more common in scrub typhus than S-OIV infection. Conclusion. There was considerable overlap in HRCT findings between S-OIV infection and scrub typhus. However, S-OIV showed a distinctive peribronchovascular distribution of GGO lesions. Consolidation and bronchial wall thickening were seen more frequently in S-OIV infection, whereas interlobular septal thickening and axillary lymphadenopathy were more common in scrub typhus. Thus, CT could

  8. Feed quality in swine diet

    Živković Branislav

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper will demonstrate the quality of some feed used in swine diet. The emphasis will be on feed whose incorporation into mixes could result in unfavorable effects on production, health and economic production of swine. Data will be presented on maize and its possible negative effects, having in mind toxins. Soybean meal, or genetically modified soybean meal, will also be observed. The next feed which will be discussed will be soybean whey obtained by different procedures and the potential dangers of its use in swine diet rations. Sunflower meal, feed of animal origin, with emphasis on fish flour and meat-bone flour will also be covered in the work. A feed which has been attracting particular attention lately is yeast imported from Italy. Its quality characteristics will be discussed, the so-called non-protein nitrogen. Analyses of mineral feed will include sources of phosphorus, phosphates (monocalciumphosphate, dicalcium phosphate phytases and resolving the problem of phosphorus in swine rations. Finally, an inevitable segment are synthetic amino acids, especially lysine and its role in swine diet.

  9. Swine production.

    Plain, Ronald L; Lawrence, John D

    2003-07-01

    The US swine industry is large and growing. The quantity of pork desired by consumers of US pork is growing at the rate of 1.5%/y. New production systems and new technology have enabled production per sow to grow at a rate of 4% annually in recent years. Consequently, the number of sows in the United States is declining. Because productivity growth is outpacing demand growth, the deflated price of hogs and pork is declining. Hog production and prices continue to exhibit strong seasonal and cyclic patterns. Pork production is usually lowest in the summer and highest in the fall. Production and prices tend to follow 4-year patterns. The US swine industry continues to evolve toward fewer and larger producers who rely on contracts for both hog production and marketing. In 2000, over half of the hogs marketed were from approximately 156 firms marketing more than 50,000 head annually. These producers finished 60% of their production in contract facilities. Over 90% of their marketings were under contract or were owned by a packer. These producers expressed a high level of satisfaction with hog production. Both they and their contract growers were satisfied with production contracts. These large producers were satisfied with their marketing contracts and planned to continue them in the future. The hog industry has changed a great deal in the last decade. There is little reason to believe this rapid rate of change will not continue. This swine industry is highly competitive and profit driven. Profit margins are too small to allow producers the luxury of ignoring new technology and innovative production systems. Consequently, hog production will continue its rapid evolution from traditional agriculture to typical industry.

  10. Trends in vaccine adjuvants

    Schijns, V.E.J.C.; Lavelle, E.C.

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvants are essential components of most clinically used vaccines. This is because the majority of nonliving vaccines are relatively poor inducers of adaptive immunity unless effective adjuvants are co-administered. Aluminum salts (alum) have been used as adjuvants with great success for almost a

  11. Adjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer

    Paula Ghaneh; John Slavin; Robert Sutton; Mark Hartley; John P Neoptolemos

    2001-01-01

    The outlook for patients with pancreatic cancer has been grim. There have been major advances in the surgical treatment of pancreatic csncer, leading to a drsmatic reduction in post-operative mortality from the development of high volume specialized centres. This stimulated the study of adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatments in pancreatic cancer including chemoradiotherapy and chemotherapy. Initial protocols have been based on the original but rather small GITSG study first reported in 1985. There have been two large European trials totalling over 600 patients (EORTC and ESPAC-1) that do not support the use of chemoradiation as adjuvant therapy. A second major finding from the ESPAC-1 trial (541 patients randomized) was some but not conclusive evidence for a survival benefit associated with chemotherapy. A third major finding from the ESPAC-1 trial was that the quality of life was not affected by the use of adjuvant treatments compared to surgery alone.The ESPAC-3 trial aims to assess the definitive use of adjuvant chemotherapy in a randomized controlled trial of 990 patients.

  12. 9 CFR 94.3 - Organs, glands, extracts, or secretions of ruminants or swine.

    2010-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY: PROHIBITED AND..., originating in any region where rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease exists, as designated in § 94.1,...

  13. 9 CFR 94.25 - Restrictions on the importation of live swine, pork, or pork products from certain regions free...

    2010-01-01

    ... DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE... port of arrival. The certification must identify both the exporting region and the region of origin as... the region of origin of the pork or pork products as a region designated in §§ 94.9 and 94.10 as...

  14. Sucrose fatty acid sulphate esters as novel vaccine adjuvants: effect of the chemical composition

    Blom, A.G.; Hilgers, L.A.T.

    2004-01-01

    Adjuvant activity of novel, synthetic sucrose derivatives towards a recombinant glycoprotein was determined in large, non-rodent animal species. Compared to antigen alone, up to 3000-fold higher virus neutralizing antibody titres (VNTs) and 10-fold higher cellular responses against classical swine f

  15. Triple-reassortant influenza A virus with H3 of human seasonal origin, NA of swine origin, and internal A(H1N1) pandemic 2009 genes is established in Danish pigs

    Krog, Jesper Schak; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Larsen, Michael Albin

    2017-01-01

    This report describes a triple-reassortant influenza A virus with a HA that resembles H3 of human seasonal influenza from 2004 to 2005, N2 from influenza A virus already established in swine, and the internal gene cassette from A(H1N1)pdm09 has spread in Danish pig herds. The virus has been...... detected in several Danish pig herds during the last 2-3 years and may possess a challenge for human as well as animal health....

  16. Origins.

    Online-Offline, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Provides an annotated list of resources dealing with the theme of origins of life, the universe, and traditions. Includes Web sites, videos, books, audio materials, and magazines with appropriate grade levels and/or subject disciplines indicated; professional resources; and learning activities. (LRW)

  17. Anti-viral properties and mode of action of standardized Echinacea purpurea extract against highly pathogenic avian Influenza virus (H5N1, H7N7 and swine-origin H1N1 (S-OIV

    Schoop Roland

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza virus (IV infections are a major threat to human welfare and animal health worldwide. Anti-viral therapy includes vaccines and a few anti-viral drugs. However vaccines are not always available in time, as demonstrated by the emergence of the new 2009 H1N1-type pandemic strain of swine origin (S-OIV in April 2009, and the acquisition of resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors such as Tamiflu® (oseltamivir is a potential problem. Therefore the prospects for the control of IV by existing anti-viral drugs are limited. As an alternative approach to the common anti-virals we studied in more detail a commercial standardized extract of the widely used herb Echinacea purpurea (Echinaforce®, EF in order to elucidate the nature of its anti-IV activity. Results Human H1N1-type IV, highly pathogenic avian IV (HPAIV of the H5- and H7-types, as well as swine origin IV (S-OIV, H1N1, were all inactivated in cell culture assays by the EF preparation at concentrations ranging from the recommended dose for oral consumption to several orders of magnitude lower. Detailed studies with the H5N1 HPAIV strain indicated that direct contact between EF and virus was required, prior to infection, in order to obtain maximum inhibition in virus replication. Hemagglutination assays showed that the extract inhibited the receptor binding activity of the virus, suggesting that the extract interferes with the viral entry into cells. In sequential passage studies under treatment in cell culture with the H5N1 virus no EF-resistant variants emerged, in contrast to Tamiflu®, which produced resistant viruses upon passaging. Furthermore, the Tamiflu®-resistant virus was just as susceptible to EF as the wild type virus. Conclusion As a result of these investigations, we believe that this standard Echinacea preparation, used at the recommended dose for oral consumption, could be a useful, readily available and affordable addition to existing control options

  18. Swine flu in Asia

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2009-01-01

    Emerging swine flu (variant H1N1 influenza virus infection)is a new problem in medicine.The outbreaks in Mexico,USA and Canada bring attention to medical scientists that thing infection might finalize in the global pandemic situation.In this specific paper,the author hereby discusses on the situation of swine flu in Asia.

  19. Pseudorabies virus in wild swine: a global perspective.

    Müller, T; Hahn, E C; Tottewitz, F; Kramer, M; Klupp, B G; Mettenleiter, T C; Freuling, C

    2011-10-01

    Suid herpesvirus 1 (SuHV1, syn. Aujeszky's disease virus [ADV] or pseudorabies virus [PrV]), which belongs to the family Herpesviridae, subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae, genus Varicellovirus is the causative agent of Aujeszky's disease (AD, pseudorabies), a notifiable disease, that causes substantial economic losses to the swine industry in countries, where AD is present. Members of the family Suidae (true pigs) are the only natural hosts for PrV, although the virus can infect numerous other mammals including ruminants, carnivores and rodents. Despite the tremendous progress that has been made in controlling and eliminating PrV in domestic pigs, there is mounting evidence that PrV infections are more widespread in wild swine across the world than originally thought. Unfortunately, our understanding of the extent of PrV infections in these wild populations and of the threat to domestic swine is still fragmentary. This review aims at giving a global perspective on PrV infections in wild swine by scrutinizing the current state of knowledge concerning (i) the global occurrence of PrV infections in free-living populations of wild swine, e.g., wild boar and feral swine, (ii) the molecular characterization of wild swine PrV, (iii) infection characteristics of PrV in populations of wild swine, (iv) the risk of spillover infections to domestic pigs, (v) potential risk-mitigating measures, focusing on further research needs.

  20. Big Data Analysis on Swine,Bovine,Ovine and Chicken Originated Quarantine in Liaoning Province in 2015%辽宁省2015年猪牛羊鸡产地检疫大数据分析

    刘俊; 郭洪军; 金晖; 钱锐; 郝德威; 司占军

    2016-01-01

    In order to reveal the status of animal quarantine and to provide basic data for the understanding and analysis of animal health supervision, according to related data from the Animal Health Monitoring Information Tracing Platform, the originated quarantine situation of swine,bovine,ovine and chicken in Liaoning province in 2015 was analyzed.%辽宁省动物卫生监管信息追溯平台运行以来积累了大量数据,大数据的效用逐渐显现。本文结合相关数据,就辽宁省2015年猪、牛、羊、鸡产地检疫情况进行简要分析,以期揭示全省动物产地检疫工作现状,为了解和分析全省动物卫生监督工作状况提供基础数据。

  1. Vaccines, adjuvants and autoimmunity.

    Guimarães, Luísa Eça; Baker, Britain; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines and autoimmunity are linked fields. Vaccine efficacy is based on whether host immune response against an antigen can elicit a memory T-cell response over time. Although the described side effects thus far have been mostly transient and acute, vaccines are able to elicit the immune system towards an autoimmune reaction. The diagnosis of a definite autoimmune disease and the occurrence of fatal outcome post-vaccination have been less frequently reported. Since vaccines are given to previously healthy hosts, who may have never developed the disease had they not been immunized, adverse events should be carefully accessed and evaluated even if they represent a limited number of occurrences. In this review of the literature, there is evidence of vaccine-induced autoimmunity and adjuvant-induced autoimmunity in both experimental models as well as human patients. Adjuvants and infectious agents may exert their immune-enhancing effects through various functional activities, encompassed by the adjuvant effect. These mechanisms are shared by different conditions triggered by adjuvants leading to the autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome). In conclusion, there are several case reports of autoimmune diseases following vaccines, however, due to the limited number of cases, the different classifications of symptoms and the long latency period of the diseases, every attempt for an epidemiological study has so far failed to deliver a connection. Despite this, efforts to unveil the connection between the triggering of the immune system by adjuvants and the development of autoimmune conditions should be undertaken. Vaccinomics is a field that may bring to light novel customized, personalized treatment approaches in the future.

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of NS5B gene of classical swine fever virus isolates indicates plausible Chinese origin of Indian subgroup 2.2 viruses.

    Patil, S S; Hemadri, D; Veeresh, H; Sreekala, K; Gajendragad, M R; Prabhudas, K

    2012-02-01

    Twenty-three CSFV isolates recovered from field outbreaks in various parts of India during 2006-2009 were used for genetic analysis in the NS5B region (409 nts). Seventeen of these were studied earlier [16] in the 5'UTR region. Phylogenetic analysis indicated the continued dominance of subgroup 1.1 strains in the country. Detailed analysis of a subgroup 2.2 virus indicated the plausible Chinese origin of this subgroup in India and provided indirect evidence of routes of CSFV movement within South East Asia region.

  3. Swine Fecal Metagenomics

    Metagenomic approaches are providing rapid and more robust means to investigate the composition and functional genetic potential of complex microbial communities. In this study, we utilized a metagenomic approach to further understand the functional diversity of the swine gut. To...

  4. Reassortment patterns in Swine influenza viruses.

    Hossein Khiabanian

    Full Text Available Three human influenza pandemics occurred in the twentieth century, in 1918, 1957, and 1968. Influenza pandemic strains are the results of emerging viruses from non-human reservoirs to which humans have little or no immunity. At least two of these pandemic strains, in 1957 and in 1968, were the results of reassortments between human and avian viruses. Also, many cases of swine influenza viruses have reportedly infected humans, in particular, the recent H1N1 influenza virus of swine origin, isolated in Mexico and the United States. Pigs are documented to allow productive replication of human, avian, and swine influenza viruses. Thus it has been conjectured that pigs are the "mixing vessel" that create the avian-human reassortant strains, causing the human pandemics. Hence, studying the process and patterns of viral reassortment, especially in pigs, is a key to better understanding of human influenza pandemics. In the last few years, databases containing sequences of influenza A viruses, including swine viruses, collected since 1918 from diverse geographical locations, have been developed and made publicly available. In this paper, we study an ensemble of swine influenza viruses to analyze the reassortment phenomena through several statistical techniques. The reassortment patterns in swine viruses prove to be similar to the previous results found in human viruses, both in vitro and in vivo, that the surface glycoprotein coding segments reassort most often. Moreover, we find that one of the polymerase segments (PB1, reassorted in the strains responsible for the last two human pandemics, also reassorts frequently.

  5. Pandemic Swine-Origin H1N1 Influenza Virus Replicates to Higher Levels and Induces More Fever and Acute Inflammatory Cytokines in Cynomolgus versus Rhesus Monkeys and Can Replicate in Common Marmosets.

    Mooij, Petra; Koopman, Gerrit; Mortier, Daniëlla; van Heteren, Melanie; Oostermeijer, Herman; Fagrouch, Zahra; de Laat, Rudy; Kobinger, Gary; Li, Yan; Remarque, Edmond J; Kondova, Ivanela; Verschoor, Ernst J; Bogers, Willy M J M

    2015-01-01

    The close immunological and physiological resemblance with humans makes non-human primates a valuable model for studying influenza virus pathogenesis and immunity and vaccine efficacy against infection. Although both cynomolgus and rhesus macaques are frequently used in influenza virus research, a direct comparison of susceptibility to infection and disease has not yet been performed. In the current study a head-to-head comparison was made between these species, by using a recently described swine-origin pandemic H1N1 strain, A/Mexico/InDRE4487/2009. In comparison to rhesus macaques, cynomolgus macaques developed significantly higher levels of virus replication in the upper airways and in the lungs, involving both peak level and duration of virus production, as well as higher increases in body temperature. In contrast, clinical symptoms, including respiratory distress, were more easily observed in rhesus macaques. Expression of sialyl-α-2,6-Gal saccharides, the main receptor for human influenza A viruses, was 50 to 73 times more abundant in trachea and bronchus of cynomolgus macaques relative to rhesus macaques. The study also shows that common marmosets, a New World non-human primate species, are susceptible to infection with pandemic H1N1. The study results favor the cynomolgus macaque as model for pandemic H1N1 influenza virus research because of the more uniform and high levels of virus replication, as well as temperature increases, which may be due to a more abundant expression of the main human influenza virus receptor in the trachea and bronchi.

  6. Evaluation of a 2-aminoimidazole variant as adjuvant treatment for dermal bacterial infections.

    Draughn, G Logan; Allen, C Leigh; Routh, Patricia A; Stone, Maria R; Kirker, Kelly R; Boegli, Laura; Schuchman, Ryan M; Linder, Keith E; Baynes, Ronald E; James, Garth; Melander, Christian; Pollard, Angela; Cavanagh, John

    2017-01-01

    2-Aminoimidazole (2-AI)-based compounds have been shown to efficiently disrupt biofilm formation, disperse existing biofilms, and resensitize numerous multidrug-resistant bacteria to antibiotics. Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, we provide initial pharmacological studies regarding the application of a 2-AI as a topical adjuvant for persistent dermal infections. In vitro assays indicated that the 2-AI H10 is nonbactericidal, resensitizes bacteria to antibiotics, does not harm the integument, and promotes wound healing. Furthermore, in vivo application of H10 on swine skin caused no gross abnormalities or immune reactions. Taken together, these results indicate that H10 represents a promising lead dermal adjuvant compound.

  7. 9 CFR 94.20 - Gelatin derived from horses or swine, or from ruminants that have not been in any region where...

    2010-01-01

    ... RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY: PROHIBITED AND RESTRICTED IMPORTATIONS... national government of the region of origin. The official certificate must state the species of animal...

  8. Adjuvants for allergy vaccines.

    Moingeon, Philippe

    2012-10-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is currently performed via either the subcutaneous or sublingual routes as a treatment for type I (IgE dependent) allergies. Aluminum hydroxide or calcium phosphate are broadly used as adjuvants for subcutaneous allergy vaccines, whereas commercial sublingual vaccines rely upon high doses of aqueous allergen extracts in the absence of any immunopotentiator. Adjuvants to be included in the future in products for allergen specific immunotherapy should ideally enhance Th1 and CD4+ regulatory T cell responses. Imunomodulators impacting dendritic or T cell functions to induce IL10, IL12 and IFNγ production are being investigated in preclinical allergy models. Such candidate adjuvants encompass synthetic or biological immunopotentiators such as glucocorticoids, 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3, selected probiotic strains (e.g., Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species) as well as TLR2 (Pam3CSK4), TLR4 (monophosphoryl lipid A, synthetic lipid A analogs) or TLR9 (CpGs) ligands. Furthermore, the use of vector systems such as mucoadhesive particules, virus-like particles or liposomes are being considered to enhance allergen uptake by tolerogenic antigen presenting cells present in mucosal tissues.

  9. Reverse zoonosis of influenza to swine: new perspectives on the human-animal interface.

    Nelson, Martha I; Vincent, Amy L

    2015-03-01

    The origins of the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic in swine are unknown, highlighting gaps in our understanding of influenza A virus (IAV) ecology and evolution. We review how recently strengthened influenza virus surveillance in pigs has revealed that influenza virus transmission from humans to swine is far more frequent than swine-to-human zoonosis, and is central in seeding swine globally with new viral diversity. The scale of global human-to-swine transmission represents the largest 'reverse zoonosis' of a pathogen documented to date. Overcoming the bias towards perceiving swine as sources of human viruses, rather than recipients, is key to understanding how the bidirectional nature of the human-animal interface produces influenza threats to both hosts.

  10. Molucular Epidemiology and Evolution of Influenza Viruses Circulating within European Swine between 2009 and 2013

    Watson, S.J.; Langat, P.; Reid, S.; Lam, T.; Cotten, M.; Kelly, M.; Reeth, Van K.; Qiu, Y.; Simon, G.; Bonin, E.; Foni, E.; Chiapponi, C.; Larsen, L.; Hjulsager, C.; Markowska-Daniel, I.; Urbaniak, K.; Durrwald, R.; Schlegel, M.; Huovilainen, A.; Davidson, I.; Dan, A.; Loeffen, W.L.A.; Edwards, S.; Bublot, M.; Vila, T.; Maldonado, J.; Valls, L.; Brown, I.H.; Pybus, O.G.; Kellam, P.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence in humans of the A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus, a complex reassortant virus of swine origin, highlighted the importance of worldwide influenza virus surveillance in swine. To date, large-scale surveillance studies have been reported for southern China and North America, but such data ha

  11. Molecular Epidemiology and Evolution of Influenza Viruses Circulating within European Swine between 2009 and 2013

    J. Watson, Simon; Langat, Pinky; M. Reid, Scott;

    2015-01-01

    The emergence in humans of the A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus, a complex reassortant virus of swine origin, highlighted the importance of worldwide influenza virus surveillance in swine. To date, large-scale surveillance studies have been reported for southern China and North America, but such data...

  12. Molecular epidemiology study of swine influenza virus revealing a reassorted virus H1N1 in swine farms in Cuba.

    Pérez, Lester J; Perera, Carmen Laura; Coronado, Liani; Rios, Liliam; Vega, Armando; Frías, Maria T; Ganges, Llilianne; Núñez, José Ignacio; Díaz de Arce, Heidy

    2015-05-01

    In this report, we describe the emergence of reassorted H1N1 swine influenza virus, originated from a reassortment event between the H1N1 pandemic influenza virus (H1N1p/2009) and endemic swine influenza virus in Cuban swine population. In November 2010, a clinical respiratory outbreak was reported on a pig fattening farm in Cuba. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all the genes of one of the isolate obtained, with the exception of neuraminidase, belonged to the H1N1p/2009 cluster. This finding suggests that H1N1pdm has been established in swine and has become a reservoir of reassortment that may produce new viruses with both animal and public health risks.

  13. 9 CFR 85.5 - Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine.

    2010-01-01

    ... or exposed swine. 85.5 Section 85.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PRODUCTS PSEUDORABIES § 85.5 Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine. Infected swine or exposed swine, other than swine described in § 85.4 (a) or (b), shall only be moved interstate...

  14. Report of mecC-carrying MRSA in domestic swine

    Angen, Ø.; Stegger, M.; Larsen, J.; Lilje, B.; Kaya, H.; Pedersen, K. S.; Jakobsen, A.; Petersen, A.; Larsen, A. R.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We unexpectedly identified MRSA isolates carrying mecC (mecC-MRSA) from a Danish swine farm located in eastern Zealand. The objective of the present study was to investigate the origin of these isolates and their genetic relatedness to other mecC-MRSA isolates from Zealand. Methods WGS was used to infer the phylogenetic relationship between 19 identified mecC-MRSA isolates from the swine farm and 34 additional epidemiologically unrelated human isolates from the same geographical region of Denmark. Variations in the accessory genome were investigated by bioinformatics tools, and antibiotic susceptibility profiles were assessed by MIC determination. Results mecC-MRSA was isolated from a domestic swine farm, but not from cattle reared at the same farm. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all mecC-MRSA isolates from both farm animals and workers formed a separate cluster, whereas human isolates from the same municipality belonged to a closely related cluster. Analysis of the accessory genome supported this relationship. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of mecC-MRSA isolated from domestic swine. The investigation strongly indicates that transmission of mecC-MRSA has taken place on the swine farm between the farmers and swine. The close clustering of farm isolates and isolates from the same municipality suggests a local transmission of mecC-MRSA. PMID:27650187

  15. Swine Brucellosis: Current Perspectives

    Brucella suis is a significant zoonosis that is present in domestic livestock and wildlife in many countries worldwide. Transmission from animal reservoirs is the source of human infection as human to human transmission is very rare. Although swine brucellosis causes economic losses in domestic liv...

  16. Carbohydrate-based immune adjuvants

    Petrovsky, Nikolai; Cooper, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    The role for adjuvants in human vaccines has been a matter of vigorous scientific debate, with the field hindered by the fact that for over 80 years, aluminum salts were the only adjuvants approved for human use. To this day, alum-based adjuvants, alone or combined with additional immune activators, remain the only adjuvants approved for use in the USA. This situation has not been helped by the fact that the mechanism of action of most adjuvants has been poorly understood. A relative lack of resources and funding for adjuvant development has only helped to maintain alum’s relative monopoly. To seriously challenge alum’s supremacy a new adjuvant has many major hurdles to overcome, not least being alum’s simplicity, tolerability, safety record and minimal cost. Carbohydrate structures play critical roles in immune system function and carbohydrates also have the virtue of a strong safety and tolerability record. A number of carbohydrate compounds from plant, bacterial, yeast and synthetic sources have emerged as promising vaccine adjuvant candidates. Carbohydrates are readily biodegradable and therefore unlikely to cause problems of long-term tissue deposits seen with alum adjuvants. Above all, the Holy Grail of human adjuvant development is to identify a compound that combines potent vaccine enhancement with maximum tolerability and safety. This has proved to be a tough challenge for many adjuvant contenders. Nevertheless, carbohydrate-based compounds have many favorable properties that could place them in a unique position to challenge alum’s monopoly over human vaccine usage. PMID:21506649

  17. Adjuvant Therapy: Melanoma

    Diwakar Davar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With an incidence that is increasing at 2–5% per year, cutaneous melanoma is an international scourge that disproportionately targets young individuals. Despite much research, the treatment of advanced disease is still quite challenging. Immunotherapy with high-dose interferon-α2b or interleukin-2 benefits a select group of patients in the adjuvant and metastatic settings, respectively, with significant attendant toxicity. Advances in the biology of malignant melanoma and the role of immunomodulatory therapy have produced advances that have stunned the field. In this paper, we review the data for the use of interferon-α2b in various dosing ranges, vaccine therapy, and the role of radiotherapy in the adjuvant setting for malignant melanoma. Recent trials in the metastatic setting using anticytoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (anti-CTLA-4 monoclonal antibody therapy and BRAF inhibitor therapy have demonstrated clear benefit with prolongation of survival. Trials investigating combinations of these novel agents with existing immunomodulators are at present underway.

  18. Control of African swine fever epidemics in industrialized swine populations

    Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq; Bøtner, Anette; Mortensen, Sten

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a notifiable infectious disease with a high impact on swine health. The disease is endemic in certain regions in the Baltic countries and has spread to Poland constituting a risk of ASF spread toward Western Europe. Therefore, as part of contingency planning, it is im......African swine fever (ASF) is a notifiable infectious disease with a high impact on swine health. The disease is endemic in certain regions in the Baltic countries and has spread to Poland constituting a risk of ASF spread toward Western Europe. Therefore, as part of contingency planning...

  19. Adjuvant therapies for colorectal cancer

    2007-01-01

    The management of colon and rectal cancer has changed dramatically over the last 25 years. The use of adjuvant therapies has become standard practice in locally advanced (stage Ⅲ and selected stage Ⅱ) colorectal cancer. Improved surgical techniques, chemotherapeutics and radiotherapy are resulting in higher cure rates and the development of agents targeting proliferative and angiogenic pathways offer further promise. Here we explore risk factors for local and distant recurrence after resection of colon and rectal cancer, and the role of adjuvant treatments. Discussion will focus on the evidence base for adjuvant therapies utilised in colorectal cancer, and the treatment of sub-groups such as the elderly and stage Ⅱ disease. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal cancer in reduction of recurrence will be explored and the role and optimal methods for surveillance post-curative resection with or without adjuvant therapy will also be addressed.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Classical Swine Fever Virus Genotype 2.2 Strain Bergen

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Lohse, Louise; Becher, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of the genotype 2.2 classical swine fever virus strain Bergen has been determined; this strain was originally isolated from persistently infected domestic pigs in the Netherlands and is characterized to be of low virulence....

  1. External validation of Adjuvant! Online breast cancer prognosis tool. Prioritising recommendations for improvement.

    David Hajage

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adjuvant! Online is a web-based application designed to provide 10 years survival probability of patients with breast cancer. Several predictors have not been assessed in the original Adjuvant! Online study. We provide the validation of Adjuvant! Online algorithm on two breast cancer datasets, and we determined whether the accuracy of Adjuvant! Online is improved with other well-known prognostic factors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The French data set is composed of 456 women with early breast cancer. The Dutch data set is composed of 295 women less than 52 years of age. Agreement between observation and Adjuvant! Online prediction was checked, and logistic models were performed to estimate the prognostic information added by risk factors to Adjuvant! Online prediction. RESULTS: Adjuvant! Online prediction was overall well-calibrated in the French data set but failed in some subgroups of such high grade and HER2 positive patients. HER2 status, Mitotic Index and Ki67 added significant information to Adjuvant! Online prediction. In the Dutch data set, the overall 10-year survival was overestimated by Adjuvant! Online, particularly in patients less than 40 years old. CONCLUSION: Adjuvant! Online needs to be updated to adjust overoptimistic results in young and high grade patients, and should consider new predictors such as Ki67, HER2 and Mitotic Index.

  2. Genotoxicity of swine effluents.

    Techio, V H; Stolberg, J; Kunz, A; Zanin, E; Perdomo, C C

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of genotoxic effects of swine effluents from different stages of a treatment system for swine wastes through bioassay of stamen hairs and micronuclei in Tradescantia (clone BNL 4430). No significant differences (p≥0.05) regarding the genic mutations were found in the bioassay of stamen hairs, independently of the effluent analysed. For the genotoxicity test with micronuclei, the plants exposed to raw wastes, to sludge, and to effluent of the biodigester have presented higher rates of chromosomal damages (micronuclei), with significant differences in relation to the control group and other effluent of the waste treatment system (p≤0.05). The association between the chemical parameters and the genotoxicity data have shown that the variables COD and TKN have presented significant correlation (p≤0.05) with the number of mutagenic events in the tetrads.

  3. Comparison of immune effect on spleen and lymph tissue and cell line origin classical swine fever vaccine in field%猪瘟脾淋苗和传代细胞苗田间免疫效果比较试验

    洪江庭

    2015-01-01

    Three vaccines were used to compare immune effect on spleen and lymph tissue and cell line origin classical swine fever vaccine. Forty-five 30-day-old piglets were randomly selected and divided into 3 groups in a scale farm in Xiamen, meanwhile first immunization was carried out, second immunizationafter28 days, group A used spleen and lymph tissue origin classical swine fever vaccine from CQ and group B used spleen and lymph tissue origin vaccine from CD, while group C used cell line origin classical swine fever vaccine from JX, through regular tracking of antibody level to evaluate the immune effect. The results showed: The anti-body positive rate in group C herds was the highest on the 38thday after second immunization, with a significant difference in group A herds.%为比较猪瘟脾淋苗和传代细胞苗的免疫效果,在厦门市同安区某规模猪场,选用代号为CQ、CD和JX 3个厂家生产的猪瘟脾淋苗和传代细胞苗进行免疫效果试验。随机选取45头30日龄断乳仔猪,分为3组,30日龄首免,首免后28 d二免,A组免疫接种CQ厂家的猪瘟脾淋苗,B组免疫接种CD厂家的猪瘟脾淋苗,C组免疫接种JX厂家的猪瘟细胞传代苗,通过定期跟踪3组猪群血清中的抗体水平,评估疫苗的免疫效果。结果显示:3组猪群二免后7d前免疫抗体抗体水平和阳性率无显著差异,38 d后才出现免疫抗体水平和阳性率显著差异,以C组猪群的抗体阳性率最高,A组猪群的抗体阳性率最低。

  4. ERM immersion vaccination and adjuvants

    Skov, J.; Chettri, J. K.; Jaafar, R. M.;

    2015-01-01

    Two candidate adjuvants were tested with a commercial ERM dip vaccine (AquaVac™ Relera, MSD Animal Health) for rainbow trout in an experimental design compatible with common vaccination practices at farm level, i.e. immersion of fish in vaccine (±adjuvant) for 30 s. The adjuvants were...... the commercial product Montanide™ IMS 1312 VG PR (SEPPIC), and a soluble and ≥98% pure β-glucan from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (Sigma-Aldrich). Hence, five experimental groups in duplicate were established and exposed to vaccine and adjuvants in the following combinations: AquaVac™ Relera (alone); Aqua......Vac™ Relera + Montanide™; AquaVac™ Relera + β-glucan; Montanide™ (alone); and β-glucan (alone). Approximately 450 degree days post-vaccination, the fish were bath-challenged with live Yersinia ruckeri to produce survival curves. Blood, skin and gills were sampled at selected time points during the course...

  5. Global migration of influenza A viruses in swine.

    Nelson, Martha I; Viboud, Cécile; Vincent, Amy L; Culhane, Marie R; Detmer, Susan E; Wentworth, David E; Rambaut, Andrew; Suchard, Marc A; Holmes, Edward C; Lemey, Philippe

    2015-03-27

    The complex and unresolved evolutionary origins of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic exposed major gaps in our knowledge of the global spatial ecology and evolution of influenza A viruses in swine (swIAVs). Here we undertake an expansive phylogenetic analysis of swIAV sequence data and demonstrate that the global live swine trade strongly predicts the spatial dissemination of swIAVs, with Europe and North America acting as sources of viruses in Asian countries. In contrast, China has the world's largest swine population but is not a major exporter of live swine, and is not an important source of swIAVs in neighbouring Asian countries or globally. A meta-population simulation model incorporating trade data predicts that the global ecology of swIAVs is more complex than previously thought, and the United States and China's large swine populations are unlikely to be representative of swIAV diversity in their respective geographic regions, requiring independent surveillance efforts throughout Latin America and Asia.

  6. Aluminium: a natural adjuvant in Leishmania transmission via sand flies?

    Maingon, Rhayza; Khela, Amandeep; Sampson, Christopher; Ward, Richard; Walker, Karen; Exley, Christopher

    2008-11-01

    Genetically identical Leishmania chagasi/infantum parasites cause both atypical cutaneous leishmaniasis and visceral leishmaniasis. In this report we have tested the first part of a hypothesis that states that the form of this disease that is manifested depends upon the adjuvant-like activity of aluminium of dietary origin accumulated in the salivary gland of the sand fly vector. In sand flies fed aluminium-supplemented sucrose we have used histochemistry to qualitatively identify aluminium in their salivary glands and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry to quantify the aluminium content of dissected salivary glands. Aluminium may be acting as a natural adjuvant in some forms of leishmaniasis.

  7. How to define green adjuvants.

    Beck, Bert; Steurbaut, Walter; Spanoghe, Pieter

    2012-08-01

    The concept 'green adjuvants' is difficult to define. This paper formulates an answer based on two approaches. Starting from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) definition for green chemistry, production-based and environmental-impact-based definitions for green adjuvants are proposed. According to the production-based approach, adjuvants are defined as green if they are manufactured using renewable raw materials as much as possible while making efficient use of energy, preferably renewable energy. According to the environmental impact approach, adjuvants are defined as green (1) if they have a low human and environmental impact, (2) if they do not increase active ingredient environmental mobility and/or toxicity to humans and non-target organisms, (3) if they do not increase the exposure to these active substances and (4) if they lower the impact of formulated pesticides by enhancing the performance of active ingredients, thus potentially lowering the required dosage of active ingredients. Based on both approaches, a tentative definition for 'green adjuvants' is given, and future research and legislation directions are set out.

  8. Novel Human-like Influenza A Viruses Circulate in Swine in Mexico and Chile

    Nelson, Martha; Culhane, Marie R.; Rovira, Albert; Torremorell, Montserrat; Guerrero, Pedro; Norambuena, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Further understanding of the genetic diversity and evolution of influenza A viruses circulating in swine (IAV-S) is important for the development of effective vaccines and our knowledge of pandemic threats. Until recently, very little was known of IAV-S diversity in Latin America, owing to a lack of surveillance. Methods: To address this gap, we sequenced and conducted a phylogenetic analysis of 69 hemagglutinin (HA) sequences from IAV-S isolates collected in swine in Mexico and Chile during 2010-2014, including the H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 subtypes. Results: Our analysis identified multiple IAV-S lineages that appear to have been circulating undetected in swine for decades, including four novel IAV-S lineages of human seasonal virus origin that have not been previously identified in any swine populations globally. We also found evidence of repeated introductions of pandemic H1N1 viruses from humans into swine in Mexico and Chile since 2009, and incursions of H1 and H3 viruses from North American swine into Mexico. Discussion: Overall, our findings indicate that at least 12 genetically distinct HA lineages circulate in Latin American swine herds, only two of which have been found in North American swine herds. Human-to-swine transmission, spatial migration via swine movements, and genomic reassortment are the key evolutionary mechanisms that generate this viral diversity. Additional antigenic characterization and whole-genome sequencing is greatly needed to understand the diversity and independent evolution of IAV-S in Latin America.  PMID:26345598

  9. Longitudinal Study of Salmonella Dispersion and the Role of Environmental Contamination in Commercial Swine Production Systems▿

    Dorr, Paul M.; Tadesse, Daniel A.; Zewde, Bayleyegn Molla; Fry, Pamela; Thakur, Siddhartha; Wondwossen A Gebreyes

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the roles of various environmental sources, such as truck-washing systems, waste-processing lagoons, and other sources, as potential contributors to the exposure and dissemination of Salmonella in commercial swine production systems. Four cohorts of nursery age swine herds which originated from distinct farm flows were selected. In addition, cross-sectional sampling of four truck wash stations selected based on the types of disinfectants and sources of water used for s...

  10. Chemokines as Cancer Vaccine Adjuvants

    Agne Petrosiute

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We are witnessing a new era of immune-mediated cancer therapies and vaccine development. As the field of cancer vaccines advances into clinical trials, overcoming low immunogenicity is a limiting step in achieving full success of this therapeutic approach. Recent discoveries in the many biological roles of chemokines in tumor immunology allow their exploitation in enhancing recruitment of antigen presenting cells (APCs and effector cells to appropriate anatomical sites. This knowledge, combined with advances in gene therapy and virology, allows researchers to employ chemokines as potential vaccine adjuvants. This review will focus on recent murine and human studies that use chemokines as therapeutic anti-cancer vaccine adjuvants.

  11. Swine Flu Threatens the World

    2009-01-01

    The epidemic spreads from Mexico to other countries at an alarming rate How serious is the swine flu? It is so sensitive that the White House had to reassure reporters that U.S. President Barack Obama is still in good health after visiting Mexico in mid-April. Besides the United States and Canada, swine flu cases have appeared in Europe and Asia. The world now faces a "public health emergency of

  12. The adjuvant mechanism of cationic dimethyldioctadecylammonium liposomes

    Korsholm, Karen Smith; Agger, Else Marie; Foged, Camilla;

    2007-01-01

    Cationic liposomes are being used increasingly as efficient adjuvants for subunit vaccines but their precise mechanism of action is still unknown. Here, we investigated the adjuvant mechanism of cationic liposomes based on the synthetic amphiphile dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA). The liposomes ...

  13. 9 CFR 94.10 - Swine from regions where classical swine fever exists.

    2010-01-01

    ... swine fever exists. 94.10 Section 94.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY: PROHIBITED AND...

  14. Who Benefits From Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for Gastric Cancer? A Meta-Analysis

    Ohri, Nitin, E-mail: ohri.nitin@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Garg, Madhur K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Aparo, Santiago; Kaubisch, Andreas [Department of Medical Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Tome, Wolfgang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Kennedy, Timothy J. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Kalnicki, Shalom; Guha, Chandan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Large randomized trials have demonstrated significant survival benefits with the use of adjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation therapy for gastric cancer. The importance of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) remains unclear. We performed an up-to-date meta-analysis of randomized trials testing the use of RT for resectable gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for randomized trials testing adjuvant (including neoadjuvant) RT for resectable gastric cancer. Hazard ratios describing the impact of adjuvant RT on overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were extracted directly from the original studies or calculated from survival curves. Pooled estimates were obtained using the inverse variance method. Subgroup analyses were performed to determine whether the efficacy of RT varies with chemotherapy use, RT timing, geographic region, type of nodal dissection performed, or lymph node status. Results: Thirteen studies met all inclusion criteria and were used for this analysis. Adjuvant RT was associated with a significant improvement in both OS (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.70-0.86, P<.001) and DFS (HR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.63-0.80, P<.001). In the 5 studies that tested adjuvant chemoradiation therapy against adjuvant chemotherapy, similar effects were seen for OS (HR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.67-1.03, P=.087) and DFS (HR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.91-0.65, P=.002). Available data did not reveal any subgroup of patients that does not benefit from adjuvant RT. Conclusion: In randomized trials for resectable gastric cancer, adjuvant RT provides an approximately 20% improvement in both DFS and OS. Available data do not reveal a subgroup of patients that does not benefit from adjuvant RT. Further study is required to optimize the implementation of adjuvant RT for gastric cancer with regard to patient selection and integration with systemic therapy.

  15. A Review and Prospect on Herbicide Adjuvants

    2005-01-01

    The history, present status and future prospects of adjuvants application in herbicides were briefly reviewed. Adjuvants can be separated into two groups, activator adjuvants and utility adjuvants. The former directly enhances the efficacy of a herbicide through increasement of herbicide absorption, spreading, cuticular penetration, rainfastness and retention enhancement, and photodegradation of the herbicide can also be decreased. And the latter is utilized for improving application characteristics, behaviors and physical properties of herbicides and reducing or minimizing unwanted side effects on application.

  16. 猪瘟耐热保护剂活疫苗(兔源)免疫效果监测%Surveillance of the Immune Effect of Live Classical Swine Fever Vaccine(Rabbit-Origin)with Heat-resistant Protectants

    栗新

    2014-01-01

    In order to know the compulsory immunization effects of swine fever vaccine with heat-resistant protectants in natural conditions,2140 piglet serum samples were collected from 50 intensive pig farms and 380 free-ranging pig holders after concentrated immunizations in spring and autumn for immune-surveillance. Results showed that the positive rate of classical swine fever antibody was 67.3%after spring immunization,with 79.8%in intensive farms and 56.3%in free-ranging holders;the positive rate of swine fever antibody was 69.1%after autumn immunization,with 70.1%by vaccine B(81.6%in intensive farms and 61.3%in free-ranging holders),and 65.8%by vaccine C(78.5%in inten-sive farms and 51.2%in free-ranging holders). The antibody dispersion of spring immunization was 37.5%in average, with 25.5%in intensive farms and 48.2%in free-ranging holders;the antibody dispersion of autumn immunization with vaccine B was 31.4%,with 28.4%in intensive farms and 35.6%in free-ranging holders;and the antibody dispersion of autumn immunization with vaccine C was 41.5%,with 42.1%in intensive farms and 41.2%in free-ranging holders.%为了解掌握猪瘟耐热保护剂活疫苗在自然状态下的强制免疫效果,在春秋二季集中免疫之后,跟踪监测了50个规模猪场和380个散养户仔猪血样2140份。监测结果发现:春防猪瘟样品抗体监测阳性率为67.3%,其中规模场79.8%,散户56.3%;秋防猪瘟样品抗体监测阳性率为69.1%,其中,免疫B苗的抗体阳性率为70.1%(规模场81.6%,散户61.3%),C苗的抗体阳性率为65.8%(规模场78.5%,散户51.2%)。春防抗体离散度平均37.5%,其中规模场25.5%,散户48.2%;秋防B苗接种的抗体离散度31.4%,其中规模场28.4%,散户35.6%;秋防C苗接种的抗体离散度41.5%,其中规模场42.1%,散户41.2%。

  17. Interspecies interactions and potential Influenza A virus risk in small swine farms in Peru

    McCune Sarah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent avian influenza epidemic in Asia and the H1N1 pandemic demonstrated that influenza A viruses pose a threat to global public health. The animal origins of the viruses confirmed the potential for interspecies transmission. Swine are hypothesized to be prime "mixing vessels" due to the dual receptivity of their trachea to human and avian strains. Additionally, avian and human influenza viruses have previously been isolated in swine. Therefore, understanding interspecies contact on smallholder swine farms and its potential role in the transmission of pathogens such as influenza virus is very important. Methods This qualitative study aimed to determine swine-associated interspecies contacts in two coastal areas of Peru. Direct observations were conducted at both small-scale confined and low-investment swine farms (n = 36 and in open areas where swine freely range during the day (n = 4. Interviews were also conducted with key stakeholders in swine farming. Results In both locations, the intermingling of swine and domestic birds was common. An unexpected contact with avian species was that swine were fed poultry mortality in 6/20 of the farms in Chancay. Human-swine contacts were common, with a higher frequency on the confined farms. Mixed farming of swine with chickens or ducks was observed in 36% of all farms. Human-avian interactions were less frequent overall. Use of adequate biosecurity and hygiene practices by farmers was suboptimal at both locations. Conclusions Close human-animal interaction, frequent interspecies contacts and suboptimal biosecurity and hygiene practices pose significant risks of interspecies influenza virus transmission. Farmers in small-scale swine production systems constitute a high-risk population and need to be recognized as key in preventing interspecies pathogen transfer. A two-pronged prevention approach, which offers educational activities for swine farmers about sound hygiene and

  18. Scrapie in swine: a diagnostic challenge

    A naturally occurring prion disease has not been recognized in swine, but the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy does transmit to swine by experimental routes. Swine are thought to have a robust species barrier when exposed to the naturally occurring prion diseases of other species, but the s...

  19. Swine Flu -A Comprehensive View

    Singh, Vandana; Sood, Meenakshi

    2012-07-01

    The present article is aimed on comprehensive view of Swine flu. It was first isolated from pigs in 1930 in USA. Pandemic caused by H1N1 in 2009 brought it in limelight. Itís a viral respiratory disease caused by viruses that infects pigs, resulting in nasal secretions, barking cough, decreased appetite, and listless behavior. Swine virus consist of eight RNA strands, one strand derived from human flu strains, two from avian (bird) strains, and five from swine strains. Swine flu spreads from infected person to healthy person by inhalation or ingestion of droplets contaminated with virus while sneezing or coughing. Two antiviral agents have been reported to help prevent or reduce the effects of swine flu, flu shot and nasal spray. WHO recommended for pandemic period to prevent its future outbreaks through vaccines or non-vaccines means. Antiviral drugs effective against this virus are Tamiflu and Relenza. Rapid antigen testing (RIDT), DFA testing, viral culture, and molecular testing (RT-PCR) are used for its diagnosis in laboratory

  20. Optimal Use of Vaccines for Control of Influenza A Virus in Swine

    Matthew R. Sandbulte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus in swine (IAV-S is one of the most important infectious disease agents of swine in North America. In addition to the economic burden of IAV-S to the swine industry, the zoonotic potential of IAV-S sometimes leads to serious public health concerns. Adjuvanted, inactivated vaccines have been licensed in the United States for over 20 years, and there is also widespread usage of autogenous/custom IAV-S vaccines. Vaccination induces neutralizing antibodies and protection against infection with very similar strains. However, IAV-S strains are so diverse and prone to mutation that these vaccines often have disappointing efficacy in the field. This scientific review was developed to help veterinarians and others to identify the best available IAV-S vaccine for a particular infected herd. We describe key principles of IAV-S structure and replication, protective immunity, currently available vaccines, and vaccine technologies that show promise for the future. We discuss strategies to optimize the use of available IAV-S vaccines, based on information gathered from modern diagnostics and surveillance programs. Improvements in IAV-S immunization strategies, in both the short term and long term, will benefit swine health and productivity and potentially reduce risks to public health.

  1. Optimal Use of Vaccines for Control of Influenza A Virus in Swine.

    Sandbulte, Matthew R; Spickler, Anna R; Zaabel, Pamela K; Roth, James A

    2015-01-30

    Influenza A virus in swine (IAV-S) is one of the most important infectious disease agents of swine in North America. In addition to the economic burden of IAV-S to the swine industry, the zoonotic potential of IAV-S sometimes leads to serious public health concerns. Adjuvanted, inactivated vaccines have been licensed in the United States for over 20 years, and there is also widespread usage of autogenous/custom IAV-S vaccines. Vaccination induces neutralizing antibodies and protection against infection with very similar strains. However, IAV-S strains are so diverse and prone to mutation that these vaccines often have disappointing efficacy in the field. This scientific review was developed to help veterinarians and others to identify the best available IAV-S vaccine for a particular infected herd. We describe key principles of IAV-S structure and replication, protective immunity, currently available vaccines, and vaccine technologies that show promise for the future. We discuss strategies to optimize the use of available IAV-S vaccines, based on information gathered from modern diagnostics and surveillance programs. Improvements in IAV-S immunization strategies, in both the short term and long term, will benefit swine health and productivity and potentially reduce risks to public health.

  2. Engineered Swine Models of Cancer

    Adrienne L. Watson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, the technology to engineer genetically modified swine has seen many advancements, and because their physiology is remarkably similar to that of humans, swine models of cancer may be extremely valuable for preclinical safety studies as well as toxicity testing of pharmaceuticals prior to the start of human clinical trials. Hence, the benefits of using swine as a large animal model in cancer research and the potential applications and future opportunities of utilizing pigs in cancer modeling are immense. In this review, we discuss how pigs have been and can be used as a biomedical models for cancer research, with an emphasis on current technologies. We have focused on applications of precision genetics that can provide models that mimic human cancer predisposition syndromes. In particular, we describe the advantages of targeted gene-editing using custom endonucleases, specifically TALENs and CRISPRs, and transposon systems, to make novel pig models of cancer with broad preclinical applications.

  3. Role of verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli in the swine production chain

    Laura Ercoli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC can cause severe clinical diseases in humans, such as haemorrhagic colitis (HC and haemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS. Although ruminants, primarily cattle, have been suggested as typical reservoirs of STEC, many food products of other origins, including pork products, have been confirmed as vehicles for STEC transmission. Only in rare cases, pork consumption is associated with severe clinical symptoms caused by high pathogenic STEC strains. However, in these outbreaks, it is unknown whether the contamination of food products occurs during swine processing or via cross-contamination from foodstuffs of different sources. In swine, STEC plays an important role in the pathogenesis of oedema disease. In particular a Shiga toxin subtype, named stx2e, it is considered as a key factor involved in the damage of swine endothelial cells. On the contrary, stx2e-producing Escherichia coli has rarely been isolated in humans, and usually only from asymptomatic carriers or from patients with mild symptoms, such as uncomplicated diarrhoea. In fact, the presence of gene stx2e, encoding for stx2e, has rarely been reported in STEC strains that cause HUS. Moreover, stx2e-producing STEC isolated from humans and pigs were found to differ in serogroup, their virulence profile and interaction with intestinal epithelial cells. Because of the limited epidemiologic data of STEC in swine and the increasing role of non-O157 STEC in human illnesses, the relationship between swine STEC and human disease needs to be further investigated.

  4. Swine Influenza Virus Vaccine: Potentiation of Antibody Responses in Rhesus Monkeys

    1977-04-01

    and of polyllUCI. Monkeys given the vac- Fever was not observed in monkeys carboxymethylcellulose lpoly(ICL.C)l cine-adjuvant combinations were gisen...1ICL0 - - ~ - __C D unit antigen prepared from the AINJ/76 k 0 7142425lO (New Jersey; swine) strain of virus. when ug) 0 7- 142Q10 5 tested in monkeys...7) (12) (34) (M0) (40) prepared as described previously (3). 100 < < 20 40 160 80 20 was 10or .00 Ag/kg in the first study 100 < ម 40 320 320 64

  5. Overview of Classical Swine Fever (Hog Cholera, Classical Swine fever)

    Classical swine fever is a contagious often fatal disease of pigs clinically characterized by high body temperature, lethargy, yellowish diarrhea, vomits and purple skin discoloration of ears, lower abdomen and legs. It was first described in the early 19th century in the USA. Later, a condition i...

  6. 9 CFR 85.6 - Interstate movement of pseudorabies vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene...

    2010-01-01

    ... vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herds, not known to be..., except swine from qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herds, not known to be infected with or exposed to pseudorabies. Pseudorabies vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative...

  7. Polymerase discordance in novel swine influenza H3N2v constellations is tolerated in swine but not human respiratory epithelial cells.

    Joshua D Powell

    Full Text Available Swine-origin H3N2v, a variant of H3N2 influenza virus, is a concern for novel reassortment with circulating pandemic H1N1 influenza virus (H1N1pdm09 in swine because this can lead to the emergence of a novel pandemic virus. In this study, the reassortment prevalence of H3N2v with H1N1pdm09 was determined in swine cells. Reassortants evaluated showed that the H1N1pdm09 polymerase (PA segment occurred within swine H3N2 with ∼ 80% frequency. The swine H3N2-human H1N1pdm09 PA reassortant (swH3N2-huPA showed enhanced replication in swine cells, and was the dominant gene constellation. Ferrets infected with swH3N2-huPA had increased lung pathogenicity compared to parent viruses; however, swH3N2-huPA replication in normal human bronchoepithelial cells was attenuated - a feature linked to expression of IFN-β and IFN-λ genes in human but not swine cells. These findings indicate that emergence of novel H3N2v influenza constellations require more than changes in the viral polymerase complex to overcome barriers to cross-species transmission. Additionally, these findings reveal that while the ferret model is highly informative for influenza studies, slight differences in pathogenicity may not necessarily be indicative of human outcomes after infection.

  8. Adjuvant

    Ramadan M. Nafae

    2013-07-01

    Conclusion: Adjunctive 7 day course of low dose hydrocortisone IV in patients with CAP hastens clinical recovery and prevents the development of sepsis-related complications with a significant reduction in the duration of mechanical ventilation, duration of IV antibiotics and length of hospital stay with the improvement in hospital outcome and weaning success from mechanical ventilation.

  9. 9 CFR 94.14 - Swine from regions where swine vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited.

    2010-01-01

    ... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY... vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited. 94.14 Section 94.14 Animals and Animal Products...

  10. African swine fever virus serotype-specific proteins are significant protective antigens for African swine fever

    African swine fever (ASF) is an emerging disease threat for the swine industry worldwide. No ASF vaccine is available and progress is hindered by lack of knowledge concerning the extent of African swine fever virus (ASFV) strain diversity and the viral antigens conferring type specific protective im...

  11. House dust extracts contain potent immunological adjuvants

    Beukelman, C.J.; Dijk, H. van; Aerts, P.C.; Rademaker, P.M.; Berrens, L.; Willers, J.M.N.

    1987-01-01

    A crude aqueous extract of house dust and two house dust subfractions were tested for adjuvant activity in a sensitivity assay performed in mice. Evidence is presented that house dust contains at least two potent immunological adjuvants. One of these, present in both subfractions, was probably endot

  12. Novel Adjuvants and Immunomodulators for Veterinary Vaccines

    Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Fang, Yongxiang; Jungersen, Gregers

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants are crucial for efficacy of vaccines, especially subunit and recombinant vaccines. Rational vaccine design, including knowledge-based and molecularly defined adjuvants tailored for directing and potentiating specific types of host immune responses towards the antigens included in the va...

  13. Swine in biomedical research. V. 1

    Tumbleson, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This volume presents information on the following topics: the history of pigs; conceptual and operational history of the development of miniature swine; breeding program and population standards of the Gottingen miniature swine; moral, social and scientific aspects of the use of swine in research; fertility in gilts inseminated with frozen boar semen stored at -196 C for eight years; ultrastructure of piglet liver; porcine models in surgical research; anesthesia in swine; pulse monitoring, intravascular and instramuscular injection sites in pigs; collagen biosynthesis and collagen content as a measure of dermal healing in experimental wounds in domestic swine; methods for hair removal; swine as a cardiac surgical model; bone marrow transplantation in miniature swine; technical aspects of small intestinal transplantation in young pigs; models; the pig in studies of diarrhea pathophysiology; use of swine to validate airflow perturbation device for airways resistance measurements in humans; swine as a model for human diabetes; and the weanling Yorkshire pig as an animal model for measuring percutaneous penetration.

  14. Swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) diversity in Sinclair and Hanford swine.

    Ho, Chak-Sum; Martens, Gregory W; Amoss, Max S; Gomez-Raya, Luis; Beattie, Craig W; Smith, Douglas M

    2010-03-01

    The swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) haplotype B is associated with increased penetrance of the tumor traits in Sinclair swine cutaneous melanoma (SSCM). We established a series of SinclairxHanford swine crosses to facilitate genetic mapping of the tumor-associated loci. In this study, the SLA diversity in the founding animals was characterized for effective selection of maximum tumor penetrance in the pedigrees. Using the sequence-based typing (SBT) method we identified a total of 29 alleles at five polymorphic SLA loci (SLA-1, SLA-3, SLA-2, DRB1 and DQB1) representing six class I and five class II haplotypes. We subsequently developed a rapid PCR-based typing assay using sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) to efficiently follow the SLA types of the crossbred progeny. In a total of 469 animals we identified three crossovers within the class I region and three between the class I and class II regions, which corresponded to recombination frequencies of 0.39% and 0.56%, respectively. We also confirmed the presence of two expressed SLA-1 loci in three of the class I haplotypes and were able to determine the relative chromosomal arrangement of the duplicated loci in two haplotypes. This study furthers our understanding of the allelic architecture and polymorphism of the SLA system and will facilitate the mapping of loci associated with the expression of SSCM.

  15. Vulnerability of the British swine industry to classical swine fever

    Porphyre, Thibaud; Correia-Gomes, Carla; Chase-Topping, Margo E.; Gamado, Kokouvi; Auty, Harriet K.; Hutchinson, Ian; Reeves, Aaron; Gunn, George J.; Woolhouse, Mark E. J.

    2017-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a notifiable, highly contagious viral disease of swine which results in severe welfare and economic consequences in affected countries. To improve preparedness, it is critical to have some understanding of how CSF would spread should it be introduced. Based on the data recorded during the 2000 epidemic of CSF in Great Britain (GB), a spatially explicit, premises-based model was developed to explore the risk of CSF spread in GB. We found that large outbreaks of CSF would be rare and generated from a limited number of areas in GB. Despite the consistently low vulnerability of the British swine industry to large CSF outbreaks, we identified concerns with respect to the role played by the non-commercial sector of the industry. The model further revealed how various epidemiological features may influence the spread of CSF in GB, highlighting the importance of between-farm biosecurity in preventing widespread dissemination of the virus. Knowledge of factors affecting the risk of spread are key components for surveillance planning and resource allocation, and this work provides a valuable stepping stone in guiding policy on CSF surveillance and control in GB. PMID:28225040

  16. Adjuvants: Classification, Modus Operandi, and Licensing

    Apostólico, Juliana de Souza

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most efficient strategies for the prevention of infectious diseases. Although safer, subunit vaccines are poorly immunogenic and for this reason the use of adjuvants is strongly recommended. Since their discovery in the beginning of the 20th century, adjuvants have been used to improve immune responses that ultimately lead to protection against disease. The choice of the adjuvant is of utmost importance as it can stimulate protective immunity. Their mechanisms of action have now been revealed. Our increasing understanding of the immune system, and of correlates of protection, is helping in the development of new vaccine formulations for global infections. Nevertheless, few adjuvants are licensed for human vaccines and several formulations are now being evaluated in clinical trials. In this review, we briefly describe the most well known adjuvants used in experimental and clinical settings based on their main mechanisms of action and also highlight the requirements for licensing new vaccine formulations. PMID:27274998

  17. Adjuvants for single droplet application of glyphosate

    Mathiassen, Solvejg Kopp; Kudsk, Per; Lund, Ivar

    2016-01-01

    Retention and biological activity of droplets of glyphosate deposited onto plant leaves using a Drop on Demand inkjet printer application system, was examined on pot-grown Brassica napus, Solanum nigrum, Chenopodium album, Silene noctiflora and Echinocloa crus-galli plants. Retention was measured...... in admixture with the adjuvant Control was significantly higher on B. napus than with any of the other adjuvants, whereas on S. nigrum no difference was observed between Control and Bermocoll E 230 FQ. Only small differences among the adjuvants were observed on C. album, S. noctiflora and E. crus......-galli. The biological performance was not significantly influenced by the adjuvants except with C. album. However droplet volumes varied significantly with a minimum of 0.3 μl in admixture with Control and a maximum of 0.6 μl in combination with Adhere. In conclusion, retention could be optimized by adjuvant selection...

  18. Nipple-sparing mastectomy in breast cancer patients: The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (Review).

    Janssen, Stefan; Holz-Sapra, Edna; Rades, Dirk; Moser, Alexander; Studer, Gabriela

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) following nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive breast cancer, based on the published literature. Currently, there is no standard for RT following NSM. NSM aims to spare the nipple areola complex (NAC) without compromising locoregional control. Long-term follow-up studies have begun to show promising results. A search of the English literature was performed using the Medline database and Cochrane central library, with the keywords 'nipple/areola-sparing mastectomy', 'whole skin mastectomy' and 'NAC preservation'. A total of 32 original studies with data on NSM in terms of locoregional control, NAC control, NAC necrosis and adjuvant RT were identified. The median locoregional and NAC recurrence rates were 3.2 and 1.4% (range, 0-28.4% and 0-3.7%), respectively. The volume of remaining breast tissue following NSM was reported inconsistently. In 15 studies, RT was not mentioned. In the remaining 17 studies, RT was administered in 0-100% of patients. Only 7 studies provided detailed information regarding the use of adjuvant RT. Adjuvant thoracic wall irradiation was not used in certain studies, not even for locoregionally advanced tumors. Overall, NSM appears a feasible treatment without increased risk of locoregional recurrence for selected patients. The role of adjuvant RT following NSM requires further clarification. The decision regarding adjuvant RT must be made in interdisciplinary tumor boards and with consideration of the individual situation of the patient.

  19. Reverse zoonosis of influenza to swine: new perspectives on the human–animal interface

    The origins of the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic in swine are unknown, highlighting gaps in our understanding of influenza A virus (IAV) ecology and evolution. We review how recently strengthened influenza virus surveillance in pigs has revealed that influenza virus transmission from humans to sw...

  20. Phylogenetic Relationships of the Mangalitsa Swine Breed Inferred from Mitochondrial DNA Variation

    Sergiu Emil Georgescu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The Mangalitsa pig, a swine breed belonging to the protected gene fund of original and primitive animal breeds of the FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization, has been known to inhabit Romanian territories since the 19th century. The aim of this study was to compare the Mangalitsa breed with several European and Asiatic swine breeds in order to emphasize its uniqueness and to elucidate its origin. For this purpose, we analyzed a 613 bp mitochondrial DNA D-loop fragment and 1140 bp of the cytochrome b gene in a population of Mangalitsa pigs and the polymorphic sites were compared with sequences from GenBank originating from other swine breeds. Taking into account the total of 24 breeds and 5 different Wild Boar populations analyzed, 86 polymorphic sites representing 32 haplotypes were observed, with an average percentage of polymorphic sites of 4.9%. Three Neighbor-Joining phylogenetic trees were constructed based on Kimura 2-parameter distances, using D-loop, cytochrome b and mitochondrial reunited sequences. For the analyzed Mangalitsa population, four distinct haplotypes were identified, including one that was common to other breeds. Our study suggests that the Mangalitsa swine originate from primitive breeds which might be directly derived from the Wild Boar.

  1. Shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic analyses of dusts from swine confinement and grain facilities.

    Robert J Boissy

    Full Text Available Inhalation of agricultural dusts causes inflammatory reactions and symptoms such as headache, fever, and malaise, which can progress to chronic airway inflammation and associated diseases, e.g. asthma, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Although in many agricultural environments feed particles are the major constituent of these dusts, the inflammatory responses that they provoke are likely attributable to particle-associated bacteria, archaebacteria, fungi, and viruses. In this study, we performed shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic analyses of DNA from dusts from swine confinement facilities or grain elevators, with comparisons to dusts from pet-free households. DNA sequence alignment showed that 19% or 62% of shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic DNA sequence reads from swine facility or household dusts, respectively, were of swine or human origin, respectively. In contrast only 2% of such reads from grain elevator dust were of mammalian origin. These metagenomic shotgun reads of mammalian origin were excluded from our analyses of agricultural dust microbiota. The ten most prevalent bacterial taxa identified in swine facility compared to grain elevator or household dust were comprised of 75%, 16%, and 42% gram-positive organisms, respectively. Four of the top five swine facility dust genera were assignable (Clostridium, Lactobacillus, Ruminococcus, and Eubacterium, ranging from 4% to 19% relative abundance. The relative abundances of these four genera were lower in dust from grain elevators or pet-free households. These analyses also highlighted the predominance in swine facility dust of Firmicutes (70% at the phylum level, Clostridia (44% at the Class level, and Clostridiales at the Order level (41%. In summary, shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic analyses of agricultural dusts show that they differ qualitatively and quantitatively at the level of microbial taxa present, and that the

  2. Adjuvants are Key Factors for the Development of Future Vaccines: Lessons from the Finlay Adjuvant Platform

    Pérez, Oliver; Romeu, Belkis; Cabrera, Osmir; González, Elizabeth; Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Labrada, Alexis; Pérez, Rocmira; Reyes, Laura M.; Ramírez, Wendy; Sifontes, Sergio; Fernández, Nelson; Lastre, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    The development of effective vaccines against neglected diseases, especially those associated with poverty and social deprivation, is urgently needed. Modern vaccine technologies and a better understanding of the immune response have provided scientists with the tools for rational and safer design of subunit vaccines. Often, however, subunit vaccines do not elicit strong immune responses, highlighting the need to incorporate better adjuvants; this step therefore becomes a key factor for vaccine development. In this review we outline some key features of modern vaccinology that are linked with the development of better adjuvants. In line with the increased desire to obtain novel adjuvants for future vaccines, the Finlay Adjuvant Platform offers a novel approach for the development of new and effective adjuvants. The Finlay Adjuvants (AFs), AFPL (proteoliposome), and AFCo (cochleate), were initially designed for parenteral and mucosal applications, and constitute potent adjuvants for the induction of Th1 responses against several antigens. This review summarizes the status of the Finlay technology in producing promising adjuvants for unsolved-vaccine diseases including mucosal approaches and therapeutic vaccines. Ideas related to adjuvant classification, adjuvant selection, and their possible influence on innate recognition via multiple toll-like receptors are also discussed. PMID:24348475

  3. Gamma ray sterilization of delta inulin adjuvant particles (Advax™) makes minor, partly reversible structural changes without affecting adjuvant activity.

    Cooper, P D; Barclay, T G; Ginic-Markovic, M; Petrovsky, N

    2014-01-23

    We earlier identified a developmental series of seven isoforms/polymorphs of microparticulate inulin by comparing non-covalent bonding strengths. Their pharmaceutical utility lies in the modulation of cellular immunity, exploited as vaccine adjuvants (Advax™) especially for delta inulin (DI). As such particles cannot be sterilized by filtration we explore the effect of (60)Co gamma radiation (GR) on inulin isoforms, particularly DI. Its adjuvant activity and overt physical properties were unaffected by normal GR sterilizing doses (up to 25kGy). Heating irradiated isoform suspensions near their critical dissolution temperature revealed increased solubility deduced to reflect a single lethal event in one component of a multi-component structure. Local oxidative effects of GR on DI were not found. The observed DI loss was almost halved by re-annealing at the critical temperature: surviving inulin chains apparently reassemble into smaller amounts of the original type of structure. Colorimetric tetrazolium assay revealed increases in reducing activity after GR of raw inulin powder, which yielded DI with normal physical properties but only 25% normal recovery yet 4× normal reducing ability, implying final retention of some GR-changed inulin chains. These findings suggest minimal inulin chain cleavage and confirm that GR may be a viable strategy for terminal sterilization of microparticulate inulin adjuvants.

  4. Identification and characterization of H2N3 avian influenza virus from backyard poultry and comparison with novel H2N3 swine influenza virus.

    Killian, Mary Lea; Zhang, Yan; Panigrahy, Brundaban; Trampel, Darrell; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin

    2011-12-01

    In early 2007, H2N3 influenza virus was isolated from a duck and a chicken in two separate poultry flocks in Ohio. Since the same subtype influenza virus with hemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N) genes of avian lineage was also identified in a swine herd in Missouri in 2006, the objective of this study was to characterize and compare the genetic, antigenic, and biologic properties of the avian and swine isolates. Avian isolates were low pathogenic by in vivo chicken pathogenicity testing. Sequencing and phylogenetic analyses revealed that all genes of the avian isolates were comprised of avian lineages, whereas the swine isolates contained contemporary swine internal gene segments, demonstrating that the avian H2N3 viruses were not directly derived from the swine virus. Sequence comparisons for the H and N genes demonstrated that the avian isolates were similar but not identical to the swine isolates. Accordingly, the avian and swine isolates were also antigenically related as determined by hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) and virus neutralization assays, suggesting that both avian and swine isolates originated from the same group of H2N3 avian influenza viruses. Although serological surveys using the HI assay on poultry flocks and swine herds in Ohio did not reveal further spread of H2 virus from the index flocks, surveillance is important to ensure the virus is not reintroduced to domestic swine or poultry. Contemporary H2N3 avian influenza viruses appear to be easily adaptable to unnatural hosts such as poultry and swine, raising concern regarding the potential for interspecies transmission of avian viruses to humans.

  5. 9 CFR 206.2 - Swine contract library.

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Swine contract library. 206.2 Section... STOCKYARDS PROGRAMS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWINE CONTRACT LIBRARY § 206.2 Swine contract library. (a) Do... swine contract library will be made available to the public? GIPSA will summarize the information it...

  6. Safety of vaccine adjuvants: focus on autoimmunity.

    van der Laan, Jan Willem; Gould, Sarah; Tanir, Jennifer Y

    2015-03-24

    Questions have been recently raised regarding the safety of vaccine adjuvants, particularly in relation to autoimmunity or autoimmune disease(s)/disorder(s) (AID). The International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) formed a scientific committee and convened a 2-day workshop, consisting of technical experts from around the world representing academia, government regulatory agencies, and industry, to investigate and openly discuss the issues around adjuvant safety in vaccines. The types of adjuvants considered included oil-in-water emulsions and toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. The state of science around the use of animal models and biomarkers for the evaluation and prediction of AID were also discussed. Following extensive literature reviews by the HESI committee, and presentations by experts at the workshop, several key points were identified, including the value of animal models used to study autoimmunity and AID toward studying novel vaccine adjuvants; whether there is scientific evidence indicating an intrinsic risk of autoimmunity and AID with adjuvants, or a higher risk resulting from the mechanism of action; and if there is compelling clinical data linking adjuvants and AID. The tripartite group of experts concluded that there is no compelling evidence supporting the association of vaccine adjuvants with autoimmunity signals. Additionally, it is recommended that future research on the potential effects of vaccine adjuvants on AID should consider carefully the experimental design in animal models particularly if they are to be used in any risk assessment, as an improper design and model could result in misleading information. Finally, studies on the mechanistic aspects and potential biomarkers related to adjuvants and autoimmunity phenomena could be developed.

  7. Swine flu vaccination for patients with cancers

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In oncology, vaccination is accepted as an important preventive measure. As a tertiary prevention protocol, several vaccines are recommended for the oncology patients. The newest vaccine in medicine is swine flu vaccine which is developed for prevention of novel H1N1 influenza virus infection. In this paper, the author will briefly discuss on swine flu vaccination for oncology patients.

  8. 75 FR 16641 - Swine Contract Library

    2010-04-02

    ... and Stockyards Administration 9 CFR Part 206 RIN 0580-AB06 Swine Contract Library AGENCY: Grain... (1999 Act) by establishing the Swine Contract Library (SCL). The statutory authority for the library... creation and maintenance of a library of marketing contracts offered by certain packers to producers...

  9. Advances in Swine biomedical Model Genomics

    This manuscript is a short update on the diversity of swine biomedical models and the importance of genomics in their continued development. The swine has been used as a major mammalian model for human studies because of the similarity in size and physiology, and in organ development and disease pro...

  10. Classical Swine Fever Virus-Rluc Replicons

    Risager, Peter Christian; Belsham, Graham J.; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the etiologic agent of the severe porcine disease, classical swine fever. Unraveling the molecular determinants of efficient replication is crucial for gaining proper knowledge of the pathogenic traits of this virus. Monitoring the replication competence within...

  11. Classical swine fever (CSF) marker vaccine - Trial I. Challenge studies in weaner pigs

    Uttenthal, Åse; Le Potier, M.F.; Romero, L.;

    2001-01-01

    , -10 or -7, and subsequently challenged at day 0. The challenge virus was CSFV 277, originating from a recent outbreak of classical swine fever (CSF) in Germany. In all groups, only 5 out of 10 pigs were challenged; the remaining 5 pigs served as vaccinated contact controls. Also, three control groups......Two commercial marker vaccines against classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and companion diagnostic tests were examined in 160 conventional pigs. To test the vaccines in a "worst case scenario", group of 10 weaners were vaccinated using a single dose of an E2 (gp55) based vaccine at days -21, -14...

  12. Glucocorticosteroids: as Adjuvant Therapy for Bacterial Infections

    WONDIM MELKAM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids (GCs, synthetic analogues of the natural steroid hormones, are well known for their antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive properties in the periphery. They are widely and successfully used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammation, and transplant rejection. Nowadays, GCs are claimed to have a beneficial role being as adjunct therapy in various infections. Different studies have been conducted to investigate their use as adjuvant therapy for different bacterial infection. This review, therefore, summarizes various bacterial infections for which glucocorticoids are reported to be used as adjuvant therapy, strategies for administration of glucocorticoids, and challenges of using glucocorticoids as adjuvant therapy.

  13. Genetic evolution of recently emerged novel human-like swine H3 influenza A viruses (IAV) in United States swine

    Introduction Influenza A virus (IAV) is a major cause of respiratory disease in swine. IAV transmission from humans to swine is a major contributor to swine IAV diversity. In 2012, a novel H3N2 with an HA (hu-H3) and NA derived from human seasonal H3N2 was detected in United States (US) swine. The h...

  14. Digestibilidade aparente e verdadeira do fósforo de alimentos de origem animal para suínos Apparent and true digestibility of phosphorus from animal origin feedstuffs for swines

    S. Bünzen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Determinaram-se os coeficientes de digestibilidade aparente (CDAP e verdadeira (CDVP do fósforo de alimentos de origem animal. Foram utilizados 24 suínos, machos castrados, com média de peso de 25,0±3,0kg no período de crescimento e 24 suínos com média de peso de 60,0±5,0kg para o período de terminação. Os tratamentos foram resultantes de um fatorial de duas metodologias (coleta total de fezes e indicador fecal, duas fases (crescimento e terminação e oito dietas (seis alimentos de origem animal, uma ração referência e uma ração com baixo conteúdo de fósforo total para estimar as perdas de fósforo endógeno, com três repetições e um animal por unidade experimental. Não foram encontradas diferenças entre as metodologias ou entre as fases avaliadas (P>0,05. Os valores médios de CDAP e CDVP encontrados com suínos em crescimento e terminação foram, respectivamente, 61,7 e 62,0% para a farinha de carne e ossos com 35% de proteína bruta (PB; 62,3 e 62,9% para a farinha de carne e ossos com 41% de PB; 49,0 e 52,5% para a farinha de vísceras e penas; 72,3 e 90,8% para a farinha de penas; 85,5 e 88,5% para a farinha de peixe com 55% de PB; e 80,0 e 92,0% para o soro de leite em pó.The coefficients of apparent (CADP and true (CTDP digestibility of the phosphorus from animal origin feedstuffs were determined. Twenty-four barrows in growing phase with initial weight 25.0±3.0kg and the same barrows in finishing phase with initial weight 60.0±5.0kg were used. The treatments were made by a factorial of two methodologies (total collection of feces and fecal marker, two phases (growing and finishing, and eight diets (six animal origin feedstuffs, one reference diet, and one diet with low content of total phosphorus in order to estimate the losses of endogenous phosphorus, with three replicates by treatment. There was no difference between the methodologies or phases evaluated (P>0.05. The average of CADP and CTDP found in

  15. Finding a new drug and vaccine for emerging swine flu: What is the concept?

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Viroj WiwanitkitWiwanitkit House, Bangkhae, Bangkok 10160Abstract: Influenza is a well known infection of the respiratory system. The main clinical manifestations of influenza include fever, sore throat, headache, cough, coryza, and malaise. Apart from the well known classical influenza, there are also groups of influenza virus infections that are called “atypical infection”. These infections are usually due to a novel influenza virus infection. In early 2009, an emerging novel influenza originating from Mexico called swine flu was reported. The World Health Organization noted a level VI precaution, the highest level precaution possible, for this newest influenza virus infection. As of June 2009, it is not known if this disease will be successfully controlled. Finding new drugs and vaccine for the emerging swine flu is still required to cope with this emerging worldwide problem.Keywords: swine flu, drug, vaccine, concept

  16. Pathogens gone wild? Medical anthropology and the "swine flu" pandemic.

    Singer, Merrill

    2009-07-01

    Beginning in April 2009, global attention began focusing on the emergence in Mexico of a potentially highly lethal new influenza strain of porcine origin that has successfully jumped species barriers and is now being transmitted around the world. Reported on extensively by the mass media, commented on by public health and government officials across the globe, and focused on with nervous attention by the general public, the so-called swine flu pandemic raises important questions, addressed here, concerning the capacity of medical anthropology to respond usefully to such disease outbreaks and their health and social consequences.

  17. [Adjuvant dermato-cosmetic acne therapy].

    Bayerl, Christiane; Degitz, Klaus; Meigel, Eva; Kerscher, Martina

    2010-03-01

    Adjuvant dermato-cosmetic therapy in acne is an essential part of the concept of treating acne after initiation and during maintenance therapy. Those are mechanical peeling, chemical peeling and its combination. It needs supervision by an experienced dermatologist.

  18. Adjuvants for spraying of fungicides in wheat

    2014-01-01

    The foliar diseases and spike can markedly reduce the yield of wheat. Despite prevailing chemical control in the management of disease, studies with adjuvants to improve the performance of fungicides are still incipient. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding adjuvants to chemical fungicides to control leaf diseases and spike, as well as on the yield of wheat crop. The experimental design was a randomized block design with 05 treatments: control (no fungicide application i...

  19. Applications of nanomaterials as vaccine adjuvants.

    Zhu, Motao; Wang, Rongfu; Nie, Guangjun

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine adjuvants are applied to amplify the recipient's specific immune responses against pathogen infection or malignancy. A new generation of adjuvants is being developed to meet the demands for more potent antigen-specific responses, specific types of immune responses, and a high margin of safety. Nanotechnology provides a multifunctional stage for the integration of desired adjuvant activities performed by the building blocks of tailor-designed nanoparticles. Using nanomaterials for antigen delivery can provide high bioavailability, sustained and controlled release profiles, and targeting and imaging properties resulting from manipulation of the nanomaterials' physicochemical properties. Moreover, the inherent immune-regulating activity of particular nanomaterials can further promote and shape the cellular and humoral immune responses toward desired types. The combination of both the delivery function and immunomodulatory effect of nanomaterials as adjuvants is thought to largely benefit the immune outcomes of vaccination. In this review, we will address the current achievements of nanotechnology in the development of novel adjuvants. The potential mechanisms by which nanomaterials impact the immune responses to a vaccine and how physicochemical properties, including size, surface charge and surface modification, impact their resulting immunological outcomes will be discussed. This review aims to provide concentrated information to promote new insights for the development of novel vaccine adjuvants.

  20. Microscopy and image analysis based approaches for the species-specific identification of bovine and swine bone containing material

    Matteo Ottoboni

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of image analysis measurements in combination with the official analytical method for the detection of constituents of animal origin in feedstuffs, in distinguishing between bovine and swine (bone containing material. Authentic samples of controlled origin containing bovine or swine meat and bone meals were analysed by the microscopic method, in accordance with the official analytical method. Sediment fractions of each sample were observed with a compound microscope at X40. A total of 362 bone fragment lacunae images were recorded and processed through image analysis software, deriving 30 geometric variables for each lacuna. Results indicated that not only were most variables significantly (P<0.001 different between bovine and swine samples, but also that two thirds of the same variables were bigger in bovine than in swine. This information, however, does not seem to be so effective in practice since bovine and swine features and measurements overlapped. It can be concluded that the microscopic method even when combined with image analysis does not fit all the requirements for accurately identifying prohibited ingredients of animal origin. A combined approach with other methods is therefore recommended.

  1. Swine flu - A pandemic outbreak

    Jini George

    Full Text Available Hippocrates had described influenza like outbreak in 412 B.C. and since then repeated influenza like epidemics and pandemics have been recorded in recent times. One of the greatest killers of all time was the pandemic of swine flu (Spanish flu of 1918-1919, when 230 million people died. Annual influenza epidemics are estimated to affect 5–15% of the global population, resulting in severe illness in 3–5 million patients causing 250,000–500,000 deaths worldwide. Severe illness and deaths occur mainly in the high-risk populations of infants, the elderly and chronically ill patients. The 2009 outbreak of swine flu is thought to be a mutation more specifically a reassortment of four known strains of influenza A virus subtype H1N1; one endemic in humans, one endemic in birds, and two endemic in pigs. WHO officially declared the outbreak to be a pandemic on June 11, 2009, but stressed that the new designation was a result of the global "spread of the virus," not its severity. [Vet World 2009; 2(12.000: 472-474

  2. Review: Adjuvant effects of saponins on animal immune responses

    RAJPUT Zahid Iqbal; HU Song-hua; XIAO Chen-wen; ARIJO Abdullah G.

    2007-01-01

    Vaccines require optimal adjuvants including immunopotentiator and delivery systems to offer long term protection from infectious diseases in animals and man. Initially it was believed that adjuvants are responsible for promoting strong and sustainable antibody responses. Now it has been shown that adjuvants influence the isotype and avidity of antibody and also affect the properties of cell-mediated immunity. Mostly oil emulsions, lipopolysaccharides, polymers, saponins, liposomes, cytokines,ISCOMs (immunostimulating complexes), Freund's complete adjuvant, Freund's incomplete adjuvant, alums, bacterial toxins etc.,are common adjuvants under investigation. Saponin based adjuvants have the ability to stimulate the cell mediated immune system as well as to enhance antibody production and have the advantage that only a low dose is needed for adjuvant activity. In the present study the importance of adjuvants, their role and the effect of saponin in immune system is reviewed.

  3. (Neo)adjuvant systemic therapy for melanoma.

    van Zeijl, M C T; van den Eertwegh, A J; Haanen, J B; Wouters, M W J M

    2017-03-01

    Surgery still is the cornerstone of treatment for patients with stage II and III melanoma, but despite great efforts to gain or preserve locoregional control with excision of the primary tumour, satellites, intransits, sentinel node biopsy and lymphadenectomy, surgery alone does not seem to improve survival any further. Prognosis for patients with high risk melanoma remains poor with 5-year survival rates of 40 to 80%. Only interferon-2b has been approved as adjuvant therapy since 1995, but clinical integration is low considering the high risk-benefit ratio. In recent years systemic targeted- and immunotherapy have proven to be beneficial in advanced melanoma and could be a promising strategy for (neo)adjuvant treatment of patients with resectable high risk melanomas as well. Randomised, placebo- controlled phase III trials on adjuvant systemic targeted- and immunotherapy are currently being performed using new agents like ipilimumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab, vemurafenib and dabrafenib plus trametinib. In this article we review the literature on currently known adjuvant therapies and currently ongoing trials of (neo)adjuvant therapies in high risk melanomas.

  4. Evaluation of a 2-aminoimidazole variant as adjuvant treatment for dermal bacterial infections

    Draughn GL

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available G Logan Draughn,1 C Leigh Allen,1 Patricia A Routh,2 Maria R Stone,2 Kelly R Kirker,3 Laura Boegli,3 Ryan M Schuchman,1 Keith E Linder,2 Ronald E Baynes,2 Garth James,3 Christian Melander,4 Angela Pollard,5 John Cavanagh1 1Department of Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, 2Department of Population Health and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA; 3Center for Biofilm Engineering, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, USA; 4Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA; 5Agile Sciences Inc., Raleigh, NC, USA Abstract: 2-Aminoimidazole (2-AI-based compounds have been shown to efficiently disrupt biofilm formation, disperse existing biofilms, and resensitize numerous multidrug-resistant bacteria to antibiotics. Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, we provide initial pharmacological studies regarding the application of a 2-AI as a topical adjuvant for persistent dermal infections. In vitro assays indicated that the 2-AI H10 is nonbactericidal, resensitizes bacteria to antibiotics, does not harm the integument, and promotes wound healing. Furthermore, in vivo application of H10 on swine skin caused no gross abnormalities or immune reactions. Taken together, these results indicate that H10 represents a promising lead dermal adjuvant compound. Keywords: transdermal absorption, antimicrobial activity, skin irritation, synergism, oroidin derivative, drip-flow reactor, ESKAPE pathogens

  5. Geochemical fate of arsenic in swine litter

    Quazi, S.; Makris, K.; Sarkar, D.; Datta, R.; Punamiya, P.

    2007-12-01

    Swine diet is often supplemented by organoarsenicals, such as roxarsone to treat diseases and to promote growth. Recent data reported roxarsone degradation under anaerobic conditions in poultry litter, but no such data exist for swine wastes typically stored in unprotected lagoons in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). However, serious environmental health risk may arise upon significant arsenic (As) release into solution. The problem may be exacerbated under certain environmental conditions where organoarsenicals, such as roxarsone transform into the more toxic inorganic As, posing serious health risk to the surrounding ecosystem. The objective of this study were to analyze swine wastes collected from 19 randomly selected CAFOs in the USA for As concentrations, and to determine the geochemical fate of As in the swine waste suspensions. Swine wastes were analyzed for total-recoverable, total soluble, and water-extractable As, which were measured by ICP-MS. Speciation of As was performed following a well-established hyphenated technique using HPLC- ICPMS. Swine waste suspensions differed in solids contents; thus, the particulate matters with varying As concentrations were spiked with roxarsone and incubated under dark/light and aerobic/anaerobic conditions. Findings show the prevalence of inorganic As [As(V)] in swine waste suspension solutions. Roxarsone underwent degradation to both organoarsenicals, such as p-ASA, as well as inorganic arsenate and to a number of unidentified metabolites. Roxarsone degradation kinetics was influenced by the solids content and the air conditions (anaerobic/aerobic) of the swine waste suspensions. Maximum degradation rates were observed under anaerobic conditions, in suspensions which were low in solids content. Roxarsone degradation was primarily microbially-mediated, but in certain cases abiotic degradation was also observed, which were significantly slower.

  6. Swine in biomedical research. V. 2

    Tumbleson, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This volume presents information on the following topics: the effect of dietary fiber on growing pigs; preparation of a cerebral perfusion model in the pig - anatomic considerations; a review of the utilization of lactose, glucose, sucrose, and cornstarch by neonatal piglets reared artificially; histology of piglet liver, swine hematology; use of swine as a model of musculoskeletal growth in animals; boar and human sperm as cellular models for membrane phospholipiid biosynthesis and degradation; a stereotaxic atlas of the developing swine (Sus Scrofa) forebrain; the effect of ethanol on liver mitochondrial Ca++-uptake; control of feed intake in pigs; the pig as a model of abberations associated with carbohydrate and lipid metabolism; whey and cholesterol in swine; vitamin and mineral nutrition and malnutrition; cadmium absorption, distribution and excretion in young and adult minature swine; a piglet model for infant total parenteral nutrition studies; swine in perinatal research; the endocrine pancreas of the fetal pig; cardiovascular physiology of the pig fetus; and the effect of sow's milk versus formula on the superior mesenteric blood flow of newborn piglets.

  7. Acute calcium homeostasis in MHS swine.

    Harrison, G G; Morrell, D F; Brain, V; Jaros, G G

    1987-07-01

    To elucidate a pathogenesis for the reduction in bone calcium content observed in MHS individuals, we studied the acute calcium homeostasis of MHS swine. This was achieved by the serial measurement, with a calcium selective electrode, of calcium transients in Landrace MHS (five) and control Landrace/large white cross MH negative (five) swine following IV bolus injection of calcium gluconate 0.1 mmol X kg-1--a dose which induced an acute 45 per cent increase in plasma ionised calcium. Experimental animals were anaesthetised with ketamine 10 mg X kg-1 IM, thiopentone (intermittent divided doses) 15-25 mg X kg-1 (total) IV and N2O/O2 (FIO2 0.3) by IPPV to maintain a normal blood gas, acid/base state. The plasma ionised calcium decay curve observed in MHS swine did not differ from that of control normal swine. Further it was noted that the induced acute rise in plasma ionised calcium failed to trigger the MH syndrome in any MHS swine. It is concluded that the mechanisms of acute calcium homeostasis in MHS swine are normal. An explanation for the reduction in bone calcium content observed in MHS individuals must be sought, therefore, through study of the slow long-term component of the calcium regulatory process. In addition, the conventional strictures placed on the use, in MHS patients, of calcium gluconate are called in question.

  8. Adjuvant chemotherapy in early breast cancer

    Ejlertsen, Bent

    2016-01-01

    % of patients aged 40 or younger in 77B had regular menses throughout chemotherapy, the corresponding percentage was 37 in 82B and 47 in 89B. The DBCG in collaboration with a Swedish and a Dutch centre participating in the DBCG trial 89B compared CMF with ovarian ablation in premenopausal high-risk breast...... are not clinically useful by themselves as other chemotherapy regimens have been more efficacious, and knowledge is still lacking regarding the benefits from adding ovarian suppression to chemotherapy plus tamoxifen. The results from the DBCG 77B and 82C are in accordance with other large adjuvant trials...... adjuvant trials demonstrated that patients with either TOP2A or centromere 17 aberrations, but not with HER2 amplification, benefit from anthracycline-containing adjuvant chemotherapy. Anthracyclins have additional distinct biological mechanisms; and results from the DBCG 89D suggested that tumours...

  9. Mycophenolate mofetil as adjuvant in pemphigus vulgaris

    Sarma Nilendu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pemphigus vulgaris (PV is a life threatening autoimmune blistering disease of skin and mucous membranes. Advent of systemic steroids has greatly reduced the mortality rate. However, steroids and adjuvant immunosuppressive therapy are nowadays frequent contributory agents of morbidity and mortality of PV. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF has been reported to be an effective adjuvant to systemic steroids. It helps in increasing the immunosuppressive effect and minimizing the toxicities by steroid sparing effect. However, its efficacy in refractory cases of PV is not well documented. The lowest possible dose with satisfactory therapeutic efficacy and least side effects is known. We used MMF 1 g/day and systemic steroids in 3 Indian patients with pemphigus vulgaris who were resistant to systemic steroid monotherapy or combination treatment with azathioprine. In our experience, MMF offers an effective adjuvant with minimal side-effects in the treatment of resistant PV.

  10. Pathogenesis and transmission studies: non-swine influenza A viruses in the swine host

    Abstract Influenza A virus (IAV) causes disease in poultry, pigs, and people with wild waterfowl being the natural reservoir. IAV strains have been periodically transmitted between swine and humans in both directions and avian IAV have also sporadically infected swine. If an individual is infected w...

  11. Swine flu: a Birmingham experience.

    Scriven, James; Mcewen, Ruth; Mistry, Sanjay; Green, Chris; Osman, Husam; Bailey, Mark; Ellis, Christopher

    2009-12-01

    By the beginning of July 2009 the West Midlands had seen more cases of novel H1N1 influenza (swine flu) than any other region in the U.K. Over a three-week period almost 850 people presented to Heartlands Hospital with flu-like symptoms. Of those admitted 52 adults were subsequently confirmed as having H1N1 infection. Most were younger than 30 and not from traditional influenza risk groups. The main risk factor for severe disease was asthma, and to a lesser extent pregnancy and obesity. Seven patients were admitted to intensive care and five developed an acute lung injury requiring prolonged admission. Two patients required extra corporeal membrane oxygenation and one died. Despite increased workload normal clinical services were unaffected. The hospital was not closed to admissions nor was it paralysed by staff absence. With a predicted second wave expected at the end of 2009, efforts to maintain effective community assessment remain crucial.

  12. African swine fever : transboundary diseases

    M-L. Penrith

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available African swine fever (ASF is a devastating haemorrhagic fever of pigs that causes up to 100 % mortality, for which there is no vaccine. It is caused by a unique DNA virus that is maintained in an ancient cycle between warthogs and argasid ticks, making it the only known DNA arbovirus. ASF has a high potential for transboundary spread, and has twice been transported from Africa to other continents - Europe and subsequently the Caribbean and Brazil (1957, 1959 and the Caucasus (2007. It is also a devastating constraint for pig production in Africa. Research at Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute has made and is making important contributions to knowledge of this disease, focusing on the cycle in warthogs and tampans and transmission from that cycle to domestic pigs, resistance to its effects in domestic pigs, and the molecular genetic characterisation and epidemiology of the virus.

  13. Green propolis phenolic compounds act as vaccine adjuvants, improving humoral and cellular responses in mice inoculated with inactivated vaccines

    Geferson Fischer

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Adjuvants play an important role in vaccine formulations by increasing their immunogenicity. In this study, the phenolic compound-rich J fraction (JFR of a Brazilian green propolis methanolic extract stimulated cellular and humoral immune responses when co-administered with an inactivated vaccine against swine herpesvirus type 1 (SuHV-1. When compared to control vaccines that used aluminium hydroxide as an adjuvant, the use of 10 mg/dose of JFR significantly increased (p < 0.05 neutralizing antibody titres against SuHV-1, as well as the percentage of protected animals following SuHV-1 challenge (p < 0.01. Furthermore, addition of phenolic compounds potentiated the performance of the control vaccine, leading to increased cellular and humoral immune responses and enhanced protection of animals after SuHV-1 challenge (p < 0.05. Prenylated compounds such as Artepillin C that are found in large quantities in JFR are likely to be the substances that are responsible for the adjuvant activity.

  14. Sulfolipo-cyclodextrin in squalane-in-water as a novel and safe vaccine adjuvant.

    Hilgers, L A; Lejeune, G; Nicolas, I; Fochesato, M; Boon, B

    1999-01-21

    Previously, we described synergistic adjuvanticity of combinations of synthetic sulfolipo(SL)-derivatives of polysaccharide (SL-polysaccharides) and squalane-in-water emulsions (squalane/W). In this paper, effects of type of polysaccharide and nature of oil on adjuvanticity, reactogenicity and stability are described. SL-derivatives of the following polysaccharides were synthesised: synthetic polysucroses with weight-average molecular weight (MW) of 400,000 (Ficoll400), 70,000 (Ficoll70) and 39,000 Da (Ficoll39), polyfructose of 5,000 Da (inulin), linear polyglucose of 1,200 Da (maltodextrin) and cyclic polyglucose of 1,135 Da (beta-cyclodextrin). The number of sulphate groups per monosaccharide of the different SL-polysaccharides varied between 0.15 and 0.23 and the number of lipid groups per monosaccharide between 1.15 and 1.29. Adjuvant formulations were prepared by incorporating these SL-polysaccharides into oil-in-water emulsions of either squalane, hexadecane, soya oil or mineral oil. Adjuvanticity of the formulations obtained for humoral responses to inactivated pseudorabies virus (PRV) and inactivated influenza virus strains A/Swine (A/Swine) and MRC-11 (MRC-11) in pigs and MRC-11 and ovalbumin (OVA) in mice depended on the type of oil (squalane = mineral oil > hexadecane = soya oil) but not on the type of polysaccharide backbone of the SL-derivative. Reactogenicity assessed by local swelling in mice decreased with decreasing MW (SL-Ficoll400 = Ficoll70 = Ficoll39 > SL-inulin = SL-maltodextrin > SL-cyclodextrin) when combined with squalane and decreased with the type of oil in the following order: squalane > mineral oil > hexadecane > soya oil when combined with SL-Ficoll400. Stability of the SL-polysaccharide/squalane/W emulsions at elevated temperature increased with decreasing MW of the SL-polysaccharide (SL-Ficoll400 squalane/W remained stable for > 2.5 years at 4 degrees C, > 18 weeks at 37 degrees C and > 10 days at 60 degrees C. We concluded that

  15. Epidemiological relationship of human and swine Streptococcus suis isolates.

    Tarradas, C; Luque, I; de Andrés, D; Abdel-Aziz Shahein, Y E; Pons, P; González, F; Borge, C; Perea, A

    2001-06-01

    Two cases of meningitis due to Streptococcus suis in humans are reported here. A butcher and an abattoir worker were referred to a health centre in Castellón (Spain) with fever and symptoms of meningitis. After adequate treatment, a slight hipoacusia persisted as sequelae in both cases. Colonies of S. suis group R, serotype 2 and phenotype MRP+EF+ were isolated from cerebroespinal fluid. Epidemiological studies showed that both workers had in common the handling of pork meat of slaughtered healthy pigs from three closed farms. A study of the tonsils from apparently healthy, slaughtered pigs was carried out. A total of 234 tonsillar samples were obtained and 81 strains of S. suis were isolated from them. Serotype 2 appeared to be the most frequent (50.6%), and the analysis for phenotype showed a high percentage of tonsillar strains with the phenotype MRP+EF+ (35.9%). The humans and 28 tonsillar swine strains showed a similar profile (S. suis group R, serotype 2 and phenotype MRP+EF+). A total of 26 of the swine isolates were analysed by ribotyping using EcoRI. The human strains showed the same six-band hybridization pattern that shared five bands with the pattern most frequently shown by most of the tonsillar N. suis group R, serotype 2 and phenotype MRP+EF+ strains, differing only in the lightest, faintest band which was slightly less anodical in human (> or = 1.8 kb) than in swine (approximately 1.8 kb). From these results, both groups of strains, humans and porcine, showed differences; how can these differences in the pattern of ribotyping be explained if they should have the same origin? Is it possible that they have undergone an adaptation to the new host or perhaps the modification is due to other unknown causes? Further studies in this area are required in order to answer these questions.

  16. Microbiota Influences Vaccine and Mucosal Adjuvant Efficacy

    2017-01-01

    A symbiotic relationship between humans and the microbiota is critical for the maintenance of our health, including development of the immune system, enhancement of the epithelial barrier, and acquisition of nutrients. Recent research has shown that the microbiota impacts immune cell development and differentiation. These findings suggest that the microbiota may also influence adjuvant and vaccine efficacy. Indeed, several factors such as malnutrition and poor sanitation, which affect gut microbiota composition, impair the efficacy of vaccines. Although there is little evidence that microbiota alters vaccine efficacy, further understanding of human immune system-microbiota interactions may lead to the effective development of adjuvants and vaccines for the treatment of diseases. PMID:28261017

  17. Adjuvants and vector systems for allergy vaccines.

    Moingeon, Philippe; Lombardi, Vincent; Saint-Lu, Nathalie; Tourdot, Sophie; Bodo, Véronique; Mascarell, Laurent

    2011-05-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy represents a curative treatment of type I allergies. Subcutaneous immunotherapy is conducted with allergens adsorbed on aluminum hydroxide or calcium phosphate particles, whereas sublingual immunotherapy relies on high doses of soluble allergen without any immunopotentiator. There is a potential benefit of adjuvants enhancing regulatory and Th1 CD4+T cell responses during specific immunotherapy. Molecules affecting dendritic cells favor the induction of T regulatory cell and Th1 responses and represent valid candidate adjuvants for allergy vaccines. Furthermore, the interest in viruslike particles and mucoadhesive particulate vector systems, which may better address the allergen(s) to tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells, is documented.

  18. Source tracking swine fecal waste in surface water proximal to swine concentrated animal feeding operations

    Heaney, Christopher D.; Myers, Kevin; Wing, Steve; Hall, Devon; Baron, Dothula; Stewart, Jill R.

    2015-01-01

    Swine farming has gone through many changes in the last few decades, resulting in operations with a high animal density known as confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs). These operations produce a large quantity of fecal waste whose environmental impacts are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate microbial water quality in surface waters proximal to swine CAFOs including microbial source tracking of fecal microbes specific to swine. For one year, surface water samples at up- and downstream sites proximal to swine CAFO lagoon waste land application sites were tested for fecal indicator bacteria (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus) and candidate swine-specific microbial source-tracking (MST) markers (Bacteroidales Pig-1-Bac, Pig-2-Bac, and Pig-Bac-2, and methanogen P23-2). Testing of 187 samples showed high fecal indicator bacteria concentrations at both up- and downstream sites. Overall, 40%, 23%, and 61% of samples exceeded state and federal recreational water quality guidelines for fecal coliforms, E. coli, and Enterococcus, respectively. Pig-1-Bac and Pig-2-Bac showed the highest specificity to swine fecal wastes and were 2.47 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03, 5.94) and 2.30 times (95% CI = 0.90, 5.88) as prevalent proximal down- than proximal upstream of swine CAFOs, respectively. Pig-1-Bac and Pig-2-Bac were also 2.87 (95% CI = 1.21, 6.80) and 3.36 (95% CI = 1.34, 8.41) times as prevalent when 48 hour antecedent rainfall was greater than versus less than the mean, respectively. Results suggest diffuse and overall poor sanitary quality of surface waters where swine CAFO density is high. Pig-1-Bac and Pig-2-Bac are useful for tracking off-site conveyance of swine fecal wastes into surface waters proximal to and downstream of swine CAFOs and during rain events. PMID:25600418

  19. Novel Vaccine Against Mycoplasma Hyosynoviae: The Immunogenic Effect of Iscom-Based Vaccines in Swine

    Lauritsen, Klara Tølbøll; Vinther Heydenreich, Annette; Riber, Ulla;

    Arthritis in swine is frequently caused by Mycoplasma hyosynoviae (Mhs). For the development of an effective vaccine we investigated the immunogenic effect of three vaccine preparations with the ISCOM adjuvant Posintro™ from Nordic Vaccine. A: formalin fixed whole-cells Mhs (300 µg/dose) mixed...... with Posintro, B: Deoxycholate extracted lipoproteins from Mhs organisms (DOC-antigen, 300 μg/dose) in Posintro and C: DOC-antigen (50 μg/dose) in Posintro. Each vaccine-group contained three pigs. Vaccinations (i.m.) were performed at 12 and 15 weeks of age. The development of specific IgG and secretion...... of IFNγ were measured. Three weeks after the second vaccination, pigs were euthanised and autopsied. Vaccine B induced a high level of specific serum IgG in all pigs a week after boost. Vaccine C gave a variable response after boost, with two pigs seroconverting, while no response was seen by vaccine A...

  20. Gaps in knowledge and prospects for research of adjuvanted vaccines.

    Seder, Robert; Reed, Steven G; O'Hagan, Derek; Malyala, Padma; D'Oro, Ugo; Laera, Donatello; Abrignani, Sergio; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Steinman, Lawrence; Bertholet, Sylvie

    2015-06-08

    A panel of researchers working in different areas of adjuvanted vaccines deliberated over the topic, "Gaps in knowledge and prospects for research of adjuvanted vaccines" at, "Enhancing Vaccine Immunity and Value" conference held in July 2014. Several vaccine challenges and applications for new adjuvant technologies were discussed.

  1. 9 CFR 78.32 - Brucellosis exposed swine.

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed swine. 78.32... AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Swine Because of Brucellosis § 78.32 Brucellosis exposed swine....

  2. 9 CFR 78.31 - Brucellosis reactor swine.

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brucellosis reactor swine. 78.31... AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Swine Because of Brucellosis § 78.31 Brucellosis reactor swine....

  3. Towards an improved understanding of African swine fever virus transmission

    Cardoso de Carvalho Ferreira, H.

    2013-01-01

    African swine fever is a haemorrhagic disease of swine caused by African swine fever virus (ASFV). Estimates of virus transmission (direct or indirect) parameters for ASFV are necessary in order to model the spread of the virus, and to design more efficient control measures. Results presented on thi

  4. Full-Genome Sequence of a Reassortant H1N1 Swine Influenza Virus Isolated from Pigs in Italy.

    Chiapponi, Chiara; Baioni, Laura; Luppi, Andrea; Moreno, Ana; Castellan, Alberto; Foni, Emanuela

    2013-10-03

    In this study, the full-genome sequence of a novel reassortant H1N1 swine influenza virus (SIV) is reported. The isolate has a hemagglutinin (HA) gene of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, but it carries the seven genome segments of the avian-origin H1N1 SIV currently circulating in European pig farms.

  5. A novel non-mineral oil-based adjuvant. II. Efficacy of a synthetic sulfolipopolysaccharide in a squalane-in-water emulsion in pigs.

    Hilgers, L A; Platenburg, P L; Luitjens, A; Groenveld, B; Dazelle, T; Weststrate, M W

    1994-05-01

    The adjuvanticity of a sulfolipopolysaccharide (SLP) incorporated into a squalane-in-water emulsion (SLP/S/W) was compared with that of a mineral oil-in-water (O/W) adjuvant currently used in commercial porcine vaccines. Groups of pigs were immunized twice with vaccines comprising either inactivated influenza virus (iFlu3 containing strains A/Swine, MRC-11 and X-79), inactivated pseudorabies virus (iPRV), live pseudorabies virus (PRV) or inactivated porcine parvovirus (iPPV) as antigen and SLP/S/W or O/W as adjuvant. Antibody titres in serum 2 or 3 weeks after the second immunization were measured by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) or serum neutralization (SN) assays. Both adjuvants significantly augmented the antibody responses against the antigens tested. Mean factors of increase obtained by SLP/S/W and O/W were: 315 and 91, respectively, for A/Swine; 478 and 137 for MRC-11; 362 and 128 for X-79; 69 and 49 for iPRV; and 23 and 7 for live PRV. Increased humoral immunity against live PRV was affirmed by reduced levels and duration of virus excreted by pigs after challenge with virulent PRV. Immunization of pigs with iPPV plus adjuvant SLP/S/W gave 36-fold higher titres than with O/W. It was concluded that SLP/S/W is more effective than O/W in stimulating humoral immunity against the viral antigens examined and that the two constituents SLP and S/W interact synergistically. Advantages of SLP/S/W over O/W include stronger adjuvanticity, better biocompatibility and lower doses of active substances.

  6. Recoding classical swine fever virus (CSFV) structural glycoprotein E2 produces complete virus attenuation in swine and protects infected animals against disease

    Controlling classical swine fever (CSF) involves vaccination in endemic regions and preemptive slaughter of infected swine herds during epidemics. Generally, live attenuated vaccines induce solid immunity. Using diverse approaches, reverse genetics has been useful in developing classical swine fever...

  7. Follow-up study of prevalence and control of ascariasis in swine populations in Serbia.

    Ilić, Tamara; Becskei, Zsolt; Tasić, Aleksandar; Dimitrijević, Sanda

    2013-09-01

    The cause of the most significant helminth diseases in swine - Ascaris suum, can also causes infections in humans. The use of swine manure in agriculture renders the eggs of this ascaridida an accessible source of infection, thus posing a significant risk factor for human health. With the objective of proving the prevalence of infection with A. suum nematodes in the territory of Serbia, investigations were carried out in the period between 2007-2011 in the territories of five districts: North Bačka, South Banat, Braničevo, Zlatibor and Nišava. The investigations covered coprological examinations of 1031 feces samples of swine originating from farms owned by individual breeders. The samples were examined using the standard flotation method with a saturated water solution of NaCl. The established prevalence of ascariasis infection amounted to 47.62% (1031/491). The biggest prevalence of infection was determined in the territory of the Braničevo District, 65.78% (301/198), and the smallest in the territory of the Nišava District, 32.24% (183/59). In spite of its prevalence and vast economic importance, there is still insufficient information about the key aspects of the biology and epidemiology of A. suum. Viewed from the aspect of epizootiology, it is very important to know the prevalence of swine infections with Ascaris because of the possible infection of humans by its migrating larvae.

  8. Vascularização arterial da região do nó sinoatrial em corações suínos: origem, distribuição e quantificação Arterial vascularization of the sinoatrial node in swine hearts: origin, distribution and quantification

    Ana P. Vidotti

    2008-02-01

    superfície de área (Sv foi de 182 e a superfície de área (S - mm² - foi de 64,3x10(6µm². A estimação da densidade numérica vascular (Nv(vasc, quantidade de vasos por unidade de volume (cm³, foi de 2,19 10-5 e o número total de vasos no órgão (N(vasc, estimado pelo método dissector físico em combinação com a estimativa do número de Euler (Xv, foi de 773,6832 x10-2. A elevada densidade vascular e do número total de vasos na região do nó sinoatrial de suínos sugere a existência de uma complexa e densa rede vascular perinodal, ratificando a importância deste marca-passo pelo seu suprimento sangüíneo.The sinoatrial node, for being topographically installed as the initial component of the conduction system, is responsible for the production of the nervous impulses, which determines the cardiac contraction. There have been made studies related to the node's morphology in order to know the origin, distribution and quantification of the vases in this tissue, however, in spite of the results and quantitative data of the nodal irrigation - arterial vascular conduct and arterial vascular density, at the nodal level - the literature is scarce. With this objective 27 SRD swine hearts, injected with colored resin for macroscopic analysis of the origin and distribution of ANSA (sinoatrial node artery, 3 others injected with watery solution of colloidal coal (dyed nanquim were used, to mark the route of the vases on the node level for stereological analysis. The atrial arteries originated as well from the right coronary artery as from the left one, with predominance of the first (66.66% and 33.33%, respectively. When originated from the right coronary artery, there existed the following branches: AADAM (right cranial medial atrial artery in 14 cases, AADAI (right cranial intermedial atrial artery in 2 cases, and AADAL (right cranial lateral atrial artery in 2 cases. In 9 cases (33.33% the following branches originated from the left coronary artery: 4 through

  9. Vitamins as influenza vaccine adjuvant components.

    Quintilio, Wagner; de Freitas, Fábio Alessandro; Rodriguez, Dunia; Kubrusly, Flavia Saldanha; Yourtov, Dimitri; Miyaki, Cosue; de Cerqueira Leite, Luciana Cezar; Raw, Isaias

    2016-10-01

    A number of adjuvant formulations were assayed in mice immunized with 3.75 µg of A/California/7/2009 (H1N1) pdm09 influenza vaccine with vitamins A, D and/or E in emulsions or B2 and/or B9 combined with Bordetella pertussis MPLA and/or alum as adjuvants. Squalene was used as positive control, as well as MPLA with alum. The immune response was evaluated by a panel of tests, including a hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) test, ELISA for IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a and IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10 quantification in splenocyte culture supernatant after stimulus with influenza antigen. Immunological memory was evaluated using a 1/10 dose booster 60 days after the first immunization followed by assessment of the response by HAI, IgG ELISA, and determination of the antibody affinity index. The highest increases in HAI, IgG1 and IgG2a titers were obtained with the adjuvant combinations containing vitamin E, or the hydrophilic combinations containing MPLA and alum or B2 and alum. The IgG1/IgG2a ratio indicates that the response to the combination of B2 with alum would have more Th2 character than the combination of MPLA with alum. In an assay to investigate the memory response, a significant increase in HAI titer was observed with a booster vaccine dose at 60 days after immunization with vaccines containing MPLA with alum or B2 with alum. Overall, of the 27 adjuvant combinations, MPLA with alum and B2 with alum were the most promising adjuvants to be evaluated in humans.

  10. New biotechnological procedures in swine reproduction

    Petrujkić Tihomir

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available New biotechnological procedures and the use of hormones in swine breeding are aimed at increasing the number of piglets in the litter. In small herds and groups, selected sows with 16 mammary complexes (tits can yield up to 32 piglets, or porkers, per year per sow. In order to achieve such reproduction results, special, individual stalls for sow deliveries are used, in addition to biotechnological methods, with a warm core and floor heating, phased diet and clean facilities. The ovulation value in swine is determined by their genetic and paragenetic effects, and it is often provoked and increased with injections and preparations for superovulation. However, the results vary, since any administration of hormone injecions can reduce the reproductive cycle, shorten the duration of estrus, or disrupt the work of ovaries and create cystic follicles. The use of follicle-stimulating hormones in quantities up to 1000 IU per animal for the induction and synchronization of estrus has become customary for sows and gilts, as well as the use of prostaglandins, the use of GnRH for increasing ovulation in swine and increasing the number of follicles >4 mm in diameter in the implementation of new biotechnologies in swine breeding, increases the number of ovulations and fertility in swine. In this way, reproduction is raised to the highest possible level, and artificial insemination of sows has 12 separate rules which enable better and more successful artificial insemination of sows.

  11. Epitope selection to male specific antigens for sex selection in swine.

    Mohammadi, Azarm Akhavien; Tetro, Jason A; Filion, Lionel G

    2011-04-01

    Immunological approaches to gender selection have been contemplated since the discovery of the family of male-specific H-Y antigens found only on the surface of male cells. H-Y antigens are able to elicit an immune reaction when cells or tissues from a male donor are grafted to a female recipient. We describe here the development and testing of an inexpensive approach using polyclonal antibodies against four specific H-Y outer membrane proteins male enhanced antigen 1 (MEA 1), male enhanced antigen 2 (MEA 2), sex determining region Y (SRY) and testis determining factor (TDF). Epitopes based on hydrophilic primary sequences of the proteins were synthesized, N-terminal biotin-labeled, linked to streptavidin and mixed with a Ribi adjuvant prior to immunization in rabbits. The antiserum was tested to determine affinity to swine spermatozoa using anti-motility, flow cytometry and motility and sedimentation chambers. Fluorescent microscopy and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to identify the percentage of motile spermatozoa that contained the Y chromosome. We found that the polyclonal antibodies had high affinity to the spermatozoa leading to a cessation of motility. Furthermore, the majority of these non-motile spermatozoa contained the Y chromosome. We conclude that the use of polyclonal antiserum against synthetic H-Y peptide antigens may be an inexpensive and simple means to inhibit the motility of swine spermatozoa bearing the Y chromosome.

  12. Transcriptional immunoresponse of tissue-specific macrophages in swine after infection with African swine fever virus

    Kowalczyk Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages and cytokines are important in the control of inflammation and regulation of the immune response. However, they can also contribute to immunopathology in the host after viral infection and the regulatory network can be subverted by infectious agents, including viruses, some of which produce cytokine analogues or have mechanisms that inhibit cytokine function. African swine fever virus (ASFV encodes a number of proteins which modulate cytokine and chemokine induction, host transcription factor activation, stress responses, and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to elucidate the mechanisms of immune responses to ASFV in different subpopulations of porcine macrophages. A transcriptional immune response in different resident tissue macrophages following ASFV infection was presented in many publications. ASFV-susceptible porcine macrophages can be of several origins, such as peripheral blood, lungs, bone marrow, etc. blood monocytes, blood macrophages, and lung macrophages have demonstrated a modulation of phenotype. Monocyte-derived macrophages could express surface markers not found on their monocyte precursors. Moreover, they can undergo further differentiation after infection and during inflammation. When viruses infect such cells, immunological activity can be seriously impaired or modified.

  13. New generation adjuvants--from empiricism to rational design.

    O'Hagan, Derek T; Fox, Christopher B

    2015-06-08

    Adjuvants are an essential component of modern vaccine development. Despite many decades of development, only a few types of adjuvants are currently included in vaccines approved for human use. In order to better understand the reasons that development of some adjuvants succeeded while many others failed, we discuss some of the common attributes of successful first generation adjuvants. Next, we evaluate current trends in the development of second generation adjuvants, including the potential advantages of rationally designed synthetic immune potentiators appropriately formulated. Finally, we discuss desirable attributes of next generation adjuvants. Throughout, we emphasize that the importance of formulation and analytical characterization in all aspects of vaccine adjuvant development is often underappreciated. We highlight the formulation factors that must be evaluated in order to optimize interactions between vaccine antigens, immune potentiators, and particulate formulations, and the resulting effects on safety, biological activity, manufacturability, and stability.

  14. [Gastrointestinal surgeons should master the adjuvant therapy of colorectal cancer].

    Gu, Jin; Chen, Pengju

    2015-10-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer is one of the main diseases of gastrointestinal surgeons. It is very important to master the adjuvant chemotherapy of colorectal cancer for gastrointestinal surgeons. In recent years, with the development of a number of clinical trials and the appearance of new drugs, fluorouracil combined with oxaliplatin had been established as the standard regimen of adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal cancer. In the current guidelines, stage III( colon cancer is the indication for adjuvant chemotherapy, while stage II( colon cancer should receive adjuvant chemotherapy is uncertain. Unlike colon cancer, adjuvant therapy of rectal cancer is not evidence-based. Especially, the indication and duration of adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy remain controversial. Adjuvant therapy of colorectal cancer still needs further investigation.

  15. Influenza exposure in United States feral swine populations

    Hall, J.S.; Minnis, R.B.; Campbell, T.A.; Barras, S.; DeYoung, R.W.; Pabilonia, K.; Avery, M.L.; Sullivan, H.; Clark, L.; McLean, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Swine play an important role in the disease ecology of influenza. Having cellular receptors in common with birds and humans, swine provide opportunities for mixed infections and potential for genetic reassortment between avian, human, and porcine influenza. Feral swine populations are rapidly expanding in both numbers and range and are increasingly coming into contact with waterfowl, humans, and agricultural operations. In this study, over 875 feral swine were sampled from six states across the United States for serologic evidence of exposure to influenza. In Oklahoma, Florida, and Missouri, USA, no seropositive feral swine were detected. Seropositive swine were detected in California, Mississippi, and Texas, USA. Antibody prevalences in these states were 1% in Mississippi, 5% in California, and 14.4% in Texas. All seropositive swine were exposed to H3N2 subtype, the predominant subtype currently circulating in domestic swine. The only exceptions were in San Saba County, Texas, where of the 15 seropositive samples, four were positive for H1N1 and seven for both H1N1 and H3N2. In Texas, there was large geographical and temporal variation in antibody prevalence and no obvious connection to domestic swine operations. No evidence of exposure to avian influenza in feral swine was uncovered. From these results it is apparent that influenza in feral swine poses a risk primarily to swine production operations. However, because feral swine share habitat with waterfowl, prey on and scavenge dead and dying birds, are highly mobile, and are increasingly coming into contact with humans, the potential for these animals to become infected with avian or human influenza in addition to swine influenza is a distinct possibility. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  16. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Brachyspira Species Isolated from Swine Herds in the United States

    Mirajkar, Nandita S.; Davies, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Outbreaks of swine dysentery, caused by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and the recently discovered “Brachyspira hampsonii,” have reoccurred in North American swine herds since the late 2000s. Additionally, multiple Brachyspira species have been increasingly isolated by North American diagnostic laboratories. In Europe, the reliance on antimicrobial therapy for control of swine dysentery has been followed by reports of antimicrobial resistance over time. The objectives of our study were to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility trends of four Brachyspira species originating from U.S. swine herds and to investigate their associations with the bacterial species, genotypes, and epidemiological origins of the isolates. We evaluated the susceptibility of B. hyodysenteriae, B. hampsonii, Brachyspira pilosicoli, and Brachyspira murdochii to tiamulin, valnemulin, doxycycline, lincomycin, and tylosin by broth microdilution and that to carbadox by agar dilution. In general, Brachyspira species showed high susceptibility to tiamulin, valnemulin, and carbadox, heterogeneous susceptibility to doxycycline, and low susceptibility to lincomycin and tylosin. A trend of decreasing antimicrobial susceptibility by species was observed (B. hampsonii > B. hyodysenteriae > B. murdochii > B. pilosicoli). In general, Brachyspira isolates from the United States were more susceptible to these antimicrobials than were isolates from other countries. Decreased antimicrobial susceptibility was associated with the genotype, stage of production, and production system from which the isolate originated, which highlights the roles of biosecurity and husbandry in disease prevention and control. Finally, this study also highlights the urgent need for Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute-approved clinical breakpoints for Brachyspira species, to facilitate informed therapeutic and control strategies. PMID:27252458

  17. Glucocorticosteroids: as Adjuvant Therapy for Bacterial Infections

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs), synthetic analogues of the natural steroid hormones, are well known for their antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive properties in the periphery. They are widely and successfully used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammation, and transplant rejection. Nowadays, GCs are claimed to have a beneficial role being as adjunct therapy in various infections. Different studies have been conducted to investigate their use as adjuvant therapy for different bact...

  18. Inflammatory responses following intramuscular and subcutaneous immunization with aluminum-adjuvanted or non-adjuvanted vaccines.

    Kashiwagi, Yasuyo; Maeda, Mika; Kawashima, Hisashi; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2014-06-05

    Aluminum-adjuvanted vaccines are administered through an intramuscular injection (IM) in the US and EU, however, a subcutaneous injection (SC) has been recommended in Japan because of serious muscle contracture previously reported following multiple IMs of antibiotics. Newly introduced adjuvanted vaccines, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, have been recommended through IM. In the present study, currently available vaccines were evaluated through IM in mice. Aluminum-adjuvanted vaccines induced inflammatory nodules at the injection site, which expanded into the intra-muscular space without any muscle degeneration or necrosis, whereas non-adjuvanted vaccines did not. These nodules consisted of polymorph nuclear neutrophils with some eosinophils within the initial 48h, then monocytes/macrophages 1 month later. Inflammatory nodules were observed 6 months after IM, had decreased in size, and were absorbed 12 months after IM, which was earlier than that after SC. Cytokine production was examined in the injected muscular tissues and AS04 adjuvanted HPV induced higher IL-1β, IL-6, KC, MIP-1, and G-CSF levels in muscle tissues than any other vaccine, but similar serum cytokine profiles were observed to those induced by the other vaccines. Currently available vaccines did not induce muscular degeneration or fibrotic scar as observed with muscle contracture caused by multiple IMs of antibiotics in the past.

  19. Adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment in pancreatic cancer

    Marta Herreros-Villanueva; Elizabeth Hijona; Angel Cosme; Luis Bujanda

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive human malignancies,ranking 4th among causes for cancer-related death in the Western world including the United States.Surgical resection offers the only chance of cure,but only 15 to 20 percent of cases are potentially resectable at presentation.Different studies demonstrate and confirm that advanced pancreatic cancer is among the most complex cancers to treat and that these tumors are relatively resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy.Currently there is no consensus around the world on what constitutes "standard"adjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer.This controversy derives from several studies,each fraught with its own limitations.Standards of care also vary somewhat with regard to geography and economy,for instance chemo-radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy or vice versa is considered the optimal therapy in North America while chemotherapy alone is the current standard in Europe.Regardless of the efforts in adjuvant and neoadjuvant improved therapy,the major goal to combat pancreatic cancer is to find diagnostic markers,identifying the disease in a pre-metastatic stage and making a curative treatment accessible to more patients.In this review,authors examined the different therapy options for advanced pancreatic patients in recent years and the future directions in adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatments for these patients.

  20. Proteomic analysis of swine serum following highly virulent classical swine fever virus infection

    Guo Huan-cheng

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classical swine fever virus (CSFV belongs to the genus Pestivirus within the family Flaviviridae. Virulent strains of classical swine fever virus (CSFV cause severe disease in pigs characterized by immunosuppression, thrombocytopenia and disseminated intravascular coagulation, which causes significant economic losses to the pig industry worldwide. Methods To reveal proteomic changes in swine serum during the acute stage of lethal CSFV infection, 5 of 10 pigs were inoculated with the virulent CSFV Shimen strain, the remainder serving as uninfected controls. A serum sample was taken at 3 days post-infection from each swine, at a stage when there were no clinical symptoms other than increased rectal temperatures (≥40°C. The samples were treated to remove serum albumin and immunoglobulin (IgG, and then subjected to two-dimension differential gel electrophoresis. Results Quantitative intensity analysis revealed 17 protein spots showing at least 1.5-fold quantitative alteration in expression. Ten spots were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF MS or LTQ MS. Expression of 4 proteins was increased and 6 decreased in CSFV-infected pigs. Functions of these proteins included blood coagulation, anti-inflammatory activity and angiogenesis. Conclusion These proteins with altered expression may have important implications in the pathogenesis of classical swine fever and provide a clue for identification of biomarkers for classical swine fever early diagnosis.

  1. Spillback transmission of European H1N1 avian-like swine influenza viruses to turkeys: A strain-dependent possibility?

    Bonfante, Francesco; Fusaro, Alice; Tassoni, Luca; Patrono, Livia Victoria; Milani, Adelaide; Maniero, Silvia; Salviato, Annalisa; Terregino, Calogero

    2016-04-15

    In 1979, an avian influenza virus of the H1N1 subtype began to circulate in European swine herds, rapidly replacing classical swine H1N1 viruses. Spill-back transmissions to turkeys were recorded occasionally, but they might have been underreported due to the asymptomatic nature of the infection and the lack of specific surveillance. In our study, we evaluated the infectivity and transmissibility in turkeys of seven strains of H1N1 avian-like swine viruses isolated from 1979 to 2006, and compared them with their closest progenitor A/duck/Bavaria/1/77 (H1N1), to establish whether the adaptation to pigs has gradually decreased their fitness in turkeys. Our data indicate that the circulation of European H1N1 in pigs might have impaired the possibility of infecting turkeys. Nevertheless, the two swine-origin strains, which showed the ability to replicate and transmit in turkeys, possess typical swine-like genetic traits, not different from the rest of the tested isolates, suggesting replication of avian-like swine H1N1 viruses in turkeys as a strain-dependent polygenic feature.

  2. Swine MRSA isolates form robust biofilms

    Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization of livestock animals is common and prevalence rates for pigs have been reported to be as high as 49%. Measures to prevent, control, or eliminate MRSA in swine is of considerable public health concern. Bacterial colonization ...

  3. Computerized management support for swine breeding farms.

    Huirne, R.B.M.

    1990-01-01

    1. INTRODUCTIONThe investigations described in this thesis have been directed towards computerized management support for swine breeding farms, focused on sow productivity and profitability. The study is composed of three basic parts: (1) basic description and definition of farm man

  4. Colistin Resistance in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica Strains Isolated from Swine in Brazil

    Adriano Savoia Morales

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reports about acquired resistance to colistin in different bacteria species are increasing, including E. coli of animal origin, but reports of resistance in wild S. enterica of different serotypes from swine are not found in the literature. Results obtained with one hundred and twenty-six E. coli strains from diseased swine and one hundred and twenty-four S. enterica strains from diseased and carrier swine showed a frequency of 6.3% and 21% of colistin-resistant strains, respectively. When comparing the disk diffusion test with the agar dilution test to evaluate the strains, it was confirmed that the disk diffusion test is not recommended to evaluate colistin resistance as described previously. The colistin MIC 90 and MIC 50 values obtained to E. coli were 0.25 μg/mL and 0.5 μg/mL, the MIC 90 and MIC 50 to S. enterica were 1 μg/mL and 8 μg/mL. Considering the importance of colistin in control of nosocomial human infections with Gram-negative multiresistant bacteria, and the large use of this drug in animal production, the colistin resistance prevalence in enterobacteriaceae of animal origin must be monitored more closely.

  5. From discovery to licensure, the Adjuvant System story

    Garçon, Nathalie; Di Pasquale, Alberta

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adjuvants are substances added to vaccines to improve their immunogenicity. Used for more than 80 years, aluminum, the first adjuvant in human vaccines, proved insufficient to develop vaccines that could protect against new challenging pathogens such as HIV and malaria. New adjuvants and new combinations of adjuvants (Adjuvant Systems) have opened the door to the delivery of improved and new vaccines against re-emerging and difficult pathogens. Adjuvant Systems concept started through serendipity. The access to new developments in technology, microbiology and immunology have been instrumental for the dicephering of what they do and how they do it. This knowledge opens the door to more rational vaccine design with implications for developing new and better vaccines. PMID:27636098

  6. 76 FR 65935 - Brucellosis in Swine; Add Texas to List of Validated Brucellosis-Free States

    2011-10-25

    .... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. Troy Bigelow, Swine Health Programs, Aquaculture, Swine, Equine... conditions, including arthritis. Humans can be treated for brucellosis with antibiotics. In an interim...

  7. 76 FR 28885 - Brucellosis in Swine; Add Texas to List of Validated Brucellosis-Free States

    2011-05-19

    .... Troy Bigelow, Swine Health Programs, Aquaculture, Swine, Equine, and Poultry Programs, National Center... treated for brucellosis with antibiotics. The brucellosis regulations in 9 CFR part 78 (referred to...

  8. The global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses

    Lewis, Nicola S; Russell, Colin A; Langat, Pinky;

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled...... with geographic segregation of global swine populations. Much of this diversity is characterized genetically but the antigenic diversity of these viruses is poorly understood. Critically, the antigenic diversity shapes the risk profile of swine influenza viruses in terms of their epizootic and pandemic potential....... Here, using the most comprehensive set of swine influenza virus antigenic data compiled to date, we quantify the antigenic diversity of swine influenza viruses on a multi-continental scale. The substantial antigenic diversity of recently circulating viruses in different parts of the world adds...

  9. Immunogenicity and immunization costs of adjuvanted versus non-adjuvanted hepatitis B vaccine in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Vilajeliu, Alba; Sequera, Víctor-Guillermo; García-Basteiro, Alberto L; Sicuri, Elisa; Aldea, Marta; Velasco, César; Bayas, José M

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination is recommended for all susceptible chronic pre-hemodialysis and hemodialysis patients. This study assessed the immunogenicity of HBV vaccines (adjuvanted and non-adjuvanted) in chronic kidney disease patients vaccinated at the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona (Spain) between January 2007 and July 2012. In addition, the costs for the health system were evaluated accor-ding to the proportion of vaccine responders after receiving either vaccine. Patients receiving 3 doses of hepatitis B adjuvanted vaccine were 3 times more likely to seroconvert than patients immunized with non-adjuvanted vaccines, OR 3.56 (95% CI 1.84-6.85). This resulted in fewer patients requiring a second course of HBV vaccination and fewer outpatient visits, saving more than €9,500 per 100 patients. The higher immunogenicity of the adjuvanted HBV vaccine would counterbalance the lower costs associated with the non-adjuvanted vaccine.

  10. History of ‘swine fever’ in Southern Africa

    Mary-Louise Penrith

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The histories of the two swine fevers in southern Africa differ widely. Classical swine fever (hog cholera has been known in the northern hemisphere since 1830 and it is probable that early cases of ‘swine fever’ in European settlers’ pigs in southern Africa were accepted to be that disease. It was only in 1921 that the first description of African swine fever as an entity different from classical swine fever was published after the disease had been studied in settlers’ pigs in Kenya. Shortly after that, reports of African swine fever in settlers’ pigs emerged from South Africa and Angola. In South Africa, the report related to pigs in the north-eastern part of the country. Previously (in 1905 or earlier a disease assumed to be classical swine fever caused high mortality among pigs in the Western Cape and was only eradicated in 1918. African swine fever was found over the following years to be endemic in most southern African countries. Classical swine fever, however, apart from an introduction with subsequent endemic establishment in Madagascar and a number of introductions into Mauritius, the last one in 2000, had apparently remained absent from the region until it was diagnosed in the Western and subsequently the Eastern Cape of South Africa in 2005. It was eradicated by 2007. The history of these diseases in the southern African region demonstrates their importance and their potential for spread over long distances, emphasising the need for improved management of both diseases wherever they occur.

  11. Histopathological and immunohistochemical findings of swine with spontaneous influenza A infection in Brazil, 2009-2010

    Tatiane T.N. Watanabe

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Swine influenza (SI is caused by the type A swine influenza virus (SIV. It is a highly contagious disease with a rapid course and recovery. The major clinical signs and symptoms are cough, fever, anorexia and poor performance. The disease has been associated with other co-infections in many countries, but not in Brazil, where, however, the first outbreak has been reported in 2011. The main aim of this study was to characterize the histological features in association with the immunohistochemical (IHC results for influenza A (IA, porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV in lung samples from 60 pigs submitted to Setor de Patologia Veterinária at the Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (SPV-UFRGS, Brazil, during 2009-2010. All of these lung samples had changes characterized by interstitial pneumonia with necrotizing bronchiolitis, never observed previously in the evaluation of swine lungs in our laboratory routine. Pigs in this study had showed clinical signs of a respiratory infection. Swine samples originated from Rio Grande do Sul 31 (52%, Santa Catarina 14 (23%, Paraná 11 (18%, and Mato Grosso do Sul 4 (7%. Positive anti-IA IHC labelling was observed in 45% of the cases, which were associated with necrotizing bronchiolitis, atelectasis, purulent bronchopneumonia and hyperemia. Moreover, type II pneumocyte hyperplasia, alveolar and bronchiolar polyp-like structures, bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT hyperplasia and pleuritis were the significant features in negative anti-IA IHC, which were also associated with chronic lesions. There were only two cases with positive anti-PCV2 IHC and none to PRRSV. Therefore, SIV was the predominant infectious agent in the lung samples studied. The viral antigen is often absent due to the rapid progress of SI, which may explain the negative IHC results for IA (55%; therefore, IHC should be performed at the beginning of the disease. This study

  12. The mode of action of immunological adjuvants.

    Allison, A C

    1998-01-01

    Adjuvants augment immune responses to antigens and influence the balance between cell-mediated and humoral responses, as well as the isotypes of antibodies formed. New adjuvant formulations include antigen-carrying vehicles and small molecules with immunomodulating activity. Widely used two-phase vehicles comprise liposomes and microfluidized squalene or squalane emulsions. These are believed to target antigens to antigen-presenting cells, including dendritic cells (DC), follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and B-lymphocytes. Activation of complement generates C3d, which binds CR2 (CD21) on FDC and B-lymphocytes, thereby stimulating the proliferation of the latter and the generation of B-memory. Targeting of antigens to DC may favour cell-mediated immunity. Immunomodulating agents induce the production of cytokine cascades. In a primary cascade at injection sites TNF-alpha, GM-CSF and IL-1 are produced. TNF-alpha promotes migration of DC to lymphoid tissues, while GM-CSF and IL-1 accelerate the maturation of DC into efficient antigen-presenting cells for T-lymphocytes. In a secondary cytokine cascade in draining lymph nodes, DC produce IL-12, which induces Th1 responses with the production of IFN-gamma. The cytokines elicit cell-mediated immune responses and the formation of antibodies of protective isotypes, such as IgG2a in the mouse and IgG1 in humans. Antibodies of these isotypes activate complement and collaborate with antibody-dependent effector cells in protective immune responses.

  13. New Artificial Insemination Technologies for Swine.

    Bortolozzo, F P; Menegat, M B; Mellagi, A P G; Bernardi, M L; Wentz, I

    2015-07-01

    Better efficiency in swine artificial insemination (AI) is accomplished by reducing the necessary number of sperm cells and achieving high reproductive performance. Some strategies have been developed for use under field conditions, such as the site of sperm deposition (post-cervical AI), a single AI with control of oestrus and ovulation (fixed-time AI), and the better use of high genetic merit boars, to spread their genes as much as possible. To apply these technologies, it is important to understand some anatomical limits, physiological aspects and farm requirements. In this review, we point out some strategies to achieve higher efficiency on the use of sperm for AI technology application in swine species.

  14. Modelling the Growth of Swine Flu

    Thomson, Ian

    2010-01-01

    The spread of swine flu has been a cause of great concern globally. With no vaccine developed as yet, (at time of writing in July 2009) and given the fact that modern-day humans can travel speedily across the world, there are fears that this disease may spread out of control. The worst-case scenario would be one of unfettered exponential growth.…

  15. Protein antigen adsorption to the DDA/TDB liposomal adjuvant

    Hamborg, Mette; Jorgensen, Lene; Bojsen, Anders Riber;

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the nature of adjuvant-antigen interactions is important for the future design of efficient and safe subunit vaccines, but remains an analytical challenge. We studied the interactions between three model protein antigens and the clinically tested cationic liposomal adjuvant composed...

  16. A Review on “Kapa Sura Kudineer”-A Siddha Formulary Prediction for Swine Flu

    Thillaivanan. S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Siddha medicine is one of the oldest medical systems in the world. This system is most commonly practicing in India especially in southern regions. Siddha medicines become popular nowadays because of various outbreaks of communicable and very infectious diseases like chikungunya, dengue, swine flu etc. These diseases of viral origin are very challenge to the modern world because of lack of ideal anti-viral therapy. Pandemic flu is different from ordinary flu because it’s a new flu virus that appears in humans and spreads very quickly from person to person worldwide. Because it’s a new virus, no one will have immunity to it and everyone could be at risk of catching it. This includes healthy adults as well as older people, young children and those with existing medical conditions. The polyherbal decoction Kapa Sura Kudineer (KSK is a well-known one in this series next to Nilavembu kudineer (NVK. This KSK is introduced for the prevention and the management of Swine flu. And the people of Tamil Nadu are very attentive about this Siddha drug KSK because to prevent and protect from the deadly life threatening disease, Swine flu. Here, an attempt has been made to review the explored ethno pharmacological activities of the ingredients of KSK to strengthen the scientific facts favoring this formulation.

  17. Use of Aeromonas as a process indicator during swine carcass dressing and cutting

    Palumbo, Samuel A.; Yu, Linda S. L.

    1999-01-01

    Using starch ampicillin agar, qualitative and quantitative determinations of Aeromonas spp. were made at several sites during swine carcass dressing and cutting. Aeromonas spp. were observed at all sites surveyed. Levels increased during shackling and passage through the first and middle polisher/washers, and significantly decreased during the singeing steps. Passage through the final polisher/washer caused a small increase in levels in Aeromonas spp. and these levels then remained constant during the rest of the carcass dressing operation. Aeromonas spp. were also isolated from the room where the carcasses were cut into wholesale cuts and cuts for further processing. Presumptive Aeromonas spp. cultures isolated from the different sites were confirmed as belonging to the genus Aeromonas and then speciated using the biochemical scheme of Joseph and Carnahan; 81% of the cultures were identified at A. hydrophila. Since most isolates were A. hydrophila, determination of the origin of isolates from different sites in the processing plant must await utilizing molecular biotyping techniques on the cultures. These results indicate the Aeromonas spp. occurs extensively in the swine dressing environment and thus represents a possible public health hazard and potential spoilage concern. Changes in cleaning and sanitizing of equipment may be necessary during swine carcass dressing and cutting to guard against this pathogen.

  18. Economic feasibility of biogas production in swine farms using time series analysis

    Felipe Luis Rockenbach

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study aimed to measure the economic feasibility and the time needed to return capital invested for the installation of a swine manure treatment system, these values originated the sale of carbon credits and/or of compensation of electric energy in swine farms, using the Box-Jenkins forecast models. It was found that the use of biogas is a viable option in a large scale with machines that operate daily for 10h or more, being the return period between 70 to 80 months. Time series analysis models are important to anticipate the series under study behavior, providing the swine breeder/investor means to reduce the financial investment risk as well as helping to decrease the production costs. Moreover, this process can be seen as another source of income and enable the breeder to be self-sufficient in the continuous supply of electric energy, which is very valuable nowadays considering that breeders are now increasingly using various technologies.

  19. Vaxjo: A Web-Based Vaccine Adjuvant Database and Its Application for Analysis of Vaccine Adjuvants and Their Uses in Vaccine Development

    Samantha Sayers; Guerlain Ulysse; Zuoshuang Xiang; Yongqun He

    2012-01-01

    Vaccine adjuvants are compounds that enhance host immune responses to co-administered antigens in vaccines. Vaxjo is a web-based central database and analysis system that curates, stores, and analyzes vaccine adjuvants and their usages in vaccine development. Basic information of a vaccine adjuvant stored in Vaxjo includes adjuvant name, components, structure, appearance, storage, preparation, function, safety, and vaccines that use this adjuvant. Reliable references are curated and cited. Bi...

  20. African swine fever: an epidemiological update.

    Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M; Mur, L; Martínez-López, B

    2012-03-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is one of the most important swine diseases, mainly because of its significant sanitary and socioeconomic consequences. This review gives an update on the epidemiology of the disease and reviews key issues and strategies to improve control of the disease and promote its eradication. Several characteristics of ASF virus (ASFV) make its control and eradication difficult, including the absence of available vaccines, marked virus resistance in infected material and contaminated animal products, and a complex epidemiology and transmission involving tick reservoir virus interactions. The incidence of ASF has not only increased on the African continent over the last 15 years, so that it now affects West African countries, Mauritius and Madagascar, but it has also reached new areas, such as the Caucasus region in 2007. In fact, the rapid spread of the disease on the European continent and the uncontrolled situation in the Russian Federation places all countries at great risk as a result of intense global trade. The proximity of some affected areas to the European Union (EU) borders (African swine fever -free countries should be aware of the potential risk of ASF incursion and implement risk reduction measures such as trade controls and other sanitary measures. This review will discuss lessons learnt so far about ASF control, current challenges to its control and future studies needed to support global efforts at prevention and control.

  1. Epidemiology of African swine fever virus.

    Costard, S; Mur, L; Lubroth, J; Sanchez-Vizcaino, J M; Pfeiffer, D U

    2013-04-01

    African swine fever virus used to occur primarily in Africa. There had been occasional incursions into Europe or America which apart from the endemic situation on the island of Sardinia always had been successfully controlled. But following an introduction of the virus in 2007, it now has expanded its geographical distribution into Caucasus and Eastern Europe where it has not been controlled, to date. African swine fever affects domestic and wild pig species, and can involve tick vectors. The ability of the virus to survive within a particular ecosystem is defined by the ecology of its wild host populations and the characteristics of livestock production systems, which influence host and vector species densities and interrelationships. African swine fever has high morbidity in naïve pig populations and can result in very high mortality. There is no vaccine or treatment available. Apart from stamping out and movement control, there are no control measures, thereby potentially resulting in extreme losses for producers. Prevention and control of the infection requires good understanding of its epidemiology, so that targeted measures can be instigated.

  2. Immune adjuvant activity of the olive, soybean and corn oils

    Ana Claudia Marinho da Silva

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last half of the century, a large amount of substances has been used as immune adjuvant. The immune adjuvant effect of olive, soybean and corn oils in Swiss mice immunized with ovalbumin (OVA plus aluminum hydroxide or emulsified in Marcol, soybean, olive or corn oils was evaluated through the OVA-specific antibodies determined by ELISA and Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis. In this work the comparison of the intensity of the immune response was established by the Bayesian analysis. The adjuvant effect of the vegetable oils was shown to be more effective than aluminium hydroxide. Regarding to OVA-specific IgE synthesis, olive oil had the slowest adjuvant effect of the three vegetable oils. Accordingly, olive oil was the most convenient among the vegetable oils to be used as immune adjuvant, since it stimulated a higher production of OVA-specific Ig and lower levels of anti-OVA IgE.

  3. Vaxjo: A Web-Based Vaccine Adjuvant Database and Its Application for Analysis of Vaccine Adjuvants and Their Uses in Vaccine Development

    Samantha Sayers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine adjuvants are compounds that enhance host immune responses to co-administered antigens in vaccines. Vaxjo is a web-based central database and analysis system that curates, stores, and analyzes vaccine adjuvants and their usages in vaccine development. Basic information of a vaccine adjuvant stored in Vaxjo includes adjuvant name, components, structure, appearance, storage, preparation, function, safety, and vaccines that use this adjuvant. Reliable references are curated and cited. Bioinformatics scripts are developed and used to link vaccine adjuvants to different adjuvanted vaccines stored in the general VIOLIN vaccine database. Presently, 103 vaccine adjuvants have been curated in Vaxjo. Among these adjuvants, 98 have been used in 384 vaccines stored in VIOLIN against over 81 pathogens, cancers, or allergies. All these vaccine adjuvants are categorized and analyzed based on adjuvant types, pathogens used, and vaccine types. As a use case study of vaccine adjuvants in infectious disease vaccines, the adjuvants used in Brucella vaccines are specifically analyzed. A user-friendly web query and visualization interface is developed for interactive vaccine adjuvant search. To support data exchange, the information of vaccine adjuvants is stored in the Vaccine Ontology (VO in the Web Ontology Language (OWL format.

  4. Use of AERMOD to Determine a Hydrogen Sulfide Emission Factor for Swine Operations by Inverse Modeling.

    O'Shaughnessy, Patrick T; Altmaier, Ralph

    2011-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine both optimal settings applied to the plume dispersion model, AERMOD, and a scalable emission factor for accurately determining the spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide concentrations in the vicinity of swine concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). These operations emit hydrogen sulfide from both housing structures and waste lagoons. With ambient measurements made at 4 stations within 1 km of large swine CAFOs in Iowa, an inverse-modeling approach applied to AERMOD was used to determine hydrogen sulfide emission rates. CAFO buildings were treated as volume sources whereas nearby lagoons were modeled as area sources. The robust highest concentration (RHC), calculated for both measured and modeled concentrations, was used as the metric for adjusting the emission rate until the ratio of the two RHC levels was unity. Utilizing this approach, an average emission flux rate of 0.57 µg/m(2)-s was determined for swine CAFO lagoons. Using the average total animal weight (kg) of each CAFO, an average emission factor of 6.06 × 10(-7) µg/yr-m(2)-kg was calculated. From studies that measured either building or lagoon emission flux rates, building fluxes, on a floor area basis, were considered equal to lagoon flux rates. The emission factor was applied to all CAFOs surrounding the original 4 sites and surrounding an additional 6 sites in Iowa, producing an average modeled-to-measured RHC ratio of 1.24. When the emission factor was applied to AERMOD to simulate the spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide around a hypothetical large swine CAFO (1M kg), concentrations 0.5 km from the CAFO were 35 ppb and dropped to 2 ppb within 6 km of the CAFO. These values compare to a level of 30 ppb that has been determined by the State of Iowa as a threshold level for ambient hydrogen sulfide levels.

  5. 9 CFR 94.24 - Restrictions on the importation of pork, pork products, and swine from the APHIS-defined EU CSF...

    2010-01-01

    ... IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND...

  6. Advax-adjuvanted recombinant protective antigen provides protection against inhalational anthrax that is further enhanced by addition of murabutide adjuvant.

    Feinen, Brandon; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Verma, Anita; Merkel, Tod J

    2014-04-01

    Subunit vaccines against anthrax based on recombinant protective antigen (PA) potentially offer more consistent and less reactogenic anthrax vaccines but require adjuvants to achieve optimal immunogenicity. This study sought to determine in a murine model of pulmonary anthrax infection whether the polysaccharide adjuvant Advax or the innate immune adjuvant murabutide alone or together could enhance PA immunogenicity by comparison to an alum adjuvant. A single immunization with PA plus Advax adjuvant afforded significantly greater protection against aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne strain 7702 than three immunizations with PA alone. Murabutide had a weaker adjuvant effect than Advax when used alone, but when murabutide was formulated together with Advax, an additive effect on immunogenicity and protection was observed, with complete protection after just two doses. The combined adjuvant formulation stimulated a robust, long-lasting B-cell memory response that protected mice against an aerosol challenge 18 months postimmunization with acceleration of the kinetics of the anamnestic IgG response to B. anthracis as reflected by ∼4-fold-higher anti-PA IgG titers by day 2 postchallenge versus mice that received PA with Alhydrogel. In addition, the combination of Advax plus murabutide induced approximately 3-fold-less inflammation than Alhydrogel as measured by in vivo imaging of cathepsin cleavage resulting from injection of ProSense 750. Thus, the combination of Advax and murabutide provided enhanced protection against inhalational anthrax with reduced localized inflammation, making this a promising next-generation anthrax vaccine adjuvanting strategy.

  7. 78 FR 9028 - Notice of Availability of a Swine Brucellosis and Pseudorabies Proposed Action Plan

    2013-02-07

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Notice of Availability of a Swine Brucellosis and Pseudorabies... approach to managing swine brucellosis and pseudorabies available for public review and comment. Swine brucellosis and pseudorabies have been eliminated from commercial swine herds within the United States,...

  8. 9 CFR 94.9 - Pork and pork products from regions where classical swine fever exists.

    2010-01-01

    ... where classical swine fever exists. 94.9 Section 94.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY: PROHIBITED AND RESTRICTED IMPORTATIONS § 94.9 Pork and pork products from regions where classical swine...

  9. Varied prevalence of Clostridium difficile in an integrated swine operation

    The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence of Clostridium difficile among different age and production groups of swine in a vertically integrated swine operation in Texas in 2006 and to compare our isolates to other animal and human isolates. Preliminary results are based on 131 C. d...

  10. PREVALENCE OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE IN AN INTEGRATED SWINE OPERATION

    The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence of Clostridium difficile among different age and production groups of swine in a vertically integrated swine operation in Texas in 2006 and to compare our isolates to other animal and human isolates. Isolation of C. difficile was performed u...

  11. Lysozyme as an alternative to antibiotics in swine feed

    Antibiotics have been fed at subtherapeutic levels to swine as growth promoters for more than 60 years, and the majority of swine produced in the U.S. receive antibiotics in their feed at some point in their production cycle. These compounds benefit the producers by minimizing production losses by ...

  12. Transmission rate of African swine fever virus under experimental conditions

    Carvalho Ferreira, de H.C.; Backer, J.A.; Weesendorp, E.; Klinkenberg, D.; Stegeman, J.A.; Loeffen, W.L.A.

    2013-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a highly lethal, viral disease of swine. No vaccine is available, so controlling an ASF outbreak is highly dependent on zoosanitary measures, such as stamping out infected herds and quarantining of affected areas. Information on ASF transmission parameters could allow fo

  13. Emergence of African swine fever virus, northwestern Iran.

    Rahimi, Pooneh; Sohrabi, Amir; Ashrafihelan, Javad; Edalat, Rosita; Alamdari, Mehran; Masoudi, Mohammadhossein; Mostofi, Saied; Azadmanesh, Kayhan

    2010-12-01

    In 2008, African swine fever was introduced into Georgia, after which it spread to neighboring Armenia, Azerbaijan, and the Russian Federation. That same year, PCR and sequence analysis identified African swine fever virus in samples from 3 dead female wild boars in northwestern Iran. Wild boars may serve as a reservoir.

  14. 78 FR 27937 - Environmental Impact Statement; Feral Swine Damage Management

    2013-05-13

    ... organizations at the State level to accommodate varying local laws and management objectives for feral swine... and organizations to meet local management objectives, which may include reducing statewide... practices (40 CFR 1502.14(d)). Under the no action alternative, current APHIS feral swine damage...

  15. Global migration of influenza A viruses in swine

    The emergence of the 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic virus underscores the importance of understanding how influenza A viruses evolve in swine on a global scale. To reveal the frequency, patterns and drivers of the spread of swine influenza virus globally, we conducted the largest phylogenetic analysis of swin...

  16. Modern Vaccines/Adjuvants Formulation Session 6: Vaccine &Adjuvant Formulation & Production 15-17 May 2013, Lausanne, Switzerland.

    Fox, Christopher B

    2013-09-01

    The Modern Vaccines/Adjuvants Formulation meeting aims to fill a critical gap in current vaccine development efforts by bringing together formulation scientists and immunologists to emphasize the importance of rational formulation design in order to optimize vaccine and adjuvant bioactivity, safety, and manufacturability. Session 6 on Vaccine and Adjuvant Formulation and Production provided three examples of this theme, with speakers emphasizing the need for extensive physicochemical characterization of adjuvant-antigen interactions, the rational formulation design of a CD8+ T cell-inducing adjuvant based on immunological principles, and the development and production of a rabies vaccine by a developing country manufacturer. Throughout the session, the practical importance of sound formulation and manufacturing design accompanied by analytical characterization was highlighted.

  17. Designing CAF-adjuvanted dry powder vaccines: Spray drying preserves the adjuvant activity of CAF01

    Ingvarsson, Pall Thor; Schmidt, Signe Tandrup; Christensen, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    spray drying. The optimal excipient to stabilize CAF01 during spray drying and for the design of nanocomposite microparticles was identified among mannitol, lactose and trehalose. Trehalose and lactose were promising stabilizers with respect to preserving liposome size, as compared to mannitol......Dry powder vaccine formulations are highly attractive due to improved storage stability and the possibility for particle engineering, as compared to liquid formulations. However, a prerequisite for formulating vaccines into dry formulations is that their physicochemical and adjuvant properties...... remain unchanged upon rehydration. Thus, we have identified and optimized the parameters of importance for the design of a spray dried powder formulation of the cationic liposomal adjuvant formulation 01 (CAF01) composed of dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) bromide and trehalose 6,6′-dibehenate (TDB) via...

  18. Ranitidine as adjuvant treatment in colorectal cancer

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Moesgaard, F;

    2002-01-01

    by oral ranitidine 150 mg or placebo twice daily for 5 years. Adjuvant cytotoxic or radiation therapy was not given. An observer-blinded interim analysis performed after 40 months showed that there was no effect of ranitidine on overall survival, and the study was discontinued in accordance....... RESULTS: The median observation period of the 740 patients included was 6.8 (range 5.4-7.9) years. A univariate analysis of all 740 patients and of the subgroup of 560 who underwent curative resection showed no significant effect of ranitidine on survival. Furthermore, ranitidine had no survival benefit...... in curatively resected patients who received a perioperative blood transfusion (n = 358), but it improved the survival of non-transfused patients (n = 202; hazard ratio (HR) 0.6 (95 per cent confidence interval (c.i.) 0.4 to 0.9), P = 0.02) and of non-transfused patients who did not develop postoperative...

  19. Ranitidine as adjuvant treatment in colorectal cancer

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Moesgaard, F;

    2002-01-01

    by oral ranitidine 150 mg or placebo twice daily for 5 years. Adjuvant cytotoxic or radiation therapy was not given. An observer-blinded interim analysis performed after 40 months showed that there was no effect of ranitidine on overall survival, and the study was discontinued in accordance......BACKGROUND: Results from short-term studies of histamine type 2 (H2) receptor antagonists on survival of patients with solid tumours are debatable. In this study the efficacy of the H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine on long-term survival of patients with colorectal cancer was evaluated. METHODS...... curative resection of colorectal cancer and who do not receive perioperative blood transfusion and do not develop postoperative infectious complications....

  20. 9 CFR 93.504 - Import permits for swine and for swine specimens for diagnostic purposes; and reservation fees...

    2010-01-01

    ... specimen will be moved only for scientific research or museum display purposes. (Signature of importer... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Import permits for swine and for swine... APHIS. 93.504 Section 93.504 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  1. The effect of immediate breast reconstruction on the timing of adjuvant chemotherapy: a systematic review.

    Xavier Harmeling, J; Kouwenberg, Casimir A E; Bijlard, Eveline; Burger, Koert N J; Jager, Agnes; Mureau, Marc A M

    2015-09-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy is often needed to achieve adequate breast cancer control. The increasing popularity of immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) raises concerns that this procedure may delay the time to adjuvant chemotherapy (TTC), which may negatively impact oncological outcome. The current systematic review aims to investigate this effect. During October 2014, a systematic search for clinical studies was performed in six databases with keywords related to breast reconstruction and chemotherapy. Eligible studies met the following inclusion criteria: (1) research population consisted of women receiving therapeutic mastectomy, (2) comparison of IBR with mastectomy only groups, (3) TTC was clearly presented and mentioned as outcome measure, and (4) original studies only (e.g., cohort study, randomized controlled trial, case-control). Fourteen studies were included, representing 5270 patients who had received adjuvant chemotherapy, of whom 1942 had undergone IBR and 3328 mastectomy only. One study found a significantly shorter mean TTC of 12.6 days after IBR, four studies found a significant delay after IBR averaging 6.6-16.8 days, seven studies found no significant difference in TTC between IBR and mastectomy only, and two studies did not perform statistical analyses for comparison. In studies that measured TTC from surgery, mean TTC varied from 29 to 61 days for IBR and from 21 to 60 days for mastectomy only. This systematic review of the current literature showed that IBR does not necessarily delay the start of adjuvant chemotherapy to a clinically relevant extent, suggesting that in general IBR is a valid option for non-metastatic breast cancer patients.

  2. Adjuvants for veterinary vaccines--types and modes of action.

    Gerdts, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvants are used to improve the immune response to vaccines. Formulation with adjuvants can result in an earlier onset of immunity, an overall stronger immune response, a specific type of immunity, or a longer duration of immunity to the vaccine. Adjuvants were discovered empirically, and for decades, have been used in both humans and animals without understanding the mechanisms of action. With an improved understanding of the immune system, and in particular the interplay between innate and adaptive immunity, we are now getting better insight into the function of adjuvants. As a result, new adjuvants are being developed that are safe and highly effective for common use in humans and animals, as well as for use in high risk populations such as immunocompromised animals, neonates or very old animals. Furthermore, adjuvants can help to reduce the amount of antigen needed in the vaccine, increase the stability of the vaccine and enable alternatiye administration routes such as needle-free delivery of the vaccine. Here, I will provide an over view of the existing adjuvant technologies for veterinary vaccines and provide an outlook into some of the new technologies in preclinical and clinical development.

  3. Progress in adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer: an overview.

    Anampa, Jesus; Makower, Della; Sparano, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer and cancer death worldwide. Although most patients present with localized breast cancer and may be rendered disease-free with local therapy, distant recurrence is common and is the primary cause of death from the disease. Adjuvant systemic therapies are effective in reducing the risk of distant and local recurrence, including endocrine therapy, anti-HER2 therapy, and chemotherapy, even in patients at low risk of recurrence. The widespread use of adjuvant systemic therapy has contributed to reduced breast cancer mortality rates. Adjuvant cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens have evolved from single alkylating agents to polychemotherapy regimens incorporating anthracyclines and/or taxanes. This review summarizes key milestones in the evolution of adjuvant systemic therapy in general, and adjuvant chemotherapy in particular. Although adjuvant treatments are routinely guided by predictive factors for endocrine therapy (hormone receptor expression) and anti-HER2 therapy (HER2 overexpression), predicting benefit from chemotherapy has been more challenging. Randomized studies are now in progress utilizing multiparameter gene expression assays that may more accurately select patients most likely to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy.

  4. The role of adjuvant in mediating antigen structure and stability.

    Braun, Latoya Jones; Eldridge, Aimee M; Cummiskey, Jessica; Arthur, Kelly K; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to probe the fate of a model antigen, a cysteine-free mutant of bacteriophage T4 lysozyme, to the level of fine structural detail, as a consequence of its interaction with an aluminum (Al)-containing adjuvant. Fluorescence spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry were used to compare the thermal stability of the protein in solution versus adsorbed onto an Al-containing adjuvant. Differences in accessible hydrophobic surface areas were investigated using an extrinsic fluorescence probe, 8-Anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS). As has been observed with other model antigens, the apparent thermal stability of the protein decreased following adsorption onto the adjuvant. ANS spectra suggested that adsorption onto the adjuvant caused an increase in exposure of hydrophobic regions of the protein. Electrostatic interactions drove the adsorption, and disruption of these interactions with high ionic strength buffers facilitated the collection of two-dimensional (15) N heteronuclear single quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance data of protein released from the adjuvant. Although the altered stability of the adsorbed protein suggested changes to the protein's structure, the fine structure of the desorbed protein was nearly identical to the protein's structure in the adjuvant-free formulation. Thus, the adjuvant-induced changes to the protein that were responsible for the reduced thermal stability were not observed upon desorption.

  5. Development and controversies of adjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer

    Wan-Yee Lau; Eric C. H. Lai

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a dismal prognosis. Radical surgery provides the only chance for a cure with a 5-year survival rate of 7%-25%. An effective adjuvant therapy is urgently needed to improve the surgical outcome. This review describes the current status of adjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer, and highlights its controversies. DATA SOURCES:A Medline database search was performed to identify relevant articles using the keywords"pancreatic neoplasm", and"adjuvant therapy". Additional papers were identiifed by a manual search of the references from the key articles. RESULTS:Eight prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of adjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiation for pancreatic cancer could be identiifed. The results for adjuvant regimens based on systemic 5-lfuorouracil with or without external radiotherapy were conlficting. The recent two RCTs on gemcitabine based regimen gave promising results. CONCLUSIONS:Based on the available data, no standard adjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer can be established yet. The best adjuvant regimen remains to be determined in large-scale RCTs. Future trials should use a gemcitabine based regimen.

  6. Some tropical viral diseases that can mimic swine flu in pediatrics

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Swine flu is an important emerging infection that is presently pandemic around the world. The pediatric population is an important group that can be infected with swine flu. Generally, common presentations of swine flu include fever and respiratory presentations. However, there are several infections that can have similar presentations to swine flu. In this specific article, the author will briefly discuss on some tropical viral diseases that can mimic swine flu in pediatrics. ...

  7. Some tropical viral diseases that can mimic swine flu in pediatrics

    Viroj WIWANITKIT

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Swine flu is an important emerging infection that is presently pandemic around the world. The pediatric population is an important group that can be infected with swine flu. Generally, common presentations of swine flu include fever and respiratory presentations. However, there are several infections that can have similar presentations to swine flu. In this specific article, the author will briefly discuss on some tropical viral diseases that can mimic swine flu in pediatrics.

  8. Adjuvants for vaccines to drugs of abuse and addiction.

    Alving, Carl R; Matyas, Gary R; Torres, Oscar; Jalah, Rashmi; Beck, Zoltan

    2014-09-22

    Immunotherapeutic vaccines to drugs of abuse, including nicotine, cocaine, heroin, oxycodone, methamphetamine, and others are being developed. The theoretical basis of such vaccines is to induce antibodies that sequester the drug in the blood in the form of antibody-bound drug that cannot cross the blood brain barrier, thereby preventing psychoactive effects. Because the drugs are haptens a successful vaccine relies on development of appropriate hapten-protein carrier conjugates. However, because induction of high and prolonged levels of antibodies is required for an effective vaccine, and because injection of T-independent haptenic drugs of abuse does not induce memory recall responses, the role of adjuvants during immunization plays a critical role. As reviewed herein, preclinical studies often use strong adjuvants such as complete and incomplete Freund's adjuvant and others that cannot be, or in the case of many newer adjuvants, have never been, employed in humans. Balanced against this, the only adjuvant that has been included in candidate vaccines in human clinical trials to nicotine and cocaine has been aluminum hydroxide gel. While aluminum salts have been widely utilized worldwide in numerous licensed vaccines, the experience with human responses to aluminum salt-adjuvanted vaccines to haptenic drugs of abuse has suggested that the immune responses are too weak to allow development of a successful vaccine. What is needed is an adjuvant or combination of adjuvants that are safe, potent, widely available, easily manufactured, and cost-effective. Based on our review of the field we recommend the following adjuvant combinations either for research or for product development for human use: aluminum salt with adsorbed monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA); liposomes containing MPLA [L(MPLA)]; L(MPLA) adsorbed to aluminum salt; oil-in-water emulsion; or oil-in-water emulsion containing MPLA.

  9. Evaluation of Microflow Digital Imaging Particle Analysis for Sub-Visible Particles Formulated with an Opaque Vaccine Adjuvant.

    Frahm, Grant E; Pochopsky, Alex W T; Clarke, Tessa M; Johnston, Michael J W

    2016-01-01

    Microflow digital imaging (MDI) has become a widely accepted method for assessing sub-visible particles in pharmaceutical formulations however, to date; no data have been presented on the utility of this methodology when formulations include opaque vaccine adjuvants. This study evaluates the ability of MDI to assess sub-visible particles under these conditions. A Fluid Imaging Technologies Inc. FlowCAM® instrument was used to assess a number of sub-visible particle types in solution with increasing concentrations of AddaVax™, a nanoscale squalene-based adjuvant. With the objective (10X) used and the limitations of the sensor resolution, the instrument was incapable of distinguishing between sub-visible particles and AddaVax™ droplets at particle sizes less than 5 μm. The instrument was capable of imaging all particle types assessed (polystyrene beads, borosilicate glass, cellulose, polyethylene protein aggregate mimics, and lysozyme protein aggregates) at sizes greater than 5 μm in concentrations of AddaVax™ up to 50% (vol:vol). Reduced edge gradients and a decrease in measured particle sizes were noted as adjuvant concentrations increased. No significant changes in particle counts were observed for polystyrene particle standards and lysozyme protein aggregates, however significant reductions in particle counts were observed for borosilicate (80% of original) and cellulose (92% of original) particles. This reduction in particle counts may be due to the opaque adjuvant masking translucent particles present in borosilicate and cellulose samples. Although the results suggest that the utility of MDI for assessing sub-visible particles in high concentrations of adjuvant may be highly dependent on particle morphology, we believe that further investigation of this methodology to assess sub-visible particles in challenging formulations is warranted.

  10. Evaluation of Microflow Digital Imaging Particle Analysis for Sub-Visible Particles Formulated with an Opaque Vaccine Adjuvant.

    Grant E Frahm

    Full Text Available Microflow digital imaging (MDI has become a widely accepted method for assessing sub-visible particles in pharmaceutical formulations however, to date; no data have been presented on the utility of this methodology when formulations include opaque vaccine adjuvants. This study evaluates the ability of MDI to assess sub-visible particles under these conditions. A Fluid Imaging Technologies Inc. FlowCAM® instrument was used to assess a number of sub-visible particle types in solution with increasing concentrations of AddaVax™, a nanoscale squalene-based adjuvant. With the objective (10X used and the limitations of the sensor resolution, the instrument was incapable of distinguishing between sub-visible particles and AddaVax™ droplets at particle sizes less than 5 μm. The instrument was capable of imaging all particle types assessed (polystyrene beads, borosilicate glass, cellulose, polyethylene protein aggregate mimics, and lysozyme protein aggregates at sizes greater than 5 μm in concentrations of AddaVax™ up to 50% (vol:vol. Reduced edge gradients and a decrease in measured particle sizes were noted as adjuvant concentrations increased. No significant changes in particle counts were observed for polystyrene particle standards and lysozyme protein aggregates, however significant reductions in particle counts were observed for borosilicate (80% of original and cellulose (92% of original particles. This reduction in particle counts may be due to the opaque adjuvant masking translucent particles present in borosilicate and cellulose samples. Although the results suggest that the utility of MDI for assessing sub-visible particles in high concentrations of adjuvant may be highly dependent on particle morphology, we believe that further investigation of this methodology to assess sub-visible particles in challenging formulations is warranted.

  11. Adjuvant Strategies for Resectable Pancreatic Cancer: Have We Made Progress?

    Suzanne Russo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Substantial controversy remains regarding the optimal adjuvant treatment for patients with resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Despite improvements in radiation techniques, systemic therapies, and incorporation of targeted agents, the 5-year survival rates for early stage patients remains less than 25% and the optimal adjuvant treatment approach remains unclear. Here we summarize the data presented at the 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium regarding controversial issues surrounding the role, timing, and selection of patients for adjuvant chemoradiation strategies following curative resection for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. (Abstracts #301, #333, and #206.

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of recent isolates of classical swine fever virus from Colombia.

    Sabogal, Zonia Yubyll; Mogollón, José Darío; Rincón, Maria Antonia; Clavijo, Alfonso

    2006-01-01

    The ability to discriminate between different classical Swine fever virus (CSFV) isolates is a prerequisite for identifying the possible origin of an outbreak. To determine the relatedness between Colombian isolates from different geographical regions, genetic sequences of the glycoprotein E2 and the 5'UTR of CSFV were amplified by PCR, sequenced and compared with reference strains of different genetic grouping. The viruses originated from classical swine fever (CSF) outbreaks in Colombia during 1998-2002. All viruses characterized belonged to genogroup 1 and were members of the subgroup 1.1. The results indicate that the outbreaks from the year 2002 are caused by a strain related to the virus CSF/Santander, isolated in 1980, suggesting that the current CSF outbreaks are the consequence of a single strain that continues to circulate in the field. For the first time, an association between isolates from outbreaks in Colombia in the 1990s was established with a virus isolate from Brazil, indicating a possible origin of the virus causing the outbreak.

  13. The Haemophilus ducreyi trimeric autotransporter adhesin DsrA protects against an experimental infection in the swine model of chancroid.

    Fusco, William G; Choudhary, Neelima R; Routh, Patty A; Ventevogel, Melissa S; Smith, Valerie A; Koch, Gary G; Almond, Glen W; Orndorff, Paul E; Sempowski, Gregory D; Leduc, Isabelle

    2014-06-24

    Adherence of pathogens to cellular targets is required to initiate most infections. Defining strategies that interfere with adhesion is therefore important for the development of preventative measures against infectious diseases. As an adhesin to host extracellular matrix proteins and human keratinocytes, the trimeric autotransporter adhesin DsrA, a proven virulence factor of the Gram-negative bacterium Haemophilus ducreyi, is a potential target for vaccine development. A recombinant form of the N-terminal passenger domain of DsrA from H. ducreyi class I strain 35000HP, termed rNT-DsrAI, was tested as a vaccine immunogen in the experimental swine model of H. ducreyi infection. Viable homologous H. ducreyi was not recovered from any animal receiving four doses of rNT-DsrAI administered with Freund's adjuvant at two-week intervals. Control pigs receiving adjuvant only were all infected. All animals receiving the rNT-DsrAI vaccine developed antibody endpoint titers between 3.5 and 5 logs. All rNT-DsrAI antisera bound the surface of the two H. ducreyi strains used to challenge immunized pigs. Purified anti-rNT-DsrAI IgG partially blocked binding of fibrinogen at the surface of viable H. ducreyi. Overall, immunization with the passenger domain of the trimeric autotransporter adhesin DsrA accelerated clearance of H. ducreyi in experimental lesions, possibly by interfering with fibrinogen binding.

  14. [Antigenic diversity of African swine fever viruses].

    Sereda, A D; Balyshev, V M

    2011-01-01

    Data on the seroimmunotypic and hemadsorbing characteristics of African swine fever virus (ASF) are summarized. According to the results of immunological sampling in pigs and those of hemagglutination inhibition test, the known ASFV strains and isolates were divided into 11 groups, 8 were characterized as seroimmunogroups having their specific reference strains. A 110-140-kD ASFV serotype-specific nonstructural major glycoprotein was identified. It is suggested that it is the glycoprotein that corresponds to the genetic engineering detected virus-specific homolog of lymphocyte membrane protein CD2, gene deletion of which results in the loss of hemadsorbing properties by ASFV.

  15. Endogenous oils derived from human adipocytes are potent adjuvants that promote IL-1α-dependent inflammation.

    Tynan, Graham A; Hearnden, Claire H; Oleszycka, Ewa; Lyons, Claire L; Coutts, Graham; O'Connell, Jean; Corrigan, Michelle A; Lynch, Lydia; Campbell, Matthew; Callanan, John J; Mok, Kenneth H; Geoghegan, Justin; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Allan, Stuart M; Roche, Helen M; O'Shea, Donal B; Lavelle, Ed C

    2014-06-01

    Obesity is characterized by chronic inflammation associated with neutrophil and M1 macrophage infiltration into white adipose tissue. However, the mechanisms underlying this process remain largely unknown. Based on the ability of oil-based adjuvants to induce immune responses, we hypothesized that endogenous oils derived from necrotic adipocytes may function as an immunological "danger signal." Here we show that endogenous oils of human origin are potent adjuvants, enhancing antibody responses to a level comparable to Freund's incomplete adjuvant. The endogenous oils were capable of promoting interleukin (IL)-1α-dependent recruitment of neutrophils and M1-like macrophages, while simultaneously diminishing M2-like macrophages. We found that endogenous oils from subcutaneous and omental adipocytes, and from healthy and unhealthy obese individuals, promoted comparable inflammatory responses. Furthermore, we also confirmed that white adipocytes in visceral fat of metabolically unhealthy obese (MUO) individuals are significantly larger than those in metabolically healthy obese individuals. Since adipocyte size is positively correlated with adipocyte death, we propose that endogenous oils have a higher propensity to be released from hypertrophied visceral fat in MUO individuals and that this is the key factor in driving inflammation. In summary, this study shows that adipocytes contain a potent oil adjuvant which drives IL-1α-dependent proinflammatory responses in vivo.

  16. Pandemism of swine flu and its prospective drug therapy.

    Saxena, R K; Tripathi, P; Rawat, G

    2012-12-01

    Swine flu is a respiratory disease caused by influenza A H1N1 virus. The current pandemic of swine flu is most probably due to a mutation-more specifically, a re-assortment of four known strains of influenza A virus subtype H1N1. Antigenic variation of influenza viruses while circulating in the population is an important factor leading to difficulties in controlling influenza by vaccination. Due to the global effect of swine flu and its effect on humans, extensive investigations are being undertaken. In this context, Tamiflu is the only available drug used in the prophylaxis of this disease and is made from the compound shikimic acid. Due to the sudden increase in the demand of shikimic acid, its price has increased greatly. Thus, it is necessary to find an alternative approach for the treatment of swine flu. This review presents the overall information of swine flu, beginning from its emergence to the prevention and treatment of the disease, with a major emphasis on the alternative approach (bacterial fermentation process) for the treatment of swine flu. The alternative approach for the treatment of swine flu includes the production of shikimic acid from a fermentation process and it can be produced in large quantities without any time limitations.

  17. Mx bio adjuvant for enhancing immune responses against influenza virus

    Sina Soleimani

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: These data revealed that Mx1 as biological adjuvant was able to increase antibody titer and induction memory immune responses against influenza immunization without causing any side effects.

  18. Endometrial adenocarcinoma, adjuvant radiotherapy tailored to prognostic factors.

    Meerwaldt, J H; Hoekstra, C J; van Putten, W L; Tjokrowardojo, A J; Koper, P C

    1990-02-01

    The optimal adjuvant radiotherapy for surgically treated endometrial cancer has not yet been defined. We report on 389 patients treated between 1970 and 1985 with adjuvant radiotherapy. The treatment was tailored to the known prognostic factors: myometrial invasion and grade of differentiation of the tumor. Ten-year overall survival was 67%, 10-year relapse-free survival 77%; 23% relapse, of which 21% distant and 6% locoregional relapse. In a multivariate analysis, stage (pT), grade, and myometrial invasion were prognostic factors. The number of locoregional failures was very small (n = 23). This small number, the fact that radiation treatment was tailored to prognostic factors, and the absence of a nontreated control group precluded an analysis of the effect of the adjuvant irradiation. Large randomized studies with a control (no treatment) arm should be performed to determine the value of adjuvant radiotherapy.

  19. Activity of glycated chitosan and other adjuvants to PDT vaccines

    Korbelik, Mladen; Banáth, Judit; Čiplys, Evaldas; Szulc, Zdzislaw; Bielawska, Alicja; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-03-01

    Glycated chitosan (GC), a water soluble galactose-conjugated natural polysaccharide, has proven to be an effective immunoadjuvant for treatment of tumors based on laser thermal therapy. It was also shown to act as adjuvant for tumor therapy with high-intensity ultrasound and in situ photodynamic therapy (PDT). In the present study, GC was examined as potential adjuvant to PDT-generated cancer vaccine. Two other agents, pure calreticulin protein and acid ceramidase inhibitor LCL521, were also tested as prospective adjuvants for use in conjunction with PDT vaccines. Single treatment with GC, included with PDT vaccine cells suspension, improved the therapeutic efficacy when compared to vaccine alone. This attractive prospect of GC application remains to be carefully optimized and mechanistically elucidated. Both calreticulin and LCL521 proved also effective adjuvants when combined with PDT vaccine tumor treatment.

  20. The Vaccine Formulation Laboratory: a platform for access to adjuvants.

    Collin, Nicolas; Dubois, Patrice M

    2011-07-01

    Adjuvants are increasingly used by the vaccine research and development community, particularly for their ability to enhance immune responses and for their dose-sparing properties. However, they are not readily available to the majority of public sector vaccine research groups, and even those with access to suitable adjuvants may still fail in the development of their vaccines because of lack of knowledge on how to correctly formulate the adjuvants. This shortcoming led the World Health Organization to advocate for the establishment of the Vaccine Formulation Laboratory at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland. The primary mission of the laboratory is to transfer adjuvants and formulation technology free of intellectual property rights to academic institutions, small biotechnology companies and developing countries vaccine manufacturers. In this context, the transfer of an oil-in-water emulsion to Bio Farma, an Indonesian vaccine manufacturer, was initiated to increase domestic pandemic influenza vaccine production capacity as part of the national pandemic influenza preparedness plan.

  1. Influence of mycotoxin zearalenone on the swine reproductive failure

    Prodanov-Radulović Jasna Z.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive failure in swine is often a difficult diagnostic problem. If diagnoses of infectious disease or management related problems are not obtained, feed quality and safety may be questioned. Mycotoxins are often present in swine feed in the amount that can have detrimental impact on production and reproduction. Problems are expressed only as alterations of the reproductive cycle, reduced feed intake, slow growth or impaired feed efficiency. In Serbia, generally speaking, high concentrations of mycotoxins were noticed, especially mycotoxin zearalenone. High presence of zearalenone in swine feed is probably due to climatic influence and should be monitored constantly. This paper includes field observations regarding the influence of moldy feed containing mycotoxin zearalenone on the occurrence of the reproductive failure in swine breeding categories (sows, gilts and boars. The material for this research was obtained from four swine farms where certain reproductive disorders and health problems in breeding animals were detected. Depending on the specificity of each evaluated case and available material, the applied research methods included: anamnestic and clinical evaluation, pathomorphological examination, standard laboratory testing for detection of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, and microbiological feed testing, in order to examine the presence of fungi and mycotoxins by applying the method of thin layer chromatography. On the basis of the obtained results, it could be concluded that mycotoxin zearalenone was detected in all examined feed samples. The presence of mycotoxin in feed was directly related to the reproductive failures in the examined swine categories (vulvovaginitis, endometritis, rebreeding, infertility. Swine reproduction represents the base for intensive swine production. The presence of mycotoxins in swine feed have influence on the reproduction and health status of pigs and under certain conditions may significantly

  2. Effect of Freund's adjuvant on standard dark and pastel mink.

    Tabel, H; Ingram, D G

    1971-04-01

    Following a long series of injections of homologous immunoglobulin in complete and incomplete Freund's adjuvant into mink, a moderate elevation in the level of gammaglobulin in the serum was observed in a few animals. Relatively mild pathological changes also were seen in liver, spleen, lymph nodes, lungs and kidney. It is concluded that the injection of Freund's adjuvant, under the experimental conditions described, produced lesions which were readily distinguishable from the lesions characteristic of aleutian disease of mink.

  3. Engineering of an Inhalable DDA/TDB Liposomal Adjuvant

    Ingvarsson, Pall Thor; Yang, Mingshi; Mulvad, Helle;

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and optimize spray drying parameters of importance for the design of an inhalable powder formulation of a cationic liposomal adjuvant composed of dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) bromide and trehalose-6,6'-dibehenate (TDB).......The purpose of this study was to identify and optimize spray drying parameters of importance for the design of an inhalable powder formulation of a cationic liposomal adjuvant composed of dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) bromide and trehalose-6,6'-dibehenate (TDB)....

  4. Learning impairment in honey bees caused by agricultural spray adjuvants.

    Timothy J Ciarlo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spray adjuvants are often applied to crops in conjunction with agricultural pesticides in order to boost the efficacy of the active ingredient(s. The adjuvants themselves are largely assumed to be biologically inert and are therefore subject to minimal scrutiny and toxicological testing by regulatory agencies. Honey bees are exposed to a wide array of pesticides as they conduct normal foraging operations, meaning that they are likely exposed to spray adjuvants as well. It was previously unknown whether these agrochemicals have any deleterious effects on honey bee behavior. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An improved, automated version of the proboscis extension reflex (PER assay with a high degree of trial-to-trial reproducibility was used to measure the olfactory learning ability of honey bees treated orally with sublethal doses of the most widely used spray adjuvants on almonds in the Central Valley of California. Three different adjuvant classes (nonionic surfactants, crop oil concentrates, and organosilicone surfactants were investigated in this study. Learning was impaired after ingestion of 20 µg organosilicone surfactant, indicating harmful effects on honey bees caused by agrochemicals previously believed to be innocuous. Organosilicones were more active than the nonionic adjuvants, while the crop oil concentrates were inactive. Ingestion was required for the tested adjuvant to have an effect on learning, as exposure via antennal contact only induced no level of impairment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A decrease in percent conditioned response after ingestion of organosilicone surfactants has been demonstrated here for the first time. Olfactory learning is important for foraging honey bees because it allows them to exploit the most productive floral resources in an area at any given time. Impairment of this learning ability may have serious implications for foraging efficiency at the colony level, as well as potentially many

  5. Designing CAF-adjuvanted dry powder vaccines: spray drying preserves the adjuvant activity of CAF01.

    Ingvarsson, Pall Thor; Schmidt, Signe Tandrup; Christensen, Dennis; Larsen, Niels Bent; Hinrichs, Wouter Leonardus Joseph; Andersen, Peter; Rantanen, Jukka; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Yang, Mingshi; Foged, Camilla

    2013-05-10

    Dry powder vaccine formulations are highly attractive due to improved storage stability and the possibility for particle engineering, as compared to liquid formulations. However, a prerequisite for formulating vaccines into dry formulations is that their physicochemical and adjuvant properties remain unchanged upon rehydration. Thus, we have identified and optimized the parameters of importance for the design of a spray dried powder formulation of the cationic liposomal adjuvant formulation 01 (CAF01) composed of dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) bromide and trehalose 6,6'-dibehenate (TDB) via spray drying. The optimal excipient to stabilize CAF01 during spray drying and for the design of nanocomposite microparticles was identified among mannitol, lactose and trehalose. Trehalose and lactose were promising stabilizers with respect to preserving liposome size, as compared to mannitol. Trehalose and lactose were in the glassy state upon co-spray drying with the liposomes, whereas mannitol appeared crystalline, suggesting that the ability of the stabilizer to form a glassy matrix around the liposomes is one of the prerequisites for stabilization. Systematic studies on the effect of process parameters suggested that a fast drying rate is essential to avoid phase separation and lipid accumulation at the surface of the microparticles during spray drying. Finally, immunization studies in mice with CAF01 in combination with the tuberculosis antigen Ag85B-ESAT6-Rv2660c (H56) demonstrated that spray drying of CAF01 with trehalose under optimal processing conditions resulted in the preservation of the adjuvant activity in vivo. These data demonstrate the importance of liposome stabilization via optimization of formulation and processing conditions in the engineering of dry powder liposome formulations.

  6. Squalene and squalane emulsions as adjuvants.

    Allison, A C

    1999-09-01

    Microfluidized squalene or squalane emulsions are efficient adjuvants, eliciting both humoral and cellular immune responses. Microfluidization stabilizes the emulsions and allows sterilization by terminal filtration. The emulsions are stable for years at ambient temperature and can be frozen. Antigens are added after emulsification so that conformational epitopes are not lost by denaturation and to facilitate manufacture. A Pluronic block copolymer can be added to the squalane or squalene emulsion. Soluble antigens administered in such emulsions generate cytotoxic T lymphocytes able to lyse target cells expressing the antigen in a genetically restricted fashion. Optionally a relatively nontoxic analog of muramyl dipeptide (MDP) or another immunomodulator can be added; however, the dose of MDP must be restricted to avoid systemic side effects in humans. Squalene or squalane emulsions without copolymers or MDP have very little toxicity and elicit potent antibody responses to several antigens in nonhuman primates. They could be used to improve a wide range of vaccines. Squalene or squalane emulsions have been administered in human cancer vaccines, with mild side effects and evidence of efficacy, in terms of both immune responses and antitumor activity.

  7. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Watad, Abdulla; David, Paula; Brown, Stav; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2017-01-01

    The autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA), presented by Shoenfeld and Agmon-Levin in 2011, is an entity that incorporates diverse autoimmune conditions induced by the exposure to various adjuvants. Adjuvants are agents that entail the capability to induce immune reactions. Adjuvants are found in many vaccines and used mainly to increase the response to vaccination in the general population. Silicone has also been reported to be able to induce diverse immune reactions. Clinical cases and series of heterogeneous autoimmune conditions including systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and rheumatoid arthritis have been reported to be induced by several adjuvants. However, only a small number of cases of autoimmune thyroid disorder have been included under the umbrella of ASIA syndrome. Indeed, clinical cases of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and/or subacute thyroiditis were observed after the exposure to vaccines as well as silicone implantation. In our review, we aimed to summarize the current knowledge on ASIA syndrome presented as endocrinopathies, focusing on autoimmune thyroid disorders associated with the various adjuvants. PMID:28167927

  8. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in the U.S. swine herd using sera collected during the National Animal Health Monitoring Survey (Swine 2006)

    Sera and data on swine management practices was collected during the voluntary survey of 185 grower/finisher swine production sites located in 16 states accounting for >90% of U.S. swine production . A total of 6,238 sera were tested for T. gondii antibodies using a commercial ELISA assay; all posit...

  9. Influence of Asian dust particles on immune adjuvant effects and airway inflammation in asthma model mice.

    Jun Kurai

    Full Text Available An Asian dust storm (ADS contains airborne particles that affect conditions such as asthma, but the mechanism of exacerbation is unclear. The objective of this study was to compare immune adjuvant effects and airway inflammation induced by airborne particles collected on ADS days and the original ADS soil (CJ-1 soil in asthma model mice.Airborne particles were collected on ADS days in western Japan. NC/Nga mice were co-sensitized by intranasal instillation with ADS airborne particles and/or Dermatophagoides farinae (Df, and with CJ-1 soil and/or Df for 5 consecutive days. Df-sensitized mice were stimulated with Df challenge intranasally at 7 days after the last Df sensitization. At 24 hours after challenge, serum allergen specific antibody, differential leukocyte count and inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF were measured, and airway inflammation was examined histopathologically.Co-sensitization with ADS airborne particles and Df increased the neutrophil and eosinophil counts in BALF. Augmentation of airway inflammation was also observed in peribronchiolar and perivascular lung areas. Df-specific serum IgE was significantly elevated by ADS airborne particles, but not by CJ-1 soil. Levels of interleukin (IL-5, IL-13, IL-6, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 were higher in BALF in mice treated with ADS airborne particles.These results suggest that substances attached to ADS airborne particles that are not in the original ADS soil may play important roles in immune adjuvant effects and airway inflammation.

  10. Expression of Porcine Interleukin-2 and Porcine Interleukin-6 and Their Adjuvant Effects on Gene Deleted Vaccine of Pseudorabies Virus (TK-/gG-/LacZ+)

    YAN Lin; HE Qi-gai; CHEN Huan-chun; XIAO Shao-bo; WU Mei-zhou; LU Jian-qiang; HAN Li

    2003-01-01

    Porcine interleukin-2 and porcine interleukin-6 cDNA sequences were cloned into the expressing vectors pET-28a and pGEX-KG respectively. They were expressed in E.coli BL21 (DE3) with high-level production. The gene deleted vaccine of pseudorabies virus Ea strain (TK-/gG-/LacZ+) was mixed with the two different purified recombinant proteins each, or both, with the doses of 2, 5 or 10 μg ml-1. Ten groups of pseudorabies negative antibody swines were immuned twice with tested vaccines with different doses, or control vaccine, respectively. The antibody titers of the test groups were detected by neutralization test, and the daily weight gains of swines were calculated and analyzed statistically. In the study, all the neutralizing antibody titers in test groups were higher than the control group, and the recombinant proteins appeared a dose dependent adjuvant effect. The tested vaccines with 2 μg ml-1 pIL-2 and with 10 μg ml-1 pIL-2/pIL-6 got significant and extremely significant differences, compared with the vaccines without pILs. The difference of the daily weight gain indicated the potential positive influence of pIL-2 and pIL-6 on immune protection.

  11. Kinetics of Methane Production from Swine Manure and Buffalo Manure.

    Sun, Chen; Cao, Weixing; Liu, Ronghou

    2015-10-01

    The degradation kinetics of swine and buffalo manure for methane production was investigated. Six kinetic models were employed to describe the corresponding experimental data. These models were evaluated by two statistical measurements, which were root mean square prediction error (RMSPE) and Akaike's information criterion (AIC). The results showed that the logistic and Fitzhugh models could predict the experimental data very well for the digestion of swine and buffalo manure, respectively. The predicted methane yield potential for swine and buffalo manure was 487.9 and 340.4 mL CH4/g volatile solid (VS), respectively, which was close to experimental values, when the digestion temperature was 36 ± 1 °C in the biochemical methane potential assays. Besides, the rate constant revealed that swine manure had a much faster methane production rate than buffalo manure.

  12. Oseltamivir resistance in swine influenza: a brief discussion

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Swine flu, an atypical H1N1 influenza virus infection, is a new emerging infectious disease starting from Mexico in 2009, and is presently pandemic around the world. For treatment of this infection, oseltamivir is recommended as drug of choice. Generally, a big problem for using oseltamivir in treatment of classical H1NI influenza virus infection is drug resistance. In this brief paper, the author discusses on the situation of oseltamivir resistance in swine influenza. Briefly, the oseltamivir resistance of swine flu is expected to be possible due to many underlying factors. It is needed to perform surveillance on oseltamivir resistance in swine flu. Planning for management of case of emerging oseltamivir drug resistance is needed.

  13. Toxicokinetics of Microcystin and Dihydro-Microcystin in Swine

    1994-05-14

    AND METHODS Animals- Landrace -cross, specific pathogen free female swine weighing 18 to 24 kg were given free access to feed and water until 12 hours...MATERIALS AND METHODS Animals- Landrace cross specific pathogen free female swine weighing from 18 to 24 kg were group housed and given free access to...ileal loop model. Materials and Methods Animals- Landrace -cross, specific pathogen free female pigs weighing 18 to 24 kg were given free access to feed

  14. A Blast Model of Traumatic Brain Injury in Swine

    2009-05-01

    public release; distribution unlimited Although blast-induced traumatic brain injury (BI- TBI ) is a significant cause of morbidity and behavioral...survival model of BI- TBI in swine. Traumatic Brain Injury , Swine, Blast, Model Development U U U 7 USAMRMC W81XWH-08-2-0082... Injury , TBI Scientific Advisor, Defense Center of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury ) and Dr. Tamara Crowder at the DoD

  15. [African swine fever in Russian Federation].

    Zaberezhnyĭ, A D; Aliper, T I; Grebennikova, T A; Verkhovskiĭ, O A; Sanchez-Vizcaino, J M; Mur, Lina; Nepoklonov, E A; L'vov, D K

    2012-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is an infectious viral disease that causes high economic losses due to the necessity of depopulation of pigs in affected areas, sanitary measures, trade restrictions, etc. The virus (ASFV) is relatively stable in the unprocessed meat products and environment. Thus, large areas are at risk due to free movement of people and products. The ASFV does not affect people and animals, except the wild and domestic pigs. Some ticks can become infected and carry the virus for years. Adaptation of the virus by changing into the less virulent form would mean the threat of an endemic situation to the area. The disease is endemic in domestic and wild pigs in most of sub-Saharan Africa and Sardinia, Italy. There is no treatment for ASF, and no vaccine has been developed. In case of infection with less virulent ASFV strains, the recovered pigs could spread the virus as long as their live. In terms of clinical symptoms, ASF is very similar to Classical Swine Fever. The methods of laboratory diagnostics are well developed and efficient for identification of ASFV and virus-specific antibodies. Experience of eradication of ASF in Spain suggests the importance of serological monitoring of pigs. In the spring of 2007, the ASF was detected in the Caucasus region. Same virus was detected in Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Russia. The ASFV circulating in the Caucasus and the Russian Federation is a highly virulent virus. No reduction of the virulence was observed since the first outbreak in Georgia. In the last years, the ASF remained in the Caucasus, southern parts of Russia and appeared occasionally as far as St. Petersburg and St. Petersburg region, and in the area of Nizhny Novgorod. Domestic pigs play an important role in the ASFV spread; they transfer the virus to the wild boars. The virus circulates in the population of wild boars depending on their density in the area. Occasionally, the disease is spread from wild to domestic pigs. There is no evidence of

  16. Tumor tissue levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-I (TIMP-I) and outcome following adjuvant chemotherapy in premenopausal lymph node-positive breast cancer patients

    Schrohl, Anne-Sofie; Look, Maxime P.; Gelder, Marion E. Meijer-van

    2009-01-01

    an association between shorter survival after treatment in TIMP-1 high patients compared with TIMP-1 low patients, especially in patients receiving anthracycline-based therapy. This suggests that high tumor tissue levels of TIMP-1 might be associated with reduced benefit from classical adjuvant chemotherapy. Our......BACKGROUND: We have previously demonstrated that high tumor tissue levels of TIMP-1 are associated with no or limited clinical benefit from chemotherapy with CMF and anthracyclines in metastatic breast cancer patients. Here, we extend our investigations to the adjuvant setting studying outcome...... after adjuvant chemotherapy in premenopausal lymph node-positive patients. We hypothesize that TIMP-1 high tumors are less sensitive to chemotherapy and accordingly that high tumor tissue levels are associated with shorter survival. METHODS: From our original retrospectively collected tumor samples we...

  17. Occurrence of tylosin in swine wastewater in Mexico.

    García-Sánchez, Liliana; Garzón-Zúñiga, Marco Antonio; Buelna, Gerardo; Moeller-Chávez, Gabriela Eleonora; Noyola, Adalberto; Avilez-Flores, Martha; Estrada-Arriaga, Edson B

    2013-01-01

    This study determined a tylosin concentration in swine wastewater located in a Mexican pig farm, during different stages of the pigs' growth. The detection of antibiotics in swine wastewater is complex due to its high concentration of solids. Analytical method was developed for detection of tylosin in swine wastewater and swine slurry. Average recoveries of tylosin in the liquid and solid phase were greater than 51 and 44%, respectively, with a greater total recovery of 95%. The results indicated the presence of tylosin in swine wastewater and slurry at concentrations greater than the ones reported in the literature. In grab samples of swine wastewater, the tylosin detected showed concentrations of 56, 72 and 8.6 μg L(-1), in breeding-gestation, nursery pigs, and grow-finishing area, respectively. In composite samples, the concentration of tylosin was 11.8 μg L(-1) for the breeding-gestation area and 2.4 μg L(-1) for the grow-finishing area. For slurry, the concentration of tylosin was 20.6 and 17.8 μg L(-1), for the breeding-gestation and grow-finishing area, respectively. This study presents the detection of a high concentration of tylosin in breeding-gestation and nursery pigs. Traces of tylosin in wastewater from grow-finishing stage were found although the animals were not receiving antibiotics.

  18. Survey of quality of swine feed mixes

    Mašić Zoran

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of analyses of the chemical composition of 455 samples, microbiological analysis of 412 samples, and mucotoxicological analyses of 212 samples of feed mixes for different categories of swine which arrived for control at authorized laboratories from the territory of the Republic of Serbia during the period from 2000 until 2001. The analyses of 455 swine feed mix samples showed that as many as 185 feed mixes do not meet the quality condition on protein content envisaged by legal regulations, and the highest discrepancy was determined in feed mixes for piglets. Analyses of Ca, P and NaCl contents showed that the mixes in a large number of cases contain insufficient quantities, and in a considerable number even quantities which are not permitted. Analyses of the contents of certain microelements showed that mixes contain insufficient quantities in a large number of cases, especially of copper, manganese and zinc. The number of saprophytic bacteria greatly varied depending on the type of feed mix but all examined samples contained a permitted number of saprophytic bacteria. These analyses most often isolated Bacillus spp., Staphylococcus spp., coliform bacteries, and Micrococcus spp.. Most examined samples contained a permitted number of clostridia, and a smaller number of samples mostly for piglets, showed an impermissible number of clostridia. The quantity of mold fungi in mixes was significantly higher in mixes for young animals, and the determination of fungi most frequently resulted in the isolation of Penicillium spp., Aspergillus spp., Fusarium spp., and Mucor spp.. The mucotoxin analysis of 212 feed mixes showed that only 30.2% were within permitted levels, and the differences between the mixes for young and adult animals were not significant. The mucotoxins most often present were zearalenon and ochratoxin, and all mixes in which aflatoxin and trychotecenes were identified contained these toxins in quantities

  19. Regulatory considerations on new adjuvants and delivery systems.

    Sesardic, D

    2006-04-12

    New and improved vaccines and delivery systems are increasingly being developed for prevention, treatment and diagnosis of human diseases. Prior to their use in humans, all new biological products must undergo pre-clinical evaluation. These pre-clinical studies are important not only to establish the biological properties of the material and to evaluate its possible risk to the public, but also to plan protocols for subsequent clinical trials from which safety and efficacy can be evaluated. For vaccines, evaluation in pre-clinical studies is particularly important as information gained may also contribute to identifying the optimum composition and formulation process and provide an opportunity to develop suitable indicator tests for quality control. Data from pre-clinical and laboratory evaluation studies, which continue during clinical studies, is used to support an application for marketing authorisation. Addition of a new adjuvant and exploration of new delivery systems for vaccines presents challenges to both manufacturers and regulatory authorities. Because no adjuvant is licensed as a medicinal product in its own right, but only as a component of a particular vaccine, pre-clinical and appropriate toxicology studies need to be designed on a case-by-case basis to evaluate the safety profile of the adjuvant and adjuvant/vaccine combination. Current regulatory requirements for the pharmaceutical and pre-clinical safety assessment of vaccines are insufficient and initiatives are in place to develop more specific guidelines for evaluation of adjuvants in vaccines.

  20. Environmental adjuvants, apoptosis and the censorship over autoimmunity.

    Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Manfredi, Angelo A; Sabbadini, Maria Grazia

    2005-11-01

    Alterations during apoptosis lead to the activation of autoreactive T cells and the production of autoantibodies. This article discusses the pathogenic potential of cells dying in vivo, dissecting the role of signals that favor immune responses (adjuvants) and the influence of genetic backgrounds. Diverse factors determine whether apoptosis leads or not to a self-sustaining, clinically apparent autoimmune disease. The in vivo accumulation of uncleared dying cells per se is not sufficient to cause disease. However, dying cells are antigenic and their complementation with immune adjuvants causes lethal diseases in predisposed lupus-prone animals. At least some adjuvant signals directly target the function and the activation state of antigen presenting cells. Several laboratories are aggressively pursuing the molecular identification of endogenous adjuvants. Sodium monourate and the high mobility group B1 protein (HMGB1) are, among those identified so far, well known to rheumatologists. However, even the complementation of apoptotic cells with potent adjuvant signals fail to cause clinical autoimmunity in most strains: autoantibodies generated are transient, do not undergo to epitope/spreading and do not cause disease. Novel tools for drug development will derive from the molecular identification of the constraints that prevent autoimmunity in normal subjects.

  1. Nanoparticulate Adjuvants and Delivery Systems for Allergen Immunotherapy

    Juliana De Souza Rebouças

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, significant progress in research and clinics has been made to offer possible innovative therapeutics for the management of allergic diseases. However, current allergen immunotherapy shows limitations concerning the long-term efficacy and safety due to local side effects and risk of anaphylaxis. Thus, effective and safe vaccines with reduced dose of allergen have been developed using adjuvants. Nevertheless, the use of adjuvants still has several disadvantages, which limits its use in human vaccines. In this context, several novel adjuvants for allergen immunotherapy are currently being investigated and developed. Currently, nanoparticles-based allergen-delivery systems have received much interest as potential adjuvants for allergen immunotherapy. It has been demonstrated that the incorporation of allergens into a delivery system plays an important role in the efficacy of allergy vaccines. Several nanoparticles-based delivery systems have been described, including biodegradable and nondegradable polymeric carriers. Therefore, this paper provides an overview of the current adjuvants used for allergen immunotherapy. Furthermore, nanoparticles-based allergen-delivery systems are focused as a novel and promising strategy for allergy vaccines.

  2. Novel adjuvants & delivery vehicles for vaccines development: a road ahead.

    Mohan, Teena; Verma, Priyanka; Rao, D Nageswara

    2013-11-01

    The pure recombinant and synthetic antigens used in modern day vaccines are generally less immunogenic than older style live/attenuated and killed whole organism vaccines. One can improve the quality of vaccine production by incorporating immunomodulators or adjuvants with modified delivery vehicles viz. liposomes, immune stimulating complexes (ISCOMs), micro/nanospheres apart from alum, being used as gold standard. Adjuvants are used to augment the effect of a vaccine by stimulating the immune system to respond to the vaccine, more vigorously, and thus providing increased immunity to a particular disease. Adjuvants accomplish this task by mimicking specific sets of evolutionary conserved molecules which include lipopolysaccharides (LPS), components of bacterial cell wall, endocytosed nucleic acids such as dsRNA, ssDNA and unmethylated CpG dinucleotide containing DNA. This review provides information on various vaccine adjuvants and delivery vehicles being developed to date. From literature, it seems that the humoral immune responses have been observed for most adjuvants and delivery platforms while viral-vector, ISCOMs and Montanides have shown cytotoxic T-cell response in the clinical trials. MF59 and MPL® have elicited Th1 responses, and virus-like particles (VLPs), non-degradable nanoparticle and liposomes have also generated cellular immunity. Such vaccine components have also been evaluated for alternative routes of administration with clinical success reported for intranasal delivery of viral-vectors and proteosomes and oral delivery of VLP vaccines.

  3. Nanoparticulate adjuvants and delivery systems for allergen immunotherapy.

    De Souza Rebouças, Juliana; Esparza, Irene; Ferrer, Marta; Sanz, María Luisa; Irache, Juan Manuel; Gamazo, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    In the last decades, significant progress in research and clinics has been made to offer possible innovative therapeutics for the management of allergic diseases. However, current allergen immunotherapy shows limitations concerning the long-term efficacy and safety due to local side effects and risk of anaphylaxis. Thus, effective and safe vaccines with reduced dose of allergen have been developed using adjuvants. Nevertheless, the use of adjuvants still has several disadvantages, which limits its use in human vaccines. In this context, several novel adjuvants for allergen immunotherapy are currently being investigated and developed. Currently, nanoparticles-based allergen-delivery systems have received much interest as potential adjuvants for allergen immunotherapy. It has been demonstrated that the incorporation of allergens into a delivery system plays an important role in the efficacy of allergy vaccines. Several nanoparticles-based delivery systems have been described, including biodegradable and nondegradable polymeric carriers. Therefore, this paper provides an overview of the current adjuvants used for allergen immunotherapy. Furthermore, nanoparticles-based allergen-delivery systems are focused as a novel and promising strategy for allergy vaccines.

  4. Adjuvants for Clostridium tetani and Clostridium diphtheriae vaccines updating.

    Alshanqiti, Fatimah M; Al-Masaudi, Saad B; Al-Hejin, Ahmed M; Redwan, Elrashdy M

    2017-01-01

    It's known that diphtheria and tetanus are a contagious lethal diseases over the years, they caused by pathogenic microbes corynebacterium diphtheria and Clostridium tetani, respectively. The diseases result from the production of bacterial toxin. Vaccination with bacterial toxoid vaccines adsorbed on particulates adjuvants still are the best way to prevent this epidemic diseases from spread. The particulate vaccines have been shown to be more efficient than soluble one for the induction of the immune responses. Nanoparticles can be engineered to enhance the immune responses. As well known the immune response to inactivate killed and subunit vaccine enhances by alum adjuvants. The adjuvants examined and tested after reducing its size to particle size, thus mimic size of viruses which is considered smallest units can derive the immune system. The major issue is minimizing the adjuvant particles, to gain insight of resulting immunity types and impact on immune response. The adjuvant effect of micro/nanoparticles appears to largely be a consequence of their uptake into antigen presenting cells.

  5. In Vitro Activity and Rodent Efficacy of Clinafloxacin For Bovine and Swine Respiratory Disease

    Michael T Sweeney

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Clinafloxacin is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone that was originally developed and subsequently abandoned in the late 1990s as a human health antibiotic for respiratory diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the activity of clinafloxacin as a possible treatment for respiratory disease in cattle and pigs. MIC values were determined using CLSI recommended procedures with recent strains from the Zoetis culture collection. Rodent efficacy was determined in CD-1 mice infected systemically or intranasally with bovine M. haemolytica or P. multocida, or swine A. pleuropneumoniae, and administered clinafloxacin for determination of ED50s. The MIC90 values for clinafloxacin against bovine P. multocida, M. haemolytica, H. somni and M. bovis were 0.125, 0.5, 0.125 and 1 µg/ml, respectively, and the MIC90 values against swine P. multocida, A. pleuropneumoniae, S. suis, and M. hyopneumoniae were ≤0.03, ≤0.03, 0.125 and ≤0.008 µg/ml, respectively. Efficacy in mouse models showed average ED50s of 0.019 mg/kg/dose in the bovine M. haemolytica systemic infection model, 0.55 mg/kg in the bovine P. multocida intranasal lung challenge model, 0.08 mg/kg/dose in the bovine P. multocida systemic infection model, and 0.7 mg/kg/dose in the swine A. pleuropneumoniae systemic infection model. Clinafloxacin shows good in vitro activity and efficacy in mouse models and may be a novel treatment alternative for the treatment of respiratory disease in cattle and pigs.

  6. In vitro activity and rodent efficacy of clinafloxacin for bovine and swine respiratory disease.

    Sweeney, Michael T; Quesnell, Rebecca; Tiwari, Raksha; Lemay, Mary; Watts, Jeffrey L

    2013-01-01

    Clinafloxacin is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone that was originally developed and subsequently abandoned in the late 1990s as a human health antibiotic for respiratory diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the activity of clinafloxacin as a possible treatment for respiratory disease in cattle and pigs. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommended procedures with recent strains from the Zoetis culture collection. Rodent efficacy was determined in CD-1 mice infected systemically or intranasally with bovine Mannheimia haemolytica or Pasteurella multocida, or swine Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and administered clinafloxacin for determination of ED50 (efficacious dose-50%) values. The MIC90 values for clinafloxacin against bovine P. multocida, M. haemolytica, Histophilus somni, and M. bovis were 0.125, 0.5, 0.125, and 1 μg/ml, respectively, and the MIC90 values against swine P. multocida, A. pleuropneumoniae, S. suis, and M. hyopneumoniae were í0.03, í0.03, 0.125, and í0.008 μg/ml, respectively. Efficacy in mouse models showed average ED50 values of 0.019 mg/kg/dose in the bovine M. haemolytica systemic infection model, 0.55 mg/kg in the bovine P. multocida intranasal lung challenge model, 0.08 mg/kg/dose in the bovine P. multocida systemic infection model, and 0.7 mg/kg/dose in the swine A. pleuropneumoniae systemic infection model. Clinafloxacin shows good in vitro activity and efficacy in mouse models and may be a novel treatment alternative for the treatment of respiratory disease in cattle and pigs.

  7. A Microtitration Agglutination Test for Detecting Group E Streptococcus Infection in Swine

    1982-01-01

    A microtitration agglutination test was developed and evaluated for detecting infection of swine with group E streptococci type IV, the most common causative agent of streptococcic lymphadenitis of swine.

  8. Suppression of complete Freund's adjuvant-induced adjuvant arthritis by cobratoxin

    Yan-li LIU; Hai-ming LIN; Rong ZOU; Jun-chao WU; Rong HAN; Laurence N RAYMOND; Paul F REID; Zheng-hong QIN

    2009-01-01

    Aim:Cobratoxin (CTX),the long-chain α-neurotoxin from Thailand cobra venom,has been demonstrated to have analgesic action in rodent pain models.The present study evaluated the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects of CTX on adju-vant arthritis (AA) in rats.Methods: Arthritis was induced by injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in rats.Paw swelling and hyperalgesia of AA rats were measured at various times after CFA administration.Tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α),interleukin-1 (IL-1),interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels in serum were determined with ELISA.Histopathological changes in synoviocytes were examined under a microscope.Involvement of the cholinergic system in the effects of CTX was examinedby pretreatment of animals with the α7 nicotinic receptor (α7-nAChR) antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA).Results: CFA induced marked paw swelling and reduced thresholds of mechanical and cold-induced paw withdrawal.The lev-els of TNF-α,IL-1 and IL-2 in the serum of AA rats were increased,whereas the level of IL-10 was decreased.Histopathologi-cal examination of synoviocytes showed pronounced inflammation and accumulation of collagen.The administration of CTX (17.0 μg/kg,ip) significantly reduced paw swelling and mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia.CTX also reduced the produc-tion ofTNF-α,IL-1,and IL-2 but increased the production of IL-10 and altered pathohistological changes.The analgesic and anti-inflammatory efficacy of CTX was significantly reduced by MLA (3 mg/kg,sc).Conclusion: These results indicate that CTX has a beneficial effect on CFA-induced arthritis by modulating the production of inflammatory cytokines,α7-nAChR appears to mediate the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory actions of CTX.

  9. The immunobiology of aluminium adjuvants: how do they really work?

    Exley, Christopher; Siesjö, Peter; Eriksson, Håkan

    2010-03-01

    Aluminium adjuvants potentiate the immune response, thereby ensuring the potency and efficacy of typically sparingly available antigen. Their concomitant critical importance in mass vaccination programmes may have prompted recent intense interest in understanding how they work and their safety. Progress in these areas is stymied, however, by a lack of accessible knowledge pertaining to the bioinorganic chemistry of aluminium adjuvants, and, consequently, the inappropriate application and interpretation of experimental models of their mode of action. The objective herein is, therefore, to identify the many ways that aluminium chemistry contributes to the wide and versatile armoury of its adjuvants, such that future research might be guided towards a fuller understanding of their role in human vaccinations.

  10. Validation of Respiratory Inductance Plethysmography for Measuring Tidal Volume in Swine

    2015-01-01

    Measuring tidal volume (VT) in nonintubated swine or swine with leaking breathing circuits is challenging. The aim of this study was to validate respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) for measuring VT in swine that are comparable in size to adult humans. To determine calibration curves, VT and RIP readings were obtained from anesthetized swine (n = 8; weight, 46–50 kg) during positive-pressure (mechanical) ventilation and spontaneous breathing. For positive-pressure ventilation, 6 pigs ...

  11. Arterial supply of the cervical thymus lobes in swine fetuses (Sus scrofa domesticus of the Camborough 25 lineage

    Eduardo Maurício Mendes de Lima

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to discover more about the arterial supply of cervical lobes of the thymus, in relation to its origins, distribution and ordination in swine (Sus scrofa domesticus of Camborough 25 lineage. Thus, 29 swine (17 males and 12 females were studied. The arterial system of the models was colored with aqueous solution of Neoprene Latex “450” (50% and after the models were fixed in 10% formaldehyde aqueous solution. Great individual variations in the length and size of the thymus vessel supply, and also in the layout, size and thickness of the cervical lobes of the thymus, were observed. The superficial cervical artery (96.55%, common carotid artery (54.54% and occipital artery (55.17% contribute to the blood supply of the cervical lobes on both sides. In addition, branches from the lingual artery (3.45% and internal carotid artery (3.45% on both sides, as well as the subclavian artery (6.90% on the left side, were observed. No significant differences in vascularization of lobes in relation to antimerals or sexes were evidenced. Considering the findings, it was conclued that each animal had its own characteristics and peculiarities, thus enabling the establishment of a particular arrangement of the swine strain.

  12. Genetic Characterization and Evolution of H1N1pdm09 after Circulation in a Swine Farm

    Arianna Boni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the emergence of the A(H1N1pdm09 in humans, this novel influenza virus was reverse transmitted from infected people to swine population worldwide. In this study we investigated the molecular evolution of A(H1N1pdm09 virus identified in pigs reared in a single herd. Nasal swabs taken from pigs showing respiratory distress were tested for influenza type A and A(H1N1pdm09 by real-time RT-PCR assays. Virus isolation from positive samples was attempted by inoculation of nasal swabs samples into specific pathogen free embryonated chicken eggs (ECE and complete genome sequencing was performed on virus strains after replication on ECE or from original swab sample. The molecular analysis of hemagglutinin (HA showed, in four of the swine influenza viruses under study, a unique significant amino acid change, represented by a two-amino acid insertion at the HA receptor binding site. Phylogenetic analysis of HA, neuraminidase, and concatenated internal genes revealed a very similar topology, with viruses under study forming a separate cluster, branching outside the A(H1N1pdm09 isolates recognized until 2014. The emergence of this new cluster of A(H1N1pdm09 in swine raises further concerns about whether A(H1N1pdm09 with new molecular characteristics will become established in pigs and potentially transmitted to humans.

  13. 78 FR 23740 - Notice of Availability of a Swine Brucellosis and Pseudorabies Proposed Action Plan

    2013-04-22

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Notice of Availability of a Swine Brucellosis and Pseudorabies... swine brucellosis and pseudorabies available for public review and comment. This action will allow... a potential new approach to managing swine brucellosis and pseudorabies available for public...

  14. 76 FR 81467 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Swine Influenza Vaccine, RNA

    2011-12-28

    ... Swine Influenza Vaccine, RNA AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice... test, an unlicensed Swine Influenza Vaccine, RNA. The environmental assessment, which is based on a...: Requester: Harrisvaccines, Inc. Product: Swine Influenza Vaccine, RNA. Field Test Locations: North...

  15. Wind Tunnel Evaluation of Vegetative Buffer Effects on Air Flow near Swine Production Facilities

    Increasing concerns about generation and transport of swine odor constituents have substantiated wind tunnel simulation studies on air flow dynamics near swine production facilities. A possible odor mitigation strategy is a forest vegetative buffer as a windbreak barrier near swine facilities becaus...

  16. Impact of dietary carbohydrate and protein source and content on swine manure foaming properties

    Diet ingredients are thought to contribute to foaming problems associated with swine deep-pit systems. Two experiments explored the impact of protein and carbohydrate sources in swine diets on the physicochemical properties, methane production potential, and foaming characteristics of swine manure. ...

  17. Tetracycline residues and tetracycline resistance genes in groundwater impacted by swine production facilities

    Mackie, R.I.; Koike, S.; Krapac, I.; Chee-Sanford, J.; Maxwell, Susan; Aminov, R.I.

    2006-01-01

    Antibiotics are used at therapeutic levels to treat disease; at slightly lower levels as prophylactics; and at low, subtherapeutic levels for growth promotion and improvement of feed efficiency. Over 88% of swine producers in the United States gave antimicrobials to grower/finisher pigs in feed as a growth promoter in 2000. It is estimated that ca. 75% of antibiotics are not absorbed by animals and are excreted in urine and feces. The extensive use of antibiotics in swine production has resulted in antibiotic resistance in many intestinal bacteria, which are also excreted in swine feces, resulting in dissemination of resistance genes into the environment.To assess the impact of manure management on groundwater quality, groundwater samples have been collected near two swine confinement facilities that use lagoons for manure storage and treatment. Several key contaminant indicators-including inorganic ions, antibiotics, and antibiotic resistance genes-were analyzed in groundwater collected from the monitoring wells. Chloride, ammonium, potassium, and sodium were predominant inorganic constituents in the manure samples and served as indicators of groundwater contamination. Based on these analyses, shallow groundwater has been impacted by lagoon seepage at both sites. Liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) was used to measure the dissolved concentrations of tetracycline, chlortetracycline, and oxytetracycline in groundwater and manure. Although tetracyclines were regularly used at both facilities, they were infrequently detected in manure samples and then at relatively trace concentrations. Concentrations of all tetracyclines and their breakdown products in the groundwater sampled were generally less than 0.5 ??g/L.Bacterial tetracycline resistance genes served as distinct genotypic markers to indicate the dissemination and mobility of antibiotic resistance genes that originated from the lagoons. Applying PCR to genomic DNA extracted from the lagoon and

  18. Pathogenicity of modified bat influenza virus with different M genes and its reassortment potential with swine influenza A virus.

    Yang, Jianmei; Lee, Jinhwa; Ma, Jingjiao; Lang, Yuekun; Nietfeld, Jerome; Li, Yuhao; Duff, Michael; Li, Yonghai; Yang, Yuju; Liu, Haixia; Zhou, Bin; Wentworth, David E; Richt, Juergen A; Li, Zejun; Ma, Wenjun

    2017-01-18

    In our previous studies the reassortant virus containing only the PR8 H1N1 matrix (M) gene in the background of the modified bat influenza Bat09:mH1mN1 virus could be generated. However, whether M genes from other origins can be rescued in the background of the Bat09:mH1mN1 virus and whether the resulting novel reassortant virus is virulent remain unknown. Herein, two reassortant viruses were generated in the background of the Bat09:mH1mN1 virus containing either a North American or a Eurasian swine influenza virus M gene. These two reassortant viruses and the reassortant virus with PR8 M as well as the control Bat09:mH1mN1 virus replicated efficiently in cultured cells, while the reassortant virus with PR8 M grew to a higher titer than the other three viruses in tested cells. Mouse studies showed that reassortant viruses with either North American or Eurasian swine influenza virus M genes did not enhance virulence, whereas the reassortant virus with PR8 M gene displayed higher pathogenicity when compared to the Bat09:mH1mN1 virus. This is most likely due to the fact that the PR8 H1N1 virus is a mouse-adapted virus. Furthermore, reassortment potential between the Bat09:mH1mN1 virus and an H3N2 swine influenza virus (A/swine/Texas/4199-2/1998) was investigated using co-infection of MDCK cells, but no reassortant viruses were detected. Taken together, our results indicate that the modified bat influenza virus is most likely incapable of reassortment with influenza A viruses with in vitro co-infection experiments, although reassortant viruses with different M genes can be generated by reverse genetics.

  19. Reasoned opinion on the setting of new MRLs for tembotrione in kidney and liver of bovine and swine

    European Food Safety Authority

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    In accordance with Article 6 of Regulation (EC No 396/2005, Austria, hereafter referred to as the evaluating Member State (EMS, received an application from Bayer Austria GmbH to set MRLs for the active substance tembotrione in bovine kidney, bovine liver and swine liver. In order to accommodate the intended use of tembotrione on maize in Austria and as a result of using maize products as livestock feed, the EMS proposed to set the MRLs of 0.05 mg/kg in bovine kidney, 0.1 mg/kg in bovine liver and 0.02 mg/kg in swine liver. The EMS drafted an evaluation report in accordance with Article 8 of Regulation (EC No 396/2005, which was submitted to the European Commission and forwarded to EFSA. The calculated dietary burdens and the results of livestock feeding studies indicate that from the intake of maize silage and grain no residues above the LOQ are expected in milk, fat, muscle of bovine and swine. Residues above the LOQ are expected in bovine liver and kidney and, swine kidney and liver and MRLs for these commodities are therefore proposed. Based on the risk assessment results, EFSA concludes thatthe intended use of tembotrione on maize and the proposed MRLs for the commodities of animal origin will not result in a consumer exposure exceeding the toxicological reference values and therefore is unlikely to pose a public health concern. Since the peer review according to Commission Regulation (EU No 188/2011 is not yet finalised, the conclusions reported in this reasoned opinion should be taken as provisional and might need to be reconsidered in the light of the outcome of the peer review.

  20. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pigs and farm workers on conventional and antibiotic-free swine farms in the USA.

    Smith, Tara C; Gebreyes, Wondwossen A; Abley, Melanie J; Harper, Abby L; Forshey, Brett M; Male, Michael J; Martin, H Wayne; Molla, Bayleyegn Z; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Thakur, Siddhartha; Thiruvengadam, Madhumathi; Davies, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    Much uncertainty remains about the origin and public health implications of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA). This study aimed to investigate the occurrence and prevalence of MRSA in general and LA-MRSA in particular in pigs and farm workers in five states. We collected nasal swabs from pigs and farm workers at 45 swine herds (21 antibiotic-free herds; 24 conventional herds) in Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, North Carolina and Ohio. MRSA was isolated from 50 of 1085 pigs (4.6%) and 31 of 148 (20.9%) of farm workers. MRSA-positive pigs and people were clustered in four conventional swine farms in Iowa and Illinois. Based on genotyping, spa type t034, a common livestock associated variant, was predominant among both human and swine isolates. These results confirm the presence of LA-MRSA in pigs and swine farm workers in the USA, but the prevalence found is relatively low compared with European studies.

  1. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pigs and farm workers on conventional and antibiotic-free swine farms in the USA.

    Tara C Smith

    Full Text Available Much uncertainty remains about the origin and public health implications of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA. This study aimed to investigate the occurrence and prevalence of MRSA in general and LA-MRSA in particular in pigs and farm workers in five states. We collected nasal swabs from pigs and farm workers at 45 swine herds (21 antibiotic-free herds; 24 conventional herds in Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, North Carolina and Ohio. MRSA was isolated from 50 of 1085 pigs (4.6% and 31 of 148 (20.9% of farm workers. MRSA-positive pigs and people were clustered in four conventional swine farms in Iowa and Illinois. Based on genotyping, spa type t034, a common livestock associated variant, was predominant among both human and swine isolates. These results confirm the presence of LA-MRSA in pigs and swine farm workers in the USA, but the prevalence found is relatively low compared with European studies.

  2. Epicardial wavefronts arise from widely distributed transient sources during ventricular fibrillation in the isolated swine heart

    Rogers, J. M.; Walcott, G. P.; Gladden, J. D.; Melnick, S. B.; Ideker, R. E.; Kay, M. W.

    2008-01-01

    It has been proposed that ventricular fibrillation (VF) waves emanate from stable localized sources, often called 'mother rotors'. However, evidence for the existence of these rotors is conflicting. Using a new panoramic optical mapping system that can image nearly the entire ventricular epicardium, we recently excluded epicardial mother rotors as the drivers of Wiggers' stage II VF in the isolated swine heart. Furthermore, we were unable to find evidence that VF requires sustained intramural sources. The present study was designed to test the following hypotheses: (i) VF is driven by a specific region, and (ii) rotors that are long-lived, though not necessarily permanent, are the primary generators of VF wavefronts. Using panoramic optical mapping, we mapped VF wavefronts from six isolated swine hearts. Wavefronts were tracked to characterize their activation pathways and to locate their originating sources. We found that the wavefronts that participate in epicardial re-entry were not confined to a compact region; rather they activated the entire epicardial surface. New wavefronts feeding into the epicardial activation pattern were generated over the majority of the epicardium and almost all of them were associated with rotors or repetitive breakthrough patterns that lasted for less than 2 s. These findings indicate that epicardial wavefronts in this model are generated by many transitory epicardial sources distributed over the entire surface of the heart.

  3. Characterization of Yersinia enterocolitica biotype 1A strains isolated from swine slaughterhouses and markets.

    Paixão, Renata; Moreno, Luisa Zanolli; Sena de Gobbi, Débora Dirani; Raimundo, Daniele Cristine; Hofer, Ernesto; Matté, Maria Helena; Ferreira, Thais Sebastiana Porfida; de Moura Gomes, Vasco Tulio; Costa, Barbara Leticia Pereira; Moreno, Andrea Micke

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is an important foodborne pathogen that causes illness in humans and animals. Y. enterocolitica is also the most heterogeneous species of the genus and is divided into distinct serotypes and over six biotypes. Y. enterocolitica biotype 1A strains are classically considered as nonpathogenic; however, some biotype 1A isolates have been considered as causative of gastrointestinal disease, yielding symptoms indistinguishable from those produced by pathogenic biotypes. Even after decades of isolation of clinical strains, the pathogenic mechanisms of these isolates are still not fully understood. In the present study, 122 Yersinia enterocolitica biotype 1A strains isolated from swine slaughterhouses and meat markets in Sao Paulo, Brazil, were characterized according to the presence of the virulence genes ail, virF, and ystA. A total of 94 strains were positive to at least one virulence gene (77.05%), and 67 were positive to all of them (54.92%). Twenty-two strains were submitted to PFGE genotyping resulting in 22 distinct pulsotypes, varying from 50% to 84% of genetic similarity. Any clustering tendency among pulsotypes related to origin, isolation site, or even virulence profile was not observed. The present study reports an important contamination of the environment in swine slaughterhouses, meat markets, and pork, by potentially virulent Y. enterocolitica biotype 1A.

  4. Characterization of Yersinia enterocolitica Biotype 1A Strains Isolated from Swine Slaughterhouses and Markets

    Renata Paixão

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia enterocolitica is an important foodborne pathogen that causes illness in humans and animals. Y. enterocolitica is also the most heterogeneous species of the genus and is divided into distinct serotypes and over six biotypes. Y. enterocolitica biotype 1A strains are classically considered as nonpathogenic; however, some biotype 1A isolates have been considered as causative of gastrointestinal disease, yielding symptoms indistinguishable from those produced by pathogenic biotypes. Even after decades of isolation of clinical strains, the pathogenic mechanisms of these isolates are still not fully understood. In the present study, 122 Yersinia enterocolitica biotype 1A strains isolated from swine slaughterhouses and meat markets in Sao Paulo, Brazil, were characterized according to the presence of the virulence genes ail, virF, and ystA. A total of 94 strains were positive to at least one virulence gene (77.05%, and 67 were positive to all of them (54.92%. Twenty-two strains were submitted to PFGE genotyping resulting in 22 distinct pulsotypes, varying from 50% to 84% of genetic similarity. Any clustering tendency among pulsotypes related to origin, isolation site, or even virulence profile was not observed. The present study reports an important contamination of the environment in swine slaughterhouses, meat markets, and pork, by potentially virulent Y. enterocolitica biotype 1A.

  5. Diagnosis and genotyping of African swine fever viruses from 2015 outbreaks in Zambia

    Jonas Thoromo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In early 2015, a highly fatal haemorrhagic disease of domestic pigs resembling African swine fever (ASF occurred in North Western, Copperbelt, and Lusaka provinces of Zambia. Molecular diagnosis by polymerase chain reaction targeting specific amplification of p72 (B646L gene of ASF virus (ASFV was conducted. Fourteen out of 16 domestic pigs from the affected provinces were found to be positive for ASFV. Phylogenetic analyses based on part of the p72 and the complete p54 (E183L genes revealed that all the ASFVs detected belonged to genotypes I and Id, respectively. Additionally, epidemiological data suggest that the same ASFV spread from Lusaka to other provinces possibly through uncontrolled and/or illegal pig movements. Although the origin of the ASFV that caused outbreaks in domestic pigs in Zambia could not be ascertained, it appears likely that the virus may have emerged from within the country or region, probably from a sylvatic cycle. It is recommended that surveillance of ASF, strict biosecurity, and quarantine measures be imposed in order to prevent further spread and emergence of new ASF outbreaks in Zambia.Keywords: African swine fever; Asfarviridae; Molecular epidemiology; Zambia

  6. Simulating the epidemiological and economic effects of an African swine fever epidemic in industrialized swine populations

    Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq; Bøtner, Anette; Mortensen, Sten;

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a notifiable infectious disease with a considerable impact on animal health and is currently one of the most important emerging diseases of domestic pigs. ASF was introduced into Georgia in 2007 and subsequently spread to the Russian Federation and several Eastern...... European countries. Consequently, there is a non-negligible risk of ASF spread towards Western Europe. Therefore it is important to develop tools to improve our understanding of the spread and control of ASF for contingency planning. A stochastic and dynamic spatial spread model (DTU-DADS) was adjusted...

  7. Antibodies against avian-like A (H1N1) swine influenza virus among swine farm residents in eastern China.

    Yin, Xiuchen; Yin, Xin; Rao, Baizhong; Xie, Chunfang; Zhang, Pengchao; Qi, Xian; Wei, Ping; Liu, Huili

    2014-04-01

    In 2007, the avian-like H1N1 virus (A/swine/Zhejiang/1/07) was first isolated in pigs in China. Recently, it was reported that a 3-year-old boy was infected with avian-like A (H1N1) swine influenza virus (SIV) in Jiangsu Province, China. To investigate the prevalence of avian-like A (H1N1) SIV infection among swine farm residents in eastern China, an active influenza surveillance program was conducted on swine farms in this region from May 21, 2010 through April 22, 2012. A total of 1,162 participants were enrolled, including 1,136 persons from 48 pig farms, as well as 26 pig farm veterinarians. A total of 10.7% and 7.8% swine farm residents were positive for antibodies against avian-like A (H1N1) SIV by HI and NT assay, respectively, using 40 as the cut-off antibody titer. Meanwhile, all the serum samples collected from a control of healthy city residents were negative against avian-like A (H1N1) SIV. As the difference in numbers of antibody positive samples between the swine farm residents and health city residents controls was statistically significant (P = 0.002), these data suggest that occupational exposure to pigs may increase swine farm residents' and veterinarians' risk of avian-like A (H1N1) SIV infection in eastern China. This study provides the first data on avian-like A (H1N1) SIV infections in humans in China; the potential for avian-like A (H1N1) SIV entering the human population should also be taken into consideration.

  8. Novel reassortant swine influenza viruses are circulating in Danish pigs

    Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Trebbien, Ramona;

    of the reassortant viruses comprised a HA gene similar to H1 of H1N1 avian-like swine influenza virus (SIV) and a NA gene most closely related to N2 gene of human H3N2 influenza virus that circulated in humans in the mid 1990s. The internal genes of this reassortant virus with the subtype H1avN2hu all belonged......The Danish surveillance program for influenza A virus in pigs has revealed that two novel reassortant swine influenza viruses may now be circulating in the Danish swine population, since they each have been detected in at least two submissions from different herds in 2011 as well as in 2012. One...... to the H1N1 avian-like SIV lineages. Until now this novel virus H1avN2hu has only been detected in Danish swine. The other novel reassortant virus contained the HA gene from H1N1pdm09 virus and a NA gene similar to the N2 gene of H3N2 SIV that have been circulating in European swine since the mid 1980s...

  9. Passive immunization with a polyclonal antiserum to the hemoglobin receptor of Haemophilus ducreyi confers protection against a homologous challenge in the experimental swine model of chancroid.

    Leduc, Isabelle; Fusco, William G; Choudhary, Neelima; Routh, Patty A; Cholon, Deborah M; Hobbs, Marcia M; Almond, Glen W; Orndorff, Paul E; Elkins, Christopher

    2011-08-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of chancroid, has an obligate requirement for heme. Heme is acquired by H. ducreyi from its human host via TonB-dependent transporters expressed at its bacterial surface. Of 3 TonB-dependent transporters encoded in the genome of H. ducreyi, only the hemoglobin receptor, HgbA, is required to establish infection during the early stages of the experimental human model of chancroid. Active immunization with a native preparation of HgbA (nHgbA) confers complete protection in the experimental swine model of chancroid, using either Freund's or monophosphoryl lipid A as adjuvants. To determine if transfer of anti-nHgbA serum is sufficient to confer protection, a passive immunization experiment using pooled nHgbA antiserum was conducted in the experimental swine model of chancroid. Pigs receiving this pooled nHgbA antiserum were protected from a homologous, but not a heterologous, challenge. Passively transferred polyclonal antibodies elicited to nHgbA bound the surface of H. ducreyi and partially blocked hemoglobin binding by nHgbA, but were not bactericidal. Taken together, these data suggest that the humoral immune response to the HgbA vaccine is protective against an H. ducreyi infection, possibly by preventing acquisition of the essential nutrient heme.

  10. Advax, a Delta Inulin Microparticle, Potentiates In-built Adjuvant Property of Co-administered Vaccines

    Masayuki Hayashi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Advax, a delta inulin-derived microparticle, has been developed as an adjuvant for several vaccines. However, its immunological characteristics and potential mechanism of action are yet to be elucidated. Here, we show that Advax behaves as a type-2 adjuvant when combined with influenza split vaccine, a T helper (Th2-type antigen, but behaves as a type-1 adjuvant when combined with influenza inactivated whole virion (WV, a Th1-type antigen. In addition, an adjuvant effect was not observed when Advax-adjuvanted WV vaccine was used to immunize toll-like receptor (TLR 7 knockout mice which are unable to respond to RNA contained in WV antigen. Similarly, no adjuvant effect was seen when Advax was combined with endotoxin-free ovalbumin, a neutral Th0-type antigen. An adjuvant effect was also not seen in tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α knockout mice, and the adjuvant effect required the presences of dendritic cells (DCs and phagocytic macrophages. Therefore, unlike other adjuvants, Advax potentiates the intrinsic or in-built adjuvant property of co-administered antigens. Hence, Advax is a unique class of adjuvant which can potentiate the intrinsic adjuvant feature of the vaccine antigens through a yet to be determined mechanism.

  11. Advax, a Delta Inulin Microparticle, Potentiates In-built Adjuvant Property of Co-administered Vaccines.

    Hayashi, Masayuki; Aoshi, Taiki; Haseda, Yasunari; Kobiyama, Kouji; Wijaya, Edward; Nakatsu, Noriyuki; Igarashi, Yoshinobu; Standley, Daron M; Yamada, Hiroshi; Honda-Okubo, Yoshikazu; Hara, Hiromitsu; Saito, Takashi; Takai, Toshiyuki; Coban, Cevayir; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Ishii, Ken J

    2017-02-01

    Advax, a delta inulin-derived microparticle, has been developed as an adjuvant for several vaccines. However, its immunological characteristics and potential mechanism of action are yet to be elucidated. Here, we show that Advax behaves as a type-2 adjuvant when combined with influenza split vaccine, a T helper (Th)2-type antigen, but behaves as a type-1 adjuvant when combined with influenza inactivated whole virion (WV), a Th1-type antigen. In addition, an adjuvant effect was not observed when Advax-adjuvanted WV vaccine was used to immunize toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 knockout mice which are unable to respond to RNA contained in WV antigen. Similarly, no adjuvant effect was seen when Advax was combined with endotoxin-free ovalbumin, a neutral Th0-type antigen. An adjuvant effect was also not seen in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α knockout mice, and the adjuvant effect required the presences of dendritic cells (DCs) and phagocytic macrophages. Therefore, unlike other adjuvants, Advax potentiates the intrinsic or in-built adjuvant property of co-administered antigens. Hence, Advax is a unique class of adjuvant which can potentiate the intrinsic adjuvant feature of the vaccine antigens through a yet to be determined mechanism.

  12. 75 FR 66766 - NIAID Blue Ribbon Panel Meeting on Adjuvant Discovery and Development

    2010-10-29

    ... discovery, development and clinical evaluation of adjuvants for use with preventive vaccines. NIAID has developed a draft Strategic Plan and Research Agenda for Adjuvant Discovery and Development, which... HUMAN SERVICES NIAID Blue Ribbon Panel Meeting on Adjuvant Discovery and Development Notice is...

  13. Adjuvant chemotherapy compliance is not superior after thoracoscopic lobectomy

    Licht, Peter B; Schytte, Tine; Jakobsen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is generally assumed that patient compliance with adjuvant chemotherapy is superior after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery compared with open lobectomy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The level of evidence for this assumption, however, is limited to single-institution, ......BACKGROUND: It is generally assumed that patient compliance with adjuvant chemotherapy is superior after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery compared with open lobectomy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The level of evidence for this assumption, however, is limited to single...... histopathology. A clinical oncologist, who was blinded to the surgical approach, reviewed all medical oncology charts for types of adjuvant chemotherapy, reasons for not initiating or stopping treatment, number of cycles delivered, and time interval from surgery to initial chemotherapy. RESULTS: During a 6-year...... adjuvant chemotherapy and 121 (38.7%) completed all four cycles. Ordinal logistic regression revealed that chemotherapy compliance (none, partial, and full chemotherapy) was significantly reduced by the patient's age (p

  14. Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer operated for cure

    Petersen, Sune Høirup; Harling, Henrik; Kirkeby, Lene Tschemerinsky

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in the Western world. Apart from surgery - which remains the mainstay of treatment for resectable primary tumours - postoperative (i.e., adjuvant) chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based regimens is now the standard treatment...

  15. Persistent neurocognitive problems after adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer

    Kreukels, B.P.C.; van Dam, F.S.A.M.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Boogerd, W.; Schagen, S.B.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Neurocognitive problems have been observed in a number of women previously treated with adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. The present study aims to combine the results of neuropsychological and electrophysiological techniques collected in patients with breast cancer treated with c

  16. Lipopolysaccharide contamination in intradermal DNA vaccination : toxic impurity or adjuvant?

    Berg, J.H. van den; Quaak, S.G.L.; Beijnen, J.H.; Hennink, W.E.; Storm, G.; Schumacher, T.N.; Haanen, J.B.A.G.; Nuijen, B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are known both as potential adjuvants for vaccines and as toxic impurity in pharmaceutical preparations. The aim of this study was to assess the role of LPS in intradermal DNA vaccination administered by DNA tattooing. Method: Micewere vaccinated with a model DNA v

  17. Effects of 5-fluorouracil adjuvant treatment of colon cancer

    Kelder, Wendy; Hospers, Geke A. P.; Plukker, John T. M.

    2006-01-01

    Since the late 1980s and early 1990s, 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy has been the standard adjuvant treatment for Stage III colon cancer. After the initial introduction of 5-fluorouracil in standard treatment protocols, several changes have been made based on results of randomized studies on vari

  18. Evaluation of adjuvant effects of fucoidan for improving vaccine efficacy.

    Kim, Su-Yeon; Joo, Hong-Gu

    2015-01-01

    Fucoidan is a sulfated polysaccharide derived from brown seaweed, including Fucus vesiculosus. This compound is known to have immunostimulatory effects on various types of immune cells including macrophages and dendritic cells. A recent study described the application of fucoidan as a vaccine adjuvant. Vaccination is regarded as the most efficient prophylactic method for preventing harmful or epidemic diseases. To increase vaccine efficacy, effective adjuvants are needed. In the present study, we determined whether fucoidan can function as an adjuvant using vaccine antigens. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that fucoidan increases the expression of the activation markers major histocompatibility complex class II, cluster of differentiation (CD)25, and CD69 in spleen cells. In combination with Bordetella bronchiseptica antigen, fucoidan increased the viability and tumor necrosis factor-α production of spleen cells. Furthermore, fucoidan increased the in vivo production of antigen-specific antibodies in mice inoculated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigen. Overall, this study has provided valuable information about the use of fucoidan as a vaccine adjuvant.

  19. Fc receptors do not mediate African swine fever virus replication in macrophages

    Alcami, A.; Vinuela, E. (Centro de Biologia Molecular, Universidad Autonoma, Madrid (Spain))

    1991-04-01

    Titration experiments in swine macrophages have shown that African swine fever virus infectivity was not enhanced in the presence of antiviral antibodies. The early viral protein synthesis and the viral DNA replication in swine macrophages infected with virus-antibody complexes were inhibited in the presence of high doses of uv-inactivated virus, which saturated specific virus receptors, but not when Fc receptors were saturated with antibodies. These results indicate that African swine fever virus does not infect swine macrophages through Fc receptors and that the normal entry pathway through virus receptors is not bypassed by the virus-antibody complexes.

  20. Influence of polymer hydrolysis on adjuvant effect of Gantrez®AN nanoparticles: implications for oral vaccination.

    Vandamme, Katrien; Melkebeek, Vesna; Cox, Eric; Adriaensens, Peter; Van Vlierberghe, Sandra; Dubruel, Peter; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul

    2011-10-01

    The adjuvant effect of methylvinylether-co-maleic anhydride (Gantrez®AN) nanoparticles was investigated during oral vaccination of mice with F4 adhesins of F4-positive Escherichia coli. To differentiate whether the adjuvant effect originated from a nanoparticle effect or a polymer effect, 20 μg F4 was administered as slightly crosslinked F4-containing nanoparticles (g(F4)(0.01)) or as F4 mixed with slightly crosslinked pure nanoparticles (F4+g(0.01)). The F4-specific immune response was reduced using F4-containing nanoparticles due to complete shielding of F4, whereas oral administration of F4+g(0.01) increased the level of F4-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASC) in the spleen. When repeating the vaccination study after 6months using freshly prepared nanoparticles, the adjuvant effect of F4+g(0.01) was lost due to an altered polymer reactivity caused by partial hydrolysis of anhydride groups of Gantrez®AN. Combining F4 with nanoparticles stabilised with a higher crosslinker amount during nanoparticle synthesis (F4+g(0.22)) could overcome the effect of partial polymer hydrolysis, as higher levels of ASC were detected. Hence, an in-depth characterisation of the Gantrez®AN polymer is required as stability issues can alter its biological effect during oral vaccination.

  1. Fate of tetracyclines in swine manure of three selected swine farms in China

    Min Qiao; Wangda Chen; Jianqiang Su; Bing Zhang; Cai Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Veterinary antibiotics can enter the environment due to the common practice of land application of manure from treated animals.The environmental fate of tetracyclines in swine manure after composting and field application remains largely unknown.This study analyzed the concentrations of tetracyclines in manure,manure-based compost and compost amended soil in selected swine farms from Beijing,Jiaxing and Putian,China to determine the dilution effects of antibiotics when released into the soil environment.The results demonstrate that residues of antibiotics were detected in all samples and chlortetracycline as well as its degradation products should be regarded critically concerning their potential ecotoxicity.Application of manure-based compost to soil could reduce the possible risk posed by antibiotic contamination,but the trigger value of 100 μg/kg was still exceeded in soil samples (776.1 μg/kg dw) from Putian City after application of compost.Field studies such as the present one can help to improve the routine administration of antibiotic-containing composted manure.

  2. Intensive swine production and pork safety.

    Davies, Peter R

    2011-02-01

    Major structural changes in livestock production in developed countries, particularly intensive confinement production and increases in herd and flock sizes, have raised several societal concerns about the future directions and implications of livestock food production, including the safety of meat products. This review of the major parasitic and bacterial foodborne pathogens associated with pork production indicates that pork safety in the United States has improved demonstrably over recent decades. Most notably, changes in swine production methods have been associated with virtual elimination of risk of the foodborne parasites Taenia solium, Trichinella spiralis, and Toxoplasma gondii from pigs reared on modern intensive farms. This represents a substantial public health achievement that has gone largely unheralded. Regulatory changes have led to demonstrably lower prevalence of Salmonella on pork carcasses, but control of bacterial foodborne pathogens on farms remains a significant challenge. Available evidence does not support the hypothesis that intensive pork production has increased risk for the major bacterial foodborne pathogens that are common commensals of the pig (Salmonella, Campylobacter, Listeria, and Yersinia enterocolitica), or that pigs produced in alternative systems are at reduced risk of colonization with these organisms. However, pigs raised in outdoor systems inherently confront higher risks of exposure to foodborne parasites, particularly T. gondii.

  3. Demonstrating freedom from disease using multiple complex data sources 2: Case study-Classical swine fever in Denmark

    Martin, P.A.J.; Cameron, A.R.; Barfod, Kristen

    2007-01-01

    A method for quantitative evaluation of surveillance for disease freedom has been presented in the accompanying paper (Martin et al., 2007). This paper presents an application of the methods, using as an example surveillance for classical swine fever (CSF) in Denmark in 2005. A scenario tree model...... is presented for the abattoir-based serology component of the Danish CSF surveillance system, in which blood samples are collected in an ad hoc abattoir sampling process, from adult pigs originating in breeding herds in Denmark. The model incorporates effects of targeting (differential risk of seropositivity...

  4. Adjuvant systemic chemotherapy for stages II and III colon cancer after complete resection: a clinical practice guideline

    Meyers, B.M.; Cosby, R.; Quereshy, F.; Jonker, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Updated practice guidelines on adjuvant chemotherapy for completely resected colon cancer are lacking. In 2008, Cancer Care Ontario’s Program in Evidence-Based Care developed a guideline on adjuvant therapy for stages ii and iii colon cancer. With newer regimens being assessed in this patient population and older agents being either abandoned because of non-effectiveness or replaced by agents that are more efficacious, a full update of the original guideline was undertaken. Methods Literature searches (January 1987 to August 2015) of medline, embase, and the Cochrane Library were conducted; in addition, abstracts from the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the European Society for Medical Oncology, and the European Cancer Congress were reviewed (the latter for January 2007 to August 2015). A practice guideline was drafted that was then scrutinized by internal and external reviewers whose comments were incorporated into the final guideline. Results Twenty-six unique reports of eighteen randomized controlled trials and thirteen unique reports of twelve meta-analyses or pooled analyses were included in the evidence base. The 5 recommendations developed included 3 for stage ii colon cancer and 2 for stage iii colon cancer. Conclusions Patients with completely resected stage iii colon cancer should be offered adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5fu)–based chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin (based on definitive data for improvements in survival and disease-free survival). Patients with resected stage ii colon cancer without “high-risk” features should not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. For patients with “high-risk” features, 5fu-based chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin should be offered, although no clinical trials have been conducted to conclusively demonstrate the same benefits seen in stage iii colon cancer. PMID:28050138

  5. 9 CFR 94.17 - Dry-cured pork products from regions where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine...

    2010-01-01

    ... RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER... where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine fever, classical swine fever, or swine vesicular disease exists. 94.17 Section 94.17 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  6. Lumbricidae as transitory hosts in Metastrongylus infection in swine

    Pavlović Ivan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastrongylidosis or lungworm disease in swine is a disease caused by several types of nematodes of the genus Metastrongylus. Metastrongylidae are biohelminths whose causes use transitory hosts for their development and maintaining their biological cycle, and in this case they are numerous species of Lumbricidae (earthworms. Depending on the geographic environment, numerous representatives of Lumbricidae persist as transitory hosts. In our environment, these are dominant earthworm species of the genus Eisenia spp, Dandreobena spp, Allopbophora spp, Lubricus spp, Octoiasium spp, Bimastus spp, and rarely those from the genus Heledrillus spp. Swine are infected perorally with Metastrongylidae when they ingest infected earthworms.

  7. Isolation and analysis of odorous components in swine manure.

    Yasuhara, A; Fuwa, K

    1983-12-23

    Systematic procedures are described for the isolation and extraction of odorous components in swine faeces, urine and rotten mixtures of swine faeces and urine. Samples were frozen and subjected to vacuum distillation in the frozen state. The distillate was continuously extracted with diethyl ether. The residue was extracted with diethyl ether and the extract was subjected to vacuum distillation. The former extract and the latter distillate were combined and concentrated. Recovery by these procedures was considered. Odorous compounds isolated were analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  8. Persistent Classical Swine Fever infection in newborn piglets

    Uttenthal, Åse; Lohse, Louise; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun

    Pestiviruses are unique in their ability to cause persistent infection (PI) in pigs infected in utero. In cattle, PI calves play an important role in maintenance of bovine viral diarrhoea virus infection in the herd. In pigs, the occurence of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) PI piglets is antic......Pestiviruses are unique in their ability to cause persistent infection (PI) in pigs infected in utero. In cattle, PI calves play an important role in maintenance of bovine viral diarrhoea virus infection in the herd. In pigs, the occurence of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) PI piglets...

  9. Original pedagogues

    Schmidt, Christina Haandbæk

    Original pedagogues Distention between competences and originality By Christina Haandbæk Schmidt, ph. d. student Aarhus University, Denmark This presentation concerns a Ph.D. project (Sept. 2012 –Sept. 2015) about pedagogues in day care facilities and their struggles to develop and retain...... of pedagogues and in everyday life in daycare facilities. The competence term includes at least two discourses of interest; a pedagogical competence discourse and a political jurisdiction discourse which forms a distention between authenticity and competence. In order that pedagogues may regain their autonomy I...

  10. Regeneration of dentin-pulp complex with cementum and periodontal ligament formation using dental bud cells in gelatin-chondroitin-hyaluronan tri-copolymer scaffold in swine.

    Kuo, Tzong-Fu; Huang, An-Ting; Chang, Hao-Hueng; Lin, Feng-Huei; Chen, San-Tai; Chen, Rung-Shu; Chou, Cheng-Hung; Lin, Hsin-Chi; Chiang, Han; Chen, Min-Huey

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this study is to use a tissue engineering approach for tooth regeneration. The swine dental bud cells (DBCs) were isolated from the developing mandibular teeth, expanded in vitro, and cultured onto cylinder scaffold gelatin-chrondroitin-hyaluronan-tri-copolymer (GCHT). After culturing in vitro, the DBCs/GCHT scaffold was autografted back into the original alveolar socket. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining combined with immunohistochemical staining were applied for identification of regenerated tooth structure. After 36-week post-transplantation, tooth-like structures, including well-organized dentin-pulp complex, cementum, and periodontal ligament, were evident in situ in two of six experimental animals. The size of the tooth structure (1 x 0.5 x 0.5 cm(3) and 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 cm(3) size) appeared to be dictated by the size of the GCHT scaffold (1 x 1 x 1.5 cm(3)). The third swine was demonstrated with irregular dentin-bony like calcified tissue about 1 cm in diameter without organized tooth or periodontal ligament formation. The other three swine in the experimental group showed normal bone formation and no tooth regeneration in the transplantation sites. The successful rate of tooth regeneration from DBCs/GCHT scaffolds' was about 33.3%. In the control group, three swine's molar teeth buds were removed without DBCs/GCHT implantation, the other three swine received GCHT scaffold implants without DBCs. After evaluation, no regenerated tooth was found in the transplantation site of the control group. The current results using DBSs/GCHT scaffold autotransplantation suggest a technical breakthrough for tooth regeneration.

  11. Diagnostic value of meat juice in early detection of classical swine fever infection

    Lohse, Louise; Uttenthal, Åse; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun;

    2011-01-01

    before real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed. Viral RNA was detected in meat juice, but at a lower level than in corresponding serum. Sensitivity was calculated to 91% and specificity to 97%. Disagreements between meat juice and serum results were found when......To evaluate the diagnostic potential of meat juice for early detection of Classical swine fever virus (CSFV), meat juice and serum samples from pigs experimentally infected with different strains of CSFV were compared for virus load. From all samples, viral RNA was extracted by automated procedure...... samples originated from pigs infected with low virulence CSFV strains and/or when samples were collected within the first days after infection. In conclusion, while not the first choice for sample material for CSFV diagnosis, meat juice may constitute a useful alternative for herd-based studies or when...

  12. Original Copies

    Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2013-01-01

    of similarity by looking at artefactual similarity as the results of prototyping and as a production of simulacra. In this light, the concept of copying turns out to be more than simply a matter of trying to imitate an exotic or prestigious original, and it fundamentally raises the question how different a copy...

  13. MEDIAMUSIC ORIGINS

    Chernyshov Alexander V.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the origins of music in electronic regular broadcasting, which conditions have appeared in the XIX century. They stand out in the "telephone concerts", "phonograph concerts" and the proto-sound films (T.Edison, W.Dickson, Ch.Pathé, O.Messter. In the early twentieth century, a clear prototype of mediamusic playing by the music of "silent" films, which has been divided on the on-screen and offscreen sound layers, the method of compilation, the basics of synchronization between musical sound and off-music montage-structures. In addition, the origins of music of electronic mass media can be regarded as attempts to understand the "musical" noise features, which subsequently materialize in the phenomenon of "noisemusic" of media audio-score (L.Russolo, Ars.Avraamov, D.Vertov, W.Ruttmann, N.Voinov, P.Schaeffer. Are considered Russian, European and North American experiences.

  14. Mitochondrial origins.

    Yang, D.; Oyaizu, Y; Oyaizu, H; Olsen, G J; Woese, C R

    1985-01-01

    The 16S ribosomal RNA sequences from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Pseudomonas testosteroni have been determined to further delimit the origin of the endosymbiont that gave rise to the mitochondrion. These two prokaryotes represent the alpha and beta subdivisions, respectively, of the so-called purple bacteria. The endosymbiont that gave rise to the mitochondrion belonged to the alpha subdivision, a group that also contains the rhizobacteria, the agrobacteria, and the rickettsias--all prokary...

  15. Presence of gastrointestinal parasites in swine and human of four swine production farms in Cundinamarca- Colombia

    María F Mendoza-Gómez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Determine the presence and the type of endoparasites with zoonotic potential in swine and human of two technified and two semi-technified farms in the department of Cundinamarca, Colombia. Materials and methods. Three serial samplings of feces were taken in a pen row within intervals of 15 days, in two technified and two semi-technified farms in different age groups distributed as follows: pregnant-sows, nursing-females, boars, weaners, suckling-piglets, and growing-pig. By means of informed consent thirty-three people agreed to enter the study. Thirty-three samples from men and women of different ages were received. The pool and individual samples of fecal were evaluated by direct analysis, qualitative flotation and sedimentation techniques and modified ZiehlNeelsen stain. Results. For the porcine population, on the average, the results obtained from both technified farms showed that Balantidium coli (42%, Endolimax nana (21.9% and Iodamoeba bütschlii (7.8% were the most common parasites. In semi-technified farms they were: Entamoeba coli (40%, Endolimax nana (35%, Iodamoeba bütschlii (25% and Balantidium coli (5%. By means of the test chi2 it is possible to conclude that there is a significant difference between the parasites species and the type of farm. The results obtained in human showed the presence of parasites as: E. coli (42.2%, Entamoeba hystolitica/dispar (12.1%, E. nana (9.1%, B. coli (9.1%, I. bütschlii (3.0% and Blastocystis hominis (3.0%. Conclusions. The presence of parasites such as Balantidium coli, Endolimax nana, Iodamoeba bütschlii and Entamoeba coli in swine and human suggests a possible rotation of parasitic species between hosts.

  16. Detection of a Novel Porcine Parvovirus in Chinese Swine Herds

    To determine whether the recently reported novel porcine parvovirus type 4 (PPV4) is prevalent in China, a set of PPV4 specific primers were designed and used for the molecular survey of PPV4 among clinical samples. The results indicated a positive detection for PPV4 in Chinese swine herds of 1.84% ...

  17. 9 CFR 113.44 - Swine safety test.

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Swine safety test. 113.44 Section 113.44 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS...

  18. Composting swine slurry to reduce indicators and antibiotic resistance genes

    Over the last twenty years there have been considerable increases in the incidence of human infections with bacteria that are resistant to commonly used antibiotics. This has precipitated concerns about the use of antibiotics in livestock production. Composting of swine manure has several advantages...

  19. SWINE FLU”: THE RETURN OF PANDEMIC

    Phalke VD

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Influenza – A (H1N1 is a new influenza virus causing illness in people. First detected in Mexico in April, 2009, it has spread to many countries in the World. WHO declared the outbreak of swine flu had become a pandemic. The current WHO phase of pandemic alert is Phase 6. Influenza A virus strains caused three major global epidemics during the 20th century: the Spanish flu in 1918, Asian flu in 1957 and Hong Kong flu in 1968–69. These pandemics were caused by strains of Influenza A virus that had undergonemajor genetic changes and for which the population did not have significant immunity. Current strain is transmitted amongst people and not from swine. Swine flu is basically a misnomer. Present article reviews historical context, mode of transmission, symptoms, expected severity & prevention and control measures of swine flu. Because it’s a new virus, no one will have immunity to it and everyone could be at risk.Public awareness about the disease & good hygiene practices are essential.

  20. Quantification of airborne African Swine Fever virus after experimental infection

    Carvalho Ferreira, de H.C.; Weesendorp, E.; Quak, S.; Stegeman, J.A.; Loeffen, W.L.A.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge on African Swine Fever (ASF) transmission routes can be useful when designing control measures against the spread of ASF virus (ASFV). Few studies have focused on the airborne transmission route, and until now no data has been available on quantities of ASF virus (ASFV) in the air. Our aim

  1. Comparative prevalence of immune evasion complex genes associated with beta-hemolysin converting bacteriophages in MRSA ST5 isolates from swine, swine facilities, humans with swine contact, and humans with no swine contact

    Livestock associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) draws concern from the public health community because in some countries these organisms may represent the largest reservoir of MRSA outside hospital settings. Recent studies indicate LA-MRSA strains from swine are more genet...

  2. Solids and nutrient removal from flushed swine manure using polyacrylamide

    Perez Sangrador, M. P.; Garcia Gonzalez, M. C.; Leon Cofreces, M. C.; Acitores Benavente, M.

    2009-07-01

    Most of the organic nutrient elements (nitrogen and phosphorus) and carbon compounds (COD) in liquid swine manure are contained in fine suspended particles. Flocculation treatment with polyacrylamide (PAM) followed by screening if on the best methods to separate the liquid fraction.

  3. Excluding feral swine, javelina and raccoons from deer bait stations

    Here we present a design and construction procedure for a physical and electric barrier fence to prevent feral swine (Sus scrofa), javelina (Pecari tajacu), raccoons (Procyon lotor), and perhaps other non-target animals from accessing or damaging bait stations designed to administer acaricide treatm...

  4. Pathogenesis, diagnosis and epizootiology of swine vesicular disease

    Dekker, Aaldert

    2000-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was initiated after the outbreaks of swine vesicular disease (SVD) in the Netherlands in 1992. The thesis starts with a general introduction on SVD and the virus causing SVD. Infection with SVD virus had been absent from the Netherlands for 17 years, and before 1992

  5. Comparative analysis of African swine fever virus genotypes and serogroups.

    Malogolovkin, Alexander; Burmakina, Galina; Titov, Ilya; Sereda, Alexey; Gogin, Andrey; Baryshnikova, Elena; Kolbasov, Denis

    2015-02-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes highly lethal hemorrhagic disease among pigs, and ASFV's extreme antigenic diversity hinders vaccine development. We show that p72 ASFV phylogenetic analysis does not accurately define ASFV hemadsorption inhibition assay serogroups. Thus, conventional ASFV genotyping cannot discriminate between viruses of different virulence or predict efficacy of a specific ASFV vaccine.

  6. Vaccinology of classical swine fever: from lab to field

    Oirschot, van J.T.

    2003-01-01

    There are two types of classical swine fever vaccines available: the classical live and the recently developed E2 subunit vaccines. The live Chinese strain vaccine is the most widely used. After a single vaccination, it confers solid immunity within a few days that appears to persist lifelong. The E

  7. Composting swine manure from high rise finishing facilities

    Over the last twenty years there have been considerable increases in the incidence of human infections with bacteria that are resistant to commonly used antibiotics. This has precipitated concerns about the use of antibiotics in livestock production. Composting of swine manure has several advantages...

  8. Modulation of Translation Initiation Efficiency in Classical Swine Fever Virus

    Friis, Martin Barfred; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Belsham, Graham J.

    Modulation of translation initiation efficiency on classical swine fever virus (CSFV) RNA can be achieved by targeted mutations within the internal ribosome entry site (IRES). In this study, the nucleotides 47 to 427, including the IRES region of the wt CSFV strain Paderborn, were amplified...

  9. Reconstructing the highly virulent Classical Swine Fever Virus strain Koslov

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Nielsen, Jens

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) may be highly virulent in pigs with a mortality rate close to 100%. The CSFV “Koslov strain” is known to be one of the most virulent CSFV, but so far a functional cloned cDNA of this strain has not been described. We suggest that this may be due to the error...

  10. Modulation of Translation Initiation Efficiency in Classical Swine Fever Virus

    Friis, Martin Barfred; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Belsham, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Modulation of translation initiation efficiency on classical swine fever virus (CSFV) RNA can be achieved by targeted mutations within the internal ribosome entry site (IRES). In this study, cDNAs corresponding to the wild type (wt) or mutant forms of the IRES of CSFV strain Paderborn were...

  11. Interaction of classical swine fever virus with dendritic cells

    Carrasco, C.P.; Rigden, R.C.; Vincent, I.E.; Balmelli, C.; Ceppi, M.; Bauhofer, O.; Tache, V.; Hjertner, B.; McNeilly, F.; Gennip, van H.G.P.; McCullough, K.C.; Summerfield, A.

    2004-01-01

    Functional disruption of dendritic cells (DCs) is an important strategy for viral pathogens to evade host defences. Monocytotropic viruses such as classical swine fever virus (CSFV) could employ such a mechanism, since the virus can suppress immune responses and induce apoptosis without infecting ly

  12. Anaerobic digestion of swine manure: Inhibition by ammonia

    Hansen, Kaare Hvid; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1998-01-01

    A stable anaerobic degradation of swine manure with ammonia concentration of 6 g-N/litre was obtained in continuously stirred tank reactors with a hydraulic retention time of 15 days, at Four different temperatures. Methane yields of 188, 141, 67 and 22 ml-CH4/g-VS were obtained at 37, 45, 55...

  13. Assessment of classical swine fever diagnostics and vaccine performance

    Loeffen, W.L.A.

    2006-01-01

    Rapid and accurate diagnosis is of the utmost importance in the control of epizootic diseases such as classical swine fever (CSF), and efficacious vaccination can be used as a supporting tool. While most of the recently developed CSF vaccines and diagnostic kits are mostly validated according to Wor

  14. Epidemiology, geographical distribution, and economic consequences of swine zoonoses: a narrative review.

    Uddin Khan, Salah; Atanasova, Kalina R; Krueger, Whitney S; Ramirez, Alejandro; Gray, Gregory C

    2013-12-01

    We sought to review the epidemiology, international geographical distribution, and economic consequences of selected swine zoonoses. We performed literature searches in two stages. First, we identified the zoonotic pathogens associated with swine. Second, we identified specific swine-associated zoonotic pathogen reports for those pathogens from January 1980 to October 2012. Swine-associated emerging diseases were more prevalent in the countries of North America, South America, and Europe. Multiple factors were associated with the increase of swine zoonoses in humans including: the density of pigs, poor water sources and environmental conditions for swine husbandry, the transmissibility of the pathogen, occupational exposure to pigs, poor human sanitation, and personal hygiene. Swine zoonoses often lead to severe economic consequences related to the threat of novel pathogens to humans, drop in public demand for pork, forced culling of swine herds, and international trade sanctions. Due to the complexity of swine-associated pathogen ecology, designing effective interventions for early detection of disease, their prevention, and mitigation requires an interdisciplinary collaborative "One Health" approach from veterinarians, environmental and public health professionals, and the swine industry.

  15. Adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy for gastric carcinoma with poor prognostic signs.

    Slot, A; Meerwaldt, J H; van Putten, W L; Treurniet-Donker, A D

    1989-12-01

    Fifty-seven patients with poor prognostic factors following resection with curative intent for gastric adenocarcinoma (T3 or T4, positive lymph nodes, positive resection line) received adjuvant radiotherapy. A dose of 30.0-50.0 Gy was given in 10-25 fractions in one course or with a split of 2 weeks after 15 fractions. This was combined with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (375 mg/m2) given i.v. as a bolus during the first 4 days of radiation (n = 49). The 5-year survival was 26%; this rate is higher than the figures mentioned in the literature after surgery alone. The only way to prove the role of adjuvant radiotherapy for gastric carcinoma is a prospective randomized trial.

  16. Adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy for gastric carcinoma with poor prognostic signs

    Slot, A.; Meerwaldt, J.H.; Treurniet-Donker, A.D. (Dr. Daniel Den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotteram (Netherlands). Department of Radiotherapy); Putten, W.L.J. van (Dr. Daniel Den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands). Department of Statistics)

    1989-12-01

    Fifty-seven patients with poor prognostic factors following resection with curative intent for gastric adenocarcinoma T{sub 3} or T{sub 4}, positive lymph nodes, positive resection line received adjuvant radiotherapy. A dose of 30.0-50.0 Gy was given in 10-25 fraction in one course or with a split of 2 weeks after 15 fractions. This was combined with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (375 mg/m{sup 2}) given i.v. as a bolus during the first 4 days of radiation (n = 49). The 5-year survival was 26%; this rate is higher than the figures mentioned in the literature after surgery alone. The only way to prove the role of adjuvant radiotherapy for gastric carcinoma is a prospective randomized trial. (author). 11 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Evaluation of mucoadhesive carrier adjuvant: toward an oral anthrax vaccine.

    Mangal, Sharad; Pawar, Dilip; Agrawal, Udita; Jain, Arvind K; Vyas, Suresh P

    2014-02-01

    The aim of present study was to evaluate the potential of mucoadhesive alginate-coated chitosan microparticles (A-CHMp) for oral vaccine against anthrax. The zeta potential of A-CHMp was -29.7 mV, and alginate coating could prevent the burst release of antigen in simulated gastric fluid. The results indicated that A-CHMp was mucoadhesive in nature and transported it to the peyer's patch upon oral delivery. The immunization studies indicated that A-CHMp resulted in the induction of potent systemic and mucosal immune responses, whereas alum-adjuvanted rPA could induce only systemic immune response. Thus, A-CHMp represents a promising acid carrier adjuvant for oral immunization against anthrax.

  18. Plant Viruses as Nanoparticle-Based Vaccines and Adjuvants

    Marie-Ève Lebel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines are considered one of the greatest medical achievements in the battle against infectious diseases. However, the intractability of various diseases such as hepatitis C, HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and cancer poses persistent hurdles given that traditional vaccine-development methods have proven to be ineffective; as such, these challenges have driven the emergence of novel vaccine design approaches. In this regard, much effort has been put into the development of new safe adjuvants and vaccine platforms. Of particular interest, the utilization of plant virus-like nanoparticles and recombinant plant viruses has gained increasing significance as an effective tool in the development of novel vaccines against infectious diseases and cancer. The present review summarizes recent advances in the use of plant viruses as nanoparticle-based vaccines and adjuvants and their mechanism of action. Harnessing plant-virus immunogenic properties will enable the design of novel, safe, and efficacious prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against disease.

  19. Antifungal adjuvants: Preserving and extending the antifungal arsenal.

    Butts, Arielle; Palmer, Glen E; Rogers, P David

    2017-02-17

    As the rates of systemic fungal infections continue to rise and antifungal drug resistance becomes more prevalent, there is an urgent need for new therapeutic options. This issue is exacerbated by the limited number of systemic antifungal drug classes. However, the discovery, development, and approval of novel antifungals is an extensive process that often takes decades. For this reason, there is growing interest and research into the possibility of combining existing therapies with various adjuvants that either enhance activity or overcome existing mechanisms of resistance. Reports of antifungal adjuvants range from plant extracts to repurposed compounds, to synthetic peptides. This approach would potentially prolong the utility of currently approved antifungals and mitigate the ongoing development of resistance.

  20. Comparative Prevalence of Immune Evasion Complex Genes Associated with β-Hemolysin Converting Bacteriophages in MRSA ST5 Isolates from Swine, Swine Facilities, Humans with Swine Contact, and Humans with No Swine Contact.

    Samantha J Hau

    Full Text Available Livestock associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA draws concern from the public health community because in some countries these organisms may represent the largest reservoir of MRSA outside hospital settings. Recent studies indicate LA-MRSA strains from swine are more genetically diverse than the first reported sequence type ST398. In the US, a diverse population of LA-MRSA is found including organisms of the ST398, ST9, and ST5 lineages. Occurrence of ST5 MRSA in swine is of particular concern since ST5 is among the most prevalent lineages causing clinical infections in humans. The prominence of ST5 in clinical disease is believed to result from acquisition of bacteriophages containing virulence or host-adapted genes including the immune-evasion cluster (IEC genes carried by β-hemolysin converting bacteriophages, whose absence in LA-MRSA ST398 is thought to contribute to reduced rates of human infection and transmission associated with this lineage. The goal of this study was to investigate the prevalence of IEC genes associated with β-hemolysin converting bacteriophages in MRSA ST5 isolates obtained from agricultural sources, including swine, swine facilities, and humans with short- or long-term swine exposure. To gain a broader perspective, the prevalence of these genes in LA-MRSA ST5 strains was compared to the prevalence in clinical MRSA ST5 strains from humans with no known exposure to swine. IEC genes were not present in any of the tested MRSA ST5 strains from agricultural sources and the β-hemolysin gene was intact in these strains, indicating the bacteriophage's absence. In contrast, the prevalence of the β-hemolysin converting bacteriophage in MRSA ST5 strains from humans with no exposure to swine was 90.4%. The absence of β-hemolysin converting bacteriophage in LA-MRSA ST5 isolates is consistent with previous reports evaluating ST398 strains and provides genetic evidence indicating LA-MRSA ST5 isolates

  1. Tocotrienols are good adjuvants for developing cancer vaccines

    Radhakrishnan Ammu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs have the potential for cancer immunotherapy due to their ability to process and present antigens to T-cells and also in stimulating immune responses. However, DC-based vaccines have only exhibited minimal effectiveness against established tumours in mice and humans. The use of appropriate adjuvant enhances the efficacy of DC based cancer vaccines in treating tumours. Methods In this study we have used tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF, a non-toxic natural compound, as an adjuvant to enhance the effectiveness of DC vaccines in treating mouse mammary cancers. In the mouse model, six-week-old female BALB/c mice were injected subcutaneously with DC and supplemented with oral TRF daily (DC+TRF and DC pulsed with tumour lysate from 4T1 cells (DC+TL. Experimental mice were also injected with DC pulsed with tumour lysate and supplemented daily with oral TRF (DC+TL+TRF while two groups of animal which were supplemented daily with carrier oil (control and with TRF (TRF. After three times vaccination, mice were inoculated with 4T1 cells in the mammary breast pad to induce tumour. Results Our study showed that TRF in combination with DC pulsed with tumour lysate (DC+TL+TRF injected subcutaneously significantly inhibited the growth of 4T1 mammary tumour cells as compared to control group. Analysis of cytokines production from murine splenocytes showed significant increased productions of IFN-γ and IL-12 in experimental mice (DC+TL+TRF compared to control, mice injected with DC without TRF, mice injected with DC pulsed with tumour lysate and mice supplemented with TRF alone. Higher numbers of cytotoxic T cells (CD8 and natural killer cells (NK were observed in the peripheral blood of TRF adjuvanted DC pulsed tumour lysate mice. Conclusion Our study show that TRF has the potential to be an adjuvant to augment DC based immunotherapy.

  2. Hypothesis: Silver Nanoparticles as an Adjuvant for Cancertherapy

    Ramin Mohammadzadeh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic agents are a main part of therapeutic process against the observed tumors, which lead to some unwished damages, due to drug uptake by normal body cells causing various tissue/organ failures associated with formal administration manners. But nowadays the risk is reduced by new target therapy techniques, of which the observed physical nature of micelles and nanosilver particles, governing their special behavior, could help using micelle-coated silver nanoparticles as a novel adjuvant for cancer target therapy.

  3. Adjuvant properties of a simplified C32 monomycolyl glycerol analogue.

    Bhowruth, Veemal; Minnikin, David E; Agger, Else Marie; Andersen, Peter; Bramwell, Vincent W; Perrie, Yvonne; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2009-04-01

    A simplified C(32) monomycolyl glycerol (MMG) analogue demonstrated enhanced immunostimulatory activity in a dioctadecyl ammonium bromide (DDA)/Ag85B-ESAT-6 formulation. Elevated levels of IFN-gamma and IL-6 were produced in spleen cells from mice immunised with a C(32) MMG analogue comparable activity to the potent Th1 adjuvant, trehalose 6,6'-di-behenate (TDB).

  4. Preparation and evaluation of functional foods in adjuvant arthritis

    2012-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis is an animal model that closely resembles rheumatoid arthritis in humans. It is a successful working model used to study new anti-inflammatory agents. In previous studies (animal and clinical) we have shown that evening primrose oil, fish oil and the methanol extract of date fruits and fenugreek seeds have anti-inflammatory activity and that the methanol extract of dates has an antioxidant effect. Based on these studies, the aim of the present study was to prepare 7 functio...

  5. Freund's vaccine adjuvant promotes Her2/Neu breast cancer

    Woditschka Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation has been linked to the etiology of many organ-specific cancers. Indirect evidence suggests a possible role for inflammation in breast cancer. We investigated whether the systemic inflammation induced by Freund's adjuvant (FA promotes mammary carcinogenesis in a rat model in which cancer is induced by the neu oncogene. Methods The effects of FA on hyperplastic mammary lesions and mammary carcinomas were determined in a neu-induced rat model. The inflammatory response to FA treatment was gauged by measuring acute phase serum haptoglobin. In addition, changes in cell proliferation and apoptosis following FA treatment were assessed. Results Rats receiving FA developed twice the number of mammary carcinomas as controls. Systemic inflammation following FA treatment is chronic, as shown by a doubling of the levels of the serum biomarker, haptoglobin, 15 days following initial treatment. We also show that this systemic inflammation is associated with the increased growth of hyperplastic mammary lesions. This increased growth results from a higher rate of cellular proliferation in the absence of changes in apoptosis. Conclusion Our data suggests that systemic inflammation induced by Freund's adjuvant (FA promotes mammary carcinogenesis. It will be important to determine whether adjuvants currently used in human vaccines also promote breast cancer.

  6. [Development of Nucleic Acid-Based Adjuvant for Cancer Immunotherapy].

    Kobiyama, Kouji; Ishii, Ken J

    2015-09-01

    Since the discovery of the human T cell-defined tumor antigen, the cancer immunotherapy field has rapidly progressed, with the research and development of cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccines, being conducted actively. However, the disadvantages of most cancer vaccines include relatively weak immunogenicity and immune escape or exhaustion. Adjuvants with innate immunostimulatory activities have been used to overcome these issues, and these agents have been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines and to act as mono-therapeutic anti-tumor agents. CpG ODN, an agonist for TLR9, is one of the promising nucleic acid-based adjuvants, and it is a potent inducer of innate immune effector functions. CpG ODN suppresses tumor growth in the absence of tumor antigens and peptide administration. Therefore, CpG ODN is expected to be useful as a cancer vaccine adjuvant as well as a cancer immunotherapy agent. In this review, we discuss the potential therapeutic applications and mechanisms of CpG ODN for cancer immunotherapy.

  7. Cyclic GMP-AMP displays mucosal adjuvant activity in mice.

    Ivana Škrnjug

    Full Text Available The recently discovered mammalian enzyme cyclic GMP-AMP synthase produces cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP after being activated by pathogen-derived cytosolic double stranded DNA. The product can stimulate STING-dependent interferon type I signaling. Here, we explore the efficacy of cGAMP as a mucosal adjuvant in mice. We show that cGAMP can enhance the adaptive immune response to the model antigen ovalbumin. It promotes antigen specific IgG and a balanced Th1/Th2 lymphocyte response in immunized mice. A characteristic of the cGAMP-induced immune response is the slightly reduced induction of interleukin-17 as a hallmark of Th17 activity--a distinct feature that is not observed with other cyclic di-nucleotide adjuvants. We further characterize the innate immune stimulation activity in vitro on murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and human dendritic cells. The observed results suggest the consideration of cGAMP as a candidate mucosal adjuvant for human vaccines.

  8. Evaluation of preventive homeopathic treatment against Colibacillosis in swine production

    Flávia Carolina Souza Oliveira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is the most important etiologic agent implied in neonatal diarrhea in swine; colibacillosis is the disease with highest impact in production of swine. The demands of consumers for meat without chemical residues and the ban on the use of antibiotics and chemotherapics in production of swine compelled to find alternative therapeutic and preventive treatments. Aims: to assess homeopathic treatment as preventive against colibacillosis in swine. Methods: the study was conducted in a farm in Mato Grosso, Brazil; stools of 4 piglets with diarrhea were collected to establish the presence of E. coli; concomitantly it was performed a clinical exam to identify the symptoms leading to the choice of a homeopathy remedy. Newborn piglets were divided into 4 groups (n= 11 or 12: 1 control, subjected to antibiotic treatment against diarrhea; 2 homeopathic treatment, performed with Phosphorus 30cH according to the symptoms collected; 3 biotherapic treatment, performed with Escherichia coli 30cH prepared from the locally obtained bacteria; 4 homeopathic + biotherapics treatment. Results: all 3 groups treated with homeopathy/isotherapy presented a significant reduction of diarrhea compared to the control group (p=0.02; the group treated with Phosphorus 30cH + Escherichia coli 30cH presented the highest weight gain which was significant by comparison to all other groups (p=0.001. Conclusion: homeopathic and biotherapics treatment were more effective than antibiotics in the control of diarrhea in newborn piglets; combination of homeopathic and isopathic treatment resulted in the highest weight gain. These results suggest that homeopathy and isopathy are effective alternatives for the treatment of diarrhea by E. coli in newborn swine.

  9. The epidemiology of A.suum at swines in Albania

    Edith Juka

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available About 300 000 swines are bred in Albania, out of which 120 000 under intensive growth conditions and 180 000 under ½ intensive and extensive growth conditions. In the study we included 738 swines out of which 372 in extensive growth and 356 samples from intensive growth spread all over the territory of the Republic. 10 samples were collected from imported pigs. 120 samples from these belonged to piglets 0-3 months old, 224 to piglets 3-7 months old, 163 samples to sow about to be substituted, 78 sows a week before farrowing, 126 samples of sows within 2 weeks of lactation, and 27 samples were taken from uncastrated pigs. The quantitative and qualitative sedimentation was the coproscopic method used in the study. To evaluate the parasitic load we applied the Mc Master technique. The post Mortum diagnose was proved in 37 heads. For the first time in Albania we define accurately the presence of A. sum among all age groups of swines. The average parasite load resulted 83 v/g/f in piglets 0-3 months old, 180 v/g/f in piglets 3-7 months old, 210 v/g/f in sows about to be substituted, 190 v/g/f in sows before farrowing, 284 v/g/f during lactation 90 v/g/f in uncastrated pigs. By evaluating the efficiency and parasitic load for other parasites, we conclude that A. suum is the main cause of hypoefficiency in swines of extensive and intensive growth. Considering the conditions of extensive and ½ intensive growth we notice a higher parasitic load. The periodic controls of the feces and at least 3 dehelmentisations per year would keep under control infestations and the damages in the conditions of extensive economies of swine growth. The observed parasitic load requires necessarily a dehelmentisation of the show's 2 weeks before farrow

  10. Comparative analysis of epidemiological and clinical features in hospitalized children with acute respiratory infection caused by novel swine-origin influenza virus and seasonal influenza virus A in Chongqing from 2009 to 2011%重庆单中心2009至2011年急性呼吸道感染住院患儿2种甲型流感病毒检出情况及临床特征分析

    谢晓虹; 金玲; 彭才静; 王丽佳; 邓昱; 刘恩梅

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the epidemiological and clinical features in hospitalized children with acute respiratory infection caused by novel swine-origin influenza virus and seasonal influenza virus A in Chongqing. Methods A total of 1 074 nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected in hospitalized children with acute respiratory tract infection enrolled in the department of respiratory medicine in Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University from June 2009 to May 2011. The RNA of S-OIVs /seasonal IVA in the sample was examined using real time PCR. Clinical data were recorded and analyzed. Results The presence of IVA was detected in 105(9. 8%)samples of 1 074 cases,including S-OIVs in 15(1. 4%)samples and seasonal IVA in the rest of samples(8. 4%). No differences in gender,age and average inpatient hospital stay were found between patients with S-OIVs infection and seasonal IVA infection. ①The prevalence of S-OIVs was 73. 3%(11/15)in summer of 2009,and the incidence of seasonal IVA infection was higher in the summer of 2009(26/95,27. 4%),summer of 2010(22/95,23. 2%)and spring of 2011 (25/95,26. 3%). The incidence of both two viruses infection was lower in autumn and winter of 2009-2010. ②The rate of severe pneumonia in patients with S-OIVs and seasonal IVA infection was 1/15(6. 7%)and 14/90(15. 6%). There were no significant differences in clinical manifestation,white cell counts,CRP level between S-OIVs and seasonal IVA positive cases. 14 of 90 seasonal IVA positive cases were with severe pneumonia and 1 of 15 S-OIVs positive cases was with severe bronchiolitis. ③Five samples were found with single S-OIVs infection among 15 S-OIVs positive cases,other respiratory viruses were detected in 9 samples. Twenty one samples were found to be single seasonal IVA postive among 90 seasonal IVA positive cases,other respiratory viruses were detected in 42 samples. ④Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that underling heart medical condition (OR=13. 60

  11. North American soft ticks (Ornithodoros spp.): biology and feral swine parasitism as risks for the emergence of African swine fever in the U.S.A.

    African Swine Fever (ASF) is an emerging arboviral disease that affects pigs. The causative agent is the double-stranded DNA African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV). Several soft tick species in the genus Ornithodoros are known arthropod vectors of ASFV. Infection with ASFV can result in a hemorrhagic synd...

  12. Comparable quality attributes of hepatitis E vaccine antigen with and without adjuvant adsorption-dissolution treatment.

    Zhang, Yue; Li, Min; Yang, Fan; Li, Yufang; Zheng, Zizheng; Zhang, Xiao; Lin, Qingshan; Wang, Ying; Li, Shaowei; Xia, Ningshao; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Qinjian

    2015-01-01

    Most vaccines require adjuvants for antigen stabilization and immune potentiation. Aluminum-based adjuvants are the most widely used adjuvants for human vaccines. Previous reports demonstrated the preservation of antigen conformation and other antigen characteristics after recovery from adjuvanted Hepatitis B and human papillomavirus vaccines. In this study, we used a combination of various physiochemical and immunochemical methods to analyze hepatitis E vaccine antigen quality attributes after recovery from adjuvants. All biochemical and biophysical methods showed similar characteristics of the p239 protein after recovery from adjuvanted vaccine formulation compared to the antigen in solution which never experienced adsorption/desorption process. Most importantly, we demonstrated full preservation of key antigen epitopes post-recovery from adjuvanted vaccine using a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies as exquisite probes. Antigenicity of p239 was probed with a panel of 9 mAbs using competition/blocking ELISA, surface plasmon resonance and sandwich ELISA methods. These multifaceted analyses demonstrated the preservation of antigen key epitopes and comparable protein thermal stability when adsorbed on adjuvants or of the recovered antigen post-dissolution treatment. A better understanding of the antigen conformation in adjuvanted vaccine will enhanced our knowledge of antigen-adjuvant interactions and facilitate an improved process control and development of stable vaccine formulation.

  13. Type I strain of Toxoplasma gondii from chicken induced different immune responses with that from human, cat and swine in chicken

    Zhao Guang-wei; Xu Li-xin; LI Xiang-rui; WanG Shuai; WanG Wang; ZhanG Zhen-chao; XIe Qing; ZhanG Meng; I a hassan; Yan Ruo-feng; SonG Xiao-kai

    2015-01-01

    In this study, four strains of Toxoplasma gondi with the same genetic type (Type I) originated from chicken, human, cat and swine were used to compare the immune responses in resistant chicken host to investigate the relationships between the parasite origins and the pathogenicity in certain host. A total of 300, 10-day-old chickens were al ocated randomly into ifve groups which named JS (from chicken), CAT (from cat), CN (from swine), RH (from human) and a negative control group (–Ve) with 60 birds in each group. Tachyzoites of four different T. gondi strains (JS, CAT, CN and RH) were inocu-lated intraperitoneal y with the dose of 1×107 in the four designed groups, respectively. The negative control (–Ve) group was mockly inoculated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) alone. Blood and spleen samples were obtained on the day of inoculation (day 0) and at days 4, 11, 25, 39 and 53 post-infection to screen the immunopathological changes. The results demonstrated some different immune characters of T. gondi infected chickens with that of mice or swine previous reported. These differences included up-regulation of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules in the early stage of infection, early peak expressions of interleukin (IL)-12 (IL-12) and-10 (IL-10) and long keep of IL-17. These might partial y contribute to the resistance of chicken to T. gondi infection. Comparisons to chickens infected with strains from human, cat and swine, chickens infected with strain from chicken showed signiifcant high levels of CD4+and CD8+T cel s, interferon gamma (IFN-γ), IL-12 and IL-10. It suggested that the strain from chicken had different ability to stimulate cel ular immunity in chicken.

  14. Serological and molecular investigation of the prevalence of Aujeszky's disease in feral swine (Sus scrofa) in the subregions of the Pantanal wetland, Brazil.

    Paes, Rita de Cássia da Silva; Fonseca, A A; Monteiro, L A R C; Jardim, G C; Piovezan, U; Herrera, H M; Mauro, R A; Vieira-da-Motta, O

    2013-08-30

    The feral swine (FS) originated from the domestic pig and is present throughout the Brazilian wetland plain (the Pantanal). Aujeszky's disease (AD) was first serologically confirmed in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul (MS) in 2001; however, there was no viral confirmation. The aim of this study was to investigate antibodies against-SuHV-1 in the sera of feral swine in the studied areas, detect SuHV-1 through PCR and classify the viral genome. Among the 218 animals sampled, 186 were analyzed by ELISA, resulting in 88 (47.3%) reactive samples. In the serum neutralization test (SN), 57/179 (31.8%) samples presented antibodies against the AD virus (SuHV-1). By nested PCR, 104 DNA samples were extracted for analysis and confirmed with amplification of a fragment of glycoprotein B (gB) in five samples. The SuHV-1 was detected in 12 samples by using primers for glycoprotein E (gE) and viral genome was classified as Type I by ul44 partial sequencing. The amplification of SuHV-1 glycoprotein fragments in the fetuses of seropositive sows indicate that the vertical transmission contribute to maintain SuHV-1 in a free-living feral swine population. The origin of AD in the feral swine populations of the Pantanal is unknown, however, the determination of viral latency, the vertical transmission of the antigen by the amplification of SuHV-1 glycoprotein fragments in the fetuses of seropositive sows and genome typing contribute to the elucidation of the epidemiology of this disease in the wetlands of MS, Brazil.

  15. Original Thinking

    Ashok Natarajan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available History that comes to us as a chronology of events is really a collective existence that is evolving through several stages to develop Individuality in all members of the society. The human community, nation states, linguistic groups, local castes and classes, and families are the intermediate stages in development of the Individual. The social process moves through phases of survival, growth, development and evolution. In the process it organizes the consciousness of its members at successive levels from social external manners, formed behavior, value-based character and personality to culminate in the development of Individuality. Through this process, society evolves from physicality to Mentality. The power of accomplishment in society and its members develops progressively through stages of skill, capacity, talent, and ability. Original thinking is made possible by the prior development of thinking that organizes facts into information. The immediate result of the last world war was a shift in reliance from physical force and action to mental conception and mental activity on a global scale. At such times no problem need defy solution, if only humanity recognizes the occasion for thinking and Original Thinking. The apparently insoluble problems we confront are an opportunity to formulate a comprehensive theory of social evolution. The immediate possibility is to devise complete solutions to all existing problems, if only we use the right method of thought development.

  16. Cost-utility analysis of adjuvant goserelin (Zoladex and adjuvant chemotherapy in premenopausal women with breast cancer

    Cheng Tsui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased health care costs have made it incumbent on health-care facilities and physicians to demonstrate both clinical and cost efficacy when recommending treatments. Though studies have examined the cost-effectiveness of adjuvant goserelin with radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer, few have compared the cost-effectiveness of adjuvant goserelin to adjuvant chemotherapy alone in premenopausal breast cancer. Methods In this retrospective study at one hospital, the records of 152 patients with stage Ia to IIIa ER + breast cancer who received goserelin or chemotherapy were reviewed. Survival analysis was assessed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Patients were interviewed to evaluate their quality of life using the European Organization for Research and Treatment Quality of Life questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ-C30, version 4.0, and to obtain the utility value by the standard gamble (SG and visual scale (VS methods. Total medical cost was assessed from the (National Health Insurance NHI payer's perspective. Results Survival at 11 years was significantly better in the groserelin group (P Conclusions Goserelin therapy results in better survival and higher utility-weighted life-years, and is more cost-effective than TC or TEC chemotherapy.

  17. Clinically relevant multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica in swine and meat handlers at the abattoir.

    Gomes-Neves, Eduarda; Antunes, Patrícia; Manageiro, Vera; Gärtner, Fátima; Caniça, Manuela; da Costa, José Manuel Correia; Peixe, Luísa

    2014-01-10

    The presence of multidrug resistant (MDR) Salmonella serotypes in slaughtered swine, carcasses, meat and meat handlers is scarcely evaluated. Recently we demonstrated that diverse Salmonella serotypes are frequently present in swine, pork meat and carcasses, and meat handlers at Portuguese abattoirs. Here we have characterized their antibiotic resistance phenotypes and genotypes, helping elucidate the flow of MDR Salmonella in the food chain. Testing 60 Salmonella isolates from different serotypes, the highest frequencies of resistance were observed for tetracycline (T) [70% (n=42/60), tet(A)/tet(B)/tet(G)], streptomycin (S) [63% (n=38/60), aadA2/strA/strB], sulfamethoxazole (Sul) [62% (n=37/60), sul1/sul2/sul3] and ampicillin (A) [57% (n=34/60), blaPSE-1/blaTEM]. Thirty-seven percent (n=22/60) carried class 1 integrons and multidrug resistance was frequently observed (63% n=38/60), including those serotypes common to human infections [S. Typhimurium 78% n=25/32; S. 4,[5],12:i:- 67% n=2/3; S. Rissen 75% (n=3/4); S. London 67% n=2/3; S. Derby 55%; n=6/11)]. The emergent S. 4,[5],12:i:- isolates were mostly characterized by ASSuT phenotype [blaTEM/strA-strB/sul2/tet(B)], typical of the European clone, while for the first time the ST phenotype [strA-strB-tet(A)-tet(B)] was also observed. Moreover, we report a first finding of a MDR phenotype in S. London [ANSSuT; blaTEM-strA-strB-sul2-tet(A)]. Our findings suggest that the abattoir environment and the slaughter operations seem not only to harbor MDR serotypes that originated in the pig reservoir, but also propagate them through cross-contamination processes, involving meat handlers. The present study suggests a probable relationship between swine and human salmonellosis throughout the food chain, which is of interest for epidemiological, animal health and public health purposes.

  18. A Delphi exercise used to identify potential causes of variation in litter size of Ontario swine

    Dewey, Catherine E.; Martin, S. Wayne; Friendship, Robert M.; Kennedy, Brain

    1992-01-01

    Forty-eight people, considered to the swine experts, were asked to collaborate in a Delphi exercise to identify the factors which they believed affect litter size in Ontario swine. The panel included 16 animal scientists, 16 pork producers, and 16 veterinarians in swine practice. The ten factors with the highest ratings were parity of the sow, mycotoxins in the feed, infections with porcine parvovirus or Leptospira spp., breeding gilts on their second versus first observed estrus, the timing ...

  19. [Antibodies against Toxoplasma gondii in swine in Costa Rica: epidemiologic importance].

    Torres, A L; Chinchilla, M; Reyes, L

    1991-01-01

    On a three hundred swine sera sample collected from a Municipal Slaughter house and a Research Laboratory at the Ministerio de Agricultura y Ganadería a 26% of positivity against T. gondii was found using the carbon immunoassay. A relationship between the age and swine race are made. The epidemiological significance of this findings are discussed focused mainly on the role of swine meat as a source of human infection in Costa Rica.

  20. Market Concentration Rate and Market Performance of China’s Swine Industry

    Jia ZHANG; Yucheng HE

    2016-01-01

    Empirical study on market concentration rate and market performance of China’s Swine Industry indicates that higher market concentration rate brings higher overall performance of swine industry. There exists no obvious causal relation between market concentration rate and market performance,but market performance is highly correlated with market concentration rate. The improvement in performance of swine industry is dependent on further optimization of market concentration rate and other factors.

  1. High-level synthesis of a heterologous milk protein in the mammary glands of transgenic swine.

    Wall, R J; Pursel, V G; Shamay, A; McKnight, R A; Pittius, C W; Hennighausen, L

    1991-01-01

    The whey acidic protein (WAP) is a major milk protein in mice, rats, and rabbits but has not been found in milk of livestock including swine. To determine whether mammary gland regulatory elements from the WAP gene function across species boundaries and whether it is possible to qualitatively alter milk protein composition, we introduced the mouse WAP gene into the genome of swine. Three lines of transgenic swine were analyzed, and mouse WAP was detected in milk from all lactating females at ...

  2. Development of a minimal saponin vaccine adjuvant based on QS-21

    Fernández-Tejada, Alberto; Chea, Eric K.; George, Constantine; Pillarsetty, Nagavarakishore; Gardner, Jeffrey R.; Livingston, Philip O.; Ragupathi, Govind; Lewis, Jason S.; Tan, Derek S.; Gin, David Y.

    2014-07-01

    Adjuvants are materials added to vaccines to enhance the immunological response to an antigen. QS-21 is a natural product adjuvant under investigation in numerous vaccine clinical trials, but its use is constrained by scarcity, toxicity, instability and an enigmatic molecular mechanism of action. Herein we describe the development of a minimal QS-21 analogue that decouples adjuvant activity from toxicity and provides a powerful platform for mechanistic investigations. We found that the entire branched trisaccharide domain of QS-21 is dispensable for adjuvant activity and that the C4-aldehyde substituent, previously proposed to bind covalently to an unknown cellular target, is also not required. Biodistribution studies revealed that active adjuvants were retained preferentially at the injection site and the nearest draining lymph nodes compared with the attenuated variants. Overall, these studies have yielded critical insights into saponin structure-function relationships, provided practical synthetic access to non-toxic adjuvants, and established a platform for detailed mechanistic studies.

  3. National Swine Genetic Improvement: An overview of essential program components and organizational structure needed for success

    John; MABRY

    2005-01-01

    The swine industry in China is a thrivingand evolving industry that has shown phenome-nal growth over the past10years.Newand mod-ern swine farms have been started in locationsacross the country.Genetics has been importedfrom many different countries in an effort to up-grade the quality and efficiency of the traditionalbreeds of swine.But to insure long term successand viability in a worldwide competitive industrysuch as pork,there is need for a National SwineGenetic Improvement Program.This programneeds to ...

  4. Adjuvant Activity of a Novel Metabolizable Lipid Emulsion with Inactivated Viral Vaccines

    1980-06-01

    hamsters, sheep, and two species of nonhuman 0 primates which demonstrate the adjuvant activity of a new metabolizable lipid emulsion with marginally...mice, hamsters, sheep, and two species of nonhuman primates . This adjuvant has several 10.000 advantages over other known adjuvant com-cpounds. It is...plaque neutralization method for arboviruses . Proc. Soc. granulomatous reaction was not observed. We Exp. Biol. Med. 125:741-747. closely observed the

  5. Insight into the cellular fate and toxicity of aluminium adjuvants used in clinically approved human vaccinations

    2016-01-01

    Aluminium adjuvants remain the most widely used and effective adjuvants in vaccination and immunotherapy. Herein, the particle size distribution (PSD) of aluminium oxyhydroxide and aluminium hydroxyphosphate adjuvants was elucidated in attempt to correlate these properties with the biological responses observed post vaccination. Heightened solubility and potentially the generation of Al3+ in the lysosomal environment were positively correlated with an increase in cell mortality in vitro, pote...

  6. Towards real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance guided transarterial CoreValve implantation: in vivo evaluation in swine

    Kahlert Philipp

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance (rtCMR is considered attractive for guiding TAVI. Owing to an unlimited scan plane orientation and an unsurpassed soft-tissue contrast with simultaneous device visualization, rtCMR is presumed to allow safe device navigation and to offer optimal orientation for precise axial positioning. We sought to evaluate the preclinical feasibility of rtCMR-guided transarterial aortic valve implatation (TAVI using the nitinol-based Medtronic CoreValve bioprosthesis. Methods rtCMR-guided transfemoral (n = 2 and transsubclavian (n = 6 TAVI was performed in 8 swine using the original CoreValve prosthesis and a modified, CMR-compatible delivery catheter without ferromagnetic components. Results rtCMR using TrueFISP sequences provided reliable imaging guidance during TAVI, which was successful in 6 swine. One transfemoral attempt failed due to unsuccessful aortic arch passage and one pericardial tamponade with subsequent death occurred as a result of ventricular perforation by the device tip due to an operating error, this complication being detected without delay by rtCMR. rtCMR allowed for a detailed, simultaneous visualization of the delivery system with the mounted stent-valve and the surrounding anatomy, resulting in improved visualization during navigation through the vasculature, passage of the aortic valve, and during placement and deployment of the stent-valve. Post-interventional success could be confirmed using ECG-triggered time-resolved cine-TrueFISP and flow-sensitive phase-contrast sequences. Intended valve position was confirmed by ex-vivo histology. Conclusions Our study shows that rtCMR-guided TAVI using the commercial CoreValve prosthesis in conjunction with a modified delivery system is feasible in swine, allowing improved procedural guidance including immediate detection of complications and direct functional assessment with reduction of radiation and omission of contrast media.

  7. Improved survival with early adjuvant chemotherapy after colonic resection for stage III colonic cancer

    Klein, Mads; Azaquoun, Najah; Jensen, Benny Vittrup

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In stage III colonic cancer, time from surgery to start of adjuvant chemotherapy may influence survival. In this study, we evaluated the effect of timing of adjuvant therapy on survival. METHODS: Database study from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group's national database....... RESULTS: The final population included 1,827 patients scheduled for adjuvant chemotherapy. Adjuvant therapy started within 4 and 8 weeks improved survival when compared to start later than 8 weeks (HR [95%CI]: 1.7 [1.1-2.6]; P = 0.024 and 1.4 [1.07-1.8]; P = 0.013, respectively), whereas...

  8. Adjuvants and delivery systems in veterinary vaccinology: current state and future developments

    Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Dedieu, Laurence; Johnson, Nicholas;

    2011-01-01

    low immunogenicity themselves. The development of such adjuvants may take advantage of the increased knowledge of the molecular mechanisms and factors controlling these responses. However, knowledge of such molecular details of immune mechanisms is relatively scarce for species other than humans......Modern adjuvants should induce strong and balanced immune responses, and it is often desirable to induce specific types of immunity. As an example, efficient Th1-immunity-inducing adjuvants are highly in demand. Such adjuvants promote good cell-mediated immunity against subunit vaccines that have...

  9. Adjuvants and immunostimulants in fish vaccines: current knowledge and future perspectives.

    Tafalla, Carolina; Bøgwald, Jarl; Dalmo, Roy A

    2013-12-01

    Vaccination is the most adequate method to control infectious diseases that threaten the aquaculture industry worldwide. Unfortunately, vaccines are usually not able to confer protection on their own; especially those vaccines based on recombinant antigens or inactivated pathogens. Therefore, the use of adjuvants or immunostimulants is often necessary to increase the vaccine efficacy. Traditional adjuvants such as mineral oils are routinely used in different commercial bacterial vaccines available for fish; however, important side effects may occur with this type of adjuvants. A search for alternative molecules or certain combinations of them as adjuvants is desirable in order to increase animal welfare without reducing protection levels. Especially, combinations that may target specific cell responses and thus a specific pathogen, with no or minor side effects, should be explored. Despite this, the oil adjuvants currently used are quite friendlier with respect to side effects compared with the oil adjuvants previously used. The great lack of fish antiviral vaccines also evidences the importance of identifying optimal combinations of a vaccination strategy with the use of a targeting adjuvant, especially for the promising fish antiviral DNA vaccines. In this review, we summarise previous studies performed with both traditional adjuvants as well as the most promising new generation adjuvants such as ligands for Toll receptors or different cytokines, focussing mostly on their protective efficacies, and also on what is known concerning their effects on the fish immune system when delivered in vivo.

  10. Origin and future distribution of the new A (H1N1) influenza virus emerging in North America in 2009

    CHEN JiMing; SUN YingXue; LIU Shuo; JIANG WenMing; CHEN Jie; HOU GuangYu; LI JinPing

    2009-01-01

    The origin of the new A (H1N1) influenza virus recently emerging in North America is a hot controversial topic of significance in disease control and risk assessment.Some experts claimed that it was an unusually mongrelized mix of human,avian and swine influenza viruses,while some others concluded that it was totally a simple re-assortment hybrid of two lineages of swine influenza viruses.Here the phylogenetic diversity of the viral PB1,PA and PB2 gene sequences using online web servers,and the results suggest that all the 8 genetic segments of the new virus were possibly from two lineages of swine influenza viruses,and one of the lineage was a mongrelized mix of human,avian and swine influenza viruses emerging in the world approximately 10 years ago.Considering the recent epidemiological trends of the new virus,we believe it will spread more widely in the world and persist long in human populations.It also could spread among swine populations.The future wide spreading of the new virus may coincide the disappearance of a subtype of previous human influenza A virus.

  11. 9 CFR 201.94 - Information as to business; furnishing of by packers, swine contractors, live poultry dealers...

    2010-01-01

    ... of by packers, swine contractors, live poultry dealers, stockyard owners, market agencies, and... poultry dealers, stockyard owners, market agencies, and dealers. Each packer, swine contractor, live poultry dealer, stockyard owner, market agency, and dealer, upon proper request, shall give to...

  12. Treg inducing adjuvants for therapeutic vaccination against chronic inflammatory diseases

    Chantal eKeijzer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Many existing therapies in autoimmune diseases are based on systemic suppression of inflammation, the observed side effects illustrate the need for more specific interventions. Regulatory T cells (Treg are pivotal controllers of (autoaggressive immune responses, and decreased Treg numbers and/or functioning have been associated with autoimmune disease. Especially antigen-specific targeting of Treg would enable tailor made interventions, while obviating negative side effects of general immuno-suppression. Self-antigens that participate in inflammation, irrespective of the etiology of the different autoimmune diseases, are held to be candidate antigens for such interventions. Rather than tolerance induction to disease inciting self-antigens, which are frequently unknown, general self-antigens expressed at sites of inflammation would allow targeting of disease independent, but inflammatory-site specific, regulatory mechanisms. Preferably, such self-antigens should be abundantly expressed and up-regulated at the inflammatory site. Heat shock proteins show several of these characteristics.The development of antigen-specific Treg inducing vaccines is a major novel goal in the field of immunotherapy in autoimmune diseases. Progress is hampered by the lack of effective antigens and by the fact that other factors such as dose, route and the presence or absence of an adjuvant, turned out to be critical unknowns, with respect to effective induction of Treg. The use of a Treg inducing adjuvant might be required to achieve effective regulatory responses, in the case of ongoing inflammation. Future goals will be the optimization of natural Treg expansion (or the induction of adaptive Treg without loss of their suppressive function or the concomitant induction of non-regulatory T cells. Here, we discuss the potential use of protein/peptide-based vaccines combined with Treg inducing adjuvants for the development of therapeutic vaccines against chronic

  13. Beryllium, an adjuvant that promotes gamma interferon production.

    Lee, J Y; Atochina, O; King, B; Taylor, L; Elloso, M; Scott, P; Rossman, M D

    2000-07-01

    Beryllium is associated with a human pulmonary granulomatosis characterized by an accumulation of CD4(+) T cells in the lungs and a heightened specific lymphocyte proliferative response to beryllium (Be) with gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) release (i.e., a T helper 1 [Th1] response). While an animal model of Be sensitization is not currently available, Be has exhibited adjuvant effects in animals. The effects of Be on BALB/c mice immunized with soluble leishmanial antigens (SLA) were investigated to determine if Be had adjuvant activity for IFN-gamma production, an indicator of the Th1 response. In this strain of Leishmania-susceptible BALB/c mice, a Th2 response is normally observed after in vivo SLA sensitization and in vitro restimulation with SLA. If interleukin-12 (IL-12) is given during in vivo sensitization with SLA, markedly increased IFN-gamma production and decreased IL-4 production are detected. We show here that when beryllium sulfate (BeSO(4)) was added during in vivo sensitization of BALB/c mice with SLA and IL-12, significantly increased IFN-gamma production and decreased IL-4 production from lymph node and spleen cells were detected upon in vitro SLA restimulation. No specific responses were observed to Be alone. Lymph node and spleen cells from all mice proliferated strongly and comparably upon in vitro restimulation with SLA and with SLA plus Be; no differences were noted among groups of mice that received different immunization regimens. In vivo, when Be was added to SLA and IL-12 for sensitization of BALB/c mice, more effective control of Leishmania infection was achieved. This finding has implications for understanding not only the development of granulomatous reactions but also the potential for developing Be as a vaccine adjuvant.

  14. Determination of minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane in juvenile swine.

    Moeser, Adam J; Blikslager, Anthony T; Swanson, Cliff

    2008-04-01

    Pigs are important animal models in veterinary and medical research and have been widely used in experiments requiring surgical anesthesia. Sevoflurane is an inhalant anesthetic with unique properties that make it an ideal anesthetic for mask induction and anesthesia maintenance. However, there are relatively few studies reporting the anesthetic requirements for sevoflurane in juvenile swine, an age group that is commonly used in research experiments. Therefore the objective of this study was to determine the Minimum Alveolar Concentration (MAC) for sevoflurane in juvenile swine. Sevoflurane anesthesia was induced in six Yorkshire-cross pigs of approximately 9 weeks-of-age and MAC for sevoflurane was determined. The sevoflurane MAC value was determined to be 3.5+/-0.1% which is notably higher than values reported in the literature for pigs. This discrepancy in MAC values may represent changes in anesthetic requirements between different age groups of pigs and differences in the type of stimulus used to determine MAC.

  15. Swine trichinellosis in slaughterhouses of the metropolitan area of Toluca.

    Monroy, H; Flores-Trujillo, M; Benitez, E; Arriaga, C

    2001-06-01

    In order to determine the prevalence of Trichinella spiralis infections in abattoirs of the metropolitan area of Toluca where pigs from commercial farms as well as backyard pigs are slaughtered, 539 swine diaphragm tissue samples were collected and examined by trichinoscopy and artificial digestion. Serum samples from the same animals were analyzed by ELISA using somatic and excretory/secretory antigens, and by Western blot analysis. T. spiralis muscle larvae were not found by trichinoscopy or artificial digestion. However, specific antibodies were detected by ELISA and confirmed by Western blotting in 12.4% of the serum samples examined. Analysis of risk factors showed no association of seropositive results with sex. However, significant higher risk was observed in swine seven to 12 months old and in backyard pigs, compared with pigs from commercial farms.

  16. Zeolite and swine inoculum effect on poultry manure biomethanation

    Kougias, Panagiotis; Fotidis, Ioannis; Zaganas, I.D.

    2013-01-01

    Poultry manure is an ammonia-rich substrate that inhibits methanogenesis, causing severe problems to the anaerobic digestion process. In this study, the effect of different natural zeolite concentrations on the mesophilic anaerobic digestion of poultry waste inoculated with well-digested swine...... manure was investigated. A significant increase in methane production was observed in treatments where zeolite was added, compared to the treatment without zeolite.Methane production in the treatment with 10 g dm-3 of natural zeolite was found to be 109.75% higher compared to the treatment without...... zeolite addition. The results appear to be influenced by the addition of zeolite, which reduces ammonia toxicity in anaerobic digestion and by the ammonia-tolerant swine inoculum....

  17. In vitro and in vivo glucose consumption in swine eperythrozoonosis.

    Smith, J E; Cipriano, J E; Hall, S M

    1990-10-01

    One complication of swine eperythrozoonosis is the hypoglycemia that occurs during parasitemia. To determine the cause of the hypoglycemia, we studied glucose consumption in splenectomized pigs infected with Eperythrozoon suis. With the rapid rise of erythroparasites, the in vitro glucose consumption of parasited whole blood increased dramatically, and hypoglycemia developed. Because mature porcine erythrocytes are impermeable to glucose, the increased glucose consumption is most logically the result of E. suis metabolism. Iodoacetamide and sodium fluoride (which inhibit glycolysis), but not sodium cyanide (which prevents cellular respiration), and tetracycline (which is used to treat eperythrozoonosis) inhibited glucose consumption. In vivo glucose turnover studies before infection and during peak parasitemia indicated an increased glucose production by infected pigs during parasitemia. The results suggest that hypoglycemia occurs during swine eperythrozoonosis because the parasite uses glucose faster than the gluconeogenic pathways can provide it.

  18. Radiation Recall Reaction Induced by Adjuvant Trastuzumab (Herceptin

    Caroline Chung

    2009-01-01

    trastuzumab (Herceptin administration, there has been no published case of radiation recall reaction associated with trastuzumab. This case describes a clinical presentation consistent with a radiation recall reaction following administration of adjuvant trastuzumab after neoadjuvant FEC-D chemotherapy and locoregional radiotherapy for HER2-positive, locally advanced breast cancer in a premenopausal woman. Although the mechanism and etiology of radiation recall dermatitis remain unclear, this case raises further hypotheses regarding a possible drug dose-dependence and possible predisposing risk factor for the development of radiation recall reactions.

  19. Adjuvant chemo-radiation for gastric adenocarcinoma: an institutional experience

    Ghosn Marwan G

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have shown that surgery alone is less than satisfactory in the management of early gastric cancer, with cure rates approaching 40%. The role of adjuvant therapy was indefinite until three large, randomized controlled trials showed the survival benefit of adjuvant therapy over surgery alone. Chemoradiation therapy has been criticized for its high toxicity. Methods 24 patients diagnosed between September 2001 and July 2007 were treated with adjuvant chemoradiation. 18 patients had the classical MacDonald regimen of 4500 cGy of XRT and chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5FU and leucovorin, while chemotherapy consisted of 5FU/Cisplatin for 6 patients. Results This series consisted of non-metastatic patients, 17 females and 7 males with a median age of 62.5 years. 23 patients (96% had a performance status of 0 or 1. The full course of radiation therapy (4500 cGy was completed by 22 patients (91.7%. Only 7 patients (36.8% completed the total planned courses of chemotherapy. 2 local relapses (10%, 2 regional relapses (10% and 2 distant relapses (10% were recorded. Time to progression has not been reached. 9 patients (37.5% died during follow-up with a median overall survival of 75 months. Patients lost a mean of 4 Kgs during radiation therapy. We recorded 6 episodes of febrile neutropenia and the most frequent toxicity was gastro-intestinal in 17 patients (70.8% with 9 (36% patients suffering grade 3 or 4 toxicity and 5 patients (20% suffering from grade 3 or 4 neutropenia. 4 (17% patients required total parenteral nutrition for a mean duration of 20 days. 4 patients suffered septic shock (17% and 1 patient developed a deep venous thrombosis and a pulmonary embolus. Conclusions Adjuvant chemo-radiation for gastric cancer is a standard at our institution and has resulted in few relapses and an interesting median survival. Toxicity rates were serious and this remains a harsh regimen with only 36.8% of patients completing the

  20. 猪瘟疫苗田间免疫效果监测%A Monitoring of the Field Immunity Efficacy of Classical Swine Fever Vaccine

    何长生; 朱良强; 占松鹤; 王军; 沈艳; 刘华; 周迎春; 陈静

    2014-01-01

    In order to know well the immunity efficacy of classical swine fever( CSF) vaccine, from 2010 to 2012, we had monitored the immunity efficacy of classical swine fever vaccine which was used in Anhui province. 7439 swineserums collected from 454 swine farms that had been immunized with CSF vaccine for one month or so had been detected for the antibody titer of CSFV by antibody blocking ELISA. The results indicated that the immunity efficacy of CSF vaccine was good, and the positive rate of immune antibody exceeded 70% which was demanded by MOA of China. The immunity efficacy of CSF vaccine of both spleen and lymph tissue origin and tissue culture origin was not much different, but the immunity efficacy of spleen and lymph tissue origin was steady, and the tissue culture origin was unsteady. Furthermore, the immunity efficacy of CSF vaccine from different manufactures was different.%为准确掌握猪瘟疫苗免疫效果,2010-2012年对投放安徽省的猪瘟疫苗免疫效果进行了监测。采用抗体阻断ELISA方法,检测了454个猪场7439份免疫猪瘟弱毒活疫苗1个月左右的血清中猪瘟免疫抗体水平。结果显示,安徽省猪瘟疫苗免疫效果总体良好,免疫抗体合格率超过了70%;脾淋组织苗和细胞苗免疫效果相当,但脾淋组织苗免疫效果稳定,细胞苗免疫效果稳定性较差;不同厂家疫苗免疫效果参差不齐。

  1. Progressive adaptation of a Georgian isolate of African swine fever virus to vero cells leads to a gradual attenuation of virulence in swine corresponding to major changes of the viral genome

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes a contagious and often lethal disease of feral and domestic swine. Experimental vaccines derived from naturally occurring, genetically modified or cell culture-adapted ASFV have been evaluated but no commercial vaccine is available to control African Swine Fev...

  2. Deletion of African swine fever virus Georgia 2007 virulence-associated gene 9GL (B119L) leads to virus attenuation in swine at low doses while inducing an effective protection against homologous challenge

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the etiological agent of a contagious and often lethal viral disease of domestic pigs that has significant economic consequences for swine breeding. The control of African Swine Fever (ASF) has been hampered by the unavailability of vaccines. Experimental vaccines...

  3. African swine fever virus Georgia isolate harboring deletions of MGF360 and MGF505 genes is attenuated in swine and confers protection against challenge with the virulent parental virus

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the etiological agent of a contagious and often lethal disease of domestic pigs that has significant economic consequences for the swine industry. The control of African Swine Fever (ASF) has been hampered by the unavailability of vaccines. Experimental vaccines h...

  4. Investigations of eugenol efficacy in treatment of mange in swine

    Jezdimirović Milanka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The acaricide efficacy, tolerability and safety of the active ingredient of the etheric oil of cloves eugenol was investigated in the treatment of mange in swine, and the obtained results were compared with the results of acaricide efficacy of the synthetic acaricide permethrin, which has been in use for quite a some time. A single application of permethrin in the form of a 1% solution showed maximum efficacy of 62.5%, and after three applications of 75.0% in the treatment of sarcoptes in swine mange. A single application of eugenol in the form of a 10% solution had maximum efficacy of 75.0%, and applied three times an efficacy of 100% in curbing Sarcoptes scabiei var. suis. A single administration of 20% eugenol solution showed maximum efficacy of 87.5%, and applied three times it was 100% efficient in curbing Sarcoptes scabeiei var. suis. The best efficacy in the treatment of sarcoptes mange in swine was achieved with three applications of eugenol in a concentration of 20%. This maximum effect (100% was obtained already after the second treatment. Eugenol in a concentration of 10% was safe for local application on skin because it does not cause any undesired reactions, while a 20% concentration caused irritation followed by a passing redness and disquiet in a smaller number of treated animals. The results of comparative investigations of acaricide efficacy of permethrin and eugenol demonstrate that there is resistence in Sarcoptes scabiei var. suis to permethrin. The biocide eugenol can safely be recommended for the treatment of sarcoptes mange in swine.

  5. A Blast Model of Traumatic Brain Injury in Swine

    2011-02-01

    information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM...swine brain. The animals in the second set were given ketorolac (30 mg) s.c. for analgesia. The anesthesia was gradually reduced and the animals were...The second set of 6 animals were deeply anesthetized with isoflurane, then were euthanized with an i.v. injection of saturated KCl. When all

  6. [Radioactivity of fodder mixtures for poultry and swine].

    Dziura, A; Kossakowski, S

    1990-01-01

    The investigation was conducted to determine the radioactivities of fodder mixtures and their components for poultry and swine. The total radioactivity, concentrations of potassium, potassium radioisotopes radium and thorium in 273 fodder mixture samples for poultry, 131 fodder mixture samples and concentrates for swine, and 915 component samples of the mixtures were estimated. The radioactivities of fodder mixtures for poultry, swine, and protein concentrates ranged from 212.0 (DKM-2) to 269.0 Bq/kg (DKA-starter), from 206.0 (PT-1) to 233.0 (PP-prestarter), and from 444.0 (KT-1) to 557.0 Bq/kg (Provit), respectively. As to the components of fodder mixture, the radioactivities ranged from 18.0 (fodder phosphate) to 1104.0 Bq/kg (fodder yeasts). The potassium concentrations in fodder mixtures for poultry ranged from 0.82 g/100 g (DKA-starter) to 0.62 g/100 g (KB-1); for swine ranged from 1.97 g/100 g (Provit) to 0.63 g/100 g (PT-1). The highest concentration of potassium was found in fodder yeasts (3.85 g/100 g), and the lowest one in fodder phosphate (0.01 g/100 g). The analysis of the data showed that the radioactivity of the mixtures and their components was mostly conditioned by radiopotassium and revealed correlations between the radioactivities and the total concentrations of potassium. The contamination with the natural radioelements (potassium, radium, thorium) as well as their limited absorption by the gastrointestinal tract, their metabolism in organism, and their radiotoxicological characteristics do not create radiological threat to animals.

  7. Outbreak of swine influenza in Argentina reveals a non-contemporary human H3N2 virus highly transmissible among pigs.

    Cappuccio, Javier A; Pena, Lindomar; Dibárbora, Marina; Rimondi, Agustina; Piñeyro, Pablo; Insarralde, Lucas; Quiroga, María A; Machuca, Mariana; Craig, Maria I; Olivera, Valeria; Chockalingam, Ashok; Perfumo, Carlos J; Perez, Daniel R; Pereda, Ariel

    2011-12-01

    Sporadic outbreaks of human H3N2 influenza A virus (IAV) infections in swine populations have been reported in Asia, Europe and North America since 1970. In South America, serological surveys in pigs indicate that IAVs of the H3 and H1 subtypes are currently in circulation; however, neither virus isolation nor characterization has been reported. In November 2008, an outbreak of respiratory disease in pigs consistent with swine influenza virus (SIV) infection was detected in Argentina. The current study describes the clinical epidemiology, pathology, and molecular and biological characteristics of the virus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the virus isolate shared nucleotide identities of 96-98 % with H3N2 IAVs that circulated in humans from 2000 to 2003. Antigenically, sera from experimentally inoculated animals cross-reacted mainly with non-contemporary human-origin H3N2 influenza viruses. In an experimental infection in a commercial swine breed, the virus was of low virulence but was transmitted efficiently to contact pigs and caused severe disease when an infected animal acquired a secondary bacterial infection. This is the first report of a wholly human H3N2 IAV associated with clinical disease in pigs in South America. These studies highlight the importance of two-way transmission of IAVs and SIVs between pigs and humans, and call for enhanced influenza surveillance in the pig population worldwide.

  8. Ankistrodesmus gracilis (Chlorophyta fertilized in swine manure in the laboratory

    Lúcia Helena Sipaúba-Tavares

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work was to investigate the influence of swine manure media on the growth, total length, dry weight, and nutritional value of Ankistrodesmus gracilis microalgae. Two media were measured: “in natura” and biodigested. The growth rate peak for A. gracilis was highest with biodigester treatment (6.2 x 107 cells.mL-1 on the 5th day, at a volume of 2L. The highest percentage of lipids was verifi ed for “in natura” media. Protein was highest (p > 0.05 for the biodigested media at 2L. Biovolume, ash rate, and total length were different (p 0.05. Light demand was also different between media, with lesser intensity being required for biodigested media (13.5μE.cm-2.s-1. In fact, the biodigested media proved to be cheaper in terms of cost and benefit. Generally, the medium containing swine manure, both “in natura” and biodigested, showed better results in A. gracilis development, with water quality adequate for culture systems. Swine manure in both forms may also be used in high-density cultures in the laboratory.

  9. Role of adjuvant radiation in the management of central neurocytoma: Experience from a tertiary cancer care center of India

    S Mallick

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Neurocytoma (NC is a rare benign neuronal tumor. A complete excision remains curative for most of these tumors, but atypical histology and extra-ventricular location often necessitates adjuvant therapy. We intended to explore the clinico-pathological features and treatment outcome in patients of NC in our institute. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medical records were reviewed and data collected on NC over a 6-year period (2006-2012 from the departmental archives. Disease free survival (DFS was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: A total of 18 patients met the study criteria. Fourteen patients had intra-ventricular neurocytoma (IVNC, right lateral ventricle being the most common site of origin. Gross total resection and near total resection were achieved in eight cases each whereas tumor decompression and biopsy could be done in two cases. On post-operative histopathological examination, eight patients were found to have atypical NC while 10 patients had typical NC. All patients underwent adjuvant radiation. The median dose of post-operative radiation was 56 Gy. All patients were alive at their final follow-up. One patient had both clinical and radiological evidence of local relapse. In the evaluable patients (n = 18, after a median follow-up of 35 months the DFS rate at 2 years and 3 years are 100% and 83% respectively. CONCLUSION: Use of adjuvant radiation to a total dose of 56 Gy enhances the local control and achieves superior survival in patients of NC. Use of 3D conformal planning techniques may help us to achieve better therapeutic ratio in patients with NC.

  10. Utilization and impact of adjuvant therapy in anaplastic oligodendroglioma: an analysis on 1692 patients.

    Shin, Jacob Y; Diaz, Aidnag Z

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the utilization rates and impact of adjuvant therapy on overall survival (OS) for anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO). Data were extracted from the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). Chi square test, Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox regression models were employed in SPSS 22.0 (Armonk, NY: IBM Corp.) for data analyses. 1692 patients with AO who underwent surgery were identified. 945 (55.9 %) received adjuvant radiotherapy with concomitant chemotherapy (chemoRT), 102 (6.0 %) adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) sequentially followed by chemotherapy, 244 (14.4 %) adjuvant RT alone, and 401 (23.7 %) received no adjuvant therapy. Patients were more likely to receive adjuvant chemoRT if they were diagnosed in 2009-2013 vs. 2004-2008 (p 70 vs. <70 (p = 0.018), had private insurance vs. Medicaid vs. no insurance (p < 0.001), or had median income ≥$63,000 vs. <$63,000 (p = 0.014). Those who received adjuvant chemoRT (concomitant or sequential) had significantly better 5-year OS than those who received adjuvant RT alone or no adjuvant therapy (59.8 % vs. 65.0 % vs. 44.9 % vs. 45.6 %, p < 0.001). This significant 5-year OS benefit was also observed regardless of age. There was no difference in OS when comparing concomitant chemoRT to sequential RT and chemotherapy (p = 0.481). On multivariate analysis, receipt of adjuvant chemoRT (concomitant or sequential) remained an independent prognostic factor for improved OS. Adjuvant chemoRT (concomitant or sequential) is an independent prognostic factor for improved OS in anaplastic oligodendroglioma and should be considered for all clinically suitable patients who have undergone surgery for the disease.

  11. Three-phase foam analysis and development of a lab-scale foaming capacity and stability test for swine manure

    Foam accumulation on the manure slurry at deep pit swine facilities has been linked to flash fire incidents, making it a serious safety concern for pork producers. In order to investigate this phenomenon, samples of swine manure were collected from over 50 swine production facilities in Iowa with va...

  12. 9 CFR 312.2 - Official marks and devices to identify inspected and passed products of cattle, sheep, swine, or...

    2010-01-01

    ... inspected and passed products of cattle, sheep, swine, or goats. 312.2 Section 312.2 Animals and Animal... cattle, sheep, swine, or goats. (a) The official inspection legend required by part 316 of this subchapter to be applied to inspected and passed carcasses and parts of carcasses of cattle, sheep, swine...

  13. 9 CFR 96.2 - Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    2010-01-01

    ... ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES § 96.2 Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine... processed in a region where African swine fever exists, as listed in § 94.8 of this subchapter, is... swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. 96.2 Section 96.2 Animals and Animal Products...

  14. Genes indicative of zoonotic and swine pathogens are persistent in stream water and sediment following a swine manure spill

    Haack, Sheridan K.; Duris, Joseph W.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Johnson, Heather E.; Gibson, Kristen E.; Focazio, Michael J.; Schwab, Kellogg J.; Hubbard, Laura E.; Foreman, William T.

    2015-01-01

    Manure spills to streams are relatively frequent, but no studies have characterized stream contamination with zoonotic and veterinary pathogens, or fecal chemicals, following a spill. We tested stream water and sediment over 25 days and downstream for 7.6 km for: fecal indicator bacteria (FIB); the fecal indicator chemicals cholesterol and coprostanol; 20 genes for zoonotic and swine-specific bacterial pathogens by presence/absence polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for viable cells; one swine-specific Escherichia coli toxin gene (STII) by quantitative PCR (qPCR); and nine human and animal viruses by qPCR, or reverse-transcriptase qPCR. Twelve days post-spill, and 4.2 km downstream, water concentrations of FIB, cholesterol, and coprostanol were 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than those detected before, or above, the spill, and genes indicating viable zoonotic or swine-infectious Escherichia coli, were detected in water or sediment. STII increased from undetectable before, or above the spill, to 105 copies/100 mL water 12 days post-spill. Thirteen of 14 water (8/9 sediment) samples had viable STII-carrying cells post-spill. Eighteen days post-spill porcine adenovirus and teschovirus were detected 5.6 km downstream. Sediment FIB concentrations (per gram wet weight) were greater than in water, and sediment was a continuous reservoir of genes and chemicals post-spill. Constituent concentrations were much lower, and detections less frequent, in a runoff event (200 days post-spill) following manure application, although the swine-associated STII and stx2e genes were detected. Manure spills are an underappreciated pathway for livestock-derived contaminants to enter streams, with persistent environmental outcomes, and the potential for human and veterinary health consequences.

  15. Assessing the Risk of African Swine Fever Introduction into the European Union by Wild Boar.

    De la Torre, A; Bosch, J; Iglesias, I; Muñoz, M J; Mur, L; Martínez-López, B; Martínez, M; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M

    2015-06-01

    The presence of African swine fever (ASF) in the Caucasus region and Russian Federation has increased concerns that wild boars may introduce the ASF virus into the European Union (EU). This study describes a semi-quantitative approach for evaluating the risk of ASF introduction into the EU by wild boar movements based on the following risk estimators: the susceptible population of (1) wild boars and (2) domestic pigs in the country of origin; the outbreak density in (3) wild boars and (4) domestic pigs in the countries of origin, the (5) suitable habitat for wild boars along the EU border; and the distance between the EU border and the nearest ASF outbreak in (6) wild boars or (7) domestic pigs. Sensitivity analysis was performed to identify the most influential risk estimators. The highest risk was found to be concentrated in Finland, Romania, Latvia and Poland, and wild boar habitat and outbreak density were the two most important risk estimators. Animal health authorities in at-risk countries should be aware of these risk estimators and should communicate closely with wild boar hunters and pig farmers to rapidly detect and control ASF.

  16. Occurrence and Diversity of Tetracycline Resistance Genes in Lagoons and Groundwater Underlying Two Swine Production Facilities

    Chee-Sanford, J. C.; Aminov, R.I.; Krapac, I.J.; Garrigues-Jeanjean, N.; Mackie, R.I.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we used PCR typing methods to assess the presence of tetracycline resistance determinants conferring ribosomal protection in waste lagoons and in groundwater underlying two swine farms. All eight classes of genes encoding this mechanism of resistance [tet(O), tet(Q), tet(W), tet(M), tetB(P), tet(S), tet(T), and otrA] were found in total DNA extracted from water of two lagoons. These determinants were found to be seeping into the underlying groundwater and could be detected as far as 250 m downstream from the lagoons. The identities and origin of these genes in groundwater were confirmed by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analyses. Tetracycline-resistant bacterial isolates from groundwater harbored the tet(M) gene, which was not predominant in the environmental samples and was identical to tet(M) from the lagoons. The presence of this gene in some typical soil inhabitants suggests that the vector of antibiotic resistance gene dissemination is not limited to strains of gastrointestinal origin carrying the gene but can be mobilized into the indigenous soil microbiota. This study demonstrated that tet genes occur in the environment as a direct result of agriculture and suggested that groundwater may be a potential source of antibiotic resistance in the food chain.

  17. Evaluation of the efficiency of a tubular digester in the reduction of organic load of biogas from swine wastes; Avaliacao da eficiencia de um biodigestor tubular na reducao da carga organica de biogas a partir de dejetos de suinos

    Angonese, Andre Ricardo [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (UNIOESTE), PR (Brazil)], Email: aangonese@yahoo.com.br; Campos, Alessandro Torres [Universidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri (UFVJM), Diamantina, MG (Brazil)], Email: atcampos3@yahoo.com.br; Moreno Palacio, Soraya [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), PR (Brazil); Szymanski, Nayara [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (UNIOESTE), PR (Brazil). Curso de Quimica

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficiency of the anaerobic biological treatment systems in the reduction and stabilization of biodegradable organic matter of swine waste. The experiment was carried out at Vale dos Ipes Farm, located in the city of Ouro Verde do Oeste, in the Western of Parana State. One finishing phase swine unity containing 600 animals was monitored from January to June 2005. The system is composed by one steel digester with capacity for 50 m{sup 3}. The swine barn cleaning is performed by dry scratching on a daily basis. The generated residues flow by gravitation through ducts towards the digester. The duration of the hydraulic retention period was 12 days. The residues analysis was performed by means of sampling at the entrance and way out of the digester. The following parameters were analyzed: pH, DBO{sub 5}, DQO, total solids, total volatile solids, total fixed solids, total nitrogen e ammonia, potassium, total phosphate, average of biogas production. The results suggested that the anaerobic biological treatment system was efficient for reducing and stabilizing the organic matter resulted from the swine wastes. Expressive reductions of DBO, DQO, ST and SVT of 76, 77, 43 and 59% respectively, were obtained for the effluent originated by the digester. The average daily production of biogas during the analyzed period was 31, 5 m{sup 3}. (author)

  18. Effect of ascorbic acid and other adjuvants on manganese absorption

    Papaioannou, R.; Sohler, A.; Pfeiffer, C.C.

    1986-03-01

    Animal experiments have demonstrated that manganese is poorly absorbed from the gut and that it is rapidly removed from the blood by liver uptake and bilary excretion. Zinc supplements which are readily absorbed can induce a Mn deficiency so that Mn supplementation is necessary. Supplementation with a diet rich in Mn (high in legumes, nuts, whole grains, tea) failed to influence blood Mn levels. The present study is concerned with the route of Mn administration and the effect of various adjuvants on the absorption and availability of Mn. Oral and sublingual administration of 20 mgs of Mn as the chloride failed to elicit a blood level rise. A rise was noted after the intramuscular injection of 2.5 mgs Mn as Mn Cl/sub 2/. Blood Mn levels rose to a maximum in thirty minutes and were back to basal levels within three hours. Adjuvants such as arginine, lecithin, taurine, biotin, bioflavinoids, were tested with essentially negative results. Mn orotate also failed to increase absorption. Oral absorption was obtained with ascorbic acid in five female subjects when 20 mgs of Mn as the chloride was given orally with 1 gm of ascorbic acid. This effect was not observed with five male subjects. A 30-40% increase in blood Mn after 2 hours was found when Mn was administered with ascorbic acid in the female subjects.

  19. Ethoxylated rapeseed oil derivatives as novel adjuvants for herbicides.

    Müller, Thomas; Brancq, Bernard; Milius, Alain; Okori, Nathalie; Vaille, Claude; Gauvrit, Christian

    2002-12-01

    Ethoxylates of rapeseed oil and of methylated rapeseed oil were synthesized and tested as adjuvants for 2,4-D and phenmedipham. Provided they had less than 6 units of ethylene oxide (EO), 1.0 to 10 g litre(-1) ethoxylates in water induced droplet spreading on barley leaves. In an acetone-based medium all derivatives strongly promoted the foliar uptake of 2,4-D, with no clear influence of the ethoxylation degree. In the same medium there was a negative influence of ethoxylate chain length on the foliar uptake of phenmedipham. In a water-based medium, phenmedipham applied with rapeseed oil emulsified with ethoxylated (20 EO) rapeseed oil displayed uptake rates close to a commercial preparation. The same was true for phenmedipham applied with ethoxylated (2 EO) methylated rapeseed oil. In bioassays, phenmedipham prepared with methylated rapeseed oil emulsified with ethoxylated (20 EO) rapeseed oil was as efficacious on barley as a commercial formulation. The same was true for phenmedipham prepared with ethoxylated (2 EO) methylated rapeseed oil. However, neither rapeseed oil nor methylated rapeseed oil emulsified with ethoxylated (2 EO) methylated rapeseed oil conferred good efficacy to phenmedipham. Hence, ethoxylated rapeseed oil derivatives are promising adjuvants or formulants for herbicides.

  20. Mucosal and systemic adjuvant activity of alphavirus replicon particles

    Thompson, Joseph M.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Konopka, Jennifer L.; Collier, Martha L.; Richmond, Erin M. B.; Davis, Nancy L.; Staats, Herman F.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2006-03-01

    Vaccination represents the most effective control measure in the fight against infectious diseases. Local mucosal immune responses are critical for protection from, and resolution of, infection by numerous mucosal pathogens. Antigen processing across mucosal surfaces is the natural route by which mucosal immunity is generated, as peripheral antigen delivery typically fails to induce mucosal immune responses. However, we demonstrate in this article that mucosal immune responses are evident at multiple mucosal surfaces after parenteral delivery of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP). Moreover, coinoculation of null VRP (not expressing any transgene) with inactivated influenza virions, or ovalbumin, resulted in a significant increase in antigen-specific systemic IgG and fecal IgA antibodies, compared with antigen alone. Pretreatment of VRP with UV light largely abrogated this adjuvant effect. These results demonstrate that alphavirus replicon particles possess intrinsic systemic and mucosal adjuvant activity and suggest that VRP RNA replication is the trigger for this activity. We feel that these observations and the continued experimentation they stimulate will ultimately define the specific components of an alternative pathway for the induction of mucosal immunity, and if the activity is evident in humans, will enable new possibilities for safe and inexpensive subunit and inactivated vaccines. vaccine vector | Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus | viral immunology | RNA virus

  1. Innate Immune Signaling by, and Genetic Adjuvants for DNA Vaccination.

    Kobiyama, Kouji; Jounai, Nao; Aoshi, Taiki; Tozuka, Miyuki; Takeshita, Fumihiko; Coban, Cevayir; Ishii, Ken J

    2013-01-01

    DNA vaccines can induce both humoral and cellular immune responses. Although some DNA vaccines are already licensed for infectious diseases in animals, they are not licensed for human use because the risk and benefit of DNA vaccines is still controversial. Indeed, in humans, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines is lower than that of other traditional vaccines. To develop the use of DNA vaccines in the clinic, various approaches are in progress to enhance or improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. Recent studies have shown that immunogenicity of DNA vaccines are regulated by innate immune responses via plasmid DNA recognition through the STING-TBK1 signaling cascade. Similarly, molecules that act as dsDNA sensors that activate innate immune responses through STING-TBK1 have been identified and used as genetic adjuvants to enhance DNA vaccine immunogenicity in mouse models. However, the mechanisms that induce innate immune responses by DNA vaccines are still unclear. In this review, we will discuss innate immune signaling upon DNA vaccination and genetic adjuvants of innate immune signaling molecules.

  2. Effects of 3% trehalose as an adjuvant treatment after LASIK

    Mateo Orobia, Antonio J; Casas Pascual, Paula; Cristóbal Bescós, José Á; Perez García, Diana; Peiro Embid, Carlos; del Buey Sayas, M Ángeles; Korobko Kulikova, Valentyna; Lafuente Ojeda, Noelia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of 3% trehalose as an adjuvant in the standard treatment after laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis. Design Interventional prospective comparative single-blind study. Setting Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Quirón Zaragoza, Spain. Methods A total of 26 eyes (13 patients) were included, of which 12 eyes (group 1) received conventional treatment with lubricant drops of hyaluronic acid (0.15%) and 14 eyes (group 2) received, additionally, an ophthalmic solution of 3% trehalose. Pre- and postoperative quality-of-life tests and vital stains, tear breakup time, and osmolarity measurements were made. Results We obtained statistically significant differences between the groups in the Symptom Assessment in Dry Eye test in all visits with respect to severity, and in the postoperative day 1 visit with respect to frequency, in all cases favoring the trehalose treatment. The values of osmolarity were not significantly different between groups. However, we did find significant differences in the Oxford scale in day 90 for the trehalose treatment (P<0.001), and in the National Eye Institute scale in day 30 (P=0.02). Conclusion The results of this exploratory study indicate that the adjuvant treatment with 3% trehalose could be superior with respect to the standard treatment, with improvements in the objective and subjective parameters of tear quality. PMID:28243058

  3. Preparation and evaluation of functional foods in adjuvant arthritis

    Al-Okbi, S. Y.; Mohamed, D. A.

    2012-07-01

    Adjuvant arthritis is an animal model that closely resembles rheumatoid arthritis in humans. It is a successful working model used to study new anti-inflammatory agents. In previous studies (animal and clinical) we have shown that evening primrose oil, fish oil and the methanol extract of date fruits and fenugreek seeds have anti-inflammatory activity and that the methanol extract of dates has an antioxidant effect. Based on these studies, the aim of the present study was to prepare 7 functional foods containing such bioactive fractions separately or in combination and to evaluate them in adjuvant arthritis in rats, study the stability of bioactive ingredients and evaluate their sensory properties. The studied biochemical parameters were erythrocyte sedimentation rate, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and plasma copper, zinc and interlukin 2. Nutritional parameters, including body weight gain, food intake and food efficiency ratio were monitored during the feeding of the functional foods. The bioactive ingredients assessed were total phenolic contents and fatty acids. The results showed improvement in the biochemical parameters, body weight gain and food efficiency ratio of arthritic rats fed on the functional foods with different degrees. All the prepared functional foods were sensory accepted. The active ingredients showed stability during storage. In conclusion, all the tested functional foods showed promising antiinflammatory activity and were determined to be acceptable through sensory evaluation which means that their potential beneficial use as dietary supplements in rheumatoid arthritis patients may be recommended. (Author) 42 refs.

  4. Innate Immune Signaling by, Genetic Adjuvants for, DNA Vaccination

    Kouji Kobiyama

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA vaccines can induce both humoral and cellular immune responses. Although some DNA vaccines are already licensed for infectious diseases in animals, they are not licensed for human use because the risk and benefit of DNA vaccines is still controversial. Indeed, in humans, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines is lower than that of other traditional vaccines. To develop the use of DNA vaccines in the clinic, various approaches are in progress to enhance or improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. Recent studies have shown that immunogenicity of DNA vaccines are regulated by innate immune responses via plasmid DNA recognition through the STING-TBK1 signaling cascade. Similarly, molecules that act as dsDNA sensors that activate innate immune responses through STING-TBK1 have been identified and used as genetic adjuvants to enhance DNA vaccine immunogenicity in mouse models. However, the mechanisms that induce innate immune responses by DNA vaccines are still unclear. In this review, we will discuss innate immune signaling upon DNA vaccination and genetic adjuvants of innate immune signaling molecules.

  5. Geographic information systems: a useful tool to approach African swine fever surveillance management of wild pig populations.

    Rolesu, Sandro; Aloi, Daniela; Ghironi, Annalisa; Oggiano, Nicolino; Oggiano, Annalisa; Puggioni, Giantonella; Patta, Cristiana; Farina, Salvatore; Montinaro, Salvatore

    2007-01-01

    The epidemiological surveillance of African swine fever in wild pig populations requires the previous collection of numerous samples of biological materials for virological and serological testing from each animal that has been killed during the hunting season. The number of samples needs to demonstrate the absence of the disease at a prevalence level of 5% (and confidence level of 95%) in the area subject observed. Since the typology of the territory suitable for maintaining wild pig populations and the precise location can be identified, it is possible to pinpoint specific areas within Sardinia where organised sampling is undertaken. The results from tests are used to estimate the prevalence of the disease in the wild pig population in the place of origin. Areas were identified using the geographic information system technology with support from maps in the field. The correct localisation of seropositivity has led to the redefinition of high-risk areas for African swine fever. Results from the outbreaks and the surveillance of the wild pig population has confirmed the decreasing role of the wild boar in maintaining the disease.

  6. Continuous dry fermentation of swine manure for biogas production

    Chen, Chuang; Zheng, Dan [Biogas Institute of Ministry of Agriculture, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu, Gang–Jin [Biogas Institute of Ministry of Agriculture, Chengdu 610041 (China); Bioprocess Control AB, Scheelevägen 22, 223 63 Lund (Sweden); Deng, Liang–Wei, E-mail: dengliangwei@caas.cn [Biogas Institute of Ministry of Agriculture, Chengdu 610041 (China); Laboratory of Development and Application of Rural Renewable Energy, Ministry of Agriculture, Chengdu 610041 (China); Southwest Collaborative Innovation Center of Swine for Quality & Safety, Chengdu 611130 (China); Long, Yan; Fan, Zhan–Hui [Biogas Institute of Ministry of Agriculture, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Continuous dry fermentation of swine manure for biogas production is feasible. • The feedstock TS concentration exerted a significant impact on biogas production. • Influences of ammonia and digestate liquidity were investigated in this study. • The results showed that the feedstock TS of swine manure should not exceed 30%. - Abstract: A down plug-flow anaerobic reactor (DPAR) was designed for the feasibility study on continuous dry fermentation of swine manure without any additional stirring. Using fresh swine manure as the feedstock with TS concentration (w/w) of 20%, 25%, 30%, and 35%, stable volumetric biogas production rates of 2.40, 1.92, 0.911, and 0.644 L·(L d){sup −1} and biogas yields of 0.665, 0.532, 0.252, and 0.178 L g{sup −1}VS were obtained respectively, and the TS degradation rates were 46.5%, 45.4%, 53.2%, and 55.6%, respectively. With the increase of feedstock TS concentration, the concentration of ammonia nitrogen grew up to the maximum value of 3500 mg L{sup −1}. Biogas production was obviously inhibited when the concentration of ammonia nitrogen was above 3000 mg L{sup −1}. The maximal volumetric biogas production rate of 2.34 L·(L d){sup −1} and biogas yield of 0.649 L g{sup −1}VS were obtained with TS concentration of 25% at 25 °C without inhibition. Liquidity experiments showed that TS concentration of digestate could be less than 15.8%, and the flow rate of digestate more than 0.98 m s{sup −1} when the feedstock TS concentration was less than 35%, which indicated the digestate could be easily discharged from a DPAR. Therefore, it is feasible to conduct a continuous dry fermentation in a DPAR using fresh swine manure as the feedstock with TS concentration less than 35%, whereas the feedstock TS concentration should not exceed 30% to achieve the maximal biogas production rate and biogas yield.

  7. 9 CFR 94.8 - Pork and pork products from regions where African swine fever exists or is reasonably believed to...

    2010-01-01

    ... IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE... region with known outbreaks of African swine fever; or (4) A region's lack of a disease...

  8. Virulence determinants within the E2 glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus

    Johnston, Camille Melissa; Fahnøe, Ulrik; Lohse, Louise

    Classical Swine Fever is a highly contagious disease of pigs caused by Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV), a member of the pestivirus genus within the family Flaviviridae. The E2 glycoprotein of CSFV has been shown to be an important factor for the virulence of the virus. In a recent study, we ha...

  9. Denitrification enzyme activity in swine wastewater effluent of a nitrification/denitrification treatment system

    Intensification of swine production in the USA and around the world requires advanced manure management. For swine manure management in the state of North Carolina, one system met all of the required advanced management criteria, and it was qualified as a superior technology. This investigation was ...

  10. 76 FR 29991 - Live Goats and Swine for Export; Removal of Certain Testing Requirements

    2011-05-24

    ... brucellosis testing of goats and breeding swine intended for export to countries that do not require such... brucellosis prior to export. Some countries do not require that goats and breeding swine be tested for... eliminate the requirement for pre-export tuberculosis and brucellosis testing of goats and breeding...

  11. 75 FR 56912 - Live Goats and Swine for Export; Removal of Certain Testing Requirements

    2010-09-17

    ... requirement for pre-export tuberculosis and brucellosis testing of goats and breeding swine intended for... exportation be tested for tuberculosis and, for some goats, brucellosis prior to export. Section 91.9 requires... countries do not require that goats and breeding swine be tested for tuberculosis and brucellosis prior...

  12. Prevalence, serotype, virulence characteristics, clonality and antibiotic susceptibility of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica from swine feces

    Introduction: Swine are the only known animal reservoir of Yersinia enterocolitica (YE), a human pathogen. Since YE is a fecal organism of swine, the primary goal of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, serotype, virulence plasmid (pYV)-associated characteristics, clonality, and antibiotic su...

  13. No evidence of African swine fever virus replication in hard ticks

    de Carvalho Ferreira, Helena C; Tudela Zúquete, Sara; Wijnveld, Michiel; Weesendorp, Eefke; Jongejan, Frans; Stegeman, Arjan; Loeffen, Willie L A

    2014-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is caused by African swine fever virus (ASFV), a tick-borne DNA virus. Soft ticks of the genus Ornithodoros are the only biological vectors of ASFV recognized so far. Although other hard ticks have been tested for vector competence, two commonly found tick species in Europe

  14. Effects of oxytocin administration in early life on the behavioral and physiological stress response of swine

    The swine industry is moving toward the group-housing of sows. However, group-housing can result in increased aggression and social stress, with detrimental effects on swine health and productivity. In contrast, positive social relationships can reduce the adverse effects of social stress. This migh...

  15. Immunologic mechanisms in the adaptation of swine farm workers to their work environment

    Bønløkke, Jakob Hjort; Cormier, Yvon; Veillette, Marc;

    2013-01-01

    Swine building exposure causes inflammatory reactions that appear to be attenuated with prolonged periods of contact. The mechanisms behind this adaptation to a dusty and endotoxin-rich environment are poorly understood. Our aim was to compare levels of selected inflammatory mediators in swine fa...

  16. Seroprevalence and risk factors for the presence of ruminant pestviruses in the Dutch swine population

    Loeffen, W.L.A.; Beuningen, van A.R.; Quak, J.; Elbers, A.R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Swine can be infected with classical swine fever virus (CSFV), as well as ruminant pestiviruses: bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV), and Border disease virus (BDV). Cross-reactions between pestiviruses occur, both regarding protective immunity and in diagnostic tests. The presence of BVDV and BDV i

  17. Vegetative buffers for swine odor mitigation - wind tunnel evaluation of air flow dynamics

    Vegetative buffers are a cost effective method to mitigate odor and particulate emissions from swine confined facilities. Establishment of vegetative buffers can be done prior to beginning operations, or during any given point in the lifetime of the swine facility. Design of vegetative buffers shoul...

  18. A wind tunnel study of air flow near model swine confinement buildings

    One of the most significant and persistent environmental concerns regarding swine production is the transport of odor constituents, trace gases, and particulates from animal production and manure storage facilities. The objectives of this study were to determine how swine housing unit orientation af...

  19. 9 CFR 71.19 - Identification of swine in interstate commerce.

    2010-01-01

    ... commerce. 71.19 Section 71.19 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... GENERAL PROVISIONS § 71.19 Identification of swine in interstate commerce. (a)(1) Except as provided in... offered for sale or transportation, in interstate commerce, unless each swine is identified at...

  20. H1N1 'Swine Flu' Vaccine Unlikely to Raise Birth Defect Risk

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161034.html H1N1 'Swine Flu' Vaccine Unlikely to Raise Birth Defect ... Swedish researchers report that the vaccine against the H1N1 "swine flu" strain of influenza doesn't seem ...

  1. H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) URL of this page: https:// ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) - Multiple Languages To use the ...

  2. Treatment with interferon-alpha delays disease in swine infected with a highly virulent CSFV strain

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is an economically significant, highly contagious swine disease. The etiological agent, CSF virus (CSFV), is an enveloped virus with a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome, classified as a member of the genus Pestivirus within the family Flaviviridae (Becher et al.,...

  3. Species-specific visitation and removal of baits for delivery of pharmaceuticals to feral swine.

    Campbell, Tyler A; Long, David B

    2007-07-01

    Within the domestic swine industry there is growing trepidation about the role feral swine (Sus scrofa) play in the maintenance and transmission of important swine diseases. Innovative disease management tools for feral swine are needed. We used field trials conducted in southern Texas from February to March 2006 to compare species-specific visitation and removal rates of fish-flavored and vegetable-flavored baits with and without commercially available raccoon (Procyon lotor) repellent (trial 1) and removal rates of baits deployed in a systematic and cluster arrangement (trial 2). During trial 1, 1) cumulative bait removal rates after four nights ranged from 93% to 98%; 2) bait removal rates by feral swine, raccoons, and collared peccaries (Pecari tajacu) did not differ by treatment; and 3) coyotes (Canis latrans) removed more fish-flavored baits without raccoon repellent and white-tailed deer removed more vegetable-flavored baits without raccoon repellent than expected. During trial 2, feral swine removed fish-flavored baits distributed in a cluster arrangement (eight baits within 5 m2) at a rate greater than expected. Our observed bait removal rates illustrate bait attractiveness to feral swine. However, the diverse assemblage of omnivores in the United States compared with Australia where the baits were manufactured adds complexity to the development of a feral swine-specific baiting system for pharmaceutical delivery.

  4. Occurrence and movement of antibiotic resistant bacxteria, in tile-drained agricultural fields receiving swine manure

    The use of tylosin at subtherapeutic levels by the swine industry provides selective pressure for the development of antibiotic resistance in gastrointestinal bacteria. The land application of swine manure to drained agricultural fields might accelerate the transport of pathogen indicators such as e...

  5. Tylosin-resistant Enterococci, erm genes, and tylosin in drained fields receiving swine manure

    The use of tylosin at subtherapeutic levels by the swine industry provides selective pressure for the development of antibiotic resistance in gastrointestinal bacteria. The land application of swine manure to drained agricultural fields might introduce elevated levels of total and tylosin-resistant ...

  6. 78 FR 58512 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Swine Health

    2013-09-24

    ... of swine diseases, and part 85 regulates the interstate movement of swine to prevent the spread of the pseudorabies virus (PRV). In addition, part 52 allows for the payment of indemnity, under the... the spread of pests and diseases of livestock within the United States. The regulations in part...

  7. Study to assess knowledge, attitude and practice regarding swine flu vaccine amongst medical students

    Rajvardhan R. Solunke

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: This study shows high knowledge, favourable attitude but poor practice towards Swine flu vaccination amongst medical students. So there is need to increase awareness for vaccination of swine flu amongst medical students by continuous health education and also need to increase the availability of vaccine in government hospitals. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(5.000: 1978-1983

  8. Reducing odorous VOC emissions from swine manure using soybean peroxidase and peroxides

    Air emissions from swine production facilities can cause odor nuisance issues. Peroxidase enzymes have been used to treat phenolic compounds in industrial wastewaters, but little is known about their efficacy for treating swine manure. The objective of the research was to determine the optimum app...

  9. Microbial Ecology of Stored Swine Manure and Reduction of Emissions Using Condensed Tannins.

    Management practices from large-scale swine production facilities have resulted in the increased collection and storage of manure for off-season fertilization use. Stored swine manure serves as a habitat for billions of microorganisms and is associated with the generation of odorous compounds and g...

  10. The impact of carbohydrate and protein level and sources on swine manure foaming properties

    This study explored the impact of swine diet on the composition, methane production potential, and foaming properties of manure. Samples of swine manure were collected from controlled feeding trials with diets varying in protein and carbohydrate levels and sources. Protein sources consisted of corn ...

  11. Effect of turning frequency and season on composting materials from swine high-rise facilities

    Composting of swine manure has several advantages, liquid slurries are converted to solid, the total volume of material is reduced and the stabilized product is more easily transported off-site. Despite this, swine waste is generally stored, treated and applied in its liquid form. The high-rise fini...

  12. Current trends from the USDA influenza a virus in swine surveillance system

    A U.S. national surveillance system for influenza A viruses (IAV) in swine was initiated in 2009 with increasing participation to the present day. The objectives are to monitor genetic evolution of IAV in swine, make isolates available for research, diagnostic reagents, and vaccine development throu...

  13. Virulence determinants within the E2 glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus

    Johnston, Camille Melissa; Fahnøe, Ulrik; Lohse, Louise

    Classical Swine Fever is a highly contagious disease of pigs caused by Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV), a member of the pestivirus genus within the family Flaviviridae. The E2 glycoprotein of CSFV has been shown to be an important factor for the virulence of the virus. In a recent study, we have...

  14. Pathogenesis Studies of the 2009 Pandemic Influenza Virus and Pseudorabies Virus From Wild Pigs In Swine

    Over the last ten years in the United States the epidemiology and ecology of swine flu and pseudorabies has been dynamic. Swine flu is caused by influenza A virus and the disease was first recognized in pigs concurrent with the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic in humans. Pigs displayed clinical signs simil...

  15. The genetic diversity of contemporary swine influenza A viruses in the United States

    Introduction: Influenza A virus (IAV) is one of the most important respiratory pathogens of swine. It impacts mortality and causes significant financial losses through decreased production and the costs associated with vaccination and treatment. Further, due to the susceptibility of swine to transie...

  16. Unraveling molecular signatures of immunostimulatory adjuvants in the female genital tract through systems biology.

    Madelene Lindqvist

    Full Text Available Sexually transmitted infections (STIs unequivocally represent a major public health concern in both industrialized and developing countries. Previous efforts to develop vaccines for systemic immunization against a large number of STIs in humans have been unsuccessful. There is currently a drive to develop mucosal vaccines and adjuvants for delivery through the genital tract to confer protective immunity against STIs. Identification of molecular signatures that can be used as biomarkers for adjuvant potency can inform rational development of potent mucosal adjuvants. Here, we used systems biology to study global gene expression and signature molecules and pathways in the mouse vagina after treatment with two classes of experimental adjuvants. The Toll-like receptor 9 agonist CpG ODN and the invariant natural killer T cell agonist alpha-galactosylceramide, which we previously identified as equally potent vaginal adjuvants, were selected for this study. Our integrated analysis of genome-wide transcriptome data determined which signature pathways, processes and networks are shared by or otherwise exclusive to these 2 classes of experimental vaginal adjuvants in the mouse vagina. To our knowledge, this is the first integrated genome-wide transcriptome analysis of the effects of immunomodulatory adjuvants on the female genital tract of a mammal. These results could inform rational development of effective mucosal adjuvants for vaccination against STIs.

  17. Trastuzumab-associated cardiac adverse effects in the herceptin adjuvant trial

    Suter, Thomas M.; Procter, Marion; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Muscholl, Michael; Bergh, Jonas; Carlomagno, Chiara; Perren, Timothy; Passalacqua, Rodolfo; Bighin, Claudia; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Ageev, Fail T.; Hitre, Erika; Groetz, Juergen; Iwata, Hiroji; Knap, Malgorzata; Gnant, Michael; Muehlbauer, Susanne; Spence, Alison; Gelber, Richard D.; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this analysis was to investigate trastuzumab- associated cardiac adverse effects in breast cancer patients after completion of ( neo) adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy. Patients and Methods The Herceptin Adjuvant ( HERA) trial is a three- group, multicenter, o

  18. Long-term heart function after adjuvant epirubicin chemotherapy for breast cancer

    Appel, Jon M; Zerahn, Bo; Møller, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Newer studies raise concern that adjuvant anthracycline treatment for breast cancer (BC) causes long-term heart damage. We aimed to examine whether heart failure or impairment could be demonstrated several years after low-dose epirubicin-based adjuvant treatment....

  19. Current adjuvant treatment modalities for gastric cancer:From history to the future

    Leyla Kilic; Cetin Ordu; Ibrahim Yildiz; Fatma Sen; Serkan Keskin; Rumeysa Ciftci; Kezban Nur Pilanci

    2016-01-01

    The discrepancy between the surgical technique and the type of adjuvant chemotherapy used in clinical trials and patient outcomes in terms of overall survival rates has led to the generation of different adjuvant treatment protocols in distinct parts of the world.The adjuvant treatment recommendation is generally chemoradiotherapy in the United States,perioperative chemotherapy in the United Kingdom and parts of Europe,and chemotherapy in Asia.These options mainly rely on the United States Intergroup-0116,United Kingdom British Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy,and the Asian Adjuvant Chemotherapy Trial of S-1 for Gastric Cancer and Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin Adjuvant Study in Stomach Cancer trials.However,the benefits were evident for only certain patients,which were not very homogeneous regarding the type of surgery,chemotherapy regimens,and stage of disease.Whether the dissimilarities in survival are attributable to surgical technique or intrinsic biological differences is a subject of debate.Regardless of the extent of surgery,multimodal therapy may offer modest survival advantage at least for diseases with lymph node involvement.Moreover,in the era of individualized treatment for most of the other cancer types,identification of special subgroups comprising those who will derive more or no benefit from adjuvant therapy merits further investigation.The aim of this review is to reveal the historical evolution and future reflections of adjuvant treatment modalities for resected gastric cancer patients.

  20. The effect of immediate breast reconstruction on the timing of adjuvant chemotherapy: a systematic review

    J. Xavier Harmeling; C.A.E. Kouwenberg (Casimir A. E.); E. Bijlard (Eveline); K.N.J. Burger (Koert N. J.); A. Jager (Agnes); M.A.M. Mureau (Marc)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAdjuvant chemotherapy is often needed to achieve adequate breast cancer control. The increasing popularity of immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) raises concerns that this procedure may delay the time to adjuvant chemotherapy (TTC), which may negatively impact oncological outcome. The

  1. Aluminium based adjuvants and their effects on mitochondria and lysosomes of phagocytosing cells.

    Ohlsson, Lars; Exley, Christopher; Darabi, Anna; Sandén, Emma; Siesjö, Peter; Eriksson, Håkan

    2013-11-01

    Aluminium oxyhydroxide, Al(OH)3 is one of few compounds approved as an adjuvant in human vaccines. However, the mechanism behind its immune stimulating properties is still poorly understood. In vitro co-culture of an aluminium adjuvant and the human monocytic cell line THP-1 resulted in reduced cell proliferation. Inhibition occurred at concentrations of adjuvant several times lower than would be found at the injection site using a vaccine formulation containing an aluminium adjuvant. Based on evaluation of the mitochondrial membrane potential, THP-1 cells showed no mitochondrial rupture after co-culture with the aluminium adjuvant, instead an increase in mitochondrial activity was seen. The THP-1 cells are phagocytosing cells and after co-culture with the aluminium adjuvant the phagosomal pathway was obstructed. Primary or early phagosomes mature into phagolysosomes with an internal pH of 4.5 - 5 and carry a wide variety of hydrolysing enzymes. Co-culture with the aluminium adjuvant yielded a reduced level of acidic vesicles and cathepsin L activity, a proteolytic enzyme of the phagolysosomes, was almost completely inhibited. THP-1 cells are an appropriate in vitro model in order to investigate the mechanism behind the induction of a phagocytosing antigen presenting cell into an inflammatory cell by aluminium adjuvants. Much information will be gained by investigating the phagosomal pathway and what occurs inside the phagosomes and to elucidate the ultimate fate of phagocytosed aluminium particles.

  2. Prognostic role of adjuvant radiotherapy in triple-negative breast cancer : A historical cohort study

    Bhoo Pathy, Nirmala; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Wong, Fuh-Yong; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Kwong, Ava; Tan, Ern-Yu; Taib, Nur Aishah; Nei, Wen-Long; Ho, Gwo-Fuang; Tan, Benita; Chan, Patrick; Lee, Soo-Chin; Hartman, Mikael; Yip, Cheng-Har; Dent, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    The value of adjuvant radiotherapy in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is currently debated. We assessed the association between adjuvant radiotherapy and survival in a large cohort of Asian women with TNBC. Women diagnosed with TNBC from 2006 to 2011 in five Asian centers (N=1,138) were include

  3. Feasibility of a randomized trial on adjuvant radio-iodine therapy in differentiated thyroid cancer.

    Dragoiescu, C.; Hoekstra, O.S.; Kuik, D.J.; Lips, P.T.A.M.; Plaizier, MA; Rodrigus, PT; Huijsmans, DA; Ribot, JG; Kuijpens, J; Coebergh, J.W.; Teule, G.J.J.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Justification for adjuvant radio-iodine (I-131) therapy in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is purely based on retrospective data. This is true for ablative therapy and even more so for high-dosage adjuvant schedules. Randomized trials on the latter application are considered impossib

  4. Antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates enable co-delivery of antigen and adjuvant to dendritic cells in cis but only have partial targeting specificity.

    Martin Kreutz

    Full Text Available Antibody-antigen conjugates, which promote antigen-presentation by dendritic cells (DC by means of targeted delivery of antigen to particular DC subsets, represent a powerful vaccination approach. To ensure immunity rather than tolerance induction the co-administration of a suitable adjuvant is paramount. However, co-administration of unlinked adjuvant cannot ensure that all cells targeted by the antibody conjugates are appropriately activated. Furthermore, antigen-presenting cells (APC that do not present the desired antigen are equally strongly activated and could prime undesired responses against self-antigens. We, therefore, were interested in exploring targeted co-delivery of antigen and adjuvant in cis in form of antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates for the induction of anti-tumour immunity. In this study, we report on the assembly and characterization of conjugates consisting of DEC205-specific antibody, the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN. We show that such conjugates are more potent at inducing cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses than control conjugates mixed with soluble CpG. However, our study also reveals that the nucleic acid moiety of such antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates alters their binding and uptake and allows delivery of the antigen and the adjuvant to cells partially independently of DEC205. Nevertheless, antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates are superior to antibody-free antigen-adjuvant conjugates in priming CTL responses and efficiently induce anti-tumour immunity in the murine B16 pseudo-metastasis model. A better understanding of the role of the antibody moiety is required to inform future conjugate vaccination strategies for efficient induction of anti-tumour responses.

  5. Pseudo-Mannosylated DC-SIGN Ligands as Potential Adjuvants for HIV Vaccines

    Angela Berzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of new and effective adjuvants may play a fundamental role in improving HIV vaccine efficacy. New classes of vaccine adjuvants activate innate immunity receptors, notably toll like receptors (TLRs. Adjuvants targeting the C-Type lectin receptor DC-SIGN may be alternative or complementary to adjuvants based on TRL activation. Herein we evaluate the ability of the glycomimetic DC-SIGN ligand Polyman 19 (PM 19 to modulate innate immune responses. Results showed that PM 19 alone, or in combination with TLR agonists, induces the expression of cytokines, β chemokines and co-stimulatory molecules that may, in turn, modulate adaptive immunity and exert anti-viral effects. These results indicate that the suitability of this compound as a vaccine adjuvant should be further evaluated.

  6. A synthetic adjuvant to enhance and expand immune responses to influenza vaccines.

    Rhea N Coler

    Full Text Available Safe, effective adjuvants that enhance vaccine potency, including induction of neutralizing Abs against a broad range of variant strains, is an important strategy for the development of seasonal influenza vaccines which can provide optimal protection, even during seasons when available vaccines are not well matched to circulating viruses. We investigated the safety and ability of Glucopyranosyl Lipid Adjuvant-Stable Emulsion (GLA-SE, a synthetic Toll-like receptor (TLR4 agonist formulation, to adjuvant Fluzone® in mice and non-human primates. The GLA-SE adjuvanted Fluzone vaccine caused no adverse reactions, increased the induction of T helper type 1 (T(H1-biased cytokines such as IFNγ, TNF and IL-2, and broadened serological responses against drifted A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 influenza variants. These results suggest that synthetic TLR4 adjuvants can enhance the magnitude and quality of protective immunity induced by influenza vaccines.

  7. The Effect of Adjuvants on Penetration of beta-cypermethrin Through the Epidermis of Cabbage Leaf

    WANG Yi; ZHANG Li-ta; ZHENG Fei-neng; CHEN Fu-liang; LIANG Wen-ping

    2002-01-01

    The effects of three types of adjuvant (mineral oil, higher aliphatic acid and nonionic surfactant) on the penetration of beta-cypermethrin through the cabbage leaf surface were studied. The results showed that the penetration was positively correlated with both the concentration of adjuvant and the time after application, in a given range of treatment. A synergistic effect of two types of adjuvant on the penetration was found. Some physical properties of emulsions were determined. The change of the structures of the cabbage leaf surface by these adjuvants was observed from photomicrographs. The mechanism concerned with the effect of these adjuvants on the penetration of beta-cypermethrin through the cabbage leaf surface was tentatively discussed.

  8. Saponins from the Spanish saffron Crocus sativus are efficient adjuvants for protein-based vaccines.

    Castro-Díaz, Nathaly; Salaun, Bruno; Perret, Rachel; Sierro, Sophie; Romero, Jackeline F; Fernández, Jose-Antonio; Rubio-Moraga, Angela; Romero, Pedro

    2012-01-05

    Protein and peptide-based vaccines provide rigorously formulated antigens. However, these purified products are only weakly immunogenic by themselves and therefore require the addition of immunostimulatory components or adjuvants in the vaccine formulation. Various compounds derived from pathogens, minerals or plants, possess pro-inflammatory properties which allow them to act as adjuvants and contribute to the induction of an effective immune response. The results presented here demonstrate the adjuvant properties of novel saponins derived from the Spanish saffron Crocus sativus. In vivo immunization studies and tumor protection experiments unambiguously establish the value of saffron saponins as candidate adjuvants. These saponins were indeed able to increase both humoral and cellular immune responses to protein-based vaccines, ultimately providing a significant degree of protection against tumor challenge when administered in combination with a tumor antigen. This preclinical study provides an in depth immunological characterization of a new saponin as a vaccine adjuvant, and encourages its further development for use in vaccine formulations.

  9. Adjuvant chemoradiotherapy for adenocarcinoma of the stomach. A new progress?; Chimioradiotherapie dans le traitement adjuvant des adenocarcinomes gastriques: reelle avancee?

    Mineur, L. [Institut Sainte Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France); Lacaine, F. [Hopital Tenon, 75 - Paris (France); Ychou, M. [Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer Val d' Aurelle, Service d' Oncologie, 34 - Montpellier (France); Bosset, J.F. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Service de Radiotherapie, 25 - Besancon (France); Daban, A. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Service de Radiotherapie, 86 - Poitiers (France)

    2002-11-01

    Frequency of local and distant failures after gastrectomy has led to extended lymph nodes dissection to obtain a better locoregional control. However, five year survival rates were not significantly different between patients undergoing D2 and D1 lymphadenectomy, and higher morbidity and post operative deaths were reported in large randomized trials (respectively 25% vs 48% and 4 vs 13%). Additionally, several met-analysis failed to demonstrate a significant survival advantage with adjuvant chemotherapy. The results of the first trial demonstrating one advantage to adjuvant post-operative chemoradiotherapy should modify the standard care. Disease free and overall survival after surgery alone and after surgery and concurrent chemoradiotherapy were respectively 31% vs 48% and 41% vs 50%. The inter-group trial demonstrate that better local control improve survival if radiation fields include stamps, tumour bed, proximal nodal chains and nodes corresponding to D2 extended lymph nodes dissection. Treatment was feasible with few severe toxic effects (1%). Of the 281 patients, 17% stopped treatment because toxic effects. Technical modalities of radiotherapy and post-operative nutrition support which are critical points of interest for this treatment, are also discussed. (authors)

  10. Preliminary results of capecitabine metronomic chemotherapy in operable triple-negative breast cancer after standard adjuvant therapy – A single-arm phase II study

    Hanan Shawky

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: One year of capecitabine metronomic therapy preceded by standard adjuvant chemotherapy, is active and well-tolerated in TNBC patients previously treated with standard adjuvant chemotherapy.

  11. Pilot scale production of the vaccine adjuvant Proteoliposome derived Cochleates (AFCo1) from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B

    Zayas, Caridad; González, Domingo; Acevedo, Reinaldo; del Campo, Judith; Lastre, Miriam; González, Elizabeth; Romeu, Belkis; Cuello, Maribel; Balboa, Julio; Cabrera, Osmir; Guilherme, Luisa; Pérez, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    The use of new adjuvants in vaccine formulations is a subject of current research. Only few parenteral adjuvants have been licensed. We have developed a mucosal and parenteral adjuvant known as AFCo1 (Adjuvant Finlay Cochleate 1, derived from proteoliposomes of N. meningitidis B) using a dialysis procedure to produce them on lab scale. The immunogenicity of the AFCo1 produced by dialysis has been already evaluated, but it was necessary to demonstrate the feasibility of a larger-scale manufact...

  12. Successful penile reconstruction after multimodal therapy in patients with primitive neuroectodermal tumor originating from the penis.

    Akino, Tomoshige; Shinohara, Nobuo; Hatanaka, Kanako; Kobayashi, Nozomi; Yamamoto, Yuhei; Nonomura, Katsuya

    2014-06-01

    We herein present an extremely rare case of primitive neuroectodermal tumor originating in the penis. A 16-year-old male adolescent presented with painful penile swelling. Pathological, immunohistochemical and cytogenetical examinations of the specimens obtained from total penectomy confirmed the diagnosis of primitive neuroectodermal tumor. After total penectomy, the patient received adjuvant chemotherapy with ifosfamide-based regimen for 48 weeks. As a series of therapies, the patient underwent penile reconstruction surgery after completing adjuvant chemotherapy. The patient has not shown any evidence of recurrence for the 7 years after penile reconstruction surgery, and voiding function is completely normal. A favorable outcome was observed by multimodal therapy including aggressive resection for local control, intensive adjuvant chemotherapy, and penile reconstruction with cosmetic and functional success. Similar therapeutic approaches might be selected for children with primary malignant tumors of the penis.

  13. Comparative fecal metagenomics unveils unique functional capacity of the swine gut

    Martinson John

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uncovering the taxonomic composition and functional capacity within the swine gut microbial consortia is of great importance to animal physiology and health as well as to food and water safety due to the presence of human pathogens in pig feces. Nonetheless, limited information on the functional diversity of the swine gut microbiome is available. Results Analysis of 637, 722 pyrosequencing reads (130 megabases generated from Yorkshire pig fecal DNA extracts was performed to help better understand the microbial diversity and largely unknown functional capacity of the swine gut microbiome. Swine fecal metagenomic sequences were annotated using both MG-RAST and JGI IMG/M-ER pipelines. Taxonomic analysis of metagenomic reads indicated that swine fecal microbiomes were dominated by Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes phyla. At a finer phylogenetic resolution, Prevotella spp. dominated the swine fecal metagenome, while some genes associated with Treponema and Anareovibrio species were found to be exclusively within the pig fecal metagenomic sequences analyzed. Functional analysis revealed that carbohydrate metabolism was the most abundant SEED subsystem, representing 13% of the swine metagenome. Genes associated with stress, virulence, cell wall and cell capsule were also abundant. Virulence factors associated with antibiotic resistance genes with highest sequence homology to genes in Bacteroidetes, Clostridia, and Methanosarcina were numerous within the gene families unique to the swine fecal metagenomes. Other abundant proteins unique to the distal swine gut shared high sequence homology to putative carbohydrate membrane transporters. Conclusions The results from this metagenomic survey demonstrated the presence of genes associated with resistance to antibiotics and carbohydrate metabolism suggesting that the swine gut microbiome may be shaped by husbandry practices.

  14. An instantaneous approach for determining the infrared emissivity of swine surface and the influencing factors.

    Zhang, Kun; Jiao, Leizi; Zhao, Xiande; Dong, Daming

    2016-04-01

    Infrared thermal imaging technology has been widely employed in temperature measurements of human and animals and its accuracy relies on the determination process of the emissivity of the target to a large extent. However, common used methods were unable to determine the emissivity of the surface of living animals and thus lower the accuracy. In this paper, we suggested a new approach to acquire the infrared emissivity of living swine in real time. In the approach, the surface temperature of swine and reference body were measured to compute the emissivity and the measurement process was completed in a non-contact and non-invasive manner. We changed the surface reflection energy of animals and reference body by changing the ambient radiant energy and obtain the surface emissivity in real time without confirming the actual temperature of animal surface. In this way, the infrared emissivity of the animal surface can be determined instantaneously and without knowing the real temperature. Both swine specimen and a living swine were used in this study. Using this method, we measured the emissivity of different body sites of the swine. The results showed that the emissivity values at different body sites show the significant differences. The emissivity values at trotter and eye were respectively 0.895 and 0.930 and the emissivity on swine surface varied from 0.945 to 0.978. More important, the distribution of the infrared emissivity on a living swine was explored and the detailed differences of the emissivity on a swine surface can be cleanly seen. Furthermore, we studied the influencing factors on the emissivity of animal surface, through measuring the emissivity distribution on swine surface when pig specimens were sprayed with water on the surface or heated using this method. This study is of great significance for the accurate measurement of swine surface temperature.

  15. Avian-like A (H1N1) swine influenza virus antibodies among swine farm residents and pigs in southern China.

    Zhou, Han; Cao, Zhenpeng; Tan, Likai; Fu, Xinliang; Lu, Gang; Qi, Wenbao; Ke, Changwen; Wang, Heng; Sun, Lingshuang; Zhang, Guihong

    2014-01-01

    Infection of human with avian-like A (H1N1) swine influenza virus (SIV) occasionally occurs in China, suggesting a potential risk of cross-species transmission of the swine influenza H1N1 virus from pigs to humans, particularly to those having direct contact with pigs. A seroepidemiological study was conducted to assess the prevalence of antibodies against the avian-like A (H1N1) SIV among swine farm residents and pigs in southern China to evaluate the risk of infection to swine farm workers. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays revealed that 11.17% (61/546) of the sera samples from swine farm residents in southern China were positive for antibodies against the avian-like A (H1N1) SIV. The difference in numbers of antibody-positive samples obtained from swine farm residents and a control group of healthy city residents was statistically significant (P = 0.031). In addition, 219 of the 1,180 serum samples from pigs were positive for the antibodies against an avian-like A (H1N1) SIV, A/swine/Guangdong/SS1/2013(H1N1), as assessed by HI. The data suggest that occupational exposure of swine farm residents and veterinarians in southern China to pigs may increase their risk of acquiring avian-like A (H1N1) SIV infection. According to a special pig farming model in southern China, the staff and residents are in close contact with infected pigs and may be among the first to become infected.

  16. The role of postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy in resected esophageal cancer

    Lee, Chang Geol; Kim, Choong Bae; Chung, Kyung Young; Lee, Doo Yun; Seong Jin Sil; Kim, Gwi Eon; Suh, Chang Ok [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    A retrospective study was performed to evaluate whether postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy can improve survival and decrease recurrence as compared with surgery alone in resected esophageal cancer. From Jan. 1985 to Dec. 1993, among 94 esophageal cancer patients treated with surgery, fifty-one patients were included in this study. Transthoracic esophagectomy was performed in 35 patients and transhiatal esophagectomy in 16. Postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy was performed 4 weeks after surgery in 26 among 38 patients in stage II and III. A total dose of 30 {approx} 60 Gy in 1.8 Gy daily fraction, median 54 Gy over 6 weeks, was delivered in the mediastinum + both supraclavicular lymph nodes or celiac lymph nodes according to the tumor location. Forty-seven patients (92%) had squamous histology. The median follow-up period was 38 months. The overall 2-year and 5-year survival and median survival were 56.4%, 36.8% and 45 months. Two-year and 5-year survival and median survival by stage were 92%, 60.3% for stage I, 63%, 42% and 51 months for stage II and 34%, 23% and 19 months for stage III ({rho} = 0.04). For stage II and III patients, 5-year survival and median survival were 22.8%. 45 months for the surgery alone group and 37.8%, 22 months for the postoperative RT group ({rho} = 0.89). For stage III patients, 2-year survival and median survival were 0%, 11 months for the surgery alone group and 36.5%, 20 months for the postoperative RT group ({rho} = 0.14). Local and distant failure rates for stage II and III were 50%, 16% for the surgery alone and 39%, 31% for the postoperative RT group. For N1 patients, local failure rate was 71% for the surgery alone group and 37% for the postoperative RT group ({rho} = 0.19). Among 10 local failures in the postoperative RT group, in-field failures were 2, marginal failures 1, out-field 5 and anastomotic site failures 2. There were no statistically significant differences in either the overall survival or the patterns of failure

  17. Nested RT-PCR method for the detection of European avian-like H1 swine inlfuenza A virus

    WEI Yan-di; PEI Xing-yao; ZHANG Yuan; YU Chen-fang; SUN Hong-lei; LIU Jin-hua; PU Juan

    2016-01-01

    Swine inlfuenza A virus (swine IAV) circulates worldwide in pigs and poses a serious public health threat, as evidenced by the 2009 H1N1 inlfuenza pandemic. Among multiple subtypes/lineages of swine inlfuenza A viruses, European avian-like (EA) H1N1 swine IAV has been dominant since 2005 in China and caused infections in humans in 2010. Highly sensitive and speciifc methods of detection are required to differentiate EA H1N1 swine IAVs from viruses belonging to other lineages and subtypes. In this study, a nested reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay was developed to detect EA H1 swine IAVs. Two primer sets (outer and inner) were designed speciifcaly to target the viral hemagglutinin genes. Speciifc PCR products were obtained from al tested EA H1N1 swine IAV isolates, but not from other lineages of H1 swine IAVs, other subtypes of swine IAVs, or other infectious swine viruses. The sensitivity of the nested RT-PCR was improved to 1 plaque forming unit (PFU) mL–1which was over 104 PFU mL–1 for a previously established multiplex RT-PCR method. The nested RT-PCR results obtained from screening 365 clinical samples were consistent with those obtained using conventional virus isolation methods combined with sequencing. Thus, the nested RT-PCR assay reported herein is more sensitive and suitable for the diagnosis of clinical infections and surveilance of EA H1 swine IAVs in pigs and humans.

  18. Novel triple-reassortant H1N1 swine influenza viruses in pigs in Tianjin, Northern China.

    Sun, Ying-Feng; Wang, Xiu-Hui; Li, Xiu-Li; Zhang, Li; Li, Hai-Hua; Lu, Chao; Yang, Chun-Lei; Feng, Jing; Han, Wei; Ren, Wei-Ke; Tian, Xiang-Xue; Tong, Guang-Zhi; Wen, Feng; Li, Ze-Jun; Gong, Xiao-Qian; Liu, Xiao-Min; Ruan, Bao-Yang; Yan, Ming-Hua; Yu, Hai

    2016-02-01

    Pigs are susceptible to both human and avian influenza viruses and therefore have been proposed to be mixing vessels for the generation of pandemic influenza viruses through reassortment. In this study, for the first time, we report the isolation and genetic analyses of three novel triple-reassortant H1N1 swine influenza viruses from pigs in Tianjin, Northern China. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these novel viruses contained genes from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (PB2, PB1, PA and NP), Eurasian swine (HA, NA and M) and triple-reassortant swine (NS) lineages. This indicated that the reassortment among the 2009 pandemic H1N1, Eurasian swine and triple-reassortant swine influenza viruses had taken place in pigs in Tianjin and resulted in the generation of new viruses. Furthermore, three human-like H1N1, two classical swine H1N1 and two Eurasian swine H1N1 viruses were also isolated during the swine influenza virus surveillance from 2009 to 2013, which indicated that multiple genetic lineages of swine H1N1 viruses were co-circulating in the swine population in Tianjin, China. The emergence of novel triple-reassortant H1N1 swine influenza viruses may be a potential threat to human health and emphasizes the importance of further continuous surveillance.

  19. [Endotoxin adsortion as adjuvant therapy in gram negative severe sepsis].

    Candel, F J; Martínez-Sagasti, F; Borges, M; Maseda, E; Herrera-Gutiérrez, M; Garnacho-Montero, J; Maynar, F J; Zaragoza, R; Mensa, J; Azanza, J R

    2010-09-01

    The mortality rate of severe sepsis and septic shock remains still high. Within the last years a better knowledge of its physiopathology and the implementation of a group of measures addressed to a fast identification and early treatment of the septic patients have proved to reduce mortality rate. Likewise, it continues being investigated in modulating the inflammatory response and limiting the harmful action of the bacterial products on the immune system. As a result of this research some endotoxin adsorber devices have been designed to control one of the most important targets that start the inflammatory cascade when gram negative microorganisms are involved.The usefulness that these endotoxin removal devices might have as adjuvant treatment in the Septic Syndrome and its applicability are reviewed in this paper. Likewise a profile of patient that might be to the benefit of this therapy is suggested according to the current knowledge.

  20. Cardiotoxicity in Asymptomatic Patients Receiving Adjuvant 5-fluorouracil

    Nielsen, Karin; Polk, Anne; Nielsen, Dorte Lisbet

    2014-01-01

    Evolving evidence of cardiotoxicity in cancer patients treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been reported. We report two different clinical manifestations of asymptomatic 5-FU-associated cardiotoxicity in patients operated for colorectal cancer and treated with adjuvant chemotherapy of 5-FU...... (bolus-injection and continuous infusion for 46 hours), folinic acid and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX). For a research study evaluating cardiac events during 5-FU treatment, Holter monitoring, electrocardiogram (ECG) and echocardiography were done and cardiac markers monitored before and during the first...... and hyperlipidemia as well as an incidental finding of negative T-waves in electrocardiogram years before 5-FU treatment. No subjective cardiac symptoms were described during infusion, but approximately 12 hours after infusion she suffered from cardiac arrest but was revived. Subsequent analysis of the Holter...

  1. Uncaria tomentosa-Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer: Clinical Trial.

    Santos Araújo, Maria do Carmo; Farias, Iria Luiza; Gutierres, Jessie; Dalmora, Sergio L; Flores, Nélia; Farias, Julia; de Cruz, Ivana; Chiesa, Juarez; Morsch, Vera Maria; Chitolina Schetinger, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm affecting women worldwide. Some of the recommended treatments involve chemotherapy whose toxic effects include leukopenia and neutropenia. This study assessed the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa (Ut) in reducing the adverse effects of chemotherapy through a randomized clinical trial. Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma-Stage II, who underwent a treatment regimen known as FAC (Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide), were divided into two groups: the UtCa received chemotherapy plus 300 mg dry Ut extract per day and the Ca group that only received chemotherapy and served as the control experiment. Blood samples were collected before each one of the six chemotherapy cycles and blood counts, immunological parameters, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress were analyzed. Uncaria tomentosa reduced the neutropenia caused by chemotherapy and was also able to restore cellular DNA damage. We concluded that Ut is an effective adjuvant treatment for breast cancer.

  2. Uncaria tomentosa—Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer: Clinical Trial

    Santos Araújo, Maria do Carmo; Farias, Iria Luiza; Gutierres, Jessie; Dalmora, Sergio L.; Flores, Nélia; Farias, Julia; de Cruz, Ivana; Chiesa, Juarez; Morsch, Vera Maria; Chitolina Schetinger, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm affecting women worldwide. Some of the recommended treatments involve chemotherapy whose toxic effects include leukopenia and neutropenia. This study assessed the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa (Ut) in reducing the adverse effects of chemotherapy through a randomized clinical trial. Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma—Stage II, who underwent a treatment regimen known as FAC (Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide), were divided into two groups: the UtCa received chemotherapy plus 300 mg dry Ut extract per day and the Ca group that only received chemotherapy and served as the control experiment. Blood samples were collected before each one of the six chemotherapy cycles and blood counts, immunological parameters, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress were analyzed. Uncaria tomentosa reduced the neutropenia caused by chemotherapy and was also able to restore cellular DNA damage. We concluded that Ut is an effective adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. PMID:22811748

  3. Uncaria tomentosa—Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer: Clinical Trial

    Maria do Carmo Santos Araújo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm affecting women worldwide. Some of the recommended treatments involve chemotherapy whose toxic effects include leukopenia and neutropenia. This study assessed the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa (Ut in reducing the adverse effects of chemotherapy through a randomized clinical trial. Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma—Stage II, who underwent a treatment regimen known as FAC (Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide, were divided into two groups: the UtCa received chemotherapy plus 300 mg dry Ut extract per day and the Ca group that only received chemotherapy and served as the control experiment. Blood samples were collected before each one of the six chemotherapy cycles and blood counts, immunological parameters, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress were analyzed. Uncaria tomentosa reduced the neutropenia caused by chemotherapy and was also able to restore cellular DNA damage. We concluded that Ut is an effective adjuvant treatment for breast cancer.

  4. Prolonged Survival in Stage III Melanoma with Ipilimumab Adjuvant Therapy

    Eggermont, Alexander M M; Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna; Grob, Jean-Jacques;

    2016-01-01

    Background On the basis of data from a phase 2 trial that compared the checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab at doses of 0.3 mg, 3 mg, and 10 mg per kilogram of body weight in patients with advanced melanoma, this phase 3 trial evaluated ipilimumab at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram in patients who had...... undergone complete resection of stage III melanoma. Methods After patients had undergone complete resection of stage III cutaneous melanoma, we randomly assigned them to receive ipilimumab at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram (475 patients) or placebo (476) every 3 weeks for four doses, then every 3 months...... patients (1.1%) died owing to immune-related adverse events. Conclusions As adjuvant therapy for high-risk stage III melanoma, ipilimumab at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram resulted in significantly higher rates of recurrence-free survival, overall survival, and distant metastasis-free survival than placebo...

  5. Adjuvant systemic therapy in older women with breast cancer

    Leone, Julieta; Leone, Bernardo Amadeo; Leone, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer in the elderly is an increasing clinical problem. In addition, ~60% of deaths from breast cancer occur in women aged 65 years and older. Despite this, older women with breast cancer have been underrepresented in clinical trials, and this has led to less than optimal evidence to guide their therapy. The management of elderly women with early breast cancer is a complex process that requires careful evaluation of life expectancy, comorbidities, patient values, and risks and benefits of available treatment options. This review will focus on current adjuvant systemic therapy options for older women with breast cancer, discuss the principles in the decision-making process, and define the role of endocrine therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted agents. PMID:27524919

  6. Lactic acid bacteria as adjuvants for sublingual allergy vaccines.

    Van Overtvelt, Laurence; Moussu, Helene; Horiot, Stéphane; Samson, Sandrine; Lombardi, Vincent; Mascarell, Laurent; van de Moer, Ariane; Bourdet-Sicard, Raphaëlle; Moingeon, Philippe

    2010-04-01

    We compared immunomodulatory properties of 11 strains of lactic acid bacteria as well as their capacity to enhance sublingual immunotherapy efficacy in a murine asthma model. Two types of bacterial strains were identified, including: (i) potent inducers of IL-12p70 and IL-10 in dendritic cells, supporting IFN-gamma and IL-10 production in CD4+ T cells such as Lactobacillus helveticus; (ii) pure Th1 inducers such as L. casei. Sublingual administration in ovalbumin-sensitized mice of L. helveticus, but not L. casei, reduced airways hyperresponsiveness, bronchial inflammation and proliferation of specific T cells in cervical lymph nodes. Thus, probiotics acting as a Th1/possibly Treg, but not Th1 adjuvant, potentiate tolerance induction via the sublingual route.

  7. Eccentric exercise as an adjuvant to influenza vaccination in humans.

    Edwards, Kate M; Burns, Victoria E; Allen, Louise M; McPhee, Jamie S; Bosch, Jos A; Carroll, Douglas; Drayson, Mark; Ring, Christopher

    2007-02-01

    The immune response to vaccination in animals can be enhanced by exposure to acute stress at the time of vaccination. The efficacy of this adjuvant strategy for vaccination in humans requires investigation. The current study employed a randomised controlled trial design to examine the effects of eccentric exercise prior to influenza vaccination on the antibody and cell-mediated responses. Sixty young healthy adults (29 men, 31 women) performed eccentric contractions of the deltoid and biceps brachii muscles of the non-dominant arm (exercise group) or rested quietly (control group), and were vaccinated 6h later in the non-dominant arm. Change in arm circumference and pain were measured to assess the physiological response to exercise. Antibody titres were measured pre-vaccination and at 6- and 20-week follow-ups. Interferon-gamma in response to in vitro stimulation by the whole vaccine, an index of the cell-mediated response, was measured 8 weeks post-vaccination. Interferon-gamma responses were enhanced by exercise in men, whereas antibody titres were enhanced by eccentric exercise in women but not in men. Men showed greater increase in arm circumference after eccentric exercise than women but there was no difference in reported pain. The interferon-gamma response was positively associated with the percentage increase in arm circumference among the exercise group. Eccentric exercise exerted differential effects on the response to vaccination in men and women, with enhancement of the antibody response in women, but enhancement of the cell-mediated response in men. Eccentric exercise of the muscle at the site of vaccine administration should be explored further as a possible behavioural adjuvant to vaccination.

  8. Piglet preweaning mortality in a commercial swine herd in Thailand.

    Nuntapaitoon, Morakot; Tummaruk, Padet

    2015-12-01

    In the modern swine industry, the number of piglets born alive per litter is dramatically increasing due to genetic improvement of litter traits. However, knowledge on post-partum management is inadequate to reduce piglet preweaning mortality. The present study aimed to investigate piglet preweaning mortality in a commercial swine herd in Thailand in relation to the number of littermate pigs and piglet birth weight. Data included 11,154 litters from 3574 sows farrowed from January 2009 to December 2012. Littermate pig was defined as the number of piglets after cross-fostering. Number of littermate pigs was classified as 1-7, 8-10, 11-12, and 13-15 piglets per litter. Mean birth weight of the piglets was classified as low (Piglet preweaning mortality was calculated, logged transformed, and analyzed by general linear mixed models. On average, piglet preweaning mortality was 14.5 % (median = 10.0 %). Piglet preweaning mortality in the litter with 13-15 littermate pigs (24.1 %) was significantly higher than the litter with 1-7 (11.9 %, P piglet birth weight had a higher piglet preweaning mortality rate (18.8 %) than the litters with a medium (15.7 %, P piglet birth weight (12.1 %, P piglet preweaning mortality in commercial swine herds, special care needs to be taken in litters with more than 13 littermate pigs and with piglets with birth weight below 1.30 kg.

  9. EXPOSURE TO SWINE HOUSING DUST MODULATES MACROPHAGE MORPHOLOGY AND FUNCTION

    Ruth J. Pender

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Swine Confinement Facility (SCF dust consists of a complex mixture of feed grain particles, bacterial components, organic particulates and gases. When these particles are inhaled they deposit along the respiratory tract and mediate respiratory symptoms and disease in swine farmers and facility workers. Macrophages ingest and eliminate microbes and debris under chronic conditions; however, the role of macrophages in agricultural-related respiratory disease has not been fully elucidated. The goal was to evaluate the hypothesis that chronic exposure to SCF dust causes inflammation by modulating pulmonary protein levels and macrophage function. Balb/c mice were exposed to 5, 12.5 and 25% SCF Dust Extract (DE via nebulization 30 min/day five days a week, for eight weeks with weekends excluded. Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid (BALF was collected and analyzed for protein concentration, leukocyte distribution and macrophage morphology. For comparison, THP-1 monocytic cells were exposed to 0.1-10% DE overnight and evaluated for phagocytosis and reactive oxygen species production. Repeated exposure to DE via nebulizer caused a significant increase in protein concentration and inflammatory cell number, namely macrophages, in a dose-dependent manner within the lung as compared to controls. Macrophages with pseudopods and vacuoles were the most abundant leukocytes within BALF of mice exposed to DE. Similarly, in vitro studies with 10% DE treated THP-1 cells revealed enhanced phagocytosis (p<0.05, pseudopodia and vacuolization following exposure to compared to control cells. In addition, there were time- and dose-dependent increases of intracellular ROS production by THP-1 cells exposed to 5 and 10% DE compared to control (p<0.01. These findings indicate repeated, long-term inhalation of swine confinement facility dust may mediate chronic airway and lung inflammation through modulation of protein concentration and macrophage function. The aerosolized dust

  10. Continuous dry fermentation of swine manure for biogas production.

    Chen, Chuang; Zheng, Dan; Liu, Gang-Jin; Deng, Liang-Wei; Long, Yan; Fan, Zhan-Hui

    2015-04-01

    A down plug-flow anaerobic reactor (DPAR) was designed for the feasibility study on continuous dry fermentation of swine manure without any additional stirring. Using fresh swine manure as the feedstock with TS concentration (w/w) of 20%, 25%, 30%, and 35%, stable volumetric biogas production rates of 2.40, 1.92, 0.911, and 0.644L · (Ld)(-1) and biogas yields of 0.665, 0.532, 0.252, and 0.178 L g(-)(1)VS were obtained respectively, and the TS degradation rates were 46.5%, 45.4%, 53.2%, and 55.6%, respectively. With the increase of feedstock TS concentration, the concentration of ammonia nitrogen grew up to the maximum value of 3500 mg L(-1). Biogas production was obviously inhibited when the concentration of ammonia nitrogen was above 3000 mg L(-1). The maximal volumetric biogas production rate of 2.34 L ·(Ld)(-1) and biogas yield of 0.649 L g(-1)VS were obtained with TS concentration of 25% at 25°C without inhibition. Liquidity experiments showed that TS concentration of digestate could be less than 15.8%, and the flow rate of digestate more than 0.98 m s(-1) when the feedstock TS concentration was less than 35%, which indicated the digestate could be easily discharged from a DPAR. Therefore, it is feasible to conduct a continuous dry fermentation in a DPAR using fresh swine manure as the feedstock with TS concentration less than 35%, whereas the feedstock TS concentration should not exceed 30% to achieve the maximal biogas production rate and biogas yield.

  11. Comparative Activities of Cattle and Swine Platelet Microbicidal Proteins.

    Ivanov, Iuri B; Gritsenko, Viktor A

    2009-12-01

    The bactericidal activities of cattle and swine platelet microbicidal proteins (PMPs) with their comparison with human PMP were studied. Activities of PMP were tested against Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Escherichia coli. B. subtilis and B. cereus were high susceptible to PMP at very low concentrations. Of the gram-positive cocci studied, M. lysodeikticus and S. aureus were the most, and S. epidermidis the least, susceptible. E. coli was found to be relatively resistant to the lethal action of all PMP. The findings of this study confirm that the existence of antimicrobial peptides is conserved among mammalian platelets.

  12. Radioisotope diagnostics in auxiliary liver transplantation in miniature swine

    Buchali, K.; Nawroth, R.; Sydow, K.; Pahlig, H.; Wolff, H. (Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (German Democratic Republic). Bereich Medizin (Charite))

    1985-01-01

    Experiences in the blood flow measurement (/sup 133/Xe washing out) and function test (/sup 133/I-bromosulfophthalein, /sup 99m/Tc-IDA) in auxiliary liver transplantation in miniature swine are reported. Normal values for global blood flow (70 (35-144) ml/100 g x min) and the bromosulfophthalein half-time (6.5 +- 2.4 min) were defined preoperatively. Selective blood flow measurements were carried out invasively after transplantation. Only insufficient experience was obtained in scintiscanning of liver and biliary ducts because of graft insufficiency.

  13. Wet explosion og wheat straw and codigestion with swine manure

    Wang, Guangtao; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Skiadas, Ioannis V.

    2009-01-01

    with wheat straw in a continuous operated system was investigated, as a method to increase the efficiency of biogas plants that are based on anaerobic digestion of swine manure. Also, the pretreatment of wheat straw with the wet explosion method was studied and the efficiency of the wet explosion process...... was evaluated based on (a) the sugars release and (b) the methane potential of the pretreated wheat straw compared to that of the raw biomass. It was found that, although a high release of soluble sugars was observed after wet explosion, the methane obtained from the wet-exploded wheat straw was slightly lower...

  14. Immune Adjuvant Effect of Molecularly-defined Toll-Like Receptor Ligands

    Deana N. Toussi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine efficacy is optimized by addition of immune adjuvants. However, although adjuvants have been used for over a century, to date, only few adjuvants are approved for human use, mostly aimed at improving vaccine efficacy and antigen-specific protective antibody production. The mechanism of action of immune adjuvants is diverse, depending on their chemical and molecular nature, ranging from non-specific effects (i.e., antigen depot at the immunization site to specific activation of immune cells leading to improved host innate and adaptive responses. Although the detailed molecular mechanism of action of many adjuvants is still elusive, the discovery of Toll-like receptors (TLRs has provided new critical information on immunostimulatory effect of numerous bacterial components that engage TLRs. These ligands have been shown to improve both the quality and the quantity of host adaptive immune responses when used in vaccine formulations targeted to infectious diseases and cancer that require both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. The potential of such TLR adjuvants in improving the design and the outcomes of several vaccines is continuously evolving, as new agonists are discovered and tested in experimental and clinical models of vaccination. In this review, a summary of the recent progress in development of TLR adjuvants is presented.

  15. STRAP Is a Strong Predictive Marker of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Benefit in Colorectal Cancer

    Martin Buess

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular predictors for the effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy in colorectal cancer are of considerable clinical interest. To this aim, we analyzed the serine threonine receptor-associated protein (STRAP, an inhibitor of TGF-βsignaling, with regard to prognosis and prediction of adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy benefit. i The gene copy status of STRAP was determined using quantitative realtime polymerase chain reaction in 166 colorectal tumor biopsies, which had been collected from a randomized multicenter trial of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU/mitomycin C (MMC adjuvant chemotherapy of the Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research (SAKK. RESULTS: Amplification of STRAP was found in 22.8% of the tumors. When left without adjuvant chemotherapy, patients bearing tumors with a STRAP amplification had a significantly better prognosis (hazard ratio for death: 0.26; P = .004. Interestingly, these patients, when receiving adjuvant treatment, had a worse survival (hazard ratio for death: 3.48; P = .019 than without chemotherapy, whereas patients carrying tumors with diploidy or deletion of STRAP benefited from the treatment (hazard ratio for death: 0.44; P = .052. This suggests the amplification of STRAP as a strong predictor of an unfavorable effect of 5-FU-based adjuvant chemotherapy. CONCLUSION: If confirmed, the STRAP gene copy status might provide a parameter to decide about the use of 5-FU-based adjuvant chemotherapy.

  16. Review of influenza A virus in swine worldwide: a call for increased surveillance and research.

    Vincent, A; Awada, L; Brown, I; Chen, H; Claes, F; Dauphin, G; Donis, R; Culhane, M; Hamilton, K; Lewis, N; Mumford, E; Nguyen, T; Parchariyanon, S; Pasick, J; Pavade, G; Pereda, A; Peiris, M; Saito, T; Swenson, S; Van Reeth, K; Webby, R; Wong, F; Ciacci-Zanella, J

    2014-02-01

    Pigs and humans have shared influenza A viruses (IAV) since at least 1918, and many interspecies transmission events have been documented since that time. However, despite this interplay, relatively little is known regarding IAV circulating in swine around the world compared with the avian and human knowledge base. This gap in knowledge impedes our understanding of how viruses adapted to swine or man impacts the ecology and evolution of IAV as a whole and the true impact of swine IAV on human health. The pandemic H1N1 that emerged in 2009 underscored the need for greater surveillance and sharing of data on IAV in swine. In this paper, we review the current state of IAV in swine around the world, highlight the collaboration between international organizations and a network of laboratories engaged in human and animal IAV surveillance and research, and emphasize the need to increase information in high-priority regions. The need for global integration and rapid sharing of data and resources to fight IAV in swine and other animal species is apparent, but this effort requires grassroots support from governments, practicing veterinarians and the swine industry and, ultimately, requires significant increases in funding and infrastructure.

  17. New influenza A virus reassortments have been found in Danish swine in 2011

    Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Trebbien, Ramona;

    2012-01-01

    In 2011 a passive surveillance for influenza A virus was conducted in Danish swine. Tested samples were clinical samples from affected pigs submitted to the Danish National Veterinary Institute for swine influenza virus detection. In total 713 samples from 276 herds were analysed and about 24% of...... the pandemic H1N1 virus. This study contribute significantly to our knowledge of the epidemiology of swine influenza A virus circulating in Danish swine and the potential role of swine in the emergence of novel reassortant viruses.......” viruses which have been circulating in Danish pigs since it was found for the first time in 1981. ii) H1N2 reassortant viruses which comprise HA from “avian like” H1N1 and NA from swine H3N2. The reassortant H1N2 virus was discovered in Danish pig for the first time in 2003 and is now well established...... in the Danish pig population. iii) H1N1pdm09 viruses which were found the first time in Danish pigs in January 2010. iv) Three new subtype variants comprising H1 “avian like” together with N2 “human like”, H1 pandemic with N2 “human like” and finally H1 pandemic with N2 from swine H3N2. The presence of N2...

  18. Variations in abundance, diversity and community composition of airborne fungi in swine houses across seasons.

    Kumari, Priyanka; Woo, Cheolwoon; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Choi, Hong-Lim

    2016-11-28

    We examined the abundance, diversity and community composition of airborne fungi in swine houses during winter and summer seasons by using quantitative PCR and Illumina HiSeq sequencing of ITS1 region. The abundance of airborne fungi varied significantly only between seasons, while fungal diversity varied significantly both within and between seasons, with both abundance and diversity peaked in winter. The fungal OTU composition was largely structured by the swine house unit and season as well as by their interactions. Of the measured microclimate variables, relative humidity, particulate matters (PMs), ammonia, and stocking density were significantly correlated with fungal OTU composition. The variation in beta diversity was higher within swine houses during summer, which indicates that the airborne fungal community composition was more heterogeneous in summer compared to winter. We also identified several potential allergen/pathogen related fungal genera in swine houses. The total relative abundance of potential allergen/pathogen related fungal genera varied between swine houses in both seasons, and showed positive correlation with PM2.5. Overall, our findings show that the abundance, diversity and composition of airborne fungi are highly variable in swine houses and to a large extent structured by indoor microclimate variables of swine houses.

  19. Variations in abundance, diversity and community composition of airborne fungi in swine houses across seasons

    Kumari, Priyanka; Woo, Cheolwoon; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Choi, Hong-Lim

    2016-11-01

    We examined the abundance, diversity and community composition of airborne fungi in swine houses during winter and summer seasons by using quantitative PCR and Illumina HiSeq sequencing of ITS1 region. The abundance of airborne fungi varied significantly only between seasons, while fungal diversity varied significantly both within and between seasons, with both abundance and diversity peaked in winter. The fungal OTU composition was largely structured by the swine house unit and season as well as by their interactions. Of the measured microclimate variables, relative humidity, particulate matters (PMs), ammonia, and stocking density were significantly correlated with fungal OTU composition. The variation in beta diversity was higher within swine houses during summer, which indicates that the airborne fungal community composition was more heterogeneous in summer compared to winter. We also identified several potential allergen/pathogen related fungal genera in swine houses. The total relative abundance of potential allergen/pathogen related fungal genera varied between swine houses in both seasons, and showed positive correlation with PM2.5. Overall, our findings show that the abundance, diversity and composition of airborne fungi are highly variable in swine houses and to a large extent structured by indoor microclimate variables of swine houses.

  20. Metabonomic study of the biochemical profiles of heterozygous myostatin knockout swine

    Jianxiang XU,Dengke PAN,Jie ZHAO,Jianwu WANG,Xiaohong HE,Yuehui MA,Ning LI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Myostatin is a transforming growth factor-β family member that normally acts to limit skeletal muscle growth. Myostatin gene (MSTN knockout (KO mice show possible effects for the prevention or treatment of metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. We applied chromatography and mass spectrometry based metabonomics to assess system-wide metabolic response of heterozygous MSTN KO (MSTN+/- swine. Most of the metabolic data for MSTN+/- swine were similar to the data for wild type (WT control swine. There were, however, metabolic changes related to fatty acid metabolism, glucose utilization, lipid metabolism, as well as BCAA catabolism caused by monoallelic MSTN depletion.The statistical analyses suggested that: (1 most metabolic changes were not significant in MSTN+/- swine compared to WT swine; (2 only a few metabolic properties were significantly different between KO and WT swine, especially for lipid metabolism. Significantly, these minor changes were most evident in female KO swine and suggested differences in gender sensitivity to myostatin.

  1. Biochar from swine manure solids: influence on carbon sequestration and Olsen phosphorus and mineral nitrogen dynamics in soil with and without digestate incorporation

    Rosa Marchetti

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Interest in biochar (BC has grown dramatically in recent years, due mainly to the fact that its incorporation into soil reportedly enhances carbon sequestration and fertility. Currently, BC types most under investigation are those obtained from organic matter (OM of plant origin. As great amounts of manure solids are expected to become available in the near future, thanks to the development of technologies for the separation of the solid fraction of animal effluents, processing of manure solids for BC production seems an interesting possibility for the recycling of OM of high nutrient value. The aim of this study was to investigate carbon (C sequestration and nutrient dynamics in soil amended with BC from dried swine manure solids. The experiment was carried out in laboratory microcosms on a silty clay soil. The effect on nutrient dynamics of interaction between BC and fresh digestate obtained from a biogas plant was also investigated to test the hypothesis that BC can retain nutrients. A comparison was made of the following treatments: soil amended with swine manure solids (LC, soil amended with charred swine manure solids (LT, soil amended with wood chip (CC, soil amended with charred wood chip (CT, soil with no amendment as control (Cs, each one of them with and without incorporation of digestate (D for a total of 10 treatments. Biochar was obtained by treating OM (wood chip or swine manure with moisture content of less than 10% at 420°C in anoxic conditions. The CO2-C release and organic C, available phosphorus (P (Olsen P, POls and inorganic (ammonium+nitrate nitrogen (N (Nmin contents at the start and three months after the start of the experiment were measured in the amended and control soils. After three months of incubation at 30°C, the CO2-C emissions from soil with BC (CT and LT, ±D were the same as those in the control soil (Cs and were lower than those in the soils with untreated amendments (CC and LC, ±D. The organic C content

  2. Effects of Immunity in Astragalan Adjuvan on Swine Plague Vaccine on Piglets%黄芪多糖佐剂对猪瘟疫苗免疫效果的影响

    黄德尚; 郭爱珍

    2011-01-01

    To explore the effects of swine plague antibody which was induced by swine plague vaccine in astragalan adjuvant on piglets. 40 piglets were randomly divided into 4 groups (n= 10), those groups were respectively normal sodium (NS)group, swine plague vaccine (SPV) group, astragalan injection (AGI) group and astragalan injection-swine plague vaccine (AGI-SPV) group. They were respectively injected drugs into musculi colli on the 20th day and 85th of piglets were born after were taken suction blood (5 mL) for detection from precaval vein, such as the NS 3 mL was injected for 3 d, SPV 1 mL for 1 d and NS 3 mL for 2 d, AGI 10 mg/kg for 3 d, AGI 10 mg/kg for 3 d with the SPV 1 mL for 1 d,and then they were accordingly taken suction blood on the 35th and 100th day for detecting the IgG, IgM, IgA, y-Globulin (γ-G) and swine plague antibody (SP-Ab) and so on. Those γ-G, IgG, IgM and IgA of the AGI group and AGI-SPV group are significantly higher than the NS group and the SPV group (P<0.05); the blocking rate of swine plague antibody of SPV group and the AGI-SPV group are significantly higher than themselves on the 35th and 20th day, as well the AGI-SPV group is higher than the SPV group, too.The AGI can be used for immunologic adjuvant for improving immunity of piglets on swine plague vaccine, the mechanism of action might be concerned with raising the immunoglobulin and facilitating the swine plague antibody-formaing.%本试验旨在探讨以黄芪多糖(astragalan,AG)为佐剂对仔猪猪瘟疫苗诱导猪瘟抗体的影响.将20日龄仔猪40头随机分成4组(n=10),即生理盐水(normal sodium,NS)组、猪瘟疫苗(swine plague vaccine,SPV)组、黄芪多糖注射液(astragalan injection,AGI)组以及黄芪多糖注射液和猪瘟疫苗(astragalan injection and swine plague vaccine,AGI-SPV)组.各组于前腔静脉采血5 mL(用于检测)后,分别于仔猪出生第20、85天连续3 d颈部肌肉注射NS 3 mL×3 d,SPV 1 mt×1 d+NS 3mL×2 d,AGI 10 mg/kg×3 d

  3. Pilot study of postoperative adjuvant chemoradiation for advanced gastric cancer: Adjuvant 5-FU/cisplatin and chemoradiation with capecitabine

    Hyung-Sik Lee; Min-Chan Kim; Youngmin Choi; Won-Joo Hur; Hyo-Jin Kim; Hyuk-Chan Kwon; Sung-Hyun Kim; Jae-Seok Kim; Jong-Hoon Lee; Ghap-Joong Jung

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of postoperative chemoradiation using FP chemotherapy and oral capecitabine during radiation for advanced gastric cancer following curative resection.METHODS: Thirty-one patients who had underwent a potentially curative resection for Stage Ⅲ and Ⅳ (MO) gastric cancer were enrolled. Therapy consists of one cycle of FP (continuous infusion of 5-FU 1000 mg/m2 on d 1 to 5 and cisplatin 60 mg/m2 on d 1) followed by 4500 cGy (180 cGy/d) with capecitabine (1650 mg/m2 daily throughout radiotherapy). Four wk after completion of the radiotherapy, patients received three additional cycles of FP every three wk. The median follow-up duration was 22.2 mo.RESULTS: The 3-year disease free and overall survival in this study were 82.7% and 83.4%, respectively. Four patients (12.9%) showed relapse during follow-up. Eight patients did not complete all planned adjuvant therapy.Grade 3/4 toxicities included neutropenia in 50.2%, anemia in 12.9%, thrombocytopenia in 3.2% and nausea/vomiting in 3.2%. Neither grade 3/4 hand foot syndrome nor treatment related febrile neutropenia or death were observed.CONCLUSION: These preliminary results suggest that this postoperative adjuvant chemoradiation regimen of FP before and after capecitabine and concurrent radiotherapy appears well tolerated and offers a comparable toxicity profile to the chemoradiation regimen utilized in INT-0116. This treatment modality allowed successful loco-regional control rate and 3-year overall survival.

  4. Adjuvant chemotherapy for completely resected non-small-cell lung cancer

    Toyooka,Shinichi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available For many years, surgery alone was the standard treatment for patients with stage I-IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. However, recent studies have demonstrated that adjuvant chemotherapy provides a survival benefit. The first adjuvant chemotherapy for NSCLC was performed in the 1960s using a key drug known as cyclophosphamide. In the 1980s and early 1990s, a new anti-cancer drug, cisplatin, was developed. The first meta-analysis of this drug was conducted by the Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Collaborative Group in 1995. This analysis comparing surgery with surgery plus chemotherapy containing cisplatin produced a hazard ratio of 0.87 and suggested an absolute benefit of chemotherapy of 5% at 5 years;this difference was not statistically significant (p0.08. Several clinical trials of adjuvant chemotherapy were planned after the meta-analysis conducted in 1995, but the efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy remained a matter of controversy. However, useful evidence was reported after 2003. The International Adjuvant Lung Cancer Collaborative Group Trial (IALT demonstrated a 4.1% improvement in survival for patients with stage I to III NSCLC. The JBR. 10 trial demonstrated a 15% improvement in 5-year survival for the adjuvant chemotherapy arm in stage IB or II (excluding T3N0 patients. The Adjuvant Navelbine International Trialist Association (ANITA trial reported that the overall survival at 5 years improved by 8.6% in the chemotherapy arm and that this survival rate was maintained at 7 years (8.4% in stage II and IIIA patients. A meta-analysis based on collected and pooled individual patient data from the 5 largest randomized trials was conducted by the Lung Adjuvant Cisplatin Evaluation (LACE. This analysis demonstrated that cisplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy improved survival in patients with stage II or III cancer. Alterna-tively, uracil-tegafur has been developed and tested in Japan. The Japan Lung Cancer Research Group (JLCRG on Postsurgical

  5. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis Infection in Swine Associated with Peat Used for Bedding

    Tone Bjordal Johansen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis is an environmental bacterium causing opportunistic infections in swine, resulting in economic losses. Additionally, the zoonotic aspect of such infections is of concern. In the southeastern region of Norway in 2009 and 2010, an increase in condemnation of pig carcasses with tuberculous lesions was seen at the meat inspection. The use of peat as bedding in the herds was suspected to be a common factor, and a project examining pigs and environmental samples from the herds was initiated. Lesions detected at meat inspection in pigs originating from 15 herds were sampled. Environmental samples including peat from six of the herds and from three peat production facilities were additionally collected. Samples were analysed by culture and isolates genotyped by MLVA analysis. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis was detected in 35 out of 46 pigs, in 16 out of 20 samples of peat, and in one sample of sawdust. MLVA analysis demonstrated identical isolates from peat and pigs within the same farms. Polyclonal infection was demonstrated by analysis of multiple isolates from the same pig. To conclude, the increase in condemnation of porcine carcasses at slaughter due to mycobacteriosis seemed to be related to untreated peat used as bedding.

  6. Diagnosis and genotyping of African swine fever viruses from 2015 outbreaks in Zambia.

    Thoromo, Jonas; Simulundu, Edgar; Chambaro, Herman M; Mataa, Liywalii; Lubaba, Caesar H; Pandey, Girja S; Takada, Ayato; Misinzo, Gerald; Mweene, Aaron S

    2016-04-29

    In early 2015, a highly fatal haemorrhagic disease of domestic pigs resembling African swine fever (ASF) occurred in North Western, Copperbelt, and Lusaka provinces of Zambia. Molecular diagnosis by polymerase chain reaction targeting specific amplification of p72 (B646L) gene of ASF virus (ASFV) was conducted. Fourteen out of 16 domestic pigs from the affected provinces were found to be positive for ASFV. Phylogenetic analyses based on part of the p72 and the complete p54 (E183L) genes revealed that all the ASFVs detected belonged to genotypes I and Id, respectively. Additionally, epidemiological data suggest that the same ASFV spread from Lusaka to other provinces possibly through uncontrolled and/or illegal pig movements. Although the origin of the ASFV that caused outbreaks in domestic pigs in Zambia could not be ascertained, it appears likely that the virus may have emerged from within the country or region, probably from a sylvatic cycle. It is recommended that surveillance of ASF, strict biosecurity, and quarantine measures be imposed in order to prevent further spread and emergence of new ASF outbreaks in Zambia.

  7. Phylogeographic analysis of African swine fever virus based on the p72 gene sequence.

    Muangkram, Y; Sukmak, M; Wajjwalku, W

    2015-05-04

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) outbreak has been considered as an emerging and re-emerging disease for almost a century. Diagnostically, simple polymerase chain reaction and sequencing-based molecular detection could be employed for both viral identification and genotyping. This study established a novel phylogenetic analysis and epidemiology comparison based on 205 bp of p72 gene sequences. Based on this partial p72 fragment, an updated list of 44 different genotypes from a total of 516 ASFV sequences compiled from GenBank was generated. Nucleotide diversity was 0.04325 ± 0.00231. The analysis of spatial genetic variation divided the ASFV populations of the African continent into four clades (clade A: central and upper eastern Africa; clade B: eastern Africa; clade C: eastern and southern Africa; and clade D: southern Africa). These results and the developed protocol could serve as useful molecular tools for ASFV diagnosis from degraded DNA or putrefied samples, and also provide the phylogeographic perspective to identify the origin of viral outbreaks, facilitating the decision planning to limit their spread.

  8. Assessment of Knowledge and Practices towards Swine flu: A cross-sectional study among rural housewives

    Rashmi Kumari; Rajiv Kumar Gupta; Bhavna Langer; Aruna Verma

    2016-01-01

    Background: Swine flu is an emerging public health problem in various countries including India and was declared a “Phase 6 Pandemic” by WHO in 2009. India ranks as 3rd most affected country for cases and deaths of swine flu globally.Objectives: To assess the level of knowledge and practices regarding Swine flu among rural housewives of Jammu and to find out the association between the two.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted during the month of April 2015 using a pre-tested and sem...

  9. DETECTION OF CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER VIRUS BY RT-PCR IN WEST BENGAL, INDIA

    Sumit Chowdhury

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Classical swine fever is a deadly disease of swine, caused by a RNA virus. The present study has identified presence of the classical swine fever virus (CSFV in pigs of West Bengal by one step reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR performed using 5’ NTR specific primers. Internal organs from clinically affected pigs were examined from three districts of West Bengal. RT-PCT has identified presence of CSFV in all the tissues examined confirming presence of CSFV in different parts of the state.

  10. Control of swine pseudorabies in China: Opportunities and limitations.

    Sun, Yuan; Luo, Yuzi; Wang, Chun-Hua; Yuan, Jin; Li, Na; Song, Kun; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2016-02-01

    Pseudorabies (PR), also known as Aujeszky's disease (AD), is caused by pseudorabies virus (PRV) or called suid herpesvirus 1 (SuHV-1). It is an economically significant viral disease of pigs and other animals. Although the disease has been eradicated in commercial swine populations of some countries using gE-deleted vaccines and differentiating infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) strategy, PR continues to be one of the most important diseases of pigs in many countries, particularly in regions with dense pig populations, including China. This article reviews the current situation of PR in China, including epidemiology, diagnostic assays, control strategies and challenges of the disease. PR has been endemic in most provinces of China largely due to the lack of appropriate compulsory vaccination campaigns of pigs, sufficient awareness and biosecurity measures, although gE-deleted vaccines based on the Bartha-K61 strain and regional DIVA-based eradication programs have been widely used in the past decades. Notably, since 2011, an emerging variant PRV with enhanced pathogenicity has become prevalent in vaccinated swine herds in many regions of China and the disease situation is worsening. Control and eventual eradication of PR remain a big challenge in China, and strengthened control measures based on updated DIVA strategy are urgently needed toward national eradication of PR.

  11. Classical swine fever in pigs: recent developments and future perspectives.

    Chander, Vishal; Nandi, S; Ravishankar, C; Upmanyu, V; Verma, Rishendra

    2014-06-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is one of the most devastating epizootic diseases of pigs, causing high morbidity and mortality worldwide. The diversity of clinical signs and similarity in disease manifestations to other diseases make CSF difficult to diagnose with certainty. The disease is further complicated by the presence of a number of different strains belonging to three phylogenetic groups. Advanced diagnostic techniques allow detection of antigens or antibodies in clinical samples, leading to implementation of proper and effective control programs. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods, including portable real-time PCR, provide diagnosis in a few hours with precision and accuracy, even at the point of care. The disease is controlled by following a stamping out policy in countries where vaccination is not practiced, whereas immunization with live attenuated vaccines containing the 'C' strain is effectively used to control the disease in endemic countries. To overcome the problem of differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals, different types of marker vaccines, with variable degrees of efficacy, along with companion diagnostic assays have been developed and may be useful in controlling and even eradicating the disease in the foreseeable future. The present review aims to provide an overview and status of CSF as a whole with special reference to swine husbandry in India.

  12. Comparison of Biotribology of Swine Compact Bone Against UHMWPE

    WANG Qing-liang; GE Shi-rong

    2007-01-01

    A pin-on-disk tribometer was used, in a comparative test to observe the tribological behavior of the swine femoral bone against UHMWPE with dry friction, physiological water and human plasma lubrication. The wear mechanisms of swine bones and UHMWPE were investigated by SEM. The experimental results of these wear tests demonstrated that both the friction coefficient and wear rate of UHMWPE were the lowest when human plasma lubrication was used. The wear mechanism of the compact bone was mainly fatigue wear with dry friction, corrosive wear under physiological water lubrication and abrasive wear with human plasma lubrication. For UHMWPE, the wear mechanism was adhesive wear and plastic deformation with dry friction, serious ploughing and fatigue fracture wear under physiological water lubrication, fine ploughing and plastic deformation with human plasma lubrication. An analysis of.nitrogen elements on the wear surface of UHMWPE indicated that the content of nitrogen in worn areas was 16 times higher than that in unworn areas, which proved that serum protein deposition occurred on worn areas.

  13. Endothelial cell proliferation in swine experimental aneurysm after coil embolization.

    Yumiko Mitome-Mishima

    Full Text Available After coil embolization, recanalization in cerebral aneurysms adversely influences long-term prognosis. Proliferation of endothelial cells on the coil surface may reduce the incidence of recanalization and further improve outcomes after coil embolization. We aimed to map the expression of proliferating tissue over the aneurysmal orifice and define the temporal profile of tissue growth in a swine experimental aneurysm model. We compared the outcomes after spontaneous thrombosis with those of coil embolization using histological and morphological techniques. In aneurysms that we not coiled, spontaneous thrombosis was observed, and weak, easily detachable proliferating tissue was evident in the aneurysmal neck. In contrast, in the coil embolization group, histological analysis showed endothelial-like cells lining the aneurysmal opening. Moreover, immunohistochemical and morphological analysis suggested that these cells were immature endothelial cells. Our results indicated the existence of endothelial cell proliferation 1 week after coil embolization and showed immature endothelial cells in septal tissue between the systemic circulation and the aneurysm. These findings suggest that endothelial cells are lead to and proliferate in the former aneurysmal orifice. This is the first examination to evaluate the temporal change of proliferating tissue in a swine experimental aneurysm model.

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Swine Influenza Vaccine: A Case Report

    Gurjot Basra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is the most common chronic inflammatory joint disease. Multiple scientific articles have documented that vaccinations for influenza, MMR, and HBV, to name a few, could be triggers of RA in genetically predisposed individuals. However, there is limited data regarding the association of swine flu vaccine (H1N1 and RA. We report the case of a Mexican American female who developed RA right after vaccination with H1N1 vaccine. Genetically, RA has consistently been associated with an epitope in the third hypervariable region of the HLA-DR chains, known as the “shared epitope”, which is found primarily in DR4 and DR1 regions. The presence of HLA-DRB1 alleles is associated with susceptibility to RA in Mexican Americans. Hence, certain individuals with the presence of the “shared epitope” may develop RA following specific vaccinations. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of RA following vaccination with the swine flu vaccine.

  15. [Applications of reverse genetics in studying classical swine fever virus].

    Liu, Dafei; Sun, Yuan; Qiu, Huaji

    2009-10-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF), caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV), has been epidemic or endemic in many countries, and causes great economical losses to pig industry worldwide. Attenuated vaccines (such as C-strain) have played an important role in the control of CSF. Recently some new phenomena appear, such as atypical and persistent infections of CSF, immunization failure and so on. Meanwhile, eradication programs have been implemented in many countries, restricting the widespread applications of attenuated vaccines. Thus, currently the priority is to strengthen the research in pathogenesis and transmission mechanisms, as well as to develop marker vaccines. Recently, the applications of reverse genetics technology open up a new way for research of structure and function of CSFV proteins and development of novel vaccines against CSF. This review focuses on the progress of applications of reverse genetics in the functional analysis and marker vaccine development of CSFV, and also discusses the problems confronted now and prospective aspects in the study of CSFV.

  16. Tratamento adjuvante nos GISTs Adjuvant treatment in GISTs

    Laercio Gomes Lourenço

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O tumor estromal gastrointestinal (GIST é o sarcoma mais comum do aparelho digestivo. Essa neoplasia ocorre devido à mutação do gene KIT com consequente ativação constitutiva da proteína KIT. O tratamento primário é cirúrgico e consiste na sua ressecção completa. Entretanto, alguns grupos de pacientes apresentam risco elevado de recorrência mesmo após operação com ressecção completa (R0, indicando diferenças no comportamento biológico. Estudos clínicos comprovaram a atividade clínica do mesilato de imatinibe, fazendo dele a primeira linha de tratamento padrão nos GISTs metastáticos ou irressecáveis, mudando muito o desfecho clínico dessa doença em relação aos benefícios anteriormente obtidos com a quimioterapia antineoplásica. MÉTODO: Foi realizada revisão da literatura com consulta nos periódicos das bases Medline/Pubmed, Scielo e Lilacs cruzando os descritores: tumor estromal gastrointestinal, Gist, tratamento, adjuvância. Além desta revisão foi adicionada a experiência pessoal dos autores. CONCLUSÃO: Melhor refinamento dos critérios de prognóstico tem permitido selecionar de forma mais adequada pacientes para o tratamento adjuvante com imatinibe. Os resultados de maior evidência até o momento respaldam o tratamento adjuvante por um ano, o que produz benefício significativo na sobrevida livre de recidiva, mas não na sobrevida global desses pacientes.INTRODUCTION: Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST is the most common sarcoma of the digestive tract. This cancer occurs due to mutation of the KIT gene resulting in constitutive activation of KIT protein. The primary treatment is surgical and consists of complete resection. However, some groups of patients at high risk of recurrence even after surgery with complete resection (R0, indicate differences in biological behavior. Clinical studies have demonstrated the clinical activity of imatinib mesylate, making it the standard first

  17. Effects of 3% trehalose as an adjuvant treatment after LASIK

    Mateo Orobia AJ

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Antonio J Mateo Orobia,1–3 Paula Casas Pascual,1,4 José Á Cristóbal Bescós,1 Diana Perez García,1,4 Carlos Peiro Embid,1,4 M Ángeles del Buey Sayas,1,4 Valentyna Korobko Kulikova,1 Noelia Lafuente Ojeda5 1Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Quirón, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Universitario Miguel Servet, 3Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Aragón (IIS, 4Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Clínico Universitario Lozano-Blesa, 5Department of Anesthesiology, Hospital Universitario Miguel Servet, Zaragoza, Spain Purpose: To evaluate the effect of 3% trehalose as an adjuvant in the standard treatment after laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis.Design: Interventional prospective comparative single-blind study.Setting: Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Quirón Zaragoza, Spain.Methods: A total of 26 eyes (13 patients were included, of which 12 eyes (group 1 received conventional treatment with lubricant drops of hyaluronic acid (0.15% and 14 eyes (group 2 received, additionally, an ophthalmic solution of 3% trehalose. Pre- and postoperative quality-of-life tests and vital stains, tear breakup time, and osmolarity measurements were made.Results: We obtained statistically significant differences between the groups in the Symptom Assessment in Dry Eye test in all visits with respect to severity, and in the postoperative day 1 visit with respect to frequency, in all cases favoring the trehalose treatment. The values of osmolarity were not significantly different between groups. However, we did find significant differences in the Oxford scale in day 90 for the trehalose treatment (P<0.001, and in the National Eye Institute scale in day 30 (P=0.02.Conclusion: The results of this exploratory study indicate that the adjuvant treatment with 3% trehalose could be superior with respect to the standard treatment, with improvements in the objective and subjective parameters of tear quality. Keywords: dry eye syndrome, trehalose

  18. A Review of the Current Status of Relevant Zoonotic Pathogens in Wild Swine (Sus scrofa) Populations: Changes Modulating the Risk of Transmission to Humans.

    Ruiz-Fons, F

    2017-02-01

    Many wild swine populations in different parts of the World have experienced an unprecedented demographic explosion that may result in increased exposure of humans to wild swine zoonotic pathogens. Interactions between humans and wild swine leading to pathogen transmission could come from different ways, being hunters and game professionals the most exposed to acquiring infections from wild swine. However, increasing human settlements in semi-natural areas, outdoor activities, socio-economic changes and food habits may increase the rate of exposure to wild swine zoonotic pathogens and to potentially emerging pathogens from wild swine. Frequent and increasing contact rate between humans and wild swine points to an increasing chance of zoonotic pathogens arising from wild swine to be transmitted to humans. Whether this frequent contact could lead to new zoonotic pathogens emerging from wild swine to cause human epidemics or emerging disease outbreaks is difficult to predict, and assessment should be based on thorough epidemiologic surveillance. Additionally, several gaps in knowledge on wild swine global population dynamics trends and wild swine-zoonotic pathogen interactions should be addressed to correctly assess the potential role of wild swine in the emergence of diseases in humans. In this work, viruses such as hepatitis E virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, Influenza virus and Nipah virus, and bacteria such as Salmonella spp., Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, Campylobacter spp. and Leptospira spp. have been identified as the most prone to be transmitted from wild swine to humans on the basis of geographic spread in wild swine populations worldwide, pathogen circulation rates in wild swine populations, wild swine population trends in endemic areas, susceptibility of humans to infection, transmissibility from wild swine to humans and existing evidence of wild swine-human transmission events.

  19. Adjuvant drugs in autoimmune bullous diseases, efficacy versus safety: Facts and controversies.

    Schiavo, Ada Lo; Puca, Rosa Valentina; Ruocco, Vincenzo; Ruocco, Eleonora

    2010-01-01

    During the last decades, the conventional therapy for autoimmune blistering diseases has been high-dose, long-term systemic corticosteroid and immunosuppressive agents or adjuvant drugs. Long-term, high-dose steroid therapy can result in serious adverse effects. The rationale for using adjuvant drugs is that concerns reducing the need for corticosteroids, and hence, their side effects, or it may result in better control of the disease, or both. Immunosuppressive agents are not free of adverse effects, however. Prolonged immune suppression may account for high rates of morbidity, disability, and possible death. There is no consensus about the first-choice adjuvant drug for the management of blistering autoimmune diseases. This contribution evaluates six adjuvant drugs-cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, intravenous immunoglobulin, and rituximab-and discusses the choice of a "winning drug" that is effective and safe.

  20. THE EFFECT OF SYNTHETIC ADJUVANT ON THE FORMATION OF THE IMMUNE RESPONSE

    Savina, S.V.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains experimental materials on the effects of synthetic adjuvants on the formation of the immune responses. Currently, the search continues for new effective vaccines based on polymeric compounds having immunostimulating properties (Petrov R. V. et al. 1986, V. Schijns,2000 An important condition in the development of certain carriers (adjuvants is the creation of a drug capable of long-term is in the body, with its active immune system and no local and General negative reactions in the body (Volpin O. M.,1992, etc.. We carried out experiments to study the synthetic adjuvant (BP, the raw material which is polydiallyldimethyl chloride - PES. Conducted preclinical trials to study acute and chronic toxicity in laboratory animals showed no abnormalities in physiological and Toxicological parameters, i.e. its harmlessness. The results show positive effects of synthetic adjuvants on the formation of General immune responses in animals that allow it to be used as a filler in vaccines.