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Sample records for adjustable dental impression

  1. Dental Impression Materials and Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punj, Amit; Bompolaki, Despoina; Garaicoa, Jorge

    2017-10-01

    Dental impression making is the process of creating a negative form of the teeth and oral tissues, into which gypsum or other die materials can be processed to create working analogues. Contemporary dentistry generates new information every year and digital dentistry is becoming established and influential. Although dentists should stay abreast of new technologies, some of the conventional materials and time-tested techniques remain widely used. It is important to review the impression-making process to ensure that practitioners have up-to-date information about how to safely and effectively capture the exact form of the oral tissues to provide optimal patient management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Disinfection effect of dental impression tray adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensel, Tobias; Pollak, Rita; Stimmelmayr, Michael; Hey, Jeremias

    2013-03-01

    Iatrogenic infections are serious problems in dental offices. Impression tray adhesives are delivered in glass containers with a fixed brush attached inside the cap. Using the brush for application of the impression tray adhesive on a contaminated impression tray or prostheses, pathogen transmission by replacing the cap with the brush is possible. Bacterial strains (patient strains and in vitro strains) were supervaccinated on Columbia agar. The bacterial solution was diluted with TSB and aerobically grown, and starting concentration was 1 × 10(7) cfu/ml. The stock solution was placed on Columbia agar. Alginate, polyether, and silicon impression tray adhesives were applied to the center of the particular blood agar plates and incubated for 48 h. The expansion of the inhibition zone assays were measured using a microscope. Twenty-one different bacterial strains were selected in the saliva samples of 20 patients. The growth inhibition for alginate impression tray adhesive was 1.1 % (±0.3) of the patient strains. The overgrowth of polyether impression tray adhesive was 30.6 % (±9.3) and for silicon impression tray adhesive 11.8 % (±5.0). In in vitro strains, alginate impression tray adhesive performed an inhibition of 0.7 % (±0.3). The overgrowth of polyether impression tray adhesive was 7.0 % (±1.6) and for silicon impression tray adhesive was 6.5 % (±1.3). Using the fixed brush for application of the impression tray adhesive on multiple patients, a cross-contamination cannot be ruled out. An application of the impression tray adhesive with a pipette and a single-use brush would eliminate the contamination.

  3. [Dental prostheses and dental impressions from a hygienic viewpoint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, J P

    1986-12-01

    Dentures, dental impressions, removable orthodontic appliances and all dental technical devices, which are part of any dental treatment are parts as well of a potential crosscontamination chain in dental treatment. Most of those items do not tolerate heat as a sure sterilization medium. For disinfection, chemical disinfectant solutions may be used as far as they work properly and as they are tolerated by the materials in question. Though, one can report some progress in disinfection of dentures and impressions, there are still questions open depending on safety and/or compatibility of the particular materials. For disinfection of removable dentures chlorine-yielding preparations such as Maranon can be recommended. Peracid preparations, such as Sekusept, Sekusept steril and Dentavon may be useful for disinfection of dental impressions. To do the possible means to reduce the infection risk for all persons involved in the dental treatment, patient, dentist, dental technician and all auxiliary persons. This includes both, active hygiene provisions as sterilization and disinfection, as well as possible passive self protection.

  4. Disinfection of dental impressions and occlusal records by ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, T; Fiehn, N E; Peutzfeldt, A; Owall, B

    2000-06-01

    As chemical disinfection of dental impressions may cause adverse effects on materials and the dental personnel this study examined disinfection by ultraviolet radiation. Alginate, addition silicone rubber and red wax contaminated by Streptococcus salivarius, Fusobacterium nucleatum and five other bacteria in different suspension media were radiated for up to 18 min, and the number of colony forming units was compared to non-radiated controls. The effect of ultraviolet radiation differed among bacterial species and depended on the organic content in the suspension. Generally, the bacterial reduction after ultraviolet radiation was below 4 log steps and thus insufficient for disinfection of dental impressions.

  5. Dental impressions using 3D digital scanners: virtual becomes reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Nathan S; Aaronson, Heidi B

    2008-10-01

    The technologies that have made the use of three-dimensional (3D) digital scanners an integral part of many industries for decades have been improved and refined for application to dentistry. Since the introduction of the first dental impressioning digital scanner in the 1980s, development engineers at a number of companies have enhanced the technologies and created in-office scanners that are increasingly user-friendly and able to produce precisely fitting dental restorations. These systems are capable of capturing 3D virtual images of tooth preparations, from which restorations may be fabricated directly (ie, CAD/CAM systems) or fabricated indirectly (ie, dedicated impression scanning systems for the creation of accurate master models). The use of these products is increasing rapidly around the world and presents a paradigm shift in the way in which dental impressions are made. Several of the leading 3D dental digital scanning systems are presented and discussed in this article.

  6. Contamination level of alginate impressions arriving at a dental laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofou, A; Larsen, T; Fiehn, N-E; Owall, B

    2002-09-01

    The contamination level of alginate impressions delivered to a large dental laboratory in Sweden was determined. One hundred and seven consecutive alginate impressions were included during 7 days. Samples were taken and transferred into sterile physiological saline and analysed microbiologically for colony-forming units (cfu) as well as nonhemolytic, alpha-hemolytic, and beta-hemolytic colonies. After sampling, the clinics were contacted and asked to fill in simple questionnaires about their routines of disinfecting impressions. The questionnaire study revealed that about half of the clinics had some kind of disinfection routine, while the others rinsed in running water only. Seventy-two percent of the impressions yielded growth of bacteria, with a median number of 1.3x10(2) cfu. Thirteen per cent of the samples yielded >10(3) cfu, with a maximum number of 3.4x10(4) cfu. The majority of isolates were non- and alpha-hemolytic bacteria. Growth was recorded in 61.3% of disinfected impressions, and the numbers of bacteria in disinfected and nondisinfected impressions were similar. These findings raise the question of whether impressions need to be disinfected or if proper handling and hygienic procedures are sufficient to block the possible route of infection.

  7. Inorganic particle analysis of dental impression elastomers

    OpenAIRE

    Carlo,Hugo Lemes; FONSECA, Rodrigo Borges; Soares, Carlos José; Correr,Américo Bortolazzo; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti,Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine quantitatively and qualitatively the inorganic particle fraction of commercially available dental elastomers. The inorganic volumetric fraction of two addition silicones (Reprosil Putty/Fluid and Flexitime Easy Putty/Fluid), three condensation silicones (Clonage Putty/Fluid, Optosil Confort/Xantopren VL and Silon APS Putty/Fluid), one polyether (Impregum Soft Light Body) and one polysulfide (Permlastic Light Body) was accessed by weighing a previously de...

  8. A rare allergy to a polyether dental impression material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittermüller, Pauline; Szeimies, Rolf-Markus; Landthaler, Michael; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2012-08-01

    Polyether impression materials have been used in dentistry for more than 40 years. Allergic reactions to these materials such as reported in the 1970s ceased after replacement of a catalyst. Very recently, however, patients have started to report symptoms that suggest a new allergic reaction from polyether impression materials. Here, we report on the results of allergy testing with polyether impression materials as well as with its components. Eight patients with clinical symptoms of a contact allergy (swelling, redness or blisters) after exposure to a polyether impression material were subjected to patch tests, two of them additionally to a prick test. A further patient with atypical symptoms of an allergy (nausea and vomiting after contact with a polyether impression material in the oral cavity) but with a history of other allergic reaction was also patch tested. The prick tests showed no immediate reactions in the two patients tested. In the patch tests, all eight patients with typical clinical symptoms showed positive reactions to the mixed polyether impression materials, to the base paste or to a base paste component. The patient with the atypical clinical symptoms did not show any positive patch test reactions. Polyether impression materials may evoke type IV allergic reactions. The causative agent was a component of the base paste. In consideration of the widespread use of this impression material (millions of applications per year) and in comparison to the number of adverse reactions from other dental materials, the number of such allergic reactions is very low. In very scarce cases, positive allergic reactions to polyether impression materials are possible.

  9. Inorganic particle analysis of dental impression elastomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, Hugo Lemes; Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Soares, Carlos José; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine quantitatively and qualitatively the inorganic particle fraction of commercially available dental elastomers. The inorganic volumetric fraction of two addition silicones (Reprosil Putty/Fluid and Flexitime Easy Putty/Fluid), three condensation silicones (Clonage Putty/Fluid, Optosil Confort/Xantopren VL and Silon APS Putty/Fluid), one polyether (Impregum Soft Light Body) and one polysulfide (Permlastic Light Body) was accessed by weighing a previously determined mass of each material in water before and after burning samples at 600 ºC, during 3 h. Unsettled material samples were soaked in acetone and chloroform for removal of the organic portion. The remaining filler particles were sputter-coated with gold evaluation of their morphology and size, under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexitime Easy Putty was the material with the highest results for volumetric particle fraction, while Impregum Soft had the lowest values. Silon 2 APS Fluid presented the lowest mean filler size values, while Clonage Putty had the highest values. SEM micrographs of the inorganic particles showed several morphologies - lathe-cut, spherical, spherical-like, sticks, and sticks mixed to lathe-cut powder. The results of this study revealed differences in particle characteristics among the elastometic materials that could lead to different results when testing mechanical properties.

  10. Accuracy of digital impression in dental implants: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudabe Kulivand

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of dental implants remains one of the most challenging aspects of implant dentistry. Although it is not clear whether prosthetic misfit could affect osseointegration, mechanical complications of implant-supported prostheses can be avoided by achieving a good passive fit between the framework and the implants. Passive fit is a difficult concept to define. Obtaining absolute passive fit of the prosthetic framework on implants has been reported to be nearly impossible. Because of the multiple steps involved in processing and manufacturing implant-borne prostheses, errors in precision seem to be unavoidable. Misfit of prosthesis may lead to mechanical failures such as screw distortion and loosening, component fractures and even implant failure. Digital impressions offer advantages to both the clinician and the patient. For clinicians, digital impressions may reduce laboratory remakes because the computer screen image of the prepared teeth is magnified, improving the view of the preparation quality. The quality and accuracy of impressions has been demonstrated to be an effective clinical procedure for reducing inaccuracies in prostheses. So, the aim of the current research was to determine accuracy of digital impression in dental implants using the PubMed and Medline database English literature by the terms “Digital impression”, “Implants”, Dentistry”.

  11. Do dental impression materials play a role in cross contamination?

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    Matalon, Shlomo; Eini, Amir; Gorfil, Colin; Ben-Amar, Ariel; Slutzky, Hagay

    2011-01-01

    Dentists are required to institute infectious control procedures. Dental impression materials possessing antimicrobial properties may aid in reducing the risk of cross contamination since impression materials might play a role as carriers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of four impression materials. Four impression materials--Orthoprint, Impregum Penta, Aquasil Ultra Monophase, and Permlastic--were evaluated by the direct contact test. The materials were tested in contact with Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Candida albicans. The materials were mixed; allowed to set; and examined immediately and after aging for 24, 48, and 72 hours and 1 week. Two-way ANOVA, one-way ANOVA, and Tukey multiple comparison procedures were applied to the results. Impregum Penta presented the broadest antibacterial spectrum of all the materials tested. There was a complete growth inhibition of S aureus and S epidermidis, and it sustained this ability for at least 7 days. It also showed an antifungal effect by partially inhibiting the growth of C albicans, a quality that was seen only immediately after setting. Aquasil Ultra showed an antifungal effect only immediately after setting. Permlastic showed a complete growth inhibition when in contact with C albicans and sustained this ability for at least 7 days. No significant antimicrobial properties were recorded for Orthoprint. When in contact with E faecalis, no significant antibacterial properties were recorded for any of the materials. None of the tested materials exhibited a long-lasting or complete antibacterial and antifungal property. Therefore, disinfection of impressions is essential.

  12. Surface detail reproduction of Type IV dental stones with selected polyvinyl siloxane impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelb, E; Cavazos, E; Troendle, K B; Prihoda, T J

    1991-01-01

    Four polyvinyl siloxane impression materials and 14 modified Type IV dental stones were evaluated for their abilities to reproduce surface detail. Each combination of impression material and dental stone was used to duplicate a 20-microns-wide line. Surface detail reproduction was observed by two paired-rater groups. The line was reproduced in all impression material specimens, but in only 32% of the stone cast specimens. Some combinations of impression material/dental stone reproduced the line all or most of the time, but 12 combinations did not reproduce the line at all.

  13. Evaluation of digital dental models obtained from dental cone-beam computed tomography scan of alginate impressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tingting; Lee, Sang-Mi; Hou, Yanan; Chang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the dimensional accuracy of digital dental models obtained from the dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan of alginate impressions according to the time elapse when the impressions are stored under ambient conditions. Methods Alginate impressions were obtained from 20 adults using 3 different alginate materials, 2 traditional alginate materials (Alginoplast and Cavex Impressional) and 1 extended-pour alginate material (Cavex ColorChange). The impressions were stored under ambient conditions, and scanned by CBCT immediately after the impressions were taken, and then at 1 hour intervals for 6 hours. After reconstructing three-dimensional digital dental models, the models were measured and the data were analyzed to determine dimensional changes according to the elapsed time. The changes within the measurement error were regarded as clinically acceptable in this study. Results All measurements showed a decreasing tendency with an increase in the elapsed time after the impressions. Although the extended-pour alginate exhibited a less decreasing tendency than the other 2 materials, there were no statistically significant differences between the materials. Changes above the measurement error occurred between the time points of 3 and 4 hours after the impressions. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that digital dental models can be obtained simply from a CBCT scan of alginate impressions without sending them to a remote laboratory. However, when the impressions are not stored under special conditions, they should be scanned immediately, or at least within 2 to 3 hours after the impressions are taken. PMID:27226958

  14. Dental wax impressions of plant tissues for viewing with scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beermann, Anke; Hülskamp, Martin

    2010-09-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a valuable method for examining surface structures. Taking wax impressions of plant structures, such as leaves, is a nondestructive procedure that makes it possible to view changes in surface structures over time, such as during development. This protocol describes a method for making dental wax impressions of plant tissues.

  15. Effects of radio-opacifier addition in dental impression material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mota Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the effects of barium sulfate addition in two dental impression materials previously proved as radiolucent. Materials and Methods: An irreversible hydrocolloid (IH and polyether (PE were tested for optical density, linear dimension stability and detail reproduction. Statistical Analysis Used: The optical density data were submitted to Kolmogorov-Smirnov normality test and compared with two-way ANOVA and Tukey (alpha=0.05. Results: The results of optical density (pixel were: IH control 45.24 f (±7.6, PE control 54.93 e (±4.45, PE 5Wt% 60.43 d (±6.27, IH 1Wt% 61.54 cd (±5.3, PE 1Wt% 66.9 bc (±5.05, IH 5Wt% 67.17 b (±6.01, PE 10Wt% 84.55 a (±5.14, IH 10Wt% 85.33 a (±5.53. On detail reproduction, polyether control was able to copy the 6 μm line. Adding 1 or 5Wt% of barium sulfate have not change this characteristic. For the irreversible hydrocolloid, the control group was able to copy a line with 14 μm, however, adding 1Wt% barium sulfate, the capability decreased to 22 μm. Adding barium sulfate in the polyether promoted an increase in between the copied lines, for the control, the average distance was 931.6 μm, 936 μm to 1Wt% and 954.5 μm to 5 Wt%. For the IH, the control presented 975 μm in comparison to 987.25 μm for 1 Wt% samples. Conclusion: The addition of barium sulfate was capable of increasing significantly the optical density of tested material, have changed the linear dimension stability, however, have not interfered in detail reproduction only for PE.

  16. Impression Procedures for Metal Frame Removable Partial Dentures as Applied by General Dental Practitioners.

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    Fokkinga, Wietske A; van Uchelen, Judith; Witter, Dick J; Mulder, Jan; Creugers, Nico H J

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study analyzed impression procedures for conventional metal frame removable partial dentures (RPDs). Heads of RPD departments of three dental laboratories were asked to record features of all incoming impressions for RPDs during a 2-month period. Records included: (1) impression procedure, tray type (stock/custom), impression material (elastomer/alginate), use of border-molding material (yes/no); and (2) RPD type requested (distal-extension/tooth-bounded/combination). Of the 132 total RPD impressions, 111 (84%) involved custom trays, of which 73 (55%) were combined with an elastomer. Impression border-molding material was used in 4% of the cases. Associations between impression procedure and RPD type or dentists' year/university of graduation were not found.

  17. Dimensional accuracy of 3 silicone dental impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, A K

    2006-09-01

    This study was carried out to measure the dimensional changes in silicone impression material, which can affect the fitness of the prosthesis. Using both single and double mix techniques, 20 impression samples for each of 3 different proprietary silicones, Xantopren-H, President and Fulldent, were made. Selected measurements were made on the stone casts made from each impression. In all 3 cases, the single mix gave more accurate casts than the double mix technique. The Xantopren-H impressions had the most accurate dimensions.

  18. Neither here, nor there: impression management does not predict expatriate adjustment and job performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HANNAH JACKSON FOLDES

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Social desirability scale scores reflect substantive individual differences related to personality. The objective of the current study was to examine whether social desirability, and impression management specifically (a component of social desirability, is predictive of adjustment and job performance for expatriates. Based on theoretical considerations, it was proposed that impression management might be linked to expatriate job performance in a predictive and mediated relationship through adjustment. Job performance ratings provided by host country national co-workers were obtained for 308 expatriates on assignment in Turkey. Expatriates responded to a measure of personality and cross cultural adjustment. It was found that impression management scale scores were not related to either adjustment or job performance. These results are discussed in the broader context of research on social desirability, expatriate job performance, and expatriate research in general.

  19. Accuracy of different abutment level impression techniques in All-On-4 dental implants

    OpenAIRE

    Marzieh Alikhasi; Mahnaz Arshad; Hakime Siadat; Susan Rahimian

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims: Passive fit of prosthetic frameworks is a major concern in implant dentistry. Impression technique is one of the several variables that may affect the outcome of dental implants. The purpose of this study was to compare the three dimensional accuracy of direct and indirect abutment level implant impressions ofALL-ON-4 treatment plan.Materials and Methods: A reference acrylic resin model with four Branemark fixtures was made according to All-On-4 treatment plan. Multiunit ...

  20. Effect of the disinfection technique on the linear dimensional stability of dental impression materials

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Sávio Marcelo Leite Moreira da; Salvador, Milton Carlos Gonçalves

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dimensional stability of heavy and light bodied condensation silicones after immersion in disinfectant solution for 10 or 20 minutes. The impression materials were Optosil Comfort and Xantopren VL Plus and the disinfectant solutions were 1% sodium hypochlorite and 2% glutaraldehyde. Impressions were made on a perforated stainless steel tray, according to the American Dental Association specification No. 19, adding up to a total of 50 samples. The ...

  1. A new method for training of ear framework creation by silicon dental impression material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thadani, Sandeep M; Ladani, Parit S

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the novel method of training of creating cartilage framework for total ear reconstruction in microtia. Replica of costal cartilage harvested for real surgery was simulated by silicon dental impression material. Carving of framework was done with wood carving instruments. Silicon dental impression material gives the consistency and texture almost comparable to real costal cartilage. Sequential steps similar to actual surgery were simulated to create the three-dimensional framework.By using this novel technique, novice surgeons can practice creating ear framework and improvise their results in the actual surgery.

  2. Three-dimensional assessment of dental casts' occlusal surfaces using two impression materials.

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    Tarawneh, F M; Panos, P G; Athanasiou, A E

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess by means of a three-dimensional computed tomography scanning system the occlusal surface characteristics of dental casts made using two different impression materials. Alginate and polyvinyl siloxane impressions were taken of 20 dental students resulting in 40 dental casts. The casts were paired for each student separately so that each pair consisted of an alginate poured cast and a polyvinyl siloxane poured out cast. The casts were scanned using FlashCT scanner and for each cast, a three-dimensional digital image was obtained. The digitized casts were processed using the three-dimensional imaging software Geomagic Studio 9. A total of 464 paired teeth were digitally separated and superimposed. For each tooth, two measurements were obtained corresponding to the two different impression materials used. The two sets of volumes for all digitally separated teeth were compared and analysed using the Wilcoxon signed test. Larger volume measurements were obtained for teeth separated from alginate poured out casts than from their corresponding ones from polyvinyl siloxane casts (P = 0.005). When the teeth were divided into the groups of incisors, canines and premolars/molars, only the last one exhibited significant difference (P = 0.00). The mean difference between the volumes measured for all 464 teeth separated was 0.041 mm(3) (+/-0.33). The occlusal surfaces of teeth appear differently in dental casts depending on the impression materials used. Impressions of dental casts should be utilized with caution in relation to their research application and in reference with dental wear studies.

  3. Accuracy of different abutment level impression techniques in All-On-4 dental implants

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    Marzieh Alikhasi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Passive fit of prosthetic frameworks is a major concern in implant dentistry. Impression technique is one of the several variables that may affect the outcome of dental implants. The purpose of this study was to compare the three dimensional accuracy of direct and indirect abutment level implant impressions ofALL-ON-4 treatment plan.Materials and Methods: A reference acrylic resin model with four Branemark fixtures was made according to All-On-4 treatment plan. Multiunit abutments were screwed into the fixtures and two special trays were made for direct and indirect impression techniques. Ten direct and ten indirect impression techniques with respective impression transfers were made. Impressions were poured with stone and the positional accuracy of the abutment analogues in each dimension of x, y, and z axes and also angular displacement (Δθ were evaluated using a Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM. Data were analyzed using T- test.Results: The results showed that direct impression technique was significantly more accurate than indirect technique (P<0.001.Conclusion: The results showed that the accuracy of direct impression technique was significantly more than that of indirect technique in Δθ and Δr coordinate and also Δx, Δy, Δz.

  4. Clinical Evaluation of Different Pre-impression Preparation Procedures of Dental Arch

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    Arora, Nitin; Arora, Monika; Gupta, Naveen; Agarwal, Manisha; Verma, Rohit; Rathod, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bubbles and voids on the occlusal surface impede the actual intercuspation and pre-impression preparation aims to reduce the incidence of air bubbles and voids as well as influences the quality of occlusal reproduction and actual clinical intercuspation in the articulator. The study was undertaken to determine the influence of different pre-impression preparation procedures of antagonistic dental arch on the quality of the occlusal reproduction of the teeth in irreversible hydrocolloid impressions and to determine most reliable pre-impression preparation method to reduce the incidence of air bubbles. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 subjects were selected having full complement of mandibular teeth from second molar to second molar with well demarcated cusp height. 200 impressions were made with irreversible hydrocolloid material. The impressions were divided into five groups of 40 impressions each and each group had one specific type of pre-impression preparation. All the impressions were poured in die stone. A stereomicroscope with graduated eyepiece was used to count the number of bubbles on the occlusal surface of premolars and molars. The mean and standard deviations were calculated for each group. Mann–Whitney U-test was applied to find the significant difference between different groups. Results: Least bubbles were found in the group in which oral cavity was dried by saliva ejector and fluid hydrocolloid was finger painted onto the occlusal surfaces immediately before the placement of impression tray in the mouth. Conclusion: It was found that finger painting the tooth surfaces with fluid hydrocolloid immediately before the placement of loaded impression tray in the mouth was the most reliable method. The oral cavity can be cleared more easily of excess saliva by vacuum suction rather than by use of an astringent solution. PMID:26229376

  5. Comparison of dimensional accuracy of digital dental models produced from scanned impressions and scanned stone casts

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    Subeihi, Haitham

    Introduction: Digital models of dental arches play a more and more important role in dentistry. A digital dental model can be generated by directly scanning intraoral structures, by scanning a conventional impression of oral structures or by scanning a stone cast poured from the conventional impression. An accurate digital scan model is a fundamental part for the fabrication of dental restorations. Aims: 1. To compare the dimensional accuracy of digital dental models produced by scanning of impressions versus scanning of stone casts. 2. To compare the dimensional accuracy of digital dental models produced by scanning of impressions made of three different materials (polyvinyl siloxane, polyether or vinyl polyether silicone). Methods and Materials: This laboratory study included taking addition silicone, polyether and vinyl polyether silicone impressions from an epoxy reference model that was created from an original typodont. Teeth number 28 and 30 on the typodont with a missing tooth number 29 were prepared for a metal-ceramic three-unit fixed dental prosthesis with tooth #29 being a pontic. After tooth preparation, an epoxy resin reference model was fabricated by duplicating the typodont quadrant that included the tooth preparations. From this reference model 12 polyvinyl siloxane impressions, 12 polyether impressions and 12 vinyl polyether silicone impressions were made. All 36 impressions were scanned before pouring them with dental stone. The 36 dental stone casts were, in turn, scanned to produce digital models. A reference digital model was made by scanning the reference model. Six groups of digital models were produced. Three groups were made by scanning of the impressions obtained with the three different materials, the other three groups involved the scanning of the dental casts that resulted from pouring the impressions made with the three different materials. Groups of digital models were compared using Root Mean Squares (RMS) in terms of their

  6. Resistance to disinfection of a polymicrobial association contaminating the surface of elastomeric dental impressions.

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    Giammanco, Giovanni M; Melilli, Dario; Rallo, Antonio; Pecorella, Sonia; Mammina, Caterina; Pizzo, Giuseppe

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability to resist disinfection of a polymicrobial association contaminating the surface of dental impressions obtained with two different elastomers: a polyether (Impregum) and an addition-polymerized silicone (Elite). Impressions were contaminated with a mixture of three biofilm-forming microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans) and disinfected immediately after contamination, or after microbial layers were allowed to develop during a six-hour storage. Two commercial disinfectants were tested: MD 520 containing 0.5% glutaraldehyde and Sterigum Powder without glutaraldehyde. Residual contamination was recovered by mechanical rinsing immediately after disinfection and after a six-hour storage of disinfected impressions, and assessed by colony counting. Both disinfectants tested were shown to be effective in reducing the microbial presence on the impression materials, achieving at least a 102 reduction of microbial counts compared to water rinsing. However, Sterigum was generally less effective on the Elite elastomer and could not grant disinfection on six-hour aged P. aeruginosa and C. albicans microbial layers. The results of this study suggest that the materials used for the impressions influence the efficacy of disinfection. Disinfectants should be tested according to conditions encountered in everyday clinical practice and the need for immediate disinfection of impressions should be clearly indicated by manufacturers.

  7. Changes in water contact angles during the first phase of setting of dental impression materials.

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    Mondon, Matthias; Ziegler, Christiane

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the changes in wettability of dental impression materials during setting. This study compared the properties of the initial water contact of two different dental impression materials and their subsequent development during polymerization. Two dental impression materials (Impregum Penta Soft and Aquasil) with different chemical compositions (polyether and polyvinyl siloxane, respectively) were investigated with respect to their changing wetting properties by time-resolved static contact angle measurements. Ten sets of measurements each were taken over a period of 400 seconds with 150 points of data each; the first pictures were used for further characterization of the initial interaction. With 73 degrees, Impregum Penta Soft exhibited a significantly lower contact angle, which stayed lower during the process of setting, compared to the silicone-based material. The initial interaction of the droplet showed a repulsive interaction of Aquasil with the water droplet. Impregum Penta Soft showed a more hydrophilic behavior during the process of setting compared to Aquasil and can therefore be expected to exhibit better flow properties. The method of time-resolved static contact angle measurements is a well-suited analytic instrument to monitor temporally changing wetting phenomena.

  8. Evaluation of accuracy of complete-arch multiple-unit abutment-level dental implant impressions using different impression and splinting materials.

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    Buzayan, Muaiyed; Baig, Mirza Rustum; Yunus, Norsiah

    2013-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the accuracy of multiple-unit dental implant casts obtained from splinted or nonsplinted direct impression techniques using various splinting materials by comparing the casts to the reference models. The effect of two different impression materials on the accuracy of the implant casts was also evaluated for abutment-level impressions. A reference model with six internal-connection implant replicas placed in the completely edentulous mandibular arch and connected to multi-base abutments was fabricated from heat-curing acrylic resin. Forty impressions of the reference model were made, 20 each with polyether (PE) and polyvinylsiloxane (PVS) impression materials using the open tray technique. The PE and PVS groups were further subdivided into four subgroups of five each on the bases of splinting type: no splinting, bite registration PE, bite registration addition silicone, or autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The positional accuracy of the implant replica heads was measured on the poured casts using a coordinate measuring machine to assess linear differences in interimplant distances in all three axes. The collected data (linear and three-dimensional [3D] displacement values) were compared with the measurements calculated on the reference resin model and analyzed with nonparametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney). No significant differences were found between the various splinting groups for both PE and PVS impression materials in terms of linear and 3D distortions. However, small but significant differences were found between the two impression materials (PVS, 91 μm; PE, 103 μm) in terms of 3D discrepancies, irrespective of the splinting technique employed. Casts obtained from both impression materials exhibited differences from the reference model. The impression material influenced impression inaccuracy more than the splinting material for multiple-unit abutment-level impressions.

  9. In vitro study of transmission of bacteria from contaminated metal models to stone models via impressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sofou, A.; Larsen, T.; Öwall, B.

    2002-01-01

    Dental impression, stone model, bacterial contamination, cross-infection, dental clinic, dental laboratory......Dental impression, stone model, bacterial contamination, cross-infection, dental clinic, dental laboratory...

  10. Impression Techniques Used for Single-Unit Crowns: Findings from the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Michael S; Louis, David R; Litaker, Mark S; Minyé, Helena M; Oates, Thomas; Gordan, Valeria V; Marshall, Don G; Meyerowitz, Cyril; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2017-01-11

    To: (1) determine which impression and gingival displacement techniques practitioners use for single-unit crowns on natural teeth; and (2) test whether certain dentist and practice characteristics are significantly associated with the use of these techniques. Dentists participating in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network were eligible for this survey study. The study used a questionnaire developed by clinicians, statisticians, laboratory technicians, and survey experts. The questionnaire was pretested via cognitive interviewing with a regionally diverse group of practitioners. The survey included questions regarding gingival displacement and impression techniques. Survey responses were compared by dentist and practice characteristics using ANOVA. The response rate was 1777 of 2132 eligible dentists (83%). Regarding gingival displacement, most clinicians reported using either a single cord (35%) or dual cord (35%) technique. About 16% of respondents preferred an injectable retraction technique. For making impressions, the most frequently used techniques and materials are: poly(vinyl siloxane), 77%; polyether, 12%; optical/digital, 9%. A dental auxiliary or assistant made the final impression 2% of the time. Regarding dual-arch impression trays, 23% of practitioners report they typically use a metal frame tray, 60% use a plastic frame, and 16% do not use a dual-arch tray. Clinicians using optical impression techniques were more likely to be private practice owners or associates. This study documents current techniques for gingival displacement and making impressions for crowns. Certain dentist and practice characteristics are significantly associated with these techniques. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  11. Impression evaluation and laboratory use for single-unit crowns: Findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Michael S; Litaker, Mark S; George, Ashley J; Durand, Scott; Malekpour, Sepideh; Marshall, Don G; Meyerowitz, Cyril; Carter, Lauren; Gordan, Valeria V; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2017-08-16

    Objectives were to determine the likelihood that a clinician accepts an impression for a single-unit crown and document crown remake rates. The authors developed a questionnaire that asked dentists about techniques used to fabricate single-unit crowns. The authors showed dentists photographs of 4 impressions and asked them to accept or reject each impression. The authors correlated answers with dentist and practice characteristics. Other questions pertained to laboratory use and crown remake rates. The response rate was 83% (1,777 of 2,132 eligible dentists). Of the 4 impressions evaluated, 3 received consistent responses, with 85% agreement. One impression was more equivocal; 52% accepted the impression. The likelihood of accepting an impression was associated significantly with the clinician's sex, race, ethnicity, and practice busyness. Clinicians produced 18 crowns per month on average, and 9% used in-office milling. Most dentists (59%) reported a remake rate of less than 2%, whereas 17% reported a remake rate greater than 4%. Lower remake rates were associated significantly with more experienced clinicians, optical impressions, and not using dual-arch trays. Although dentists were largely consistent in their evaluation of impressions (> 85%), nonclinical factors were associated with whether an impression was accepted or rejected. Lower crown remake rates were associated with more experienced clinicians, optical impressions, and not using dual-arch trays. These results provide a snapshot of clinical care considerations among a diverse group of dentists. Clinicians can compare their own remake rates and impression evaluation techniques with those in this sample when developing best practice protocols. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Complete denture impression techniques practiced by private dental practitioners: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakatkar, Vinay R

    2013-09-01

    Impression making is an important step in fabricating complete dentures. A survey to know the materials used and techniques practiced while recording complete denture impressions was conducted. It is disheartening to know that 33 % practitioners still use base plate custom trays to record final impressions. 8 % still use alginate for making final impressions. An acceptable technique for recording CD impressions is suggested.

  13. Marginal and Internal Fit of Cobalt-Chromium Fixed Dental Prostheses Generated from Digital and Conventional Impressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Svanborg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Digital impressions are increasingly used and have the potential to avoid the problem of inaccurate impressions. Only a few studies to verify the accuracy of digital impressions have been performed. The purpose of this study was to compare the marginal and internal fit of 3-unit tooth supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs fabricated from digital and conventional impressions. Methods. Ten FDPs were produced from digital impressions using the iTero system and 10 FDPs were produced using vinyl polysiloxane (VPS impression material. A triple-scan protocol and CAD software were used for measuring and calculating discrepancies of the FDPs at 3 standard areas: mean internal discrepancy, absolute marginal gap, and cervical area discrepancy. The Mann-Whitney U test was used for analyzing the results. Results. For conventional and digital impressions, respectively, FDPs had an absolute marginal gap of 147 μm and 142 μm, cervical area discrepancy of 69 μm and 44 μm, and mean internal discrepancy of 117 μm and 93 μm. The differences were statistically significant in the cervical and internal areas (P<0.001. Significance. The results indicated that the digital impression technique is more exact and can generate 3-unit FDPs with a significantly closer fit compared to the VPS technique.

  14. An unusual foreign body in the maxillary sinus: Dental impression material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Y; Zengin, A Z; Karli, R

    2016-01-01

    Foreign bodies in paranasal sinuses are very rare and most of them are encountered in the maxillary sinus. These foreign bodies may be organic or inorganic and can enter the maxillary sinus through an oro-antral fistula. The oro-antral fistula is formed by a break in the bony segment of the maxillary sinus floor and usually arises subsequent to maxillary premolar and molar extractions. A 63-year-old female patient evaluated for a nonhealing, left, toothless palate lesion and chronic headache occurring over 4 years. Radiography and computed tomography revealed bone discontinuity in the left floor of the maxillary sinus and calcifications within the antrum. A blue foreign body, later identified as dental impression material, was removed by intranasal endoscopy. A careful oral examination is recommended prior to prosthetic restorations. In addition, paranasal sinus foreign bodies should be surgically removed to prevent secondary soft tissue reactions.

  15. Investigation of dental alginate and agar impression materials as a brain simulant for ballistic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falland-Cheung, Lisa; Piccione, Neil; Zhao, Tianqi; Lazarjan, Milad Soltanipour; Hanlin, Suzanne; Jermy, Mark; Waddell, J Neil

    2016-06-01

    Routine forensic research into in vitro skin/skull/brain ballistic blood backspatter behavior has traditionally used gelatin at a 1:10 Water:Powder (W:P) ratio by volume as a brain simulant. A limitation of gelatin is its high elasticity compared to brain tissue. Therefore this study investigated the use of dental alginate and agar impression materials as a brain simulant for ballistic testing. Fresh deer brain, alginate (W:P ratio 91.5:8.5) and agar (W:P ratio 81:19) specimens (n=10) (11×22×33mm) were placed in transparent Perspex boxes of the same internal dimensions prior to shooting with a 0.22inch caliber high velocity air gun. Quantitative analysis to establish kinetic energy loss, vertical displacement elastic behavior and qualitative analysis to establish elasticity behavior was done via high-speed camera footage (SA5, Photron, Japan) using Photron Fastcam Viewer software (Version 3.5.1, Photron, Japan) and visual observation. Damage mechanisms and behavior were qualitatively established by observation of the materials during and after shooting. The qualitative analysis found that of the two simulant materials tested, agar behaved more like brain in terms of damage and showed similar mechanical response to brain during the passage of the projectile, in terms of energy absorption and vertical velocity displacement. In conclusion agar showed a mechanical and subsequent damage response that was similar to brain compared to alginate.

  16. Positive control for cytotoxicity evaluation of dental vinyl polysiloxane impression materials using sodium lauryl sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jae-Sung; Lee, Sang-Bae; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2014-11-01

    Vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) is elastomeric dental impression material which, despite having very few reports of adverse reactions, has shown high levels of cytotoxicity that is difficult to be interpreted without referencing to the positive control material. Therefore, in this study, positive control VPS was developed using sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) for the reference of cytotoxicity test. The positive control VPS with SLS was formed with a different proportion of SLS (0, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 wt%) added to the base. The cytotoxicity test was then carried out using the extractions or dilutions of the extractions from each of the test samples using murine fibroblast cells (L929). The final product of positive control VPS behaved similar to commercially available VPS; being initially liquid-like and then becoming rubber-like. Ion chromatography showed that the level of SLS released from the product increased as the proportion of added SLS increased, consequently resulting in an increased level of cytotoxicity. Also, the commercially available VPS was less cytotoxic than the positive control VPS with more or equal to 2 wt% of SLS. However, even the VPS with the highest SLS (16 wt%) did not cause oral mucosa irritation during the animal study. The positive control VPS was successfully produced using SLS, which will be useful in terms of providing references during in vitro cytotoxicity testing.

  17. Comparison of conventional study model measurements and 3D digital study model measurements from laser scanned dental impressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugrahani, F.; Jazaldi, F.; Noerhadi, N. A. I.

    2017-08-01

    The field of orthodontics is always evolving,and this includes the use of innovative technology. One type of orthodontic technology is the development of three-dimensional (3D) digital study models that replace conventional study models made by stone. This study aims to compare the mesio-distal teeth width, intercanine width, and intermolar width measurements between a 3D digital study model and a conventional study model. Twelve sets of upper arch dental impressions were taken from subjects with non-crowding teeth. The impressions were taken twice, once with alginate and once with polivinylsiloxane. The alginate impressions used in the conventional study model and the polivinylsiloxane impressions were scanned to obtain the 3D digital study model. Scanning was performed using a laser triangulation scanner device assembled by the School of Electrical Engineering and Informatics at the Institut Teknologi Bandung and David Laser Scan software. For the conventional model, themesio-distal width, intercanine width, and intermolar width were measured using digital calipers; in the 3D digital study model they were measured using software. There were no significant differences between the mesio-distal width, intercanine width, and intermolar width measurments between the conventional and 3D digital study models (p>0.05). Thus, measurements using 3D digital study models are as accurate as those obtained from conventional study models

  18. The dynamic interaction of water with four dental impression materials during cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinpour, Dariush; Berg, John C

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the interaction of water with four different dental impression materials: Aquasil (Ultra XLV Type 3), Take 1 (Wash Regular Set), Genie (Light Body, Standard Set), and Impregum Garant (Soft Light Bodied Consistency). Apparent contact angles of de-ionized water made against thin horizontal sample films of the different materials under different conditions were measured from analysis of profile images of symmetrical sessile drops of water placed on the sample films using a Model FTA200 dynamic drop shape analysis system, which included a JAI M30 high speed CCD camera combined with a zoom microscope. Data were taken for specimens of dry ages (times following mixing) from a minimum of 20 seconds up to 1220 seconds. Imaging was started before the initial water/impression material contact, and lasted for at least 420 seconds in each case. The interval at the beginning of each run was 0.033 second, and then increased by a factor of 1.012 to the end. During the initial 3 seconds following the drop deposition, the drop's shape oscillated due to inertial effects, so apparent contact angle data during this period were neglected in all cases. All measurements were made at room temperature. The drops were enclosed in a humidified chamber that suppressed evaporation. All data were repeated at least five times, and results were analyzed where appropriate using one-way ANOVA. Microscopic images of the water/impression material interactions for fresh (uncured) materials were acquired to reveal the destructive interactions that resulted from such contact. Finally, surface tension measurements were made of water that had been contacted with material of varying dry age using the pendant drop method capability of the drop shape analysis system. These helped to assess the origin of hydrophilicity development for the different materials. For short curing times (dry ages), water showed a destructive effect on the integrity of all of the

  19. Three-dimensional accuracy of different impression techniques for dental implants

    OpenAIRE

    Nakhaei, Mohammadreza; Madani, Azam S; Moraditalab, Azizollah; Haghi, Hamidreza Rajati

    2015-01-01

    Background: Accurate impression making is an essential prerequisite for achieving a passive fit between the implant and the superstructure. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the three-dimensional accuracy of open-tray and three closed-tray impression techniques. Materials and Methods: Three acrylic resin mandibular master models with four parallel implants were used: Biohorizons (BIO), Straumann tissue-level (STL), and Straumann bone-level (SBL). Forty-two putty/wash polyvinyl sil...

  20. Three-dimensional accuracy of different impression techniques for dental implants

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadreza Nakhaei; Madani, Azam S; Azizollah Moraditalab; Hamidreza Rajati Haghi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Accurate impression making is an essential prerequisite for achieving a passive fit between the implant and the superstructure. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the three-dimensional accuracy of open-tray and three closed-tray impression techniques. Materials and Methods: Three acrylic resin mandibular master models with four parallel implants were used: Biohorizons (BIO), Straumann tissue-level (STL), and Straumann bone-level (SBL). Forty-two putty/wash polyvinyl...

  1. Radiodensity evaluation of dental impression materials in comparison to tooth structures

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Borges Fonseca; Carolina Assaf Branco; Francisco Haiter-Neto; Luciano Souza Gonçalves; Carlos José Soares; Hugo Lemes Carlo; Mário Alexandre Coelho Sinhoreti; Lourenço Correr-Sobrinho

    2010-01-01

    In the most recent decades, several developments have been made on impression materials' composition, but there are very few radiodensity studies in the literature. It is expected that an acceptable degree of radiodensity would enable the detection of small fragments left inside gingival sulcus or root canals. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the radiodensity of different impression materials, and to compare them to human and bovine enamel and dentin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Tw...

  2. Three-dimensional accuracy of different impression techniques for dental implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhaei, Mohammadreza; Madani, Azam S; Moraditalab, Azizollah; Haghi, Hamidreza Rajati

    2015-01-01

    Background: Accurate impression making is an essential prerequisite for achieving a passive fit between the implant and the superstructure. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the three-dimensional accuracy of open-tray and three closed-tray impression techniques. Materials and Methods: Three acrylic resin mandibular master models with four parallel implants were used: Biohorizons (BIO), Straumann tissue-level (STL), and Straumann bone-level (SBL). Forty-two putty/wash polyvinyl siloxane impressions of the models were made using open-tray and closed-tray techniques. Closed-tray impressions were made using snap-on (STL model), transfer coping (TC) (BIO model) and TC plus plastic cap (TC-Cap) (SBL model). The impressions were poured with type IV stone, and the positional accuracy of the implant analog heads in each dimension (x, y and z axes), and the linear displacement (ΔR) were evaluated using a coordinate measuring machine. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey tests (α = 0.05). Results: The ΔR values of the snap-on technique were significantly lower than those of TC and TC-Cap techniques (P impression techniques for STL in Δx, Δy, Δz and ΔR values (P = 0.444, P = 0.181, P = 0.835 and P = 0.911, respectively). Conclusion: Considering the limitations of this study, the snap-on implant-level impression technique resulted in more three-dimensional accuracy than TC and TC-Cap, but it was similar to the open-tray technique. PMID:26604956

  3. Three-dimensional accuracy of different impression techniques for dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Nakhaei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Accurate impression making is an essential prerequisite for achieving a passive fit between the implant and the superstructure. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the three-dimensional accuracy of open-tray and three closed-tray impression techniques. Materials and Methods: Three acrylic resin mandibular master models with four parallel implants were used: Biohorizons (BIO, Straumann tissue-level (STL, and Straumann bone-level (SBL. Forty-two putty/wash polyvinyl siloxane impressions of the models were made using open-tray and closed-tray techniques. Closed-tray impressions were made using snap-on (STL model, transfer coping (TC (BIO model and TC plus plastic cap (TC-Cap (SBL model. The impressions were poured with type IV stone, and the positional accuracy of the implant analog heads in each dimension (x, y and z axes, and the linear displacement (ΔR were evaluated using a coordinate measuring machine. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey tests (α = 0.05. Results: The ΔR values of the snap-on technique were significantly lower than those of TC and TC-Cap techniques (P < 0.001. No significant differences were found between closed and open impression techniques for STL in Δx, Δy, Δz and ΔR values (P = 0.444, P = 0.181, P = 0.835 and P = 0.911, respectively. Conclusion: Considering the limitations of this study, the snap-on implant-level impression technique resulted in more three-dimensional accuracy than TC and TC-Cap, but it was similar to the open-tray technique.

  4. 77 FR 25747 - Certain Incremental Dental Positioning Adjustment Appliances and Methods of Producing Same...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ... COMMISSION Certain Incremental Dental Positioning Adjustment Appliances and Methods of Producing Same; Notice... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain incremental dental positioning... importing, offering for sale, and selling for importation in the United States incremental dental...

  5. Comparison of the Surface Roughness of Gypsum (Dental Stone with three Types of Tissue Conditioner Impression Materials over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nili M.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problems: Although the primary use of tissue conditioners is for healing the damaged mucosa but they can also be used as functional impression; it seems that its effeicasy depends on its viscoelastic features such as compatibility with gypsum and surface roughness.Purpose: The aim of this study is to compare the surface roughness of gypsum with several tissue conditioner impression materials avaliable in the market.Materials and Method: In this experimental study, three tissue conditioners (Acrosoft, viscogel & GC were used. Pars dental gypsum moldano Type III and a polyvinyl siloxane impression were used for the controls. The tissue conditioners powder liquid ratio was mixed according to the manufacturer’s recommendation and immediately poured in a mold with an internal diameter of 18 mm and depth of 2mm. The mold was completely filled. Then, a glass block with the mean roughness of 0.8 µm was placed on its surface for two hours. Then, the 5 samples were immediately placed in 37oC water for 0-24 hrs, 3, 7, and 14 days. After that, the specimens were beaded, boxed and poured with pars dental gypsum type III. The gypsum sample’s surface roughness was measured with profilometer with the length of 2.5 mm and cut-off of 0.8 mm. The results were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey tests.Results: The results showed that surface roughness of Acrosoft in different storage times did not change significantly and there was no significant difference between Acrosoft and the control group. Viscogels surface roughness was significantly different with all other groups at zero time; with the increase of storage time the surface roughness decreases. The control group showed a significant difference with viscogel at zero time and with GC at 24 hrs and 3 days but it revealed no difference with the other groups. The least surface roughness belonged to GC at zero and 14 days and the highests surface roughness belonged to viscogel at zero time

  6. Radiodensity evaluation of dental impression materials in comparison to tooth structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Borges Fonseca

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In the most recent decades, several developments have been made on impression materials' composition, but there are very few radiodensity studies in the literature. It is expected that an acceptable degree of radiodensity would enable the detection of small fragments left inside gingival sulcus or root canals. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the radiodensity of different impression materials, and to compare them to human and bovine enamel and dentin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-five impression materials, from 5 classes, were studied: addition and condensation silicones, polyether, polysulfides and alginates. Five 1-mm-thick samples of each material and tooth structure were produced. Each sample was evaluated 3 times (N=15, being exposed to x-ray over a phosphor plate of Digora digital system, and radiodensity was obtained by the software Digora for Windows 2.5 Rev 0. An aluminum stepwedge served as a control. Data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's method (α=0.05. RESULTS: Different materials and respective classes had a different behavior with respect to radiodensity. Polysulfides showed high values of radiodensity, comparable to human enamel (p>0.05, but not to bovine enamel (p<0.05. Human dentin was similar only to a heavy-body addition silicon material, but bovine dentin was similar to several materials. Generally, heavy-body materials showed higher radiodensity than light-body ones (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Impression materials' radiodensity are influenced by composition, and almost all of them would present a difficult detection against enamel or dentin background in radiographic examinations.

  7. 口腔印模消毒技术研究进展%The progress in disinfection technique on dental impression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岑琼

    2009-01-01

    口腔医院的感染情况已经引起世界各国管理部门的高度重视,口腔印模被细菌和病毒所污染,并能导致交叉感染.本文针对口腔印模被污染状况、口腔印模的消毒方法、消毒方法对模型稳定性的影响进行综合评述,并在此基础上展望该领域的发展趋势.%Infection situation in dental hospital had been attached great importance by management all o-ver the world. Dental impression was contaminated by bacteria and viruses. It also had led to cross - infection. This text aimed at dental impression by pollution and disinfection methods affected to the stability of dental impression. Therefore, looking forward to development trends in the field on that basis.

  8. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6570 Impression tube. (a) Identification. An impression... material, such as wax, the remaining end is slipped over the tooth to make the impression....

  9. Methods of dental impression disinfection and the prospect%口腔印模消毒方法及前景展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张叶影; 屈野; 郝玉梅; 韩泽民

    2016-01-01

    制取印模是口腔修复工作中基础而关键的环节,传统的口腔印模技术发展到现在已有100多年历史;在制取的过程中直接接触患者的唾液甚至血液而被病原菌污染,不经消毒会成为疾病传播的媒介;关于印模的消毒方法、消毒剂对其三维精度、性能的影响一直是修复医师研究的热点;近年兴起的数字化印模技术为口腔修复学开辟了一个全新的数字化领域,精确、快速、节约等优点使其备受青睐,本文就口腔印模消毒方法及其对印模质量的影响和数字化印模的先进性、前景展望作一综述。%Making dental impressions is a fundamental and key link in prosthodontics .The development of the tra-ditional dental impression technique has a history of more than 100 years .Since the dental impressions get in direct contact with saliva or even the blood of the patients ,they might be contaminated by pathogenic bacteria and be the media for spreading disease without disinfection .The disinfection methods and the effects of the disinfectants on the three dimensional accuracy and property of the impressions ,has always been the hot spots of the dentists .In recent years ,the evolution of digital impression technology for oral prosthodontics has opened up a new digital field ,and the advantages of precision ,velocity and economy make it favored by dentists .This review summarized the current methods of disinfection and the influence on the property of the dental impressions ,and the advance-ment and future perspectives of digital impression .

  10. Cytotoxic Evaluation of Elastomeric Dental Impression Materials on a Permanent Mouse Cell Line and on a Primary Human Gingival Fibroblast Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Tiozzo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The need for clinically relevant in vitro tests of dental materials is widely recognized. Nearly all dental impression materials are introduced into the mouth just after mixing and allowed to set in contact with the oral tissues. Under these conditions, the materials may be toxic to cells or may sensitize the tissues. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the potential cytotoxicity of new preparations of elastomeric dental impression materials: A four vinylpolysiloxanes: Elite H-D Putty and Elite H-D Light Body (Zhermack, Badia Polesine, Rovigo, Italy; Express Putty and Express Light Body (3M ESPE AG Seefeld, Germany and B two polyethers: Impregum Penta and Permadyne Penta L (3M ESPE AG Seefeld, Germany. The cytotoxicity of these impression materials were examined using two different cell lines: Balb/c 3T3 (permanent cell line and human gingival fibroblasts (primary cell line and their effects were studied by indirect and direct tests. The direct tests are performed by placing one sample of the impression materials in the centre of the Petri dishes at the time of the seeding of cells. The cell growth was evaluated at the 12th and 24th hours by cell number. The indirect tests were performed by incubating a square of 1 cm diameter impression material in 5 mL of medium at 37 °C for 24 hours (“eluates”. Subconfluent cultures are incubated with “eluates” for 24 hours. The MTT-formazan production is the method used for measuring the cell viability. The results indicate that: a polyether materials are cytotoxic under both experimental conditions; b among vinylpolysiloxanes, only Express Light Body (3M ESPE AG Seefeld, Germany induces clear inhibition of cellular viability of Balb/c 3T3 evaluated by direct and indirect tests and c the primary cell line is less sensitive to the toxic effect than the permanent cell line.

  11. Influence of abutment tooth geometry on the accuracy of conventional and digital methods of obtaining dental impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajal Mejía, Jeison B; Wakabayashi, Kazumichi; Nakamura, Takashi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2017-09-01

    Direct (intraoral) and indirect (desktop) digital scanning can record abutment tooth preparations despite their geometry. However, little peer-reviewed information is available regarding the influence of abutment tooth geometry on the accuracy of digital methods of obtaining dental impressions. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of abutment tooth geometry on the accuracy of conventional and digital methods of obtaining dental impressions in terms of trueness and precision. Crown preparations with known total occlusal convergence (TOC) angles (-8, -6, -4, 0, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 22 degrees) were digitally created from a maxillary left central incisor and printed in acrylic resin. Each of these 9 reference models was scanned with a highly accurate reference scanner and saved in standard tessellation language (STL) format. Then, 5 conventional polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impressions were made from each reference model, which was poured with Type IV dental stone scanned using both the reference scanner (group PVS) and the desktop scanner and exported as STL files. Additionally, direct digital impressions (intraoral group) of the reference models were made, and the STL files were exported. The STL files from the impressions obtained were compared with the original geometry of the reference model (trueness) and within each test group (precision). Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA with the post hoc least significant difference test (α=.05). Overall trueness values were 19.1 μm (intraoral scanner group), 23.5 μm (desktop group), and 26.2 μm (PVS group), whereas overall precision values were 11.9 μm (intraoral), 18.0 μm (PVS), and 20.7 μm (desktop). Simple main effects analysis showed that impressions made with the intraoral scanner were significantly more accurate than those of the PVS and desktop groups when the TOC angle was less than 8 degrees (Pgeometry. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry

  12. Ontogenetic variations and structural adjustments in mammals evolving prolonged to continuous dental growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Rodrigues, Helder; Lefebvre, Rémi; Fernández-Monescillo, Marcos; Mamani Quispe, Bernardino; Billet, Guillaume

    2017-01-01

    Studying dental ontogeny in mammals can provide valuable insight on the evolution of their masticatory apparatus and their related adaptations. The multiple acquisitions of a prolonged to continuous growth of teeth in herbivorous mammals in response to high abrasion represent an intensively investigated issue. However, the ontogenetic and architectural patterns associated with these repeated dental innovations remain poorly known. Here, we focused on two case studies corresponding to distant mammalian clades, the extinct Mesotheriidae (Notoungulata), which shared some striking dental features with the extant Ctenodactylidae (Rodentia). We studied the impact of prolonged to continuous growth of molars on their occlusal complexity, their relative size and their dynamics in the jaw. We found that variations of occlusal complexity patterns are the result of paedomorphic or peramorphic heterochronic processes impacting dental crown. We showed that variations in both upper and lower molar proportions generally follow the inhibitory developmental cascade model. In that context, prolonged dental growth implies transitory adjustments due to wear, and also involves dental migration and loss when combined with molar lengthening. Interestingly, these features may be present in many mammals having prolonged dental growth, and emphasize the crucial need of considering these aspects in future evolutionary and developmental studies. PMID:28791172

  13. Ontogenetic variations and structural adjustments in mammals evolving prolonged to continuous dental growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Rodrigues, Helder; Lefebvre, Rémi; Fernández-Monescillo, Marcos; Mamani Quispe, Bernardino; Billet, Guillaume

    2017-07-01

    Studying dental ontogeny in mammals can provide valuable insight on the evolution of their masticatory apparatus and their related adaptations. The multiple acquisitions of a prolonged to continuous growth of teeth in herbivorous mammals in response to high abrasion represent an intensively investigated issue. However, the ontogenetic and architectural patterns associated with these repeated dental innovations remain poorly known. Here, we focused on two case studies corresponding to distant mammalian clades, the extinct Mesotheriidae (Notoungulata), which shared some striking dental features with the extant Ctenodactylidae (Rodentia). We studied the impact of prolonged to continuous growth of molars on their occlusal complexity, their relative size and their dynamics in the jaw. We found that variations of occlusal complexity patterns are the result of paedomorphic or peramorphic heterochronic processes impacting dental crown. We showed that variations in both upper and lower molar proportions generally follow the inhibitory developmental cascade model. In that context, prolonged dental growth implies transitory adjustments due to wear, and also involves dental migration and loss when combined with molar lengthening. Interestingly, these features may be present in many mammals having prolonged dental growth, and emphasize the crucial need of considering these aspects in future evolutionary and developmental studies.

  14. Flow properties of dental impression materials by means of a modified sharkfin test at clinically relevant times after mixing

    OpenAIRE

    Saker, Odie

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was: (1) To determine the relevant processing times for clinical practice. (2) To analyze the flow properties of several elastomeric impression materials depending on these clinically measured times by means of the modified sharkfin test. Methods and materials: (1) Clinical trial: The processing times of 86 clinical cases were measured by the same person. The impressions were taken by 14 different clinicians with the one-step technique (Impregum-Penta as...

  15. Accuracy of a new ring-opening metathesis elastomeric dental impression material with spray and immersion disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronström, Mats H; Johnson, Glen H; Hompesch, Richard W

    2010-01-01

    A new elastomeric impression material has been formulated with a ring-opening metathesis chemistry. In addition to other properties of clinical significance, the impression accuracy must be confirmed. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of the new elastomeric impression material with vinyl polysiloxane and polyether following both spray and immersion disinfection. Impressions of a modified dentoform with a stainless steel crown preparation in the lower right quadrant were made, and type IV gypsum working casts and dies were formed. Anteroposterior (AP), cross-arch (CA), buccolingual (BL), mesiodistal (MD), occlusogingivobuccal (OGB), and occlusogingivolingual (OGL) dimensions were measured using a microscope. Working cast and die dimensions were compared to those of the master model. The impression materials were a newly formulated, ring-opening metathesis-polymerization impression material (ROMP Cartridge Tray and ROMP Volume Wash), vinyl polysiloxane (VPS, Aquasil Ultra Monophase/LV), and a polyether (PE, Impregum Penta Soft/Permadyne Garant L). Fifteen impressions with each material were made, of which 5 were disinfected by spray for 10 minutes (CaviCide), 5 were disinfected by immersion for 90 minutes (ProCide D), and 5 were not disinfected. There were significant cross-product interactions with a 2-way ANOVA, so a 1-way ANOVA and Dunnett's T3 multiple comparison test were used to compare the dimensional changes of the 3 impression materials, by disinfection status and for each location (alpha=.05). For ROMP, there were no significant differences from the master, for any dimension, when comparing the control and 2 disinfectant conditions. No significant differences were detected among the 3 impression materials for CA, BL, and MD. The working die dimensions of OGB and OGL for VPS with immersion disinfection were significantly shorter than with PE and ROMP (P<.05). Overall, the AP dimension was more accurate than CA, and the BL of working dies

  16. A randomised controlled trial of complete denture impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, T P; Craddock, H L; Gray, J C; Pavitt, S H; Hulme, C; Godfrey, M; Fernandez, C; Navarro-Coy, N; Dillon, S; Wright, J; Brown, S; Dukanovic, G; Brunton, P A

    2014-08-01

    There is continuing demand for non-implant prosthodontic treatment and yet there is a paucity of high quality Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) evidence for best practice. The aim of this research was to provide evidence for best practice in prosthodontic impressions by comparing two impression materials in a double-blind, randomised, crossover, controlled, clinical trial. Eighty-five patients were recruited, using published eligibility criteria, to the trial at Leeds Dental Institute, UK. Each patient received two sets of dentures; made using either alginate or silicone impressions. Randomisations determined the order of assessment and order of impressions. The primary outcome was patient blinded preference for unadjusted dentures. Secondary outcomes were patient preference for the adjusted dentures, rating of comfort, stability and chewing efficiency, experience of each impression, and an OHIP-EDENT questionnaire. Seventy-eight (91.8%) patients completed the primary assessment. 53(67.9%) patients preferred dentures made from silicone impressions while 14(17.9%) preferred alginate impressions. 4(5.1%) patients found both dentures equally satisfactory and 7 (9.0%) found both equally unsatisfactory. There was a 50% difference in preference rates (in favour of silicone) (95%CI 32.7-67.3%, pUnilever Hatton Award of the International Assocation for Dental Research, Capetown, South Africa, June 2014. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Surface properties of monolithic zirconia after dental adjustment treats and in vitro wear simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Preis, Verena; Schmalzbauer, Michael; Bougeard, Dominique; Schneider-Feyrer, Sibylle; Rosentritt, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the surface properties (roughness, composition, phase transformation) of monolithic zirconia specimens after dental adjustment procedures (grinding, polishing) and wear simulation. Methods Zirconia specimens (Cercon base, Cercon ht, DeguDent, G; n = 10/material) were successively sintered, ground, and polished with an intraoral polishing kit in a three-step procedure. Sintered zirconia specimens with high surface roughness served as a reference. For each tre...

  18. Effect of disinfection of irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials with 1% sodium hypochlorite on surface roughness and dimensional accuracy of dental stone casts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Rodrigues Dorner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of disinfection of commercially available irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials with 1% sodium hypochlorite on the surface roughness and dimensional accuracy of dies produced using type IV dental stone. Materials and Methods: Four different brands of irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials were used as follows: Jeltrate Plus without disinfection (GJ, Jeltrate Plus with disinfection (GJD, Hydrogum without disinfection (GH, Hidrogun with disinfection (GHD, Hidrogum 5 Days without disinfection (GH5, Hidrogum 5 Days with disinfection (GH5D, Cavex without disinfection (GC, and Cavex with disinfection (GCD. A total of 80 dies were poured using type IV dental stone and their mean surface roughness was evaluated using rugosimeter (Mitutoyo SJ-400. To conduct the dimensional alteration analysis, type IV dental stone casts were obtained from a matrix made of chemically-activated resin. They were analyzed in a coordinate-measuring machine (Brown and Sharpe. Statistics Analysis: Numerical data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA with Tukey′s post hoc test at 5% confi dence interval. Results: Hidrogun 5 Days and Cavex showed the least surface roughness value even after 5 days. There were no significant differences in the dimensional alteration of Jeltrate (GJ and GJD and Hidrogum (GH and GHD in relation to the "new brands" Hidrogum 5 (GH5 and GH5D and Cavex (GC and GCD, even after 5 days of storage. Conclusion: Considering the results obtained, it can be concluded that there was a roughness increase in the die stones poured from irreversible hydrocolloids disinfected with sodium hypochlorite.

  19. Machinability of lithium disilicate glass ceramic in in vitro dental diamond bur adjusting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiao-Fei; Ren, Hai-Tao; Yin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Esthetic high-strength lithium disilicate glass ceramics (LDGC) are used for monolithic crowns and bridges produced in dental CAD/CAM and oral adjusting processes, which machinability affects the restorative quality. A machinability study has been made in the simulated oral clinical machining of LDGC with a dental handpiece and diamond burs, regarding the diamond tool wear and chip control, machining forces and energy, surface finish and integrity. Machining forces, speeds and energy in in vitro dental adjusting of LDGC were measured by a high-speed data acquisition and force sensor system. Machined LDGC surfaces were assessed using three-dimensional non-contact chromatic confocal optical profilometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Diamond bur morphology and LDGC chip shapes were also examined using SEM. Minimum tool wear but significant LDGC chip accumulations were found. Machining forces and energy significantly depended on machining conditions (pMachining speeds dropped more rapidly with increased removal rates than other glass ceramics (pmachinability indices associated with the hardness, Young's modulus and fracture toughness were derived based on the normal force-removal rate relations, which ranked LDGC the most difficult to machine among glass ceramics. Surface roughness for machined LDGC was comparable for other glass ceramics. The removal mechanisms of LDGC were dominated by penetration-induced brittle fracture and shear-induced plastic deformation. Unlike most other glass ceramics, distinct intergranular and transgranular fractures of lithium disilicate crystals were found in LDGC. This research provides the fundamental data for dental clinicians on the machinability of LDGC in intraoral adjustments.

  20. 75 FR 16511 - Pentron Clinical Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental... prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental materials to Mexicali... Dental/Sybron Dental Specialities, Formally Known as Customedix Corporation, Including On-Site Leased...

  1. A Randomised Controlled Trial of complete denture impression materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, T.P.; Craddock, H.L.; Gray, J.C.; Pavitt, S.H.; Hulme, C.; Godfrey, M.; Fernandez, C.; Navarro-Coy, N.; Dillon, S.; Wright, J.; Brown, S.; Dukanovic, G.; Brunton, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is continuing demand for non-implant prosthodontic treatment and yet there is a paucity of high quality Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) evidence for best practice. The aim of this research was to provide evidence for best practice in prosthodontic impressions by comparing two impression materials in a double-blind, randomised, crossover, controlled, clinical trial. Methods Eighty-five patients were recruited, using published eligibility criteria, to the trial at Leeds Dental Institute, UK. Each patient received two sets of dentures; made using either alginate or silicone impressions. Randomisations determined the order of assessment and order of impressions. The primary outcome was patient blinded preference for unadjusted dentures. Secondary outcomes were patient preference for the adjusted dentures, rating of comfort, stability and chewing efficiency, experience of each impression, and an OHIP-EDENT questionnaire. Results Seventy-eight (91.8%) patients completed the primary assessment. 53(67.9%) patients preferred dentures made from silicone impressions while 14(17.9%) preferred alginate impressions. 4(5.1%) patients found both dentures equally satisfactory and 7 (9.0%) found both equally unsatisfactory. There was a 50% difference in preference rates (in favour of silicone) (95%CI 32.7–67.3%, p silicone impressions were preferred by patients. Clinical significance Given the strength of the clinical findings within this paper, dentists should consider choosing silicone rather than alginate as their material of choice for secondary impressions for complete dentures. Trial Registration: ISRCTN 01528038.

 This article forms part of a project for which the author (TPH) won the Senior Clinical Unilever Hatton Award of the International Assocation for Dental Research, Capetown, South Africa, June 2014. PMID:24995473

  2. Application of digital impression in dental restoration%数字化印模在牙体修复中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨艳峰; 黄丽佳; 张志娟; 杨锦丽

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore the effect of digital impression in dental restoration .Methods:There were forty patients randomly divided into observation group and control group from June 2015 to December 2015 .The patients in the observation group received digital printing and the control group received tra-ditional silicone rubber impression.The mean deviation between the two groups of registration data and the time of initial wearing were compared.Results:The mean deviation of the observation group was less than that of the control group ,and the initial wearing time and the time of taking the mold in the mouth were significantly lower than those in the control group .The number of conscious wearing comfortably in the observation group was significantly higher than that in the control group;the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05).Conclusion:Compared with the traditional silicone impression,the digital im-pression had the advantages of fastness,higher accuracy and stability,and it was worthy to be popularized.%目的:探讨数字化印模在牙体修复中的效果。方法:选取2015年6月~2015年12月在我院接受牙体修复患者40例,随机等分为观察组和对照组,观察组接受数字化印模修复,对照组接受传统硅橡胶印模修复,比较两组患者的配准数据间的平均偏差以及初戴时间。结果:观察组平均偏差小于对照组,且每单位修复体的初戴时间和口内取模时间显著低于对照组;观察组自觉佩戴舒适人数明显高于对照组;差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:数字化印模较传统硅胶印模比较具有快速、更高的精度以及稳定度,值得临床推广应用。

  3. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification. Impression material is a device composed of materials such as alginate or polysulfide intended to be placed... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Impression material. 872.3660 Section...

  4. 两种消毒法对口腔印模的消毒效果及模型精度的影响%Influence of two disinfectants methods on disinfection efficiency and model precision of dental impression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李少兰; 徐平英

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨2种消毒法对口腔3种常用印模材料的消毒效果及模型精度的影响.方法 依据统一的标准制作藻酸盐、藻酸盐琼脂及硅橡胶3种不同材料的口腔印模.分别以含量氯消毒液浸泡和雾化酸性氧化电位水进行消毒.比较两种消毒方法对3种印模的消毒效果及模型精度的影响.结果 含氯消毒液浸泡30 min以及雾化酸性氧化电位水消毒30 rmin对3种材料的印模均可达到有效消毒效果,对染菌的最低杀灭率为99.48%.含氯消毒液浸泡法对藻酸盐印模与硅橡胶印模的精度无显著影响,但对藻酸盐琼脂混合材料的印模精度有显著影响.雾化酸性氧化电位水消毒对3种材料的印模精度无显著影响.结论 雾化酸性氧化电位水适合于临床3种材料印模的消毒,含氯消毒液浸泡法适合于藻酸盐、硅橡胶印模,但不适于藻酸盐琼脂混合印模的消毒.%Objective To iavestigate the influence of two disinfectants methods on disintection efficiency and model precision of dental impression.Methods Alginate impressions,alginate and agar complex impressions and silicon rubber impressions were made according to a unified standard.Chlorinous disinfectant solution and acidic oxidative potential water were used to disinfect the infected impressions.The influence of two disinfectants on disinfection efficiency and model precision of dental impression was compared.Results Two disinfectants for 30 minutes had significant disinfection effect on these three kinds of impressions.The effective rate reached 99.48%.Chlorinous disinfectant solution bad no significant influence on the model precision of alginate impressions and silicon rubber impressions,but had significant influence on the model precision of alginate and agar complex impressions.Acidic oxidative potential water did not influence the model precision of the three dental impressions.Conclusions Acidic oxidative potential water can be used to

  5. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material. (a) Identification. Resin impression tray material is a device intended for use in a two-step dental mold fabricating... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670...

  6. Good Impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Geraldine; Pulsifer, Mary

    1986-01-01

    An art activity featuring ballerinas in classic poses and costumes was extended by a visit to an exhibit on Edgar Degas. Hearing impaired students shared their impressions of another traveling exhibit with French students via computers. (CL)

  7. A quadrant tray and bite registration as an alternative to dual-arch impressions for fixed prosthetics: a clinical and dental laboratory technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Barry D; Myers, Michael L; Haywood, Van B

    2011-01-01

    To perform fixed prosthodontic procedures, dentists take a full-arch or quadrant impression and articulate the casts. The dual-arch impression technique is a popular quadrant technique for crown fabrication. The technique described in this article, which uses a quadrant impression and separate interocclusal record, offers several advantages over the traditional dual-arch method.

  8. 21 CFR 872.6880 - Preformed impression tray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preformed impression tray. 872.6880 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6880 Preformed impression tray. (a) Identification. A preformed impression tray is a metal or plastic device intended to hold impression material...

  9. First Impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coen, Frank

    1969-01-01

    The unreliability of first impressions and subjective judgments is the subject of both Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" and Lionel Trilling's "Of This Time, Of That Place"; consequently, the works are worthwhile parallel studies for high school students. Austen, by means of irony and subtle characterization, dramatizes the…

  10. 口腔弹性印模材料及临床使用注意事项%Dental elastic impression materials and clinical manipulation properties.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林红

    2009-01-01

    The quality of impression plays a very impor-tant role in the accuracy and quality of the final restoratives.The commonly used elastic impression materials in clinic are alginate hydrocolloid impression material, agar hydrocolloid impression material, silicone impression material, polyether impression material and polysulfide impression material. Their properties are varies from each other due to the differences in compositions. Thus, in order to achieve the best treatment re-suits, it is important to select appropriate impression materials and disinfection methods according to the cases in clinic. This article summarizes the properties of elastic impression materi-als and their clinical manipulation properties that should be paied attention to in clinical work.%口腔印模的质量直接影响修复体的准确性和修复质量.临床常用的口腔弹性印模材料有藻酸盐水胶体印模材料、琼脂水胶体印模材料、硅橡胶印模材料、聚醚橡胶印模材料和聚硫橡胶印模材料.各种材料组成不同,性能各异,临床使用时应根据具体病例,选择合适的印模材料和消毒方法,以获取最佳效果.本文主要介绍了各弹性印模材料性能特点及临床使用注意事项.

  11. Dimensional stability ofautoclave sterilised addition cured impressions and trays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, S; Etemad-Shahidi, S; Millar, B J

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dimensional accuracy of impressions following sterilisation by autoclaving. Dental impressions (75) were of a dentoform containing 6 reference points. The impressions were split into 5 groups of 15, each group used a different impression technique. Groups were divided into 3 subgroups with 5 impressions as control, 5 for disinfection by Perform-ID and 5 being autoclaved. Measurements were made using a travelling light microscope. A minimal significant dimensional difference (0.01impression method. No significant dimensional differences were observed for all other groups (P>0.05). The trays and materials tested were suitable for the autoclave sterilisation.

  12. Comparative Evaluation of Dimensional Accuracy of Elastomeric Impression Materials when Treated with Autoclave, Microwave, and Chemical Disinfection

    OpenAIRE

    Kamble, Suresh S.; Khandeparker, Rakshit Vijay; P.Somasundaram; Raghav, Shweta; Babaji, Rashmi P; Varghese, T Joju

    2015-01-01

    Background: Impression materials during impression procedure often get infected with various infectious diseases. Hence, disinfection of impression materials with various disinfectants is advised to protect the dental team. Disinfection can alter the dimensional accuracy of impression materials. The present study was aimed to evaluate the dimensional accuracy of elastomeric impression materials when treated with different disinfectants; autoclave, chemical, and microwave method. Materials and...

  13. 两种消毒液对凯迪康硅橡胶尺寸精度的影响%The effect of two kinds of disinfectant on the size accuracy of ChemomentTM Silicone dental impression material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄琛琛; 姚玲玲; 周健; 何流

    2012-01-01

    目的 测试消毒液对凯迪康硅橡胶尺寸精度的影响.方法 使用重、轻体成分的加成型硅橡胶采用两次法分别制取同一实验模具的印模,随机平均分为3组,每组15个.对照组:清水冲洗,实验组1:使用2%戊二醛浸泡消毒,实验组2:使用84消毒液浸泡消毒.灌注石膏模型,用游标卡尺测量主模型及石膏模型上各标志点的距离,对测量数据进行统计学分析,用x2比较所取印模经过浸泡后对水晶牙模复制精度上的差异.结果 两种消毒液浸泡的印模与对照组印模在对水晶牙模复制精度上效果相同,三者之间差异无统计学意义.在线性变化率上比较,浸泡消毒液的印模的BC、DE值变化率均比对照组要大,但与原始数据差异无统计学意义.结论 凯迪康加成型硅橡胶印模材料使用2%戊二醛溶液和有效氯浓度为0.3%的84消毒液溶液浸泡消毒,不影响其印模精度.%Objective To test the effect of two kinds of disinfectant on the size accuracy of ChemomentTM Silicone dental impression material. Methods Make three groups of addition silicone rubber impression for one and the same master model by two - step technique. The impressions were randomly divided into three groups. 1 : control group ;2:2% alkaline glutaraldehyde;3 :84TM disinfectant o Stone models were made of all impressions. Vertical and horizontal dimensions between landmarks on the master and stone models were measured with vernier caliper. Chi - square test was used to compare the size accuracy of all the models. Results The difference of dimensions accuracy of in three groups stone models is no statistical significance. The difference of linear change - rate of three groups stone models is statistical significance ,but the difference of dimensions between the experimental groups and master model is no statistical significance. Conclusion ChemomentTM Silicone dental impression material should be sterilized with 2% alkaline

  14. 化学消毒法杀灭口腔印模及模型表面HIV效果研究%Inactivation of HIV on dental impression and stone model by chemical disinfection methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑明; 于皓; 林泓磊

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the inactivation effect of chemical disinfection methods on HIV on surfaces of den-tal impression and stone models. Methods The 2%acid glutaraldehyde solution and chlorine disinfectant solution were used to disinfect the silicone impressions and the stone models,respectively. Real-time PCR assay was used to evaluate the efficiency of disinfection. Results When both of the impressions and the models were disinfected(group C),the logarithm inactivation value of HIV was 5.12. When neither was disinfected(group D),the logarithm inactivation value of HIV was below 1.00. When only the impressions were disinfected(group A),the logarithm inactivation value of HIV was 3.28,while the logarithm inactivation value was 2.34 when only the models were disinfected(group B). Conclusion The chemical disinfection on dental impressions and models can effectively inactivate HIV on surfaces of stone models. Disinfection on the impressions or the models alone cannot inactivate HIV sufficiently.%目的探讨人类免疫缺陷病毒(Human immunodeficiency virus,HIV)感染者口腔印模和模型的消毒方法。方法本研究于2008年7月至2011年10月在福建医科大学附属口腔医院中心实验室完成。选择福建省某戒毒所现有1000余名戒毒人员中有口腔修复诊疗需求的HIV感染者28例,分别用2%戊二醛消毒液和含氯消毒液对其口腔印模及模型进行消毒。根据印模与模型是否同时消毒分为4组,用无菌棉拭子在灌注后的模型表面采样,并用核酸定量法检测不同消毒方法对HIV灭活的影响。结果印模与模型均进行消毒后,模型表面HIV的灭活对数值为5.12,印模与模型均不消毒时,模型表面HIV的灭活对数值<1.00。仅对印模进行消毒和仅对模型进行消毒时,模型表面HIV的灭活对数值分别为3.28及2.34。结论口腔诊疗中完善的印模及模型消毒可以有效地阻止艾滋病的传播与交叉感染;单

  15. The Application of Decomposition Teaching in Teaching of Stirring of Dental Impression Materials%分解式教学法在口腔印模材料调拌教学中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许志华

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨分解式教学法在口腔印模材料调拌教学中的应用。方法选取在我校实习培训的60名护生,其中对照组30名采用传统式教学法,观察组30例采用分解式教学法,观察两组护生的学习效果。结果观察组的双手协调性、调拌方法、汇聚材料、排气、塑性、上托盘、材料形状的达标时间均优于对照组,差异比较均有统计学意义(P <0.05)。结论分解式教学法可提高口腔印模材料调拌教学的质量。%Objective To study the effect of decomposition teaching method in the dental impression material mixing teaching. Methods Selected 60 students in the internship training, including the control group of 30 students adopted traditional teaching method, observation group of 30 students adopted decomposition teaching method, observed learning effect. Results hands coordination, mixing method, gathering material, exhaust, plasticity and tray in observation group were superior to control group (P<0.05). Conclusion Decomposition teaching method can improve the quality of the dental impression material mixing teaching.

  16. A Simplified Technique for Implant-Abutment Level Impression after Soft Tissue Adaptation around Provisional Restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Kutkut; Osama Abu-Hammad; Robert Frazer

    2016-01-01

    Impression techniques for implant restorations can be implant level or abutment level impressions with open tray or closed tray techniques. Conventional implant-abutment level impression techniques are predictable for maximizing esthetic outcomes. Restoration of the implant traditionally requires the use of the metal or plastic impression copings, analogs, and laboratory components. Simplifying the dental implant restoration by reducing armamentarium through incorporating conventional techniq...

  17. Clinical trial investigating success rates for polyether and vinyl polysiloxane impressions made with full-arch and dual-arch plastic trays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Glen H; Mancl, Lloyd A; Schwedhelm, E Ricardo; Verhoef, Douglas R; Lepe, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Success rates for making fixed prosthodontic impressions based on material and tray selection are not known. The purpose of this clinical study was to compare first impression success rates for 2 types of impression material and 2 impression tray systems. Dual-viscosity impressions were made with a vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) (Aquasil Ultra Monophase/Aquasil Ultra XLV) and a polyether (PE) (Impregum Penta Soft HB/Impregum Garant Soft LB) impression material. The first impression made was evaluated for success or failure using developed criteria. Fifty senior dental students participated. The type of impression material alternated for each new patient. A full-arch perforated plastic (President Tray) or a plastic dual-arch impression tray (Tri-Bite) was used based on clinical guidelines. Impression success rates were compared using logistic regression, fitted using the method of generalized estimating equations (alpha=.05). One hundred ninety-one impressions were evaluated, and the overall success rate was 61% for VPS and 54% for PE (P=.39). Additional regression analyses, adjusted for potential confounders, did not indicate a difference between the 2 systems (P=.35). There was little difference in success rates between the 2 materials when a full-arch tray was used (50% versus 49% success, P=.89), whereas a larger difference was apparent with the use of dual-arch trays (70% success with VPS versus 58% success with PE, P=.21). The most common critical defect was located on the preparation finish line (94%), and the most common operator error was inadequate gingival displacement (15%). There was little difference in success rates between VPS and PE when full-arch impression trays were used, but there was greater success when using VPS with dual-arch trays. For single teeth, the trend favored VPS, but when more than one prepared tooth per impression was involved, the success rate was higher for PE. Copyright 2010 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic

  18. Evaluation of properties of irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials mixed with disinfectant liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arul Amalan

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Chlorhexidine solution can be used to mix irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials in regular dental practice as it did not significantly alter the properties. This may ensure effective disinfection of impressions.

  19. The dimensional accuracy of polyvinyl siloxane impression materials using two different impression techniques: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Nirmala; Nandeeshwar, D B

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the linear dimensional changes of the three representative polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression materials and to compare the accuracy of single mix with double mix impression technique. A study mold was prepared according to revised American Dental Association specification number 19 for nonaqueous elastic dental impression materials. Three PVS impression materials selected were Elite-HD, Imprint(™) II Garant, Aquasil Ultra Heavy. Two impression techniques used were single mix and double mix impression technique. A total of 60 specimens were made and after 24 h the specimens were measured using profile projector. The data were analyzed using one-way analyses of variance analysis and significant differences were separated using Student's Newman-Keul's test. When all the three study group impression materials were compared for double mix technique, the statistically significant difference was found only between Imprint(™) II Garantand Elite-HD (P material in double mix impression technique and single mix impression technique were compared with the control group, Imprint(™) II Garant showed the values more nearing to the values of master die, followed by Aquasil Ultra Heavy and Elite-HD respectively. Among the impression materials Imprint(™) II Garant showed least dimensional change. Among the impression techniques, double mix impression technique showed the better results.

  20. Effect of the disinfection technique on the linear dimensional stability of dental impression materials Efeito da técnica de desinfecção sobre a estabilidade dimensional linear dos materiais de moldagem odontológicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sávio Marcelo Leite Moreira da Silva

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dimensional stability of heavy and light bodied condensation silicones after immersion in disinfectant solution for 10 or 20 minutes. The impression materials were Optosil Comfort and Xantopren VL Plus and the disinfectant solutions were 1% sodium hypochlorite and 2% glutaraldehyde. Impressions were made on a perforated stainless steel tray, according to the American Dental Association specification No. 19, adding up to a total of 50 samples. The double mixing method (one time, two viscosities was used. Impressions were removed from the roulette block after 7 minutes to ensure complete curing and then immersed in the solutions. Impressions not submitted to treatment composed the control group. After these steps, the impressions were removed from the solution, rinsed in running water and air-dried. Three-dimensional measurements were calculated using an optic microscope graduated at 0.001 mm. The two-way ANOVA indicated no differences (p>0.05 for any combination between variables. The results showed that the solution studied can be safely used to disinfect condensation silicone in clinical prosthodontic procedures.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a estabilidade dimensional das siliconas de condensação pesada e leve para moldagem odontológica, quando imersas em solução desinfetante por 10 e 20 minutos, relacionando a importância da biossegurança no manuseio destes materiais. Os materiais de moldagem testados foram: Optosil Confort e Xantopren VL Plus; e as soluções desinfetantes foram o hipoclorito de sódio a 1% (Solução de Milton e o glutaraldeído a 2% (Glutaron II. Impressões foram obtidas através de moldeiras perfuradas de aço inoxidável, de acordo com a especificação n.º 19 da ADA, perfazendo um total de 50 moldagens, que foram executadas pela técnica em passo único. Para assegurar a completa polimerização o material foi removido após 7 minutos e submetido à imers

  1. Comparison of Dimensional Accuracies Using Two Elastomeric Impression Materials in Casting Three-dimensional Tool Marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate two types of impression materials which were frequently used for casting three-dimensional tool marks in China, namely (i) dental impression material and (ii) special elastomeric impression material for tool mark casting. The two different elastomeric impression materials were compared under equal conditions. The parameters measured were dimensional accuracies, the number of air bubbles, the ease of use, and the sharpness and quality of the individual characteristics present on casts. The results showed that dental impression material had the advantage of special elastomeric impression material in casting tool marks in crime scenes; hence, it combined ease of use, dimensional accuracy, sharpness and high quality.

  2. Changing the bonding force of impression tray to edentulous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Bonding force, impression tray, maxillary jaw. Date of Acceptance: ... The purpose of complete dentures is to restore the dental and alveolar structures. ... A review of the literature revealed a lack of reports evaluating the pressure ...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3661 - Optical Impression Systems for CAD/CAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Optical Impression Systems for CAD/CAM. 872.3661... (CAD/CAM) is a device used to record the topographical characteristics of teeth, dental impressions, or... Design and Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) of Dental Restorations; Guidance for Industry and FDA.” For...

  4. Evaluation of dimensional stability of autoclavable elastomeric impression material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendra, G P; Anjum, Ayesha; Satish Babu, C L; Shetty, Shilpa

    2011-03-01

    Impressions are important sources of cross contamination between patients and dental laboratories. As a part of infection control impressions contaminated with variety of micro-organisms via blood and oral secretions should be cleaned and disinfected or sterilized before being handled in dental laboratory. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of autoclaving on dimensional stability of elastomeric impression material (polyvinyl siloxane-Affinis). In this in vitro study standardized stainless steel die as per ADA specification number 19 was fabricated. Polyvinyl siloxane (Affinis) light body and putty viscosity elastomeric impression materials were used. A total of 40 impressions of the stainless steel die were made and numeric coding system was used to identify the samples. Measurements were made using a measuring microscope. Distance between the cross lines CD and C'D' reproduced in the impression were measured before autoclaving, immediately after autoclaving and 24 hours after autoclaving and dimensional change was calculated. The data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. The mean difference in dimensional change between the three groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). However the results revealed that there was higher mean dimensional change immediately after autoclaving when compared to the other 2 time intervals. It is desirable to delay the casting of an autoclavable elastomeric impression material by about 24 hours. Though disinfection of impression is routinely followed autoclaving of impression is an effective method of sterilization.

  5. ETI: Our first impressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Albert A.; Johnson, Joel T.

    2000-06-01

    Despite scant or ambiguous information, people are capable of developing comprehensive and detailed impressions. Consequently, if the detection of an electromagnetically-active civilization is announced, many people will rapidly form impressions of what the extraterrestrials and their civilization are "like". First impressions are crucial, not only because of their immediate psychological, social, and political consequences on Earth, but because they can influence the future of interstellar communication. Initial impressions will rest less on hard data than on the nature and tone of the "evidence" that is gleaned from the transmission; the interpretation and dissemination of this evidence; and the hard wiring, psychological programming, cultural conditioning, and social influence processes that shape human perception. We consider how dispositional inferences, implicit theories of personality, negatively toned or adverse information, physical appearance, prior expectations, the confirmation bias, and thinking and unthinking approaches to attitude formation are likely to affect human impressions of ETI.

  6. How the adoption of impression management goals alters impression formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Bryan; Poposki, Elizabeth M

    2010-11-01

    Five experiments (N = 390) tested the hypothesis that adopting an impression management goal leads the impression manager to view an interaction partner as having less of the trait he or she is attempting to express. This hypothesis was confirmed for the impression management goals of appearing introverted, extraverted, smart, confident, and happy. Experiment 2 shows that adoption of the impression goal could alter judgments even when participants could not act on the goal. Experiment 3 provides evidence that adopting an impression management goal prompted a comparison mind-set and that this comparison mind-set activation mediated target judgments. Experiment 4 rules out a potential alternative explanation and provides more direct evidence that comparison of the impression manager's self-concept mediates the impression of the target. Experiment 5 eliminates a potential confound and extends the effect to another impression goal. These experiments highlight the dynamic interplay between impression management and impression formation.

  7. Reliability of the impression replica technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Anders; Vult von Steyern, Per; Fransson, Håkan; Thorén, Margareta Molin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of the impression replica technique with a four-unit zirconia fixed dental prosthesis (FDP). Marginal and internal fit were measured by repeatedly placing the FDP on an epoxy cast using light-body silicone material corresponding to cement. All measured marginal and internal fit points showed varying values. The greatest variations were seen at the most distal margin (33 μm) and at the distal abutment of the FDP (77 μm). The results showed that the technique gives moderate variations and is a useful method to evaluate marginal and internal fit.

  8. Surface Decoration: And Impressed Pots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcock, Jan Hoag

    1978-01-01

    The pots described in this article evolved through a process of pressing objects into clay pieces for textural impressions and arranging these impressed pieces together for an overall pattern. (Author)

  9. Substance Use as Impression Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Mark J.; Getz, J. Greg

    1996-01-01

    Examines the function of substance use as an impression management tactic. Introductory psychology students (n=377) responded to a survey instrument measuring self-monitoring, perceived success in impression management, interaction anxiety, and self-esteem. Results suggest that alcohol use may serve an impression management function. (JPS)

  10. Adjusting dental ceramics: An in vitro evaluation of the ability of various ceramic polishing kits to mimic glazed dental ceramic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, René; Beier, Ulrike S; Heiss-Kisielewsky, Irene; Engelmeier, Robert; Dumfahrt, Herbert; Dhima, Matilda

    2015-06-01

    During the insertion appointment, the practitioner is often faced with the need to adjust ceramic surfaces to fit a restoration to the adjacent or opposing dentition and soft tissues. The purpose of this study was to assess the ceramic surface smoothness achieved with various commercially available ceramic polishing kits on different commonly used ceramic systems. The reliability of the cost of a polishing kit as an indicator of improved surface smoothness was assessed. A total of 350 ceramic surfaces representing 5 commonly available ceramic systems (IPS Empress Esthetic, IPS e.max Press, Cergo Kiss, Vita PM 9, Imagine PressX) were treated with 5 types of ceramic polishing systems (Cerapreshine, 94006C, Ceramiste, Optrafine, Zenostar) by following the manufacturers' guidelines. The surface roughness was measured with a profilometer (Taylor Hobson; Precision Taylor Hobson Ltd). The effects of ceramic systems and polishing kits of interest on surface roughness were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA, paired t test, and Bonferroni corrected significance level. The ceramic systems and polishing kits statistically affected surface roughness (Pceramic surface. No correlation could be established between the high cost of the polishing kit and low surface roughness. None of the commonly used ceramic polishing kits could create a surface smoother than that of glazed ceramic (Pceramic polishing kits is not recommended as a reliable indicator of better performance of ceramic polishing kits (P>.30). Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. IMPROVDENT: improving dentures for patient benefit. A crossover randomised clinical trial comparing impression materials for complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Janine C; Navarro-Coy, Nuria; Pavitt, Sue H; Hulme, Claire; Godfrey, Mary; Craddock, Helen L; Brunton, Paul A; Brown, Sarah; Dillon, Sean; Dukanovic, Gillian; Fernandez, Catherine; Wright, Jonathan; Collier, Howard; Swithenbank, Shirley; Lee, Carol; Hyde, T Paul

    2012-08-31

    According to the UK Adult Dental Health Survey (2009) 15% of adults aged 65-74, 30% aged 75-84 and 47% aged >85 years are edentulous and require complete dentures. Patients' quality of life and nutrition status are affected by poor dentures. The quality of the dental impression is the most important issue for improving the fit and comfort of new dentures. There is paucity of RCT evidence for which impression material is best for complete dentures construction. This study aims to compare two impression materials for effectiveness and cost effectiveness. IMPROVDENT is a double-blind crossover trial comparing the use of alginate and silicone, two commonly used denture impression materials, in terms of patient preference and cost-effectiveness. Eighty five edentulous patients will be recruited and provided with two sets of dentures, similar in all aspects except for the impression material used (alginate or silicone). Patients will try both sets of dentures for a two-week period, unadjusted, to become accustomed to the feel of the new dentures (habituation period). Patients will then wear each set of dentures for a period of 8 weeks (in random order) during which time the dentures will be adjusted for optimum comfort. Finally, patients will be given both sets of dentures for a further two weeks to wear whichever denture they prefer (confirmation period).Patients will be asked about quality of life and to rate dentures on function and comfort at the end of each trial period and asked which set they prefer at the end of the habituation period (unadjusted denture preference) and confirmation period (adjusted denture preference). A health economic evaluation will estimate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of producing dentures from the two materials. A qualitative study will investigate the impact of dentures on behaviour and quality of life. IMPROVDENT is funded by NIHR RfPB (PB-PG-0408-16300). This trial aims to provide evidence on the costs and quality of dentures

  12. Improvdent: Improving dentures for patient benefit. A crossover randomised clinical trial comparing impression materials for complete dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Janine C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to the UK Adult Dental Health Survey (2009 15% of adults aged 65–74, 30% aged 75–84 and 47% aged >85 years are edentulous and require complete dentures. Patients’ quality of life and nutrition status are affected by poor dentures. The quality of the dental impression is the most important issue for improving the fit and comfort of new dentures. There is paucity of RCT evidence for which impression material is best for complete dentures construction. This study aims to compare two impression materials for effectiveness and cost effectiveness. Methods/Design IMPROVDENT is a double-blind crossover trial comparing the use of alginate and silicone, two commonly used denture impression materials, in terms of patient preference and cost-effectiveness. Eighty five edentulous patients will be recruited and provided with two sets of dentures, similar in all aspects except for the impression material used (alginate or silicone. Patients will try both sets of dentures for a two-week period, unadjusted, to become accustomed to the feel of the new dentures (habituation period. Patients will then wear each set of dentures for a period of 8 weeks (in random order during which time the dentures will be adjusted for optimum comfort. Finally, patients will be given both sets of dentures for a further two weeks to wear whichever denture they prefer (confirmation period. Patients will be asked about quality of life and to rate dentures on function and comfort at the end of each trial period and asked which set they prefer at the end of the habituation period (unadjusted denture preference and confirmation period (adjusted denture preference. A health economic evaluation will estimate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of producing dentures from the two materials. A qualitative study will investigate the impact of dentures on behaviour and quality of life. Funding: IMPROVDENT is funded by NIHR RfPB (PB-PG-0408-16300. Discussion

  13. Accuracy of stone casts obtained by different impression materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Cláudia Lapria Faria

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Several impression materials are available in the Brazilian marketplace to be used in oral rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of different impression materials used for fixed partial dentures following the manufacturers' instructions. A master model representing a partially edentulous mandibular right hemi-arch segment whose teeth were prepared to receive full crowns was used. Custom trays were prepared with auto-polymerizing acrylic resin and impressions were performed with a dental surveyor, standardizing the path of insertion and removal of the tray. Alginate and elastomeric materials were used and stone casts were obtained after the impressions. For the silicones, impression techniques were also compared. To determine the impression materials' accuracy, digital photographs of the master model and of the stone casts were taken and the discrepancies between them were measured. The data were subjected to analysis of variance and Duncan's complementary test. Polyether and addition silicone following the single-phase technique were statistically different from alginate, condensation silicone and addition silicone following the double-mix technique (p .05 to alginate and addition silicone following the double-mix technique, but different from polysulfide. The results led to the conclusion that different impression materials and techniques influenced the stone casts' accuracy in a way that polyether, polysulfide and addition silicone following the single-phase technique were more accurate than the other materials.

  14. Accuracy of stone casts obtained by different impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Adriana Cláudia Lapria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Macedo, Ana Paula; Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello de; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria

    2008-01-01

    Several impression materials are available in the Brazilian marketplace to be used in oral rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of different impression materials used for fixed partial dentures following the manufacturers' instructions. A master model representing a partially edentulous mandibular right hemi-arch segment whose teeth were prepared to receive full crowns was used. Custom trays were prepared with auto-polymerizing acrylic resin and impressions were performed with a dental surveyor, standardizing the path of insertion and removal of the tray. Alginate and elastomeric materials were used and stone casts were obtained after the impressions. For the silicones, impression techniques were also compared. To determine the impression materials' accuracy, digital photographs of the master model and of the stone casts were taken and the discrepancies between them were measured. The data were subjected to analysis of variance and Duncan's complementary test. Polyether and addition silicone following the single-phase technique were statistically different from alginate, condensation silicone and addition silicone following the double-mix technique (p or = .05) to alginate and addition silicone following the double-mix technique, but different from polysulfide. The results led to the conclusion that different impression materials and techniques influenced the stone casts' accuracy in a way that polyether, polysulfide and addition silicone following the single-phase technique were more accurate than the other materials.

  15. Effect of Storage Time and Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Impressions Made with Zinc Oxide Impression Paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sareh Habibzadeh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of storage time and temperature on dimensional stability of impressions made with Cavex Outline zinc oxide impression paste.Materials and Methods: A round stainless steel mold with five grooves (three horizontal and two vertical was used in this in-vitro experimental study. Cavex Outline impression paste was prepared according to the manufacturer’s instructions and applied to the mold. The mold was placed on a block and stored at 35°C and 100% humidity for setting. The impressions were poured with stone immediately and also after 30, 120, 240 and 420 minutes and 24 hours. The distance between the vertical lines on the casts was measured and compared with that in the immediately poured cast.Results: Storage in a refrigerator and at room temperature for zero to seven hours had no significant effect on dimensional stability of the impressions; however, 24 hours of storage in a refrigerator or at room temperature decreased the dimensional stability of Cavex Outline (P=0.001. Also, a significant association was found between dimensional changes following 24 hours of storage in a refrigerator (4°C and at room temperature (23°C; P<0.01.Conclusions: The optimal pouring time of Cavex Outline impressions with stone is between zero to seven hours, and 24 hours of storage significantly decreases the dimensional stability.Keywords: Dental Impression Materials; Zinc Oxide; Cavex

  16. [Impressibility of schizophrenic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhin, E F; Korneva, T V; Lomachenkov, A S

    1978-01-01

    The authors studied the abilities to identify emotional states according to the acustico-phonetical symptoms of speech in 160 schizophrenic patients and 80 normals. These studies were performed with the aid of a specially elaborated tape recorder test. It was established that difficulties in accomplishing these tasks were found in schizophrenic patients with paranoid symptomatology. Patients with other clinical states, including sufficiently expressed specific disturbances in the emotional sphere, extremely subtly differentiated the emotional state of the announcers. These data are considered as proof of preserved impressive abilities in the majority of schizophrenic patients. The significance of these factors for the organization of psychosocial influences are discussed.

  17. Dental and skeletal changes in patients with mandibular retrognathism following treatment with Herbst and pre-adjusted fixed appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio de Abreu Vigorito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the dentoskeletal changes observed in treatment of Class II, division 1 malocclusion patients with mandibular retrognathism. Treatment was performed with the Herbst orthopedic appliance during 13 months (phase I and pre-adjusted orthodontic fixed appliance (phase II. METHODS: Lateral cephalograms of 17 adolescents were taken in phase I onset (T1 and completion (T2; in the first thirteen months of phase II (T3 and in phase II completion (T4. Differences among the cephalometric variables were statistically analyzed (Bonferroni variance and multiple comparisons. RESULTS: From T1 to T4, 42% of overall maxillary growth was observed between T1 and T2 (P < 0.01, 40.3% between T2 and T3 (P < 0.05 and 17.7% between T3 and T4 (n.s.. As for overall mandibular movement, 48.2% was observed between T1 and T2 (P < 0.001 and 51.8% between T2 and T4 (P < 0.01 of which 15.1% was observed between T2 and T3 (n.s. and 36.7% between T3 and T4 (P < 0.01. Class II molar relationship and overjet were properly corrected. The occlusal plane which rotated clockwise between T1 and T2, returned to its initial position between T2 and T3 remaining stable until T4. The mandibular plane inclination did not change at any time during treatment. CONCLUSION: Mandibular growth was significantly greater in comparison to maxillary, allowing sagittal maxillomandibular adjustment. The dentoalveolar changes (upper molar that overcorrected the malocclusion in phase I, partially recurred in phase II, but did not hinder correction of the malocclusion. Facial type was preserved.

  18. Modified cytotoxicity evaluation of elastomeric impression materials while polymerizing with reduced exposure time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jae-Sung; Lee, Sang-Bae; Kim, Chong-Kwan; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2012-12-01

    Cytotoxicity evaluation is an important step in biocompatibility assessment of dental impression materials. Previously, cytotoxicity evaluations were carried out on already set ('set') impression materials for contact time or extraction time of 24 h or longer in duration. However, clinically, dental impression materials are in contact with oral tissue while they are being set ('polymerizing'), for no longer than 10 min. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the difference in results between 'polymerizing' and 'set' forms of impression materials as well as the difference in results between longer duration of contact or extraction time (12 or 24 h) and shorter duration of time (15 or 30 min). Seven dental impression materials of different chemical compositions were tested. Two commonly used in vitro tests were used-test on extraction and test by direct contact. Both 'polymerizing' and 'set' forms of impression materials were used with different durations of extraction and contact (15 min, 30 min, 12 h and 24 h). There were significant (p materials. Also, significant (p material for cytotoxicity evaluation, with 15 or 30 min of contact between cell and dental impression materials and an extraction time of 15 or 30 min that is more reflective of clinical situations.

  19. An impressive start

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    This has been an excellent week for the LHC, with a succession of fills rapidly increasing the number of proton bunches to 194 per beam. This has allowed the experiments to reach a peak luminosity of 2.5 × 1032 cm-2s-1, thereby surpassing the record for 2010 where we reached 2.0 × 1032 cm-2s-1. At the time of writing, the integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC in 2011 is around 28 inverse picobarns, which is already more than half of the total 2010 dataset.   These are impressive numbers, but what impresses me most is how quickly the LHC operators are now able to turn the machine around between fills, and how well LHC running has been incorporated into the overall operation of CERN’s accelerator complex. The flexibility of the LHC was illustrated on Thursday when we started a short phase of running at 1.38 TeV per beam, equivalent to the energy-per-nucleon of a lead-ion run. This lower energy data will be used by the experiments, in particular by ALICE, to compare...

  20. In vitro study of transmission of bacteria from contaminated metal models to stone models via impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofou, A; Larsen, T; Owall, B; Fiehn, N-E

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of microbiological transmission into the dental laboratory via impressions and dental stone models. Metal master models were contaminated with Bacillus subtilis and Streptococcus sanguis. Impressions in alginate, polyvinylsiloxane, and polyether were used, and models were cast in two brands of dental stone. Samples were taken from the impression surfaces before and after casting, and sections from the stone models were taken by a technique developed for this study. After incubation, the numbers of colonies were counted and the numbers of colony-forming units per milliliter were calculated. The reductions were statistically significant but considered to be clinically insignificant. The conclusion is that even after severe contamination, the risks to dental laboratory personnel are minimal. "Normal" hygienic procedures are recommended instead of disinfection.

  1. In vitro evaluation of prosthodontic impression on natural dentition: a comparison between traditional and digital techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    MALAGUTI, G.; ROSSI, R.; MARZIALI, B.; ESPOSITO, A.; BRUNO, G.; DARIOL, C.; DI FIORE, A.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives The aim of this in vitro study is to evaluate the marginal and internal fit of zirconia core crowns manufactured following different digital and traditional workflows. Methods A 6° taper shoulder prepared abutment tooth was used to produce 20 zirconia core crowns using four different scanning techniques: scanned directly with the extraoral lab scanner, scanned with intraoral scanner, dental impressions using individual dental tray and polyether, dental casts from a polyether impressions. Marginal and internal fits were evaluated with digital photography and the silicone replica method. Results Medium marginal gaps were 76,00 μm ± 28.9 for extraoral lab scanner, 80.50 μm ± 36,2 for intraoral scanner, 88.10 μm ± 34,8 for dental impression scan and 112,4 μm ± 37,2 for dental cast scan. Medium internal gaps were 23.20 μm ± 10,3 for extraoral lab scanner, 16.20 μm ± 8.3 for intraoral scanner, 27.20 μm ± 16.7 for dental impression scan and 30.20 μm ± 12.7 for dental cast scan. Conclusion Internal gap were extensively lower than 70 μm described in literature. Marginal fit was higher than ideal values for all the techniques but within the limit of clinical success. Intraoral scanners obtained the best results for internal gap. PMID:28280529

  2. Application of round-shape pin-hole marker measurement in irregular alginate dental impression deformation%正圆形圆洞标记法测量口腔不规则藻酸盐印模形变的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宫耀; 李烨侃; 陈洁; 魏斌; 沈刚

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨添加正圆形圆洞标记点测量口腔不规则藻酸盐印模形变的可行性.方法 模拟临床固定修复基牙牙备体制作金属母模,表面有互成三角形的凸出圆形钢针,分别用两种藻酸盐印模材料(Alginoplast和Palgat Plus)制取印模样本各10个,钢针对应部位形成圆洞标记.脱模后运用体式显微镜观察标记点边缘情况,以正圆心模拟软件标定坐标,测量脱模后0、2、4、6、8、10、12、15、20 min时间点的标记点位移值(测量CG长径线段变化时增加30 min时间点),计算印模样本的线性变化率.结果 脱模后的圆洞标记点边缘轮廓清晰,圆心坐标重复性好.在脱模后20 min时间点,Alginoplast印模样本的线性变化率为0.38%,Palgat Plus印模样本的线性变化率为0.45%.Alginoplast印模样本在脱模后2 min时间点的标记点位移增大0.040%(8.4 μm),最大减小值为30 min时的0.237% (49.4 μm);Palgat Plus印模样本在脱模后2 min时间点的标记点位移增大0.068%(14.2μm),最大减小值为30 min时的0.189%(39.5μm).结论 采用正圆形圆洞标记法对口腔不规则藻酸盐印模形变情况进行检测是可行的.%Objective To investigate the feasibility of round-shape pin-hole marker measurement of irregular alginate dental impression deformation. Methods The metal model simulating abutment preparations was obtained, which had triangle-formed circular needles on the surface. Two types of alginate impression ( Alginoplast and Palgat Plus, n = 10 for each material) made by the metal model had the corresponding pin-hole markers. The dimensional changes of the markers after model withdrawl were observed by stereomicroscopy. The data of coordinates 0 min, 2 min, 4 min, 6 min, 8 min, 10 min, 12 min, 15 min and 20 min after model withdrawl were output by the software which could simulate the center of a circle to measure the displacement and impression accuracy ( additional time point of 30 min

  3. PRECISION OF STONE MODEL MOULDING ACCORDING TO THE POLYETHER IMPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona IONAŞ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Polyethers represent imprinting materials largely used on the market due to their precision in reproducing the prosthetic field. The present study aims at evaluating the linear dimensional variations of the models of dental stone following imprinting with polyethers by the technique of monophasic impression. The obtained results show no significant dimensional differences between the models of dental stone gypsum moulded 24 hours or 7 days after imprinting. The conclusion to be drawn is that the imprinting materials containing polyethers, applied by the monophasic technique, permit realization of high-precision models even 7 days after imprinting.

  4. Impression Material Mass Retained in the Mucobuccal Fold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Karam Genno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Trapped foreign bodies and tissue reactions to foreign materials are commonly encountered in the oral cavity. Traumatically introduced dental materials, instruments, or needles are the most common materials referred to in the dental literature. This paper describes an iatrogenic foreign body encapsulation in the oral mucosa, clinically appearing as 5×10 mm tumor-like swelling with an intact overlying epithelium and diagnosed as a polymeric impression material. Detailed case history and, clinical and radiographic examinations including CBCT and spectrometric analysis of the retrieved sample were necessary to determine accurately the nature, size, and location of the foreign body. It is suggested that the origin of the material relates to an impression made 2 years ago, leaving a mass trapped in a traumatized mucosal tissue.

  5. [Changes of the elastomer impression materials after their immersion in some disinfection agents for AIDS infection control purposes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pissiotis, A; Panagiotoyni, E; Kapari, D; Kaloyiannides, A

    1989-01-01

    In achieving infection control in the dental office and the dental laboratory it has been suggested that impressions made in the dental office should be disinfected before they are send to the dental laboratory. In this study we examined the solubility and the linear changes of some elastomer impression materials after their immersion in disinfection agents after ten, twenty and forty minute time intervals. The disinfection agents used were: 75% alcohol, domestic chlorine 10%, the agent sterile pack (isopropyl alcohol) and 2% activated glutaraldehyde (SIDEX). Water was used as control. Our findings show that all types of elastomer impression materials appear to suffer insignificant changes both linear and weight-wise but polyether impression materials show significant changes in almost all the disinfection agents that were used and the time intervals that were studied.

  6. 可调式牙冠形态试件厚度控制仪的研制%Development of Adjustable Sculpting Apparatus for Dental Crown Shape Specimen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    靳海立; 贾骏; 邓再喜; 刘更; 段嫄嫄; 周建学

    2012-01-01

    目的:为能够严格控制牙冠形态试件各层结构尺寸的准确、均匀一致,设计出精度高、使用方便的可调式牙冠形态试件厚度控制仪.方法:利用AUTO CAD软件分析构图,我们自行研制了可调式牙冠形态试件厚度控制仪,用于牙冠形试件的核基底层蜡型制作、饰面层堆瓷过程中的厚度调控.应用此仪器制作0.75、1.00、1.20 mm等3种厚度的蜡型试件,将完成的试件从咬合面垂直切开,千分尺随机测量试件咬合面与轴壁厚度.结果:蜡型厚度误差为0.01 mm,同组蜡型的咬合面及轴壁各测试点之间的数值无显著差异(P>0.05).结论:该仪器设计科学合理,结果准确可靠,试件加工重复性好,咬合面厚度与轴壁厚度均与所设计的理论厚度相符且均匀一致,能够满足口腔牙冠修复材料实验的测试要求.%Objective To design adjustable sculpting apparatus for dental crown shape specimen with high sensitivity and convenience in order to exactly control the accurateness and uniformness of each layer structure size of dental crown shape specimen. Methods With AUTO CAD software analyse, the sculpting apparatus to control the thickness for wax pattern of core crown and veneer specimen was developed. Three groups wax type specimens with the thickness of 0.75,1.00 and 1.20mm were made respectively. The wax pattern was cut vertically from the occlusal surface, the thickness of the occlusal surfaces and axial wall could be measured randomly. Results The thickness measurement error of the wax pattern was 0.01 mm, there was no significant difference between the thickness of occlusal surfaces and axial wall in the same group(P>0.05). Conclusion Design of the sculpting apparatus is rational and scientific, the results of measurement are accurate and reliable, specimen processing is repeatable, and the practical size of occlusal surface thickness and axial wall thickness are in accord with the theory. The precision of the

  7. Study of the interocclusal distortion in impressions taken with different types of closed-mouth trays and two types of impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mañes-Ferrer, José-Félix; Selva-Otaolaurruchi, Eduardo-José; Parra-Arenós, Carmina; Selfa-Bas, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare different types of impression trays for the closed-mouth impression technique, using two different types of impression material. For this study, five different types of impression trays were used with two different types of impression materials, one of addition silicone and the other of polyether. We designed a model used for taking the impressions and for measuring interocclusal distortion. The results obtained show that the impression trays COE (GC (R) GC America INC. Alsip) and Premier (Premier (R), Premier Dental Products Co. Canada) show a lesser degree of interocclusal distortion when taking closed-mouth impressions. In terms of impression materials, the polyether was the one that produced the best results. From a clinical point of view, our study shows that the use of these types of trays is absolutely recommendable when used according to the clinical indications for which they have been designed; that said, we must not fail to consider that selecting the proper type of tray is also important.

  8. Impressions of a "Newcomer"

    CERN Multimedia

    Oreglia, M

    I guess I am passed "newcomer" status, so this report can be considered as paying in a debt from 2001 when world events prevented me from attending the Physics Workshop at Lund. At the outset I must compliment the Athens organizers for facilitating a superb workshop in a wonderful setting. The lovely evenings permitted us to recover from Fabiola's grueling meeting schedule :-) What really impressed me about the Athens workshop is the astounding progress in the last two years, particularly in the software. ATHENA is really a useful tool which all of us can implement now for realistic simulation and reconstruction. We are just starting to pass from the "euphoria" phase where our naive modelling suggested analyses would be easy, to the "realism" phase where we are making the analyses more robust. Detector noise is still an important missing ingredient, and some important analysis tools are still missing, but this was acknowledged and they do not appear to be far off. (It would be nice if the online documentati...

  9. A recurrent connectionist model of person impression formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Overwalle, Frank; Labiouse, Christophe

    2004-01-01

    Major findings in impression formation are reviewed and modeled from a connectionist perspective. The findings are in the areas of primacy and recency in impression formation, asymmetric diagnosticity of ability- and morality-related traits, increased recall for trait-inconsistent information, assimilation and contrast in priming, and discounting of trait inferences by situational information. The majority of these phenomena are illustrated with well-known experiments and simulated with an autoassociative network architecture with linear activation update and using the delta learning algorithm for adjusting the connection weights. All of the simulations successfully reproduced the empirical findings. Moreover, the proposed model is shown to be consistent with earlier algebraic models of impression formation (Anderson, 1981; Busemeyer, 1991; Hogarth and Einhorn, 1992). The discussion centers on how our model compares to other connectionist approaches to impression formation and how it may contribute to a more parsimonious and unified theory of person perception.

  10. Dimensional Stability of Two Polyvinyl Siloxane Impression Materials in Different Time Intervals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aalaei Sh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Dental prosthesis is usually made indirectly; there- fore dimensional stability of the impression material is very important. Every few years, new impression materials with different manufacturers’ claims regarding their better properties are introduced to the dental markets which require more research to evaluate their true dimensional changes. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate dimensional stability of additional silicone impression material (Panasil® and Affinis® in different time intervals. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, using two additional silicones (Panasil® and Affinis®, we made sixty impressions of standard die in similar conditions of 23 °C and 59% relative humidity by a special tray. The die included three horizontal and two vertical lines that were parallel. The vertical line crossed the horizontal ones at a point that served as reference for measurement. All impressions were poured with high strength dental stone. The dimensions were measured by stereo-microscope by two examiners in three interval storage times (1, 24 and 168 hours.The data were statistically analyzed using t-test and ANOVA. Results: All of the stone casts were larger than the standard die. Dimensional changes of Panasil and Affinis were 0.07%, 0.24%, 0.27% and 0.02%, 0.07%, 0.16% after 1, 24 and 168 hours, respectively. Dimensional change for two impression materials wasn’t significant in the interval time, expect for Panasil after one week (p = 0.004. Conclusions: According to the limitations of this study, Affinis impressions were dimensionally more stable than Panasil ones, but it was not significant. Dimensional change of Panasil impression showed a statistically significant difference after one week. Dimensional changes of both impression materials were based on ADA standard limitation in all time intervals (< 0.5%; therefore, dimensional stability of this impression was accepted at least

  11. Cost-effectiveness of silicone and alginate impressions for complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, C; Yu, G; Browne, C; O'Dwyer, J; Craddock, H; Brown, S; Gray, J; Pavitt, S; Fernandez, C; Godfrey, M; Dukanovic, G; Brunton, P; Hyde, T P

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cost effectiveness of silicone and alginate impressions for complete dentures. Cost effectiveness analyses were undertaken alongside a UK single centre, double blind, controlled, crossover clinical trial. Taking the perspective of the healthcare sector, effectiveness is measured using the EuroQol (EQ-5D-3L) which provides a single index value for health status that may be combined with time to produce quality adjusted life years (QALYs); and Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-EDENT). Incremental cost effectiveness ratios are presented representing the additional cost per one unit gained. Mean cost was higher in the silicone impression group (£388.57 vs. £363.18). Negligible between-group differences were observed in QALY gains; the silicone group had greater mean OHIP-EDENT gains. The additional cost using silicone was £3.41 per change of one point in the OHIP-EDENT. The silicone group was more costly, driven by the cost of materials. Changes in the EQ-5D and QALY gains over time and between arms were not statistically significant. Change in OHIP-EDENT score showed greater improvement in the silicone group and the difference between arms was statistically significant. Given negligible QALY gains and low level of resource use, results must be treated with caution. It is difficult to make robust claims about the comparative cost-effectiveness. Silicone impressions for complete dentures improve patients' quality of life (OHIP-EDENT score). The extra cost of silicone impressions is £30 per patient. Dentists, patients and health care funders need to consider the clinical and financial value of silicone impressions. Different patients, different dentists, different health funders will have individual perceptions and judgements. ISRCTN01528038. NIHR-RfPB grant PB-PG-0408-16300. This article forms part of a project for which the author (TPH) won the Senior Clinical Unilever Hatton Award of the International Assocation for Dental

  12. Cost-effectiveness of silicone and alginate impressions for complete dentures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, C.; Yu, G.; Browne, C.; O’Dwyer, J.; Craddock, H.; Brown, S.; Gray, J.; Pavitt, S.; Fernandez, C.; Godfrey, M.; Dukanovic, G.; Brunton, P.; Hyde, T.P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the cost effectiveness of silicone and alginate impressions for complete dentures. Methods Cost effectiveness analyses were undertaken alongside a UK single centre, double blind, controlled, crossover clinical trial. Taking the perspective of the healthcare sector, effectiveness is measured using the EuroQol (EQ-5D-3L) which provides a single index value for health status that may be combined with time to produce quality adjusted life years (QALYs); and Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-EDENT). Incremental cost effectiveness ratios are presented representing the additional cost per one unit gained. Results Mean cost was higher in the silicone impression group (£388.57 vs. £363.18). Negligible between-group differences were observed in QALY gains; the silicone group had greater mean OHIP-EDENT gains. The additional cost using silicone was £3.41 per change of one point in the OHIP-EDENT. Conclusions The silicone group was more costly, driven by the cost of materials. Changes in the EQ-5D and QALY gains over time and between arms were not statistically significant. Change in OHIP-EDENT score showed greater improvement in the silicone group and the difference between arms was statistically significant. Given negligible QALY gains and low level of resource use, results must be treated with caution. It is difficult to make robust claims about the comparative cost-effectiveness. Clinical significance Silicone impressions for complete dentures improve patients’ quality of life (OHIP-EDENT score). The extra cost of silicone impressions is £30 per patient. Dentists, patients and health care funders need to consider the clinical and financial value of silicone impressions. Different patients, different dentists, different health funders will have individual perceptions and judgements. ISRCTN01528038. NIHR-RfPB grant PB-PG-0408-16300.

 This article forms part of a project for which the author (TPH) won the Senior Clinical

  13. The dimensional stability of impression materials and its effect on in vitro tooth wear studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jose M; Bartlett, David W

    2011-03-01

    To assess the dimensional stability of 8 impression materials over 12 weeks relevant to in vitro tribology studies. Ten impressions from eight impression materials were taken of a metal block (ADA block) conforming to the American Dental Association specification for impression materials and of another metal block (custom block) which allowed measurements over a larger surface area. The impressions and blocks were scanned on a non-contacting laser profilometer (Taicaan® - Southampton, UK) and using surface metrology software Boddies® (Taicaan® - Southampton, UK) measurements were made at 24h, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks. The impression materials tested were [1] Aquasil®, [2] Aquasil® DECA, [3] Affinis®, [4] Express®, [5] Extrude®, [6] Impregum®, [7] President® and [8] Take 1®. Seven addition silicones and one polyether [6] were tested. [2] and [6] were monophasic, the rest were putty-wash. The results from impressions of the ADA block showed that all materials contracted compared to measurements obtained directly from the block [1] expanded over time (+31.5 μm) (p1.5% and were stable for 12 weeks. Nevertheless, the range of changes would affect tribology studies were cut-offs lesser than the reported changes are selected. All impressions should be processed after similar time delays to reduce the errors introduced by dimensional changes. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Impression management as symbolic capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lueg, Klarissa; Nielsen, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    Social Network Sites (SNS) play an increasingly important role in the European business world, especially with respect to cross-cultural impression management. Departing from the Bourdieusian concept of “capital,” this paper analyzes the differences in the use of two popular business SNS: XING...... and the Danish markets. It is apparent that even business experts operating in both markets could better adapt to the standards and possibilities offered by the German SNS with respect to impression management. We introduce a set of recommendations to foster SNS-related and culture-sensitive impression...... in Germany and LinkedIn in Denmark. We summarize those differences and relate them to different cultural contexts and impression management practices. Our sample consists of Danish Higher Executives (HEs)/managers (e.g., CEOs) and companies that have profiles on both SNS, thus reaching out to both the German...

  15. 60 Years of Impression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Qiwei

    2009-01-01

    @@ It has been 60 years since foundation of the People's Republic of China.These 60 years,China has experienced a huge transformation,from short supply of textile and apparel to nowadays big country of it.Facing the tough time of economic crisis,China's textile and apparel industry has been carrying out adjustment and renovation in time.How to enhance independent and creative capacity,upgrade technology,and improve brands' influence,to explore a new industrialized road and achieve the goal of being a strong country of textile by 2020 as well,it still has a long way to go.

  16. The quality of working impressions for the fabrication of fixed prosthodontics prostheses (crown and bridgework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Syahir Ahmad Zu Saifudin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The study was carried out to assess the quality of working impressions sent to commercial laboratories for fabrication of fixed prostheses. Materials and Methods: Impressions (n: 200 received by four dental laboratories were evaluated by two calibrated examiners. The type of work, tray designs, impression materials and techniques were recorded for each impression. Quality data on crucial details of the tooth preparations, voids at tooth preparations, tears along the finished margin line and flow of materials were documented and each criterion scored either with 2 (Good, 1 (Acceptable or 0 (Unacceptable. The Chi-square test for independence was done for relationship analysis of the impression defects and different type of impression materials. Results: From 200 examined impressions, 53.9% were for crown works, 35.9% bridge works, 1.4% posts and cores and 8.8% for other types of work. The impression materials used were polyether (39.5% and polyvinyl-siloxane (60.5%. The two main types of trays were metal stock (48.5% and disposable plastic (37.5%. Impression techniques were monophase one-step technique (50.0%, putty wash two-steps technique (23.5%, putty wash one-step technique (15.5% and dual phase one-step technique (11.0%. Overall, 64.5% of the impressions sent had unacceptable quality (0 score recorded for at least one criteria. The proportions of impression defects were significant to the type of impression materials (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The percentage of unacceptable impressions (64.5% sent to the laboratories is a serious concern, as it contributes to the inaccuracy of the crown and bridgeworks provided to patients.

  17. Evaluation of the accuracy of different transfer impression techniques for multiple implants

    OpenAIRE

    Júlio César Brigolini de Faria; Laís Regiane Silva-Concílio; Ana Christina Claro Neves; Milton Edson Miranda; Marcelo Lucchesi Teixeira

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of three implant transfer impression techniques. Four groups (n = 5) were defined, according to the technique: TC - tapered copings without splint; SC - square copings without splint; SCS - square copings splinted with dental floss and acrylic resin, and CG (control group) - master model with four external hexagonal implants and a superstructure. Individual trays and polyether were used for the impression. All casts were checked for their fit...

  18. Influence of splinting materials (auto vs. photopolymerizing) on implant impression accuracy: an in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Braz, Luís Miguel Baptista

    2016-01-01

    Tese de mestrado, Medicina Dentária, Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, 2016 Purpose: The aim of the present study was to evaluate if there was any significant difference in accuracy between multiple-unit dental implant casts obtained from splinted direct impression techniques using 2 splinting materials by comparing the casts to the reference models. The null hypothesis tested was that the accuracy of implant-impressions was not affected regardless of the splinting ma...

  19. 60 Years of Impression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    It has been 60 years since foundation of the People’s Republic of China. These 60 years, China has experienced a huge transformation, from short supply of textile and apparel to nowadays big country of it. Facing the tough time of economic crisis, China’s textile and apparel industry has been carrying out adjustment and renovation in time. How to enhance independent and creative capacity, upgrade technology, and improve brands’ influence, to explore a new industrialized road and achieve the goal of being a strong country of textile by 2020 as well, it still has a long way to go.But once we look back the history, we find pride and inspiration of China’s textile industry.

  20. Case series of undetected intranasal impression material in patients with clefts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Simon D; Drake, David J

    2013-04-01

    We report the cases of two female patients in their twenties who had had corrective surgery for bilateral cleft lip and palate as babies. They had both had residual palatal fistulas and had had further treatment that required repeated dental impressions. Several years later both had complained of persistent nasal discomfort and discharge, and routine clinical examination and investigations had failed to identify the cause. Full examination of the whole nasal cavity under general anaesthesia, in both cases, showed the presence of displaced dental impression material in the nasal floor. Removal resulted in complete resolution of symptoms.

  1. Utilization of iTero digital impression unit for resin composite inlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laman, Stephen A; Frey, Gary N; Patel, Shalizeh A; Quock, Ryan L

    2014-01-01

    Historically, traditional elastomeric impression techniques for indirect fixed procedures have presented challenges for the operator, laboratory, and patient. Recent digital impression unit technology offers a compelling alternative to elastomeric impressions. The iTero system applies parallel confocal imaging to create a virtual impression that can be easily captured, edited, and uploaded electronically to the dental laboratory. Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technology is applied to the virtual impression to create an unlimited number of identical polyurethane models. This case report is presented from the perspectives of the clinicians and the laboratory technician using an iTero system to treat a left mandibular second premolar with a resin composite inlay.

  2. Theoretical and practical aspects regarding the development and control of microbial biofilms attached to the surface of dental materials and dental prostheses in particular

    OpenAIRE

    Zisi, Sonila; Bortollini, Sergio; Muntianu, Ligia; Papakoca, Kiro; Mihai BURLIBASA

    2012-01-01

    Microbial biofilms play an essential role in oral pathology, in the etiology of dental caries, periodontopathy, but also in surface contamination of dental materials (and here we refer to prosthetic material such as acrylic materials usedfor dentures, occlusal rims, try-in dentures, dental alloys used in fixed dental restorations, impression materials, etc.)

  3. Dental Fluorosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have been broadly termed dental fluorosis. What is dental fluorosis? Dental fluorosis is a condition that causes ... less than 2 milligrams per liter. What causes dental fluorosis? Dental fluorosis is caused by taking in ...

  4. Dental Amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  5. Impression management as symbolic capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lueg, Klarissa; Nielsen, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    Social Network Sites (SNS) play an increasingly important role in the European business world, especially with respect to cross-cultural impression management. Departing from the Bourdieusian concept of “capital,” this paper analyzes the differences in the use of two popular business SNS: XING...... in Germany and LinkedIn in Denmark. We summarize those differences and relate them to different cultural contexts and impression management practices. Our sample consists of Danish Higher Executives (HEs)/managers (e.g., CEOs) and companies that have profiles on both SNS, thus reaching out to both the German...

  6. Comparative Evaluation of Dimensional Accuracy of Elastomeric Impression Materials when Treated with Autoclave, Microwave, and Chemical Disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamble, Suresh S; Khandeparker, Rakshit Vijay; Somasundaram, P; Raghav, Shweta; Babaji, Rashmi P; Varghese, T Joju

    2015-09-01

    Impression materials during impression procedure often get infected with various infectious diseases. Hence, disinfection of impression materials with various disinfectants is advised to protect the dental team. Disinfection can alter the dimensional accuracy of impression materials. The present study was aimed to evaluate the dimensional accuracy of elastomeric impression materials when treated with different disinfectants; autoclave, chemical, and microwave method. The impression materials used for the study were, dentsply aquasil (addition silicone polyvinylsiloxane syringe and putty), zetaplus (condensation silicone putty and light body), and impregum penta soft (polyether). All impressions were made according to manufacturer's instructions. Dimensional changes were measured before and after different disinfection procedures. Dentsply aquasil showed smallest dimensional change (-0.0046%) and impregum penta soft highest linear dimensional changes (-0.026%). All the tested elastomeric impression materials showed some degree of dimensional changes. The present study showed that all the disinfection procedures produce minor dimensional changes of impression material. However, it was within American Dental Association specification. Hence, steam autoclaving and microwave method can be used as an alternative method to chemical sterilization as an effective method.

  7. Impression management as symbolic capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lueg, Klarissa; Nielsen, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    Social Network Sites (SNS) play an increasingly important role in the European business world, especially with respect to cross-cultural impression management. Departing from the Bourdieusian concept of “capital,” this paper analyzes the differences in the use of two popular business SNS: XING...

  8. Children's Impressions of Television Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartella, Ellen

    This research study examines the types of social behaviors portrayed by families in various television series and explores children's impressions of the TV family members. Content analysis of nine family-oriented TV series was employed to describe the ranges of behaviors of fathers, mothers and children on television. Eleven shows from each series…

  9. Antibacterial Effect of Sanosil 2% and 6% and Sodium Hypochlorite 0.5% on Impressions of Irreversible Hydrocolloid (Alginate and Condensational Silicone (Speedex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izadi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Dental impressions often carry microorganisms that may cause cross-infection from patients to dental staff. Impressions should be disinfected to eliminate the risk of cross-contamination. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of three different disinfectant solutions on two commonly used impression materials. Materials and Methods Seventy-two impressions were taken from dentate arches of nine dental staff from the School of Dentistry, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences. Eight successive impressions were recorded in two different impression materials for each participant as four alginate and four condensational silicones (Speedex. For each impression material, specimens were exposed to four different regimens; one was immersed in sterile water as control, and the remaining specimens were exposed to three different disinfection treatments (0.5% sodium hypochlorite, 2% Sanosil, and 6% Sanosil for 10 minutes. The impressions were washed with distilled water for 15 seconds, were inserted into sterilized tubes, and covered with Tryptic soy broth media (TSB. The tubes were incubated at 350 ºC for 24 hours. In total, 0.01 milliliter was obtained from each tube, and inoculated on blood agar medium. Gram staining and biochemical tests were performed for bacterial detection. Data was analyzed by SPSS software using Fisher exact test. Results Bacterial growth was observed in all impressions immersed in sterile water for 10 minutes (control group. Disinfected alginate impressions were not contaminated with any microorganisms. None of the solutions under examination were completely effective for condensational silicone impressions. Antibacterial effects on condensational silicone impressions ranked in a decreasing order as 0.5% sodium hypochlorite, 6% Sanosil and 2% Sanosil. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, disinfectants were able to completely eliminate microorganisms carried by the alginate

  10. Preliminary SEM Observations on the Surface of Elastomeric Impression Materials after Immersion or Ozone Disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prombonas, Anthony; Yannikakis, Stavros; Karampotsos, Thanasis; Katsarou, Martha-Spyridoula; Drakoulis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surface integrity of dental elastomeric impression materials that are subjected to disinfection is of major importance for the quality of the final prosthetic restorations. Aim The aim of this qualitative Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) study was to reveal the effects of immersion or ozone disinfection on the surface of four dental elastomeric impression materials. Materials and Methods Four dental elastomeric impression material brands were used (two vinyl polysiloxane silicones, one polyether, and one vinyl polyether silicone). Total of 32 specimens were fabricated, eight from each impression material. Specimens were immersion (0.525% sodium hypochlorite solution or 0.3% benzalkonium chloride solution) or ozone disinfected or served as controls and examined with SEM. Results Surface degradation was observed on several speci-mens disinfected with 0.525% sodium hypochlorite solution. Similar wavy-wrinkling surface structures were observed in almost all specimens, when treated either with 0.3% benzalkonium chloride solution or ozone. Conclusion The SEM images obtained from this study revealed that both immersion disinfectants and ozone show similar impression material surface alterations. Ozone seems to be non-inferior as compared to immersion disinfectants, but superior as to environmental protection. PMID:28208993

  11. Canadian Impressions Title: Impresiones canadienses Title: Impressions canadiennes

    OpenAIRE

    Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)

    2011-01-01

    Canadian Impressions pays tribute to Canada and Calgary, Alberta, home of the 52nd Annual Meeting of the Board of Governors of the Inter-American Development Bank. Twelve Canadian artists who were selected in an open call, present a total of 34 prints in various techniques from etching to monotype. Among the participating artists are: Briar Craig, Delio Delgado, René Derouin, Katie Fife, Joscelyn Gardner, Michel Gautier, Vanessa Hall-Patch, Miriam Rudolph, Tracy Lynn Templeton, Todd Treme, Os...

  12. Impressed by impression management: Newcomer reactions to ingratiated supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulk, Trevor A; Long, David M

    2016-10-01

    Organizational newcomers are unfamiliar with many aspects of their workplace and look for information to help them reduce uncertainty and better understand their new environment. One aspect critical to newcomers is the disposition of their supervisor-the person who arguably can impact the newcomer's career the most. To form an impression of their new supervisor, newcomers look to social cues from coworkers who have interpersonal contact with the supervisor. In the present research, we investigate the ways newcomers use observed ingratiation-a common impression management strategy whereby coworkers try to appear likable (Schlenker, 1980)-to form impressions of a supervisor's warmth. Research on social influence cannot easily account for how third parties will interpret ingratiation, as the behaviors linked to ingratiation suggest something positive about the target, yet the unsavory aspects of the behavior imply it may not have the same effects as other positive behaviors. Our findings suggest that newcomers are unique in that they are motivated to learn about their new supervisor, and are prone to ignore those unsavory aspects and infer something positive about a supervisor targeted with ingratiation. Our findings also suggest that this effect can be weakened based on the supervisor's response. In other words, newcomers rely less on evidence from a coworker's ingratiation in the presence of direct behaviors from the supervisor. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. SELECTIVE PRESSURE IMPRESSION TECHNIQUE: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Impression is basically an interaction between tissues and impression material. The variety of impression materials and the range of working characteristics of these materials, make possible the development of impression procedures best suited for specific conditions. Our method for making impressions should be based on the basic principles of maximum area coverage and intimate contact so as to achieve the objectives of retention, support, stability, esthetics, preservation of ridge (supporting structures. Various impression techniques have been mentioned in the literature for recording impression of edentulous ridges. These techniques have been classified by different authors as functional, mucostatic, mucocompressive, selective pressure, minimal pressure etc. However none of these techniques has been designated as the ‘time best’ for a particular patient though selective pressure technique has got much attention in the literature. This article is presenting a critical review on the selective pressure impression technique used for edentulous patients.

  14. Forming impressions from incongruent traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casselden, P A; Hampson, S E

    1990-08-01

    The factors that affect the ease with which impressions are formed from incongruent trait pairs are investigated. In Experiments 1 and 2, trait pairs that were both descriptively and evaluatively congruent, as well as ones that were only evaluatively congruent, were found to be more imaginable and to be perceived as more frequently co-occurring than incongruent trait pairs. In Experiment 3, response latency provided a converging measure of ease of imaginability. Experiment 4 examined written descriptions of targets described by these trait pairs, and found more attempts to integrate the congruent than the incongruent pairs. These findings are discussed in terms of the relation between laypersons' impressions of personality and formal personality assessment.

  15. Accuracy of Implant Position Transfer and Surface Detail Reproduction with Different Impression Materials and Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Alikhasi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of implant position transfer and surface detail reproduction using two impression techniques and materials.Materials and Methods: A metal model with two implants and three grooves of 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 mm in depth on the flat superior surface of a die was fabricated. Ten regular-body polyether (PE and 10 regular-body polyvinyl siloxane (PVS impressions with square and conical transfer copings using open tray and closed tray techniques were made for each group. Impressions were poured with type IV stone, and linear and angular displacements of the replica heads were evaluated using a coordinate measuring machine (CMM. Also, accurate reproduction of the grooves was evaluated by a video measuring machine (VMM. These measurements were compared with the measurements calculated on the reference model that served as control, and the data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and t-test at P= 0.05.Results: There was less linear displacement for PVS and less angular displacement for PE in closed-tray technique, and less linear displacement for PE in open tray technique (P<0.001. Also, the open tray technique showed less angular displacement with the use of PVS impression material. Detail reproduction accuracy was the same in all the groups (P>0.05(.Conclusion: The open tray technique was more accurate using PE, and also both closed tray and open tray techniques had acceptable results with the use of PVS. The choice of impression material and technique made no significant difference in surface detail reproduction.Keywords: Dental Implants; Dental Impression Materials, Dental Impression Technique

  16. A Model of Client Impression Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodden, Jack L.; Winer, Jane L.

    1978-01-01

    The model describes the clients' impression-formation process, describes changes in client impressions as therapy progresses, and suggests the relevance of client impressions for therapy outcome. An attempt at empirical validation by using a clinical population lent some support to certain aspects of the proposed model. (Author)

  17. A new device for impression transfer for non-parallel endosseus implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danza, Matteo; Zollino, Ilaria; Guidi, Riccardo; Carinci, Francesco

    2009-07-01

    The three-dimensional orientation of dental implant is transferred to a model by means of transfer device and impression material. If more than one implant is inserted and fixtures are not perfectly parallel, the impression may become distorted when removed from the mouth. In this case, a transfer that can be disengaged from the internal implant-abutment connection and removed together with the tray could be useful. An impression transfer device composed of a proper transfer, an inner hexagon and a central screw is described. When the central screw and the hexagon are removed, the proper transfer is free to move horizontally and the tray can be removed from the mouth without distortion of the impression material.

  18. Statistical Analysis for Subjective and Objective Evaluations of Dental Drill Sounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Yamada

    Full Text Available The sound produced by a dental air turbine handpiece (dental drill can markedly influence the sound environment in a dental clinic. Indeed, many patients report that the sound of a dental drill elicits an unpleasant feeling. Although several manufacturers have attempted to reduce the sound pressure levels produced by dental drills during idling based on ISO 14457, the sound emitted by such drills under active drilling conditions may negatively influence the dental clinic sound environment. The physical metrics related to the unpleasant impressions associated with dental drill sounds have not been determined. In the present study, psychological measurements of dental drill sounds were conducted with the aim of facilitating improvement of the sound environment at dental clinics. Specifically, we examined the impressions elicited by the sounds of 12 types of dental drills in idling and drilling conditions using a semantic differential. The analysis revealed that the impressions of dental drill sounds varied considerably between idling and drilling conditions and among the examined drills. This finding suggests that measuring the sound of a dental drill in idling conditions alone may be insufficient for evaluating the effects of the sound. We related the results of the psychological evaluations to those of measurements of the physical metrics of equivalent continuous A-weighted sound pressure levels (LAeq and sharpness. Factor analysis indicated that impressions of the dental drill sounds consisted of two factors: "metallic and unpleasant" and "powerful". LAeq had a strong relationship with "powerful impression", calculated sharpness was positively related to "metallic impression", and "unpleasant impression" was predicted by the combination of both LAeq and calculated sharpness. The present analyses indicate that, in addition to a reduction in sound pressure level, refining the frequency components of dental drill sounds is important for creating a

  19. Influence of retentive areas associated to onlay preparations on the dimensional stability of silicone impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsuda, Regis A; Lima, Adriano F; Yatsuda, Regiane; Cavalcanti, Andrea N; Capp, Cláudia I; Novelli, Moacyr D; de Cara, Antonio A

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of retentive areas on onlay preparations on the dimensional alterations in condensation and addition silicone materials. A standard model with an onlay preparation was made. Each impression material was used through the double or simultaneous impression technique (n=25), resulting in a hundred impressions of the same model. Impressions were poured with type IV dental stone. Digital images were taken with a light microscope and the distances between the reference points created on the plaster dies were compared with the ones on the standard model. In the occlusal, mesial-medium and mesial-cervical segments, the double impression (DI) with condensation silicone presented similar values compared to the standard model. The values of the addition silicone with DI were similar to the standard model only in the mesial-occlusal segment. In the other segments (distal-cervical, distal-medium and distal-occlusal), all groups were statistically different from the control. It could be concluded that addition and condensation silicone impressions provided plaster dies with significant dimensional alterations in most of the evaluated areas when compared to the standard model. The retentive areas related to the onlay preparation influenced the dimensional stability of the addition and condensation silicone impressions.

  20. Evaluation of properties of irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials mixed with disinfectant liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalan, Arul; Ginjupalli, Kishore; Upadhya, Nagaraja

    2013-01-01

    Addition of disinfectant to irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials can eliminate the disinfection step to avoid dimensional changes associated with it. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of various disinfectant mixing liquids on the properties of commercially available irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials. Four commercially available irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials (Zelgan, Vignette, Tropicalgin, and Algitex) were mixed with disinfectant liquid containing chlorhexidine (0.1 and 0.2%) and sodium hypochlorite (0.1 and 0.5%). After mixing with disinfectant liquids, materials were evaluated for pH changes during gelation, gelation time, flow, gel strength, permanent deformation and detail reproduction. Significant changes in gelation time were observed in irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials upon mixing with disinfectant liquids. In general, chlorhexidine increased the gelation time, whereas sodium hypochlorite reduced it. However, no significant changes in the flow were observed both with chlorhexidine and sodium hypochlorite. Gel strength was found to decrease when mixed with chlorhexidine, whereas an increase in gel strength was observed upon mixing with sodium hypochlorite. Permanent deformation of the most irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials was below the specification limit even after mixing with disinfectant liquids. Sodium hypochlorite significantly reduced the surface detail reproduction, whereas no change in detail reproduction was observed with chlorhexidine. Chlorhexidine solution can be used to mix irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials in regular dental practice as it did not significantly alter the properties. This may ensure effective disinfection of impressions.

  1. Dental Assistant Specialty, AFS 981X0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    from radiation Irrigate root canals Wear and maintain film badges Take dental impressions Mix acrylics Mix impression pastes Cut or remove sutures...patients Mix silver alloys Irrigate oral cavities Remove subgingival calculus, stains, or plaque from teeth Polish teeth Advise patients on home care...PROCEDURES 12J(3). ASSIST IN ENDODONTIC PROCEDURES 12K(2). PREPARE PERIODONTIC MATERIALS 12K(3). ASSIST IN PERIODONTIC PROCEDURES 12L(2). ASSIST IN

  2. Dimensional Stability of Polyether, Alginate, and Silicone Impression Materials After Disinfection With 2% Sanosil Through the Immersion Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izadi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background To prevent diseases transmission, infection control in dental offices without reducing the accuracy and dimensional stability of impression materials is very important. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Sanosil disinfectants on the dimensional stability of some usual impression materials. Materials and Methods Three types of impression material, namely, alginate, condensational silicone, and polyether, were used in this study. Impressions were obtained from the master steel model. Fifteen impressions of each material (control group were immersed in water for ten minutes and impressions of study groups were disinfected by immersion in 2% Sanosil for ten minutes. Then impressions were poured by type III gypsum according to the manufacture's instruction. Dimensions of casts in the two anterior dimensions, i.e. interval between the anterior abutments and interval between anterior-posterior abutments, were recorded by a digital caliper with the accuracy of 0.01 mm. Data were analyzed with SPSS through two-way ANOVA test. Results The results showed that there was no significant difference in the mean dimension of casts prepared by different impression materials in anterior and anterior-posterior dimensions in comparison to the original model after disinfection with Sanosil. Conclusions The study revealed that disinfection with 2% Sanosil has no significant effect on casts dimensions of alginate, silicone, and polyether impression and dimensional stability is maintained.

  3. In vitro study on the dimensional accuracy of selected materials for monophase elastic impression making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwowarczyk, Andree; Ottl, Peter; Büchler, Alfred; Lauer, Hans-Christoph; Hoffmann, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated the dimensional accuracy of various impression materials for monophase elastic impression making. To isolate this parameter, a direct measurement of the impressions was made without taking the model material into consideration. A total of eight materials were tested; six impression materials were addition-curing silicones, and two were polyether impression materials. All materials were processed according to the manufacturers' instructions. A specially developed precision mold made of stainless steel served as basis for measuring the elastomeric impression materials. Using a stereomicroscope at a temperature of 23.0 +/- 1.0 degrees C and with a precision linear adjustment and lathe, sights were set on the marking points of customized posts. The measurement was performed after the earliest time possible for fabricating the model according to the manufacturer (time 1) and after 90 minutes (time 2). In a one-way analysis of variance, multiple average comparisons of dimensional accuracy were made (P materials under investigation. Under the conditions of this study, the impression materials tested demonstrated a very high dimensional accuracy. The arithmetic means of the dimensional changes ranged from -11 to 19 microns for both measuring times. Since as a rule, no significant dimensional changes occurred for the different impression materials between time 1 and time 2, this time interval for fabricating a model can be recommended.

  4. Vinyl polysiloxane impression material in removable prosthodontics. Part 1: edentulous impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massad, Joseph J; Cagna, David R

    2007-08-01

    Recent advances in impression materials and stock edentulous impression trays have resulted in simplified approaches to impression making in removable prosthodontics. Once considered an absolute necessity, it is now possible to avoid the need for custom impression trays. In an effort to achieve reliable master casts in a single appointment, new and innovative procedures are now available. This article, the first in a 3-part series, will review historical information, basic concepts, materials considerations, and philosophic approaches to impression making in complete-denture therapy. A modem technique using readily available impression materials will be described and illustrated so readers can consider the benefits of incorporation into their daily management of edentulous patients.

  5. Comparison of dimensional accuracy of four different die materials before and after disinfection of the impression: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandini, Yamini; Vinitha, K B; Manvi, Supriya; Smitha, M

    2013-07-01

    This study was conducted to compare the linear dimensional accuracy of die materials before and after disinfection of the impression. Type IV and V conventional dental stone, type IV-resin impregnated and copper-plated die materials were studied. A stainless-steel master die analogs to a complete veneer crown preparation with three scribed lines (I: vertical, II and III: horizontal) was machined and measurements were made from these scribed reference lines. Impressions were made with monophase addition silicone impression material for each of the specimens. 2% glutaraldehyde was used as a disinfectant. The fabricated dies were measured to the nearest 0.0001 mm. ANOVA and post hoc was carried out using Scheffe multiple comparison test at significance level of 0.05. Type IV resin-impregnated dental stone and copperplated dies approximated the dimensions of the master die. Type IV and V conventional dental stone dies showed greater variation in measurements. Statistically significant differences were observed for type IV resin-impregnated and copper-plated dies in dimension I and III. For dimension II no significant differences were found for dies fabricated from four die materials. A one-way analysis of variance indicated no statistical significant differences among the two groups of dies fabricated from disinfectant treated impressions and those fabricated from nondisinfectant treated impressions. Type IV resin-impregnated dental stone and copper-plated dies are dimensionally more accurate than type IV and V conventional dental stone die materials. No significant linear distortion in the dies fabricated from the disinfected impressions was observed.

  6. Evaluation of the occlusal contact of crowns fabricated with the bite impression method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Sachi; Okada, Daizo; Shin, Chiharu; Ogura, Reiko; Ikeda, Masaomi; Miura, Hiroyuki

    2013-09-30

    In prosthodontic treatment, reconstruction of a proper occlusal contact relationship is very important as well as reconstruction of a proper interproximal relationship and marginal fitness. Unfortunately, occlusal relationships are sometimes lost in the process of occlusal adjustment of crowns. The purpose of this study was to compare the occlusal contacts of single crown fabricated by two different types of impression techniques. Nine subjects, whose molars required treatment with crown restoration, were enrolled in this study. Full cast crowns were fabricated using two types of impression techniques: the conventional impression method (CIM) and the bite impression method (BIM). The occlusal contacts of crowns were precisely evaluated at the following stages: after occlusal adjustment on the articulator (Step 0), before occlusal adjustment in the mouth (Step 1), after occlusal adjustment at the intercuspal position (Step 2), and after occlusal adjustment during lateral and protrusive excursions (Step 3). The number of occlusal contacts of the crowns on the functional cusps fabricated with BIM was significantly greater than that with CIM after occlusal adjustment. For this reason, the crowns fabricated with BIM might have a more functionally desirable occlusal surface compared to the crowns fabricated with CIM.

  7. Dental Emergencies

    OpenAIRE

    Domb, Ivor

    1982-01-01

    Emergency dental problems can result from trauma, dental pathology, or from dental treatment itself. While the physician can treat many instances of dental trauma, the patient should see a dentist as soon as possible so that teeth can be saved. Emergency treatment of dental pathology usually involves relief of pain and/or swelling. Bleeding is the most frequent post-treatment emergency. The physician should be able to make the patient comfortable until definitive dental treatment can be avail...

  8. Predicting and managing consumers' package size impressions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Ordabayeva (Nailya); P. Chandon (Pierre)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWith rising public concerns about waste and overconsumption, predicting and effectively managing consumers' package size impressions have become critical for both marketers and public health advocates. The AddChange heuristic model of size impression assumes that people add (rather than

  9. A Classroom Exercise in Impression Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrenberg, Joy L.

    1987-01-01

    A classroom exercise for teaching students how to examine aspects of their own impression-formation processes is described. The data generated can be used to stimulate discussion about the origins of implicit personality theories, person prototypes, and the accuracy of first impressions. (Author/DH)

  10. Dental Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures.

  11. The neural dynamics of updating person impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Cai, Yang; Todorov, Alexander

    2013-08-01

    Person perception is a dynamic, evolving process. Because other people are an endless source of social information, people need to update their impressions of others based upon new information. We devised an fMRI study to identify brain regions involved in updating impressions. Participants saw faces paired with valenced behavioral information and were asked to form impressions of these individuals. Each face was seen five times in a row, each time with a different behavioral description. Critically, for half of the faces the behaviors were evaluatively consistent, while for the other half they were inconsistent. In line with prior work, dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) was associated with forming impressions of individuals based on behavioral information. More importantly, a whole-brain analysis revealed a network of other regions associated with updating impressions of individuals who exhibited evaluatively inconsistent behaviors, including rostrolateral PFC, superior temporal sulcus, right inferior parietal lobule and posterior cingulate cortex.

  12. Immersion disinfection of irreversible hydrocolloid impressions with sodium hypochlorite. Part I: Microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyerle, M P; Hensley, D M; Bradley, D V; Schwartz, R S; Hilton, T J

    1994-01-01

    Current American Dental Association infection control guidelines recommend immersion disinfection of irreversible hydrocolloid impressions, and this study further defines the parameters for use of sodium hypochlorite. Sodium hypochlorite has been shown to be an effective disinfectant for impressions; however, it has not been fully evaluated for optimum immersion time and concentration. In this study, irreversible hydrocolloid impressions contaminated with different bacteria were immersed in varying concentrations of sodium hypochlorite for 1, 5, or 10 minutes. Dilute solutions of sodium hypochlorite (0.525% or 0.0525%) produced a 4-log10 (99.99%) reduction in colony-forming units of Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella choleraesuis, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa after 1 to 5 minutes' immersion. Full-strength sodium hypochlorite (5.25%) required 5 minutes to produce a 4-log10 reduction of Bacillus subtilis. A 4-log10 reduction of Mycobacterium bovis was not obtained under any conditions examined.

  13. Dimensional accuracy of 2-stage putty-wash impressions: influence of impression trays and viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkenhol, Markus; Ferger, Paul; Wöstmann, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of the impression tray and viscosity of the wash material on the dimensional accuracy of impressions taken using a 2-stage putty-wash technique. Identically shaped metal stock trays (MeTs) and disposable plastic stock trays (DiTs) were used for taking impressions (n = 10) of a mandibular cast (4 abutments) with 2 different impression materials. Dies were poured and the relative diameter deviation was calculated after measurement. Zero viscosity of the materials was determined. Dimensional accuracy was significantly affected when DiTs were used. Lower-viscosity wash materials led to more precise impressions.

  14. Gender Differences in Impression Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdana Humă

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to highlight the differences between men and women regarding impressionformation. It is based on secondary analysis of the data gathered in two previous experiments withsimilar conditions. However, the hypotheses formulated within this study have not been testedbefore. The current analysis was conducted on 86 participants, 47 males and 39 females. Their agesranged between 15 and 32, as they were either high school or university students engaged in amaster’s program. Their task consisted of watching a 14 seconds long video of a female confederatereading a neutral text and then evaluating her using a semantic differential with four dimensions:sociability, ethics, power and activity. Based on previous studies, it was hypothesized that men andwomen will form different first impressions of the actor employed in the movie. More precisely, themajority of the studies undertaken in this area compare men and women’s accuracy scores of facialexpressions decoding, yielding mostly significant differences, with women achieving higheraccuracy. A small percentage has addressed other aspects of social perception like: personality traitsor socio-demographic characteristics, yielding similar results. However, the current experimentfailed to reveal any differences between men’s and women’s evaluations. Accuracy assessmentswere disregarded in this study, since establishing unequivocal criteria for personality traitsevaluation is yet to be achieved. The results are consistent with a small percentage of the studiesconducted on gender differences in social perception and allow multiple interpretations.

  15. Combined Characterization of the Time Response of Impression Materials via Traditional and FTIR Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Giacomo Derchi; Enrico Manca; Amirreza Shayganpour; Antonio Barone; Alberto Diaspro; Marco Salerno

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the temporal response of four dental impression materials, namely three siloxanes (Imprint 4, Flexitime, Aquasil) and one polyether (Impregum). The null hypothesis was that the nominal working times are confirmed by instrumental laboratory tests. We also aimed to identify alternative techniques with strong physical-chemical background for the assessment of temporal response. Traditional characterization was carried out by shark fin test device and durometer at both ambient a...

  16. The effect of rinsing time periods on wettability of elastomeric impression materials: in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Acar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether different rinsing time periods affected the wettability of polymerized elastomeric impression materials. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Panasil Contact Plus (PCP, Panasil Contact Non-Surfactant (PCNS, Panasil Initial Contact (PIC, Express (EXP and Impregum (IMP impression materials were tested. Standardized samples were rinsed with water for 10 s, 15 s or 20 s, and the wettability was determined by contact angle measurement through an evaluation period of 60 seconds (n=7. Non-rinsed groups were used as control. Measurements were made at 5 time points (at 0, 6, 15, 30 and 60 seconds. Kruskal Wallis test and Conover’s multiple comparison tests were used for all multiple comparisons. Bonferroni adjustment was applied for controlling Type I error (p0.002. CONCLUSION: Rinsing the surfactant-containing polyvinylsiloxane impression materials decreased their wettability, whereas no such effect was seen for the surfactant free polyvinylsiloxane and polyether impression materials.

  17. ADJUSTMENT FACTORS AND ADJUSTMENT STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Benzao

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, adjustment factors J and R put forward by professor Zhou Jiangwen are introduced and the nature of the adjustment factors and their role in evaluating adjustment structure is discussed and proved.

  18. Convexity Adjustments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    M. Gaspar, Raquel; Murgoci, Agatha

    2010-01-01

    of particular importance to practitioners: yield convexity adjustments, forward versus futures convexity adjustments, timing and quanto convexity adjustments. We claim that the appropriate way to look into any of these adjustments is as a side effect of a measure change, as proposed by Pelsser (2003...

  19. The effect of a range of disinfectants on the dimensional accuracy and stability of some impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagger, D C; Vowles, R W; McNally, L; Davis, F; O'Sullivan, D J

    2007-03-01

    Disinfection of dental impressions should be considered as a routine procedure in dental surgeries and dental laboratories. Disinfectants can have deleterious effects on some properties of impression materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dimensional accuracy and dimensional stability of a model dental stone, reproduced from five commonly used impression materials (Aquasil soft putty/Aquasil Ultra LV; Aquasil Monophase; Aquasil Ultra Heavy; Impregum F and Provil putty/Provil Light CD wash) retained by their adhesives in acrylic resin trays and exposed to three disinfectant solutions (Perform ID; Haz-Tabs and MD 520). Two hundred models were used to investigate the effect of the three disinfectants on the dimensional accuracy of the five impression materials. Five impressions were taken for each impression material for each disinfection treatment group. Measurements were carried out using a High Precision Reflex Microscope. All materials demonstrated a percentage change in dimensions when subjected to no disinfection when compared to the brass master die and all materials demonstrated a percentage change in dimension when subjected to the different disinfection procedures. The results of this study have demonstrated that for all of the materials investigated, the changes in dimensional stability were small in the order of microns. These changes may however be of clinical significance for procedures requiring a high degree of accuracy, for example fixed prosthodontics. The materials respond differently depending on the disinfectant used and it may therefore be appropriate that manufacturers recommend the use of particular disinfectants for their products in order to ensure optimum dimensional accuracy and stability.

  20. A pilot survey of impression materials and techniques used by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A pilot survey of impression materials and techniques used by dentists in the fabrication ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING ... Objective: To assess the choice of impression material and impression ...

  1. Modification of pH Conferring Virucidal Activity on Dental Alginates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navina Nallamuthu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To formulate an alginate dental impression material with virucidal properties, experimental alginate dental impression materials were developed and the formulations adjusted in order to study the effect on pH profiles during setting. Commercially available materials served as a comparison. Eight experimental materials were tested for antiviral activity against Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1. Changing the amount of magnesium oxide (MgO used in the experimental formulations had a marked effect on pH. Increasing MgO concentration corresponded with increased pH values. All experimental materials brought about viral log reductions ranging between 0.5 and 4.0 over a period of 4 h. The material with the lowest pH was the most effective. The current work highlights the very important role of MgO in controlling pH profiles. This knowledge has been applied to the formulation of experimental alginates; where materials with pH values of approximately 4.2–4.4 are able to achieve a significant log reduction when assayed against HSV-1.

  2. A Framework on Impression Management in Negotiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Ditte Dahl; Esbjerg, Lars

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we develop a dramaturgical framework to provide us with a new understanding of how negotiators use impression management behaviour during the negotiation process to position themselves in an endeavour to reach a desirable outcome.......In this paper we develop a dramaturgical framework to provide us with a new understanding of how negotiators use impression management behaviour during the negotiation process to position themselves in an endeavour to reach a desirable outcome....

  3. Preliminary impression techniques for microstomia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K Aswini; Bhat, Vinaya; Nair, K Chandrasekheran; Suresh, Reshma

    2016-01-01

    The Prosthetic rehabilitation of microstomia patients presents difficulties at all the stages. The difficulty starts with the preliminary impression making. This is due to the tongue rigidity and the decreased oral opening. A maximum oral opening which is smaller than the size of the tray can make prosthetic treatment challenging. Due to the restricted mouth opening, insertion and removal of the impression trays is extremely cumbersome and various modifications of the trays have been used in the past. Among these are the flexible trays and the sectional trays used with different modes of reassembling the segments extra orally after the impression is made. This article reviews the literature published from 1971 to 2015 concerning preliminary impression techniques used in making impressions for patients with microstomia based on various tray designs. An electronic search was performed across three databases (PubMed, Science Direct and Google Scolar) for relevant citations. The keywords/combinations used for the search were microstomia, limited/constricted/restricted mouth opening/oral access, trismus, sectional trays, impressions and prosthetic/prosthodontic rehabilitation. The search was limited to papers written in English which resulted in a total of 45 related articles of which 17 articles were included for discussion of this review.

  4. Preliminary impression techniques for microstomia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Aswini Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Prosthetic rehabilitation of microstomia patients presents difficulties at all the stages. The difficulty starts with the preliminary impression making. This is due to the tongue rigidity and the decreased oral opening. A maximum oral opening which is smaller than the size of the tray can make prosthetic treatment challenging. Due to the restricted mouth opening, insertion and removal of the impression trays is extremely cumbersome and various modifications of the trays have been used in the past. Among these are the flexible trays and the sectional trays used with different modes of reassembling the segments extra orally after the impression is made. This article reviews the literature published from 1971 to 2015 concerning preliminary impression techniques used in making impressions for patients with microstomia based on various tray designs. An electronic search was performed across three databases (PubMed, Science Direct and Google Scolar for relevant citations. The keywords/combinations used for the search were microstomia, limited/constricted/restricted mouth opening/oral access, trismus, sectional trays, impressions and prosthetic/prosthodontic rehabilitation. The search was limited to papers written in English which resulted in a total of 45 related articles of which 17 articles were included for discussion of this review.

  5. Effects of implant angulation, material selection, and impression technique on impression accuracy: a preliminary laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkunas, Vygandas; Sveikata, Kestutis; Savickas, Raimondas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary laboratory study was to evaluate the effects of 5- and 25-degree implant angulations in simulated clinical casts on an impression's accuracy when using different impression materials and tray selections. A convenience sample of each implant angulation group was selected for both open and closed trays in combination with one polyether and two polyvinyl siloxane impression materials. The influence of material and technique appeared to be significant for both 5- and 25-degree angulations (P impression accuracy. The open-tray technique was more accurate with highly nonaxially oriented implants for the small sample size investigated.

  6. Evaluation in Accuracy to Two Impression Techniques: In Case of Bone Anchored Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sularsih Sularsih

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the accuracy of two procedures: open tray with splinting technique and closed tray impression techniques, in innovative in vitro experiments. Materials and Methods: One master cast was fabricated with 4 abutment replica implants with almost parallel position in an anterior region of an edentuloys mandibular plaster cast. The working cast was taken impessions with open tray splinting technique (group 1 and closed tray technique (group 2 using polyvinyl siloxane impression material. The Type III dental stone ws poured into around the impressions. The accuracy of impression procedured were measured 24 hours long after pouring dental stone to each impression. Four sited were marked to measured on every platform of implant analogs. The analyzing stylus was positioned to each site and the heights, horizontal inclination and saggital incliniation were measured using the Laser displacement transducer (LK G115; Keyence, Osaka, Japan. Measurements of these 16 points of four implants per a model was repeated 7 times under the same condition. The gap between the abutment and superstructure at one screw test was evaluated with a digital microscope system (VH-Z100 & VH-5000; Keyence, Osaka, Japan. The mean and standard deviation estimated from the samples of each subgroup were statistically analyzed by ANOVA test (P<0.05 as the level of significance. Results: The relative differences of implant heights, horizontal inclination and saggital inclination of each implant on closed tray technique was statistically different to master cast and open tray with splinting (P<0.005. Conclusion: The open tray technique was more accurate comparing to the closed tray technique. The gap between the abutment and superstructure in the open tray with splinting technique was smaller comparing to closed tray technique.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v17i1.111

  7. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... should I have my fillings removed? What is dental amalgam? Dental amalgam is a dental filling material ...

  8. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  9. Dental Sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dates Electronic Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write a Grant) Questions and Answers Grant Writing Tips ... offers strategies for providing oral care. NIDCR > Data & Statistics > Find Data by Topic > Dental Sealants Dental Sealants ...

  10. Dental Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z INDEX | OOH SITE MAP | EN ESPAÑOL Healthcare > Dental Assistants PRINTER-FRIENDLY EN ESPAÑOL Summary What They ... of workers and occupations. What They Do -> What Dental Assistants Do About this section Assistants prepare and ...

  11. Dental sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  12. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001055.htm Dental cavities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dental cavities are holes (or structural damage) in the ...

  13. How To Achieve Better Impressions in Computer-Mediated Communication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuliang; Ginther, Dean

    This paper presents a review of the literature on impression formation in face-to-face (FtF) and computer-mediated communication (CMC) and provides impression management recommendations for CMC users in a variety of environments. The first section provides an introduction to impression formation. Factors affecting impression formation in FtF and…

  14. Accuracy of implant transfer and surface detail reproduction with polyether and polyvinyl siloxane using closed-tray impression technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Alikhasi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Making accurate impressions of prepared teeth when they are adjacent to dental implants is of great importance. In these situations, disregarding the selection of appropriate impression material and technique, not only can affect accuracy of transferring of the 3-dimentional spatial status of implant, but also can jeopardize the accurate recording of tooth. In the present study, the accuracy of two impression materials with taper impression copings for recording implant position and surface details was evaluated.   Materials and Methods: One metal reference model with 2 implants (Implantium and a preparation of three grooves on a tooth according to ADA no. 19 standard was fabricated. 10 medium- consistency polyEther (PE impressions using custom trays and 10 polyVinyl Siloxane (PVS putty wash impressions using prefabricated trays with conical impression coping were made. Impressions were poured with ADA type IV stone. A Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM evaluated x, y and angular displacement of the implant analog heads and also accuracy of groove reproduction were measured using a Video Measuring Machine (VMM. These measurements were compared to the ones from reference model. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and T-test.   Results: Putty wash PVS had less linear discrepancy compared with reference model (P > 0.001. There was no significant difference in the surface detail reproduction (P = 0.15.   Conclusion: Putty wash PVS had better results for linear displacement compared with medium consistency PE. There was no significant difference in surface detail reproduction between the two impression materials.

  15. A comparative evaluation of the dimensional stability of three different elastomeric impression materials after autoclaving - an invitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thota, Kiran Kumar; Jasthi, Sujana; Ravuri, Rajyalakshmi; Tella, Suchita

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of autoclaving on the dimensional stability of three different elastomeric impression materials at three different time intervals. Standardized stainless steel master die as per ADA specification number 19 was fabricated. The impression materials used for the study were condensation silicone (GP1), addition silicone (GP2) and polyether (GP3). A total of 45 samples of the stainless steel die were made (n = 45), that is 15 samples for each group. Impression materials were mixed according to the manufacturer's instructions and were loaded into the mold to make an impression of the die. Impressions were identified with the help of numerical coding system and measurements were made using stereomicroscope (MAGNUS MSZ-Bi) of 0.65x magnification with the help of image analysis software (IMACE PRO-INSIGHT VERSION.The results were subjected to statistical analysis using one way analysis of variance and student t-test for comparison between the groups. Within the limitations of the study statistically significant dimensional changes were observed for all the three impression materials at three different time intervals but this change was not clinically significant. It is well-known fact that all impressions should be disinfected to avoid possible transmission of infectious diseases either by direct contact or cross contamination. Immersion and spray disinfection as well as various disinfection solutions have been tested and proven to be effective for this purpose. But for elastomeric impression materials these methods have proven to be ineffective as they do not prevent cross contamination among the dental team. So autoclaving was one of the most effective sterilization procedure for condensation silicone and addition silicone. Since polyether is hydrophilic it is better to disinfect the impressions as recommended by the manufacturer or by immersion or spray atomization.

  16. DENTAL MATERIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study deals with the determination of characteristic physical and mechanical properties of restorative dental materials, and effect of...manipulative variables on these properties. From the study an entirely new dental gold inlay casting technic was developed, based on the principle of...controlled water added hygroscopic technic. The method has had successful dental applications and is a recognized method of dental inlay casting procedure

  17. Impression formation: the role of expressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggio, R E; Friedman, H S

    1986-02-01

    This research examined the effects of personality/social skills and individual differences in expressive style on impression formation. Particular attention was given to the role of nonverbal behaviors in the formation of initial impressions. Sixty-two subjects were measured on self-report personality and communication skill scales, on posed emotional sending ability, and on physical attractiveness. Subjects were then videotaped while giving a spontaneous "explanation." Trained coders measured five separate nonverbal cue factors displayed by the subjects in the videotapes. Groups of untrained judges viewed the tapes and rated their impressions of the subjects on scales of likability, speaking effectiveness, and expressivity-confidence. Male subjects who were nonverbally skilled and extraverted tended to display more outwardly focused and fluid expressive behaviors, and made more favorable impressions on judges, than did males who scored low on the measures of nonverbal skills and extraversion. Females who were nonverbally skilled displayed more facial expressiveness, which led to more favorable initial impressions. Sex differences may reflect basic differences in the acquisition and use of expressive nonverbal cues by males and females.

  18. Assessing the clarity of friction ridge impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicklin, R Austin; Buscaglia, JoAnn; Roberts, Maria Antonia

    2013-03-10

    The ability of friction ridge examiners to correctly discern and make use of the ridges and associated features in finger or palm impressions is limited by clarity. The clarity of an impression relates to the examiner's confidence that the presence, absence, and attributes of features can be correctly discerned. Despite the importance of clarity in the examination process, there have not previously been standard methods for assessing clarity in friction ridge impressions. We introduce a process for annotation, analysis, and interchange of friction ridge clarity information that can be applied to latent or exemplar impressions. This paper: (1) describes a method for evaluating the clarity of friction ridge impressions by using color-coded annotations that can be used by examiners or automated systems; (2) discusses algorithms for overall clarity metrics based on manual or automated clarity annotation; and (3) defines a method of quantifying the correspondence of clarity when comparing a pair of friction ridge images, based on clarity annotation and resulting metrics. Different uses of this approach include examiner interchange of data, quality assurance, metrics, and as an aid in automated fingerprint matching.

  19. Similarity to the Self Affects Memory for Impressions of Others

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshikar, Eric D.; Gutchess, Angela H.

    2017-01-01

    The present studies investigated whether similarity to the self influenced memory for impressions of others. We predicted that similarity to the self would facilitate impression memory for others, paralleling the self-reference effect found when information is processed relative to the self. We were interested in how the initial valence of the impression, whether positive or negative, affected impression memory. Across two experiments, participants formed impressions while viewing faces paired with traits and behaviors. After recognition, participants rated the self-descriptiveness of the studied traits allowing impression memory to be sorted into high-, medium-, and low-self-similarity. For positive impressions, similar others were remembered better than dissimilar others. For negative impressions, similar others were remembered more poorly than dissimilar others. These results illustrate that similarity to the self has multifaceted effects on person memory, leading to memory enhancement in the case of people given positive impressions, but reducing memory for people associated with negative impressions. PMID:28936392

  20. Description of dental arch form using the Fourier series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, A Patricia; Pardo, Marco A; Yezioro, Salomon

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the form of the human superior dental arch using Fourier transformations. Forty models made in dental stone from impressions of the maxillary dental arch were used to obtain the reference data, which were expressed in Cartesian coordinates, from the mesovestibular cuspid vertices of molar teeth, vestibular cuspid of premolars, and incisal edge. Fourth-grade equations and Fourier series were calculated from these data. The results indicate that Fourier series more precisely express the form and size of different dental arches, with mixed or permanent dentition, than fourth-grade equations. Details of the mathematical procedure and the precision obtained were provided.

  1. Conjunctival impression cytology in computer users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S; Bansal, R; Khare, A; Malik, K P S; Malik, V K; Jain, K; Jain, C

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the computer users develop the features of dry eye. To study the cytological changes in the conjunctiva using conjunctival impression cytology in computer users and a control group. Fifteen eyes of computer users who had used computers for more than one year and ten eyes of an age-and-sex matched control group (those who had not used computers) were studied by conjunctival impression cytology. Conjunctival impression cytology (CIC) results in the control group were of stage 0 and stage I while the computer user group showed CIC results between stages II to stage IV. Among the computer users, the majority ( > 90 %) showed stage III and stage IV changes. We found that those who used computers daily for long hours developed more CIC changes than those who worked at the computer for a shorter daily duration. © NEPjOPH.

  2. Revisiting impressions using dual-arch trays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Bruce W

    2012-01-01

    Making routine perfect impressions is the goal of any restorative dentist. Using dual-arch trays is an easy, repeatable way to accomplish that goal, as long as each step is done before the next and each step is performed perfectly. This column reviewed several articles that support the metal dual-arch concept and provided some clinical tips that might help restorative dentists. The dual-arch technique does have its limits and is meant for one or two teeth in a quadrant when there are other teeth to occlude with. Also, if the case involves anterior guidance, a full-arch impression maybe advisable.

  3. Evaluation of local muscle soreness treatment with anterior bite splint made of soft putty impression material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Laksono

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Local muscle soreness is the most common temporomandibular disorders complaint of patients seeking treatment in the dental clinics. The emergency treatment that can be done in the clinics to manage this disorder is by making anterior bite splint. Anterior bite splint is usually made of acrylic, but currently there is a soft putty impression material that can also be used for making anterior bite splint. The effectiveness of soft putty anterior bite splint in local muscle soreness treatment still has not clear. Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of the soft putty impression material as a material used for making anterior bite splint in the treatment of local muscle soreness. Case: Six patients was reported five female patients aged 20-40 years old and one male patient aged 37 years old with local muscle soreness. Four female patients with a “click” sound on TMJ. Case management: Make differential diagnosis with screening history (anamnesis, clinical examination consists of extra oral examination such as muscle and temporomandibular joint palpation, measure the mandibular movement, end-feel, load test, intra oral examination and radiographic evaluation. Record the results and make the diagnosis. Make a soft putty anterior bite splint, adjusted and inserted in the maxillary anterior teeth. Record the results based on signs and symptoms. Conclusion: It can be concluded that anterior bite splint made of soft putty impression material is effective for treatment the local muscle soreness.Latar belakang: Salah satu tipe temporomandibular disorders yang paling sering dijumpai di klinik dokter gigi adalah local muscle soreness. Perawatan yang dapat dengan segera dilakukan di klinik untuk mengelola gangguan tersebut adalah dengan pembuatan anterior bite splint. Biasanya anterior bite splint terbuat dari akrilik, namun saat ini telah ada bahan cetak soft putty yang memungkinkan untuk dipakai sebagai bahan pembuatan anterior bite splint

  4. Dimensional Accuracy of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic VPS Impression Materials Using Different Impression Techniques - An Invitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basapogu, Sreeramulu; Pilla, Ajai; Pathipaka, Suman

    2016-02-01

    The dimensional stability of the impression material could have an influence on the accuracy of the final restoration. Vinyl Polysiloxane Impression materials (VPS) are most frequently used as the impression material in fixed prosthodontics. As VPS is hydrophobic when it is poured with gypsum products, manufacturers added intrinsic surfactants and marketed as hydrophilic VPS. These hydrophilic VPS have shown increased wettability with gypsum slurries. VPS are available in different viscosities ranging from very low to very high for usage under different impression techniques. To compare the dimensional accuracy of hydrophilic VPS and hydrophobic VPS using monophase, one step and two step putty wash impression techniques. To test the dimensional accuracy of the impression materials a stainless steel die was fabricated as prescribed by ADA specification no. 19 for elastomeric impression materials. A total of 60 impressions were made. The materials were divided into two groups, Group1 hydrophilic VPS (Aquasil) and Group 2 hydrophobic VPS (Variotime). These were further divided into three subgroups A, B, C for monophase, one-step and two-step putty wash technique with 10 samples in each subgroup. The dimensional accuracy of the impressions was evaluated after 24 hours using vertical profile projector with lens magnification range of 20X-125X illumination. The study was analyzed through one-way ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey HSD test and unpaired t-test for mean comparison between groups. Results showed that the three different impression techniques (monophase, 1-step, 2-step putty wash techniques) did cause significant change in dimensional accuracy between hydrophilic VPS and hydrophobic VPS impression materials. One-way ANOVA disclosed, mean dimensional change and SD for hydrophilic VPS varied between 0.56% and 0.16%, which were low, suggesting hydrophilic VPS was satisfactory with all three impression techniques. However, mean dimensional change and SD for hydrophobic VPS

  5. Repeatability and reproducibility of individual abutment impression, assessed with a blue light scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Yeon; Lee, Jae-Jun; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We assessed the repeatability and reproducibility of abutment teeth dental impressions, digitized with a blue light scanner, by comparing the discrepancies in repeatability and reproducibility values for different types of abutment teeth. MATERIALS AND METHODS To evaluate repeatability, impressions of the canine, first premolar, and first molar, prepared for ceramic crowns, were repeatedly scanned to acquire 5 sets of 3-dimensional data via stereolithography (STL) files. Point clouds were compared and the error sizes were measured (n=10, per type). To evaluate reproducibility, the impressions were rotated by 10-20° on the table and scanned. These data were compared to the first STL data and the error sizes were measured (n=5, per type). One-way analysis of variance was used to assess the repeatability and reproducibility of the 3 types of teeth, and Tukey honest significant differences (HSD) multiple comparison test was used for post hoc comparisons (α=.05). RESULTS The differences with regard to repeatability were 4.5, 2.7, and 3.1 µm for the canine, premolar, and molar, indicating the poorest repeatability for the canine (P<.001). For reproducibility, the differences were 6.6, 5.8, and 11.0 µm indicating the poorest reproducibility for the molar (P=.007). CONCLUSION Our results indicated that impressions of individual abutment teeth, digitized with a blue light scanner, had good repeatability and reproducibility. PMID:27350856

  6. Group impressions as dynamic configurations: the tensor product model of group impression formation and change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashima, Y; Woolcock, J; Kashima, E S

    2000-10-01

    Group impressions are dynamic configurations. The tensor product model (TPM), a connectionist model of memory and learning, is used to describe the process of group impression formation and change, emphasizing the structured and contextualized nature of group impressions and the dynamic evolution of group impressions over time. TPM is first shown to be consistent with algebraic models of social judgment (the weighted averaging model; N. Anderson, 1981) and exemplar-based social category learning (the context model; E. R. Smith & M. A. Zárate, 1992), providing a theoretical reduction of the algebraic models to the present connectionist framework. TPM is then shown to describe a common process that underlies both formation and change of group impressions despite the often-made assumption that they constitute different psychological processes. In particular, various time-dependent properties of both group impression formation (e.g., time variability, response dependency, and order effects in impression judgments) and change (e.g., stereotype change and group accentuation) are explained, demonstrating a hidden unity beneath the diverse array of empirical findings. Implications of the model for conceptualizing stereotype formation and change are discussed.

  7. Impression Generation of Indonesian Cultural Paintings for Mobile Application with Culture Dependent Color-Impression Metric Creation Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devira Nanda Kuswhara

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Painting is one of complex image reflecting observations and feelings of the artist to the environment. This condition extends the need of painting impression generation system since common people with lack of art experience would have difficulties to interpret the painting. From this point of view we presents a new model to provide representative impressions of paintings by providing a color-impression metric taken from public survey and implement it for mobile application. The new model provides analytical functions to generate the representative impression of the image query. The functions consist of two main section: (1 The cultural-dependent color-impression metric creation which consist of conducting survey, applying normalized 3D color vector quantization to image dataset, generating image-impression metric, and generating color- impression metric; and (2 Impression generation of image query which consist of applying normalized 3D color vector quantization to image query and measuring the similarity between image query andcolor-impression metric. To perform our proposed impression generation system, we examine our system with Indonesian cultural image dataset and 5 different mobile devices. Our proposed system performs main color impression precision result with average precision of more than 60%. Brightness intensity and zooming affects the retrieved impressions. Rotating captures of an image generate the same retrieved impressions. The system also performs average response time vary in range 41263 to 117434 milliseconds from all devices. Keywords: impression generation system, color based impression, cultural computing, mobile application.

  8. Effects of implant system, impression technique, and impression material on accuracy of the working cast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Kerstin; Weskott, Katharina; Zenginel, Martha; Rehmann, Peter; Wöstmann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to identify the effects of the implant system, impression technique, and impression material on the transfer accuracy of implant impressions. The null hypothesis tested was that, in vitro and within the parameters of the experiment, the spatial relationship of a working cast to the placement of implants is not related to (1) the implant system, (2) the impression technique, or (3) the impression material. A steel maxilla was used as a reference model. Six implants of two different implant systems (Standard Plus, Straumann; Semados, Bego) were fixed in the reference model. The target variables were: three-dimensional (3D) shift in all directions, implant axis direction, and rotation. The target variables were assessed using a 3D coordinate measuring machine, and the respective deviations of the plaster models from the nominal values of the reference model were calculated. Two different impression techniques (reposition/pickup) and four impression materials (Aquasil Ultra, Flexitime, Impregum Penta, P2 Magnum 360) were investigated. In all, 80 implant impressions for each implant system were taken. Statistical analysis was performed using multivariate analysis of variance. The implant system significantly influenced the transfer accuracy for most spatial dimensions, including the overall 3D shift and implant axis direction. There was no significant difference between the two implant systems with regard to rotation. Multivariate analysis of variance showed a significant effect on transfer accuracy only for the implant system. Within the limits of the present study, it can be concluded that the transfer accuracy of the intraoral implant position on the working cast is far more dependent on the implant system than on the selection of a specific impression technique or material.

  9. Lasting Impressions: Hannah Arendt's Educational Legacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Rita A.

    2016-01-01

    Hannah Arendt's work is gaining increasing recognition in educational administration. But less has been written about her as an educator, colleague, and provocateur. Here, I explore the lasting impressions that Arendt had on former students, colleagues, and friends. This exploration is conducted through the lens of Arendtian narrative inquiry. For…

  10. Patterns of Vocalization and Impression Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Donald P.; Bouma, Gary D.

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses the interactive behavior that accompanies verbal exchange. It specifically describes a set of experiments designed to isolate an important subset of interactive behavior, the vocal (as opposed to the verbal) and to relate this information to a wide range of social impressions resulting from verbal exchange. (Available from…

  11. Impression creep technique-An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sastry, D.H. [Department of Metallurgy, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India)]. E-mail: dhsastry@hotmail.com

    2005-11-15

    Impression creep technique is a modified indentation creep test wherein the conical or ball indenter is replaced by a cylindrical, flat bottomed punch. The usefulness of this technique, pioneered by Prof. Li, is illustrated by application to a variety of problems in this laboratory. High temperature creep behavior of a number of metals and alloys, particularly estimation of the thermal activation parameters aiding the identification of the rate controlling mechanisms of creep, has been investigated. The technique has also been exploited to assess the 'single crystal' creep behavior vis a vis that of a polycrystalline sample. Utilizing the impression creep test, the creep behavior of individual zones in steel weldments has been examined. The simplicity and the utility of the impression creep test have been further demonstrated by its application to the study of superplastic behavior in alloys. This paper presents a cross section of the results obtained in the above investigations. It is concluded that the impression creep test technique is capable of yielding much of the information that can be obtained from tensile creep testing. Furthermore, it can provide data which are either impossible or extremely difficult to obtain with conventional creep testing.

  12. Interpersonal Teaching Style and Student Impression Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldren, Jeffrey; Hively, Jodi

    2009-01-01

    Assuming that learning is an inherently social process, this research explores interpersonal variables that affect teaching. Specifically, does the interpersonal teaching style affect student impressions of the instructor? Eighty-five undergraduates viewed one of three ten-minute videos that portrayed either an authoritarian, authoritative, or…

  13. Patterns of Vocalization and Impression Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Donald P.; Bouma, Gary D.

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses the interactive behavior that accompanies verbal exchange. It specifically describes a set of experiments designed to isolate an important subset of interactive behavior, the vocal (as opposed to the verbal) and to relate this information to a wide range of social impressions resulting from verbal exchange. (Available from…

  14. Negativity and descriptive extremity in impression formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pligt, J.; Eiser, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    With a 2-trait impression task in which all traits denoted risk-related behavior and both evaluative and descriptive ratings were included as dependent variables, it was hypothesized that (1) negative traits receive a higher weight than positive traits in the formation of an overall judgment, (2) ne

  15. Interpersonal Teaching Style and Student Impression Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldren, Jeffrey; Hively, Jodi

    2009-01-01

    Assuming that learning is an inherently social process, this research explores interpersonal variables that affect teaching. Specifically, does the interpersonal teaching style affect student impressions of the instructor? Eighty-five undergraduates viewed one of three ten-minute videos that portrayed either an authoritarian, authoritative, or…

  16. Evaluation of linear dimensional stability of various combinations of dental stone and plaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegbulugbe, I C; Oderinu, O H; Shaba, O P; Oremosu, O A

    2011-01-01

    It has been observed that due to the cheaper cost of dental plaster compared to dental stone, casts on which most of the dental prostheses and appliances were being fabricated in various laboratories were often mixtures of dental stone and dental plaster in order to reduce production cost. To evaluate the dimensional stability of various combinations of Dental Stone and Dental Plaster mixtures used to make dental casts. Alginate impressions of a master model of truncated metal cones were made and casts were produced by pouring with various combinations of dental stone and dental plaster mixtures. The linear dimensional differences between the inter-abutment distances on the casts were measured with an electronic caliper. One sample t-test and percentage differences were calculated. Dimensional variations for the distances measured using either 50% dental stone or 25% dental stone with plaster were statistically significant (p d" 0.05). Mixture of 75% dental stone and 25% dental plaster produced casts with no statistically significant dimensional variation from the master model (p e" 0.05). A mixture of 75% dental stone and 25% dental plaster could be used for procedures not requiring very accurate replica like mounting of teeth for dental training and for study models.

  17. The Comparison Flow of Four Impression Compounds (Green Stick with ADA Standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mir Mohammad Rezaei

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Low- fusing compound (type 1 is used for border molding and impressions. Flow and reproducibility of surface detail are two important characteristics of these materials. There are no valid data available comparing domestic and imported brands.Purpose: The Purpose of this study was to evaluate these two properties of four different products including Kerr (Kerr Manufacture MI 98174-2600, Harvard (Hoffman Harvard Dental GMb H Germany; Kymia (Kymia dental company 713 Iran; and Pishro (Pishro72534 Iran.Materials and Methods: All procedures were followed according to ADA and BSStandard.Total number of 48 samples were divided into 8 groups (6 in each group.Twenty disks were fabricated for impression tests. The specimen dimensions were 40 mm (diameter and 6mm (thickness. Standard test blocks were used to test the specimens.Results: The Willcoxon test showed significant difference in flow rate between materials tested with the best result for Kerr (P<0.05. Kerr flow was 85% and under 5% at 45°C and 37°C, respectively. There were great deviations from standards value at 45°C. For the rest of the samples at 37°C; except Kymia the flow rate for 3 materials (Kerr; Harvard Pishrowere almost acceptable. The impression test results revealed that only Kerr was able torecord the details at 45°C.Conclusion: Kerr flow is exactly what ADA standards specify. But the flow rate for three materials exhibit a great distance from these standards. In impression test only Kerr was able to record the details

  18. Chiropractic Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome) A certain type of stroke (vertebral artery dissection) after neck manipulation Don't seek chiropractic adjustment ... Chiropractic treatment. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2015. Shekelle P, et al. Spinal ...

  19. You want to give a good impression? Be honest! Moral traits dominate group impression formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Marco; Sacchi, Simona; Rusconi, Patrice; Cherubini, Paolo; Yzerbyt, Vincent Y

    2012-03-01

    Research has shown that warmth and competence are core dimensions on which perceivers judge others and that warmth has a primary role at various phases of impression formation. Three studies explored whether the two components of warmth (i.e., sociability and morality) have distinct roles in predicting the global impression of social groups. In Study 1 (N= 105) and Study 2 (N= 112), participants read an immigration scenario depicting an unfamiliar social group in terms of high (vs. low) morality, sociability, and competence. In both studies, participants were asked to report their global impression of the group. Results showed that global evaluations were better predicted by morality than by sociability or competence-trait ascriptions. Study 3 (N= 86) further showed that the effect of moral traits on group global evaluations was mediated by the perception of threat. The importance of these findings for the impression-formation process is discussed.

  20. Gingival displacement methods used by dental professionals: A survey

    OpenAIRE

    S V Giridhar Reddy; M.Bharathi; B. Vinod; K Rajeev Kumar Reddy; N Simhachalam Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to identify the methods used by dental professionals for gingival displacement before making impressions for fixed prostheses. Materials and Methods: A printed questionnaire was distributed to over 600 dentists at a National Dental Conference held in Hyderabad. The questionnaire was designed to know the preferred method of gingival displacement, medicament used, frequency of performing gingival displacement, etc. The results were analyzed and represented ...

  1. Physical characteristic of brown algae (Phaeophyta from madura strait as irreversible hydrocolloid impression material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prihartini Widiyanti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brown algae is a raw material for producing natrium alginates. One type of brown algae is Sargassum sp, a member of Phaeophyta division. Sargassum sp could be found in Madura strait Indonesia. Natrium alginate can be extracted from Sargassum sp. The demand of alginate in Indonesia is mainly fulfilled from abroad, meanwhile Sargassum sp is abundantly available. Purpose: The purpose of study were to explore the potency of brown alga Sargassum sp from Madura strait as hydrocolloid impression material and to examine its physical characteristic. Methods: The methods of research including extraction natrium alginate from Sargassum sp, synthesis of dental impression material and the test of porosity, density, viscosity, and water content of impression material which fulfilled the standard of material used in clinical application in dentistry. Results: Extraction result of Sargassum sp was natrium alginate powder with cream colour, odorless, and water soluble. The water content of natrium alginate was 21.64% and the viscosity was 0.7 cPs. The best porosity result in the sample with the addition of trinatrium phosphate 4% was 3.61%. Density value of impression material was 3 gr/cm3. Conclusion: The research suggested that brown algae Sargassum sp from Madura strait is potential as hydrocolloid impression material, due to its physical properties which close to dental impression material, but still need further research to optimize the physical characteristic.Latar belakang: Alga coklat adalah sumber bahan baku material natrium alginat. Salah satu jenis alga coklat adalah Sargassum sp yang merupakan anggota divisi Phaeophyta. Sargassum sp dapat ditemukan di Selat Madura Indonesia. Natrium alginat dapat diekstraksi dari Sargassum sp. Kebutuhan akan bahan ini di Indonesia sebagian besar dipenuhi dari impor, padahal ketersediaan Sargassum sp di Indonesia sangat melimpah. Tujuan: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengeksplorasi potensi alga coklat

  2. Do we spontaneously form stable trustworthiness impressions from facial appearance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klapper, André; Dotsch, Ron; van Rooij, Iris; Wigboldus, Daniël H J

    It is widely assumed among psychologists that people spontaneously form trustworthiness impressions of newly encountered people from their facial appearance. However, most existing studies directly or indirectly induced an impression formation goal, which means that the existing empirical support

  3. Do we spontaneously form stable trustworthiness impressions from facial appearance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klapper, A.P.; Dotsch, R.; Rooij, I.J.E.I. van; Wigboldus, D.H.J.

    2016-01-01

    It is widely assumed among psychologists that people spontaneously form trustworthiness impressions of newly encountered people from their facial appearance. However, most existing studies directly or indirectly induced an impression formation goal, which means that the existing empirical support

  4. The Importance of Subtextual Impression Management and Business Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Lillian H.; Lyden, Julie A.

    1998-01-01

    College students (n=265) reported their impressions of business faculty's personal appearance, body language, behavior, and office appearance. Findings indicate that impression management is useful for professors who want to convey credibility, authority, and interest in students. (JOW)

  5. Impressive: printmaking, letterpress and graphic design

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Philippa

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by the challenge of hands-on tweaks and unpredictable results as well as the tactile qualities of different inks, papers, and binding techniques, today’s creatives are rediscovering old-fashioned printing methods and crafts. Impressive is a topical exploration of the interplay between current trends in graphic design and traditional handiwork such as letterpress printing, hand-cut linotype, chiselled woodblocks, and embossing. In addition to a rich selection of invitations, business ...

  6. Contact angle of unset elastomeric impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menees, Timothy S; Radhakrishnan, Rashmi; Ramp, Lance C; Burgess, John O; Lawson, Nathaniel C

    2015-10-01

    Some elastomeric impression materials are hydrophobic, and it is often necessary to take definitive impressions of teeth coated with some saliva. New hydrophilic materials have been developed. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare contact angles of water and saliva on 7 unset elastomeric impression materials at 5 time points from the start of mixing. Two traditional polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) (Aquasil, Take 1), 2 modified PVS (Imprint 4, Panasil), a polyether (Impregum), and 2 hybrid (Identium, EXA'lence) materials were compared. Each material was flattened to 2 mm and a 5 μL drop of distilled water or saliva was dropped on the surface at 25 seconds (t0) after the start of mix. Contact angle measurements were made with a digital microscope at initial contact (t0), t1=2 seconds, t2=5 seconds, t3=50% working time, and t4=95% working time. Data were analyzed with a generalized linear mixed model analysis, and individual 1-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD post hoc tests (α=.05). For water, materials grouped into 3 categories at all time-points: the modified PVS and one hybrid material (Identium) produced the lowest contact angles, the polyether material was intermediate, and the traditional PVS materials and the other hybrid (EXA'lence) produced the highest contact angles. For saliva, Identium, Impregum, and Imprint 4 were in the group with the lowest contact angle at most time points. Modified PVS materials and one of the hybrid materials are more hydrophilic than traditional PVS materials when measured with water. Saliva behaves differently than water in contact angle measurement on unset impression material and produces a lower contact angle on polyether based materials. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Consumer Perceived Ethicality: An Impression Formation Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Brunk, Katja H.

    2010-01-01

    This research investigates the process of how consumers form ethical perceptions of companies or brands by means of twenty in-depth interviews with general consumers. The study offers illustrative examples of evidence that the formation of consumer perceived ethicality (CPE) appears more in line with the configural model of impression formation, suggesting that perception formation is holistic and gestalt-like, rather than following the algebraic model, which takes a piecemeal information int...

  8. Impressive: printmaking, letterpress and graphic design

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Philippa

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by the challenge of hands-on tweaks and unpredictable results as well as the tactile qualities of different inks, papers, and binding techniques, today’s creatives are rediscovering old-fashioned printing methods and crafts. Impressive is a topical exploration of the interplay between current trends in graphic design and traditional handiwork such as letterpress printing, hand-cut linotype, chiselled woodblocks, and embossing. In addition to a rich selection of invitations, business ...

  9. Impressions management: lessons from the oil industry

    OpenAIRE

    Halderen, Mignon; Berens, Guido; Bhatt, Mamta; Brown, Tom; Riel, Cees

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractIn the late 1990s, after over a century of extracting hydrocarbons, the petroleum industry faced a growing scientific consensus that pollution from fossil fuels is a major cause of global warming. Operationally and in terms of their global image, oil and gas companies faced a serious dilemma. Two major players, Exxon and British Petroleum, took very different approaches in their corporate communications strategies, the outcomes of which offer valuable lessons in impressions ma...

  10. IMPRESS Integrated Project-An overview paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, D.J. [European Space Agency-ESA/ESTEC, Physical Science Unit, Directorate of Human Spaceflight, Microgravity and Exploration, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands)]. E-mail: david.john.jarvis@esa.int; Voss, D. [European Space Agency-ESA/ESTEC, Physical Science Unit, Directorate of Human Spaceflight, Microgravity and Exploration, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    2005-12-15

    IMPRESS is an acronym for Intermetallic Materials Processing in Relation to Earth and Space Solidification. This project was selected by the European Commission and recently started in November 2004. The main scientific objective of IMPRESS is to gain a better understanding of the links between materials processing routes, structure and final properties of intermetallic alloys. Technically speaking, the project aims to develop and test two distinct prototypes based on intermetallic materials, namely gas turbine blades and Raney-type catalytic powder. Numerous material processing routes are being explored within the project with a strong emphasis on solidification. For turbine blade manufacturing, the principal processes under study are tilt casting, counter-gravity casting and centrifugal casting. For catalytic powder production, the focus is placed on gas atomisation and vapour condensation processes. IMPRESS combines a wide range of fundamental studies of solidification both on ground and in space, as well as industrial process development. This paper will describe some of the different facets related to solidification.

  11. Neurofibromatosis, stroke and basilar impression: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PIOVESAN ELCIO JULIATO

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 can virtually affect any organ, presenting most frequently with "cafe au lait" spots and neurofibromas. Vasculopathy is a known complication of NF1, but cerebrovascular disease is rare. We report the case of a 51-year-old man admitted to the hospital with a history of stroke four months before admission. On physical examination, he presented various "cafe au lait" spots and cutaneous neurofibromas. Neurologic examination demonstrated right-sided facial paralysis, right-sided hemiplegia, and aphasia. Computed tomography scan of head showed hypodense areas in the basal ganglia and centrum semiovale. Radiographs of cranium and cervical spine showed basilar impression. Angiography revealed complete occlusion of both vertebral and left internal carotid arteries, and partial stenosis of the right internal carotid artery. A large network of collateral vessels was present (moyamoya syndrome. It is an uncommon case of occlusive cerebrovascular disease associated with NF1, since most cases described in the literature are in young people, and tend to spare the posterior cerebral circulation. Basilar impression associated with this case may be considered a pure coincidence, but rare cases of basilar impression and NF1 have been described.

  12. A two-step (altered cast) impression technique in the prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient after a maxillectomy: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojvodic, Denis; Kranjcic, Josip

    2013-09-01

    This clinical report describes the prosthetic rehabilitation complicated by trismus (as a consequence of surgery and radiation therapy) of a patient with an acquired maxillary defect, after surgical removal of the right maxillary sinus tumor. The patient was restored with a partial removable dental prosthesis with a hollow bulb obturator to obtain orofacial rehabilitation and defect obturation. Precise obturation requires an accurate impression of the resection defect. A 2-step impression was performed because of trismus. A primary maxillary impression was made with an irreversible hydrocolloid, while a secondary (altered cast) impression was made with a silicone material by using the obturator cast framework as a tray. In that way an altered cast was produced. Subsequently, an obturator prosthesis was processed with a conventional technique.

  13. Dental Hygienist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

  14. Dimensional accuracy of stone casts made from silicone-based impression materials and three impression techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitti, Rafael Pino; da Silva, Marcos Aurélio Bomfim; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure and compare the dimensional accuracy of stone casts of a partially edentulous mandibular arch made by two condensation silicones, two addition silicones and three impression techniques (1-step putty/light-body, 2-step putty/light-body and monophase technique). A partially edentulous standard stainless steel mandibular arch cast was obtained with reference points on the permanent mandibular right and left canines, and permanent mandibular right and left second molars. The anteroposterior distances (between the mandibular left canine and second molar and between the mandibular right canine and second molar) and transverse distances (between the mandibular left and right canines and between the mandibular left and right second molars) of stainless steel cast were measured by a microscope at 30× magnification and 0.5 µm accuracy. All impressions were made with condensation or addition silicones. The 1- and 2-step putty/light-body impressions were accomplished with putty and light-body materials and the monophase impressions with light-body material only. After the impression procedures, accuracy of each material and technique was assessed measuring the stone casts poured (n=5) from the impressions, by the same microscope. The differences between the values of stone cast and stainless steel cast were calculated, presented as percentages and analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and the means compared by Tukey's test (α=0.05). All distances measured on stone casts showed altered dimensions with significantly negative linear changes (shrinkage) as compared to those of the stainless steel cast. The stone casts made from the addition silicones were dimensionally more accurate. No differences were found among the impression techniques.

  15. Comparison of Dimensional Accuracy between Open-Tray and Closed-Tray Implant Impression Technique in 15° Angled Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balouch F.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Various impression techniques have different effects on the accuracy of final cast dimensions. Meanwhile; there are some controversies about the best technique. Purpose: This study was performed to compare two kinds of implant impression methods (open tray and closed tray on 15 degree angled implants.Materials and Method: In this experimental study, a steel model with 8 cm in diameter and 3 cm in height were produced with 3 holes devised inside to stabilize 3 implants. The central implant was straight and the other two implants were 15° angled. The two angled implants had 5 cm distance from each other and 3.5 cm from the central implant. Dental stone, high strength (type IV was used for the main casts. Impression trays were filled with poly ether, and then the two impression techniques (open tray and closed tray were compared. To evaluate positions of the implants, each cast was analyzed by CMM device in 3 dimensions (x,y,z. Differences in the measurements obtained from final casts and laboratory model were analyzed using t-Test. Results: The obtained results indicated that closed tray impression technique was significantly different in dimensional accuracy when compared with open tray method. Dimensional changes were 129 ± 37μ and 143.5 ± 43.67μ in closed tray and open tray, while coefficient of variation in closed- tray and open tray were reported to be 27.2% and 30.4%, respectively.Conclusion: Closed impression technique had less dimensional changes in comparison with open tray method, so this study suggests that closed tray impression technique is more accurate.

  16. Preliminary functional impression for the mandibular complete denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiche, H

    1989-01-01

    A technique for producing a preliminary impression of a resorbed edentulous mandibular ridge is presented. A 2-mm metal wire is adapted to the curve of the mandibular arch. A high-viscosity impression material is then formed to the wire and placed in the patient's mouth. Speech movements are used to functionally shape the material. Following polymerization, additional material is added to create extensions not captured in the first impression. A final wash using a low-viscosity silicone or polysulfide rubber material completes the impression. The resultant preliminary impression has the advantage of not being distorted by an ill-fitting stock tray or artificially manipulated by the clinician.

  17. In Vitro Comparative Evaluation of Different Types of Impression Trays and Impression Materials on the Accuracy of Open Tray Implant Impressions: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sonam; Narayan, Aparna Ichalangod; Balakrishnan, Dhanasekar

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. For a precise fit of multiple implant framework, having an accurate definitive cast is imperative. The present study evaluated dimensional accuracy of master casts obtained using different impression trays and materials with open tray impression technique. Materials and Methods. A machined aluminum reference model with four parallel implant analogues was fabricated. Forty implant level impressions were made. Eight groups (n = 5) were tested using impression materials (polyether and vinylsiloxanether) and four types of impression trays, two being custom (self-cure acrylic and light cure acrylic) and two being stock (plastic and metal). The interimplant distances were measured on master casts using a coordinate measuring machine. The collected data was compared with a standard reference model and was statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results. Statistically significant difference (p materials. However, the difference seen was small (36 μm) irrespective of the tray type used. No significant difference (p > 0.05) was observed between varied stock and custom trays. Conclusions. The polyether impression material proved to be more accurate than vinylsiloxanether impression material. The rigid nonperforated stock trays, both plastic and metal, could be an alternative for custom trays for multi-implant impressions when used with medium viscosity impression materials.

  18. Salary adjustments

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    In accordance with decisions taken by the Finance Committee and Council in December 2007, salaries are adjusted with effect from 1 January 2008. Scale of basic salaries and scale of stipends paid to fellows (Annex R A 5 and R A 6 respectively): increased by 0.71% with effect from 1 January 2008. As a result of the stability of the Geneva consumer price index, the following elements do not increase: a)\tFamily Allowance, Child Allowance and Infant Allowance (Annex R A 3); b)\tReimbursement of education fees: maximum amounts of reimbursement (Annex R A 4.01) for the academic year 2007/2008. Related adjustments will be applied, wherever applicable, to Paid Associates and Students. As in the past, the actual percentage increase of each salary position may vary, due to the application of a constant step value and rounding effects. Human Resources Department Tel. 73566

  19. Salary adjustments

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    In accordance with decisions taken by the Finance Committee and Council in December 2007, salaries are adjusted with effect from 1 January 2008. Scale of basic salaries and scale of stipends paid to fellows (Annex R A 5 and R A 6 respectively): increased by 0.71% with effect from 1 January 2008. As a result of the stability of the Geneva consumer price index, following elements do not increase: a) Family Allowance, Child Allowance and Infant Allowance (Annex R A 3). b) Reimbursement of education fees: maximum amounts of reimbursement (Annex R A 4.01) for the academic year 2007/2008. Related adjustments will be implemented, wherever applicable, to Paid Associates and Students. As in the past, the actual percentage increase of each salary position may vary, due to the application of a constant step value and the rounding effects. Human Resources Department Tel. 73566

  20. Study of the interocclusal distortion in impressions taken with different types of closed-mouth trays and two types of impression materials

    OpenAIRE

    Mañes-Ferrer, José Félix; Selva-Otaolaurruchi, Eduardo José; Parra-Arenos, Carmina; Selfa-Bas, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare different types of impression trays for the closed-mouth impression technique, using two different types of impression material. For this study, five different types of impression trays were used with two different types of impression materials, one of addition silicone and the other of polyether. We designed a model used for taking the impressions and for measuring interocclusal distortion. The results obtained show that the impression trays COE (GC (R) G...

  1. Simulation of dental collisions and occlusal dynamics in the virtual environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavness, I K; Hannam, A G; Tobias, D L; Zhang, X

    2016-04-01

    Semi-adjustable articulators have often been used to simulate occlusal dynamics, but advances in intra-oral scanning and computer software now enable dynamics to be modelled mathematically. Computer simulation of occlusal dynamics requires accurate virtual casts, records to register them and methods to handle mesh collisions during movement. Here, physical casts in a semi-adjustable articulator were scanned with a conventional clinical intra-oral scanner. A coordinate measuring machine was used to index their positions in intercuspation, protrusion, right and left laterotrusion, and to model features of the articulator. Penetrations between the indexed meshes were identified and resolved using restitution forces, and the final registrations were verified by distance measurements between dental landmarks at multiple sites. These sites were confirmed as closely approximating via measurements made from homologous transilluminated vinylpolysiloxane interocclusal impressions in the mounted casts. Movements between the indexed positions were simulated with two models in a custom biomechanical software platform. In model DENTAL, 6 degree-of-freedom movements were made to minimise deviation from a straight line path and also shaped by dynamic mesh collisions detected and resolved mathematically. In model ARTIC, the paths were further constrained by surfaces matching the control settings of the articulator. Despite these differences, the lower mid-incisor point paths were very similar in both models. The study suggests that mathematical simulation utilising interocclusal 'bite' registrations can closely replicate the primary movements of casts mounted in a semi-adjustable articulator. Additional indexing positions and appropriate software could, in some situations, replace the need for mechanical semi-adjustable articulation and/or its virtual representation.

  2. Dental OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  3. Effect of five brands of latex gloves on the setting time of polyvinyl siloxane putty impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, C M; Sangur, Rajashekar

    2012-01-01

    Addition silicone impression materials have been used as impression material for more than 20 years. Although they are among the most expensive impression materials, they became popular during the past decade as they have excellent physical properties. Prevention of infection is an important aspect in dental treatment since dental professionals are routinely exposed to the wide variety of microorganisms present in saliva. Gloves are the most common protective measure used during dental treatment. The gloves are mostly made of latex. In this study, we examine how the setting time of three types polyvinyl putty materials were affected by the use of five different brands of latex gloves and one brand of vinyl gloves. Each material was first mixed without wearing gloves according to the manufacturer's instructions. After the stipulated mixing time, the setting time was measured using the Vicat needle. The setting time is measured from the time of mixing till the time that the needle does not produce any indentation on the surface of the material. The putty material was then mixed with gloved hands (using the five different brands of latex gloves in turn) and the setting time was measured. Then the material was mixed with washed gloved hands, and the setting time was measured again. Finally, the material was mixed with vinyl gloved hands and the setting time was measured. The following conclusions were drawn from the study: Reprosil and Express showed significant variation in the setting time with the latex gloved hands.There was no significant variation in the setting time when material was mixed with unwashed vs washed gloved hands.Vinyl gloves did not significantly affect the setting time of any of the putty impression materials.

  4. A comparison of six impression syringes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, M; Shillingburg, H T; Duncanson, M G

    1980-05-01

    Five manually operated, and one air-activated, syringes were evaluated and compared. When used with polyether or polysulfide, some disposable syringes were found to require in excess of 100 pounds of force to operate. The metal reusable syringe required only 13 and 21 pounds, respectively, with the same materials; the air-activated syringe required none. There was no significant difference among the syringes with regard to bubble entrapment during impression making. There was a significant difference found in this regard among the five experienced dentists. The air-activated syringe was most easily controlled, as evidenced by the significantly smaller number of tracing errors made with it.

  5. Influence of scanning system and dentist's level of training in the accuracy of digital impressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hategan, Simona; Gabor, Alin; Zaharia, Cristian; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Jivanescu, Anca

    2016-03-01

    Background: The principal aim of our study was to evaluate digital impressions, taken with spray powder and powderfree scan systems, in order to determine the influence of the dentist's commitment to training as a critical factor regarding quality. Material and method: Two digital intraoral impression systems from the same manufacture (Sirona) : Apollo DI and CEREC Omnicam, were used to scan 16 crown preparations on teeth on a typodont maxillary model. Because an Apollo Di intraoral camera is a powder system, an adhesive was applied before using the powder spray. Three groups were used to scan the crown preparations in order to determine coating thickness homogeneity. One group consisted of senior year dental students, a second consisted of prosthodontics residents, and the third consisted of prosthodontics specialists. The same procedure was applied with a CEREC Omnicam intraoral camera, which is a powder-free system. By using the two systems software parameters we were able to determine the scanning precision. Results: Homogeneity scores for Apollo Di regarding the spray layer was significantly thinner for all dental surfaces in the first group, while the second group had thinner coatings for buccal and distal surfaces. For the third group, the crown preparations were coated more homogeneously than the first two groups. The powder-free system CEREC Omnicam can, to a degree, mask the lack of experience in direct optical impressions by avoiding the poor quality coating, which can lead to defective marginal adaptation of definitive restoration. Conclusions: The dentist's lack of experience can be mitigated, and partially avoided, by using powder-free systems. At the same time, the dentist can give more time towards learning how to integrate computerized fabricated restoration into the practice. The commitment to training is a critical factor in the successful integration of the technology. In addition, scanning marginal preparation details needs time in order to

  6. Conjunctival impression cytology in contact lens wearers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Priya

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the cytological changes in conjunctiva following regular contact lens wear and to determine the correlation, if any, between severity of cytological alteration and symptoms related to contact lens wear. METHODS: One hundred eyes (50 normal asymptomatic subjects who served as a control group were studied by conjunctival impression cytology (CIC. These subjects were fitted with rigid gas permeable (RGP or soft contact lenses and were followed up at the end of 3 and 6 months. At each follow-up visit the CIC was repeated. A filter paper with the impression specimen was stained with periodic acid schiff (PAS and haematoxylin stain to study goblet cell loss. Papanicolaou stain was done to study squamous metaplasia. The cytological changes were graded using the system described by Natadisastra et al. RESULTS: Severity of cytological changes increased with the duration of contact lens wear (P = 0.00001. At the end of 6 months, 60% of symptomatic eyes wearing soft contact lens and RGP lens showed abnormal CIC changes. None of the asymptomatic RGP contact lens wearing eyes showed abnormal CIC changes whereas 33.4% of the asymptomatic soft contact lens wearing eyes showed abnormal CIC changes (P = 0.033. Epithelial changes occurred within 3-6 months of contact lens fitting. CONCLUSION: Severity of cytological changes increased with duration of lens wear (P = 0.00001. Prevalence and severity of cytological alteration is more in symptomatic contact lens wearers. Soft contact lens wearers although asymptomatic showed severe CIC changes.

  7. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find Data by Topic > Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Main Content Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  8. Infant dental care (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma can result ...

  9. Accuracy assessment of high frequency 3D ultrasound for digital impression-taking of prepared teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heger, Stefan; Vollborn, Thorsten; Tinschert, Joachim; Wolfart, Stefan; Radermacher, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    Silicone based impression-taking of prepared teeth followed by plaster casting is well-established but potentially less reliable, error-prone and inefficient, particularly in combination with emerging techniques like computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) of dental prosthesis. Intra-oral optical scanners for digital impression-taking have been introduced but until now some drawbacks still exist. Because optical waves can hardly penetrate liquids or soft-tissues, sub-gingival preparations still need to be uncovered invasively prior to scanning. High frequency ultrasound (HFUS) based micro-scanning has been recently investigated as an alternative to optical intra-oral scanning. Ultrasound is less sensitive against oral fluids and in principal able to penetrate gingiva without invasively exposing of sub-gingival preparations. Nevertheless, spatial resolution as well as digitization accuracy of an ultrasound based micro-scanning system remains a critical parameter because the ultrasound wavelength in water-like media such as gingiva is typically smaller than that of optical waves. In this contribution, the in-vitro accuracy of ultrasound based micro-scanning for tooth geometry reconstruction is being investigated and compared to its extra-oral optical counterpart. In order to increase the spatial resolution of the system, 2nd harmonic frequencies from a mechanically driven focused single element transducer were separated and corresponding 3D surface models were calculated for both fundamentals and 2nd harmonics. Measurements on phantoms, model teeth and human teeth were carried out for evaluation of spatial resolution and surface detection accuracy. Comparison of optical and ultrasound digital impression taking indicate that, in terms of accuracy, ultrasound based tooth digitization can be an alternative for optical impression-taking.

  10. Investigating the Effects of Spraying Deconex on Disinfection of Three Different Impression Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasemi E.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Dentists and dental laboratory technicians’ awareness of the dangers of cross-contaminations has made them seek the best ways to control and eradicate the main sources of infections.Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of spraying Deconex on three different impression materials.Materials and Method: In this in vitro experimental study, 30 circular samples of different impression materials, such as alginate, silicone and polyether impression materials were separately contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC29213, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC27853, and Candida albicans fungus (PTCC5027. Except for the control samples, all the other samples were disinfected with Deconex through spraying. Then, they were kept in plastic bags which were stuffed with humid rolled cotton for 5 and 10 minutes. In order to isolate bacteria, the samples were immersed in 2% trypsin for one hour and then the solution was diluted with normal saline in proportion of 1, ½ and 1/4. The trypsin suspensions were transferred to culture plates and the number of colonies was counted after 24 and 48 hours for bacteria and after 72 hours for fungus. Data analysis was done through running Mann-Whitney Test (  = 0.05.Results: There was a significant difference between the effect of Deconex on silicone and its effect on polyether for all the mentioned microorganisms after 5 minutes (p <0.05. The highest percentage of bacterial growth prevention was recorded for silicone impression material. Deconex completely eradicated the three kinds of microorganisms after 5 and 10 minutes in the silicon group. Deconex was not capable to eliminate all three microorganisms in the polyether and the alginate groups; with the exception of Pseudomonas aeruginosa after10 minutes.Conclusion: The results of the present study indicated that Deconex has the highest capacity when it is used with silicone; it eradicates all microorganisms in both 5 and 10

  11. The effect of impression of the inherent deformation after adding the circular marker on oral impression%添加"正圆形标记"后对印模形变规律的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李烨侃; 陈洁; 魏斌

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of impression of the inherent deformation after adding the circular marker on oral impression. Methods Two metal molds were made by American Dental Association standards. Six metal circular needles were inserted on one of molds. Two groups of impression sample which named A and B were made by two metal molds. Marker line on the impressions were measured and observed by measuring microscope to compare the impressions (group A and B) with the deformation extent and the deformation law. Croup t test method of SAS6.12 software was adopted to analyze the dimensional changes of the samples. Results The deformation range of two. groups( A and B) of alginate impressions was 0.38% ~ 0.58% and 0.43% ~ 0. 66%. Two groups of silicone impressions' deformation range was 0.38% ~ 0.42% and 0.33% ~ 0.49%. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05 ). Conclusion The method with adding markers points on the oral impression would the impression of the inherent deformation. This marking method wag feasible.%目的 探索添加"正圆形标记"后对印模固有形变规律的影响.方法 按美国牙科协会ADA标准,制作两个金属母模,并在其中1个上安置6根横断面为正圆形的钢针.分别对两个金属母模制取印模,获得A、B两组印模样本.用测量显微镜观察、测量标记线,比较两组印模的形变程度及规律.所获数据采用SAS 6.12软件的成组t检验比较.结果 A、B两组印模的形变范围分别为,藻酸盐0.38%~0.58%和0.43%~0.66%;硅橡胶0.38%~0.42%和0.33%~0.49%,两组之间差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 在口腔印模上添加正圆形标记点,不会影响印模本身固有的形变规律,该标记方法是可行的.

  12. [Impression Formation in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Mental Disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Michael; Dymke, Tina; Hüttner, Susanne; Schnaubelt, Sabine

    2016-06-01

    The first item of any psychopathological assessment is "general impression". There is some research under the heading of "impression formation" which shows that the outer appearance of a person decides about how a person is perceived by others and how others react. Impression formation is an important factor in social interaction. This is of special importance in mental disorders, which may express themselves in a distorted impression formation. As impression formation is by and large an emotional process, measurement can be done by adjective lists. An example is the bipolar MED rating scale. Such lists can be used in therapy to help patients and therapists to understand the problem and initiate modifications. A special group intervention in occupational therapy is described. Results suggest that impression formation is quite objective, that self- and observer judgments coincide and that therapy can help to adopt a less irritating outer appearance.

  13. Influence of disinfection with peracetic acid and hypochlorite in dimensional alterations of casts obtained from addition silicone and polyether impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Daher Antonio; Peçanha, Marcelo Massaroni; Neves, Ana Christina Claro; Frizzera, Fausto; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Silva-Concílio, Laís Regiane

    2013-11-01

    Dental impressions disinfection is important to reduce the risk of cross contamination but this process may produce dimensional distortions. Peracetic acid is a disinfectant agent with several favorable characteristics yet underutilized in Dentistry. The aim of this paper is to compare the dimensional stability of casts obtained from addition silicone and polyether impressions that were immersed for 10 minutes in a solution of 0.2% peracetic acid or 1% sodium hypochlorite. Sixty samples in type IV gypsum were produced after a master cast that simulated a full crown preparation of a maxillary premolar. Samples were divided in 6 groups (n = 10) according to the impression material and disinfection agent: Group AC--addition silicone control (without disinfectant); Group APA--addition silicone + 0.2% peracetic acid; Group AH--addition silicone + 1% sodium hypochlorite; Group PC--polyether control (without disinfectant); Group PPA--polyether + 0.2% peracetic acid; Group PH--polyether + 1% sodium hypochlorite. Cast height, base and top diameter were measured and a mean value was obtained for each sample and group all data was statistically analyzed (ANOVA, p peracetic acid could be considered a reliable material to disinfect dental molds.

  14. Effect of storage time of extended-pour and conventional alginate impressions on dimensional accuracy of casts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Rohanian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Some manufacturers claim to have produced new irreversible hydro-colloids that are able to maintain their dimensional stability during storage. The present study evaluated the effect of storage time on dimensional stability of three alginates: Hydrogum 5, Tropicalgin and Alginoplast.In this experimental in-vitro trial, a total of 90 alginate impressions were made from a Dentoform model using Hydrogum 5, Tropicalgin and Alginoplast alginates. The impressions were stored in a sealed plastic bag without a damp paper towel for 0, 24, 48, 72 and 120 hours and then poured with type III dental stone. Cross-arch (facial of 6 to facial of 6 on the opposite side and antero-posterior (distal of right first molar to the ipsilateral central incisor measurements were made with a digital caliper on the casts. Data were analyzed by two-way and one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (P<0.05.Alginate type and the pouring time significantly affected the dimensional stability of alginate impressions (both Ps<0.001. Pouring of Hydrogum 5 impressions can be delayed for up to 120 hours without significant dimensional changes. Alginoplast impressions may be poured after 72 hours, but Tropicalgin should be poured immediately and the storage time should not be more than 24 hours.Immediate pouring of alginate impressions provides the highest accuracy in reproducing the teeth and adjacent tissues; however, this study demonstrated that pouring may be delayed for up to five days using extended-pour (Hydrogum 5 alginates.

  15. At Face Value: Visual Antecedents of Impression Formation in Servicescapes

    OpenAIRE

    Verhoeven, Joost W.M.; Rompay, van, Thomas; Pruyn, Ad

    2009-01-01

    Consumers may base employee impressions on physical appearance and displayed personal objects. In a scenario experiment, using photos of a physician and a 360-degree panorama of his consultation room, we examined the effects of appearance and tangibles on impression formation. Study 1 shows that observers employ various strategies of combining information from different sources when forming an impression of the employee’s friendliness and competence. Whereas previous research has shown that i...

  16. Modeling first impressions from highly variable facial images

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richard J. W. Vernon; Clare A. M. Sutherland; Andrew W. Young; Tom Hartley

    2014-01-01

    First impressions of social traits, such as trustworthiness or dominance, are reliably perceived in faces, and despite their questionable validity they can have considerable real-world consequences...

  17. Individual Differences and Rating Errors in First Impressions of Psychopathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gillen, Christopher T. A; Bergstrøm, Henriette; Forth, Adelle E

    2016-01-01

    The current study is the first to investigate whether individual differences in personality are related to improved first impression accuracy when appraising psychopathy in female offenders from thin...

  18. [Impression traces from firearms on cadaver skin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Püschel, K; Koops, E; Kulle, K J

    1996-01-01

    Guns may occasionally leave traces on human skin, for example by compression/impression of the tissue (esp. in the area of livores), by contact-transfer of dirt, oil, and rust, or by forming the pattern of blood-smears. The case of a 31-year-old drug-addict is presented in detail: The man committed suicide by shooting himself (entrance hole under the chin). When the dead body was found there was no weapon at the scene. By careful securing of evidence and analyzing the pattern of metallisations (identified as rust from the old pistol) it was reconstructed that the suicident held the pistol (identified as Russian Tokarew TT33-7.62 mm) in his hand for many hours postmortem until it was removed by an unknown thief.

  19. [Minimal emotional dysfunction and first impression formation in personality disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, M; Vilain, M

    2011-01-01

    "Minimal cerebral dysfunctions" are isolated impairments of basic mental functions, which are elements of complex functions like speech. The best described are cognitive dysfunctions such as reading and writing problems, dyscalculia, attention deficits, but also motor dysfunctions such as problems with articulation, hyperactivity or impulsivity. Personality disorders can be characterized by isolated emotional dysfunctions in relation to emotional adequacy, intensity and responsivity. For example, paranoid personality disorders can be characterized by continuous and inadequate distrust, as a disorder of emotional adequacy. Schizoid personality disorders can be characterized by low expressive emotionality, as a disorder of effect intensity, or dissocial personality disorders can be characterized by emotional non-responsivity. Minimal emotional dysfunctions cause interactional misunderstandings because of the psychology of "first impression formation". Studies have shown that in 100 ms persons build up complex and lasting emotional judgements about other persons. Therefore, minimal emotional dysfunctions result in interactional problems and adjustment disorders and in corresponding cognitive schemata.From the concept of minimal emotional dysfunctions specific psychotherapeutic interventions in respect to the patient-therapist relationship, the diagnostic process, the clarification of emotions and reality testing, and especially an understanding of personality disorders as impairment and "selection, optimization, and compensation" as a way of coping can be derived.

  20. Dental caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D

    2017-01-01

    , exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental......Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life...... caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries...

  1. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  2. Feline dental radiography and radiology: A primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2014-11-01

    Information crucial to the diagnosis and treatment of feline oral diseases can be ascertained using dental radiography and the inclusion of this technology has been shown to be the best way to improve a dental practice. Becoming familar with the techniques required for dental radiology and radiography can, therefore, be greatly beneficial. Novices to dental radiography may need some time to adjust and become comfortable with the techniques. If using dental radiographic film, the generally recommended 'E' or 'F' speeds may be frustrating at first, due to their more specific exposure and image development requirements. Although interpreting dental radiographs is similar to interpreting a standard bony radiograph, there are pathologic states that are unique to the oral cavity and several normal anatomic structures that may mimic pathologic changes. Determining which teeth have been imaged also requires a firm knowledge of oral anatomy as well as the architecture of dental films/digital systems. This article draws on a range of dental radiography and radiology resources, and the benefit of the author's own experience, to review the basics of taking and interpreting intraoral dental radiographs. A simplified method for positioning the tubehead is explained and classic examples of some common oral pathologies are provided. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.

  3. A study of the antimicrobial properties of impression tray adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, D A

    1993-01-01

    Three impression tray adhesives were tested for their antimicrobial actions on three bacteria strains used for disinfectant studies. The colony forming unit (CFU) counts from plating the adhesive-exposed bacteria showed a significant reduction in number compared with the CFU of the controls. Statistical analyses confirmed the significant reduction (p impression tray adhesives can help prevent cross contamination.

  4. At Face Value: Visual Antecedents of Impression Formation in Servicescapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Joost W.M.; Rompay, van Thomas; Pruyn, Ad

    2009-01-01

    Consumers may base employee impressions on physical appearance and displayed personal objects. In a scenario experiment, using photos of a physician and a 360-degree panorama of his consultation room, we examined the effects of appearance and tangibles on impression formation. Study 1 shows that obs

  5. Impression Formation and the Attribution of Attitudes: A "Sleeper" Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxton, Jack S.; Miller, Arthur G.

    Recent studies indicate that investigators are now focusing on the cognitive determinants of the attribution process; however, few researchers are looking specifically at the attribution process over time. The impact of attitudinal and behavioral information on impression formation was studied to determine how impressions change over time. The…

  6. Accuracy of different impression materials in parallel and nonparallel implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahroo Vojdani

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, in parallel conditions, the type of impression material cannot affect the accuracy of the implant impressions; however, in nonparallel conditions, polyvinyl siloxane is shown to be a better choice, followed by vinyl siloxanether and polyether respectively.

  7. 17 CFR 200.61 - Impressions of influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Impressions of influence. 200...; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Canons of Ethics § 200.61 Impressions of influence. A... influence him, that any person unduly enjoys his favor or that he is affected in any way by the...

  8. An alternative impression technique for individuals with special care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topouzelis, Nikolaos; Kotsiomiti, Eleni; Arhakis, Aristidis

    2010-01-01

    Impression making may be complicated in individuals with limited ability to cooperate with caregivers. An alternative technique for obtaining full-arch casts from sectional preliminary impressions is described. The technique is a modification of the procedure advocated for impression making in subjects with limited mouth opening. A pair of partial stock trays is selected to fit the right and left side of the arch. Two sectional irreversible hydrocolloid impressions are made separately. The first cast is placed into the second impression prior to pouring, to obtain a cast of the complete arch. The procedure was used during the treatment of an uncooperative young patient with Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome and provided a simple and reliable means to obtain the diagnostic cast of the mandibular teeth. It is recommended not only for uncooperative patients, but also for patients with special needs; such as those with anatomical restrictions, functional impairment, and movement disorders.

  9. Motivation alters impression formation and related neural systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Brent L; Zaki, Jamil; Ambady, Nalini

    2017-01-01

    Observers frequently form impressions of other people based on complex or conflicting information. Rather than being objective, these impressions are often biased by observers' motives. For instance, observers often downplay negative information they learn about ingroup members. Here, we characterize the neural systems associated with biased impression formation. Participants learned positive and negative information about ingroup and outgroup social targets. Following this information, participants worsened their impressions of outgroup, but not ingroup, targets. This tendency was associated with a failure to engage neural structures including lateral prefrontal cortex, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, temporoparietal junction, Insula and Precuneus when processing negative information about ingroup (but not outgroup) targets. To the extent that participants engaged these regions while learning negative information about ingroup members, they exhibited less ingroup bias in their impressions. These data are consistent with a model of 'effortless bias', under which perceivers fail to process goal-inconsistent information in order to maintain desired conclusions.

  10. Translucency measurements in teeth and dental materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawicz, Andrew H.; Melnyk, Ivan; Kowalski, Pawel

    2003-06-01

    Exact color matching of dental restorative materials to vital teeth is a difficult task. There are several reasons for this difficulty and they will be elaborated upon in the presentation. One of the most important reasons is the fact that teeth, as well as dental restorative materials are translucent, and thus the color impression is a product of light scattering, back scattering, transmission, and spectral modifications inside of these objects. Classic colorimetry is insufficient to provide an exact color match. Additional information about the translucency factor of the considered object (material and geometry) is necessary to provide full reproducibility. Translucency has a direct effect on perceived brightness. In this article we describe the TransluDent, a complementary product to ColorDent, which measures translucency of teeth and dental materials. TransluDent determines translucency by measuring light transmitted through an object and light scattered inside of the object. The translucency measurements were performed on two groups of subjects. One group consisted of people in their twenties and the second group of subjects was in fifties. For comparison several sets of dental shade-guides were also tested. The great discrepancy in translucency factor between human teeth and popular on the market shades may explain difficulty in color matching of dental restorative materials to teeth.

  11. 一种口内扫描数字化技术在口腔正畸模型测量中的应用%The application of the CEREC Bluecam digital impressions in orthodontic model measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺维; 施斌

    2015-01-01

    目的 介绍CEREC Bluecam数字化印模技术的功能和特点,探索其在口腔正畸模型测量中的应用前景.方法 36位非拔牙正畸患者,分别采用CEREC Bluecam数字化印模口内扫描获取数字化印模和常规制取石膏模型,分别测量牙弓宽度,牙冠宽度和高度.比较两组测量数据的差别,并进行数字化印模方法测量的可重复性测试,所有数据用SPSS 18.0进行分析.结果 CEREC Bluecam数字化印模与传统石膏模型在牙弓宽度、牙冠宽度及高度的测量结果无明显差异(P>0.05),数字化印模上测量的可重复性良好(P>0.05).结论 在常用的口腔正畸模型测量中,CEREC Bluecam数字化印模能够成为石膏模型的替代品,而CEREC Bluecam数字化印模在使用上更加便捷、高效,在口腔正畸中的应用前景更加广阔.%Objective To introduces the functions and characteristics of the CEREC Bluecam digital impressions, and to study its application in orthodontic models measurements.Methods 36 non-extraction patients were selected and the dental models and CEREC Bluecam digital impressions of them were made.The dental crown width, height and arch width of every dental model were measured.The CEREC Bluecam digital impressions were measured, too.The repeatability by CEREC Bluecam digital impressions measurements were made.The data was analyzed by SPSS 18.0.Results There is no statistical significant differences of the arch width, dental crown width and height measurements data between the dental models and CEREC Bluecam digital impressions (P> 0.05).The repeatability of measurement by CEREC Bluecam digital impressions were favorable (P>0.05).Conclusions The dental cast models can be replaced by CEREC Bluecam digital impressions in orthodontic model measurements.Duo to its high efficiency and convenience, the CEREC Bluecam digital impressions showed a wide-range prospect in orthodontic clinic application.

  12. Oral breathing and dental malocclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zicari, A M; Albani, F; Ntrekou, P; Rugiano, A; Duse, M; Mattei, A; Marzo, G

    2009-06-01

    Aim of the present study was to evaluate existing correlations between oral breathing and dental malocclusions. The study was conducted on a paediatric group of 71 oral breathers selected at the Allergology and Paediatric Immunology Department of Umberto I General Hospital, University of Rome "La Sapienza" (Italy). The children were selected based on inclusion/exclusion criteria. Children aged 6 to 12 years with no history of craniofacial malformations or orthodontic treatment were included. The results were compared with a control group composed of 71 patient aged 6 to 12 years with nasal breathing. After their medical history was recorded, all patients underwent orthodontic/otolaryngological clinical examinations. The following diagnostic procedures were then performed: latero-lateral projection teleradiography, orthopantomogram, dental impressions, anterior rhinomanometry before and after administering a local vasoconstrictor, nocturnal home pulse oximetry (NHPO) recording, spirometry test, skin prick test, study cast evaluation and cephalometric analysis following Tweed's principles. The intraoral examination assessed: dental class type, overbite, overjet, midlines, crossbite, and presence of parafunctional oral habits such as atypical swallowing, labial incompetence, finger sucking and sucking of the inner lip. Evaluation of the study casts involved arch perimeter and transpalatal width assessment, and space analysis. The results showed a strong correlation between oral breathing and malocclusions, which manifests itself with both dentoskeletal and functional alterations, leading to a dysfunctional malocclusive pattern. According to the authors' results, dysfunctional malocclusive pattern makes it clear that the association between oral breathing and dental malocclusions represents a self-perpetuating vicious circle in which it is difficult to establish if the primary alteration is respiratory or maxillofacial. Regardless, the problem needs to be addressed and

  13. A simple method for fabricating custom sectional impression trays for making definitive impressions in patients with microstomia

    OpenAIRE

    Bachhav, Vinay Chila; Aras, Meena Ajay

    2012-01-01

    Objective: A maximum mouth opening that is smaller than the size of a complete denture can make prosthetic treatment challenging. This article describes a simple technique used to fabricate maxillary and mandibular custom sectional impression trays for making definitive impressions in patients with microstomia.

  14. Dental Training Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

  15. Conjunctival impression cytology: bright hope of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    A practical method of screening for pre-clinical xerophthalmia due to vitamin A deficiency, called conjunctival impression cytology (CIC), is described as it is being used in a training stage in the Philippines. The noninvasive technic consists of touching the conjunctiva with a filter paper disc, and fixing and staining the disc on a slide for histology. Normally goblet cells with mucin spots are seen among sheets of epithelial cells. In abnormal conjunctiva from vitamin A deficient individuals, the epithelial cells are enlarged, and goblet cells are lacking. These specimens may be obtained from areas of the conjunctiva that appear clinically normal. The equipment needed is millipore paper, a hand-held suction pump with 5 feet of tubing, tissue or gauze, screw-top vials, labels, fixative, Papanicolaou stain, and a microscope. Vitamin A supplements can be given to affected children, or to the whole population at risk. With CIC training materials donated by International Center for Epidemiologic and Preventive Ophthalmology (ICEPO) at the Wilmer Institute, and the School of Hygiene and Public Health of the Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, the 1st training class was certified by the Nutrition Center of the Philippines. Twice yearly training of physicians and technologists has been recommended.

  16. Delivering new physics at impressive speed

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    The speed with which the heavy ion run at the LHC is delivering new physics is impressive not only for the insights it is bringing to the early Universe, but also for the clear demonstration it gives of the value of competition and complementarity between the experiments.   ALICE was the first off the mark to publish papers from the ion run, as you’d expect from the LHC’s dedicated ion experiment, but results emerging from ATLAS and CMS are bringing new understanding in their own right. Each collaboration’s result plays to the strengths of its detector, and it is by taking all the results together that our knowledge advances. The creation, observation and understanding of the hot dense matter that would have existed in the early Universe, normally known as Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), is complex science and one of the ion programme’s key goals. Many signals for QGP exist, and like pieces of a puzzle, we must assemble all of them to get the full picture. At th...

  17. Custom CAD-CAM healing abutment and impression coping milled from a poly(methyl methacrylate) block and bonded to a titanium insert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussaefs, Periklis

    2016-11-01

    This article describes a technique in which a custom-made computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) healing abutment milled from a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) block is fabricated and bonded to a titanium metal insert. An impression is made during dental implant surgery, and the CAD-CAM custom-made healing abutment is fabricated before second-stage surgery while appropriate healing time is allowed for the dental implant to osseointegrate. The contours of the healing abutment are based on the contours of a tentatively designed definitive prosthesis. The healing tissue obtains contours that will be compatible with the contours of the definitive prosthesis. After the milling process is complete, a titanium metal insert is bonded to the healing abutment. Placement of the custom-made CAD-CAM healing abutment at second-stage surgery allows the tissue to obtain contours similar to those of the definitive prosthesis. A custom-made CAD-CAM impression coping milled from a PMMA block and with a titanium insert is used for the definitive impression after the soft tissue has healed. This technique allows guided soft tissue healing by using a custom-made CAD-CAM healing abutment and impression coping.

  18. The influence of storage duration on the setting time of type 1 alginate impression material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmadina, A.; Triaminingsih, S.; Irawan, B.

    2017-08-01

    Alginate is one of the most commonly used dental impression materials; however, its setting time is subject to change depending on storage conditions and duration. This creates problems because consumer carelessness can affect alginate shelf life and quality. In the present study, the setting times of two groups of type I alginate with different expiry dates was tested. The first group consisted of 11 alginate specimens that had not yet passed the expiry date, and the second group consisted of alginates that had passed the expiry date. The alginate powder was mixed with distilled water, poured into a metal ring, and tested with a polished rod of poly-methyl methacrylate. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference (palginate that had not passed the expiry date (157 ± 3 seconds) and alginate that had passed the expiry date (144 ± 2 seconds). These findings indicate that storage duration can affect alginate setting time.

  19. Effect of impression tray design and impression technique upon the accuracy of stone casts produced from a putty-wash polyvinyl siloxane impression material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, W P; Sharkey, S W; Smith, G M; Taylor, W G

    1991-10-01

    This study examined the accuracy of stone casts produced from impressions taken in stock polycarbonate trays, some of which had been strengthened with autopolymerizing polymethyl methacrylate resin. Three techniques were used to make the impression of an acrylic master model of the mandibular arch on which two extracoronal preparations for bridgework and one intracoronal inlay preparation had been carried out. Each preparation had been indented with a reference point for later measurement. The impression material was a putty-wash polyvinyl siloxane material. Five impressions were taken for each type of tray for each impression technique and these were cast in die-stone after 24 h. The distances between the points were measured with a reflex microscope and the means determined for each design of tray. The mean difference between casts produced from the various tray designs and the acrylic master model were determined for each of the distances between the three measuring points for the various impression techniques. Statistical analysis showed that, with the polycarbonate stock trays, there were significant differences between some of the modifications and between them and the acrylic model, for the three distances (P less than 0.05). These differences were limited to one measurement for one design of tray for each of the two-stage impression methods. With the one-stage technique the unreinforced tray and those reinforced with acrylic, over the heels and anteriorly, and the barred design were statistically significantly different from the acrylic model for measurement A-B.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Evaluation of the accuracy of different transfer impression techniques for multiple implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Júlio César Brigolini de; Silva-Concílio, Laís Regiane; Neves, Ana Christina Claro; Miranda, Milton Edson; Teixeira, Marcelo Lucchesi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of three implant transfer impression techniques. Four groups (n = 5) were defined, according to the technique: TC - tapered copings without splint; SC - square copings without splint; SCS - square copings splinted with dental floss and acrylic resin, and CG (control group) - master model with four external hexagonal implants and a superstructure. Individual trays and polyether were used for the impression. All casts were checked for their fit into the master superstructure; for this, all four screws were placed in the implants. Digital photos were taken and images were analyzed using UTHSCSA ImageTool software. Statistical analyses were performed using one-way analysis of variance and Student's t test (p < 0.05). The means and standard deviation were (µm): CG = 2.03 ± 0.00, TC = 14.74 ± 3.41, SC = 12.08 ± 2.56, and SCS = 6.51 ± 0.09. The control group was found to be statistically different from the TC and SC groups. Within the limitations of this study, all groups presented clinically acceptable standard gap values, and the SCS group showed no statistical difference in relation to the CG (control group), demonstrating more accuracy and fidelity to transfer implants.

  1. Evaluation of the accuracy of different transfer impression techniques for multiple implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio César Brigolini de Faria

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of three implant transfer impression techniques. Four groups (n = 5 were defined, according to the technique: TC - tapered copings without splint; SC - square copings without splint; SCS - square copings splinted with dental floss and acrylic resin, and CG (control group - master model with four external hexagonal implants and a superstructure. Individual trays and polyether were used for the impression. All casts were checked for their fit into the master superstructure; for this, all four screws were placed in the implants. Digital photos were taken and images were analyzed using UTHSCSA ImageTool software. Statistical analyses were performed using one-way analysis of variance and Student’s t test (p < 0.05. The means and standard deviation were (µm: CG = 2.03 ± 0.00, TC = 14.74 ± 3.41, SC = 12.08 ± 2.56, and SCS = 6.51 ± 0.09. The control group was found to be statistically different from the TC and SC groups. Within the limitations of this study, all groups presented clinically acceptable standard gap values, and the SCS group showed no statistical difference in relation to the CG (control group, demonstrating more accuracy and fidelity to transfer implants.

  2. Electronic palatal rugae impression: a potentially relevant technology in personal identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Guerra

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Forensic medicine is now able to identify people through lots of different systems. Actually, fingerprints identification is the mostused identification method. To avoid identifying, many people alter or erase their fingerprints through chemical and / or abrasivesystems. The study of palatal rugae (palatoscopy is an identification technique today accepted by the international scientificcommunity as an alternative, safe and effective identification system, because of their characteristic feature of immutability andindividuality. Currently, the most used procedure is dental impression through plaster casts or photographs. The difficulties in therecording and cast’s storage limited the use of this identification system in comparison with others techniques. In order to improvethe palatal rugae analysis system, we designed a software, connected to a camera device that allows to acquire the palatal impression,to easily identify the salient palatal features and to store them in a database. This would permit a fast, simple and economicrecognition method that could be used without the need of specific staff training and that could easily be integrated with the existingfingerprint identification systems.

  3. Measurement of the accuracy of dental working casts using a coordinate measuring machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potran Michal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Dental impressions present a negative imprint of intraoral tissues of a patient which is, by pouring in gypsum, transferred extraorally on the working cast. Casting an accurate and precise working cast presents the first and very important step, since each of the following stages contributes to the overall error of the production process, which can lead to inadequately fitting dental restorations. The aim of this study was to promote and test a new model and technique for in vitro evaluation of the dental impression accuracy, as well as to asses the dimensional stability of impression material depending on the material bulk, and its effect on the accuracy of working casts. Methods. Impressions were made by the monophasic technique using the experimental master model. Custom trays with spacing of 1, 2 and 3 mm were constructed by rapid prototyping. The overall of 10 impressions were made with each custom tray. Working casts were made with gypsum type IV. Measurement of working casts was done 24 h later using a co-ordinate measuring machine. Results. The obtained results show that the working casts of all the three custom trays were in most cases significantly different in the transversal and sagittal planes in relation to the master model. The height of abutments was mainly unaffected. The degree of convergence showed certain significance in all the three custom trays, most pronounced in the tray with 3 mm spacing. Conclusion. The impression material bulk of 1–3 mm could provide accurate working casts when using the monophasic impression technique. The increase of the distance between abutment teeth influences the accuracy of working casts depending on the material bulk. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 35020: Research and development of modelling methods and approaches in manufacturing of dental recoveries with the application of modern technologies and computer aided systems

  4. Diabetes: Dental Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes and Oral Health > Diabetes: Dental Tips Diabetes: Dental Tips Main Content Diabetes can cause serious problems ... FOIA Web Policies Privacy Policy National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Institutes of Health Bethesda, ...

  5. Dental Exam for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they're most treatable. When to have a dental exam Various factors might determine how frequently your ... wisdom teeth (third molars) at the appropriate age. Dental X-ray A dental X-ray (radiograph) allows ...

  6. Dental Care in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Share with Women Dental Care in Pregnancy Why is dental care in pregnancy important? During pregnancy, you are more likely to have problems ... There are 2 major reasons women can have dental problems during pregnancy: Pregnancy gingivitis— During pregnancy, changes ...

  7. American Dental Education Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Interest Groups ADEA Governance Documents and Publications ADEA Dental Faculty Code of Conduct ADEA Bylaws ADEAGies Foundation ... Benefits for Faculty ADEA Member Benefits for Allied Dental Programs ADEA Member Benefits for Dental Schools ADEA ...

  8. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Conditions » Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental care is important for everybody, but people ... is Different About the Teeth of People With Down Syndrome? Delayed Eruption The teeth of people with Down ...

  9. Disinfection of bacterially contaminated hydrophilic PVS impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estafanous, Emad Wadie; Palenik, Charles John; Platt, Jeffrey A

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated disinfection of bacterially contaminated hydrophilic polyvinylsiloxane (PVS) and polyether impressions. Four light-bodied PVS (Examix, Genie, Take 1, Aquasil) and one polyether (Impregum) impression materials were evaluated using three disinfectants (EcoTru [EnviroSystems], ProSpray [Certol], and bleach [diluted 1:9]) as spray and immersion disinfections for 10-minute exposures. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442, Salmonella choleraesius ATCC 10708, and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 was the microbial challenge. Test specimens were prepared using aluminum molds with ten tapered cones. Mucin covered each cone, followed by 0.01 mL of each bacterium. Impressions were made using low viscosity impression material that was injected over the cones and filled custom trays. One-half of the impressions were spray disinfected, while the others underwent immersion disinfection. Trays that were contaminated but not disinfected served as positive controls, while those not bacterially contaminated or disinfected served as negative controls. The impressions were poured with Silky Rock Die Stone, and after setting, two cones were placed within a sterile capsule and triturated into powder. Four milliliters of TRIS buffer (0.05 M, pH 7.0) containing sodium thiosulfate (0.0055% w/v) were poured in each tube. After mixing, the solution was serially diluted and spread-plated onto selective agars. After incubation, colony counting occurred. No viable bacteria transferred to casts from either spray- or immersion-disinfected impressions. Negative controls produced no microbial colonies. Positive controls produced on average 3.35 × 10(5) bacterial cells. Results suggest the methods used could disinfect contaminated impression materials. Microbial transfer from nondisinfected impressions to cones approached 33.5%. © 2011 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  10. Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Jason A

    2017-10-01

    Systematic reviews of literature over the period between 2008 and 2017 are discussed regarding clinical evidence for the factors affecting survival and failure of dental implants. The factors addressed include publication bias, tooth location, insertion torque, collar design, implant-abutment connection design, implant length, implant width, bone augmentation, platform switching, surface roughness, implant coatings, and the use of ceramic materials in the implant body and abutment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Dental Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  12. Dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D; Ekstrand, Kim; Weintraub, Jane A; Ramos-Gomez, Francisco; Tagami, Junji; Twetman, Svante; Tsakos, Georgios; Ismail, Amid

    2017-05-25

    Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life, exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries, acknowledging the historical era dominated by restoration of tooth decay by surgical means, but focuses on current, progressive and more holistic long-term, patient-centred, tooth-preserving preventive care.

  13. SOCIAL LOAFING AND IMPRESSION MANAGEMENT IN AN ORGANIZATIONAL CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Harun Meydan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to find out relationship between behaviors of people who tend to loaf in organizational context and their impression management strategies, and to reveal specific impression management strategies applied by loafers. Our research is conducted with voluntary participation of 100 bank clerks, who work at a private bank located in Ankara, Turkey. Data were collected by means of questionnaires. Findings indicate that social loafers are engaged in impression management strategies. Loafers, who feel disconnected, behave distractive and disruptive. However, perceived results of loafing curtail their face saving efforts. Findings are further discussed and recommendations for future studies are emphasized.

  14. Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to basilar impression: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Holanda, Maurus Marques; Pereira Neto, Normando Guedes; de Moura Peixoto, Gustavo; Pinheiro Santos, Rayan Haquim

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of trigeminal neuralgia. A 23-year-old woman with a history of 1 year of typical trigeminal neuralgia manifested the characteristics of basilar impression. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated basilar impression, deformity of the posterior fossa with asymmetry of petrous bone, and compression of medulla oblongata in the topography of the odontoid apophysis. The operation was performed through a suboccipital craniectomy. The neuralgia disappeared after surgery and remains completely resolved until today. This is the second reported case of trigeminal neuralgia in a patient with basilar impression in Brazil. PMID:25972713

  15. Strategies for managing impressions of racial identity in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Laura Morgan; Cha, Sandra E; Kim, Sung Soo

    2014-10-01

    This article deepens understanding of the workplace experiences of racial minorities by investigating racial identity-based impression management (RIM) by Asian American journalists. Racial centrality, directly or indirectly, predicted the use of 4 RIM strategies (avoidance, enhancement, affiliation, and racial humor). Professional centrality also predicted strategy use, which was related to life satisfaction and perceived career success. By shedding light on proactive strategies that individuals use to influence colleagues' impressions of their racial identity, we contribute to research on diversity in organizations, impression management, and racial identity. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Danish dental education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed.......The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed....

  17. Danish dental education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed.......The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed....

  18. American Dental Hygienists' Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Student Resources National Exam Student Advisor Resources Dental Hygiene Programs Scholarships and Grants Research Center Transforming Dental Hygiene Education Advocacy Practice Issues Direct Access Scope ...

  19. Dental Fear among Medical and Dental Undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht’s Dental Fear Survey (DFS questionnaire. Methods. Kleinknecht’s DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates’ of the University of Malaya. Results. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%. However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%. Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P=0.004. “Heart beats faster” and “muscle being tensed” were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. “Drill” and “anesthetic needle” were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Conclusion. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services.

  20. Efficient digitalization method for dental restorations using micro-CT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changhwan; Baek, Seung Hoon; Lee, Taewon; Go, Jonggun; Kim, Sun Young; Cho, Seungryong

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using micro-CT scan of dental impressions for fabricating dental restorations and to compare the dimensional accuracy of dental models generated from various methods. The key idea of the proposed protocol is that dental impression of patients can be accurately digitized by micro-CT scan and that one can make digital cast model from micro-CT data directly. As air regions of the micro-CT scan data of dental impression are equivalent to the real teeth and surrounding structures, one can segment the air regions and fabricate digital cast model in the STL format out of them. The proposed method was validated by a phantom study using a typodont with prepared teeth. Actual measurement and deviation map analysis were performed after acquiring digital cast models for each restoration methods. Comparisons of the milled restorations were also performed by placing them on the prepared teeth of typodont. The results demonstrated that an efficient fabrication of precise dental restoration is achievable by use of the proposed method. PMID:28294188

  1. Efficient digitalization method for dental restorations using micro-CT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changhwan; Baek, Seung Hoon; Lee, Taewon; Go, Jonggun; Kim, Sun Young; Cho, Seungryong

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using micro-CT scan of dental impressions for fabricating dental restorations and to compare the dimensional accuracy of dental models generated from various methods. The key idea of the proposed protocol is that dental impression of patients can be accurately digitized by micro-CT scan and that one can make digital cast model from micro-CT data directly. As air regions of the micro-CT scan data of dental impression are equivalent to the real teeth and surrounding structures, one can segment the air regions and fabricate digital cast model in the STL format out of them. The proposed method was validated by a phantom study using a typodont with prepared teeth. Actual measurement and deviation map analysis were performed after acquiring digital cast models for each restoration methods. Comparisons of the milled restorations were also performed by placing them on the prepared teeth of typodont. The results demonstrated that an efficient fabrication of precise dental restoration is achievable by use of the proposed method.

  2. Efficient digitalization method for dental restorations using micro-CT data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changhwan; Baek, Seung Hoon; Lee, Taewon; Go, Jonggun; Kim, Sun Young; Cho, Seungryong

    2017-03-15

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using micro-CT scan of dental impressions for fabricating dental restorations and to compare the dimensional accuracy of dental models generated from various methods. The key idea of the proposed protocol is that dental impression of patients can be accurately digitized by micro-CT scan and that one can make digital cast model from micro-CT data directly. As air regions of the micro-CT scan data of dental impression are equivalent to the real teeth and surrounding structures, one can segment the air regions and fabricate digital cast model in the STL format out of them. The proposed method was validated by a phantom study using a typodont with prepared teeth. Actual measurement and deviation map analysis were performed after acquiring digital cast models for each restoration methods. Comparisons of the milled restorations were also performed by placing them on the prepared teeth of typodont. The results demonstrated that an efficient fabrication of precise dental restoration is achievable by use of the proposed method.

  3. Accuracy in dental medicine, a new way to measure trueness and precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ender, Andreas; Mehl, Albert

    2014-04-29

    Reference scanners are used in dental medicine to verify a lot of procedures. The main interest is to verify impression methods as they serve as a base for dental restorations. The current limitation of many reference scanners is the lack of accuracy scanning large objects like full dental arches, or the limited possibility to assess detailed tooth surfaces. A new reference scanner, based on focus variation scanning technique, was evaluated with regards to highest local and general accuracy. A specific scanning protocol was tested to scan original tooth surface from dental impressions. Also, different model materials were verified. The results showed a high scanning accuracy of the reference scanner with a mean deviation of 5.3 ± 1.1 µm for trueness and 1.6 ± 0.6 µm for precision in case of full arch scans. Current dental impression methods showed much higher deviations (trueness: 20.4 ± 2.2 µm, precision: 12.5 ± 2.5 µm) than the internal scanning accuracy of the reference scanner. Smaller objects like single tooth surface can be scanned with an even higher accuracy, enabling the system to assess erosive and abrasive tooth surface loss. The reference scanner can be used to measure differences for a lot of dental research fields. The different magnification levels combined with a high local and general accuracy can be used to assess changes of single teeth or restorations up to full arch changes.

  4. Dental students--dental advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensch, Brittany

    2010-01-01

    Student advocacy and involvement in the political process is built into the structure of the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), especially in its Legislative Grassroots Network and an internal communication network among students to ensure political awareness. Students are concerned with such issues as a universally accepted, non-patient-based licensure process, mid-level providers, loan availability and tax deductibility, financial support for schools, and service early in one's professional career (giving forward rather than giving back). Through collaboration with the American Dental Education Association and with many state associations, students participate in lobbying, awareness campaigns, and behind the scenes as legislative aids. Although students share the same love for the profession that animates established practitioners, they are perceived by legislators as being different. Students are involved in the legislative process because it represents their future.

  5. Impression Management in the Job Interview: An Effective Way of Mitigating Discrimination against Older Applicants?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Irina Gioaba; Franciska Krings

    2017-01-01

    .... Drawing on theories of social identity and impression management, our research examines the role of impression management, aimed at refuting common older worker stereotypes, in diminishing bias...

  6. Polyvinyl siloxane impression materials: a review of properties and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, W W; Donovan, T E

    1992-11-01

    Polyvinyl siloxane impression materials have been shown to have excellent properties as impression materials; however, they are sensitive to manipulative variables. Several methods of using very high viscosity (putty) materials to form "trays" to obtain uniform bulk of the wash impression are described, and the disadvantages of each of these techniques is pointed out. It is recommended that for best results acrylic resin custom trays should be used routinely. The interaction of polyvinyl siloxane materials with latex products is also discussed and problems that this inhibition can cause are stated. Suggestions to avoid this interaction are outlined. One of the disadvantages of the impression materials is that it has a relatively short working time. Refrigerating the material will increase working time without affecting accuracy.

  7. Effect of provisional luting agents on polyvinyl siloxane impression material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R H; Cook, G S; Moon, M G

    1996-04-01

    Eugenol-containing cements have been traditionally selected for seating provisional restorations, but incomplete polymerization of polyvinyl siloxane impression materials has been attributed to these cements. This study clinically evaluated the inhibitory effect on polymerization of a specific polyvinyl siloxane impression material with five luting agents used for provisional restorations. Three of these luting agents contained eugenol, whereas two interim cements did not contain eugenol. A total of 60 human posterior teeth were prepared for complete crowns, fitted for provisional crowns, and cemented with interim luting agents. After 2.5 weeks the provisional crowns were removed, the cement on tooth preparations was removed with an explorer, and impressions were made. The results revealed that none of the luting agents in this investigation had an inhibitory effect on polymerization of polyvinyl siloxane impression materials.

  8. Technique for adapting a spacer for a custom impression tray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harsimran; Nanda, Aditi; Verma, Mahesh; Koli, Dheeraj

    2016-12-01

    A method of adapting a spacer for the custom trays used to make a definite impression for complete dentures is presented. The technique can be used under a variety of conditions and offers several advantages.

  9. Accuracy of impressions obtained with dual-arch trays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöstmann, Bernd; Rehmann, Peter; Balkenhol, Markus

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the accuracy resulting from dual-arch impressions when compared to conventional impressions in complex preparations (ie, inlay and partial crown). One hundred eighty impressions were made using two different dual-arch trays; conventional trays served as the control. The accuracy of the dies obtained (Fuji-Rock EP, GC Europe) was assessed indirectly from the change of 59 transversal dimensions. Statistical analysis (t test, analysis of variance) revealed that less rigid dual-arch trays performed better than rigid ones. Though the inlay preparation was more difficult to reproduce with dual-arch trays, it can be concluded that the accuracy obtainable with nonrigid dual-arch trays is comparable to impressions taken from full-arch trays.

  10. SAM: A Simple Averaging Model of Impression Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robert A.

    1976-01-01

    Describes the Simple Averaging Model (SAM) which was developed to demonstrate impression-formation computer modeling with less complex and less expensive procedures than are required by most established programs. (RC)

  11. Impression Formation and Role Fulfillment: A "Holistic Reference" Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, E. Tory; Rholes, William S.

    1976-01-01

    Previous approaches to impression formation from verbal information are discussed. A "holistic reference" approach is presented which proposes that a person first calls to mind the reference of the verbal description as a whole, and then evaluates that reference. (Editor)

  12. Managing Impression Formation in Computer-Mediated Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuliang; Ginther, Dean

    2001-01-01

    Offers suggestions for online instructors regarding verbal and nonverbal impression management. The recommendations should facilitate computer mediated teacher-student or manager-client interactions and help develop constructive relationships that promote learning and productivity. (EV)

  13. Malawian impressions of expatriate physicians: A qualitative study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malawian impressions of expatriate physicians: A qualitative study. ... Despite the well-known benefits of global health experiences for expatriates, little is known ... guide individual expatriate physicians who hope to optimise their roles abroad.

  14. Electronic evaluation for video commercials by impression index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Wanzeng; Zhao, Xinxin; Hu, Sanqing; Vecchiato, Giovanni; Babiloni, Fabio

    2013-12-01

    How to evaluate the effect of commercials is significantly important in neuromarketing. In this paper, we proposed an electronic way to evaluate the influence of video commercials on consumers by impression index. The impression index combines both the memorization and attention index during consumers observing video commercials by tracking the EEG activity. It extracts features from scalp EEG to evaluate the effectiveness of video commercials in terms of time-frequency-space domain. And, the general global field power was used as an impression index for evaluation of video commercial scenes as time series. Results of experiment demonstrate that the proposed approach is able to track variations of the cerebral activity related to cognitive task such as observing video commercials, and help to judge whether the scene in video commercials is impressive or not by EEG signals.

  15. Image Processing Techniques for Assessment of Dental Trays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Dimensional Tooth Movement During Orthodontic Treatment�, IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, Vol. 38, no 4, pp. 360-365, April 1991. [2...in a Complete Dental Arch Cast�, The Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, Vol 61, no 1, pp. 54-58, January 1989. [3] Saunders, W. P., Sharkey, S. W...Polyvinyl Siloxane Impression Material�, Journal of Dentistry, Vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 283-289, October 1991. [4] Johnson, G.H., Craig, R. G., �Accuracy

  16. Characterization of dental anatomy and gingival biotype in Asian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stacey A; Kim, Alexis C; Prusa, Louis A; Kao, Richard T

    2013-01-01

    Gingival and dental characteristics are risk factors for periodontal problems. With short or fused roots, a decreased periodontium results in some attachment loss, compromising periodontal stability. Similarly, with an increased incidence of thin gingival biotype, inflammatory and traumatic insults may result in gingival recession. Anecdotally, Asian dentitions have been described as having short roots with "thin gingiva". This cross-sectional study will utilize clinical data and radiographic interpretation to ascertain whether this clinical impression is valid.

  17. Anisotropic local physical properties of human dental enamel in comparison to properties of some common dental filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raue, Lars; Hartmann, Christiane D; Rödiger, Matthias; Bürgers, Ralf; Gersdorff, Nikolaus

    2014-11-01

    A major aspect in evaluating the quality of dental materials is their physical properties. Their properties should be a best fit of the ones of dental hard tissues. Manufacturers give data sheets for each material. The properties listed are characterized by a specific value. This assumes (but does not prove) that there is no direction dependence of the properties. However, dental enamel has direction-dependent properties which additionally vary with location in the tooth. The aim of this paper is to show the local direction dependence of physical properties like the elastic modulus or the thermal expansion in dental hard tissues. With this knowledge the 'perfect filling/dental material' could be characterized. Enamel sections of ∼400-500 μm thickness have been cut with a diamond saw from labial/buccal to palatal/lingual (canine, premolar and molar) and parallel to labial (incisor). Crystallite arrangements have been measured in over 400 data points on all types of teeth with x-ray scattering techniques, known from materials science. X-ray scattering measurements show impressively that dental enamel has a strong direction dependence of its physical properties which also varies with location within the tooth. Dental materials possess only little or no property direction dependence. Therefore, a mismatch was found between enamel and dental materials properties. Since dental materials should possess equal (direction depending) properties, worthwhile properties could be characterized by transferring the directional properties of enamel into a property 'wish list' which future dental materials should fulfil. Hereby the 'perfect dental material' can be characterized.

  18. Factors for determining dental anxiety in preschool children with severe dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanto, Jenny; Vidigal, Evelyn Alvarez; Carvalho, Thiago Saads; Sá, Stella Núbia Coelho de; Bönecker, Marcelo

    2017-01-16

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical and socioeconomic indicators associated with dental anxiety in preschool children with severe dental caries. A total of 100 children between 3 and 5 years of age were selected during a dental screening procedure. The selection criteria were having at least one tooth with dental caries and a visible pulpal involvement, ulceration, fistula, and abscess (PUFA) index of ≥1 in primary teeth. Before the clinical examination or any treatment procedure was performed, we evaluated the children's dental anxiety using the Facial Image Scale (FIS). Parents completed a questionnaire on socioeconomic conditions, which included the family structure, number of siblings, parental level of education, and family income. A dentist blinded to FIS and socioeconomic data performed the clinical examination. Poisson regressions associate clinical and socioeconomic conditions with the outcome. Most of the children (53%) experienced extensive dental caries (dmf-t ≥ 6), and all children had severe caries lesions, with a PUFA index of ≥1 in 41% and that of ≥2 in 59%. The multivariate adjusted model showed that older children (4-5-year old) experienced lower dental anxiety levels compared with younger children (3-year old) (RR = 0.35; 95%CI: 0.17-0.72 and RR = 0.18; 95%CI: 0.04-0.76, respectively), and children with three or more siblings were associated with higher levels of dental anxiety (RR = 2.27; 95%CI: 1.06-4.87). Older age is associated with low dental anxiety, and more number of siblings is associated with high dental anxiety in preschool children, whereas the severity or extent of dental caries is not associated with dental anxiety.

  19. Prefabricated Stock Trays for Impression of Auricular Region

    OpenAIRE

    Vibha, Shetty; Anandkrishna, G. N.; Anupam, Purwar; Namratha, N.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional methods of impression making for maxillofacial defects are cumbersome and time consuming for both patient and operator. This study focuses upon standardizing and simplifying the impression making methodology for auricular prosthesis with the help of prefabricated stock trays for auricular region. The stock trays were designed on positive replicas of anatomical structures, broadly divided into long and narrow, short and broad and long and broad ear. For each stock tray, impres...

  20. Functional Impressions in Complete Denture and Overdenture Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Tooth loss can cause loss of occlusal, masticatory, esthetic, physiognomic, phonetic and psychosocial function of patients. The most frequently used treatment method of completely edentulous patients and patients with a small number of remaining teeth are complete dentures or overdentures. One of the most important clinical and laboratory procedures in their fabrication is functional impression taking. The aim of this paper was to present procedures of taking functional impressions in fabrica...

  1. Competition and dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grytten, J; Sørensen, R

    2000-07-01

    Dental services for adults are different from all other Norwegian health services in that they are provided by private producers (dentists) who have full freedom to establish a practice. They have had this freedom since the end of World War II. A further liberalization of the market for dental services occurred in November 1995, when the so-called normal tariff was repealed. The system changed from a fixed fee system to a deregulated fee system. In principle, the market for dental services for adults operates as a free competitive market, in which dentists must compete for a market share. The aim of this study was to study the short-term effects of competition. A comprehensive set of data on fees, practice characteristics, treatment profiles and factors that dentists take into account when determining fees was analysed. The main finding was that competition has a weak effect. No support was found for the theory that the level of fees is the result of monopolistic competition or monopoly. The results also provided some evidence against the inducement hypothesis. At this stage, it is interesting to notice that dentists do not seem to exploit the power they have to control the market. One explanation, which is consistent with the more recent literature, is that physicians' behaviour to a large extent is influenced by professional norms and caring concerns about their patients. Financial incentives are important, but these incentives are constrained by norms other than self-interest. The interpretation of the results should also take into account that the deregulation has operated for a short time and that dentists and patients may not yet have adjusted to changes in the characteristics of the market.

  2. Comparison of two impression techniques for auricular prosthesis: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Kasim; Mani, U M; Seenivasan, M K; Vaidhyanathan, A K; Veeravalli, P T

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to compare the accuracy of a new impression technique, the triple-layer impression technique (TLIT), with the conventional impression technique (CIT) to fabricate an auricular prosthesis. Fifteen male subjects (aged 22-45 yr) were selected. Ten markings were made on the subject's ear (super aurale [sa], sub aurale [sba], pre aurale [pra], post aurale [poa], A, A1, B, B1, C, and C1) and five measurements (sa-sba, pra-poa, A-A1, B-B1, and C-C1) were made. Custom-made trays were used to record impression in CIT and TLIT. Impressions were made using alginate, and models were cast with type IV gypsum product. Markings were transferred on the cast. Measurements were rechecked on the models. Distribution analysis of difference in measurements between the two impression techniques and the subject's actual values was evaluated. Sign test was used to analyze the statistical significance. Statistically significant differences were found in measurements A-A1, B-B1, and C-C1 between the two techniques when compared with the subject's actual dimensions (p < 0.01). TLIT was found to produce accurate models when compared with CIT. The TLIT used in the study was cost effective, less technique sensitive, and tailor made to reduce chairside orientation time during wax try-in appointments for rehabilitating patients, especially those with unilateral auricular defects.

  3. SENSITIVITY OF IMPRESSION CYTOLOGY IN DIAGNOSING OCULAR SURFACE SQUAMOUS NEOPLASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malleswari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available OSSN describes a spectrum of neoplastic lesions, originating from squamous epithelium ranging from simple dysplasia to invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, involving the conjunctiva, limbus and the cornea. Impression cytology refers to the technique by which superficial layers of the ocular surface are removed through application of cellulose acetate filter material onto the ocular surface AIM: To Assess the Sensitivity of Impression Cytology in the Diagnosis of Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia Using Millipore Filter Paper. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a Prospective Observational and Interventional Study conducted at Sarojini Devi Eye Hospital and Gandhi Medical College/Hospital, Hyderabad. Study was conducted from July2013 to Feb2015 and included 50patients presenting with conjunctival mass at the limbus or on the conjunctiva Hospital ethics committee approval was obtained No financials involved in the study. RESULTS: A total of 50Excision biopsies of 50patients suspected for OSSN were performed there were 40 males and 10females Excision biopsy confirmed the Impression Cytology results in 44 cases. In 6 cases there was poor correlation among which 4cases showed mild dysplasia in Impression Cytology while HPE showed Invasive Squamous cell carcinoma in 2cases few dysplastic cells were noted in Impression cytology but HPE showed Carcinoma in situ. CONCLUSION: This study shows that Impression Cytology has a promising role in diagnosing Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia for its high positive predictive accuracy (95.65% compared with tissue histology.

  4. Auditory and visual spatial impression: Recent studies of three auditoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Andy; Cabrera, Densil

    2004-10-01

    Auditory spatial impression is widely studied for its contribution to auditorium acoustical quality. By contrast, visual spatial impression in auditoria has received relatively little attention in formal studies. This paper reports results from a series of experiments investigating the auditory and visual spatial impression of concert auditoria. For auditory stimuli, a fragment of an anechoic recording of orchestral music was convolved with calibrated binaural impulse responses, which had been made with the dummy head microphone at a wide range of positions in three auditoria and the sound source on the stage. For visual stimuli, greyscale photographs were used, taken at the same positions in the three auditoria, with a visual target on the stage. Subjective experiments were conducted with auditory stimuli alone, visual stimuli alone, and visual and auditory stimuli combined. In these experiments, subjects rated apparent source width, listener envelopment, intimacy and source distance (auditory stimuli), and spaciousness, envelopment, stage dominance, intimacy and target distance (visual stimuli). Results show target distance to be of primary importance in auditory and visual spatial impression-thereby providing a basis for covariance between some attributes of auditory and visual spatial impression. Nevertheless, some attributes of spatial impression diverge between the senses.

  5. Risk factors for severe dental anxiety among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, Slobodan M; Aleksić, Dragana; Bahtijari, Zulfer; Jelić, Anica; Klacar, Jelena; Kovacević, Aleksandra; Mijailović, Natasa; Milovanović, Olivera; Petrović, Aleksandra; Radovanović, Ana; Sovrlić, Miroslav; Zecević, Dejana Ruzić

    2014-01-01

    Severe dental anxiety (SDA) is the most severe form of dental anxiety, thus the aim of this study was to determine the factors associated with SDA in students of health-related disciplines. In this case-control study the cases were students with severe dental anxiety. The study was conducted at the Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Serbia. The participants were undergraduate students attending lectures during spring semester 2010/2011 (n = 1,812). A random sample of 800 students was assessed for the association between various risk factors and the severe dental anxiety. The main outcome measures were the data on demographics, dental anxiety, habits concerning oral hygiene, nutrition, general anxiety and (co)morbidity which were collected from the study participants by semi-structured questionnaire. Less frequent visits to the dentist (OR adjusted = 7.02 [2.65; 18.60]) and visiting the dentist only when there is a dental problem (OR adjusted = 8.08 [1.28; 50.93]) were associated with severe dental anxiety. The same was true for improper oral hygiene (OR adjusted = 4.25 [1.16; 15.60]). Factors as changing toothbrush more frequently (OR adjusted = 0.33 [0.14; 0.76]) and having chronic disease (OR adjusted = 0.01 [0.00; 0.09]) were inversely associated with severe dental anxiety. The level of education of students was not associated with severe dental anxiety. Inappropriate oral hygiene, less frequent changes of a toothbrush and less frequent visits to the dentist are important risk factors for severe dental anxiety.

  6. Risk factors for severe dental anxiety among medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Slobodan M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Severe dental anxiety (SDA is the most severe form of dental anxiety, thus the aim of this study was to determine the factors associated with SDA in students of health-related disciplines. Methods. In this case-control study the cases were students with severe dental anxiety. The study was conducted at the Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Serbia. The participants were undergraduate students attending lectures during spring semester 2010/2011 (n = 1,812. A random sample of 800 students was assessed for the association between various risk factors and the severe dental anxiety. The main outcome measures were the data on demographics, dental anxiety, habits concerning oral hygiene, nutrition, general anxiety and (comorbidity which were collected from the study participants by semi-structured questionnaire. Results. Less frequent visits to the dentist (OR adjusted = 7.02 [2.65; 18.60] and visiting the dentist only when there is a dental problem (OR adjusted = 8.08 [1.28; 50.93] were associated with severe dental anxiety. The same was true for improper oral hygiene (OR adjusted = 4.25 [1.16; 15.60]. Factors as changing toothbrush more frequently (OR adjusted = 0.33 [0.14; 0.76] and having chronic disease (OR adjusted = 0.01 [0.00; 0.09] were inversely associated with severe dental anxiety. The level of education of students was not associated with severe dental anxiety. Conclusion. Inappropriate oral hygiene, less frequent changes of a toothbrush and less frequent visits to the dentist are important risk factors for severe dental anxiety. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175007

  7. Dental erozyon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özen, B.; Yönel, N.; Çetiner, S.

    2015-01-01

    Dental erozyon, plak içermeyen diş yüzeyleri üzerinde içsel ve dışsal asitlerin veya şelatların etkileriyle oluşan kimyasal bir aşınmadır. İçsel ve/veya dışsal kaynaklar nedensel faktörler olarak tanımlanırken tükürük ve pelikıl gibi biyolojik faktörler, yeme ve içme alışkanlıkları ve ağız hijyeni

  8. Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Close Home > Medicaid > Benefits > Dental Care Dental Care Dental Care Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees Dental health ... services and opportunities and challenges to obtaining care. Dental Benefits for Children in Medicaid Medicaid covers dental ...

  9. Forensic considerations when dealing with incinerated human dental remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reesu, Gowri Vijay; Augustine, Jeyaseelan; Urs, Aadithya B

    2015-01-01

    Establishing the human dental identification process relies upon sufficient post-mortem data being recovered to allow for a meaningful comparison with ante-mortem records of the deceased person. Teeth are the most indestructible components of the human body and are structurally unique in their composition. They possess the highest resistance to most environmental effects like fire, desiccation, decomposition and prolonged immersion. In most natural as well as man-made disasters, teeth may provide the only means of positive identification of an otherwise unrecognizable body. It is imperative that dental evidence should not be destroyed through erroneous handling until appropriate radiographs, photographs, or impressions can be fabricated. Proper methods of physical stabilization of incinerated human dental remains should be followed. The maintenance of integrity of extremely fragile structures is crucial to the successful confirmation of identity. In such situations, the forensic dentist must stabilise these teeth before the fragile remains are transported to the mortuary to ensure preservation of possibly vital identification evidence. Thus, while dealing with any incinerated dental remains, a systematic approach must be followed through each stage of evaluation of incinerated dental remains to prevent the loss of potential dental evidence. This paper presents a composite review of various studies on incinerated human dental remains and discusses their impact on the process of human identification and suggests a step by step approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  10. Agave Chewing and Dental Wear: Evidence from Quids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily E Hammerl

    Full Text Available Agave quid chewing is examined as a potential contributing behavior to hunter-gatherer dental wear. It has previously been hypothesized that the contribution of Agave quid chewing to dental wear would be observed in communities wherever phytolith-rich desert succulents were part of subsistence. Previous analysis of coprolites from a prehistoric agricultural site, La Cueva de los Muertos Chiquitos in Durango, Mexico, showed that Agave was a consistent part of a diverse diet. Therefore, quids recovered at this site ought to be useful materials to test the hypothesis that dental wear was related to desert succulent consumption. The quids recovered from the site were found to be largely derived from chewing Agave. In this study, the quids were found to be especially rich in phytoliths, and analysis of dental casts made from impressions left in the quids revealed flat wear and dental attrition similar to that of Agave-reliant hunter-gatherers. Based on evidence obtained from the analysis of quids, taken in combination with results from previous studies, it is determined that Agave quid chewing was a likely contributing factor to dental wear in this population. As such, our method provides an additional avenue of dental research in areas where quids are present.

  11. Agave Chewing and Dental Wear: Evidence from Quids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerl, Emily E; Baier, Melissa A; Reinhard, Karl J

    2015-01-01

    Agave quid chewing is examined as a potential contributing behavior to hunter-gatherer dental wear. It has previously been hypothesized that the contribution of Agave quid chewing to dental wear would be observed in communities wherever phytolith-rich desert succulents were part of subsistence. Previous analysis of coprolites from a prehistoric agricultural site, La Cueva de los Muertos Chiquitos in Durango, Mexico, showed that Agave was a consistent part of a diverse diet. Therefore, quids recovered at this site ought to be useful materials to test the hypothesis that dental wear was related to desert succulent consumption. The quids recovered from the site were found to be largely derived from chewing Agave. In this study, the quids were found to be especially rich in phytoliths, and analysis of dental casts made from impressions left in the quids revealed flat wear and dental attrition similar to that of Agave-reliant hunter-gatherers. Based on evidence obtained from the analysis of quids, taken in combination with results from previous studies, it is determined that Agave quid chewing was a likely contributing factor to dental wear in this population. As such, our method provides an additional avenue of dental research in areas where quids are present.

  12. A snapshot of cultural competency education in US dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Michael L; Bean, Canise Y; Casamassimo, Paul S

    2006-09-01

    During the last decade, cultural competency has received a great deal of attention in health care and the literature of many fields, including education, social services, law, and health care. The dental education literature provides little information regarding status, strategies, or guiding principles of cultural competency education in U.S. dental schools. This study was an attempt to describe the status of cultural competency education in U.S. dental schools. A web-based thirty-question survey regarding cultural competency education coursework, teaching, course materials, and content was sent in 2005 to the assistant/associate deans for academic affairs at fifty-six U.S. dental schools, followed up by subsequent email messages. Thirty-four (61 percent) dental school officials responded to the survey. The majority of respondents (twenty-eight; 82 percent) did not have a specific stand-alone cultural competency course, but indicated it was integrated into the curriculum. Recognition of local and national community diversity needs prompted course creation in most schools. Respondents at almost two-thirds of schools indicated that their impression of students' acceptance was positive. Teachers of cultural competency were primarily white female dentists. Few schools required faculty to have similar cultural competency or diversity training. Thirty-three of the thirty-four U.S. dental schools responding to this survey offer some form of coursework in cultural competency with little standardization and a variety of methods and strategies to teach dental students.

  13. Child Indicators: Dental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewit, Eugene M.; Kerrebrock, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Reviews measures of dental health in children and the evidence on child dental health. Although children's dental health has improved over the past two decades, many poor children do not receive necessary dental health services, and reasons for this failure are summarized. (SLD)

  14. Accuracy of newly formulated fast-setting elastomeric impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwani, Chandur P K; Johnson, Glen H; Lepe, Xavier; Raigrodski, Ariel J

    2005-06-01

    Elastomeric impression materials have been reformulated to achieve a faster set. The accuracy of fast-setting elastomeric impression materials should be confirmed, particularly with respect to disinfection. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of 2 types of fast-setting impression materials when disinfected with acid glutaraldehyde. Impressions of the mandibular arch of a modified dentoform master model were made, from which gypsum working casts and dies were formed. Measurements of the master model and working casts included anteroposterior (AP) and cross-arch (CA) dimensions. A stainless steel circular crown preparation incorporated within the master model was measured in buccolingual (BL), mesiodistal (MD), and occlusogingival (OG) dimensions and compared to measurements from recovered gypsum dies. The impression materials examined were a fast-set vinyl polysiloxane (VPS-FS, Aquasil Ultra Fast Set), a fast-set polyether (PE-FS, Impregum Penta Soft Quick Step), and a regular-setting polyether as a control (PE, Impregum Penta). Disinfection involved immersion in 3.5% acid glutaraldehyde (Banicide Advanced) for 20 minutes, and nondisinfected impressions served as a control. Linear measurements were made with a measuring microscope. Statistical analysis utilized a 2-way and single-factor analysis of variance with pair-wise comparison of mean values when appropriate. Hypothesis testing was conducted at alpha = .05 No differences were shown between the disinfected and nondisinfected conditions for all locations. However, there were statistical differences among the 3 materials for AP, CA, MD, and OG dimensions. AP and CA dimensions of all working casts were larger than the master model. Impressions produced oval-shaped working dies for all impression materials. PE and PE-FS working dies were larger in all dimensions compared to the stainless steel preparation, whereas VPS-FS-generated working dies were reduced in OG and MD dimensions. Differences

  15. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution.

  16. Custom sectional impression trays with interlocking type handle for microstomia patients

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes Aquaviva; Mascarenhas Kennedy; Aras Meena

    2009-01-01

    Making impressions in microstomia patients is often cumbersome. A modification of standard impression procedure is often necessary while treating such patients. This article describes the fabrication of a custom sectional impression tray with interlocking type of a handle for definitive impression procedures in a microstomia patient.

  17. Custom sectional impression trays with interlocking type handle for microstomia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes Aquaviva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Making impressions in microstomia patients is often cumbersome. A modification of standard impression procedure is often necessary while treating such patients. This article describes the fabrication of a custom sectional impression tray with interlocking type of a handle for definitive impression procedures in a microstomia patient.

  18. Custom sectional impression trays with interlocking type handle for microstomia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Aquaviva S; Mascarenhas, Kennedy; Aras, Meena A

    2009-01-01

    Making impressions in microstomia patients is often cumbersome. A modification of standard impression procedure is often necessary while treating such patients. This article describes the fabrication of a custom sectional impression tray with interlocking type of a handle for definitive impression procedures in a microstomia patient.

  19. [Association between malocclusion and dissatisfaction with dental and gingival appearance: study with Brazilian adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Carolina Marques; Peres, Marco Aurélio; Peres, Karen Glazer

    2010-12-01

    In spite of the high prevalence of malocclusion in adolescents reported worldwide, there are few studies that have investigated the association between normative malocclusion and self-rated dental and gingival appearance among adolescents. The aim of this study was to identify the association between normative malocclusion and dissatisfaction with dental and gingival appearance among Brazilian adolescents. A cross-sectional study was carried out with adolescents aged 15 to 19 years (n= 16,126) living in 250 towns of all five Brazilian regions. Dissatisfaction with dental and gingival appearance was the outcome. The main explanatory variable was malocclusion assessed by using the Dental Aesthetic Index - DAI. The other explanatory variables included were per capita family income, schooling delay, study conditions, sex, age, skin color, dental outcomes (untreated dental caries, missing teeth due dental caries, dental calculus, fluorosis, and dental pain) and use of dental services. Simple and multivariable Poisson regression analyses were performed. Dissatisfaction with dental appearance reached 11.4% (95%CI: 10.4-12.5) of the entire sample. All levels of malocclusion were associated with dissatisfaction with dental appearance. Adjusted multivariable analysis showed that dissatisfaction with dental appearance among individuals affected by severe or very severe malocclusion was respectively 40% and 80% higher than among those with normal occlusion. Malocclusion was associated with dissatisfaction with dental and gingival appearance. The results contribute to include self-rated dental appearance criteria in orthodontic treatment decision, mainly within the National Health System - SUS.

  20. Prefabricated stock trays for impression of auricular region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibha, Shetty; Anandkrishna, G N; Anupam, Purwar; Namratha, N

    2010-06-01

    The conventional methods of impression making for maxillofacial defects are cumbersome and time consuming for both patient and operator. This study focuses upon standardizing and simplifying the impression making methodology for auricular prosthesis with the help of prefabricated stock trays for auricular region. The stock trays were designed on positive replicas of anatomical structures, broadly divided into long and narrow, short and broad and long and broad ear. For each stock tray, impressions of auricle, of patients of different morphology were made with plastic funnels of different shape and size ensuring at least 6 mm of space between the anatomical part and inner surface of funnel and master cast was obtained. Subsequent adaptation of wax was done and fabrications of stock stainless steel trays were done. A standardized stock tray for making of auricular impressions was developed. From this innovative technical procedure it is possible to get an accurate impression of auricular defects now by the use of prefabricated stock trays rather than the cumbersome conventional method.

  1. Accuracy of Multiple Pour Cast from Various Elastomer Impression Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralur, Satheesh B; Saad Toman, Majed; Ali Al-Shahrani, Abdullah; Ali Al-Qarni, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    The accurate duplicate cast obtained from a single impression reduces the profession clinical time, patient inconvenience, and extra material cost. The stainless steel working cast model assembly consisting of two abutments and one pontic area was fabricated. Two sets of six each custom aluminum trays were fabricated, with five mm spacer and two mm spacer. The impression methods evaluated during the study were additional silicone putty reline (two steps), heavy-light body (one step), monophase (one step), and polyether (one step). Type IV gypsum casts were poured at the interval of one hour, 12 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours. The resultant cast was measured with traveling microscope for the comparative dimensional accuracy. The data obtained were subjected to Analysis of Variance test at significance level impression techniques had the percentage of variation for the height -0.36 to -0.97%, while diameter was increased by 0.40-0.90%. The values for one-step heavy-light body impression dies, additional silicone monophase impressions, and polyether were -0.73 to -1.21%, -1.34%, and -1.46% for the height and 0.50-0.80%, 1.20%, and -1.30% for the width, respectively.

  2. Accuracy of Multiple Pour Cast from Various Elastomer Impression Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satheesh B. Haralur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The accurate duplicate cast obtained from a single impression reduces the profession clinical time, patient inconvenience, and extra material cost. The stainless steel working cast model assembly consisting of two abutments and one pontic area was fabricated. Two sets of six each custom aluminum trays were fabricated, with five mm spacer and two mm spacer. The impression methods evaluated during the study were additional silicone putty reline (two steps, heavy-light body (one step, monophase (one step, and polyether (one step. Type IV gypsum casts were poured at the interval of one hour, 12 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours. The resultant cast was measured with traveling microscope for the comparative dimensional accuracy. The data obtained were subjected to Analysis of Variance test at significance level <0.05. The die obtained from two-step putty reline impression techniques had the percentage of variation for the height −0.36 to −0.97%, while diameter was increased by 0.40–0.90%. The values for one-step heavy-light body impression dies, additional silicone monophase impressions, and polyether were −0.73 to −1.21%, −1.34%, and −1.46% for the height and 0.50–0.80%, 1.20%, and −1.30% for the width, respectively.

  3. Wettability of elastomeric impression materials: effect of selected surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, J T; Antony, S J; Dial, M L; Duncanson, M G; Shillingburg, H T

    1989-01-01

    This study evaluated seven classes of 65 impression materials for the effect of selected surfactants on contact angle values for high-strength stone. Uniform surfaces of the materials were treated with a surfactant, and stone samples were poured on each impression material surface. The samples were sectioned and photographed for measurement of the advancing contact angles. Statistical analysis supported four conclusions: No significant difference was found between the two surfactants. Both surfactants were significantly better than the control (water). Polyether impression materials were superior in wettability to the other elastomeric impression materials tested. With respect to contact angle, two distinct groups of impression materials emerged. Reversible hydrocolloid (47.7 +/- 1.5), irreversible hydrocolloid (36.8 +/- 8.8), and polyether (45.8 +/- 7.6) formed a hydrophilic group. A hydrophobic group consisted of the polysulfide (62.6 +/- 10.1), poly(vinyl siloxane) (71.1 +/- 12.3), condensation-reaction silicone (74.1 +/- 11.0), and polyethene (75.9 +/- 14.6) materials.

  4. Outcome dependency alters the neural substrates of impression formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Daniel L; Fiske, Susan T

    2013-12-01

    How do people maintain consistent impressions of other people when other people are often inconsistent? The present research addresses this question by combining recent neuroscientific insights with ecologically meaningful behavioral methods. Participants formed impressions of real people whom they met in a personally involving situation. fMRI and supporting behavioral data revealed that outcome dependency (i.e., depending on another person for a desired outcome) alters previously identified neural dynamics of impression formation. Consistent with past research, a functional localizer identified a region of dorsomedial PFC previously linked to social impression formation. In the main task, this ROI revealed the predicted patterns of activity across outcome dependency conditions: greater BOLD response when information confirmed (vs. violated) social expectations if participants were outcome-independent, and the reverse pattern if participants were outcome-dependent. We suggest that, although social perceivers often discount expectancy-disconfirming information as noise, being dependent on another person for a desired outcome focuses impression-formation processing on the most diagnostic information, rather than on the most tractable information.

  5. Similarity to the self influences cortical recruitment during impression formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshikar, Eric D; Cassidy, Brittany S; Gutchess, Angela H

    2016-04-01

    Prior work has shown that whether or not someone is similar to the self influences person memory--a type of self-reference effect for others. In this study, we were interested in understanding the neural regions supporting the generation of impressions and subsequent memory for targets who vary in similarity to the self. Participants underwent fMRI scanning while forming positive or negative impressions of face-behavior pairs. We tested participants' memory for their generated impressions and then back-sorted the impression trials (encoding) into different levels of self-similarity (high, medium, low) using a self-similarity posttest that came after recognition. Extending prior behavioral work, our data confirmed our hypothesis that memory would be highest for self-similar others and lowest for self-dissimilar others. Dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) activity increased with self-similarity (high > medium > low) to targets, regardless of later memory for them. An analysis of regions supporting impression memory revealed a double dissociation within medial temporal lobe regions: for similar others, amygdala recruitment supported memory, whereas for dissimilar others, hippocampal activation supported memory. These results suggest that self-similarity influences evaluation and memory for targets but also affects the underlying neural resources engaged when thinking about others who vary in self-similarity.

  6. Enhancing the authenticity of assessments through grounding in first impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humă, Bogdana

    2015-09-01

    This article examines first impressions through a discursive and interactional lens. Until now, social psychologists have studied first impressions in laboratory conditions, in isolation from their natural environment, thus overseeing their discursive roles as devices for managing situated interactional concerns. I examine fragments of text and talk in which individuals spontaneously invoke first impressions of other persons as part of assessment activities in settings where the authenticity of speakers' stances might be threatened: (1) in activities with inbuilt evaluative components and (2) in sequential contexts where recipients have been withholding affiliation to speakers' actions. I discuss the relationship between authenticity, as a type of credibility issue related to intersubjective trouble, and the characteristics of first impression assessments, which render them useful for dealing with this specific credibility concern. I identify four features of first impression assessments which make them effective in enhancing authenticity: witness positioning (Potter, 1996, Representing reality: Discourse, rhetoric and social construction, Sage, London), (dis)location in time and space, automaticity, and extreme formulations (Edwards, 2003, Analyzing race talk: Multidisciplinary perspectives on the research interview, Cambridge University Press, New York).

  7. Outcome dependency alters the neural substrates of impression formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Daniel L.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    How do people maintain consistent impressions of other people when other people are often inconsistent? The present research addresses this question by combining recent neuroscientific insights with ecologically meaningful behavioral methods. Participants formed impressions of real people whom they met in a personally involving situation. fMRI and supporting behavioral data revealed that outcome dependency (i.e., depending on another person for a desired outcome) alters previously identified neural dynamics of impression formation. Consistent with past research, a functional localizer identified a region of dorsomedial PFC previously linked to social impression formation. In the main task, this ROI revealed the predicted patterns of activity across outcome dependency conditions: greater BOLD response when information confirmed (vs. violated) social expectations if participants were outcome-independent and the reverse pattern if participants were outcome-dependent. We suggest that, although social perceivers often discount expectancy-disconfirming information as noise, being dependent on another person for a desired outcome focuses impression-formation processing on the most diagnostic information, rather than on the most tractable information. PMID:23850465

  8. Dental erozyon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özen, B.; Yönel, N.; Çetiner, S.

    2015-01-01

    Dental erozyon, plak içermeyen diş yüzeyleri üzerinde içsel ve dışsal asitlerin veya şelatların etkileriyle oluşan kimyasal bir aşınmadır. İçsel ve/veya dışsal kaynaklar nedensel faktörler olarak tanımlanırken tükürük ve pelikıl gibi biyolojik faktörler, yeme ve içme alışkanlıkları ve ağız hijyeni g

  9. Dental Care Utilization for Examination and Regional Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheol-Sin; Han, Sun-Young; Lee, Seung Eun; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Kim, Chul-Woung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Receiving proper dental care plays a significant role in maintaining good oral health. We investigated the relationship between regional deprivation and dental care utilization. Methods: Multilevel logistic regression was used to identify the relationship between the regional deprivation level and dental care utilization purpose, adjusting for individual-level variables, in adults aged 19+ in the 2008 Korean Community Health Survey (n=220 258). Results: Among Korean adults, 12.8% used dental care to undergo examination and 21.0% visited a dentist for other reasons. In the final model, regional deprivation level was associated with significant variations in dental care utilization for examination (pdental care utilization for other reasons in the final model. Conclusions: This study’s findings suggest that policy interventions should be considered to reduce regional variations in rates of dental care utilization for examination. PMID:26265665

  10. A Dental Education Perspective on Dental Health Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Alvin L.

    1985-01-01

    Two issues related to dental health policy are examined: the contribution of dental education to the process by which dental health policy is established, and the nature of dental education's response to established policies. (MLW)

  11. Ergonomic applications to dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shipra Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The term "work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs," refers to musculoskeletal disorders to which the work environment contributes significantly, or to musculoskeletal disorders that are made worse or longer lasting by work conditions or workplace risk factors. In recent years, there has been an increase in reporting WMSDs for dental persons. Risk factors of WMSDs with specific reference to dentistry include - stress, poor flexibility, improper positioning, infrequent breaks, repetitive movements, weak postural muscles, prolonged awkward postures and improper adjustment of equipment. Ergonomics is the science of designing jobs, equipment and workplaces to fit workers. Proper ergonomic design is necessary to prevent repetitive strain injuries, which can develop over time and can lead to long-term disability. In this article, 20 strategies to prevent WMSDs in the dental operatory are discussed.

  12. COMMUNITY DENTAL HEALTH SURVEY TRAINING TO DENTAL HEALTH PERSONNEL

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Fikawati; Ita Yulita

    2015-01-01

    Dentist and dental nurse as dental health personnel in community health center are spearheads in community dental health service. The effectiveness and efficacy of community dental health service needs updated adequate dental health knowledge and skill. One effort to assure the fulfillment of those needs is by providing community dental health survey training. This training aims at improving the skill and capability of dental health personnel to conduct dental health survey. The training cons...

  13. 无牙颌下颌开窗式印模技术%Window-opening impression techniques for edentulous mandibular ridges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴国锋

    2011-01-01

    重度吸收的无牙颌下颌牙槽嵴,其表面常被覆有过度增生的条索状黏膜组织,如何制取这些组织的精确印模是临床常见难题之一.本文介绍了1 种无牙颌下颌开窗式印模制取方法.首先通过在无牙颌个别托盘相应区域开窗,充分显露出增生黏膜组织,使得医师可以在取模过程中随时准确观察这些组织状况.其次本文应用了2 种新的印模材料--流体印模蜡与聚硫硅橡胶材料,分别用于制取正常黏膜组织与增生黏膜软组织区域的印模,获得了精确的下颌无牙颌印模.这种开窗式印模的特点是印模操作时间充分,两步式取模方式不会挤压组织变形,能够准确反映下颌无牙颌组织形态.%Impressions of mandibular ridges with displaceable tissues are very challenging for prosthodontists in clinic.This article describes a new technique for making a definitive impression for highly displaceable residual mandibular edentulous ridges.Firstly a window was created in the tray over the crest of the residual ridge, which exposed the displaceable soft mucosa tissue.Thus, the prosthodontist can view the tissue directly at anytime during the impression process.Following lwo new dental impression material were applied to capture the shape of the residual ridge and place pressure onto denture load-bearing areas.A fluid wax impression was to take the impression over the area without displaceable soft mucosa tissue.Polysulfide impression material was then used over the window opening to capture the surface details of the residual ridge without distorting the displaceable tissues.The choice of the impression materials focuses on preventing any distortion of the displaceable residual ridges during impression making.The advantages of this technique are to have enough working time as well as accurate contour of the edentulous mandibular ridge.

  14. How do children form impressions of persons? They average.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrick, C; Franz, C M; Hoving, K L

    1975-05-01

    The experiment reported was concerned with impression formation in children. Twelve subjects in each of Grades K, 2, 4, and 6 rated several sets of single trait words and trait pairs. The response scale consisted of a graded series of seven schematic faces which ranged from a deep frown to a happy smile. A basic question was whether children use an orderly integration rule in forming impressions of trait pairs. The answer was clear. At all grade levels a simple averaging model adequately accounted for pair ratings. A second question concerned how children resolve semantic inconsistencies. Responses to two highly inconsistent trait pairs suggested that subjects responded in the same fashion, essentially averaging the two traits in a pair. Overall, the data strongly supported an averaging model, and indicated that impression formation of children is similar to previous results obtained from adults.

  15. Custom impression trays: Part I--Mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeding, L C; Dixon, D L; Moseley, J P

    1994-01-01

    Dimensional stability of custom impression trays is an important factor in determining the degree of accuracy achieved in forming a master cast. Such trays must remain stable over time and must not exhibit permanent deformation when a completed impression is removed from the oral cavity. Measurement of the mechanical properties allows comparison between various tray materials and is useful in interpreting data on stresses incurred during removal of the completed impression. In Part I of this three-part series, the various mechanical properties of five tray resins: one autopolymerizing polymethyl methacrylate, one light-polymerizing, and three brands of thermoplastic resins were recorded and compared. The thermoplastic resins studied in this investigation exhibited lower measured values for the strength and elastic modulus properties than the light-polymerizing resin and the autopolymerizing polymethyl methacrylate resin studied.

  16. Immersion disinfection of irreversible hydrocolloid impressions. Part 1: Microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, R S; Bradley, D V; Hilton, T J; Kruse, S K

    1994-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of four disinfectants for irreversible hydrocolloid impressions. Impressions were made of a sterile metal model of the maxillary arch that had been contaminated with one of the following bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella choleraesuis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Mycobacterium bovis, or Bacillus subtilis. The impressions were cultured before and after immersion in one of the following disinfectants: lodofive, OMC II, 0.525% sodium hypochlorite, or Alcide LD. Alcide LD achieved a 4-log10 (99.99%) or greater reduction in colony forming units for all five organisms plus mixed oral flora. Sodium hypochlorite achieved a 4-log10 reduction in three of the five organisms and mixed oral flora. Iodofive and OMC II were ineffective against all test organisms and mixed oral flora.

  17. Impression formation and revision in social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haker, Ayala; Aderka, Idan M; Marom, Sofi; Hermesh, Haggai; Gilboa-Schechtman, Eva

    2014-03-01

    Interpersonal relations are markedly impaired in social anxiety. Yet, little is known about the ways social anxiety affects social cognition. We examined impression formation and impression revision among individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD, n = 26) and non-anxious individuals (n = 29). Participants read initial descriptions of protagonists depicted as dominant, neutral or submissive and rated them on social rank and affiliation dimensions. Next, participants were presented with behavioral acts that were either congruent, incongruent or irrelevant to the initial descriptions, and re-rated the protagonists. Individuals with SAD (a) rated others as more extreme on social rank dimension, (b) rated others as lower on the affiliation dimension, and (c) revised their impressions of others to a greater extent than did the non-anxious individuals. Understanding the ways social anxiety affects the formation and revision of perceptions of others can improve our understanding of maintaining processes in SAD.

  18. Cancer patients and positive sensory impressions in the hospital environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, Connie; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Birkelund, Regner

    2013-01-01

    This study explores how cancer patients experience the meaning of positive sensory impressions in the hospital environment such as architecture, decoration and the interior. Data were obtained at a general hospital in Denmark by interviewing six cancer patients at two different wards. The analysi...... sensory impressions and the opportunity for recreation through environmental facilities strengthen the patient's positive thoughts and feelings....... process was guided by the hermeneutical–phenomenological theory of interpretation as presented by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur. Two main themes were identified: to preserve identity and positive thoughts and feelings. The participants experienced that positive sensory impressions in the hospital...... environment had a significant impact on their mood, generating positive thoughts and feelings. A view to nature also helped them to forget their negative thoughts for a while. The possibility of having a view helped some cancer patients to connect with good memories and personal life stories that enabled them...

  19. Forming impressions: effects of facial expression and gender stereotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Tay

    2014-04-01

    The present study of 138 participants explored how facial expressions and gender stereotypes influence impressions. It was predicted that images of smiling women would be evaluated more favorably on traits reflecting warmth, and that images of non-smiling men would be evaluated more favorably on traits reflecting competence. As predicted, smiling female faces were rated as more warm; however, contrary to prediction, perceived competence of male faces was not affected by facial expression. Participants' female stereotype endorsement was a significant predictor for evaluations of female faces; those who ascribed more strongly to traditional female stereotypes reported the most positive impressions of female faces displaying a smiling expression. However, a similar effect was not found for images of men; endorsement of traditional male stereotypes did not predict participants' impressions of male faces.

  20. Effect of splinting in accuracy of two implant impression techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Avila, Erica Dorigatti; de Matos Moraes, Fernanda; Castanharo, Sabrina Maria; Del'Acqua, Marcelo Antonialli; de Assis Mollo, Francisco

    2014-12-01

    Because there is no consensus in the literature about the need for a splint between copings, the aim of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the accuracy of 2 impression techniques for implant-supported prostheses. A master cast was fabricated with four parallel implant abutment analogs and a passive framework. Two groups with 5 casts each were formed: Group 1 (squared impression copings with no splint: S) and Group 2 (splinted squared impression copings, using metal drill burs and Pattern resin: SS). The impression material used was polyvinyl siloxane with open trays for standard preparation of the casts. For each cast, the framework was positioned, and a titanium screw was tightened with 10 N·cm torque in analog A, after which measurements of the abutment-framework interface gaps were performed at analogs C and D. This process was repeated for analog D. These measurements were analyzed using software. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with a confidence interval of 95% was used to analyze the data. Significant differences were detected between S and SS in relation to the master cast (P ≤ 0.05). The median values of the abutment-framework interface gaps were as follows: master cast: 39.64 μm; squared impression copings with no splint: 205.86 μm; splinted squared impression copings: 99.19 μm. Under the limitations of this study, the technique presented for Group 2 produces better results compared with the technique used for Group 1.

  1. Effect of storage period on the accuracy of elastomeric impressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Batista Franco

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To investigate the effect of the storage period on the accuracy of recently developed elastomeric materials. METHODS: Simultaneous impressions of a steel die were taken using a polyether (I: Impregum Soft Heavy and Light body, 3M ESPE and vinyl polysiloxane (P: Perfectim Blue Velvet and Flexi-Velvet, J.Morita. The trays were loaded with the heavy-bodied impression materials while the light-bodied impression materials were simultaneously spread on the steel die. The impressions were poured after 2 hours, 24 hours, and 7 days. Impressions were stored at approximately 55% relative humidity and room temperature. Ten replicas were produced for each experimental condition (n=60. Accuracy of the stone dies was assessed with a depth-measuring microscope. The difference in height between the surface of the stone die and a standard metallic ring was recorded in micrometers at four demarcated points, by two independent examiners. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (a = 0.05. RESULTS: Significant differences were found among the groups. Smaller discrepancies were observed when pouring was performed up to 24 hours (I-2h= 65.0 ± 15.68 µm; I-24h= 81.6 ± 11.13 µm for the polyether, and up to 7 days for the vinyl polysiloxane (P-2h= 79.1 ± 13.82 µm; P-24h= 96.8 ± 6.02 µm; P-7d= 81.4 ± 4.3 µm. Significant dimensional discrepancies, however, were observed when polyether was stored for 7 days (I-7d= 295.3 ± 17.4 µm. CONCLUSION: Storage may significantly affect the dimensional accuracy of impressions and, thus, a maximum period and storage condition should be specified for the recently developed materials.

  2. How Does Binocular Disparity Affect the Impressions in Viewing Stereograms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Ichikawa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We examined how the size of binocular disparity affects the impressions in different dimensions, as well as apparent depth, in viewing line-contoured stereograms, random dot stereogram, and stereoscopic pictures of naturalistic scenes. We used a semantic differential method with the scales that are related to the different dimensions of impression; evaluation, activity, and potency. The stereograms of naturalistic scenes were selected to give observers strong or weak impressions in different impression dimensions. We prepared the two-depth-layer condition and six-depth-layer condition for those stereograms. The size of binocular disparity between the nearest and farthest layers ranged from 0 to about 70 min of arc. Apparent depth magnitude increased with the increment of disparity size for those stereograms while the increment for the six depth-layer condition was larger than that for the two depth-layer conditions. Regardless of the type of stereograms, for the six depth-layer condition, the rating for the evaluation increased with the size of disparity although, for the two-depth-layer condition, it did not increase at the large disparity size. In addition, the rating for the activity increased with disparity size for both the two depth-layer condition and six depth-layer conditions if the stereogram induced some active impression by itself. These results indicate that the effects of binocular disparity size on apparent depth magnitude and impressions in viewing stereoscopic pictures depend upon the depth structure that is specified by binocular disparity, rather than what the stereogram representationally depicts.

  3. Does immediate dentin sealing influence the polymerization of impression materials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiggi, Paula Cristine; Steiger, Arno Kieling; Marcondes, Maurem Leitão; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of the following study is to evaluate the interaction between the resin materials used in immediate dentin sealing (IDS) techniques and impression materials with two different techniques to eliminate the oxygen-inhibition layer. Materials and Methods: The occlusal dentin surface of 35 human molars was exposed. The teeth were used in two Groups: Group 1 – Impression with Express XT; Group 2 – Impression with Impregum. Groups 1 and 2 were divided into 14 subgroups: Groups 1a and 2a – Control groups; 1b and 2b – IDS with Clearfil SE Bond (CSE); 1c and 2c – IDS with CSE + additional polymerization with glycerin jelly; 1d and 2d – IDS with CSE + alcohol; 1e and 2e – IDS with CSE and Protect Liner F (PLF); 1f and 2f – IDS with CSE and PLF + additional polymerization with glycerin jelly; and 1g and 2g – IDS with CSE and PLF + alcohol. Five teeth were used in each experimental group, and the tooth surface was photographed using a digital camera. Results: Small quantity of unpolymerized impression material remained attached to the CSE or to the PLF in Groups 1b and 1e. Groups 1c and 1d prevented the interaction. Small quantity of polymerized impression material remained attached to the CSE or to the PLF for Groups 2b and 2e. The same interaction was observed for Groups 2c and 2d. For Groups 2c and 2f, no interactions were observed. Conclusion: Resin materials interacted with impression materials. The application of glycerin jelly and alcohol prevented the interaction of CSE with Express XT and PLF with Impregum; however, these treatments were not completely effective in preventing the interaction of CSE with Impregum and PLF with Express XT. PMID:25202218

  4. The fit of crowns produced using digital impression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennerstrom, Micael; Fakhary, Mobin; Von Steyern, Per Vult

    2014-01-01

    Compare the marginal and internal fit of crowns manufactured using four different digital impression systems with crowns manufactured using conventional impression technique, that served as a control group. Fifty all-ceramic crowns were fabricated using 50 standardized dies divided into five groups, each group representing one impression system. Each crown was cemented onto its respective model and sectioned into four segments.The marginal and internal fit were measured at 8 predefined points. A total of 1567 measurements were made, statistically analyzed and compared with crowns fabricated using the five systems. The following was found: (1) No significant difference was found with regard to mar ginal gap when comparing the control group to any of the digital systems. (2) Lava™ had smaller marginal gaps than CEREC® and iTero®, (3) CEREC and Lava had smaller gaps in the chamfer compared to iTero and the control, (4) E4D® showed smaller gaps than CEREC at measuring points 4-8 and CEREC a smaller gap at point 2, (5) Lava showed smaller gaps than CEREC at measuring points 1,3 and 5-8. (6) Lava had smaller gaps than iTero at measuring points 1-4,7 and 8. All differences presented were significant. In conclusions, crowns manufactured using digital impressions present a marginal and internal fit equal to, or better than, crowns made using a conventional impression method.The marginal and internal fit of reconstructions made using digital impression techniques could improve with a lower initial setting of the spacer.

  5. Generation of Variations on Theme Music Based on Impressions of Story Scenes Considering Human's Feeling of Music and Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenkichi Ishizuka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a system which generates variations on theme music fitting to story scenes represented by texts and/or pictures. Inputs to the present system are original theme music and numerical information on given story scenes. The present system varies melodies, tempos, tones, tonalities, and accompaniments of given theme music based on impressions of story scenes. Genetic algorithms (GAs using modular neural network (MNN models as fitness functions are applied to music generation in order to reflect user's feeling of music and stories. The present system adjusts MNN models for each user on line. This paper also describes the evaluation experiments to confirm whether the generated variations on theme music reflect impressions of story scenes appropriately or not.

  6. Looks and linguistics: Impression formation in online exchange marketplaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuchta, Michael P; O'Toole, Jay

    2016-01-01

    This study advances theories of impression formation by focusing on two factors that generate emotional responses: physical attractiveness and positive word use. Although considerable research on impression formation exists, most studies consider factors in isolation and neglect possible interactions. Our theory introduces competing mechanisms regarding possible interaction effects, and we empirically test them in an online marketplace. Results from the analysis of 729 loan requests from a leading online peer-to-peer lending market suggest that physical attractiveness and positive word use work together to influence the likelihood of acquiring resources and establish an important boundary condition to the general "beauty is good" effect.

  7. Functional relationship of room temperature and setting time of alginate impression material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Irnawati

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Indonesia is a tropical country with temperature variation. A lot of dental clinics do not use air conditioner. The room temperature influences water temperature for mixing alginate impression materials. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the functional relationship of room temperature and initial setting time of alginate impression materials. Methods: The New Kromopan® alginate (normal and fast sets were used. The initial setting time were tested at 23 (control, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30 and 31 degrees Celcius room temperatures (n = 5. The initial setting time was tested based on ANSI/ADA Specification no. 18 (ISO 1563. The alginate powder was mixed with distilled water (23/50 ratio, put in the metal ring mould, and the initial setting time was measured by test rod. Data were statistically analyzed by linear regression (α = 0.05. result: The initial setting times were 149.60 ± 0.55 (control and 96.40 ± 0.89 (31° C seconds for normal set, and 122.00 ± 1.00 (control and 69.60 ± 0.55 (31° C seconds for fast set. The coefficient of determination of room temperature to initial setting time of alginate were R2 = 0.74 (normal set and R2 = 0.88 (fast set. The regression equation for normal set was Y = 257.6 – 5.5 X (p < 0.01 and fast set was Y = 237.7 – 5.6 X (p < 0.01. Conclusions: The room temperature gave high contribution and became a strength predictor for initial setting time of alginates. The share contribution to the setting time was 0.74% for normal set and 0.88% for fast set alginates.

  8. Effect of frequency and amplitude of vibration and role of a surfactant on void formation in models poured from polyvinyl siloxane impressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Kulashekar Reddy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims : To determine whether the frequency and amplitude of vibration and the use of surfactant has any effect on the formation of voids on the cast surface, poured from a polyvinyl siloxane impression material, using a mechanical model vibrator. Materials and Methods : A total of 100 impressions of a master die were made using Reprosil, Type 1, Medium Viscosity, Regular body, and Dentsply Caulk. The test group was subdivided into a surfactant and non-surfactant group, 50 impressions each. The impressions were poured in a dental stone with a mechanical model vibrator that was set at a vibration frequency of 3000 cycles / minute (low and 6000 cycles / minute (high with the help of a knob. The resultant casts were examined with a Stereomicroscope (LABOMED CZM4 under x10 magnifications. Results : For the low and high frequencies, when surfactant and non-surfactant groups were compared, for all the amplitudes and for both the material groups, the surfactant groups resulted in fewer void formations and showed very high statistical significance (P-value = 0.001. Conclusions : The lowest mean voids were obtained for high frequency surfactant groups. Reprosil: High frequency amplitude 2 being the most prominent, produced the least mean voids (mean = 23.2000, P = 0.001, very highly significant. In comparison, the surfactant groups produced the least voids for both frequencies.

  9. Dental Encounter System (DES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Dental Encounter System (DES) is an automated health care application designed to capture critical data about the operations of VA Dental Services. Information on...

  10. Dental education in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Razak, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Bird, William F

    2007-12-01

    There was only one dental school in Malaysia until 1997 but five new schools have been established since 1998. This review provides information about dental education in Malaysia including; the history of dental education, the current dental school system and curriculum, and dental licensure. There are four public and two private dental schools in Malaysia. High school graduates are required to take the nationwide matriculation entrance examination or the Higher School Certificate (HSC) to apply for a dental degree programme. A five-year dental programme leads to the BDS or the DDS degree. National or state examinations are not required to practise dentistry. Currently, there are approximately 2,500 dentists, with a ratio of 1 dentist for every 10,000 people.

  11. Dental Care in Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dental Care in Scleroderma People living with scleroderma face unique challenges while trying to maintain their oral ... They are more likely to be affected by dental conditions such as small mouth, dry mouth, jaw ...

  12. Dental care - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002213.htm Dental care - child To use the sharing features on ... and rinsing daily. It also includes having routine dental exams, and getting necessary treatments such as fluoride, ...

  13. AUTHORITARIANISM AND DENTAL CARIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    in particular. If so, dental decay among nonauthoritarians might well progress further than among authoritarians. To determine whether or not there...is any relationship between dental decay and authoritarianism is the purpose of the present study. (Author)

  14. Dental Effluent Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overview and documents for Dental Office Category regulation (40 CFR Part 441); comprising pretreatment standards for discharges of dental amalgam pollutants, including mercury, into publicly owned treatment works (POTWs).

  15. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MMWR RSS VitalSigns RSS Error processing SSI file Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities Effective protection for children Language: ... more use of sealants and reimbursement of services. Dental care providers can Apply sealants to children at ...

  16. Smile dental journal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    "Smile dental journal is quarterly issued, peer-reviewed open access journal. Subject coverage is dentistry, dealing with all specialties of dentistry, its management, besides dental health related subjects...

  17. 75 FR 33169 - Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ...-AG21 Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation of Special Controls for Dental Amalgam, Mercury, and Amalgam Alloy; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Food... classified dental amalgam as a class II device, reclassified dental mercury from class I to class II, and...

  18. Forming On-Line Impressions: A Class Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop-Clark, Cathy; Dietz-Uhler, Beth

    2003-01-01

    In an exercise designed to assess the accuracy of the impressions we form of people in online settings, students in a Psychology of the Internet course were asked to interact with two people in two different Internet settings. First, students were asked to interact with "Tom" (a college student) in an asynchronous discussion board setting over the…

  19. Modeling first impressions from highly variable facial images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Richard J W; Sutherland, Clare A M; Young, Andrew W; Hartley, Tom

    2014-08-12

    First impressions of social traits, such as trustworthiness or dominance, are reliably perceived in faces, and despite their questionable validity they can have considerable real-world consequences. We sought to uncover the information driving such judgments, using an attribute-based approach. Attributes (physical facial features) were objectively measured from feature positions and colors in a database of highly variable "ambient" face photographs, and then used as input for a neural network to model factor dimensions (approachability, youthful-attractiveness, and dominance) thought to underlie social attributions. A linear model based on this approach was able to account for 58% of the variance in raters' impressions of previously unseen faces, and factor-attribute correlations could be used to rank attributes by their importance to each factor. Reversing this process, neural networks were then used to predict facial attributes and corresponding image properties from specific combinations of factor scores. In this way, the factors driving social trait impressions could be visualized as a series of computer-generated cartoon face-like images, depicting how attributes change along each dimension. This study shows that despite enormous variation in ambient images of faces, a substantial proportion of the variance in first impressions can be accounted for through linear changes in objectively defined features.

  20. Do we spontaneously form stable trustworthiness impressions from facial appearance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapper, André; Dotsch, Ron; van Rooij, Iris; Wigboldus, Daniël H J

    2016-11-01

    It is widely assumed among psychologists that people spontaneously form trustworthiness impressions of newly encountered people from their facial appearance. However, most existing studies directly or indirectly induced an impression formation goal, which means that the existing empirical support for spontaneous facial trustworthiness impressions remains insufficient. In particular, it remains an open question whether trustworthiness from facial appearance is encoded in memory. Using the 'who said what' paradigm, we indirectly measured to what extent people encoded the trustworthiness of observed faces. The results of 4 studies demonstrated a reliable tendency toward trustworthiness encoding. This was shown under conditions of varying context-relevance, and salience of trustworthiness. Moreover, evidence for this tendency was obtained using both (experimentally controlled) artificial and (naturalistic varying) real faces. Taken together, these results suggest that there is a spontaneous tendency to form relatively stable trustworthiness impressions from facial appearance, which is relatively independent of the context. As such, our results further underline how widespread influences of facial trustworthiness may be in our everyday life. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Using Teacher Impression Journals to Improve Intervention Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, SeonYeong; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.; Meyer, Lori E.; Favazza, Paddy C.; Mouzourou, Chryso; van Luling, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of "Teacher Impression Journals" during a larger study that examined the efficacy of an intervention program designed to promote kindergarteners' positive attitudes toward peers with disabilities (i.e., the "Special Friends" program). The journals were designed to gather information about…

  2. Accuracy of different impression materials in parallel and nonparallel implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojdani, Mahroo; Torabi, Kianoosh; Ansarifard, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Background: A precise impression is mandatory to obtain passive fit in implant-supported prostheses. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of three impression materials in both parallel and nonparallel implant positions. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, two partial dentate maxillary acrylic models with four implant analogues in canines and lateral incisors areas were used. One model was simulating the parallel condition and the other nonparallel one, in which implants were tilted 30° bucally and 20° in either mesial or distal directions. Thirty stone casts were made from each model using polyether (Impregum), additional silicone (Monopren) and vinyl siloxanether (Identium), with open tray technique. The distortion values in three-dimensions (X, Y and Z-axis) were measured by coordinate measuring machine. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used for data analysis (α = 0.05). Results: Under parallel condition, all the materials showed comparable, accurate casts (P = 0.74). In the presence of angulated implants, while Monopren showed more accurate results compared to Impregum (P = 0.01), Identium yielded almost similar results to those produced by Impregum (P = 0.27) and Monopren (P = 0.26). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, in parallel conditions, the type of impression material cannot affect the accuracy of the implant impressions; however, in nonparallel conditions, polyvinyl siloxane is shown to be a better choice, followed by vinyl siloxanether and polyether respectively. PMID:26288620

  3. Cross-Cultural Impression Management: A Cultural Knowledge Audit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Abigail; Kamau, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Many people moving into a new culture for work or study do so without prior cross-cultural training, yet successful cultural adaptation has important ramifications. The purpose of this paper is to focus on cross-cultural impression management as an element of cultural adaptation. Does cultural adaptation begin by paying strong attention…

  4. Impressions of Counselors as a Function of Counselor Physical Attractiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jean A.

    1978-01-01

    Research assessed the effects of counselor physical attractiveness and inter-actions between attractiveness and counselor subject sex. It is suggested that sex of counselor and client may play a more important role independently and in conjunction with attractiveness than does attractiveness alone in influencing impressions and expectations.…

  5. Formal Operational Reasoning and the Primacy Effect in Impression Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmquist, Wendy Jean

    1979-01-01

    Results showed that when information about a target individual was presented in two internally consistent blocks which were mutually contradictory, impressions produced by concrete operational adolescents contained a significantly greater proportion of evaluative statements in the same evaluative direction as the first block of information…

  6. Classroom Design and Impression Formation: A New Area for Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Carol S.; Woolfolk, Anita E.

    1981-01-01

    The contention that classroom design influences impression formation has not been empirically tested. The purpose of this article is to bring to the attention of educational psychologists the possibilities for research in this area. The paper summarizes the findings of some initial investigations and suggests directions for future study.…

  7. Impression Formation and Modifiability: Testing a Theoretical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrug, Sylvie; Hoza, Betsy

    2007-01-01

    This study proposed and tested a developmental model of impression formation based on observed behavior, prior expectancies, and additional incongruent information. Participants were 51 kindergartners, 53 second graders, and 104 college students who provided trait and liking judgments after watching a child actor engage in behaviors from three…

  8. Impression Formation in Children: Influence of Gender and Expectancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAninch, Cecile B.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A total of 114 boys and girls were given an expectancy that a stimulus child was either shy or outgoing and then rated the child on several personality dimensions. Results revealed that, when children were presented with both expectancy-congruent and expectancy-incongruent information, impression formation was largely attribute based, and the…

  9. The impact of motivation on race-based impression formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianyi; Cardenas-Iniguez, Carlos; Correll, Joshua; Cloutier, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    Affective biases toward racial out-group members, characterized by White perceivers' negative evaluations of Black individuals, prevail in U.S. culture. Such affective associations have been found to guide race-based impression formation. Accordingly, individuals may strive to resolve inconsistencies when perceiving targets violating their expectations. The current study focuses on the impact of evaluative incongruence on the activity of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) - a brain region previously shown to support impression formation. When asking participants to form impressions of positively and negatively evaluated Black and White individuals, we found preferential dmPFC activity in response to individuals paired with information that violates race-based affective associations. Importantly, individual differences in internal motivation to respond without prejudice (IMS) were found to shape the extent to which dmPFC activity indexes the interactive effects of race and affective associations during impression formation. Specifically, preferential dmPFC activity in response to evaluatively incongruent targets (i.e., Black-positive & White-negative) was present among participants with lower, but not those with higher, levels of IMS. Implications and future directions are discussed in the context of dmPFC involvement in social cognition.

  10. Shared impression formation in the cognitively interdependent dyad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscher, Janet B; Santuzzi, Alecia M; Hammer, Elizabeth Yost

    2003-09-01

    We examined the role of cognitive interdependence in determining how close friends form shared impressions of another person. Cognitive interdependence should provide a processing advantage, such that close friends are more efficient in forming shared impressions and are more successful at doing so. Under normal circumstances, the conversations of close friends should be marked by little necessity to make explicit requests for information, mutual recognition of who currently is controlling the flow of conversation, and willingness to express differences in opinion. Given these advantages, close friends also should be able to form complex shared impressions that go beyond mere one-sided stereotypic judgments and that instead resolve apparent discrepancies in the target's personality. However, if the cognitive interdependence system is disrupted by mutual distraction, these advantages should attenuate or even reverse. Dyads of varying degrees of closeness were mutually distracted or not while discussing their impressions of another female college student. Results supported predictions and are discussed with reference to how cognitive interdependence may help close dyads function within their mutual social networks.

  11. Empirical study of alginate impression materials by customized proportioning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Alginate mixers available in the market do not have the automatic proportioning unit. In this study, an automatic proportioning unit for the alginate mixer and controller software were designed and produced for a new automatic proportioning unit. With this device, it was ensured that proportioning operation could arrange weight-based alginate impression materials. MATERIALS AND METHODS The variation of coefficient in the tested groups was compared with the manual proportioning. Compression tension and tear tests were conducted to determine the mechanical properties of alginate impression materials. The experimental data were statistically analyzed using one way ANOVA and Tukey test at the 0.05 level of significance. RESULTS No statistically significant differences in modulus of elastisity (P>0.3), tensional/compresional strength (P>0.3), resilience (P>0.2), strain in failure (P>0.4), and tear energy (P>0.7) of alginate impression materials were seen. However, a decrease in the standard deviation of tested groups was observed when the customized machine was used. To verify the efficiency of the system, powder and powder/water mixing were weighed and significant decrease was observed. CONCLUSION It was possible to obtain more mechanically stable alginate impression materials by using the custom-made proportioning unit. PMID:27826387

  12. Empirical study of alginate impression materials by customized proportioning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtulus, Karani; Tüfekci, Kenan

    2016-10-01

    Alginate mixers available in the market do not have the automatic proportioning unit. In this study, an automatic proportioning unit for the alginate mixer and controller software were designed and produced for a new automatic proportioning unit. With this device, it was ensured that proportioning operation could arrange weight-based alginate impression materials. The variation of coefficient in the tested groups was compared with the manual proportioning. Compression tension and tear tests were conducted to determine the mechanical properties of alginate impression materials. The experimental data were statistically analyzed using one way ANOVA and Tukey test at the 0.05 level of significance. No statistically significant differences in modulus of elastisity (P>0.3), tensional/compresional strength (P>0.3), resilience (P>0.2), strain in failure (P>0.4), and tear energy (P>0.7) of alginate impression materials were seen. However, a decrease in the standard deviation of tested groups was observed when the customized machine was used. To verify the efficiency of the system, powder and powder/water mixing were weighed and significant decrease was observed. It was possible to obtain more mechanically stable alginate impression materials by using the custom-made proportioning unit.

  13. Teachers' Views on Cyberloafing and Impression Management Tactics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nartgün, Senay Sezgin; Ekinci, Serkan; Limon, Ibrahim; Tükel, Hayrettin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify secondary school teachers' employed in Nevsehir central district views on impression management tactics and cyberloafing. It also aims to determine whether there is a significant relationship between their views. The study was conducted in relational screening model. On the other hand, the universe of the study…

  14. First Impressions: Gait Cues Drive Reliable Trait Judgements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoresen, John C.; Vuong, Quoc C.; Atkinson, Anthony P.

    2012-01-01

    Personality trait attribution can underpin important social decisions and yet requires little effort; even a brief exposure to a photograph can generate lasting impressions. Body movement is a channel readily available to observers and allows judgements to be made when facial and body appearances are less visible; e.g., from great distances.…

  15. Student Impressions of Syllabus Design: Engaging versus Contractual Syllabus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludy, Mary-Jon; Brackenbury, Tim; Folkins, John Wm; Peet, Susan H.; Langendorfer, Stephen J.; Beining, Kari

    2016-01-01

    This study compared student impressions of a text-rich contractual syllabus to a graphic-rich engaging syllabus. Students enrolled in sections of an undergraduate introductory nutrition course viewed either a contractual or engaging syllabus and completed a survey regarding their perceptions of the course and instructor. Students perceived both…

  16. Dental pain, socioeconomic status, and dental caries in young male adults from southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastos João Luiz Dornelles

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess dental pain prevalence and its association with dental caries and socioeconomic status in 18-year-old males from Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a random sample (n = 414 selected from the Brazilian Army conscription list in 2003. Dental pain during the 12 months prior to the interview was recorded as the outcome. Socioeconomic data were obtained through a questionnaire. Dental caries experience was registered according to the DMFT Index. Analyses included simple and multiple non-conditional logistic regression following a hierarchical approach. Response rate was 95.6%. High rates of inter-examiner agreement were achieved (kappa > 0.83. Dental pain prevalence was 21.2% (95%CI: 17.3-25.1. After adjustment, individuals with one or more untreated caries were 3.2 times more likely (95%CI: 1.7-5.8 to have dental pain compared to caries-free subjects. Conscripts with low family income were 1.8 times more likely (95%CI: 1.0-3.3 to have dental pain than those with higher income.

  17. Dental pain, socioeconomic status, and dental caries in young male adults from southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Luiz Dornelles Bastos

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess dental pain prevalence and its association with dental caries and socioeconomic status in 18-year-old males from Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a random sample (n = 414 selected from the Brazilian Army conscription list in 2003. Dental pain during the 12 months prior to the interview was recorded as the outcome. Socioeconomic data were obtained through a questionnaire. Dental caries experience was registered according to the DMFT Index. Analyses included simple and multiple non-conditional logistic regression following a hierarchical approach. Response rate was 95.6%. High rates of inter-examiner agreement were achieved (kappa > 0.83. Dental pain prevalence was 21.2% (95%CI: 17.3-25.1. After adjustment, individuals with one or more untreated caries were 3.2 times more likely (95%CI: 1.7-5.8 to have dental pain compared to caries-free subjects. Conscripts with low family income were 1.8 times more likely (95%CI: 1.0-3.3 to have dental pain than those with higher income.

  18. Dental Practice Management

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghe Raftu

    2016-01-01

    the population. Private dental practices in Romania require personnel specialized in dental management. Success in dentistry depends, on the one hand, on the management of clinical aspects, and equallyon the efficient management of the dental practice. Patient satisfaction is influenced by factors related to the communication between the physicianand the patient, technical competence and by the environment provided by dental practice. The realization of the paper followed a review...

  19. Examining dental expenditure and dental insurance accounting for probability of incurring expenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teusner, Dana; Smith, Valerie; Gnanamanickam, Emmanuel; Brennan, David

    2017-04-01

    There are few studies of dental service expenditure in Australia. Although dental insurance status is strongly associated with a higher probability of dental visiting, some studies indicate that there is little variation in expenditure by insurance status among those who attend for care. Our objective was to assess the overall impact of insurance on expenditures by modelling the association between insurance and expenditure accounting for variation in the probability of incurring expenses, that is dental visiting. A sample of 3000 adults (aged 30-61 years) was randomly selected from the Australian electoral roll. Dental service expenditures were collected prospectively over 2 years by client-held log books. Questionnaires collecting participant characteristics were administered at baseline, 12 months and 24 months. Unadjusted and adjusted ratios of expenditure were estimated using marginalized two-part log-skew-normal models. Such models accommodate highly skewed data and estimate effects of covariates on the overall marginal mean while accounting for the probability of incurring expenses. Baseline response was 39%; of these, 40% (n = 438) were retained over the 2-year period. Only participants providing complete data were included in the analysis (n = 378). Of these, 68.5% were insured, and 70.9% accessed dental services of which nearly all (97.7%) incurred individual dental expenses. The mean dental service expenditure for the total sample (those who did and did not attend) for dental care was AUS$788. Model-adjusted ratios of mean expenditures were higher for the insured (1.61; 95% CI 1.18, 2.20), females (1.38; 95% CI 1.06, 1.81), major city residents (1.43; 95% CI 1.10, 1.84) and those who brushed their teeth twice or more a day (1.50; 95% CI 1.15, 1.96) than their respective counterparts. Accounting for the probability of incurring dental expenses, and other explanatory factors, insured working-aged adults had (on average) approximately 60% higher individual

  20. Biased relevance filtering in the auditory system: A test of confidence-weighted first-impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullens, D; Winkler, I; Damaso, K; Heathcote, A; Whitson, L; Provost, A; Todd, J

    2016-03-01

    stability of the transition-statistics are violated. Both studies provide compelling evidence that the auditory system extrapolates patterns on multiple timescales to adjust its response to prediction-errors, while profoundly distorting the effects of transition-statistics by the assumptions formed on the basis of first-impressions.

  1. Stress Among Dental Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Alzahem (Abdullah)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Dental students are facing many stressors in dental education, causing many negative outcomes. The most common are the exams and the clinical requirements. We suggest exposing the dental students to patient care as early as possible in their curriculum. This can help to bal

  2. [Dental records and responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, W.G.

    2006-01-01

    Dental records are more than a small part of the bookkeeping. In most dental practises, keeping records is the task of a dental assistant. In civil court, the dentist is in most countries liable for the mistakes of his employees. In disciplinary court however there may be doubt whether the dentist i

  3. Stress Among Dental Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Alzahem (Abdullah)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Dental students are facing many stressors in dental education, causing many negative outcomes. The most common are the exams and the clinical requirements. We suggest exposing the dental students to patient care as early as possible in their curriculum. This can help to bal

  4. Dental Assistant, Advanced. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    a jaw fracture, leukemia, dental caries, and periodontal disease. Dental diabetes mellitus , rheumatic fever, allergies, car- disease can be prevented...Dentistry ........................ 4-1 5. Oral Surgery, Endodontics, and Periodontics ................ 5-1 6. Prosthodontics...Diagnosis Periodontics Medical clinics may have branch clinics subor- Operative Dentistry Preventive Dentistry dinate to them. Although dental

  5. Annual Adjustment Factors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Department of Housing and Urban Development establishes the rent adjustment factors - called Annual Adjustment Factors (AAFs) - on the basis of Consumer Price...

  6. Effect of Contact Time Between Silicone Impression Materials and Stone on Dimensional Stability of Resultant Cast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Numerous factors have an effect on the accuracy of an impression and resultant cast, and these include: impression material, impression technique, tray selection, impression disinfection, storage time of impression before pouring, stone type used for fabrication of cast. Up to now, there has been little research conducted on the effect of contact time of a cast with an impression, on the dimensional stability of a cast. Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the contact time of silicone impression materials with stone casts, on the dimensional stability of resultant casts. Materials and Methods A total of 44 impressions were made from a stainless steel master model, with each one of two silicone impression materials (Elite HD+ and Speedex, and poured with Elite Master Type IV. The thickness of the light-body material (1 mm was provided by using four copings. The resulting casts from each material were placed in four groups(n = 11 after each contact time with the impression (1 hour, 24 hours, 48 hours, 1 week. Distance between anterior and posterior abutments was measured for the casts and master model. Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and a Tukey test. Results The relationship between the dimensional stability of the casts and the simultaneous effect of the impression material and contact time of the cast with the impression was not statistically significant (P = 0.099. Type of impression material on the dimensional stability of the cast had no significant effect (P = 0.163. Increased contact time of the cast with the impression resulted in increased dimensional change (P < 0.001. Conclusions Dimensional stability of the casts after different contact time with the impression was acceptable. The best time to separate the cast from the impression was one hour after pouring the impression.

  7. Fabrication of a Sectional Impression Tray and a Collapsible Removable Complete Denture in a Microstomia Patient: A Clinical Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadzadeh A.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available An abnormally small oral orifice is defined as microstomia which is caused by various factors like burning, scleroderma, etc. This disorder is difficult to treat due to the reduced oral opening. In particular, fabrication of removable prostheses is further complicated by tongue rigidity and the constant adjustment required to accommodate the changing periphery; however, successful treatment is possible through specific measures. In this article, a 41-year-old woman living in Baghmalek, Khoozestan was referred to the Prosthodontic department of Jondishapoor University in Ahvaz, southern Iran. She was suffering from microstomia and poor manual ability caused by scleroderma. Initial impression was prepared for her, using Silicon impression material by applying fingers pressure. The final impression was prepared using a two section tray so that the larger part covered one third of the smaller one and both could be attached by compressable button. Then the occlusal relation was established using occlusal rims connected to the two section parcels. Two part parcel prostheses connected with attachments were made for the lower and upper jaws, respectively. The patient was followed up for six months. Conclusion: In order to overcome the above-mentioned problems, the new method of removable prosthesis enjoys the advantage of sufficient precision as well as ease of use by the patient. For further evaluation, diagnosis and proper treatment plan are reported.

  8. Combined Characterization of the Time Response of Impression Materials via Traditional and FTIR Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Derchi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the temporal response of four dental impression materials, namely three siloxanes (Imprint 4, Flexitime, Aquasil and one polyether (Impregum. The null hypothesis was that the nominal working times are confirmed by instrumental laboratory tests. We also aimed to identify alternative techniques with strong physical-chemical background for the assessment of temporal response. Traditional characterization was carried out by shark fin test device and durometer at both ambient and body temperature. Additionally, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was performed at room temperature. From shark fin height and Shore hardness versus time the working time and the setting time of the materials were evaluated, respectively. These were in reasonable agreement with the nominal values, except for Impregum, which showed longer working time. Spectroscopy confirmed the different character of the two types of materials, and provided for Imprint 4 and Aquasil an independent evaluation of both evolution times, consistent with the results of the other techniques. Shark fin test and durometer measurements showed deviations in setting time, low sensitivity to temperature for Flexitime, and longer working time at higher temperature for Impregum. Deviations of working time appear in operating conditions from what specified by the manufacturers. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy can provide insight in the correlation between material properties and their composition and structure.

  9. Combined Characterization of the Time Response of Impression Materials via Traditional and FTIR Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derchi, Giacomo; Manca, Enrico; Shayganpour, Amirreza; Barone, Antonio; Diaspro, Alberto; Salerno, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the temporal response of four dental impression materials, namely three siloxanes (Imprint 4, Flexitime, Aquasil) and one polyether (Impregum). The null hypothesis was that the nominal working times are confirmed by instrumental laboratory tests. We also aimed to identify alternative techniques with strong physical-chemical background for the assessment of temporal response. Traditional characterization was carried out by shark fin test device and durometer at both ambient and body temperature. Additionally, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was performed at room temperature. From shark fin height and Shore hardness versus time the working time and the setting time of the materials were evaluated, respectively. These were in reasonable agreement with the nominal values, except for Impregum, which showed longer working time. Spectroscopy confirmed the different character of the two types of materials, and provided for Imprint 4 and Aquasil an independent evaluation of both evolution times, consistent with the results of the other techniques. Shark fin test and durometer measurements showed deviations in setting time, low sensitivity to temperature for Flexitime, and longer working time at higher temperature for Impregum. Deviations of working time appear in operating conditions from what specified by the manufacturers. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy can provide insight in the correlation between material properties and their composition and structure.

  10. Autoclave use in dental practice in the Republic of Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, C M; Kearns, H P O; Coulter, W A; Stevenson, M; Burke, F J T

    2004-08-01

    To assess by postal questionnaire, cross-infection control methods, especially sterilisation procedures, of 700 general dental practitioners in the Republic of Ireland, and to biologically monitor steam pressure sterilisers or autoclaves in their practices. Methods of instrument cleaning and sterilisation, autoclave efficacy. A response rate of 40% with all, except one practitioner, using steam sterilisation. 49% also reported the use of chemical sterilisation with a quarter of these using glutaraldehyde. However, instrument soaking time varied greatly from 2.5 minutes to 74 hours. Methods of instrument cleaning prior to autoclaving were as follows: scrubbing by hand 41.5%, ultrasonic cleaning 7.0%, combination of both 50%. 52.9% of the respondents did not autoclave their dental handpieces and only 44.7% disinfected impressions before sending them to the laboratory. The autoclaves of thirty practitioners (11.3%) did not pass the initial biological test. Following counselling about possible causes of failure, four autoclaves (1.5%) failed a repeat biological test. However, seven practitioners did not return the repeat biological test. Some aspects of recommended cross-infection control procedures are well adhered to, e.g. instrument cleaning, but further education is required in certain key areas, in particular the use of chemical sterilisation, dental handpiece autoclaving and impression disinfection. There is also a need to increase awareness of the importance of routine autoclave servicing and calibration, along with validation and monitoring.

  11. Developmental Level, Emotional Involvement, and the Resolution of Inconsistency in Impression Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbach, Dvora; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Wernerian developmental theory is used to examine both the kinds of changes in impressions of others that occur with development and the conditions under which relatively immature impressions may be produced by presumably mature individuals. (Authors)

  12. The Role of Profanity and Sex Variables in Interpersonal Impression Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Marshall M.; Saine, Thomas J.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses a study designed to identify areas of research which may increase under standing of the relationship between speaker profanity and impression formation. Provides an experimental test of the predicted interrelationships between profanity, sex variables, and impression formation. (MH)

  13. Adjustment index pont for women and men

    OpenAIRE

    Nava–Salcedo, Paula María; Gutiérrez–Rojo, Jaime Fabián; Rojas–García, Alma Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Arch of men and women is different, in men the dental arch is wide and in women of parabolic shape. There are indexes and methods for the prediction of the width and shape of the ideal arch in orthodontics; one of these indices is that of Pont whichdoes not take into account the differences between the sexes. Objectives: determine the effectiveness of the Pont index to employ men and women, adjust if necessary to the formulas of the Pont index to be able to apply to men and women. Materialsan...

  14. Subjective relevance of objective measures for spatial impression (A)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Lily M.; Gade, Anders Christian

    2000-01-01

    Several objective measures have been proposed to describe the feeling of spatial impression in concert halls, including Lateral Energy Fraction (LF) and Interaural Cross-Correlation Coefficient (IACC). However, previous studies have shown that LF and IACC values did not highly correlate with each...... other at individual seat positions in real halls [J. S. Bradley, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 96, 3525–3535 (1994)]. To investigate the listener envelopment aspect of spatial impression further, subjective paired-comparison tests have been run using signals which have various values for LF, early IACC (from 5......–80 ms), late IACC (from 80 ms–1 s), and late lateral relative sound level (GLL). Another proposed measure, called Interaural Level Fluctuations (IALF), has also been included, which is based on the rate of change over time of the level difference between the ears. The binaural test signals were...

  15. Exercise promotes positive impression formation towards both men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanarek, Robin B; Mathes, Wendy Foulds; D'Anci, Kristen E

    2012-06-01

    Exercise is endorsed for its physiological and psychological benefits, and has been proposed to have positive effects on impression formation. To test this proposal, 62 female and 44 male college students read one of three brief descriptions of either a fictitious male or female "target" student. The descriptions varied only in exercise level: no exercise; moderate exercise and intensive exercise. Participants then rated the fictitious student on 38 personality traits. Ratings of characteristics that are associated with exercise (e.g. athletic; energetic) increased, while ratings associated with the lack of exercise (e.g. lazy; weak) decreased as a function of the reported level of exercise. Exercise level also positively influenced ratings of characteristics not related to exercise. These data show that even minimal information about exercise is an important component of first impressions in both men and women.

  16. e-Perceptions: personality impressions based on personal websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazire, Simine; Gosling, Samuel D

    2004-07-01

    This research examined the accuracy of personality impressions based on personal websites, a rapidly growing medium for self-expression, where identity claims are predominant. Eighty-nine websites were viewed by 11 observers, who rated the website authors' personalities. The ratings were compared with an accuracy criterion (self- and informant reports) and with the authors' ideal-self ratings. The websites elicited high levels of observer consensus and accuracy, and observers' impressions were somewhat enhanced for Extraversion and Agreeableness. The accuracy correlations were comparable in magnitude to those found in other contexts of interpersonal perception and generally stronger than those found in zero-acquaintance contexts. These findings suggest that identity claims are used to convey valid information about personality.

  17. Older and Younger Adults’ First Impressions From Faces: Similar in Agreement but Different in Positivity

    OpenAIRE

    Zebrowitz, Leslie A; Franklin, Robert G.; Hillman, Suzanne; Boc, Henry

    2012-01-01

    People readily form first impressions from faces, with consensual judgments that have significant social consequences. Similar impressions are shown by children, young adults (YA), and people from diverse cultures. However, this is the first study to systematically investigate older adults’ (OA) impressions. OA and YA showed similar levels of within-age agreement in their impressions of competence, health, hostility, and trustworthiness. Both groups also showed stronger within- than between a...

  18. Impression management within the Zulu culture: Exploring tactics in the work context

    OpenAIRE

    Debrah Mtshelwane; Jan Alewyn Nel; Lizelle Brink

    2016-01-01

    Orientation: Impression management tactics are utilised differently by people depending on the situation and the others around them.Research purpose: The purpose of the study was to identify the impression management tactics Zulu people display when they want to impress people in a work context.Motivation for this study: Organisations are competing for talented employees and people who contribute to the return on investment for the organisation. Individuals display impression tactics to influ...

  19. [The viscosity of Thiokol impression material during gelation (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Y; Kawakami, M

    1976-09-01

    Viscosity behavior of the impression materials is important property which determines the pressure and its distribution to be exerted on oral soft tissues in relation to the tray design and impression technique. The impression material, however, react to gel so fast to measure the viscosity during the reaction that it is still not completely elucidated. It would be able to seize the viscosity behavior of Thiokol impression material during the gelation unequivocally by retarding the oxidative condensation reaction using weak oxidative, lead monoxide. Based on the equal reactivity of SH groups of Thiokol liquid polymer there is no difference in statistic molecular weight distribution at any degree of the reaction between with lead monoxide and with the other oxidatives now in practical use. The viscosity measurement of the mixture of Thiokol LP-2, lead monoxide, and di-butyl phthalate was performed at the rates of shear ranged from 10(1.5) to 10(3.9) sec-1 at 20 degrees C. The viscosity of the mixture progressively increases after spatulation of the materials but yield value does not appear for the time being before setting, that is, the infinite network forming via the pendant SH groups could not take place until the most of SH groups were consumed, attributed to low concentration of poly-functional prepolymer in the liquid polymer. At early stages of the reaciton the viscosity behavior is approximately Newtonian at lower rates of shear and pseudplastic at higher rates of shear. As the reaction proceeds it becomes pseudplastic even at lower rates of shear.

  20. Polyvinyl siloxane impression materials: an update on clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandikos, M N

    1998-12-01

    Polyvinyl siloxane impression materials have applications in a variety of indirect procedures in prosthodontics and restorative dentistry. Favourable handling properties, good patient acceptance and excellent physical properties have resulted in their popularity in today's practice. In this review, the chemistry and important physical properties of polyvinyl siloxanes are summarized, and recent clinical questions of improved hydrophilics, tray adhesives, disinfection, and glove-induced polymerization inhibition are addressed.

  1. Individual Differences and Rating Errors in First Impressions of Psychopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher T. A. Gillen; Henriette Bergstrøm; Adelle E. Forth

    2016-01-01

    The current study is the first to investigate whether individual differences in personality are related to improved first impression accuracy when appraising psychopathy in female offenders from thin-slices of information. The study also investigated the types of errors laypeople make when forming these judgments. Sixty-seven undergraduates assessed 22 offenders on their level of psychopathy, violence, likability, and attractiveness. Psychopathy rating accuracy improved as rater extroversion-...

  2. Individual Differences and Rating Errors in First Impressions of Psychopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher T. A. Gillen; Henriette Bergstrøm; Forth, Adelle E.

    2016-01-01

    The current study is the first to investigate whether individual differences in personality are related to improved first impression accuracy when appraising psychopathy in female offenders from thin-slices of information. The study also investigated the types of errors laypeople make when forming these judgments. Sixty-seven undergraduates assessed 22 offenders on their level of psychopathy, violence, likability, and attractiveness. Psychopathy rating accuracy improved as rater extroversion-...

  3. Self-presentational persona: simultaneous management of multiple impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Mark R; Allen, Ashley Batts

    2011-11-01

    Most research on self-presentation has examined how people convey images of themselves on only 1 or 2 dimensions at a time. In everyday interactions, however, people often manage their impressions on several image-relevant dimensions simultaneously. By examining people's self-presentations to several targets across multiple dimensions, these 2 studies offer new insights into the nature of self-presentation and provide a novel paradigm for studying impression management. Results showed that most people rely on a relatively small number of basic self-presentational personas in which they convey particular profiles of impressions as a set and that these personas reflect both normative influences to project images that are appropriate to a particular target and distinctive influences by which people put an idiosyncratic spin on these normative images. Furthermore, although people's self-presentational profiles correlate moderately with their self-views, they tailor their public images to specific targets. The degree to which participants' self-presentations were normative and distinctive, as well as the extent to which they reflected their own self-views, were moderated by individual differences in agreeableness, self-esteem, authenticity, and Machiavellianism.

  4. Emotion in the neutral face: a mechanism for impression formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Reginald B; Nelson, Anthony J; Soto, José A; Hess, Ursula; Kleck, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    The current work examined contributions of emotion-resembling facial cues to impression formation. There exist common facial cues that make people look emotional, male or female, and from which we derive personality inferences. We first conducted a Pilot Study to assess these effects. We found that neutral female versus neutral male faces were rated as more submissive, affiliative, naïve, honest, cooperative, babyish, fearful, happy, and less angry than neutral male faces. In our Primary Study, we then "warped" these same neutral faces over their corresponding anger and fear displays so the resultant facial appearance cues now structurally resembled emotion while retaining a neutral visage (e.g., no wrinkles, furrows, creases, etc.). The gender effects found in the Pilot Study were replicated in the Primary Study, suggesting clear stereotype-driven impressions. Critically, ratings of the neutral-over-fear warps versus neutral-over-anger warps also revealed a profile similar to the gender-based ratings, revealing perceptually driven impressions directly attributable to emotion overgeneralisation.

  5. Dental caries vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivakumar K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is one of the most common diseases in humans. In modern times, it has reached epidemic proportions. Dental caries is an infectious microbiologic disease of the teeth that results in localized dissolution and destruction of the calcified tissue. Dental caries is a mulitifactorial disease, which is caused by host, agent, and environmental factors. The time factor is important for the development and progression of dental caries. A wide group of microorganisms are identified from carious lesions of which S. mutans , Lactobacillus acidophilus , and Actinomyces viscosus are the main pathogenic species involved in the initiation and development of dental caries. In India, surveys done on school children showed caries prevalence of approximately 58%. Surveys among the U.S. population showed an incidence of 45.3% in children and 93.8% in adults with either past or present coronal caries. Huge amounts of money and time are spent in treating dental caries. Hence, the prevention and control of dental caries is the main aim of public health, eventually the ultimate objective of public health is the elimination of the disease itself. Recently, dental caries vaccines have been developed for the prevention of dental caries. These dental caries vaccines are still in the early stages.

  6. Exploring the Ways that Adolescents Form and Perpetuate Impressions of Their Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucinski, Steven Jon

    2010-01-01

    This study used qualitative methodology including observations and interviews to attempt to discover how secondary students form impressions of their teachers and how those impressions are perpetuated among students, leading to teacher reputation. The findings from the study indicate that students form impressions of their teachers by assessing…

  7. Multiple motives and persuasive communication : Creative elaboration as a result of impression motivation and accuracy motivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienhuis, AE; Manstead, ASR; Spears, R

    2001-01-01

    The authors examined the influence of impression motivation (Experiments 1 and 2) and the combined effects of accuracy motivation and impression motivation (Experiment 3) on the elaboration of persuasive messages as reflected in attitude change and cognitive responses. Intermediate levels of impress

  8. Developing the Perfect Pitch: Creating a Positive First Impression through Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmiston, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Too often we take for granted first impressions and how others perceive us, but such perceptions frequently form the basis for personal and professional success. Today, many first impressions are made online through search engine results and social networks. To ensure that students make a positive first impression, this teaching innovation…

  9. Computer-Mediated Impression Formation: A Test of the Sticky Cues Model Using Facebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Heide, Brandon Lee

    2009-01-01

    This research offers a model of online impression formation that explains how different impression-bearing cues may carry more or less informational value. This research considers the possibility that impression-bearing cues have greater informational value when those cues are distinctive and are task-relevant. This research refers to such cues as…

  10. Why Most People Disapprove of Me: Experience Sampling in Impression Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denrell, Jerker

    2005-01-01

    Individuals are typically more likely to continue to interact with people if they have a positive impression of them. This article shows how this sequential sampling feature of impression formation can explain several biases in impression formation. The underlying mechanism is the sample bias generated when the probability of interaction depends…

  11. Dental hygiene in Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciak-Donsberger, C; Krizanová, M

    2004-08-01

    This article reports on the development of the dental hygiene profession in Slovakia from a global perspective. The aim is to inform about current developments and to examine, how access to qualified dental hygiene care might be improved and how professional challenges might be met. For an international study on dental hygiene, secondary source data were obtained from members of the House of Delegates of the International Federation of Dental Hygienists (IFDH) or by fax and e-mail from experts involved in the national professional and educational organization of dental hygiene in non-IFDH member countries, such as Slovakia. Responses were followed-up by interviews, e-mail correspondence, visits to international universities, and a review of supporting studies and reference literature. Results show that the introduction of dental hygiene in Slovakia in 1992 was inspired by the delivery of preventive care in Switzerland. Initiating local dentists and dental hygienists strive to attain a high educational level, equitable to that of countries in which dental hygiene has an established tradition of high quality care. Low access to qualified dental hygiene care may be a result of insufficient funding for preventive services, social and cultural lack of awareness of the benefits of preventive care, and of limitations inherent in the legal constraints preventing unsupervised dental hygiene practice. These may be a result of gender politics affecting a female-dominated profession and of a perception that dental hygiene is auxiliary to dental care. International comparison show that of all Eastern European countries, the dental hygiene profession appears most advanced in Slovakia. This is expressed in high evidence-based academic goals, in extensive work with international consultants from the Netherlands and Switzerland, in annual congresses of high professional quality, and in the establishment of a profession, which has not been introduced in all Western EU countries.

  12. Forming impressions of personality: A replication and review of Asch's (1946) evidence for a primacy-of-warmth effect in impression formation

    OpenAIRE

    Nauts, S.; Langner, O.; Huijsmans, I.; Vonk, R.; Wigboldus, D.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Asch's seminal research on "Forming Impressions of Personality'' (1946) has widely been cited as providing evidence for a primacy-of-warmth effect, suggesting that warmth-related judgments have a stronger influence on impressions of personality than competence-related judgments (e. g., Fiske, Cuddy, & Glick, 2007; Wojciszke, 2005). Because this effect does not fit with Asch's Gestalt-view on impression formation and does not readily follow from the data presented in his original paper, the go...

  13. Forming impressions of personality: A replication and review of Asch's (1946) evidence for a primacy-of-warmth effect in impression formation

    OpenAIRE

    Nauts, S.; Langner, O.; Huijsmans, I.; Vonk, R; Wigboldus, D.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Asch's seminal research on "Forming Impressions of Personality'' (1946) has widely been cited as providing evidence for a primacy-of-warmth effect, suggesting that warmth-related judgments have a stronger influence on impressions of personality than competence-related judgments (e. g., Fiske, Cuddy, & Glick, 2007; Wojciszke, 2005). Because this effect does not fit with Asch's Gestalt-view on impression formation and does not readily follow from the data presented in his original paper, the go...

  14. Dental practice satisfaction with preferred provider organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schilling Elizabeth A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite their increasing share of the dental insurance market, little is known about dental practices' satisfaction with preferred provider organizations (PPOs. This analysis examined practice satisfaction with dental PPOs and the extent to which satisfaction was a function of communications from the plan, claims handling and compensation. Methods Data were collected through telephone surveys with dental practices affiliated with MetLife between January 2002 and December 2004. Each respondent was asked a series of questions related to their satisfaction with a systematically selected PPO with which they were affiliated. Six different PPO plans had sufficient observations to allow for comparative analysis (total n = 4582. Multiple imputation procedures were used to adjust for item non-response. Results While the average level of overall satisfaction with the target plan fell between "very satisfied" and "satisfied," regression models revealed substantial differences in overall satisfaction across the 6 PPOs (p Conclusion Results demonstrate the importance of compensation to dental practice satisfaction with PPOs. However, these results also highlight the critical role of service-related factors in differentiating plans and suggest that there are important non-monetary dimensions of PPO performance that can be used to recruit and retain practices.

  15. Dental pain, use of dental services and oral health-related quality of life in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalheiro, Charles Henrique; Abegg, Claides; Fontanive, Victor Nascimento; Davoglio, Rosane Silvia

    2016-08-18

    This study aimed at assessing the relationship between dental pain and the reason for using dental services and oral health quality of life in people aged 50 to 74 years in southern Brazil. A cross-sectional population-based study was conducted with 720 individuals aged 50 to 74 years, living in three health districts in the city of Porto Alegre. Dental impacts on daily life and sociodemographic data were assessed using structured interviews. The Oral Impacts on Daily Performance - OIDP instrument was used to measure oral impacts. The information was analyzed by Poisson regression with robust variance adjustment, taking into account cluster sampling. Dental pain was present in 32.5% of those reporting an oral impact on their daily activities. Dental pain most frequently affected talking (37.6%), cleaning teeth and gums (37.0%) and enjoying the companionship of people (36.5%). After adjustments to the multivariate analysis, the reason for dental visits due to dental pain was found to have a high impact on daily activities [RP 1.68 (1.11 - 2.54].

  16. 30-Year Outcomes of Dental Implants Supporting Mandibular Fixed Dental Prostheses: A Retrospective Review of 4 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkyilmaz, Ilser; Tözüm, Tolga F

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to present the 30-year outcomes of 28 implants supporting mandibular screw-retained fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). Dental charts of the 4 patients were carefully reviewed, and it was noticed that they received 28 implants and 5 screw-retained FDPs in 1983 and 1984. The chief concerns raised by these patients were poor retention of their complete dentures and decreased masticatory function at the time of treatment planning. Each dental care they received was recorded in the last 30 years. Implant survival, radiographic, and prosthodontic examinations were performed. No implants were lost after 30 years, giving the implant a survival rate of 100%. The average marginal bone level was 2.6 ± 0.5 mm at the last recall appointment. Of the 5 FDPs delivered, 1 needed replacement, indicating a prosthesis survival rate of 80%. The patients needed 21 repairs such as replacement of denture teeth/gold screws and hard relining, and 19 adjustments such as occlusal adjustments and acrylic resin contouring, over 30 years. This clinical report shows that machined-surface dental implants can successfully support screw-retained fixed dental prostheses for over 30 years, making dental implants an important dental treatment alternative compared to the traditional prosthetic treatment methods.

  17. EAMJ Jan. Dental 10.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-01

    Jan 1, 2010 ... the prevalence of dental caries and gingivitis among. 12-year-old children .... chemical, bacterial and mechanical irritation from dental plaque and ..... We thank the School of Dental Sciences and Colgate. Palmolive for part ...

  18. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  19. Dental erosion, summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Cate, J M; Imfeld, T

    1996-04-01

    Although reports on dental erosion have always appeared in the dental literature, there is currently a growing interest among researchers and clinicians. Potential risk factors for dental erosion are changed lifestyle and eating patterns, with increased consumption of acidic foods and beverages. Various gastrointestinal and eating disorders expose the dentition to frequent contacts with very acidic gastric content, which may lead to erosion. Whether these factors indeed lead, on a population scale, to a higher prevalence and incidence of erosion is yet to be established. This article summarizes the different aspects of the prevalence, pathology, etiology, assessment, prevention and treatment of dental erosion, and concludes with recommendations for future research.

  20. Acute dental pain II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasson, Peter; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte; Rosen, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Acute dental pain most often occurs in relation to inflammatory conditions in the dental pulp or in the periradicular tissues surrounding a tooth, but it is not always easy to reach a diagnose and determine what treatment to perform. The anamnesis and the clinical examination provide valuable...... dental pain, they expect that the dentist starts treatment at once and that the treatment should provide pain relief. In this situation many patients are fragile, anxious and nervous. If the dentist is able to manage emergency treatment of acute dental pain this will build confidence and trust between...

  1. Dental Implant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  2. Dental Implant Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Oshida

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities.

  3. ADJUSTABLE CHIP HOLDER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    An adjustable microchip holder for holding a microchip is provided having a plurality of displaceable interconnection pads for connecting the connection holes of a microchip with one or more external devices or equipment. The adjustable microchip holder can fit different sizes of microchips with ...

  4. Benchmarking Judgmentally Adjusted Forecasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); L.P. de Bruijn (Bert)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractMany publicly available macroeconomic forecasts are judgmentally adjusted model-based forecasts. In practice, usually only a single final forecast is available, and not the underlying econometric model, nor are the size and reason for adjustment known. Hence, the relative weights given

  5. Benchmarking judgmentally adjusted forecasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); L.P. de Bruijn (Bert)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractMany publicly available macroeconomic forecasts are judgmentally-adjusted model-based forecasts. In practice usually only a single final forecast is available, and not the underlying econometric model, nor are the size and reason for adjustment known. Hence, the relative weights

  6. Benchmarking judgmentally adjusted forecasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); L.P. de Bruijn (Bert)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractMany publicly available macroeconomic forecasts are judgmentally-adjusted model-based forecasts. In practice usually only a single final forecast is available, and not the underlying econometric model, nor are the size and reason for adjustment known. Hence, the relative weights give

  7. Do you put your best foot forward? Interactive effects of task performance and impression management tactics on career outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jen-Wei; Chiu, Wei-La; Chang, Yi-Ying; Johnstone, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the interactive effects of task performance and impression management tactics on career outcomes from the socioanalytic perspective. Based on a survey of 195 employee-supervisor dyads from various industries in Taiwan, a hierarchical regression analysis revealed that (1) the relationship between task performance and a one-year salary adjustment was greater among employees who frequently employ ingratiation than among those who do not, (2) the relationship between task performance and a one-year salary adjustment was greater among employees who frequently employ exemplification than among those who do not, and (3) the relationship between task performance and career satisfaction was greater among employees who frequently employ self-promotion than among those who do not. This study concludes by suggesting implications for research and practice, and offers some directions for future research.

  8. Transfer Impression in Prosthodontics Implants for the Range of the Practitioner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Alves GOMES

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The success of an implant supported restoration is directly associated with accuracy and passive fit of fixture and abutments components, stability of implant/abutment interface, as well as adequate distribution of mastigatory loads to the set. The procedure of the implant or abutment transfer impression is one of the most important phase to obtain passivity fit for prosthesis/implant set. Objective: The aim of this study was to present a literature review to allow the practitioner necessary subsidies for right selection and indication of the most adequate impression material, type of the tray that proportionate more accuracy impressions, more favorable impression copping, as well as more appropriated types and impression techniques to each restoration, based on indexator PUBMED with impression, techniques, implants and fit terms and 26 being selected originals and actual manuscripts. Conclusion: From the literature review was concluded that addition silicone and polyether with custom trays and square impression copings showed more accuracy impression; conical impression copings should be indicate in small inter-arch space; impression copings should be splinted during the multiple restorations impression and customized to single restoration of esthetics site.

  9. Dental Treatment in a State-Funded Primary Dental Care Facility: Contextual and Individual Predictors of Treatment Need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanyonyi, Kristina L; Radford, David R; Gallagher, Jennifer E

    2017-01-01

    This study examined individual and contextual factors which predict the dental care received by patients in a state-funded primary dental care training facility in England. Routine clinical and demographic data were extracted from a live dental patient management system in a state-funded facility using novel methods. The data, spanning a four-year period [2008-2012] were cleaned, validated, linked by means of postcode to deprivation status, and analysed to identify factors which predict dental treatment need. The predictive relationship between patients' individual characteristics (demography, smoking, payment status) and contextual experience (deprivation based on area of residence), with common dental treatments received was examined using unadjusted analysis and adjusted logistic regression. Additionally, multilevel modelling was used to establish the isolated influence of area of residence on treatments. Data on 6,351 dental patients extracted comprised of 147,417 treatment procedures delivered across 10,371 courses of care. Individual level factors associated with the treatments were age, sex, payment exemption and smoking status and deprivation associated with area of residence was a contextual predictor of treatment. More than 50% of children (dental service and show that individual and contextual factors predict common treatments received. Implications of this research include the importance of making provision for our aging population and ensuring that preventative care is available to all. Further research is required to explain the interaction of organisational and system policies, practitioner and patient perspectives on care and, thus, inform effective commissioning and provision of dental services.

  10. [The effect of impression formation on memory of trait words: relation between coding and retrieval process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, M

    2000-08-01

    Three experiments investigated the effect of impression formation of a person on the recall and recognition of trait words. The subjects were assigned to one of four groups: Impression, Memory, Impression-Memory, and Incidental groups. Each subject performed an orienting task followed by free recall and recognition tests. In a recall test, false recall of antonyms of targets occurred more often in the Memory group than in the Impression group. There was no difference in the correct recall. In a multiple choice recognition test and a yes-no recognition test, false recognition to antonyms of targets occurred more often in the Memory group than in the Impression group. Hit to targets occurred more often in the Impression group than in the Memory group. These results were interpreted as showing that formation of an impression for a person had different effects for recall and recognition tests. The results were discussed in terms of a relation between encoding and retrieval processes.

  11. Virtually designed and CAD/CAM-fabricated lithium disilicate prostheses for an esthetic maxillary rehabilitation: a senior dental student clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandinejad, Amirali; Metz, Michael; Stevens, Paul; Lin, Wei-Shao; Morton, Dean

    2015-04-01

    During their education, dental students seek to be involved in comprehensive esthetic treatment for the rehabilitation of lost, damaged, or discolored tooth structure. Due to technological advances and patient exposure to dental advertising, recent dental school graduates can find themselves under great expectations with limited clinical experience. With the implementation of an oral health and rehabilitation department at the University of Louisville Dental School, dental students have the opportunity to plan treatment and treat such patients under the supervision of faculty with advanced training in prosthodontics and restorative dentistry. The work flow of multiple consecutive lithium disilicate ceramic prostheses using a digital impression, virtual CAD/CAM design, and milled fabrication as planned and executed by a senior dental student is presented.

  12. Heavy smoking and severe dental caries in Indonesian men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumartono, Wasis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Indonesia, the prevalence of dental caries is 85%–99% and 67.4% of males aged 15 years or older are current users of tobacco. The aim of this study was to examine the association between heavy smoking and severe dental caries. METHODS: The authors used secondary data from Basic Health Research 2007. Respondents were Indonesian males aged 45–54 years (n = 34 534. Decay, Missing, Filled Teeth (DMFT value was used to define severe dental caries with 31.4% of respondents having DMFT value ≥ 8, the cutoff point of severe dental caries in this study. In addition, the enumerators recorded socio-demographic characteristics (age, socio-economic status, education, and job, tooth brushing and smoking behavior of respondents. Chi-square test was used to compare the prevalence of severe dental caries between heavy smokers (defined as Brinkman Index or BI ≥ 400 and never smokers (BI = 0. The multivariable logistic regression model was used to estimate adjusted association between heavy smoking and dental caries severity. RESULTS: The prevalence of severe dental caries among never smokers, light smokers (BI 1-399 and heavy smokers was 24.9%, 32.5%, and 38.7% respectively (p < 0.005. Compared to never smokers, the adjusted ORs of having severe dental caries among light smokers and heavy smokers were 1.45 (95% CI: 1.37-1.53 and 1.70 (95% CI: 1.59 – 1.81, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking is a risk factor of severe dental caries in Indonesian men with dose-and-response association revealed between the exposure and the outcome. Indonesian dentists, individually and collectively, have to participate in smoking prevention and control more actively.

  13. A prospective clinical evaluation of electronically mixed polyvinyl siloxane impression materials: results from the prosthetic "SuperStudy"--a consumer evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugel, G; Swift, E J; Sorensen, J A; Tucker, J H; Dunne, J T

    1999-01-01

    Polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression materials incorporating a polyether carbosilane wetting agent and mixed with an electronic mixing system (Pentamix) were clinically compared with traditionally delivered (i.e., automixed) PVS impression materials during routine use by 1,505 general and specialized dental practitioners evaluating more than 30,000 impressions. Each study participant selected 20 patients and used standard tooth-preparation procedures appropriate to the therapy required, supplied specific data on each case, and ultimately evaluated the marginal detail, fit, and success of the final restorations. The areas requiring evaluation upon completion of the final restorations were ranked between "excellent," "good," "poor," and "remake needed," among users of the PVS materials with the electronic mixing system. About 80% of the respondents rated the Pentamix system as easier to mix and deliver than the gun or hand-mixed systems and two thirds said it was faster to mix. The system also received high scores for hygienic delivery, ease of mixing, and clean-up.

  14. Resin-composite blocks for dental CAD/CAM applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, N D; Sadoun, M J

    2014-12-01

    Advances in digital impression technology and manufacturing processes have led to a dramatic paradigm shift in dentistry and to the widespread use of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in the fabrication of indirect dental restorations. Research and development in materials suitable for CAD/CAM applications are currently the most active field in dental materials. Two classes of materials are used in the production of CAD/CAM restorations: glass-ceramics/ceramics and resin composites. While glass-ceramics/ceramics have overall superior mechanical and esthetic properties, resin-composite materials may offer significant advantages related to their machinability and intra-oral reparability. This review summarizes recent developments in resin-composite materials for CAD/CAM applications, focusing on both commercial and experimental materials.

  15. Surgical treatment of Chiari malformation complicated with basilar impression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan MA

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the therapeutic effect of small craniotomic posterior fossa decompression combined with occipital-cervical bone graft fusion and internal fixation on Chiari malformation complicated with basilar impression.Methods The clinical data of 16 cases(7 males and 9 females,aged 17 to 65 years,mean 36.4 of Chiari malformation complicated with basilar impression from 2006 to 2010 were retrospectively analyzed.The diagnoses for all the patients were confirmed by radiology.Small craniotomic posterior fossa decompression was performed in all patients,cerebellar tonsils were resected,and then one-stage occipital-cervical bone graft fusion using autogenous iliac bone and internal wiring fixation were performed.Neck support was used for 3 months after surgery.Results Symptoms were significantly improved in all cases after surgical operation.No patient died or infected.Cerebrospinal fluid leakage was found at draining site in one case.Transient pain of scapular and chest was found in one case and disappeared spontaneously.A 6-months follow-up showed that 6 patients were cured,9 improved and 1 unchanged according to Symon and Lavender standard.Postoperative MRI showed the reconstructed cisterna magna was clear in all patients,no cerebellar ptosis was found,and the occipital-cervical graft bone was fused.Conclusion In patients with Chiari malformation complicated with basilar impression,small craniotomic posterior fossa decompression combined with one-stage occipital-cervical bone graft fusion and internal wiring fixation has a clear and definite effect,it can increase the volume of posterior fossa and alleviate the ventral brain stem compression simultaneously,and reconstruct the stability of cranio-cervical junction.

  16. Forming impressions of personality: A replication and review of Asch's evidence for a primacy-of-warmth effect in impression formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauts, S.; Langner, O.; Huijsmans, I.; Vonk, R.; Wigboldus, D.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Asch's seminal research on "Forming Impressions of Personality'' (1946) has widely been cited as providing evidence for a primacy-of-warmth effect, suggesting that warmth-related judgments have a stronger influence on impressions of personality than competence-related judgments (e. g., Fiske, Cuddy,

  17. Forming impressions of personality: A replication and review of Asch's evidence for a primacy-of-warmth effect in impression formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauts, Sanne; Langner, Oliver; Huijsmans, Inge; Vonk, Roos; Wigboldus, Daniël H J

    2014-01-01

    Asch’s seminal research on “Forming Impressions of Personality” (1946) has widely been cited as providing evidence for a primacy-of-warmth effect, suggesting that warmth-related judgments have a stronger influence on impressions of personality than competence-related judgments (e.g., Fiske, Cuddy, &

  18. Forming impressions of personality: A replication and review of Asch's evidence for a primacy-of-warmth effect in impression formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauts, Sanne; Langner, Oliver; Huijsmans, Inge; Vonk, Roos; Wigboldus, Daniël H J

    2014-01-01

    Asch’s seminal research on “Forming Impressions of Personality” (1946) has widely been cited as providing evidence for a primacy-of-warmth effect, suggesting that warmth-related judgments have a stronger influence on impressions of personality than competence-related judgments (e.g., Fiske, Cuddy, &

  19. Forming impressions of personality: A replication and review of Asch's evidence for a primacy-of-warmth effect in impression formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauts, S.; Langner, O.; Huijsmans, I.; Vonk, R.; Wigboldus, D.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Asch's seminal research on "Forming Impressions of Personality'' (1946) has widely been cited as providing evidence for a primacy-of-warmth effect, suggesting that warmth-related judgments have a stronger influence on impressions of personality than competence-related judgments (e. g., Fiske, Cuddy,

  20. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more.

  1. Microbial biofilms development on the surface of biomaterials in dental medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Dobrovolschi, Oleg; Sfarghiu, Lorelai; Dobrovolschi, Tatiana; Muntianu, Ligia; Papakoca, Gordana; Papakoca, Kiro; Mihai BURLIBASA

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Microbial biofims have an important role in oral pathology, in the etiology of periodontitis, but also in contamination of some materials frequently used in dentistry. Objective: This study aims to determine the ability of adhesion and formation of microbial biofilms on the surface of common materials in dental medicine: the impression materials compared to other materials of general interest in dentistry. Material and methods: From September 2010 to December 2010, the m...

  2. Efficacy of various spray disinfectants on irreversible hydrocolloid impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerholm, H S; Bradley, D V; Schwartz, R S

    1992-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of eight disinfectant sprays on irreversible hydrocolloid impressions contaminated with three microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Mycobacterium phlei, or Bacillus subtilis) or mixed oral flora. Alcide LD, OMC II, Biocide, and Professional Lysol Spray were relatively ineffective under the test conditions. Sporicidin and 0.525% sodium hypochlorite were able to effect a 4-log10 (99.99%) reduction against S aureus only. A 4-log10 reduction in bacterial counts was achieved by 5.25% sodium hypochlorite and Impresept in all tests except against B subtilis. Full-strength sodium hypochlorite (5.25%) was the most effective disinfectant overall and required the shortest contact time.

  3. Conjunctival impression cytology--a study of normal conjunctiva.

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Conjunctival impression cytology was used to study conjunctival ocular surface in 30 normal individuals in the age group of 20 to 60 years. The cytology was graded according to the classification of Nelson. Out of 30 subjects, 26 showed the features of Grade O (average age 28.33 years) and 4 showed grade 1 (average age 56.66 years). The method was very easy to perform, cheap and fast. The relationship of various cells to each other was maintained. This method can be used to study the conditio...

  4. Dental fraud: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Max H

    2003-01-01

    A manager of a dental benefits program defines fraud and abuse in the dental context. Such practices may cost as much as four billion dollars annually and have a damaging effect on the trust the profession places in the profession and on the way dentists relate to each other.

  5. Dental Charting. Student's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Trudy Karlene; Apfel, Maura

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: dental anatomical terminology; tooth numbering systems;…

  6. [Dental practice and AIDS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanawatsirivej, S

    1991-01-01

    In Thailand nowadays AIDS is not completely under control. This is evident from reports which show an increasing number of HIV-positive patients. Since an unknown number of HIV-infected persons who are either undiagnosed or asymptomatic come to get dental service, fears of getting infected with HIV have been developed among dental professionals. This article summarizes a number of past studies and reports on HIV transmission in dental work and discusses the possibility of AIDS infection and dental occupational risk. It also urges dental professionals to take effective safety precaution against the infection. This is for their own and their patients' well-being and hopefully for Thailand's success in controlling AIDS.

  7. Family Adjustment to Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Public / Speech, Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Family Adjustment to Aphasia Richard S. was a senior manager ... It also presents a great challenge to the family. There may be tension among family members and ...

  8. Remotely Adjustable Hydraulic Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouns, H. H.; Gardner, L. D.

    1987-01-01

    Outlet pressure adjusted to match varying loads. Electrohydraulic servo has positioned sleeve in leftmost position, adjusting outlet pressure to maximum value. Sleeve in equilibrium position, with control land covering control port. For lowest pressure setting, sleeve shifted toward right by increased pressure on sleeve shoulder from servovalve. Pump used in aircraft and robots, where hydraulic actuators repeatedly turned on and off, changing pump load frequently and over wide range.

  9. What is dental ecology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Sauther, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Teeth have long been used as indicators of primate ecology. Early work focused on the links between dental morphology, diet, and behavior, with more recent years emphasizing dental wear, microstructure, development, and biogeochemistry, to understand primate ecology. Our study of Lemur catta at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, has revealed an unusual pattern of severe tooth wear and frequent tooth loss, primarily the result of consuming a fallback food for which these primates are not dentally adapted. Interpreting these data was only possible by combining our areas of expertise (dental anatomy [FC] and primate ecology [MS]). By integrating theoretical, methodological, and applied aspects of both areas of research, we adopted the term "dental ecology"-defined as the broad study of how teeth respond to the environment. Specifically, we view dental ecology as an interpretive framework using teeth as a vehicle for understanding an organism's ecology, which builds upon earlier work, but creates a new synthesis of anatomy and ecology that is only possible with detailed knowledge of living primates. This framework includes (1) identifying patterns of dental pathology and tooth use-wear, within the context of feeding ecology, behavior, habitat variation, and anthropogenic change, (2) assessing ways in which dental development and biogeochemical signals can reflect habitat, environmental change and/or stress, and (3) how dental microstructure and macro-morphology are adapted to, and reflect feeding ecology. Here we define dental ecology, provide a short summary of the development of this perspective, and place our new work into this context. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Weighted triangulation adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Walter L.

    1969-01-01

    The variation of coordinates method is employed to perform a weighted least squares adjustment of horizontal survey networks. Geodetic coordinates are required for each fixed and adjustable station. A preliminary inverse geodetic position computation is made for each observed line. Weights associated with each observed equation for direction, azimuth, and distance are applied in the formation of the normal equations in-the least squares adjustment. The number of normal equations that may be solved is twice the number of new stations and less than 150. When the normal equations are solved, shifts are produced at adjustable stations. Previously computed correction factors are applied to the shifts and a most probable geodetic position is found for each adjustable station. Pinal azimuths and distances are computed. These may be written onto magnetic tape for subsequent computation of state plane or grid coordinates. Input consists of punch cards containing project identification, program options, and position and observation information. Results listed include preliminary and final positions, residuals, observation equations, solution of the normal equations showing magnitudes of shifts, and a plot of each adjusted and fixed station. During processing, data sets containing irrecoverable errors are rejected and the type of error is listed. The computer resumes processing of additional data sets.. Other conditions cause warning-errors to be issued, and processing continues with the current data set.

  11. Weighted triangulation adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Walter L.

    1969-01-01

    The variation of coordinates method is employed to perform a weighted least squares adjustment of horizontal survey networks. Geodetic coordinates are required for each fixed and adjustable station. A preliminary inverse geodetic position computation is made for each observed line. Weights associated with each observed equation for direction, azimuth, and distance are applied in the formation of the normal equations in-the least squares adjustment. The number of normal equations that may be solved is twice the number of new stations and less than 150. When the normal equations are solved, shifts are produced at adjustable stations. Previously computed correction factors are applied to the shifts and a most probable geodetic position is found for each adjustable station. Pinal azimuths and distances are computed. These may be written onto magnetic tape for subsequent computation of state plane or grid coordinates. Input consists of punch cards containing project identification, program options, and position and observation information. Results listed include preliminary and final positions, residuals, observation equations, solution of the normal equations showing magnitudes of shifts, and a plot of each adjusted and fixed station. During processing, data sets containing irrecoverable errors are rejected and the type of error is listed. The computer resumes processing of additional data sets.. Other conditions cause warning-errors to be issued, and processing continues with the current data set.

  12. Impression cytology of melanocytic conjunctival tumours using the Biopore membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijser, S; Missotten, G S; De Wolff-Rouendaal, D; Verbeke, S L J; Van Luijk, C M; Veselic-Charvat, M; de Keizer, R J W

    2007-01-01

    To compare a new Biopore membrane impression cytology method with the routinely used exfoliative cytology in patients with a melanocytic lesion of the conjunctiva. Sixty-eight consecutive patients with a conjunctival melanocytic lesion underwent Biopore membrane impression cytology as well as exfoliative cytology. A histologic sample was also available in 26 cases. All Biopore samples were stained immediately with RAL 555. Both Biopore and exfoliative cytology samples were assessed by two cytopathologists and graded into four different categories of atypia. Twenty-three out of 26 Biopores and 20 out of 24 for the exfoliative smears correlated with the corresponding histologic sample. Biopore cytology resulted in higher numbers of cells with a greater density compared to exfoliative cytology. Biopore cytology can be used for cytologic sampling of conjunctival melanocytic lesions. Because of the larger amount and higher density of cells obtained with the Biopore membrane, interpretation by a pathologist is easier and faster. Sampling of the fornix, caruncula, and ocular material in children is difficult with the Biopore method, and exfoliative cytology seems to be the favorable test in those situations.

  13. Impressions of Serbia: Tourists on cruises along Corridor 7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragin Aleksandra S.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with cruises along Corridor 7 and the tourist offer of Serbia. The purpose of the paper has been to establish how international tourists see our country during their travels across Serbia on cruises along Corridor 7. The research has been based on the interviews with international tourists who participated in land tours while cruising through Serbia. The interviews, together with the structured questionnaire, were conducted from March to November 2007 with the objectives to establish the following: the structure of the respondents according to the country of origin, gender and age structure, as well as the social and economic structure; what their motives are for cruising along Corridor 7; what is their perception of the value obtained through the tourist product and services during the Corridor 7 cruises and during their stay in Serbia (what they liked best in Serbia; if they were dissatisfied with anything in terms of the tourist offer of Serbia; to what extent their visit complemented or influenced their personal impressions of this country - what their impressions were before and after the visit. The importance of this paper, above all, is in broadening our knowledge about the adequacy of the tourist offer in Serbia in the tourism segment which is the subject of study of the paper.

  14. Lateral orbitofrontal cortex involvement in initial negative aesthetic impression formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munar, Enric; Nadal, Marcos; Rosselló, Jaume; Flexas, Albert; Moratti, Stephan; Maestú, Fernando; Marty, Gisèle; Cela-Conde, Camilo J

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that aesthetic appreciation is related with activity in several different brain regions. The identification of the neural correlates of beauty or liking ratings has been the focus of most prior studies. Not much attention has been directed towards the fact that humans are surrounded by objects that lead them to experience aesthetic indifference or leave them with a negative aesthetic impression. Here we explore the neural substrate of such experiences. Given the neuroimaging techniques that have been used, little is known about the temporal features of such brain activity. By means of magnetoencephalography we registered the moment at which brain activity differed while participants viewed images they considered to be beautiful or not. Results show that the first differential activity appears between 300 and 400 ms after stimulus onset. During this period activity in right lateral orbitofrontal cortex (lOFC) was greater while participants rated visual stimuli as not beautiful than when they rated them as beautiful. We argue that this activity is associated with an initial negative aesthetic impression formation, driven by the relative hedonic value of stimuli regarded as not beautiful. Additionally, our results contribute to the understanding of the nature of the functional roles of the lOFC.

  15. Lateral orbitofrontal cortex involvement in initial negative aesthetic impression formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enric Munar

    Full Text Available It is well established that aesthetic appreciation is related with activity in several different brain regions. The identification of the neural correlates of beauty or liking ratings has been the focus of most prior studies. Not much attention has been directed towards the fact that humans are surrounded by objects that lead them to experience aesthetic indifference or leave them with a negative aesthetic impression. Here we explore the neural substrate of such experiences. Given the neuroimaging techniques that have been used, little is known about the temporal features of such brain activity. By means of magnetoencephalography we registered the moment at which brain activity differed while participants viewed images they considered to be beautiful or not. Results show that the first differential activity appears between 300 and 400 ms after stimulus onset. During this period activity in right lateral orbitofrontal cortex (lOFC was greater while participants rated visual stimuli as not beautiful than when they rated them as beautiful. We argue that this activity is associated with an initial negative aesthetic impression formation, driven by the relative hedonic value of stimuli regarded as not beautiful. Additionally, our results contribute to the understanding of the nature of the functional roles of the lOFC.

  16. Effects of positive impression management on the Psychopathic Personality Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edens, J F; Buffington, J K; Tomicic, T L; Riley, B D

    2001-06-01

    The Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI; S. O. Lilienfeld & B. P. Andrews, 1996) is a self-report test that has shown considerable promise as a screening measure for psychopathy. A current limitation of the PPI is that no data exist regarding the impact of response sets such as positive impression management. Although the PPI contains a validity scale (Unlikely Virtues) designed to identify response biases such as "faking good," its utility has not yet been assessed. In this study a repeated measures analogue design was employed in which 186 respondents completed the PPI both under standard conditions and with specific instructions to create a favorable impression of themselves. In the "fake good" condition, participants were able to appear significantly less psychopathic, with those who obtained higher scores in the standard instruction condition showing the largest decreases in their PPI scores. Receiver Operating Characteristic analyses indicated that, although the Unlikely Virtues scale significantly differentiated between "fake good" and honest protocols (area under the curve = .73), a considerable number of misclassifications occurred. The clinical and forensic implications of these findings are discussed.

  17. Neural dissociations between meaningful and mere inconsistency in impression updating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Todorov, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Recent neuroimaging work has identified a network of regions that work in concert to update impressions of other people, particularly in response to inconsistent behavior. However, the specific functional contributions of these regions to the updating process remain unclear. Using fMRI, we tested whether increases in activity triggered by inconsistent behavior reflect changes in the stored representations of other people in response to behavioral inconsistency, or merely a response to the inconsistency itself. Participants encountered a series of individuals whose behavior either changed in an attributionally meaningful fashion or was merely inconsistent with the immediately preceding behavior. We observed that left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC) and left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) were preferentially recruited in response to unexpected, immoral behavior, whereas a separate set of regions (including dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex and temporoparietal junction/inferior parietal lobule) was preferentially recruited in response to more mundane inconsistencies in behavior. These results shed light on the distributed systems supporting impression updating. Specifically, while many regions supporting updating may primarily respond to moment-to-moment changes in behavior, a subset of regions (e.g. vlPFC and IFG) may contribute to updating person representations in response to trait-relevant changes in behavior.

  18. 模拟口腔取模环境下 TRIOS 数字印模的精密度%Precision of digital impressions with TRIOS under simulated intraoral impression taking conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨鑫; 孙一飞; 田雷; 司文捷; 冯海兰; 刘亦洪

    2015-01-01

    目的:研究模拟口腔取模环境下TRIOS数字印模的精密度,并与口外模型扫描的精密度比较。方法:制作6个#14~#17树脂牙列,其中#16为离体牙的全瓷冠预备体。对树脂牙列分别进行:(1)硅橡胶取印模,灌注石膏模型,3Shape D700模型扫描仪重复扫描10次;(2)固定于仿头模内,3Shape TRIOS口内扫描仪重复扫描10次。Geomagic Qualify12.0对重复扫描数据两两进行最佳拟合对齐和3D比较,分别输出配准数据间的平均偏差( aver-aged errors ,AE)和差异分布彩图。秩和检验定量分析数字印模组与模型组AE的差异,根据差异分布彩图定性描述偏差分布特征。结果:数字印模组AE均数为7.058281μm,高于模型组4.092363μm,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05),但是数字印模组AE的均数和中位数均小于10μm,表明扫描数据间一致性良好。模型组偏差分布均匀,数字印模组偏差较大区域主要分布于肩台及邻面区域。结论:TRIOS数字印模精密度良好,可达到临床应用要求,预备体肩台及邻面区域为扫描的难点。%Objective:To evaluate the precision of digital impressions taken under simulated clinical impression taking conditions with TRIOS and to compare with the precision of extraoral digitalizations . Methods:Six #14 -#17 epoxy resin dentitions with extracted #16 tooth preparations embedded were made.For each artificial dentition , ( 1 ) a silicone rubber impression was taken with individual tray , poured with type IV plaster ,and digitalized with 3Shape D700 model scanner for 10 times;(2) fastened to a dental simulator , 10 digital impressions for each were taken with 3Shape TRIOS intraoral scanner .To assess the precision , best-fit algorithm and 3 D comparison were conducted between repeated scan models pairwise by Geomagic Qualify 12.0, exported as averaged errors (AE) and color-coded diagrams

  19. Dental hygiene student experiences in external placements in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jane A; Hayes, Melanie J; Wallace, Linda

    2012-05-01

    While placements in external locations are being increasingly used in dental education globally, few studies have explored the student learning experience at such placements. The purpose of this study was to investigate student experiences while on external placement in a baccalaureate dental hygiene program. A self-reporting questionnaire was distributed to final-year dental hygiene students (n=77) at the University of Newcastle, Australia, in 2010. The questionnaire included questions regarding the type of placement, experiences offered, supervision, resources available, and lasting impressions. Responding students were generally positive about their external placement experience and indicated that the majority of facilities provided them with the opportunity to provide direct patient care and perform clinical tasks typical of a practicing hygienist. However, there was a statistically significant difference in their opinions about discipline-focused and community placements. Students indicated that their external placement experience provided opportunities to learn more about time and patient management, including hands-on experience with specific clinical tasks. Ongoing evaluations are necessary to ensure that external placements meet both student needs and intended learning outcomes within dental hygiene programs.

  20. Detection of Common Dental Diseases by Dental Hygiene-Therapists

    OpenAIRE

    Macey, Richard John

    2016-01-01

    Thesis submitted to the University of Manchester by Richard Macey for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy entitled “Detection of Common Dental Diseases by Dental Hygiene-Therapists”, February 2016.Many adult patients that attend NHS dental practices on a regular basis are asymptomatic and do not need any further treatment other than a routine dental examination (“check-up”). As the oral health of the adult population is predicted to improve further, using the General Dental Practitioner to und...

  1. Health Instruction Packages: Permanent Teeth, Dental Deposits, and Dental Instruments. Dientes Permanentes, Depositos Dentales y Instrumentos Dentales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Patricia; Germano, Catherine

    These five learning modules use text interspersed with illustrations and reinforcement exercises to instruct dental aide and dental hygiene students about jaw bones and gums, dental deposits, and dental instruments. The first four modules were prepared by Patricia Lind in both Spanish and English. "The Gum and Bone of Permanent Teeth"…

  2. Wettability, imbibition, and mass change of disinfected low-viscosity impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepe, Xavier; Johnson, Glen H; Berg, John C; Aw, Tar C; Stroh, G Scott

    2002-09-01

    There is an ongoing effort by dental manufacturers to create impression materials with improved wetting properties. Disinfection solutions may alter the surface characteristics of these newer materials. This study compared wettability, imbibition, and mass change of various recently introduced automixed low-viscosity addition silicone and polyether materials before and after immersion disinfection. The Wilhelmy technique was used for deriving wetting properties of 5 addition silicone materials (Clinician's Choice Affinity, Clinician's Choice Superhydrophilic [experimental], Kerr's Take One, 3M's Imprint II, and Dentsply's Aquasil LV) and 2 polyether materials (ESPE's Permadyne Garant and Impregum Garant). Conditions included a control with no disinfection (0 hours), as well as (1/2) hour of immersion disinfection in a full-strength solution of 2% acid glutaraldehyde disinfectant (Banicide). Weight changes before and after disinfection and weight loss in air were measured over an 18-hour period to detect imbibition and mass change over time. The data were analyzed with a 1-way analysis of variance at alpha=0.05, with n = 3 for advancing (ACA) and receding (RCA) contact angles and n = 2 for imbibition and mass change. Statistical significant differences in wettability (PImpregum Garant polyether demonstrated significantly lower RCA for the control (48.4 degrees) and at (1/2) hour of disinfection (51.8 degrees). The 2 polyethers and Take One lost mass, whereas Aquasil LV gained mass in air; however, all materials exhibited some degree of imbibition during disinfection. Within the limitations of this study, the 2 polyether materials tested exhibited significantly lower ACA's and RCA's compared with the 5 addition silicones tested. Imbibition for the 2 polyether materials was significantly higher (PAquasil LV gained significantly more (0.6%) mass in air.

  3. Zirconia as a Dental Biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Della Bona

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ceramics are very important in the science of dental biomaterials. Among all dental ceramics, zirconia is in evidence as a dental biomaterial and it is the material of choice in contemporary restorative dentistry. Zirconia has been applied as structural material for dental bridges, crowns, inserts, and implants, mostly because of its biocompatibility, high fracture toughness, and radiopacity. However, the clinical success of restorative dentistry has to consider the adhesion to different substrates, which has offered a great challenge to dental zirconia research and development. This study characterizes zirconia as a dental biomaterial, presenting the current consensus and challenges to its dental applications.

  4. Association between dental pain and depression in Korean adults using the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S E; Park, Y G; Han, K; Min, J A; Kim, S Y

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationships between the prevalence of depression and dental pain using a well characterised, nationally representative, population-based study. This study analysed data from the 2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n = 4886). Oral health status was assessed using the oral health questionnaire, and oral examination was performed by trained dentists. Depression was defined as the participant having been diagnosed as depression during the previous year. Logistic regression was applied to estimate adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), controlling for a range of covariates. Results demonstrated that participants included in 'root canal treatment is necessary' showed higher prevalence of self-reported dental pain; in particular, participants with depression presented more dental pain than those without depression. After adjusting for sociodemographic factors, self-reported dental pain increased in participants with depression. The AOR (95% CI) for having self-reported dental pain was 1·58 (1·08-2·33) in dentists' diagnosis of no dental pain/depression group, 1·62 (1·32-1·98) in dentists' diagnosis of dental pain/no depression group and 2·84 (1·10-7·37) in dentists' diagnosis of dental pain/depression group. It was concluded that depression was associated with dental pain after adjustment for potential confounders in Korean adults. Thus, dentists should consider the possible presence of psychopathology when treating patients with dental pain.

  5. Risk factors for dental caries in children with developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braúna, Ana Paula Vasques Sales; Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães de; Resende, Vera Lúcia Silva; Castilho, Lia Silva de

    2016-06-14

    The aim of the present study was to investigate risk factors for dental caries in children with developmental disabilities who were treated at a clinical reference service for patients with special needs in Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. This is a retrospective cohort study that evaluated 401 dental charts of individuals without dental caries or restorations in their first dental appointment. The dependent variable was the time of occurrence of new dental caries or restorations and was measured in months. Gender, age, International Code of Diseases (ICD), mother´s education, sugar consumption, use of fluoride toothpaste, oral hygiene, mouth breathing, reports of xerostomia, gingival status, use of psychotropic or asthma drugs, and history of asthma were covariates. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to estimate the raw and adjusted hazard ratios and their respective 95% confidence intervals. The average time that individuals remained free of dental caries/restoration was equal to 107.46 months (95%CI 95.41 to 119.51), with a median of caries-free children up to 94 months. For each point increase in the scale of sucrose consumption, the increase in caries risk was 1.07 (95%CI 1.01 to 1.15). Sucrose consumption was the only risk factor for dental caries found in this group of individuals with developmental disabilities.

  6. Prerequisites in behavioral science and business: opportunities for dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, David G; Lange, Brian M; Madden, Robert D; Tacha, Koko K

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing pressure on recent dental school graduates to understand and successfully utilize patient management and business management strategies to run a productive dental office. Dental schools are faced with the dilemma to either add more credit hours in their already crowded curriculum or adjust predental school requirements. All fifty-nine U.S. dental schools were assessed online to determine admission requirements in the areas of behavioral science and business education. Results show that only 11.9 percent of the schools require prerequisite course work in behavioral science and no school requires prerequisite course work in business. However, 64.4 percent and 30.5 percent of schools encouraged or recommended prerequisite course work in behavioral science and business, respectively. We suggest that the dental education community involve key stakeholders to discuss the incorporation of prerequisite course work in behavioral science and business. Additional courses in these disciplines would provide dental students better backgrounds from which the dental curriculum could build a more advanced and applied perspective to better prepare students for practice.

  7. Factors associated with dental care utilization in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmawikarta, Denise; Chen, Yang; Carsley, Sarah; Birken, Catherine S; Parkin, Patricia C; Schroth, Robert J; Maguire, Jonathon L

    2014-06-01

    To identify sociodemographic, dietary, and biological factors associated with families who do not receive dental care in early childhood and to identify risk factors associated with having cavities among children who receive early dental care. A cross-sectional study of healthy Canadian children seen for primary health care between September 2011 and January 2013 was conducted through the TARGet Kids! practice-based research network in Toronto, Canada. Adjusted logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with children who were not seen by a dentist in early childhood and to determine risk factors associated with having dental cavities among children who received early dental care. Of the 2505 children included in the analysis, cavities. Among healthy urban children seen by a primary care provider, those most susceptible to cavities were least likely to receive early dental care. These findings support the need for publicly funded universal early preventive dental care and underscore the importance for primary care physicians to promote dental care in early childhood. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Annual ADEA Survey of Dental School Seniors: 2016 Graduating Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanchek, Tanya; Cook, Bryan J; Valachovic, Richard W

    2017-05-01

    This report examines the results of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Survey of Dental School Seniors graduating in 2016. Data were collected from 4,558 respondents at all 59 U.S. dental schools with graduating classes that year. This annual survey asks graduating students about a variety of topics in order to understand their motivation for attending dental school, educational experiences while in school, debt incurred, and plans following graduation. Motivations for choosing to attend dental school typically involved family or friends who were dentists or students' personal experiences. The timing of the decision to enter dentistry has been getting earlier over time. Similar to previous years, the average graduating student had above $200,000 in student debt. However, for the first time in two decades, inflation-adjusted debt decreased slightly. The reduction in debt was due to students from private schools reducing their average debt by $23,401. Immediately after graduation, most seniors planned to enter private practice (50.5%) or advanced dental education (33.8%). Approximately half of the respondents planned to work in underserved areas at some point in their careers. These findings underscore the continued value of the senior survey to offer a unique view of the diverse characteristics and career paths of the future dental workforce.

  9. Once an Impression Manager, Always an Impression Manager? Antecedents of Honest and Deceptive Impression Management Use and Variability across Multiple Job Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulin, Nicolas; Bourdage, Joshua S.

    2017-01-01

    Research has examined the antecedents of applicants' use of impression management (IM) tactics in employment interviews. All existing empirical studies have measured IM in one particular interview. Yet, applicants generally interview multiple times for different positions, and thus have multiple opportunities to engage in IM, before they can secure a job. Similarly, recent theoretical advances in personnel selection and IM research have suggested that applicant behaviors should be considered as dynamic and adaptive in nature. In line with this perspective, the present study is the first to examine the role of individual differences in both applicants' use of IM tactics and the variability in IM use across multiple interviews. It also highlights which honest and deceptive IM tactics remain stable vs. vary in consecutive interviews with different interviewers and organizations. Results suggest that applicants high in Extraversion or core self-evaluations tend to engage in more honest self-promotion but do not adapt their IM approach across interviews. In contrast, applicants who possess more undesirable personality traits (i.e., low on Honesty-Humility and Conscientiousness, but high on Machiavellianism, Narcissism, Psychopathy, or Competitive Worldviews) tend to use more deceptive IM (and especially image creation tactics) and are also more likely to adapt their IM strategy across interviews. Because deceptive IM users can obtain better evaluations from interviewers and the personality profile of those users is often associated with undesirable workplace outcomes, this study provides additional evidence for the claim that deceptive IM (or faking) is a potential threat for organizations. PMID:28174546

  10. Accuracy of implant transfer with open-tray and closed-tray impression techniques and surface detail reproduction of the tooth during impression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakimeh Siadat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Accurate recording of implant location is required to achieve passive fit and have the implants without stress concentration. The aim of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the dimensional and angular accuracy of open-tray and closed-tray impression techniques using polyether impression material and also to assess the surface detail reproduction of the tooth while impression making.Materials and Methods: One reference metal model with 2 implants (Implantium on the position of the maxillary second premolar and first molar and one molar tooth for evaluation of surface details was prepared. 27 polyether impressions of these models were made (9 using open-tray, 9 using closed-tray techniques and 9 were made just of the surface of the teeth without any implants. Impressions were poured with ADA type IV stone. Coordinate Measuring Machine was used for measuring the dimensional accuracy and video measuring machine for surface detail reproduction. All of these measurements were compared with the measurements on the reference model. Data were analyzed by and compared by T-test and One-way ANOVA.Results: There was a significant statistical difference between open-tray and closed-tray techniques (P0.05.Conclusion: The accuracy of open-tray impression technique was more than closed-tray technique. The surface detail reproduction of the tooth was not affected by impression technique.

  11. Evaluation of effectiveness of intraoral delivery tip on single step impressions using monophase and two-phase impression materials: An in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Gowri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Rationale: The precise fit of prosthesis depends on the impression materials and the technique used. Addition silicone impression materials being the user-friendly material are used in monophase and two-phase techniques. Considering the paucity of data on the effectiveness of intraoral delivery tip (IODT on void, tear and bubble formation using monophase impression technique in stock tray and two-phase impression technique in custom tray the present study was initiated. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 patients requiring single complete veneer crowns were enrolled. Monophase and two-phase impressions with and without IODT were made. Evaluation of the impression were made for tears, voids, and bubbles and alpha, beta, delta scores were given. Results: A significant reduction in the total number of voids was observed with two-phase technique either with or without IODT. No significant differences were observed in the proportion of overall evaluation into alpha, beta and delta between monophase and two-phase with and without IODT. No significant association was seen in the overall evaluation between the two groups (monophase and two-phase as compared using Chi-square test for independency and a trend in association between overall evaluation as tested using Chi-square for linear trend analysis. Conclusion: Two-phase impression technique with the use of IODT produced decreased number of voids.

  12. Effect of wash bulk on the accuracy of polyvinyl siloxane putty-wash impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissan, J; Gross, M; Shifman, A; Assif, D

    2002-04-01

    Variations in the bulk of wash in a putty-wash impression technique can result in dimensional changes proportional to the thickness of the wash material during setting. The purpose of the study was to determine the amount of wash necessary to achieve accurate stone models while using a two-step putty-wash impression technique with polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression material. A total of 45 impressions were made of a stainless steel master model, 15 impressions for each wash thickness (1, 2 and 3 mm). The model contained three full-crown abutment preparations, which were used as the positive control. Accuracy was assessed by measuring six dimensions (occlusogingival and interabutments) on stone dies poured from impressions of the master model. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed statistically significant differences amongst the three wash bulk groups, for all occlusogingival and interabutment measurements (P 2 mm was inadequate to obtain accurate stone dies.

  13. Interpretation of appearance: the effect of facial features on first impressions and personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolffhechel, Karin; Fagertun, Jens; Jacobsen, Ulrik Plesner; Majewski, Wiktor; Hemmingsen, Astrid Sofie; Larsen, Catrine Lohmann; Lorentzen, Sofie Katrine; Jarmer, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Appearance is known to influence social interactions, which in turn could potentially influence personality development. In this study we focus on discovering the relationship between self-reported personality traits, first impressions and facial characteristics. The results reveal that several personality traits can be read above chance from a face, and that facial features influence first impressions. Despite the former, our prediction model fails to reliably infer personality traits from either facial features or first impressions. First impressions, however, could be inferred more reliably from facial features. We have generated artificial, extreme faces visualising the characteristics having an effect on first impressions for several traits. Conclusively, we find a relationship between first impressions, some personality traits and facial features and consolidate that people on average assess a given face in a highly similar manner.

  14. Interpretation of appearance: the effect of facial features on first impressions and personality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolffhechel, Karin Marie Brandt; Fagertun, Jens; Jacobsen, Ulrik Plesner;

    2014-01-01

    Appearance is known to influence social interactions, which in turn could potentially influence personality development. In this study we focus on discovering the relationship between self-reported personality traits, first impressions and facial characteristics. The results reveal that several...... personality traits can be read above chance from a face, and that facial features influence first impressions. Despite the former, our prediction model fails to reliably infer personality traits from either facial features or first impressions. First impressions, however, could be inferred more reliably from...... facial features. We have generated artificial, extreme faces visualising the characteristics having an effect on first impressions for several traits. Conclusively, we find a relationship between first impressions, some personality traits and facial features and consolidate that people on average assess...

  15. Taking a closer look: On the operation of nonconscious impression formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Culloch, Kathleen C; Ferguson, Melissa J; Kawada, Christie C K; Bargh, John A

    2008-05-01

    In this article we analyzed the information processing that underlies nonconscious impression formation. In the first experiment, the nonconscious activation of the impression formation goal led to a faster analysis of the trait implications of behaviors, compared with a control group. In Experiment 2, participants who were nonconsciously primed with an impression formation goal were more likely than those in a control condition to form associations in memory between behaviors and implied traits. In Experiment 3, nonconsciously primed participants were more sensitive than those in a control condition to whether inconsistent trait information was relevant or irrelevant to the actor's disposition. Moreover, in Experiments 2 and 3, those with a nonconscious goal showed just as much evidence of impression formation as those who were consciously and intentionally trying to form an impression. Implications for nonconscious goal pursuit and impression formation are discussed.

  16. Beyond the actor's traits: forming impressions of actors, targets, and relationships from social behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, K P; Smith, E R

    1993-09-01

    Perceivers who observe social behaviors may form impressions not only of actors' traits but also of people as targets and of interpersonal relationships. In Study 1, Ss read about 4 individuals' behaviors under instructions to form actor-, target-, and relationship-based impressions. Ss then read additional behavioral information that they later tried to recall. Ss accurately perceived actor, target, and relationship effects in the presented information, and they better recalled subsequent behaviors that were consistent with all 3 types of impressions. In Study 2, Ss thought of 4 people they knew and judged how much each liked the other 3. These ratings revealed actor, target, and relationship effects as well as individual and dyadic reciprocity. Perceivers can form relatively accurate impressions of people as actors and as targets and accurate impressions of relationships between people, and these impressions influence memory for further behaviors.

  17. A Comparative Evaluation of Dimensional Accuracy and Surface Detail Reproduction of Four Hydrophilic Vinyl Polysiloxane Impression Materials Tested Under Dry, Moist, and Wet Conditions-An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagrath, Rahul; Lahori, Manesh; Agrawal, Manjari

    2014-12-01

    Vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression materials have application in a wide variety of situations in both fixed and removable prosthodontics. A major limitation of VPS impression materials is their hydrophobicity. There are two aspects of this problem, the wettability of the polymerized impression by dental gypsum materials and the ability of the unpolymerized material to wet intraoral tissues. To address this problem, manufacturers have added surfactants and labelled these new products as "hydrophilic vinyl polysiloxane." The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare dimensional accuracy and surface detail reproduction of four hydrophilic VPS impression materials, when used under dry, moist, and wet conditions. A total of 180 samples were made of stainless steel die similar to as described in ADA sp. no. 19. The die was scored with three horizontal and two vertical lines. Impressions were made under dry, moist and wet conditions. Dimensional accuracy was measured by comparing the length of the middle horizontal line in each impression to the same line on the metal die, by using Universal Length Measuring machine. A 2-way ANOVA was performed on the percentage change data for measured lengths of the 4 impression materials under the 3 conditions to evaluate dimensional accuracy. Surface detail was evaluated in two ways: (1) by use of criteria similar to ADA sp. no. 19 for detail reproduction, and (2) by use of a method that categorized the impressions as satisfactory or unsatisfactory based on their surface characteristics: presence of pits, voids, or roughness. Pearson X2 (α = 0.05) was used to compare surface detail reproduction results. Conditions (dry, moist, and wet) did not cause significant adverse effects on the dimensional accuracy of all the four material. With both surface detail analyses, dry, moist, and wet conditions had a significant effect on the detail reproduction of all the four materials (P study concluded that the dimensional accuracy of

  18. Effect of different impression materials and techniques on the dimensional accuracy of implant definitive casts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Ebadian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different factors such as impression techniques and materials can affect the passive fit between the superstructure and implant. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different impression materials and techniques on the dimensional accuracy of implant definitive casts. Materials and Methods: Four internal hex implants (Biohorizons Ψ4 mm were placed on a metal maxillary model perpendicular to the horizontal plane in maxillary lateral incisors, right canine and left first premolar areas. Three impression techniques including open tray, closed tray using ball top screw abutments and closed tray using short impression copings and two impression materials (polyether and polyvinyl siloxane were evaluated (n = 60. The changes in distances between implant analogues in mediolateral (x and anteroposterior (y directions and analogue angles in x/z and y/z directions in the horizontal plane on the definitive casts were measured by coordinate measuring machine. The data were analyzed by multivariate two-way analysis of variance and one sample t-test (α = 0.05. Results: No statistical significant differences were observed between different impression techniques and materials. However, deviation and distortion of definitive casts had a significant difference with the master model when short impression copings and polyvinyl siloxane impression material were used (P < 0.05. In open tray technique, there was a significant difference in the rotation of analogs compared with the master model with both impression materials (P < 0.05. Conclusion: There was no difference between open and closed tray impression techniques; however, less distortion and deviation were observed in the open tray technique. In the closed tray impression technique, ball top screw was more accurate than short impression copings.

  19. Insular and hippocampal contributions to remembering people with an impression of bad personality.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsukiura, Takashi; Shigemune, Yayoi; Nouchi, Rui; Kambara, Toshimune; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2012-01-01

    Our impressions of other people are formed mainly from the two possible factors of facial attractiveness and trustworthiness. Previous studies have shown the importance of orbitofrontal–hippocampal interactions in the better remembering of attractive faces, and psychological data have indicated that faces giving an impression of untrustworthiness are remembered more accurately than those giving an impression of trustworthiness. However, the neural mechanisms of the latter effect are largely u...

  20. A Single Step Impression Technique of Flabby Ridges Using Monophase Polyvinylsiloxane Material: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Y. Pai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complete denture fabrication in clinically compromised situations such as flabby ridges is a challenging task for the clinician. Accurate impressioning of these tissues plays a major role in ensuring a well-fitting prosthesis. In this paper, the authors have proposed a newer technique of impression making of the flabby tissues using a combination of readily available newer and older materials to ensure an accurate and easy impression of these tissues.

  1. Use of Irreversible Hydrocolloid to Blockout Interproximal Spaces for an Easy Impression Taking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Monzavi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Making impression to obtain an accurate working cast needs to use accurate impression materials such as polyether. On the other hand, polyether cannot be used easily in places with undercut such as excessive interproximal spaces and under the pontics of fixed partialdentures as it may be locked in these free spaces. In this article, a method is presented to blockout interproximal spaces in order to minimize distortion and to facilitate impression removal from the mouth.

  2. The effect of disinfectants on dimensional stability of addition and condensation silicone impressions

    OpenAIRE

    Sinobad Tamara; Obradović-Đuričić Kosovka; Nikolić Zoran; Dodić Slobodan; Lazić Vojkan; Sinobad Vladimir; Jesenko-Rokvić Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim. Dimensional stability and accuracy of an impression after chemical disinfection by immersion in disinfectants are crucial for the accuracy of final prosthetic restorations. The aim of this study was to assess the deformation of addition and condensation silicone impressions after disinfection in antimicrobial solutions. Methods. A total of 120 impressions were made on the model of the upper arch representing three full metal-ceramic crown pr...

  3. Equine dental advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S K

    2001-08-01

    The reintroduction and development of safe motorized instruments, the increased availability of continuing education, and the understanding and implementation of appropriate procedures allow practitioners to provide better dental care. Veterinarians realize that sedation, analgesia, a full-mouth speculum, and proper instrumentation are necessary to provide these services. Continued instrument design, future research, and new treatment and prophylactic protocols should have a positive impact on the future of equine dental health. New and rediscovered procedures for equilibrating equine occlusion are allowing horses to masticate more efficiently, carry a bit more comfortably, and experience improved performance. The horse, the horse owner, and the veterinary profession all benefit from providing complete equine dental care.

  4. Dental pulp stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashri, N. Y.; Ajlan, S. A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable...... scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from...... an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors....

  5. Optimization of dental implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dol, Aleksandr V.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.

    2017-02-01

    Modern dentistry can not exist without dental implantation. This work is devoted to study of the "bone-implant" system and to optimization of dental prostheses installation. Modern non-invasive methods such as MRI an 3D-scanning as well as numerical calculations and 3D-prototyping allow to optimize all of stages of dental prosthetics. An integrated approach to the planning of implant surgery can significantly reduce the risk of complications in the first few days after treatment, and throughout the period of operation of the prosthesis.

  6. Feline dental disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, P; Williams, C A

    1986-09-01

    Periodontal disease and chronic gingivitis/stomatitis are the most common feline dental diseases. With routine dental care and increased emphasis on home oral hygiene, these diseases can be controlled. Cats can be seen with a number of other dental disorders, and improved treatment methods such as restorations of early subgingival resorptive lesions, endodontic therapy, and orthodontic therapy can be performed successfully. More study and research are necessary about the gingivitis/stomatitis syndrome and subgingival resorptive lesions so that improved prevention and treatment recommendations can be made.

  7. A Novel Technique of Impression Procedure in a Hemimaxillectomy Patient with Microstomia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryakant C. Deogade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A restricted mouth opening in hemimaxillectomy patient can create a significant problem with the insertion and the removal of the obturator prosthesis. Even it poses a problem in impression making due to small oral opening. A modification of the standard impression procedure is often necessary to accomplish an acceptable impression in the fabrication of a successful prosthesis. Sectional trays are a good option for such patients. This paper describes a novel technique of impression procedure and a method of fabricating a sectional tray with the anterior and the posterior locking mechanism for a hemimaxillectomy patient with limited oral opening.

  8. An innovative impression technique for fabrication of a custom made ocular prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Chandra Tripuraneni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various impression and fitting techniques have been described in the past for restoring ocular defects. The present article describes a new direct impression technique for recording and rehabilitating ocular defects, by custom-made ocular prosthesis. All the techniques described in the history, mainly concentrated in recording the tissue surface of the defect, which made it difficult to contour the palpebral surface resulting in the poor esthetics of the prosthesis. The present impression technique uses heavy bodied polyvinyl siloxane impression material, which facilitates accurate recording of the tissue surface and the palpebral surface of the defect, resulting in the fabrication of functionally and esthetically acceptable prosthesis.

  9. An innovative impression technique for fabrication of a custom made ocular prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripuraneni, Sunil Chandra; Vadapalli, Sriharsha Babu; Ravikiran, P; Nirupama, N

    2015-01-01

    Various impression and fitting techniques have been described in the past for restoring ocular defects. The present article describes a new direct impression technique for recording and rehabilitating ocular defects, by custom-made ocular prosthesis. All the techniques described in the history, mainly concentrated in recording the tissue surface of the defect, which made it difficult to contour the palpebral surface resulting in the poor esthetics of the prosthesis. The present impression technique uses heavy bodied polyvinyl siloxane impression material, which facilitates accurate recording of the tissue surface and the palpebral surface of the defect, resulting in the fabrication of functionally and esthetically acceptable prosthesis. PMID:26265651

  10. Evaluation of dimensional stability and accuracy of autoclavable polyvinyl siloxane impression material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Subash M; Vijitha, D; Karthikeyan, S; Balasubramanian, R; Satish, A

    2013-12-01

    Dimensionally stable autoclavable impressions will be effective in controlling the cross-infection and contamination caused by patient's saliva and other oral secretions. The accuracy of newly introduced autoclavable polyvinyl siloxane impression material was assessed for its dimensional stability and accuracy. A standard metal model (Dentoform, U-501, Columbia) was customised for impression making. The impressions were made using the newly introduced polyvinyl siloxane impression materials (AFFINIS, Coltene/Whaledent AG, 9450 Alstalten, Switzerland). Fifty impressions were made and were divided into two groups A and B of 25 each. Group A was the control sample (non-autoclaved impressions) and group B was the test sample (autoclaved impressions), which was subjected to the steam autoclave procedure at 134 °C for 18 min, casts were poured in type IV gypsum products. The customised metal model, casts obtained from control and test group were subjected to laboratory evaluation with help of a travelling microscope (×10 magnification), and digital vernier calliper (0.01 mm/10 μm accuracy). Data analysis was done using one-way ANOVA and One-Sample t test to evaluate the overall accuracy (P polyvinyl siloxane impression material is accurate and dimensional stable for clinical use when steam autoclaved at 134 °C for 18 min.

  11. Insular and hippocampal contributions to remembering people with an impression of bad personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukiura, Takashi; Shigemune, Yayoi; Nouchi, Rui; Kambara, Toshimune; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2013-06-01

    Our impressions of other people are formed mainly from the two possible factors of facial attractiveness and trustworthiness. Previous studies have shown the importance of orbitofrontal-hippocampal interactions in the better remembering of attractive faces, and psychological data have indicated that faces giving an impression of untrustworthiness are remembered more accurately than those giving an impression of trustworthiness. However, the neural mechanisms of the latter effect are largely unknown. To investigate this issue, we investigated neural activities with event-related fMRI while the female participants rated their impressions of the personalities of men in terms of trustworthiness. After the rating, memory for faces was tested to identify successful encoding activity. As expected, faces that gave bad impressions were remembered better than those that gave neutral or good impressions. In fMRI data, right insular activity reflected an increasing function of bad impressions, and bilateral hippocampal activities predicted subsequent memory success. Additionally, correlation between these insular and hippocampal regions was significant only in the encoding of faces associated with a bad impression. Better memory for faces associated with an impression of bad personality could reflect greater interaction between the avoidance-related insular region and the encoding-related hippocampal region.

  12. Does aging impair first impression accuracy? Differentiating emotion recognition from complex social inferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krendl, Anne C; Rule, Nicholas O; Ambady, Nalini

    2014-09-01

    Young adults can be surprisingly accurate at making inferences about people from their faces. Although these first impressions have important consequences for both the perceiver and the target, it remains an open question whether first impression accuracy is preserved with age. Specifically, could age differences in impressions toward others stem from age-related deficits in accurately detecting complex social cues? Research on aging and impression formation suggests that young and older adults show relative consensus in their first impressions, but it is unknown whether they differ in accuracy. It has been widely shown that aging disrupts emotion recognition accuracy, and that these impairments may predict deficits in other social judgments, such as detecting deceit. However, it is unclear whether general impression formation accuracy (e.g., emotion recognition accuracy, detecting complex social cues) relies on similar or distinct mechanisms. It is important to examine this question to evaluate how, if at all, aging might affect overall accuracy. Here, we examined whether aging impaired first impression accuracy in predicting real-world outcomes and categorizing social group membership. Specifically, we studied whether emotion recognition accuracy and age-related cognitive decline (which has been implicated in exacerbating deficits in emotion recognition) predict first impression accuracy. Our results revealed that emotion recognition accuracy did not predict first impression accuracy, nor did age-related cognitive decline impair it. These findings suggest that domains of social perception outside of emotion recognition may rely on mechanisms that are relatively unimpaired by aging.

  13. A novel technique of impression procedure in a hemimaxillectomy patient with microstomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deogade, Suryakant C

    2012-01-01

    A restricted mouth opening in hemimaxillectomy patient can create a significant problem with the insertion and the removal of the obturator prosthesis. Even it poses a problem in impression making due to small oral opening. A modification of the standard impression procedure is often necessary to accomplish an acceptable impression in the fabrication of a successful prosthesis. Sectional trays are a good option for such patients. This paper describes a novel technique of impression procedure and a method of fabricating a sectional tray with the anterior and the posterior locking mechanism for a hemimaxillectomy patient with limited oral opening.

  14. Adaptation gap hypothesis: How differences between users’ expected and perceived agent functions affect their subjective impression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanori Komatsu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe an “adaptation gap” that indicates the differences between the functions of artificial agents that users expect before starting their interactions and the functions they perceive after their interactions. We investigated the effect of this adaptation gap on users’ impressions of artificial agents because any variations in impression before and after the start of an interaction determines whether the user feels that this agent is worth interacting with. The results showed that positive or negative signs of the adaptation gap and subjective impression scores of agents before the experiment significantly affected the users’ final impressions of the agents.

  15. Establishing versus preserving impressions: Predicting success in the multiple audience problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Austin Lee; Cottrell, Catherine A

    2015-12-01

    People sometimes seek to convey discrepant impressions of themselves to different audiences simultaneously. Research suggests people are generally successful in this "multiple audience problem." Adding to previous research, the current research sought to examine factors that may limit this success by measuring social anxiety and placing participants into situations requiring them to either establish or preserve multiple impressions simultaneously. In general, participants were more successful when preserving previously conveyed impressions than when establishing impressions for the first time. In contrast, social anxiety did not affect multiple audience success. In all, this research offers valuable insight into potential challenges that people face in many social situations.

  16. Accuracy of the One-Stage and Two-Stage Impression Techniques: A Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladan Jamshidy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. One of the main steps of impression is the selection and preparation of an appropriate tray. Hence, the present study aimed to analyze and compare the accuracy of one- and two-stage impression techniques. Materials and Methods. A resin laboratory-made model, as the first molar, was prepared by standard method for full crowns with processed preparation finish line of 1 mm depth and convergence angle of 3-4°. Impression was made 20 times with one-stage technique and 20 times with two-stage technique using an appropriate tray. To measure the marginal gap, the distance between the restoration margin and preparation finish line of plaster dies was vertically determined in mid mesial, distal, buccal, and lingual (MDBL regions by a stereomicroscope using a standard method. Results. The results of independent test showed that the mean value of the marginal gap obtained by one-stage impression technique was higher than that of two-stage impression technique. Further, there was no significant difference between one- and two-stage impression techniques in mid buccal region, but a significant difference was reported between the two impression techniques in MDL regions and in general. Conclusion. The findings of the present study indicated higher accuracy for two-stage impression technique than for the one-stage impression technique.

  17. Conjunctival impression cytology--a study of normal conjunctiva.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadkari S

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Conjunctival impression cytology was used to study conjunctival ocular surface in 30 normal individuals in the age group of 20 to 60 years. The cytology was graded according to the classification of Nelson. Out of 30 subjects, 26 showed the features of Grade O (average age 28.33 years and 4 showed grade 1 (average age 56.66 years. The method was very easy to perform, cheap and fast. The relationship of various cells to each other was maintained. This method can be used to study the conditions like trachoma, avitaminosis A and other disorders of conjunctival surface. It can be undertaken by a paramedical worker in an out patient clinic.

  18. Impressions of the Meson Spectrum: Hybrids & Exotics, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennington, Michael R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-03-25

    It has long been expected that the spectrum of hadrons in QCD would be far richer and extensive than experiment has so far revealed. While there have been experimental hints of this richness for some time, it is really only in the last few years that dramatic progress has been seen in the exploration both experimentally and in calculations on the lattice. Precision studies enabled by new technology both with detectors and high performance computations are converging on an understanding of the spectrum in strong coupling QCD. These methodologies are laying the foundation for a decade of potential discovery that electro and photoproduction experiments at Jefferson Lab, which when combined with key results on B and charmonium decays from both e+e? and pp colliders, should turn mere impressions of the light meson spectrum into a high definition picture.

  19. Study on impression smears of hepatic coccidiosis in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivajothi, S; Reddy, B Sudhakara; Rayulu, V C

    2016-09-01

    Hepatic coccidiosis is a contagious and lethal disease condition in rabbits. The disease was recorded in six rabbits suffering with watery diarrhoea. Clinically, affected rabbits showed decreased growth rate, anorexia, debilitation, diarrhea and rough hair coat. Examination of the faecal samples revealed the presence of unsporulated oocysts of Eimeria spp. After sporulation Eimeria stiedae oocysts were identified. Postmortem examination revealed hepatomegaly with presence of discrete yellowish-white nodules on the surface of the liver. Impression smears from the liver revealed the presence of numerous developmental stages of E. stiedae corresponding with the stage of the liver lesion and also represent the histological changes of the liver. Rabbits were treated with a combination of sulphaquinoxaline and diaveridine for five days.

  20. The complex interplay between semantics and grammar in impression formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreves, Wyley B; Hart, William; Adams, John M; Guadagno, Rosanna E; Eno, Cassie A

    2014-09-01

    We sought to bridge findings showing that (a) describing a person's behavior with the perfective verb aspect (did), compared to the imperfective aspect (was doing), increases processing of semantic knowledge unrelated to the target's action such as stereotypes and (b) an increased recognition of stereotypical thoughts often promotes a judgment correction for the stereotypes. We hypothesized an interplay between grammar (verb conjugation) and semantic information (gender) in impression-formation. Participants read a resume, attributed to a male or female, for a traditionally masculine job. When the resume was written in the imperfective, people rated a male (vs. female) more positively. When the resume was in the perfective, this pattern reversed. Only these latter effects of gender were influenced by cognitive load. Further, people more quickly indicated the applicant's gender in the perfective condition, suggesting an enhanced focus on gender during processing.