WorldWideScience

Sample records for adjoint parameter sensitivity

  1. Adjoint Parameter Sensitivity Analysis for the Hydrodynamic Lattice Boltzmann Method with Applications to Design Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingen, Georg; Evgrafov, Anton; Maute, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    We present an adjoint parameter sensitivity analysis formulation and solution strategy for the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The focus is on design optimization applications, in particular topology optimization. The lattice Boltzmann method is briefly described with an in-depth discussion...

  2. Adjoint sensitivity of global cloud droplet number to aerosol and dynamical parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Karydis

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the development of the adjoint of a comprehensive cloud droplet formation parameterization for use in aerosol-cloud-climate interaction studies. The adjoint efficiently and accurately calculates the sensitivity of cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC to all parameterization inputs (e.g., updraft velocity, water uptake coefficient, aerosol number and hygroscopicity with a single execution. The adjoint is then integrated within three dimensional (3-D aerosol modeling frameworks to quantify the sensitivity of CDNC formation globally to each parameter. Sensitivities are computed for year-long executions of the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI Chemical Transport Model (CTM, using wind fields computed with the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS Global Circulation Model (GCM II', and the GEOS-Chem CTM, driven by meteorological input from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS of the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO. We find that over polluted (pristine areas, CDNC is more sensitive to updraft velocity and uptake coefficient (aerosol number and hygroscopicity. Over the oceans of the Northern Hemisphere, addition of anthropogenic or biomass burning aerosol is predicted to increase CDNC in contrast to coarse-mode sea salt which tends to decrease CDNC. Over the Southern Oceans, CDNC is most sensitive to sea salt, which is the main aerosol component of the region. Globally, CDNC is predicted to be less sensitive to changes in the hygroscopicity of the aerosols than in their concentration with the exception of dust where CDNC is very sensitive to particle hydrophilicity over arid areas. Regionally, the sensitivities differ considerably between the two frameworks and quantitatively reveal why the models differ considerably in their indirect forcing estimates.

  3. Adjoint-based sensitivity of flames to ignition parameters in non-premixed shear-flow turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capecelatro, Jesse; Bodony, Daniel; Freund, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    The adjoint of the linearized and perturbed compressible flow equations for a mixture of chemically reacting ideal gases is used to assess the sensitivity of ignition in non-premixed shear-flow turbulence. Direct numerical simulations are used to provide an initial prediction, and the corresponding space-time discrete-exact adjoint is used to provide a sensitivity gradient for a specific quantity of interest (QoI). Owing to the ultimately binary outcome of ignition (i.e., it succeeds or fails after some period), a QoI is defined that both quantifies ignition success and varies smoothly near its threshold based on the heat release parameter in a short-time horizon during the ignition process. We use the resulting gradient to quantify the flow properties and model parameters that most affect the initiation of a sustained flame. A line-search algorithm is used to identify regions of high ignition probability and map the boundary between successful and failed ignition. The approach is demonstrated on a non-premixed turbulent shear layer and on a reacting jet-in-crossflow.

  4. Adjoint based sensitivity analysis of a reacting jet in crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashittal, Palash; Sayadi, Taraneh; Schmid, Peter

    2016-11-01

    With current advances in computational resources, high fidelity simulations of reactive flows are increasingly being used as predictive tools in various industrial applications. In order to capture the combustion process accurately, detailed/reduced chemical mechanisms are employed, which in turn rely on various model parameters. Therefore, it would be of great interest to quantify the sensitivities of the predictions with respect to the introduced models. Due to the high dimensionality of the parameter space, methods such as finite differences which rely on multiple forward simulations prove to be very costly and adjoint based techniques are a suitable alternative. The complex nature of the governing equations, however, renders an efficient strategy in finding the adjoint equations a challenging task. In this study, we employ the modular approach of Fosas de Pando et al. (2012), to build a discrete adjoint framework applied to a reacting jet in crossflow. The developed framework is then used to extract the sensitivity of the integrated heat release with respect to the existing combustion parameters. Analyzing the sensitivities in the three-dimensional domain provides insight towards the specific regions of the flow that are more susceptible to the choice of the model.

  5. Adjoint-Based Forecast Error Sensitivity Diagnostics in Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langland, R.; Daescu, D.

    2016-12-01

    We present an up-to-date review of the adjoint-data assimilation system (DAS) approach to evaluate the forecast sensitivity to error covariance parameters and provide guidance to flow-dependent adaptive covariance tuning (ACT) procedures. New applications of the forecast sensitivity to observation error covariance (FSR) are investigated including the sensitivity to observation error correlations and a priori first-order assessment to the error correlation impact on the forecasts. Issues related to ambiguities in the a posteriori estimation to the observation error covariance (R) and background error covariance (B) are discussed. A synergistic framework to adaptive covariance tuning is considered that combines R-estimates derived from a posteriori covariance diagnosis and FSR derivative information. The evaluation of the forecast sensitivity to the innovation-weight coefficients is introduced as a computationally-feasible approach to account for the characteristics of both R- and B-parameters and perform direct tuning of the DAS gain operator (K). Theoretical aspects are discussed and recent results are provided with the adjoint versions of the Naval Research Laboratory Atmospheric Variational Data Assimilation System-Accelerated Representer (NAVDAS-AR).

  6. Optimizing Spectral Wave Estimates with Adjoint-Based Sensitivity Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-18

    forecasts of nearshore wave conditions are important to a diverse constituency, including vacation destinations such as Miami Beach or San Diego, coastal...a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 18 FEB 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES...Sensitivity maps for wave spectra For any type of adjoint, sensitivity maps may be constructed from adjoint output to track the response of system properties

  7. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of high frequency structures with Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Bakr, Mohamed; Demir, Veysel

    2017-01-01

    This book covers the theory of adjoint sensitivity analysis and uses the popular FDTD (finite-difference time-domain) method to show how wideband sensitivities can be efficiently estimated for different types of materials and structures. It includes a variety of MATLAB® examples to help readers absorb the content more easily.

  8. The adjoint sensitivity method of global electromagnetic induction for CHAMP magnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinec, Zdeněk; Velímský, Jakub

    2009-12-01

    An existing time-domain spectral-finite element approach for the forward modelling of electromagnetic induction vector data as measured by the CHAMP satellite is, in this paper, supplemented by a new method of computing the sensitivity of the CHAMP electromagnetic induction data to the Earth's mantle electrical conductivity, which we term the adjoint sensitivity method. The forward and adjoint initial boundary-value problems, both solved in the time domain, are identical, except for the specification of prescribed boundary conditions. The respective boundary-value data at the satellite's altitude are the X magnetic component measured by the CHAMP vector magnetometer along the satellite track for the forward method and the difference between the measured and predicted Z magnetic component for the adjoint method. The squares of these differences summed up over all CHAMP tracks determine the misfit. The sensitivities of the CHAMP data, that is the partial derivatives of the misfit with respect to mantle conductivity parameters, are then obtained by the scalar product of the forward and adjoint solutions, multiplied by the gradient of the conductivity and integrated over all CHAMP tracks. Such exactly determined sensitivities are checked against numerical differentiation of the misfit, and good agreement is obtained. The attractiveness of the adjoint method lies in the fact that the adjoint sensitivities are calculated for the price of only an additional forward calculation, regardless of the number of conductivity parameters. However, since the adjoint solution proceeds backwards in time, the forward solution must be stored at each time step, leading to memory requirements that are linear with respect to the number of steps undertaken. Having determined the sensitivities, we apply the conjugate gradient method to infer 1-D and 2-D conductivity structures of the Earth based on the CHAMP residual time series (after the subtraction of static field and secular variations

  9. Equilibrium sensitivities of the Greenland ice sheet inferred from the adjoint of the three- dimensional thermo-mechanical model SICOPOLIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimbach, P.; Bugnion, V.

    2008-12-01

    We present a new and original approach to understanding the sensitivity of the Greenland ice sheet to key model parameters and environmental conditions. At the heart of this approach is the use of an adjoint ice sheet model. MacAyeal (1992) introduced adjoints in the context of applying control theory to estimate basal sliding parameters (basal shear stress, basal friction) of an ice stream model which minimize a least-squares model vs. observation misfit. Since then, this method has become widespread to fit ice stream models to the increasing number and diversity of satellite observations, and to estimate uncertain model parameters. However, no attempt has been made to extend this method to comprehensive ice sheet models. Here, we present a first step toward moving beyond limiting the use of control theory to ice stream models. We have generated an adjoint of the three-dimensional thermo-mechanical ice sheet model SICOPOLIS of Greve (1997). The adjoint was generated using the automatic differentiation (AD) tool TAF. TAF generates exact source code representing the tangent linear and adjoint model of the parent model provided. Model sensitivities are given by the partial derivatives of a scalar-valued model diagnostic or "cost function" with respect to the controls, and can be efficiently calculated via the adjoint. An effort to generate an efficient adjoint with the newly developed open-source AD tool OpenAD is also under way. To gain insight into the adjoint solutions, we explore various cost functions, such as local and domain-integrated ice temperature, total ice volume or the velocity of ice at the margins of the ice sheet. Elements of our control space include initial cold ice temperatures, surface mass balance, as well as parameters such as appear in Glen's flow law, or in the surface degree-day or basal sliding parameterizations. Sensitivity maps provide a comprehensive view, and allow a quantification of where and to which variables the ice sheet model is

  10. The adjoint sensitivity method of global electromagnetic induction for CHAMP magnetic data

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Martinec; J. Velimsky

    2017-01-01

    An existing time-domain spectral-finite element approach for the forward modelling of electromagnetic induction vector data as measured by the CHAMP satellite is, in this paper, supplemented by a new method of computing the sensitivity of the CHAMP electromagnetic induction data to the Earth's mantle electrical conductivity, which we term the adjoint sensitivity method. The forward and adjoint initial boundary-value problems, both solved in the time domain, are identical, except for the speci...

  11. Sensitivity Analysis for Reactor Period Induced by Positive Reactivity Using One-point Adjoint Kinetic Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, G.; Tsuji, M.; Narabayashi, T.

    2014-04-01

    In order to better predict a kinetic behavior of a nuclear fission reactor, an improvement of the delayed neutron parameters is essential. The present paper specifies important nuclear data for a reactor kinetics: Fission yield and decay constant data of 86Ge, some bromine isotopes, 94Rb, 98mY and some iodine isotopes. Their importance is quantified as sensitivities with a help of the adjoint kinetic equation, and it is found that they are dependent on an inserted reactivity (or a reactor period). Moreover, dependence of sensitivities on nuclear data files is also quantified using the latest files. Even though the currently evaluated data are used, there are large differences among different data files from a view point of the delayed neutrons.

  12. Adjoint sensitivity studies of loop current and eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico

    KAUST Repository

    Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh

    2013-07-01

    Adjoint model sensitivity analyses were applied for the loop current (LC) and its eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) using the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm). The circulation in the GoM is mainly driven by the energetic LC and subsequent LC eddy separation. In order to understand which ocean regions and features control the evolution of the LC, including anticyclonic warm-core eddy shedding in the GoM, forward and adjoint sensitivities with respect to previous model state and atmospheric forcing were computed using the MITgcm and its adjoint. Since the validity of the adjoint model sensitivities depends on the capability of the forward model to simulate the real LC system and the eddy shedding processes, a 5 year (2004–2008) forward model simulation was performed for the GoM using realistic atmospheric forcing, initial, and boundary conditions. This forward model simulation was compared to satellite measurements of sea-surface height (SSH) and sea-surface temperature (SST), and observed transport variability. Despite realistic mean state, standard deviations, and LC eddy shedding period, the simulated LC extension shows less variability and more regularity than the observations. However, the model is suitable for studying the LC system and can be utilized for examining the ocean influences leading to a simple, and hopefully generic LC eddy separation in the GoM. The adjoint sensitivities of the LC show influences from the Yucatan Channel (YC) flow and Loop Current Frontal Eddy (LCFE) on both LC extension and eddy separation, as suggested by earlier work. Some of the processes that control LC extension after eddy separation differ from those controlling eddy shedding, but include YC through-flow. The sensitivity remains stable for more than 30 days and moves generally upstream, entering the Caribbean Sea. The sensitivities of the LC for SST generally remain closer to the surface and move at speeds consistent with advection by the high-speed core of

  13. Parameter and state estimation with a time-dependent adjoint marine ice sheet model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Goldberg

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available To date, assimilation of observations into large-scale ice models has consisted predominantly of time-independent inversions of surface velocities for basal traction, bed elevation, or ice stiffness, and has relied primarily on analytically-derived adjoints of diagnostic ice velocity models. To overcome limitations of such "snapshot" inversions, i.e. their inability to assimilate time-dependent data, or to produce initial states with minimum artificial drift and suitable for time-dependent simulations, we have developed an adjoint of a time-dependent parallel glaciological flow model. The model implements a hybrid shallow shelf-shallow ice stress balance, involves a prognostic equation for ice thickness evolution, and can represent the floating, fast-sliding, and frozen bed regimes of a marine ice sheet. The adjoint is generated by a combination of analytic methods and the use of algorithmic differentiation (AD software. Several experiments are carried out with idealized geometries and synthetic observations, including inversion of time-dependent surface elevations for past thicknesses, and simultaneous retrieval of basal traction and topography from surface data. Flexible generation of the adjoint for a range of independent uncertain variables is exemplified through sensitivity calculations of grounded ice volume to changes in basal melting of floating and basal sliding of grounded ice. The results are encouraging and suggest the feasibility, using real observations, of improved ice sheet state estimation and comprehensive transient sensitivity assessments.

  14. Adjoint sensitivity in PDE constrained least squares problems as a multiphysics problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahaye, D.; Mulckhuyse, W.F.W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to provide a framework for the implementation of an adjoint sensitivity formulation for least-squares partial differential equations constrained optimization problems exploiting a multiphysics finite elements package. The estimation of the diffusion coefficient

  15. Adjoint-based Sensitivity Analysis for High-Energy Density Radiaitive Transfer using Flux-Limited Diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Humbird, Kelli D

    2016-01-01

    Uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analyses are a vital component for predictive modeling in the sciences and engineering. The adjoint approach to sensitivity analysis requires solving a primary system of equations and a mathematically related set of adjoint equations. The information contained in the equations can be combined to produce sensitivity information in a computationally efficient manner. In this work, sensitivity analyses are performed on systems described by flux-limited radiative diffusion using the adjoint approach. The sensitivities computed are shown to agree with standard perturbation theory, and can be obtained in significantly less computational time.

  16. Introduction to Adjoint Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errico, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    In this lecture, some fundamentals of adjoint models will be described. This includes a basic derivation of tangent linear and corresponding adjoint models from a parent nonlinear model, the interpretation of adjoint-derived sensitivity fields, a description of methods of automatic differentiation, and the use of adjoint models to solve various optimization problems, including singular vectors. Concluding remarks will attempt to correct common misconceptions about adjoint models and their utilization.

  17. Adjoint-based Sensitivity Analysis for High-Energy Density Radiaitive Transfer using Flux-Limited Diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    Humbird, Kelli D.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2016-01-01

    Uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analyses are a vital component for predictive modeling in the sciences and engineering. The adjoint approach to sensitivity analysis requires solving a primary system of equations and a mathematically related set of adjoint equations. The information contained in the equations can be combined to produce sensitivity information in a computationally efficient manner. In this work, sensitivity analyses are performed on systems described by flux-limited ...

  18. Adjoint-based sensitivity analysis for high-energy density radiative transfer using flux-limited diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbird, Kelli D.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2017-03-01

    Uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analyses are a vital component for predictive modeling in the sciences and engineering. The adjoint approach to sensitivity analysis requires solving a primary system of equations and a mathematically related set of adjoint equations. The information contained in the equations can be combined to produce sensitivity information in a computationally efficient manner. In this work, sensitivity analyses are performed on systems described by flux-limited radiative diffusion using the adjoint approach. The sensitivities computed are shown to agree with standard perturbation theory and require significantly less computational time. The adjoint approach saves the computational cost of one forward solve per sensitivity, making the method attractive when multiple sensitivities are of interest.

  19. Parameter identification of multi-body railway vehicle models - Application of the adjoint state approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, S.; Puel, G.; Aubry, D.; Funfschilling, C.

    2016-12-01

    For the calibration of multi-body models of railway vehicles, the identification of the model parameters from on-track measurement is required. This involves the solution of an inverse problem by minimising the misfit function which describes the distance between model and measurement using optimisation methods. The application of gradient-based optimisation methods is advantageous but necessitates an efficient approach for the computation of the gradients considering the large number of model parameters and the costly evaluation of the forward model. This work shows that the application of the adjoint state approach to the nonlinear vehicle-track multi-body system is suitable, reducing on the one hand the computational cost and increasing on the other hand the precision of the gradients. Gradients from the adjoint state method are computed for vehicle models and validated taking into account measurement noise.

  20. Adjustment of Tsunami Source Parameters By Adjoint Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, C.; Miranda, P.

    Tsunami waveforms recorded at tide gauges can be used to adjust tsunami source pa- rameters and, indirectly, seismic focal parameters. Simple inversion methods, based on ray-tracing techniques, only used a small fraction of available information. More elab- orate techniques, based on the Green's functions methods, also have some limitations in their scope. A new methodology, using a variational approach, allows for a much more general inversion, which can directly optimize focal parameters of tsunamigenic earthquakes. Idealized synthetic data and an application to the 1969 Gorringe Earth- quake are used to validate the methodology.

  1. Topology Optimization of Turbulent Fluid Flow with a Sensitive Porosity Adjoint Method (SPAM)

    CERN Document Server

    Philippi, B

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive porosity adjoint method (SPAM) for optimizing the topology of fluid machines has been proposed. A sensitivity function with respect to the porosity has been developed. In the first step of the optimization process, porous media are introduced into the flow regime according to the sensitivity function. Then the optimized porous media are transformed to solid walls. The turbulent flow in porous media is accounted for by a modified eddy-viscosity based turbulence model. Its influence on the adjoint equations is nevertheless neglected, which refers to the so called frozen turbulence assumption. A test case of application in terms of the turbulent rough wall channel flow shows that a considerable reduction of the objective function can be obtained by this method. The transformation from porous media to solid walls may have important effect on the optimization results.

  2. An alternative factorization of the quantum harmonic oscillator and two-parameter family of self-adjoint operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcos-Olalla, Rafael, E-mail: olalla@fisica.ugto.mx [Departamento de Física, DCI Campus León, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo. Postal E143, 37150 León, Gto. (Mexico); Reyes, Marco A., E-mail: marco@fisica.ugto.mx [Departamento de Física, DCI Campus León, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo. Postal E143, 37150 León, Gto. (Mexico); Rosu, Haret C., E-mail: hcr@ipicyt.edu.mx [IPICYT, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Apdo. Postal 3-74 Tangamanga, 78231 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico)

    2012-10-01

    We introduce an alternative factorization of the Hamiltonian of the quantum harmonic oscillator which leads to a two-parameter self-adjoint operator from which the standard harmonic oscillator, the one-parameter oscillators introduced by Mielnik, and the Hermite operator are obtained in certain limits of the parameters. In addition, a single Bernoulli-type parameter factorization, which is different from the one introduced by M.A. Reyes, H.C. Rosu, and M.R. Gutiérrez [Phys. Lett. A 375 (2011) 2145], is briefly discussed in the final part of this work. -- Highlights: ► Factorizations with operators which are not mutually adjoint are presented. ► New two-parameter and one-parameter self-adjoint oscillator operators are introduced. ► Their eigenfunctions are two- and one-parameter deformed Hermite functions.

  3. On the consistency of adjoint sensitivity analysis for structural optimization of linear dynamic problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Nakshatrala, Praveen B.; Tortorelli, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Gradient-based topology optimization typically involves thousands or millions of design variables. This makes efficient sensitivity analysis essential and for this the adjoint variable method (AVM) is indispensable. For transient problems it has been observed that the traditional AVM, based...... on a differentiate-then-discretize approach, may lead to inconsistent sensitivities. Herein this effect is explicitly demonstrated for a single dof system and the source of inconsistency is identified. Additionally, we outline an alternative discretize-then-differentiate AVM that inherently produces consistent...

  4. Adjoint-based uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis for reactor depletion calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripling, Hayes Franklin

    Depletion calculations for nuclear reactors model the dynamic coupling between the material composition and neutron flux and help predict reactor performance and safety characteristics. In order to be trusted as reliable predictive tools and inputs to licensing and operational decisions, the simulations must include an accurate and holistic quantification of errors and uncertainties in its outputs. Uncertainty quantification is a formidable challenge in large, realistic reactor models because of the large number of unknowns and myriad sources of uncertainty and error. We present a framework for performing efficient uncertainty quantification in depletion problems using an adjoint approach, with emphasis on high-fidelity calculations using advanced massively parallel computing architectures. This approach calls for a solution to two systems of equations: (a) the forward, engineering system that models the reactor, and (b) the adjoint system, which is mathematically related to but different from the forward system. We use the solutions of these systems to produce sensitivity and error estimates at a cost that does not grow rapidly with the number of uncertain inputs. We present the framework in a general fashion and apply it to both the source-driven and k-eigenvalue forms of the depletion equations. We describe the implementation and verification of solvers for the forward and ad- joint equations in the PDT code, and we test the algorithms on realistic reactor analysis problems. We demonstrate a new approach for reducing the memory and I/O demands on the host machine, which can be overwhelming for typical adjoint algorithms. Our conclusion is that adjoint depletion calculations using full transport solutions are not only computationally tractable, they are the most attractive option for performing uncertainty quantification on high-fidelity reactor analysis problems.

  5. An adjoint data assimilation method for optimizing frictional parameters on the afterslip area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Masayuki; Miyazaki, Shin'ichi; Ito, Kosuke; Hirahara, Kazuro

    2013-12-01

    Afterslip sometimes triggers subsequent earthquakes within a timescale of days to several years. Thus, it may be possible to predict the occurrence of such a triggered earthquake by simulating the spatio-temporal evolution of afterslip with estimated frictional parameters. To demonstrate the feasibility of this idea, we consider a plate interface model where afterslip propagates between two asperities following a rate-and-state friction law, and we adopt an adjoint data assimilation method to optimize frictional parameters. Synthetic observation data are sampled as the slip velocities on the plate interface during 20 days. It is found that: (1) all frictional parameters are optimized if the data sets consists not only of the early phase of afterslip or acceleration, but also of the decaying phase or deceleration; and (2) the prediction of the timing of the triggered earthquake is improved by using adjusted frictional parameters.

  6. The forward sensitivity and adjoint-state methods of glacial isostatic adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinec, Zdeněk; Sasgen, Ingo; Velímský, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new method for computing the sensitivity of the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) forward solution with respect to the Earth's mantle viscosity, the so-called the forward sensitivity method (FSM), and a method for computing the gradient of data misfit with respect to viscosity parameters, the so-called adjoint-state method (ASM), are presented. These advanced formal methods complement each other in the inverse modelling of GIA-related observations. When solving this inverse problem, the first step is to calculate the forward sensitivities by the FSM and use them to fix the model parameters that do not affect the forward model solution, as well as identifying and removing redundant parts of the inferred viscosity structure. Once the viscosity model is optimized in view of the forward sensitivities, the minimization of the data misfit with respect to the viscosity parameters can be carried out by a gradient technique which makes use of the ASM. The aim is this paper is to derive the FSM and ASM in the forms that are closely associated with the forward solver of GIA developed by Martinec. Since this method is based on a continuous form of the forward model equations, which are then discretized by spectral and finite elements, we first derive the continuous forms of the FSM and ASM and then discretize them by the spectral and finite elements used in the discretization of the forward model equations. The advantage of this approach is that all three methods (forward, FSM and ASM) have the same matrix of equations and use the same methodology for the implementation of the time evolution of stresses. The only difference between the forward method and the FSM and ASM is that the different numerical differencing schemes for the time evolution of the Maxwell and generalized Maxwell viscous stresses are applied in the respective methods. However, it requires only a little extra computational time for carrying out the FSM and ASM numerically. An

  7. An adjoint sensitivity-based data assimilation method and its comparison with existing variational methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghan Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An adjoint sensitivity-based data assimilation (ASDA method is proposed and applied to a heavy rainfall case over the Korean Peninsula. The heavy rainfall case, which occurred on 26 July 2006, caused torrential rainfall over the central part of the Korean Peninsula. The mesoscale convective system (MCS related to the heavy rainfall was classified as training line/adjoining stratiform (TL/AS-type for the earlier period, and back building (BB-type for the later period. In the ASDA method, an adjoint model is run backwards with forecast-error gradient as input, and the adjoint sensitivity of the forecast error to the initial condition is scaled by an optimal scaling factor. The optimal scaling factor is determined by minimising the observational cost function of the four-dimensional variational (4D-Var method, and the scaled sensitivity is added to the original first guess. Finally, the observations at the analysis time are assimilated using a 3D-Var method with the improved first guess. The simulated rainfall distribution is shifted northeastward compared to the observations when no radar data are assimilated or when radar data are assimilated using the 3D-Var method. The rainfall forecasts are improved when radar data are assimilated using the 4D-Var or ASDA method. Simulated atmospheric fields such as horizontal winds, temperature, and water vapour mixing ratio are also improved via the 4D-Var or ASDA method. Due to the improvement in the analysis, subsequent forecasts appropriately simulate the observed features of the TL/AS- and BB-type MCSs and the corresponding heavy rainfall. The computational cost associated with the ASDA method is significantly lower than that of the 4D-Var method.

  8. Mapping Emissions that Contribute to Air Pollution Using Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastien, L. A. J.; Mcdonald, B. C.; Brown, N. J.; Harley, R.

    2014-12-01

    The adjoint of the Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ) is used to map emissions that contribute to air pollution at receptors of interest. Adjoint tools provide an efficient way to calculate the sensitivity of a model response to a large number of model inputs, a task that would require thousands of simulations using a more traditional forward sensitivity approach. Initial applications of this technique, demonstrated here, are to benzene and directly-emitted diesel particulate matter, for which atmospheric reactions are neglected. Emissions of these pollutants are strongly influenced by light-duty gasoline vehicles and heavy-duty diesel trucks, respectively. We study air quality responses in three receptor areas where populations have been identified as especially susceptible to, and adversely affected by air pollution. Population-weighted air basin-wide responses for each pollutant are also evaluated for the entire San Francisco Bay area. High-resolution (1 km horizontal grid) emission inventories have been developed for on-road motor vehicle emission sources, based on observed traffic count data. Emission estimates represent diurnal, day of week, and seasonal variations of on-road vehicle activity, with separate descriptions for gasoline and diesel sources. Emissions that contribute to air pollution at each receptor have been mapped in space and time using the adjoint method. Effects on air quality of both relative (multiplicative) and absolute (additive) perturbations to underlying emission inventories are analyzed. The contributions of local versus upwind sources to air quality in each receptor area are quantified, and weekday/weekend and seasonal variations in the influence of emissions from upwind areas are investigated. The contribution of local sources to the total air pollution burden within the receptor areas increases from about 40% in the summer to about 50% in the winter due to increased atmospheric stagnation. The effectiveness of control

  9. Second-order adjoint sensitivity analysis methodology (2nd-ASAM) for computing exactly and efficiently first- and second-order sensitivities in large-scale linear systems: I. Computational methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacuci, Dan G.

    2015-03-01

    This work presents the second-order forward and adjoint sensitivity analysis methodologies (2nd-FSAM and 2nd-ASAM) for computing exactly and efficiently the second-order functional derivatives of physical (engineering, biological, etc.) system responses (i.e., "system performance parameters") to the system's model parameters. The definition of "system parameters" used in this work includes all computational input data, correlations, initial and/or boundary conditions, etc. For a physical system comprising Nα parameters and Nr responses, we note that the 2nd-FSAM requires a total of (Nα2/2 + 3Nα / 2) large-scale computations for obtaining all of the first- and second-order sensitivities, for all Nr system responses. On the other hand, for one functional-type system response, the 2nd-ASAM requires one large-scale computation using the first-level adjoint sensitivity system for obtaining all of the first-order sensitivities, followed by at most Nα large-scale computations using the second-level adjoint sensitivity systems for obtaining exactly all of the second-order sensitivities. Therefore, the 2nd-FSAM should be used when Nr ≫Nα, while the 2nd-ASAM should be used when Nα ≫Nr. The original 2nd-ASAM presented in this work should enable the hitherto very difficult, if not intractable, exact computation of all of the second-order response sensitivities (i.e., functional Gateaux-derivatives) for large-systems involving many parameters, as usually encountered in practice. Very importantly, the implementation of the 2nd-ASAM requires very little additional effort beyond the construction of the adjoint sensitivity system needed for computing the first-order sensitivities.

  10. Adjoint Sensitivity Experiments of a Meso-β-scale Vortex in the Middle Reaches of the Yangtze River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A relatively independent and small-scale heavy rainfall event occurred to the south of a slow eastward-moving meso-α-scale vortex. The analysis shows that a meso-β-scale system is heavily responsible for the intense precipitation. An attempt to simulate it met with some failures. In view of its small scale, short lifetime and relatively sparse observations at the initial time, an adjoint model was used to examine the sensitivity of the meso-β-scale vortex simulation with respect to initial conditions. The adjoint sensitivity indicates how small perturbations of initial model variables anywhere in the model domain can influence the central vorticity of the vortex. The largest sensitivity for both the wind and temperature perturbation is located below 700 hPa, especially at the low level. The largest sensitivity for the water vapor perturbation is located below 500 hPa, especially at the middle and low levels. The horizontal adjoint sensitivity for all variables is mainly located toward the upper reaches of the Yangtze River with respect to the simulated meso-β-scale system in Hunan and Jiangxi provinces with strong locality. The sensitivity shows that warm cyclonic perturbations in the upper reaches can have a great effect on the development of the meso-β-scale vortex. Based on adjoint sensitivity, forward sensitivity experiments were conducted to identify factors influencing the development of the meso-β-scale vortex and to explore ways of improving the prediction. A realistic prediction was achieved by using adjoint sensitivity to modify the initial conditions and implanting a warm cyclone at the initial time in the upper reaches of the river with respect to the meso-β-scale vortex,as is commonly done in tropical cyclone prediction.

  11. Adjoint-consistent formulations of slip models for coupled electroosmotic flow systems

    KAUST Repository

    Garg, Vikram V

    2014-09-27

    Background Models based on the Helmholtz `slip\\' approximation are often used for the simulation of electroosmotic flows. The objectives of this paper are to construct adjoint-consistent formulations of such models, and to develop adjoint-based numerical tools for adaptive mesh refinement and parameter sensitivity analysis. Methods We show that the direct formulation of the `slip\\' model is adjoint inconsistent, and leads to an ill-posed adjoint problem. We propose a modified formulation of the coupled `slip\\' model, which is shown to be well-posed, and therefore automatically adjoint-consistent. Results Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the computation and use of the adjoint solution in two-dimensional microfluidics problems. Conclusions An adjoint-consistent formulation for Helmholtz `slip\\' models of electroosmotic flows has been proposed. This formulation provides adjoint solutions that can be reliably used for mesh refinement and sensitivity analysis.

  12. Spectral-Element Simulations of Wave Propagation in Porous Media: Finite-Frequency Sensitivity Kernels Based Upon Adjoint Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morency, C.; Tromp, J.

    2008-12-01

    successfully performed. We present finite-frequency sensitivity kernels for wave propagation in porous media based upon adjoint methods. We first show that the adjoint equations in porous media are similar to the regular Biot equations upon defining an appropriate adjoint source. Then we present finite-frequency kernels for seismic phases in porous media (e.g., fast P, slow P, and S). These kernels illustrate the sensitivity of seismic observables to structural parameters and form the basis of tomographic inversions. Finally, we show an application of this imaging technique related to the detection of buried landmines and unexploded ordnance (UXO) in porous environments.

  13. Sensitivity analysis of a time-delayed thermo-acoustic system via an adjoint-based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Magri, Luca

    2013-01-01

    We apply adjoint-based sensitivity analysis to a time-delayed thermo-acoustic system: a Rijke tube containing a hot wire. We calculate how the growth rate and frequency of small oscillations about a base state are affected either by a generic passive control element in the system (the structural sensitivity analysis) or by a generic change to its base state (the base-state sensitivity analysis). We illustrate the structural sensitivity by calculating the effect of a second hot wire with a small heat release parameter. In a single calculation, this shows how the second hot wire changes the growth rate and frequency of the small oscillations, as a function of its position in the tube. We then examine the components of the structural sensitivity in order to determine the passive control mechanism that has the strongest influence on the growth rate. We find that a force applied to the acoustic momentum equation in the opposite direction to the instantaneous velocity is the most stabilizing feedback mechanism. We ...

  14. Adjoint analysis of the source and path sensitivities of basin-guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Steven M.; Roten, Daniel; Olsen, Kim B.

    2012-05-01

    Simulations of earthquake rupture on the southern San Andreas Fault (SAF) reveal large amplifications in the San Gabriel and Los Angeles Basins (SGB and LAB) apparently associated with long-range path effects. Geometrically similar excitation patterns can be recognized repeatedly in different SAF simulations (e.g. Love wave-like energy with predominant period around 4 s, channelled southwestwardly from the SGB into LAB), yet the amplitudes with which these distinctive wavefield patterns are excited change, depending upon source details (slip distribution, direction and velocity of rupture). We describe a method for rapid calculation of the sensitivity of such predicted wavefield features to perturbations of the source kinematics, using a time-reversed (adjoint) wavefield simulation. The calculations are analogous to those done in adjoint tomography, and the same time-reversed calculation also yields path-sensitivity kernels that give further insight into the excitation mechanism. For rupture on the southernmost 300 km of SAF, LAB excitation is greatest for slip concentrated between the northern Coachella Valley and the transverse ranges, propagating to the NE and with rupture velocities between 3250 and 3500 m s-1 along that fault segment; that is, within or slightly above the velocity range (between Rayleigh and S velocities) that is energetically precluded in the limit of a sharp rupture front, highlighting the potential value of imposing physical constraints (such as from spontaneous rupture models) on source parametrizations. LAB excitation is weak for rupture to the SW and for ruptures in either direction located north of the transverse transverse ranges, whereas Ventura Basin (VTB) is preferentially excited by NE ruptures situated north of the transverse ranges. Path kernels show that LAB excitation is mediated by surface waves deflected by the velocity contrast along the southern margin of the transverse ranges, having most of their energy in basement rock

  15. Using adjoint sensitivity as a local structure function in variational data assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Hello

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available One approach recently proposed in order to improve the forecast of weather events, such as cyclogenesis, is to increase the number of observations in areas depending on the flow configuration. These areas are obtained using, for example, the sensitivity to initial conditions of a selected predicted cyclone. An alternative or complementary way is proposed here. The idea is to employ such an adjoint sensitivity field as a local structure function within variational data assimilation, 3D-Var in this instance. Away from the sensitive area, observation increments project on the initial fields with the usual climatological (or weakly flow-dependent, in the case of 4D-Var structure functions. Within the sensitive area, the gradient fields are projected using all the available data in the zone, conventional or extra, if any. The formulation of the technique is given and the approach is further explained by using a simple 1D scheme. The technique is implemented in the ARPEGE/IFS code and applied to 11 FASTEX (Fronts and Atlantic Storm-Track Experiment cyclone cases, together with the targeted observations performed at the time of the campaign. The new approach is shown to allow for the desired stronger impact of the available observations and to systematically improve the forecasts of the FASTEX cyclones, unlike the standard 3D-Var.

  16. Robust identification of harmonic oscillator parameters using the adjoint Fokker-Planck equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boujo, E.; Noiray, N.

    2017-04-01

    We present a model-based output-only method for identifying from time series the parameters governing the dynamics of stochastically forced oscillators. In this context, suitable models of the oscillator's damping and stiffness properties are postulated, guided by physical understanding of the oscillatory phenomena. The temporal dynamics and the probability density function of the oscillation amplitude are described by a Langevin equation and its associated Fokker-Planck equation, respectively. One method consists in fitting the postulated analytical drift and diffusion coefficients with their estimated values, obtained from data processing by taking the short-time limit of the first two transition moments. However, this limit estimation loses robustness in some situations-for instance when the data are band-pass filtered to isolate the spectral contents of the oscillatory phenomena of interest. In this paper, we use a robust alternative where the adjoint Fokker-Planck equation is solved to compute Kramers-Moyal coefficients exactly, and an iterative optimization yields the parameters that best fit the observed statistics simultaneously in a wide range of amplitudes and time scales. The method is illustrated with a stochastic Van der Pol oscillator serving as a prototypical model of thermoacoustic instabilities in practical combustors, where system identification is highly relevant to control.

  17. Second-order adjoint sensitivity analysis methodology (2nd-ASAM) for computing exactly and efficiently first- and second-order sensitivities in large-scale linear systems: II. Illustrative application to a paradigm particle diffusion problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacuci, Dan G.

    2015-03-01

    This work presents an illustrative application of the second-order adjoint sensitivity analysis methodology (2nd-ASAM) to a paradigm neutron diffusion problem, which is sufficiently simple to admit an exact solution, thereby making transparent the underlying mathematical derivations. The general theory underlying 2nd-ASAM indicates that, for a physical system comprising Nα parameters, the computation of all of the first- and second-order response sensitivities requires (per response) at most (2Nα + 1) "large-scale" computations using the first-level and, respectively, second-level adjoint sensitivity systems (1st-LASS and 2nd-LASS). Very importantly, however, the illustrative application presented in this work shows that the actual number of adjoint computations needed for computing all of the first- and second-order response sensitivities may be significantly less than (2Nα + 1) per response. For this illustrative problem, four "large-scale" adjoint computations sufficed for the complete and exact computations of all 4 first- and 10 distinct second-order derivatives. Furthermore, the construction and solution of the 2nd-LASS requires very little additional effort beyond the construction of the adjoint sensitivity system needed for computing the first-order sensitivities. Very significantly, only the sources on the right-sides of the diffusion (differential) operator needed to be modified; the left-side of the differential equations (and hence the "solver" in large-scale practical applications) remained unchanged. All of the first-order relative response sensitivities to the model parameters have significantly large values, of order unity. Also importantly, most of the second-order relative sensitivities are just as large, and some even up to twice as large as the first-order sensitivities. In the illustrative example presented in this work, the second-order sensitivities contribute little to the response variances and covariances. However, they have the

  18. Anelastic sensitivity kernels with parsimonious storage for adjoint tomography and full waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2016-06-13

    We introduce a technique to compute exact anelastic sensitivity kernels in the time domain using parsimonious disk storage. The method is based on a reordering of the time loop of time-domain forward/adjoint wave propagation solvers combined with the use of a memory buffer. It avoids instabilities that occur when time-reversing dissipative wave propagation simulations. The total number of required time steps is unchanged compared to usual acoustic or elastic approaches. The cost is reduced by a factor of 4/3 compared to the case in which anelasticity is partially accounted for by accommodating the effects of physical dispersion. We validate our technique by performing a test in which we compare the Kα sensitivity kernel to the exact kernel obtained by saving the entire forward calculation. This benchmark confirms that our approach is also exact. We illustrate the importance of including full attenuation in the calculation of sensitivity kernels by showing significant differences with physical-dispersion-only kernels.

  19. Anelastic sensitivity kernels with parsimonious storage for adjoint tomography and full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatitsch, Dimitri; Xie, Zhinan; Bozdaǧ, Ebru; Sales de Andrade, Elliott; Peter, Daniel; Liu, Qinya; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a technique to compute exact anelastic sensitivity kernels in the time domain using parsimonious disk storage. The method is based on a reordering of the time loop of time-domain forward/adjoint wave propagation solvers combined with the use of a memory buffer. It avoids instabilities that occur when time-reversing dissipative wave propagation simulations. The total number of required time steps is unchanged compared to usual acoustic or elastic approaches. The cost is reduced by a factor of 4/3 compared to the case in which anelasticity is partially accounted for by accommodating the effects of physical dispersion. We validate our technique by performing a test in which we compare the Kα sensitivity kernel to the exact kernel obtained by saving the entire forward calculation. This benchmark confirms that our approach is also exact. We illustrate the importance of including full attenuation in the calculation of sensitivity kernels by showing significant differences with physical-dispersion-only kernels.

  20. Anelastic sensitivity kernels with parsimonious storage for adjoint tomography and full waveform inversion

    CERN Document Server

    Komatitsch, Dimitri; Bozdag, Ebru; de Andrade, Elliott Sales; Peter, Daniel B; Liu, Qinya; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a technique to compute exact anelastic sensitivity kernels in the time domain using parsimonious disk storage. The method is based on a reordering of the time loop of time-domain forward/adjoint wave propagation solvers combined with the use of a memory buffer. It avoids instabilities that occur when time-reversing dissipative wave propagation simulations. The total number of required time steps is unchanged compared to usual acoustic or elastic approaches. The cost is reduced by a factor of 4/3 compared to the case in which anelasticity is partially accounted for by accommodating the effects of physical dispersion. We validate our technique by performing a test in which we compare the $K_\\alpha$ sensitivity kernel to the exact kernel obtained by saving the entire forward calculation. This benchmark confirms that our approach is also exact. We illustrate the importance of including full attenuation in the calculation of sensitivity kernels by showing significant differences with physical-dispersi...

  1. Adjoint-based sensitivity analysis of low-order thermoacoustic networks using a wave-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, José G.; Magri, Luca; Juniper, Matthew P.

    2017-07-01

    Strict pollutant emission regulations are pushing gas turbine manufacturers to develop devices that operate in lean conditions, with the downside that combustion instabilities are more likely to occur. Methods to predict and control unstable modes inside combustion chambers have been developed in the last decades but, in some cases, they are computationally expensive. Sensitivity analysis aided by adjoint methods provides valuable sensitivity information at a low computational cost. This paper introduces adjoint methods and their application in wave-based low order network models, which are used as industrial tools, to predict and control thermoacoustic oscillations. Two thermoacoustic models of interest are analyzed. First, in the zero Mach number limit, a nonlinear eigenvalue problem is derived, and continuous and discrete adjoint methods are used to obtain the sensitivities of the system to small modifications. Sensitivities to base-state modification and feedback devices are presented. Second, a more general case with non-zero Mach number, a moving flame front and choked outlet, is presented. The influence of the entropy waves on the computed sensitivities is shown.

  2. Sensitivity of a Shallow-Water Model to Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Kazantsev, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    An adjoint based technique is applied to a shallow water model in order to estimate the influence of the model's parameters on the solution. Among parameters the bottom topography, initial conditions, boundary conditions on rigid boundaries, viscosity coefficients Coriolis parameter and the amplitude of the wind stress tension are considered. Their influence is analyzed from three points of view: 1. flexibility of the model with respect to a parameter that is related to the lowest value of the cost function that can be obtained in the data assimilation experiment that controls this parameter; 2. possibility to improve the model by the parameter's control, i.e. whether the solution with the optimal parameter remains close to observations after the end of control; 3. sensitivity of the model solution to the parameter in a classical sense. That implies the analysis of the sensitivity estimates and their comparison with each other and with the local Lyapunov exponents that characterize the sensitivity of the mode...

  3. Using Adjoint-Based Forecast Sensitivity Method to Evaluate TAMDAR Data Impacts on Regional Forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the impact of Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR observations on regional 24-hour forecast error reduction over the Continental United States (CONUS domain using adjoint-based forecast sensitivity to observation (FSO method as the diagnostic tool. The relative impact of TAMDAR observations on reducing the forecast error was assessed by conducting the WRFDA FSO experiments for two two-week-long periods, one in January and one in June 2010. These experiments assimilated operational TAMDAR data and other conventional observations, as well as GPS refractivity (GPSREF. FSO results show that rawinsonde soundings (SOUND and TAMDAR exhibit the largest observation impact on 24 h WRF forecast, followed by GeoAMV, aviation routine weather reports (METAR, GPSREF, and synoptic observations (SYNOP. At 0000 and 1200 UTC, TAMDAR has an equivalent impact to SOUND in reducing the 24-hour forecast error. However, at 1800 UTC, TAMDAR has a distinct advantage over SOUND, which has the sparse observation report at these times. In addition, TAMDAR humidity observations at lower levels of the atmosphere (700 and 850 hPa have a significant impact on 24 h forecast error reductions. TAMDAR and SOUND observations present a qualitatively similar observation impact between FSO and Observation System Experiments (OSEs.

  4. Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis of Radiative Transfer Equation: Temperature and Gas Mixing Ratio Weighting Functions for Remote Sensing of Scattering Atmospheres in Thermal IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinov, E.

    1999-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis based on using of the adjoint equation of radiative transfer is applied to the case of atmospheric remote sensing in the thermal spectral region with non-negligeable atmospheric scattering.

  5. The forward and adjoint sensitivity methods of glacial isostatic adjustment: Existence, uniqueness and time-differencing scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinec, Zdenek; Sasgen, Ingo; Velimsky, Jakub

    2014-05-01

    In this study, two new methods for computing the sensitivity of the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) forward solution with respect to the Earth's mantle viscosity are presented: the forward sensitivity method (FSM) and the adjoint sensitivity method (ASM). These advanced formal methods are based on the time-domain,spectral-finite element method for modelling the GIA response of laterally heterogeneous earth models developed by Martinec (2000). There are many similarities between the forward method and the FSM and ASM for a general physical system. However, in the case of GIA, there are also important differences between the forward and sensitivity methods. The analysis carried out in this study results in the following findings. First, the forward method of GIA is unconditionally solvable, regardless of whether or not a combined ice and ocean-water load contains the first-degree spherical harmonics. This is also the case for the FSM, however, the ASM must in addition be supplemented by nine conditions on the misfit between the given GIA-related data and the forward model predictions to guarantee the existence of a solution. This constrains the definition of data least-squares misfit. Second, the forward method of GIA implements an ocean load as a free boundary-value function over an ocean area with a free geometry. That is, an ocean load and the shape of ocean, the so-called ocean function, are being sought, in addition to deformation and gravity-increment fields, by solving the forward method. The FSM and ASM also apply the adjoint ocean load as a free boundary-value function, but instead over an ocean area with the fixed geometry given by the ocean function determined by the forward method. In other words, a boundary-value problem for the forward method of GIA is free with respect to determining (i) the boundary-value data over an ocean area and (ii) the ocean function itself, while the boundary-value problems for the FSM and ASM are free only with respect to

  6. SQP-methods for solving optimal control problems with control and state constraints: adjoint variables, sensitivity analysis and real-time control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büskens, Christof; Maurer, Helmut

    2000-08-01

    Parametric nonlinear optimal control problems subject to control and state constraints are studied. Two discretization methods are discussed that transcribe optimal control problems into nonlinear programming problems for which SQP-methods provide efficient solution methods. It is shown that SQP-methods can be used also for a check of second-order sufficient conditions and for a postoptimal calculation of adjoint variables. In addition, SQP-methods lead to a robust computation of sensitivity differentials of optimal solutions with respect to perturbation parameters. Numerical sensitivity analysis is the basis for real-time control approximations of perturbed solutions which are obtained by evaluating a first-order Taylor expansion with respect to the parameter. The proposed numerical methods are illustrated by the optimal control of a low-thrust satellite transfer to geosynchronous orbit and a complex control problem from aquanautics. The examples illustrate the robustness, accuracy and efficiency of the proposed numerical algorithms.

  7. ADGEN: ADjoint GENerator for computer models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worley, B.A.; Pin, F.G.; Horwedel, J.E.; Oblow, E.M.

    1989-05-01

    This paper presents the development of a FORTRAN compiler and an associated supporting software library called ADGEN. ADGEN reads FORTRAN models as input and produces and enhanced version of the input model. The enhanced version reproduces the original model calculations but also has the capability to calculate derivatives of model results of interest with respect to any and all of the model data and input parameters. The method for calculating the derivatives and sensitivities is the adjoint method. Partial derivatives are calculated analytically using computer calculus and saved as elements of an adjoint matrix on direct assess storage. The total derivatives are calculated by solving an appropriate adjoint equation. ADGEN is applied to a major computer model of interest to the Low-Level Waste Community, the PRESTO-II model. PRESTO-II sample problem results reveal that ADGEN correctly calculates derivatives of response of interest with respect to 300 parameters. The execution time to create the adjoint matrix is a factor of 45 times the execution time of the reference sample problem. Once this matrix is determined, the derivatives with respect to 3000 parameters are calculated in a factor of 6.8 that of the reference model for each response of interest. For a single 3000 for determining these derivatives by parameter perturbations. The automation of the implementation of the adjoint technique for calculating derivatives and sensitivities eliminates the costly and manpower-intensive task of direct hand-implementation by reprogramming and thus makes the powerful adjoint technique more amenable for use in sensitivity analysis of existing models. 20 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  8. Towards Global Adjoint Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdag, E.; Zhu, H.; Peter, D.; Tromp, J.

    2012-04-01

    Adjoint tomography based on 3D wave simulations provides new opportunities to improve tomographic images for the following reasons: 1) the full non-linearity of wave propagation may be taken into account in the forward problem, 2) 3D background models may be used to compute Fréchet kernels and, 3) seismic models may be updated in an iterative scheme. Our aim is to use this technique based on a spectral element method (Komatitsch & Tromp 2002) to obtain a global Earth model, which is becoming feasible with current computational facilities. To this end, we select 255 global CMT events distributed worldwide having moment magnitudes between 5.8 and 7. As a reference earth model, we use 3D transversely isotropic mantle model S362ANI (Kustowski et al. 2008) with 3D crustal model Crust2.0 (Bassin et al. 2000). In numerical simulations, Moho variations in Crust2.0 are honored if crustal thickness is less than 15 km or greater than 35 km to have a better sampling of the crustal model, particularly very thin oceanic crust. Using the advantages of numerical simulations, our strategy is to invert crustal and mantle structure together to avoid any bias introduced into upper-mantle images due to "crustal corrections", which are commonly used in classical tomography. Prior to the structure inversion, we reinvert global CMT solutions by computing Green functions in the 3D reference model to take into account effects of crustal variations on source parameters. Changes in source parameters are modest, but consistent with reported global CMT errors. In general, inversion results of selected earthquakes indicate a decrease in depth, particularly for ridge events, which can be up to 12 km, and a change in scalar moment of less than 30%. Event locations mostly change by less than 5 km. We use the updated CMT solutions to run forward simulations for adjoint tomography and plan to reinvert source parameters whenever we see a significant improvement in our tomographic model. 3D

  9. The adjoint sensitivity of heavy rainfall to initial conditions in debris flow areas in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feifan

    2017-04-01

    By studying three heavy rainfall events that were accompanied by debris flows in southwestern China, we find that 24-h accumulated rainfall is most sensitive to the initial temperature. The sensitivities to wind, surface pressure, and specific humidity are generally smaller. Moreover, the upper levels of the atmosphere are identified as the sensitive levels, and the sensitive areas are the areas with heavy rainfall. These results suggest that local temperature perturbations in the upper levels are a signal of short-term heavy rainfall in southwestern China. A validation experiment is carried out to justify the sensitivity results. The possible reasons are discussed and analyzed.

  10. Generalized adjoint systems

    CERN Document Server

    Serakos, Demetrios

    2015-01-01

    This book defines and develops the generalized adjoint of an input-output system. It is the result of a theoretical development and examination of the generalized adjoint concept and the conditions under which systems analysis using adjoints is valid. Results developed in this book are useful aids for the analysis and modeling of physical systems, including the development of guidance and control algorithms and in developing simulations. The generalized adjoint system is defined and is patterned similarly to adjoints of bounded linear transformations. Next the elementary properties of the generalized adjoint system are derived. For a space of input-output systems, a generalized adjoint map from this space of systems to the space of generalized adjoints is defined. Then properties of the generalized adjoint map are derived. Afterward the author demonstrates that the inverse of an input-output system may be represented in terms of the generalized adjoint. The use of generalized adjoints to determine bounds for ...

  11. Sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation for distributed hydrological modeling: potential of variational methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Castaings

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Variational methods are widely used for the analysis and control of computationally intensive spatially distributed systems. In particular, the adjoint state method enables a very efficient calculation of the derivatives of an objective function (response function to be analysed or cost function to be optimised with respect to model inputs.

    In this contribution, it is shown that the potential of variational methods for distributed catchment scale hydrology should be considered. A distributed flash flood model, coupling kinematic wave overland flow and Green Ampt infiltration, is applied to a small catchment of the Thoré basin and used as a relatively simple (synthetic observations but didactic application case.

    It is shown that forward and adjoint sensitivity analysis provide a local but extensive insight on the relation between the assigned model parameters and the simulated hydrological response. Spatially distributed parameter sensitivities can be obtained for a very modest calculation effort (~6 times the computing time of a single model run and the singular value decomposition (SVD of the Jacobian matrix provides an interesting perspective for the analysis of the rainfall-runoff relation.

    For the estimation of model parameters, adjoint-based derivatives were found exceedingly efficient in driving a bound-constrained quasi-Newton algorithm. The reference parameter set is retrieved independently from the optimization initial condition when the very common dimension reduction strategy (i.e. scalar multipliers is adopted.

    Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis results suggest that most of the variability in this high-dimensional parameter space can be captured with a few orthogonal directions. A parametrization based on the SVD leading singular vectors was found very promising but should be combined with another regularization strategy in order to prevent overfitting.

  12. Sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation for distributed hydrological modeling: potential of variational methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaings, W.; Dartus, D.; Le Dimet, F.-X.; Saulnier, G.-M.

    2009-04-01

    Variational methods are widely used for the analysis and control of computationally intensive spatially distributed systems. In particular, the adjoint state method enables a very efficient calculation of the derivatives of an objective function (response function to be analysed or cost function to be optimised) with respect to model inputs. In this contribution, it is shown that the potential of variational methods for distributed catchment scale hydrology should be considered. A distributed flash flood model, coupling kinematic wave overland flow and Green Ampt infiltration, is applied to a small catchment of the Thoré basin and used as a relatively simple (synthetic observations) but didactic application case. It is shown that forward and adjoint sensitivity analysis provide a local but extensive insight on the relation between the assigned model parameters and the simulated hydrological response. Spatially distributed parameter sensitivities can be obtained for a very modest calculation effort (~6 times the computing time of a single model run) and the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the Jacobian matrix provides an interesting perspective for the analysis of the rainfall-runoff relation. For the estimation of model parameters, adjoint-based derivatives were found exceedingly efficient in driving a bound-constrained quasi-Newton algorithm. The reference parameter set is retrieved independently from the optimization initial condition when the very common dimension reduction strategy (i.e. scalar multipliers) is adopted. Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis results suggest that most of the variability in this high-dimensional parameter space can be captured with a few orthogonal directions. A parametrization based on the SVD leading singular vectors was found very promising but should be combined with another regularization strategy in order to prevent overfitting.

  13. Extraction of macroscopic and microscopic adjoint concepts using a lattice Boltzmann method and discrete adjoint approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekmat, Mohamad Hamed; Mirzaei, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    In the present research, we tried to improve the performance of the lattice Boltzmann (LB) -based adjoint approach by utilizing the mesoscopic inherent of the LB method. In this regard, two macroscopic discrete adjoint (MADA) and microscopic discrete adjoint (MIDA) approaches are used to answer the following two challenging questions. Is it possible to extend the concept of the macroscopic and microscopic variables of the flow field to the corresponding adjoint ones? Further, similar to the conservative laws in the LB method, is it possible to find the comparable conservation equations in the adjoint approach? If so, then a definite framework, similar to that used in the flow solution by the LB method, can be employed in the flow sensitivity analysis by the MIDA approach. This achievement can decrease the implementation cost and coding efforts of the MIDA method in complicated sensitivity analysis problems. First, the MADA and MIDA equations are extracted based on the LB method using the duality viewpoint. Meanwhile, using an elementary case, inverse design of a two-dimensional unsteady Poiseuille flow in a periodic channel with constant body forces, the procedure of analytical evaluation of the adjoint variables is described. The numerical results show that similar correlations between the distribution functions can be seen between the corresponding adjoint ones. Besides, the results are promising, emphasizing the flow field adjoint variables can be evaluated via the adjoint distribution functions. Finally, the adjoint conservative laws are introduced.

  14. Relating health and climate impacts to grid-scale emissions using adjoint sensitivity modeling for the Climate and Clean Air Coalition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henze, D. K.; Lacey, F.; Seltzer, M.; Vallack, H.; Kuylenstierna, J.; Bowman, K. W.; Anenberg, S.; Sasser, E.; Lee, C. J.; Martin, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC) was initiated in 2012 to develop, understand and promote measures to reduce short lived climate forcers such as aerosol, ozone and methane. The Coalition now includes over 30 nations, and as a service to these nations is committed to providing a decision support toolkit that allows member nations to explore the benefits of a range of emissions mitigation measures in terms of the combined impacts on air quality and climate and so help in the development of their National Action Plans. Here we will present recent modeling work to support the development of the CCAC National Action Plans toolkit. Adjoint sensitivity analysis is presented as a means of efficiently relating air quality, climate and crop impacts back to changes in emissions from each species, sector and location at the grid-scale resolution of typical global air quality model applications. The GEOS-Chem adjoint model is used to estimate the damages per ton of emissions of PM2.5 related mortality, the impacts of ozone precursors on crops and ozone-related health effects, and the combined impacts of these species on regional surface temperature changes. We show how the benefits-per-emission vary spatially as a function of the surrounding environment, and how this impacts the overall benefit of sector-specific control strategies. We present initial findings for Bangladesh, as well as Mexico, Ghana and Colombia, some of the first countries to join the CCAC, and discuss general issues related to adjoint-based metrics for quantifying air quality and climate co-benefits.

  15. Double-Difference Adjoint Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yanhua O.; Simons, Frederik J.; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a double-difference method for the inversion of seismic wavespeed structure by adjoint tomography. Differences between seismic observations and model-based predictions at individual stations may arise from factors other than structural heterogeneity, such as errors in the assumed source-time function, inaccurate timings, and systematic uncertainties. To alleviate the corresponding nonuniqueness in the inverse problem, we construct differential measurements between stations, thereby largely canceling out the source signature and systematic errors. We minimize the discrepancy between observations and simulations in terms of differential measurements made on station pairs. We show how to implement the double-difference concept in adjoint tomography, both theoretically and in practice. We compare the sensitivities of absolute and differential measurements. The former provide absolute information on structure along the ray paths between stations and sources, whereas the latter explain relative (and thus higher-resolution) structural variations in areas close to the stations. Whereas in conventional tomography, a measurement made on a single earthquake-station pair provides very limited structural information, in double-difference tomography, one earthquake can actually resolve significant details of the structure. The double-difference methodology can be incorporated into the usual adjoint tomography workflow by simply pairing up all conventional measurements; the computational cost of the necessary adjoint simulations is largely unaffected. Rather than adding to the computational burden, the inversion of double-difference measurements merely modifies the construction of the adjoint sources for data assimilation.

  16. Improved forward wave propagation and adjoint-based sensitivity kernel calculations using a numerically stable finite-element PML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Zhinan; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Martin, Roland

    2014-01-01

    an efficient infinite-domain truncation method suitable for accurately truncating an infinite domain governed by the second-order elastic wave equation written in displacement and computed based on a finite-element (FE) method. In this paper, we make several steps towards this goal. First, we make the 2-D...... in both formulations, in particular if very small mesh elements are present inside the absorbing layer, but we explain how these instabilities can be delayed as much as needed by using a stretching factor to reach numerical stability in practice for applications. Fourthly, in the case of adjoint problems...... with perfectly matched absorbing layers we introduce a computationally efficient boundary storage strategy by saving information along the interface between the CFS-UPML and the main domain only, thus avoiding the need to solve a backward wave propagation problem inside the CFS-UPML, which is known to be highly...

  17. Supersymmetric Descendants of Self-Adjointly Extended Quantum Mechanical Hamiltonians

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Hashimi, M H; Shalaby, A; Wiese, U -J

    2013-01-01

    We consider the descendants of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians in supersymmetric quantum mechanics on a half-line, on an interval, and on a punctured line or interval. While there is a 4-parameter family of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians on a punctured line, only a 3-parameter sub-family has supersymmetric descendants that are themselves self-adjoint. We also address the self-adjointness of an operator related to the supercharge, and point out that only a sub-class of its most general self-adjoint extensions is physical. Besides a general characterization of self-adjoint extensions and their supersymmetric descendants, we explicitly consider concrete examples, including a particle in a box with general boundary conditions, with and without an additional point interaction. We also discuss bulk-boundary resonances and their manifestation in the supersymmetric descendant.

  18. Real data assimilation for optimization of frictional parameters and prediction of afterslip in the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake inferred from slip velocity by an adjoint method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Masayuki; Miyazaki, Shin'ichi; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Hiyoshi, Yoshihisa; Ito, Kosuke; Hirahara, Kazuro

    2015-10-01

    Data assimilation is a technique that optimizes the parameters used in a numerical model with a constraint of model dynamics achieving the better fit to observations. Optimized parameters can be utilized for the subsequent prediction with a numerical model and predicted physical variables are presumably closer to observations that will be available in the future, at least, comparing to those obtained without the optimization through data assimilation. In this work, an adjoint data assimilation system is developed for optimizing a relatively large number of spatially inhomogeneous frictional parameters during the afterslip period in which the physical constraints are a quasi-dynamic equation of motion and a laboratory derived rate and state dependent friction law that describe the temporal evolution of slip velocity at subduction zones. The observed variable is estimated slip velocity on the plate interface. Before applying this method to the real data assimilation for the afterslip of the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake, a synthetic data assimilation experiment is conducted to examine the feasibility of optimizing the frictional parameters in the afterslip area. It is confirmed that the current system is capable of optimizing the frictional parameters A-B, A and L by adopting the physical constraint based on a numerical model if observations capture the acceleration and decaying phases of slip on the plate interface. On the other hand, it is unlikely to constrain the frictional parameters in the region where the amplitude of afterslip is less than 1.0 cm d-1. Next, real data assimilation for the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake is conducted to incorporate slip velocity data inferred from time dependent inversion of Global Navigation Satellite System time-series. The optimized values of A-B, A and L are O(10 kPa), O(102 kPa) and O(10 mm), respectively. The optimized frictional parameters yield the better fit to the observations and the better prediction skill of slip

  19. Adjoint-Based Uncertainty Quantification with MCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifried, Jeffrey E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-09-01

    This work serves to quantify the instantaneous uncertainties in neutron transport simulations born from nuclear data and statistical counting uncertainties. Perturbation and adjoint theories are used to derive implicit sensitivity expressions. These expressions are transformed into forms that are convenient for construction with MCNP6, creating the ability to perform adjoint-based uncertainty quantification with MCNP6. These new tools are exercised on the depleted-uranium hybrid LIFE blanket, quantifying its sensitivities and uncertainties to important figures of merit. Overall, these uncertainty estimates are small (< 2%). Having quantified the sensitivities and uncertainties, physical understanding of the system is gained and some confidence in the simulation is acquired.

  20. Use of large-scale transient stresses and a coupled adjoint-sensitivity/kriging approach to calibrate a groundwater-flow model at the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauheim, R.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); LaVenue, A.M. (INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    A coupled adjoint-sensitivity/kriging approach was used to calibrate a groundwater-flow model to 10 years of human-induced transient hydraulic stresses at the WIPP site in New Mexico, USA. Transmissivity data obtained from local-scale hydraulic tests were first kriged to define an initial transmissivity distribution. Steady-state model calibration was then performed employing adjoint-sensitivity techniques to identify regions where transmissivity changes would improve the model fit to the observed steady-state heads. Subsequent transient calibration to large-scale hydraulic stresses created by shaft construction and long-term pumping tests aided in the identification of smaller scale features not detected during steady-state calibration. This transient calibration resulted in a much more reliable and defendable model for use in performance-assessment calculations. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Tangent Adjoint Methods In a Higher-Order Space-Time Discontinuous-Galerkin Solver For Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diosady, Laslo; Murman, Scott; Blonigan, Patrick; Garai, Anirban

    2017-01-01

    Presented space-time adjoint solver for turbulent compressible flows. Confirmed failure of traditional sensitivity methods for chaotic flows. Assessed rate of exponential growth of adjoint for practical 3D turbulent simulation. Demonstrated failure of short-window sensitivity approximations.

  2. Thermal hydraulic simulations, error estimation and parameter sensitivity studies in Drekar::CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Thomas Michael; Shadid, John N; Pawlowski, Roger P; Cyr, Eric C; Wildey, Timothy Michael

    2014-01-01

    This report describes work directed towards completion of the Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) CFD Level 3 Milestone THM.CFD.P7.05 for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Nuclear Hub effort. The focus of this milestone was to demonstrate the thermal hydraulics and adjoint based error estimation and parameter sensitivity capabilities in the CFD code called Drekar::CFD. This milestone builds upon the capabilities demonstrated in three earlier milestones; THM.CFD.P4.02 [12], completed March, 31, 2012, THM.CFD.P5.01 [15] completed June 30, 2012 and THM.CFD.P5.01 [11] completed on October 31, 2012.

  3. Sensitivity of the model error parameter specification in weak-constraint four-dimensional variational data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jeremy A.; Daescu, Dacian N.

    2017-08-01

    This article presents the mathematical framework to evaluate the sensitivity of a forecast error aspect to the input parameters of a weak-constraint four-dimensional variational data assimilation system (w4D-Var DAS), extending the established theory from strong-constraint 4D-Var. Emphasis is placed on the derivation of the equations for evaluating the forecast sensitivity to parameters in the DAS representation of the model error statistics, including bias, standard deviation, and correlation structure. A novel adjoint-based procedure for adaptive tuning of the specified model error covariance matrix is introduced. Results from numerical convergence tests establish the validity of the model error sensitivity equations. Preliminary experiments providing a proof-of-concept are performed using the Lorenz multi-scale model to illustrate the theoretical concepts and potential benefits for practical applications.

  4. Double-difference adjoint seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yanhua O.; Simons, Frederik J.; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a `double-difference' method for the inversion for seismic wave speed structure based on adjoint tomography. Differences between seismic observations and model predictions at individual stations may arise from factors other than structural heterogeneity, such as errors in the assumed source-time function, inaccurate timings and systematic uncertainties. To alleviate the corresponding non-uniqueness in the inverse problem, we construct differential measurements between stations, thereby reducing the influence of the source signature and systematic errors. We minimize the discrepancy between observations and simulations in terms of the differential measurements made on station pairs. We show how to implement the double-difference concept in adjoint tomography, both theoretically and practically. We compare the sensitivities of absolute and differential measurements. The former provide absolute information on structure along the ray paths between stations and sources, whereas the latter explain relative (and thus higher resolution) structural variations in areas close to the stations. Whereas in conventional tomography a measurement made on a single earthquake-station pair provides very limited structural information, in double-difference tomography one earthquake can actually resolve significant details of the structure. The double-difference methodology can be incorporated into the usual adjoint tomography workflow by simply pairing up all conventional measurements; the computational cost of the necessary adjoint simulations is largely unaffected. Rather than adding to the computational burden, the inversion of double-difference measurements merely modifies the construction of the adjoint sources for data assimilation.

  5. TSUNAMI DISPERSION SENSITIVITY TO SEISMIC SOURCE PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Igorevich Gusev

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on the sensitivity of frequency dispersion effects to the form of initial surface elevation of seismic tsunami source. We vary such parameters of the source as rupture depth, dip-angle and rake-angle. Some variations in magnitude and strike angle are considered. The fully nonlinear dispersive model on a rotating sphere is used for wave propagation simulations. The main feature of the algorithm is the splitting of initial system on two subproblems of elliptic and hyperbolic type, which allows implementation of well-suitable numerical methods for them. The dispersive effects are estimated through differences between computations with the dispersive and nondispersive models. We consider an idealized test with a constant depth, a model basin for near-field tsunami simulations and a realistic scenario. Our computations show that the dispersion effects are strongly sensitive to the rupture depth and the dip-angle variations. Waves generated by sources with lager magnitude may be even more affected by dispersion.

  6. Supersymmetric descendants of self-adjointly extended quantum mechanical Hamiltonians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hashimi, M.H., E-mail: hashimi@itp.unibe.ch [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern University, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Salman, M., E-mail: msalman@qu.edu.qa [Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Physics, Qatar University, Al Tarfa, Doha 2713 (Qatar); Shalaby, A., E-mail: amshalab@qu.edu.qa [Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Physics, Qatar University, Al Tarfa, Doha 2713 (Qatar); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University (Egypt); Wiese, U.-J., E-mail: wiese@itp.unibe.ch [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern University, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-10-15

    We consider the descendants of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians in supersymmetric quantum mechanics on a half-line, on an interval, and on a punctured line or interval. While there is a 4-parameter family of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians on a punctured line, only a 3-parameter sub-family has supersymmetric descendants that are themselves self-adjoint. We also address the self-adjointness of an operator related to the supercharge, and point out that only a sub-class of its most general self-adjoint extensions is physical. Besides a general characterization of self-adjoint extensions and their supersymmetric descendants, we explicitly consider concrete examples, including a particle in a box with general boundary conditions, with and without an additional point interaction. We also discuss bulk-boundary resonances and their manifestation in the supersymmetric descendant. -- Highlights: •Self-adjoint extension theory and contact interactions. •Application of self-adjoint extensions to supersymmetry. •Contact interactions in finite volume with Robin boundary condition.

  7. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  8. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    CERN Document Server

    Urichuk, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows, and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  9. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urichuk, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.urichuk@uleth.ca [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada); Walton, Mark A., E-mail: walton@uleth.ca [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada); International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  10. Adjoint code generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Qiang; CAO JianWen; WANG Bin; ZHANG HaiBin

    2009-01-01

    The adjoint code generator (ADG) is developed to produce the adjoint codes, which are used to analytically calculate gradients and the Hessian-vector products with the costs independent of the number of the independent variables. Different from other automatic differentiation tools, the implementation of ADG has advantages of using the least program behavior decomposition method and several static dependence analysis techniques. In this paper we first address the concerned concepts and fundamentals, and then introduce the functionality and the features of ADG. In particular, we also discuss the design architecture of ADG and implementation details including the recomputation and storing strategy and several techniques for code optimization. Some experimental results in several applications are presented at the end.

  11. Application of Adjoint Methodology to Supersonic Aircraft Design Using Reversed Equivalent Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallabhandi, Sriram K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to shape an aircraft to equivalent area based objectives using the discrete adjoint approach. Equivalent areas can be obtained either using reversed augmented Burgers equation or direct conversion of off-body pressures into equivalent area. Formal coupling with CFD allows computation of sensitivities of equivalent area objectives with respect to aircraft shape parameters. The exactness of the adjoint sensitivities is verified against derivatives obtained using the complex step approach. This methodology has the benefit of using designer-friendly equivalent areas in the shape design of low-boom aircraft. Shape optimization results with equivalent area cost functionals are discussed and further refined using ground loudness based objectives.

  12. Efficient Adjoint Computation of Hybrid Systems of Differential Algebraic Equations with Applications in Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abhyankar, Shrirang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Anitescu, Mihai [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Constantinescu, Emil [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Zhang, Hong [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Sensitivity analysis is an important tool to describe power system dynamic behavior in response to parameter variations. It is a central component in preventive and corrective control applications. The existing approaches for sensitivity calculations, namely, finite-difference and forward sensitivity analysis, require a computational effort that increases linearly with the number of sensitivity parameters. In this work, we investigate, implement, and test a discrete adjoint sensitivity approach whose computational effort is effectively independent of the number of sensitivity parameters. The proposed approach is highly efficient for calculating trajectory sensitivities of larger systems and is consistent, within machine precision, with the function whose sensitivity we are seeking. This is an essential feature for use in optimization applications. Moreover, our approach includes a consistent treatment of systems with switching, such as DC exciters, by deriving and implementing the adjoint jump conditions that arise from state and time-dependent discontinuities. The accuracy and the computational efficiency of the proposed approach are demonstrated in comparison with the forward sensitivity analysis approach.

  13. MCNP: Multigroup/adjoint capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.C.; Redmond, E.L. II; Palmtag, S.P.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1994-04-01

    This report discusses various aspects related to the use and validity of the general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP for multigroup/adjoint calculations. The increased desire to perform comparisons between Monte Carlo and deterministic codes, along with the ever-present desire to increase the efficiency of large MCNP calculations has produced a greater user demand for the multigroup/adjoint capabilities. To more fully utilize these capabilities, we review the applications of the Monte Carlo multigroup/adjoint method, describe how to generate multigroup cross sections for MCNP with the auxiliary CRSRD code, describe how to use the multigroup/adjoint capability in MCNP, and provide examples and results indicating the effectiveness and validity of the MCNP multigroup/adjoint treatment. This information should assist users in taking advantage of the MCNP multigroup/adjoint capabilities.

  14. Advancing sensitivity analysis to precisely characterize temporal parameter dominance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guse, Björn; Pfannerstill, Matthias; Strauch, Michael; Reusser, Dominik; Lüdtke, Stefan; Volk, Martin; Gupta, Hoshin; Fohrer, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Parameter sensitivity analysis is a strategy for detecting dominant model parameters. A temporal sensitivity analysis calculates daily sensitivities of model parameters. This allows a precise characterization of temporal patterns of parameter dominance and an identification of the related discharge conditions. To achieve this goal, the diagnostic information as derived from the temporal parameter sensitivity is advanced by including discharge information in three steps. In a first step, the temporal dynamics are analyzed by means of daily time series of parameter sensitivities. As sensitivity analysis method, we used the Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) applied directly onto the modelled discharge. Next, the daily sensitivities are analyzed in combination with the flow duration curve (FDC). Through this step, we determine whether high sensitivities of model parameters are related to specific discharges. Finally, parameter sensitivities are separately analyzed for five segments of the FDC and presented as monthly averaged sensitivities. In this way, seasonal patterns of dominant model parameter are provided for each FDC segment. For this methodical approach, we used two contrasting catchments (upland and lowland catchment) to illustrate how parameter dominances change seasonally in different catchments. For all of the FDC segments, the groundwater parameters are dominant in the lowland catchment, while in the upland catchment the controlling parameters change seasonally between parameters from different runoff components. The three methodical steps lead to clear temporal patterns, which represent the typical characteristics of the study catchments. Our methodical approach thus provides a clear idea of how the hydrological dynamics are controlled by model parameters for certain discharge magnitudes during the year. Overall, these three methodical steps precisely characterize model parameters and improve the understanding of process dynamics in hydrological

  15. What can adjoint modelling tell about the response of the Greenland Ice Sheet to changes in basal sliding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Jonathan; Rutt, Ian; Murray, Tavi; Utke, Jean

    2013-04-01

    Studying the future behaviour of the Greenland Ice Sheet is important considering the ice sheet has a sea-level equivalent of 7 metres and the rate of mass loss from it is increasing (Velicogna, 2009). Examining the modelled response of the Greenland Ice Sheet to changes in forcing parameters can give insight into how it will behave in the future. The response of the ice sheet to specific changes in forcing parameters is referred to as the sensitivity. Being able to obtain model sensitivities in as little computation time as possible would be useful for examining the future response of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Adjoint models allow sensitivities to be obtained more efficiently than the conventional way, when considering spatially varying parameters. Conventionally, such sensitivities are obtained by perturbing a parameter at every grid point in turn and calculating the sensitivity at every grid point. Adjoint sensitivities, though, are calculated in a single step. This reduces the computational cost when obtaining sensitivities over large model domains. The adjoint method also has the advantage that it gives the exact value of the model sensitivity, rather than a finite difference approximation to it. We present the adjoint of a finite difference, shallow ice, thermomechanical ice sheet model with basal sliding, applied to the Greenland Ice Sheet. This adjoint model is obtained using the OpenAD automatic differentiation tool (Utke, 2006), which is open source. The adjoint model is validated by comparing adjoint and forward model sensitivities over 100 years. This work builds on the work of Heimbach (2009). We use the adjoint model to examine the sensitivity of the model to changes in basal sliding. About half the mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet occurs from surface runoff and half from dynamic mass loss (Broeke, 2009). Melt-water from Greenland Ice Sheet supra-glacial lakes can percolate to the bed through moulins. The melt-water that reaches the bed can then

  16. Hamiltonian realizations of nonlinear adjoint operators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fujimoto, Kenji; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.; Gray, W. Steven

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of state-space realizations for nonlinear adjoint operators. In particular, the relationships between nonlinear Hilbert adjoint operators, Hamiltonian extensions and port-controlled Hamiltonian systems are established. Then, characterizations of the adjoints of control

  17. System of adjoint P1 equations for neutron moderation; Sistema de equacoes P1 adjuntas para a moderacao de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da; Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2000-07-01

    In some applications of perturbation theory, it is necessary know the adjoint neutron flux, which is obtained by the solution of adjoint neutron diffusion equation. However, the multigroup constants used for this are weighted in only the direct neutron flux, from the solution of direct P1 equations. In this work, this procedure is questioned and the adjoint P1 equations are derived by the neutron transport equation, the reversion operators rules and analogies between direct and adjoint parameters. (author)

  18. Quantifying co-benefits of source-specific CO2 emission reductions in Canada and the US: An adjoint sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, S.; Soltanzadeh, M.; Pappin, A. J.; Hakami, A.; Turner, M. D.; Capps, S.; Henze, D. K.; Percell, P.; Bash, J. O.; Napelenok, S. L.; Pinder, R. W.; Russell, A. G.; Nenes, A.; Baek, J.; Carmichael, G. R.; Stanier, C. O.; Chai, T.; Byun, D.; Fahey, K.; Resler, J.; Mashayekhi, R.

    2016-12-01

    Scenario-based studies evaluate air quality co-benefits by adopting collective measures introduced under a climate policy scenario cannot distinguish between benefits accrued from CO2 reductions among sources of different types and at different locations. Location and sector dependencies are important factors that can be captured in an adjoint-based analysis of CO2 reduction co-benefits. The present study aims to quantify how the ancillary benefits of reducing criteria co-pollutants vary spatially and by sector. The adjoint of USEPA's CMAQ was applied to quantify the health benefits associated with emission reduction of criteria pollutants (NOX) in on-road mobile, Electric Generation Units (EGUs), and other select sectors on a location-by-location basis across the US and Canada. These health benefits are then converted to CO2 emission reduction co-benefits by accounting for source-specific emission rates of criteria pollutants in comparison to CO2. We integrate the results from the adjoint of CMAQ with emission estimates from 2011 NEI at the county level, and point source data from EPA's Air Markets Program Data and National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) for Canada. Our preliminary results show that the monetized health benefits (due to averted chronic mortality) associated with reductions of 1 ton of CO2 emissions is up to 65/ton in Canada and 200/ton in US for mobile on-road sector. For EGU sources, co-benefits are estimated at up to 100/ton and 10/ton for the US and Canada respectively. For Canada, the calculated co-benefits through gaseous pollutants including NOx is larger than those through PM2.5 due to the official association between NO2 exposure and chronic mortality. Calculated co-benefits show a great deal of spatial variability across emission locations for different sectors and sub-sectors. Implications of such spatial variability in devising control policy options that effectively address both climate and air quality objectives will be discussed.

  19. Application of the discrete adjoint method to coupled multidisciplinary unsteady flow problems for error estimation and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Karthik

    Adjoint methods have found applications in several key areas of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), namely, shape optimization and goal based adaptive solutions. CFD has become an essential tool in the design process by enabling the rapid testing of multiple designs, and currently it is normal practice to use CFD in conjunction with optimization algorithms for design improvement. In the context of shape optimization problems based on CFD, adjoint methods offer the significant advantage of computing sensitivity derivatives of the optimization cost function with respect to the set of design parameters, at a cost that is essentially independent of the number of design parameters. Adjoint methods reduce the cost of obtaining the complete gradient vector at any point in the design space equivalent to that of a single flow solution at the same point in the design space. This immediately enables the use of all gradient based optimization algorithms and lifts any restrictions on the number of design parameters required for the adequate definition of the optimization problem. Adaptive techniques in CFD constitute the other aspect where adjoint methods have have made great inroads. Typical adaptive solutions of the governing flow equations rely on estimating the local error in an evolving solution to target regions of the computational mesh for increased discrete resolution. The main goal of any adaptive solution method is the overall increase in solution accuracy with minimal increase in computational cost. However, targeting local error in the solution does not translate into efficient use of computational resources, since ultimately it is the accurate estimation of boundary integrated functional quantities such as load coefficients that are of importance to the user. Contrary to local error-based methods, adjoint methods allow the adaptation of the computational mesh specifically for the improvement of functionals such as load coefficients. This is achieved by

  20. Analysis of Nonlinear Missile Guidance Systems Through Linear Adjoint Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Gamal Eltohamy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a linear simulation algorithm, the adjoint method, is modified and employed as an efficient tool for analyzing the contributions of system parameters to the miss - distance of a nonlinear time-varying missile guidance system model. As an example for the application of the linear adjoint method, the effect of missile flight time on the miss - distance is studied. Since the missile model is highly nonlinear and a time-varying linearized model is required to apply the adjoint method, a new technique that utilizes the time-reversed linearized coefficients of the missile as a replacement for the time-varying describing functions is applied and proven to be successful. It is found that, when compared with Monte Carlo generated results, simulation results of this linear adjoint technique provide acceptable accuracy and can be produced with much less effort.

  1. Development and Applications of the FV3 GEOS-5 Adjoint Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdaway, Daniel; Kim, Jong G.; Lin, Shian-Jiann; Errico, Ron; Gelaro, Ron; Kent, James; Coy, Larry; Doyle, Jim; Goldstein, Alex

    2017-01-01

    GMAO has developed a highly sophisticated adjoint modeling system based on the most recent version of the finite volume cubed sphere (FV3) dynamical core. This provides a mechanism for investigating sensitivity to initial conditions and examining observation impacts. It also allows for the computation of singular vectors and for the implementation of hybrid 4DVAR. In this work we will present the scientific assessment of the new adjoint system and show results from a number of research application of the adjoint system.

  2. Double-difference adjoint seismic tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Yanhua O; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a `double-difference' method for the inversion for seismic wavespeed structure based on adjoint tomography. Differences between seismic observations and model predictions at individual stations may arise from factors other than structural heterogeneity, such as errors in the assumed source-time function, inaccurate timings, and systematic uncertainties. To alleviate the corresponding nonuniqueness in the inverse problem, we construct differential measurements between stations, thereby reducing the influence of the source signature and systematic errors. We minimize the discrepancy between observations and simulations in terms of the differential measurements made on station pairs. We show how to implement the double-difference concept in adjoint tomography, both theoretically and in practice. We compare the sensitivities of absolute and differential measurements. The former provide absolute information on structure along the ray paths between stations and sources, whereas the latter explain relat...

  3. Sensitivity of transient synchrotron radiation to tokamak plasma parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisch, N.J.; Kritz, A.H.

    1988-12-01

    Synchrotron radiation from a hot plasma can inform on certain plasma parameters. The dependence on plasma parameters is particularly sensitive for the transient radiation response to a brief, deliberate, perturbation of hot plasma electrons. We investigate how such a radiation response can be used to diagnose a variety of plasma parameters in a tokamak. 18 refs., 13 figs.

  4. Extension of the ADjoint Approach to a Laminar Navier-Stokes Solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paige, Cody

    The use of adjoint methods is common in computational fluid dynamics to reduce the cost of the sensitivity analysis in an optimization cycle. The forward mode ADjoint is a combination of an adjoint sensitivity analysis method with a forward mode automatic differentiation (AD) and is a modification of the reverse mode ADjoint method proposed by Mader et al.[1]. A colouring acceleration technique is presented to reduce the computational cost increase associated with forward mode AD. The forward mode AD facilitates the implementation of the laminar Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The forward mode ADjoint method is applied to a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics solver. The resulting Euler and viscous ADjoint sensitivities are compared to the reverse mode Euler ADjoint derivatives and a complex-step method to demonstrate the reduced computational cost and accuracy. Both comparisons demonstrate the benefits of the colouring method and the practicality of using a forward mode AD. [1] Mader, C.A., Martins, J.R.R.A., Alonso, J.J., and van der Weide, E. (2008) ADjoint: An approach for the rapid development of discrete adjoint solvers. AIAA Journal, 46(4):863-873. doi:10.2514/1.29123.

  5. Nonlinear self-adjointness and conservation laws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibragimov, N H, E-mail: nib@bth.se [Department of Mathematics and Science, Blekinge Institute of Technology, 371 79 Karlskrona (Sweden)

    2011-10-28

    The general concept of nonlinear self-adjointness of differential equations is introduced. It includes the linear self-adjointness as a particular case. Moreover, it embraces the strict self-adjointness (definition 1) and quasi-self-adjointness introduced earlier by the author. It is shown that the equations possessing nonlinear self-adjointness can be written equivalently in a strictly self-adjoint form by using appropriate multipliers. All linear equations possess the property of nonlinear self-adjointness, and hence can be rewritten in a nonlinear strictly self-adjoint form. For example, the heat equation u{sub t} - {Delta}u = 0 becomes strictly self-adjoint after multiplying by u{sup -1}. Conservation laws associated with symmetries are given in an explicit form for all nonlinearly self-adjoint partial differential equations and systems. (fast track communication)

  6. Unsteady adjoint of pressure loss for a fundamental transonic turbine vane

    CERN Document Server

    Talnikar, Chaitanya; Laskowski, Gregory M

    2015-01-01

    High fidelity simulations, e.g., large eddy simulation are often needed for accurately predicting pressure losses due to wake mixing in turbomachinery applications. An unsteady adjoint of such high fidelity simulations is useful for design optimization in these aerodynamic applications. In this paper we present unsteady adjoint solutions using a large eddy simulation model for a vane from VKI using aerothermal objectives. The unsteady adjoint method is effective in capturing the gradient for a short time interval aerothermal objective, whereas the method provides diverging gradients for long time-averaged thermal objectives. As the boundary layer on the suction side near the trailing edge of the vane is turbulent, it poses a challenge for the adjoint solver. The chaotic dynamics cause the adjoint solution to diverge exponentially from the trailing edge region when solved backwards in time. This results in the corruption of the sensitivities obtained from the adjoint solutions. An energy analysis of the unstea...

  7. Classification of hydrological parameter sensitivity and evaluation of parameter transferability across 431 US MOPEX basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Huiying; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Bao, Jie; Sun, Yu; Tesfa, Teklu; Ruby Leung, L.

    2016-05-01

    The Community Land Model (CLM) represents physical, chemical, and biological processes of the terrestrial ecosystems that interact with climate across a range of spatial and temporal scales. As CLM includes numerous sub-models and associated parameters, the high-dimensional parameter space presents a formidable challenge for quantifying uncertainty and improving Earth system predictions needed to assess environmental changes and risks. This study aims to evaluate the potential of transferring hydrologic model parameters in CLM through sensitivity analyses and classification across watersheds from the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) in the United States. The sensitivity of CLM-simulated water and energy fluxes to hydrological parameters across 431 MOPEX basins are first examined using an efficient stochastic sampling-based sensitivity analysis approach. Linear, interaction, and high-order nonlinear impacts are all identified via statistical tests and stepwise backward removal parameter screening. The basins are then classified according to their parameter sensitivity patterns (internal attributes), as well as their hydrologic indices/attributes (external hydrologic factors) separately, using Principal component analysis (PCA) and expectation-maximization (EM) - based clustering approach. Similarities and differences among the parameter sensitivity-based classification system (S-Class), the hydrologic indices-based classification (H-Class), and the Koppen climate classification systems (K-Class) are discussed. Within each parameter sensitivity-based classification system (S-Class) with similar parameter sensitivity characteristics, similar inversion modeling setups can be used for parameter calibration, and the parameters and their contribution or significance to water and energy cycling may also be more transferrable. This classification study provides guidance on identifiable parameters, and on parameterization and inverse model design for CLM but the

  8. Sonic Boom Mitigation Through Aircraft Design and Adjoint Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallabhandi, Siriam K.; Diskin, Boris; Nielsen, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to design of the supersonic aircraft outer mold line (OML) by optimizing the A-weighted loudness of sonic boom signature predicted on the ground. The optimization process uses the sensitivity information obtained by coupling the discrete adjoint formulations for the augmented Burgers Equation and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) equations. This coupled formulation links the loudness of the ground boom signature to the aircraft geometry thus allowing efficient shape optimization for the purpose of minimizing the impact of loudness. The accuracy of the adjoint-based sensitivities is verified against sensitivities obtained using an independent complex-variable approach. The adjoint based optimization methodology is applied to a configuration previously optimized using alternative state of the art optimization methods and produces additional loudness reduction. The results of the optimizations are reported and discussed.

  9. Tracking down the ENSO delayed oscillator with an adjoint OGCM

    CERN Document Server

    Van Oldenborgh, G J; Venzke, S; Eckert, C; Giering, R; Oldenborgh, Geert Jan van; Burgers, Gerrit; Venzke, Stephan; Eckert, Christian; Giering, Ralf

    1997-01-01

    The adjoint of an ocean general circulation model is used as a tool for investigating the causes of changes in ENSO SST indices. We identify adjoint Kelvin and Rossby waves in the sensitivities to sea level and wind stress at earlier times, which can be traced back for more than a year through western and weak eastern boundary reflections. Depending on the thermocline depth the first and second baroclinic modes are excited. The sensitivities to the heat flux and SST are local and decay in about a month. The sensitivities to the fluxes are converted into the influence of SST using the adjoint of a statistical atmosphere model. Focusing on SST perturbations in the index region itself, we recover, up to a scale factor, the delayed oscillator concept.

  10. Adjoint-based approach to Enhancing Mixing in Rayleigh-Taylor Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kord, Ali; Capecelatro, Jesse

    2016-11-01

    A recently developed adjoint method for multi-component compressible flow is used to measure sensitivity of the mixing rate to initial perturbations in Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) turbulence. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of RT instabilities are performed at moderate Reynolds numbers. The DNS are used to provide an initial prediction, and the corresponding space-time discrete-exact adjoint provides a sensitivity gradient for a specific quantity of interest (QoI). In this work, a QoI is defined based on the time-integrated scalar field to quantify the mixing rate. Therefore, the adjoint solution is used to measure sensitivity of this QoI to a set of initial perturbations, and inform a gradient-based line search to optimize mixing. We first demonstrate the adjoint approach in the linear regime and compare the optimized initial conditions to the expected values from linear stability analysis. The adjoint method is then used in the high Reynolds number limit where theory is no longer valid. Finally, chaos is known to contaminate the accuracy of the adjoint gradient in turbulent flows when integrated over long time horizons. We assess the influence of chaos on the accuracy of the adjoint gradient to guide the work of future studies on adjoint-based sensitivity of turbulent mixing. PhD Student, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

  11. Sensitivity analysis of influencing parameters in cavern stability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abolfazl Abdollahipour; Reza Rahmannejad

    2012-01-01

    In order to analyze the stability of the underground rock structures,knowing the sensitivity of geomechanical parameters is important.To investigate the priority of these geomechanical properties in the stability of cavern,a sensitivity analysis has been performed on a single cavern in various rock mass qualities according to RMR using Phase 2.The stability of cavern has been studied by investigating the side wall deformation.Results showed that most sensitive properties are coefficient of lateral stress and modulus of deformation.Also parameters of Hoek-Brown criterion and σc have no sensitivity when cavern is in a perfect elastic state.But in an elasto-plastic state,parameters of Hoek-Brown criterion and σc affect the deformability; such effect becomes more remarkable with increasing plastic area.Other parameters have different sensitivities concerning rock mass quality (RMR).Results have been used to propose the best set of parameters for study on prediction of sidewall displacement.

  12. Adjoint-based Optimal Flow Control for Compressible DNS

    CERN Document Server

    Otero, J Javier; Sandberg, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    A novel adjoint-based framework oriented to optimal flow control in compressible direct numerical simulations is presented. Also, a new formulation of the adjoint characteristic boundary conditions is introduced, which enhances the stability of the adjoint simulations. The flow configuration chosen as a case study consists of a two dimensional open cavity flow with aspect ratio $L/H=3$ and Reynolds number $Re=5000$. This flow configuration is of particular interest, as the turbulent and chaotic nature of separated flows pushes the adjoint approach to its limit. The target of the flow actuation, defined as cost, is the reduction of the pressure fluctuations at the sensor location. To exploit the advantages of the adjoint method, a large number of control parameters is used. The control consists of an actuating sub-domain where a two-dimensional body force is applied at every point within the sub-volume. This results in a total of $2.256 \\cdot 10^6$ control parameters. The final actuation achieved a successful ...

  13. Second-order sensitivity of eigenpairs in multiple parameter structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-huan CHEN; Rui GUO; Guang-wei MENG

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents methods for computing a second-order sensitivity matrix and the Hessian matrix of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of multiple parameter structures. Second-order perturbations of eigenvalues and eigenvectors are transformed into multiple parameter forms, and the second-order perturbation sensitivity matrices of eigenvalues and eigenvectors are developed. With these formulations, the efficient methods based on the second-order Taylor expansion and second-order perturbation are obtained to estimate changes of eigenvalues and eigenvectors when the design parameters are changed. The presented method avoids direct differential operation, and thus reduces difficulty for computing the second-order sensitivity matrices of eigenpairs. A numerical example is given to demonstrate application and accuracy of the proposed method.

  14. Tsunami waveform inversion by adjoint methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Carlos; Miranda, Pedro M. A.

    2001-09-01

    An adjoint method for tsunami waveform inversion is proposed, as an alternative to the technique based on Green's functions of the linear long wave model. The method has the advantage of being able to use the nonlinear shallow water equations, or other appropriate equation sets, and to optimize an initial state given as a linear or nonlinear function of any set of free parameters. This last facility is used to perform explicit optimization of the focal fault parameters, characterizing the initial sea surface displacement of tsunamigenic earthquakes. The proposed methodology is validated with experiments using synthetic data, showing the possibility of recovering all relevant details of a tsunami source from tide gauge observations, providing that the adjoint method is constrained in an appropriate manner. It is found, as in other methods, that the inversion skill of tsunami sources increases with the azimuthal and temporal coverage of assimilated tide gauge stations; furthermore, it is shown that the eigenvalue analysis of the Hessian matrix of the cost function provides a consistent and useful methodology to choose the subset of independent parameters that can be inverted with a given dataset of observations and to evaluate the error of the inversion process. The method is also applied to real tide gauge series, from the tsunami of the February 28, 1969, Gorringe Bank earthquake, suggesting some reasonable changes to the assumed focal parameters of that event. It is suggested that the method proposed may be able to deal with transient tsunami sources such as those generated by submarine landslides.

  15. Importance and sensitivity of parameters affecting the Zion Seismic Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, L.L.; O' Connell, W.J.

    1985-06-01

    This report presents the results of a study on the importance and sensitivity of structures, systems, equipment, components and design parameters used in the Zion Seismic Risk Calculations. This study is part of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) supported by the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The objective of this study is to provide the NRC with results on the importance and sensitivity of parameters used to evaluate seismic risk. These results can assist the NRC in making decisions dealing with the allocation of research resources on seismic issues. This study uses marginal analysis in addition to importance and sensitivity analysis to identify subject areas (input parameter areas) for improvements that reduce risk, estimate how much the improvement dfforts reduce risk, and rank the subject areas for improvements. Importance analysis identifies the systems, components, and parameters that are important to risk. Sensitivity analysis estimates the change in risk per unit improvement. Marginal analysis indicates the reduction in risk or uncertainty for improvement effort made in each subject area. The results described in this study were generated using the SEISIM (Systematic Evaluation of Important Safety Improvement Measures) and CHAIN computer codes. Part 1 of the SEISIM computer code generated the failure probabilities and risk values. Part 2 of SEISIM, along with the CHAIN computer code, generated the importance and sensitivity measures.

  16. Deciphering Parameter Sensitivity in the BvgAS Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapder, Tarunendu; Talukder, Srijeeta; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Banik, Suman K.

    2016-01-01

    To understand the switching of different phenotypic phases of Bordetella pertussis, we propose an optimized mathematical framework for signal transduction through BvgAS two-component system. The response of the network output to the sensory input has been demonstrated in steady state. An analysis in terms of local sensitivity amplification characterizes the nature of the molecular switch. The sensitivity analysis of the model parameters within the framework of various correlation coefficients helps to decipher the contribution of the modular structure in signal propagation. Once classified, the model parameters are tuned to generate the behavior of some novel strains using simulated annealing, a stochastic optimization technique. PMID:26812153

  17. Deciphering Parameter Sensitivity in the BvgAS Signal Transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarunendu Mapder

    Full Text Available To understand the switching of different phenotypic phases of Bordetella pertussis, we propose an optimized mathematical framework for signal transduction through BvgAS two-component system. The response of the network output to the sensory input has been demonstrated in steady state. An analysis in terms of local sensitivity amplification characterizes the nature of the molecular switch. The sensitivity analysis of the model parameters within the framework of various correlation coefficients helps to decipher the contribution of the modular structure in signal propagation. Once classified, the model parameters are tuned to generate the behavior of some novel strains using simulated annealing, a stochastic optimization technique.

  18. Deciphering Parameter Sensitivity in the BvgAS Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapder, Tarunendu; Talukder, Srijeeta; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Banik, Suman K

    2016-01-01

    To understand the switching of different phenotypic phases of Bordetella pertussis, we propose an optimized mathematical framework for signal transduction through BvgAS two-component system. The response of the network output to the sensory input has been demonstrated in steady state. An analysis in terms of local sensitivity amplification characterizes the nature of the molecular switch. The sensitivity analysis of the model parameters within the framework of various correlation coefficients helps to decipher the contribution of the modular structure in signal propagation. Once classified, the model parameters are tuned to generate the behavior of some novel strains using simulated annealing, a stochastic optimization technique.

  19. Sensitivity analysis of soil parameters based on interval

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Interval analysis is a new uncertainty analysis method for engineering struc-tures. In this paper, a new sensitivity analysis method is presented by introducing interval analysis which can expand applications of the interval analysis method. The interval anal-ysis process of sensitivity factor matrix of soil parameters is given. A method of parameter intervals and decision-making target intervals is given according to the interval analysis method. With FEM, secondary developments are done for Marc and the Duncan-Chang nonlinear elastic model. Mutual transfer between FORTRAN and Marc is implemented. With practial examples, rationality and feasibility are validated. Comparison is made with some published results.

  20. Sensitivity Analysis of Hardwired Parameters in GALE Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geelhood, Kenneth J.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Droppo, James G.

    2008-12-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to provide a data-gathering plan for updating the hardwired data tables and parameters of the Gaseous and Liquid Effluents (GALE) codes to reflect current nuclear reactor performance. This would enable the GALE codes to make more accurate predictions about the normal radioactive release source term applicable to currently operating reactors and to the cohort of reactors planned for construction in the next few years. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to define the importance of hardwired parameters in terms of each parameter’s effect on the emission rate of the nuclides that are most important in computing potential exposures. The results of this study were used to compile a list of parameters that should be updated based on the sensitivity of these parameters to outputs of interest.

  1. Probabilistic and Nonprobabilistic Sensitivity Analyses of Uncertain Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-En Fang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Parameter sensitivity analyses have been widely applied to industrial problems for evaluating parameter significance, effects on responses, uncertainty influence, and so forth. In the interest of simple implementation and computational efficiency, this study has developed two sensitivity analysis methods corresponding to the situations with or without sufficient probability information. The probabilistic method is established with the aid of the stochastic response surface and the mathematical derivation proves that the coefficients of first-order items embody the parameter main effects on the response. Simultaneously, a nonprobabilistic interval analysis based method is brought forward for the circumstance when the parameter probability distributions are unknown. The two methods have been verified against a numerical beam example with their accuracy compared to that of a traditional variance-based method. The analysis results have demonstrated the reliability and accuracy of the developed methods. And their suitability for different situations has also been discussed.

  2. Investigation of parameter sensitivity of short channel mosfets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selberherr, S.; Schütz, A.; Pötzl, H.

    1982-02-01

    A strategy to examine the sensitivity of electrical device parameters on geometrical and technological tolerances is described. An approach is offered to determine the limit of device miniaturzation for a given fabrication process and a desired operating condition. As a didactic example of practical relevance the minimum channel length for a modern silicon gate, double implant process due to threshold uncertainty is estimated. A method to calculate global sensitivity numbers for the reproducability of miniaturized devices is suggested. As an experimental determination of sensitivities is extremely difficult and expensive, numerical simulations are ideally suited for this purpose.

  3. Hamiltonian Realizations of Nonlinear Adjoint Operators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fujimoto, Kenji; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.; Gray, W. Steven

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses state-space realizations for nonlinear adjoint operators. In particular the relationship among nonlinear Hilbert adjoint operators, Hamiltonian extensions and port-controlled Hamiltonian systems are clarified. The characterization of controllability, observability and Hankel ope

  4. Quasi self-adjoint nonlinear wave equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibragimov, N H [Department of Mathematics and Science, Blekinge Institute of Technology, SE-371 79 Karlskrona (Sweden); Torrisi, M; Tracina, R, E-mail: nib@bth.s, E-mail: torrisi@dmi.unict.i, E-mail: tracina@dmi.unict.i [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, University of Catania (Italy)

    2010-11-05

    In this paper we generalize the classification of self-adjoint second-order linear partial differential equation to a family of nonlinear wave equations with two independent variables. We find a class of quasi self-adjoint nonlinear equations which includes the self-adjoint linear equations as a particular case. The property of a differential equation to be quasi self-adjoint is important, e.g. for constructing conservation laws associated with symmetries of the differential equation. (fast track communication)

  5. Modelling of intermittent microwave convective drying: parameter sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhijun

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The reliability of the predictions of a mathematical model is a prerequisite to its utilization. A multiphase porous media model of intermittent microwave convective drying is developed based on the literature. The model considers the liquid water, gas and solid matrix inside of food. The model is simulated by COMSOL software. Its sensitivity parameter is analysed by changing the parameter values by ±20%, with the exception of several parameters. The sensitivity analysis of the process of the microwave power level shows that each parameter: ambient temperature, effective gas diffusivity, and evaporation rate constant, has significant effects on the process. However, the surface mass, heat transfer coefficient, relative and intrinsic permeability of the gas, and capillary diffusivity of water do not have a considerable effect. The evaporation rate constant has minimal parameter sensitivity with a ±20% value change, until it is changed 10-fold. In all results, the temperature and vapour pressure curves show the same trends as the moisture content curve. However, the water saturation at the medium surface and in the centre show different results. Vapour transfer is the major mass transfer phenomenon that affects the drying process.

  6. Modelling of intermittent microwave convective drying: parameter sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhijun; Qin, Wenchao; Shi, Bin; Gao, Jingxin; Zhang, Shiwei

    2017-06-01

    The reliability of the predictions of a mathematical model is a prerequisite to its utilization. A multiphase porous media model of intermittent microwave convective drying is developed based on the literature. The model considers the liquid water, gas and solid matrix inside of food. The model is simulated by COMSOL software. Its sensitivity parameter is analysed by changing the parameter values by ±20%, with the exception of several parameters. The sensitivity analysis of the process of the microwave power level shows that each parameter: ambient temperature, effective gas diffusivity, and evaporation rate constant, has significant effects on the process. However, the surface mass, heat transfer coefficient, relative and intrinsic permeability of the gas, and capillary diffusivity of water do not have a considerable effect. The evaporation rate constant has minimal parameter sensitivity with a ±20% value change, until it is changed 10-fold. In all results, the temperature and vapour pressure curves show the same trends as the moisture content curve. However, the water saturation at the medium surface and in the centre show different results. Vapour transfer is the major mass transfer phenomenon that affects the drying process.

  7. Estimation of parameter sensitivities for stochastic reaction networks

    KAUST Repository

    Gupta, Ankit

    2016-01-07

    Quantification of the effects of parameter uncertainty is an important and challenging problem in Systems Biology. We consider this problem in the context of stochastic models of biochemical reaction networks where the dynamics is described as a continuous-time Markov chain whose states represent the molecular counts of various species. For such models, effects of parameter uncertainty are often quantified by estimating the infinitesimal sensitivities of some observables with respect to model parameters. The aim of this talk is to present a holistic approach towards this problem of estimating parameter sensitivities for stochastic reaction networks. Our approach is based on a generic formula which allows us to construct efficient estimators for parameter sensitivity using simulations of the underlying model. We will discuss how novel simulation techniques, such as tau-leaping approximations, multi-level methods etc. can be easily integrated with our approach and how one can deal with stiff reaction networks where reactions span multiple time-scales. We will demonstrate the efficiency and applicability of our approach using many examples from the biological literature.

  8. Universally sloppy parameter sensitivities in systems biology models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan N Gutenkunst

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative computational models play an increasingly important role in modern biology. Such models typically involve many free parameters, and assigning their values is often a substantial obstacle to model development. Directly measuring in vivo biochemical parameters is difficult, and collectively fitting them to other experimental data often yields large parameter uncertainties. Nevertheless, in earlier work we showed in a growth-factor-signaling model that collective fitting could yield well-constrained predictions, even when it left individual parameters very poorly constrained. We also showed that the model had a "sloppy" spectrum of parameter sensitivities, with eigenvalues roughly evenly distributed over many decades. Here we use a collection of models from the literature to test whether such sloppy spectra are common in systems biology. Strikingly, we find that every model we examine has a sloppy spectrum of sensitivities. We also test several consequences of this sloppiness for building predictive models. In particular, sloppiness suggests that collective fits to even large amounts of ideal time-series data will often leave many parameters poorly constrained. Tests over our model collection are consistent with this suggestion. This difficulty with collective fits may seem to argue for direct parameter measurements, but sloppiness also implies that such measurements must be formidably precise and complete to usefully constrain many model predictions. We confirm this implication in our growth-factor-signaling model. Our results suggest that sloppy sensitivity spectra are universal in systems biology models. The prevalence of sloppiness highlights the power of collective fits and suggests that modelers should focus on predictions rather than on parameters.

  9. Reentry-Vehicle Shape Optimization Using a Cartesian Adjoint Method and CAD Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    A DJOINT solutions of the governing flow equations are becoming increasingly important for the development of efficient analysis and optimization algorithms. A well-known use of the adjoint method is gradient-based shape. Given an objective function that defines some measure of performance, such as the lift and drag functionals, its gradient is computed at a cost that is essentially independent of the number of design variables (e.g., geometric parameters that control the shape). Classic aerodynamic applications of gradient-based optimization include the design of cruise configurations for transonic and supersonic flow, as well as the design of high-lift systems. are perhaps the most promising approach for addressing the issues of flow solution automation for aerodynamic design problems. In these methods, the discretization of the wetted surface is decoupled from that of the volume mesh. This not only enables fast and robust mesh generation for geometry of arbitrary complexity, but also facilitates access to geometry modeling and manipulation using parametric computer-aided design (CAD). In previous work on Cartesian adjoint solvers, Melvin et al. developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code, which is based on the full-potential equation with viscous corrections. More recently, Dadone and Grossman presented an adjoint formulation for the two-dimensional Euler equations using a ghost-cell method to enforce the wall boundary conditions. In Refs. 18 and 19, we presented an accurate and efficient algorithm for the solution of the adjoint Euler equations discretized on Cartesian meshes with embedded, cut-cell boundaries. Novel aspects of the algorithm were the computation of surface shape sensitivities for triangulations based on parametric-CAD models and the linearization of the coupling between the surface triangulation and the cut-cells. The accuracy of the gradient computation was verified using several three-dimensional test cases, which included design

  10. An Adjoint-Based Adaptive Ensemble Kalman Filter

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Hajoon

    2013-10-01

    A new hybrid ensemble Kalman filter/four-dimensional variational data assimilation (EnKF/4D-VAR) approach is introduced to mitigate background covariance limitations in the EnKF. The work is based on the adaptive EnKF (AEnKF) method, which bears a strong resemblance to the hybrid EnKF/three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3D-VAR) method. In the AEnKF, the representativeness of the EnKF ensemble is regularly enhanced with new members generated after back projection of the EnKF analysis residuals to state space using a 3D-VAR [or optimal interpolation (OI)] scheme with a preselected background covariance matrix. The idea here is to reformulate the transformation of the residuals as a 4D-VAR problem, constraining the new member with model dynamics and the previous observations. This should provide more information for the estimation of the new member and reduce dependence of the AEnKF on the assumed stationary background covariance matrix. This is done by integrating the analysis residuals backward in time with the adjoint model. Numerical experiments are performed with the Lorenz-96 model under different scenarios to test the new approach and to evaluate its performance with respect to the EnKF and the hybrid EnKF/3D-VAR. The new method leads to the least root-mean-square estimation errors as long as the linear assumption guaranteeing the stability of the adjoint model holds. It is also found to be less sensitive to choices of the assimilation system inputs and parameters.

  11. Adjoint analysis of mixed continuous/discrete systems in simulink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucco, D.; Weiss, M.

    2010-01-01

    The adjoint simulation method is a well established and efficient tool for gaining insight and understanding of key parameters affecting the behaviour and performance of a guided missile homing system. Traditionally, the method has been employed by various missile companies during the preliminary an

  12. Adjoint analysis of mixed continuous/discrete systems in simulink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucco, D.; Weiss, M.

    2010-01-01

    The adjoint simulation method is a well established and efficient tool for gaining insight and understanding of key parameters affecting the behaviour and performance of a guided missile homing system. Traditionally, the method has been employed by various missile companies during the preliminary

  13. Assimilating Remote Ammonia Observations with a Refined Aerosol Thermodynamics Adjoint"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia emissions parameters in North America can be refined in order to improve the evaluation of modeled concentrations against observations. Here, we seek to do so by developing and applying the GEOS-Chem adjoint nested over North America to conductassimilation of observations...

  14. Adjoint Functors and Representation Dimensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Chang XI

    2006-01-01

    We study the global dimensions of the coherent functors over two categories that are linked by a pair of adjoint functors. This idea is then exploited to compare the representation dimensions of two algebras. In particular, we show that if an Artin algebra is switched from the other, then they have the same representation dimension.

  15. Aerospace Applications of Adjoint Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    program. Peterson [12], and later Howe [13] and Tarrant [14), illustrated how the method could be easily applied to the performance analysis of generic...Hill Book Company, New York, NY, 1965. [14] Tarrant , G.A., " The Method of Adjoint Systems and its Application to Guided Missile Noise Studies

  16. Considerations for parameter optimization and sensitivity in climate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelin, J David; Bracco, Annalisa; Luo, Hao; McWilliams, James C; Meyerson, Joyce E

    2010-12-14

    Climate models exhibit high sensitivity in some respects, such as for differences in predicted precipitation changes under global warming. Despite successful large-scale simulations, regional climatology features prove difficult to constrain toward observations, with challenges including high-dimensionality, computationally expensive simulations, and ambiguity in the choice of objective function. In an atmospheric General Circulation Model forced by observed sea surface temperature or coupled to a mixed-layer ocean, many climatic variables yield rms-error objective functions that vary smoothly through the feasible parameter range. This smoothness occurs despite nonlinearity strong enough to reverse the curvature of the objective function in some parameters, and to imply limitations on multimodel ensemble means as an estimator of global warming precipitation changes. Low-order polynomial fits to the model output spatial fields as a function of parameter (quadratic in model field, fourth-order in objective function) yield surprisingly successful metamodels for many quantities and facilitate a multiobjective optimization approach. Tradeoffs arise as optima for different variables occur at different parameter values, but with agreement in certain directions. Optima often occur at the limit of the feasible parameter range, identifying key parameterization aspects warranting attention--here the interaction of convection with free tropospheric water vapor. Analytic results for spatial fields of leading contributions to the optimization help to visualize tradeoffs at a regional level, e.g., how mismatches between sensitivity and error spatial fields yield regional error under minimization of global objective functions. The approach is sufficiently simple to guide parameter choices and to aid intercomparison of sensitivity properties among climate models.

  17. Double-Difference Measurements in Global Adjoint Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsvuran, Ridvan; Yuan, Yanhua; Lei, Wenjie; Bozdag, Ebru; Simons, Frederik J.; Tromp, Jeroen

    2017-04-01

    The adjoint method efficiently incorporates 3D seismic wave simulations and Fréchet kernels in seismic tomography, and has been successfully applied to exploration and global-scale imaging problems. It is well known that the success of inversions is closely tied to the chosen misfit function. The recently proposed double-difference (DD) method for adjoint inversions (Yuan et al. 2016) minimizes systematic errors in structural inversions related to source parameters, such as origin times, source time functions, etc. Moreover, since the DD method is based on differential measurements between station pairs, bias in structural inversions due to an uneven distribution of stations is also reduced. In this study, our aim is to take advantages of the DD method in real full-waveform inversion problems based on earthquake data. Our main focus is to demonstrate it at the global-scale adjoint tomography. To this end, we closely follow the global adjoint tomography strategies presented in Bozdag et al. (2016) and first consider extending phase misfits, such as multitaper cross-correlation measurements, to the DD approach. The major challenges are to reduce the computational cost of making differential measurements on every station pair and assimilating misfits of all phases in DD measurements. We have initiated the first tests with surface-wave data only. We explore how to incorporate body waves in double-difference adjoint tomography and implement various other misfits, such as instantaneous phase measurements, in the context of global inversions. We discuss how we can implement DD measurements into global adjoint tomography studies in a feasible way and present our initial results.

  18. Sensitivity of footbridge vibrations to stochastic walking parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Lars; Frier, Christian

    2010-06-01

    Some footbridges are so slender that pedestrian traffic can cause excessive vibrations and serviceability problems. Design guidelines outline procedures for vibration serviceability checks, but it is noticeable that they rely on the assumption that the action is deterministic, although in fact it is stochastic as different pedestrians generate different dynamic forces. For serviceability checks of footbridge designs it would seem reasonable to consider modelling the stochastic nature of the main parameters describing the excitation, such as for instance the load amplitude and the step frequency of the pedestrian. A stochastic modelling approach is adopted for this paper and it facilitates quantifying the probability of exceeding various vibration levels, which is useful in a discussion of serviceability of a footbridge design. However, estimates of statistical distributions of footbridge vibration levels to walking loads might be influenced by the models assumed for the parameters of the load model (the walking parameters). The paper explores how sensitive estimates of the statistical distribution of vertical footbridge response are to various stochastic assumptions for the walking parameters. The basis for the study is a literature review identifying different suggestions as to how the stochastic nature of these parameters may be modelled, and a parameter study examines how the different models influence estimates of the statistical distribution of footbridge vibrations. By neglecting scatter in some of the walking parameters, the significance of modelling the various walking parameters stochastically rather than deterministically is also investigated providing insight into which modelling efforts need to be made for arriving at reliable estimates of statistical distributions of footbridge vibrations. The studies for the paper are based on numerical simulations of footbridge responses and on the use of Monte Carlo simulations for modelling the stochastic nature of

  19. Sensitivity Analysis of Differential-Algebraic Equations and Partial Differential Equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzold, L; Cao, Y; Li, S; Serban, R

    2005-08-09

    Sensitivity analysis generates essential information for model development, design optimization, parameter estimation, optimal control, model reduction and experimental design. In this paper we describe the forward and adjoint methods for sensitivity analysis, and outline some of our recent work on theory, algorithms and software for sensitivity analysis of differential-algebraic equation (DAE) and time-dependent partial differential equation (PDE) systems.

  20. Monopole condensation in two-flavour Adjoint QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Cossu, G; Di Giacomo, A; Lacagnina, G; Pica, C

    2008-01-01

    In QCD with adjoint fermions (aQCD) the deconfining transition takes place at a lower temperature than the chiral transition. We study the two transitions by use of the Polyakov Loop, the monopole order parameter and the chiral condensate. The deconfining transition is first order, the chiral is a crossover. The order parameters for confinement are not affected by the chiral transition. We conclude that the degrees of freedom relevant to confinement are different from those describing chiral symmetry.

  1. Model adjointization and its cost

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Qiang; ZHANG Linbo; WANG Bin

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the least program behavior decomposition method (LPBD) is put forward from a program structure point of view. This method can be extensively used both in algorithms of automatic differentiation (AD) and in tools design, and does not require programs to be evenly separable but the cost in terms of operations count and memory is similar to methods using checkpointing. This article starts by summarizing the rules of adjointization and then presents the implementation of LPBD. Next, the definition of the separable program space, based on the fundamental assumptions (FA) of automatic differentiation, is given and the differentiation cost functions are derived. Also,two constants of fundamental importance in AD, σ and μ, are derived under FA. Under the assumption of even separability, the adjoint cost of simple and deep decomposition is subsequently discussed quantitatively using checkpointing. Finally, the adjoint costs in terms of operations count and memory through the LPBD method are shown to be uniformly dependent on the depth of structure or decomposition.

  2. Toward regional-scale adjoint tomography in the deep earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Y.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    Thanks to the development of efficient numerical computation methods, such as the Spectral Element Method (SEM) and to the increasing power of computer clusters, it is now possible to obtain regional-scale images of the Earth's interior using adjoint-tomography (e.g. Tape, C., et al., 2009). As for now, these tomographic models are limited to the upper layers of the earth, i.e., they provide us with high-resolution images of the crust and the upper part of the mantle. Given the gigantic amount of calculation it represents, obtaing similar models at the global scale (i.e. images of the entire Earth) seems out of reach at the moment. Furthermore, it's likely that the first generation of such global adjoint tomographic models will have a resolution significantly smaller than the current regional models. In order to image regions of interests in the deep Earth, such as plumes, slabs or large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs), while keeping the computation tractable, we are developing new tools that will allow us to perform regional-scale adjoint-tomography at arbitrary depths. In a recent study (Masson et al., 2013), we showed that a numerical equivalent of the time reversal mirrors used in experimental acoustics permits to confine the wave propagation computations (i.e. using SEM simulations) inside the region to be imaged. With this ability to limit wave propagation modeling inside a region of interest, obtaining the adjoint sensitivity kernels needed for tomographic imaging is only two steps further. First, the local wavefield modeling needs to be coupled with field extrapolation techniques in order to obtain synthetic seismograms at the surface of the earth. These seismograms will account for the 3D structure inside the region of interest in a quasi-exact manner. We will present preliminary results where the field-extrapolation is performed using Green's function computed in a 1D Earth model thanks to the Direct Solution Method (DSM). Once synthetic seismograms

  3. Data Assimilation and Sensitivity of the Black Sea Model to Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Kazantsev, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    An adjoint based technique is applied to a Shallow Water Model in order to estimate influence of the model's parameters on the solution. Among parameters the bottom topography, initial conditions, boundary conditions on rigid boundaries, viscosity coefficients and the amplitude of the wind stress tension are considered. Their influence is analyzed from different points of view. Two configurations have been analyzed: an academic case of the model in a square box and a more realistic case simulating Black Sea currents. It is shown in both experiments that the boundary conditions near a rigid boundary influence the most the solution. This fact points out the necessity to identify optimal boundary approximation during a model development.

  4. Self-adjointness of deformed unbounded operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Much, Albert [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    We consider deformations of unbounded operators by using the novel construction tool of warped convolutions. By using the Kato-Rellich theorem, we show that unbounded self-adjoint deformed operators are self-adjoint if they satisfy a certain condition. This condition proves itself to be necessary for the oscillatory integral to be well-defined. Moreover, different proofs are given for self-adjointness of deformed unbounded operators in the context of quantum mechanics and quantum field theory.

  5. Efficient parameter sensitivity computation for spatially extended reaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, C.; Yates, C. A.; Baker, R. E.

    2017-01-01

    Reaction-diffusion models are widely used to study spatially extended chemical reaction systems. In order to understand how the dynamics of a reaction-diffusion model are affected by changes in its input parameters, efficient methods for computing parametric sensitivities are required. In this work, we focus on the stochastic models of spatially extended chemical reaction systems that involve partitioning the computational domain into voxels. Parametric sensitivities are often calculated using Monte Carlo techniques that are typically computationally expensive; however, variance reduction techniques can decrease the number of Monte Carlo simulations required. By exploiting the characteristic dynamics of spatially extended reaction networks, we are able to adapt existing finite difference schemes to robustly estimate parametric sensitivities in a spatially extended network. We show that algorithmic performance depends on the dynamics of the given network and the choice of summary statistics. We then describe a hybrid technique that dynamically chooses the most appropriate simulation method for the network of interest. Our method is tested for functionality and accuracy in a range of different scenarios.

  6. Neutrino Oscillation Parameter Sensitivity in Future Long-Baseline Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, Matthew [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The study of neutrino interactions and propagation has produced evidence for physics beyond the standard model and promises to continue to shed light on rare phenomena. Since the discovery of neutrino oscillations in the late 1990s there have been rapid advances in establishing the three flavor paradigm of neutrino oscillations. The 2012 discovery of a large value for the last unmeasured missing angle has opened the way for future experiments to search for charge-parity symmetry violation in the lepton sector. This thesis presents an analysis of the future sensitivity to neutrino oscillations in the three flavor paradigm for the T2K, NO A, LBNE, and T2HK experiments. The theory of the three flavor paradigm is explained and the methods to use these theoretical predictions to design long baseline neutrino experiments are described. The sensitivity to the oscillation parameters for each experiment is presented with a particular focus on the search for CP violation and the measurement of the neutrino mass hierarchy. The variations of these sensitivities with statistical considerations and experimental design optimizations taken into account are explored. The effects of systematic uncertainties in the neutrino flux, interaction, and detection predictions are also considered by incorporating more advanced simulations inputs from the LBNE experiment.

  7. Numerical simulation of groundwater level in a fractured porous medium and sensitivity analysis of the hydrodynamic parameters using grid computing: application of the plain of Gondo (Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenddabo Olivier Sawadogo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of mathematical modeling as a tool for decision support is not common in Africa in solving development problems. In this article we talk about the numerical simulation of groundwater level of the plain of Gondo (Burkina Faso and the sensitivity analysis of the hydrodynamic parameters. The domain has fractures which have hydraulic coefficients lower than those of the rock. Our contribution is to bring brief replies to the real problem posed in the thesis of Mr. KOUSSOUBE [1]. Namely that what causes the appearance of the piezometric level observed and impact of surface water on the piezometry. The mathematical model of the flow was solved by programming the finite element method on FreeFem++[2]. A local refinement of the mesh at fracture was used. We then conduct a sensitivity analysis to see which hydrodynamic parameters influences much of the solution. The method used for the sensitivity analysis is based on the calculation of the gradient by the adjoint equation and requires great computational power. To remedy this, we used a technique of distributed computing and we launched our application to the Moroccan grid (magrid. This allowed us to reduce the computation time. The results allowed to highlight the role of fractures and contributions of surface water on the evolution of the piezometric level of the plain of Gondo and identified the parameters that greatly influence the piezometric level.

  8. Sensitivity of lumbar spine loading to anatomical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzer, Michael; Ehrlich, Ingo; Rasmussen, John; Gebbeken, Norbert; Dendorfer, Sebastian

    2016-04-11

    Musculoskeletal simulations of lumbar spine loading rely on a geometrical representation of the anatomy. However, this data has an inherent inaccuracy. This study evaluates the influence of defined geometrical parameters on lumbar spine loading utilising five parametrised musculoskeletal lumbar spine models for four different postures. The influence of the dimensions of vertebral body, disc, posterior parts of the vertebrae as well as the curvature of the lumbar spine was studied. Additionally, simulations with combinations of selected parameters were conducted. Changes in L4/L5 resultant joint force were used as outcome variable. Variations of the vertebral body height, disc height, transverse process width and the curvature of the lumbar spine were the most influential. These parameters can be easily acquired from X-rays and should be used to morph a musculoskeletal lumbar spine model for subject-specific approaches with respect to bone geometry. Furthermore, the model was very sensitive to uncommon configurations and therefore, it is advised that stiffness properties of discs and ligaments should be individualised.

  9. Classification of hydrological parameter sensitivity and evaluation of parameter transferability across 431 US MOPEX basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Huiying; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Bao, Jie; Sun, Yu; Tesfa, Teklu; Ruby Leung, L.

    2016-05-01

    Effective uncertainty quantification approaches are needed to identify important parameters or factors that affect complex Earth system models that composed of multi-phase multi-component phenomena and multiple biogeophysical-biogeochemical processes. In this study, the impacts of 10 hydrologic parameters in Community Land Model (CLM) simulations of runoff and latent heat flux in a watershed are evaluated. Simple residual statistics, the Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient, and log mean square error are used as alternative measures of the deviations between the simulated and field observed values. The effects of the input parameters on the deviations are evaluated quantitatively using analysis of variance (ANOVA) based on the generalized linear model (GLM), and using generalized cross validation (GCV) based on the multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) model. These analyses 1) help identify how to adjust parameter values and therefore the calibration of the CLM parameters and to improve the model’s simulations, and 2) can approximately predict the model calibration performance. The convergence behavior of the sensitivity analysis with number of sampling points for both ANOVA and GCV is also examined relative to different combinations of input parameters and output response variables and their metrics.

  10. A MODULAR APPROACH TO SIMULATION WITH AUTOMATIC SENSITIVITY CALCULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. HANSON; G. CUNNINGHAM

    2001-02-01

    When using simulation codes, one often has the task of minimizing a scalar objective function with respect to numerous parameters. This situation occurs when trying to fit (assimilate) data or trying to optimize an engineering design. For simulations in which the objective function to be minimized is reasonably well behaved, that is, is differentiable and does not contain too many multiple minima, gradient-based optimization methods can reduce the number of function evaluations required to determine the minimizing parameters. However, gradient-based methods are only advantageous if one can efficiently evaluate the gradients of the objective function. Adjoint differentiation efficiently provides these sensitivities. One way to obtain code for calculating adjoint sensitivities is to use special compilers to process the simulation code. However, this approach is not always so ''automatic''. We will describe a modular approach to constructing simulation codes, which permits adjoint differentiation to be incorporated with relative ease.

  11. Sensitivity analysis in remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Ustinov, Eugene A

    2015-01-01

    This book contains a detailed presentation of general principles of sensitivity analysis as well as their applications to sample cases of remote sensing experiments. An emphasis is made on applications of adjoint problems, because they are more efficient in many practical cases, although their formulation may seem counterintuitive to a beginner. Special attention is paid to forward problems based on higher-order partial differential equations, where a novel matrix operator approach to formulation of corresponding adjoint problems is presented. Sensitivity analysis (SA) serves for quantitative models of physical objects the same purpose, as differential calculus does for functions. SA provides derivatives of model output parameters (observables) with respect to input parameters. In remote sensing SA provides computer-efficient means to compute the jacobians, matrices of partial derivatives of observables with respect to the geophysical parameters of interest. The jacobians are used to solve corresponding inver...

  12. Stability analysis of thermo-acoustic nonlinear eigenproblems in annular combustors. Part I. Sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Magri, Luca; Juniper, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    We present an adjoint-based method for the calculation of eigenvalue perturbations in nonlinear, degenerate and non self-adjoint eigenproblems. This method is applied to a thermo-acoustic annular combustor network, the stability of which is governed by a nonlinear eigenproblem. We calculate the first- and second-order sensitivities of the growth rate and frequency to geometric, flow and flame parameters. Three different configurations are analysed. The benchmark sensitivities are obtained by finite difference, which involves solving the nonlinear eigenproblem at least as many times as the number of parameters. By solving only one adjoint eigenproblem, we obtain the sensitivities to any thermo-acoustic parameter, which match the finite-difference solutions at much lower computational cost.

  13. Complexity, parameter sensitivity and parameter transferability in the modelling of floodplain inundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, P. D.; Neal, J. C.; Fewtrell, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    In this we paper we consider two related questions. First, we address the issue of how much physical complexity is necessary in a model in order to simulate floodplain inundation to within validation data error. This is achieved through development of a single code/multiple physics hydraulic model (LISFLOOD-FP) where different degrees of complexity can be switched on or off. Different configurations of this code are applied to four benchmark test cases, and compared to the results of a number of industry standard models. Second we address the issue of how parameter sensitivity and transferability change with increasing complexity using numerical experiments with models of different physical and geometric intricacy. Hydraulic models are a good example system with which to address such generic modelling questions as: (1) they have a strong physical basis; (2) there is only one set of equations to solve; (3) they require only topography and boundary conditions as input data; and (4) they typically require only a single free parameter, namely boundary friction. In terms of complexity required we show that for the problem of sub-critical floodplain inundation a number of codes of different dimensionality and resolution can be found to fit uncertain model validation data equally well, and that in this situation Occam's razor emerges as a useful logic to guide model selection. We find also find that model skill usually improves more rapidly with increases in model spatial resolution than increases in physical complexity, and that standard approaches to testing hydraulic models against laboratory data or analytical solutions may fail to identify this important fact. Lastly, we find that in benchmark testing studies significant differences can exist between codes with identical numerical solution techniques as a result of auxiliary choices regarding the specifics of model implementation that are frequently unreported by code developers. As a consequence, making sound

  14. Sensitivity analysis on parameter changes in underground mine ventilation systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gary; KOCSIS Charles; HARDCASTLE Steve

    2011-01-01

    A more efficient mine ventilation system,the ventilation-on-demand (VOD) system,has been proposed and tested in Canadian mines recently.In order to supply the required air volumes to the production areas of a mine,operators need to know the cause and effect of any changes requested from the VOD system.The sensitivity analysis is developed through generating a cause and effect matrix of sensitivity factors on given parameter changes in a ventilation system.This new utility,which was incorporated in the 3D-CANVENT mine ventilation simulator,is able to predict the airflow distributions in a ventilation network when underground conditions and ventilation controls are changed.For a primary ventilation system,the software can determine the optimal operating speed of the main fans to satisfy the airflow requirements in underground workings without necessarily using booster fans and regulators locally.An optimized fan operating speed time-table would assure variable demand-based fresh air delivery to the production areas effectively,while generating significant savings in energy consumption and operating cost.

  15. Parameter sensitivity in satellite-gravity-constrained geothermal modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorutti, Alberto; Braitenberg, Carla

    2017-04-01

    The use of satellite gravity data in thermal structure estimates require identifying the factors that affect the gravity field and are related to the thermal characteristics of the lithosphere. We propose a set of forward-modelled synthetics, investigating the model response in terms of heat flow, temperature, and gravity effect at satellite altitude. The sensitivity analysis concerns the parameters involved, as heat production, thermal conductivity, density and their temperature dependence. We discuss the effect of the horizontal smoothing due to heat conduction, the superposition of the bulk thermal effect of near-surface processes (e.g. advection in ground-water and permeable faults, paleoclimatic effects, blanketing by sediments), and the out-of equilibrium conditions due to tectonic transients. All of them have the potential to distort the gravity-derived estimates.We find that the temperature-conductivity relationship has a small effect with respect to other parameter uncertainties on the modelled temperature depth variation, surface heat flow, thermal lithosphere thickness. We conclude that the global gravity is useful for geothermal studies.

  16. Sensitivity analysis on parameters and processes affecting vapor intrusion risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picone, Sara; Valstar, Johan; van Gaans, Pauline; Grotenhuis, Tim; Rijnaarts, Huub

    2012-05-01

    A one-dimensional numerical model was developed and used to identify the key processes controlling vapor intrusion risks by means of a sensitivity analysis. The model simulates the fate of a dissolved volatile organic compound present below the ventilated crawl space of a house. In contrast to the vast majority of previous studies, this model accounts for vertical variation of soil water saturation and includes aerobic biodegradation. The attenuation factor (ratio between concentration in the crawl space and source concentration) and the characteristic time to approach maximum concentrations were calculated and compared for a variety of scenarios. These concepts allow an understanding of controlling mechanisms and aid in the identification of critical parameters to be collected for field situations. The relative distance of the source to the nearest gas-filled pores of the unsaturated zone is the most critical parameter because diffusive contaminant transport is significantly slower in water-filled pores than in gas-filled pores. Therefore, attenuation factors decrease and characteristic times increase with increasing relative distance of the contaminant dissolved source to the nearest gas diffusion front. Aerobic biodegradation may decrease the attenuation factor by up to three orders of magnitude. Moreover, the occurrence of water table oscillations is of importance. Dynamic processes leading to a retreating water table increase the attenuation factor by two orders of magnitude because of the enhanced gas phase diffusion.

  17. Sensitivity analysis on parameters and processes affecting vapor intrusion risk

    KAUST Repository

    Picone, Sara

    2012-03-30

    A one-dimensional numerical model was developed and used to identify the key processes controlling vapor intrusion risks by means of a sensitivity analysis. The model simulates the fate of a dissolved volatile organic compound present below the ventilated crawl space of a house. In contrast to the vast majority of previous studies, this model accounts for vertical variation of soil water saturation and includes aerobic biodegradation. The attenuation factor (ratio between concentration in the crawl space and source concentration) and the characteristic time to approach maximum concentrations were calculated and compared for a variety of scenarios. These concepts allow an understanding of controlling mechanisms and aid in the identification of critical parameters to be collected for field situations. The relative distance of the source to the nearest gas-filled pores of the unsaturated zone is the most critical parameter because diffusive contaminant transport is significantly slower in water-filled pores than in gas-filled pores. Therefore, attenuation factors decrease and characteristic times increase with increasing relative distance of the contaminant dissolved source to the nearest gas diffusion front. Aerobic biodegradation may decrease the attenuation factor by up to three orders of magnitude. Moreover, the occurrence of water table oscillations is of importance. Dynamic processes leading to a retreating water table increase the attenuation factor by two orders of magnitude because of the enhanced gas phase diffusion. © 2012 SETAC.

  18. Analysis of the Properties of Adjoint Equations and Accuracy Verification of Adjoint Model Based on FVM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaodeng Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are two different approaches on how to formulate adjoint numerical model (ANM. Aiming at the disputes arising from the construction methods of ANM, the differences between nonlinear shallow water equation and its adjoint equation are analyzed; the hyperbolicity and homogeneity of the adjoint equation are discussed. Then, based on unstructured meshes and finite volume method, a new adjoint model was advanced by getting numerical model of the adjoint equations directly. Using a gradient check, the correctness of the adjoint model was verified. The results of twin experiments to invert the bottom friction coefficient (Manning’s roughness coefficient indicate that the adjoint model can extract the observation information and produce good quality inversion. The reason of disputes about construction methods of ANM is also discussed in the paper.

  19. Adjoint Error Estimation for Linear Advection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connors, J M; Banks, J W; Hittinger, J A; Woodward, C S

    2011-03-30

    An a posteriori error formula is described when a statistical measurement of the solution to a hyperbolic conservation law in 1D is estimated by finite volume approximations. This is accomplished using adjoint error estimation. In contrast to previously studied methods, the adjoint problem is divorced from the finite volume method used to approximate the forward solution variables. An exact error formula and computable error estimate are derived based on an abstractly defined approximation of the adjoint solution. This framework allows the error to be computed to an arbitrary accuracy given a sufficiently well resolved approximation of the adjoint solution. The accuracy of the computable error estimate provably satisfies an a priori error bound for sufficiently smooth solutions of the forward and adjoint problems. The theory does not currently account for discontinuities. Computational examples are provided that show support of the theory for smooth solutions. The application to problems with discontinuities is also investigated computationally.

  20. Local-in-Time Adjoint-Based Method for Optimal Control/Design Optimization of Unsteady Compressible Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaleev, N. K.; Diskin, B.; Nielsen, E. J.

    2009-01-01

    .We study local-in-time adjoint-based methods for minimization of ow matching functionals subject to the 2-D unsteady compressible Euler equations. The key idea of the local-in-time method is to construct a very accurate approximation of the global-in-time adjoint equations and the corresponding sensitivity derivative by using only local information available on each time subinterval. In contrast to conventional time-dependent adjoint-based optimization methods which require backward-in-time integration of the adjoint equations over the entire time interval, the local-in-time method solves local adjoint equations sequentially over each time subinterval. Since each subinterval contains relatively few time steps, the storage cost of the local-in-time method is much lower than that of the global adjoint formulation, thus making the time-dependent optimization feasible for practical applications. The paper presents a detailed comparison of the local- and global-in-time adjoint-based methods for minimization of a tracking functional governed by the Euler equations describing the ow around a circular bump. Our numerical results show that the local-in-time method converges to the same optimal solution obtained with the global counterpart, while drastically reducing the memory cost as compared to the global-in-time adjoint formulation.

  1. Adjoint method and runaway electron avalanche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Brennan, Dylan P.; Boozer, Allen H.; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2017-02-01

    The adjoint method for the study of runaway electron dynamics in momentum space Liu et al (2016 Phys. Plasmas 23 010702) is rederived using the Green’s function method, for both the runaway probability function (RPF) and the expected loss time (ELT). The RPF and ELT obtained using the adjoint method are presented, both with and without the synchrotron radiation reaction force. The adjoint method is then applied to study the runaway electron avalanche. Both the critical electric field and the growth rate for the avalanche are calculated using this fast and novel approach.

  2. Adjoint methods for aerodynamic wing design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Bernard

    1993-01-01

    A model inverse design problem is used to investigate the effect of flow discontinuities on the optimization process. The optimization involves finding the cross-sectional area distribution of a duct that produces velocities that closely match a targeted velocity distribution. Quasi-one-dimensional flow theory is used, and the target is chosen to have a shock wave in its distribution. The objective function which quantifies the difference between the targeted and calculated velocity distributions may become non-smooth due to the interaction between the shock and the discretization of the flowfield. This paper offers two techniques to resolve the resulting problems for the optimization algorithms. The first, shock-fitting, involves careful integration of the objective function through the shock wave. The second, coordinate straining with shock penalty, uses a coordinate transformation to align the calculated shock with the target and then adds a penalty proportional to the square of the distance between the shocks. The techniques are tested using several popular sensitivity and optimization methods, including finite-differences, and direct and adjoint discrete sensitivity methods. Two optimization strategies, Gauss-Newton and sequential quadratic programming (SQP), are used to drive the objective function to a minimum.

  3. Tracking influential haze source areas in North China using an adjoint model, GRAPES-CUACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, X. Q.; Zhai, S. X.; Jin, M.; Gong, S. L.; Wang, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Based upon the adjoint theory, the adjoint of the aerosol module in the atmospheric chemical modeling system GRAPES-CUACE (Global/Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System coupled with the CMA Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environment) was developed and tested for its correctness. Through statistic comparison, BC (black carbon aerosol) concentrations simulated by GRAPES-CUACE were generally consistent with observations from Nanjiao (one urban observation station) and Shangdianzi (one rural observation station) stations. To track the most influential emission-sources regions and the most influential time intervals for the high BC concentration during the simulation period, the adjoint model was adopted to simulate the sensitivity of average BC concentration over Beijing at the highest concentration time point (referred to as the Objective Function) with respect to BC emission amount over Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region. Four types of regions were selected based on administrative division and sensitivity coefficient distribution. The adjoint model was used to quantify the effects of emission-sources reduction in different time intervals over different regions by one independent simulation. Effects of different emission reduction strategies based on adjoint sensitivity information show that the more influential regions (regions with relatively larger sensitivity coefficients) do not necessarily correspond to the administrative regions, and the influence effectiveness of sensitivity-oriented regions was greater than the administrative divisions. The influence of emissions on the objective function decreases sharply approximately for the pollutants emitted 17-18 h ago in this episode. Therefore, controlling critical emission regions during critical time intervals on the basis of adjoint sensitivity analysis is much more efficient than controlling administrative specified regions during an experiential time period.

  4. Local fibred right adjoints are polynomial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Anders; Kock, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    For any locally cartesian closed category E, we prove that a local fibred right adjoint between slices of E is given by a polynomial. The slices in question are taken in a well known fibred sense......For any locally cartesian closed category E, we prove that a local fibred right adjoint between slices of E is given by a polynomial. The slices in question are taken in a well known fibred sense...

  5. Monopole condensation in two-flavour Adjoint QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Cossu, G; Di Giacomo, Adriano; Lacagnina, G; Pica, C

    2006-01-01

    Two distinct phase transitions occur at different temperatures in QCD with adjoint fermions (aQCD): deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration. In this model, quarks do no explicitely break the center Z(3) symmetry and therefore the Polyakov loop is a good order parameter for the deconfinement transition. We study monopole condensation by inspecting the expectation value of an operator which creates a monopole. Such a quantity is expected to be an order parameter for the deconfinement transition as in the case of fundamental fermions.

  6. On the adjoint operator in photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arridge, Simon R.; Betcke, Marta M.; Cox, Ben T.; Lucka, Felix; Treeby, Brad E.

    2016-11-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging biomedical imaging from coupled physics technique, in which the image contrast is due to optical absorption, but the information is carried to the surface of the tissue as ultrasound pulses. Many algorithms and formulae for PAT image reconstruction have been proposed for the case when a complete data set is available. In many practical imaging scenarios, however, it is not possible to obtain the full data, or the data may be sub-sampled for faster data acquisition. In such cases, image reconstruction algorithms that can incorporate prior knowledge to ameliorate the loss of data are required. Hence, recently there has been an increased interest in using variational image reconstruction. A crucial ingredient for the application of these techniques is the adjoint of the PAT forward operator, which is described in this article from physical, theoretical and numerical perspectives. First, a simple mathematical derivation of the adjoint of the PAT forward operator in the continuous framework is presented. Then, an efficient numerical implementation of the adjoint using a k-space time domain wave propagation model is described and illustrated in the context of variational PAT image reconstruction, on both 2D and 3D examples including inhomogeneous sound speed. The principal advantage of this analytical adjoint over an algebraic adjoint (obtained by taking the direct adjoint of the particular numerical forward scheme used) is that it can be implemented using currently available fast wave propagation solvers.

  7. Sensitivity analysis of radiative transfer for atmospheric remote sensing in thermal IR: atmospheric weighting functions and surface partials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinov, E. A.

    2003-01-01

    In this presentation, we apply the adjoint sensitivity analysis of radiative transfer in thermal IR to the general case of the analytic evaluation of the weighting functions of atmospheric parameters together with the partial derivatives for the surface parameters. Applications to remote sensing of atmospheres of Mars and Venus are discussed.

  8. The continuous adjoint approach to the k-ω SST turbulence model with applications in shape optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavvadias, I. S.; Papoutsis-Kiachagias, E. M.; Dimitrakopoulos, G.; Giannakoglou, K. C.

    2015-11-01

    In this article, the gradient of aerodynamic objective functions with respect to design variables, in problems governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the k-ω SST turbulence model, is computed using the continuous adjoint method, for the first time. Shape optimization problems for minimizing drag, in external aerodynamics (flows around isolated airfoils), or viscous losses in internal aerodynamics (duct flows) are considered. Sensitivity derivatives computed with the proposed adjoint method are compared to those computed with finite differences or a continuous adjoint variant based on the frequently used assumption of frozen turbulence; the latter proves the need for differentiating the turbulence model. Geometries produced by optimization runs performed with sensitivities computed by the proposed method and the 'frozen turbulence' assumption are also compared to quantify the gain from formulating and solving the adjoint to the turbulence model equations.

  9. Adjoint Techniques for Topology Optimization of Structures Under Damage Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgun, Mehmet A.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this cooperative agreement was to seek computationally efficient ways to optimize aerospace structures subject to damage tolerance criteria. Optimization was to involve sizing as well as topology optimization. The work was done in collaboration with Steve Scotti, Chauncey Wu and Joanne Walsh at the NASA Langley Research Center. Computation of constraint sensitivity is normally the most time-consuming step of an optimization procedure. The cooperative work first focused on this issue and implemented the adjoint method of sensitivity computation (Haftka and Gurdal, 1992) in an optimization code (runstream) written in Engineering Analysis Language (EAL). The method was implemented both for bar and plate elements including buckling sensitivity for the latter. Lumping of constraints was investigated as a means to reduce the computational cost. Adjoint sensitivity computation was developed and implemented for lumped stress and buckling constraints. Cost of the direct method and the adjoint method was compared for various structures with and without lumping. The results were reported in two papers (Akgun et al., 1998a and 1999). It is desirable to optimize topology of an aerospace structure subject to a large number of damage scenarios so that a damage tolerant structure is obtained. Including damage scenarios in the design procedure is critical in order to avoid large mass penalties at later stages (Haftka et al., 1983). A common method for topology optimization is that of compliance minimization (Bendsoe, 1995) which has not been used for damage tolerant design. In the present work, topology optimization is treated as a conventional problem aiming to minimize the weight subject to stress constraints. Multiple damage configurations (scenarios) are considered. Each configuration has its own structural stiffness matrix and, normally, requires factoring of the matrix and solution of the system of equations. Damage that is expected to be tolerated is local

  10. Study of influence of the fiber optic coatings parameters on optical acoustic sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, V. S.; Kulikov, A. V.; Plotnikov, M. U.; Efimov, M. E.; Varzhel, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents the optical fiber acoustic sensitivity dependence on the coating parameters and the thickness of coating layer. A comparison of data obtained from the theoretical research and experimental estimates of real samples sensitivity in air and water.

  11. An approach to measure parameter sensitivity in watershed hydrological modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrologic responses vary spatially and temporally according to watershed characteristics. In this study, the hydrologic models that we developed earlier for the Little Miami River (LMR) and Las Vegas Wash (LVW) watersheds were used for detail sensitivity analyses. To compare the...

  12. Sensitivity analysis on parameters and processes affecting vapor intrusion risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picone, S.; Valstar, J.R.; Gaans, van P.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    A one-dimensional numerical model was developed and used to identify the key processes controlling vapor intrusion risks by means of a sensitivity analysis. The model simulates the fate of a dissolved volatile organic compound present below the ventilated crawl space of a house. In contrast to the v

  13. Sensitivity of lumbar spine loading to anatomical parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putzer, Michael; Ehrlich, Ingo; Rasmussen, John

    2016-01-01

    models for four different postures. The in uence of the dimensions of vertebral body, disc, posterior parts of the vertebrae as well as the curvature of the lumbar spine were studied. Additionally, simulations with combinations of selected parameters were conducted. Changes in L4/L5 resultant joint force......Musculoskeletal simulations of lumbar spine loading rely on a geometrical representation of the anatomy. However, this data has an inherent inaccuracy. This study evaluates the in uence of dened geometrical parameters on lumbar spine loading utilizing ve parametrized musculoskeletal lumbar spine...... were used as outcome variable. Variations of the vertebral body height, disc height, transverse process width and the curvature of the lumbar spine were the most in uential. The results indicated that measuring these parameters from X-rays would be most important to morph an existing musculoskeletal...

  14. Ambient pressure sensitivity of microbubbles investigated through a parameter study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Scheldrup; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-01-01

    Measurements on microbubbles clearly indicate a relation between the ambient pressure and the acoustic behavior of the bubble. The purpose of this study was to optimize the sensitivity of ambient pressure measurements, using the subharmonic component, through microbubble response simulations...... cycles driving pulse, a reduction of 4.6 dB is observed when changing pov from 0 to 25 kPa. Increasing the pulse duration makes the reduction even more clear. For a pulse with 64 cycles, the reduction is 9.9 dB. This simulation is in good correspondence with measurement results presented by Shi et al....... 1999, who found a linear reduction of 9.6 dB. Further simulations of Levovist show that also the shape and the acoustic pressure of the driving pulse are very important factors. The best pressure sensitivity of Levovist was found to be 0.88 dB/kPa. For Sonazoid, a sensitivity of 1.14 dB/kPa has been...

  15. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using the Discrete Adjoint of the Navier-Stokes Equations: Applications Toward Complex 3D Configutations

    OpenAIRE

    Brezillon, Joël; Dwight, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    Within the next few years, numerical shape optimization based on high fidelity methods is likely to play a strategic role in future aircraft design. In this context, suitable tools have to be developed for solving aerodynamic shape optimization problems, and the adjoint approach - which allows fast and accurate evaluations of the gradients with respect to the design parameters - is seen as a promising strategy. After describing the theory of the viscous discrete adjoint method and its impleme...

  16. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using the Discrete Adjoint of the Navier-Stokes Equations: Applications towards Complex 3D Configurations

    OpenAIRE

    Brezillon, J.; Dwight, R.P.

    2009-01-01

    Within the next few years, numerical shape optimization based on high fidelity methods is likely to play a strategic role in future aircraft design. In this context, suitable tools have to be developed for solving aerodynamic shape optimization problems, and the adjoint approach - which allows fast and accurate evaluations of the gradients with respect to the design parameters - is seen as a promising strategy. After describing the theory of the viscous discrete adjoint method and its impleme...

  17. Land Building Models: Uncertainty in and Sensitivity to Input Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Louisiana Coastal Area Ecosystem Restoration Projects Study , Vol. 3, Final integrated ERDC/CHL CHETN-VI-44 August 2013 24 feasibility study and... Nourishment Module, Chapter 8. In Coastal Louisiana Ecosystem Assessment and Restoration (CLEAR) Model of Louisiana Coastal Area (LCA) Comprehensive...to Input Parameters by Ty V. Wamsley PURPOSE: The purpose of this Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering Technical Note (CHETN) is to document a

  18. Sensitivity analysis of permeability parameters for flows on Barcelona networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rarità, Luigi; D'Apice, Ciro; Piccoli, Benedetto; Helbing, Dirk

    We consider the problem of optimizing vehicular traffic flows on an urban network of Barcelona type, i.e. square network with streets of not equal length. In particular, we describe the effects of variation of permeability parameters, that indicate the amount of flow allowed to enter a junction from incoming roads. On each road, a model suggested by Helbing et al. (2007) [11] is considered: free and congested regimes are distinguished, characterized by an arrival flow and a departure flow, the latter depending on a permeability parameter. Moreover we provide a rigorous derivation of the model from fluid dynamic ones, using recent results of Bretti et al. (2006) [3]. For solving the dynamics at nodes of the network, a Riemann solver maximizing the through flux is used, see Coclite et al. (2005) [4] and Helbing et al. (2007) [11]. The network dynamics gives rise to complicate equations, where the evolution of fluxes at a single node may involve time-delayed terms from all other nodes. Thus we propose an alternative hybrid approach, introducing additional logic variables. Finally we compute the effects of variations on permeability parameters over the hybrid dynamics and test the obtained results via simulations.

  19. Adjoint accuracy for the full-Stokes ice flow model: limits to the transmission of basal friction variability to the surface

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    This work focuses on the numerical assessment of the accuracy of an adjoint-based gradient in the perspective of variational data assimilation and parameter identification in glaciology. Using noisy synthetic data, we quantify the ability to identify the friction coefficient for such methods with a non-linear friction law. The exact adjoint problem is solved, based on second order numerical schemes, and a comparison with the so called "self-adjoint" approximation, neglecting the viscosity dependency to the velocity (leading to an incorrect gradient), common in glaciology, is carried out. For data with a noise of $1\\%$, a lower bound of identifiable wavelengths of $10$ ice thicknesses in the friction coefficient is established, when using the exact adjoint method, while the "self-adjoint" method is limited, even for lower noise, to a minimum of $20$ ice thicknesses wavelengths. The second order exact gradient method therefore provides robustness and reliability for the parameter identification process. In othe...

  20. Sensitivity of viscosity Arrhenius parameters to polarity of liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacem, R. B. H.; Alzamel, N. O.; Ouerfelli, N.

    2017-09-01

    Several empirical and semi-empirical equations have been proposed in the literature to estimate the liquid viscosity upon temperature. In this context, this paper aims to study the effect of polarity of liquids on the modeling of the viscosity-temperature dependence, considering particularly the Arrhenius type equations. To achieve this purpose, the solvents are classified into three groups: nonpolar, borderline polar and polar solvents. Based on adequate statistical tests, we found that there is strong evidence that the polarity of solvents affects significantly the distribution of the Arrhenius-type equation parameters and consequently the modeling of the viscosity-temperature dependence. Thus, specific estimated values of parameters for each group of liquids are proposed in this paper. In addition, the comparison of the accuracy of approximation with and without classification of liquids, using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, shows a significant discrepancy of the borderline polar solvents. For that, we suggested in this paper new specific coefficient values of the simplified Arrhenius-type equation for better estimation accuracy. This result is important given that the accuracy in the estimation of the viscosity-temperature dependence may affect considerably the design and the optimization of several industrial processes.

  1. Parameter uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in sediment flux calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Cheviron

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines uncertainties in the calculation of annual sediment budgets at the outlet of rivers. Emphasis is put on the sensitivity of power-law rating curves to degradations of the available discharge-concentration data. The main purpose is to determine how predictions arising from usual or modified power laws resist to the infrequence of concentration data and to relative uncertainties affecting source data. This study identifies cases in which the error on the estimated sediment fluxes remains of the same order of magnitude or even inferior to these in source data, provided the number of concentration data is high enough. The exposed mathematical framework allows considering all limitations at once in further detailed investigations. It is applied here to bound the error on sediment budgets for the major French rivers to the sea.

  2. Sensitivity of adjustment to parameter correlations and to response-parameter correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagschal, J.J. [Racah Inst. of Physics, Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem, Edmond J. Safra Campus, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel)

    2011-07-01

    The adjusted parameters and response, and their respective posterior uncertainties and correlations, are presented explicitly as functions of all relevant prior correlations for the two parameters, one response case. The dependence of these adjusted entities on the various prior correlations is analyzed and portrayed graphically for various valid correlation combinations on a simple criticality problem. (authors)

  3. Self-adjoint oscillator operator from a modified factorization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, Marco A. [Departamento de Fisica, DCI Campus Leon, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo. Postal E143, 37150 Leon, Gto. (Mexico); Rosu, H.C., E-mail: hcr@ipicyt.edu.mx [IPICyT, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Apdo. Postal 3-74 Tangamanga, 78231 San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico); Gutierrez, M. Ranferi [Departamento de Fisica, DCI Campus Leon, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo. Postal E143, 37150 Leon, Gto. (Mexico)

    2011-05-30

    By using an alternative factorization, we obtain a self-adjoint oscillator operator of the form L{sub δ}=d/(dx) (p{sub δ}(x)d/(dx) )-((x{sup 2})/(p{sub δ}(x)) +p{sub δ}(x)-1), where p{sub δ}(x)=1+δe{sup -x{sup 2}}, with δ element of (-1,∞) an arbitrary real factorization parameter. At positive values of δ, this operator interpolates between the quantum harmonic oscillator Hamiltonian for δ=0 and a scaled Hermite operator at high values of δ. For the negative values of δ, the eigenfunctions look like deformed quantum mechanical Hermite functions. Possible applications are mentioned. -- Highlights: → We present a generalization of the Mielnik factorization. → We study the case of linear relationship between the factorization coefficients. → We introduce a new one-parameter self-adjoint oscillator operator. → We show its properties depending on the values of the parameter.

  4. Recent advances in the spectral green's function method for monoenergetic slab-geometry fixed-source adjoint transport problems in S{sub N} formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curbelo, Jesus P.; Alves Filho, Hermes; Barros, Ricardo C., E-mail: jperez@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: halves@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: rcbarros@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Instituto Politecnico. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Modelagem Computacional; Hernandez, Carlos R.G., E-mail: cgh@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba)

    2015-07-01

    The spectral Green's function (SGF) method is a numerical method that is free of spatial truncation errors for slab-geometry fixed-source discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) adjoint problems. The method is based on the standard spatially discretized adjoint S{sub N} balance equations and a nonstandard adjoint auxiliary equation expressing the node-average adjoint angular flux, in each discretization node, as a weighted combination of the node-edge outgoing adjoint fluxes. The auxiliary equation contains parameters which act as Green's functions for the cell-average adjoint angular flux. These parameters are determined by means of a spectral analysis which yields the local general solution of the S{sub N} equations within each node of the discretization grid. In this work a number of advances in the SGF adjoint method are presented: the method is extended to adjoint S{sub N} problems considering linearly anisotropic scattering and non-zero prescribed boundary conditions for the forward source-detector problem. Numerical results to typical model problems are considered to illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the o offered method. (author)

  5. An efficient parameter identification procedure for soft sensitive clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang YE; Yin-fu JIN; Shui-long SHEN; Ping-ping SUN; Cheng ZHOU

    2016-01-01

    The creep and destructuration characteristics of soft clay are always coupled under loading, making it difficult for engineers to determine these related parameters. This paper proposes a simple and efficient optimization procedure to identify both creep and destructuration parameters based on low cost experiments. For this purpose, a simplex algorithm (SA) with random samplings is adopted in the optimization. Conventional undrained triaxial tests are performed on Wenzhou clay. The newly de-veloped creep model accounting for the destructuration is enhanced by anisotropy of elasticity and adopted to simulate tests. The optimal parameters are validated first by experimental measurements, and then by simulating other tests on the same clay. Finally, the proposed procedure is successfully applied to soft Shanghai clay. The results demonstrate that the proposed optimization procedure is efficient and reliable in identifying creep and destructuration related parameters.%中文概要题目:一个结构性软土参数的确定方法目的:软土流变和结构破坏的相互耦合导致结构性软土的参数难以准确得到。本文拟建立一个有效的参数确定方法,期望仅基于常规的室内试验得到可靠的、合理的本构参数。创新点:1.通过采用优化方法来实现结构性软土参数的确定;2.仅基于常规的室内试验得到本构参数;3.采用最近提出的考虑各向异性、流变和结构破坏的超应力本构模型。方法:1.建立数值模拟和试验数据之间的误差计算公式;2.通过流变本构模拟室内常规试验,并计算模拟误差;3.采用下山单纯形法(simplex)优化方法,寻找模拟误差的最小值;此最小值对应的这组模拟参数即为土体的最优参数;4.利用最优参数模拟其他类型的试验,验证参数的合理性和可靠性。结论:本文提出的优化程序可以有效的找到结构性土体的流变和结构破坏参数,并

  6. The Roots of Adjoint Polynomial of the Graphs Contain Triangles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YECheng-fu

    2004-01-01

    We denote h(G,x) as the adjoint polynomial of graph G. In [5], Ma obtained the interpolation properties of the roots of adjoint polynomial of graphs containing triangles. By the properties, we prove the non-zero root of adjoint polynomial of Dn and Fn are single multiple.

  7. Extreme parameter sensitivity of transient persistence in spatially coupled ecological systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates persistence of transient dynamics depending on parameters in spatially coupled ecological systems. We emphasis that the persistence time can be obtained by populations of species or Lyapunov exponents of transient dynamics. It is found that extreme sensitive dependence of persistence on parameters occurs commonly in ecological models. A non-zero uncertainty exponent is used to characterize the high sensitivity in a reasonable parameter region. The result of a small uncertainty expone...

  8. Geomagnetically induced currents in Uruguay: Sensitivity to modelling parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraballo, R.

    2016-11-01

    According to the traditional wisdom, geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) should occur rarely at mid-to-low latitudes, but in the last decades a growing number of reports have addressed their effects on high-voltage (HV) power grids at mid-to-low latitudes. The growing trend to interconnect national power grids to meet regional integration objectives, may lead to an increase in the size of the present energy transmission networks to form a sort of super-grid at continental scale. Such a broad and heterogeneous super-grid can be exposed to the effects of large GIC if appropriate mitigation actions are not taken into consideration. In the present study, we present GIC estimates for the Uruguayan HV power grid during severe magnetic storm conditions. The GIC intensities are strongly dependent on the rate of variation of the geomagnetic field, conductivity of the ground, power grid resistances and configuration. Calculated GIC are analysed as functions of these parameters. The results show a reasonable agreement with measured data in Brazil and Argentina, thus confirming the reliability of the model. The expansion of the grid leads to a strong increase in GIC intensities in almost all substations. The power grid response to changes in ground conductivity and resistances shows similar results in a minor extent. This leads us to consider GIC as a non-negligible phenomenon in South America. Consequently, GIC must be taken into account in mid-to-low latitude power grids as well.

  9. Parameters influencing deposit estimation when using water sensitive papers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Cerruto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess the possibility of using water sensitive papers (WSP to estimate the amount of deposit on the target when varying the spray characteristics. To identify the main quantities influencing the deposit, some simplifying hypotheses were applied to simulate WSP behaviour: log-normal distribution of the diameters of the drops and circular stains randomly placed on the images. A very large number (4704 of images of WSPs were produced by means of simulation. The images were obtained by simulating drops of different arithmetic mean diameter (40-300 μm, different coefficient of variation (0.1-1.5, and different percentage of covered surface (2-100%, not considering overlaps. These images were considered to be effective WSP images and then analysed using image processing software in order to measure the percentage of covered surface, the number of particles, and the area of each particle; the deposit was then calculated. These data were correlated with those used to produce the images, varying the spray characteristics. As far as the drop populations are concerned, a classification based on the volume median diameter only should be avoided, especially in case of high variability. This, in fact, results in classifying sprays with very low arithmetic mean diameter as extremely or ultra coarse. The WSP image analysis shows that the relation between simulated and computed percentage of covered surface is independent of the type of spray, whereas impact density and unitary deposit can be estimated from the computed percentage of covered surface only if the spray characteristics (arithmetic mean and coefficient of variation of the drop diameters are known. These data can be estimated by analysing the particles on the WSP images. The results of a validation test show good agreement between simulated and computed deposits, testified by a high (0.93 coefficient of determination.

  10. Continuous-Energy Adjoint Flux and Perturbation Calculation using the Iterated Fission Probability Method in Monte Carlo Code TRIPOLI-4® and Underlying Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truchet, G.; Leconte, P.; Peneliau, Y.; Santamarina, A.; Malvagi, F.

    2014-06-01

    this perturbation method are presented and tested like the calculation of exact kinetic parameters (βeff, Λeff) or sensitivity parameters.

  11. Earthquake Source Modeling using Time-Reversal or Adjoint Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorleifsdottir, V.; Liu, Q.; Tromp, J.

    2007-12-01

    In recent years there have been great advances in earthquake source modeling. Despite the effort, many questions about earthquake source physics remain unanswered. In order to address some of these questions, it is useful to reconstruct what happens on the fault during an event. In this study we focus on determining the slip distribution on a fault plane, or a moment-rate density, as a function of time and space. This is a difficult process involving many trade offs between model parameters. The difficulty lies in the fact that earthquakes are not a controlled experiment, we don't know when and where they will occur, and therefore we have only limited control over what data will be acquired for each event. As a result, much of the advance that can be made, is by extracting more information out of the data that is routinely collected. Here we use a technique that uses 3D waveforms to invert for the slip on a fault plane during rupture. By including 3D wave-forms we can use parts of the wave-forms that are often discarded, as they are altered by structural effects in ways that cannot be accurately predicted using 1D Earth models. However, generating 3D synthetic is computationally expensive. Therefore we turn to an `adjoint' method (Tarantola Geoph.~1984, Tromp et al.~GJI 2005), that reduces the computational cost relative to methods that use Green's function libraries. In it's simplest form an adjoint method for inverting for source parameters can be viewed as a time-reversal experiment performed with a wave-propagation code (McMechan GJRAS 1982). The recorded seismograms are inserted as simultaneous sources at the location of the receiver and the computed wave field (which we call the adjoint wavefield) is recorded on an array around the earthquake location. Here we show, mathematically, that for source inversions for a moment tensor (distributed) source, the time integral of the adjoint strain is the quantity to monitor. We present the results of time

  12. Sensitivity of Human Choice to Manipulations of Parameters of Positive and Negative Sound Reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Joseph Michael

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether altering parameters of positive and negative reinforcement in identical ways could influence behavior maintained by each in different ways. Three undergraduate students participated in a series of assessments designed to identify preferred and aversive sounds with similar reinforcing values. Following reinforcer identification, we conducted parameter sensitivity assessments for both positive and negative reinforcers. Parameter manipulation...

  13. Sensitivity of detachment extent to magnetic configuration and external parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipschultz, Bruce; Parra, Felix I.; Hutchinson, Ian H.

    2016-05-01

    Divertor detachment may be essential to reduce heat loads to magnetic fusion tokamak reactor divertor surfaces. Yet in experiments it is difficult to control the extent of the detached, low pressure, plasma region. At maximum extent the front edge of the detached region reaches the X-point and can lead to degradation of core plasma properties. We define the ‘detachment window’ in a given position control variable C (for example, the upstream plasma density) as the range in C within which the front location can be stably held at any position from the target to the X-point; increased detachment window corresponds to better control. We extend a 1D analytic model [1] to determine the detachment window for the following control variables: the upstream plasma density, the impurity concentration and the power entering the scrape-off layer (SOL). We find that variations in magnetic configuration can have strong effects; increasing the ratio of the total magnetic field at the X-point to that at the target, {{B}×}/{{B}t} , (total flux expansion, as in the super-x divertor configuration) strongly increases the detachment window for all control variables studied, thus strongly improving detachment front control and the capability of the divertor plasma to passively accommodate transients while still staying detached. Increasing flux tube length and thus volume in the divertor, through poloidal flux expansion (as in the snowflake or x-divertor configurations) or length of the divertor, also increases the detachment window, but less than the total flux expansion does. The sensitivity of the detachment front location, z h , to each control variable, C, defined as \\partial {{z}h}/\\partial C , depends on the magnetic configuration. The size of the radiating volume and the total divertor radiation increase \\propto {{≤ft({{B}×}/{{B}t}\\right)}2} and \\propto {{B}×}/{{B}t} , respectively, but not by increasing divertor poloidal flux expansion or field line length. We

  14. Parameter sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for a storm surge and wave model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastidas, Luis A.; Knighton, James; Kline, Shaun W.

    2016-09-01

    Development and simulation of synthetic hurricane tracks is a common methodology used to estimate hurricane hazards in the absence of empirical coastal surge and wave observations. Such methods typically rely on numerical models to translate stochastically generated hurricane wind and pressure forcing into coastal surge and wave estimates. The model output uncertainty associated with selection of appropriate model parameters must therefore be addressed. The computational overburden of probabilistic surge hazard estimates is exacerbated by the high dimensionality of numerical surge and wave models. We present a model parameter sensitivity analysis of the Delft3D model for the simulation of hazards posed by Hurricane Bob (1991) utilizing three theoretical wind distributions (NWS23, modified Rankine, and Holland). The sensitive model parameters (of 11 total considered) include wind drag, the depth-induced breaking γB, and the bottom roughness. Several parameters show no sensitivity (threshold depth, eddy viscosity, wave triad parameters, and depth-induced breaking αB) and can therefore be excluded to reduce the computational overburden of probabilistic surge hazard estimates. The sensitive model parameters also demonstrate a large number of interactions between parameters and a nonlinear model response. While model outputs showed sensitivity to several parameters, the ability of these parameters to act as tuning parameters for calibration is somewhat limited as proper model calibration is strongly reliant on accurate wind and pressure forcing data. A comparison of the model performance with forcings from the different wind models is also presented.

  15. Parameter sensitivity analysis of a simplified electrochemical and thermal model for Li-ion batteries aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edouard, C.; Petit, M.; Forgez, C.; Bernard, J.; Revel, R.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a simplified electrochemical and thermal model that can predict both physicochemical and aging behavior of Li-ion batteries is studied. A sensitivity analysis of all its physical parameters is performed in order to find out their influence on the model output based on simulations under various conditions. The results gave hints on whether a parameter needs particular attention when measured or identified and on the conditions (e.g. temperature, discharge rate) under which it is the most sensitive. A specific simulation profile is designed for parameters involved in aging equations in order to determine their sensitivity. Finally, a step-wise method is followed to limit the influence of parameter values when identifying some of them, according to their relative sensitivity from the study. This sensitivity analysis and the subsequent step-wise identification method show very good results, such as a better fitting of the simulated cell voltage with experimental data.

  16. Dual of QCD with One Adjoint Fermion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mojaza, Matin; Nardecchia, Marco; Pica, Claudio;

    2011-01-01

    We construct the magnetic dual of QCD with one adjoint Weyl fermion. The dual is a consistent solution of the 't Hooft anomaly matching conditions, allows for flavor decoupling and remarkably constitutes the first nonsupersymmetric dual valid for any number of colors. The dual allows to bound the...

  17. Parameter identification and global sensitivity analysis of Xinanjiang model using meta-modeling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-meng SONG

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parameter identification, model calibration, and uncertainty quantification are important steps in the model-building process, and are necessary for obtaining credible results and valuable information. Sensitivity analysis of hydrological model is a key step in model uncertainty quantification, which can identify the dominant parameters, reduce the model calibration uncertainty, and enhance the model optimization efficiency. There are, however, some shortcomings in classical approaches, including the long duration of time and high computation cost required to quantitatively assess the sensitivity of a multiple-parameter hydrological model. For this reason, a two-step statistical evaluation framework using global techniques is presented. It is based on (1 a screening method (Morris for qualitative ranking of parameters, and (2 a variance-based method integrated with a meta-model for quantitative sensitivity analysis, i.e., the Sobol method integrated with the response surface model (RSMSobol. First, the Morris screening method was used to qualitatively identify the parameters’ sensitivity, and then ten parameters were selected to quantify the sensitivity indices. Subsequently, the RSMSobol method was used to quantify the sensitivity, i.e., the first-order and total sensitivity indices based on the response surface model (RSM were calculated. The RSMSobol method can not only quantify the sensitivity, but also reduce the computational cost, with good accuracy compared to the classical approaches. This approach will be effective and reliable in the global sensitivity analysis of a complex large-scale distributed hydrological model.

  18. Method of Tallying Adjoint Fluence and Calculating Kinetics Parameters in Monte Carlo Codes%在蒙特卡罗程序中统计共轭通量并计算中子动力学参数的方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪量子; 姚栋; 王侃

    2012-01-01

    A method of using iterated fission probability to estimate the adjoint fluence during particles simulation, and using it as the weighting function to calculate kinetics parameters βell and A in Monte Carlo codes, was introduced in this paper. Implements of this method in continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP and multi-group Monte Carlo code MCMG are both elaborated. Verification results show that, with regardless additional computing cost, using this method, the adjoint fluence accounted by MCMG matches well with the result computed by ANISN, and the kinetics parameters calculated by MCNP agree very well with benchmarks. This method is proved to be reliable, and the function of calculating kinetics parameters in Monte Carlo codes is carried out effectively, which could be the basement for Monte Carlo codes' utility in the analysis of nuclear reactors' transient behavior.%文章介绍了在蒙特卡罗程序中,使用反复裂变几率的统计结果作为共轭通量的估计,并作为权重函数计算动力学参数βeff和Λ的方法,阐释了在连续能量蒙特卡罗程序MCNP和多群蒙特卡罗程序MCMG中实现这种方法的过程.数值校验结果表明:在几乎不带来附加计算量的同时,在MCMG中使用该方法统计得到的共轭通量与ANISN的共轭通量计算结果符合较好,在MCNP中使用该方法计算得到的中子动力学参数与基准测量结果符合较好.在蒙特卡罗程序中实现了高效率计算中子动力学参数的功能,为蒙特卡罗程序进一步用于反应堆动态行为的分析奠定了基础.

  19. Self-adjoint integral operator for bounded nonlocal transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggs, J. E.; Morales, G. J.

    2016-11-01

    An integral operator is developed to describe nonlocal transport in a one-dimensional system bounded on both ends by material walls. The "jump" distributions associated with nonlocal transport are taken to be Lévy α -stable distributions, which become naturally truncated by the bounding walls. The truncation process results in the operator containing a self-consistent, convective inward transport term (pinch). The properties of the integral operator as functions of the Lévy distribution parameter set [α ,γ ] and the wall conductivity are presented. The integral operator continuously recovers the features of local transport when α =2 . The self-adjoint formulation allows for an accurate description of spatial variation in the Lévy parameters in the nonlocal system. Spatial variation in the Lévy parameters is shown to result in internally generated flows. Examples of cold-pulse propagation in nonlocal systems illustrate the capabilities of the methodology.

  20. Discussion on Failure Sensitive Parameters of an EED Life Performance in Storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Nan; JIANG Min-rong

    2005-01-01

    An issue to distinguish sensitive parameters of storage life prior to the failure of a bridgewire electro-explosive device (EED) is studied. The degradations of bridgewire resistance, 50% firing current, ignition delay time, bridgewire molten time and powder color with the storage time were measured under a simulating accelerated life test of high-temperature and high-humidity. The most sensitive parameter suitable to evaluate the EED storage life is discussed. It is concluded that the standard deviation of resistance change is the most sensitive degradation variable, and the next is bridgewire molten time, 50% firing current and ignition delay time. The mean of resistance is an insensitive degradation parameter.

  1. A practical method to assess model sensitivity and parameter uncertainty in C cycle models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahaies, Sylvain; Roulstone, Ian; Nichols, Nancy

    2015-04-01

    data streams or by considering longer observation windows no systematic analysis has been carried out so far to explain the large differences among results. We consider adjoint based methods to investigate inverse problems using DALEC and various data streams. Using resolution matrices we study the nature of the inverse problems (solution existence, uniqueness and stability) and show how standard regularization techniques affect resolution and stability properties. Instead of using standard prior information as a penalty term in the cost function to regularize the problems we constraint the parameter space using ecological balance conditions and inequality constraints. The efficiency and rapidity of this approach allows us to compute ensembles of solutions to the inverse problems from which we can establish the robustness of the variational method and obtain non Gaussian posterior distributions for the model parameters and initial carbon stocks.

  2. Sensitivity analysis on various parameters for lattice analysis of DUPIC fuel with WIMS-AECL code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Gyu Hong; Choi, Hang Bok; Park, Jee Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The code WIMS-AECL has been used for the lattice analysis of DUPIC fuel. The lattice parameters calculated by the code is sensitive to the choice of number of parameters, such as the number of tracking lines, number of condensed groups, mesh spacing in the moderator region, other parameters vital to the calculation of probabilities and burnup analysis. We have studied this sensitivity with respect to these parameters and recommend their proper values which are necessary for carrying out the lattice analysis of DUPIC fuel.

  3. Sensitivity analysis and dynamic modification of modal parameter in mechanical transmission system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is one of the effective methods in the dynamic modification. The sensitivity of the modal parameters such as the natural frequencies and mode shapes in undamped free vibration of mechanical transmission system is analyzed in this paper.In particular,the sensitivities of the modal parameters to physical parameters of shaft system such as the inertia and stiffness are given.A calculation formula for dynamic modification is presented based on the analysis of modal parameter.With a mechanical transmission system as an example, the sensitivities of natural frequencies and modes shape are calculated and analyzed. Furthermore, the dynamic modification is also carried out and a good result is obtained.

  4. Sensitivity analysis and parameter optimization for vibration reduction of undamped multi-ribbed belt drive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhi-chao; Lao, Yao-xin; Lu, Qiu-hai

    2008-11-01

    Tensioner is a critical mechanism to ensure a constant tension level within a serpentine belt drive that is widely used in modern passenger vehicles. For a belt drive with n pulleys, generic and explicit formulae about sensitivities of both frequency and steady harmonic responses are established in terms of system matrices with respect to any design parameter of the system. Deductions from the formulae results in frequency and steady response sensitivities relative to key tensioner parameters and the belt speed. Based on sensitivity analysis, optimizations are conducted on tensioner so as to suppress dynamic responses of the system by frequency detuning. A new approach for searching optimal parameters is put forward by incorporating sensitivity information into a classical coordinate alternating procedure. Examples are given to validate the analytical formulae of the frequency sensitivity and to demonstrate the effect of optimization.

  5. Development of an adjoint model of GRAPES-CUACE and its application in tracking influential haze source areas in north China

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Xing Qin; Xian Zhai, Shi; Jin, Min; Gong, Sunling; Wang, Yu

    2016-06-01

    The aerosol adjoint module of the atmospheric chemical modeling system GRAPES-CUACE (Global-Regional Assimilation and Prediction System coupled with the CMA Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environment) is constructed based on the adjoint theory. This includes the development and validation of the tangent linear and the adjoint models of the three parts involved in the GRAPES-CUACE aerosol module: CAM (Canadian Aerosol Module), interface programs that connect GRAPES and CUACE, and the aerosol transport processes that are embedded in GRAPES. Meanwhile, strict mathematical validation schemes for the tangent linear and the adjoint models are implemented for all input variables. After each part of the module and the assembled tangent linear and adjoint models is verified, the adjoint model of the GRAPES-CUACE aerosol is developed and used in a black carbon (BC) receptor-source sensitivity analysis to track influential haze source areas in north China. The sensitivity of the average BC concentration over Beijing at the highest concentration time point (referred to as the Objective Function) is calculated with respect to the BC amount emitted over the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region. Four types of regions are selected based on the administrative division or the sensitivity coefficient distribution. The adjoint sensitivity results are then used to quantify the effect of reducing the emission sources at different time intervals over different regions. It is indicated that the more influential regions (with relatively larger sensitivity coefficients) do not necessarily correspond to the administrative regions. Instead, the influence per unit area of the sensitivity selected regions is greater. Therefore, controlling the most influential regions during critical time intervals based on the results of the adjoint sensitivity analysis is much more efficient than controlling administrative regions during an experimental time period.

  6. Characterization of SWAT hydrologic parameter sensitivity and behavior across spatial and temporal gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Hwang, T.; Vose, J. M.; Martin, K. L.; Band, L. E.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrologic models reflect our understanding of factors that regulate stream discharge and range from simple empirical models to highly complex process-based models. Sensitivity analysis is a commonly used tool to detect the parameters that significantly impact model results. In this study, we hypothesized that (1) analysis of patterns in parameter sensitivity could be used to better understand variation in controls on hydrologic behavior within and across a mountain-piedmont-coastal gradient, and (2) shifts in parameter significance among wet, dry, and average precipitation years could reveal differing sensitivities to variation in precipitation. To test our hypotheses, we applied the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to several small headwater sub-watersheds in the Yadkin-Pee Dee basin, located in North and South Carolina, USA. In global sensitivity analyses, we found that main channel routing and curve number for surface runoff parameters were the most significant parameters across all of the study watersheds. Parameters influence on hydrologic behavior varied across the physiographic gradient as well. Soil parameters were more sensitive in the Mountains, while the surface runoff lag coefficient and the plant uptake compensation factor were significant in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain watersheds. The groundwater revap coefficient was significant only in the Piedmont watersheds. We also found noticeable shifts in the behavioral ranges of parameters along the geographical gradient, including surface runoff, main channel routing and soil related parameters. There were also inter-annual variations across the dry, wet, and normal water yield years at the study watersheds. Mountain watersheds exhibited noticeable temporal variation in the behavior of parameters driving evapotranspiration, main channel routing, and soil properties. Two Piedmont watersheds had different temporal variations in parameter behavior, which might be due to the difference in landuse

  7. Adjoint $SU(5)$ GUT model with $T_{7}$ flavor symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Arbeláez, Carolina; Kovalenko, Sergey; Schmidt, Iván

    2015-01-01

    We propose an adjoint $SU(5)$ GUT model with a $T_{7}$ family symmetry and an extra $Z_{2}\\otimes Z_{2}^{\\prime }\\otimes Z_{3}\\otimes Z_{4}\\otimes Z_{12}$ discrete group, that successfully describes the prevailing Standard Model (SM) fermion mass and mixing pattern. The observed hierarchy of the charged fermion masses and the quark mixing angles arises from the $Z_{3}\\otimes Z_{4}\\otimes Z_{12}$ symmetry breaking, which occurs near the GUT scale. The light active neutrino masses are generated by type I and type III seesaw mechanisms mediated by the fermionic $SU(5)$ singlet and the adjoint $\\mathbf{24}$-plet. The model predicts the effective Majorana neutrino mass parameter of neutrinoless double beta decay to be $m_{\\beta \\beta }=$ 4 and 50 meV for the normal and the inverted neutrino spectrum, respectively. We construct several benchmark scenarios, which lead to $SU(5)$ gauge coupling unification and are compatible with the known phenomenological constraints originating from the lightness of neutrinos, prot...

  8. Sensitivity Analysis of the Optimal Parameter Settings of an LTE Packet Scheduler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez Diaz, I.; Litjens, R.; Berg, J.L. van den; Dimitrova, D.C.; Spaey, K.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced packet scheduling schemes in 3G/3G+ mobile networks provide one or more parameters to optimise the trade-off between QoS and resource efficiency. In this paper we study the sensitivity of the optimal parameter setting for packet scheduling in LTE radio networks with respect to various traff

  9. Quantifying dynamic sensitivity of optimization algorithm parameters to improve hydrological model calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wei; Zhang, Chi; Fu, Guangtao; Zhou, Huicheng

    2016-02-01

    It is widely recognized that optimization algorithm parameters have significant impacts on algorithm performance, but quantifying the influence is very complex and difficult due to high computational demands and dynamic nature of search parameters. The overall aim of this paper is to develop a global sensitivity analysis based framework to dynamically quantify the individual and interactive influence of algorithm parameters on algorithm performance. A variance decomposition sensitivity analysis method, Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), is used for sensitivity quantification, because it is capable of handling small samples and more computationally efficient compared with other approaches. The Shuffled Complex Evolution method developed at the University of Arizona algorithm (SCE-UA) is selected as an optimization algorithm for investigation, and two criteria, i.e., convergence speed and success rate, are used to measure the performance of SCE-UA. Results show the proposed framework can effectively reveal the dynamic sensitivity of algorithm parameters in the search processes, including individual influences of parameters and their interactive impacts. Interactions between algorithm parameters have significant impacts on SCE-UA performance, which has not been reported in previous research. The proposed framework provides a means to understand the dynamics of algorithm parameter influence, and highlights the significance of considering interactive parameter influence to improve algorithm performance in the search processes.

  10. Quantification of remodeling parameter sensitivity - assessed by a computer simulation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, J.S.; Mosekilde, Li.; Mosekilde, Erik

    1996-01-01

    We have used a computer simulation model to evaluate the effect of several bone remodeling parameters on vertebral cancellus bone. The menopause was chosen as the base case scenario, and the sensitivity of the model to the following parameters was investigated: activation frequency, formation...

  11. Modeling and Sensitivity Analysis of Navigation Parameter Errors for Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar Stereo Geolocation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Lei; ZHANG Jixian; YAN Qin

    2010-01-01

    For the high-resolution airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) stereo geolocation application, the final geolocation accuracy is influenced by various error parameter sources. In this paper, an airborne SAR stereo geolocation parameter error model,involving the parameter errors derived from the navigation system on the flight platform, has been put forward. Moreover, a kind of near-direct method for modeling and sensitivity analysis of navigation parameter errors is also given. This method directly uses the ground reference to calculate the covariance matrix relationship between the parameter errors and the eventual geolocation errors for ground target points. In addition, utilizing true flight track parameters' errors, this paper gave a verification of the method and a corresponding sensitivity analysis for airborne SAR stereo geolocation model and proved its efficiency.

  12. Multi-objective global sensitivity analysis of the WRF model parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Jiping; Di, Zhenhua; Duan, Qingyun; Gong, Wei; Wang, Chen

    2015-04-01

    Tuning model parameters to match model simulations with observations can be an effective way to enhance the performance of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models such as Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. However, this is a very complicated process as a typical NWP model involves many model parameters and many output variables. One must take a multi-objective approach to ensure all of the major simulated model outputs are satisfactory. This talk presents the results of an investigation of multi-objective parameter sensitivity analysis of the WRF model to different model outputs, including conventional surface meteorological variables such as precipitation, surface temperature, humidity and wind speed, as well as atmospheric variables such as total precipitable water, cloud cover, boundary layer height and outgoing long radiation at the top of the atmosphere. The goal of this study is to identify the most important parameters that affect the predictive skill of short-range meteorological forecasts by the WRF model. The study was performed over the Greater Beijing Region of China. A total of 23 adjustable parameters from seven different physical parameterization schemes were considered. Using a multi-objective global sensitivity analysis method, we examined the WRF model parameter sensitivities to the 5-day simulations of the aforementioned model outputs. The results show that parameter sensitivities vary with different model outputs. But three to four of the parameters are shown to be sensitive to all model outputs considered. The sensitivity results from this research can be the basis for future model parameter optimization of the WRF model.

  13. Chiral transition of fundamental and adjoint quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capdevilla, R.M. [Instituto de Física Teórica, UNESP – Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Dr. Bento T. Ferraz, 271, Bloco II, 01140-070 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Doff, A., E-mail: agomes@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná – UTFPR – DAFIS, Av. Monteiro Lobato Km 04, 84016-210 Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Natale, A.A., E-mail: natale@ift.unesp.br [Instituto de Física Teórica, UNESP – Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Dr. Bento T. Ferraz, 271, Bloco II, 01140-070 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-170 Santo André, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-20

    The chiral symmetry breaking transition of quarks in the fundamental and adjoint representation is studied in a model where the gap equation contains two contributions, one containing a confining propagator and another corresponding to the exchange of one-dressed dynamically massive gluons. When quarks are in the fundamental representation the confinement effect dominates the chiral symmetry breaking while the gluon exchange is suppressed due to the dynamical gluon mass effect in the propagator and in the coupling constant. In this case the chiral and deconfinement transition temperatures are approximately the same. For quarks in the adjoint representation, due to the larger Casimir eigenvalue, the gluon exchange is operative and the chiral transition happens at a larger temperature than the deconfinement one.

  14. Optimal Multistage Algorithm for Adjoint Computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aupy, Guillaume; Herrmann, Julien; Hovland, Paul; Robert, Yves

    2016-01-01

    We reexamine the work of Stumm and Walther on multistage algorithms for adjoint computation. We provide an optimal algorithm for this problem when there are two levels of checkpoints, in memory and on disk. Previously, optimal algorithms for adjoint computations were known only for a single level of checkpoints with no writing and reading costs; a well-known example is the binomial checkpointing algorithm of Griewank and Walther. Stumm and Walther extended that binomial checkpointing algorithm to the case of two levels of checkpoints, but they did not provide any optimality results. We bridge the gap by designing the first optimal algorithm in this context. We experimentally compare our optimal algorithm with that of Stumm and Walther to assess the difference in performance.

  15. Sensitivity analysis of CLIMEX parameters in modeling potential distribution of Phoenix dactylifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzin Shabani

    Full Text Available Using CLIMEX and the Taguchi Method, a process-based niche model was developed to estimate potential distributions of Phoenix dactylifera L. (date palm, an economically important crop in many counties. Development of the model was based on both its native and invasive distribution and validation was carried out in terms of its extensive distribution in Iran. To identify model parameters having greatest influence on distribution of date palm, a sensitivity analysis was carried out. Changes in suitability were established by mapping of regions where the estimated distribution changed with parameter alterations. This facilitated the assessment of certain areas in Iran where parameter modifications impacted the most, particularly in relation to suitable and highly suitable locations. Parameter sensitivities were also evaluated by the calculation of area changes within the suitable and highly suitable categories. The low temperature limit (DV2, high temperature limit (DV3, upper optimal temperature (SM2 and high soil moisture limit (SM3 had the greatest impact on sensitivity, while other parameters showed relatively less sensitivity or were insensitive to change. For an accurate fit in species distribution models, highly sensitive parameters require more extensive research and data collection methods. Results of this study demonstrate a more cost effective method for developing date palm distribution models, an integral element in species management, and may prove useful for streamlining requirements for data collection in potential distribution modeling for other species as well.

  16. Dual of QCD with One Adjoint Fermion

    CERN Document Server

    Mojaza, Matin; Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We construct the magnetic dual of QCD with one adjoint Weyl fermion. The dual is a consistent solution of the 't Hooft anomaly matching conditions, allows for flavor decoupling and remarkably constitutes the first nonsupersymmetric dual valid for any number of colors. The dual allows to bound the anomalous dimension of the Dirac fermion mass operator to be less than one in the conformal window.

  17. Chiral phases of fundamental and adjoint quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natale, A. A. [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC 09210-170, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Física Teórica - UNESP Rua Dr. Bento T. Ferraz, 271, Bl.II - 01140-070, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-01-22

    We consider a QCD chiral symmetry breaking model where the gap equation contains an effective confining propagator and a dressed gluon propagator with a dynamically generated mass. This model is able to explain the ratios between the chiral transition and deconfinement temperatures in the case of fundamental and adjoint quarks. It also predicts the recovery of the chiral symmetry for a large number of quarks (n{sub f} ≈ 11 – 13) in agreement with lattice data.

  18. Adjoint string breaking in the pseudoparticle approach

    CERN Document Server

    Szasz, Christian

    2008-01-01

    We apply the pseudoparticle approach to SU(2) Yang-Mills theory and perform a detailed study of the potential between two static charges for various representations. Whereas for charges in the fundamental representation we find a linearly rising confining potential, we clearly observe string breaking, when considering charges in the adjoint representation. We also demonstrate Casimir scaling and compute gluelump masses for different spin and parity. Numerical results are in qualitative agreement with lattice results.

  19. Finite-frequency tomography using adjoint methods-Methodology and examples using membrane surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tape, Carl; Liu, Qinya; Tromp, Jeroen

    2007-03-01

    We employ adjoint methods in a series of synthetic seismic tomography experiments to recover surface wave phase-speed models of southern California. Our approach involves computing the Fréchet derivative for tomographic inversions via the interaction between a forward wavefield, propagating from the source to the receivers, and an `adjoint' wavefield, propagating from the receivers back to the source. The forward wavefield is computed using a 2-D spectral-element method (SEM) and a phase-speed model for southern California. A `target' phase-speed model is used to generate the `data' at the receivers. We specify an objective or misfit function that defines a measure of misfit between data and synthetics. For a given receiver, the remaining differences between data and synthetics are time-reversed and used as the source of the adjoint wavefield. For each earthquake, the interaction between the regular and adjoint wavefields is used to construct finite-frequency sensitivity kernels, which we call event kernels. An event kernel may be thought of as a weighted sum of phase-specific (e.g. P) banana-doughnut kernels, with weights determined by the measurements. The overall sensitivity is simply the sum of event kernels, which defines the misfit kernel. The misfit kernel is multiplied by convenient orthonormal basis functions that are embedded in the SEM code, resulting in the gradient of the misfit function, that is, the Fréchet derivative. A non-linear conjugate gradient algorithm is used to iteratively improve the model while reducing the misfit function. We illustrate the construction of the gradient and the minimization algorithm, and consider various tomographic experiments, including source inversions, structural inversions and joint source-structure inversions. Finally, we draw connections between classical Hessian-based tomography and gradient-based adjoint tomography.

  20. MOESHA: A genetic algorithm for automatic calibration and estimation of parameter uncertainty and sensitivity of hydrologic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characterization of uncertainty and sensitivity of model parameters is an essential and often overlooked facet of hydrological modeling. This paper introduces an algorithm called MOESHA that combines input parameter sensitivity analyses with a genetic algorithm calibration routin...

  1. Investigating CloudSat Retrievals Sensitivity to Forward Iterative Algorithm Parameters in the Mixed Cloud Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yujun; Lu, Chunsong

    2016-09-01

    When millimeter-wave cloud radar data are used for the forward iterative retrieval of the liquid water content (LWC) and effective radius of cloud droplets ( R e) in a cloud layer, the prior values and tolerance ranges of the cloud droplet number density ( N t), scale parameter ( R g) and spectral width parameter ( W g) in the iterative algorithm are the main factors that affect the retrieval accuracy. In this study, we used data from stratus and convective clouds that were simultaneously observed by CloudSat and aircraft to conduct a sensitivity analysis of N t, R g, and W g for the retrieval accuracies of LWC and R e in both stratus and convective clouds. N t is the least sensitive parameter for accurately retrieving stratus LWC and R e in both stratus and convective clouds, except for retrieving the convective cloud LWC. Opposite to N t, R g is the most sensitive parameter for both LWC and R e retrievals. As to the effects of parameter tolerance ranges on the retrievals of LWC and R e, the least important parameter is the N t tolerance range; the most important one is the W g tolerance range for retrieving convective cloud LWC and R e, the R g is the important parameter for retrieving stratus LWC and R e. To obtain accurate retrieved values for clouds in a specific region, it is important to use typical values of the sensitive parameters, which could be calculated from in situ observations of cloud droplet size distributions. In addition, the sensitivities of the LWC and R e to the three parameters are stronger in convective clouds than in stratus clouds. This may be related to the melting and merging of solid cloud droplets during the convective mixing process in the convective clouds.

  2. Laryngeal High-Speed Videoendoscopy: Sensitivity of Objective Parameters towards Recording Frame Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Schützenberger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current use of laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopy in clinic settings involves subjective visual assessment of vocal fold vibratory characteristics. However, objective quantification of vocal fold vibrations for evidence-based diagnosis and therapy is desired, and objective parameters assessing laryngeal dynamics have therefore been suggested. This study investigated the sensitivity of the objective parameters and their dependence on recording frame rate. A total of 300 endoscopic high-speed videos with recording frame rates between 1000 and 15 000 fps were analyzed for a vocally healthy female subject during sustained phonation. Twenty parameters, representing laryngeal dynamics, were computed. Four different parameter characteristics were found: parameters showing no change with increasing frame rate; parameters changing up to a certain frame rate, but then remaining constant; parameters remaining constant within a particular range of recording frame rates; and parameters changing with nearly every frame rate. The results suggest that (1 parameter values are influenced by recording frame rates and different parameters have varying sensitivities to recording frame rate; (2 normative values should be determined based on recording frame rates; and (3 the typically used recording frame rate of 4000 fps seems to be too low to distinguish accurately certain characteristics of the human phonation process in detail.

  3. Sensitivity analysis of CLIMEX parameters in modelling potential distribution of Lantana camara L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhashni Taylor

    Full Text Available A process-based niche model of L. camara L. (lantana, a highly invasive shrub species, was developed to estimate its potential distribution using CLIMEX. Model development was carried out using its native and invasive distribution and validation was carried out with the extensive Australian distribution. A good fit was observed, with 86.7% of herbarium specimens collected in Australia occurring within the suitable and highly suitable categories. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to identify the model parameters that had the most influence on lantana distribution. The changes in suitability were assessed by mapping the regions where the distribution changed with each parameter alteration. This allowed an assessment of where, within Australia, the modification of each parameter was having the most impact, particularly in terms of the suitable and highly suitable locations. The sensitivity of various parameters was also evaluated by calculating the changes in area within the suitable and highly suitable categories. The limiting low temperature (DV0, limiting high temperature (DV3 and limiting low soil moisture (SM0 showed highest sensitivity to change. The other model parameters were relatively insensitive to change. Highly sensitive parameters require extensive research and data collection to be fitted accurately in species distribution models. The results from this study can inform more cost effective development of species distribution models for lantana. Such models form an integral part of the management of invasive species and the results can be used to streamline data collection requirements for potential distribution modelling.

  4. Parameter estimation and sensitivity analysis for a mathematical model with time delays of leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cândea, Doina; Halanay, Andrei; Rǎdulescu, Rodica; Tǎlmaci, Rodica

    2017-01-01

    We consider a system of nonlinear delay differential equations that describes the interaction between three competing cell populations: healthy, leukemic and anti-leukemia T cells involved in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) under treatment with Imatinib. The aim of this work is to establish which model parameters are the most important in the success or failure of leukemia remission under treatment using a sensitivity analysis of the model parameters. For the most significant parameters of the model which affect the evolution of CML disease during Imatinib treatment we try to estimate the realistic values using some experimental data. For these parameters, steady states are calculated and their stability is analyzed and biologically interpreted.

  5. Generalized Uncertainty Principle and Self-Adjoint Operators

    CERN Document Server

    Balasubramanian, Venkat; Vagenas, Elias C

    2014-01-01

    In this work we explore the self-adjointness of the GUP-modified momentum and Hamiltonian operators over different domains. In particular, we utilize the theorem by von-Newmann for symmetric operators in order to determine whether the momentum and Hamiltonian operators are self-adjoint or not, or they have self-adjoint extensions over the given domain. In addition, a simple example of the Hamiltonian operator describing a particle in a box is given. The solutions of the boundary conditions that describe the self-adjoint extensions of the specific Hamiltonian operator are obtained.

  6. Generalized uncertainty principle and self-adjoint operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramanian, Venkat, E-mail: vbalasu8@uwo.ca [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Das, Saurya, E-mail: saurya.das@uleth.ca [Theoretical Physics Group, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, 4401 University Drive, Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada); Vagenas, Elias C., E-mail: elias.vagenas@ku.edu.kw [Theoretical Physics Group, Department of Physics, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060 (Kuwait)

    2015-09-15

    In this work we explore the self-adjointness of the GUP-modified momentum and Hamiltonian operators over different domains. In particular, we utilize the theorem by von-Neumann for symmetric operators in order to determine whether the momentum and Hamiltonian operators are self-adjoint or not, or they have self-adjoint extensions over the given domain. In addition, a simple example of the Hamiltonian operator describing a particle in a box is given. The solutions of the boundary conditions that describe the self-adjoint extensions of the specific Hamiltonian operator are obtained.

  7. Sensitivity of a general circulation model to land surface parameters in African tropical deforestation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maynard, K.; Royer, J.F. [Meteo-France CNRM, 42 Avenue G. Coriolis, 31057, Toulouse Cedex 1 (France)

    2004-06-01

    During the last two decades, several land surface schemes for use in climate, regional and/or mesoscale, hydrological and ecological models have been designed. Incorrect parametrization of land-surface processes and prescription of the surface parameters in atmospheric modeling, can result in artificial changes of the horizontal gradient of the sensible heat flux. Thus, an error in horizontal temperature gradient within the lower atmosphere may be introduced. The reliability of the model depends on the quality of boundary layer scheme implemented and its sensitivity to the bare soil and vegetation parameters. In this study, a series of sensitivity experiments has been conducted over broad time scales, using a version of the ARPEGE Climate Model coupled to the ISBA land surface scheme in order to investigate model sensitivity to separate changes in land surface parameters over Africa. Effects of perturbing vegetation cover, distribution of soil depth, albedo of vegetation, roughness length, leaf area index and minimum stomatal resistance were explored by using a simple statistical analysis. Identifying which parameters are important in controlling turbulent energy fluxes, temperature and soil moisture is dependent on which variables are used to determine sensibility, which type of vegetation and climate regime is being simulated and the magnitude and sign of the parameter change. This study does not argue that a particular parameter is important in ISBA, rather it shows that no general ranking of parameters is possible. So, it is essential to specify all land surface parameters with greater precision when attempting to determine the climate response to modification of the land surface. The implication of ISBA being sensitive to parameters that cannot be validated suggests that there will always be considerable doubt over the predictive quality of land-surface schemes. (orig.)

  8. Sensitivity analysis of distributed parameter elements In high-speed circuit networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei DOU; Zhiquan WANG

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis method,based on MacCormack's technique,for the evaluation of the time domain sensitivity of distributed parameter elements in high-speed circuit networks.Sensitivities can be calculated from electrical and physical parameters of the distributed parameter elements.The proposed method is a direct numerical method of time-space discretization and does not require complicated mathematical deductive process.Therefore,it is very convenient to program this method.It can be applied to sensitivity analysis of general transmission lines in linear or nonlinear circuit networks.The proposed method is second-order-accurate.Numerical experiment is presented to demonstrate its accuracy and efficiency.

  9. The sensitivity of flowline models of tidewater glaciers to parameter uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Enderlin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Depth-integrated (1-D flowline models have been widely used to simulate fast-flowing tidewater glaciers and predict change because the continuous grounding line tracking, high horizontal resolution, and physically based calving criterion that are essential to realistic modeling of tidewater glaciers can easily be incorporated into the models while maintaining high computational efficiency. As with all models, the values for parameters describing ice rheology and basal friction must be assumed and/or tuned based on observations. For prognostic studies, these parameters are typically tuned so that the glacier matches observed thickness and speeds at an initial state, to which a perturbation is applied. While it is well know that ice flow models are sensitive to these parameters, the sensitivity of tidewater glacier models has not been systematically investigated. Here we investigate the sensitivity of such flowline models of outlet glacier dynamics to uncertainty in three key parameters that influence a glacier's resistive stress components. We find that, within typical observational uncertainty, similar initial (i.e., steady-state glacier configurations can be produced with substantially different combinations of parameter values, leading to differing transient responses after a perturbation is applied. In cases where the glacier is initially grounded near flotation across a basal over-deepening, as typically observed for rapidly changing glaciers, these differences can be dramatic owing to the threshold of stability imposed by the flotation criterion. The simulated transient response is particularly sensitive to the parameterization of ice rheology: differences in ice temperature of ~ 2 °C can determine whether the glaciers thin to flotation and retreat unstably or remain grounded on a marine shoal. Due to the highly non-linear dependence of tidewater glaciers on model parameters, we recommend that their predictions are accompanied by

  10. The sensitivity of flowline models of tidewater glaciers to parameter uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Enderlin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Depth-integrated (1-D flowline models have been widely used to simulate fast-flowing tidewater glaciers and predict future change because their computational efficiency allows for continuous grounding line tracking, high horizontal resolution, and a physically-based calving criterion, which are all essential to realistic modeling of tidewater glaciers. As with all models, the values for parameters describing ice rheology and basal friction must be assumed and/or tuned based on observations. For prognostic studies, these parameters are typically tuned so that the glacier matches observed thickness and speeds at an initial state, to which a perturbation is applied. While it is well know that ice flow models are sensitive to these parameters, the sensitivity of tidewater glacier models has not been systematically investigated. Here we investigate the sensitivity of such flowline models of outlet glacier dynamics to uncertainty in three key parameters that influence a glacier's resistive stress components. We find that, within typical observational uncertainty, similar initial (i.e. steady-state glacier configurations can be produced with substantially different combinations of parameter values, leading to differing transient responses after a perturbation is applied. In cases where the glacier is initially grounded near flotation across a basal overdeepening, as typically observed for rapidly changing glaciers, these differences can be dramatic owing to the threshold of stability imposed by the flotation criterion. The simulated transient response is particularly sensitive to the parameterization of ice rheology: differences in ice temperature of ∼ 2 °C can determine whether the glaciers thin to flotation and retreat unstably or remain grounded on a marine shoal. Due the highly non-linear dependence of tidewater glaciers on model parameters, we recommend that their predictions are accompanied by sensitivity tests that take parameter uncertainty

  11. Determining scaling laws from geodynamic simulations using adjoint gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuber, Georg; Kaus, Boris; Popov, Anton

    2016-04-01

    Whereas significant progress has been made in modelling of lithospheric and crustal scale processes in recent years, it often remains a challenge to understand which of the many model parameters is of key importance for a particular simulation. Determining this is usually done by manually changing the model input parameters and performing new simulations. For a few cases, such as for crustal-scale folding instabilities (with viscous rheologies, e.g. [1]) or for Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, one can use existing scaling laws to obtain such insights. Yet, for a more general case, it is not straightforward to do this (apart from running many simulations). Here, we test a different approach which computes gradients of the model parameters using adjoint based methods, which has the advantage that we can test the influence of an independent number of parameters on the system by computing and analysing the covariance matrix and the gradient of the parameter space. This method might give us the chance to get insights on which parameters affect for example subduction processes and how strong the system depends on their influence. [1] Fernandez, N., & Kaus, B. J. (2014). Fold interaction and wavelength selection in 3D models of multilayer detachment folding. Tectonophysics, 632, 199-217.

  12. Geometrical parameter analysis of the high sensitivity fiber optic angular displacement sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, João M S; Kitano, Cláudio; Tittmann, Bernhard R

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present an analysis of the influence of the geometrical parameters on the sensitivity and linear range of the fiber optic angular displacement sensor, through computational simulations and experiments. The geometrical parameters analyzed were the lens focal length, the gap between fibers, the fibers cladding radii, the emitting fiber critical angle (or, equivalently, the emitting fiber numerical aperture), and the standoff distance (distance between the lens and the reflective surface). Besides, we analyzed the sensor sensitivity regarding any spurious linear displacement. The simulation and experimental results showed that the parameters which play the most important roles are the emitting fiber core radius, the lens focal length, and the light coupling efficiency, while the remaining parameters have little influence on sensor characteristics. This paper was published in Applied Optics and is made available as an electronic reprint with the permission of OSA. The paper can be found at the fo...

  13. A specialized ODE integrator for the efficient computation of parameter sensitivities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonnet Pedro

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dynamic mathematical models in the form of systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs play an important role in systems biology. For any sufficiently complex model, the speed and accuracy of solving the ODEs by numerical integration is critical. This applies especially to systems identification problems where the parameter sensitivities must be integrated alongside the system variables. Although several very good general purpose ODE solvers exist, few of them compute the parameter sensitivities automatically. Results We present a novel integration algorithm that is based on second derivatives and contains other unique features such as improved error estimates. These features allow the integrator to take larger time steps than other methods. In practical applications, i.e. systems biology models of different sizes and behaviors, the method competes well with established integrators in solving the system equations, and it outperforms them significantly when local parameter sensitivities are evaluated. For ease-of-use, the solver is embedded in a framework that automatically generates the integrator input from an SBML description of the system of interest. Conclusions For future applications, comparatively ‘cheap’ parameter sensitivities will enable advances in solving large, otherwise computationally expensive parameter estimation and optimization problems. More generally, we argue that substantially better computational performance can be achieved by exploiting characteristics specific to the problem domain; elements of our methods such as the error estimation could find broader use in other, more general numerical algorithms.

  14. Development of CO2 inversion system based on the adjoint of the global coupled transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikov, Dmitry; Maksyutov, Shamil; Chevallier, Frederic; Kaminski, Thomas; Ganshin, Alexander; Blessing, Simon

    2014-05-01

    We present the development of an inverse modeling system employing an adjoint of the global coupled transport model consisting of the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) Eulerian transport model (TM) and the Lagrangian plume diffusion model (LPDM) FLEXPART. NIES TM is a three-dimensional atmospheric transport model, which solves the continuity equation for a number of atmospheric tracers on a grid spanning the entire globe. Spatial discretization is based on a reduced latitude-longitude grid and a hybrid sigma-isentropic coordinate in the vertical. NIES TM uses a horizontal resolution of 2.5°×2.5°. However, to resolve synoptic-scale tracer distributions and to have the ability to optimize fluxes at resolutions of 0.5° and higher we coupled NIES TM with the Lagrangian model FLEXPART. The Lagrangian component of the forward and adjoint models uses precalculated responses of the observed concentration to the surface fluxes and 3-D concentrations field simulated with the FLEXPART model. NIES TM and FLEXPART are driven by JRA-25/JCDAS reanalysis dataset. Construction of the adjoint of the Lagrangian part is less complicated, as LPDMs calculate the sensitivity of measurements to the surrounding emissions field by tracking a large number of "particles" backwards in time. Developing of the adjoint to Eulerian part was performed with automatic differentiation tool the Transformation of Algorithms in Fortran (TAF) software (http://www.FastOpt.com). This method leads to the discrete adjoint of NIES TM. The main advantage of the discrete adjoint is that the resulting gradients of the numerical cost function are exact, even for nonlinear algorithms. The overall advantages of our method are that: 1. No code modification of Lagrangian model is required, making it applicable to combination of global NIES TM and any Lagrangian model; 2. Once run, the Lagrangian output can be applied to any chemically neutral gas; 3. High-resolution results can be obtained over

  15. Laryngeal High-Speed Videoendoscopy: Sensitivity of Objective Parameters towards Recording Frame Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Schützenberger; Melda Kunduk; Michael Döllinger; Christoph Alexiou; Denis Dubrovskiy; Marion Semmler; Anja Seger; Christopher Bohr

    2016-01-01

    The current use of laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopy in clinic settings involves subjective visual assessment of vocal fold vibratory characteristics. However, objective quantification of vocal fold vibrations for evidence-based diagnosis and therapy is desired, and objective parameters assessing laryngeal dynamics have therefore been suggested. This study investigated the sensitivity of the objective parameters and their dependence on recording frame rate. A total of 300 endoscopic high-sp...

  16. Temperature Sensitivity as a Microbial Trait Using Parameters from Macromolecular Rate Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Jean Alster

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The activity of soil microbial extracellular enzymes is strongly controlled by temperature, yet the degree to which temperature sensitivity varies by microbe and enzyme type is unclear. Such information would allow soil microbial enzymes to be incorporated in a traits-based framework to improve prediction of ecosystem response to global change. If temperature sensitivity varies for specific soil enzymes, then determining the underlying causes of variation in temperature sensitivity of these enzymes will provide fundamental insights for predicting nutrient dynamics belowground. In this study, we characterized how both microbial taxonomic variation as well as substrate type affects temperature sensitivity. We measured β-glucosidase, leucine aminopeptidase, and phosphatase activities at six temperatures: 4, 11, 25, 35, 45, and 60°C, for seven different soil microbial isolates. To calculate temperature sensitivity, we employed two models, Arrhenius, which predicts an exponential increase in reaction rate with temperature, and Macromolecular Rate Theory (MMRT, which predicts rate to peak and then decline as temperature increases. We found MMRT provided a more accurate fit and allowed for more nuanced interpretation of temperature sensitivity in all of the enzyme × isolate combinations tested. Our results revealed that both the enzyme type and soil isolate type explain variation in parameters associated with temperature sensitivity. Because we found temperature sensitivity to be an inherent and variable property of an enzyme, we argue that it can be incorporated as a microbial functional trait, but only when using the MMRT definition of temperature sensitivity. We show that the Arrhenius metrics of temperature sensitivity are overly sensitive to test conditions, with activation energy changing depending on the temperature range it was calculated within. Thus, we propose the use of the MMRT definition of temperature sensitivity for accurate

  17. Temperature Sensitivity as a Microbial Trait Using Parameters from Macromolecular Rate Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alster, Charlotte J; Baas, Peter; Wallenstein, Matthew D; Johnson, Nels G; von Fischer, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    The activity of soil microbial extracellular enzymes is strongly controlled by temperature, yet the degree to which temperature sensitivity varies by microbe and enzyme type is unclear. Such information would allow soil microbial enzymes to be incorporated in a traits-based framework to improve prediction of ecosystem response to global change. If temperature sensitivity varies for specific soil enzymes, then determining the underlying causes of variation in temperature sensitivity of these enzymes will provide fundamental insights for predicting nutrient dynamics belowground. In this study, we characterized how both microbial taxonomic variation as well as substrate type affects temperature sensitivity. We measured β-glucosidase, leucine aminopeptidase, and phosphatase activities at six temperatures: 4, 11, 25, 35, 45, and 60°C, for seven different soil microbial isolates. To calculate temperature sensitivity, we employed two models, Arrhenius, which predicts an exponential increase in reaction rate with temperature, and Macromolecular Rate Theory (MMRT), which predicts rate to peak and then decline as temperature increases. We found MMRT provided a more accurate fit and allowed for more nuanced interpretation of temperature sensitivity in all of the enzyme × isolate combinations tested. Our results revealed that both the enzyme type and soil isolate type explain variation in parameters associated with temperature sensitivity. Because we found temperature sensitivity to be an inherent and variable property of an enzyme, we argue that it can be incorporated as a microbial functional trait, but only when using the MMRT definition of temperature sensitivity. We show that the Arrhenius metrics of temperature sensitivity are overly sensitive to test conditions, with activation energy changing depending on the temperature range it was calculated within. Thus, we propose the use of the MMRT definition of temperature sensitivity for accurate interpretation of

  18. Selection of body sway parameters according to their sensitivity and repeatability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejc Sarabon

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available For the precise evaluation of body balance, static type of tests performed on a force plate are the most commonly used ones. In these tests, body sway characteristics are analyzed based on the model of inverted pendulum and looking at the center of pressure (COP movement in time. Human body engages different strategies to compensate for balance perturbations. For this reason, there is a need to identify parameters which are sensitive to specific balance changes and which enable us to identify balance sub-components. The aim of our study was to investigate intra-visit repeatability and sensibility of the 40 different body sway parameters. Twenty-nine subjects participated in the study. They performed three different balancing tasks of different levels of difficulty, three repetitions each. The hip-width parallel stance and the single leg stance, both with open eyes, were used as ways to compare different balance intensities due to biomechanical changes. Additionally, deprivation of vision was used in the third balance task to study sensitivity to sensory system changes. As shown by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC, repeatability of cumulative parameters such as COP, maximal amplitude and frequency showed excellent repeatability (ICC>0,85. Other parameters describing sub-dynamics through single repetition proved to have unsatisfying repeatability. Parameters most sensitive to increased intensity of balancing tasks were common COP, COP in medio-lateral and in antero-posterior direction, and maximal amplitues in the same directions. Frequency of oscilations has proved to be sensitive only to deprivation of vision. As shown in our study, cumulative parameters describing the path which the center of pressure makes proved to be the most repeatable and sensitive to detect different increases of balancing tasks enabling future use in balance studies and in clinical practice.

  19. Estimating a planetary magnetic field with time-dependent global MHD simulations using an adjoint approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabert, Christian; Othmer, Carsten; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2017-05-01

    The interaction of the solar wind with a planetary magnetic field causes electrical currents that modify the magnetic field distribution around the planet. We present an approach to estimating the planetary magnetic field from in situ spacecraft data using a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation approach. The method is developed with respect to the upcoming BepiColombo mission to planet Mercury aimed at determining the planet's magnetic field and its interior electrical conductivity distribution. In contrast to the widely used empirical models, global MHD simulations allow the calculation of the strongly time-dependent interaction process of the solar wind with the planet. As a first approach, we use a simple MHD simulation code that includes time-dependent solar wind and magnetic field parameters. The planetary parameters are estimated by minimizing the misfit of spacecraft data and simulation results with a gradient-based optimization. As the calculation of gradients with respect to many parameters is usually very time-consuming, we investigate the application of an adjoint MHD model. This adjoint MHD model is generated by an automatic differentiation tool to compute the gradients efficiently. The computational cost for determining the gradient with an adjoint approach is nearly independent of the number of parameters. Our method is validated by application to THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) magnetosheath data to estimate Earth's dipole moment.

  20. Sensitivity analysis of helicopter IMC decelerating steep approach and landing performance to navigation system parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmali, M. S.; Phatak, A. V.

    1982-01-01

    Results of a study to investigate, by means of a computer simulation, the performance sensitivity of helicopter IMC DSAL operations as a function of navigation system parameters are presented. A mathematical model representing generically a navigation system is formulated. The scenario simulated consists of a straight in helicopter approach to landing along a 6 deg glideslope. The deceleration magnitude chosen is 03g. The navigation model parameters are varied and the statistics of the total system errors (TSE) computed. These statistics are used to determine the critical navigation system parameters that affect the performance of the closed-loop navigation, guidance and control system of a UH-1H helicopter.

  1. Neutrino masses in SU(5) x U(1){sub F} with adjoint flavons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nardi, Enrico [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Frascati (Italy); IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Madrid (Spain); Restrepo, Diego; Velasquez, Mauricio [Universidad de Antioquia, Instituto de Fisica, Medellin (Colombia)

    2012-03-15

    We present a SU(5) x U(1){sub F} supersymmetric model for neutrino masses and mixings that implements the seesaw mechanism by means of the heavy SU(2) singlets and triplets states contained in three adjoints of SU(5). We discuss how Abelian U(1){sub F} symmetries can naturally yield non-hierarchical light neutrinos even when the heavy states are strongly hierarchical, and how it can also ensure that R-parity arises as an exact accidental symmetry. By assigning two flavons that break U(1){sub F} to the adjoint representation of SU(5) and assuming universality for all the fundamental couplings, the coefficients of the effective Yukawa and Majorana mass operators become calculable in terms of group theoretical quantities. There is a single free parameter in the model, however, at leading order the structure of the light neutrinos mass matrix is determined in a parameter independent way. (orig.)

  2. Elementary operators on self-adjoint operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Lajos; Semrl, Peter

    2007-03-01

    Let H be a Hilbert space and let and be standard *-operator algebras on H. Denote by and the set of all self-adjoint operators in and , respectively. Assume that and are surjective maps such that M(AM*(B)A)=M(A)BM(A) and M*(BM(A)B)=M*(B)AM*(B) for every pair , . Then there exist an invertible bounded linear or conjugate-linear operator and a constant c[set membership, variant]{-1,1} such that M(A)=cTAT*, , and M*(B)=cT*BT, .

  3. Local Volatility Calibration Using An Adjoint Proxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel TURINICI

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We document the calibration of the local volatility in a framework similar to Coleman, Li and Verma. The quality of a surface is assessed through a functional to be optimized; the specificity of the approach is to separate the optimization (performed with any suitable optimization algorithm from the computation of the functional where we use an adjoint (as in L. Jiang et. al. to obtain an approximation; moreover our main calibration variable is the implied volatility (the procedure can also accommodate the Greeks. The procedure performs well on benchmarks from the literature and on FOREX data.

  4. Stabilized FE simulation of prototype thermal-hydraulics problems with integrated adjoint-based capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadid, J. N.; Smith, T. M.; Cyr, E. C.; Wildey, T. M.; Pawlowski, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    A critical aspect of applying modern computational solution methods to complex multiphysics systems of relevance to nuclear reactor modeling, is the assessment of the predictive capability of specific proposed mathematical models. In this respect the understanding of numerical error, the sensitivity of the solution to parameters associated with input data, boundary condition uncertainty, and mathematical models is critical. Additionally, the ability to evaluate and or approximate the model efficiently, to allow development of a reasonable level of statistical diagnostics of the mathematical model and the physical system, is of central importance. In this study we report on initial efforts to apply integrated adjoint-based computational analysis and automatic differentiation tools to begin to address these issues. The study is carried out in the context of a Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes approximation to turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer using a particular spatial discretization based on implicit fully-coupled stabilized FE methods. Initial results are presented that show the promise of these computational techniques in the context of nuclear reactor relevant prototype thermal-hydraulics problems.

  5. Sensitivity analysis of large system of chemical kinetic parameters for engine combustion simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, H; Sanz-Argent, J; Petitpas, G; Havstad, M; Flowers, D

    2012-04-19

    In this study, the authors applied the state-of-the art sensitivity methods to downselect system parameters from 4000+ to 8, (23000+ -> 4000+ -> 84 -> 8). This analysis procedure paves the way for future works: (1) calibrate the system response using existed experimental observations, and (2) predict future experiment results, using the calibrated system.

  6. Breathing dynamics based parameter sensitivity analysis of hetero-polymeric DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukder, Srijeeta; Sen, Shrabani; Chaudhury, Pinaki, E-mail: pinakc@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 A P C Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Chakraborti, Prantik; Banik, Suman K., E-mail: skbanik@jcbose.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Bose Institute, 93/1 A P C Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Metzler, Ralf, E-mail: rmetzler@uni-potsdam.de [Institute for Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam-Golm, Germany and Physics Department, Tampere University of Technology, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2014-03-28

    We study the parameter sensitivity of hetero-polymeric DNA within the purview of DNA breathing dynamics. The degree of correlation between the mean bubble size and the model parameters is estimated for this purpose for three different DNA sequences. The analysis leads us to a better understanding of the sequence dependent nature of the breathing dynamics of hetero-polymeric DNA. Out of the 14 model parameters for DNA stability in the statistical Poland-Scheraga approach, the hydrogen bond interaction ε{sub hb}(AT) for an AT base pair and the ring factor ξ turn out to be the most sensitive parameters. In addition, the stacking interaction ε{sub st}(TA-TA) for an TA-TA nearest neighbor pair of base-pairs is found to be the most sensitive one among all stacking interactions. Moreover, we also establish that the nature of stacking interaction has a deciding effect on the DNA breathing dynamics, not the number of times a particular stacking interaction appears in a sequence. We show that the sensitivity analysis can be used as an effective measure to guide a stochastic optimization technique to find the kinetic rate constants related to the dynamics as opposed to the case where the rate constants are measured using the conventional unbiased way of optimization.

  7. Parametric sensitivity analysis for techno-economic parameters in Indian power sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallah, Subhash; Bansal, N.K. [Shri Mata Vaishno Devi University, Katra, Jammu and Kashmir 182 320 (India)

    2011-03-15

    Sensitivity analysis is a technique that evaluates the model response to changes in input assumptions. Due to uncertain prices of primary fuels in the world market, Government regulations for sustainability and various other technical parameters there is a need to analyze the techno-economic parameters which play an important role in policy formulations. This paper examines the variations in technical as well as economic parameters that can mostly affect the energy policy of India. MARKAL energy simulation model has been used to analyze the uncertainty in all techno-economic parameters. Various ranges of input parameters are adopted from previous studies. The results show that at lower discount rate coal is the least preferred technology and correspondingly carbon emission reduction. With increased gas and nuclear fuel prices they disappear from the allocations of energy mix. (author)

  8. Self-adjointness of the Gaffney Laplacian on Vector Bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandara, Lashi, E-mail: lashi.bandara@chalmers.se [Chalmers University of Technology and University of Gothenburg, Mathematical Sciences (Sweden); Milatovic, Ognjen, E-mail: omilatov@unf.edu [University of North Florida, Department of Mathematics and Statistics (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We study the Gaffney Laplacian on a vector bundle equipped with a compatible metric and connection over a Riemannian manifold that is possibly geodesically incomplete. Under the hypothesis that the Cauchy boundary is polar, we demonstrate the self-adjointness of this Laplacian. Furthermore, we show that negligible boundary is a necessary and sufficient condition for the self-adjointness of this operator.

  9. On the product of the self-adjoint operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wulf Rehder

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available A proof is given for the fact that the product of two self-adjoint operators, one of which is also positive, is again self-adjoint if and only if the product is normal. This theorem applies, in particular, if one operator is an orthogonal projection. In general, the positivity requirement cannot be dropped.

  10. A reduced adjoint approach to variational data assimilation

    KAUST Repository

    Altaf, Muhammad

    2013-02-01

    The adjoint method has been used very often for variational data assimilation. The computational cost to run the adjoint model often exceeds several original model runs and the method needs significant programming efforts to implement the adjoint model code. The work proposed here is variational data assimilation based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) which avoids the implementation of the adjoint of the tangent linear approximation of the original nonlinear model. An ensemble of the forward model simulations is used to determine the approximation of the covariance matrix and only the dominant eigenvectors of this matrix are used to define a model subspace. The adjoint of the tangent linear model is replaced by the reduced adjoint based on this reduced space. Thus the adjoint model is run in reduced space with negligible computational cost. Once the gradient is obtained in reduced space it is projected back in full space and the minimization process is carried in full space. In the paper the reduced adjoint approach to variational data assimilation is introduced. The characteristics and performance of the method are illustrated with a number of data assimilation experiments in a ground water subsurface contaminant model. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Adjoint method for hybrid guidance loop state-space models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, M.; Bucco, D.

    2015-01-01

    A framework is introduced to develop the theory of the adjoint method for models including both continuous and discrete dynamics. The basis of this framework consists of the class of impulsive linear dynamic systems. It allows extension of the adjoint method to more general models that include multi

  12. The compressible adjoint equations in geodynamics: equations and numerical assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghelichkhan, Siavash; Bunge, Hans-Peter

    2016-04-01

    The adjoint method is a powerful means to obtain gradient information in a mantle convection model relative to past flow structure. While the adjoint equations in geodynamics have been derived for the conservation equations of mantle flow in their incompressible form, the applicability of this approximation to Earth is limited, because density increases by almost a factor of two from the surface to the Core Mantle Boundary. Here we introduce the compressible adjoint equations for the conservation equations in the anelastic-liquid approximation. Our derivation applies an operator formulation in Hilbert spaces, to connect to recent work in seismology (Fichtner et al (2006)) and geodynamics (Horbach et al (2014)), where the approach was used to derive the adjoint equations for the wave equation and incompressible mantle flow. We present numerical tests of the newly derived equations based on twin experiments, focusing on three simulations. A first, termed Compressible, assumes the compressible forward and adjoint equations, and represents the consistent means of including compressibility effects. A second, termed Mixed, applies the compressible forward equation, but ignores compressibility effects in the adjoint equations, where the incompressible equations are used instead. A third simulation, termed Incompressible, neglects compressibility effects entirely in the forward and adjoint equations relative to the reference twin. The compressible and mixed formulations successfully restore earlier mantle flow structure, while the incompressible formulation yields noticeable artifacts. Our results suggest the use of a compressible formulation, when applying the adjoint method to seismically derived mantle heterogeneity structure.

  13. Adjoint representation of the graded Lie algebra osp(2/1; C) and its exponentiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ilyenko, K

    2003-01-01

    We construct explicitly the grade star Hermitian adjoint representation of osp(2/1; C) graded Lie algebra. Its proper Lie subalgebra, the even part of the graded Lie algebra osp(2/1; C), is given by su(2) compact Lie algebra. The Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula is considered and reality conditions for the Grassman-odd transformation parameters, which multiply the pair of odd generators of the graded Lie algebra, are clarified.

  14. Sensitivity analysis of effective population size to demographic parameters in house sparrow populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubberud, Marlene Waege; Myhre, Ane Marlene; Holand, Håkon; Kvalnes, Thomas; Ringsby, Thor Harald; Saether, Bernt-Erik; Jensen, Henrik

    2017-02-16

    The ratio between the effective and the census population size, Ne/N, is an important measure of the long-term viability and sustainability of a population. Understanding which demographic processes that affect Ne/N most will improve our understanding of how genetic drift and the probability of fixation of alleles is affected by demography. This knowledge may also be of vital importance in management of endangered populations and species. Here, we use data from 13 natural populations of house sparrow (Passer domesticus) in Norway to calculate the demographic parameters that determine Ne/N. Using the global variance-based Sobol' method for the sensitivity analyses, we found that Ne/N was most sensitive to demographic variance, especially among older individuals. Furthermore, the individual reproductive values (that determine the demographic variance) were most sensitive to variation in fecundity. Our results draw attention to the applicability of sensitivity analyses in population management and conservation. For population management aiming to reduce the loss of genetic variation, a sensitivity analysis may indicate the demographic parameters towards which resources should be focused. The result of such an analysis may depend on the life history and mating system of the population or species under consideration, because the vital rates and sex-age classes that Ne/N is most sensitive to may change accordingly.

  15. Breast tumor oxygenation in response to carbogen intervention assessed simultaneously by three oxygen-sensitive parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yueqing; Bourke, Vincent; Kim, Jae Gwan; Xia, Mengna; Constantinescu, Anca; Mason, Ralph P.; Liu, Hanli

    2003-07-01

    Three oxygen-sensitive parameters (arterial hemoglobin oxygen saturation SaO2, tumor vascular oxygenated hemoglobin concentration [HbO2], and tumor oxygen tension pO2) were measured simultaneously by three different optical techniques (pulse oximeter, near infrared spectroscopy, and FOXY) to evaluate dynamic responses of breast tumors to carbogen (5% CO2 and 95% O2) intervention. All three parameters displayed similar trends in dynamic response to carbogen challenge, but with different response times. These response times were quantified by the time constants of the exponential fitting curves, revealing the immediate and the fastest response from the arterial SaO2, followed by changes in global tumor vascular [HbO2], and delayed responses for pO2. The consistency of the three oxygen-sensitive parameters demonstrated the ability of NIRS to monitor therapeutic interventions for rat breast tumors in-vivo in real time.

  16. Sensitivity analysis of dimensionless parameters for physical simulation of water-flooding reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yuhu; LI Jiachun; ZHOU Jifu

    2005-01-01

    A numerical approach to optimize dimensionless parameters of water-flooding porous media flows is proposed based on the analysis of the sensitivity factor defined as the variation ration of a target function with respect to the variation of dimensionless parameters. A complete set of scaling criteria for water-flooding reservoir of five-spot well pattern case is derived from the 3-D governing equations, involving the gravitational force,the capillary force and the compressibility of water, oil and rock. By using this approach,we have estimated the influences of each dimensionless parameter on experimental results, and thus sorting out the dominant ones with larger sensitivity factors ranging from 10-4 to 100.

  17. Practical Aerodynamic Design Optimization Based on the Navier-Stokes Equations and a Discrete Adjoint Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    The technical details are summarized below: Compressible and incompressible versions of a three-dimensional unstructured mesh Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver have been differentiated and resulting derivatives have been verified by comparisons with finite differences and a complex-variable approach. In this implementation, the turbulence model is fully coupled with the flow equations in order to achieve this consistency. The accuracy demonstrated in the current work represents the first time that such an approach has been successfully implemented. The accuracy of a number of simplifying approximations to the linearizations of the residual have been examined. A first-order approximation to the dependent variables in both the adjoint and design equations has been investigated. The effects of a "frozen" eddy viscosity and the ramifications of neglecting some mesh sensitivity terms were also examined. It has been found that none of the approximations yielded derivatives of acceptable accuracy and were often of incorrect sign. However, numerical experiments indicate that an incomplete convergence of the adjoint system often yield sufficiently accurate derivatives, thereby significantly lowering the time required for computing sensitivity information. The convergence rate of the adjoint solver relative to the flow solver has been examined. Inviscid adjoint solutions typically require one to four times the cost of a flow solution, while for turbulent adjoint computations, this ratio can reach as high as eight to ten. Numerical experiments have shown that the adjoint solver can stall before converging the solution to machine accuracy, particularly for viscous cases. A possible remedy for this phenomenon would be to include the complete higher-order linearization in the preconditioning step, or to employ a simple form of mesh sequencing to obtain better approximations to the solution through the use of coarser meshes. . An efficient surface parameterization based

  18. Adjoint of the Global Eulerian–Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric transport model (A-GELCA v1.0: development and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Belikov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We present the development of the Adjoint of the Global Eulerian–Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric (A-GELCA model that consists of the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES model as an Eulerian three-dimensional transport model (TM, and FLEXPART (FLEXible PARTicle dispersion model as the Lagrangian plume diffusion model (LPDM. The tangent and adjoint components of the Eulerian model were constructed directly from the original NIES TM code using an automatic differentiation tool known as TAF (Transformation of Algorithms in Fortran; http://www.FastOpt.com, with additional manual pre- and post-processing aimed at improving the performance of the computing, including MPI (Message Passing Interface. As results, the adjoint of Eulerian model is discrete. Construction of the adjoint of the Lagrangian component did not require any code modification, as LPDMs are able to track a significant number of particles back in time and thereby calculate the sensitivity of observations to the neighboring emissions areas. Eulerian and Lagrangian adjoint components were coupled at the time boundary in the global domain.The results are verified using a series of test experiments. The forward simulation shown the coupled model is effective in reproducing the seasonal cycle and short-term variability of CO2 even in the case of multiple limiting factors, such as high uncertainty of fluxes and the low resolution of the Eulerian model. The adjoint model demonstrates the high accuracy compared to direct forward sensitivity calculations and fast performance. The developed adjoint of the coupled model combines the flux conservation and stability of an Eulerian discrete adjoint formulation with the flexibility, accuracy, and high resolution of a Lagrangian backward trajectory formulation.

  19. Adjoint of the global Eulerian-Lagrangian coupled atmospheric transport model (A-GELCA v1.0): development and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikov, Dmitry A.; Maksyutov, Shamil; Yaremchuk, Alexey; Ganshin, Alexander; Kaminski, Thomas; Blessing, Simon; Sasakawa, Motoki; Gomez-Pelaez, Angel J.; Starchenko, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    We present the development of the Adjoint of the Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric (A-GELCA) model that consists of the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) model as an Eulerian three-dimensional transport model (TM), and FLEXPART (FLEXible PARTicle dispersion model) as the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM). The forward tangent linear and adjoint components of the Eulerian model were constructed directly from the original NIES TM code using an automatic differentiation tool known as TAF (Transformation of Algorithms in Fortran; http://www.FastOpt.com, with additional manual pre- and post-processing aimed at improving transparency and clarity of the code and optimizing the performance of the computing, including MPI (Message Passing Interface). The Lagrangian component did not require any code modification, as LPDMs are self-adjoint and track a significant number of particles backward in time in order to calculate the sensitivity of the observations to the neighboring emission areas. The constructed Eulerian adjoint was coupled with the Lagrangian component at a time boundary in the global domain. The simulations presented in this work were performed using the A-GELCA model in forward and adjoint modes. The forward simulation shows that the coupled model improves reproduction of the seasonal cycle and short-term variability of CO2. Mean bias and standard deviation for five of the six Siberian sites considered decrease roughly by 1 ppm when using the coupled model. The adjoint of the Eulerian model was shown, through several numerical tests, to be very accurate (within machine epsilon with mismatch around to ±6 e-14) compared to direct forward sensitivity calculations. The developed adjoint of the coupled model combines the flux conservation and stability of an Eulerian discrete adjoint formulation with the flexibility, accuracy, and high resolution of a Lagrangian backward trajectory formulation. A-GELCA will be incorporated

  20. Correspondence of the eigenvalues of a non-self-adjoint operator to those of a self-adjoint operator

    CERN Document Server

    Weir, John

    2008-01-01

    We prove that the eigenvalues of a certain highly non-self-adjoint operator correspond, up to scaling by a positive constant, to those of a self-adjoint operator with compact resolvent; hence there are infinitely many eigenvalues which accumulate only at infinity.

  1. Global sensitivity analysis and Bayesian parameter inference for solute transport in porous media colonized by biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, A.; Delay, F.; Fajraoui, N.; Fahs, M.; Mara, T. A.

    2016-08-01

    The concept of dual flowing continuum is a promising approach for modeling solute transport in porous media that includes biofilm phases. The highly dispersed transit time distributions often generated by these media are taken into consideration by simply stipulating that advection-dispersion transport occurs through both the porous and the biofilm phases. Both phases are coupled but assigned with contrasting hydrodynamic properties. However, the dual flowing continuum suffers from intrinsic equifinality in the sense that the outlet solute concentration can be the result of several parameter sets of the two flowing phases. To assess the applicability of the dual flowing continuum, we investigate how the model behaves with respect to its parameters. For the purpose of this study, a Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) and a Statistical Calibration (SC) of model parameters are performed for two transport scenarios that differ by the strength of interaction between the flowing phases. The GSA is shown to be a valuable tool to understand how the complex system behaves. The results indicate that the rate of mass transfer between the two phases is a key parameter of the model behavior and influences the identifiability of the other parameters. For weak mass exchanges, the output concentration is mainly controlled by the velocity in the porous medium and by the porosity of both flowing phases. In the case of large mass exchanges, the kinetics of this exchange also controls the output concentration. The SC results show that transport with large mass exchange between the flowing phases is more likely affected by equifinality than transport with weak exchange. The SC also indicates that weakly sensitive parameters, such as the dispersion in each phase, can be accurately identified. Removing them from calibration procedures is not recommended because it might result in biased estimations of the highly sensitive parameters.

  2. Seismic structure of the European crust and upper mantle based on adjoint tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hejun

    We use adjoint tomography to estimate three-dimensional variations in seismic parameters within the crust and upper mantle beneath Europe and the North Atlantic Ocean. Spectral-element and adjoint methods are used to numerically calculate synthetic seismograms and sensitivity kernels in three-dimensional Earth models. Combined with gradient- based optimization algorithms, e.g., preconditioned conjugate-gradient and L-BFGS methods, we iteratively update seismic models of Earth's interior. A three-stage inversion strategy is designed to estimate variations in elastic wavespeeds, anelastic attenuation and radial & azimuthal anisotropy. In stage one, frequency-dependent phase differences between observed and simulated seismograms are used to determine a new radially anisotropic wavespeed model for the European crust and upper mantle, namely EU30. Long-wavelength structures in EU30 compare favorably with previous body- and surface-wave tomographic models. Some hitherto unidentified features naturally emerge from the smooth starting model. In stage two, frequency-dependent amplitude differences combined with remaining phase anomalies are used to simultaneously constrain elastic and anelastic structures. A new anelastic model, named EU50, is constructed in this stage. We observe several notable features, such as enhanced attenuation within the mantle transition zone beneath the North Atlantic Ocean. In the first two stages, long-period surface waves and short-period body waves in three-component seismograms are combined to simultaneously constrain shallow and deep structures. In stage three, frequency-dependent phase and amplitude anomalies of three-component surface waves are used to construct a radially and azimuthally anisotropic model EU60. We find that the direction of the fast axis is closely tied to the tectonic evolution in this region, such as extension along the North Atlantic Ridge, trench retreat in the Mediterranean, and counterclockwise rotation of the

  3. Effect of parameters in moving average method for event detection enhancement using phase sensitive OTDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong-Seok; Naeem, Khurram; Jeon, Min Yong; Kwon, Il-bum

    2017-04-01

    We analyze the relations of parameters in moving average method to enhance the event detectability of phase sensitive optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR). If the external events have unique frequency of vibration, then the control parameters of moving average method should be optimized in order to detect these events efficiently. A phase sensitive OTDR was implemented by a pulsed light source, which is composed of a laser diode, a semiconductor optical amplifier, an erbium-doped fiber amplifier, a fiber Bragg grating filter, and a light receiving part, which has a photo-detector and high speed data acquisition system. The moving average method is operated with the control parameters: total number of raw traces, M, number of averaged traces, N, and step size of moving, n. The raw traces are obtained by the phase sensitive OTDR with sound signals generated by a speaker. Using these trace data, the relation of the control parameters is analyzed. In the result, if the event signal has one frequency, then the optimal values of N, n are existed to detect the event efficiently.

  4. Parameter sensitivity study of the biogeochemical model in the China coastal seas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Xuanliang; LIU Guimei; GAO Shan; WANG Hui

    2015-01-01

    In order to develop a coupled basin scale model of ocean circulation and biogeochemical cycling, we present a biogeochemical model including 12 components to study the ecosystem in the China coastal seas (CCS). The formulation of phytoplankton mortality and zooplankton growth are modified according to biological characteristics of CCS.The four sensitivity biological parameters, zooplankton assimilation efficiency rate (ZooAE_N), zooplankton basal metabolism rate (ZooBM), maximum specific growth rate of zooplankton (μ20) and maximum chlorophyll to carbon ratio (Chl2C_m) are obtained in sensitivity experiments for the phytoplankton, and experiments about the parameterμ20, half-saturation for phytoplankton NO3 uptake ( KNO3 ) and remineralization rate of small detritusN (SDeRRN) are conducted. The results demonstrate that the biogeochemical model is quite sensitive to the zooplankton grazing parameter when it ranges from 0.1 to 1.2 d–1. The KNO3 and SDeRRN also play an important role in determining the nitrogen cycle within certain ranges.The sensitive interval of KNO3 is from 0.1 to 1.5 (mmol/m3)–1, and interval of SEdRRN is from 0.01 and 0.1 d–1. The observational data from September 1998 to July 2000 obtained at SEATS station are used to validate the performance of biological model after parameters optimization. The results show that the modified model has a good capacity to reveal the biological process features, and the sensitivity analysis can save computational resources greatly during the model simulation.

  5. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of estimated soil hydraulic parameters for simulating soil water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Manika; Garg, Naveen Kumar; Srivastava, Prashant K.

    2014-05-01

    The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis has been carried out for the scalar parameters (soil hydraulic parameters (SHPs)), which govern the simulation of soil water content in the unsaturated soil zone. The study involves field experiments, which were conducted in real field conditions for wheat crop in Roorkee, India under irrigated conditions. Soil samples were taken for the soil profile of 60 cm depth at an interval of 15 cm in the experimental field to determine soil water retention curves (SWRCs). These experimentally determined SWRCs were used to estimate the SHPs by least square optimization under constrained conditions. Sensitivity of the SHPs estimated by various pedotransfer functions (PTFs), that relate various easily measurable soil properties like soil texture, bulk density and organic carbon content, is compared with lab derived parameters to simulate respective soil water retention curves. Sensitivity analysis was carried out using the monte carlo simulations and the one factor at a time approach. The different sets of SHPs, along with experimentally determined saturated permeability, are then used as input parameters in physically based, root water uptake model to ascertain the uncertainties in simulating soil water content. The generalised likelihood uncertainty estimation procedure (GLUE) was subsequently used to estimate the uncertainty bounds (UB) on the model predictions. It was found that the experimentally obtained SHPs were able to simulate the soil water contents with efficiencies of 70-80% at all the depths for the three irrigation treatments. The SHPs obtained from the PTFs, performed with varying uncertainties in simulating the soil water contents. Keywords: Sensitivity analysis, Uncertainty estimation, Pedotransfer functions, Soil hydraulic parameters, Hydrological modelling

  6. Sensitivity of precipitation to parameter values in the community atmosphere model version 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannesson, Gardar; Lucas, Donald; Qian, Yun; Swiler, Laura Painton; Wildey, Timothy Michael

    2014-03-01

    One objective of the Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) program is to develop the capability to thoroughly test and understand the uncertainties in the overall climate model and its components as they are being developed. The focus on uncertainties involves sensitivity analysis: the capability to determine which input parameters have a major influence on the output responses of interest. This report presents some initial sensitivity analysis results performed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LNNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In the 2011-2012 timeframe, these laboratories worked in collaboration to perform sensitivity analyses of a set of CAM5, 2° runs, where the response metrics of interest were precipitation metrics. The three labs performed their sensitivity analysis (SA) studies separately and then compared results. Overall, the results were quite consistent with each other although the methods used were different. This exercise provided a robustness check of the global sensitivity analysis metrics and identified some strongly influential parameters.

  7. Sensitivity Analyses for Cross-Coupled Parameters in Automotive Powertrain Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pongpun Othaganont

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available When vehicle manufacturers are developing new hybrid and electric vehicles, modeling and simulation are frequently used to predict the performance of the new vehicles from an early stage in the product lifecycle. Typically, models are used to predict the range, performance and energy consumption of their future planned production vehicle; they also allow the designer to optimize a vehicle’s configuration. Another use for the models is in performing sensitivity analysis, which helps us understand which parameters have the most influence on model predictions and real-world behaviors. There are various techniques for sensitivity analysis, some are numerical, but the greatest insights are obtained analytically with sensitivity defined in terms of partial derivatives. Existing methods in the literature give us a useful, quantified measure of parameter sensitivity, a first-order effect, but they do not consider second-order effects. Second-order effects could give us additional insights: for example, a first order analysis might tell us that a limiting factor is the efficiency of the vehicle’s prime-mover; our new second order analysis will tell us how quickly the efficiency of the powertrain will become of greater significance. In this paper, we develop a method based on formal optimization mathematics for rapid second-order sensitivity analyses and illustrate these through a case study on a C-segment electric vehicle.

  8. Optimization of prostate cancer treatment plans using the adjoint transport method and discrete ordinates codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, S.; Henderson, D.L. [Dept. of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Thomadsen, B.R. [Dept. of Medical Physics and Dept. of Human Oncology, Madison (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Interstitial brachytherapy is a type of radiation in which radioactive sources are implanted directly into cancerous tissue. Determination of dose delivered to tissue by photons emitted from implanted seeds is an important step in the treatment plan process. In this paper we will investigate the use of the discrete ordinates method and the adjoint method to calculate absorbed dose in the regions of interest. MIP (mixed-integer programming) is used to determine the optimal seed distribution that conforms the prescribed dose to the tumor and delivers minimal dose to the sensitive structures. The patient treatment procedure consists of three steps: (1) image acquisition with the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and assessing the region of interest, (2) adjoint flux computation with discrete ordinate code for inverse dose calculation, and (3) optimization with the MIP branch-and-bound method.

  9. Sensitivity Analysis of WEC Array Layout Parameters Effect on the Power Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz, Pau Mercadé; Ferri, Francesco; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses the effect that the array layout choice has on the power performance. To this end, a sensitivity analysis is carried out with six array layout parameters, as the simulation inputs, the array power performance (q-factor), as the simulation output, and a simulation model specially...... developed in cooperation with the DTOcean research project, which aims to provide design tools for the deployment of the first generation of ocean energy converter arrays. The sensitivity analysis is performed for the particular case of an array of floating cylinders moving in the usual six rigid body...

  10. Sensitivity analysis of the SWMM Runoff-Transport parameters and the effects of catchment discretisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghloul, Nabil A.

    The use of the SWMM model to simulate the Runoff-Transport phenomenon necessitates the proper calibration of the different parameters involved in the process and the effect of these parameters on the routed hydrograph. A detailed sensitivity analysis is conducted on the main parameters of the Runoff-Transport Blocks to establish which are the most sensitive parameters affecting the Runoff-Transport simulation. The result of the study indicates a relative influence of the major parameters used in both the Runoff and Transport Blocks. Hence, the SWMM default values can be used adequately. The costs of setting up and running a SWMM simulation are largely determined by the level of discretisation used for a particular catchment. The purpose of this part of the study is to investigate the level of discretisation needed to adequately represent an urban watershed and to illustrate the effects of reducing the number of subcatchments on the accuracy of runoff simulation. A methodology is defined to achieve a representative equivalent catchment from theoretical considerations. Verification of the procedures involved a series of applications on both hypothetical and real areas.

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of Depletion Parameters for Heat Load Evaluation of PWR Spent Fuel Storage Pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Young; Lee, Un Chul [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    As necessity of safety re-evaluation for spent fuel storage facility has emphasized after the Fukushima accident, accuracy improvement of heat load evaluation has become more important to acquire reliable thermal-hydraulic evaluation results. As groundwork, parametric and sensitivity analyses of various storage conditions for Kori Unit 4 spent fuel storage pool and spent fuel depletion parameters such as axial burnup effect, operation history, and specific heat are conducted using ORIGEN2 code. According to heat load evaluation and parametric sensitivity analyses, decay heat of last discharged fuel comprises maximum 80.42% of total heat load of storage facility and there is a negative correlation between effect of depletion parameters and cooling period. It is determined that specific heat is most influential parameter and operation history is secondly influential parameter. And decay heat of just discharged fuel is varied from 0.34 to 1.66 times of average value and decay heat of 1 year cooled fuel is varied from 0.55 to 1.37 times of average value in accordance with change of specific power. Namely depletion parameters can cause large variation in decay heat calculation of short-term cooled fuel. Therefore application of real operation data instead of user selection value is needed to improve evaluation accuracy. It is expected that these results could be used to improve accuracy of heat load assessment and evaluate uncertainty of calculated heat load.

  12. Analysis of Parameter Sensitivity Using Robust Design Techniques for a Flatfish Type Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Santhakumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamic parameters play a major role in the dynamics and control of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs. The performance of an AUV is dependent on the parameter variations and a proper understanding of these parametric influences is essential for the design, modeling, and control of high-performance AUVs. In this paper, the sensitivity of hydrodynamic parameters on the control of a flatfish type AUV is analyzed using robust design techniques such as Taguchi's design method and statistical analysis tools such as Pareto-ANOVA. Since the pitch angle of an AUV is one of the crucial variables in the control applications, the sensitivity analysis of pitch angle variation is studied here. Eight prominent hydrodynamic coefficients are considered in the analysis. The results show that there are two critical hydrodynamic parameters, that is, hydrodynamic force and hydrodynamic pitching moment in the heave direction that influence the performance of a flatfish type AUV. A near-optimal combination of the parameters was identified and the simulation results have shown the effectiveness of the method in reducing the pitch error. These findings are significant for the design modifications as well as controller design of AUVs.

  13. Studying the physics potential of long-baseline experiments in terms of new sensitivity parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Mandip

    2016-01-01

    We investigate physics opportunities to constraint leptonic CP-violation phase $\\delta_{CP}$ through numerical analysis of working neutrino oscillation probability parameters, in the context of long base line experiments. Numerical analysis of two parameters, the " transition probability $\\delta_{CP}$ phase sensitivity parameter ($A^M$) " and " CP-violation probability $\\delta_{CP}$ phase sensitivity parameter ($A^{CP}$) ", as function of beam energy and/or base line has been preferably carried out. It is an elegant technique to broadly analyze different experiments to constraint $\\delta_{CP}$ phase and also to investigate mass hierarchy in the leptonic sector. The positive and negative values of parameter $A^{CP}$ corresponding to either of hierarchy in the specific beam energy ranges, could be a very promising way to explore mass hierarchy and $\\delta_{CP}$ phase. The keys to more robust bounds on $\\delta_{CP}$ phase are improvements of the involved detection techniques to explore bit low energy and relativ...

  14. Sensitivity analysis in oxidation ditch modelling: the effect of variations in stoichiometric, kinetic and operating parameters on the performance indices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abusam, A.A.A.; Keesman, K.J.; Straten, van G.; Spanjers, H.; Meinema, K.

    2001-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the application of the factorial sensitivity analysis methodology in studying the influence of variations in stoichiometric, kinetic and operating parameters on the performance indices of an oxidation ditch simulation model (benchmark). Factorial sensitivity analysis investig

  15. Dependence of mis-alignment sensitivity of ring laser gyro cavity on cavity parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Feng; Zhang Xi; Zhang Hongbo; Yang Changcheng, E-mail: sunok1234@sohu.com [Huazhong Institute of Electro-Optics - Wuhan National Lab for Optoelectronics, Wuhan, Hubei (China)

    2011-02-01

    The ring laser gyroscope (RLG), as a rotation sensor, has been widely used for navigation and guidance on vehicles and missiles. The environment of strong random-vibration and large acceleration may deteriorate the performance of the RLG due to the vibration-induced tilting of the mirrors. In this paper the RLG performance is theoretically analyzed and the parameters such as the beam diameter at the aperture, cavity mirror alignment sensitivities and power loss due to the mirror tilting are calculated. It is concluded that by carefully choosing the parameters, the significant loss in laser power can be avoided.

  16. [Sensitivity analysis of AnnAGNPS model's hydrology and water quality parameters based on the perturbation analysis method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Qing; Li, Zhao-Fu; Luo, Chuan

    2014-05-01

    Sensitivity analysis of hydrology and water quality parameters has a great significance for integrated model's construction and application. Based on AnnAGNPS model's mechanism, terrain, hydrology and meteorology, field management, soil and other four major categories of 31 parameters were selected for the sensitivity analysis in Zhongtian river watershed which is a typical small watershed of hilly region in the Taihu Lake, and then used the perturbation method to evaluate the sensitivity of the parameters to the model's simulation results. The results showed that: in the 11 terrain parameters, LS was sensitive to all the model results, RMN, RS and RVC were generally sensitive and less sensitive to the output of sediment but insensitive to the remaining results. For hydrometeorological parameters, CN was more sensitive to runoff and sediment and relatively sensitive for the rest results. In field management, fertilizer and vegetation parameters, CCC, CRM and RR were less sensitive to sediment and particulate pollutants, the six fertilizer parameters (FR, FD, FID, FOD, FIP, FOP) were particularly sensitive for nitrogen and phosphorus nutrients. For soil parameters, K is quite sensitive to all the results except the runoff, the four parameters of the soil's nitrogen and phosphorus ratio (SONR, SINR, SOPR, SIPR) were less sensitive to the corresponding results. The simulation and verification results of runoff in Zhongtian watershed show a good accuracy with the deviation less than 10% during 2005- 2010. Research results have a direct reference value on AnnAGNPS model's parameter selection and calibration adjustment. The runoff simulation results of the study area also proved that the sensitivity analysis was practicable to the parameter's adjustment and showed the adaptability to the hydrology simulation in the Taihu Lake basin's hilly region and provide reference for the model's promotion in China.

  17. Parameter sensitivity analysis of stochastic models provides insights into cardiac calcium sparks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Seon; Liu, Ona Z; Hwang, Hyun Seok; Knollmann, Bjorn C; Sobie, Eric A

    2013-03-05

    We present a parameter sensitivity analysis method that is appropriate for stochastic models, and we demonstrate how this analysis generates experimentally testable predictions about the factors that influence local Ca(2+) release in heart cells. The method involves randomly varying all parameters, running a single simulation with each set of parameters, running simulations with hundreds of model variants, then statistically relating the parameters to the simulation results using regression methods. We tested this method on a stochastic model, containing 18 parameters, of the cardiac Ca(2+) spark. Results show that multivariable linear regression can successfully relate parameters to continuous model outputs such as Ca(2+) spark amplitude and duration, and multivariable logistic regression can provide insight into how parameters affect Ca(2+) spark triggering (a probabilistic process that is all-or-none in a single simulation). Benchmark studies demonstrate that this method is less computationally intensive than standard methods by a factor of 16. Importantly, predictions were tested experimentally by measuring Ca(2+) sparks in mice with knockout of the sarcoplasmic reticulum protein triadin. These mice exhibit multiple changes in Ca(2+) release unit structures, and the regression model both accurately predicts changes in Ca(2+) spark amplitude (30% decrease in model, 29% decrease in experiments) and provides an intuitive and quantitative understanding of how much each alteration contributes to the result. This approach is therefore an effective, efficient, and predictive method for analyzing stochastic mathematical models to gain biological insight.

  18. Sensitivity of benzene natural attenuation to variations in kinetic and transport parameters in Liwa Aquifer, UAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mohamed M; Saleh, Nawal E; Sherif, Mohsen M

    2010-04-01

    Dissolved benzene was detected in the shallow unconfined Liwa aquifer (UAE). This aquifer represents the main freshwater source for a nearby residence camp area. A finite element model is used to simulate the fate, transport, and attenuation of the dissolved benzene plume to help decision makers assess natural attenuation as a viable remediation option. Sensitivity of benzene attenuation to uncertainties in the estimation of some of the kinetic and transport parameters is studied. It was found that natural attenuation is more sensitive to microbial growth rate and half saturation coefficients of both benzene and oxygen than initial biomass concentration and dispersivity coefficients. Increasing microbial growth rate by fourfold increased natural attenuation effectiveness after 40 years by 10%; while decreasing it by fourfold decreased natural attenuation effectiveness by 77%. On the other hand, increasing half saturation coefficient by fourfold decreased natural attenuation effectiveness by 46% in 40 years. Decreasing the same parameter fourfold caused natural attenuation effectiveness to increase by 9%.

  19. The sensitivity of wind technology utilization to cost and market parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodd, H.M. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Hock, S.M.; Thresher, R.W. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA))

    1990-11-01

    This study explores the sensitivity of future wind energy market penetration to available wind resources, wind system costs, and competing energy system fuel costs for several possible energy market evolution scenarios. The methodology for the modeling is described in general terms. Cost curves for wind technology evolution are presented and used in conjunction with wind resource estimates and energy market projections to estimate wind penetration into the market. Results are presented that show the sensitivity of the growth of wind energy use to key cost parameters and to some of the underlying modeling assumptions. In interpreting the results, the authors place particular emphasis on the relative influence of the parameters studied. 4 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Fast Computation of Global Sensitivity Kernel Database Based on Spectral-Element Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales de Andrade, Elliott; Liu, Qinya

    2017-07-01

    Finite-frequency sensitivity kernels, a theoretical improvement from simple infinitely thin ray paths, have been used extensively in recent global and regional tomographic inversions. These sensitivity kernels provide more consistent and accurate interpretation of a growing number of broadband measurements, and are critical in mapping 3D heterogeneous structures of the mantle. Based on Born approximation, the calculation of sensitivity kernels requires the interaction of the forward wavefield and an adjoint wavefield generated by placing adjoint sources at stations. Both fields can be obtained accurately through numerical simulations of seismic wave propagation, particularly important for kernels of phases that cannot be sufficiently described by ray theory (such as core-diffracted waves). However, the total number of forward and adjoint numerical simulations required to build kernels for individual source-receiver pairs and to form the design matrix for classical tomography is computationally unaffordable. In this paper, we take advantage of the symmetry of 1D reference models, perform moment tensor forward and point force adjoint spectral-element simulations, and save six-component strain fields only on the equatorial plane based on the open-source spectral-element simulation package, SPECFEM3D_GLOBE. Sensitivity kernels for seismic phases at any epicentral distance can be efficiently computed by combining forward and adjoint strain wavefields from the saved strain field database, which significantly reduces both the number of simulations and the amount of storage required for global tomographic problems. Based on this technique, we compute traveltime, amplitude and/or boundary kernels of isotropic and radially anisotropic elastic parameters for various (P, S, P_{diff}, S_{diff}, depth, surface-reflected, surface wave, S 660 S boundary, etc.) phases for 1D ak135 model, in preparation for future global tomographic inversions.

  1. Determination of new electroweak parameters at the ILC. Sensitivity to new physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, M.; Schmidt, E.; Schroeder, H. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Kilian, W. [Siegen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Fach Physik]|[Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Krstonosic, P.; Reuter, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Moenig, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2006-04-15

    We present a study of the sensitivity of an International Linear Collider (ILC) to electroweak parameters in the absence of a light Higgs boson. In particular, we consider those parameters that have been inaccessible at previous colliders, quartic gauge couplings. Within a generic effective-field theory context we analyze all processes that contain quasi-elastic weak-boson scattering, using complete six-fermion matrix elements in unweighted event samples, fast simulation of the ILC detector, and a multidimensional parameter fit of the set of anomalous couplings. The analysis does not rely on simplifying assumptions such as custodial symmetry or approximations such as the equivalence theorem. We supplement this by a similar new study of triple weak-boson production, which is sensitive to the same set of anomalous couplings. Including the known results on triple gauge couplings and oblique corrections, we thus quantitatively determine the indirect sensitivity of the ILC to new physics in the electroweak symmetry-breaking sector, conveniently parameterized by real or fictitious resonances in each accessible spin/isospin channel. (Orig.)

  2. Gauge Mediation Models with Adjoint Messengers

    CERN Document Server

    Gogoladze, Ilia; Shafi, Qaisar; Un, Cem Salih

    2016-01-01

    We present a class of models in the framework of gauge mediation supersymmetry breaking where the messenger fields transform in the adjoint representation of the Standard Model gauge symmetry. To avoid unacceptably light right-handed sleptons in the spectrum we introduce a non-zero U(1)_B-L D-term. This leads to an additional contribution to the soft supersymmetry breaking mass terms which makes the right-handed slepton masses compatible with the current experimental bounds. We show that in this framework the observed 125 GeV Higgs boson mass can be accommodated with the sleptons accessible at the LHC, while the squarks and gluinos lie in the multi-TeV range. We also discuss the issue of the fine-tuning and show that the desired relic dark matter abundance can also be accommodated.

  3. Sensitivity of the NMR density matrix to pulse sequence parameters: a simplified analytic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momot, Konstantin I; Takegoshi, K

    2012-08-01

    We present a formalism for the analysis of sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance pulse sequences to variations of pulse sequence parameters, such as radiofrequency pulses, gradient pulses or evolution delays. The formalism enables the calculation of compact, analytic expressions for the derivatives of the density matrix and the observed signal with respect to the parameters varied. The analysis is based on two constructs computed in the course of modified density-matrix simulations: the error interrogation operators and error commutators. The approach presented is consequently named the Error Commutator Formalism (ECF). It is used to evaluate the sensitivity of the density matrix to parameter variation based on the simulations carried out for the ideal parameters, obviating the need for finite-difference calculations of signal errors. The ECF analysis therefore carries a computational cost comparable to a single density-matrix or product-operator simulation. Its application is illustrated using a number of examples from basic NMR spectroscopy. We show that the strength of the ECF is its ability to provide analytic insights into the propagation of errors through pulse sequences and the behaviour of signal errors under phase cycling. Furthermore, the approach is algorithmic and easily amenable to implementation in the form of a programming code. It is envisaged that it could be incorporated into standard NMR product-operator simulation packages.

  4. A Fault Alarm and Diagnosis Method Based on Sensitive Parameters and Support Vector Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinjie; Yao, Ziyun; Lv, Zhiquan; Zhu, Qunxiong; Xu, Fengtian; Jiang, Zhinong

    2015-08-01

    Study on the extraction of fault feature and the diagnostic technique of reciprocating compressor is one of the hot research topics in the field of reciprocating machinery fault diagnosis at present. A large number of feature extraction and classification methods have been widely applied in the related research, but the practical fault alarm and the accuracy of diagnosis have not been effectively improved. Developing feature extraction and classification methods to meet the requirements of typical fault alarm and automatic diagnosis in practical engineering is urgent task. The typical mechanical faults of reciprocating compressor are presented in the paper, and the existing data of online monitoring system is used to extract fault feature parameters within 15 types in total; the inner sensitive connection between faults and the feature parameters has been made clear by using the distance evaluation technique, also sensitive characteristic parameters of different faults have been obtained. On this basis, a method based on fault feature parameters and support vector machine (SVM) is developed, which will be applied to practical fault diagnosis. A better ability of early fault warning has been proved by the experiment and the practical fault cases. Automatic classification by using the SVM to the data of fault alarm has obtained better diagnostic accuracy.

  5. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Cacuci, Dan G; Navon, Ionel Michael

    2005-01-01

    As computer-assisted modeling and analysis of physical processes have continued to grow and diversify, sensitivity and uncertainty analyses have become indispensable scientific tools. Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis. Volume I: Theory focused on the mathematical underpinnings of two important methods for such analyses: the Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis Procedure and the Global Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis Procedure. This volume concentrates on the practical aspects of performing these analyses for large-scale systems. The applications addressed include two-phase flow problems, a radiative c

  6. GPU-accelerated adjoint algorithmic differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremse, Felix; Höfter, Andreas; Razik, Lukas; Kiessling, Fabian; Naumann, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Many scientific problems such as classifier training or medical image reconstruction can be expressed as minimization of differentiable real-valued cost functions and solved with iterative gradient-based methods. Adjoint algorithmic differentiation (AAD) enables automated computation of gradients of such cost functions implemented as computer programs. To backpropagate adjoint derivatives, excessive memory is potentially required to store the intermediate partial derivatives on a dedicated data structure, referred to as the ;tape;. Parallelization is difficult because threads need to synchronize their accesses during taping and backpropagation. This situation is aggravated for many-core architectures, such as Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), because of the large number of light-weight threads and the limited memory size in general as well as per thread. We show how these limitations can be mediated if the cost function is expressed using GPU-accelerated vector and matrix operations which are recognized as intrinsic functions by our AAD software. We compare this approach with naive and vectorized implementations for CPUs. We use four increasingly complex cost functions to evaluate the performance with respect to memory consumption and gradient computation times. Using vectorization, CPU and GPU memory consumption could be substantially reduced compared to the naive reference implementation, in some cases even by an order of complexity. The vectorization allowed usage of optimized parallel libraries during forward and reverse passes which resulted in high speedups for the vectorized CPU version compared to the naive reference implementation. The GPU version achieved an additional speedup of 7.5 ± 4.4, showing that the processing power of GPUs can be utilized for AAD using this concept. Furthermore, we show how this software can be systematically extended for more complex problems such as nonlinear absorption reconstruction for fluorescence-mediated tomography.

  7. Qualification of the Most Statistically "Sensitive" Diffusion Tensor Imaging Parameters for Detection of Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyżak, A. T.; Jasiński, A.; Adamek, D.

    2006-07-01

    Qualification of the most statistically "sensitive" diffusion parameters using Magnetic Resonance (MR) Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) of the control and injured spinal cord of a rat in vivo and in vitro after the trauma is reported. Injury was induced in TH12/TH13 level by a controlled "weight-drop". In vitro experiments were performed in a home-built MR microscope, with a 6.4 T magnet, in vivo samples were measured in a 9.4 T/21 horizontal magnet The aim of this work was to find the most effective diffusion parameters which are useful in the statistically significant detection of spinal cord tissue damage. Apparent diffusion tensor (ADT) weighted data measured in vivo and in vitro on control and injured rat spinal cord (RSC) in the transverse planes and analysis of the diffusion anisotropy as a function of many parameters, which allows statisticall expose of the existence of the damage are reported.

  8. Classical nucleation theory of immersion freezing: sensitivity of contact angle schemes to thermodynamic and kinetic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickes, Luisa; Welti, André; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2017-02-01

    Heterogeneous ice formation by immersion freezing in mixed-phase clouds can be parameterized in general circulation models (GCMs) by classical nucleation theory (CNT). CNT parameterization schemes describe immersion freezing as a stochastic process, including the properties of insoluble aerosol particles in the droplets. There are different ways to parameterize the properties of aerosol particles (i.e., contact angle schemes), which are compiled and tested in this paper. The goal of this study is to find a parameterization scheme for GCMs to describe immersion freezing with the ability to shift and adjust the slope of the freezing curve compared to homogeneous freezing to match experimental data. We showed in a previous publication that the resulting freezing curves from CNT are very sensitive to unconstrained kinetic and thermodynamic parameters in the case of homogeneous freezing. Here we investigate how sensitive the outcome of a parameter estimation for contact angle schemes from experimental data is to unconstrained kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. We demonstrate that the parameters describing the contact angle schemes can mask the uncertainty in thermodynamic and kinetic parameters. Different CNT formulations are fitted to an extensive immersion freezing dataset consisting of size-selected measurements as a function of temperature and time for different mineral dust types, namely kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, microcline (K-feldspar), and Arizona test dust. We investigated how accurate different CNT formulations (with estimated fit parameters for different contact angle schemes) reproduce the measured freezing data, especially the time and particle size dependence of the freezing process. The results are compared to a simplified deterministic freezing scheme. In this context, we evaluated which CNT-based parameterization scheme able to represent particle properties is the best choice to describe immersion freezing in a GCM.

  9. Parameters sensitivity analysis for a~crop growth model applied to winter wheat in the Huanghuaihai Plain in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, M.; He, B.; Lü, A.; Zhou, L.; Wu, J.

    2014-06-01

    Parameters sensitivity analysis is a crucial step in effective model calibration. It quantitatively apportions the variation of model output to different sources of variation, and identifies how "sensitive" a model is to changes in the values of model parameters. Through calibration of parameters that are sensitive to model outputs, parameter estimation becomes more efficient. Due to uncertainties associated with yield estimates in a regional assessment, field-based models that perform well at field scale are not accurate enough to model at regional scale. Conducting parameters sensitivity analysis at the regional scale and analyzing the differences of parameter sensitivity between stations would make model calibration and validation in different sub-regions more efficient. Further, it would benefit the model applied to the regional scale. Through simulating 2000 × 22 samples for 10 stations in the Huanghuaihai Plain, this study discovered that TB (Optimal temperature), HI (Normal harvest index), WA (Potential radiation use efficiency), BN2 (Normal fraction of N in crop biomass at mid-season) and RWPC1 (Fraction of root weight at emergency) are more sensitive than other parameters. Parameters that determine nutrition supplement and LAI development have higher global sensitivity indices than first-order indices. For spatial application, soil diversity is crucial because soil is responsible for crop parameters sensitivity index differences between sites.

  10. A sensitivity analysis of hazardous waste disposal site climatic and soil design parameters using HELP3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelman, D.D. [Water Resources Engineer, Lincoln, NE (United States); Stansbury, J. [Univ. of Nebraska-Lincoln, Omaha, NE (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Subtitle C, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, And Liability Act (CERCLA), and subsequent amendments have formed a comprehensive framework to deal with hazardous wastes on the national level. Key to this waste management is guidance on design (e.g., cover and bottom leachate control systems) of hazardous waste landfills. The objective of this research was to investigate the sensitivity of leachate volume at hazardous waste disposal sites to climatic, soil cover, and vegetative cover (Leaf Area Index) conditions. The computer model HELP3 which has the capability to simulate double bottom liner systems as called for in hazardous waste disposal sites was used in the analysis. HELP3 was used to model 54 combinations of climatic conditions, disposal site soil surface curve numbers, and leaf area index values to investigate how sensitive disposal site leachate volume was to these three variables. Results showed that leachate volume from the bottom double liner system was not sensitive to these parameters. However, the cover liner system leachate volume was quite sensitive to climatic conditions and less sensitive to Leaf Area Index and curve number values. Since humid locations had considerably more cover liner system leachate volume than and locations, different design standards may be appropriate for humid conditions than for and conditions.

  11. A new zonation algorithm with parameter estimation using hydraulic head and subsidence observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meijing; Burbey, Thomas J; Nunes, Vitor Dos Santos; Borggaard, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Parameter estimation codes such as UCODE_2005 are becoming well-known tools in groundwater modeling investigations. These programs estimate important parameter values such as transmissivity (T) and aquifer storage values (Sa ) from known observations of hydraulic head, flow, or other physical quantities. One drawback inherent in these codes is that the parameter zones must be specified by the user. However, such knowledge is often unknown even if a detailed hydrogeological description is available. To overcome this deficiency, we present a discrete adjoint algorithm for identifying suitable zonations from hydraulic head and subsidence measurements, which are highly sensitive to both elastic (Sske) and inelastic (Sskv) skeletal specific storage coefficients. With the advent of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), distributed spatial and temporal subsidence measurements can be obtained. A synthetic conceptual model containing seven transmissivity zones, one aquifer storage zone and three interbed zones for elastic and inelastic storage coefficients were developed to simulate drawdown and subsidence in an aquifer interbedded with clay that exhibits delayed drainage. Simulated delayed land subsidence and groundwater head data are assumed to be the observed measurements, to which the discrete adjoint algorithm is called to create approximate spatial zonations of T, Sske , and Sskv . UCODE-2005 is then used to obtain the final optimal parameter values. Calibration results indicate that the estimated zonations calculated from the discrete adjoint algorithm closely approximate the true parameter zonations. This automation algorithm reduces the bias established by the initial distribution of zones and provides a robust parameter zonation distribution.

  12. Scanning laser polarimetry: »number« parameter sensitivity and specificity in glaucoma diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Cvenkel

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Scanning laser polarimetry (SLP is a method that enables quantitative assessment of retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL thickness surrounding the optic nerve. The commercially available device GDx (GDx, Laser Diagnostics Technologies, San Diego, CA yields an outprint consisting of a reflectance image, colour-coded retardation map, and the 14 parameters, of which the »Number« was shown to be the single best parameter to discriminate between glaucomatous and normal eyes. The »Number« is a probability score, ranging from 1 (low probability of glaucoma to 100 (high probability of glaucoma. In our study we determined the sensitivity and the specificity of the »Number« at cutoff values of 23 and 30. Methods: Thirty patients with different stage of glaucoma and 14 patients with typical glaucomatous changes of the ONH without visual field loss (preperimetric glaucoma were included in the analysis. The control group was represented by 27 adults without ocular pathology with intraocular pressure of < 21 mmHg and normal visual fields. The sensitivity and specificity of the »Number« was determined at a cut-off level of 23 and 30. Results: The sensitivity of the »Number« at a cut-off level of 30 for the glaucoma group was 74% at a specificity of 86%, at a cut-off of 23 the sensitivity increased to 83% at a specificity of 76%. The discriminating ability of the »Number« in the group with preperimetric glaucoma was low, with the sensitivities of 36% and 50% at a cut-off value of 30 and 23, respectively.Conclusions: The parameter »Number« yielded good separation between normal eyes and eyes with moderate and advanced glaucoma. However, the sensitivity of the »Number« in eyes with mild glaucoma and especially with preperimetric glaucoma was low. Because of the great interindividual variability of the RNFL, the assessment of RNFL thickness change over time would be more appropriate to detect early glaucomatous changes.

  13. Adjoint Networks with Inverting and Noninverting Current Conveyors

    OpenAIRE

    J. Cajka; T. Dostal; Vrba, K.

    2000-01-01

    Four types of second-generation current conveyors are shown. The realisation of the above conveyors using differential voltage current conveyors (VDCC) is presented. Two examples illustrate the building of adjoint networks containing second-generation current conveyors.

  14. Adjoint method for the optimum planning of industrial pollutant sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Feng; HU Fei; ZHU Jiang

    2005-01-01

    The optimum planning of industrial pollutant sources, which optimizes the economic object without violating environmental constraints, is an important and hard task to be conquered. In this paper, an adjoint method is developed to solve the problem. The penalty function is introduced to deal with the environmental inequality constraints, and Lagrange function is constructed to derive the adjoint equation and the gradient of the object function. In this means, the gradient of the object function can be calculated by solving the adjoint equation, and the information from the gradient is used to make the object function descend and approach to an optimal solution after some iterations. A two-dimensional, simplified model is used for numerical experiments. The theoretical derivations are verified by the results of the experiments. Furthermore, the adjoint method is shown to be of excellent convergence and efficiency, which is adaptive to the fast development of air quality numerical models and super computers.

  15. Correlation between oncogenic mutations and parameter sensitivity of the apoptosis pathway model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major breakthroughs in oncogenesis research in recent years is the discovery that, in most patients, oncogenic mutations are concentrated in a few core biological functional pathways. This discovery indicates that oncogenic mechanisms are highly related to the dynamics of biologic regulatory networks, which govern the behaviour of functional pathways. Here, we propose that oncogenic mutations found in different biological functional pathways are closely related to parameter sensitivity of the corresponding networks. To test this hypothesis, we focus on the DNA damage-induced apoptotic pathway--the most important safeguard against oncogenesis. We first built the regulatory network that governs the apoptosis pathway, and then translated the network into dynamics equations. Using sensitivity analysis of the network parameters and comparing the results with cancer gene mutation spectra, we found that parameters that significantly affect the bifurcation point correspond to high-frequency oncogenic mutations. This result shows that the position of the bifurcation point is a better measure of the functionality of a biological network than gene expression levels of certain key proteins. It further demonstrates the suitability of applying systems-level analysis to biological networks as opposed to studying genes or proteins in isolation.

  16. Neural Network Training by Integration of Adjoint Systems of Equations Forward in Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor); Barhen, Jacob (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for supervised neural learning of time dependent trajectories exploits the concepts of adjoint operators to enable computation of the gradient of an objective functional with respect to the various parameters of the network architecture in a highly efficient manner. Specifically. it combines the advantage of dramatic reductions in computational complexity inherent in adjoint methods with the ability to solve two adjoint systems of equations together forward in time. Not only is a large amount of computation and storage saved. but the handling of real-time applications becomes also possible. The invention has been applied it to two examples of representative complexity which have recently been analyzed in the open literature and demonstrated that a circular trajectory can be learned in approximately 200 iterations compared to the 12000 reported in the literature. A figure eight trajectory was achieved in under 500 iterations compared to 20000 previously required. Tbc trajectories computed using our new method are much closer to the target trajectories than was reported in previous studies.

  17. First-arrival traveltime tomography for anisotropic media using the adjoint-state method

    KAUST Repository

    Waheed, Umair bin

    2016-05-27

    Traveltime tomography using transmission data has been widely used for static corrections and for obtaining near-surface models for seismic depth imaging. More recently, it is also being used to build initial models for full-waveform inversion. The classic traveltime tomography approach based on ray tracing has difficulties in handling large data sets arising from current seismic acquisition surveys. Some of these difficulties can be addressed using the adjoint-state method, due to its low memory requirement and numerical efficiency. By coupling the gradient computation to nonlinear optimization, it avoids the need for explicit computation of the Fréchet derivative matrix. Furthermore, its cost is equivalent to twice the solution of the forward-modeling problem, irrespective of the size of the input data. The presence of anisotropy in the subsurface has been well established during the past few decades. The improved seismic images obtained by incorporating anisotropy into the seismic processing workflow justify the effort. However, previous literature on the adjoint-state method has only addressed the isotropic approximation of the subsurface. We have extended the adjoint-state technique for first-arrival traveltime tomography to vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) media. Because δ is weakly resolvable from surface seismic alone, we have developed the mathematical framework and procedure to invert for vNMO and η. Our numerical tests on the VTI SEAM model demonstrate the ability of the algorithm to invert for near-surface model parameters and reveal the accuracy achievable by the algorithm.

  18. CAD Integrated Multipoint Adjoint-Based Optimization of a Turbocharger Radial Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse Mueller

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The adjoint method is considered as the most efficient approach to compute gradients with respect to an arbitrary number of design parameters. However, one major challenge of adjoint-based shape optimization methods is the integration into a computer-aided design (CAD workflow for practical industrial cases. This paper presents an adjoint-based framework that uses a tailored shape parameterization to satisfy geometric constraints due to mechanical and manufacturing requirements while maintaining the shape in a CAD representation. The system employs a sequential quadratic programming (SQP algorithm and in-house developed libraries for the CAD and grid generation as well as a 3D Navier–Stokes flow and adjoint solver. The developed method is applied to a multipoint optimization of a turbocharger radial turbine aiming at maximizing the total-to-static efficiency at multiple operating points while constraining the output power and the choking mass flow of the machine. The optimization converged in a few design cycles in which the total-to-static efficiency could be significantly improved over a wide operating range. Additionally, the imposed aerodynamic constraints with strict convergence tolerances are satisfied and several geometric constraints are inherently respected due to the parameterization of the turbine. In particular, radial fibered blades are used to avoid bending stresses in the turbine blades due to centrifugal forces. The methodology is a step forward towards robustness and consistency of gradient-based optimization for practical industrial cases, as it maintains the optimal shape in CAD representation. As shown in this paper, this avoids shape approximations and allows manufacturing constraints to be included.

  19. Self-Adjointness Criterion for Operators in Fock Spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falconi, Marco, E-mail: marco.falconi@univ-rennes1.fr [Université de Rennes I, IRMAR and Centre Henri Lebesgue (France)

    2015-12-15

    In this paper we provide a criterion of essential self-adjointness for operators in the tensor product of a separable Hilbert space and a Fock space. The class of operators we consider may contain a self-adjoint part, a part that preserves the number of Fock space particles and a non-diagonal part that is at most quadratic with respect to the creation and annihilation operators. The hypotheses of the criterion are satisfied in several interesting applications.

  20. A meta-analysis of reinforcement sensitivity theory: on performance parameters in reinforcement tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leue, Anja; Beauducel, André

    2008-11-01

    J. A. Gray's Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST) has produced a wealth of quasi-experimental studies in more than 35 years of research on personality and reinforcement sensitivity. The present meta-analysis builds on this literature by investigating RST in conflict and nonconflict reinforcement tasks in humans. Based on random-effects meta-analysis, we confirmed RST predictions of performance parameters (e.g., number of responses, reaction time) in reinforcement tasks for impulsivity- and anxiety-related traits. In studies on anxiety-related traits, the effect size variance was smaller for conflict tasks than for nonconflict tasks. A larger mean effect size and a larger variability of effect sizes were found for conflict compared to nonconflict tasks in studies on impulsivity-related traits. Our results suggest that problems with RST confirmation in reinforcement tasks are at least partly caused by insufficient statistical power of primary studies, and thus, encourage future research on RST.

  1. An update in monopole condensation in two-flavour Adjoint QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Lacagnina, G; D'Elia, M; Di Giacomo, A; Pica, C

    2007-01-01

    QCD with fermions in the adjoint representation (aQCD) is a model for which a deconfinement and a chiral phase transition take place at different temperatures. In this work, we present a study of the deconfinement transition in the dual superconductor picture based on the evaluation of an operator which carries magnetic charge. The expectation value of this operator signals monopole condensation and is an order parameter for deconfinement as in the case of fermions in the fundamental representation. We find a sharp first order deconfinement transition. We also study the effects of the chiral transition on the monopole order parameter and find them negligible.

  2. Universal Racah matrices and adjoint knot polynomials: Arborescent knots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, A.; Morozov, A.

    2016-04-01

    By now it is well established that the quantum dimensions of descendants of the adjoint representation can be described in a universal form, independent of a particular family of simple Lie algebras. The Rosso-Jones formula then implies a universal description of the adjoint knot polynomials for torus knots, which in particular unifies the HOMFLY (SUN) and Kauffman (SON) polynomials. For E8 the adjoint representation is also fundamental. We suggest to extend the universality from the dimensions to the Racah matrices and this immediately produces a unified description of the adjoint knot polynomials for all arborescent (double-fat) knots, including twist, 2-bridge and pretzel. Technically we develop together the universality and the "eigenvalue conjecture", which expresses the Racah and mixing matrices through the eigenvalues of the quantum R-matrix, and for dealing with the adjoint polynomials one has to extend it to the previously unknown 6 × 6 case. The adjoint polynomials do not distinguish between mutants and therefore are not very efficient in knot theory, however, universal polynomials in higher representations can probably be better in this respect.

  3. Universal Racah matrices and adjoint knot polynomials. I. Arborescent knots

    CERN Document Server

    Mironov, A

    2015-01-01

    By now it is well established that the quantum dimensions of descendants of the adjoint representation can be described in a universal form, independent of a particular family of simple Lie algebras. The Rosso-Jones formula then implies a universal description of the adjoint knot polynomials for torus knots, which in particular unifies the HOMFLY (SU_N) and Kauffman (SO_N) polynomials. For E_8 the adjoint representation is also fundamental. We suggest to extend the universality from the dimensions to the Racah matrices and this immediately produces a unified description of the adjoint knot polynomials for all arborescent (double-fat) knots, including twist, 2-bridge and pretzel. Technically we develop together the universality and the "eigenvalue conjecture", which expresses the Racah and mixing matrices through the eigenvalues of the quantum R-matrix, and for dealing with the adjoint polynomials one has to extend it to the previously unknown 6x6 case. The adjoint polynomials do not distinguish between mutant...

  4. Identification of adipokine clusters related to parameters of fat mass, insulin sensitivity and inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesine Flehmig

    Full Text Available In obesity, elevated fat mass and ectopic fat accumulation are associated with changes in adipokine secretion, which may link obesity to inflammation and the development of insulin resistance. However, relationships among individual adipokines and between adipokines and parameters of obesity, glucose metabolism or inflammation are largely unknown. Serum concentrations of 20 adipokines were measured in 141 Caucasian obese men (n = 67 and women (n = 74 with a wide range of body weight, glycemia and insulin sensitivity. Unbiased, distance-based hierarchical cluster analyses were performed to recognize patterns among adipokines and their relationship with parameters of obesity, glucose metabolism, insulin sensitivity and inflammation. We identified two major adipokine clusters related to either (1 body fat mass and inflammation (leptin, ANGPTL3, DLL1, chemerin, Nampt, resistin or insulin sensitivity/hyperglycemia, and lipid metabolism (vaspin, clusterin, glypican 4, progranulin, ANGPTL6, GPX3, RBP4, DLK1, SFRP5, BMP7, adiponectin, CTRP3 and 5, omentin. In addition, we found distinct adipokine clusters in subgroups of patients with or without type 2 diabetes (T2D. Logistic regression analyses revealed ANGPTL6, DLK1, Nampt and progranulin as strongest adipokine correlates of T2D in obese individuals. The panel of 20 adipokines predicted T2D compared to a combination of HbA1c, HOMA-IR and fasting plasma glucose with lower sensitivity (78% versus 91% and specificity (76% versus 94%. Therefore, adipokine patterns may currently not be clinically useful for the diagnosis of metabolic diseases. Whether adipokine patterns are relevant for the predictive assessment of intervention outcomes needs to be further investigated.

  5. Design Optimization of Structural Parameters for Highly Sensitive Photonic Crystal Label-Free Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-ah Han

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of structural design parameters on the performance of nano-replicated photonic crystal (PC label-free biosensors were examined by the analysis of simulated reflection spectra of PC structures. The grating pitch, duty, scaled grating height and scaled TiO2 layer thickness were selected as the design factors to optimize the PC structure. The peak wavelength value (PWV, full width at half maximum of the peak, figure of merit for the bulk and surface sensitivities, and surface/bulk sensitivity ratio were also selected as the responses to optimize the PC label-free biosensor performance. A parametric study showed that the grating pitch was the dominant factor for PWV, and that it had low interaction effects with other scaled design factors. Therefore, we can isolate the effect of grating pitch using scaled design factors. For the design of PC-label free biosensor, one should consider that: (1 the PWV can be measured by the reflection peak measurement instruments, (2 the grating pitch and duty can be manufactured using conventional lithography systems, and (3 the optimum design is less sensitive to the grating height and TiO2 layer thickness variations in the fabrication process. In this paper, we suggested a design guide for highly sensitive PC biosensor in which one select the grating pitch and duty based on the limitations of the lithography and measurement system, and conduct a multi objective optimization of the grating height and TiO2 layer thickness for maximizing performance and minimizing the influence of parameter variation. Through multi-objective optimization of a PC structure with a fixed grating height of 550 nm and a duty of 50%, we obtained a surface FOM of 66.18 RIU−1 and an S/B ratio of 34.8%, with a grating height of 117 nm and TiO2 height of 210 nm.

  6. Distribution of Redox-Sensitive Groundwater Quality Parameters Downgradient of a Landfill (Grindsted, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Rügge, Kirsten; Pedersen, Jørn K.;

    1995-01-01

    , dinitrogen oxide, nitrite, nitrate, and oxygen in the groundwater samples indicate that methane production, sulfate reduction, iron reduction, manganese reduction, and nitrate reduction take place in the plume. Adjacent to the landfill, methanogenic and sulfatereducing zones were identified, while aerobic......The leachate plume stretching 300 m downgradient from the Grindsted Landfill (Denmark) has been characterized in terms of redox-sensitive groundwater quality parameters along two longitudinal transects (285 samples). Variations in the levels of methane, sulfide, iron(ll), manganese(ll), ammonium...

  7. The impact of Ag nanoparticles on the parameters of DSS- cells sensitized by Z907

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrayev, N. Kh; Aimukhanov, A. K.; Zeinidenov, A. K.

    2016-02-01

    Research of influence of Ag nanoparticles are in-process undertaken on absorption and on parameters CVC DSS-cells sensitized Z907. It is set that with the height of concentration Ag nanoparticles in tape to the concentration of 0.3% wt%. the absorbance of Z907 in a short-wave stripe grew to the value 1,6. It is set that under reaching the concentration of Ag nanoparticles in the cell of value the 0.3% wt%. efficiency of cell increased to 2.2%.

  8. Parameter uncertainty, sensitivity, and sediment coupling in bioenergetics-based food web models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barron, M.G.; Cacela, D.; Beltman, D. [Hagler Bailly, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A bioenergetics-based food web model was developed and calibrated using measured PCB water and sediment concentrations in two Great Lakes food webs: Green Bay, Michigan and Lake Ontario. The model incorporated functional based trophic levels and sediment, water, and food chain exposures of PCBs to aquatic biota. Sensitivity analysis indicated the parameters with the greatest influence on PCBs in top predators were lipid content of plankton and benthos, planktivore assimilation efficiency, Kow, prey selection, and ambient temperature. Sediment-associated PCBs were estimated to contribute over 90% of PCBs in benthivores and less than 50% in piscivores. Ranges of PCB concentrations in top predators estimated by Monte Carlo simulation incorporating parameter uncertainty were within one order of magnitude of modal values. Model applications include estimation of exceedences of human and ecological thresholds. The results indicate that point estimates from bioenergetics-based food web models have substantial uncertainty that should be considered in regulatory and scientific applications.

  9. Analysis of the sensitivity properties of a model of vector-borne bubonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzby, Megan; Neckels, David; Antolin, Michael F; Estep, Donald

    2008-09-06

    Model sensitivity is a key to evaluation of mathematical models in ecology and evolution, especially in complex models with numerous parameters. In this paper, we use some recently developed methods for sensitivity analysis to study the parameter sensitivity of a model of vector-borne bubonic plague in a rodent population proposed by Keeling & Gilligan. The new sensitivity tools are based on a variational analysis involving the adjoint equation. The new approach provides a relatively inexpensive way to obtain derivative information about model output with respect to parameters. We use this approach to determine the sensitivity of a quantity of interest (the force of infection from rats and their fleas to humans) to various model parameters, determine a region over which linearization at a specific parameter reference point is valid, develop a global picture of the output surface, and search for maxima and minima in a given region in the parameter space.

  10. Tide-surge adjoint modeling: A new technique to understand forecast uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Chris; Horsburgh, Kevin J.; Williams, Jane; Flowerdew, Jonathan; Zanna, Laure

    2013-10-01

    For a simple dynamical system, such as a pendulum, it is easy to deduce where and when applied forcing might produce a particular response. However, for a complex nonlinear dynamical system such as the ocean or atmosphere, this is not as obvious. Knowing when or where the system is most sensitive, to observational uncertainty or otherwise, is key to understanding the physical processes, improving and providing reliable forecasts. We describe the application of adjoint modeling to determine the sensitivity of sea level at a UK coastal location, Sheerness, to perturbations in wind stress preceding an extreme North Sea storm surge event on 9 November 2007. Sea level at Sheerness is one of the most important factors used to decide whether to close the Thames Flood Barrier, which protects London. Adjoint modeling has been used by meteorologists since the 1990s, but is a relatively new technique for ocean modeling. It may be used to determine system sensitivity beyond the scope of ensemble modeling and in a computationally efficient way. Using estimates of wind stress error from Met Office forecasts, we find that for this event total sea level at Sheerness is most sensitive in the 3 h preceding the time of its unperturbed maximum level and over a radius of approximately 300 km. We also find that the pattern of sensitivity follows a simple sequence when considered in the reverse-time direction.

  11. Global adjoint tomography: first-generation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdağ, Ebru; Peter, Daniel; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Tromp, Jeroen; Hill, Judith; Podhorszki, Norbert; Pugmire, David

    2016-12-01

    We present the first-generation global tomographic model constructed based on adjoint tomography, an iterative full-waveform inversion technique. Synthetic seismograms were calculated using GPU-accelerated spectral-element simulations of global seismic wave propagation, accommodating effects due to 3-D anelastic crust & mantle structure, topography & bathymetry, the ocean load, ellipticity, rotation, and self-gravitation. Fréchet derivatives were calculated in 3-D anelastic models based on an adjoint-state method. The simulations were performed on the Cray XK7 named `Titan', a computer with 18 688 GPU accelerators housed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The transversely isotropic global model is the result of 15 tomographic iterations, which systematically reduced differences between observed and simulated three-component seismograms. Our starting model combined 3-D mantle model S362ANI with 3-D crustal model Crust2.0. We simultaneously inverted for structure in the crust and mantle, thereby eliminating the need for widely used `crustal corrections'. We used data from 253 earthquakes in the magnitude range 5.8 ≤ Mw ≤ 7.0. We started inversions by combining ˜30 s body-wave data with ˜60 s surface-wave data. The shortest period of the surface waves was gradually decreased, and in the last three iterations we combined ˜17 s body waves with ˜45 s surface waves. We started using 180 min long seismograms after the 12th iteration and assimilated minor- and major-arc body and surface waves. The 15th iteration model features enhancements of well-known slabs, an enhanced image of the Samoa/Tahiti plume, as well as various other plumes and hotspots, such as Caroline, Galapagos, Yellowstone and Erebus. Furthermore, we see clear improvements in slab resolution along the Hellenic and Japan Arcs, as well as subduction along the East of Scotia Plate, which does not exist in the starting model. Point-spread function tests demonstrate that we are approaching the resolution

  12. Global adjoint tomography: first-generation model

    KAUST Repository

    Bozdağ, Ebru

    2016-09-23

    We present the first-generation global tomographic model constructed based on adjoint tomography, an iterative full-waveform inversion technique. Synthetic seismograms were calculated using GPU-accelerated spectral-element simulations of global seismic wave propagation, accommodating effects due to 3-D anelastic crust & mantle structure, topography & bathymetry, the ocean load, ellipticity, rotation, and self-gravitation. Fréchet derivatives were calculated in 3-D anelastic models based on an adjoint-state method. The simulations were performed on the Cray XK7 named \\'Titan\\', a computer with 18 688 GPU accelerators housed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The transversely isotropic global model is the result of 15 tomographic iterations, which systematically reduced differences between observed and simulated three-component seismograms. Our starting model combined 3-D mantle model S362ANI with 3-D crustal model Crust2.0. We simultaneously inverted for structure in the crust and mantle, thereby eliminating the need for widely used \\'crustal corrections\\'. We used data from 253 earthquakes in the magnitude range 5.8 ≤ M ≤ 7.0. We started inversions by combining ~30 s body-wave data with ~60 s surface-wave data. The shortest period of the surface waves was gradually decreased, and in the last three iterations we combined ~17 s body waves with ~45 s surface waves. We started using 180 min long seismograms after the 12th iteration and assimilated minor- and major-arc body and surface waves. The 15th iteration model features enhancements of well-known slabs, an enhanced image of the Samoa/Tahiti plume, as well as various other plumes and hotspots, such as Caroline, Galapagos, Yellowstone and Erebus. Furthermore, we see clear improvements in slab resolution along the Hellenic and Japan Arcs, as well as subduction along the East of Scotia Plate, which does not exist in the starting model. Point-spread function tests demonstrate that we are approaching the

  13. Improving the Fit of a Land-Surface Model to Data Using its Adjoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raoult, Nina; Jupp, Tim; Cox, Peter; Luke, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    Land-surface models (LSMs) are crucial components of the Earth System Models (ESMs) which are used to make coupled climate-carbon cycle projections for the 21st century. The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is the land-surface model used in the climate and weather forecast models of the UK Met Office. In this study, JULES is automatically differentiated using commercial software from FastOpt, resulting in an analytical gradient, or adjoint, of the model. Using this adjoint, the adJULES parameter estimation system has been developed, to search for locally optimum parameter sets by calibrating against observations. We present an introduction to the adJULES system and demonstrate its ability to improve the model-data fit using eddy covariance measurements of gross primary production (GPP) and latent heat (LE) fluxes. adJULES also has the ability to calibrate over multiple sites simultaneously. This feature is used to define new optimised parameter values for the 5 Plant Functional Types (PFTS) in JULES. The optimised PFT-specific parameters improve the performance of JULES over 90% of the FLUXNET sites used in the study. These reductions in error are shown and compared to reductions found due to site-specific optimisations. Finally, we show that calculation of the 2nd derivative of JULES allows us to produce posterior probability density functions of the parameters and how knowledge of parameter values is constrained by observations.

  14. Sensitivity of dynamic simulations of gait and dynamometer experiments to hill muscle model parameters of knee flexors and extensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groote, F; Van Campen, A; Jonkers, I; De Schutter, J

    2010-07-20

    We assessed and compared sensitivities of dynamic simulations to musculotendon (MT) parameters for gait and dynamometer experiments. Our aim with this comparison was to investigate whether dynamometer experiments could provide information about MT-parameters that are important to reliably study MT-function during gait. This would mean that dynamometer experiments could be used to estimate these parameters. Muscle contribution to the joint torque (MT-torque) rather than relative MT-force primarily affects the resulting gait pattern and torque measured by the dynamometer. In contrast to recent studies, therefore, we assessed the sensitivity of the MT-torque, rather than the sensitivity of the relative MT-force. Based on sensitivity of the MT-torque to a parameter perturbation, MT-parameters of the knee flexors and extensors were classified in three categories: low, medium, and high. For gait, classification was based on the average sensitivity during a gait cycle. For isometric and isokinetic dynamometer experiments, classification was based on the highest sensitivity found in the experiments. The calculated muscle contributions to the knee torque during gait and dynamometer experiments had a high sensitivity to only a limited number of MT-parameters of the knee flexors and extensors, suggesting that not all MT-parameters need to be estimated. In general, the highest sensitivity was found for tendon slack length. However, for some muscles the sensitivity to the optimal fibre length or the maximal isometric muscle force was also high or medium. The classification of the individual MT-parameters for gait and dynamometer experiments was largely similar. We therefore conclude that dynamometer experiments provide information about MT-parameters important to reliably study MT-function during gait, so that subject-specific estimates of MT-parameters could be made based on dynamometer experiments.

  15. The truncated Newton using 1st and 2nd order adjoint-state method: a new approach for traveltime tomography without rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretaudeau, F.; Metivier, L.; Brossier, R.; Virieux, J.

    2013-12-01

    Traveltime tomography algorithms generally use ray tracing. The use of rays in tomography may not be suitable for handling very large datasets and perform tomography in very complex media. Traveltime maps can be computed through finite-difference approach (FD) and avoid complex ray-tracing algorithm for the forward modeling (Vidale 1998, Zhao 2004). However, rays back-traced from receiver to source following the gradient of traveltime are still used to compute the Fréchet derivatives. As a consequence, the sensitivity information computed using back-traced rays is not numerically consistent with the FD modeling used (the derivatives are only a rough approximation of the true derivatives of the forward modeling). Leung & Quian (2006) proposed a new approach that avoid ray tracing where the gradient of the misfit function is computed using the adjoint-state method. An adjoint-state variable is thus computed simultaneously for all receivers using a numerical method consistent with the forward modeling, and for the computational cost of one forward modeling. However, in their formulation, the receivers have to be located at the boundary of the investigated model, and the optimization approach is limited to simple gradient-based method (i.e. steepest descent, conjugate gradient) as only the gradient is computed. However, the Hessian operator has an important role in gradient-based reconstruction methods, providing the necessary information to rescale the gradient, correct for illumination deficit and remove artifacts. Leung & Quian (2006) uses LBFGS, a quasi-Newton method that provides an improved estimation of the influence of the inverse Hessian. Lelievre et al. (2011) also proposed a tomography approach in which the Fréchet derivatives are computed directly during the forward modeling using explicit symbolic differentiation of the modeling equations, resulting in a consistent Gauss-Newton inversion. We are interested here in the use of a new optimization approach

  16. Modelling suspended-sediment propagation and related heavy metal contamination in floodplains: a parameter sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostache, R.; Hissler, C.; Matgen, P.; Guignard, C.; Bates, P.

    2014-09-01

    Fine sediments represent an important vector of pollutant diffusion in rivers. When deposited in floodplains and riverbeds, they can be responsible for soil pollution. In this context, this paper proposes a modelling exercise aimed at predicting transport and diffusion of fine sediments and dissolved pollutants. The model is based upon the Telemac hydro-informatic system (dynamical coupling Telemac-2D-Sysiphe). As empirical and semiempirical parameters need to be calibrated for such a modelling exercise, a sensitivity analysis is proposed. An innovative point in this study is the assessment of the usefulness of dissolved trace metal contamination information for model calibration. Moreover, for supporting the modelling exercise, an extensive database was set up during two flood events. It includes water surface elevation records, discharge measurements and geochemistry data such as time series of dissolved/particulate contaminants and suspended-sediment concentrations. The most sensitive parameters were found to be the hydraulic friction coefficients and the sediment particle settling velocity in water. It was also found that model calibration did not benefit from dissolved trace metal contamination information. Using the two monitored hydrological events as calibration and validation, it was found that the model is able to satisfyingly predict suspended sediment and dissolve pollutant transport in the river channel. In addition, a qualitative comparison between simulated sediment deposition in the floodplain and a soil contamination map shows that the preferential zones for deposition identified by the model are realistic.

  17. Techno-economic sensitivity study of heliostat field parameters for micro-gas turbine CSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, Willem A.; Gauché, Paul; Dinter, Frank; Myburgh, J. T.

    2017-06-01

    Concentrating solar power systems based on micro-gas turbines potentially offer numerous benefits should they become commercially viable. Heliostat fields for such systems have unique requirements in that the number of heliostats and the focal ratios are typically much lower than conventional central receiver systems. This paper presents a techno-economic sensitivity study of heliostat field parameters for a micro-gas turbine central receiver system. A 100 kWe minitower system is considered for the base case and a one-at-a-time strategy is used to investigate parameter sensitivities. Increasing heliostat focal ratios are found to have significant optical performance benefits due to both a reduction in astigmatic aberrations and a reduction in the number of facet focal lengths required; confirming the hypothesis that smaller heliostats offer a techno-economic advantage. Fixed Horizontal Axis tracking mechanism is shown to outperform the conventional Azimuth Zenith tracking mechanism in high density heliostat fields. Although several improvements to heliostat field performance are discussed, the capex fraction of the heliostat field for such system is shown to be almost half that of a conventional central receiver system and optimum utilization of the higher capex components, namely; the receiver and turbine subsystems, are more rewarding than that of the heliostat field.

  18. Parameter Sensitivity of High–Order Equivalent Circuit Models Of Turbine Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Niewierowicz–Swiecicka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the results of a parametric sensitivity analysis applied to a state–space representation of high–order two–axis equivalent circuits (ECs of a turbo generator (150 MVA, 120 MW, 13.8 kV y 50 Hz. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate each parameter impact on the transient response of the analyzed two–axis models –d–axis ECs with one to five damper branches and q–axis ECs from one to four damper branches–. The parametric sensitivity concept is formulated in a general context and the sensibility function is established from the generator response to a short circuit condition. Results ponder the importance played by each parameter in the model behavior. The algorithms were design within MATLAB® environment. The study gives way to conclusions on electromagnetic aspects of solid rotor synchronous generators that have not been previously studied. The methodology presented here can be applied to any other physical system.

  19. Volcano deformation source parameters estimated from InSAR: Sensitivities to uncertainties in seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterlark, Timothy; Donovan, Theodore; Feigl, Kurt L.; Haney, Matthew; Thurber, Clifford H.; Tung, Sui

    2016-04-01

    The eruption cycle of a volcano is controlled in part by the upward migration of magma. The characteristics of the magma flux produce a deformation signature at the Earth's surface. Inverse analyses use geodetic data to estimate strategic controlling parameters that describe the position and pressurization of a magma chamber at depth. The specific distribution of material properties controls how observed surface deformation translates to source parameter estimates. Seismic tomography models describe the spatial distributions of material properties that are necessary for accurate models of volcano deformation. This study investigates how uncertainties in seismic tomography models propagate into variations in the estimates of volcano deformation source parameters inverted from geodetic data. We conduct finite element model-based nonlinear inverse analyses of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data for Okmok volcano, Alaska, as an example. We then analyze the estimated parameters and their uncertainties to characterize the magma chamber. Analyses are performed separately for models simulating a pressurized chamber embedded in a homogeneous domain as well as for a domain having a heterogeneous distribution of material properties according to seismic tomography. The estimated depth of the source is sensitive to the distribution of material properties. The estimated depths for the homogeneous and heterogeneous domains are 2666 ± 42 and 3527 ± 56 m below mean sea level, respectively (99% confidence). A Monte Carlo analysis indicates that uncertainties of the seismic tomography cannot account for this discrepancy at the 99% confidence level. Accounting for the spatial distribution of elastic properties according to seismic tomography significantly improves the fit of the deformation model predictions and significantly influences estimates for parameters that describe the location of a pressurized magma chamber.

  20. Knee model sensitivity to cruciate ligaments parameters: a stability simulation study for a living subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertozzi, Luigi; Stagni, Rita; Fantozzi, Silvia; Cappello, Angelo

    2007-01-01

    If the biomechanic function of the different anatomical sub-structures of the knee joint was needed in physiological conditions, the only possible way is a modelling approach. Subject-specific geometries and kinematic data, acquired from the same living subject, were the foundations of the 3D quasi-static knee model developed. Each cruciate ligament was modelled by means of 25 elastic springs, paying attention to the anatomical twisting of the fibres. The sensitivity of the model to the cross-sectional area was performed during the anterior/posterior tibial translations, the sensitivity to all the cruciate ligaments parameters was performed during the internal/external rotations. The model reproduced very well the mechanical behaviour reported in literature during anterior/posterior translations, in particular considering 30% of the mean insertional area. During the internal/external tibial rotations, similar behaviour of the axial torques was obtained in the three sensitivity analyses. The overlapping of the ligaments was assessed at about 25 degrees of internal axial rotation. The presented model featured a good level of accuracy in combination with a low computational weight, and it could provide an in vivo estimation of the role of the cruciate ligaments during the execution of daily living activities.

  1. Influence of task parameters on rotarod performance and sensitivity to ethanol in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustay, Nathan R; Wahlsten, Douglas; Crabbe, John C

    2003-05-15

    Motor performance in mice can be assessed with multiple apparatus and protocols. Use of the rotarod (a.k.a. rotorod, rota-rod, roto-rod, or accelerod) is very common, and it is often used with the apparent assumption by the experimenters that it is a straightforward and simple assay of coordination. The rotarod is sensitive to drugs that affect motor coordination, including ethanol. However, there are few systematic data assessing the range of "normal" performance in mice. There are also few data exploring optimal task parameters (e.g. the influence of different speeds of rotation). In these experiments, we show that both accelerating and fixed-speed rotarod (FSRR) performance vary under different test protocols and conditions, and that moderate to high doses of ethanol disrupt performance. Under certain conditions, low doses of ethanol were found to enhance performance on the accelerating rotarod (ARR). Therefore, it is not possible to characterize individual differences fully using a single set of test parameters. For example, because of the biphasic effect of ethanol on performance, at least two doses of the drug are necessary to explore individual sensitivity differences. We offer recommendations of parameters we believe to be generally suitable for exploring the performance of new genotypes using the rotarod. We suggest that other putative tests of "ataxia" are similarly complex, and that characterizing the contribution of genetic differences will require similar attention to the details of task apparatus and protocols. These data also underscore the need to employ multiple behavioral assays in order to model a complex domain such as "ataxia" or "coordination."

  2. Sensitivity Analysis on the Reliability of an Offshore Winch Regarding Selected Gearbox Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lothar Wöll

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available To match the high expectations and demands of customers for long-lasting machines, the development of reliable products is crucial. Furthermore, for reasons of competitiveness, it is necessary to know the future product lifetime as accurately as possible to avoid over-dimensioning. Additionally, a more detailed system understanding enables the designer to influence the life expectancy of the product without performing an extensive amount of expensive and time-consuming tests. In early development stages of new equipment only very basic information about the future system design, like the ratio or the system structure, is available. Nevertheless, a reliable lifetime prediction of the system components and subsequently of the system itself is necessary to evaluate possible design alternatives and to identify critical components beforehand. Lifetime predictions, however, require many parameters, which are often not known in these early stages. Therefore, this paper performs a sensitivity analysis on the drivetrain of an offshore winch with active heave compensation for two typical load cases. The influences of the parameters gear center distance and ambient temperature are investigated by varying the parameters within typical ranges and evaluating the quantitative effect on the lifetime.

  3. An Investigation on the Sensitivity of the Parameters of Urban Flood Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, A. B.; Lohani, B.; Jain, A.

    2015-12-01

    Global climatic change has triggered weather patterns which lead to heavy and sudden rainfall in different parts of world. The impact of heavy rainfall is severe especially on urban areas in the form of urban flooding. In order to understand the effect of heavy rainfall induced flooding, it is necessary to model the entire flooding scenario more accurately, which is now becoming possible with the availability of high resolution airborne LiDAR data and other real time observations. However, there is not much understanding on the optimal use of these data and on the effect of other parameters on the performance of the flood model. This study aims at developing understanding on these issues. In view of the above discussion, the aim of this study is to (i) understand that how the use of high resolution LiDAR data improves the performance of urban flood model, and (ii) understand the sensitivity of various hydrological parameters on urban flood modelling. In this study, modelling of flooding in urban areas due to heavy rainfall is carried out considering Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Kanpur, India as the study site. The existing model MIKE FLOOD, which is accepted by Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), is used along with the high resolution airborne LiDAR data. Once the model is setup it is made to run by changing the parameters such as resolution of Digital Surface Model (DSM), manning's roughness, initial losses, catchment description, concentration time, runoff reduction factor. In order to realize this, the results obtained from the model are compared with the field observations. The parametric study carried out in this work demonstrates that the selection of catchment description plays a very important role in urban flood modelling. Results also show the significant impact of resolution of DSM, initial losses and concentration time on urban flood model. This study will help in understanding the effect of various parameters that should be part of a

  4. Optimal Parameter and Uncertainty Estimation of a Land Surface Model: Sensitivity to Parameter Ranges and Model Complexities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youlong XIA; Zong-Liang YANG; Paul L. STOFFA; Mrinal K. SEN

    2005-01-01

    Most previous land-surface model calibration studies have defined global ranges for their parameters to search for optimal parameter sets. Little work has been conducted to study the impacts of realistic versus global ranges as well as model complexities on the calibration and uncertainty estimates. The primary purpose of this paper is to investigate these impacts by employing Bayesian Stochastic Inversion (BSI)to the Chameleon Surface Model (CHASM). The CHASM was designed to explore the general aspects of land-surface energy balance representation within a common modeling framework that can be run from a simple energy balance formulation to a complex mosaic type structure. The BSI is an uncertainty estimation technique based on Bayes theorem, importance sampling, and very fast simulated annealing.The model forcing data and surface flux data were collected at seven sites representing a wide range of climate and vegetation conditions. For each site, four experiments were performed with simple and complex CHASM formulations as well as realistic and global parameter ranges. Twenty eight experiments were conducted and 50 000 parameter sets were used for each run. The results show that the use of global and realistic ranges gives similar simulations for both modes for most sites, but the global ranges tend to produce some unreasonable optimal parameter values. Comparison of simple and complex modes shows that the simple mode has more parameters with unreasonable optimal values. Use of parameter ranges and model complexities have significant impacts on frequency distribution of parameters, marginal posterior probability density functions, and estimates of uncertainty of simulated sensible and latent heat fluxes.Comparison between model complexity and parameter ranges shows that the former has more significant impacts on parameter and uncertainty estimations.

  5. Using a variance-based sensitivity analysis for analyzing the relation between measurements and unknown parameters of a physical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J.; Tiede, C.

    2011-05-01

    An implementation of uncertainty analysis (UA) and quantitative global sensitivity analysis (SA) is applied to the non-linear inversion of gravity changes and three-dimensional displacement data which were measured in and active volcanic area. A didactic example is included to illustrate the computational procedure. The main emphasis is placed on the problem of extended Fourier amplitude sensitivity test (E-FAST). This method produces the total sensitivity indices (TSIs), so that all interactions between the unknown input parameters are taken into account. The possible correlations between the output an the input parameters can be evaluated by uncertainty analysis. Uncertainty analysis results indicate the general fit between the physical model and the measurements. Results of the sensitivity analysis show quite different sensitivities for the measured changes as they relate to the unknown parameters of a physical model for an elastic-gravitational source. Assuming a fixed number of executions, thirty different seeds are observed to determine the stability of this method.

  6. Parameter sensitivity of three Kalman Filter Schemes for the assimilation of tide guage data in coastal and self sea models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jacob Viborg Tornfeldt; Madsen, Henrik; Madsen, H.

    2006-01-01

    sensitivity study of three well known Kalman filter approaches for the assimilation of water levels in a three dimensional hydrodynamic modelling system. The filters considered are the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), the reduced rank square root Kalman filter (RRSQRT) and the steady Kalman filter....... A sensitivity analysis of key parameters in the schemes is undertaken for a setup in an idealised bay. The sensitivity of the resulting root mean square error (RMSE) is shown to be low to moderate. Hence the schemes are robust within an acceptable range and their application even with misspecified parameters...... is to be encouraged in this perspective. However, the predicted uncertainty of the assimilation results are sensitive to the parameters and hence must be applied with care. The sensitivity study further demonstrates the effectiveness of the steady Kalman filter in the given system as well as the great impact...

  7. Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehgartner, Brian L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Park, Byoung Yoon

    2009-03-01

    A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes for strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

  8. Task parallel sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation of groundwater simulations through the SALSSA framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuchardt, Karen L.; Agarwal, Khushbu; Chase, Jared M.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Elsethagen, Todd O.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Chin, George; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika

    2010-07-15

    The Support Architecture for Large-Scale Subsurface Analysis (SALSSA) provides an extensible framework, sophisticated graphical user interface, and underlying data management system that simplifies the process of running subsurface models, tracking provenance information, and analyzing the model results. Initially, SALSSA supported two styles of job control: user directed execution and monitoring of individual jobs, and load balancing of jobs across multiple machines taking advantage of many available workstations. Recent efforts in subsurface modelling have been directed at advancing simulators to take advantage of leadership class supercomputers. We describe two approaches, current progress, and plans toward enabling efficient application of the subsurface simulator codes via the SALSSA framework: automating sensitivity analysis problems through task parallelism, and task parallel parameter estimation using the PEST framework.

  9. Sensitivity of natural gas HCCI combustion to fuel and operating parameters using detailed kinetic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceves, S; Dibble, R; Flowers, D; Smith, J R; Westbrook, C K

    1999-07-19

    This paper uses the HCT (Hydrodynamics, Chemistry and Transport) chemical kinetics code to analyze natural gas HCCI combustion in an engine. The HCT code has been modified to better represent the conditions existing inside an engine, including a wall heat transfer correlation. Combustion control and low power output per displacement remain as two of the biggest challenges to obtaining satisfactory performance out of an HCCI engine, and these are addressed in this paper. The paper considers the effect of natural gas composition on HCCI combustion, and then explores three control strategies for HCCI engines: DME (dimethyl ether) addition, intake heating and hot EGR addition. The results show that HCCI combustion is sensitive to natural gas composition, and an active control may be required to compensate for possible changes in composition. The three control strategies being considered have a significant effect in changing the combustion parameters for the engine, and should be able to control HCCI combustion.

  10. An Efficient Finite Difference Method for Parameter Sensitivities of Continuous Time Markov Chains

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, David F

    2011-01-01

    We present an efficient finite difference method for the computation of parameter sensitivities for a wide class of continuous time Markov chains. The motivating class of models, and the source of our examples, are the stochastic chemical kinetic models commonly used in the biosciences, though other natural application areas include population processes and queuing networks. The method is essentially derived by making effective use of the random time change representation of Kurtz, and is no harder to implement than any standard continuous time Markov chain algorithm, such as "Gillespie's algorithm" or the next reaction method. Further, the method is analytically tractable, and, for a given number of realizations of the stochastic process, produces an estimator with substantially lower variance than that obtained using other common methods. Therefore, the computational complexity required to solve a given problem is lowered greatly. In this work, we present the method together with the theoretical analysis de...

  11. Sensitivity testing practice on pre-processing parameters in hard and soft coupled modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ignaszak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper pays attention to the problem of practical applicability of coupled modeling with the use of hard and soft models types and necessity of adapted to that models data base possession. The data base tests results for cylindrical 30 mm diameter casting made of AlSi7Mg alloy were presented. In simulation tests that were applied the Calcosoft system with CAFE (Cellular Automaton Finite Element module. This module which belongs to „multiphysics” models enables structure prediction of complete casting with division of columnar and equiaxed crystals zones of -phase. Sensitivity tests of coupled model on the particular values parameters changing were made. On these basis it was determined the relations of CET (columnar-to-equaiaxed transition zone position influence. The example of virtual structure validation based on real structure with CET zone location and grain size was shown.

  12. Energy parameters of lasers utilizing erbium glasses sensitized with ytterbium and chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunter, S.G.; Murzin, A.G.; Tolstoi, M.N.; Fedorov, Y.K.; Fromzel' , V.A.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the effect of sensitizing ytterbium- and erbium-activated lead barium phosphate glasses with Cr/sup 3 +/ ions on the energy parameters of lasing due to the /sup 4/I/sub 13//sub ///sub 2/--/sup 4/I/sub 15//sub ///sub 2/ transition in Er/sup 3 +/ ions (lambda/sub l/ = 1.54 ..mu..). It was found that substantial sensitization was achieved in phosphate glasses for only low concentrations of Cr/sup 3 +/ ions (< or approx. =0.07 wt.%) so that the efficiency of flashlamp-pumped erbium lasers could be improved by a factor of 1.5--4. The optimal conditions for achieving the best energy parameters of these lasers under free-lasing conditions were determined allowing for the spectral and energy distributions of the flashlamp radiation in the absorption range of the coactivator ions. By implementing these conditions using active elements 6 mm in diameter and 85 mm long, containing 17 wt.% Yb/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 0.25 wt.% Er/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and 0.07 wt.% Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, it was possible to achieve an efficiency of 1.2% for an electrical pump energy of 1 kJ. This was the highest efficiency achieved so far for erbium lasers. Measurements were made of the efficiency of transfer of the excitation energy from Cr/sup 3 +/ ions to Yb/sup 3 +/ ions at high levels of excitation of the medium.

  13. Design and operational parameters of a rooftop rainwater harvesting system: definition, sensitivity and verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, J S; Han, M Y

    2012-01-01

    The appropriate design and evaluation of a rainwater harvesting (RWH) system is necessary to improve system performance and the stability of the water supply. The main design parameters (DPs) of an RWH system are rainfall, catchment area, collection efficiency, tank volume and water demand. Its operational parameters (OPs) include rainwater use efficiency (RUE), water saving efficiency (WSE) and cycle number (CN). The sensitivity analysis of a rooftop RWH system's DPs to its OPs reveals that the ratio of tank volume to catchment area (V/A) for an RWH system in Seoul, South Korea is recommended between 0.03 and 0.08 in terms of rate of change in RUE. The appropriate design value of V/A is varied with D/A. The extra tank volume up to V/A of 0.15∼0.2 is also available, if necessary to secure more water. Accordingly, we should figure out suitable value or range of DPs based on the sensitivity analysis to optimize design of an RWH system or improve operation efficiency. The operational data employed in this study, which was carried out to validate the design and evaluation method of an RWH system, were obtained from the system in use at a dormitory complex at Seoul National University (SNU) in Korea. The results of these operational data are in good agreement with those used in the initial simulation. The proposed method and the results of this research will be useful in evaluating and comparing the performance of RWH systems. It is found that RUE can be increased by expanding the variety of rainwater uses, particularly in the high rainfall season.

  14. Left atrial active contractile function parameters assessed by cardiac MR are sensitive to myocardial iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbe, Mahmoud S; Yamamura, Jin; Fischer, Roland; Grosse, Regine; Berliner, Christoph; Graessner, Joachim; Lund, Gunner; Adam, Gerhard; Schoennagel, Bjoern P

    2017-02-01

    To determine the impact of myocardial iron overload on left atrial (LA) volume and function using MR in patients with systemic iron overload. Thirty-eight patients with systemic iron overload disease and 10 controls underwent 1.5 Tesla MR performing steady state free precession short-axis cine-series of the LA. Three-dimensional-volumetry was assessed to calculate LA volumes and function. Parameters were indexed (i) to body surface area. The myocardial transverse relaxation rate R2* was determined in the ventricular septum using a multi-echo GRE sequence (breathhold; electrocardiography triggered; 12 echoes; echo time = 1.3-25.7 ms). Significantly decreased active atrial emptying fraction (AAEF) (23% [95%-range, 7-34] versus 36% [95%-range, 14-49], P = 0.009), active atrial emptying volume (AAEVi) (5.5 mL/m(2) [95%-range, 2-11] versus 11.9 mL/m(2) [95%-range, 3-23], P = 0.008), and active peak emptying rate (APERi) (46 mL/s/m(2) [95%-range, 29-69] versus 75 mL/s/m(2) [95%-range, 45-178], P  40 s(-1) ) compared with patients with normal myocardial iron levels (R2* sensitivities and specificities of 82% (AAEF), 79% (APERi), 73% (AAEVi), and 57% (LAEF). MR parameters of active LA contractile function were associated with myocardial iron overload. This cross-sectional study suggests impaired active LA contractile function to be sensitive to myocardial iron toxicity. 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:535-541. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. Parameter Estimation and Sensitivity Analysis of an Urban Surface Energy Balance Parameterization at a Tropical Suburban Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshan, S.; Roth, M.; Velasco, E.

    2014-12-01

    Forecasting of the urban weather and climate is of great importance as our cities become more populated and considering the combined effects of global warming and local land use changes which make urban inhabitants more vulnerable to e.g. heat waves and flash floods. In meso/global scale models, urban parameterization schemes are used to represent the urban effects. However, these schemes require a large set of input parameters related to urban morphological and thermal properties. Obtaining all these parameters through direct measurements are usually not feasible. A number of studies have reported on parameter estimation and sensitivity analysis to adjust and determine the most influential parameters for land surface schemes in non-urban areas. Similar work for urban areas is scarce, in particular studies on urban parameterization schemes in tropical cities have so far not been reported. In order to address above issues, the town energy balance (TEB) urban parameterization scheme (part of the SURFEX land surface modeling system) was subjected to a sensitivity and optimization/parameter estimation experiment at a suburban site in, tropical Singapore. The sensitivity analysis was carried out as a screening test to identify the most sensitive or influential parameters. Thereafter, an optimization/parameter estimation experiment was performed to calibrate the input parameter. The sensitivity experiment was based on the "improved Sobol's global variance decomposition method" . The analysis showed that parameters related to road, roof and soil moisture have significant influence on the performance of the model. The optimization/parameter estimation experiment was performed using the AMALGM (a multi-algorithm genetically adaptive multi-objective method) evolutionary algorithm. The experiment showed a remarkable improvement compared to the simulations using the default parameter set. The calibrated parameters from this optimization experiment can be used for further model

  16. Tracer SWIW tests in propped and un-propped fractures: parameter sensitivity issues, revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghergut, Julia; Behrens, Horst; Sauter, Martin

    2017-04-01

    -scale diffusion; (iii) attempt to determine both advective and non-advective transport parameters from one and the same conservative-tracer signal (relying on 'third-party' knowledge), or from twin signals of a so-called 'dual' tracer pair, e. g.: using tracers with contrasting reactivity and partitioning behavior to determine residual saturation in depleted oilfields (Tomich et al. 1973), or to determine advective parameters (Ghergut et al. 2014); using early-time signals of conservative and sorptive tracers for propped-fracture characterization (Karmakar et al. 2015); using mid-time signals of conservative tracers for a reservoir-borne inflow profiling in multi-frac systems (Ghergut et al. 2016), etc. The poster describes new uses of type-(iii) techniques for the specific purposes of shale-gas reservoir characterization, productivity monitoring, diagnostics and engineering of 're-frac' treatments, based on parameter sensitivity findings from German BMWi research project "TRENDS" (Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy, FKZ 0325515) and from the EU-H2020 project "FracRisk" (grant no. 640979).

  17. Heat and Mass Transfer of Vacuum Cooling for Porous Foods-Parameter Sensitivity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the theory of heat and mass transfer, a coupled model for the porous food vacuum cooling process is constructed. Sensitivity analyses of the process to food density, thermal conductivity, specific heat, latent heat of evaporation, diameter of pores, mass transfer coefficient, viscosity of gas, and porosity were examined. The simulation results show that the food density would affect the vacuum cooling process but not the vacuum cooling end temperature. The surface temperature of food was slightly affected and the core temperature is not affected by the changed thermal conductivity. The core temperature and surface temperature are affected by the changed specific heat. The core temperature and surface temperature are affected by the changed latent heat of evaporation. The core temperature is affected by the diameter of pores. But the surface temperature is not affected obviously. The core temperature and surface temperature are not affected by the changed gas viscosity. The parameter sensitivity of mass transfer coefficient is obvious. The core temperature and surface temperature are affected by the changed mass transfer coefficient. In all the simulations, the end temperature of core and surface is not affected. The vacuum cooling process of porous medium is a process controlled by outside process.

  18. Odontologic use of copper/aluminum alloys: mitochondrial respiration as sensitive parameter of biocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Luiz Erlon A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper/aluminum alloys are largely utilized in odontological restorations because they are less expensive than gold or platinum. However, tarnishing and important corrosion in intrabuccal prostheses made with copper/aluminum alloys after 28 days of use have been reported. Several kinds of food and beverage may attack and corrode these alloys. Copper is an essential component of several important enzymes directly involved in mitochondrial respiratory metabolism. Aluminum, in contrast, is very toxic and, when absorbed, plasma values as small as 1.65 to 21.55 mg/dl can cause severe lesions to the nervous system, kidneys, and bone marrow. Because mitochondria are extremely sensitive to minimal variation of cellular physiology, the direct relationship between the mitocondrial respiratory chain and cell lesions has been used as a sensitive parameter to evaluate cellular aggression by external agents. This work consisted in the polarographic study of mitochondrial respiratory metabolism of livers and kidneys of rabbits with femoral implants of titanium or copper/aluminum alloy screws. The experimental results obtained did not show physiological modifications of hepatic or renal mitochondria isolated from animals of the three experimental groups, which indicate good biocompatibility of copper/aluminum alloys and suggest their odontological use.

  19. Validation and Parameter Sensitivity Tests for Reconstructing Swell Field Based on an Ensemble Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Tandeo, Pierre; Fablet, Ronan; Husson, Romain; Guan, Lei; Chen, Ge

    2016-01-01

    The swell propagation model built on geometric optics is known to work well when simulating radiated swells from a far located storm. Based on this simple approximation, satellites have acquired plenty of large samples on basin-traversing swells induced by fierce storms situated in mid-latitudes. How to routinely reconstruct swell fields with these irregularly sampled observations from space via known swell propagation principle requires more examination. In this study, we apply 3-h interval pseudo SAR observations in the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) to reconstruct a swell field in ocean basin, and compare it with buoy swell partitions and polynomial regression results. As validated against in situ measurements, EnKF works well in terms of spatial–temporal consistency in far-field swell propagation scenarios. Using this framework, we further address the influence of EnKF parameters, and perform a sensitivity analysis to evaluate estimations made under different sets of parameters. Such analysis is of key interest with respect to future multiple-source routinely recorded swell field data. Satellite-derived swell data can serve as a valuable complementary dataset to in situ or wave re-analysis datasets. PMID:27898005

  20. Validation and Parameter Sensitivity Tests for Reconstructing Swell Field Based on an Ensemble Kalman Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Tandeo, Pierre; Fablet, Ronan; Husson, Romain; Guan, Lei; Chen, Ge

    2016-11-25

    The swell propagation model built on geometric optics is known to work well when simulating radiated swells from a far located storm. Based on this simple approximation, satellites have acquired plenty of large samples on basin-traversing swells induced by fierce storms situated in mid-latitudes. How to routinely reconstruct swell fields with these irregularly sampled observations from space via known swell propagation principle requires more examination. In this study, we apply 3-h interval pseudo SAR observations in the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) to reconstruct a swell field in ocean basin, and compare it with buoy swell partitions and polynomial regression results. As validated against in situ measurements, EnKF works well in terms of spatial-temporal consistency in far-field swell propagation scenarios. Using this framework, we further address the influence of EnKF parameters, and perform a sensitivity analysis to evaluate estimations made under different sets of parameters. Such analysis is of key interest with respect to future multiple-source routinely recorded swell field data. Satellite-derived swell data can serve as a valuable complementary dataset to in situ or wave re-analysis datasets.

  1. Simulation of multi-scale heterogeneity of porous media and parameter sensitivity analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Yong; (张; 勇); G.E.; Fogg

    2003-01-01

    Because of the inherent multi-scale heterogeneity of porous media and the limitation of single-subject observed data, we propose to combine deterministic and stochastic techniques to simulate heterogeneity. We select a coastal plain sediment system as an example to demonstrate and verify this approach. Firstly, we apply transition probability matrix to determine and delineate the nonstationary unconformity, and combine hydro-stratigraphy analyses to establish the field/large-scale, deterministic stratigraphy model. Secondly, we apply fence diagrams and CPT data to infer the horizontal mean length of hydrofacies, and then build Markov chain models for each depositional system and simulate the local/intermediate-scale, stochastic hydrofacies model. Finally, we combine the stratigraphy and hydrofacies models to get a multi-scale heterogeneous model embedded with quantitative and qualitative observed data, with both deterministic and stochastic characteristics. In order to study the influence of uncertainty in model parameters on solute transport, we build multiple realizations of two types of heterogeneous model and use them to simulate groundwater flow and solute transport. The parameter sensitivity analysis shows the 1st and 2nd spatial moments of the contaminant plume increase with the lateral average length of hydrofacies.

  2. Sensitivities of surface wave velocities to the medium parameters in a radially anisotropic spherical Earth and inversion strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar N. Bhattacharya

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivity kernels or partial derivatives of phase velocity (c and group velocity (U with respect to medium parameters are useful to interpret a given set of observed surface wave velocity data. In addition to phase velocities, group velocities are also being observed to find the radial anisotropy of the crust and mantle. However, sensitivities of group velocity for a radially anisotropic Earth have rarely been studied. Here we show sensitivities of group velocity along with those of phase velocity to the medium parameters VSV, VSH , VPV, VPH , h and density in a radially anisotropic spherical Earth. The peak sensitivities for U are generally twice of those for c; thus U is more efficient than c to explore anisotropic nature of the medium. Love waves mainly depends on VSH while Rayleigh waves is nearly independent of VSH . The sensitivities show that there are trade-offs among these parameters during inversion and there is a need to reduce the number of parameters to be evaluated independently. It is suggested to use a nonlinear inversion jointly for Rayleigh and Love waves; in such a nonlinear inversion best solutions are obtained among the model parameters within prescribed limits for each parameter. We first choose VSH, VSV and VPH within their corresponding limits; VPV and h can be evaluated from empirical relations among the parameters. The density has small effect on surface wave velocities and it can be considered from other studies or from empirical relation of density to average P-wave velocity.

  3. Sensitivity Analysis of Core Neutronic Parameters in Electron Accelerator-driven Subcritical Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marziye Ebrahimkhani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Calculation of the core neutronic parameters is one of the key components in all nuclear reactors. In this research, the energy spectrum and spatial distribution of the neutron flux in a uranium target have been calculated. In addition, sensitivity of the core neutronic parameters in accelerator-driven subcritical advanced liquid metal reactors, such as electron beam energy (Ee and source multiplication coefficient (ks, has been investigated. A Monte Carlo code (MCNPX_2.6 has been used to calculate neutronic parameters such as effective multiplication coefficient (keff, net neutron multiplication (M, neutron yield (Yn/e, energy constant gain (G0, energy gain (G, importance of neutron source (φ∗, axial and radial distributions of neutron flux, and power peaking factor (Pmax/Pave in two axial and radial directions of the reactor core for four fuel loading patterns. According to the results, safety margin and accelerator current (Ie have been decreased in the highest case of ks, but G and φ∗ have increased by 88.9% and 21.6%, respectively. In addition, for LP1 loading pattern, with increasing Ee from 100 MeV up to 1 GeV, Yn/e and G improved by 91.09% and 10.21%, and Ie and Pacc decreased by 91.05% and 10.57%, respectively. The results indicate that placement of the Np–Pu assemblies on the periphery allows for a consistent keff because the Np–Pu assemblies experience less burn-up.

  4. Nonlinear Self-Adjoint Classification of a Burgers-KdV Family of Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio Cesar Santos Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The concepts of strictly, quasi, weak, and nonlinearly self-adjoint differential equations are revisited. A nonlinear self-adjoint classification of a class of equations with second and third order is carried out.

  5. Approximation of weak adjoints by reverse automatic differentiation of BDF methods

    CERN Document Server

    Beigel, Dörte; Wirsching, Leonard; Bock, Hans Georg

    2011-01-01

    With this contribution, we shed light on the relation between the discrete adjoints of multistep backward differentiation formula (BDF) methods and the solution of the adjoint differential equation. To this end, we develop a functional-analytic framework based on a constrained variational problem and introduce the notion of weak adjoint solutions. We devise a finite element Petrov-Galerkin interpretation of the BDF method together with its discrete adjoint scheme obtained by reverse internal numerical differentiation. We show how the finite element approximation of the weak adjoint is computed by the discrete adjoint scheme and prove its asymptotic convergence in the space of normalized functions of bounded variation. We also obtain asymptotic convergence of the discrete adjoints to the classical adjoints on the inner time interval. Finally, we give numerical results for non-adaptive and fully adaptive BDF schemes. The presented framework opens the way to carry over the existing theory on global error estimat...

  6. Time-varying sensitivity analysis of hydrologic and sediment parameters at multiple timescales: Implications for conservation practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hui; Shen, Zhenyao; Chen, Lei; Qiu, Jiali; Dong, Jianwei

    2017-11-15

    Environmental models can be used to better understand the hydrologic and sediment behavior in a watershed system. However, different processes may dominate at different time periods and timescales, which highly complicate the model interpretation. The related parameter uncertainty may be significant and needs to be addressed to avoid bias in the watershed management. In this study, we used the time-varying and multi-timescale (TVMT) method to characterize the temporal dynamics of parameter sensitivity at different timescales in hydrologic and sediment modeling. As a case study, the first order sensitivity indices were estimated with the Fourier amplitude sensitivity test (FAST) method for the Hydrological Simulation Program - Fortran (HSPF) model in the Zhangjiachong catchment in the Three Gorge Reservoir Region (TGRR) in China. The results were compared to those of the traditional aggregate method to demonstrate the merits of the TVMT method. The time-varying nature of the hydrologic and sediment parameters was revealed and explained mainly by the variation of hydro-climatic conditions. The baseflow recession parameter, evapotranspiration (ET) parameter for the soil storage, and sediment washoff parameter showed high sensitivities almost across the whole period. However, parameters related to canopy interception and channel sediment scour varied notably over time due to changes in the climate forcing. The timescale-dependent characteristics was observed and was most evident for the baseflow recession parameter and ET parameter. At last, the parameters affecting the sediment export and transport were discussed together with the inferred conservation practices. Reasonable controls for sediment must be storm-dependent. Compared to management practices on the land surface, practices affecting channel process would be more effective during storm events. Our results present one of the first investigations for sediment modeling in terms of the importance of parameter

  7. Relative sensitivity of developmental and immune parameters in juvenile versus adult male rats after exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonk, Elisa C.M., E-mail: ilse.tonk@rivm.nl [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Verhoef, Aart; Gremmer, Eric R. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Loveren, Henk van [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Piersma, Aldert H. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Veterinary Faculty, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-04-01

    The developing immune system displays a relatively high sensitivity as compared to both general toxicity parameters and to the adult immune system. In this study we have performed such comparisons using di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) as a model compound. DEHP is the most abundant phthalate in the environment and perinatal exposure to DEHP has been shown to disrupt male sexual differentiation. In addition, phthalate exposure has been associated with immune dysfunction as evidenced by effects on the expression of allergy. Male wistar rats were dosed with corn oil or DEHP by gavage from postnatal day (PND) 10–50 or PND 50–90 at doses between 1 and 1000 mg/kg/day. Androgen-dependent organ weights showed effects at lower dose levels in juvenile versus adult animals. Immune parameters affected included TDAR parameters in both age groups, NK activity in juvenile animals and TNF-α production by adherent splenocytes in adult animals. Immune parameters were affected at lower dose levels compared to developmental parameters. Overall, more immune parameters were affected in juvenile animals compared to adult animals and effects were observed at lower dose levels. The results of this study show a relatively higher sensitivity of juvenile versus adult rats. Furthermore, they illustrate the relative sensitivity of the developing immune system in juvenile animals as compared to general toxicity and developmental parameters. This study therefore provides further argumentation for performing dedicated developmental immune toxicity testing as a default in regulatory toxicology. -- Highlights: ► In this study we evaluate the relative sensitivities for DEHP induced effects. ► Results of this study demonstrate the age-dependency of DEHP toxicity. ► Functional immune parameters were more sensitive than structural immune parameters. ► Immune parameters were affected at lower dose levels than developmental parameters. ► Findings demonstrate the susceptibility of the

  8. A RISK-SENSITIVE STOCHASTIC MAXIMUM PRINCIPLE FOR OPTIMAL CONTROL OF JUMP DIFFUSIONS AND ITS APPLICATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Jingtao; Wu Zhen

    2011-01-01

    A stochastic maximum principle for the risk-sensitive optimal control prob- lem of jump diffusion processes with an exponential-of-integral cost functional is derived assuming that the value function is smooth, where the diffusion and jump term may both depend on the control. The form of the maximum principle is similar to its risk-neutral counterpart. But the adjoint equations and the maximum condition heavily depend on the risk-sensitive parameter. As applications, a linear-quadratic risk-sensitive control problem is solved by using the maximum principle derived and explicit optimal control is obtained.

  9. Sensitivity analysis of helicopter IMC decelerating steep approach and landing performance to navigation system parameters. [Instrument Meteorological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmali, M. S.; Phatak, A. V.; Bull, J. S.; Peach, L. L.; Demko, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with a sensitivity analysis of the Decelerated Steep Approach and Landing (DSAL) maneuver to on-board and ground-based navigation system parameters. The Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) DSAL maneuver involves decelerating to zero range rate while tracking the localizer and glideslope. The considered study investigated the performance of the navigation systems using Constant Deceleration Profile (CDP) guidance and a six degrees glideslope trajectory. A closed-loop computer simulation of the UH1H helicopter DSAL system was developed for the sensitivity analysis. Conclusions on system performance parameter sensitivity are discussed.

  10. Sensitivity analysis of minor actinides transmutation to physical and technological parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kooyman Timothée

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Minor actinides transmutation is one of the three main axis defined by the 2006 French law for management of nuclear waste, along with long-term storage and use of a deep geological repository. Transmutation options for critical systems can be divided in two different approaches: (a homogeneous transmutation, in which minor actinides are mixed with the fuel. This exhibits the drawback of “polluting” the entire fuel cycle with minor actinides and also has an important impact on core reactivity coefficients such as Doppler Effect or sodium void worth for fast reactors when the minor actinides fraction increases above 3 to 5% depending on the core; (b heterogeneous transmutation, in which minor actinides are inserted into transmutation targets which can be located in the center or in the periphery of the core. This presents the advantage of decoupling the management of the minor actinides from the conventional fuel and not impacting the core reactivity coefficients. In both cases, the design and analyses of potential transmutation systems have been carried out in the frame of Gen IV fast reactor using a “perturbation” approach in which nominal power reactor parameters are modified to accommodate the loading of minor actinides. However, when designing such a transmutation strategy, parameters from all steps of the fuel cycle must be taken into account, such as spent fuel heat load, gamma or neutron sources or fabrication feasibility. Considering a multi-recycling strategy of minor actinides, an analysis of relevant estimators necessary to fully analyze a transmutation strategy has been performed in this work and a sensitivity analysis of these estimators to a broad choice of reactors and fuel cycle parameters has been carried out. No threshold or percolation effects were observed. Saturation of transmutation rate with regards to several parameters has been observed, namely the minor actinides volume fraction and the irradiation time

  11. Searching for Standard Model Adjoint Scalars with Diboson Resonance Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Carpenter, Linda M

    2015-01-01

    We explore the phenomenology of scalar fields in the adjoint representation of SM gauge groups. We write a general set of dimension 5 effective operators in which SM adjoint scalars couple to pairs of standard model bosons. Using these effective operators, we explore new possible decay channels of a scalar color octet into a gluon and a Z boson/ gluon and a photon. We recast several analyses from Run I of the LHC to find constraints on an a scalar octet decaying into these channels, and we project the discovery potential of color octets in our gluon+photon channel for the 14 TeV run of LHC.

  12. On the Adjoint of a Strongly Continuous Semigroup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diómedes Bárcenas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Using some techniques from vector integration, we prove the weak measurability of the adjoint of strongly continuous semigroups which factor through Banach spaces without isomorphic copy of l1; we also prove the strong continuity away from zero of the adjoint if the semigroup factors through Grothendieck spaces. These results are used, in particular, to characterize the space of strong continuity of {T**(t}t≥0, which, in addition, is also characterized for abstract L- and M-spaces. As a corollary, it is proven that abstract L-spaces with no copy of l1 are finite-dimensional.

  13. Gaussians Rarely Extremize Adjoint Fourier Restriction Inequalities For Paraboloids

    CERN Document Server

    Christ, Michael

    2010-01-01

    It was proved independently by Foschi and Hundertmark, Zharnitsky that Gaussians extremize the adjoint Fourier restriction inequality for L^2 functions on the paraboloid in the two lowest-dimesional cases. Here we prove that Gaussians are critical points for the L^p to L^q adjoint Fourier restriction inequalities if and only if p=2. Also, Gaussians are critial points for the L^2 to L^r_t L^q_x Strichartz inequalities for all admissible pairs (r,q) in (1,infinity)^2.

  14. High Order Adjoint Derivatives using ESDIRK Methods for Oil Reservoir Production Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capolei, Andrea; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2012-01-01

    and continuous adjoints . The high order integration scheme allows larger time steps and therefore faster solution times. We compare gradient computation by the continuous adjoint method to the discrete adjoint method and the finite-difference method. The methods are implemented for a two phase flow reservoir...

  15. Compressions of maximal dissipative and self-adjoint linear relations and of dilations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azizov, T.Ya.; Dijksma, A.; Wanjala, G.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we generalize results from Stenger (1968) [30], Nudelman (2011) [28] and Azizov and Dijksma (2012) [7] to maximal dissipative and self-adjoint linear relations and discuss related results for nonnegative self-adjoint extensions of nonnegative symmetric linear relations and self-adjoint

  16. Interleukin-6: A Sensitive Parameter for the Early Detection of Neonatal Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Khaled Noor

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neonatal sepsis is a major cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity throughout the world. Though blood culture is the gold standard and has higher sensitivity and specificity over the hematological value and cytokine, it is not available in our community health situation and also in most of health care facilities. It is also time consuming. Therefore hematological value and interleukin-6 can be evaluated for the early diagnosis of neonatal bacterial infection. Objective: This study was conducted to see the usefulness of IL-6 as an early marker of neonatal sepsis and also to compare the sensitivity in comparison with CRP, hematological value and blood culture. Study Design: It was a quasy experimental study. Setting: This study was carried out in the neonatal unit of pediatric department, BSMMU during the period of September, 2005 to February, 2006. Method: Forty five suspected septic cases were enrolled in the study and thirty healthy newborn were taken for comparison. Venous blood sample from peripheral vein was collected on the 1st day of symptoms and/or 1st day of admission and was sent for IL-6 estimation within half an hour and estimation of IL-6 was done by using immunolyte DPC USA which employed automated chemiluminescent immunoassays. Results: Out of forty five cases of suspected-neonatal sepsis, IL-6 were positive in twenty five cases. In culture proven sepsis 100% cases had raised IL-6. In control group only five babies had raised IL-6. Three cases were culture positive, of which all were also positive for IL-6 (100%. Among the cases twenty six were CRP positive, of which twenty were also positive for IL-6 (76.92%. Conclusion: In the present study IL-6 was found to be an early marker of neonatal infection. Sensitivity was more than CRP and other hematological parameter in the first twenty four hours. Key words: Interleukin-6, Neonatal Sepsis.DOI: 10.3329/bsmmuj.v1i1.3687 BSMMU J 2008; 1(1: 1-5

  17. Normalized sensitivities and parameter identifiability of in situ diffusion experiments on Callovo-Oxfordian clay at Bure site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samper, J.; Dewonck, S.; Zheng, L.; Yang, Q.; Naves, A.

    2009-10-01

    DIR (Diffusion of Inert and Reactive tracers) is an experimental program performed by ANDRA at Bure underground research laboratory in Meuse/Haute Marne (France) to characterize diffusion and retention of radionuclides in Callovo-Oxfordian (C-Ox) argillite. In situ diffusion experiments were performed in vertical boreholes to determine diffusion and retention parameters of selected radionuclides. C-Ox clay exhibits a mild diffusion anisotropy due to stratification. Interpretation of in situ diffusion experiments is complicated by several non-ideal effects caused by the presence of a sintered filter, a gap between the filter and borehole wall and an excavation disturbed zone (EdZ). The relevance of such non-ideal effects and their impact on estimated clay parameters have been evaluated with numerical sensitivity analyses and synthetic experiments having similar parameters and geometric characteristics as real DIR experiments. Normalized dimensionless sensitivities of tracer concentrations at the test interval have been computed numerically. Tracer concentrations are found to be sensitive to all key parameters. Sensitivities are tracer dependent and vary with time. These sensitivities are useful to identify which are the parameters that can be estimated with less uncertainty and find the times at which tracer concentrations begin to be sensitive to each parameter. Synthetic experiments generated with prescribed known parameters have been interpreted automatically with INVERSE-CORE{sup 2D} and used to evaluate the relevance of non-ideal effects and ascertain parameter identifiability in the presence of random measurement errors. Identifiability analysis of synthetic experiments reveals that data noise makes difficult the estimation of clay parameters. Parameters of clay and EdZ cannot be estimated simultaneously from noisy data. Models without an EdZ fail to reproduce synthetic data. Proper interpretation of in situ diffusion experiments requires accounting for filter

  18. Ultra-Weak Fiber Bragg Grating Sensing Network Coated with Sensitive Material for Multi-Parameter Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Bai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A multi-parameter measurement system based on ultra-weak fiber Bragg grating (UFBG array with sensitive material was proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The UFBG array interrogation principle is time division multiplex technology with two semiconductor optical amplifiers as timing units. Experimental results showed that the performance of the proposed UFBG system is almost equal to that of traditional FBG, while the UFBG array system has obvious superiority with potential multiplexing ability for multi-point and multi-parameter measurement. The system experimented on a 144 UFBG array with the reflectivity of UFBG ~0.04% for the four target parameters: hydrogen, humidity, temperature and salinity. Moreover, a uniform solution was customized to divide the cross-sensitivity between temperature and other target parameters. It is expected that this scheme will be capable of handling thousands of multi-parameter sensors in a single fiber.

  19. Relative sensitivities of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters to arterial input function (AIF) scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Cai, Yu; Moloney, Brendan; Chen, Yiyi; Huang, Wei; Woods, Mark; Coakley, Fergus V; Rooney, William D; Garzotto, Mark G; Springer, Charles S

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic-Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) has been used widely for clinical applications. Pharmacokinetic modeling of DCE-MRI data that extracts quantitative contrast reagent/tissue-specific model parameters is the most investigated method. One of the primary challenges in pharmacokinetic analysis of DCE-MRI data is accurate and reliable measurement of the arterial input function (AIF), which is the driving force behind all pharmacokinetics. Because of effects such as inflow and partial volume averaging, AIF measured from individual arteries sometimes require amplitude scaling for better representation of the blood contrast reagent (CR) concentration time-courses. Empirical approaches like blinded AIF estimation or reference tissue AIF derivation can be useful and practical, especially when there is no clearly visible blood vessel within the imaging field-of-view (FOV). Similarly, these approaches generally also require magnitude scaling of the derived AIF time-courses. Since the AIF varies among individuals even with the same CR injection protocol and the perfect scaling factor for reconstructing the ground truth AIF often remains unknown, variations in estimated pharmacokinetic parameters due to varying AIF scaling factors are of special interest. In this work, using simulated and real prostate cancer DCE-MRI data, we examined parameter variations associated with AIF scaling. Our results show that, for both the fast-exchange-limit (FXL) Tofts model and the water exchange sensitized fast-exchange-regime (FXR) model, the commonly fitted CR transfer constant (K(trans)) and the extravascular, extracellular volume fraction (ve) scale nearly proportionally with the AIF, whereas the FXR-specific unidirectional cellular water efflux rate constant, kio, and the CR intravasation rate constant, kep, are both AIF scaling insensitive. This indicates that, for DCE-MRI of prostate cancer and possibly other cancers, kio and kep may be more suitable imaging

  20. Relative sensitivities of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters to arterial input function (AIF) scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Cai, Yu; Moloney, Brendan; Chen, Yiyi; Huang, Wei; Woods, Mark; Coakley, Fergus V.; Rooney, William D.; Garzotto, Mark G.; Springer, Charles S.

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic-Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) has been used widely for clinical applications. Pharmacokinetic modeling of DCE-MRI data that extracts quantitative contrast reagent/tissue-specific model parameters is the most investigated method. One of the primary challenges in pharmacokinetic analysis of DCE-MRI data is accurate and reliable measurement of the arterial input function (AIF), which is the driving force behind all pharmacokinetics. Because of effects such as inflow and partial volume averaging, AIF measured from individual arteries sometimes require amplitude scaling for better representation of the blood contrast reagent (CR) concentration time-courses. Empirical approaches like blinded AIF estimation or reference tissue AIF derivation can be useful and practical, especially when there is no clearly visible blood vessel within the imaging field-of-view (FOV). Similarly, these approaches generally also require magnitude scaling of the derived AIF time-courses. Since the AIF varies among individuals even with the same CR injection protocol and the perfect scaling factor for reconstructing the ground truth AIF often remains unknown, variations in estimated pharmacokinetic parameters due to varying AIF scaling factors are of special interest. In this work, using simulated and real prostate cancer DCE-MRI data, we examined parameter variations associated with AIF scaling. Our results show that, for both the fast-exchange-limit (FXL) Tofts model and the water exchange sensitized fast-exchange-regime (FXR) model, the commonly fitted CR transfer constant (Ktrans) and the extravascular, extracellular volume fraction (ve) scale nearly proportionally with the AIF, whereas the FXR-specific unidirectional cellular water efflux rate constant, kio, and the CR intravasation rate constant, kep, are both AIF scaling insensitive. This indicates that, for DCE-MRI of prostate cancer and possibly other cancers, kio and kep may be more suitable imaging

  1. Automation of Global Adjoint Tomography Based on ASDF and Workflow Management Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, W.; Ruan, Y.; Bozdag, E.; Smith, J. A.; Modrak, R. T.; Krischer, L.; Chen, Y.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Tromp, J.

    2016-12-01

    Global adjoint tomography is computationally expensive, requiring thousands of wavefield simulations and massive data processing. Though a collaboration with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory computing group and an allocation on the `Titan' GPU-accelerated supercomputer, we have begun to assimilate waveform data from more than 4,000 earthquakes, from 1995 to 2015, in our inversions. However, since conventional file formats and signal processing tools were not designed for parallel processing of massive data volumes, use of such tools in high-resolution global inversions leads to major bottlenecks. To overcome such problems and allow for continued scientific progress, we designed the Adaptive Seismic Data Format (ASDF) and developed a set of processing tools based on ASDF, covering from signal processing (pytomo3d), time window selection (pyflex) to adjoint source (pyadjoint). These new tools greatly enhance the reproducibility and accountability of our research while taking full advantage of parallel computing, showing superior scaling on modern computational platforms. The entire inversion workflow, intrinsically complex and sensitive to human errors, is carefully handled and automated by modern workflow management tools, preventing data contamination and saving a huge amount of time. Our starting model GLAD-M15 (Bozdag et al., 2016), an elastic model with transversely isotropic upper mantle, is based on 253 earthquakes and 15 nonlinear conjugate gradient iterations. We have now completed source inversions for more than 1,000 earthquakes and have started structural inversions using a quasi-Newton optimization algorithm. We will discuss the challenges of large-scale workflows on HPC systems, the solutions offered by our new adjoint tomography tools, and the initial tomographic results obtained using the new expanded dataset.

  2. Sensitivity Analysis of Hydrological Parameters in Modeling Flow and Transport in the Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Zhang; Y.S. Wu; J.E. Houseworth

    2006-03-21

    The unsaturated fractured volcanic deposits at Yucca Mountain have been intensively investigated as a possible repository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. Field studies at the site have revealed that there exist large variabilities in hydrological parameters over the spatial domain of the mountain. This paper reports on a systematic analysis of hydrological parameters using the site-scale 3-D unsaturated zone (UZ) flow model. The objectives of the sensitivity analyses are to evaluate the effects of uncertainties in hydrologic parameters on modeled UZ flow and contaminant transport results. Sensitivity analyses are carried out relative to fracture and matrix permeability and capillary strength (van Genuchten a), through variation of these parameter values by one standard deviation from the base-case values. The parameter variation results in eight parameter sets. Modeling results for the eight UZ flow sensitivity cases have been compared with field observed data and simulation results from the base-case model. The effects of parameter uncertainties on the flow fields are discussed and evaluated through comparison of results for flow and transport. In general, this study shows that uncertainties in matrix parameters cause larger uncertainty in simulated moisture flux than corresponding uncertainties in fracture properties for unsaturated flow through heterogeneous fractured rock.

  3. Sensitivity Analysis Of Hydrological Parameters In Modeling FlowAnd Transport In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Houseworth, James E

    2006-02-01

    The unsaturated fractured volcanic deposits at Yucca Mountain in Nevada, USA, have been intensively investigated as a possible repository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. Field studies at the site have revealed that there exist large variabilities in hydrological parameters over the spatial domain of the mountain. Systematic analyses of hydrological parameters using a site-scale three-dimensional unsaturated zone (UZ) flow model have been undertaken. The main objective of the sensitivity analyses was to evaluate the effects of uncertainties in hydrologic parameters on modeled UZ flow and contaminant transport results. Sensitivity analyses were carried out relative to fracture and matrix permeability and capillary strength (van Genuchten {alpha}) through variation of these parameter values by one standard deviation from the base-case values. The parameter variation resulted in eight parameter sets. Modeling results for the eight UZ flow sensitivity cases have been compared with field observed data and simulation results from the base-case model. The effects of parameter uncertainties on the flow fields were evaluated through comparison of results for flow and transport. In general, this study shows that uncertainties in matrix parameters cause larger uncertainty in simulated moisture flux than corresponding uncertainties in fracture properties for unsaturated flow through heterogeneous fractured rock.

  4. Spatial representation in the social interaction potential metric: an analysis of scale and parameter sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Farber, Steven

    2016-10-01

    The social interaction potential (SIP) metric measures urban structural constraints on social interaction opportunities of a metropolitan region based on the time geographic concept of joint accessibility. Previous implementations of the metric used an interaction surface based on census tracts and the locations of their centroids. This has been shown to be a shortcoming, as the metric strongly depends on the scale of the zoning system in the region, making it difficult to compare the SIP metric between metropolitan regions. This research explores the role of spatial representation in the SIP metric and identifies a suitable grid-based representation that allows for comparison between regions while retaining cost-effectiveness with respect to computational burden. We also report on findings from an extensive sensitivity analysis investigating the SIP metric's input parameters such as a travel flow congestion factor and the length of the allowable time budget for social activities. The results provide new insights on the role of the modifiable areal unit problem in the computation of time geographic measures of accessibility.

  5. Sensitivity Analysis of Parameters Governing the Recovery of Methane from Natural Gas Hydrate Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Giraldo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring gas hydrates are regarded as an important future source of energy and considerable efforts are currently being invested to develop methods for an economically viable recovery of this resource. The recovery of natural gas from gas hydrate deposits has been studied by a number of researchers. Depressurization of the reservoir is seen as a favorable method because of its relatively low energy requirements. While lowering the pressure in the production well seems to be a straight forward approach to destabilize methane hydrates, the intrinsic kinetics of CH4-hydrate decomposition and fluid flow lead to complex processes of mass and heat transfer within the deposit. In order to develop a better understanding of the processes and conditions governing the production of methane from methane hydrates it is necessary to study the sensitivity of gas production to the effects of factors such as pressure, temperature, thermal conductivity, permeability, porosity on methane recovery from naturally occurring gas hydrates. A simplified model is the base for an ensemble of reservoir simulations to study which parameters govern productivity and how these factors might interact.

  6. Exceptional Sensitivity to Neutrino Parameters with a Two Baseline Beta-Beam Set-up

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar; Raychaudhuri, Amitava

    2008-01-01

    We examine the reach of a Beta-beam experiment with two detectors at carefully chosen baselines for exploring neutrino mass parameters. Locating the source at CERN, the two detectors and baselines are: (a) a 50 kton iron calorimeter (ICAL) at a baseline of around 7150 km which is roughly the magic baseline, e.g., ICAL@INO, and (b) a 50 kton Totally Active Scintillator Detector at a distance of 730 km, e.g., at Gran Sasso. We choose 8B/8Li source ions with a boost factor \\gamma of 650 for the magic baseline while for the closer detector we consider 18Ne/6He ions with a range of Lorentz boosts. We find that the locations of the two detectors complement each other leading to an exceptional high sensitivity. With \\gamma=650 for 8B/8Li and \\gamma=575 for 18Ne/6He and total luminosity corresponding to 5\\times (1.1 \\times 10^{18}) and 5\\times (2.9\\times 10^{18}) useful ion decays in neutrino and antineutrino modes respectively, we find that our two detector set-up can probe maximal CP violation and establish the neu...

  7. Sensitivity analysis of DSMC parameters for an 11-species air hypersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higdon, Kyle J.; Goldstein, David B.; Varghese, Philip L.

    2016-11-01

    This research investigates the influence of input parameters in the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for the simulation of a hypersonic flow scenario. Simulations are performed using the Computation of Hypersonic Ionizing Particles in Shocks (CHIPS) code to reproduce NASA Ames Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) experimental results for a 10.26 km/s, 0.2 Torr scenario. Since the chosen nominal simulation involves an energetic flow, an electronic excitation model is introduced into CHIPS to complement the pre-existing 11-species air models. A global Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis was completed for this chosen scenario and three quantities of interest (QoIs) were investigated: translational temperature, electronic temperature, and electron number density. The electron impact ionization reaction, N + e- ⇌ N+ + e- + e-, was determined to have the greatest effect on all three QoIs as it defines the electron cascade that occurs post-shock. In addition, molecular nitrogen dissociation, associative ionization, and the N + NO+ ⇌ N+ + NO charge exchange reaction were all found to be important for these QoIs.

  8. Sensitivity of Fish Landings to Some Meteorological Parameters: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madihah Jafar-Sidik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: A widely held belief that climate change has impacts on sustainable fish catch leads us to find out how these effects influence fish landings in Sabah, Malaysia, especially for the west and east coasts, based upon monsoonal periods. Correlation of fish landings with rainfall suggests that local fish landing is believed to be sensitive to the effects of climate change. Approach: Rainfall, temperature, wind, the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI and fish landings time series for 3 specific regions (Kota Kinabalu (KK, Tawau and Sandakan have been studied using available local data for the last 9 years. Results: Results indicated significant fish landing variations due to the fluctuation of these meteorological parameters, for example, ~20% reduction is found during Northeast (NE monsoon at KK. Heavy rainfall correlates well with high fish landings when fish landings lead rainfall by 1 month. Fish landings and temperature were also highly correlated. Fish landings leads wind stress by 1-2 months with 99% certainty and it is high when the wind direction is between 150-200° from north (approximately for South Easterlies and South Westerlies. Conclusion: The results confirmed that fish landing is low during NE monsoon period. In regard to the effect of El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO, low or negative SOI indicates high fish landings.

  9. Quantifying Parameter Sensitivity, Interaction and Transferability in Hydrologically Enhanced Versions of Noah-LSM over Transition Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosero, Enrique; Yang, Zong-Liang; Wagener, Thorsten; Gulden, Lindsey E.; Yatheendradas, Soni; Niu, Guo-Yue

    2009-01-01

    We use sensitivity analysis to identify the parameters that are most responsible for shaping land surface model (LSM) simulations and to understand the complex interactions in three versions of the Noah LSM: the standard version (STD), a version enhanced with a simple groundwater module (GW), and version augmented by a dynamic phenology module (DV). We use warm season, high-frequency, near-surface states and turbulent fluxes collected over nine sites in the US Southern Great Plains. We quantify changes in the pattern of sensitive parameters, the amount and nature of the interaction between parameters, and the covariance structure of the distribution of behavioral parameter sets. Using Sobol s total and first-order sensitivity indexes, we show that very few parameters directly control the variance of the model output. Significant parameter interaction occurs so that not only the optimal parameter values differ between models, but the relationships between parameters change. GW decreases parameter interaction and appears to improve model realism, especially at wetter sites. DV increases parameter interaction and decreases identifiability, implying it is overparameterized and/or underconstrained. A case study at a wet site shows GW has two functional modes: one that mimics STD and a second in which GW improves model function by decoupling direct evaporation and baseflow. Unsupervised classification of the posterior distributions of behavioral parameter sets cannot group similar sites based solely on soil or vegetation type, helping to explain why transferability between sites and models is not straightforward. This evidence suggests a priori assignment of parameters should also consider climatic differences.

  10. Estimation of Oceanic Eddy Viscosity Profile and Wind Stress Drag Coefficient Using Adjoint Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qilin Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adjoint method is used to assimilate pseudoobservations to simultaneously estimate the OEVP and the WSDC in an oceanic Ekman layer model. Five groups of experiments are designed to investigate the influences that the optimization algorithms, step-length, inverse integral time of the adjoint model, prescribed vertical distribution of eddy viscosity, and regularization parameter exert on the inversion results. Experimental results show that the best estimation results are obtained with the GD algorithm; the best estimation results are obtained when the step-length is equal to 1 in Group 2; in Group 3, 8 days of inverse integral time yields the best estimation results, and good assimilation efficiency is achieved by increasing iteration steps when the inverse integral time is reduced; in Group 4, the OEVP can be estimated for some specific distributions; however, when the VEVCs increase along with the depth at the bottom of water, the estimation results are relatively poor. For this problem, we use extrapolation method to deal with the VEVCs in layers in which the estimation results are poor; the regularization method with appropriate regularization parameter can indeed improve the experiment result to some extent. In all experiments in Groups 2-3, the WSDCs are inverted successfully within 100 iterations.

  11. Towards adjoint-based inversion of time-dependent mantle convection with non-linear viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dunzhu; Gurnis, Michael; Stadler, Georg

    2017-01-01

    We develop and study an adjoint-based inversion method for the simultaneous recovery of initial temperature conditions and viscosity parameters in time-dependent mantle convection from the current mantle temperature and historic plate motion. Based on a realistic rheological model with temperature- and strain rate-dependent viscosity, we formulate the inversion as a PDE-constrained optimization problem. The objective functional includes the misfit of surface velocity (plate motion) history, the misfit of the current mantle temperature, and a regularization for the uncertain initial condition. The gradient of this functional with respect to the initial temperature and the uncertain viscosity parameters is computed by solving the adjoint of the mantle convection equations. This gradient is used in a preconditioned quasi-Newton minimization algorithm. We study the prospects and limitations of the inversion, as well as the computational performance of the method using two synthetic problems, a sinking cylinder and a realistic subduction model. The subduction model is characterized by the migration of a ridge toward a trench whereby both plate motions and subduction evolve. The results demonstrate: (1) for known viscosity parameters, the initial temperature can be well recovered, as in previous initial condition-only inversions where the effective viscosity was given; (2) for known initial temperature, viscosity parameters can be recovered accurately, despite the existence of trade-offs due to ill-conditioning; (3) for the joint inversion of initial condition and viscosity parameters, initial condition and effective viscosity can be reasonably recovered, but the high dimension of the parameter space and the resulting ill-posedness may limit recovery of viscosity parameters.

  12. Adjoint-based optimization of a foam EOR process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Namdar Zanganeh, M.; Kraaijevanger, J.F.B.M.; Buurman, H.W.; Jansen, J.D.; Rossen, W.R.

    2012-01-01

    We apply adjoint-based optimization to a Surfactant-Alternating-Gas foam process using a linear foam model introducing gradual changes in gas mobility and a nonlinear foam model giving abrupt changes in gas mobility as function of oil and water saturations and surfactant concentration. For the

  13. Non-self-adjoint hamiltonians defined by Riesz bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagarello, F., E-mail: fabio.bagarello@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Energia, Ingegneria dell' Informazione e Modelli Matematici, Facoltà di Ingegneria, Università di Palermo, I-90128 Palermo, Italy and INFN, Università di Torino, Torino (Italy); Inoue, A., E-mail: a-inoue@fukuoka-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Mathematics, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Trapani, C., E-mail: camillo.trapani@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Università di Palermo, I-90123 Palermo (Italy)

    2014-03-15

    We discuss some features of non-self-adjoint Hamiltonians with real discrete simple spectrum under the assumption that the eigenvectors form a Riesz basis of Hilbert space. Among other things, we give conditions under which these Hamiltonians can be factorized in terms of generalized lowering and raising operators.

  14. Nefness of adjoint bundles for ample vector bundles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Maeda

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available Let E be an ample vector bundle of rank >1 on a smooth complex projective variety X of dimension n. This paper gives a classification of pairs (X,E whose adjoint bundles K_X+det E are not nef in the case when  r=n-2.

  15. Adjoint Methods for Guiding Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Tsunami Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, B. N.; LeVeque, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    One difficulty in developing numerical methods for tsunami modeling is the fact that solutions contain time-varying regions where much higher resolution is required than elsewhere in the domain, particularly when tracking a tsunami propagating across the ocean. The open source GeoClaw software deals with this issue by using block-structured adaptive mesh refinement to selectively refine around propagating waves. For problems where only a target area of the total solution is of interest (e.g., one coastal community), a method that allows identifying and refining the grid only in regions that influence this target area would significantly reduce the computational cost of finding a solution. In this work, we show that solving the time-dependent adjoint equation and using a suitable inner product with the forward solution allows more precise refinement of the relevant waves. We present the adjoint methodology first in one space dimension for illustration and in a broad context since it could also be used in other adaptive software, and potentially for other tsunami applications beyond adaptive refinement. We then show how this adjoint method has been integrated into the adaptive mesh refinement strategy of the open source GeoClaw software and present tsunami modeling results showing that the accuracy of the solution is maintained and the computational time required is significantly reduced through the integration of the adjoint method into adaptive mesh refinement.

  16. On self-adjointness of singular Floquet Hamiltonians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duclos, Pierre; Jensen, Arne

    2010-01-01

    Schrödinger equations with time-dependent interactions are studied. We investigate how to define the Floquet Hamiltonian as a self-adjoint operator, when the interaction is singular in time or space. Using these results we establish the existence of a bounded propagator, by applying a result given...

  17. Large-volume results in SU(2) with adjoint fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Pica, Claudio; Patella, Agostino; Rago, Antonio; Roman, Sabin

    2014-01-01

    Taming finite-volume effects is a crucial ingredient in order to identify the existence of IR fixed points. We present the latest results from our numerical simulations of SU(2) gauge theory with 2 Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation on large volumes. We compare with previous results, and extrapolate to thermodynamic limit when possible.

  18. Large-volume results in SU(2) with adjoint fermions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Lucini, Biagio; Pica, Claudio;

    2013-01-01

    Taming finite-volume effects is a crucial ingredient in order to identify the existence of IR fixed points. We present the latest results from our numerical simulations of SU(2) gauge theory with 2 Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation on large volumes. We compare with previous results, an...

  19. Finite volume effects in SU(2) with two adjoint fermions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Lucini, Biagio; Patella, Agostino;

    2011-01-01

    Many evidences from lattice simulations support the idea that SU(2) with two Dirac flavors in the adjoint representation (also called Minimal Walking Technicolor) is IR conformal. A possible way to see this is through the behavior of the spectrum of the mass-deformed theory. When fermions are mas...

  20. Calculating Air Quality and Climate Co-Benefits Metrics from Adjoint Elasticities in Chemistry-Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spak, S.; Henze, D. K.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    The science and policy communities both need common metrics that clearly, comprehensively, and intuitively communicate the relative sensitivities of air quality and climate to emissions control strategies, include emissions and process uncertainties, and minimize the range of error that is transferred to the metric. This is particularly important because most emissions control policies impact multiple short-lived climate forcing agents, and non-linear climate and health responses in space and time limit the accuracy and policy value of simple emissions-based calculations. Here we describe and apply new second-order elasticity metrics to support the direct comparison of emissions control policies for air quality and health co-benefits analyses using adjoint chemical transport and chemistry-climate models. Borrowing an econometric concept, the simplest elasticities in the atmospheric system are the percentage changes in concentrations due to a percentage change in the emissions. We propose a second-order elasticity metric, the Emissions Reduction Efficiency, which supports comparison across compounds, to long-lived climate forcing agents like CO2, and to other air quality impacts, at any temporal or spatial scale. These adjoint-based metrics (1) possess a single uncertainty range; (2) allow for the inclusion of related health and other impacts effects within the same framework; (3) take advantage of adjoint and forward sensitivity models; and (4) are easily understood. Using global simulations with the adjoint of GEOS-Chem, we apply these metrics to identify spatial and sectoral variability in the climate and health co-benefits of sectoral emissions controls on black carbon, sulfur dioxide, and PM2.5. We find spatial gradients in optimal control strategies on every continent, along with differences among megacities.

  1. Sensitivity Analysis of Uncertainty Parameter based on MARS-LMR Code on SHRT-45R of EBR II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seok-Ju; Kang, Doo-Hyuk; Seo, Jae-Seung [System Engineering and Technology Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sung-Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hae-Yong [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In order to assess the uncertainty quantification of the MARS-LMR code, the code has been improved by modifying the source code to accommodate calculation process required for uncertainty quantification. In the present study, a transient of Unprotected Loss of Flow(ULOF) is selected as typical cases of as Anticipated Transient without Scram(ATWS) which belongs to DEC category. The MARS-LMR input generation for EBR II SHRT-45R and execution works are performed by using the PAPIRUS program. The sensitivity analysis is carried out with Uncertainty Parameter of the MARS-LMR code for EBR-II SHRT-45R. Based on the results of sensitivity analysis, dominant parameters with large sensitivity to FoM are picked out. Dominant parameters selected are closely related to the development process of ULOF event.

  2. Exceptional sensitivity to neutrino parameters with a two-baseline Beta-beam set-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India); Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)], E-mail: sanjib@hri.res.in; Choubey, Sandhya [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India)], E-mail: sandhya@hri.res.in; Raychaudhuri, Amitava [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India); Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)], E-mail: raychaud@hri.res.in

    2008-12-11

    We examine the reach of a Beta-beam experiment with two detectors at carefully chosen baselines for exploring neutrino mass parameters. Locating the source at CERN, the two detectors and baselines are: (a) a 50 kton iron calorimeter (ICAL) at a baseline of around 7150 km which is roughly the magic baseline, e.g., ICAL-INO, and (b) a 50 kton Totally Active Scintillator Detector at a distance of 730 km, e.g., at Gran Sasso. We choose {sup 8}B and {sup 8}Li source ions with a boost factor {gamma} of 650 for the magic baseline while for the closer detector we consider {sup 18}Ne and {sup 6}He ions with a range of Lorentz boosts. We find that the locations of the two detectors complement each other leading to an exceptional high sensitivity. With {gamma}=650 for {sup 8}B/{sup 8}Li and {gamma}=575 for {sup 18}Ne/{sup 6}He and total luminosity corresponding to 5x(1.1x10{sup 18}) and 5x(2.9x10{sup 18}) useful ion decays in neutrino and antineutrino modes respectively, we find that the two-detector set-up can probe maximal CP violation and establish the neutrino mass ordering if sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13} is 1.4x10{sup -4} and 2.7x10{sup -4}, respectively, or more. The sensitivity reach for sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13} itself is 5.5x10{sup -4}. With a factor of 10 higher luminosity, the corresponding sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13} reach of this set-up would be 1.8x10{sup -5}, 4.6x10{sup -5} and 5.3x10{sup -5} respectively for the above three performance indicators. CP violation can be discovered for 64% of the possible {delta}{sub CP} values for sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13}{>=}10{sup -3} ({>=}8x10{sup -5}), for the standard luminosity (10 times enhanced luminosity). Comparable physics performance can be achieved in a set-up where data from CERN to INO-ICAL is combined with that from CERN to the Boulby mine in United Kingdom, a baseline of 1050 km.

  3. Short term low-calorie diet improves insulin sensitivity and metabolic parameters in obese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazielle Vilas Bôas Huguenin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and insulin resistance are associated with an increase of cardiovascular risk factors, including adipocytokines. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of low-calorie diet on serum lipids, adipokines, insulin resistance and body composition in obese women. It was a clinical trial with class I obese women aged 30-45 years submitted to hypocaloric diet for 90 days. Dietary intake, anthropometric parameters, body composition, serum lipids, glucose, insulin, leptin, adiponectin, HOMA-IR and QUICKI indexes were evaluated at the baseline, 30, 60 and 90 days. There was 30% significant decrease in energy intake, and also decrease in body weight, body mass index and waist circumference (p < 0.01 throughout the treatment period. Despite the amount of lean body mass (kg reduced in average, it was observed that lean body mass (% had increased (p < 0.01 and that the amount of fat body mass (kg had decreased significantly in the third month (p < 0.05. Systolic blood pressure reduced up to -5mmHg (p < 0.05 after 90 days. Was observed a decrease (p < 0.05 on serum insulin and HOMA-IR until the 60th day, while the serum adiponectin increased (p < 0.01 during treatment. Corroborating with the reduction of fat body mass and weight, serum leptin also reduced (p < 0.01. These results suggest that the short-term low-calorie diet reduces total body fat, mainly found in the abdominal region, and efficiently improve insulin sensitivity decreasing cardiovascular risk in obese women.

  4. Sensitivity analysis of parameters important to nuclear criticality safety of Castor X/28F spent nuclear fuel cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leotlela, Mosebetsi J. [Witwatersrand Univ., Johannesburg (South Africa). School of Physics; Koeberg Operating Unit, Johannesburg (South Africa). Regulations and Licensing; Malgas, Isaac [Koeberg Nuclear Power Station, Duinefontein (South Africa). Nuclear Engineering Analysis; Taviv, Eugene [ASARA consultants (PTY) LTD, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2015-11-15

    In nuclear criticality safety analysis it is essential to ascertain how various components of the nuclear system will perform under certain conditions they may be subjected to, particularly if the components of the system are likely to be affected by environmental factors such as temperature, radiation or material composition. It is therefore prudent that a sensitivity analysis is performed to determine and quantify the response of the output to variation in any of the input parameters. In a fissile system, the output parameter of importance is the k{sub eff}. Therefore, in attempting to prevent reactivity-induced accidents, it is important for the criticality safety analyst to have a quantified degree of response for the neutron multiplication factor to perturbation in a given input parameter. This article will present the results of the perturbation of the parameters that are important to nuclear criticality safety analysis and their respective correlation equations for deriving the sensitivity coefficients.

  5. Parameter sensitivity of three Kalman Filter Schemes for the assimilation of tide guage data in coastal and self sea models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jacob Viborg Tornfeldt; Madsen, Henrik; Madsen, H.

    2006-01-01

    sensitivity study of three well known Kalman filter approaches for the assimilation of water levels in a three dimensional hydrodynamic modelling system. The filters considered are the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), the reduced rank square root Kalman filter (RRSQRT) and the steady Kalman filter...... is to be encouraged in this perspective. However, the predicted uncertainty of the assimilation results are sensitive to the parameters and hence must be applied with care. The sensitivity study further demonstrates the effectiveness of the steady Kalman filter in the given system as well as the great impact...

  6. Magnetic Field Separation Around Planets Using an Adjoint-Method Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabert, Christian; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Heyner, Daniel; Othmer, Carsten

    The two spacecraft of the BepiColombo mission will reach planet Mercury in 2022. The magnetometers on-board these polar orbiting spacecraft will provide a detailed map of the magnetic field in Mercury's environment. Unfortunately, a separation of the magnetic field into internal and external parts using the classical Gauss-algorithm is not possible due to strong electric currents in the orbit region of the spacecraft. These currents are due to the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury's planetary magnetic field. We use an MHD code to simulate this interaction process. This requires a first choice of Mercury's planetary field which is used and modified until the simulation results fit to the actual measurements. This optimization process is carried out most efficiently using an adjoint-method. The adjoint-method is well known for its low computational cost in order to determine sensitivities required for the minimization. In a first step, the validity of our approach to separate magnetic field contributions into internal and external parts is demonstrated using synthetic generated data. Furthermore, we apply our approach to satellite measurements of the Earth's magnetic field. We can compare the results with the well known planetary field of the Earth to prove practical suitability.

  7. Adjoint Tomography of Taiwan Region: From Travel-Time Toward Waveform Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H. H.; Lee, S. J.; Tromp, J.

    2014-12-01

    The complicated tectonic environment such as Taiwan region can modulate the seismic waveform severely and hamper the discrimination and the utilization of later phases. Restricted to the use of only first arrivals of P- and S-wave, the travel-time tomographic models of Taiwan can simulate the seismic waveform barely to a frequency of 0.2 Hz to date. While it has been sufficient for long-period studies, e.g. source inversion, this frequency band is still far from the applications to the community and high-resolution studies. To achieve a higher-frequency simulation, more data and the considerations of off-path and finite-frequency effects are necessary. Based on the spectral-element and the adjoint method recently developed, we prepared 94 MW 3.5-6.0 earthquakes with well-defined location and focal mechanism solutions from Real-Time Moment Tensor Monitoring System (RMT), and preformed an iterative gradient-based inversion employing waveform modeling and finite-frequency measurements of adjoint method. By which the 3-D sensitivity kernels are taken into account realistically and the full waveform information are naturally sought, without a need of any phase pick. A preliminary model m003 using 10-50 sec data was demonstrated and compared with previous travel-time models. The primary difference appears in the mountainous area, where the previous travel-time model may underestimate the S-wave speed in the upper crust, but overestimates in the lower crust.

  8. Aerodynamic Optimization of the Nose Shape of a Train Using the Adjoint Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Munoz-Paniagua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The adjoint method is used in this paper for the aerodynamic optimization of the nose shape of a train. This method has been extensively applied in aircraft or ground vehicle aerodynamic optimization, but is still in progress in train aerodynamics. Here we consider this innovative optimization method and present its application to reduce the aerodynamic drag when the train is subjected to front wind. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method, highlighting the requirements, limitations and capabilities of it. Furthermore, a significant reduction of the aerodynamic drag in a short number of solver calls is aimed as well. The independence of the computational cost with respect to the number of design variables that define the optimal candidate is stressed as the most interesting characteristic of the adjoint method. This behavior permits a more complete modification of the shape of the train nose because the number of design variables is not a constraint anymore. The information obtained from the sensitivity field permits determining the regions of the geometry where a small modification of the nose shape might introduce a larger improvement of the train performance. A good agreement between this information and the successive geometry modifications is observed here.

  9. Temperature Sensitivity as a Microbial Trait Using Parameters from Macromolecular Rate Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Charlotte Jean Alster; Peter Baas; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Nels G. Johnson; von Fischer, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    The activity of soil microbial extracellular enzymes is strongly controlled by temperature, yet the degree to which temperature sensitivity varies by microbe and enzyme type is unclear. Such information would allow soil microbial enzymes to be incorporated in a traits-based framework to improve prediction of ecosystem response to global change. If temperature sensitivity varies for specific soil enzymes, then determining the underlying causes of variation in temperature sensitivity of these e...

  10. Ocean acoustic tomography from different receiver geometries using the adjoint method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaofeng; Wang, Dongxiao

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an ocean acoustic tomography inversion using the adjoint method in a shallow water environment is presented. The propagation model used is an implicit Crank-Nicolson finite difference parabolic equation solver with a non-local boundary condition. Unlike previous matched-field processing works using the complex pressure fields as the observations, here, the observed signals are the transmission losses. Based on the code tests of the tangent linear model, the adjoint model, and the gradient, the optimization problem is solved by a gradient-based minimization algorithm. The inversions are performed in numerical simulations for two geometries: one in which hydrophones are sparsely distributed in the horizontal direction, and another in which the hydrophones are distributed vertically. The spacing in both cases is well beyond the half-wavelength threshold at which beamforming could be used. To deal with the ill-posedness of the inverse problem, a linear differential regularization operator of the sound-speed profile is used to smooth the inversion results. The L-curve criterion is adopted to select the regularization parameter, and the optimal value can be easily determined at the elbow of the logarithms of the residual norm of the measured-predicted fields and the norm of the penalty function.

  11. A general nonlinear inverse transport algorithm using forward and adjoint flux computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Iterative approaches to the nonlinear inverse transport problem are described, which give rise to the structure that best predicts a set of transport observations. Such methods are based on minimizing a global error functional measuring the discrepancy between predicted and observed transport data. Required for this minimization is the functional gradient (Frechet derivative) of the global error evaluated with respect to a set of unknown material parameters (specifying boundary locations, scattering cross sections, etc.) which are to be determined. It is shown how this functional gradient is obtained from numerical solutions to the forward and adjoint transport problems computed once per iteration. This approach is not only far more efficient, but also more accurate, than a finite-difference method for computing the gradient of the global error. The general technique can be applied to inverse-transport problems of all descriptions, provided only that solutions to the forward and adjoint problems can be found numerically. As an illustration, two inverse problems are treated: the reconstruction of an anisotropic scattering function in a one-dimensional homogeneous slab and the two-dimensional imaging of a spatially-varying scattering cross section.

  12. Modeling radiative transfer in tropical rainforest canopies: sensitivity of simulated albedo to canopy architectural and optical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Sílvia N M; Costa, Marcos H

    2011-12-01

    This study evaluates the sensitivity of the surface albedo simulated by the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) to a set of Amazonian tropical rainforest canopy architectural and optical parameters. The parameters tested in this study are the orientation and reflectance of the leaves of upper and lower canopies in the visible (VIS) and near-infrared (NIR) spectral bands. The results are evaluated against albedo measurements taken above the K34 site at the INPA (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia) Cuieiras Biological Reserve. The sensitivity analysis indicates a strong response to the upper canopy leaves orientation (χup) and to the reflectivity in the near-infrared spectral band (ρNIR,up), a smaller sensitivity to the reflectivity in the visible spectral band (ρVIS,up) and no sensitivity at all to the lower canopy parameters, which is consistent with the canopy structure. The combination of parameters that minimized the Root Mean Square Error and mean relative error are χup = 0.86, ρVIS,up = 0.062 and ρNIR,up = 0.275. The parameterizations performed resulted in successful simulations of tropical rainforest albedo by IBIS, indicating its potential to simulate the canopy radiative transfer for narrow spectral bands and permitting close comparison with remote sensing products.

  13. Sensitivity of subject-specific models to Hill muscle-tendon model parameters in simulations of gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbone, Vincenzo; van der Krogt, Marjolein; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Subject-specific musculoskeletal (MS) models of the lower extremity are essential for applications such as predicting the effects of orthopedic surgery. We performed an extensive sensitivity analysis to assess the effects of potential errors in Hill muscle–tendon (MT) model parameters for each of

  14. Sensitivity of subject-specific models to Hill muscle-tendon model parameters in simulations of gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbone, V.; Krogt, M.M. van der; Koopman, H.F.J.M.; Verdonschot, N.J.

    2016-01-01

    Subject-specific musculoskeletal (MS) models of the lower extremity are essential for applications such as predicting the effects of orthopedic surgery. We performed an extensive sensitivity analysis to assess the effects of potential errors in Hill muscle-tendon (MT) model parameters for each of th

  15. Sensitivity of subject-specific models to Hill muscle-tendon model parameters in simulations of gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbone, Vincenzo; van der Krogt, Marjolein; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Subject-specific musculoskeletal (MS) models of the lower extremity are essential for applications such as predicting the effects of orthopedic surgery. We performed an extensive sensitivity analysis to assess the effects of potential errors in Hill muscle–tendon (MT) model parameters for each of th

  16. Assessing the Impact of Advanced Satellite Observations in the NASA GEOS-5 Forecast System Using the Adjoint Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelaro, Ron; Liu, Emily; Sienkiewicz, Meta

    2011-01-01

    The adjoint of a data assimilation system provides a flexible and efficient tool for estimating observation impacts on short-range weather forecasts. The impacts of any or all observations can be estimated simultaneously based on a single execution of the adjoint system. The results can be easily aggregated according to data type, location, channel, etc., making this technique especially attractive for examining the impacts of new hyper-spectral satellite instruments and for conducting regular, even near-real time, monitoring of the entire observing system. In this talk, we present results from the adjoint-based observation impact monitoring tool in NASA's GEOS-5 global atmospheric data assimilation and forecast system. The tool has been running in various off-line configurations for some time, and is scheduled to run as a regular part of the real-time forecast suite beginning in autumn 20 I O. We focus on the impacts of the newest components of the satellite observing system, including AIRS, IASI and GPS. For AIRS and IASI, it is shown that the vast majority of the channels assimilated have systematic positive impacts (of varying magnitudes), although some channels degrade the forecast. Of the latter, most are moisture-sensitive or near-surface channels. The impact of GPS observations in the southern hemisphere is found to be a considerable overall benefit to the system. In addition, the spatial variability of observation impacts reveals coherent patterns of positive and negative impacts that may point to deficiencies in the use of certain observations over, for example, specific surface types. When performed in conjunction with selected observing system experiments (OSEs), the adjoint results reveal both redundancies and dependencies between observing system impacts as observations are added or removed from the assimilation system. Understanding these dependencies appears to pose a major challenge for optimizing the use of the current observational network and

  17. An approach to computing discrete adjoints for MPI-parallelized models applied to Ice Sheet System Model 4.11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larour, Eric; Utke, Jean; Bovin, Anton; Morlighem, Mathieu; Perez, Gilberto

    2016-11-01

    Within the framework of sea-level rise projections, there is a strong need for hindcast validation of the evolution of polar ice sheets in a way that tightly matches observational records (from radar, gravity, and altimetry observations mainly). However, the computational requirements for making hindcast reconstructions possible are severe and rely mainly on the evaluation of the adjoint state of transient ice-flow models. Here, we look at the computation of adjoints in the context of the NASA/JPL/UCI Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM), written in C++ and designed for parallel execution with MPI. We present the adaptations required in the way the software is designed and written, but also generic adaptations in the tools facilitating the adjoint computations. We concentrate on the use of operator overloading coupled with the AdjoinableMPI library to achieve the adjoint computation of the ISSM. We present a comprehensive approach to (1) carry out type changing through the ISSM, hence facilitating operator overloading, (2) bind to external solvers such as MUMPS and GSL-LU, and (3) handle MPI-based parallelism to scale the capability. We demonstrate the success of the approach by computing sensitivities of hindcast metrics such as the misfit to observed records of surface altimetry on the northeastern Greenland Ice Stream, or the misfit to observed records of surface velocities on Upernavik Glacier, central West Greenland. We also provide metrics for the scalability of the approach, and the expected performance. This approach has the potential to enable a new generation of hindcast-validated projections that make full use of the wealth of datasets currently being collected, or already collected, in Greenland and Antarctica.

  18. Self-sustaining smoldering combustion for NAPL remediation: laboratory evaluation of process sensitivity to key parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pironi, Paolo; Switzer, Christine; Gerhard, Jason I; Rein, Guillermo; Torero, Jose L

    2011-04-01

    Smoldering combustion has been introduced recently as a potential remediation strategy for soil contaminated by nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Published proof-of-concept experiments demonstrated that the process can be self-sustaining (i.e., requires energy input only to start the process) and achieve essentially complete remediation of the contaminated soil. Those initial experiments indicated that the process may be applicable across a broad range of NAPLs and soils. This work presents the results of a series of bench-scale experiments that examine in detail the sensitivity of the process to a range of key parameters, including contaminant concentration, water saturation, soil type, and air flow rates for two contaminants, coal tar and crude oil. Smoldering combustion was observed to be self-sustaining in the range 28,400 to 142,000 mg/kg for coal tar and in the range 31,200 to 104,000 mg/kg for crude oil, for the base case air flux. The process remained self-sustaining and achieved effective remediation across a range of initial water concentrations (0 to 177,000 mg/kg water) despite extended ignition times and decreased temperatures and velocities of the reaction front. The process also exhibited self-sustaining and effective remediation behavior across a range of fine to coarse sand grain sizes up to a threshold maximum value between 6 mm and 10 mm. Propagation velocity is observed to be highly dependent on air flux, and smoldering was observed to be self-sustaining down to an air Darcy flux of at least 0.5 cm/s for both contaminants. The extent of remediation in these cases was determined to be at least 99.5% and 99.9% for crude oil and coal tar, respectively. Moreover, no physical evidence of contamination was detected in the treatment zone for any case where a self-sustaining reaction was achieved. Lateral heat losses to the external environment were observed to significantly affect the smoldering process at the bench scale, suggesting that the field

  19. Gas migration in KBS-3 buffer bentonite. Sensitivity of test parameters to experimental boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, J.F.; Horseman, S.T. [British Geological Survey, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2003-01-01

    In the current Swedish repository design concept, hydrogen gas can be generated inside a waste canister by anaerobic corrosion of the ferrous metal liner. If the gas generation rate exceeds the diffusion rate of gas molecules in the buffer porewater, gas will accumulate in the void-space of a canister until its pressure becomes large enough for it to enter the bentonite as a discrete gaseous phase. Three long tenn gas injection tests have been performed on cylinders of pre-compacted MX80 bentonite. Two of these tests were undertaken using a custom-designed constant volume and radial flow (CVRF) apparatus. Gas was injected at a centrally located porous filter installed in the clay before hydration. Arrangements were made for gas to flow to three independently monitored sink-filter arrays mounted around the specimen. Axial and radial total stresses and internal porewater pressures were continuously monitored. Breakthrough and peak gas pressures were substantially larger than the sum of the swelling pressure and the external porewater. The third test was performed. using an apparatus which radially constrains the specimen during gas flow. Observed sensitivity of the breakthrough and peak gas pressures to the test boundary conditions suggests that gas entry must be accompanied by dilation of the bentonite fabric. In other words, there is a tendency for the volume of the specimen to increase during this process. The experimental evidence is consistent with the flow of gas along a relatively small number of crack-like pathways which propagate through the clay as gas pressure increases. Gas entry and breakthrough under constant volume boundary conditions causes a substantial increase in the total stress and the internal porewater pressure. It is possible to determine the point at which gas enters the clay by monitoring changes in these parameters. Localisation of gas flow within multiple pathways results, in nonuniform discharge rates at the sinks. When gas injection

  20. The mass movement routing tool r.randomwalk and its functionalities for parameter sensitivity analysis and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenn, Julia; Mergili, Martin

    2016-04-01

    r.randomwalk is a GIS-based, multi-functional conceptual tool for mass movement routing. Starting from one to many release points or release areas, mass points are routed down through the digital elevation model until a defined break criterion is reached. Break criteria are defined by the user and may consist in an angle of reach or a related parameter (empirical-statistical relationships), in the drop of the flow velocity to zero (two-parameter friction model), or in the exceedance of a maximum runup height. Multiple break criteria may be combined. A constrained random walk approach is applied for the routing procedure, where the slope and the perpetuation of the flow direction determine the probability of the flow to move in a certain direction. r.randomwalk is implemented as a raster module of the GRASS GIS software and, as such, is open source. It can be obtained from http://www.mergili.at/randomwalk.html. Besides other innovative functionalities, r.randomwalk serves with built-in functionalities for the derivation of an impact indicator index (III) map with values in the range 0-1. III is derived from multiple model runs with different combinations of input parameters varied in a random or controlled way. It represents the fraction of model runs predicting an impact at a given pixel and is evaluated against the observed impact area through an ROC Plot. The related tool r.ranger facilitates the automated generation and evaluation of many III maps from a variety of sets of parameter combinations. We employ r.randomwalk and r.ranger for parameter optimization and sensitivity analysis. Thereby we do not focus on parameter values, but - accounting for the uncertainty inherent in all parameters - on parameter ranges. In this sense, we demonstrate two strategies for parameter sensitivity analysis and optimization. We avoid to (i) use one-at-a-time parameter testing which would fail to account for interdependencies of the parameters, and (ii) to explore all possible

  1. Neutrino masses in $SU(5)\\times U(1)_F$ with adjoint flavons

    CERN Document Server

    Nardi, Enrico; Velasquez, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    We present a $SU(5)\\times U(1)_F$ supersymmetric model for neutrino masses and mixings that includes three heavy singlet neutrinos and two flavons. We discuss how Abelian $U(1)_F$ symmetries can naturally yield non-hierarchical light neutrinos even when the heavy states are strongly hierarchical, and how it can also ensure that $R$--parity arises as an exact accidental symmetry. By assigning flavons to the adjoint representation of SU(5) and assuming universality for all the fundamental couplings, the coefficients of the effective Yukawa and Majorana mass operators become calculable in terms of group theoretical quantities. There is a single free parameter in the model, however, at leading order the structure of the light neutrinos mass matrix is determined in a parameter independent way.

  2. Investigations of the sensitivity of a coronal mass ejection model (ENLIL) to solar input parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenberg, Thea Vilstrup; Vršnak, B.; Taktakishvili, A.;

    2010-01-01

    investigate the parameter space of the ENLILv2.5b model using the CME event of 25 July 2004. ENLIL is a time‐dependent 3‐D MHD model that can simulate the propagation of cone‐shaped interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) through the solar system. Excepting the cone parameters (radius, position...... (CMEs), but in order to predict the caused effects, we need to be able to model their propagation from their origin in the solar corona to the point of interest, e.g., Earth. Many such models exist, but to understand the models in detail we must understand the primary input parameters. Here we......, and initial velocity), all remaining parameters are varied, resulting in more than 20 runs investigated here. The output parameters considered are velocity, density, magnetic field strength, and temperature. We find that the largest effects on the model output are the input parameters of upper limit...

  3. Sensitivity analysis and determination of free relaxation parameters for the weakly-compressible MRT-LBM schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Hui; Sagaut, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    It is well-known that there exist several free relaxation parameters in the MRT-LBM. Although these parameters have been tuned via linear analysis, the sensitivity analysis of these parameters and other related parameters are still not sufficient for detecting the behaviors of the dispersion and dissipation relations of the MRT-LBM. Previous researches have shown that the bulk dissipation in the MRT-LBM induces a significant over-damping of acoustic disturbances. This indicates that MRT-LBM cannot be used to obtain the correct behavior of pressure fluctuations because of the fixed bulk relaxation parameter. In order to cure this problem, an effective algorithm has been proposed for recovering the linearized Navier-Stokes equations from the linearized MRT-LBM. The recovered L-NSE appear as in matrix form with arbitrary order of the truncation errors with respect to ${\\delta}t$. Then, in wave-number space, the first/second-order sensitivity analyses of matrix eigenvalues are used to address the sensitivity of t...

  4. Curvature theory for point-path and plane-envelope in spherical kinematics by new adjoint approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Delun

    2014-11-01

    Planar kinematics has been studied systematically based on centrodes, however axodes are underutilized to set up the curvature theories in spherical and spatial kinematics. Through a spherical adjoint approach, an axode-based theoretical system of spherical kinematics is established. The spherical motion is re-described by the adjoint approach and vector equation of spherical instant center is concisely derived. The moving and fixed axodes for spherical motion are mapped onto a unit sphere to obtain spherical centrodes, whose kinematic invariants totally reflect the intrinsic property of spherical motion. Based on the spherical centrodes, the curvature theories for a point and a plane of a rigid body in spherical motion are revealed by spherical fixed point and plane conditions. The Euler-Savary analogue for point-path is presented. Tracing points with higher order curvature features are located in the moving body by means of algebraic equations. For plane-envelope, the construction parameters are obtained. The osculating conditions for plane-envelope and circular cylindrical surface or circular conical surface are given. A spherical four-bar linkage is taken as an example to demonstrate the spherical adjoint approach and the curvature theories. The research proposes systematic spherical curvature theories with the axode as logical starting-point, and sets up a bridge from the centrode-based planar kinematics to the axode-based spatial kinematics.

  5. Curvature Theory for Point-Path and Plane-Envelope in Spherical Kinematics by New Adjoint Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; WANG Delun

    2014-01-01

    Planar kinematics has been studied systematically based on centrodes, however axodes are underutilized to set up the curvature theories in spherical and spatial kinematics. Through a spherical adjoint approach, an axode-based theoretical system of spherical kinematics is established. The spherical motion is re-described by the adjoint approach and vector equation of spherical instant center is concisely derived. The moving and fixed axodes for spherical motion are mapped onto a unit sphere to obtain spherical centrodes, whose kinematic invariants totally reflect the intrinsic property of spherical motion. Based on the spherical centrodes, the curvature theories for a point and a plane of a rigid body in spherical motion are revealed by spherical fixed point and plane conditions. The Euler-Savary analogue for point-path is presented. Tracing points with higher order curvature features are located in the moving body by means of algebraic equations. For plane-envelope, the construction parameters are obtained. The osculating conditions for plane-envelope and circular cylindrical surface or circular conical surface are given. A spherical four-bar linkage is taken as an example to demonstrate the spherical adjoint approach and the curvature theories. The research proposes systematic spherical curvature theories with the axode as logical starting-point, and sets up a bridge from the centrode-based planar kinematics to the axode-based spatial kinematics.

  6. Bifurcations, chaos, and sensitivity to parameter variations in the Sato cardiac cell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, Stefan; Berg, Sebastian; Luther, Stefan; Parlitz, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of a detailed ionic cardiac cell model proposed by Sato et al. (2009) is investigated in terms of periodic and chaotic action potentials, bifurcation scenarios, and coexistence of attractors. Starting from the model's standard parameter values bifurcation diagrams are computed to evaluate the model's robustness with respect to (small) parameter changes. While for some parameters the dynamics turns out to be practically independent from their values, even minor changes of other parameters have a very strong impact and cause qualitative changes due to bifurcations or transitions to coexisting attractors. Implications of this lack of robustness are discussed.

  7. A Sensitivity Study for an Evaluation of Input Parameters Effect on a Preliminary Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Hyun-Me; Kim, Min Kyu; Choi, In-Kil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Sheen, Dong-Hoon [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The tsunami hazard analysis has been based on the seismic hazard analysis. The seismic hazard analysis has been performed by using the deterministic method and the probabilistic method. To consider the uncertainties in hazard analysis, the probabilistic method has been regarded as attractive approach. The various parameters and their weight are considered by using the logic tree approach in the probabilistic method. The uncertainties of parameters should be suggested by analyzing the sensitivity because the various parameters are used in the hazard analysis. To apply the probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis, the preliminary study for the Ulchin NPP site had been performed. The information on the fault sources which was published by the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) had been used in the preliminary study. The tsunami propagation was simulated by using the TSUNAMI{sub 1}.0 which was developed by Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES). The wave parameters have been estimated from the result of tsunami simulation. In this study, the sensitivity analysis for the fault sources which were selected in the previous studies has been performed. To analyze the effect of the parameters, the sensitivity analysis for the E3 fault source which was published by AESJ was performed. The effect of the recurrence interval, the potential maximum magnitude, and the beta were suggested by the sensitivity analysis results. Level of annual exceedance probability has been affected by the recurrence interval.. Wave heights have been influenced by the potential maximum magnitude and the beta. In the future, the sensitivity analysis for the all fault sources in the western part of Japan which were published AESJ would be performed.

  8. An eddy-permitting, dynamically consistent adjoint-based assimilation system for the tropical Pacific: Hindcast experiments in 2000

    KAUST Repository

    Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2010-03-02

    An eddy-permitting adjoint-based assimilation system has been implemented to estimate the state of the tropical Pacific Ocean. The system uses the Massachusetts Institute of Technology\\'s general circulation model and its adjoint. The adjoint method is used to adjust the model to observations by controlling the initial temperature and salinity; temperature, salinity, and horizontal velocities at the open boundaries; and surface fluxes of momentum, heat, and freshwater. The model is constrained with most of the available data sets in the tropical Pacific, including Tropical Atmosphere and Ocean, ARGO, expendable bathythermograph, and satellite SST and sea surface height data, and climatologies. Results of hindcast experiments in 2000 suggest that the iterated adjoint-based descent is able to significantly improve the model consistency with the multivariate data sets, providing a dynamically consistent realization of the tropical Pacific circulation that generally matches the observations to within specified errors. The estimated model state is evaluated both by comparisons with observations and by checking the controls, the momentum balances, and the representation of small-scale features that were not well sampled by the observations used in the assimilation. As part of these checks, the estimated controls are smoothed and applied in independent model runs to check that small changes in the controls do not greatly change the model hindcast. This is a simple ensemble-based uncertainty analysis. In addition, the original and smoothed controls are applied to a version of the model with doubled horizontal resolution resulting in a broadly similar “downscaled” hindcast, showing that the adjustments are not tuned to a single configuration (meaning resolution, topography, and parameter settings). The time-evolving model state and the adjusted controls should be useful for analysis or to supply the forcing, initial, and boundary conditions for runs of other models.

  9. Developmental immunotoxicity of methylmercury: The relative sensitivity of developmental and immune parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonk, E.C.M.; Groot, D.M.G. de; Penninks, A.H.; Waalkens - Berendsen, I.D.H.; Wolterbeek, A.P.M.; Slob, W.; Piersma, A.H.; Loveren, H. van

    2010-01-01

    Current developmental and reproductive toxicity protocols include only a limited set of parameters for effects on the developing immune system. In this study, a wide range of immunological parameters were included in a pre- and postnatal developmental toxicity study. Dose-response data were compared

  10. Sensitivity of land surface modeling to parameters: An uncertainty quantification method applied to the Community Land Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciuto, D. M.; Mei, R.; Mao, J.; Hoffman, F. M.; Kumar, J.

    2015-12-01

    Uncertainties in land parameters could have important impacts on simulated water and energy fluxes and land surface states, which will consequently affect atmospheric and biogeochemical processes. Therefore, quantification of such parameter uncertainties using a land surface model is the first step towards better understanding of predictive uncertainty in Earth system models. In this study, we applied a random-sampling, high-dimensional model representation (RS-HDMR) method to analyze the sensitivity of simulated photosynthesis, surface energy fluxes and surface hydrological components to selected land parameters in version 4.5 of the Community Land Model (CLM4.5). Because of the large computational expense of conducting ensembles of global gridded model simulations, we used the results of a previous cluster analysis to select one thousand representative land grid cells for simulation. Plant functional type (PFT)-specific uniform prior ranges for land parameters were determined using expert opinion and literature survey, and samples were generated with a quasi-Monte Carlo approach-Sobol sequence. Preliminary analysis of 1024 simulations suggested that four PFT-dependent parameters (including slope of the conductance-photosynthesis relationship, specific leaf area at canopy top, leaf C:N ratio and fraction of leaf N in RuBisco) are the dominant sensitive parameters for photosynthesis, surface energy and water fluxes across most PFTs, but with varying importance rankings. On the other hand, for surface ans sub-surface runoff, PFT-independent parameters, such as the depth-dependent decay factors for runoff, play more important roles than the previous four PFT-dependent parameters. Further analysis by conditioning the results on different seasons and years are being conducted to provide guidance on how climate variability and change might affect such sensitivity. This is the first step toward coupled simulations including biogeochemical processes, atmospheric processes

  11. Adjoint optimal control problems for the RANS system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attavino, A.; Cerroni, D.; Da Vià, R.; Manservisi, S.; Menghini, F.

    2017-01-01

    Adjoint optimal control in computational fluid dynamics has become increasingly popular recently because of its use in several engineering and research studies. However the optimal control of turbulent flows without the use of Direct Numerical Simulation is still an open problem and various methods have been proposed based on different approaches. In this work we study optimal control problems for a turbulent flow modeled with a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes system. The adjoint system is obtained through the use of a Lagrangian multiplier method by setting as objective of the control a velocity matching profile or an increase or decrease in the turbulent kinetic energy. The optimality system is solved with an in-house finite element code and numerical results are reported in order to show the validity of this approach.

  12. Mitigation of Engine Inlet Distortion Through Adjoint-Based Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordaz, Irian; Rallabhandi, Sriram; Nielsen, Eric J.; Diskin, Boris

    2017-01-01

    The adjoint-based design capability in FUN3D is extended to allow efficient gradient- based optimization and design of concepts with highly integrated aero-propulsive systems. A circumferential distortion calculation, along with the derivatives needed to perform adjoint-based design, have been implemented in FUN3D. This newly implemented distortion calculation can be used not only for design but also to drive the existing mesh adaptation process and reduce the error associated with the fan distortion calculation. The design capability is demonstrated by the shape optimization of an in-house aircraft concept equipped with an aft fuselage propulsor. The optimization objective is the minimization of flow distortion at the aerodynamic interface plane of this aft fuselage propulsor.

  13. Three-Dimensional Turbulent RANS Adjoint-Based Error Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Engineering problems commonly require functional outputs of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with specified accuracy. These simulations are performed with limited computational resources. Computable error estimates offer the possibility of quantifying accuracy on a given mesh and predicting a fine grid functional on a coarser mesh. Such an estimate can be computed by solving the flow equations and the associated adjoint problem for the functional of interest. An adjoint-based error correction procedure is demonstrated for transonic inviscid and subsonic laminar and turbulent flow. A mesh adaptation procedure is formulated to target uncertainty in the corrected functional and terminate when error remaining in the calculation is less than a user-specified error tolerance. This adaptation scheme is shown to yield anisotropic meshes with corrected functionals that are more accurate for a given number of grid points then isotropic adapted and uniformly refined grids.

  14. Nonself-adjoint semicrossed products by abelian semigroups

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, Adam Hanley

    2011-01-01

    Let $\\mathcal{S}$ be the semigroup $\\mathcal{S}=\\sum^{\\oplus k}_{i=1}\\Sc{S}_i$, where for each $i\\in I$, $\\mathcal{S}_i$ is a countable subsemigroup of the additive semigroup $\\B{R}_+$ containing 0. We consider representations of $\\mathcal{S}$ as contractions $\\{T_s\\}_{s\\in\\mathcal{S}}$ on a Hilbert space with the Nica-covariance property: $T_s^*T_t=T_tT_s^*$ whenever $t\\wedge s=0$. We show that all such representations have a unique minimal isometric Nica-covariant dilation. This result is used to help analyse the nonself-adjoint semicrossed product algebras formed from Nica-covariant representations of the action of $\\mathcal{S}$ on an operator algebra $\\mathcal{A}$ by completely contractive endomorphisms. We conclude by calculating the $C^*$-envelope of the isometric nonself-adjoint semicrossed product algebra (in the sense of Kakariadis and Katsoulis).

  15. Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis of Coupled Reactor Physics Problems: Method Development for Multi-Physics in Reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perkó, Z.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis presents novel adjoint and spectral methods for the sensitivity and uncertainty (S&U) analysis of multi-physics problems encountered in the field of reactor physics. The first part focuses on the steady state of reactors and extends the adjoint sensitivity analysis methods well establish

  16. Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis of Coupled Reactor Physics Problems: Method Development for Multi-Physics in Reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perkó, Z.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis presents novel adjoint and spectral methods for the sensitivity and uncertainty (S&U) analysis of multi-physics problems encountered in the field of reactor physics. The first part focuses on the steady state of reactors and extends the adjoint sensitivity analysis methods well

  17. Multi-parameter Sensitivity Analysis and Application Research in the Robust Optimization Design for Complex Nonlinear System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Tao; ZHANG Weigang; ZHANG Yang; TANG Ting

    2015-01-01

    The current research of complex nonlinear system robust optimization mainly focuses on the features of design parameters, such as probability density functions, boundary conditions, etc. After parameters study, high-dimensional curve or robust control design is used to find an accurate robust solution. However, there may exist complex interaction between parameters and practical engineering system. With the increase of the number of parameters, it is getting hard to determine high-dimensional curves and robust control methods, thus it’s difficult to get the robust design solutions. In this paper, a method of global sensitivity analysis based on divided variables in groups is proposed. By making relevant variables in one group and keeping each other independent among sets of variables, global sensitivity analysis is conducted in grouped variables and the importance of parameters is evaluated by calculating the contribution value of each parameter to the total variance of system response. By ranking the importance of input parameters, relatively important parameters are chosen to conduct robust design analysis of the system. By applying this method to the robust optimization design of a real complex nonlinear system-a vehicle occupant restraint system with multi-parameter, good solution is gained and the response variance of the objective function is reduced to 0.01, which indicates that the robustness of the occupant restraint system is improved in a great degree and the method is effective and valuable for the robust design of complex nonlinear system. This research proposes a new method which can be used to obtain solutions for complex nonlinear system robust design.

  18. Strain rate sensitivity index's theoretical formulae expressed by experimental parameters and its measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A group of formulae for measuring strain rate sensitivity index is established under the conditions of constant strain rate, constant velocity and constant load. And measuring methods are given corresponding to each kind of experimental curves. Furthermore the experimental results are measured and compared on Zn-wt5%Al alloy at room temperature (18 ℃), which shows that this kind of alloy is structural sensitive even at room temperature.

  19. Higher order self-adjoint operators with polynomial coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Azad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We study algebraic and analytic aspects of self-adjoint operators of order four or higher with polynomial coefficients. As a consequence, a systematic way of constructing such operators is given. The procedure is applied to obtain many examples up to order 8; similar examples can be constructed for all even order operators. In particular, a complete classification of all order 4 operators is given.

  20. Arrangements, multiderivations, and adjoint quotient map of type ADE

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshinaga, Masahiko

    2010-01-01

    The first part of this paper is a survey on algebro-geometric aspects of sheaves of logarithmic vector fields of hyperplane arrangements. In the second part we prove that the relative de Rham cohomology (of degree two) of ADE-type adjoint quotient map is naturally isomorphic to the module of certain multiderivations. The isomorphism is obtained by the Gauss-Manin derivative of the Kostant-Kirillov form.

  1. Sensitivity Analysis of Mechanical Parameters of Different Rock Layers to the Stability of Coal Roadway in Soft Rock Strata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng-hui Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the geological characteristics of Xinjiang Ili mine in western area of China, a physical model of interstratified strata composed of soft rock and hard coal seam was established. Selecting the tunnel position, deformation modulus, and strength parameters of each layer as influencing factors, the sensitivity coefficient of roadway deformation to each parameter was firstly analyzed based on a Mohr-Columb strain softening model and nonlinear elastic-plastic finite element analysis. Then the effect laws of influencing factors which showed high sensitivity were further discussed. Finally, a regression model for the relationship between roadway displacements and multifactors was obtained by equivalent linear regression under multiple factors. The results show that the roadway deformation is highly sensitive to the depth of coal seam under the floor which should be considered in the layout of coal roadway; deformation modulus and strength of coal seam and floor have a great influence on the global stability of tunnel; on the contrary, roadway deformation is not sensitive to the mechanical parameters of soft roof; roadway deformation under random combinations of multi-factors can be deduced by the regression model. These conclusions provide theoretical significance to the arrangement and stability maintenance of coal roadway.

  2. Sensitivity analysis of mechanical parameters of different rock layers to the stability of coal roadway in soft rock strata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zeng-hui; Wang, Wei-ming; Gao, Xin; Yan, Ji-xing

    2013-01-01

    According to the geological characteristics of Xinjiang Ili mine in western area of China, a physical model of interstratified strata composed of soft rock and hard coal seam was established. Selecting the tunnel position, deformation modulus, and strength parameters of each layer as influencing factors, the sensitivity coefficient of roadway deformation to each parameter was firstly analyzed based on a Mohr-Columb strain softening model and nonlinear elastic-plastic finite element analysis. Then the effect laws of influencing factors which showed high sensitivity were further discussed. Finally, a regression model for the relationship between roadway displacements and multifactors was obtained by equivalent linear regression under multiple factors. The results show that the roadway deformation is highly sensitive to the depth of coal seam under the floor which should be considered in the layout of coal roadway; deformation modulus and strength of coal seam and floor have a great influence on the global stability of tunnel; on the contrary, roadway deformation is not sensitive to the mechanical parameters of soft roof; roadway deformation under random combinations of multi-factors can be deduced by the regression model. These conclusions provide theoretical significance to the arrangement and stability maintenance of coal roadway.

  3. Hybrid Active Noise Control using Adjoint LMS Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Hyun Do; Hong, Sik Ki [Dankook University (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-07-01

    A multi-channel hybrid active noise control(MCHANC) is derived by combining hybrid active noise control techniques and adjoint LMS algorithms, and this algorithm is applied to an active noise control system in a three dimensional enclosure. A MCHANC system uses feed forward and feedback filters simultaneously to cancel noises in an enclosure. The adjoint LMs algorithm, in which the error is filtered through an adjoint filter of the secondary channel, is also used to reduce the computational burden of adaptive filters. The overall attenuation performance and convergence characteristics of MCHANC algorithm is better than both multiple-channel feed forward algorithms and multiple-channel feedback algorithms. In a large enclosure, the acoustic reverberation can be very long, which means a very high order feed forward filter must be used to cancel the reverberation noises. Strong reverberation noises are generally narrow band and low frequency, which can be effectively predicted and canceled by a feedback adaptive filters. So lower order feed forward filter taps can be used in MCHANC algorithm which combines advantages of fast convergence and small excess mean square error. In this paper, computer simulations and real time implementations is carried out on a TMS320C31 processor to evaluate the performance of the MCHANC systems. (author). 11 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling using Space, Energy and Angle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL; Mosher, Scott W [ORNL; Evans, Thomas M [ORNL

    2012-08-01

    For challenging radiation transport problems, hybrid methods combine the accuracy of Monte Carlo methods with the global information present in deterministic methods. One of the most successful hybrid methods is CADIS Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling. This method uses a deterministic adjoint solution to construct a biased source distribution and consistent weight windows to optimize a specific tally in a Monte Carlo calculation. The method has been implemented into transport codes using just the spatial and energy information from the deterministic adjoint and has been used in many applications to compute tallies with much higher figures-of-merit than analog calculations. CADIS also outperforms user-supplied importance values, which usually take long periods of user time to develop. This work extends CADIS to develop weight windows that are a function of the position, energy, and direction of the Monte Carlo particle. Two types of consistent source biasing are presented: one method that biases the source in space and energy while preserving the original directional distribution and one method that biases the source in space, energy, and direction. Seven simple example problems are presented which compare the use of the standard space/energy CADIS with the new space/energy/angle treatments.

  5. An Adjoint-Based Analysis of the Sampling Footprints of Tall Tower, Aircraft and Potential Future Lidar Observations of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Arlyn; Kawa, Randy; Zhu, Zhengxin; Burris, John; Abshire, Jim

    2004-01-01

    A detailed mechanistic understanding of the sources and sinks of CO2 will be required to reliably predict future CO2 levels and climate. A commonly used technique for deriving information about CO2 exchange with surface reservoirs is to solve an 'inverse problem', where CO2 observations are used with an atmospheric transport model to find the optimal distribution of sources and sinks. Synthesis inversion methods are powerful tools for addressing this question, but the results are disturbingly sensitive to the details of the calculation. Studies done using different atmospheric transport models and combinations of surface station data have produced substantially different distributions of surface fluxes. Adjoint methods are now being developed that will more effectively incorporate diverse datasets in estimates of surface fluxes of CO2. In an adjoint framework, it will be possible to combine CO2 concentration data from longterm surface and aircraft monitoring stations with data from intensive field campaigns and with proposed future satellite observations. We have recently developed an adjoint for the GSFC 3-D Parameterized Chemistry and Transport Model (PCTM). Here, we will present results from a PCTM Adjoint study comparing the sampling footprints of tall tower, aircraft and potential future lidar observations of CO2. The vertical resolution and extent of the profiles and the observation frequency will be considered for several sites in North America.

  6. Detection of Independent Associations of Plasma Lipidomic Parameters with Insulin Sensitivity Indices Using Data Mining Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhmann, Kai; Xu, Aimin; Schulte, Klaus-Martin; Simeonovic, Charmaine J.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Shevchenko, Andrej; Graessler, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    Objective Glucolipotoxicity is a major pathophysiological mechanism in the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). We aimed to detect subtle changes in the circulating lipid profile by shotgun lipidomics analyses and to associate them with four different insulin sensitivity indices. Methods The cross-sectional study comprised 90 men with a broad range of insulin sensitivity including normal glucose tolerance (NGT, n = 33), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT, n = 32) and newly detected T2D (n = 25). Prior to oral glucose challenge plasma was obtained and quantitatively analyzed for 198 lipid molecular species from 13 different lipid classes including triacylglycerls (TAGs), phosphatidylcholine plasmalogen/ether (PC O-s), sphingomyelins (SMs), and lysophosphatidylcholines (LPCs). To identify a lipidomic signature of individual insulin sensitivity we applied three data mining approaches, namely least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), Support Vector Regression (SVR) and Random Forests (RF) for the following insulin sensitivity indices: homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), glucose insulin sensitivity index (GSI), insulin sensitivity index (ISI), and disposition index (DI). The LASSO procedure offers a high prediction accuracy and and an easier interpretability than SVR and RF. Results After LASSO selection, the plasma lipidome explained 3% (DI) to maximal 53% (HOMA-IR) variability of the sensitivity indexes. Among the lipid species with the highest positive LASSO regression coefficient were TAG 54:2 (HOMA-IR), PC O- 32:0 (GSI), and SM 40:3:1 (ISI). The highest negative regression coefficient was obtained for LPC 22:5 (HOMA-IR), TAG 51:1 (GSI), and TAG 58:6 (ISI). Conclusion Although a substantial part of lipid molecular species showed a significant correlation with insulin sensitivity indices we were able to identify a limited number of lipid metabolites of particular importance based on the LASSO approach. These

  7. Parameter space exploration of ocean carbon cycle climate sensitivity: a Quaternary maximum, and hopefully some novel results too.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblatt, C.

    2016-12-01

    Past changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide are a major driver in changes in past climate. But atmospheric CO2 is only 2% of the ocean-atmosphere CO2 at present. Changes in this partitioning will affect climate sensitivity through the past. This partitioning depends on alkalinity in total atmosphere ocean carbon. Here, I explore that parameter space. A somewhat obvious feature is a maximum in carbon cycle climate sensitivity near Quaternary values, which seemed very exciting until I realized that it had already been done [Goodwin et al., doi:10.1038/NGEO416 ]. Thus, I will try to squeeze something novel from my results, or else present something totally different.

  8. Inversion of CO and NOx emissions using the adjoint of the IMAGES model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Stavrakou

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available We use ground-based observations of CO mixing ratios and vertical column abundances together with tropospheric NO2 columns from the GOME satellite instrument as constraints for improving the global annual emission estimates of CO and NOx for the year 1997. The agreement between concentrations calculated by the global 3-dimensional CTM IMAGES and the observations is optimized using the adjoint modelling technique, which allows to invert for CO and NOx fluxes simultaneously, taking their chemical interactions into account. Our analysis quantifies a total of 39 flux parameters, comprising anthropogenic and biomass burning sources over large continental regions, soil and lightning emissions of NOx, biogenic emissions of CO and non-methane hydrocarbons, as well as the deposition velocities of both CO and NOx. Comparison between observed, prior and optimized CO mixing ratios at NOAA/CMDL sites shows that the inversion performs well at the northern mid- and high latitudes, and that it is less efficient in the Southern Hemisphere, as expected due to the scarsity of measurements over this part of the globe. The inversion, moreover, brings the model much closer to the measured NO2 columns over all regions. Sensitivity tests show that anthropogenic sources exhibit weak sensitivity to changes of the a priori errors associated to the bottom-up inventory, whereas biomass burning sources are subject to a strong variability. Our best estimate for the 1997 global top-down CO source amounts to 2760 Tg CO. Anthropogenic emissions increase by 28%, in agreement with previous inverse modelling studies, suggesting that the present bottom-up inventories underestimate the anthropogenic CO emissions in the Northern Hemisphere. The magnitude of the optimized NOx global source decreases by 14% with respect to the prior, and amounts to 42.1 Tg N, out of which 22.8 Tg N are due to anthropogenic sources. The NOx emissions increase over Tropical regions, whereas they

  9. Using Adjoint Methods to Improve 3-D Velocity Models of Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q.; Tape, C.; Maggi, A.; Tromp, J.

    2006-12-01

    We use adjoint methods popular in climate and ocean dynamics to calculate Fréchet derivatives for tomographic inversions in southern California. The Fréchet derivative of an objective function χ(m), where m denotes the Earth model, may be written in the generic form δχ=int Km(x) δln m(x) d3x, where δln m=δ m/m denotes the relative model perturbation. For illustrative purposes, we construct the 3-D finite-frequency banana-doughnut kernel Km, corresponding to the misfit of a single traveltime measurement, by simultaneously computing the 'adjoint' wave field s† forward in time and reconstructing the regular wave field s backward in time. The adjoint wave field is produced by using the time-reversed velocity at the receiver as a fictitious source, while the regular wave field is reconstructed on the fly by propagating the last frame of the wave field saved by a previous forward simulation backward in time. The approach is based upon the spectral-element method, and only two simulations are needed to produce density, shear-wave, and compressional-wave sensitivity kernels. This method is applied to the SCEC southern California velocity model. Various density, shear-wave, and compressional-wave sensitivity kernels are presented for different phases in the seismograms. We also generate 'event' kernels for Pnl, S and surface waves, which are the Fréchet kernels of misfit functions that measure the P, S or surface wave traveltime residuals at all the receivers simultaneously for one particular event. Effectively, an event kernel is a sum of weighted Fréchet kernels, with weights determined by the associated traveltime anomalies. By the nature of the 3-D simulation, every event kernel is also computed based upon just two simulations, i.e., its construction costs the same amount of computation time as an individual banana-doughnut kernel. One can think of the sum of the event kernels for all available earthquakes, called the 'misfit' kernel, as a graphical

  10. The effects of anodization parameters on titania nanotube arrays and dye sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Z. B.; Adams, S.; Blackwood, D. J.; Wang, J.

    2008-10-01

    Ordered, closely packed, and vertically oriented titania nanotube arrays with lengths exceeding 10 µm were fabricated by anodization of titanium foils. The effects of anodization voltage and time on the microstructural morphology and the photovoltaic performance of dye sensitized solar cells based on the titania nanotube arrays were investigated. On increasing the anodization voltage or time, the increase in active surface area leads to enhanced photovoltaic currents and thereby an overall higher performance of the dye sensitized solar cells. The efficiency enhancement with rising anodization voltage exceeds the increase in the outer surface area of the nanotubes, indicating that the active surface area is further enlarged by a more accessible inner surface of the nanotube arrays grown with a higher anodization voltage. A promising efficiency of 3.67% for dye sensitized solar cells based on anodized titania nanotube arrays was achieved under AM1.5, 100 mW cm-2 illumination.

  11. The effects of anodization parameters on titania nanotube arrays and dye sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Z B; Adams, S; Blackwood, D J; Wang, J [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117574 (Singapore)], E-mail: msexz@nus.edu.sg

    2008-10-08

    Ordered, closely packed, and vertically oriented titania nanotube arrays with lengths exceeding 10 {mu}m were fabricated by anodization of titanium foils. The effects of anodization voltage and time on the microstructural morphology and the photovoltaic performance of dye sensitized solar cells based on the titania nanotube arrays were investigated. On increasing the anodization voltage or time, the increase in active surface area leads to enhanced photovoltaic currents and thereby an overall higher performance of the dye sensitized solar cells. The efficiency enhancement with rising anodization voltage exceeds the increase in the outer surface area of the nanotubes, indicating that the active surface area is further enlarged by a more accessible inner surface of the nanotube arrays grown with a higher anodization voltage. A promising efficiency of 3.67% for dye sensitized solar cells based on anodized titania nanotube arrays was achieved under AM1.5, 100 mW cm{sup -2} illumination.

  12. A new and consistent parameter for measuring the quality of multivariate analytical methods: Generalized analytical sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoso, Wallace; Allegrini, Franco; Olivieri, Alejandro C

    2016-08-24

    Generalized analytical sensitivity (γ) is proposed as a new figure of merit, which can be estimated from a multivariate calibration data set. It can be confidently applied to compare different calibration methodologies, and helps to solve literature inconsistencies on the relationship between classical sensitivity and prediction error. In contrast to the classical plain sensitivity, γ incorporates the noise properties in its definition, and its inverse is well correlated with root mean square errors of prediction in the presence of general noise structures. The proposal is supported by studying simulated and experimental first-order multivariate calibration systems with various models, namely multiple linear regression, principal component regression (PCR) and maximum likelihood PCR (MLPCR). The simulations included instrumental noise of different types: independently and identically distributed (iid), correlated (pink) and proportional noise, while the experimental data carried noise which is clearly non-iid.

  13. AN OVERVIEW OF THE UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS, SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS, AND PARAMETER ESTIMATION (UA/SA/PE) API AND HOW TO IMPLEMENT IT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Application Programming Interface (API) for Uncertainty Analysis, Sensitivity Analysis, andParameter Estimation (UA/SA/PE API) (also known as Calibration, Optimization and Sensitivity and Uncertainty (CUSO)) was developed in a joint effort between several members of both ...

  14. Analytic Solutions of Some Self-Adjoint Equations by Using Variable Change Method and Its Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdi Delkhosh; Mohammad Delkhosh

    2012-01-01

    Many applications of various self-adjoint differential equations, whose solutions are complex, are produced (Arfken, 1985; Gandarias, 2011; and Delkhosh, 2011). In this work we propose a method for the solving some self-adjoint equations with variable change in problem, and then we obtain a analytical solutions. Because this solution, an exact analytical solution can be provided to us, we benefited from the solution of numerical Self-adjoint equations (Mohynl-Din, 2009; Allame and Azal, 2011;...

  15. Numerical conformal mapping via a boundary integral equation with the adjoint generalized Neumann kernel

    OpenAIRE

    Nasser, Mohamed M. S.; Murid, Ali H. M.; Sangawi, Ali W. K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new uniquely solvable boundary integral equation for computing the conformal mapping, its derivative and its inverse from bounded multiply connected regions onto the five classical canonical slit regions. The integral equation is derived by reformulating the conformal mapping as an adjoint Riemann-Hilbert problem. From the adjoint Riemann-Hilbert problem, we derive a boundary integral equation with the adjoint generalized Neumann kernel for the derivative of the boundary...

  16. Monte Carlo Ray Tracing Based Sensitivity Analysis of the Atmospheric and the Ocean Parameters on Top of the Atmosphere Radiance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo Ray Tracing: MCRT based sensitivity analysis of the geophysical parameters (the atmosphere and the ocean on Top of the Atmosphere: TOA radiance in visible to near infrared wavelength regions is conducted. As the results, it is confirmed that the influence due to the atmosphere is greater than that of the ocean. Scattering and absorption due to aerosol particles and molecules in the atmosphere is major contribution followed by water vapor and ozone while scattering due to suspended solid is dominant contribution for the ocean parameters.

  17. An analysis of sensitivity of CLIMEX parameters in mapping species potential distribution and the broad-scale changes observed with minor variations in parameters values: an investigation using open-field Solanum lycopersicum and Neoleucinodes elegantalis as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ricardo Siqueira; Kumar, Lalit; Shabani, Farzin; Picanço, Marcelo Coutinho

    2017-02-01

    A sensitivity analysis can categorize levels of parameter influence on a model's output. Identifying parameters having the most influence facilitates establishing the best values for parameters of models, providing useful implications in species modelling of crops and associated insect pests. The aim of this study was to quantify the response of species models through a CLIMEX sensitivity analysis. Using open-field Solanum lycopersicum and Neoleucinodes elegantalis distribution records, and 17 fitting parameters, including growth and stress parameters, comparisons were made in model performance by altering one parameter value at a time, in comparison to the best-fit parameter values. Parameters that were found to have a greater effect on the model results are termed "sensitive". Through the use of two species, we show that even when the Ecoclimatic Index has a major change through upward or downward parameter value alterations, the effect on the species is dependent on the selection of suitability categories and regions of modelling. Two parameters were shown to have the greatest sensitivity, dependent on the suitability categories of each species in the study. Results enhance user understanding of which climatic factors had a greater impact on both species distributions in our model, in terms of suitability categories and areas, when parameter values were perturbed by higher or lower values, compared to the best-fit parameter values. Thus, the sensitivity analyses have the potential to provide additional information for end users, in terms of improving management, by identifying the climatic variables that are most sensitive.

  18. Modelling and simulation of a transketolase mediated reaction: Sensitivity analysis of kinetic parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sayar, N.A.; Chen, B.H.; Lye, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we have used a proposed mathematical model, describing the carbon-carbon bond format ion reaction between beta-hydroxypyruvate and glycolaldehyde to synthesise L-erythrulose, catalysed by the enzyme transketolase, for the analysis of the sensitivity of the process to its kinetic par....... (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  19. Development of an ensemble-adjoint optimization approach to derive uncertainties in net carbon fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ziehn

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Accurate modelling of the carbon cycle strongly depends on the parametrization of its underlying processes. The Carbon Cycle Data Assimilation System (CCDAS can be used as an estimator algorithm to derive posterior parameter values and uncertainties for the Biosphere Energy Transfer and Hydrology scheme (BETHY. However, the simultaneous optimization of all process parameters can be challenging, due to the complexity and non-linearity of the BETHY model. Therefore, we propose a new concept that uses ensemble runs and the adjoint optimization approach of CCDAS to derive the full probability density function (PDF for posterior soil carbon parameters and the net carbon flux at the global scale. This method allows us to optimize only those parameters that can be constrained best by atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 data. The prior uncertainties of the remaining parameters are included in a consistent way through ensemble runs, but are not constrained by data. The final PDF for the optimized parameters and the net carbon flux are then derived by superimposing the individual PDFs for each ensemble member. We find that the optimization with CCDAS converges much faster, due to the smaller number of processes involved. Faster convergence also gives us much increased confidence that we find the global minimum in the reduced parameter space.

  20. A comparison of three adsorption equations and sensitivity study of parameter uncertainty effects on adsorption refrigeration thermal performance estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongling; Hu, Eric; Blazewicz, Antoni

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents isosteric-based adsorption equilibrium tests of three activated carbon samples with methanol as an adsorbate. Experimental data was fitted into Langmuir equation, Freundlich equation and Dubinin-Astakov (D-A) equation, respectively. The fitted adsorption equations were compared in terms of agreement with experimental data. Moreover, equation format's impacts on calculation of the coefficient of performance (COP) and refrigeration capacity of an adsorption refrigeration system was analyzed. In addition, the sensitivity of each parameter in each adsorption equation format to the estimation of cycle's COP and refrigeration capacity was investigated. It was found that the D-A equation is the best form for presenting the adsorptive property of a carbon-methanol working pair. The D-A equation is recommended for estimating thermal performance of an adsorption refrigeration system because simulation results obtained using the D-A equation are less sensitive to errors of experimentally determined D-A equation's parameters.

  1. Sensitivity Analysis and Parameter Identifiability of the Land Surface Model JULES at the point scale in permeable catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakopoulou, C.; Bulygina, N.; Butler, A. P.; McIntyre, N. R.

    2012-04-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) are recognised as important components of Global Circulation Models (GCMs). Simulating exchanges of the moisture, carbon and energy between land surface and atmosphere in a consistent manner requires physics-based LSMs of high complexity, fine vertical resolution and a large number of parameters that need to be estimated. The "physics" that is incorporated in such models is generally based on our knowledge of point (or very small) scale hydrological processes. Therefore, while larger GCM grid-scale performance may be the ultimate goal, the ability of the model to simulate the point-scale processes is, intuitively, a pre-requisite for its reliable use at larger scales. Critical evaluation of model performance and parameter uncertainty at point scales is therefore a rational starting point for critical evaluation of LSMs; and identification of optimal parameter sets at the point scale is a significant stage of the model evaluation at larger scales. The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is a complex LSM, which is used to represent surface exchanges in the UK Met Office's forecast and climate change models. This complexity necessitates a large number of model parameters (in total 108) some of which are incapable of being measured directly at large (i.e. kilometer) scales. For this reason, a parameter sensitivity analysis is a vital confidence building process within the framework of every LSM, and as a part of the calibration strategy. The problem of JULES parameter estimation and uncertainty at the point scale with a view to assessing the accuracy and the uncertainty in the default parameter values is addressed. The sensitivity of the JULES output of soil moisture is examined using parameter response surface analysis. The implemented technique is based on the Regional Sensitivity Analysis method (RSA), which evaluates the model response surface over a region of parameter space using Monte Carlo sampling. The modified version of RSA

  2. Open-circuit sensitivity model based on empirical parameters for a capacitive-type MEMS acoustic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaewoo; Jeon, J. H.; Je, C. H.; Lee, S. Q.; Yang, W. S.; Lee, S.-G.

    2016-03-01

    An empirical-based open-circuit sensitivity model for a capacitive-type MEMS acoustic sensor is presented. To intuitively evaluate the characteristic of the open-circuit sensitivity, the empirical-based model is proposed and analysed by using a lumped spring-mass model and a pad test sample without a parallel plate capacitor for the parasitic capacitance. The model is composed of three different parameter groups: empirical, theoretical, and mixed data. The empirical residual stress from the measured pull-in voltage of 16.7 V and the measured surface topology of the diaphragm were extracted as +13 MPa, resulting in the effective spring constant of 110.9 N/m. The parasitic capacitance for two probing pads including the substrate part was 0.25 pF. Furthermore, to verify the proposed model, the modelled open-circuit sensitivity was compared with the measured value. The MEMS acoustic sensor had an open- circuit sensitivity of -43.0 dBV/Pa at 1 kHz with a bias of 10 V, while the modelled open- circuit sensitivity was -42.9 dBV/Pa, which showed good agreement in the range from 100 Hz to 18 kHz. This validates the empirical-based open-circuit sensitivity model for designing capacitive-type MEMS acoustic sensors.

  3. Large eddy simulations of surface roughness parameter sensitivity to canopy-structure characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. D. Maurer

    2014-11-01

    parameters to be highly variable, but were able to find positive relationships between displacement height and maximum canopy height, aerodynamic canopy height and maximum canopy height and leaf area index, and eddy-penetration depth and gap fraction. We also found negative relationships between aerodynamic canopy height and gap fraction, and between eddy-penetration depth and maximum canopy height and leaf area index. Using a decade of wind and canopy structure observations in a site in Michigan, we tested the effectiveness of our model-resolved parameters in predicting the frictional velocity over heterogeneous and disturbed canopies. We compared it with three other semi-empirical models and with a decade of meteorological observations. We found that parameterizations with fixed representations of roughness performed relatively well. Nonetheless, some empirical approaches that incorporate seasonal and inter-annual changes to the canopy structure performed even better than models with temporally fixed parameters.

  4. Adjoint complement to viscous finite-volume pressure-correction methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stück, Arthur; Rung, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    A hybrid-adjoint Navier-Stokes method for the pressure-based computation of hydrodynamic objective functional derivatives with respect to the shape is systematically derived in three steps: The underlying adjoint partial differential equations and boundary conditions for the frozen-turbulence Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are considered in the first step. In step two, the adjoint discretisation is developed from the primal, unstructured finite-volume discretisation, such that adjoint-consistent approximations to the adjoint partial differential equations are obtained following a so-called hybrid-adjoint approach. A unified, discrete boundary description is outlined that supports high- and low-Reynolds number turbulent wall-boundary treatments for both the adjoint boundary condition and the boundary-based gradient formula. The third component focused in the development of the industrial adjoint CFD method is the adjoint counterpart to the primal pressure-correction algorithm. The approach is verified against the direct-differentiation method and an application to internal flow problems is presented.

  5. On adjoint symmetry equations, integrating factors and solutions of nonlinear ODEs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guha, Partha [Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences, Inselstrasse 22, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Choudhury, A Ghose [Department of Physics, Surendranath College, 24/2 Mahatma Gandhi Road, Calcutta-700 009 (India); Khanra, Barun [Sailendra Sircar Vidyalaya, 62A Shyampukur Street, Calcutta-700 004 (India)], E-mail: partha.guha@mis.mpg.de, E-mail: a_ghosechoudhury@rediffmail.com, E-mail: barunkhanra@rediffmail.com

    2009-03-20

    We consider the role of the adjoint equation in determining explicit integrating factors and first integrals of nonlinear ODEs. In Chandrasekar et al (2006 J. Math. Phys. 47 023508), the authors have used an extended version of the Prelle-Singer method for a class of nonlinear ODEs of the oscillator type. In particular, we show that their method actually involves finding a solution of the adjoint symmetry equation. Next, we consider a coupled second-order nonlinear ODE system and derive the corresponding coupled adjoint equations. We illustrate how the coupled adjoint equations can be solved to arrive at a first integral.

  6. Forward and adjoint quasi-geostrophic models of the geomagnetic secular variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canet, Elisabeth; Fournier, Alexandre; Jault, Dominique

    2009-11-01

    We introduce a quasi-geostrophic model of core dynamics, which aims at describing core processes on geomagnetic secular variation timescales. It extends the formalism of Alfvén torsional oscillations by incorporating nonzonal motions. Within this framework, the magnetohydrodynamics takes place in the equatorial plane; it involves quadratic magnetic quantities, which are averaged along the direction of rotation of the Earth. In addition, the equatorial flow is projected on the core-mantle boundary. It interacts with the magnetic field at the core surface, through the radial component of the magnetic induction equation. That part of the model connects the dynamics and the observed secular variation, with the radial component of the magnetic field acting as a passive tracer. We resort to variational data assimilation to formally construct the relationship between model predictions and observations. Variational data assimilation seeks to minimize an objective function by computing its sensitivity to its control variables. The sensitivity is efficiently calculated after integration of the adjoint model. We illustrate that framework with twin experiments, performed first in the case of the kinematic core flow inverse problem and then in the case of Alfvén torsional oscillations. In both cases, using the adjoint model allows us to retrieve core state variables which, while taking part in the dynamics, are not directly sampled at the core surface. We study the effect of several factors on the solution (width of the assimilation time window, amount and quality of data), and we discuss the potential of the model to deal with real geomagnetic observations.

  7. Sensitivity analysis of high-efficiency silicon solar-cell design parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokashi, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon solar cell design parameters were investigated to determine their bearing on cell efficiency. Among the parameters reviewed were: (1) bulk resistivity, (2) minority carrier lifetime cell thickness, (3) front junction depth, (4) front surface doping concentration, (5) front surface recombination velocity, and (6) back surface contact. The following were concluded: (1) there is good agreement between experimental and simulation results; (2) sheet material quality improvement is needed for high efficiency cells; (3) 20% cell of this design is feasible with 10 ms bulk lifetime material; and (4) for achieving efficiencies higher than 20% new cell designs including thin cells with light trapping and back surface field should be considered.

  8. Using High-Resolution Data to Test Parameter Sensitivity of the Distributed Hydrological Model HydroGeoSphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Cornelissen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Parameterization of physically based and distributed hydrological models for mesoscale catchments remains challenging because the commonly available data base is insufficient for calibration. In this paper, we parameterize a mesoscale catchment for the distributed model HydroGeoSphere by transferring evapotranspiration parameters calibrated at a highly-equipped headwater catchment in addition to literature data. Based on this parameterization, the sensitivity of the mesoscale catchment to spatial variability in land use, potential evapotranspiration and precipitation and of the headwater catchment to mesoscale soil and land use data was conducted. Simulations of the mesoscale catchment with transferred parameters reproduced daily discharge dynamics and monthly evapotranspiration of grassland, deciduous and coniferous vegetation in a satisfactory manner. Precipitation was the most sensitive input data with respect to total runoff and peak flow rates, while simulated evapotranspiration components and patterns were most sensitive to spatially distributed land use parameterization. At the headwater catchment, coarse soil data resulted in a change in runoff generating processes based on the interplay between higher wetness prior to a rainfall event, enhanced groundwater level rise and accordingly, lower transpiration rates. Our results indicate that the direct transfer of parameters is a promising method to benefit highly equipped simulations of the headwater catchments.

  9. Scaling properties of SU(2) gauge theory with mixed fundamental-adjoint action

    CERN Document Server

    Rinaldi, Enrico; Lucini, Biagio; Patella, Agostino; Rago, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    We study the phase diagram of the SU(2) lattice gauge theory with fundamental-adjoint Wilson plaquette action. We confirm the presence of a first order bulk phase transition and we estimate the location of its end-point in the bare parameter space. If this point is second order, the theory is one of the simplest realizations of a lattice gauge theory admitting a continuum limit at finite bare couplings. All the relevant gauge observables are monitored in the vicinity of the fixed point with very good control over finite-size effects. The scaling properties of the low-lying glueball spectrum are studied while approaching the end-point in a controlled manner.

  10. Sensitivity of NTCP parameter values against a change of dose calculation algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Carsten; Berg, Martin; Nielsen, Morten

    2007-01-01

    with a collapsed cone algorithm (CC) to compare the NTCP estimates for radiation pneumonitis with those obtained from the clinically used pencil beam algorithm (PB). For the PB calculations the NTCP parameters were taken from previously published values for three different models. For the CC calculations...

  11. Characterizing parameter sensitivity and uncertainty for a snow model across hydroclimatic regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, M.; Hogue, T.S.; Franz, K.J.; Margulis, S.A.; Vrugt, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS) uses the SNOW17 model to forecast snow accumulation and ablation processes in snow-dominated watersheds nationwide. Successful application of the SNOW17 relies heavily on site-specific estimation of model parameters. The current study undertakes a comprehensive

  12. Sensitivity of Human Choice to Manipulations of Parameters of Positive and Negative Sound Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether altering parameters of positive and negative reinforcement in identical ways could influence behavior maintained by each in different ways. Three undergraduate students participated in a series of assessments designed to identify preferred and aversive sounds with similar reinforcing values.…

  13. Characterizing parameter sensitivity and uncertainty for a snow model across hydroclimatic regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, M.; Hogue, T.S.; Franz, K.J.; Margulis, S.A.; Vrugt, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS) uses the SNOW17 model to forecast snow accumulation and ablation processes in snow-dominated watersheds nationwide. Successful application of the SNOW17 relies heavily on site-specific estimation of model parameters. The current study undertakes a comprehensive sen

  14. Achievements and challenges in automated parameter, shape and topology optimization for divertor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baelmans, M.; Blommaert, M.; Dekeyser, W.; Van Oevelen, T.

    2017-03-01

    Plasma edge transport codes play a key role in the design of future divertor concepts. Their long simulation times in combination with a large number of control parameters turn the design into a challenging task. In aerodynamics and structural mechanics, adjoint-based optimization techniques have proven successful to tackle similar design challenges. This paper provides an overview of achievements and remaining challenges with these techniques for complex divertor design. It is shown how these developments pave the way for fast sensitivity analysis and improved design from different perspectives.

  15. A sensitivity analysis of the parameters controlling water-sediment interactions in the coastal zone: Consequences to man and environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosjpe, M.

    2011-10-01

    A sensitivity analysis has been carried out on the basis of the local and global sensitivity indexes for selected radionuclides ( 3H, 137Cs, 238Pu, 241Am and 244Cm) and main parameters describing the water-sediment interaction (sediment reworking rate, pore-water turnover rate, sediment distribution coefficient, suspended sediment load in water column, sedimentation rate, molecular diffusion coefficient, surface sediment thickness, porosity of bottom sediment and density of sediment material). Sensitivity analysis has been carried out using a compartment model for dose assessment to man and biota, which includes the processes of advection of radioactivity between compartments, sedimentation, diffusion of radioactivity through pore water in sediments, particle mixing, pore water mixing and a burial process of radioactivity in deep sediment layers. The sensitivity analysis indicates that for the conditions in the Norwegian Current (the Norwegian Sea) particle mixing dominates the transfer of radioactivity between the bottom water and surface sediment compartments. For the conditions in the Ob Bay (the Kara Sea), the sedimentation process has also been found to be significant. The calculated dynamics of the sensitivity indexes demonstrate clearly the complexities encountered when modeling water-sediment interactions. It is also shown that the results can be strongly dependent on the time of analysis. For example, given a specific change of parameters the radionuclide concentration will be either increased or decreased, depending on the temporal interval. Information provided by the sensitivity analysis can contribute to a better understanding of experimental data and might further improve the parameterization process. The obtained results show that water-sediment interactions can play a key role in the marine coastal environment, thus demonstrating the need to further deepen our understanding of them, as well as improve the models describing them.

  16. Clustering of Parameter Sensitivities: Examples from a Helicopter Airframe Model Updating Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Shahverdi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for high fidelity models in the aerospace industry has become ever more important as increasingly stringent requirements on noise and vibration levels, reliability, maintenance costs etc. come into effect. In this paper, the results of a finite element model updating exercise on a Westland Lynx XZ649 helicopter are presented. For large and complex structures, such as a helicopter airframe, the finite element model represents the main tool for obtaining accurate models which could predict the sensitivities of responses to structural changes and optimisation of the vibration levels. In this study, the eigenvalue sensitivities with respect to Young's modulus and mass density are used in a detailed parameterisation of the structure. A new methodology is developed using an unsupervised learning technique based on similarity clustering of the columns of the sensitivity matrix. An assessment of model updating strategies is given and comparative results for the correction of vibration modes are discussed in detail. The role of the clustering technique in updating large-scale models is emphasised.

  17. Data assimilation for massive autonomous systems based on a second-order adjoint method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shin-ichi; Nagao, Hiromichi; Yamanaka, Akinori; Tsukada, Yuhki; Koyama, Toshiyuki; Kano, Masayuki; Inoue, Junya

    2016-10-01

    Data assimilation (DA) is a fundamental computational technique that integrates numerical simulation models and observation data on the basis of Bayesian statistics. Originally developed for meteorology, especially weather forecasting, DA is now an accepted technique in various scientific fields. One key issue that remains controversial is the implementation of DA in massive simulation models under the constraints of limited computation time and resources. In this paper, we propose an adjoint-based DA method for massive autonomous models that produces optimum estimates and their uncertainties within reasonable computation time and resource constraints. The uncertainties are given as several diagonal elements of an inverse Hessian matrix, which is the covariance matrix of a normal distribution that approximates the target posterior probability density function in the neighborhood of the optimum. Conventional algorithms for deriving the inverse Hessian matrix require O (C N2+N3) computations and O (N2) memory, where N is the number of degrees of freedom of a given autonomous system and C is the number of computations needed to simulate time series of suitable length. The proposed method using a second-order adjoint method allows us to directly evaluate the diagonal elements of the inverse Hessian matrix without computing all of its elements. This drastically reduces the number of computations to O (C ) and the amount of memory to O (N ) for each diagonal element. The proposed method is validated through numerical tests using a massive two-dimensional Kobayashi phase-field model. We confirm that the proposed method correctly reproduces the parameter and initial state assumed in advance, and successfully evaluates the uncertainty of the parameter. Such information regarding uncertainty is valuable, as it can be used to optimize the design of experiments.

  18. SENSITIVITY OF STRUCTURAL RESPONSE TO GROUND MOTION SOURCE AND SITE PARAMETERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, Erdal; Brebbia, C.A.; Cakmak, A.S.; Abdel Ghaffar, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    Designing structures to withstand earthquakes requires an accurate estimation of the expected ground motion. While engineers use the peak ground acceleration (PGA) to model the strong ground motion, seismologists use physical characteristics of the source and the rupture mechanism, such as fault length, stress drop, shear wave velocity, seismic moment, distance, and attenuation. This study presents a method for calculating response spectra from seismological models using random vibration theory. It then investigates the effect of various source and site parameters on peak response. Calculations are based on a nonstationary stochastic ground motion model, which can incorporate all the parameters both in frequency and time domains. The estimation of the peak response accounts for the effects of the non-stationarity, bandwidth and peak correlations of the response.

  19. Sensitivity of a Lidar Inversion Algorithm to Parameters Relating Atmospheric Backscatter and Extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    AD-A141 565 SENSITVIT 0F A LDAR INVERSION ALGORITHM 0OI PARAMETERS RELATINO ATMOSPH..U) NAVAL OCEAN SYSTEMS CENER SANDIEGO CA HNGHUGHESEl AL APR 84...H. Stephens J. A. Ferguson April 1984 Final Report Prepared for Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR 330) Approved for public release; distribution...CLASS. (of AlmA. espot) Unclassified is. 0 C&ŕIPICATION/ DOWNGRADING If. DISTRIBUTlION STATEMENT (of this RepelS) Approved for public release

  20. Mass Action Models Describing Extant Horizontal Transfer of Plasmids: Inferences and Parameter Sensitivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smets, Barth F.; Lardon, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    of the outcomes to the various plasmid dynamic parameters. For our analysis, we developed a set of user-friendly MatLab® routines, which are deposited in the public domain. We hope that the availability of these routines will encourage the computationally untrained microbiologist to make use of these mathematical...... models. Finally, further permutations, as well as limitations of these mass action models in view of the structured complexity of most microbial systems are addressed....

  1. Biological optimization of simultaneous boost on intra-prostatic lesions (DILs): sensitivity to TCP parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzeroni, R; Maggio, A; Fiorino, C; Mangili, P; Cozzarini, C; De Cobelli, F; Di Muzio, N G; Calandrino, R

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this investigation was to explore the potential of biological optimization in the case of simultaneous integrated boost on intra-prostatic dominant lesions (DIL) and evaluating the impact of TCP parameters uncertainty. Different combination of TCP parameters (TD50 and γ50 in the Poisson-like model), were considered for DILs and the prostate outside DILs (CTV) for 7 intermediate/high-risk prostate patients. The aim was to maximize TCP while constraining NTCPs below 5% for all organs at risk. TCP values were highly depending on the parameters used and ranged between 38.4% and 99.9%; the optimized median physical doses were in the range 94-116 Gy and 69-77 Gy for DIL and CTV respectively. TCP values were correlated with the overlap PTV-rectum and the minimum distance between rectum and DIL. In conclusion, biological optimization for selective dose escalation is feasible and suggests prescribed dose around 90-120 Gy to the DILs. The obtained result is critically depending on the assumptions concerning the higher radioresistence in the DILs. In case of very resistant clonogens into the DIL, it may be difficult to maximize TCP to acceptable levels without violating NTCP constraints.

  2. Motion and vibration control of a slewing flexible structure by SMA actuators and parameter sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, F. C.; Tusset, A. M.; Piccirillo, V.; Balthazar, J. M.; Brasil, R. M. L. R. F.

    2015-11-01

    This work presents two approaches to the problem of vibration and positioning control of a flexible structural beam driven by a DC motor. The position is controlled by the current applied to the DC motor armature. A Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) actuator controls vibrations of the flexible structural beam. The State Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE) technique is used to provide a control action which uses sub-optimal control and system local stability search. The robustness of these two controllers is tested by sensitivity analysis to parametric uncertainties. Numerical simulations results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy.

  3. QSPR modeling of detonation parameters and sensitivity of some energetic materials: DFT vs. PM3 calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianying; Chen, Gangling; Gong, Xuedong

    2017-06-01

    The quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) methodology was applied to describe and seek the relationship between the structures and energetic properties (and sensitivity) for some common energy compounds. An extended series of structural and energetic descriptors was obtained with density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP and semi-empirical PM3 approaches. Results indicate that QSPR model constructed using quantum descriptors can be applied to verify the confidence of calculation results compared with experimental data. It can be extended to predict the properties of similar compounds.

  4. Sensitivity Analysis of Vagus Nerve Stimulation Parameters on Acute Cardiac Autonomic Responses: Chronotropic, Inotropic and Dromotropic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, David; Le Rolle, Virginie; Romero-Ugalde, Hector M.; Gallet, Clément; Bonnet, Jean-Luc; Henry, Christine; Bel, Alain; Mabo, Philippe; Carrault, Guy; Hernández, Alfredo I.

    2016-01-01

    Although the therapeutic effects of Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) have been recognized in pre-clinical and pilot clinical studies, the effect of different stimulation configurations on the cardiovascular response is still an open question, especially in the case of VNS delivered synchronously with cardiac activity. In this paper, we propose a formal mathematical methodology to analyze the acute cardiac response to different VNS configurations, jointly considering the chronotropic, dromotropic and inotropic cardiac effects. A latin hypercube sampling method was chosen to design a uniform experimental plan, composed of 75 different VNS configurations, with different values for the main parameters (current amplitude, number of delivered pulses, pulse width, interpulse period and the delay between the detected cardiac event and VNS onset). These VNS configurations were applied to 6 healthy, anesthetized sheep, while acquiring the associated cardiovascular response. Unobserved VNS configurations were estimated using a Gaussian process regression (GPR) model. In order to quantitatively analyze the effect of each parameter and their combinations on the cardiac response, the Sobol sensitivity method was applied to the obtained GPR model and inter-individual sensitivity markers were estimated using a bootstrap approach. Results highlight the dominant effect of pulse current, pulse width and number of pulses, which explain respectively 49.4%, 19.7% and 6.0% of the mean global cardiovascular variability provoked by VNS. More interestingly, results also quantify the effect of the interactions between VNS parameters. In particular, the interactions between current and pulse width provoke higher cardiac effects than the changes on the number of pulses alone (between 6 and 25% of the variability). Although the sensitivity of individual VNS parameters seems similar for chronotropic, dromotropic and inotropic responses, the interacting effects of VNS parameters provoke

  5. Sensitivity of Penicillium expansum field isolates to tebuconazole, iprodione, fludioxonil and cyprodinil and characterization of fitness parameters and patulin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoglanidis, George S; Markoglou, Anastasios N; Bardas, George A; Doukas, Eleftherios G; Konstantinou, Sotiris; Kalampokis, John F

    2011-01-31

    A total of 236 Penicillium expansum field isolates from decayed apple fruit collected from packinghouses and processing industries located in the region of Imathia, Northern Greece were tested for their sensitivity to tebuconazole, fludioxonil, iprodione and cyprodinil. Preliminary fungitoxicity tests on the response of the isolates showed several phenotypes, distinguished according to their sensitivity to fungicides tested. The EC(50) values ranged from 0.64 to 5 (average = 0.98) μg/ml for iprodione, 0.9 to 7.3 (average = 2.66) μg/ml for tebuconazole, 0.008 to 1.28 (average = 0.55) μg/ml for cyprodinil and from 0.013 to 0.47 (average = 0.08) μg/ml for fludioxonil. A bimodal distribution of the EC(50) values of isolates with distinct sensitive and resistant populations to fludioxonil and tebuconazole were observed. In the case of cyprodinil, a much broader, hundred-fold, range of sensitivity was found, probably indicating that some isolates are relatively insensitive to cyprodinil compared to the most sensitive ones. Isolates exhibiting simultaneously reduced sensitivity to tebuconazole and fludioxonil or tebuconazole and iprodione or to tebuconazole and cyprodinil were also observed at low frequencies. A small portion of the population (7.5%) showed multiple resistance to tebuconazole, fludioxonil and iprodione. Study of fitness determining parameters showed that the resistance to tebuconazole, fludioxonil and iprodione had a significant adverse effect on mycelial growth rate and pathogenicity. Contrary to that, these fitness parameters were not affected in the isolates showing reduced sensitivity to cyprodinil. Analysis of patulin production on YES-agar growth medium and on artificially inoculated apple fruit showed that all isolates were mycotoxigenic. Most of the cyprodinil-insensitive isolates produced patulin at concentrations similar to or relatively higher (up to 1.5-fold on growth medium) than the sensitive ones. In contrast, a significant reduction

  6. High sensitivity of p-modes near the acoustic cutoff frequency to solar model parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, D. B.

    1991-01-01

    The p-mode frequencies of low l have been calculated for solar models with initial helium mass fraction varying from Y = 0.2753-0.2875. The differences in frequency of the p-modes in the frequency range, 2500-4500 microHz, do not exceed 1-5 microHz among the models. But in the vicinity of the acoustic cutoff frequency, near 5000 microHz the p-mode frequency differences are enhanced by a factor of 4. The enhanced sensitivity of p-modes near the acoustic cutoff frequency was further tested by calculating and comparing p-mode frequencies of low l for two solar models one incorporating the Eddington T-tau relation and the other the Krishna Swamy T-tau relation. Again, it is found that p-modes with frequencies near the acoustic cutoff frequency show a significant increase in sensitivity to the different T-tau relations, compared to lower frequency p-modes. It is noted that frequencies above the acoustic cutoff frequency are complex, hence, cannot be modeled by the adiabatic pulsation code (assumes real eigenfrequencies) used in these calculations.

  7. EGS in sedimentary basins: sensitivity of early-flowback tracer signals to induced-fracture parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Shyamal; Ghergut, Julia; Sauter, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Artificial-fracture design, and fracture characterization during or following stimulation treatment is a central aspect of many EGS ('enhanced' or 'engineered' geothermal system) projects. During the creation or stimulation of an EGS, the injection of fluids, followed by flowback and production stages offers the opportunity for conducting various tracer tests in a single-well (SW) configuration, and given the typical operational and time limitations associated with such tests, along with the need to assess treatment success in real time, investigators mostly favour using short-time tracer-test data, rather than awaiting long-term 'tailings' of tracer signals. Late-time tracer signals from SW injection-flowback and production tests have mainly been used for the purpose of multiple-fracture inflow profiling in multi-layer reservoirs [1]. However, the potential of using SW short-term tracer signals for fracture characterization [2, 3] remained little explored as yet. Dealing with short-term flowback signals, we face a certain degree of parameter interplay, leading to ambiguity in fracture parameter inversion from the measured signal of a single tracer. This ambiguity can, to a certain extent, be overcome by - combining different sources of information (lithostratigraphy, and hydraulic monitoring) in order to constrain the variation range of hydrogeologic parameters (matrix and fracture permeability and porosity, fracture size), - using different types of tracers, such as conservative tracer pairs with contrasting diffusivity, or tracers pairs with contrasting sorptivity onto target surfaces. Fracture height is likely to be constrained by lithostratigraphy, while fracture length is supposed to be determinable from hydraulic monitoring (pressure recordings); the flowback rate can be assumed as a known (measurable) quantity during individual-fracture flowback. This leaves us with one or two unknown parameters to be determined from tracer signals: - the transport

  8. Structural-acoustic coupling characteristics of honeycomb sandwich plate based on parameter sensitivity analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王盛春; 沈卫东; 徐嘉锋; 李赟

    2014-01-01

    The structural-acoustic coupling model for isotropic thin elastic plate was extended to honeycomb sandwich plate (HSP) by applying Green function method. Then an equivalent circuit model of the weakly-strongly coupled system was proposed. Based on that, the estimation formulae of the coupled eigenfrequency were derived. The accuracy of the theoretical predictions was checked against experimental data, with good agreement achieved. Finally, the effects of HSP design parameters on the system coupling degree, the acoustic cavity eigenfrequency, and sound pressure response were analyzed. The results show that mechanical and acoustical characteristics of HSP can be improved by increasing the thickness of face sheet and reducing the mass density of material.

  9. A finite difference method for estimating second order parameter sensitivities of discrete stochastic chemical reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Elizabeth Skubak; Anderson, David F

    2012-12-14

    We present an efficient finite difference method for the approximation of second derivatives, with respect to system parameters, of expectations for a class of discrete stochastic chemical reaction networks. The method uses a coupling of the perturbed processes that yields a much lower variance than existing methods, thereby drastically lowering the computational complexity required to solve a given problem. Further, the method is simple to implement and will also prove useful in any setting in which continuous time Markov chains are used to model dynamics, such as population processes. We expect the new method to be useful in the context of optimization algorithms that require knowledge of the Hessian.

  10. Sensitivity analysis of hydraulic and thermal parameters inducing anomalous heat flow in the Lower Yarmouk Gorge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goretzki, Nora; Inbar, Nimrod; Kühn, Michael; Möller, Peter; Rosenthal, Eliyahu; Schneider, Michael; Siebert, Christian; Magri, Fabien

    2016-04-01

    The Lower Yarmouk Gorge, at the border between Israel and Jordan, is characterized by an anomalous temperature gradient of 46 °C/km. Numerical simulations of thermally-driven flow show that ascending thermal waters are the result of mixed convection, i.e. the interaction between the regional flow from the surrounding heights and buoyant flow within permeable faults [1]. Those models were calibrated against available temperature logs by running several forward problems (FP), with a classic "trial and error" method. In the present study, inverse problems (IP) are applied to find alternative parameter distributions that also lead to the observed thermal anomalies. The investigated physical parameters are hydraulic conductivity and thermal conductivity. To solve the IP, the PEST® code [2] is applied via the graphical interface FEPEST® in FEFLOW® [3]. The results show that both hydraulic and thermal conductivity are consistent with the values determined with the trial and error calibrations, which precede this study. However, the IP indicates that the hydraulic conductivity of the Senonian Paleocene aquitard can be 8.54*10-3 m/d, which is three times lower than the originally estimated value in [1]. Moreover, the IP suggests that the hydraulic conductivity in the faults can increase locally up to 0.17 m/d. These highly permeable areas can be interpreted as local damage zones at the faults/units intersections. They can act as lateral pathways in the deep aquifers that allow deep outflow of thermal water. This presentation provides an example about the application of FP and IP to infer a wide range of parameter values that reproduce observed environmental issues. [1] Magri F, Inbar N, Siebert C, Rosenthal E, Guttman J, Möller P (2015) Transient simulations of large-scale hydrogeological processes causing temperature and salinity anomalies in the Tiberias Basin. Journal of Hydrology, 520, 342-355 [2] Doherty J (2010) PEST: Model-Independent Parameter Estimation. user

  11. Adjoint optimization of natural convection problems: differentially heated cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saglietti, Clio; Schlatter, Philipp; Monokrousos, Antonios; Henningson, Dan S.

    2016-06-01

    Optimization of natural convection-driven flows may provide significant improvements to the performance of cooling devices, but a theoretical investigation of such flows has been rarely done. The present paper illustrates an efficient gradient-based optimization method for analyzing such systems. We consider numerically the natural convection-driven flow in a differentially heated cavity with three Prandtl numbers (Pr=0.15{-}7 ) at super-critical conditions. All results and implementations were done with the spectral element code Nek5000. The flow is analyzed using linear direct and adjoint computations about a nonlinear base flow, extracting in particular optimal initial conditions using power iteration and the solution of the full adjoint direct eigenproblem. The cost function for both temperature and velocity is based on the kinetic energy and the concept of entransy, which yields a quadratic functional. Results are presented as a function of Prandtl number, time horizons and weights between kinetic energy and entransy. In particular, it is shown that the maximum transient growth is achieved at time horizons on the order of 5 time units for all cases, whereas for larger time horizons the adjoint mode is recovered as optimal initial condition. For smaller time horizons, the influence of the weights leads either to a concentric temperature distribution or to an initial condition pattern that opposes the mean shear and grows according to the Orr mechanism. For specific cases, it could also been shown that the computation of optimal initial conditions leads to a degenerate problem, with a potential loss of symmetry. In these situations, it turns out that any initial condition lying in a specific span of the eigenfunctions will yield exactly the same transient amplification. As a consequence, the power iteration converges very slowly and fails to extract all possible optimal initial conditions. According to the authors' knowledge, this behavior is illustrated here

  12. The development of three-dimensional adjoint method for flow control with blowing in convergent-divergent nozzle flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikarwar, Nidhi

    The noise produced by the low bypass ratio turbofan engines used to power fighter aircraft is a problem for communities near military bases and for personnel working in close proximity to the aircraft. For example, carrier deck personnel are subject to noise exposure that can result in Noise-Induced Hearing Loss which in-turn results in over a billion dollars of disability payments by the Veterans Administration. Several methods have been proposed to reduce the jet noise at the source. These methods include microjet injection of air or water downstream of the jet exit, chevrons, and corrugated nozzle inserts. The last method involves the insertion of corrugated seals into the diverging section of a military-style convergent-divergent jet nozzle (to replace the existing seals). This has been shown to reduce both the broadband shock-associated noise as well as the mixing noise in the peak noise radiation direction. However, the original inserts were designed to be effective for a take-off condition where the jet is over-expanded. The nozzle performance would be expected to degrade at other conditions, such as in cruise at altitude. A new method has been proposed to achieve the same effects as corrugated seals, but using fluidic inserts. This involves injection of air, at relatively low pressures and total mass flow rates, into the diverging section of the nozzle. These fluidic inserts" deflect the flow in the same way as the mechanical inserts. The fluidic inserts represent an active control method, since the injectors can be modified or turned off depending on the jet operating conditions. Noise reductions in the peak noise direction of 5 to 6 dB have been achieved and broadband shock-associated noise is effectively suppressed. There are multiple parameters to be considered in the design of the fluidic inserts. This includes the number and location of the injectors and the pressures and mass flow rates to be used. These could be optimized on an ad hoc basis with

  13. On the Norm Convergence of the Self-Adjoint Trotter–Kato Product Formula with Error Bound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Takashi Ichinose; Hideo Tamura

    2002-02-01

    The norm convergence of the Trotter–Kato product formula with error bound is shown for the semigroup generated by that operator sum of two nonnegative self-adjoint operators and which is self-adjoint.

  14. Self-adjoint Extensions for the Neumann Laplacian and Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. A. NAZAROV; J. SOKO(L)OWSKI

    2006-01-01

    A new technique is proposed for the analysis of shape optimization problems. The technique uses the asymptotic analysis of boundary value problems in singularly perturbed geometrical domains. The asymptotics of solutions are derived in the framework of compound and matched asymptotics expansions. The analysis involves the so-called interior topology variations. The asymptotic expansions are derived for a model problem, however the technique applies to general elliptic boundary value problems. The self-adjoint extensions of elliptic operators and the weighted spaces with detached asymptotics are exploited for the modelling of problems with small defects in geometrical domains. The error estimates for proposed approximations of shape functionals are provided.

  15. Bimetric Gravity From Adjoint Frame Field In Four Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We provide a novel model of gravity by using adjoint frame fields in four dimensions. It has a natural interpretation as a gravitational theory of a complex metric field, which describes interactions between two real metrics. The classical solutions establish three appealing features. The spherical symmetric black hole solution has an additional hair, which includes the Schwarzschild solution as a special case. The de Sitter solution is realized without introducing a cosmological constant. The constant flat background breaks the Lorentz invariance spontaneously, although the Lorentz breaking effect can be localized to the second metric while the first metric still respects the Lorentz invariance.

  16. Advances in Global Adjoint Tomography -- Massive Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Y.; Lei, W.; Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Smith, J. A.; Krischer, L.; Tromp, J.

    2015-12-01

    Azimuthal anisotropy and anelasticity are key to understanding a myriad of processes in Earth's interior. Resolving these properties requires accurate simulations of seismic wave propagation in complex 3-D Earth models and an iterative inversion strategy. In the wake of successes in regional studies(e.g., Chen et al., 2007; Tape et al., 2009, 2010; Fichtner et al., 2009, 2010; Chen et al.,2010; Zhu et al., 2012, 2013; Chen et al., 2015), we are employing adjoint tomography based on a spectral-element method (Komatitsch & Tromp 1999, 2002) on a global scale using the supercomputer ''Titan'' at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. After 15 iterations, we have obtained a high-resolution transversely isotropic Earth model (M15) using traveltime data from 253 earthquakes. To obtain higher resolution images of the emerging new features and to prepare the inversion for azimuthal anisotropy and anelasticity, we expanded the original dataset with approximately 4,220 additional global earthquakes (Mw5.5-7.0) --occurring between 1995 and 2014-- and downloaded 300-minute-long time series for all available data archived at the IRIS Data Management Center, ORFEUS, and F-net. Ocean Bottom Seismograph data from the last decade are also included to maximize data coverage. In order to handle the huge dataset and solve the I/O bottleneck in global adjoint tomography, we implemented a python-based parallel data processing workflow based on the newly developed Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF). With the help of the data selection tool MUSTANG developed by IRIS, we cleaned our dataset and assembled event-based ASDF files for parallel processing. We have started Centroid Moment Tensors (CMT) inversions for all 4,220 earthquakes with the latest model M15, and selected high-quality data for measurement. We will statistically investigate each channel using synthetic seismograms calculated in M15 for updated CMTs and identify problematic channels. In addition to data screening, we also modified

  17. Large-N reduction with adjoint Wilson fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Bringoltz, Barak; Sharpe, Stephen R

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the large-N behavior of SU(N) lattice gauge theories with adjoint fermions by studying volume-reduced models, as pioneered by Eguchi and Kawai. We perform simulations on a single-site lattice for Nf = 1 and Nf = 2 Wilson Dirac fermions with values of N up to 53. We show for both values of Nf that in the large-N limit there is a finite region, containing both light and heavy fermions, of unbroken center symmetry where the theory exhibits volume independence. Using large-N reduction we attempt to calculate physical quantities such as the string tension and meson masses.

  18. Mass anomalous dimension in SU(2) with two adjoint fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Bursa, Francis; Keegan, Liam; Pica, Claudio; Pickup, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We study SU(2) lattice gauge theory with two flavours of Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation. We measure the running of the coupling in the Schroedinger Functional (SF) scheme and find it is consistent with the existence of an infrared fixed point (IRFP). We discuss how systematic errors affect the evidence for an IRFP. We present the first measurement of the running of the mass in the SF scheme. Assuming the existence of a fixed point, we can deduce the anomalous dimension at the fixed point. At the current level of accuracy, we can estimate 0.05 < gamma < 0.56 at the IRFP.

  19. QCD thermodynamics from 3d adjoint Higgs model

    CERN Document Server

    Karsch, Frithjof; Patkós, András; Petreczky, P; Szép, Z; Szep, Zs.

    1998-01-01

    The screening masses of hot SU(N) gauge theory, defined as poles of the corresponding propagators are studied in 3d adjoint Higgs model, considered as an effective theory of QCD, using coupled gap equations and lattice Monte-Carlo simulations (for N=2). Using so-called lambda gauges non-perturbative evidence for gauge independence of the pole masses within this class of gauges is given. A possible application of the screening masses for the resummation of the free energy is discussed.

  20. Aerodynamic parameter studies and sensitivity analysis for rotor blades in axial flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Y. Danny; Peters, David A.

    1991-01-01

    The analytical capability is offered for aerodynamic parametric studies and sensitivity analyses of rotary wings in axial flight by using a 3-D undistorted wake model in curved lifting line theory. The governing equations are solved by both the Multhopp Interpolation technique and the Vortex Lattice method. The singularity from the bound vortices is eliminated through the Hadamard's finite part concept. Good numerical agreement between both analytical methods and finite differences methods are found. Parametric studies were made to assess the effects of several shape variables on aerodynamic loads. It is found, e.g., that a rotor blade with out-of-plane and inplane curvature can theoretically increase lift in the inboard and outboard regions respectively without introducing an additional induced drag.

  1. Sensitivity analysis of multi-objective optimization of CPG parameters for quadruped robot locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Miguel; Santos, Cristina P.; Costa, Lino

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, a study based on sensitivity analysis is performed for a gait multi-objective optimization system that combines bio-inspired Central Patterns Generators (CPGs) and a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm based on NSGA-II. In this system, CPGs are modeled as autonomous differential equations, that generate the necessary limb movement to perform the required walking gait. In order to optimize the walking gait, a multi-objective problem with three conflicting objectives is formulated: maximization of the velocity, the wide stability margin and the behavioral diversity. The experimental results highlight the effectiveness of this multi-objective approach and the importance of the objectives to find different walking gait solutions for the quadruped robot.

  2. Sensitivity Analysis of Wind Plant Performance to Key Turbine Design Parameters: A Systems Engineering Approach; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Veers, P.

    2014-02-01

    This paper introduces the development of a new software framework for research, design, and development of wind energy systems which is meant to 1) represent a full wind plant including all physical and nonphysical assets and associated costs up to the point of grid interconnection, 2) allow use of interchangeable models of varying fidelity for different aspects of the system, and 3) support system level multidisciplinary analyses and optimizations. This paper describes the design of the overall software capability and applies it to a global sensitivity analysis of wind turbine and plant performance and cost. The analysis was performed using three different model configurations involving different levels of fidelity, which illustrate how increasing fidelity can preserve important system interactions that build up to overall system performance and cost. Analyses were performed for a reference wind plant based on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's 5-MW reference turbine at a mid-Atlantic offshore location within the United States.

  3. Carbonate Doping in TiO2 Microsphere: The Key Parameter Influencing Others for Efficient Dye Sensitized Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddigi, Zaki S.; Ahmed, Saleh A.; Sardar, Samim; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Four key parameters namely light trapping, density of light harvesting centre, photoinduced electron injection and electron transport without self-recombination are universally important across all kinds of solar cells. In the present study, we have considered the parameters in the context of a model Dye Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC). Our experimental studies reveal that carbonate doping of TiO2 mesoporous microspheres (doped MS) makes positive influence to all the above mentioned key parameters responsible for the enhanced solar cell efficiency. A simple method has been employed to synthesize the doped MS for the photoanode of a N719 (ruthenium dye)-based DSSC. A detail electron microscopy has been used to characterize the change in morphology of the MS upon doping. The optical absorption spectrum of the doped MS reveals significant shift of TiO2 (compared to that of the MS without doping) towards maximum solar radiance (~500 nm) and the excellent scattering in the entire absorption band of the sensitizing dye (N719). Finally, and most importantly, for the first time we have demonstrated that the solar cells with doped MS offers better efficiency (7.6%) in light harvesting compared to MS without doping (5.2%) and also reveal minimum self recombination of photoelectrons in the redox chain.

  4. Damage Detection of Bridges Using Vibration Data by Adjoint Variable Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Mirzaee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research entails a theoretical and numerical study on a new damage detection method for bridges, using response sensitivity in time domain. This method, referred to as “adjoint variable method,” is a finite element model updating sensitivity based method. Governing equation of the bridge-vehicle system is established based on finite element formulation. In the inverse analysis, the new approach is presented to identify elemental flexural rigidity of the structure from acceleration responses of several measurement points. The computational cost of sensitivity matrix is the main concern associated with damage detection by these methods. The main advantage of the proposed method is the inclusion of an analytical method to augment the accuracy and speed of the solution. The reliable performance of the method to precisely identify the location and intensity of all types of predetermined single, multiple, and random damages over the whole domain of moving vehicle speed is shown. A comparison study is also carried out to demonstrate the relative effectiveness and upgraded performance of the proposed method in comparison to the similar ordinary sensitivity analysis methods. Moreover, various sources of errors including the effects of noise and primary errors on the numerical stability of the proposed method are discussed.

  5. Probability strength design of steam turbine blade and sensitivity analysis with respect to random parameters based on response surface method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei DUAN

    2008-01-01

    Many stochastic parameters have an effect on the reliability of a steam turbine blade during practical operation. To improve the reliability of blade design, it is necessary to take these stochastic parameters into account. An equal cross-section blade is investigated and a finite element model is built parametrically. Geometrical parameters, material parameters and load parameters of the blade are considered as input random variables while the maximum deflection and maximum equivalent stress are output random variables. Analysis file of the blade is compiled by deterministic finite element method and applied to be loop file to create sample points. A quadratic polynomial with cross terms is chosen to regress these samples by step-forward regression method and employed as a surrogate of numerical solver to drastically reduce the number of solvers call. Then, Monte Carlo method is used to obtain the statistical characteristics and cumulative distribution function of the maximum deflection and maximum equivalent stress of the blade. Probability sensitivity analysis, which combines the slope of the gradient and the width of the scatter range of the random input variables, is applied to evaluate how much the output parameters are influenced by the random input para-meters. The scatter plots of structural responses with respect to the random input variables are illustrated to analyze how to change the input random variables to improve the reliability of the blade. The results show that combination of the finite element method, the response surface method and Monte Carlo method is an ideal way for the reliability analysis and probability strength design of the blade.

  6. Challenges in adjoint-based well location optimization when using well models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashoori, E.; Jansen, J.D.

    2015-01-01

    There is a general consensus that the most efficient method for large-scale well location optimization is gradient-based with gradients computed with an adjoint formulation. Handels et al. (2007) (later published in journal form as Zandvliet et al., 2008), were the first to use the adjoint method fo

  7. Comparison of the Monte Carlo adjoint-weighted and differential operator perturbation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiedrowski, Brian C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Two perturbation theory methodologies are implemented for k-eigenvalue calculations in the continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, MCNP6. A comparison of the accuracy of these techniques, the differential operator and adjoint-weighted methods, is performed numerically and analytically. Typically, the adjoint-weighted method shows better performance over a larger range; however, there are exceptions.

  8. The state-space approach to the method of adjoints for hybrid guidance loop models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, M.; Bucco, D.

    2009-01-01

    A framework is introduced to develop the theory of the Adjoint Method for models including both continuous and discrete dynamics. The basis of this framework consists of the class of impulsive linear dynamical systems. It allows extension of the Adjoint Method to more general models that include mul

  9. On rational R-matrices with adjoint SU(n) symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Stronks, Laurens; Schuricht, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Using the representation theory of Yangians we construct the rational R-matrix which takes values in the adjoint representation of SU(n). From this we derive an integrable SU(n) spin chain with lattice spins transforming under the adjoint representation. However, the resulting Hamiltonian is found to be non-Hermitian.

  10. THE TOPOGRAPHIC PARAMETER SENSITIVITY TO VORTICITY PROPAGATION AND TYPHOON TANGENTIAL VELOCITY CHANGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jin-hua

    2005-01-01

    A high resolution shallow-water model is designed to study the roles which the topographical parameter and latitudinal basic flow play in the propagation of vortex Rossby waves and typhoon tangential velocity changes. With no latitudinal flow, the horizontal scale effects of island terrain on the vortex Rossby waves propagation show that the disturbance vorticity follows a clockwise island-circulating path more significantly, the local maximum wind speed amplitude reduces more sharply, the maximum mean azimuthally tangential wind spins down more substantially, when the topographic horizontal scale augments. With the latitudinal basic flow, the evolution of local wind and mean velocity are affected by the distance changes between TC and the terrain and the time length of topographic action: the local wind amplitude intensifies and the mean velocity diminishes while the distance is shortening; the opposite is true while TC is away from the terrain gradually.

  11. Numerical Simulation and Sensitivity Analysis of Parameters for Multistand Roll Forming of Channel Section With Outer Edge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Guo; LAI Xin-min; YU Zhong-qi; LIN Zhong-qin

    2009-01-01

    Cold roll forming is a high production but complex metal forming process under the conditions of coupled effects with multi-factor.A new booting finite element method (FEM) model using the updated Lagrangian (UL) method for multistand roll forming process is developed and validated.Compared with most of the literatures related to roll forming simulation,the new model can take the roll rotation into account and is well suited for simulating multistand roll forming.Based on the model,the process of a channel section with outer edge formed with twelve passes is simulated and the sensitivity analysis of parameters is conducted with orthogonal design combined FEM model.It is found that the multiatand roll forming process can he efficiently analyzed by the new booting model,and sensitivity analysis shows that the yield strength plays an important role in controlling the quality of the products.

  12. Multi-parameter trajectory sensitivity approach for location of series-connected controllers to enhance power system transient stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamora-Cardenas, A.; Fuerte-Esquivel, Claudio R. [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Faculty of Electrical Enginering, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    Determining suitable locations of series-connected controllers is a practical problem when it is necessary to install them in modern power systems. The aim of this paper is to find the best location of series controllers in order to reduce the proximity to instability of a current operating point of a power system, from a transient stability viewpoint. In order to achieve this goal, a general approach has been developed based on an index of proximity to instability and trajectory sensitivity analysis. An efficient way to carry out multi-parameter sensitivities is formulated analytically and solved simultaneously with the set of differential-algebraic equations representing power system's dynamics within a single-frame of reference. Simulations are performed on 9-bus and 39-bus benchmark power systems for illustration purposes. Results show that the proposed approach provides the most effective location of series-connected controllers to improve the power system's transient behavior. (author)

  13. Adjoint tomography of the crust and upper mantle structure beneath the Kanto region using broadband seismograms

    KAUST Repository

    Miyoshi, Takayuki

    2017-10-04

    A three-dimensional seismic wave speed model in the Kanto region of Japan was developed using adjoint tomography for application in the effective reproduction of observed waveforms. Starting with a model based on previous travel time tomographic results, we inverted the waveforms obtained at seismic broadband stations from 140 local earthquakes in the Kanto region to obtain the P- and S-wave speeds Vp and Vs. Additionally, all centroid times of the source solutions were determined before the structural inversion. The synthetic displacements were calculated using the spectral-element method (SEM) in which the Kanto region was parameterized using 16 million grid points. The model parameters Vp and Vs were updated iteratively by Newton’s method using the misfit and Hessian kernels until the misfit between the observed and synthetic waveforms was minimized. Computations of the forward and adjoint simulations were conducted on the K computer in Japan. The optimized SEM code required a total of 6720 simulations using approximately 62,000 node hours to obtain the final model after 16 iterations. The proposed model reveals several anomalous areas with extremely low-Vs values in comparison with those of the initial model. These anomalies were found to correspond to geological features, earthquake sources, and volcanic regions with good data coverage and resolution. The synthetic waveforms obtained using the newly proposed model for the selected earthquakes showed better fit than the initial model to the observed waveforms in different period ranges within 5–30 s. This result indicates that the model can accurately predict actual waveforms.

  14. Assessing sensitivity of Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) to fault parameters: Sumatra case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omang, A.; Cummins, P. R.; Horspool, N.; Hidayati, S.

    2012-12-01

    Slip rate data and fault geometry are two important inputs in determining seismic hazard, because they are used to estimate earthquake recurrence intervals which strongly influence the hazard level in an area. However, the uncertainty of slip-rates and geometry of the fault are rarely considered in any probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA), which is surprising given the estimates of slip-rates can vary significantly from different data sources (e.g. geological vs. Geodetic). We use the PSHA method to assess the sensitivity of seismic hazard to fault slip-rates along the Great Sumatran Fault in Sumatra, Indonesia. We will consider the epistemic uncertainty of fault slip rate by employing logic trees to include alternative slip rate models. The weighting of the logic tree is determined by the probability density function of the slip rate estimates using the approach of Zechar and Frankel (2009). We consider how the PSHA result accounting for slip rate uncertainty differs from that for a specific slip rate by examining hazard values as a function of return period and distance from the fault. We also consider the geometry of the fault, especially the top and the bottom of the rupture area within a fault, to study the effect from different depths. Based on the results of this study, in some cases the uncertainty in fault slip-rates, fault geometry and maximum magnitude have a significant effect on hazard level and area impacted by earthquakes and should be considered in PSHA studies.

  15. Flow analysis with WaSiM-ETH – model parameter sensitivity at different scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cullmann

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available WaSiM-ETH (Gurtz et al., 2001, a widely used water balance simulation model, is tested for its suitability to serve for flow analysis in the context of rainfall runoff modelling and flood forecasting. In this paper, special focus is on the resolution of the process domain in space as well as in time. We try to couple model runs with different calculation time steps in order to reduce the effort arising from calculating the whole flow hydrograph at the hourly time step. We aim at modelling on the daily time step for water balance purposes, switching to the hourly time step whenever high-resolution information is necessary (flood forecasting. WaSiM-ETH is used at different grid resolutions, thus we try to become clear about being able to transfer the model in spatial resolution. We further use two different approaches for the overland flow time calculation within the sub-basins of the test watershed to gain insights about the process dynamics portrayed by the model. Our findings indicate that the model is very sensitive to time and space resolution and cannot be transferred across scales without recalibration.

  16. Lagrangian model of zooplankton dispersion: numerical schemes comparisons and parameter sensitivity tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Zhongfeng; Andrea M. DOGLIOLI; HE Yijun; Francois CARLOTTI

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents two comparisons or tests for a Lagrangian model of zooplankton dispersion: numerical schemes and time steps. Firstly, we compared three numerical schemes using idealized circulations. Results show that the precisions of the advanced Adams-Bashfold-Moulton (ABM) method and the Runge-Kutta (RK) method were in the same order and both were much higher than that of the Euler method. Furthermore, the advanced ABM method is more efficient than the RK method in computational memory requirements and time consumption. We therefore chose the advanced ABM method as the Lagrangian particle-tracking algorithm. Secondly, we performed a sensitivity test for time steps, using outputs of the hydrodynamic model, Symphonie. Results show that the time step choices depend on the fluid response time that is related to the spatial resolution of velocity fields. The method introduced by Oliveira et al. in 2002 is suitable for choosing time steps of Lagrangian particle-tracking models, at least when only considering advection.

  17. Adjoint-based Gradient Estimation Using the Space-time Solutions of Unknown Conservation Law Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Han

    2016-01-01

    Many control applications can be formulated as optimization constrained by conservation laws. Such optimization can be efficiently solved by gradient-based methods, where the gradient is obtained through the adjoint method. Traditionally, the adjoint method has not been able to be implemented in "gray-box" conservation law simulations. In gray-box simulations, the analytical and numerical form of the conservation law is unknown, but the space-time solution of relevant flow quantities is available. Without the adjoint gradient, optimization can be challenging for problems with many control variables. However, much information about the gray-box simulation is contained in its space-time solution, which motivates us to estimate the adjoint gradient by leveraging the space-time solution. This article considers a type of gray-box simulations where the flux function is partially unknown. A method is introduced to estimate the adjoint gradient at a cost independent of the number of control variables. The method firs...

  18. Singular Potentials in Quantum Mechanics and Ambiguity in the Self-Adjoint Hamiltonian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Fülöp

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available For a class of singular potentials, including the Coulomb potential (in three and less dimensions and $V(x = g/x^2$ with the coefficient $g$ in a certain range ($x$ being a space coordinate in one or more dimensions, the corresponding Schrödinger operator is not automatically self-adjoint on its natural domain. Such operators admit more than one self-adjoint domain, and the spectrum and all physical consequences depend seriously on the self-adjoint version chosen. The article discusses how the self-adjoint domains can be identified in terms of a boundary condition for the asymptotic behaviour of the wave functions around the singularity, and what physical differences emerge for different self-adjoint versions of the Hamiltonian. The paper reviews and interprets known results, with the intention to provide a practical guide for all those interested in how to approach these ambiguous situations.

  19. A study of the sensitivity of shape measurements to the input parameters of weak lensing image simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Hoekstra, Henk; Herbonnet, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Improvements in the accuracy of shape measurements are essential to exploit the statistical power of planned imaging surveys that aim to constrain cosmological parameters using weak lensing by large-scale structure. Although a range of tests can be performed using the measurements, the performance of the algorithm can only be quantified using simulated images. This yields, however, only meaningful results if the simulated images resemble the real observations sufficiently well. In this paper we explore the sensitivity of the multiplicative bias to the input parameters of Euclid-like image simulations.We find that algorithms will need to account for the local density of sources. In particular the impact of galaxies below the detection limit warrants further study, because magnification changes their number density, resulting in correlations between the lensing signal and multiplicative bias. Although achieving sub-percent accuracy will require further study, we estimate that sufficient archival Hubble Space Te...

  20. Parameter estimation using a complete signal and inspiral templates for nonspinning low mass binary black holes with Advanced LIGO sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Hee-Suk

    2015-01-01

    We study the validity of the inspiral templates in gravitational wave data analysis for nonspinning binary black holes with Advanced LIGO sensitivity. We use the phenomenological waveform model, which contains the inspiral-merger-ring down (IMR) phases defined in the Fourier domain. For parameter estimation purposes, we calculate the statistical errors assuming the IMR signals and IMR templates for the binaries with total masses M $\\leq$ 30Msun. Especially, we explore the systematic biases caused by a mismatch between the IMR signal model (IMR) and inspiral template model (Imerg), and investigate the impact on the parameter estimation accuracy by comparing the biases with the statistical errors. For detection purposes, we calculate the fitting factors of the inspiral templates with respect to the IMR signals. We find that the valid criteria for Imerg templates are obtained by Mcrit ~ 24Msun (if M < Mcrit, the fitting factor is higher than 0.97) for detection and M < 26Msun (where the systematic bias is ...

  1. On the Self-adjointness of the Product Operators of Two mth-Order Differential Operators on [0, +∞)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Ye AN; Jiong SUN

    2004-01-01

    In the present paper, the self-adjointness of the product of two mth-order differential operators on [0, +∞) is studied. By means of the construction theory of self-adjoint operators and matrix computation, we obtain a sufficient and necessary condition to ensure that the product operator is self-adjoint, which extends the results in the second order case.

  2. An accretion disc instability induced by a temperature sensitive {\\alpha} parameter

    CERN Document Server

    Potter, William J

    2014-01-01

    In the standard thin disc formalism the dimensionless {\\alpha} parameter is usually assumed to be constant. However, there are good theoretical reasons for believing, as well as evidence from simulations, that {\\alpha} is dependent on intrinsic disc properties. In this paper we analyse the conditions for the stability of a thin accretion disc in which {\\alpha} is a function of the magnetic Prandtl number, the ratio of collisional viscosity to resistivity. In the inner disc, where the free electron opacity and radiation viscosity dominate, the disc is unstable if {\\alpha} is proportional to the magnetic Prandtl number with an exponent > 0.5. This is within the range of values for the power-law index found in MHD simulations with simple energetics. We calculate the evolution of the unstable disc within the {\\alpha} formalism and show that the physically accessible solutions form a limit cycle, analogous to the behaviour seen in recurrent dwarf novae. It is noteworthy that the time-dependent global behaviour of ...

  3. Performance evaluation and parameter sensitivity of energy-harvesting shock absorbers on different vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Sijing; Liu, Yilun; Xu, Lin; Guo, Xuexun; Zuo, Lei

    2016-07-01

    Traditional shock absorbers provide favourable ride comfort and road handling by dissipating the suspension vibration energy into heat waste. In order to harvest this dissipated energy and improve the vehicle fuel efficiency, many energy-harvesting shock absorbers (EHSAs) have been proposed in recent years. Among them, two types of EHSAs have attracted much attention. One is a traditional EHSA which converts the oscillatory vibration into bidirectional rotation using rack-pinion, ball-screw or other mechanisms. The other EHSA is equipped with a mechanical motion rectifier (MMR) that transforms the bidirectional vibration into unidirectional rotation. Hereinafter, they are referred to as NonMMR-EHSA and MMR-EHSA, respectively. This paper compares their performances with the corresponding traditional shock absorber by using closed-form analysis and numerical simulations on various types of vehicles, including passenger cars, buses and trucks. Results suggest that MMR-EHSA provides better ride performances than NonMMR-EHSA, and that MMR-EHSA is able to improve both the ride comfort and road handling simultaneously over the traditional shock absorber when installed on light-damped, heavy-duty vehicles. Additionally, the optimal parameters of MMR-EHSA are obtained for ride comfort. The optimal solutions ('Pareto-optimal solutions') are also obtained by considering the trade-off between ride comfort and road handling.

  4. The power of sensitivity analysis and thoughts on models with large numbers of parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havlacek, William [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The regulatory systems that allow cells to adapt to their environments are exceedingly complex, and although we know a great deal about the intricate mechanistic details of many of these systems, our ability to make accurate predictions about their system-level behaviors is severely limited. We would like to make such predictions for a number of reasons. How can we reverse dysfunctional molecular changes of these systems that cause disease? More generally, how can we harness and direct cellular activities for beneficial purposes? Our ability to make accurate predictions about a system is also a measure ofour fundamental understanding of that system. As evidenced by our mastery of technological systems, a useful understanding ofa complex system can often be obtained through the development and analysis ofa mathematical model, but predictive modeling of cellular regulatory systems, which necessarily relies on quantitative experimentation, is still in its infancy. There is much that we need to learn before modeling for practical applications becomes routine. In particular, we need to address a number of issues surrounding the large number of parameters that are typically found in a model for a cellular regulatory system.

  5. Sensitivity of geological, geochemical and hydrologic parameters in complex reactive transport systems for in-situ uranium bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, G.; Maher, K.; Caers, J.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater contamination associated with remediated uranium mill tailings is a challenging environmental problem, particularly within the Colorado River Basin. To examine the effectiveness of in-situ bioremediation of U(VI), acetate injection has been proposed and tested at the Rifle pilot site. There have been several geologic modeling and simulated contaminant transport investigations, to evaluate the potential outcomes of the process and identify crucial factors for successful uranium reduction. Ultimately, findings from these studies would contribute to accurate predictions of the efficacy of uranium reduction. However, all these previous studies have considered limited model complexities, either because of the concern that data is too sparse to resolve such complex systems or because some parameters are assumed to be less important. Such simplified initial modeling, however, limits the predictive power of the model. Moreover, previous studies have not yet focused on spatial heterogeneity of various modeling components and its impact on the spatial distribution of the immobilized uranium (U(IV)). In this study, we study the impact of uncertainty on 21 parameters on model responses by means of recently developed distance-based global sensitivity analysis (DGSA), to study the main effects and interactions of parameters of various types. The 21 parameters include, for example, spatial variability of initial uranium concentration, mean hydraulic conductivity, and variogram structures of hydraulic conductivity. DGSA allows for studying multi-variate model responses based on spatial and non-spatial model parameters. When calculating the distances between model responses, in addition to the overall uranium reduction efficacy, we also considered the spatial profiles of the immobilized uranium concentration as target response. Results show that the mean hydraulic conductivity and the mineral reaction rate are the two most sensitive parameters with regard to the overall

  6. Sensitivity of Land Surface Parameters on Thunderstorm Simulation through HRLDAS-WRF Coupling Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Kumar, Krishan; Mohanty, U. C.; Kisore Osuri, Krishna

    2016-07-01

    Land surface characteristics play an important role in large scale, regional and mesoscale atmospheric process. Representation of land surface characteristics can be improved through coupling of mesoscale atmospheric models with land surface models. Mesoscale atmospheric models depend on Land Surface Models (LSM) to provide land surface variables such as fluxes of heat, moisture, and momentum for lower boundary layer evolution. Studies have shown that land surface properties such as soil moisture, soil temperature, soil roughness, vegetation cover, have considerable effect on lower boundary layer. Although, the necessity to initialize soil moisture accurately in NWP models is widely acknowledged, monitoring soil moisture at regional and global scale is a very tough task due to high spatial and temporal variability. As a result, the available observation network is unable to provide the required spatial and temporal data for the most part of the globe. Therefore, model for land surface initializations rely on updated land surface properties from LSM. The solution for NWP land-state initialization can be found by combining data assimilation techniques, satellite-derived soil data, and land surface models. Further, it requires an intermediate step to use observed rainfall, satellite derived surface insolation, and meteorological analyses to run an uncoupled (offline) integration of LSM, so that the evolution of modeled soil moisture can be forced by observed forcing conditions. Therefore, for accurate land-state initialization, high resolution land data assimilation system (HRLDAS) is used to provide the essential land surface parameters. Offline-coupling of HRLDAS-WRF has shown much improved results over Delhi, India for four thunder storm events. The evolution of land surface variables particularly soil moisture, soil temperature and surface fluxes have provided more realistic condition. Results have shown that most of domain part became wetter and warmer after

  7. Enabling Predictive Simulation and UQ of Complex Multiphysics PDE Systems by the Development of Goal-Oriented Variational Sensitivity Analysis and a-Posteriori Error Estimation Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estep, Donald [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2015-11-30

    This project addressed the challenge of predictive computational analysis of strongly coupled, highly nonlinear multiphysics systems characterized by multiple physical phenomena that span a large range of length- and time-scales. Specifically, the project was focused on computational estimation of numerical error and sensitivity analysis of computational solutions with respect to variations in parameters and data. In addition, the project investigated the use of accurate computational estimates to guide efficient adaptive discretization. The project developed, analyzed and evaluated new variational adjoint-based techniques for integration, model, and data error estimation/control and sensitivity analysis, in evolutionary multiphysics multiscale simulations.

  8. On the Origin of the UV Upturn in Elliptical Galaxies; 1, Sensitivity of UV Population Synthesis to Various Input Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, S; Oemler, A E; Yi, Sukyoung; Demarque, Pierre; Oemler, Augustus

    1997-01-01

    We present models of the late stages of stellar evolution intended to explain the UV upturn phenomenon in elliptical galaxies. Such models are sensitive to values of a number of poorly-constrained physical parameters, including metallicity, age, stellar mass loss, helium enrichment, and the distribution of stars on the zero age horizontal branch (HB). We explore the sensitivity of the results to values of these parameters, and reach the following conclusions. Old, metal rich galaxies, such as giant ellipticals, naturally develop a UV upturn within a reasonable time scale - less than a Hubble time - without the presence of young stars. The most likely stars to dominate the UV flux of such populations are low mass, core helium burning (HB and evolved HB) stars. Metal-poor populations produce a higher ratio of UV-to-V flux, due to opacity effects, but only metal-rich stars develop a UV upturn, in which the flux increases towards shorter UV wavelengths. Model color-magnitude diagrams and corresponding integrated ...

  9. Rainfall/runoff simulation with 2D full shallow water equations: Sensitivity analysis and calibration of infiltration parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Pato, Javier; Caviedes-Voullième, Daniel; García-Navarro, Pilar

    2016-05-01

    One of the most difficult issues in the development of hydrologic models is to find a rigorous source of data and specific parameters to a given problem, on a given location that enable reliable calibration. In this paper, a distributed and physically based model (2D Shallow Water Equations) is used for surface flow and runoff calculations in combination with two infiltration laws (Horton and Green-Ampt) for estimating infiltration in a watershed. This technique offers the capability of assigning a local and time-dependent infiltration rate to each computational cell depending on the available surface water, soil type or vegetation. We investigate how the calibration of parameters is affected by transient distributed Shallow Water model and the complexity of the problem. In the first part of this work, we calibrate the infiltration parameters for both Horton and Green-Ampt models under flat ponded soil conditions. Then, by means of synthetic test cases, we perform a space-distributed sensitivity analysis in order to show that this calibration can be significantly affected by the introduction of topography or rainfall. In the second part, parameter calibration for a real catchment is addressed by comparing the numerical simulations with two different sets of experimental data, corresponding to very different events in terms of the rainfall volume. We show that the initial conditions of the catchment and the rainfall pattern have a special relevance in the quality of the adjustment. Hence, it is shown that the topography of the catchment and the storm characteristics affect the calibration of infiltration parameters.

  10. Comprehensive Monte-Carlo simulator for optimization of imaging parameters for high sensitivity detection of skin cancer at the THz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ney, Michael; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim

    2016-03-01

    Skin cancer detection at its early stages has been the focus of a large number of experimental and theoretical studies during the past decades. Among these studies two prominent approaches presenting high potential are reflectometric sensing at the THz wavelengths region and polarimetric imaging techniques in the visible wavelengths. While THz radiation contrast agent and source of sensitivity to cancer related tissue alterations was considered to be mainly the elevated water content in the cancerous tissue, the polarimetric approach has been verified to enable cancerous tissue differentiation based on cancer induced structural alterations to the tissue. Combining THz with the polarimetric approach, which is considered in this study, is examined in order to enable higher detection sensitivity than previously pure reflectometric THz measurements. For this, a comprehensive MC simulation of radiative transfer in a complex skin tissue model fitted for the THz domain that considers the skin`s stratified structure, tissue material optical dispersion modeling, surface roughness, scatterers, and substructure organelles has been developed. Additionally, a narrow beam Mueller matrix differential analysis technique is suggested for assessing skin cancer induced changes in the polarimetric image, enabling the tissue model and MC simulation to be utilized for determining the imaging parameters resulting in maximal detection sensitivity.

  11. Effect of Sodium Fluoride on Bone Biomechanical and Histomorphometric Parameters and on Insulin Signaling and Insulin Sensitivity in Ovariectomized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cássia Alves Nunes, Rita; Chiba, Fernando Yamamoto; Pereira, Amanda Gomes; Pereira, Renato Felipe; de Lima Coutinho Mattera, Maria Sara; Ervolino, Edilson; Louzada, Mário Jefferson Quirino; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Silva, Cristina Antoniali; Sumida, Doris Hissako

    2016-09-01

    Osteoporosis is a systemic disease characterized by bone degradation and decreased bone mass that promotes increased bone fragility and eventual fracture risk. Studies have investigated the use of sodium fluoride (NaF) for the treatment of osteoporosis. However, fluoride can alter glucose homeostasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of NaF intake (50 mg/L) from water on the following parameters of ovariectomized (OVX) rats: (1) tyrosine phosphorylation status of insulin receptor substrate (pp185 (IRS-1/IRS-2)) in white adipose tissue; (2) insulin sensitivity; (3) plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, triglyceride, TNF-α, IL-6, osteocalcin, calcium, and fluoride; (4) bone density and biomechanical properties in the tibia; and (5) tibia histomorphometric analysis. Fifty-two Wistar rats (2 months old) were ovariectomized and distributed into two groups: control group (OVX-C) and NaF group (OVX-F), which was subjected to treatment with NaF (50 mg/L) administered in drinking water for 42 days. The chronic treatment with NaF promoted (1) a decrease in pp185 (IRS-1/IRS-2) tyrosine phosphorylation status after insulin infusion in white adipose tissue and in insulin sensitivity; (2) an increase in the plasma concentration of insulin, fluoride, osteocalcin, calcium, triglyceride, VLDL-cholesterol, TNF-α, and IL-6; (3) a reduction in the trabecular width, bone area, stiffness, maximum strength, and tenacity; (4) no changes in body weight, food and water intake, plasma glucose, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, bone mineral content, and bone mineral density. It was concluded that chronic treatment with NaF (50 mg/L) in OVX rats causes a decrease in insulin sensitivity, insulin signaling transduction, and biochemical, biomechanical, and histomorphometric bone parameters.

  12. Evaluation of transverse dispersion effects in tank experiments by numerical modeling: parameter estimation, sensitivity analysis and revision of experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, E; Bauer, S; Eberhardt, C; Beyer, C

    2012-06-01

    Transverse dispersion represents an important mixing process for transport of contaminants in groundwater and constitutes an essential prerequisite for geochemical and biodegradation reactions. Within this context, this work describes the detailed numerical simulation of highly controlled laboratory experiments using uranine, bromide and oxygen depleted water as conservative tracers for the quantification of transverse mixing in porous media. Synthetic numerical experiments reproducing an existing laboratory experimental set-up of quasi two-dimensional flow through tank were performed to assess the applicability of an analytical solution of the 2D advection-dispersion equation for the estimation of transverse dispersivity as fitting parameter. The fitted dispersivities were compared to the "true" values introduced in the numerical simulations and the associated error could be precisely estimated. A sensitivity analysis was performed on the experimental set-up in order to evaluate the sensitivities of the measurements taken at the tank experiment on the individual hydraulic and transport parameters. From the results, an improved experimental set-up as well as a numerical evaluation procedure could be developed, which allow for a precise and reliable determination of dispersivities. The improved tank set-up was used for new laboratory experiments, performed at advective velocities of 4.9 m d(-1) and 10.5 m d(-1). Numerical evaluation of these experiments yielded a unique and reliable parameter set, which closely fits the measured tracer concentration data. For the porous medium with a grain size of 0.25-0.30 mm, the fitted longitudinal and transverse dispersivities were 3.49×10(-4) m and 1.48×10(-5) m, respectively. The procedures developed in this paper for the synthetic and rigorous design and evaluation of the experiments can be generalized and transferred to comparable applications.

  13. Adjoint based data assimilation for phase field model using second order information of a posterior distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shin-Ichi; Nagao, Hiromichi; Yamanaka, Akinori; Tsukada, Yuhki; Koyama, Toshiyuki; Inoue, Junya

    Phase field (PF) method, which phenomenologically describes dynamics of microstructure evolutions during solidification and phase transformation, has progressed in the fields of hydromechanics and materials engineering. How to determine, based on observation data, an initial state and model parameters involved in a PF model is one of important issues since previous estimation methods require too much computational cost. We propose data assimilation (DA), which enables us to estimate the parameters and states by integrating the PF model and observation data on the basis of the Bayesian statistics. The adjoint method implemented on DA not only finds an optimum solution by maximizing a posterior distribution but also evaluates the uncertainty in the estimations by utilizing the second order information of the posterior distribution. We carried out an estimation test using synthetic data generated by the two-dimensional Kobayashi's PF model. The proposed method is confirmed to reproduce the true initial state and model parameters we assume in advance, and simultaneously estimate their uncertainties due to quality and quantity of the data. This result indicates that the proposed method is capable of suggesting the experimental design to achieve the required accuracy.

  14. Parameter Identification with the Random Perturbation Particle Swarm Optimization Method and Sensitivity Analysis of an Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor Nuclear Power Plant Model for Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to obtain appropriate parameters for an advanced pressurized water reactor (PWR unit model is of great significance for power system analysis. The attributes of that ability include the following: nonlinear relationships, long transition time, intercoupled parameters and difficult obtainment from practical test, posed complexity and difficult parameter identification. In this paper, a model and a parameter identification method for the PWR primary loop system were investigated. A parameter identification process was proposed, using a particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm that is based on random perturbation (RP-PSO. The identification process included model variable initialization based on the differential equations of each sub-module and program setting method, parameter obtainment through sub-module identification in the Matlab/Simulink Software (Math Works Inc., Natick, MA, USA as well as adaptation analysis for an integrated model. A lot of parameter identification work was carried out, the results of which verified the effectiveness of the method. It was found that the change of some parameters, like the fuel temperature and coolant temperature feedback coefficients, changed the model gain, of which the trajectory sensitivities were not zero. Thus, obtaining their appropriate values had significant effects on the simulation results. The trajectory sensitivities of some parameters in the core neutron dynamic module were interrelated, causing the parameters to be difficult to identify. The model parameter sensitivity could be different, which would be influenced by the model input conditions, reflecting the parameter identifiability difficulty degree for various input conditions.

  15. Sensitivity of a carbon and productivity model to climatic, water, terrain, and biophysical parameters in a Rocky Mountain watershed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, S.; Peddle, D.R.; Coburn, C.A.; Kienzle, S. [Univ. of Lethbridge, Dept. of Geography, Lethbridge, Alberta (Canada)

    2008-06-15

    Net primary productivity (NPP) is a key component of the terrestrial carbon cycle and is important in ecological, watershed, and forest management studies, and more broadly in global climate change research. Determining the relative importance and magnitude of uncertainty of NPP model inputs is important for proper carbon reporting over larger areas and time periods. This paper presents a systematic evaluation of the boreal ecosystem productivity simulator (BEPS) model in mountainous terrain using an established montane forest test site in Kananaskis, Alberta, in the Canadian Rocky Mountains. Model runs were based on forest (land cover, leaf area index (LAI), biomass) and climate-water inputs (solar radiation, temperature, precipitation, humidity, soil water holding capacity) derived from digital elevation model (DEM) derivatives, climate data, geographical information system (GIS) functions, and topographically corrected satellite imagery. Four sensitivity analyses were conducted as a controlled series of experiments involving (i) NPP individual parameter sensitivity for a full growing season, (ii) NPP independent variation tests (parameter {mu} {+-} 1{sigma}), (iii) factorial analyses to assess more complex multiple-factor interactions, and (iv) topographic correction. The results, validated against field measurements, showed that modeled NPP was sensitive to most inputs measured in the study area, with LAI and forest type the most important forest input, and solar radiation the most important climate input. Soil available water holding capacity expressed as a function of wetness index was only significant in conjunction with precipitation when both parameters represented a moisture-deficit situation. NPP uncertainty resulting from topographic influence was equivalent to 140 kg C ha{sup -1}{center_dot}year{sup -1}. This suggested that topographic correction of model inputs is important for accurate NPP estimation. The BEPS model, designed originally for flat

  16. Sensitivity of numerical simulation models of debris flow to the rheological parameters and application in the engineering environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, M.; Sesenna, R.; Magni, L.; Demurtas, L.; Uras, G.

    2009-04-01

    bidimensional and monodimensional commercial models for the simulation of debris flow, in particular because of the reconstruction of famous and expected events in the river basin of the Comboè torrent (Aosta Valley, Italy), it has been possible to reach careful consideration about the calibration of the rheological parameters and the sensitivity of simulation models, specifically about the variability of them. The geomechanical and volumetric characteristics of the sediment at the bottom of the debris could produce uncertainties in model implementation, above all in not exclusively cinematic models, mostly influenced by the rheological parameters. The parameter that mainly influences the final result of the applied numerical models is the volumetric solid concentration that is variable in space and time during the debris flow propagation. In fact rheological parameters are described by a power equation of volumetric concentration. The potentiality and the suitability of a numerical code in the engineering environmental application have to be consider not referring only to the quality and amount of results, but also to the sensibility regarding the parameters variability that are bases of the inner ruotines of the program. Therefore, a suitable model will have to be sensitive to the variability of parameters that the customer can calculate with greater precision. On the other side, it will have to be sufficiently stable to the variation of those parameters that the customer cannot define univocally, but only by range of variation. One of the models utilized for the simulation of debris flow on the Comboè Torrent has been demonstrated as an heavy influenced example by small variation of rheological parameters. Consequently, in spite of the possibility to lead accurate procedures of back-analysis about a recent intense event, it has been found a difficulty in the calibration of the concentration for new expected events. That involved an extreme variability of the final results

  17. Utilizing High-Performance Computing to Investigate Parameter Sensitivity of an Inversion Model for Vadose Zone Flow and Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Z.; Ward, A. L.; Fang, Y.; Yabusaki, S.

    2011-12-01

    High-resolution geologic models have proven effective in improving the accuracy of subsurface flow and transport predictions. However, many of the parameters in subsurface flow and transport models cannot be determined directly at the scale of interest and must be estimated through inverse modeling. A major challenge, particularly in vadose zone flow and transport, is the inversion of the highly-nonlinear, high-dimensional problem as current methods are not readily scalable for large-scale, multi-process models. In this paper we describe the implementation of a fully automated approach for addressing complex parameter optimization and sensitivity issues on massively parallel multi- and many-core systems. The approach is based on the integration of PNNL's extreme scale Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (eSTOMP) simulator, which uses the Global Array toolkit, with the Beowulf-Cluster inspired parallel nonlinear parameter estimation software, BeoPEST in the MPI mode. In the eSTOMP/BeoPEST implementation, a pre-processor generates all of the PEST input files based on the eSTOMP input file. Simulation results for comparison with observations are extracted automatically at each time step eliminating the need for post-process data extractions. The inversion framework was tested with three different experimental data sets: one-dimensional water flow at Hanford Grass Site; irrigation and infiltration experiment at the Andelfingen Site; and a three-dimensional injection experiment at Hanford's Sisson and Lu Site. Good agreements are achieved in all three applications between observations and simulations in both parameter estimates and water dynamics reproduction. Results show that eSTOMP/BeoPEST approach is highly scalable and can be run efficiently with hundreds or thousands of processors. BeoPEST is fault tolerant and new nodes can be dynamically added and removed. A major advantage of this approach is the ability to use high-resolution geologic models to preserve

  18. Haydock's recursive solution of self-adjoint problems. Discrete spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    Haydock's recursive solution is shown to underline a number of different concepts such as (i) quasi-exactly solvable models, (ii) exactly solvable models, (iii) three-term recurrence solutions based on Schweber's quantization criterion in Hilbert spaces of entire analytic functions, and (iv) a discrete quantum mechanics of Odake and Sasaki. A recurrent theme of Haydock's recursive solution is that the spectral properties of any self-adjoint problem can be mapped onto a corresponding sequence of polynomials {pn(E) } in energy variable E. The polynomials {pn(E) } are orthonormal with respect to the density of states n0(E) and energy eigenstate | E > is the generating function of {pn(E) } . The generality of Haydock's recursive solution enables one to see the different concepts from a unified perspective and mutually benefiting from each other. Some results obtained within the particular framework of any of (i) to (iv) may have much broader significance.

  19. Adjoint operators and perturbation theory of black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Cartas-Fuentevilla, R

    2000-01-01

    We present a new approach for finding conservation laws in the perturbation theory of black holes which applies for the more general cases of non-Hermitian equations governing the perturbations. The approach is based on a general result which establishes that a covariantly conserved current can be obtained from a solution of any system of homogeneous linear differential equations and a solution of the adjoint system. It is shown that the results obtained from the present approach become essentially the same (with some diferences) to those obtained by means of the traditional methods in the simplest black hole geometry corresponding to the Schwarzschild space-time. The future applications of our approach for studying the perturbations of black hole space-time in string theory is discussed.

  20. Adjoint Fokker-Planck equation and runaway electron dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chang; Boozer, Allen H; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2016-01-01

    A new method to obtain the runaway probability and the expected slowing-down time for runaway electrons is developed, by solving the adjoint Fokker-Planck equation in momentum space. The runaway probability function has a smooth transition at the runaway separatrix, which can be attributed to the effect of the pitch angle scattering term in the kinetic equation. The expected slowing-down time gives a new way to estimate the runaway current decay time in experiments. The result shows that the decay rate of high energy electron is very slow when E is close to the critical electric field, which helps elucidate the hysteresis effect seen in the runaway electron population. Given the same numerical accuracy, the new method is more efficient than the Monte Carlo simulation.