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Sample records for adiabatic resonance crossing

  1. Radioanalytical prediction of radiative capture in 99Mo production via transmutation adiabatic resonance crossing by cyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Khorshidi, Abdollah; Pazirandeh, Ali; Tenreiro, Claudio; Kadi, Yacine

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the transmutation adiabatic resonance crossing (TARC) concept was estimated in Mo-99 radioisotope production via radiative capture reaction in two designs. The TARC method was composed of moderating neutrons in lead or a composition of lead and water. Additionally, the target was surrounded by a moderator assembly and a graphite reflector district. Produced neutrons were investigated by (p,xn) interactions with 30 MeV and 300 mu A proton beam on tungsten, beryllium, and tantalum targets. The Mo-99 production yield was related to the moderator property, cross section, and sample positioning inside the distinct region of neutron storage as must be proper to achieve gains. Gathered thermal flux of neutrons can contribute to molybdenum isotope production. Moreover, the sample positioning to gain higher production yield was dependent on a greater flux in the length of thermal neutrons and region materials inside the moderator or reflector. When the sample radial distance from Be was 38 cm inside the...

  2. Experimental Verification of Neutron Phenomenology in Lead and Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing in Accelerator Driven Systems: a Short Summary

    CERN Document Server

    Abánades, A; Andriamonje, Samuel A; Angelopoulos, Angelos; Apostolakis, Alcibiades J; Arnould, H; Belle, E; Bompas, C A; Brozzi, Delecurgo; Bueno, J; Buono, S; Carminati, F; Casagrande, Federico; Cennini, P; Collar, J I; Cerro, E; Del Moral, R; Díez, S; Dumps, Ludwig; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid, M; Fernández, R; Gálvez, J; García, J; Gelès, C; Giorni, A; González, E; González, O; Goulas, I; Heuer, R D; Hussonnois, M; Kadi, Y; Karaiskos, P; Kitis, G; Klapisch, Robert; Kokkas, P; Lacoste, V; Le Naour, C; Lèpez, C; Loiseaux, J M; Martínez-Val, J M; Méplan, O; Nifenecker, H; Oropesa, J; Papadopoulos, I M; Pavlopoulos, P; Pérez-Enciso, E; Pérez-Navarro, A; Perlado, M; Placci, A; Poza, M; Revol, Jean Pierre Charles; Rubbia, Carlo; Rubio, J A; Sakelliou, L; Saldaña, F; Savvidis, E; Schussler, F; Sirvent, C; Tamarit, J; Trubert, D; Tzima, A; Viano, J B; Vieira, S L; Vlachoudis, V; Zioutas, Konstantin; CERN. Geneva. SPS and LEP Division

    2000-01-01

    The Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (TARC) experiment was carried out as PS211 at the CERN PS from 1996 to 1999. Energy and space distributions of spallation neutrons (from 2.5 and 3.57 GeV/c CERN proton beams) slowing down in a 3.3x3.3x3 m3 lead volume and neutron capture rates on long-lived fission fragements 99Tc and 129I demonstrate that Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) can be used to eliminate efficiently such nuclear waste and validate innovative simulation.

  3. Epithermal neutron formation for boron neutron capture therapy by adiabatic resonance crossing concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshidi, A.; Ghafoori-Fard, H.; Sadeghi, M.

    2014-05-01

    Low-energy protons from the cyclotron in the range of 15-30 MeV and low current have been simulated on beryllium (Be) target with a lead moderator around the target. This research was accomplished to design an epithermal neutron beam for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) using the moderated neutron on the average produced from 9Be target via (p, xn) reaction in Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) concept. Generation of neutron to proton ratio, energy distribution, flux and dose components in head phantom have been simulated by MCNP5 code. The reflector and collimator were designed in prevention and collimation of derivation neutrons from proton bombarding. The scalp-skull-brain phantom consisting of bone and brain equivalent material has been simulated in order to evaluate the dosimetric effect on the brain. Results of this analysis demonstrated while the proton energy decreased, the dose factor altered according to filters thickness. The maximum epithermal flux revealed using fluental, Fe and bismuth (Bi) filters with thicknesses of 9.4, 3 and 2 cm, respectively and also the epithermal to thermal neutron flux ratio was 103.85. The potential of the ARC method to replace or complement the current reactor-based supply sources of BNCT purposes.

  4. Experimental Verification of Neutron Phenomenology in Lead and Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing in Accelerator Driven Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Abánades, A; Andriamonje, Samuel A; Angelopoulos, Angelos; Apostolakis, Alcibiades J; Arnould, H; Belle, E; Bompas, C A; Brozzi, Delecurgo; Bueno, J; Buono, S; Carminati, F; Casagrande, Federico; Cennini, P; Collar, J I; Cerro, E; Del Moral, R; Díez, S; Dumps, Ludwig; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid, M; Fernández, R; Gálvez, J; García, J; Gelès, C; Giorni, A; González, E; González, O; Goulas, I; Heuer, R D; Hussonnois, M; Kadi, Y; Karaiskos, P; Kitis, G; Klapisch, Robert; Kokkas, P; Lacoste, V; Le Naour, C; López, C; Loiseaux, J M; Martínez-Val, J M; Méplan, O; Nifenecker, H; Oropesa, J; Papadopoulos, I M; Pavlopoulos, P; Pérez-Enciso, E; Pérez-Navarro, A; Perlado, M; Placci, Alfredo; Poza, M; Revol, Jean Pierre Charles; Rubbia, Carlo; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Sakelliou, L; Saldaña, F; Savvidis, E; Schussler, F; Sirvent, C; Tamarit, J; Trubert, D; Tzima, A; Viano, J B; Vieira, S L; Vlachoudis, V; Zioutas, Konstantin

    1999-01-01

    Energy and space distributions of spallation neutrons (from 2.5 and 3.57 GeV/c CERN proton beams) slowing down in a 3.3 x 3.3 x 3 m3 lead volume and neutron capture rates on long-lived fission fragments 99 Tc and 129 I demonstrate that Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) can be used to eliminate efficiently such nuclear waste and validate innovative simulation.

  5. Experimental verification of neutron phenomenology in lead and transmutation by adiabatic resonance crossing in accelerator driven systems

    CERN Document Server

    Arnould, H; Del Moral, R; Lacoste, V; Vlachoudis, V; Aleixandre, J; Bueno, J; Cerro, E; González, O; Tamarit, J; Andriamonje, Samuel A; Brozzi, Delecurgo; Buono, S; Carminati, F; Casagrande, Federico; Cennini, P; Collar, J I; Dumps, Ludwig; Gelès, C; Goulas, I; Fernández, R; Kadi, Y; Klapisch, Robert; Oropesa, J; Placci, Alfredo; Revol, Jean Pierre Charles; Rubbia, Carlo; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Saldaña, F; Embid, M; Gálvez, J; López, C; Pérez-Enciso, E; Poza, M; Sirvent, C; Vieira, S L; Abánades, A; García, J; Martínez-Val, J M; Perlado, M; González, E; Hussonnois, M; Le Naour, C; Trubert, D; Belle, E; Giorni, A; Heuer, R D; Loiseaux, J M; Méplan, O; Nifenecker, H; Schussler, F; Viano, J B; Angelopoulos, Angelos; Apostolakis, Alcibiades J; Karaiskos, P; Sakelliou, L; Kokkas, P; Pavlopoulos, P; Eleftheriadis, C; Kitis, G; Papadopoulos, I M; Savvidis, E; Tzima, A; Zioutas, Konstantin; Díez, S; Pérez-Navarro, A

    1999-01-01

    Energy and space distributions of spallation neutrons (from 2.5 and 3.57 GeV/c CERN proton beams) slowing down in a 3.3*3.3*3 m/sup 3/ lead volume and neutron capture rates on long-lived fission fragments /sup 99/Tc and /sup 129/I demonstrate that Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) can be used to eliminate efficiently such nuclear waste and validate innovative simulation. (17 refs).

  6. Results from the TARC experiment: spallation neutron phenomenology in lead and neutron-driven nuclear transmutation by adiabatic resonance crossing.

    CERN Document Server

    Abánades, A; Andriamonje, Samuel A; Angelopoulos, Angelos; Apostolakis, Alcibiades J; Arnould, H; Belle, E; Bompas, C A; Brozzi, Delecurgo; Bueno, J; Buono, S; Carminati, F; Casagrande, Federico; Cennini, P; Collar, J I; Cerro, E; Del Moral, R; Díez, S; Dumps, Ludwig; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid, M; Fernández, R; Gálvez, J; García, J; Gelès, C; Giorni, A; González, E; González, O; Goulas, I; Heuer, R D; Hussonnois, M; Kadi, Y; Karaiskos, P; Kitis, G; Klapisch, Robert; Kokkas, P; Lacoste, V; Le Naour, C; Lèpez, C; Loiseaux, J M; Martínez-Val, J M; Méplan, O; Nifenecker, H; Oropesa, J; Papadopoulos, I M; Pavlopoulos, P; Pérez-Enciso, E; Pérez-Navarro, A; Perlado, M; Placci, A; Poza, M; Revol, Jean Pierre Charles; Rubbia, Carlo; Rubio, J A; Sakelliou, L; Saldaña, F; Savvidis, E; Schussler, F; Sirvent, C; Tamarit, J; Trubert, D; Tzima, A; Viano, J B; Vieira, S L; Vlachoudis, V; Zioutas, Konstantin; CERN. Geneva. SPS and LEP Division

    2000-01-01

    The results of the TARC experiment are summarized herewith, whose main purpose is to demonstrate the possibility of using Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) to destroy efficiently Long-Lived Fission Fragments (LLFFs) in accelerator-driven systems and to validate a new simulation developed in the framework of the Energy Amplifier programme. An experimental set-up was installed in a CERN PS proton beam line to study how neutrons, produced by spallation at relatively high energy (En * 1 MeV), slow down quasi adiabatically, with almost flat isolethargic energy distribution and reach the capture resonance energy of an element to be transmuted where they will have a high probability of being captured. Precision measurements of energy and space distributions of spallation neutrons (using 2.5 GeV/c and 3.5 GeV/c protons) slowing down in a 3.3 m x 3.3 m x 3 m lead volume and of neutron capture rates on LLFFs 99Tc, 129I, and several other elements were performed. An appropriate formalism and appropriate computational t...

  7. Experimental verification of neutron phenomenology in lead and of transmutation by adiabatic resonance crossing in accelerator driven systems A summary of the TARC Project at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abanades, A.; Aleixandre, J.; Andriamonje, S.; Angelopoulos, A.; Apostolakis, A.; Arnould, H.; Belle, E.; Bompas, C.A.; Brozzi, D.; Bueno, J.; Buono, S.; Carminati, F.; Casagrande, F.; Cennini, P.; Collar, J.I.; Cerro, E.; Moral, R.D.R.Del; Diez, S.; Dumps, L.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid, M.; Fernandez, R.; Galvez, J.; Garcia, J.; Geles, C.; Giorni, A.; Gonzalez, E.; Gonzalez, O.; Goulas, I.; Heuer, D.; Hussonnois, M.; Kadi, Y.; Karaiskos, P.; Kitis, G.; Klapisch, R.; Kokkas, P.; Lacoste, V.; Le Naour, C.; Lopez, C.; Loiseaux, J.M.; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Meplan, O.; Nifenecker, H.; Oropesa, J.; Papadopoulos, I.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perez-Enciso, E.; Perez-Navarro, A.; Perlado, M.; Placci, A.; Poza, M.; Revol, J.-P. E-mail: Jean-Pierre.Revol@cern.ch; Rubbia, C.; Rubio, J.A.; Sakelliou, L.; Saldana, F.; Savvidis, E.; Schussler, F.; Sirvent, C.; Tamarit, J.; Trubert, D.; Tzima, A.; Viano, J.B.; Vieira, S.; Vlachoudis, V.; Zioutas, K

    2001-05-11

    The Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (TARC) experiment was carried out as PS211 at the CERN PS from 1996 to 1999. Energy and space distributions of spallation neutrons (produced by 2.5 and 3.57 GeV/c CERN proton beams) slowing down in a 3.3x3.3x3 m{sup 3} lead volume and neutron capture rates on long-lived fission fragments {sup 99}Tc and {sup 129}I demonstrate that Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) can be used to eliminate efficiently such nuclear waste and validate innovative simulation.

  8. Experimental verification of neutron phenomenology in lead and of transmutation by adiabatic resonance crossing in accelerator driven systems a summary of the TARC project at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Abánades, A; Andriamonje, Samuel A; Angelopoulos, Angelos; Apostolakis, Alcibiades J; Arnould, H; Belle, E; Bompas, C A; Brozzi, Delecurgo; Bueno, J; Buono, S; Carminati, F; Casagrande, Federico; Cennini, P; Collar, J I; Cerro, E; Del Moral, R; Díez, S; Dumps, Ludwig; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid, M; Fernández, R; Gálvez, J; García, J; Gelès, C; Giorni, A; González, E; González, O; Goulas, I; Heuer, R D; Hussonnois, M; Kadi, Y; Karaiskos, P; Kitis, G; Klapisch, Robert; Kokkas, P; Lacoste, V; Le Naour, C; López, C; Loiseaux, J M; Martínez-Val, J M; Méplan, O; Nifnecker, H; Oropesa, J; Papadopoulos, I M; Pavlopoulos, P; Pérez-Enciso, E; Pérez-Navarro, A; Perlado, M; Placci, Alfredo; Poza, M; Revol, Jean Pierre Charles; Rubbia, Carlo; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Sakelliou, L; Saldaña, F; Savvidis, E; Schussler, F; Sirvent, C; Tamarit, J; Trubert, D; Tzima, A; Viano, J B; Vieira, S L; Vlachoudis, V; Zioutas, Konstantin

    2001-01-01

    The Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (TARC) experiment was carried out as PS211 at the CERN PS from 1996 to 1999. Energy and space distributions of spallation neutrons (produced by 2.5 and 3.57 GeV/c CERN proton beams) slowing down in a 3.3*3.3*3 m/sup 3/ lead volume and neutron capture rates on long-lived fission fragments /sup 99/Tc and /sup 129/I demonstrate that Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) can be used to eliminate efficiently such nuclear waste and validate innovative simulation. (9 refs).

  9. Theory of Adiabatic Fountain Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gary A.

    2017-01-01

    The theory of "Adiabatic Fountain Resonance" with superfluid ^4{He} is clarified. In this geometry a film region between two silicon wafers bonded at their outer edge opens up to a central region with a free surface. We find that the resonance in this system is not a Helmholtz resonance as claimed by Gasparini et al., but in fact is a fourth sound resonance. We postulate that it occurs at relatively low frequency because the thin silicon wafers flex appreciably from the pressure oscillations of the sound wave.

  10. Results from the TARC experiment: spallation neutron phenomenology in lead and neutron-driven nuclear transmutation by adiabatic resonance crossing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abanades, A.; Aleixandre, J.; Andriamonje, S.; Angelopoulos, A.; Apostolakis, A.; Arnould, H.; Belle, E.; Bompas, C.A.; Brozzi, D.; Bueno, J.; Buono, S.; Carminati, F.; Casagrande, F.; Cennini, P.; Collar, J.I.; Cerro, E.; Moral, R. Del; Diez, S.; Dumps, L.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid, M.; Fernandez, R.; Galvez, J.; Garcia, J.; Geles, C.; Giorni, A.; Gonzalez, E.; Gonzalez, O.; Goulas, I.; Heuer, D.; Hussonnois, M.; Kadi, Y.; Karaiskos, P.; Kitis, G.; Klapisch, R.; Kokkas, P.; Lacoste, V.; Naour, C. Le; Lopez, C.; Loiseaux, J.M.; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Meplan, O.; Nifenecker, H.; Oropesa, J.; Papadopoulos, I.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perez-Enciso, E.; Perez-Navarro, A.; Perlado, M.; Placci, A.; Poza, M.; Revol, J.-P. E-mail: jean-pierre.revol@cern.ch; Rubbia, C.; Rubio, J.A.; Sakelliou, L.; Saldana, F.; Savvidis, E.; Schussler, F.; Sirvent, C.; Tamarit, J.; Trubert, D.; Tzima, A.; Viano, J.B.; Vieira, S.; Vlachoudis, V.; Zioutas, K

    2002-02-11

    We summarize here the results of the TARC experiment whose main purpose is to demonstrate the possibility of using Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) to destroy efficiently Long-Lived Fission Fragments (LLFFs) in accelerator-driven systems and to validate a new simulation developed in the framework of the Energy Amplifier programme. An experimental set-up was installed in a CERN PS proton beam line to study how neutrons produced by spallation at relatively high energy (E{sub n}{>=}1 MeV) slow down quasi-adiabatically with almost flat isolethargic energy distribution and reach the capture resonance energy of an element to be transmuted where they will have a high probability of being captured. Precision measurements of energy and space distributions of spallation neutrons (using 2.5 and 3.5 GeV/c protons) slowing down in a 3.3 mx3.3 mx3 m lead volume and of neutron capture rates on LLFFs {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and several other elements were performed. An appropriate formalism and appropriate computational tools necessary for the analysis and understanding of the data were developed and validated in detail. Our direct experimental observation of ARC demonstrates the possibility to destroy, in a parasitic mode, outside the Energy Amplifier core, large amounts of {sup 99}Tc or {sup 129}I at a rate exceeding the production rate, thereby making it practical to reduce correspondingly the existing stockpile of LLFFs. In addition, TARC opens up new possibilities for radioactive isotope production as an alternative to nuclear reactors, in particular for medical applications, as well as new possibilities for neutron research and industrial applications.

  11. Faster computation of adiabatic EMRIs using resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Grossman, Rebecca; Perez-Giz, Gabe

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the prohibitive computational cost of producing adiabatic extreme mass ratio inspirals, we explain how a judicious use of resonant orbits can dramatically expedite both that calculation and the generation of snapshot gravitational waves from geodesic sources. In the course of our argument, we clarify the resolution of a lingering debate on the appropriate adiabatic averaging prescription in favor of torus averaging over time averaging.

  12. Adiabaticity and Reversibility Studies for Beam Splitting using Stable Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Franchi, A; Giovannozzi, M

    2008-01-01

    At the CERN Proton Synchrotron, a series of beam experiments proved beam splitting by crossing the one-fourth resonance. Depending on the speed at which the horizontal resonance is crossed, the splitting process is more or less adiabatic, and a different fraction of the initial beam is trapped in the islands. Experiments prove that when the trapping process is reversed and the islands merged together, the final distribution features thick tails. The beam population in such tails is correlated to the speed of the resonance crossing and to the fraction of the beam trapped in the stable islands. Experiments and possible theoretical explanations are discussed.

  13. Exploration of Adiabatic Resonance Crossing Through Neutron Activator Design for Thermal and Epithermal Neutron Formation in (99)Mo Production and BNCT Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshidi, Abdollah

    2015-10-01

    A feasibility study was performed to design thermal and epithermal neutron sources for radioisotope production and boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) by moderating fast neutrons. The neutrons were emitted from the reaction between (9)Be, (181)Ta, and (184)W targets and 30 MeV protons accelerated by a small cyclotron at 300 μA. In this study, the adiabatic resonance crossing (ARC) method was investigated by means of (207)Pb and (208)Pb moderators, graphite reflector, and boron absorber around the moderator region. Thermal/epithermal flux, energy, and cross section of accumulated neutrons in the activator were examined through diverse thicknesses of the specified regions. Simulation results revealed that the (181)Ta target had the highest neutron yield, and also tungsten was found to have the highest values in both surface and volumetric flux ratio. Transmutation in the (98)Mo sample through radiative capture was investigated for the natural lead moderator. When the sample radial distance from the target was increased inside the graphite region, the production yield had the greatest value of activity. The potential of the ARC method is a replacement or complements the current reactor-based supply sources of BNCT purposes.

  14. Rapid adiabatic passage without level crossing

    CERN Document Server

    Rangelov, A A; Shore, B W

    2009-01-01

    We present a method for achieving complete population transfer in a two-state quantum system via adiabatic time evolution in which, contrary to conventional rapid adiabatic passage produced by chirped pulses, there occurs no crossing of diabatic energy curves: there is no sign change of the detuning. Instead, we use structured pulses, in which, in addition to satisfying conditions for adiabatic evolution, there occurs a sign change of the Rabi frequency when the detuning is zero. We present simulations that offer simple geometrical interpretation of the two-dimensional motion of the Bloch vector for this system, illustrating how both complete population inversion and complete population return occur for different choices of structured pulses.

  15. Adiabatic embedment of nanomechanical resonators in photonic microring cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Xiong, Chi; Li, Mo; Rooks, Michael; Tang, Hong X

    2014-01-01

    We report a circuit cavity optomechanical system in which a nanomechanical resonator is adiabatically embedded inside an optical ring resonator with ultralow transition loss. The nanomechanical device forms part of the top layer of a horizontal silicon slot ring resonator, which enables dispersive coupling to the dielectric substrate via a tapered nanogap. Our measurements show nearly uncompromised optical quality factors (Q) after the release of the mechanical beam.

  16. Efficient cross polarization with simultaneous adiabatic frequency sweep on the source and target channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Weng Kung; Takeda, Kazuyuki

    2007-10-01

    In this work, we propose a new and efficient heteronuclear cross polarization scheme, in which adiabatic frequency sweeps from far off-resonance toward on-resonance are applied simultaneously on both the source and target spins. This technique, which we call as Simultaneous ADIabatic Spin-locking Cross Polarization (SADIS CP), is capable of efficiently locking both the source and target spins with moderate power even in the presence of large spectral distribution and fast relaxation. It is shown that by keeping the time-dependent Hartmann-Hahn mismatch minimal throughout the mixing period, polarization transfer can be accelerated. Experiments are demonstrated in a powder sample of L-alanine.

  17. Monte Carlo analysis of the long-lived fission product neutron capture rates at the Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (TARC) experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abanades, A., E-mail: abanades@etsii.upm.es [Grupo de Modelizacion de Sistemas Termoenergeticos, ETSII, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, c/Ramiro de Maeztu, 7, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.M. [Centro de Investigaciones Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avda. Complutense, 40, Ed. 17, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ismailov, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Lafuente, A. [Grupo de Modelizacion de Sistemas Termoenergeticos, ETSII, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, c/Ramiro de Maeztu, 7, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Nishihara, K. [Transmutation Section, J-PARC Center, JAEA, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Saito, M. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Stanculescu, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna (Austria); Sugawara, T. [Transmutation Section, J-PARC Center, JAEA, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TARC experiment benchmark capture rates results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Utilization of updated databases, included ADSLib. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Self-shielding effect in reactor design for transmutation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of Lead nuclear data. - Abstract: The design of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) requires the development of simulation tools that are able to describe in a realistic way their nuclear performance and transmutation rate capability. In this publication, we present an evaluation of state of the art Monte Carlo design tools to assess their performance concerning transmutation of long-lived fission products. This work, performed under the umbrella of the International Atomic Energy Agency, analyses two important aspects for transmutation systems: moderation on Lead and neutron captures of {sup 99}Tc, {sup 127}I and {sup 129}I. The analysis of the results shows how shielding effects due to the resonances at epithermal energies of these nuclides affects strongly their transmutation rate. The results suggest that some research effort should be undertaken to improve the quality of Iodine nuclear data at epithermal and fast neutron energy to obtain a reliable transmutation estimation.

  18. Duality in adiabatic level crossing Quantum coherence and complete reflection

    CERN Document Server

    Fujikawa, K; Fujikawa, Kazuo; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    1997-01-01

    A field dependent su(2) gauge transformation connects between the adiabatic and diabatic pictures in the (Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg) level crossing problem. It is pointed out that weak and strong level crossing interactions are interchanged under this transformation, and thus realizing a naive strong and weak duality. A reliable perturbation theory is thus formulated in the both limits of weak and strong interactions. Main characteristics of the level crossing phenomena such as the Landau-Zener formula including its numerical coefficient are well-described by simple perturbation theory without referring to Stokes phenomena. We also show that quantum coherence in a double well potential is generally suppressed by the effect of level crossing, which is analogous to the effect of Ohmic dissipation on quantum coherence.

  19. Cross resonant optical antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, P; Huang, J S; Duò, L; Finazzi, M; Hecht, B

    2009-06-26

    We propose a novel cross resonant optical antenna consisting of two perpendicular nanosized gold dipole antennas with a common feed gap. We demonstrate that the cross antenna is able to convert propagating fields of any polarization state into correspondingly polarized, localized, and enhanced fields and vice versa. The cross antenna structure therefore opens the road towards the control of light-matter interactions based on polarized light as well as the analysis of polarized fields on the nanometer scale.

  20. Cross Resonant Optical Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, P.; Huang, J. S.; Duò, L.; Finazzi, M.; Hecht, B.

    2009-06-01

    We propose a novel cross resonant optical antenna consisting of two perpendicular nanosized gold dipole antennas with a common feed gap. We demonstrate that the cross antenna is able to convert propagating fields of any polarization state into correspondingly polarized, localized, and enhanced fields and vice versa. The cross antenna structure therefore opens the road towards the control of light-matter interactions based on polarized light as well as the analysis of polarized fields on the nanometer scale.

  1. Cross-polarization phenomena in the NMR of fast spinning solids subject to adiabatic sweeps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, Sungsool; Gan, Zhehong; Schurko, Robert; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-02-14

    Cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CPMAS) experiments employing frequency-swept pulses are explored within the context of obtaining broadband signal enhancements for rare spin S = 1/2 nuclei at very high magnetic fields. These experiments employ adiabatic inversion pulses on the S-channel ((13)C) to cover a wide frequency offset range, while simultaneously applying conventional spin-locking pulse on the I-channel ((1)H). Conditions are explored where the adiabatic frequency sweep width, Δν, is changed from selectively irradiating a single magic-angle-spinning (MAS) spinning centerband or sideband, to sweeping over multiple sidebands. A number of new physical features emerge upon assessing the swept-CP method under these conditions, including multiple zero- and double-quantum CP transfers happening in unison with MAS-driven rotary resonance phenomena. These were examined using an average Hamiltonian theory specifically designed to tackle these experiments, with extensive numerical simulations, and with experiments on model compounds. Ultrawide CP profiles spanning frequency ranges of nearly 6⋅γB1 (s) were predicted and observed utilizing this new approach. Potential extensions and applications of this extremely broadband transfer conditions are briefly discussed.

  2. Validation of magnetic resonance concentration measurements with adiabatic wall temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayles, Emily L.; Eaton, John K.

    2016-12-01

    Adiabatic wall temperature measurements were obtained in a high subsonic Mach number airflow experiment and compared with concentration measurements near the surface from a low-speed liquid flow experiment. Excellent agreement between the temperature and concentration measurements validates the investigation of turbulent mixing phenomena in compressible gas flows through the study of incompressible liquid flows with magnetic resonance techniques.

  3. Pulse-driven near-resonant quantum adiabatic dynamics: lifting of quasi-degeneracy

    CERN Document Server

    Yatsenko, L P; Jauslin, H R

    2003-01-01

    We study the quantum dynamics of a two-level system driven by a pulse that starts near-resonant for small amplitudes, yielding nonadiabatic evolution, and induces an adiabatic evolution for larger amplitudes. This problem is analyzed in terms of lifting of degeneracy for rising amplitudes. It is solved exactly for the case of linear and exponential rising. Approximate solutions are given in the case of power law rising. This allows us to determine approximative formulas for the lineshape of resonant excitation by various forms of pulses such as truncated trig-pulses. We also analyze and explain the various superpositions of states that can be obtained by the Half Stark Chirped Rapid Adiabatic Passage (Half-SCRAP) process.

  4. Penetration of a resonant magnetic perturbation in an adiabatically rippled plasma slab

    CERN Document Server

    Dewar, Robert L; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Yoshida, Zensho

    2016-01-01

    The adiabatic limit of a recently proposed dynamical extension of Taylor relaxation, \\emph{multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics} (MRxMHD) is summarized, with special attention to the appropriate definition of relative magnetic helicity. The formalism is illustrated using a simple two-region, sheared-magnetic-field model similar to the Hahm--Kulsrud--Taylor (HKT) rippled-boundary slab model. In MRxMHD a linear Grad--Shafranov equation applies, even at finite ripple amplitude. The adiabatic switching on of boundary ripple excites a shielding current sheet opposing reconnection at a resonant surface. The perturbed magnetic field as a function of ripple amplitude is calculated by invoking conservation of magnetic helicity in the two regions separated by the current sheet. At low ripple amplitude "half islands" appear on each side of the current sheet, locking the rotational transform at the resonant value. Beyond a critical amplitude these islands disappear and the rotational transform develops a discontinui...

  5. Nonadiabatic level crossing in resonant and nonresonant neutrino oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Kachelriess, M

    2001-01-01

    We study neutrino oscillations and the level-crossing probability PLSZ = exp(–gamman[script F]npi/2) (LSZ stands for Landau-Stückelberg-Zener) in power-law-like potential profiles A(r)[proportional]rn. After showing that the resonance point coincides only for a linear profile with the point of maximal violation of adiabaticity, we point out that the "adiabaticity" parameter gamman can be calculated at an arbitrary point if the correction function [script F]n is rescaled appropriately. We present a new representation for the level-crossing probability, PLSZ = exp(–kappan[script G]n), which allows a simple numerical evaluation of PLSZ in both the resonant and nonresonant cases, and where [script G]n contains the full dependence of PLSZ on the mixing angle theta. As an application we consider the case n = –3 important for oscillations of supernova neutrinos.

  6. Resonant 90 degree shifter generator for 4-phase trapezoidal adiabatic logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bargagli-Stoffi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Many adiabatic logic families make use of multi phase trapezoidal or sinusoidal power clocks to recover the energy stored in the load capacitances. A key aspect for the evaluation of the performance of adiabatic logic is then the study of a system that includes the power clock generator. A four-phase trapezoidal power clock generator, according to the requirements of the most promising architectures, namely the ECRL and PFAL, has been designed and simulated. The proposed circuit, realized with a double-well 0.25 µm CMOS technology and external inductors, is a resonant generator designed to oscillate at a frequency of 7 MHz, which is within the optimum frequency range for adiabatic circuits realized with this CMOS technology. The generator has been simulated with the equivalent load of fifty 1-bit adders and the operating behavior of a 4-bit adder has been evaluated. The key aspects of a generator for adiabatic logic are its power consumption and the phase relationships between its output signals. The proposed generator has a conversion efficiency higher than 80%, and it is robust with respect to variations of technology parameters. The four power supplies exhibit the correct relationship of phase also in the presence of no equally distributed loads.

  7. Adiabatic evolution of 1D shape resonances: an artificial interface conditions approach

    CERN Document Server

    Faraj, Ali; Nier, Francis

    2010-01-01

    Artificial interface conditions parametrized by a complex number $\\theta_{0}$ are introduced for 1D-Schr{\\"o}dinger operators. When this complex parameter equals the parameter $\\theta\\in i\\R$ of the complex deformation which unveils the shape resonances, the Hamiltonian becomes dissipative. This makes possible an adiabatic theory for the time evolution of resonant states for arbitrarily large time scales. The effect of the artificial interface conditions on the important stationary quantities involved in quantum transport models is also checked to be as small as wanted, in the polynomial scale $(h^N)_{N\\in \\N}$ as $h\\to 0$, according to $\\theta_{0}$.

  8. Dipolar Rydberg-atom gas prepared by adiabatic passage through an avoided crossing

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Limei; Zhang, Linjie; Li, Changyong; Yang, Yonggang; Zhao, Jianming; Raithel, Georg; Jia, Suotang

    2015-01-01

    The passage of cold cesium 49S$_{1/2}$ Rydberg atoms through an electric-field-induced multi-level avoided crossing with nearby hydrogen-like Rydberg levels is employed to prepare a cold, dipolar Rydberg atom gas. When the electric field is ramped through the avoided crossing on time scales on the order of 100~ns or slower, the 49S$_{1/2}$ population adiabatically transitions into high-\\emph{l} Rydberg Stark states. The adiabatic state transformation results in a cold gas of Rydberg atoms with large electric dipole moments. After a waiting time of about $1~\\mu$s and at sufficient atom density, the adiabatically transformed highly dipolar atoms become undetectable, enabling us to discern adiabatic from diabatic passage behavior through the avoided crossing. We attribute the state-selectivity to $m$-mixing collisions between the dipolar atoms. The data interpretation is supported by numerical simulations of the passage dynamics and of binary $m$-mixing collisions.

  9. Practical approximation of the non-adiabatic coupling terms for same-symmetry interstate crossings by using adiabatic potential energies only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeck, Kyoung Koo; An, Heesun

    2017-02-01

    A very simple equation, Fij A p p=[(∂2(Via-Vja ) /∂Q2 ) /(Via-Vja ) ] 1 /2/2 , giving a reliable magnitude of non-adiabatic coupling terms (NACTs, Fij's) based on adiabatic potential energies only (Via and Vja) was discovered, and its reliability was tested for several prototypes of same-symmetry interstate crossings in LiF, C2, NH3Cl, and C6H5SH molecules. Our theoretical derivation starts from the analysis of the relationship between the Lorentzian dependence of NACTs along a diabatization coordinate and the well-established linear vibronic coupling scheme. This analysis results in a very simple equation, α =2 κ /Δc , enabling the evaluation of the Lorentz function α parameter in terms of the coupling constant κ and the energy gap Δc (Δc=|Via-Vja| Q c ) between adiabatic states at the crossing point QC. Subsequently, it was shown that QC corresponds to the point where Fij A p p exhibit maximum values if we set the coupling parameter as κ =[(Via-Vja ) ṡ(∂2(Via-Vja ) /∂Q2 ) ] Qc1 /2 /2 . Finally, we conjectured that this relation could give reasonable values of NACTs not only at the crossing point but also at other geometries near QC. In this final approximation, the pre-defined crossing point QC is not required. The results of our test demonstrate that the approximation works much better than initially expected. The present new method does not depend on the selection of an ab initio method for adiabatic electronic states but is currently limited to local non-adiabatic regions where only two electronic states are dominantly involved within a nuclear degree of freedom.

  10. Generation of entangled states and error protection from adiabatic avoided level crossings

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, N F; Volkas, R R; Wong, Y Y Y; Bell, Nicole F.; Volkas, Raymond R.; Wong, Yvonne Y. Y.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the environment-affected dynamics of $N$ self-interacting particles living in one-dimensional double wells. Two topics are dealt with. First, we consider the production of entangled states of two-level systems. We show that by adiabatically varying the well biases we may dynamically generate maximally entangled states, starting from initially unentangled product states. Entanglement degradation due to a common type of environmental influence is then computed by solving a master equation. However, we also demonstrate that entanglement production is unaffected if the system-environment coupling is of the type that induces ``motional narrowing''. As our second but related topic, we construct a different master equation that seamlessly merges error protection/detection dynamics for quantum information with the environmental couplings responsible for producing the errors in the first place. Adiabatic avoided crossing schemes are used in both topics.

  11. A Theory of Self-Resonance After Inflation, Part 1: Adiabatic and Isocurvature Goldstone Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Hertzberg, Mark P; Spitzer, William G; Becerra, Juana C; Li, Lanqing

    2014-01-01

    We develop a theory of self-resonance after inflation. We study a large class of models involving multiple scalar fields with an internal symmetry. For illustration, we often specialize to dimension 4 potentials, but we derive results for general potentials. This is the first part of a two part series of papers. Here in Part 1 we especially focus on the behavior of long wavelengths modes, which are found to govern most of the important physics. Since the inflaton background spontaneously breaks the time translation symmetry and the internal symmetry, we obtain Goldstone modes; these are the adiabatic and isocurvature modes. We find general conditions on the potential for when a large instability band exists for these modes at long wavelengths. For the adiabatic mode, this is determined by a sound speed derived from the time averaged potential. While for the isocurvature mode, this is determined by a speed derived from a time averaged auxiliary potential. Interestingly, we find that this instability band usual...

  12. Controlling vibrational cooling with zero-width resonances: An adiabatic Floquet approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Arnaud; Viennot, David; Jolicard, Georges; Lefebvre, Roland; Atabek, Osman

    2016-10-01

    In molecular photodissociation, some specific combinations of laser parameters (wavelength and intensity) lead to unexpected zero-width resonances (ZWRs) with, in principle, infinite lifetimes. Their potential to induce basic quenching mechanisms has recently been devised in the laser control of vibrational cooling through filtration strategies [O. Atabek et al., Phys. Rev. A 87, 031403(R) (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.87.031403]. A full quantum adiabatic control theory based on the adiabatic Floquet Hamiltonian is developed to show how a laser pulse could be envelope-shaped and frequency-chirped so as to protect a given initial vibrational state against dissociation, taking advantage of its continuous transport on the corresponding ZWR all along the pulse duration. As compared with previous control scenarios that actually suffered from nonadiabatic contamination, drastically different and much more efficient filtration goals are achieved. A semiclassical analysis helps us to find and interpret a complete map of ZWRs in the laser parameter plane. In addition, the choice of a given ZWR path, among the complete series identified by the semiclassical approach, turns out to be crucial for the cooling scheme, targeting a single vibrational state population left at the end of the pulse, while all others have almost completely decayed. The illustrative example, which has the potential to be transposed to other diatomics, is Na2 prepared by photoassociation in vibrationally hot but translationally and rotationally cold states.

  13. Hamiltonian Dynamics and Adiabatic Invariants for Time-Dependent Superconducting Qubit-Oscillators and Resonators in Quantum Computing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Ryeol Choi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An adiabatic invariant, which is a conserved quantity, is useful for studying quantum and classical properties of dynamical systems. Adiabatic invariants for time-dependent superconducting qubit-oscillator systems and resonators are investigated using the Liouville-von Neumann equation. At first, we derive an invariant for a simple superconducting qubit-oscillator through the introduction of its reduced Hamiltonian. Afterwards, an adiabatic invariant for a nanomechanical resonator linearly interfaced with a superconducting circuit, via a coupling with a time-dependent strength, is evaluated using the technique of unitary transformation. The accuracy of conservation for such invariant quantities is represented in detail. Based on the results of our developments in this paper, perturbation theory is applicable to the research of quantum characteristics of more complicated qubit systems that are described by a time-dependent Hamiltonian involving nonlinear terms.

  14. Adiabatic Non-resonant Acceleration in Magnetic Turbulence and Hard Spectra of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Siyao; Zhang, Bing

    2017-09-01

    We introduce a non-resonant acceleration mechanism arising from the second adiabatic invariant in magnetic turbulence and apply it to study the prompt emission spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The mechanism contains both the first- and second-order Fermi acceleration, originating from the interacting turbulent reconnection and dynamo processes. It leads to a hard electron energy distribution up to a cutoff energy at the balance between the acceleration and synchrotron cooling. The sufficient acceleration rate ensures a rapid hardening of any initial energy distribution to a power-law distribution with the index p∼ 1, which naturally produces a low-energy photon index α ∼ -1 via the synchrotron radiation. For typical GRB parameters, the synchrotron emission can extend to a characteristic photon energy on the order of ∼100 keV.

  15. (1)H-(2)H cross-polarization NMR in fast spinning solids by adiabatic sweeps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, Sungsool; Schurko, Robert; Frydman, Lucio

    2017-03-14

    Cross-polarization (CP) experiments employing frequency-swept radiofrequency (rf) pulses have been successfully used in static spin systems for obtaining broadband signal enhancements. These experiments have been recently extended to heteronuclear I, S = spin-1/2 nuclides under magic-angle spinning (MAS), by applying adiabatic inversion pulses along the S (low-γ) channel while simultaneously applying a conventional spin-locking pulse on the I-channel ((1)H). This study explores an extension of this adiabatic frequency sweep concept to quadrupolar nuclei, focusing on CP from (1)H (I = 1/2) to (2)H spins (S = 1) undergoing fast MAS (νr = 60 kHz). A number of new features emerge, including zero- and double-quantum polarization transfer phenomena that depend on the frequency offsets of the swept pulses, the rf pulse powers, and the MAS spinning rate. An additional mechanism found operational in the (1)H-(2)H CP case that was absent in the spin-1/2 counterpart, concerns the onset of a pseudo-static zero-quantum CP mode, driven by a quadrupole-modulated rf/dipolar recoupling term arising under the action of MAS. The best CP conditions found at these fast spinning rates correspond to double-quantum transfers, involving weak (2)H rf field strengths. At these easily attainable (ca. 10 kHz) rf field conditions, adiabatic level-crossings among the {|1⟩,|0⟩,|-1⟩} mS energy levels, which are known to complicate the CP MAS of quadrupolar nuclei, are avoided. Moreover, the CP line shapes generated in this manner are very close to the ideal (2)H MAS spectral line shapes, facilitating the extraction of quadrupolar coupling parameters. All these features were corroborated with experiments on model compounds and justified using numerical simulations and average Hamiltonian theory models. Potential applications of these new phenomena, as well as extensions to higher spins S, are briefly discussed.

  16. Emittance growths in resonance crossing at FFAGs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab; Pang, X.; Wang, F.; Wang, X.; Lee, S.Y.; /Indiana U.

    2007-10-01

    Scaling laws of the emittance growth for a beam crossing the 6th-order systematic space-charge resonances and the random-octupole driven 4th-order resonance are obtained by numerical multi-particle simulations. These laws can be important in setting the minimum acceleration rate and maximum tolerable resonance strength for the design of non-scaling fixed-field alternating gradient accelerators.

  17. Adiabatic fast passage application in solid state NMR study of cross relaxation and molecular dynamics in heteronuclear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, M.; Woźniak-Braszak, A.; Jurga, K.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the benefits of using fast adiabatic passage for the study of molecular dynamics in the solid state heteronuclear systems in the laboratory frame. A homemade pulse spectrometer operating at the frequency of 30.2 MHz and 28.411 MHz for protons and fluorines, respectively, has been enhanced with microcontroller direct digital synthesizer DDS controller [1-4]. This work briefly describes how to construct a low-cost and easy-to-assemble adiabatic extension set for homemade and commercial spectrometers based on recently very popular Arduino shields. The described set was designed for fast adiabatic generation. Timing and synchronization problems are discussed. The cross-relaxation experiments with different initial states of the two spin systems have been performed. Contrary to our previous work [5] where the steady-state NOE experiments were conducted now proton spins 1H are polarized in the magnetic field B0 while fluorine spins 19F are perturbed by selective saturation for a short time and then the system is allowed to evolve for a period in the absence of a saturating field. The adiabatic passage application leads to a reversal of magnetization of fluorine spins and increases the amplitude of the signal.

  18. Theory for cross effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic-angle spinning in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance: the importance of level crossings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2012-08-28

    We present theoretical calculations of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) due to the cross effect in nuclear magnetic resonance under magic-angle spinning (MAS). Using a three-spin model (two electrons and one nucleus), cross effect DNP with MAS for electron spins with a large g-anisotropy can be seen as a series of spin transitions at avoided crossings of the energy levels, with varying degrees of adiabaticity. If the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T(1e) is large relative to the MAS rotation period, the cross effect can happen as two separate events: (i) partial saturation of one electron spin by the applied microwaves as one electron spin resonance (ESR) frequency crosses the microwave frequency and (ii) flip of all three spins, when the difference of the two ESR frequencies crosses the nuclear frequency, which transfers polarization to the nuclear spin if the two electron spins have different polarizations. In addition, adiabatic level crossings at which the two ESR frequencies become equal serve to maintain non-uniform saturation across the ESR line. We present analytical results based on the Landau-Zener theory of adiabatic transitions, as well as numerical quantum mechanical calculations for the evolution of the time-dependent three-spin system. These calculations provide insight into the dependence of cross effect DNP on various experimental parameters, including MAS frequency, microwave field strength, spin relaxation rates, hyperfine and electron-electron dipole coupling strengths, and the nature of the biradical dopants.

  19. An explicit model for the adiabatic evolution of quantum observables driven by 1D shape resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Faraj, A; Nier, F

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a linearized version of the transport problem where the Schr\\"{o}dinger-Poisson operator is replaced by a non-autonomous Hamiltonian, slowly varying in time. We consider an explicitly solvable model where a semiclassical island is described by a flat potential barrier, while a time dependent 'delta' interaction is used as a model for a single quantum well. Introducing, in addition to the complex deformation, a further modification formed by artificial interface conditions, we give a reduced equation for the adiabatic evolution of the sheet density of charges accumulating around the interaction point.

  20. Topology of the Adiabatic Potential Energy Surfaces for theResonance States of the Water Anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haxton, Daniel J.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2005-04-15

    The potential energy surfaces corresponding to the long-lived fixed-nuclei electron scattering resonances of H{sub 2}O relevant to the dissociative electron attachment process are examined using a combination of ab initio scattering and bound-state calculations. These surfaces have a rich topology, characterized by three main features: a conical intersection between the {sup 2}A{sub 1} and {sup 2}B{sub 2} Feshbach resonance states; charge-transfer behavior in the OH ({sup 2}{Pi}) + H{sup -} asymptote of the {sup 2}B{sub 1} and {sup 2}A{sub 1} resonances; and an inherent double-valuedness of the surface for the {sup 2}B{sub 2} state the C{sub 2v} geometry, arising from a branch-point degeneracy with a {sup 2}B{sub 2} shape resonance. In total, eight individual seams of degeneracy among these resonances are located.

  1. Integrated phononic crystal resonators based on adiabatically-terminated phononic crystal waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razi Dehghannasiri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, we demonstrate a new design for integrated phononic crystal (PnC resonators based on confining acoustic waves in a heterogeneous waveguide-based PnC structure. In this architecture, a PnC waveguide that supports a single mode at the desired resonance frequencies is terminated by two waveguide sections with no propagating mode at those frequencies (i.e., have mode gap. The proposed PnC resonators are designed through combining the spatial-domain and the spatial-frequency domain (i.e., the k-domain analysis to achieve a smooth mode envelope. This design approach can benefit both membrane-based and surface-acoustic-wave-based architectures by confining the mode spreading in k-domain that leads to improved electromechanical excitation/detection coupling and reduced loss through propagating bulk modes.

  2. Integrated phononic crystal resonators based on adiabatically-terminated phononic crystal waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghannasiri, Razi; Pourabolghasem, Reza; Eftekhar, Ali Asghar; Adibi, Ali

    2016-12-01

    In this letter, we demonstrate a new design for integrated phononic crystal (PnC) resonators based on confining acoustic waves in a heterogeneous waveguide-based PnC structure. In this architecture, a PnC waveguide that supports a single mode at the desired resonance frequencies is terminated by two waveguide sections with no propagating mode at those frequencies (i.e., have mode gap). The proposed PnC resonators are designed through combining the spatial-domain and the spatial-frequency domain (i.e., the k-domain) analysis to achieve a smooth mode envelope. This design approach can benefit both membrane-based and surface-acoustic-wave-based architectures by confining the mode spreading in k-domain that leads to improved electromechanical excitation/detection coupling and reduced loss through propagating bulk modes.

  3. Adiabatic description of capture into resonance and surfatron acceleration of charged particles by electromagnetic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A V; Neishtadt, A I; Zelenyi, L M; Vainchtein, D L

    2010-12-01

    We present an analytical and numerical study of the surfatron acceleration of nonrelativistic charged particles by electromagnetic waves. The acceleration is caused by capture of particles into resonance with one of the waves. We investigate capture for systems with one or two waves and provide conditions under which the obtained results can be applied to systems with more than two waves. In the case of a single wave, the once captured particles never leave the resonance and their velocity grows linearly with time. However, if there are two waves in the system, the upper bound of the energy gain may exist and we find the analytical value of that bound. We discuss several generalizations including the relativistic limit, different wave amplitudes, and a wide range of the waves' wavenumbers. The obtained results are used for qualitative description of some phenomena observed in the Earth's magnetosphere. © 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Elastic scattering, muon transfer, bound states and resonances in the three-body mesic molecular systems in the reduced adiabatic hyperspherical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, D. I.; Gusev, V. V.; Ponomarev, L. I.

    1999-06-01

    The uniform method of numerical investigation of bound states and scattering processes 2→ 2 (including resonance states) in the Coulomb three-body (CTB) systems is developed. It is based on the adiabatic hyperspherical approach (AHSA) and includes the numerical realization and applications to the three-body mesic atomic systems. The results of calculations of bound states of these systems (including the local characteristics of the wave functions) and the scattering processes 2→ 2 (including the characteristics of the resonance states) are presented.

  5. Elastic scattering, muon transfer, bound states and resonances in the three-body mesic molecular systems in the reduced adiabatic hyperspherical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramov, D.I. [St.-Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Gusev, V.V. [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation); Ponomarev, L.I. [Russian Research Center ' Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation)

    1999-06-15

    The uniform method of numerical investigation of bound states and scattering processes 2{sup {yields}} 2 (including resonance states) in the Coulomb three-body (CTB) systems is developed. It is based on the adiabatic hyperspherical approach (AHSA) and includes the numerical realization and applications to the three-body mesic atomic systems. The results of calculations of bound states of these systems (including the local characteristics of the wave functions) and the scattering processes 2{sup {yields}} 2 (including the characteristics of the resonance states) are presented.

  6. Resonance capture cross section of 207Pb

    CERN Document Server

    Domingo-Pardo, C; Aerts, G; Alvarez-Pol, H; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Andrzejewski, J; Andriamonje, Samuel A; Assimakopoulos, P A; Audouin, L; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvar, F; Berthoumieux, E; Bisterzo, S; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Carrapico, C; Chepel, V; Cennini, P; Chiaveri, Enrico; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dillman, I; Dolfini, R; Dridi, W; Durán, I; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Fitzpatrick, L; Frais-Kölbl, H; Fujii, K; Furman, W; Gallino, R; Gonçalves, I; González-Romero, E M; Goverdovski, A; Gramegna, F; Griesmayer, E; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martínez, A; Igashira, M; Isaev, S; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F K; Karamanis, D; Karadimos, D; Kerveno, M; Ketlerov, V; Köhler, P; Konovalov, V; Kossionides, E; Krticka, M; Lamboudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, Heinz; Oshima, M; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papachristodoulou, C; Papadopoulos, C; Paradela, C; Patronis, N; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perrot, L; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, Carlo; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Sarchiapone, L; Savvidis, I; Stéphan, C; Tagliente, G; Taín, J L; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarín, D; Vincente6, M C; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Voss, F; Walter, S; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2006-01-01

    The radiative neutron capture cross section of 207Pb has been measured at the CERN neutron time of flight installation n_TOF using the pulse height weighting technique in the resolved energy region. The measurement has been performed with an optimized setup of two C6D6 scintillation detectors, which allowed us to reduce scattered neutron backgrounds down to a negligible level. Resonance parameters and radiative kernels have been determined for 16 resonances by means of an R-matrix analysis in the neutron energy range from 3 keV to 320 keV. Good agreement with previous measurements was found at low neutron energies, whereas substantial discrepancies appear beyond 45 keV. With the present results, we obtain an s-process contribution of 77(8)% to the solar abundance of 207Pb. This corresponds to an r-process component of 23(8)%, which is important for deriving the U/Th ages of metal poor halo stars.

  7. Modeling laser brightness from cross porro prism resonators

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Forbes, A

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available . In this study a cross Porro prism resonator is considered; crossed Porro prism resonators have been known for some time, but until recently have not been modeled as a complete physical optics system that allows the modal output to be determined as a function...

  8. Quantum charge pumping through resonant crossed Andreev reflection in a superconducting hybrid junction of silicene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Ganesh C.; Saha, Arijit

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the phenomena of adiabatic quantum charge pumping through a normal-insulator-superconductor-insulator-normal (NISIN) setup of silicene within the scattering matrix formalism. Assuming a thin barrier limit, we consider the strength of the two barriers (χ1 and χ2) as the two pumping parameters in the adiabatic regime. Within this geometry, we obtain crossed Andreev reflection (CAR) with probability unity in the χ1-χ2 plane without concomitant transmission or elastic co-tunneling. Tunability of the band gap at the Dirac point by applying an external electric field perpendicular to the silicene sheet and variation of the chemical potential at the normal silicene region, open up the possibility of achieving either a perfect CAR or transmission process through our setup. This resonant behavior is periodic with the barrier strengths. We analyze the behavior of the pumped charge through the NISIN structure as a function of the pumping strength and angles of the incident electrons. We show that large (Q ˜2 e ) pumped charge can be obtained through our geometry when the pumping contour encloses either the CAR or transmission resonance in the pumping parameter space. We discuss possible experimental feasibility of our theoretical predictions.

  9. CROSSING A COUPLING SPIN RESONANCE WITH AN RF DIPOLE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BAI,M.; ROSER,T.

    2001-06-18

    In accelerators, due to quadrupole roll errors and solenoid fields, the polarized proton acceleration often encounters coupling spin resonances. In the Brookhaven AGS, the coupling effect comes from the solenoid partial snake which is used to overcome imperfection resonances. The coupling spin resonance strength is proportional to the amount of coupling as well as the strength of the corresponding intrinsic spin resonance. The coupling resonance can cause substantial beam polarization loss if its corresponding intrinsic spin resonance is very strong. A new method of using an horizontal rf dipole to induce a full spin flip crossing both the intrinsic and its coupling spin resonances is studied in the Brookhaven's AGS. Numerical simulations show that a full spin flip can be induced after crossing the two resonances by using a horizontal rf dipole to induce a large vertical coherent oscillation.

  10. Ultra-high Resolution Spectroscopy with atomic or molecular Dark Resonances: Exact steady-state lineshapes and asymptotic profiles in the adiabatic pulsed regime

    CERN Document Server

    Zanon, Thomas; Arimondo, Ennio

    2011-01-01

    Exact and asymptotic lineshape expressions are derived from the semi-classical density matrix representation describing a set of closed three-level atomic or molecular states including decoherences, relaxation rates and light-shifts. An accurate analysis of the exact steady-state Dark Resonance profile describing the Autler-Townes doublet, the Electromagnetically Induced Transparency or Coherent Population Trapping resonance and the Fano-Feshbach lineshape, leads to the linewidth expression of the two-photon Raman transition and frequency-shifts associated to the clock transition. From an adiabatic analysis of the dynamical Optical Bloch Equations in the weak field limit, a pumping time required to efficiently trap a large number of atoms into a coherent superposition of long-lived states is established. For a highly asymmetrical configuration with different decay channels, a strong two-photon resonance based on a lower states population inversion is established when the driving continuous-wave laser fields a...

  11. Imaging characterization of the rapid adiabatic passage in a source-rotatable, crossed-beam scattering experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huilin; Mondal, Sohidul; Yang, Chung-Hsin; Liu, Kopin

    2017-07-01

    In order to achieve a more efficient preparation of a specific ro-vibrationally excited reactant state for reactive scattering experiments, we implemented the rapid adiabatic passage (RAP) scheme to our pulsed crossed-beam machine, using a single-mode, continuous-wave mid-infrared laser. The challenge for this source-rotatable apparatus lies in the non-orthogonal geometry between the molecular beam and the laser propagation directions. As such, the velocity spread of the supersonic beam results in a significantly broader Doppler distribution that needs to be activated for RAP to occur than the conventional orthogonal configuration. In this report, we detail our approach to shifting, locking, and stabilizing the absolute mid-infrared frequency. We exploited the imaging detection technique to characterize the RAP process and to quantify the excitation efficiency. We showed that with appropriate focusing of the IR laser, a nearly complete population transfer can still be achieved in favorable cases. Compared to our previous setup—a pulsed optical parametric oscillator/amplifier in combination with a multipass ring reflector for saturated absorption, the present RAP scheme with a single-pass, continuous-wave laser yields noticeably higher population-transfer efficiency.

  12. Phase-space picture of resonance creation and avoided crossings

    CERN Document Server

    Timberlake, T

    2000-01-01

    Complex coordinate scaling (CCS) is used to calculate resonance eigenvalues and eigenstates for a system consisting of an inverted Gaussian potential and a monochromatic driving field. Floquet eigenvalues and Husimi distributions of resonance eigenfunctions are calculated using two different versions of CCS. The number of resonance states in this system increases as the strength of the driving field is increased, indicating that this system might have increased stability against ionization when the field strength is very high. We find that the newly created resonance states are scarred on unstable periodic orbits of the classical motion. The behavior of these periodic orbits as the field strength is increased may explain why there are more resonance states at high field strengths than at low field strengths. Close examination of an avoided crossing between resonance states shows that this type of avoided crossing does not delocalize the resonance states, although it may lead to interesting effects at certain ...

  13. Ultrahigh-resolution spectroscopy with atomic or molecular dark resonances: Exact steady-state line shapes and asymptotic profiles in the adiabatic pulsed regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanon-Willette, Thomas; Clercq, Emeric de; Arimondo, Ennio [UPMC Univ. Paris 06, UMR 7092, LPMAA, 4 place Jussieu, case 76, F-75005 Paris, France, and CNRS, UMR 7092, LPMAA, 4 place Jussieu, case 76, F-75005 Paris (France); LNE-SYRTE, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, 61 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' E. Fermi,' ' Universita di Pisa, Lgo. B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56122 Pisa (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    Exact and asymptotic line shape expressions are derived from the semiclassical density matrix representation describing a set of closed three-level {Lambda} atomic or molecular states including decoherences, relaxation rates, and light shifts. An accurate analysis of the exact steady-state dark-resonance profile describing the Autler-Townes doublet, the electromagnetically induced transparency or coherent population trapping resonance, and the Fano-Feshbach line shape leads to the linewidth expression of the two-photon Raman transition and frequency shifts associated to the clock transition. From an adiabatic analysis of the dynamical optical Bloch equations in the weak field limit, a pumping time required to efficiently trap a large number of atoms into a coherent superposition of long-lived states is established. For a highly asymmetrical configuration with different decay channels, a strong two-photon resonance based on a lower states population inversion is established when the driving continuous-wave laser fields are greatly unbalanced. When time separated resonant two-photon pulses are applied in the adiabatic pulsed regime for atomic or molecular clock engineering, where the first pulse is long enough to reach a coherent steady-state preparation and the second pulse is very short to avoid repumping into a new dark state, dark-resonance fringes mixing continuous-wave line shape properties and coherent Ramsey oscillations are created. Those fringes allow interrogation schemes bypassing the power broadening effect. Frequency shifts affecting the central clock fringe computed from asymptotic profiles and related to the Raman decoherence process exhibit nonlinear shapes with the three-level observable used for quantum measurement. We point out that different observables experience different shifts on the lower-state clock transition.

  14. Resonant Response in Mechanically Tunable Metasurface based on Crossed Metallic Gratings with Controllable Crossing Angle

    CERN Document Server

    Yachin, Vladimir V; Polevoy, Sergey Y; Tarapov, Sergey I

    2016-01-01

    We report on a resonant response in transmission spectra of a linearly polarized wave passing through the system of crossed gratings. Each grating consists of an array of parallel metallic strips located on the top of a dielectric substrate. It is revealed that the resonant position appears to be dependent on the angle of gratings crossing. It is found out that the resonant shift on the frequency scale appears as a result of increasing in the length of the resonating portion of the parallelogram periodic cell formed by the crossed metallic strips with decreasing crossing angle and the proposed design can be used in new types of planar metamaterials and filters.

  15. Amplification of weak signals via the non-adiabatic regime of stochastic resonance in a bistable dynamical system with time delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Luchun; Mei Dongcheng, E-mail: dulch@126.com [Department of Physics, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China)

    2011-07-01

    The non-adiabatic regime of stochastic resonance (SR) in a bistable system with time delay, an additive white noise and a periodic signal was investigated. The signal power amplification {eta} was employed to characterize the SR of the system. The simulation results indicate that (i) in the case of intermediate frequency {Omega} of the periodic signal, the typical behavior of SR is lowered monotonically by increasing the delay time {tau}; in the case of large {Omega}, {tau} weakens the SR behavior and then enhances it, with a non-monotonic behavior as a function of time delay; (ii) time delay induces SR when A is above the threshold, whereas no such resonance exists in the absence of time delay; (iii) time delay induces a transition from bimodal to unimodal configuration of {eta}; (iv) varying the particular form of time delay results in different phenomena.

  16. Silicon cross-connect filters using microring resonator coupled multimode-interference-based waveguide crossings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fang; Poon, Andrew W

    2008-06-09

    We report silicon cross-connect filters using microring resonator coupled multimode-interference (MMI) based waveguide crossings. Our experiments reveal that the MMI-based cross-connect filters impose lower crosstalk at the crossing than the conventional cross-connect filters using plain crossings, while offering a nearly symmetric resonance line shape in the drop-port transmission. As a proof-of-concept for cross-connection applications, we demonstrate on a silicon-on-insulator substrate (i) a 4-channel 1 x 4 linear-cascaded MMI-based cross-connect filter, and (ii) a 2-channel 2 x 2 array-cascaded MMI-based cross-connect filter.

  17. Analysis and approximations for crossing two nearby spin resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjbar, V. H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-01-07

    Solutions to the T-BMT spin equation have to date been confined to the single resonance crossing. However, in reality most cases of interest concern the overlapping of several resonances. To date there has been several serious studies of this problem; however, a good analytical solution or even approximation has eluded the community. We show that the T-BMT equation can be transformed into a Hill’s like equation. In this representation it can be shown that, while the single resonance crossing represents the solution to the Parabolic Cylinder equation, the overlapping case becomes a parametric type of resonance. We present possible approximations for both the non-accelerating case and accelerating case.

  18. Light slowdown in the vicinity of cross-over resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Perdian, M; Zaremba, J; Zielinska-Kaniasty, S

    2004-01-01

    Pulse propagation is considered in an inhomogeneously broadened medium of three-level atoms in a V-configuration, dressed by a counter-propagating pump pulse. A significant signal slowdown is demonstrated in this of the three frequency windows of a reduced absorption and a steep normal dispersion, which is due to a cross-over resonance. Particular properties of the group index in the vicinity of such a resonance are demonstrated in the case of closely spaced upper levels.

  19. Inter-spin distance determination using L-band (1-2 GHz) non-adiabatic rapid sweep electron paramagnetic resonance (NARS EPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittell, Aaron W.; Hustedt, Eric J.; Hyde, James S.

    2012-08-01

    Site-directed spin-labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (SDSL EPR) provides insight into the local structure and motion of a spin probe strategically attached to a molecule. When a second spin is introduced to the system, macromolecular information can be obtained through measurement of inter-spin distances either by continuous wave (CW) or pulsed electron double resonance (ELDOR) techniques. If both methodologies are considered, inter-spin distances of 8-80 Å can be experimentally determined. However, there exists a region at the upper limit of the conventional X-band (9.5 GHz) CW technique and the lower limit of the four-pulse double electron-electron resonance (DEER) experiment where neither method is particularly reliable. The work presented here utilizes L-band (1.9 GHz) in combination with non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) EPR to address this opportunity by increasing the upper limit of the CW technique. Because L-band linewidths are three to seven times narrower than those at X-band, dipolar broadenings that are small relative to the X-band inhomogeneous linewidth become observable, but the signal loss, due to the frequency dependence of the Boltzmann factor, has made L-band especially challenging. NARS has been shown to increase sensitivity by a factor of five, and overcomes much of this loss, making L-band distance determination more feasible [1]. Two different systems are presented, and distances of 18-30 Å have been experimentally determined at physiologically relevant temperatures. Measurements are in excellent agreement with a helical model and values determined by DEER.

  20. Nonresonance adiabatic photon trap

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, S S; Burdakov, A V; Ushkova, M Yu

    2016-01-01

    Concept of high efficiency photon storage based on adiabatic confinement between concave mirrors is presented and experimentally investigated. The approach is insensitive to typical for Fabri-Perot cells requirements on quality of accumulated radiation, tolerance of resonator elements and their stability. Experiments have been carried out with the trap, which consists from opposed concave cylindrical mirrors and conjugated with them spherical mirrors. In result, high efficiency for accumulation of radiation with large angular spread and spectrum width has been confirmed. As radiation source a commercial fiber laser has been used.

  1. Simulation Optimization and Experimental Study of Cross-Wall Adiabatic Dividing Wall Column Used to Separate Hexane-Heptane-Octane System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Yuqi; Fang Jing; Li Chunli

    2015-01-01

    Through separation of the hexane-heptane–octane system in a cross-wall adiabatic dividing wall column, the ef-fects of feed position, side-draw position, liquid split ratio, vapor split ratio and their interactions on the energy consumption were analyzed by Aspen Plus under the constant product purity, and the response surface model for the energy consumption was regressed. Based on the restriction on the optimal operating zone, the comparison of different combinations of surrogate models and optimization methods showed that, the combination of the Kriging model and multi-island genetic algorithm (Kriging-MIGA) had better prediction ability than the combination of the response surface model and partial derivative method (RSM-PD), and RSM-PD had better optimization effect than Kriging-MIGA. With a self-made cross-wall adiabatic dividing wall column, the temperature at measuring points and the energy consumption were measured during experiments, the comparison between measured values and simulated ones demonstrated that the optimized values of variables searched by RSM-PD and Kriging-MIGA could be both used as the optimum technological conditions since the experimental reli-ability was ensured, with the optimum technological conditions shown below: The feed position is 6, the side-draw position is 7, the combinations of liquid split ratio and vapor split ratio are [0.14, 0.5] and [0.16, 0.52], respectively. RSM-PD and Kriging-MIGA can provide the appropriate optimization methods for the dividing wall column.

  2. Pointwise cross-section-based on-the-fly resonance interference treatment with intermediate resonance approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacha, Meer; Joo, Han Gyu [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The effective cross sections (XSs) in the direct whole core calculation code nTRACER are evaluated by the equivalence theory-based resonance-integral-table method using the WIMS-based library as an alternative to the subgroup method. The background XSs, as well as the Dancoff correction factors, were evaluated by the enhanced neutron-current method. A method, with pointwise microscopic XSs on a union-lethargy grid, was used for the generation of resonance-interference factors (RIFs) for mixed resonant absorbers. This method was modified by the intermediate-resonance approximation by replacing the potential XSs for the non-absorbing moderator nuclides with the background XSs and neglecting the resonance-elastic scattering. The resonance-escape probability was implemented to incorporate the energy self-shielding effect in the spectrum. The XSs were improved using the proposed method as compared to the narrow resonance infinite mass-based method. The RIFs were improved by 1% in {sup 235}U, 7% in {sup 239}Pu, and >2% in {sup 240}Pu. To account for thermal feedback, a new feature was incorporated with the interpolation of pre-generated RIFs at the multigroup level and the results compared with the conventional resonance-interference model. This method provided adequate results in terms of XSs and k-eff. The results were verified first by the comparison of RIFs with the exact RIFs, and then comparing the XSs with the McCARD calculations for the homogeneous configurations, with burned fuel containing a mixture of resonant nuclides at different burnups and temperatures. The RIFs and XSs for the mixture showed good agreement, which verified the accuracy of the RIF evaluation using the proposed method. The method was then verified by comparing the XSs for the virtual environment for reactor application-benchmark pin-cell problem, as well as the heterogeneous pin cell containing burned fuel with McCARD. The method works well for homogeneous, as well as heterogeneous

  3. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlak, Mariusz [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Gagarina 7, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas [Department of Chemical Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Moiseyev, Nimrod [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Faculty of Physics, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment {sup 4}He(1s2s {sup 3}S) + HD(1s{sup 2}) → {sup 4}He(1s{sup 2}) + HD{sup +}(1s) + e{sup −} [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings.

  4. Resonance circuits for adiabatic circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Schlachta

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the possible techniques to reduces the power consumption in digital CMOS circuits is to slow down the charge transport. This slowdown can be achieved by introducing an inductor in the charging path. Additionally, the inductor can act as an energy storage element, conserving the energy that is normally dissipated during discharging. Together with the parasitic capacitances from the circuit a LCresonant circuit is formed.

  5. The adiabatic energy change of plasma electrons and the frame dependence of the cross-shock potential at collisionless magnetosonic shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, C. C.; Scudder, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The adiabatic energy gain of electrons in the stationary electric and magnetic field structure of collisionless shock waves was examined analytically in reference to conditions of the earth's bow shock. The study was performed to characterize the behavior of electrons interacting with the cross-shock potential. A normal incidence frame (NIF) was adopted in order to calculate the reversible energy change across a time stationary shock, and comparisons were made with predictions made by the de Hoffman-Teller (HT) model (1950). The electron energy gain, about 20-50 eV, is demonstrated to be consistent with a 200-500 eV potential jump in the bow shock quasi-perpendicular geometry. The electrons lose energy working against the solar wind motional electric field. The reversible energy process is close to that modeled by HT, which predicts that the motional electric field vanishes and the electron energy gain from the electric potential is equated to the ion energy loss to the potential.

  6. Adiabatic Quantum Search in Open Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Dominik S; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Knap, Michael; Yao, Norman Y; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2016-10-07

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms represent a promising approach to universal quantum computation. In isolated systems, a key limitation to such algorithms is the presence of avoided level crossings, where gaps become extremely small. In open quantum systems, the fundamental robustness of adiabatic algorithms remains unresolved. Here, we study the dynamics near an avoided level crossing associated with the adiabatic quantum search algorithm, when the system is coupled to a generic environment. At zero temperature, we find that the algorithm remains scalable provided the noise spectral density of the environment decays sufficiently fast at low frequencies. By contrast, higher order scattering processes render the algorithm inefficient at any finite temperature regardless of the spectral density, implying that no quantum speedup can be achieved. Extensions and implications for other adiabatic quantum algorithms will be discussed.

  7. Adiabatic Quantum Search in Open Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Dominik S.; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Knap, Michael; Yao, Norman Y.; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2016-10-01

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms represent a promising approach to universal quantum computation. In isolated systems, a key limitation to such algorithms is the presence of avoided level crossings, where gaps become extremely small. In open quantum systems, the fundamental robustness of adiabatic algorithms remains unresolved. Here, we study the dynamics near an avoided level crossing associated with the adiabatic quantum search algorithm, when the system is coupled to a generic environment. At zero temperature, we find that the algorithm remains scalable provided the noise spectral density of the environment decays sufficiently fast at low frequencies. By contrast, higher order scattering processes render the algorithm inefficient at any finite temperature regardless of the spectral density, implying that no quantum speedup can be achieved. Extensions and implications for other adiabatic quantum algorithms will be discussed.

  8. Formalism for neutron cross section covariances in the resonance region using kernel approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblozinsky, P.; Cho,Y-S.; Matoon,C.M.; Mughabghab,S.F.

    2010-04-09

    We describe analytical formalism for estimating neutron radiative capture and elastic scattering cross section covariances in the resolved resonance region. We use capture and scattering kernels as the starting point and show how to get average cross sections in broader energy bins, derive analytical expressions for cross section sensitivities, and deduce cross section covariances from the resonance parameter uncertainties in the recently published Atlas of Neutron Resonances. The formalism elucidates the role of resonance parameter correlations which become important if several strong resonances are located in one energy group. Importance of potential scattering uncertainty as well as correlation between potential scattering and resonance scattering is also examined. Practical application of the formalism is illustrated on {sup 55}Mn(n,{gamma}) and {sup 55}Mn(n,el).

  9. Quasi-adiabatic transport in Mercury's magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcourt, Dominique; Malova, Helmi; Zelenyi, Lev

    2017-04-01

    MESSENGER observations have revealed that the magnetotail of Mercury is fairly dynamical, possibly subjected to series of magnetic field line dipolarization on time scales of a few seconds. Because of the sharp reversal of the magnetic field, ions may not travel adiabatically in this region of space, and their behavior can be organized according to different categories. Among these categories, quasi-adiabatic (Speiser) ions are such that they experience negligible net change of magnetic moment upon crossing of the field reversal and can thus travel back to low altitudes. We examine the robustness of this quasi-adiabatic behavior during magnetic field line dipolarization where ions are subjected to a large induced electric field. We demonstrate that, although this surging electric field possibly yields substantial nonadiabatic heating, quasi-adiabaticity is robust for ions with velocities larger than the peak ExB drift speed, a behavior that we refer to as "strong" quasi-adiabaticity (as opposed to "weak" quasi-adiabaticity that is violated during dipolarization). We show that the impulsive energization of such quasi-adiabatic ions during dipolarization events can lead to prominent energy-time dispersion structures at low altitudes.

  10. Isothermal and Adiabatic Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNairy, William W.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the working of the Adiabatic Gas Law Apparatus, a useful tool for measuring the pressure, temperature, and volume of a variety of gases undergoing compressions and expansions. Describes the adaptation of this apparatus to perform isothermal measurements and discusses the theory behind the adiabatic and isothermal processes. (JRH)

  11. Adiabatic turbocompound diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamo, R.; Bryzik, W.

    1984-02-01

    The research and development of an adiabatic turbocompound engine have shown that the concept is feasible. The ability to meet the performance and sociability goals of the future power plants has been demonstrated. Low brake specific fuel consumption, low smoke and particulates, better NO /SUB x/ -BSFC trade-off, excellent multifuel capability, white smoke suppression, and potentially lower maintenance and greater reliability and durability are some of the attributes. The absence of the water cooling system adds to its attractiveness because of lower installed weight, cost, and reduction in parasitic losses. The operating environment of an adiabatic engine is shown as the basis for analysis and designing of adiabatic components. The types of material which can satisfy the needs of an adiabatic engine are presented. These materials include high temperature metals, high performance ceramics, and glass ceramics. The use of a turbocompound system to utilize the increased exhaust energy of an adiabatic engine is covered. A minimum fuel consumption of 0.285 lb/bhp-hr was achieved at 200 psi BMEP. Although the technical feasibility and viability of an adiabatic engine was demonstrated, the adiabatic diesel engine has problems which must be solved before it becomes a commercially viable product. These problem areas where more work is required are discussed.

  12. Quantum adiabatic machine learning

    CERN Document Server

    Pudenz, Kristen L

    2011-01-01

    We develop an approach to machine learning and anomaly detection via quantum adiabatic evolution. In the training phase we identify an optimal set of weak classifiers, to form a single strong classifier. In the testing phase we adiabatically evolve one or more strong classifiers on a superposition of inputs in order to find certain anomalous elements in the classification space. Both the training and testing phases are executed via quantum adiabatic evolution. We apply and illustrate this approach in detail to the problem of software verification and validation.

  13. PRACTICAL METHOD FOR ESTIMATING NEUTRON CROSS SECTION COVARIANCES IN THE RESONANCE REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Y.S.; Oblozinsky, P.; Mughabghab,S.F.; Mattoon,C.M.; Herman,M.

    2010-04-30

    Recent evaluations of neutron cross section covariances in the resolved resonance region reveal the need for further research in this area. Major issues include declining uncertainties in multigroup representations and proper treatment of scattering radius uncertainty. To address these issues, the present work introduces a practical method based on kernel approximation using resonance parameter uncertainties from the Atlas of Neutron Resonances. Analytical expressions derived for average cross sections in broader energy bins along with their sensitivities provide transparent tool for determining cross section uncertainties. The role of resonance-resonance and bin-bin correlations is specifically studied. As an example we apply this approach to estimate (n,{gamma}) and (n,el) covariances for the structural material {sup 55}Mn.

  14. Level-crossing and modal structure in microdroplet resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Sarah T; Shuvayev, Vladimir; Deych, Lev; Martin, Leopoldo L; Carmon, Tal

    2016-06-13

    We fabricate a liquid-core liquid-clad microcavity that is coupled to a standard tapered fiber, and then experimentally map the whispering-gallery modes of this droplet resonator. The shape of our resonator is similar to a thin prolate spheroid, which makes space for many high-order transverse modes, suggesting that some of them will share the same resonance frequency. Indeed, we experimentally observe that more than half of the droplet's modes have a sibling having the same frequency (to within linewidth) and therefore exhibiting a standing interference-pattern.

  15. Level-crossing and modal structure in microdroplet resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Attar, Sarah T; Deych, Lev; Martin, Leopoldo L; Carmon, Tal

    2016-01-01

    We fabricate a liquid-core liquid-clad microcavity that is coupled to a standard tapered fiber, and then experimentally map the whispering-gallery modes of this droplet resonator. The shape of our resonator is similar to a thin prolate spheroid, which makes space for many high-order transverse modes, suggesting that some of them will share the same resonance frequency. Indeed, we experimentally observe that more than half of the droplet's modes have a sibling having the same frequency (to within linewidth) and therefore exhibiting a standing interference-pattern.

  16. Resonant tunneling quantum waveguides of variable cross-section, asymptotics, numerics, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Baskin, Lev; Plamenevskii, Boris; Sarafanov, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    This volume studies electron resonant tunneling in two- and three-dimensional quantum waveguides of variable cross-sections in the time-independent approach. Mathematical models are suggested for the resonant tunneling and develop asymptotic and numerical approaches for investigating the models. Also, schemes are presented for several electronics devices based on the phenomenon of resonant tunneling.   Devices based on the phenomenon of electron resonant tunneling are widely used in electronics. Efforts are directed towards refining properties of resonance structures. There are prospects for building new nanosize electronics elements based on quantum dot systems.   However, the role of resonance structure can also be given to a quantum wire of variable cross-section. Instead of an "electrode - quantum dot - electrode" system, one can use a quantum wire with two narrows. A waveguide narrow is an effective potential barrier for longitudinal electron motion along a waveguide. The part of the waveguide between ...

  17. Adiabatic markovian dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreshkov, Ognyan; Calsamiglia, John

    2010-07-30

    We propose a theory of adiabaticity in quantum markovian dynamics based on a decomposition of the Hilbert space induced by the asymptotic behavior of the Lindblad semigroup. A central idea of our approach is that the natural generalization of the concept of eigenspace of the Hamiltonian in the case of markovian dynamics is a noiseless subsystem with a minimal noisy cofactor. Unlike previous attempts to define adiabaticity for open systems, our approach deals exclusively with physical entities and provides a simple, intuitive picture at the Hilbert-space level, linking the notion of adiabaticity to the theory of noiseless subsystems. As two applications of our theory, we propose a general framework for decoherence-assisted computation in noiseless codes and a dissipation-driven approach to holonomic computation based on adiabatic dragging of subsystems that is generally not achievable by nondissipative means.

  18. Adiabatic quantum computing

    OpenAIRE

    Lobe, Elisabeth; Stollenwerk, Tobias; Tröltzsch, Anke

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, the field of adiabatic quantum computing has gained importance due to the advances in the realisation of such machines, especially by the company D-Wave Systems. These machines are suited to solve discrete optimisation problems which are typically very hard to solve on a classical computer. Due to the quantum nature of the device it is assumed that there is a substantial speedup compared to classical HPC facilities. We explain the basic principles of adiabatic ...

  19. Canonical-ensemble state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) strategy for problems with more diabatic than adiabatic states: Charge-bond resonance in monomethine cyanines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Seth

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews basic results from a theory of the a priori classical probabilities (weights) in state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) models. It addresses how the classical probabilities limit the invariance of the self-consistency condition to transformations of the complete active space configuration interaction (CAS-CI) problem. Such transformations are of interest for choosing representations of the SA-CASSCF solution that are diabatic with respect to some interaction. I achieve the known result that a SA-CASSCF can be self-consistently transformed only within degenerate subspaces of the CAS-CI ensemble density matrix. For uniformly distributed ("microcanonical") SA-CASSCF ensembles, self-consistency is invariant to any unitary CAS-CI transformation that acts locally on the ensemble support. Most SA-CASSCF applications in current literature are microcanonical. A problem with microcanonical SA-CASSCF models for problems with "more diabatic than adiabatic" states is described. The problem is that not all diabatic energies and couplings are self-consistently resolvable. A canonical-ensemble SA-CASSCF strategy is proposed to solve the problem. For canonical-ensemble SA-CASSCF, the equilibrated ensemble is a Boltzmann density matrix parametrized by its own CAS-CI Hamiltonian and a Lagrange multiplier acting as an inverse "temperature," unrelated to the physical temperature. Like the convergence criterion for microcanonical-ensemble SA-CASSCF, the equilibration condition for canonical-ensemble SA-CASSCF is invariant to transformations that act locally on the ensemble CAS-CI density matrix. The advantage of a canonical-ensemble description is that more adiabatic states can be included in the support of the ensemble without running into convergence problems. The constraint on the dimensionality of the problem is relieved by the introduction of an energy constraint. The method is illustrated with a complete active space valence

  20. Adiabatic quantum computation along quasienergies

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Atushi

    2009-01-01

    The parametric deformations of quasienergies and eigenvectors of unitary operators are applied to the design of quantum adiabatic algorithms. The conventional, standard adiabatic quantum computation proceeds along eigenenergies of parameter-dependent Hamiltonians. By contrast, discrete adiabatic computation utilizes adiabatic passage along the quasienergies of parameter-dependent unitary operators. For example, such computation can be realized by a concatenation of parameterized quantum circuits, with an adiabatic though inevitably discrete change of the parameter. A design principle of adiabatic passage along quasienergy is recently proposed: Cheon's quasienergy and eigenspace anholonomies on unitary operators is available to realize anholonomic adiabatic algorithms [Tanaka and Miyamoto, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 160407 (2007)], which compose a nontrivial family of discrete adiabatic algorithms. It is straightforward to port a standard adiabatic algorithm to an anholonomic adiabatic one, except an introduction of...

  1. Nonadiabatic exchange dynamics during adiabatic frequency sweeps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara, Thomas M

    2016-04-01

    A Bloch equation analysis that includes relaxation and exchange effects during an adiabatic frequency swept pulse is presented. For a large class of sweeps, relaxation can be incorporated using simple first order perturbation theory. For anisochronous exchange, new expressions are derived for exchange augmented rotating frame relaxation. For isochronous exchange between sites with distinct relaxation rate constants outside the extreme narrowing limit, simple criteria for adiabatic exchange are derived and demonstrate that frequency sweeps commonly in use may not be adiabatic with regard to exchange unless the exchange rates are much larger than the relaxation rates. Otherwise, accurate assessment of the sensitivity to exchange dynamics will require numerical integration of the rate equations. Examples of this situation are given for experimentally relevant parameters believed to hold for in-vivo tissue. These results are of significance in the study of exchange induced contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  2. POLIDENT: A Module for Generating Continuous-Energy Cross Sections from ENDF Resonance Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, M.E.; Greene, N.M.

    2000-12-01

    POLIDENT (Point Libraries of Data from ENDF/B Tapes) is an AMPX module that accesses the resonance parameters from File 2 of an ENDF/B library and constructs the continuous-energy cross sections in the resonance energy region. The cross sections in the resonance range are subsequently combined with the File 3 background data to construct the cross-section representation over the complete energy range. POLIDENT has the capability to process all resonance reactions that are identified in File 2 of the ENDF/B library. In addition, the code has the capability to process the single- and multi-level Breit-Wigner, Reich-Moore and Adler-Adler resonance formalisms that are identified in File 2. POLIDENT uses a robust energy-mesh-generation scheme that determines the minimum, maximum and points of inflection in the cross-section function in the resolved-resonance region. Furthermore, POLIDENT processes all continuous-energy cross-section reactions that are identified in File 3 of the ENDF/B library and outputs all reactions in an ENDF/B TAB1 format that can be accessed by other AMPX modules.

  3. POLIDENT: A Module for Generating Continuous-Energy Cross Sections from ENDF Resonance Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, M.E.

    2000-10-20

    POLIDENT (POint LIbraries of Data from ENDF/B Tapes) is an AMPX module that accesses the resonance parameters from File 2 of an ENDF/B library and constructs the continuous-energy cross sections in the resonance energy region. The cross sections in the resonance range are subsequently combined with the File 3 background data to construct the cross-section representation over the complete energy range. POLIDENT has the capability to process all resonance reactions that are identified in File 2 of the ENDF/B library. In addition, the code has the capability to process the single- and multi-level Breit-Wigner, Reich-Moore and Adler-Adler resonance formalisms that are identified in File 2. POLIDENT uses a robust energy-mesh-generation scheme that determines the minimum, maximum and points of inflection in the cross-section function in the resolved-resonance region. Furthermore, POLIDENT processes all continuous-energy cross-section reactions that are identified in File 3 of the ENDF/B library and outputs all reactions in an ENDF/B TAB1 format that can be accessed by other AMPX modules.

  4. Resonant-tunnelling-assisted crossing for subwavelenght plasmonic slot waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2008-01-01

    is practically eliminated and the throughput reaches the unity on resonance. Simulation results are in agreement with those from coupled-mode theory. Taking the material loss into account, the symmetry properties of the modes are preserved and the crosstalk remains suppressed, while the throughput is naturally...

  5. UV-Vis Ratiometric Resonance Synchronous Spectroscopy for Determination of Nanoparticle and Molecular Optical Cross Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Charles B; Zhou, Yadong; Zou, Shengli; Zhang, Dongmao

    2016-03-01

    Demonstrated herein is a UV-vis Ratiometric Resonance Synchronous Spectroscopic (R2S2, pronounced as "R-two-S-two" for simplicity) technique where the R2S2 spectrum is obtained by dividing the resonance synchronous spectrum of a NP-containing solution by the solvent resonance synchronous spectrum. Combined with conventional UV-vis measurements, this R2S2 method enables experimental quantification of the absolute optical cross sections for a wide range of molecular and nanoparticle (NP) materials that range optically from pure photon absorbers or scatterers to simultaneous photon absorbers and scatterers, simultaneous photon absorbers and emitters, and all the way to simultaneous photon absorbers, scatterers, and emitters in the UV-vis wavelength region. Example applications of this R2S2 method were demonstrated for quantifying the Rayleigh scattering cross sections of solvents including water and toluene, absorption and resonance light scattering cross sections for plasmonic gold nanoparticles, and absorption, scattering, and on-resonance fluorescence cross sections for semiconductor quantum dots (Qdots). On-resonance fluorescence quantum yields were quantified for the model molecular fluorophore Eosin Y and fluorescent Qdots CdSe and CdSe/ZnS. The insights and methodology presented in this work should be of broad significance in physical and biological science research that involves photon/matter interactions.

  6. Vibrational dynamics of the bifluoride ion. II. Adiabatic separation and proton dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epa, V. C.; Thorson, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Vibrational dynamics of the bifluoride ion FHF-, which exhibits strongly anharmonic and nonseparable vibrations, is studied using the extended ab initio model potential surface described in the first paper of this series. Adiabatic separation of the proton motion from the F-F (ν1) motion forms a zero-order basis for description, although strong coupling of adiabatic states by the ν1 motion is important in higher vibrational levels and must be considered to understand the spectrum. The adiabatic protonic eigenstates at F-F separations R from 3.75 to 6.40 a.u. have been determined using the self-consistent field approximation in prolate spheroidal coordinates to provide a basis set for configuration interaction expansion of the exact eigenstates. 78 SCF eigenstates (21 σg, 21 σu, 21 πu, and 15 πg) were computed by ``exact'' numerical solution of the SCF equations. The adiabatic CI eigenstates are shown to be converged in energy to better than 1.0 cm-1 for the ground state of each symmetry type and usually better than 10 cm-1 for the lowest three to five states, and pass critical tests of accuracy such as the Hellmann-Feynman theorem. The resulting CI potential energy curves closely resemble corresponding SCF energy curves and justify the concept of mode separation even in this very anharmonic system. The adiabatic CI potential energy curves explain most aspects of the dynamics relevant to the IR and Raman spectra of FHF- (e.g., in KHF2), and calculations of ν1 dynamics within the adiabatic approximation suffice to assign most of the observed IR spectrum of KHF2(s) (to about 6000 cm-1). States corresponding qualitatively to modal overtone and combination levels such as 3ν2 and (ν2+2ν3) however exhibit avoided crossings in the neighborhood of the equilibrium configuration and ``Fermi resonance'' involving interactions of two or more such adiabatic states via the ν1 motion must be treated by close-coupling to predict both frequencies and intensities in the

  7. Support of NASA ADR/ Cross-Enterprise NRA Advanced Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators for Continuous Cooling from 10K to 50mK, Development of a Heat Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Paul L.

    2005-01-01

    Mechanical heat switches are used in conjunction with sorption refrigerators, adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators and for other cryogenic tasks including the pre-cooling cryogenic systems. They use a mechanical actuator which closes Au plated Cu jaws on an Au plated Cu bar. The thermal conductance in the closed position is essentially independent of the area of the jaws and proportional to the force applied. It varies linearly with T. It is approximately 10mW/K for 200 N at 1.5K. In some applications, the heat switch can be driven from outside the cryostat by a rotating rod and a screw. Such heat switches are available commercially from several sources. In other applications, including systems for space, it is desirable to drive the switch using a cold linear motor, or solenoid. Superconducting windings are used at temperatures s 4.2K to minimize power dissipation, but are not appropriate for pre-cooling a system at higher temperatures. This project was intended to improve the design of solenoid activated mechanical heat switches and to provide such switches as required to support the development of Advanced Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators for Continuous Cooling from 10 K to 50 mK at GSFC. By the time funding began in 5/1/01, the immediate need for mechanical heat switches at GSFC had subsided but, at the same time, the opportunity had arisen to improve the design of mechanical heat switching by incorporating a "latching solenoid". In this device, the solenoid current is required only for changing the state of the switch and not during the whole time that the switch is closed.

  8. Neutron cross section covariances in the resonance region: 52Cr, 56Fe, 58Ni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblozinsky, P.; Cho, Y.-S.; Mattoon, C.M.; Mughabghab, S.F.

    2010-08-03

    We evaluated covariances for neutron capture and elastic scattering cross sections on major structural materials, {sup 52}Cr, {sup 56}Fe and {sup 58}Ni, in the resonance region which extends beyond 800 keV for each of them. Use was made of the recently developed covariance formalism based on kernel approximation along with data in the Atlas of Neutron Resonances. The data of most interest for AFCI applications, elastic scattering cross section uncertainties at energies above about few hundred keV, are on the level of about 12% for {sup 52}Cr, 7-8% for {sup 56}Fe and 5-6% for {sup 58}Ni.

  9. Dependence of adiabatic population transfer on pulse profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Dasgupta; T kushwaha; D Goswami

    2006-06-01

    Control of population transfer by rapid adiabatic passage has been an established technique wherein the exact amplitude profile of the shaped pulse is considered to be insignificant. We study the effect of ultrafast shaped pulses for two-level systems, by density-matrix approach. However, we find that adiabaticity depends simultaneously on pulse profile as well as the frequency modulation under non-resonant conditions.

  10. Low loss optical waveguide crossing based on octagonal resonant cavity coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohd. Zahed M. Khan

    2009-01-01

    A waveguide crossing utilizing a high index contrast material system is presented. The structure is based on coupling with an octagonal resonant cavity inscrted at the waveguide junction. It also employs four identical square metal strips placed at the four comers of the waveguide crossing. The spectral response of the structure calculated using the method of line numerical technique, in general, shows a high power transmission in the forward arm with sufficiently low crosstalk and fraction of radiated power.

  11. Double-hump resonance structure of the cross sections for electron impact ionization of Ar5+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Configuration-average distorted-wave calculations are carried out for electron-impact ionization of Ar5+. Both direct ionization and the indirect excitation autoionization processes are included in our calculations. Our theoretical values are in quite reasonable agreement with the experimental data. The indirect processes contribute up to 50% to the total ionization cross sections. The possible origin of double-hump resonance structure of the cross sections is demonstrated and the contributions of metastable states are also taken into account.

  12. Canonical-ensemble state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) strategy for problems with more diabatic than adiabatic states: Charge-bond resonance in monomethine cyanines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Seth, E-mail: seth.olsen@uq.edu.au [School of Mathematics and Physics, The University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2015-01-28

    This paper reviews basic results from a theory of the a priori classical probabilities (weights) in state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) models. It addresses how the classical probabilities limit the invariance of the self-consistency condition to transformations of the complete active space configuration interaction (CAS-CI) problem. Such transformations are of interest for choosing representations of the SA-CASSCF solution that are diabatic with respect to some interaction. I achieve the known result that a SA-CASSCF can be self-consistently transformed only within degenerate subspaces of the CAS-CI ensemble density matrix. For uniformly distributed (“microcanonical”) SA-CASSCF ensembles, self-consistency is invariant to any unitary CAS-CI transformation that acts locally on the ensemble support. Most SA-CASSCF applications in current literature are microcanonical. A problem with microcanonical SA-CASSCF models for problems with “more diabatic than adiabatic” states is described. The problem is that not all diabatic energies and couplings are self-consistently resolvable. A canonical-ensemble SA-CASSCF strategy is proposed to solve the problem. For canonical-ensemble SA-CASSCF, the equilibrated ensemble is a Boltzmann density matrix parametrized by its own CAS-CI Hamiltonian and a Lagrange multiplier acting as an inverse “temperature,” unrelated to the physical temperature. Like the convergence criterion for microcanonical-ensemble SA-CASSCF, the equilibration condition for canonical-ensemble SA-CASSCF is invariant to transformations that act locally on the ensemble CAS-CI density matrix. The advantage of a canonical-ensemble description is that more adiabatic states can be included in the support of the ensemble without running into convergence problems. The constraint on the dimensionality of the problem is relieved by the introduction of an energy constraint. The method is illustrated with a complete active space

  13. Semi adiabatic theory of seasonal Markov processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talkner, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The dynamics of many natural and technical systems are essentially influenced by a periodic forcing. Analytic solutions of the equations of motion for periodically driven systems are generally not known. Simulations, numerical solutions or in some limiting cases approximate analytic solutions represent the known approaches to study the dynamics of such systems. Besides the regime of weak periodic forces where linear response theory works, the limit of a slow driving force can often be treated analytically using an adiabatic approximation. For this approximation to hold all intrinsic processes must be fast on the time-scale of a period of the external driving force. We developed a perturbation theory for periodically driven Markovian systems that covers the adiabatic regime but also works if the system has a single slow mode that may even be slower than the driving force. We call it the semi adiabatic approximation. Some results of this approximation for a system exhibiting stochastic resonance which usually takes place within the semi adiabatic regime are indicated. (author) 1 fig., 8 refs.

  14. Dual-band plasmonic resonator based on Jerusalem cross-shaped nanoapertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Arif E.; Kaya, Sabri; Mertiri, Alket; Aslan, Ekin; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Altug, Hatice; Turkmen, Mustafa

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we both experimentally and numerically introduce a dual-resonant metamaterial based on subwavelength Jerusalem cross-shaped apertures. We numerically investigate the physical origin of the dual-resonant behavior, originating from the constituting aperture elements, through finite difference time domain calculations. Our numerical calculations show that at the dual-resonances, the aperture system supports large and easily accessible local electromagnetic fields. In order to experimentally realize the aperture system, we utilize a high-precision and lift-off free fabrication method based on electron-beam lithography. We also introduce a fine-tuning mechanism for controlling the dual-resonant spectral response through geometrical device parameters. Finally, we show the aperture system's highly advantageous far- and near-field characteristics through numerical calculations on refractive index sensitivity. The quantitative analyses on the availability of the local fields supported by the aperture system are employed to explain the grounds behind the sensitivity of each spectral feature within the dual-resonant behavior. Possessing dual-resonances with large and accessible electromagnetic fields, Jerusalem cross-shaped apertures can be highly advantageous for wide range of applications demanding multiple spectral features with strong nearfield characteristics.

  15. Semiconductor adiabatic qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Malcolm S.; Witzel, Wayne; Jacobson, Noah Tobias; Ganti, Anand; Landahl, Andrew J.; Lilly, Michael; Nguyen, Khoi Thi; Bishop, Nathaniel; Carr, Stephen M.; Bussmann, Ezra; Nielsen, Erik; Levy, James Ewers; Blume-Kohout, Robin J.; Rahman, Rajib

    2016-12-27

    A quantum computing device that includes a plurality of semiconductor adiabatic qubits is described herein. The qubits are programmed with local biases and coupling terms between qubits that represent a problem of interest. The qubits are initialized by way of a tuneable parameter, a local tunnel coupling within each qubit, such that the qubits remain in a ground energy state, and that initial state is represented by the qubits being in a superposition of |0> and |1> states. The parameter is altered over time adiabatically or such that relaxation mechanisms maintain a large fraction of ground state occupation through decreasing the tunnel coupling barrier within each qubit with the appropriate schedule. The final state when tunnel coupling is effectively zero represents the solution state to the problem represented in the |0> and |1> basis, which can be accurately read at each qubit location.

  16. Adiabatic Quantum Simulators

    CERN Document Server

    Biamonte, J D; Whitfield, J D; Fitzsimons, J; Aspuru-Guzik, A

    2010-01-01

    In his famous 1981 talk, Feynman proposed that unlike classical computers, which would presumably experience an exponential slowdown when simulating quantum phenomena, a universal quantum simulator would not. An ideal quantum simulator would be error resistant, easily controllable, and built using existing technology. Moving away from gate-model and projective measurement based implementations of quantum computing may offer a less resource-intensive, and consequently a more feasible solution. Here we consider an adiabatic quantum simulator which simulates the ground state properties of sparse Hamiltonians consisting of one- and two-body interaction terms, using sparse Hamiltonians with at most three-body interactions. Properties of such Hamiltonians can be well approximated with Hamiltonians containing only two-local terms. The register holding the simulated ground state is brought adiabatically into interaction with a probe qubit, followed by a single diabatic gate operation on the probe which then undergoes...

  17. Cross-polarization coupling and switching in an open nano-meta-resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabelak, W.; Nasalski, W.

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrate the reconfiguration process of optical beam fields circulating in an open nano-meta-resonator cavity. The cavity is composed of four corners or quadrants of space filled alternatively with dielectric and metamaterial media. The media are assumed to be lossless, nondispersive and of parameters precluding impedance matching at the boundaries between the subsequent corners. Beam path retracement in the cavity is obtained from a resonance condition of phase compensation along each optical ray contributed to the circulating beam. Cross-polarization coupling between TM and TE components of elegant higher-order Hermite-Gaussian beams propagating in the resonator is analysed. The existence of the phenomena of beam excitation, filtering and switching predicted on these grounds is explicitly confirmed by numerical simulations. All phenomena described depend substantially on a field cross-sectional diameter of the circulating beams.

  18. Sensitivity of reactor multiplication factor to positions of cross-section resonances

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V GOPALAKRISHNAN; K R VIJAYARAGHAVAN

    2017-09-01

    Neutron–nuclear interaction cross-section is sensitive to neutron kinetic energy and most nuclei exhibit resonance behaviour at specific energies within the resonance energy range, spanning from a fraction of an electron volt to several tens or hundreds of kilo electron volts. The energy positions of these resonances correspond to the excitation energy levels of the compound nucleus that are formed as intermediate states during the interaction. Though these positions, thanks to sophistication in science and technology, are known reasonably precisely for the materials of reactor interest, deviations or spread in this data among different evaluations cannot be ruled out. In this work, the effect of such a spread in the resonance positions of the reactor materials on the multiplication factor of an infinite reactor, is obtained. The study shows that the effect on a thermal reactor is more pronounced than on a fast reactor.

  19. Broadband Metamaterial Reflectors for Polarization Manipulation Based on Cross/Ring Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We presented the investigation of broadband metamaterial reflector for polarization manipulation based on cross/ring resonators. It is demonstrated that the meta¬material reflector can convert the linearly polarized inci¬dent wave to its cross polarized wave or circularly polar¬ized wave. Due to the multiple resonances at neighboring frequencies, the proposed reflector presents broadband property and high efficiency. The measured fraction band¬width of cross polarization conversion is 55.5% with effi¬ciency higher than 80%. Furthermore, a broadband circu¬lar polarizer is designed by adjusting the dimension para¬meters and the measured fraction bandwidth exceeds 30%.

  20. Improving the positive feedback adiabatic logic familiy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fischer

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Positive Feedback Adiabatic Logic (PFAL shows the lowest energy dissipation among adiabatic logic families based on cross-coupled transistors, due to the reduction of both adiabatic and non-adiabatic losses. The dissipation primarily depends on the resistance of the charging path, which consists of a single p-channel MOSFET during the recovery phase. In this paper, a new logic family called Improved PFAL (IPFAL is proposed, where all n- and pchannel devices are swapped so that the charge can be recovered through an n-channel MOSFET. This allows to decrease the resistance of the charging path up to a factor of 2, and it enables a significant reduction of the energy dissipation. Simulations based on a 0.13µm CMOS process confirm the improvements in terms of power consumption over a large frequency range. However, the same simple design rule, which enables in PFAL an additional reduction of the dissipation by optimal transistor sizing, does not apply to IPFAL. Therefore, the influence of several sources of dissipation for a generic IPFAL gate is illustrated and discussed, in order to lower the power consumption and achieve better performance.

  1. Lithographically defined aluminum nitride cross-sectional Lamé mode resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G.; Cassella, C.; Qian, Z.; Hummel, G. E.; Rinaldi, M.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports on aluminum nitride (AlN) cross-sectional Lamé mode resonators (CLMRs) showing high electromechanical coupling coefficient (kt{2} ) in excess of 4% in a lithographically defined 307 MHz frequency range around 920 MHz. In addition, we report the performance of a CLMR showing a figure of merit (FoM, defined as the product of quality factor, Q, and kt{2} ) in excess of 85. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, such FoM value is the highest reported for AlN resonators using interdigitated metal electrodes (IDTs).

  2. Plasma adiabatic lapse rate

    CERN Document Server

    Amendt, Peter; Wilks, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The plasma analog of an adiabatic lapse rate (or temperature variation with height) in atmospheric physics is obtained. A new source of plasma temperature gradient in a binary ion species mixture is found that is proportional to the concentration gradient and difference in average ionization states . Application to inertial-confinement-fusion implosions indicates a potentially strong effect in plastic (CH) ablators that is not modeled with mainline (single-fluid) simulations. An associated plasma thermodiffusion coefficient is derived, and charge-state diffusion in a single-species plasma is also predicted.

  3. Adiabatic quantum simulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Biamonte

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In his famous 1981 talk, Feynman proposed that unlike classical computers, which would presumably experience an exponential slowdown when simulating quantum phenomena, a universal quantum simulator would not. An ideal quantum simulator would be controllable, and built using existing technology. In some cases, moving away from gate-model-based implementations of quantum computing may offer a more feasible solution for particular experimental implementations. Here we consider an adiabatic quantum simulator which simulates the ground state properties of sparse Hamiltonians consisting of one- and two-local interaction terms, using sparse Hamiltonians with at most three-local interactions. Properties of such Hamiltonians can be well approximated with Hamiltonians containing only two-local terms. The register holding the simulated ground state is brought adiabatically into interaction with a probe qubit, followed by a single diabatic gate operation on the probe which then undergoes free evolution until measured. This allows one to recover e.g. the ground state energy of the Hamiltonian being simulated. Given a ground state, this scheme can be used to verify the QMA-complete problem LOCAL HAMILTONIAN, and is therefore likely more powerful than classical computing.

  4. Improvement of the chirality near avoided resonance crossing in optical microcavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONGQingHai[1,2; GUZhiYuan[1; ZHANGNan[1; WANGKaiYang[1; YINingBo[1; XIAOShuMin[1

    2015-01-01

    Chirality is one of the important phenomena at the vicinity of exceptional point (EP). The conventional understanding is that the chirality is determined by asymmetrical scattering efficiency (η), which reaches to zero only when the resonance ap- proaches EP. Here we study the possibility to enhance the chirality in open systems with a more robust mechanism. By com- bining chirality with avoided resonance crossing, we show that the chirality and 7 can be dramatically modified. Taking a spi- ral shaped annular cavity as an example, we show that the chirality of optical resonances can be significantly improved when two sets of chiral states approach each other, The imbalance between counterclockwise (CCW) components and clockwise (CW) components has been enhanced by more than an order of magnitude. Our research provides a new route to tailor and control the chirality in open systems.

  5. Thermal neutron capture and resonance integral cross sections of 45Sc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Do, Nguyen; Duc Khue, Pham; Tien Thanh, Kim; Thi Hien, Nguyen; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Kwangsoo; Shin, Sung-Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Lee, Manwoo

    2015-11-01

    The thermal neutron cross section (σ0) and resonance integral (I0) of the 45Sc(n,γ)46Sc reaction have been measured relative to that of the 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction by means of the activation method. High-purity natural scandium and gold foils without and with a cadmium cover of 0.5 mm thickness were irradiated with moderated pulsed neutrons produced from the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF). The induced activities in the activated foils were measured with a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. In order to improve the accuracy of the experimental results the counting losses caused by the thermal (Gth) and resonance (Gepi) neutron self-shielding, the γ-ray attenuation (Fg) and the true γ-ray coincidence summing effects were made. In addition, the effect of non-ideal epithermal spectrum was also taken into account by determining the neutron spectrum shape factor (α). The thermal neutron cross-section and resonance integral of the 45Sc(n,γ)46Sc reaction have been determined relative to the reference values of the 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction, with σo,Au = 98.65 ± 0.09 barn and Io,Au = 1550 ± 28 barn. The present thermal neutron cross section has been determined to be σo,Sc = 27.5 ± 0.8 barn. According to the definition of cadmium cut-off energy at 0.55 eV, the present resonance integral cross section has been determined to be Io,Sc = 12.4 ± 0.7 barn. The present results are compared with literature values and discussed.

  6. Integer spin resonance crossing at VEPP-4M with conservation of beam polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Barladyan, A K; Glukhov, S A; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Karnaev, S E; Levichev, E B; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Okunev, I N; Piminov, P A; Shamov, A G; Zhuravlev, A N

    2015-01-01

    A recently proposed method to preserve the electron beam polarization at the VEPP-4M collider during acceleration with crossing the integer spin resonance energy E=1763 MeV has been successfully applied. It is based on full decompensation of $ 0.6\\times3.3$ Tesla$\\times$meter integral of the KEDR detector longitudinal magnetic field due to s 'switched-off' state of the anti-solenoids.

  7. Absolute determination of cross sections for resonant Raman scattering on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Matthias; Beckhoff, Burkhard; Ulm, Gerhard; Kanngießer, Birgit

    2006-07-01

    We studied the resonant Raman scattering of x rays in the vicinity of the K absorption edge of silicon. The investigation was carried out at the plane grating monochromator beamline for undulator radiation of the PTB laboratory at BESSY II in Berlin. Cross sections were determined absolutely for a wide energy range of incident photons with small relative uncertainties employing calibrated instrumentation avoiding any reference samples. The experimentally determined values differ clearly from the theoretical ones found in the literature.

  8. Thermal neutron capture and resonance integral cross sections of {sup 45}Sc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Do, Nguyen; Duc Khue, Pham; Tien Thanh, Kim [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 10 Dao Tan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Thi Hien, Nguyen [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 10 Dao Tan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Department of Physics and Center for High Energy Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Guinyun, E-mail: gnkim@knu.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Center for High Energy Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwangsoo [Department of Physics and Center for High Energy Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sung-Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun [Department of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Manwoo [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan 619-953 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-01

    The thermal neutron cross section (σ{sub 0}) and resonance integral (I{sub 0}) of the {sup 45}Sc(n,γ){sup 46}Sc reaction have been measured relative to that of the {sup 197}Au(n,γ){sup 198}Au reaction by means of the activation method. High-purity natural scandium and gold foils without and with a cadmium cover of 0.5 mm thickness were irradiated with moderated pulsed neutrons produced from the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF). The induced activities in the activated foils were measured with a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. In order to improve the accuracy of the experimental results the counting losses caused by the thermal (G{sub th}) and resonance (G{sub epi}) neutron self-shielding, the γ-ray attenuation (F{sub g}) and the true γ-ray coincidence summing effects were made. In addition, the effect of non-ideal epithermal spectrum was also taken into account by determining the neutron spectrum shape factor (α). The thermal neutron cross-section and resonance integral of the {sup 45}Sc(n,γ){sup 46}Sc reaction have been determined relative to the reference values of the {sup 197}Au(n,γ){sup 198}Au reaction, with σ{sub o,Au} = 98.65 ± 0.09 barn and I{sub o,Au} = 1550 ± 28 barn. The present thermal neutron cross section has been determined to be σ{sub o,Sc} = 27.5 ± 0.8 barn. According to the definition of cadmium cut-off energy at 0.55 eV, the present resonance integral cross section has been determined to be I{sub o,Sc} = 12.4 ± 0.7 barn. The present results are compared with literature values and discussed.

  9. Extension of the Application of the generalized pole representation to the treatment of resonance cross sections.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, R. N.; Jammes, C.

    1999-03-12

    One reliable and convenient way of processing the cross sections in the resolved energy region is by use of the generalized pole representation, whereby the Doppler-broadening calculation can be carried out rigorously using the analytical approach. So far, its applications have been limited to cases with resonance parameters specified by the Reich-Moore formalism. Although such an approach, in principle, can be extended to all three remaining representations of resolved resonance parameters specified by the ENDF data format, there is no computational tool for handling such a task at present. Given that Breit-Wigner formalisms are probably the most widely used by any evaluated nuclear data library to represent cross sections, a special effort has to be made to convert the single level and multilevel Breit-Wigner resonance parameters to pole parameters. A FORTRAN computer code BW2PR has been developed for this purpose. Extensive calculations have been performed to demonstrate that the proposed method ensures the conservation of the information contained originally in Breit-Wigner resonance parameters. This will make it possible to apply the exact Doppler-broadening method to a larger collection of nuclides.

  10. Non-adiabatic dynamics of reactions of O(1D) with Xe, CO, NO2, and CO2 from crossed atomic and molecular beam experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boering, Kristie

    2015-03-01

    Reactions of the first excited state of atomic oxygen, O(1D), with small molecules such as CO, NO2, and CO2 continue to be of interest in aeronomy and atmospheric chemistry, thus providing additional motivation to understand the dynamics of these reactions and how well they are predicted by theory. In collaboration with Prof. Jim Lin of the Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taiwan, we have studied the dynamics of quenching and non-quenching reactions between O(1D) and various small molecules using a universal crossed atomic and molecular beam apparatus. New experimental results for the dynamics of quenching of O(1D) by Xe and CO will be presented and compared with previous results for NO2 (K.A. Mar, A.L. Van Wyngarden, C.-W. Liang, Y.T. Lee, J.J. Lin, K.A. Boering, J. Chem. Phys., 137, 044302, doi: 10.1063/1.4736567, 2012) and CO2 (M.J. Perri, A.L. Van Wyngarden, K.A. Boering, J.J. Lin, and Y.T. Lee, J. Chem. Phys., 119(16), 8213-8216, 2003; M.J. Perri, A.L. Van Wyngarden, J.J. Lin, Y.T. Lee, and K.A. Boering, J. Phys. Chem. A, 108(39), 7995-8001, doi: 10.1021/jp0485845, 2004). Among the most intriguing of the new results are for quenching of O(1D) by Xe, for which marked oscillations in the differential cross sections were observed for the O(3P) and Xe products. The shape and relative phase of the oscillatory structure depended strongly on collision energy. This behavior is likely due to the quantum nature of the collision dynamics, caused by interferences among multiple curve crossing pathways accessible during electronic quenching, known as Stueckelberg oscillations.

  11. Adiabatic paths and pseudoholomorphic curves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Armen; G.; Sergeev

    2005-01-01

    We consider the (2+1)-dimensional Abelian Higgs model, governed by the Ginzburg-Landau action functional and describe the adiabatic limit construction for this model. Then we switch to the 4-dimensional case and Show that the Taubes correspondence may be considered as a (2+2)-dimensional analogue of the adiabatic limit construction.

  12. Geometry of the Adiabatic Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Augusto Cesar; Ribeiro, Rafael Antunes; Ribeiro, Clyffe de Assis; Dieguez, Pedro Ruas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and pedagogical derivation of the quantum adiabatic theorem for two-level systems (a single qubit) based on geometrical structures of quantum mechanics developed by Anandan and Aharonov, among others. We have chosen to use only the minimum geometric structure needed for the understanding of the adiabatic theorem for this case.…

  13. Adiabatic Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Pinski, Sebastian D

    2011-01-01

    Adiabatic Quantum Computing (AQC) is a relatively new subject in the world of quantum computing, let alone Physics. Inspiration for this project has come from recent controversy around D-Wave Systems in British Columbia, Canada, who claim to have built a working AQC which is now commercially available and hope to be distributing a 1024 qubit chip by the end of 2008. Their 16 qubit chip was demonstrated online for the Supercomputing 2007 conference within which a few small problems were solved; although the explanations that journalists and critics received were minimal and very little was divulged in the question and answer session. This 'unconvincing' demonstration has caused physicists and computer scientists to hit back at D-Wave. The aim of this project is to give an introduction to the historic advances in classical and quantum computing and to explore the methods of AQC. Through numerical simulations an algorithm for the Max Independent Set problem is empirically obtained.

  14. Minimizing the statistical error of resonance parameters and cross-sections derived from transmission measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Danon, Y

    2002-01-01

    Total neutron cross-sections are usually measured by a transmission experiment. In this experiment the transmission through a sample is measured by taking the ratio of the background corrected counts measured with and without the sample in the beam. This procedure can be optimized to reduce the statistical error in the measured cross-section. The objective is to find the optimal sample thickness and time split between the open beam, sample and background measurements. An optimization procedure for constant cross-section measurement is derived and extended to the area under the total cross-section curve of an isolated resonance. The minimization of the statistical error in the measured area also minimizes the statistical error in the inferred neutron width. Comparison of the analytical expression developed in this paper and resonance parameters obtained from the SAMMY (Updated users' guide for SAMMY: Multilevel R-Matrix fits to neutron data using Bays' equation, version m2, ORNTL/TM/-9179/R4) code is shown. Th...

  15. Neutron capture on (94)Zr: Resonance parameters and Maxwellian-averaged cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Tagliente, G; Fujii, K; Abbondanno, U; Aerts, G; Alvarez, H; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Andriamonje, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvar, F; Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Bisterzo, S; Calvino, F; Calviani, M; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Carrapico, C; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, E; Colonna, N; Cortes, G; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dillmann, I; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dridi, W; Duran, I; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Furman, W; Gallino, R; Goncalves, I; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Gramegna, F; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martinez, A; Jericha, E; Kappeler, F; Kadi, Y; Karadimos, D; Karamanis, D; Kerveno, M; Kossionides, E; Krticka, M; Lamboudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Martinez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, H; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papachristodoulou, C; Papadopoulos, C; Paradela, C; Patronis, N; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perrot, L; Pigni, M.T; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Praena, J; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, C; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Santos, C; Sarchiapone, L; Savvidis, I; Stephan, C; Tain, J.L; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarin, D; Vincente, M.C; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Voss, F; Walter, S; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2011-01-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of the Zr isotopes play an important role in nucleosynthesis studies. The s-process reaction flow between the Fe seed and the heavier isotopes passes through the neutron magic nucleus (90)Zr and through (91,92,93,94)Zr, but only part of the flow extends to (96)Zr because of the branching point at (95)Zr. Apart from their effect on the s-process flow, the comparably small isotopic (n, gamma) cross sections make Zr also an interesting structural material for nuclear reactors. The (94)Zr (n, gamma) cross section has been measured with high resolution at the spallation neutron source n_TOF at CERN and resonance parameters are reported up to 60 keV neutron energy.

  16. Low-power adiabatic 9T static random access memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Takahashi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors propose a novel static random access memory (SRAM that employs the adiabatic logic principle. To reduce energy dissipation, the proposed adiabatic SRAM is driven by two trapezoidal-wave pulses. The cell structure of the proposed SRAM has two high-value resistors based on a p-type metal-oxide semiconductor transistor, a cross-coupled n-type metal-oxide semiconductor (NMOS pair and an NMOS switch to reduce the short-circuit current. The inclusion of a transmission-gate controlled by a write word line signal allows the proposed circuit to operate as an adiabatic SRAM during data writing. Simulation results show that the energy dissipation of the proposed SRAM is lower than that of a conventional adiabatic SRAM.

  17. TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION DURING THE MIGRATION AND RESONANCE CROSSINGS OF THE GIANT PLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lykawka, Patryk Sofia [Astronomy Group, Faculty of Social and Natural Sciences, Kinki University, Shinkamikosaka 228-3, Higashiosaka-shi, Osaka 577-0813 (Japan); Ito, Takashi, E-mail: patryksan@gmail.com [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-08-10

    The newly formed giant planets may have migrated and crossed a number of mutual mean motion resonances (MMRs) when smaller objects (embryos) were accreting to form the terrestrial planets in the planetesimal disk. We investigated the effects of the planetesimal-driven migration of Jupiter and Saturn, and the influence of their mutual 1:2 MMR crossing on terrestrial planet formation for the first time, by performing N-body simulations. These simulations considered distinct timescales of MMR crossing and planet migration. In total, 68 high-resolution simulation runs using 2000 disk planetesimals were performed, which was a significant improvement on previously published results. Even when the effects of the 1:2 MMR crossing and planet migration were included in the system, Venus and Earth analogs (considering both orbits and masses) successfully formed in several runs. In addition, we found that the orbits of planetesimals beyond a {approx} 1.5-2 AU were dynamically depleted by the strengthened sweeping secular resonances associated with Jupiter's and Saturn's more eccentric orbits (relative to the present day) during planet migration. However, this depletion did not prevent the formation of massive Mars analogs (planets with more than 1.5 times Mars's mass). Although late MMR crossings (at t > 30 Myr) could remove such planets, Mars-like small mass planets survived on overly excited orbits (high e and/or i), or were completely lost in these systems. We conclude that the orbital migration and crossing of the mutual 1:2 MMR of Jupiter and Saturn are unlikely to provide suitable orbital conditions for the formation of solar system terrestrial planets. This suggests that to explain Mars's small mass and the absence of other planets between Mars and Jupiter, the outer asteroid belt must have suffered a severe depletion due to interactions with Jupiter/Saturn, or by an alternative mechanism (e.g., rogue super-Earths)

  18. Non-adiabatic and intersystem crossing dynamics in SO2. II. The role of triplet states in the bound state dynamics studied by surface-hopping simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Sebastian; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia

    2014-05-28

    The importance of triplet states in the photorelaxation dynamics of SO2 is studied by mixed quantum-classical dynamics simulations. Using the SHARC method, standing for Surface Hopping including ARbitrary Couplings, intersystem crossing (ISC) processes caused by spin-orbit coupling are found occurring on an ultrafast time scale (few 100 fs) and thus competing with internal conversion. While in the singlet-only dynamics only oscillatory population transfer between the (1)B1 and (1)A2 states is observed, in the dynamics including singlet and triplet states we find additionally continuous ISC to the (3)B2 state and to a smaller extent to the (3)B1/(3)A2 coupled states. The populations obtained from the dynamics are discussed with respect to the overall nuclear motion and in the light of recent TRPEPICO studies [I. Wilkinson, A. E. Boguslavskiy, J. Mikosch, D. M. Villeneuve, H.-J. Wörner, M. Spanner, S. Patchkovskii, and A. Stolow, "Excited state dynamics in SO2. I. Bound state relaxation studied by time-resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectroscopy," J. Chem. Phys. 140, 204301 (2014)].

  19. Analytical Modeling for the Bending Resonant Frequency of Multilayered Microresonators with Variable Cross-Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Lu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Multilayered microresonators commonly use sensitive coating or piezoelectric layers for detection of mass and gas. Most of these microresonators have a variable cross-section that complicates the prediction of their fundamental resonant frequency (generally of the bending mode through conventional analytical models. In this paper, we present an analytical model to estimate the first resonant frequency and deflection curve of single-clamped multilayered microresonators with variable cross-section. The analytical model is obtained using the Rayleigh and Macaulay methods, as well as the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. Our model is applied to two multilayered microresonators with piezoelectric excitation reported in the literature. Both microresonators are composed by layers of seven different materials. The results of our analytical model agree very well with those obtained from finite element models (FEMs and experimental data. Our analytical model can be used to determine the suitable dimensions of the microresonator’s layers in order to obtain a microresonator that operates at a resonant frequency necessary for a particular application.

  20. Investigation of the sup 9 sup 3 Nb neutron cross-sections in resonance energy range

    CERN Document Server

    Grigoriev, Y V; Faikov-Stanchik, H; Ilchev, G; Kim, G N; Kitaev, V Ya; Mezentseva, Z V; Panteleev, T; Sinitsa, V V; Zhuravlev, B V

    2001-01-01

    The results of gamma-ray multiplicity spectra and transmission measurements for sup 9 sup 3 Nb in energy range 21.5 eV-100 keV are presented. Gamma spectra from 1 to 7 multiplicity were measured on the 501 m and 121 m flight paths of the IBR-30 using a 16-section scintillation detector with a NaI(Tl) crystals of a total volume of 36 l and a 16-section liquid scintillation detector of a total volume of 80 l for metallic samples of 50, 80 mm in diameter and 1, 1.5 mm thickness with 100% sup 9 sup 3 Nb. Besides, the total and scattering cross-section of sup 9 sup 3 Nb were measured by means batteries of B-10 and He-3 counters on the 124 m, 504 m and 1006 m flight paths of the IBR-30. Spectra of multiplicity distribution were obtained for resolved resonances in the energy region E=30-6000 eV and for energy groups in the energy region E=21.5 eV- 100 keV. They were used for determination of the average multiplicity, resonance parameters and capture cross-section in energy groups and for low-laying resonances of sup...

  1. In-resonator variation of waveguide cross-sections for dispersion control of aluminum nitride micro-rings

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Hojoong; Tang, Hong X

    2015-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a dispersion control technique by combination of different waveguide cross sections in an aluminum nitride micro-ring resonator. Narrow and wide waveguides with normal and anomalous dispersion, respectively, are linked with tapering waveguides and enclosed in a ring resonator to produce a total dispersion near zero. The mode-coupling in multimoded waveguides is also effectively suppressed. This technique provides new degrees of freedom and enhanced flexibility in engineering the dispersion of microcomb resonators.

  2. $^{197}$Au($n,\\gamma$) cross section in the unresolved resonance region

    CERN Document Server

    Lederer, C.; Domingo-Pardo, C; Gunsing, F; Kappeler, F; Massimi, C.; Mengoni, A.; Wallner, A.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Barbagallo, M.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviani, M.; Calvino, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapico, C.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Dolfini, R.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Ketlerov, V.; Koehler, P.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Losito, R.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Mastinu, P.; Mendoza, E.; Milazzo, P.M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Oshima, M.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M.T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Sarmento, R.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.L.; Tarrio, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2011-01-01

    The cross section of the reaction (197)Au(n,gamma) was measured with the time-of-flight technique at the n_TOF (neutron time-of-flight) facility in the unresolved resonance region between 5 and 400 keV using a pair of C(6)D(6) (where D denotes (2)H) liquid scintillators for the detection of prompt capture gamma rays. The results with a total uncertainty of 3.9%-6.7% for a resolution of 20 bins per energy decade show fair agreement with the Evaluated Nuclear Data File Version B-VII.0 (ENDF B-VII.0), which contains the standard evaluation. The Maxwellian-averaged cross section (MACS) at 30 keV is in excellent agreement with the one according to the ENDF/B-VII.0 evaluation and 4.7% higher than the MACS measured independently by activation technique. Structures in the cross section, which had also been reported earlier, have been interpreted as being due to clusters of resonances.

  3. Adiabatic heavy-ion fusion potentials for fusion at deep sub-barrier energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S V S Sastry; S Kailas; A K Mohanty; A Saxena

    2005-01-01

    The recently reported unusual behaviour of fusion cross-sections at extreme sub-barrier energies has been examined. The adiabatic limit of fusion barriers has been determined from experimental data using the barrier penetration model. These adiabatic barriers are consistent with the adiabatic fusion barriers derived from the modified Wilzynska–Wilzynski prescription. The fusion barrier systematics has been obtained for a wide range of heavy-ion systems.

  4. Rapid adiabatic passage in quantum dots: Influence of scattering and dephasing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuh, K.; Jahnke, F.; Lorke, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical investigations for the realization of population inversion of semiconductor quantum dot ground-state transitions by means of adiabatic passage with chirped optical pulses are presented. While the inversion due to Rabi oscillations depends sensitively on the resonance condition...

  5. Near-field polarization shaping by a near-resonant plasmonic cross antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, Paolo; Savoini, Matteo; Huang, Jer-Shing; Duò, Lamberto; Finazzi, Marco; Hecht, Bert

    2009-10-01

    The optical phase in the feed gap of a plasmonic dipole antenna shows a transition from in-phase to counter-phase response, when its length is varied across the resonance length. We exploit this behavior in an asymmetric cross antenna structure, constituted of two perpendicular dipole antennas with different lengths, sharing the same feed gap, in order to shape the local polarization state. As an application of this concept, we propose a λ/4 nanowaveplate, able to shape and confine linearly polarized propagating waves into circularly polarized fields localized in the feed gap.

  6. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance studies of cross polarization from quadrupolar nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Paul, Susan M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The development of solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has, to a large extent, focused on using spin-1/2 nuclei as probes to investigate molecular structure and dynamics. For such nuclei, the technique of cross polarization is well-established as a method for sensitivity enhancement. However, over two-thirds of the nuclei in the periodic table have a spin-quantum number greater than one-half and are known as quadrupolar nuclei. Such nuclei are fundamental constituents of many inorganic materials including minerals, zeolites, glasses, and gels. It is, therefore, of interest to explore the extent to which polarization can be transferred from quadrupolar nuclei. In this dissertation, solid-state NMR experiments involving cross polarization from quadrupolar nuclei to spin-1/2 nuclei under magic-angle spinning (MAS) conditions are investigated in detail.

  7. Performance analysis of adiabatic engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudhakar, V.

    1984-01-01

    As the development of the adiabatic diesel engine continues with a goal of 65% reduction in net in-cylinder heat transfer over a cooled engine, several uncooled engines with intermediate levels of reduced heat transfer were studied. Some aspects and results of the adiabatic diesel engine cycle simulation are discussed. Performance test data and simulation results are compared for a conventionally cooled and uncooled Cummins NH-450 turbocompound engines. Exhaust emissions were also measured and compared.

  8. A Differential Resonant Accelerometer with Low Cross-Interference and Temperature Drift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented in this paper is a high-performance resonant accelerometer with low cross-interference, low temperature drift and digital output. The sensor consists of two quartz double-ended tuning forks (DETFs and a silicon substrate. A new differential silicon substrate is proposed to reduce the temperature drift and cross-interference from the undesirable direction significantly. The natural frequency of the quartz DETF is theoretically calculated, and then the axial stress on the vibration beams is verified through finite element method (FEM under a 100 g acceleration which is loaded on x-axis, y-axis and z-axis, respectively. Moreover, sensor chip is wire-bonded to a printed circuit board (PCB which contains two identical oscillating circuits. In addition, a steel shell is selected to package the sensor for experiments. Benefiting from the distinctive configuration of the differential structure, the accelerometer characteristics such as temperature drift and cross-interface are improved. The experimental results demonstrate that the cross-interference is lower than 0.03% and the temperature drift is about 18.16 ppm/°C.

  9. A Differential Resonant Accelerometer with Low Cross-Interference and Temperature Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Zhao, Yulong; Li, Cun; Cheng, Rongjun; Sun, Dengqiang; Wang, Songli

    2017-01-01

    Presented in this paper is a high-performance resonant accelerometer with low cross-interference, low temperature drift and digital output. The sensor consists of two quartz double-ended tuning forks (DETFs) and a silicon substrate. A new differential silicon substrate is proposed to reduce the temperature drift and cross-interference from the undesirable direction significantly. The natural frequency of the quartz DETF is theoretically calculated, and then the axial stress on the vibration beams is verified through finite element method (FEM) under a 100 g acceleration which is loaded on x-axis, y-axis and z-axis, respectively. Moreover, sensor chip is wire-bonded to a printed circuit board (PCB) which contains two identical oscillating circuits. In addition, a steel shell is selected to package the sensor for experiments. Benefiting from the distinctive configuration of the differential structure, the accelerometer characteristics such as temperature drift and cross-interface are improved. The experimental results demonstrate that the cross-interference is lower than 0.03% and the temperature drift is about 18.16 ppm/°C. PMID:28106798

  10. Dynamics of charged particles in an adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haofei Wei

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Charged-particle motion is studied in the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of a well-matched, intense charged-particle beam and an applied periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field. The beam is assumed to be in a state of adiabatic thermal equilibrium. The phase space is analyzed and compared with that of the well-known Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV-type beam equilibrium. It is found that the widths of nonlinear resonances in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium are narrower than those in the KV-type beam equilibrium. Numerical evidence is presented, indicating almost complete elimination of chaotic particle motion in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium.

  11. Near resonant bubble acoustic cross-section corrections, including examples from oceanography, volcanology, and biomedical ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainslie, Michael A; Leighton, Timothy G

    2009-11-01

    The scattering cross-section sigma(s) of a gas bubble of equilibrium radius R(0) in liquid can be written in the form sigma(s)=4piR(0) (2)[(omega(1) (2)omega(2)-1)(2)+delta(2)], where omega is the excitation frequency, omega(1) is the resonance frequency, and delta is a frequency-dependent dimensionless damping coefficient. A persistent discrepancy in the frequency dependence of the contribution to delta from radiation damping, denoted delta(rad), is identified and resolved, as follows. Wildt's [Physics of Sound in the Sea (Washington, DC, 1946), Chap. 28] pioneering derivation predicts a linear dependence of delta(rad) on frequency, a result which Medwin [Ultrasonics 15, 7-13 (1977)] reproduces using a different method. Weston [Underwater Acoustics, NATO Advanced Study Institute Series Vol. II, 55-88 (1967)], using ostensibly the same method as Wildt, predicts the opposite relationship, i.e., that delta(rad) is inversely proportional to frequency. Weston's version of the derivation of the scattering cross-section is shown here to be the correct one, thus resolving the discrepancy. Further, a correction to Weston's model is derived that amounts to a shift in the resonance frequency. A new, corrected, expression for the extinction cross-section is also derived. The magnitudes of the corrections are illustrated using examples from oceanography, volcanology, planetary acoustics, neutron spallation, and biomedical ultrasound. The corrections become significant when the bulk modulus of the gas is not negligible relative to that of the surrounding liquid.

  12. Interplay between electric and magnetic effect in adiabatic polaritonic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Alabastri, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We report on the possibility of realizing adiabatic compression of polaritonic wave on a metallic conical nano-structure through an oscillating electric potential (quasi dynamic regime). By comparing this result with an electromagnetic wave excitation, we were able to relate the classical lighting-rod effect to adiabatic compression. Furthermore, we show that while the magnetic contribution plays a marginal role in the formation of adiabatic compression, it provides a blue shift in the spectral region. In particular, magnetic permeability can be used as a free parameter for tuning the polaritonic resonances. The peculiar form of adiabatic compression is instead dictated by both the source and the metal permittivity. The analysis is performed by starting from a simple electrostatic system to end with the complete electromagnetic one through intermediate situations such as the quasi-electrostatic and quasi-dynamic regimes. Each configuration is defined by a particular set of equations which allows to clearly determine the individual role played by the electric and magnetic contribution in the generation of adiabatic compression. We notice that these findings can be applied for the realization of a THz nano-metric generator. © 2013 Optical Society of America.

  13. Thermal neutron capture cross sections resonance integrals and g-factors

    CERN Document Server

    Mughabghab, S F

    2003-01-01

    The thermal radiative capture cross sections and resonance integrals of elements and isotopes with atomic numbers from 1 to 83 (as well as sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th and sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U) have been re-evaluated by taking into consideration all known pertinent data published since 1979. This work has been undertaken as part of an IAEA co-ordinated research project on 'Prompt capture gamma-ray activation analysis'. Westcott g-factors for radiative capture cross sections at a temperature of 300K were computed by utilizing the INTER code and ENDF-B/VI (Release 8) library files. The temperature dependence of the Westcott g-factor is illustrated for sup 1 sup 1 sup 3 Cd, sup 1 sup 2 sup 4 Xe and sup 1 sup 5 sup 7 Gd at temperatures of 150, 294 and 400K. Comparisons have also been made of the newly evaluated capture cross sections of sup 6 Li, sup 7 Li, sup 1 sup 2 C and sup 2 sup 0 sup 7 Pb with those determined by the k sub 0 method.

  14. Efficacy of Magnetic Resonance urography in detecting crossing renal vessels in children with ureteropelvic junction obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavicevic, Polina K; Saranovic, Djordjije Z; Mandic, Marija J; Vukadinovic, Vojkan M; Djordjevic, Miroslav Lj; Radojicic, Zoran I; Petronic, Ivana; Cirovic, Dragana; Nikolic, Dejan

    2015-01-01

    An aberrant or accessory crossing renal vessel (CV) leading to the lower pole of the kidney is the most common extrinsic cause of uretero pelvic obstruction(UPJ) obstruction in a child and young adolescent.There is still controversy regarding there functional significance in obstruction Preoperative identification of such vessels may influence surgical management. First aim is to determine the value of magnetic resonance (MR) urography in detecting crossing vessels in children with UPJ obstruction,comparing the data with postoperative findings and the second one is to evaluate morphologic and functional parameters in these hydronephrotic kidneys. Between June 2009 and December 2012 we retrospectively reviewed MR urography records of one hundred and nine children with unilateral hydronephrosis at the University Children's Hospital. 68 (62.4%) were male and 41 (37.6%) were female,median age was 6.5 ± 5.7. Of the total number of patients, 30 (27%) underwent pyeloplasty, while 79 (72.5%) did not. The age at surgery ranged from 0.3 to 18 years (median 6.6 years). The indication for surgery was based on standard criteria (obstructed renal transit time with or without altered renal function of vDRF MRU, there was no crossing vessel in 21 kidneys, confirmed at surgery in 18. A crossing vessel was detected with MRU in 9 kidneys and confirmed at surgery in 6. Thus, the sensitivity of MRU was 66.7%, the specificity was 85.7%, the positive predictive value was 66.7%, the negative predictive value was 85.7% and the accuracy was 80%. There was no statistically significant difference in the detection of crossing vessels between MR urography and surgery (p = 0.004 and p MRU and surgery showed good agreement (κ = 0.524). Based on our results we suggest that MR urography is a reliable and safe diagnostic tool to determine crossing vessels in selected children with UPJ obstruction. Thus, MRU can substitute for other imaging modalities and provide detailed information about the

  15. Non-adiabatic primordial fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noller, Johannes; Magueijo, Joao, E-mail: johannes.noller08@imperial.ac.uk [Theoretical Physics Group, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-21

    We consider general mixtures of isocurvature and adiabatic cosmological perturbations. With a minimal assumption set consisting of the linearized Einstein equations and a primordial perfect fluid we derive the second-order action and its curvature variables. We also allow for varying equation of state and speed of sound profiles. The derivation is therefore carried out at the same level of generality that has been achieved for adiabatic modes before. As a result we find a new conserved super-horizon quantity and relate it to the adiabatically conserved curvature perturbation. Finally we demonstrate how the formalism can be applied by considering a Chaplygin gas-like primordial matter model, finding two scale-invariant solutions for structure formation.

  16. On criterion of modal adiabaticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Ning(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Pierce, A. D., Extension of the method of normal modes to sound propagation in an almost-stratified medium, J. Acoust.Soc. Am., 1965, 37: 19-27.[2]Wang, D. Z. , Shang, E. C., Underwater Acoustics (in Chinese), Beijing: Science Press, 1981.[3]Zhang Renhe, Li Fenghua, Beam-displacement rya-mode theory of sound propagation in shallow water, Science in China, Ser.A, 1999, 42(7): 739-749.[4]Zhou Jixun, Zhang Xuezhen, Rogers P., Resonance interaction of sound waves with internal solitons in coastal zone, J.Acoust. Soc. Am., 1991, 90: 2042-2054.[5]Shang, E. C., Wang, Y. Y., The impact of mesoscale oceanic structure on global-scale acoustic propagation, in Theoretical and Computational Acoustics (ed. Ding Lee et al. ), Singapore: World Scientific Publishing Co. , 1996, 409-431.[6]Milder, D. M., Ray and wave invariants for SOFAR channel propagation, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 1969, 46: 1259-1263.[7]Nag l, A., Milder, D. M., Adiabatic mode theory of underwater sound propagation in a range-dependent environment, J.Acoust. Soc. Am., 1978, 63: 739-749.[8]Brekhovskikh, L. M., Waves in Layered Media, 2nd ed., New York: Academic Press Inc., 1973.[9]Brekhovskikh, L. M., Lysanov, Yu., Fundamental of Ocean Acoustics, Ch. 7, Sec. 7.2, Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1982.[10]Evans, R. B., A coupled mode solution for acoustic propagation in a wave-guide with stepwise depth variations of a penerable bottom, J. Acoust. Soc. A.m., 1983, 74: 188-195.[11]Jensen, F. B., Kuperman, W. A., Porter, M. B. et al., Computational Ocean Acoustics, New York: Springer-Verlag,1992.[12]Wang Ning, Inverse scattering problem for the coupled second order ODE, Journal of The Physical Society of Japan, 1995, 64(12): 4907-4915.

  17. A Compact Wide-Band Hybrid Dielectric Resonator Antenna with Enhanced Gain and Low Cross-Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feibiao Dong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available By loading two printed patches to the dielectric resonator antenna (DRA, a compact wide-band hybrid dielectric resonator antenna with enhanced gain and low cross-polarization is presented. The proposed antenna utilizes a combination of a rectangular dielectric resonator and two printed patches. Due to the hybrid design, multiple resonances were obtained. By adding two air layers between the dielectric resonator and the printed patches, the bandwidth has been significantly improved. Compared to the traditional hybrid dielectric resonator antenna, the proposed antenna can achieve wide bandwidth, high gain, low cross-polarization, and even small size simultaneously. The prototype of the proposed antenna has been fabricated and tested. The measured −10 dB return loss bandwidth is 25.6% (1.7–2.2 GHz. The measured antenna gains are about 6.3 and 8.2 dBi in the operating frequency band. Low cross-polarization levels of less than −28.5 dB and −43 dB in the E-plane and H-plane are achieved. Moreover, the overall dimensions of the antenna are only 67 × 67 × 34 (mm3. The proposed antenna is especially attractive for small base antenna applications.

  18. Neutron total cross-sections and resonance parameters of Mo and Ta

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K M Moinul Haque Meaze; K Devan; Y S Lee; Y D Oh; G N Kim; D Son

    2007-02-01

    Experimental results of transmissions for the samples of natural molybdenum with thickness 0.0192 atoms/barn and for the four samples of natural tantalum with thickness 0.0222, 0.0111, 0.0055 and 0.0025 atoms/barn are presented in this work. Measurements were carried out at the Pohang Neutron Facility which consists of a 100 MeV Linac, water-cooled tantalum target, and 12 m flight path length. Effective total cross-sections were extracted from the transmission data, and resonance parameters were obtained by using the code SAMMY. The present measurements were compared with other measurements and with the evaluated nuclear data file ENDF/B-VI.8.

  19. Determination of resonance Raman cross-sections for use in biological SERS sensing with femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, W Ruchira; Keller, Emily L; Frontiera, Renee R

    2014-08-05

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a promising technique for in vivo bioanalyte detection, but accurate characterization of SERS biosensors can be challenging due to difficulties in differentiating resonance and surface enhancement contributions to the Raman signal. Here, we quantitate the resonance Raman cross-sections for a commonly used near-infrared SERS dye, 3,3'-diethylthiatricarbocyanine (DTTC). It is typically challenging to measure resonance Raman cross-sections for fluorescent dye molecules due to the overwhelming isoenergetic fluorescence signal. To overcome this issue, we used etalon-based femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy, which is intrinsically designed to acquire a stimulated Raman signal without strong fluorescence or interference from signals resulting from other four-wave mixing pathways. Using this technique, we found that the cross-sections for most of the resonantly enhanced modes in DTTC exceed 10(-25) cm(2)/molecule. These cross-sections lead to high signal magnitude SERS signals from even weakly enhancing SERS substrates, as much of what appears to be a SERS signal is actually coming from the intrinsically strong resonance Raman signal. Our work will lead to a more accurate determination of SERS enhancement factors and SERS substrate characterization in the biologically relevant near-infrared region, ultimately leading to a more widespread use of SERS for biosensing and bioimaging applications.

  20. Adiabatic/diabatic polarization beam splitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRose, Christopher; Cai, Hong

    2017-09-12

    The various presented herein relate to an on-chip polarization beam splitter (PBS), which is adiabatic for the transverse magnetic (TM) mode and diabatic for the transverse electric (TE) mode. The PBS comprises a through waveguide and a cross waveguide, wherein an electromagnetic beam comprising TE mode and TM mode components is applied to an input port of the through waveguide. The PBS can be utilized to separate the TE mode component from the TM mode component, wherein the TE mode component exits the PBS via an output port of the through waveguide, and the TM mode component exits the PBS via an output port of the cross waveguide. The PBS has a structure that is tolerant to manufacturing variations and exhibits high polarization extinction ratios over a wide bandwidth.

  1. ^amp;+^amp;-p Electroproduction Cross Sections off Protons in the Second Resonance Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotov, Gleb; Gothe, Ralf; Mokeev, Victor

    2013-04-01

    In this talk we present preliminary ^amp;+^amp;-p electroproduction cross sections off protons in the kinematical area of W from 1.4 to 1.8 GeV and Q^2 from 0.4 to 1.1 GeV^2. Our kinematical coverage in part overlap with previous CLAS measurements, but offers more than a factor six finer binning in Q^2. The physics analysis of these data within the framework of the JM model will allow us to determine the electrocouplings and the partial πδ, ρp decay widths of several high lying nucleon resonances S31(1620), S11(1650), F15(1685), D33(1700), P13(1720) and to further explore the evidence for the 3/2^+(1720) candidate-state. Analysis of the single pion electroproduction data measured with CLAS in the aforementioned kinematic region is in progress. Single and charged double pion exclusive channels are major contributors to the meson electroproduction in the N* excitation region with different non-resonant mechanisms. A successful description of all observables in these exclusive channels with consistent N* electrocouplings will offer evidence for the reliable evaluation of these fundamental quantities.

  2. Analysis of Adiabatic Batch Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erald Gjonaj

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A mixture of acetic anhydride is reacted with excess water in an adiabatic batch reactor to form an exothermic reaction. The concentration of acetic anhydride and the temperature inside the adiabatic batch reactor are calculated with an initial temperature of 20°C, an initial temperature of 30°C, and with a cooling jacket maintaining the temperature at a constant of 20°C. The graphs of the three different scenarios show that the highest temperatures will cause the reaction to occur faster.

  3. Adiabatic theory for the bipolaron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakhno, V.D. (Institute of Mathematical Problems of Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino Moscow Region, 142292 (Russian Federation))

    1995-02-01

    A translation-invariant adiabatic theory is constructed for the bipolaron. It is shown that motions in the bipolaron are divided: the relative electron coordinates describe fast electron oscillations in the induced polarization well and the center of mass coordinates represent slow electron movement followed by polarization. Nonlinear differential bipolaron equations are derived which are asymptotically exact in the adiabatic limit. Particlelike solutions of these equations correspond to the bipolaron bound state. The exact solution yields the value of the ion critical parameter [eta]=0.31 for which the bipolaron state is stable, where [eta]=[epsilon][sub [infinity

  4. Neutron Cross section Covariances in the Resonance region: 50,53Cr, 54,57Fe and 60Ni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblozinsky, P.; Cho,Y.-S.; Mattoon,C.M.; Mughabghab,S.F.

    2010-11-23

    We evaluated covariances in the neutron resonance region for capture and elastic scattering cross sections on minor structural materials, {sup 50,53}Cr, {sup 54,57}Fe and {sup 60}Ni. Use was made of the recently developed covariance formalism based on kernel approximation along with data in the Atlas of Neutron Resonances. Our results of most interest for advanced fuel cycle applications, elastic scattering cross section uncertainties at energies around 100 keV, are on the level of about 7-10%.

  5. Study of cross - relaxation and molecular dynamics in the solid 3-(trifluoromethyl) benzoic acid by solid state NMR off - resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak-Braszak, Aneta

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamics of the solid 3-(trifluoromethyl) benzoic acid containing proton (1)H and fluorine (19)F nuclei was explored by the solid-state NMR off - resonance technique. Contrary to the previous experiments the proton nuclei system I relaxed in the off - resonance effective field B→e while fluorine nuclei system S was saturated for short time in comparison to the relaxation time T1I. New cross - relaxation solid - state NMR off - resonance experiments were conducted on a homebuilt pulse spectrometer operating at the on-resonance frequency of 30.2MHz, at the off - resonance frequency varied between 30.2 and 30.6MHz for protons and at the frequency of 28.411MHz for fluorines, respectively. Based on the experimental data the dispersions of the proton off - resonance spin - lattice relaxation rate ρρ(I), the fluorine off - resonance spin - lattice relaxation rate ρρ(S) and the cross - relaxation rate σρ in the rotating frame were determined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for SIRTF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbie, P. T.; Bernstein, G. M.; Richards, P. L.

    1989-02-01

    An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) has been proposed to cool bolometric infrared detectors on the multiband imaging photometer of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). One such refrigerator has been built which uses a ferric ammonium alum salt pill suspended by nylon threads in a 3-T solenoid. The resonant modes of this suspension are above 100 Hz. The heat leak to the salt pill is less than 0.5 microW. The system has a hold time at 0.1K of more than 12 h. The cold stage temperature is regulated with a feedback loop that controls the magnetic field. A second, similar refrigerator is being built at a SIRTF prototype to fly on a ballon-borne telescope. It will use a ferromagnetic shield. The possibility of using a high-Tc solenoid-actuated heat switch is also discussed.

  7. Isotopic molybdenum total neutron cross section in the unresolved resonance region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahran, R.; Barry, D.; Block, R.; Leinweber, G.; Rapp, M.; Daskalakis, A.; Blain, E.; Williams, D.; McDermott, B.; Leal, L.; Danon, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate isotopic molybdenum nuclear data are important because molybdenum can exist in nuclear reactor components including fuel, cladding, or as a high yield fission product. High-resolution time-of-flight neutron transmission measurements on highly enriched isotopic metallic samples of 95Mo , 96Mo , 98Mo , and 100Mo were performed in the resonance energy range from 1 to 620 keV . The measurements were taken with the newly developed modular 6Li -glass transmission detector positioned at the 100-m experimental flight station. In the unresolved energy region (URR), new comprehensive methods of analysis were developed and validated in order to obtain accurate neutron total cross-section data from the measurement by correcting for background and transmission enhancement effects. Average parameters and fits to the total cross section for 95Mo were obtained using the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model code fitacs, which is currently incorporated into the sammy code. The fits to the experimental data deviate from the current evaluated nuclear data file/B-VII.1 isotopic Mo evaluations by several percent in the URR.

  8. Iterative cross-correlation analysis of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqin Yang

    Full Text Available Seed-based cross-correlation analysis (sCCA and independent component analysis have been widely employed to extract functional networks from the resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data. However, the results of sCCA, in terms of both connectivity strength and network topology, can be sensitive to seed selection variations. ICA avoids the potential problems due to seed selection, but choosing which component(s to represent the network of interest could be subjective and problematic. In this study, we proposed a seed-based iterative cross-correlation analysis (siCCA method for resting state brain network analysis. The method was applied to extract default mode network (DMN and stable task control network (STCN in two independent datasets acquired from normal adults. Compared with the networks obtained by traditional sCCA and ICA, the resting state networks produced by siCCA were found to be highly stable and independent on seed selection. siCCA was used to analyze DMN in first-episode major depressive disorder (MDD patients. It was found that, in the MDD patients, the volume of DMN negatively correlated with the patients' social disability screening schedule scores.

  9. Quantum state specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadwick, Helen, E-mail: helen.chadwick@epfl.ch; Hundt, P. Morten; Reijzen, Maarten E. van; Yoder, Bruce L.; Beck, Rainer D. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Moléculaire, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-01-21

    Highly efficient preparation of molecules in a specific rovibrationally excited state for gas/surface reactivity measurements is achieved in a molecular beam using tunable infrared (IR) radiation from a single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (cw-OPO). We demonstrate that with appropriate focusing of the IR radiation, molecules in the molecular beam crossing the fixed frequency IR field experience a Doppler tuning that can be adjusted to achieve complete population inversion of a two-level system by rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). A room temperature pyroelectric detector is used to monitor the excited fraction in the molecular beam and the population inversion is detected and quantified using IR bleaching by a second IR-OPO. The second OPO is also used for complete population transfer to an overtone or combination vibration via double resonance excitation using two spatially separated RAP processes.

  10. A Many Particle Adiabatic Invariant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    1999-01-01

    For a system of N charged particles moving in a homogeneous, sufficiently strong magnetic field, a many-particle adiabatic invariant constrains the collisional exchange of energy between the degrees of freedom perpendicular to and parallel to the magnetic field. A description of the phenomenon...

  11. Elementary examples of adiabatic invariance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, F.S. (Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA (USA) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (USA))

    1990-04-01

    Simple classical one-dimensional systems subject to adiabatic (gradual) perturbations are examined. The first examples are well known: the adiabatic invariance of the product {ital E}{tau} of energy {ital E} and period {tau} for the simple pendulum and for the simple harmonic oscillator. Next, the adiabatic invariants of the vertical bouncer are found---a ball bouncing elastically from the floor of a rising elevator having slowly varying velocity and acceleration. These examples lead to consideration of adiabatic invariance for one-dimensional systems with potentials of the form {ital V}={ital ax}{sup {ital n}}, with {ital a}={ital a}({ital t}) slowly varying in time. Then, the horizontal bouncer is considered---a mass sliding on a smooth floor, bouncing back and forth between two impenetrable walls, one of which is slowly moving. This example is generalized to a particle in a bound state of a general potential with one slowly moving turning point.'' Finally, circular motion of a charged particle in a magnetic field slowly varying in time under three different configurations is considered: (a) a free particle in a uniform field; (b) a free particle in a nonuniform betatron'' field; and (c) a particle constrained to a circular orbit in a uniform field.

  12. Digital Waveguide Adiabatic Passage Part 1: Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Vaitkus, Jesse A; Greentree, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Spatial adiabatic passage represents a new way to design integrated photonic devices. In conventional adiabatic passage designs require smoothly varying waveguide separations. Here we show modelling of adiabatic passage devices where the waveguide separation is varied digitally. Despite digitisation, our designs show robustness against variations in the input wavelength and refractive index contrast of the waveguides relative to the cladding. This approach to spatial adiabatic passage opens new design strategies and hence the potential for new photonics devices.

  13. Review of scattering and extinction cross-sections, damping factors, and resonance frequencies of a spherical gas bubble

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ainslie, M.A.; Leighton, T.G.

    2011-01-01

    Perhaps the most familiar concepts when discussing acoustic scattering by bubbles are the resonance frequency for bubble pulsation, the bubbles' damping, and their scattering and extinction cross-sections, all of which are used routinely in oceanography, sonochemistry, and biomedicine. The apparent

  14. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...... theoretical consciousness through historical narrative ‘in practice’, by discussing selected historical topics from Western cultural history, within the disciplines of history, literature, visual arts, musicology, archaeology, philosophy, and theology. The title Resonances indicates the overall perspective...

  15. Acute ischaemic brain lesions in intracerebral haemorrhage: multicentre cross-sectional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoire, Simone M; Charidimou, Andreas; Gadapa, Naveen; Dolan, Eamon; Antoun, Nagui; Peeters, Andre; Vandermeeren, Yves; Laloux, Patrice; Baron, Jean-Claude; Jäger, Hans R; Werring, David J

    2011-08-01

    Subclinical acute ischaemic lesions on brain magnetic resonance imaging have recently been described in spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage, and may be important to understand pathophysiology and guide treatment. The underlying mechanisms are uncertain. We tested the hypothesis that ischaemic lesions are related to magnetic resonance imaging markers of the severity and type of small-vessel disease (hypertensive arteriopathy or cerebral amyloid angiopathy) in a multicentre, cross-sectional study. We studied consecutive patients with intracerebral haemorrhage from four specialist stroke centres, and age-matched stroke service referrals without intracerebral haemorrhage. Acute ischaemic lesions were assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (imaging. White matter changes and cerebral microbleeds were rated with validated scales. We investigated associations between diffusion-weighted imaging lesions, clinical and radiological characteristics. We included 114 patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (39 with clinically probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy) and 47 age-matched controls. The prevalence of diffusion-weighted imaging lesions was 9/39 (23%) in probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related intracerebral haemorrhage versus 6/75 (8%) in the remaining patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (P = 0.024); no diffusion-weighted imaging lesions were found in controls. Diffusion-weighted imaging lesions were mainly cortical and were associated with mean white matter change score (odds ratio 1.14 per unit increase, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.28, P = 0.024) and the presence of strictly lobar cerebral microbleeds (odds ratio 3.85, 95% confidence interval 1.15-12.93, P = 0.029). Acute, subclinical ischaemic brain lesions are frequent but previously underestimated after intracerebral haemorrhage, and are three times more common in cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related intracerebral haemorrhage than in other intracerebral haemorrhage types. Ischaemic brain lesions are

  16. Multiplicity features of adiabatic autothermal reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovo, M.; Balakotaiah, V. (Houston Univ., TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    In this paper singularity theory, large activation energy asymptotic, and numerical methods are used to present a comprehensive study of the steady-state multiplicity features of three classical adiabatic autothermal reactor models: tubular reactor with internal heat exchange, tubular reactor with external heat exchange, and the CSTR with external heat exchange. Specifically, the authors derive the exact uniqueness-multiplicity boundary, determine typical cross-sections of the bifurcation set, and classify the different types of bifurcation diagrams of conversion vs. residence time. Asymptotic (limiting) models are used to determine analytical expressions for the uniqueness boundary and the ignition and extinction points. The analytical results are used to present simple, explicit and accurate expressions defining the boundary of the region of autothermal operation in the physical parameter space.

  17. Cross-point analysis for a multimode fiber sensor based on surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Woo-Hu; Tsao, Yu-Chia; Lin, Hong-Yu; Sheu, Bor-Chiou

    2005-09-01

    A novel analysis based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) with a side-polished multimode fiber and a white-light (halogen light) source is presented. The sensing system is a multimode optical fiber in which half of the core has been polished away and a 40 nm gold layer is deposited on to the polished surface by dc sputter. The SPR dip in the optical spectrum is investigated with an optical spectrum analyzer (OSA). In our SPR fiber sensor, the use of liquids with different refractive indices leads to a shift in the spectral dip in the SPR curve. The cross point (CP) of the two SPR spectra obtained from the refractive-index liquid and the deionized water measurements was observed with the OSA. The CP is shifted sensitively in wavelength from 630to1300 nm relative to a change in the refractive index of the liquid from 1.34 to 1.46. High sensitivities of 1.9×10^-6 refractive-index units (RIUs) in the range of the refractive index of the liquid from 1.40 to 1.44 of 5.7×10^-7 RIUs above the value of 1.44 are proposed and demonstrated in our novel SPR analysis.

  18. Resonant vibrational-excitation cross sections and rate constants for low-energy electron scattering by molecular oxygen

    CERN Document Server

    Laporta, V; Tennyson, J

    2016-01-01

    Resonant vibrational-excitation cross sections and rate constants for electron scattering by molecular oxygen are presented. Transitions between all 42 vibrational levels of O$_2(\\textrm{X}\\ ^3\\Sigma_g^- $) are considered. Molecular rotations are parameterized by the rotational quantum number $J$ which is considered in the range 1 to 151. The lowest four resonant states of O$_2^-$, $^2\\Pi_g$, $^2\\Pi_u$, $^4\\Sigma_u^-$ and $^2\\Sigma_u^-$, are taken into account. The calculations are performed using the fixed-nuclei R-matrix approach to determine the resonance positions and widths, and the boomerang model to characterize the nuclei motion. Two energy regions below and above 4~eV are investigated: the first one is characterized by sharp structures in the cross section, and the second by a broad resonance peaked at 10~eV. The computed cross sections are compared with theoretical and experimental results available in literature for both the energy regions, and are made available for use by modelers. The effect of ...

  19. Improved algorithms for the calculation of resolved resonance cross sections with applications to the structural Doppler effect in fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, R N; Toppel, B J; Henryson, H II

    1980-10-01

    Motivated by a need for an economical yet rigorous tool which can address the computation of the structural material Doppler effect, an extremely efficient improved RABANL capability has been developed utilizing the fact that the Doppler broadened line shape functions become essentially identical to the natural line shape functions or Lorentzian limits beyond about 100 Doppler widths from the resonance energy, or when the natural width exceeds about 200 Doppler widths. The computational efficiency has been further enhanced by preprocessing or screening a significant number of selected resonances during library preparation into composition and temperature independent smooth background cross sections. The resonances which are suitable for such pre-processing are those which are either very broad or those which are very weak. The former contribute very little to the Doppler effect and their self-shielding effect can readily be averaged into slowly varying background cross section data, while the latter contribute very little to either the Doppler or to self-shielding effects. To illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the improved RABANL algorithms and resonance screening techniques, calculations have been performed for two systems, the first with a composition typical of the STF converter region and the second typical of an LMFBR core composition. Excellent agreement has been found for RABANL compared to the reference Monte Carlo solution obtained using the code VIM, and improved results have also been obtained for the narrow resonance approximation in the ultra-fine-group option of MC/sup 2/-2.

  20. Collision Cross Sections for 20 Protonated Amino Acids: Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and Ion Mobility Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anupriya; Jones, Chad A.; Dearden, David V.

    2016-08-01

    We report relative dephasing cross sections for the 20 biogenic protonated amino acids measured using the cross sectional areas by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (CRAFTI) technique at 1.9 keV in the laboratory reference frame, as well as momentum transfer cross sections for the same ions computed from Boltzmann-weighted structures determined using molecular mechanics. Cross sections generally increase with increasing molecular weight. Cross sections for aliphatic and aromatic protonated amino acids are larger than the average trend, suggesting these side chains do not fold efficiently. Sulfur-containing protonated amino acids have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting the mass of the S atom. Protonated amino acids that can internally hydrogen-bond have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting more extensive folding. The CRAFTI measurements correlate well with results from drift ion mobility (IMS) and traveling wave ion mobility (TWIMS) spectrometric measurements; CRAFTI results correlate with IMS values approximately as well as IMS and TWIMS values from independent measurements correlate with each other. Both CRAFTI and IMS results correlate well with the computed momentum transfer cross sections, suggesting both techniques provide accurate molecular structural information. Absolute values obtained using the various methods differ significantly; in the case of CRAFTI, this may be due to errors in measurements of collision gas pressure, measurement of excitation voltage, and/or dependence of cross sections on kinetic energy.

  1. Invalidity of the quantitative adiabatic condition and general conditions for adiabatic approximations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dafa

    2016-05-01

    The adiabatic theorem was proposed about 90 years ago and has played an important role in quantum physics. The quantitative adiabatic condition constructed from eigenstates and eigenvalues of a Hamiltonian is a traditional tool to estimate adiabaticity and has proven to be the necessary and sufficient condition for adiabaticity. However, recently the condition has become a controversial subject. In this paper, we list some expressions to estimate the validity of the adiabatic approximation. We show that the quantitative adiabatic condition is invalid for the adiabatic approximation via the Euclidean distance between the adiabatic state and the evolution state. Furthermore, we deduce general necessary and sufficient conditions for the validity of the adiabatic approximation by different definitions.

  2. Adiabatic frequency conversion with a sign flip in the coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristova, H. S.; Rangelov, A. A.; Montemezzani, G.; Vitanov, N. V.

    2016-09-01

    Adiabatic frequency conversion is a method recently developed in nonlinear optics [H. Suchowski, D. Oron, A. Arie, and Y. Silberberg, Phys. Rev. A 78, 063821 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevA.78.063821], using ideas from the technique of rapid adiabatic passage (RAP) via a level crossing in quantum physics. In this method, the coupling coefficients are constant and the phase mismatch is chirped adiabatically. In this work, we propose another method for adiabatic frequency conversion, in which the phase mismatch is constant and the coupling is a pulse-shaped function with a sign flip (i.e., a phase step of π ) at its maximum. Compared to the RAP method, our technique has comparable efficiency but it is simpler to implement for it only needs two bulk crystals with opposite χ(2 ) nonlinearity. Moreover, because our technique requires constant nonzero frequency mismatch and has zero conversion efficiency on exact frequency matching, it can be used as a frequency filter.

  3. {sup 41}K(n, {gamma}){sup 42}K thermal and resonance integral cross section measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, F.A. Jr.; Maidana, N.L.; Vanin, V.R. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Lab. do Acelerador Linear; Dias, M.S.; Koskinas, M.F. [IPEN-CNEN, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Metrolgia Nuclear; Lopez-Pino, N. [Instituto Superior de Tecnolgias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), Habana (Cuba)

    2012-07-01

    We measured the {sup 41}K thermal neutron absorption and resonance integral cross sections after the irradiation of KNO{sub 3} samples near the core of the IEA-R1 IPEN pool-type research reactor. Bare and cadmium-covered targets were irradiated in pairs with Au-Al alloy flux-monitors. The residual activities were measured by gamma-ray spectroscopy with a HPGe detector, with special care to avoid the {sup 42}K decay {beta}{sup -} emission effects on the spectra. The gamma-ray self-absorption was corrected with the help of MCNP simulations. We applied the Westcott formalism in the average neutron flux determination and calculated the depression coefficients for thermal and epithermal neutrons due to the sample thickness with analytical approximations. We obtained 1.57(4) b and 1.02(4) b, for thermal and resonance integral cross sections, respectively, with correlation coefficient equal to 0.39.

  4. Heteronuclear cross-polarization in multinuclear multidimensional NMR: Prospects for triple-resonance CP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, A.; Zuiderweg, E.R.P. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Heteronuclear multiple-pulse-based Cross Polarization (HECP) between scalar coupled spins is gaining an important role in high-resolution multidimensional NMR of isotopically labeled biomolecules, especially in experiments involving net magnetization transfer. It has generally been observed that in these situations, the performance of HECP is superior to that of INEPT-based sequences. In particular, HECP-based three-dimensional HCCH spectroscopy is more efficient than the INEPT version of the same experiment. Differences in sensitivity have been intuitively attributed to relaxation effects and technical factors such as radiofrequency (rf) inhomogeneity We present theoretical analyses and computer simulations to probe the effects of these factors. Relaxation effects were treated phenomenologically; we found that relaxation differences are relatively small (up to 25%) between pulsed-free-precession (INEPT) and HECP-although always in favor of HECP. We explored the rf effects by employing a Gaussian distribution of rf amplitude over sample volume. We found that inhomogeneity effects significantly favor HECP over INEPT, especially under conditions of {open_quotes}matched {close_quotes} inhomogeneity in the two rf coils. The differences in favor of HECP indicate that an extension of HECP to triple resonance experiments (TRCP) in I -> S -> Q net transfers might yield better results relative to analogous INEPT-based net transfers. We theoretically analyze the possibilities of TRCP and find that transfer functions are critically dependent on the ratio J{sub IS}/J{sub SQ}. When J{sub IS} equals J{sub SQ}, we find that 100% transfer is possible for truly simultaneous TRCP and this transfer is obtained in a time 1.41 /J. The TRCP time requirement compares favorably with optimally concatenated INEPT-transfers, where net transfer I -> S -> Q is complete at 1.5 /J.

  5. Second Law Violation By Magneto-Caloric Effect Adiabatic Phase Transition of Type I Superconductive Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Keefe

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The nature of the thermodynamic behavior of Type I superconductor particles, having a cross section less than the Ginzburg-Landau temperature dependent coherence length is discussed for magnetic field induced adiabatic phase transitions from the superconductive state to the normal state. Argument is advanced supporting the view that when the adiabatic magneto-caloric process is applied to particles, the phase transition is characterized by a decrease in entropy in violation of traditional formulations of the Second Law, evidenced by attainment of a final process temperature below that which would result from an adiabatic magneto-caloric process applied to bulk dimensioned specimens.

  6. Linear response of galactic halos to adiabatic gravitational perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Murali, C; Murali, Chigurupati; Tremaine, Scott

    1997-01-01

    We determine the response of a self-similar isothermal stellar system to small adiabatic gravitational perturbations. For odd spherical harmonics, the response is identical to the response of the analogous isothermal fluid system. For even spherical harmonics, the response can be regarded as an infinite series of wavetrains in $\\log r$, implying alternating compression and rarefaction in equal logarithmic radius intervals. Partly because of the oscillatory nature of the solutions, tidal fields from external sources are not strongly amplified by an intervening isothermal stellar system, except at radii can even screen the external tidal field in a manner analogous to Debye screening. As Weinberg has pointed out, individual resonances in a stellar system can strongly amplify external tidal fields over a limited radial range, but we cannot address this possibility because we examine only adiabatic perturbations. We also discuss the application of our method to the halo response caused by the slow growth of an em...

  7. Experimental implementation of local adiabatic evolution algorithms by an NMR quantum information processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Avik; Ghosh, Arindam; Das, Ranabir; Patel, Apoorva; Kumar, Anil

    2005-12-01

    Quantum adiabatic algorithm is a method of solving computational problems by evolving the ground state of a slowly varying Hamiltonian. The technique uses evolution of the ground state of a slowly varying Hamiltonian to reach the required output state. In some cases, such as the adiabatic versions of Grover's search algorithm and Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm, applying the global adiabatic evolution yields a complexity similar to their classical algorithms. However, using the local adiabatic evolution, the algorithms given by J. Roland and N.J. Cerf for Grover's search [J. Roland, N.J. Cerf, Quantum search by local adiabatic evolution, Phys. Rev. A 65 (2002) 042308] and by Saurya Das, Randy Kobes, and Gabor Kunstatter for the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm [S. Das, R. Kobes, G. Kunstatter, Adiabatic quantum computation and Deutsh's algorithm, Phys. Rev. A 65 (2002) 062301], yield a complexity of order N (where N=2(n) and n is the number of qubits). In this paper, we report the experimental implementation of these local adiabatic evolution algorithms on a 2-qubit quantum information processor, by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

  8. PAPIN: A Fortran-IV program to calculate cross section probability tables, Bondarenko and transmission self-shielding factors for fertile isotopes in the unresolved resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Cobos, J.G.

    1981-08-01

    The Fortran IV code PAPIN has been developed to calculate cross section probability tables, Bondarenko self-shielding factors and average self-indication ratios for non-fissile isotopes, below the inelastic threshold, on the basis of the ENDF/B prescriptions for the unresolved resonance region. Monte-Carlo methods are utilized to generate ladders of resonance parameters in the unresolved resonance region, from average resonance parameters and their appropriate distribution functions. The neutron cross-sections are calculated by the single level Breit-Wigner (SLBW) formalism, with s, p and d-wave contributions. The cross section probability tables are constructed by sampling the Doppler-broadened cross sections. The various self-shielded factors are computed numerically as Lebesgue integrals over the cross section probability tables. The program PAPIN has been validated through extensive comparisons with several deterministic codes.

  9. Cross polarization from spins I=12 to spins S=1 in nuclear magnetic resonance with magic angle sample spinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Karthik; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2006-05-21

    Spin locking of the nuclear magnetization of a spin with S=1 such as deuterium in the presence of a radio-frequency field under magic angle spinning (MAS) is described in terms of adiabatic modulations of the energy levels. In a brief initial period, part of the initial density operator nutates about the Hamiltonian and is dephased. The remaining spin-locked state undergoes persistent oscillatory transfer processes between various coherences with a periodicity given by the rotation of the sample. While all crystallites in the powder undergo such periodic transfer processes, the phases of the oscillations depend on the angle gamma of the crystallites. The angle gamma is the azimuthal angle defining the orientation of the unique axis of the quadrupolar interaction tensor in a rotor-fixed frame. The theory is extended to describe cross-polarization between spins S=1 and I=12 under MAS. There are four distinct Hartmann-Hahn matching conditions that correspond to four zero-quantum matching conditions, all of which are shifted and broadened compared to their spin S=12 counterparts. These matching conditions are further split into a family of sideband conditions separated by the spinning frequency. The theory allows the calculation of both shifts and broadening factors of the matching conditions, as verified by simulations and experiments.

  10. Adiabatic Wankel type rotary engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, R.; Badgley, P.; Doup, D.

    1988-01-01

    This SBIR Phase program accomplished the objective of advancing the technology of the Wankel type rotary engine for aircraft applications through the use of adiabatic engine technology. Based on the results of this program, technology is in place to provide a rotor and side and intermediate housings with thermal barrier coatings. A detailed cycle analysis of the NASA 1007R Direct Injection Stratified Charge (DISC) rotary engine was performed which concluded that applying thermal barrier coatings to the rotor should be successful and that it was unlikely that the rotor housing could be successfully run with thermal barrier coatings as the thermal stresses were extensive.

  11. Rotational dynamics of an asymmetric top molecule in parallel electric and non-resonant laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Omiste, Juan J

    2013-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the rotational dynamics of asymmetry top molecules in parallel electric field and non-resonant linearly polarized laser pulses. The time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation is solved within the the rigid rotor approximation. Using the benzonitrile molecule as prototype, we investigate the field-dressed dynamics for experimentally accessible field configurations and compare these results to the adiabatic predictions. We show that for an asymmetric top molecule in parallel fields, the formation of the pendular doublets and the avoided crossings between neighboring levels are the two main sources of non-adiabatic effects. We also provide the field parameters under which the adiabatic dynamics would be achieved.

  12. On the topology of adiabatic passage

    CERN Document Server

    Yatsenko, L P; Jauslin, H R

    2002-01-01

    We examine the topology of eigenenergy surfaces characterizing the population transfer processes based on adiabatic passage. We show that this topology is the essential feature for the analysis of the population transfers and the prediction of its final result. We reinterpret diverse known processes, such as stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP), frequency-chirped adiabatic passage and Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passage (SCRAP). Moreover, using this picture, we display new related possibilities of transfer. In particular, we show that we can selectively control the level which will be populated in STIRAP process in Lambda or V systems by the choice of the peak amplitudes or the pulse sequence.

  13. Thermal-neutron cross sections and resonance integrals of 138Ba and 141Pr using Am-Be neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikkath, Priyada; Mohanakrishnan, P.

    2016-09-01

    The thermal-neutron capture cross sections and resonance integrals of 138Ba(n, γ)139Ba and 141Pr(n, γ)142Pr were measured by activation method using an isotopic Am-Be neutron source. The estimations were with respect to that of 55Mn(n, γ)56Mn and 197Au(n, γ)198Au reference monitors. The measured thermal-capture cross section of 138 Ba with respect to 55 Mn is 0.410±0.023 b and with respect to 197 Au is 0.386±0.019 b. The measured thermal-capture cross section of 141 Pr with respect to 55 Mn is 11.36±1.29 b and with respect to 197 Au is 10.43±1.14 b. The resonance integrals for 138 Ba are 0.380±0.033 b (55 Mn) and 0.364±0.027 b (197 Au) and for 141 Pr are 21.05±2.88 b (55 Mn) and 15.27±1.87 b (197 Au). The comparison between the present measurements and various reported values are discussed. The cross sections corresponding to the selected isotopes are measured using an Am-Be source facility for the first time.

  14. Production Cross-Section Estimates for Strongly-Interacting Electroweak-Symmetry Breaking Sector Resonances at Particle Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobado, Antonio; Guo, Feng-Kun; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.

    2015-12-01

    We are exploring a generic strongly-interacting Electroweak Symmetry Breaking Sector (EWSBS) with the low-energy effective field theory for the four experimentally known particles (W±L, ZL, h) and its dispersion-relation based unitary extension. In this contribution we provide simple estimates for the production cross-section of pairs of the EWSBS bosons and their resonances at proton-proton colliders as well as in a future e-e+ (or potentially a μ-μ+) collider with a typical few-TeV energy. We examine the simplest production mechanisms, tree-level production through a W (dominant when quantum numbers allow) and the simple effective boson approximation (in which the electroweak bosons are considered as collinear partons of the colliding fermions). We exemplify with custodial isovector and isotensor resonances at 2 TeV, the energy currently being discussed because of a slight excess in the ATLAS 2-jet data. We find it hard, though not unthinkable, to ascribe this excess to one of these WLWL rescattering resonances. An isovector resonance could be produced at a rate smaller than, but close to earlier CMS exclusion bounds, depending on the parameters of the effective theory. The ZZ excess is then problematic and requires additional physics (such as an additional scalar resonance). The isotensor one (that would describe all charge combinations) has smaller cross-section. Supported by the Spanish Excellence Network on Hadronic Physics FIS2014-57026-REDT, by Spanish Grants Universidad Complutense UCM:910309 and Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad MINECO:FPA2011-27853-C02-01, MINECO:FPA2014-53375-C2-1-P, by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and National Natural Science Foundation of China through Funds Provided to the Sino-German CRC 110 “Symmetries and the Emergence of Structure in QCD” (NSFC Grant No. 11261130311) and by NSFC (Grant No. 11165005)

  15. Analytic Elastic Cross Sections for Electron-Atom Scattering from Generalized Fano Profiles of Overlapping Low-Energy Shape Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Nicoletopoulos, P

    2003-01-01

    The variation with energy of the total cross section for elastic electron scattering from atoms of several elements is caused primarily by shape resonances corresponding to the formation of temporary negative ions. It is shown that such cross sections are expressible analytically in terms of a constant background added to a "generalized Fano profile" [Durand Ph, et al (2001) J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 34, 1953, ibid (2002) 35, 469]. In three cases (sodium, magnesium and mercury), a detailed consideration proves that this representation is accurate in a fairly wide energy range. Moreover, the related momentum transfer cross sections are tailor-made for studying "elastic" electron transport in terms of the two-term solution of the Boltzmann equation: Not only are the resulting swarm transport coefficients adjustable to the experimental values, but above all they are calculable very easily because the unnormalized energy distribution is obtainable analytically. The ample saving in computational effort is ex...

  16. Rotational echo double resonance detection of cross-links formed in mussel byssus under high-flow stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, L M; Burzio, L A; Waite, J H; Schaefer, J

    1999-07-16

    13C2H rotational echo double resonance NMR has been used to provide the first evidence for the formation of quinone-derived cross-links in mussel byssal plaques. Labeling of byssus was achieved by allowing mussels to filter feed from seawater containing L-[phenol-4-13C]tyrosine and L-[ring-d4]tyrosine for 2 days. Plaques and threads were harvested from two groups of mussels over a period of 28 days. One group was maintained in stationary water while the other was exposed to turbulent flow at 20 cm/s. The flow-stressed byssal plaques exhibited significantly enhanced levels of 5, 5'-di-dihydroxyphenylalanine cross-links. The average concentration of di-dihydroxyphenylalanine cross-links in byssal plaques is 1 per 1800 total protein amino acid residues.

  17. Evaluated 182,183,184,186W Neutron Cross Sections and Covariances in the Resolved Resonance Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigni, Marco T [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Leal, Luiz C [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently completed the resonance parameter evaluation of four tungsten isotopes, i.e., 182,183,184,186W, in the neutron energy range of thermal up to several keV. This nuclear data work was performed with support from the US Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) in an effort to provide improved tungsten cross section and covariance data for criticality safety analyses. The evaluation methodology uses the Reich-Moore approximation of the R-matrix formalism of the code SAMMY to fit high-resolution measurements performed in 2010 and 2012 at the Geel linear accelerator facility (GELINA), as well as other experimental data sets on natural tungsten available in the EXFOR library. In the analyzed energy range, this work nearly doubles the resolved resonance region (RRR) present in the latest US nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.1. In view of the interest in tungsten for distinct types of nuclear applications and the relatively homogeneous distribution of the isotopic tungsten—namely, 182W(26.5%), 183W(14.31%), 184W(30.64%), and 186W(28.43%) - the completion of these four evaluations represents a significant contribution to the improvement of the ENDF library. This paper presents an overview of the evaluated resonance parameters and related covariances for total and capture cross sections on the four tungsten isotopes.

  18. (Hybrid) Baryons Quantum Numbers and Adiabatic Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Page, P R

    1999-01-01

    We construct (hybrid) baryons in the flux-tube model of Isgur and Paton. In the limit of adiabatic quark motion, we build proper eigenstates of orbital angular momentum and indicate the flavour, spin, chirality and J^P of (hybrid) baryons. The adiabatic potential is calculated as a function of the quark positions.

  19. Cummins/Tacom advanced adiabatic engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamo, R.; Bryzik, W.

    1984-01-01

    Cummins Engine Company, Inc. and the U.S. Army have been jointly developing an adiabatic turbocompound engine during the last nine years. Although progress in the early years was slow, recent developments in the field of advanced ceramics have made it possible to make steady progress. It is now possible to reconsider the temperature limitation imposed on current heat engines and its subsequent influence on higher engine efficiency when using an exhaust energy utilization system. This paper presents an adiabatic turbocompound diesel engine concept in which high-performance ceramics are used in its design. The adiabatic turbocompound engine will enable higher operating temperatures, reduced heat loss, and higher exhaust energy recovery, resulting in higher thermal engine efficiency. This paper indicates that the careful selection of ceramics in engine design is essential. Adiabatic engine materials requirements are defined and the possible ceramic materials which will satisfy these requirements are identified. Examples in design considerations of engine components are illustrated. In addition to these important points, the use of ceramic coatings in the design of engine components. The first generation adiabatic engine with ceramic coatings is described. The advanced adiabatic engine with minimum friction features utilizaing ceramics is also presented. The advanced ceramic turbocharger turbine rotor as well as the oilless ceramic bearing design is described. Finally, the current status of the advanced adiabatic engine program culminating in the AA750 V-8 adiabatic engine is presented.

  20. Analysis of adiabatic trapping for quasi-integrable area-preserving maps

    CERN Document Server

    Bazzani, A; Giovannozzi, M; Hernalsteens, C

    2014-01-01

    Trapping phenomena involving non-linear resonances have been considered in the past in the framework of adiabatic theory. Several results are known for continuous-time dynamical systems generated by Hamiltonian flows in which the combined effect of non-linear resonances and slow time-variation of some system parameters is considered. The focus of this paper is on discrete-time dynamical systems generated by two-dimensional symplectic maps. The possibility of extending the results of neo-adiabatic theory to quasi-integrable area-preserving maps is discussed. Scaling laws are derived, which describe the adiabatic transport as a function of the system parameters using a probabilistic point of view. These laws can be particularly relevant for physical applications. The outcome of extensive numerical simulations showing the excellent agreement with the analytical estimates and scaling laws is presented and discussed in detail.

  1. Adiabatic asymmetric scattering of atoms in the field of a standing wave

    CERN Document Server

    Hakobyan, M V; Ishkhanyan, A M

    2015-01-01

    A model of the asymmetric coherent scattering process (caused by initial atomic wave-packet splitting in the momentum space) taking place at the large detuning and adiabatic course of interaction for an effective two-state system interacting with a standing wave of laser radiation is discussed. We show that the same form of initial wave-packet splitting may lead to different, in general, diffraction patterns for opposite, adiabatic and resonant, regimes of the standing-wave scattering. We show that the scattering of the Gaussian wave packet in the adiabatic case presents refraction (a limiting form of the asymmetric scattering) in contrast to the bi-refringence (the limiting case of the high-order narrowed scattering) occurring in the resonant scattering.

  2. On a Nonlinear Model in Adiabatic Evolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Song-Feng

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we study a kind of nonlinear model of adiabatic evolution in quantum search problem. As will be seen here, for this problem, there always exists a possibility that this nonlinear model can successfully solve the problem, while the linear model can not. Also in the same setting, when the overlap between the initial state and the final stare is sufficiently large, a simple linear adiabatic evolution can achieve O(1) time efficiency, but infinite time complexity for the nonlinear model of adiabatic evolution is needed. This tells us, it is not always a wise choice to use nonlinear interpolations in adiabatic algorithms. Sometimes, simple linear adiabatic evolutions may be sufficient for using. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 61402188 and 61173050. The first author also gratefully acknowledges the support from the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation under Grant No. 2014M552041

  3. PIPER Continuous Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Mark O.; Shirron, Peter J.; Canavan, Edgar R.; James, Bryan L.; Sampson, Michael A.; Letmate, Richard V.

    2017-01-01

    We report upon the development and testing of a 4-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) capable of continuous cooling at 0.100 Kelvin. This cooler is being built to cool the detector array aboard NASA's Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) observatory. The goal of this balloon mission is to measure the primordial gravitational waves that should exist if the theory of cosmological inflation is correct. At altitude, the ADR will hold the array of transition-edge sensors at 100 mK continuously while periodically rejecting heat to a 1.2 K pumped helium bath. During testing on ground, the array is held at the same temperature but heat is rejected to a 4.2 K helium bath indicating the flexibility in this coolers design.

  4. Quenching in coupled adiabatic coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.E.C.

    1985-03-01

    The prediction of the effects of a quench on stress and temperature is an important aspect of the design of superconducting magnets. Of particular interest, and the exclusive topic of this study, is the prediction of the effects of quenching in coupled adiabatic coils, such as the multi-section windings of a high field NMR spectrometer magnet. The predictive methods used here are based on the measurement of the time of propagation of quench between turns. From this measurement an approximate algorithum for the propagation time is used in a code which solves the linear differential equations for the coil currents and calculates the movement of normal zone boundaries and hence the associated winding resistance.

  5. Quantum Computation by Adiabatic Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Farhi, E; Gutmann, S; Sipser, M; Farhi, Edward; Goldstone, Jeffrey; Gutmann, Sam; Sipser, Michael

    2000-01-01

    We give a quantum algorithm for solving instances of the satisfiability problem, based on adiabatic evolution. The evolution of the quantum state is governed by a time-dependent Hamiltonian that interpolates between an initial Hamiltonian, whose ground state is easy to construct, and a final Hamiltonian, whose ground state encodes the satisfying assignment. To ensure that the system evolves to the desired final ground state, the evolution time must be big enough. The time required depends on the minimum energy difference between the two lowest states of the interpolating Hamiltonian. We are unable to estimate this gap in general. We give some special symmetric cases of the satisfiability problem where the symmetry allows us to estimate the gap and we show that, in these cases, our algorithm runs in polynomial time.

  6. Under and over-adiabatic electrons through a perpendicular collisionless shock: theory versus simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Savoini

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Test particle simulations are performed in order to analyze in detail the dynamics of transmitted electrons through a supercritical, strictly perpendicular, collisionless shock. In addition to adiabatic particles, two distinct nonadiabatic populations are observed surprisingly: (i first, an over-adiabatic population characterized by an increase in the gyrating velocity higher than that expected from the conservation of the magnetic moment µ, and (ii second, an under-adiabatic population characterized by a decrease in this velocity. Results show that both nonadiabatic populations have their pitch angle more aligned along the magnetic field than the adiabatic one at the time these hit the shock front. The formation of "under" and "over-adiabatic" particles strongly depends on their local injection conditions through the large amplitude cross-shock potential present within the shock front. A simplified theoretical model validates these results and points out the important role of the electric field as seen by the electrons. A classification shows that both nonadiabatic electrons are issued from the core part of the upstream distributionÊ function. In contrast, suprathermal and tail electrons only contribute to the adiabatic population; nevertheless, the core part of the upstream distribution contributes at a lower percentage to the adiabatic electrons. Under-adiabatic electrons are characterized by small injection angles θinj≤90°, whereas "over-adiabatic" particles have high injection angles θinj>90° (where θinj is the angle between the local gyrating velocity vector and the shock normal.

  7. Adiabatic Heavy Ion Fusion Potentials for Fusion at Deep Sub-barrier Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Sastry, S V S; Mohanty, A K; Saxena, A

    2003-01-01

    The fusion cross sections from well above barrier to extreme sub-barrier energies have been analysed using the energy (E) and angular momentum (L) dependent barrier penetration model ({\\small{ELDBPM}}). From this analysis, the adiabatic limits of fusion barriers have been determined for a wide range of heavy ion systems. The empirical prescription of Wilzynska and Wilzynski has been used with modified radius parameter and surface tension coefficient values consistent with the parameterization of the nuclear masses. The adiabatic fusion barriers calculated from this prescription are in good agreement with the adiabatic barriers deduced from {\\small{ELDBPM}} fits to fusion data. The nuclear potential diffuseness is larger at adiabatic limit, resulting in a lower $\\hbar\\omega$ leading to increase of "logarithmic slope" observed at energies well below the barrier. The effective fusion barrier radius and curvature values are anomalously smaller than the predictions of known empirical prescriptions. A detailed comp...

  8. A Type of Low Power Adiabatic Logic Circuit with Cross-coupled Transmission Gate%一种交叉耦合低功耗传输门绝热逻辑电路

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡建平; 汪鹏君; 夏银水

    2003-01-01

    提出了一种新的能量恢复型电路--Transmission Gate Adiabatic Logic(TGAL).该电路由交叉耦合的CMOS传输门完成逻辑运算与能量恢复,对负载的驱动为全绝热过程.TGAL电路输出端始终处于箝位状态,在整个输出期不存在悬空现象并具有良好的信号传输效果.分析了TGAL反相器的能耗,并与静态CMOS电路及部分文献中绝热电路进行了比较.使用TGAL构成门电路与时序系统的实例被演示.应用MOSIS的0.25 μm CMOS工艺参数的模拟结果表明,与传统CMOS和2N-2N2P绝热电路相比,TGAL电路在100 MHz工作频率时分别节省80%与60%以上的功耗.

  9. Cross polarization, magic-angle spinning /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of soil humic fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiz-Jimenez, C.; Hawkins, B.L.; Maciel, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    Cross polarization, magic-angle spinning /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to characterize humic fractions isolated from different soils. The humic acid fractions are more aromatic than the humin fractions, probably due to the higher polysaccharide content of humins. However, fulvic acid fractions are more aromatic than the corresponding humic acid and humin fractions. These results can be interpreted in terms of the isolation procedure, because the high affinity of Polyclar AT for phenols results in higher aromaticities as compared with other isolation methods (e.g. charcoal).

  10. Integral cross sections for π-p interaction in the 3,3 resonance region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Paul, M.; Schechter, M.; Altman, A.; Jennings, B. K.; Wagner, G. J.; Fazel, N.; Johnson, R. R.; Suen, N.; Fraenkel, Z.

    1993-03-01

    Total cross sections for the π-p single charge exchange and 20° “partial-total” cross sections have been measured between 126 and 202 MeV pion energy. The former are about 4% below similar results of Bugg et al. and (5-10)% below predictions made with currently accepted phase shifts. The latter agree quite well with calculations.

  11. Design of superconducting multi-pole miniaturized filters with quasi-spiral resonators for decreasing unwanted cross couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, S., E-mail: tdn01835@st.yamagata-u.ac.j [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, 4-3-16 Johnan, Yonezawa 992-8510 (Japan); Harada, Y. [Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8568 (Japan); Saito, A.; Lee, J.H.; Kato, T.; Uno, M. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, 4-3-16 Johnan, Yonezawa 992-8510 (Japan); Yoshizawa, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5, Ueda, Morioka, Iwate, 020-8551 (Japan); Ohshima, S. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, 4-3-16 Johnan, Yonezawa 992-8510 (Japan)

    2009-10-15

    We designed a 5-GHz miniaturized 8-pole bandpass filter (BPF) using superconducting microstrip quasi-spiral resonators (QSRs) for international mobile telecommunication (IMT)-advanced receiving applications. We used the QSRs with line width and spacing equal to 10 mum for further miniaturization, and investigated a relationship between the structure of the QSR and the unloaded quality factor (Q{sub u}). The Q{sub u} of the optimized QSR of approximately 25,000 was obtained. It was difficult to design a BPF using miniaturized QSRs with high Q{sub u} because of strong cross couplings between QSRs. The lambda{sub g}/8-line inserted inverters were effective in decreasing the unwanted cross couplings. Using these QSR and the lambda{sub g}/8-line inserted inverters, 8-pole cascaded quadruplet (CQ) BPF was designed. We found that it was possible to design a miniaturized BPF with high Q{sub u}.

  12. Enhancement of level-crossing resonances in rubidium atoms by frequency control of the exciting radiation field

    CERN Document Server

    Auzinsh, Marcis; Ferber, Ruvin; Gahbauer, Florian; Kalvans, Linards; Mozers, Arturs; Spiss, Agris

    2013-01-01

    We studied magneto-optical resonances caused by excited-state level crossings in a nonzero magnetic field. Experimental measurements were performed on the transitions of the $D_2$ line of rubidium. These measured signals were described by a theoretical model that takes into account all neighboring hyperfine transitions, the mixing of magnetic sublevels in an external magnetic field, the coherence properties of the exciting laser radiation, and the Doppler effect. Good agreement between the experimental measurements and the theoretical model could be achieved over a wide range of laser power densities. We further showed that the contrasts of the level-crossing peaks can be sensitive to changes in the frequency of the exciting laser radiation as small as several tens of megahertz when the hyperfine splitting of the exciting state is larger than the Doppler broadening.

  13. Partial evolution based local adiabatic quantum search

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Jie; Lu Song-Feng; Liu Fang; Yang Li-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Recently,Zhang and Lu provided a quantum search algorithm based on partial adiabatic evolution,which beats the time bound of local adiabatic search when the number of marked items in the unsorted database is larger than one.Later,they found that the above two adiabatic search algorithms had the same time complexity when there is only one marked item in the database.In the present paper,following the idea of Roland and Cerf [Roland J and Cerf N J 2002Phys.Rev.A 65 042308],if within the small symmetric evolution interval defined by Zhang et al.,a local adiabatic evolution is performed instead of the original “global” one,this “new” algorithm exhibits slightly better performance,although they are progressively equivalent with M increasing.In addition,the proof of the optimality for this partial evolution based local adiabatic search when M =1 is also presented.Two other special cases of the adiabatic algorithm obtained by appropriately tuning the evolution interval of partial adiabatic evolution based quantum search,which are found to have the same phenomenon above,are also discussed.

  14. Adiabatic theorems for generators of contracting evolutions

    CERN Document Server

    Avron, J E; Graf, G M; Grech, P

    2011-01-01

    We develop an adiabatic theory for generators of contracting evolution on Banach spaces. This provides a uniform framework for a host of adiabatic theorems ranging from unitary quantum evolutions through quantum evolutions of open systems generated by Lindbladians all the way to classically driven stochastic systems. In all these cases the adiabatic evolution approximates, to lowest order, the natural notion of parallel transport in the manifold of instantaneous stationary states. The dynamics in the manifold of instantaneous stationary states and transversal to it have distinct characteristics: The former is irreversible and the latter is transient in a sense that we explain. Both the gapped and gapless cases are considered. Some applications are discussed.

  15. Digital Waveguide Adiabatic Passage Part 2: Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, Vincent; Chaboyer, Zachary J; Nguyen, Thach; Dawes, Judith M; Withford, Michael J; Greentree, Andrew D; Steel, M J

    2016-01-01

    Using a femtosecond laser writing technique, we fabricate and characterise three-waveguide digital adiabatic passage devices, with the central waveguide digitised into five discrete waveguidelets. Strongly asymmetric behaviour was observed, devices operated with high fidelity in the counter-intuitive scheme while strongly suppressing transmission in the intuitive. The low differential loss of the digital adiabatic passage designs potentially offers additional functionality for adiabatic passage based devices. These devices operate with a high contrast ($>\\!90\\%$) over a 60~nm bandwidth, centered at $\\sim 823$~nm.

  16. Energy consumption for shortcuts to adiabaticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrontegui, E.; Lizuain, I.; González-Resines, S.; Tobalina, A.; Ruschhaupt, A.; Kosloff, R.; Muga, J. G.

    2017-08-01

    Shortcuts to adiabaticity let a system reach the results of a slow adiabatic process in a shorter time. We propose to quantify the "energy cost" of the shortcut by the energy consumption of the system enlarged by including the control device. A mechanical model where the dynamics of the system and control device can be explicitly described illustrates that a broad range of possible values for the consumption is possible, including zero (above the adiabatic energy increment) when friction is negligible and the energy given away as negative power is stored and reused by perfect regenerative braking.

  17. Empirical Fit to Inelastic Electron-Deuteron and Electron-Neutron Resonance Region Transverse Cross Sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Bosted; M. E. Christy

    2007-11-08

    An empirical fit is described to measurements of inclusive inelastic electron-deuteron cross sections in the kinematic range of four-momentum transfer $0 \\le Q^2<10$ GeV$^2$ and final state invariant mass $1.2<3$ GeV. The deuteron fit relies on a fit of the ratio $R_p$ of longitudinal to transverse cross sections for the proton, and the assumption $R_p=R_n$. The underlying fit parameters describe the average cross section for proton and neutron, with a plane-wave impulse approximation (PWIA) used to fit to the deuteron data. Pseudo-data from MAID 2007 were used to constrain the average nucleon cross sections for $W<1.2$ GeV. The mean deviation of data from the fit is 3\\%, with less than 5\\% of the data points deviating from the fit by more than 10\\%.

  18. Adiabatic quantum computing with spin qubits hosted by molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Satoru; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Sugisaki, Kenji; Sato, Kazunobu; Toyota, Kazuo; Shiomi, Daisuke; Takui, Takeji

    2015-01-28

    A molecular spin quantum computer (MSQC) requires electron spin qubits, which pulse-based electron spin/magnetic resonance (ESR/MR) techniques can afford to manipulate for implementing quantum gate operations in open shell molecular entities. Importantly, nuclear spins, which are topologically connected, particularly in organic molecular spin systems, are client qubits, while electron spins play a role of bus qubits. Here, we introduce the implementation for an adiabatic quantum algorithm, suggesting the possible utilization of molecular spins with optimized spin structures for MSQCs. We exemplify the utilization of an adiabatic factorization problem of 21, compared with the corresponding nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) case. Two molecular spins are selected: one is a molecular spin composed of three exchange-coupled electrons as electron-only qubits and the other an electron-bus qubit with two client nuclear spin qubits. Their electronic spin structures are well characterized in terms of the quantum mechanical behaviour in the spin Hamiltonian. The implementation of adiabatic quantum computing/computation (AQC) has, for the first time, been achieved by establishing ESR/MR pulse sequences for effective spin Hamiltonians in a fully controlled manner of spin manipulation. The conquered pulse sequences have been compared with the NMR experiments and shown much faster CPU times corresponding to the interaction strength between the spins. Significant differences are shown in rotational operations and pulse intervals for ESR/MR operations. As a result, we suggest the advantages and possible utilization of the time-evolution based AQC approach for molecular spin quantum computers and molecular spin quantum simulators underlain by sophisticated ESR/MR pulsed spin technology.

  19. Measurement of the resonance shift in the radar backscattering cross section of thick stainless steel fibers at 35 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyones, Sharhabeel; Bruce, Charles

    2007-03-01

    Measurements of the radar backscattering cross section of stainless steel fibers with low length-to-diameter ratio (thick fibers) had been done at 35 GHz. The intention was to confirm the resonance shift in length predicted by a numerical solution of the general problem of electromagnetic scattering and absorption by finite conducting wires [1]. The numerical methods solves the generalized form of the Pocklington equation, which is valid for both thin and thick fibers. Single particle radar backscattering measurement system was used and the resonance shift had been confirmed for four sets of aspect ratios. The position of the first resonance is shifted to shorter lengths in comparison with the previous analytical solution of the problem by P. Watermann and J. Pedersen [2]. [1] Sharhabeel Alyones, Charles W. Bruce, and Andrei Buin, `` Numerical methods for solving the problem of electromagnetic scattering by a finite thin conducting wire'', accepted for publication in IEEE. Trans. Antennas and Propag. [2] P. C. Waterman, ``Scattering, absorption and extinction by thin fibers,'' Accepted for publication in J. Opt. Soc. A.

  20. Thermoelectric Effects under Adiabatic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Levy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates not fully explained voltage offsets observed by several researchers during the measurement of the Seebeck coefficient of high Z materials. These offsets, traditionally attributed to faulty laboratory procedures, have proven to have an irreducible component that cannot be fully eliminated in spite of careful laboratory procedures. In fact, these offsets are commonly observed and routinely subtracted out of commercially available Seebeck measurement systems. This paper offers a possible explanation based on the spontaneous formation of an adiabatic temperature gradient in the presence of a force field. The diffusion-diffusion heat transport mechanism is formulated and applied to predict two new thermoelectric effects. The first is the existence of a temperature gradient across a potential barrier in a semiconductor and the second is the Onsager reciprocal of the first, that is, the presence of a measureable voltage that arises across a junction when the temperature gradient is forced to zero by a thermal clamp. Suggested future research includes strategies for utilizing the new thermoelectric effects.

  1. Capture Probability in the 3:1 Mean Motion Resonance with Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Folonier, H; Beaugé, C

    2014-01-01

    We study the capture and crossing probabilities into the 3:1 mean motion resonance with Jupiter for a small asteroid that migrates from the inner to the middle Main Belt under the action of the Yarkovsky effect. We use an algebraic mapping of the averaged planar restricted three-body problem based on the symplectic mapping of Hadjidemetriou (1993), adding the secular variations of the orbit of Jupiter and non-symplectic terms to simulate the migration. We found that, for fast migration rates, the captures occur at discrete windows of initial eccentricities whose specific locations depend on the initial resonant angles, indicating that the capture phenomenon is not probabilistic. For slow migration rates, these windows become narrower and start to accumulate at low eccentricities, generating a region of mutual overlap where the capture probability tends to 100%, in agreement with the theoretical predictions for the adiabatic regime. Our simulations allow to predict the capture probabilities in both the adiabat...

  2. Adiabatic Floquet model for the optical response in femtosecond filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The standard model of femtosecond filamentation is based on phenomenological assumptions which suggest that the ionization-induced carriers can be treated as free according to the Drude model, while the nonlinear response of the bound carriers follows the all-optical Kerr effect. Here, we demonstrate that the additional plasma generated at a multiphoton resonance dominates the saturation of the nonlinear refractive index. Since resonances are not captured by the standard model, we propose a modification of the latter in which ionization enhancements can be accounted for by an ionization rate obtained from non-Hermitian Floquet theory. In the adiabatic regime of long pulse envelopes, this augmented standard model is in excellent agreement with direct quantum mechanical simulations. Since our proposal maintains the structure of the standard model, it can be easily incorporated into existing codes of filament simulation.

  3. Adiabatic hydrodynamics: The eightfold way to dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Haehl, Felix M; Rangamani, Mukund

    2015-01-01

    We provide a complete solution to hydrodynamic transport at all orders in the gradient expansion compatible with the second law constraint. The key new ingredient we introduce is the notion of adiabaticity, which allows us to take hydrodynamics off-shell. Adiabatic fluids are such that off-shell dynamics of the fluid compensates for entropy production. The space of adiabatic fluids is quite rich, and admits a decomposition into seven distinct classes. Together with the dissipative class this establishes the eightfold way of hydrodynamic transport. Furthermore, recent results guarantee that dissipative terms beyond leading order in the gradient expansion are agnostic of the second law. While this completes a transport taxonomy, we go on to argue for a new symmetry principle, an Abelian gauge invariance that guarantees adiabaticity in hydrodynamics. We suggest that this symmetry is the macroscopic manifestation of the microscopic KMS invariance. We demonstrate its utility by explicitly constructing effective ac...

  4. Adiabatic quantum gates and Boolean functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrecut, M; Ali, M K [Department of Physics, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB, T1K 3M4 (Canada)

    2004-06-25

    We discuss the logical implementation of quantum gates and Boolean functions in the framework of quantum adiabatic method, which uses the language of ground states, spectral gaps and Hamiltonians instead of the standard unitary transformation language. (letter to the editor)

  5. Calculation of vibrational excitation cross-sections in resonant electron-molecule scattering using the time-dependent wave packet (TDWP) approach with application to the 2 CO- shape resonance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raman Kumar Singh; Manabendra Sarma; Ankit Jain; Satrajit Adhikari; Manoj K Mishra

    2007-09-01

    Results from application of a new implementation of the time-dependent wave packet (TDWP) approach to the calculation of vibrational excitation cross-sections in resonant e-CO scattering are presented to examine its applicability in the treatment of e-molecule resonances. The results show that the SCF level local complex potential (LCP) in conjunction with the TDWP approach can reproduce experimental features quite satisfactorily.

  6. Adiabatic phase-conserving processes for executing quantum operations with ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beterov, I. I.; Tret'yakov, D. B.; Entin, V. M.; Yakshina, E. A.; Khamzina, G. N.; Ryabtsev, I. I.

    2017-06-01

    We have studied the regimes of deterministic single-atom Rydberg excitation in the conditions of Rydberg blockade and the methods of compensation for the dynamic phase of the wave function during the adiabatic passage. Using these methods, we have proposed schemes of single-qubit and two-qubit quantum states with mesoscopic atomic ensembles containing a random number of atoms, considred as quibits. The double adiabatic passage of the Förster resonance for two interacting atoms with a deterministic phase shift can be used for the implementation of two-qubit gates with reduced sensitivity of the gate fidelity to the fluctuations of the interatomic distance.

  7. Quantum Adiabatic Evolution Algorithms versus Simulated Annealing

    CERN Document Server

    Farhi, E; Gutmann, S; Farhi, Edward; Goldstone, Jeffrey; Gutmann, Sam

    2002-01-01

    We explain why quantum adiabatic evolution and simulated annealing perform similarly in certain examples of searching for the minimum of a cost function of n bits. In these examples each bit is treated symmetrically so the cost function depends only on the Hamming weight of the n bits. We also give two examples, closely related to these, where the similarity breaks down in that the quantum adiabatic algorithm succeeds in polynomial time whereas simulated annealing requires exponential time.

  8. Pediatric ureteropelvic junction obstruction: can magnetic resonance urography identify crossing vessels?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parikh, Kushal R.; Kraft, Kate H.; Ivancic, Vesna; Smith, Ethan A.; Dillman, Jonathan R. [Section of Pediatric Radiology, Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hammer, Matthew R. [University of Texas Southwestern, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-11-15

    MR Urography (MRU) is an increasingly used imaging modality for the evaluation of pediatric genitourinary obstruction. To determine whether pediatric MR urography (MRU) reliably detects crossing vessels in the setting of suspected ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction. The clinical significance of these vessels was also evaluated. We identified pediatric patients diagnosed with UPJ obstruction by MRU between May 2009 and June 2014. MRU studies were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists for the presence or absence of crossing vessels. Ancillary imaging findings such as laterality, parenchymal thinning/scarring, trapped fluid in the proximal ureter, and presence of renal parenchymal edema were also evaluated. Imaging findings were compared to surgical findings. We used the Mann-Whitney U test to compare continuous data and the Fisher exact test to compare proportions. Twenty-four of 25 (96%) UPJ obstructions identified by MRU were surgically confirmed. MRU identified crossing vessels in 10 of these cases, with 9 cases confirmed intraoperatively (κ = 0.92 [95% CI: 0.75, 1.0]). Crossing vessels were determined to be the primary cause of UPJ obstruction in 7/9 children intraoperatively, while in two children the vessels were deemed incidental and noncontributory to the urinary tract obstruction. There was no significant difference in age or the proportions of ancillary findings when comparing children without and with obstructing vessels. MRU allows detection of crossing vessels in pediatric UPJ obstruction. Although these vessels are the primary cause of obstruction in some children, they are incidental and non-contributory in others. Our study failed to convincingly identify any significant predictors (e.g., age or presence of renal parenchymal edema) that indicate when a crossing vessel is the primary cause of obstruction. (orig.)

  9. Pediatric ureteropelvic junction obstruction: can magnetic resonance urography identify crossing vessels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Kushal R; Hammer, Matthew R; Kraft, Kate H; Ivančić, Vesna; Smith, Ethan A; Dillman, Jonathan R

    2015-11-01

    MR Urography (MRU) is an increasingly used imaging modality for the evaluation of pediatric genitourinary obstruction. To determine whether pediatric MR urography (MRU) reliably detects crossing vessels in the setting of suspected ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction. The clinical significance of these vessels was also evaluated. We identified pediatric patients diagnosed with UPJ obstruction by MRU between May 2009 and June 2014. MRU studies were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists for the presence or absence of crossing vessels. Ancillary imaging findings such as laterality, parenchymal thinning/scarring, trapped fluid in the proximal ureter, and presence of renal parenchymal edema were also evaluated. Imaging findings were compared to surgical findings. We used the Mann-Whitney U test to compare continuous data and the Fisher exact test to compare proportions. Twenty-four of 25 (96%) UPJ obstructions identified by MRU were surgically confirmed. MRU identified crossing vessels in 10 of these cases, with 9 cases confirmed intraoperatively (κ = 0.92 [95% CI: 0.75, 1.0]). Crossing vessels were determined to be the primary cause of UPJ obstruction in 7/9 children intraoperatively, while in two children the vessels were deemed incidental and noncontributory to the urinary tract obstruction. There was no significant difference in age or the proportions of ancillary findings when comparing children without and with obstructing vessels. MRU allows detection of crossing vessels in pediatric UPJ obstruction. Although these vessels are the primary cause of obstruction in some children, they are incidental and non-contributory in others. Our study failed to convincingly identify any significant predictors (e.g., age or presence of renal parenchymal edema) that indicate when a crossing vessel is the primary cause of obstruction.

  10. Static envelope patterns in composite resonances generated by level crossing in optical toroidal microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmon, Tal; Schwefel, Harald G L; Yang, Lan; Oxborrow, Mark; Stone, A Douglas; Vahala, Kerry J

    2008-03-14

    We study level crossing in the optical whispering-gallery (WG) modes by using toroidal microcavities. Experimentally, we image the stationary envelope patterns of the composite optical modes that arise when WG modes of different wavelengths coincide in frequency. Numerically, we calculate crossings of levels that correspond with the observed degenerate modes, where our method takes into account the not perfectly transverse nature of their field polarizations. In addition, we analyze anticrossing with a large avoidance gap between modes of the same azimuthal number.

  11. The Decent Care Movement: Subsidiarity, Pragmatic Solidarity, and Cross-Cultural Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niforatos, Joshua D

    2016-02-01

    Decent Care is the World Health Organization and The Ford Foundation's joint effort to articulate a healthcare paradigm that makes a patient's voice equal to the voice of the healthcare provider. In this article, the six tenants of Decent Care are outlined with particular emphasis on subsidiarity. Liberation theology's preferential option for the poor maxim is presented and compared with other major world religions to demonstrate the cross-cultural focus of "decency." The power of this paradigm is in its emphasis and proclamation of human flourishing in a healthcare setting, generally speaking, and more specifically, human flourishing in the presence of affliction from chronic disease or dying cross-culturally.

  12. Adiabatic regularization of power spectra in nonminimally coupled chaotic inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinea, Allan L.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the effect of adiabatic regularization on both the tensor- and scalar-perturbation power spectra in nonminimally coupled chaotic inflation. Similar to that of the minimally coupled general single-field inflation, we find that the subtraction term is suppressed by an exponentially decaying factor involving the number of e -folds. By following the subtraction term long enough beyond horizon crossing, the regularized power spectrum tends to the ``bare'' power spectrum. This study justifies the use of the unregularized (``bare'') power spectrum in standard calculations.

  13. Adiabatic regularisation of power spectra in nonminimally coupled chaotic inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Alinea, Allan L

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effect of adiabatic regularisation on both the tensor- and scalar-perturbation power spectra in \\textit{nonminimally} coupled chaotic inflation. Similar to that of the \\textit{minimally} coupled general single-field inflation, we find that the subtraction term is suppressed by an exponentially decaying factor involving the number of $ e $-folds. By following the subtraction term long enough beyond horizon crossing, the regularised power spectrum tends to the "bare" power spectrum. This study justifies the use of the unregularised ("bare") power spectrum in standard calculations.

  14. Hierarchical theory of quantum adiabatic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Gong, Jiangbin; Wu, Biao

    2014-12-01

    Quantum adiabatic evolution is a dynamical evolution of a quantum system under slow external driving. According to the quantum adiabatic theorem, no transitions occur between nondegenerate instantaneous energy eigenstates in such a dynamical evolution. However, this is true only when the driving rate is infinitesimally small. For a small nonzero driving rate, there are generally small transition probabilities between the energy eigenstates. We develop a classical mechanics framework to address the small deviations from the quantum adiabatic theorem order by order. A hierarchy of Hamiltonians is constructed iteratively with the zeroth-order Hamiltonian being determined by the original system Hamiltonian. The kth-order deviations are governed by a kth-order Hamiltonian, which depends on the time derivatives of the adiabatic parameters up to the kth-order. Two simple examples, the Landau-Zener model and a spin-1/2 particle in a rotating magnetic field, are used to illustrate our hierarchical theory. Our analysis also exposes a deep, previously unknown connection between classical adiabatic theory and quantum adiabatic theory.

  15. Efimov Trimers near the Zero-crossing of a Feshbach Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Near a Feshbach resonance, the two-body scattering length can assume any value. When it approaches zero, the next-order term given by the effective range is known to diverge. We consider the question of whether this divergence (and the vanishing of the scattering length) is accompanied by an anom...... by an anomalous solution of the three-boson Schr\\"odinger equation similar to the one found at infinite scattering length by Efimov. Within a simple zero-range model, we find no such solutions, and conclude that higher-order terms do not support Efimov physics....

  16. Changes in the adiabatic invariant and streamline chaos in confined incompressible Stokes flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainshtein, D. L.; Vasiliev, A. A.; Neishtadt, A. I.

    1996-03-01

    The steady incompressible flow in a unit sphere introduced by Bajer and Moffatt [J. Fluid Mech. 212, 337 (1990)] is discussed. The velocity field of this flow differs by a small perturbation from an integrable field whose streamlines are almost all closed. The unperturbed flow has two stationary saddle points (poles of the sphere) and a two-dimensional separatrix passing through them. The entire interior of the unit sphere becomes the domain of streamline chaos for an arbitrarily small perturbation. This phenomenon is explained by the nonconservation of a certain adiabatic invariant that undergoes a jump when a streamline crosses a small neighborhood of the separatrix of the unperturbed flow. An asymptotic formula is obtained for the jump in the adiabatic invariant. The accumulation of such jumps in the course of repeated crossings of the separatrix results in the complete breaking of adiabatic invariance and streamline chaos.

  17. Angular dependence of the cross section asymmetry of the. gamma. p. -->. p. pi. /sup 0/ reaction in resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakyan, R.O.; Bagdasaryan, A.S.; Vartapetyan, G.A.; Oganesyan, A.A.; Petrosyan, Zh.V. (Erevanskij Fizicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1984-10-01

    Angular dependences of cross section asymmetry of ..pi../sup 0/-meson photoproduction in the ..gamma..p ..-->.. p..pi../sup 0/ reaction on energy of primary ..gamma..-quanta in the Esub(..gamma..)=(0.7+-1.3) GeV range are analyzed. Recent data on cross section asymmetry for angles of ..pi../sup 0/-meson production in c. m. s. THETAsub(..pi..)=65 deg - 80 deg are presented. The measurements have been conducted on a quasimonochromatic polarized photon beam of the Yerevan synchrotron by means of a two-arm installation intended for recoil proton detection from ..gamma..p ..-->.. p..pi../sup 0/ reaction in coincidence with one ..gamma..-quantum from ..pi../sup 0/-meson decay. Data are compared with different theoretical analyses. None of the present analyses describes of the measured energy and angular dependences of polarization parameters ..sigma.., Psub(y), Psub(xz) for ..gamma..p ..-->.. p..pi../sup 0/ reaction in the range of 2-3-resonances where ..sigma..-asymmetry of the reaction cross section, Psub(y), Psub(xz) - constituent of polarization vector lying in the plane of the reaction and perpendicular.

  18. Analytic forms for cross sections of di-lepton production from e+e- collisions around the J/Ψ resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xing-Yu; Wang, Ya-Di; Xia, Li-Gang

    2017-08-01

    A detailed theoretical derivation of the cross sections of e+e- → e+e- and e+e- → μ + μ - around the J/ψ resonance is reported. The resonance and interference parts of the cross sections, related to J/ψ resonance parameters, are calculated. Higher-order corrections for vacuum polarization and initial-state radiation are considered. An arbitrary upper limit of radiative correction integration is involved. Full and simplified versions of analytic formulae are given with precision at the level of 0.1% and 0.2%, respectively. Moreover, the results obtained in the paper can be applied to the case of the ψ(3686) resonance. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275211) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Italy

  19. Adiabatic mixed-field orientation of ground-state-selected carbonyl sulfide molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Kienitz, Jens S; Mullins, Terry; Długołęcki, Karol; González-Férez, Rosario; Küpper, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrated strong adiabatic mixed-field orientation of carbonyl sulfide molecules (OCS) in their absolute ground state of $\\text{N}_{\\text{up}}/\\text{N}_{\\text{tot}}=0.882$. OCS was oriented in combined non-resonant laser and static electric fields inside a two-plate velocity map imaging spectrometer. The transition from non-adiabatic to adiabatic orientation for the rotational ground state was studied by varying the applied laser and static electric field. Above static electric field strengths of 10~kV/cm and laser intensities of $10^{11} \\text{W/cm}^2$ the observed degree of orientation reached a plateau. These results are in good agreement with computational solutions of the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation.

  20. A comparison of magnetic resonance imaging with electrodiagnostic findings in the evaluation of clinical radiculopathy: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza Soltani, Zahra; Sajadi, Simin; Tavana, Behrooz

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the agreement of magnetic resonance imaging and electrodiagnostic studies by comparing their findings in patients with clinically suspected radiculopathy. The agreements between these two procedures and clinical findings were also examined. In a 2-year cross-sectional study, a total of 114 patients with clinically suspected cervical or lumbosacral radiculopathy were included. The total agreements between clinical with MRI and EDX findings were 72 and 52%, respectively while their agreements were similar in group definite (89 vs. 82%). The agreement between EDX and MRI was 59.6 in total and 49% with respect to clinical findings. This study further supports that these two methods are complementary in general. It is reasonable to add EDX when there is discrepancy between MRI and clinical findings or when MRI neurologic findings are not visible.

  1. Ratios of 15N/12C and 4He/12C inclusive electroproduction cross sections in the nucleon resonance region

    CERN Document Server

    Bosted, P E; Amarian, M; Anefalos, S; Anghinolfi, M; Asryan, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Batourine, V; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Biselli, A S; Bonner, B E; Bouchigny, S; Boiarinov, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Cazes, A; Chen, S; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Credé, V; Cummings, J P; De Masi, R; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Donnelly, J; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dharmawardane, K V; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Feuerbach, R J; Forest, T A; Fradi, A; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, R S; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Huertas, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Jüngst, H G; Kalantarians, N; Keith, C; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kubarovski, V; Kühn, J; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Ji Li; Lima, A C S; Livingston, K; Lü, H; Lukashin, K; MacCormick, M; Markov, N; McAleer, S; McKinnon, B; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Mikhailov, K; Minehart, R; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Morrow, S A; Moteabbed, M; Müller, J; Mutchler, G S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niroula, M R; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Paterson, C; Philips, S A; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Sabati, F; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Sharabyan, Yu G; Shaw, J; Shvedunov, N V; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Suleiman, R; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S; Todor, L; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z

    2007-01-01

    The ratio of inclusive electron scattering cross sections for 15N/12C was determined in the kinematic range 0.8resonance structure, as predicted by a phenomenological model, and also by quark-hadron duality. Within the super-scaling quasi-elastic model, slight evidence is found for a 1 MeV lower effective nucleon binding energy in 15N than in 12C. Ratios of 4He/12C using 1.6 to 2.5 GeV electrons are in good agreement with the phenomenological model.

  2. CrossRef Large numbers of cold positronium atoms created in laser-selected Rydberg states using resonant charge exchange

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, R; Kolthammer, WS; Richerme, P; Müllers, A; Walz, J; Grzonka, D; Zielinski, M; Fitzakerley, D; George, MC; Hessels, EA; Storry, CH; Weel, M

    2016-01-01

    Lasers are used to control the production of highly excited positronium atoms (Ps*). The laser light excites Cs atoms to Rydberg states that have a large cross section for resonant charge-exchange collisions with cold trapped positrons. For each trial with 30 million trapped positrons, more than 700 000 of the created Ps* have trajectories near the axis of the apparatus, and are detected using Stark ionization. This number of Ps* is 500 times higher than realized in an earlier proof-of-principle demonstration (2004 Phys. Lett. B 597 257). A second charge exchange of these near-axis Ps* with trapped antiprotons could be used to produce cold antihydrogen, and this antihydrogen production is expected to be increased by a similar factor.

  3. Assessment of total efficiency in adiabatic engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitianiec, W.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents influence of ceramic coating in all surfaces of the combustion chamber of SI four-stroke engine on working parameters mainly on heat balance and total efficiency. Three cases of engine were considered: standard without ceramic coating, fully adiabatic combustion chamber and engine with different thickness of ceramic coating. Consideration of adiabatic or semi-adiabatic engine was connected with mathematical modelling of heat transfer from the cylinder gas to the cooling medium. This model takes into account changeable convection coefficient based on the experimental formulas of Woschni, heat conductivity of multi-layer walls and also small effect of radiation in SI engines. The simulation model was elaborated with full heat transfer to the cooling medium and unsteady gas flow in the engine intake and exhaust systems. The computer program taking into account 0D model of engine processes in the cylinder and 1D model of gas flow was elaborated for determination of many basic engine thermodynamic parameters for Suzuki DR-Z400S 400 cc SI engine. The paper presents calculation results of influence of the ceramic coating thickness on indicated pressure, specific fuel consumption, cooling and exhaust heat losses. Next it were presented comparisons of effective power, heat losses in the cooling and exhaust systems, total efficiency in function of engine rotational speed and also comparison of temperature inside the cylinder for standard, semi-adiabatic and full adiabatic engine. On the basis of the achieved results it was found higher total efficiency of adiabatic engines at 2500 rpm from 27% for standard engine to 37% for full adiabatic engine.

  4. Electron--electron double resonance study of magnetic energy transfer between trapped electrons and radicals in organic glasses: Relation between dipolar cross relaxation times and dipolar interaction distances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, D.P.; Feng, D.F.; Ngo, F.Q.H.; Kevan, L.

    1976-11-15

    Electron--electron double resonance (ELDOR) has been used to measure cross-relaxation times between trapped electrons and trapped radicals produced by ..gamma.. irradiation of 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and 3-methylhexane organic glasses. The cross-relaxation times are measured as a function of temperature, radiation dose, and the frequency difference ..delta..f of the microwave frequencies used. The cross-relaxation times are nearly temperature independent and depend on ..delta..f/sup 2/ at doses where the spin concentrations approach uniformity; these features indicate the dominance of single step over multistep cross-relaxation processes. Equations have been derived to relate the dipolar cross-relaxation distance to the measured cross-relaxation times, and it is suggested that the cross-relaxation line shape is Lorentzian in magnetically dilute systems. Typical electron--radical correlation distances in these organic glasses are 10 A. (AIP)

  5. Measurement of the OXYGEN-17(PROTON, Alpha Particle) Nitrogen -14 Cross Section at Stellar Energies (proton Energies, Resonant Reaction)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Jeffery Curtis

    The isotopic abundance ratio 16O/17O has been shown to be a good probe of mass flow and mixing in stars. This ratio is sensitive to the depth of convective mixing which occurs on the giant branch and to the amount of nonconvective mixing occurring on the main sequence. The interpretation of recent observations of this ratio in red giants is limited by a large uncertainty in the value of the 17O(p, alpha)14N reaction rate. This reaction rate is dominated at stellar energies by a resonance at E_{rm x} = 5673 keV in the compound nucleus 18 F, whose strength was previously uncertain. We have carried out a measurement of the ^ {17}O(p,alpha)^{14 }N cross section at proton energies of 75 keV and 65 keV. Thick, high-purity rm Ta_2O _5 targets enriched to 77% ^ {17}O were used in conjunction with beam currents of 0.45 mA and large-solid-angle detectors. The background for the experiment was measured using targets of natural isotopic composition. The resonance peak was observed in the data collected at 75 keV, and we determined the proton width of the 5673 keV state to be 22 +/- 4 neV. This implies a rate for the 17O(p,alpha)^ {14}N reaction that is ten times greater than the typical rates used previously in stellar models.

  6. Pulmonary artery diameters, cross sectional areas and area changes measured by cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burman, Elisabeth D; Keegan, Jennifer; Kilner, Philip J

    2016-03-03

    We measured by cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) main and branch pulmonary artery diameters and cross sectional areas in diastole and systole in order to establish normal ranges and the effects on them of age, gender and body surface area (BSA). Documentation of normal ranges provides a reference for research and clinical investigation in the fields of congenital heart disease, pulmonary hypertension and connective tissue disorders. We recruited 120 healthy volunteers: ten males (M) and ten females (F) in each decile between 20 and 79 years, imaging them in a 1.5 Tesla CMR system. Scout acquisitions guided the placement of steady state free precession cine acquisitions transecting the main, right and left pulmonary arteries (MPA, RPA and LPA). Cross sections were rarely quite circular. From all subjects, the means of the greater and lesser orthogonal diastolic diameters in mm were: MPA, 22.9 ± 2.4 (M) and 21.2 ± 2.1 (F), RPA 16.6 ± 2.8 (M) and 14.7 ± 2.2 (F), and LPA 17.3 ± 2.5 (M) and 15.9 ± 2.0 (F), p cine CMR are provided for reference, with documentation of their changes with age and BSA.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging depiction of acquired Dyke–Davidoff–Masson syndrome with crossed cerebro-cerebellar diaschisis: Report of two cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ranjana; Joshi, Sandeep; Mittal, Amit; Luthra, Ishita; Mittal, Puneet; Verma, Vibha

    2015-01-01

    Acquired Dyke–Davidoff–Masson syndrome, also known as hemispheric atrophy, is characterized by loss of volume of one cerebral hemisphere from an insult in early life. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis refers to dysfunction/atrophy of cerebellar hemisphere which is secondary to contralateral supratentorial insult. We describe magnetic resonance imaging findings in two cases of acquired Dyke–Davidoff–Masson syndrome with crossed cerebro-cerebellar diaschisis. PMID:26557182

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging depiction of acquired Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome with crossed cerebro-cerebellar diaschisis: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome, also known as hemispheric atrophy, is characterized by loss of volume of one cerebral hemisphere from an insult in early life. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis refers to dysfunction/atrophy of cerebellar hemisphere which is secondary to contralateral supratentorial insult. We describe magnetic resonance imaging findings in two cases of acquired Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome with crossed cerebro-cerebellar diaschisis.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging depiction of acquired Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome with crossed cerebro-cerebellar diaschisis: Report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ranjana; Joshi, Sandeep; Mittal, Amit; Luthra, Ishita; Mittal, Puneet; Verma, Vibha

    2015-01-01

    Acquired Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome, also known as hemispheric atrophy, is characterized by loss of volume of one cerebral hemisphere from an insult in early life. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis refers to dysfunction/atrophy of cerebellar hemisphere which is secondary to contralateral supratentorial insult. We describe magnetic resonance imaging findings in two cases of acquired Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome with crossed cerebro-cerebellar diaschisis.

  10. Fast forward to the classical adiabatic invariant

    CERN Document Server

    Jarzynski, Christopher; Patra, Ayoti; Subaşı, Yiğit

    2016-01-01

    We show how the classical action, an adiabatic invariant, can be preserved under non-adiabatic conditions. Specifically, for a time-dependent Hamiltonian $H = p^2/2m + U(q,t)$ in one degree of freedom, and for an arbitrary choice of action $I_0$, we construct a "fast-forward" potential energy function $V_{\\rm FF}(q,t)$ that, when added to $H$, guides all trajectories with initial action $I_0$ to end with the same value of action. We use this result to construct a local dynamical invariant $J(q,p,t)$ whose value remains constant along these trajectories. We illustrate our results with numerical simulations. Finally, we sketch how our classical results may be used to design approximate quantum shortcuts to adiabaticity.

  11. Adiabatic optimization versus diffusion Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarret, Michael; Jordan, Stephen P.; Lackey, Brad

    2016-10-01

    Most experimental and theoretical studies of adiabatic optimization use stoquastic Hamiltonians, whose ground states are expressible using only real nonnegative amplitudes. This raises a question as to whether classical Monte Carlo methods can simulate stoquastic adiabatic algorithms with polynomial overhead. Here we analyze diffusion Monte Carlo algorithms. We argue that, based on differences between L1 and L2 normalized states, these algorithms suffer from certain obstructions preventing them from efficiently simulating stoquastic adiabatic evolution in generality. In practice however, we obtain good performance by introducing a method that we call Substochastic Monte Carlo. In fact, our simulations are good classical optimization algorithms in their own right, competitive with the best previously known heuristic solvers for MAX-k -SAT at k =2 ,3 ,4 .

  12. Energy efficiency of adiabatic superconductor logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Adiabatic superconductor logic (ASL), including adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) logic, exhibits high energy efficiency because its bit energy can be decreased below the thermal energy through adiabatic switching operations. In the present paper, we present the general scaling laws of ASL and compare the energy efficiency of ASL with those of other energy-efficient logics. Also, we discuss the minimum energy-delay product (EDP) of ASL at finite temperature. Our study shows that there is a maximum temperature at which the EDP can reach the quantum limit given by ħ/2, which is dependent on the superconductor material and the Josephson junction quality, and that it is reasonable to operate ASL at cryogenic temperatures in order to achieve an EDP that approaches ħ/2.

  13. Complexity of the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hen, Itay

    2013-01-01

    The Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm (QAA) has been proposed as a mechanism for efficiently solving optimization problems on a quantum computer. Since adiabatic computation is analog in nature and does not require the design and use of quantum gates, it can be thought of as a simpler and perhaps more profound method for performing quantum computations that might also be easier to implement experimentally. While these features have generated substantial research in QAA, to date there is still a lack of solid evidence that the algorithm can outperform classical optimization algorithms.

  14. Markovian quantum master equation beyond adiabatic regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Yuge, Tatsuro; Ogawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    By introducing a temporal change time scale τA(t ) for the time-dependent system Hamiltonian, a general formulation of the Markovian quantum master equation is given to go well beyond the adiabatic regime. In appropriate situations, the framework is well justified even if τA(t ) is faster than the decay time scale of the bath correlation function. An application to the dissipative Landau-Zener model demonstrates this general result. The findings are applicable to a wide range of fields, providing a basis for quantum control beyond the adiabatic regime.

  15. Adiabatic Quantum Computation: Coherent Control Back Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Debabrata

    2013-01-01

    Though attractive from scalability aspects, optical approaches to quantum computing are highly prone to decoherence and rapid population loss due to nonradiative processes such as vibrational redistribution. We show that such effects can be reduced by adiabatic coherent control, in which quantum interference between multiple excitation pathways is used to cancel coupling to the unwanted, non-radiative channels. We focus on experimentally demonstrated adiabatic controlled population transfer experiments wherein the details on the coherence aspects are yet to be explored theoretically but are important for quantum computation. Such quantum computing schemes also form a back-action connection to coherent control developments. PMID:23788822

  16. Adiabatic hyperspherical analysis of realistic nuclear potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Daily, K M; Greene, Chris H

    2015-01-01

    Using the hyperspherical adiabatic method with the realistic nuclear potentials Argonne V14, Argonne V18, and Argonne V18 with the Urbana IX three-body potential, we calculate the adiabatic potentials and the triton bound state energies. We find that a discrete variable representation with the slow variable discretization method along the hyperradial degree of freedom results in energies consistent with the literature. However, using a Laguerre basis results in missing energy, even when extrapolated to an infinite number of basis functions and channels. We do not include the isospin $T=3/2$ contribution in our analysis.

  17. On adiabatic invariant in generalized Galileon theories

    CERN Document Server

    Ema, Yohei; Mukaida, Kyohei; Nakayama, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    We consider background dynamics of generalized Galileon theories in the context of inflation, where gravity and inflaton are non-minimally coupled to each other. In the inflaton oscillation regime, the Hubble parameter and energy density oscillate violently in many cases, in contrast to the Einstein gravity with minimally coupled inflaton. However, we find that there is an adiabatic invariant in the inflaton oscillation regime in any generalized Galileon theory. This adiabatic invariant is useful in estimating the expansion law of the universe and also the particle production rate due to the oscillation of the Hubble parameter.

  18. Quench propagation analysis in adiabatic superconducting windings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiyama, A.; Matsumura, H.; Takita, W. (Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Waseda Univ., Tokyo (JP)); Iwasa, Y (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab.)

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports the basic postulate of the author's quench simulation code, developed to analyze normal-zone propagation in adiabatic magnets which is the code's computation may be immensely simplified without sacrifice in accuracy by aggregating all thermal properties of the winding affecting normal-zone propagation into a single parameter of the transverse quench velocity. In order to verify this postulate, a finite element method (FEM) analysis has been applied to solve the temporal and spatial evolution of temperature within a section of an adiabatic magnet winding.

  19. Resonances in rotationally inelastic scattering of NH{sub 3} and ND{sub 3} with H{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Qianli; Dagdigian, Paul J., E-mail: pjdagdigian@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218-2685 (United States); Avoird, Ad van der, E-mail: A.vanderAvoird@theochem.ru.nl; Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T. van de [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Loreau, Jérôme [Service de Chimie Quantique et Photophysique C. P. 160/09, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), 50 Ave. F. D. Roosevelt, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Alexander, Millard H., E-mail: mha@umd.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-2021 (United States)

    2015-07-28

    We present theoretical studies on the scattering resonances in rotationally inelastic collisions of NH{sub 3} and ND{sub 3} molecules with H{sub 2} molecules. We use the quantum close-coupling method to compute state-to-state integral and differential cross sections for the NH{sub 3}/ND{sub 3}–H{sub 2} system for collision energies between 5 and 70 cm{sup −1}, using a previously reported potential energy surface [Maret et al., Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 399, 425 (2009)]. We identify the resonances as shape or Feshbach resonances. To analyze these, we use an adiabatic bender model, as well as examination at the scattering wave functions and lifetimes. The strength and width of the resonance peaks suggest that they could be observed in a crossed molecular beam experiment involving a Stark-decelerated NH{sub 3} beam.

  20. Angular dependence of the asymmetry of the cross section for the reaction. gamma. p. -->. p. pi. /sup 0/ in the resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakyan, R.O.; Bagdasaryan, A.S.; Vartapetyan, G.A.; Oganesyan, A.A.; Petrosyan, Z.V.

    1984-10-01

    We report measurements of the angular dependence of the asymmetry of the cross section for the reaction ..gamma..p..-->..p..pi../sup 0/ for ..pi../sup 0/-meson production angles theta(0 = 65--80/sup 0/ in the resonance region. The data are compared with various theoretical analyses.

  1. Diffusion of the adiabatic invariant for modulated symplectic maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazzani, A.; Brini, F.; Turchetti, G. [University of Bologna, INFN sezione di Bologna via Irnerio n.46, I-40126 Bologna (Italy)

    1997-02-01

    We consider the diffusion of the orbits due to a slow modulation of a parameter in an almost integrable symplectic map. This phenomenon (modulational diffusion) is relevant for the stability of the betatronic motion when the ripples are present in the feeding currents of the magnets. In the limit of a slow periodic modulation when the theory of Neishtadt applies, the diffusion takes place in the region swept by a nonlinear resonance and a random walk is defined in the space of the adiabatic invariant. The effect of the boundaries is reproduced by introducing an absorbing boundary condition (dynamical aperture) or a reflecting boundary condition. The analytical result for the action distribution function reproduces very well the numerical distribution function both when the diffusion takes place in a bounded region and when the orbits reach the dynamical aperture. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Estimating whole body intermuscular adipose tissue from single cross-sectional magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Xiang Yan; Gallagher, Dympna; Harris, Tamara; Albu, Jeanine; Heymsfield, Steven; Kuznia, Patrick; Heshka, Stanley

    2007-02-01

    Intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT), a novel fat depot linked with metabolic abnormalities, has been measured by whole body MRI. The cross-sectional slice location with the strongest relation to total body IMAT volume has not been established. The aim was to determine the predictive value of each slice location and which slice locations provide the best estimates of whole body IMAT. MRI quantified total adipose tissue of which IMAT, defined as adipose tissue visible within the boundary of the muscle fascia, is a subcomponent. Single-slice IMAT areas were calculated for the calf, thigh, buttock, waist, shoulders, upper arm, and forearm locations in a sample of healthy adult women, African-American [n = 39; body mass index (BMI) 28.5 +/- 5.4 kg/m2; 41.8 +/- 14.8 yr], Asian (n = 21; BMI 21.6 +/- 3.2 kg/m2; 40.9 +/- 16.3 yr), and Caucasian (n = 43; BMI 25.6 +/- 5.3 kg/m2; 43.2 +/- 15.3 yr), and Caucasian men (n = 39; BMI 27.1 +/- 3.8 kg/m2; 45.2 +/- 14.6 yr) and used to estimate total IMAT groups using multiple-regression equations. Midthigh was the best, or near best, single predictor in all groups with adjusted R2 ranging from 0.49 to 0.84. Adding a second and third slice further increased R2 and reduced the error of the estimate. Menopausal status and degree of obesity did not affect the location of the best single slice. The contributions of other slice locations varied by sex and race, but additional slices improved predictions. For group studies, it may be more cost-effective to estimate IMAT based on one or more slices than to acquire and segment for each subject the numerous images necessary to quantify whole body IMAT.

  3. Selective excitation in a three-state system using a hybrid adiabatic-nonadiabatic interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Yunheung; Jo, Hanlae; Ahn, Jaewook

    2016-01-01

    The chirped-pulse interaction in the adiabatic coupling regime induces cyclic permutations of the energy states of a three-level system in the $V$-type configuration, which process is known as the three-level chirped rapid adiabatic passage. Here we show that a spectral hole in a chirped pulse can turn on and off one of the two adiabatic crossing points of this process, reducing the system to an effective two-level system. The given hybrid adiabatic-nonadiabatic transition results in selective excitation of the three-level system, controlled by the laser intensity and spectral position of the hole as well as the sign of the chirp parameter. Experiments are performed with shaped femtosecond laser pulses and the three lowest energy-levels (5S$_{1/2}$, 5P$_{1/2}$, and 5P$_{3/2}$) of atomic rubidium ($^{85}$Rb), of which the result shows good agreement with the theoretically analyzed dynamics. The result indicates that our method, being combined with the ordinary chirped-RAP, implements an adiabatic transitions b...

  4. Quasielastic pion scattering near the (3,3) resonance. [255 MeV, differential cross section ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varghese, P.

    1978-12-01

    The quasielastic pion scattering process (..pi..,..pi..p), in which an energetic pion scatters off a target nucleus, knocking-out a bound proton, was studied to determine the role of recoil nucleon charge exchange in the mechanism of the process near the (3,3) free particle pion-nucleon resonance. Calculations, which incorporate the hypothesis of final state charge exchange of the outgoing nucleon, were performed to predict expectations for observing the process. Experimental measurements were made on /sup 27/Al and /sup 208/Pb, using 255-MeV ..pi../sup +/ and ..pi../sup -/ beams. The outgoing protons were observed in a counter telescope in singles and coincidence modes. Singles spectra were measured at proton angles theta/sub rho/ = 45, 55, 64, and 90/sup 0/ and cross sections were calculated as a function of the energy of the detected proton, for each of the targets. Values of the ratio of ..pi../sup +/ to ..pi../sup -/ cross sections were calculated for each of the angles of observation. The results obtained indicate that the singles spectra contain events from processes other than quasielastic scattering and that the quasielastic events cannot be easily disentangled from the large background due to such events. The study has thus established the inadequacy of observing quasielastic pion scattering in a single arm measurement. Coincidence measurements were made by observing the recoil protons in coincidence with the scattered pions, which were detected in a scintillator counter telescope. The ratio of ..pi../sup +/ to ..pi../sup -/ cross sections were obtained for each target for the angular settings (theta/sub rho/, theta/sub ..pi../) = (55, 50/sup 0/) and (64, 37.5/sup 0/). The measured values of 7.0 +- 0.7 for /sup 27/Al and 4.5 +- 0.5 for /sup 208/Pb are substantially below the impulse approximation no-charge-exchange limit of 9. The observed A dependence of this cross section ratio is in agreement with the predictions of the semiclassical charge exchange

  5. Startup of an industrial adiabatic tubular reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwijs, J.W.; Berg, van den H.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamic behaviour of an adiabatic tubular plant reactor during the startup is demonstrated, together with the impact of a feed-pump failure of one of the reactants. A dynamic model of the reactor system is presented, and the system response is calculated as a function of experimentally-determine

  6. A Diffusion Equation for Quantum Adiabatic Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, S R

    1998-01-01

    For ergodic adiabatic quantum systems, we study the evolution of energy distribution as the system evolves in time. Starting from the von Neumann equation for the density operator, we obtain the quantum analogue of the Smoluchowski equation on coarse-graining over the energy spectrum. This result brings out the precise notion of quantum diffusion.

  7. Quantum Pumping and Adiabatic Transport in Nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, G.M.M.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis consists of a theoretical exploration of quantum transport phenomena and quantum dynamics in nanostructures. Specifically, we investigate adiabatic quantum pumping of charge in several novel types of nanostructures involving open quantum dots or graphene. For a bilayer of graphene we fin

  8. Adiabatic limits,vanishing theorems and the noncommutative residue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,we compute the adiabatic limit of the scalar curvature and prove several vanishing theorems by taking adiabatic limits.As an application,we give a Kastler-Kalau-Walze type theorem for foliations.

  9. Adiabatic and Non-adiabatic quenches in a Spin-1 Bose Einstein Condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguslawski, Matthew; Hebbe Madhusudhana, Bharath; Anquez, Martin; Robbins, Bryce; Barrios, Maryrose; Hoang, Thai; Chapman, Michael

    2016-05-01

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is observed in a wide range of phenomena. We have studied the dynamics of a spin-1 ferromagnetic Bose-Einstein condensate for both adiabatic and non-adiabatic quenches through a QPT. At the quantum critical point (QCP), finite size effects lead to a non-zero gap, which makes an adiabatic quench possible through the QPT. We experimentally demonstrate such a quench, which is forbidden at the mean field level. For faster quenches through the QCP, the vanishing energy gap causes the reaction timescale of the system to diverge, preventing the system from adiabatically following the ground state. We measure the temporal evolution of the spin populations for different quench speeds and determine the exponents characterizing the scaling of the onset of excitations, which are in good agreement with the predictions of Kibble-Zurek mechanism.

  10. Fixed-point adiabatic quantum search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalzell, Alexander M.; Yoder, Theodore J.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2017-01-01

    Fixed-point quantum search algorithms succeed at finding one of M target items among N total items even when the run time of the algorithm is longer than necessary. While the famous Grover's algorithm can search quadratically faster than a classical computer, it lacks the fixed-point property—the fraction of target items must be known precisely to know when to terminate the algorithm. Recently, Yoder, Low, and Chuang [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 210501 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.210501] gave an optimal gate-model search algorithm with the fixed-point property. Previously, it had been discovered by Roland and Cerf [Phys. Rev. A 65, 042308 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevA.65.042308] that an adiabatic quantum algorithm, operating by continuously varying a Hamiltonian, can reproduce the quadratic speedup of gate-model Grover search. We ask, can an adiabatic algorithm also reproduce the fixed-point property? We show that the answer depends on what interpolation schedule is used, so as in the gate model, there are both fixed-point and non-fixed-point versions of adiabatic search, only some of which attain the quadratic quantum speedup. Guided by geometric intuition on the Bloch sphere, we rigorously justify our claims with an explicit upper bound on the error in the adiabatic approximation. We also show that the fixed-point adiabatic search algorithm can be simulated in the gate model with neither loss of the quadratic Grover speedup nor of the fixed-point property. Finally, we discuss natural uses of fixed-point algorithms such as preparation of a relatively prime state and oblivious amplitude amplification.

  11. Diabatic Versus Adiabatic Calculation of Torsion-Vibration Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougen, Jon T.

    2013-06-01

    The introductory part of this talk will deal briefly with two historical topics: (i) use of the words adiabatic, nonadiabatic, and diabatic in thermodynamics and quantum mechanics, and (ii) application of diabatic and adiabatic ideas to vibrational energy level calculations for a pair of diatomic-molecule potential energy curves exhibiting an avoided crossing. The main part of the talk will be devoted to recent work with Li-Hong Xu and Ron Lees on how ab initio projected frequency calculations for small-amplitude vibrations along the large-amplitude internal rotation path in methanol can best be used to help guide experimental assignments and fits in the IR vibrational spectrum. The three CH stretching vibrations for CH_{3}OH can conveniently be represented as coefficients multiplying three different types of basis vibrations, i.e., as coefficients of: (i) the local mode C-H_i bond displacements δr_{i} for hydrogens H_{1}, H_{2} and H_{3} of the methyl top, (ii) symmetrized linear combinations of the three δr_{i} of species A_{1} oplus E in the permutation-inversion group G_{6} = C_{3v} appropriate for methanol, or (iii) symmetrized linear combinations of the three δr_{i} of species 2A_{1} oplus A_{2} in the permutation-inversion group G_{6}. In this talk, we will focus on diabatic and adiabatic computations for the A_{1} oplus E basis vibrations of case (ii) above. We will briefly explain how Jahn-Teller-like and Renner-Teller-like torsion-vibration interaction terms occurring in the potential energy expression in the diabatic calculation become torsion-vibration Coriolis interaction terms occurring in the kinetic energy expression of the adiabatic calculations, and also show how, for algebraically solvable parameter choices, the same energy levels are obtained from either calculation. A final conclusion as to which approach is computationally superior for the numerical data given in a quantum chemistry output file has not yet been arrived at.

  12. First cross-correlation analysis of interferometric and resonant-bar gravitational-wave data for stochastic backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Aston, S.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Ballmer, S.; Bantilan, H.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barton, M. A.; Bayer, K.; Belczynski, K.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhawal, B.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A.; Brown, D. A.; Bullington, A.; Bunkowski, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burgamy, M.; Burmeister, O.; Busby, D.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cantley, C. A.; Cao, J.; Cardenas, L.; Casey, M. M.; Castaldi, G.; Cepeda, C.; Chalkey, E.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chiadini, F.; Chin, D.; Chin, E.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Clark, J.; Cochrane, P.; Cokelaer, T.; Colacino, C. N.; Coldwell, R.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Croce, R. P.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Dalrymple, J.; D'Ambrosio, E.; Danzmann, K.; Davies, G.; Debra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Degree, M.; Demma, T.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dickson, J.; di Credico, A.; Diederichs, G.; Dietz, A.; Doomes, E. E.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dupuis, R. J.; Dwyer, J. G.; Ehrens, P.; Espinoza, E.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Fazi, D.; Fejer, M. M.; Finn, L. S.; Fiumara, V.; Fotopoulos, N.; Franzen, A.; Franzen, K. Y.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Galdi, V.; Garofoli, J.; Gholami, I.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Goda, K.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L.; González, G.; Gossler, S.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, M.; Greenhalgh, J.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hamilton, W. O.; Hammer, D.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Harstad, E.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hosken, D.; Hough, J.; Howell, E.; Hoyland, D.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D.; Innerhofer, E.; Ito, M.; Itoh, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Jackrel, D.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kasprzyk, D.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalili, F. Ya.; Kim, C.; King, P.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R. K.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lazzarini, A.; Lee, B.; Lei, M.; Leiner, J.; Leonhardt, V.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Lindquist, P.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Longo, M.; Lormand, M.; Lubiński, M.; Lück, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Malec, M.; Mandic, V.; Marano, S.; Márka, S.; Markowitz, J.; Maros, E.; Martin, I.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matone, L.; Matta, V.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McCaulley, B. J.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McHugh, M.; McKenzie, K.; McNabb, J. W. C.; McWilliams, S.; Meier, T.; Melissinos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messaritaki, E.; Messenger, C. J.; Meyers, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Miller, P.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Mohanty, S.; Moody, V.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mowlowry, C.; Moylan, A.; Mudge, D.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nash, T.; Nettles, D.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Numata, K.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Paik, H.-J.; Pan, Y.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H.; Plissi, M. V.; Postiglione, F.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Rabeling, D.; Radkins, H.; Rahkola, R.; Rainer, N.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramsunder, M.; Rawlins, K.; Ray-Majumder, S.; Re, V.; Rehbein, H.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ribichini, L.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, A.; Rogan, A. M.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Route, R.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruet, L.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Samidi, M.; Sancho de La Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Saraf, S.; Sarin, P.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Savov, P.; Schediwy, S.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Sidles, J. A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Sinha, S.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Somiya, K.; Strain, K. A.; Strom, D. M.; Stuver, A.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, K.-X.; Sung, M.; Sutton, P. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarallo, M.; Taylor, R.; Taylor, R.; Thacker, J.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thüring, A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tyler, W.; Ugolini, D.; Ungarelli, C.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Broeck, C.; Varvella, M.; Vass, S.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.; Villar, A.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Ward, H.; Ward, R.; Watts, K.; Weaver, J.; Webber, D.; Weber, A.; Weidner, A.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A.; Weiss, R.; Wen, S.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitbeck, D. M.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Wilmut, I.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wise, S.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Woods, D.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Wu, W.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yan, Z.; Yoshida, S.; Yunes, N.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, P.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M.; Zur Mühlen, H.; Zweizig, J.

    2007-07-01

    Data from the LIGO Livingston interferometer and the ALLEGRO resonant-bar detector, taken during LIGO’s fourth science run, were examined for cross correlations indicative of a stochastic gravitational-wave background in the frequency range 850 950 Hz, with most of the sensitivity arising between 905 and 925 Hz. ALLEGRO was operated in three different orientations during the experiment to modulate the relative sign of gravitational-wave and environmental correlations. No statistically significant correlations were seen in any of the orientations, and the results were used to set a Bayesian 90% confidence level upper limit of Ωgw(f)≤1.02, which corresponds to a gravitational-wave strain at 915 Hz of 1.5×10-23Hz-1/2. In the traditional units of h1002Ωgw(f), this is a limit of 0.53, 2 orders of magnitude better than the previous direct limit at these frequencies. The method was also validated with successful extraction of simulated signals injected in hardware and software.

  13. Single-sided Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for condition monitoring of cross-linked polyethylene exposed to aggressive media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, A; Piechatzek, A; Schmitt, G; Siegmund, G

    2015-08-05

    The potential of single-sided Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to monitor truly non-invasive changes in polymer materials during aging under aggressive media is for the first time evaluated. For this, the NMR method is used in combination with other condition monitoring methods including mechanical measurements, mass uptake, and differential scanning calorimetry. It is validated by studying for the first time the aging kinetics of silane cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) exposed to media used in oil and gas production and transportation, including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, sulphur solvents, and corrosion inhibitors in combination with CO2 and H2S. All investigated parameters changed, with the strongest effects detected for the NMR chain mobility and in the presence of hydrocarbons. Furthermore, a universal linear correlation curve could be established between the depression of the tensile strength and the chain mobility. This result represents a fundamental step towards establishing single-sided NMR as a new analytical tool for in situ condition monitoring of polyethylene working under sour conditions. The proposed approach can be easily extended to other polymer materials.

  14. First Cross-Correlation Analysis of Interferometric and Resonant-Bar Gravitational-Wave Data for Stochastic Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogenstahl, J; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burgamy, M; Burmeister, O; Busby, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casey, M M; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkey, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chiadini, F; Chin, D; Chin, E; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cochrane, P; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coward, D; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Croce, R P; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Demma, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Di Credico, A; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fiumara, V; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L; González, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hamilton, W O; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Howell, E; Hoyland, D; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Innerhofer, E; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jackrel, D; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lee, B; Lei, M; Leiner, J; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Longo, M; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marano, S; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Matta, V; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McNabb, J W C; McWilliams, S; Meier, T; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Miller, P; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moody, V; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mudge, D; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nettles, D; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Paik, H J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Sidles, J A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Somiya, K; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Tarallo, M; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vallisneri, M; Van Den Broeck, C; Varvella, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P

    2007-01-01

    Data from the LIGO Livingston interferometer and the ALLEGRO resonant bar detector, taken during LIGO's fourth science run, were examined for cross-correlations indicative of a stochastic gravitational-wave background in the frequency range 850-950 Hz, with most of the sensitivity arising between 905 Hz and 925 Hz. ALLEGRO was operated in three different orientations during the experiment to modulate the relative sign of gravitational-wave and environmental correlations. No statistically significant correlations were seen in any of the orientations, and the results were used to set a Bayesian 90% confidence level upper limit of Omega_gw(f) <= 1.02, which corresponds to a gravitational wave strain at 915 Hz of 1.5e-23/rHz. In the traditional units of h_100^2 Omega_gw(f), this is a limit of 0.53, two orders of magnitude better than the previous direct limit at these frequencies. The method was also validated with successful extraction of simulated signals injected in hardware and software.

  15. Hojman Exact Invariants and Adiabatic Invariants of Hamilton System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The perturbation to Lie symmetry and adiabatic invariants are studied. Based on the concept of higherorder adiabatic invariants of mechanical systems with action of a small perturbation, the perturbation to Lie symmetry is studied, and Hojman adiabatic invariants of Hamilton system are obtained. An example is given to illustrate the application of the results.

  16. Non-adiabatic geometrical quantum gates in semiconductor quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Solinas, P; Zanghì, N; Rossi, F; Solinas, Paolo; Zanardi, Paolo; Zanghì, Nino; Rossi, Fausto

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we study the implementation of non-adiabatic geometrical quantum gates with in semiconductor quantum dots. Different quantum information enconding/manipulation schemes exploiting excitonic degrees of freedom are discussed. By means of the Aharanov-Anandan geometrical phase one can avoid the limitations of adiabatic schemes relying on adiabatic Berry phase; fast geometrical quantum gates can be in principle implemented

  17. Acid-triggered core cross-linked nanomicelles for targeted drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging in liver cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li X

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Xian Li,1,* Hao Li,2,4,* Wei Yi,3 Jianyu Chen,1 Biling Liang1 1Radiology Department, The Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China; 2Center of Biomedical Engineering, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China; 3Radiotherapy Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China; 4School of Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: To research the acid-triggered core cross-linked folate-poly(ethylene glycol-b-poly[N-(N',N'-diisopropylaminoethyl glutamine] (folated-PEG-P[GA-DIP] amphiphilic block copolymer for targeted drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in liver cancer cells. Methods: As an appropriate receptor of protons, the N,N-diisopropyl tertiary amine group (DIP was chosen to conjugate with the side carboxyl groups of poly(ethylene glycol-b-poly (L-glutamic acid to obtain PEG-P(GA-DIP amphiphilic block copolymers. By ultrasonic emulsification, PEG-P(GA-DIP could be self-assembled to form nanosized micelles loading doxorubicin (DOX and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs in aqueous solution. When PEG-P(GA-DIP nanomicelles were combined with folic acid, the targeted effect of folated-PEG-P(GA-DIP nanomicelles was evident in the fluorescence and MRI results. Results: To further increase the loading efficiency and the cell-uptake of encapsulated drugs (DOX and SPIONs, DIP (pKa≈6.3 groups were linked with ~50% of the side carboxyl groups of poly(L-glutamic acid (PGA, to generate the core cross-linking under neutral or weakly acidic conditions. Under the acidic condition (eg, endosome/lysosome, the carboxyl groups were neutralized to facilitate disassembly of the P(GA-DIP blocks' cross-linking, for duly accelerating the encapsulated drug release. Combined

  18. Resonances in the Photoionization Cross Sections of Atomic Nitrogen Shape the Far-Ultraviolet Spectrum of the Bright Star in 47 Tucanae

    CERN Document Server

    Dixon, William V

    2013-01-01

    The far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectrum of the Bright Star (B8 III) in 47 Tuc (NGC 104) shows a remarkable pattern: it is well fit by LTE models at wavelengths longer than Lyman beta, but at shorter wavelengths it is fainter than the models by a factor of two. A spectrum of this star obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) shows broad absorption troughs with sharp edges at 995 and 1010 A and a deep absorption feature at 1072 A, none of which are predicted by the models. We find that these features are caused by resonances in the photoionization cross sections of the first and second excited states of atomic nitrogen (2s$^2$ 2p$^3$ $^2$D$^0$ and $^2$P$^0$). Using cross sections from the Opacity Project, we can reproduce these features, but only if we use the cross sections at their full resolution, rather than the resonance-averaged cross sections usually employed to model stellar atmospheres. These resonances are strongest in stellar atmospheres with enhanced nitrogen and depleted carbon ab...

  19. Differential electron scattering cross sections for the first optically forbidden and resonance transitions in Mg II, Zn II and Cd II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, I. D.; Chutjian, A.; Mawhorter, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Differential electron scattering cross sections have been measured for dipole-forbidden and resonance transitions in Mg II, Zn II and Cd II in the angular range theta = 4-17 deg at 50 eV. These provide the first recorded angular distributions for an optically forbidden transition. It is found that while the cross section for excitation of the 4s (2)S-3d(9)4s(2) (2)D transition in Zn II is small, those for the 3s (2)S-3d (2)D, 4s (2)S (unresolved lines) in Mg II, and the 5s (2)S-4d(9)5s(2) D in Cd II are comparable in magnitude with the cross sections for resonance excitation. In addition, for Cd II it is found that the allowed and forbidden transitions have very similar angular distributions, and it is proposed that excitation to the 2D state may be dominated by a virtual 'double-dipole' transition via the 2P state. Also, the total excitation cross section of the resonance 2P state in Cd II is a factor of four higher than that predicted by the Gaunt factor approximation, suggesting that the accepted value for the oscillator strength may be too low.

  20. Theoretical vibrational-excitation cross sections and rate coefficients for electron-impact resonant collisions involving rovibrationally excited N2 and NO molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Laporta, V; Wadehra, J M

    2012-01-01

    Electron-impact vi->vf vibrational excitations cross sections, involving rovibrationally excited N_{2}(v_{i}, J) and NO(v_{i}, J) molecules (fixed J), are calculated for collisions occurring through the nitrogen resonant electronic state N_{2}^{-} (X ^{2}\\Pi_{g}), and the three resonant states of nitric oxide NO^{-}(^{3}\\Sigma^{-},^{1} \\Delta,^{1} \\Sigma^{+}). Complete sets of cross sections have been obtained for all possible transitions involving 68 vibrational levels of N2(X ^{1}\\Sigma^{+}_{g}) and 55 levels of NO(X ^{2}\\Pi), for the incident electron energy between 0.1 and 10 eV. In order to study the rotational motion in the resonant processes, cross sections have been also computed for rotationally elastic transitions characterized by the rotational quantum number J running from 0 through 150. The calculations are performed within the framework of the local complex potential model, by using potentials energies and widths optimized in order to reproduce the experimental cross sections available in litera...

  1. Quantum-Classical Correspondence of Shortcuts to Adiabaticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Manaka; Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2017-04-01

    We formulate the theory of shortcuts to adiabaticity in classical mechanics. For a reference Hamiltonian, the counterdiabatic term is constructed from the dispersionless Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) hierarchy. Then the adiabatic theorem holds exactly for an arbitrary choice of time-dependent parameters. We use the Hamilton-Jacobi theory to define the generalized action. The action is independent of the history of the parameters and is directly related to the adiabatic invariant. The dispersionless KdV hierarchy is obtained from the classical limit of the KdV hierarchy for the quantum shortcuts to adiabaticity. This correspondence suggests some relation between the quantum and classical adiabatic theorems.

  2. Non-adiabatic perturbations in multi-component perfect fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshelev, N.A., E-mail: koshna71@inbox.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy str 42, 432970 (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-01

    The evolution of non-adiabatic perturbations in models with multiple coupled perfect fluids with non-adiabatic sound speed is considered. Instead of splitting the entropy perturbation into relative and intrinsic parts, we introduce a set of symmetric quantities, which also govern the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation in models with energy transfer. We write the gauge invariant equations for the variables that determine on a large scale the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation and the rate of changes of the comoving curvature perturbation. The analysis of evolution of the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation has been made for several particular models.

  3. Diabatic and Adiabatic Collective Motion in a Model Pairing System

    CERN Document Server

    Nakatsukasa, T; Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Walet, Niels R.

    1998-01-01

    Large amplitude collective motion is investigated for a model pairing Hamiltonian containing an avoided level crossing. A classical theory of collective motion for the adiabatic limit is applied utilising either a time-dependent mean-field theory or a direct parametrisation of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. A modified local harmonic equation is formulated to take account of the Nambu-Goldstone mode. It turns out that in some cases the system selects a diabatic path. Requantizing the collective Hamiltonian, a reasonable agreement with an exact calculation for the low-lying levels are obtained for both weak and strong pairing force. This improves on results of the conventional Born-Oppenheimer approximation.

  4. Population transfer of a NaH molecule via stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zai, Jing-Bo; Zhan, Wei-Shen; Wang, Shuo; Dang, Hai-Ping; Han, Xiao

    2016-09-01

    The population transfer of a NaH molecule from the ground state {{X}1}{Σ+} to the target state {{A}1}{Σ+} via stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) is investigated. The results show that the intensity, delay time and detuning have a significant effect on population transfer. A large population transfer is observed with increased pump and Stokes intensity, especially when the pump and Stokes intensity match. Population transfer also depends on the delay time between the pump laser pulse and the Stokes laser pulse. The detuning of the two pulses influences the population transfer. Efficient population transfer can be realized under the resonant or two-photon resonant condition.

  5. Plasmonic black gold by adiabatic nanofocusing and absorption of light in ultra-sharp convex grooves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Thomas; Novikov, Sergey M.; Stær, Tobias Holmgaard

    2012-01-01

    Excitation of localized and delocalized surface plasmon resonances can be used for turning excellent reflectors of visible light, such as gold and silver, into efficient absorbers, whose wavelength, polarization or angular bandwidths are however necessarily limited owing to the resonant nature......-defined geometry by using ultra-sharp convex metal grooves via adiabatic nanofocusing of gap surface plasmon modes excited by scattering off subwavelength-sized wedges. We demonstrate experimentally that two-dimensional arrays of sharp convex grooves in gold ensure efficient (>87%) broadband (450-850 nm...

  6. Adiabatic quantum simulation of quantum chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-10-13

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions.

  7. Adiabatic Quantum Optimization for Associative Memory Recall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadayat eSeddiqi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO. Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are stored in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.

  8. Adiabatic Theorem for Quantum Spin Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, S.; De Roeck, W.; Fraas, M.

    2017-08-01

    The first proof of the quantum adiabatic theorem was given as early as 1928. Today, this theorem is increasingly applied in a many-body context, e.g., in quantum annealing and in studies of topological properties of matter. In this setup, the rate of variation ɛ of local terms is indeed small compared to the gap, but the rate of variation of the total, extensive Hamiltonian, is not. Therefore, applications to many-body systems are not covered by the proofs and arguments in the literature. In this Letter, we prove a version of the adiabatic theorem for gapped ground states of interacting quantum spin systems, under assumptions that remain valid in the thermodynamic limit. As an application, we give a mathematical proof of Kubo's linear response formula for a broad class of gapped interacting systems. We predict that the density of nonadiabatic excitations is exponentially small in the driving rate and the scaling of the exponent depends on the dimension.

  9. Adiabatic Quantum Optimization for Associative Memory Recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis

    2014-12-01

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are stored in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.

  10. Ramsey numbers and adiabatic quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2012-01-06

    The graph-theoretic Ramsey numbers are notoriously difficult to calculate. In fact, for the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m,n) with m, n≥3, only nine are currently known. We present a quantum algorithm for the computation of the Ramsey numbers R(m,n). We show how the computation of R(m,n) can be mapped to a combinatorial optimization problem whose solution can be found using adiabatic quantum evolution. We numerically simulate this adiabatic quantum algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and R(2,s) for 5≤s≤7. We then discuss the algorithm's experimental implementation, and close by showing that Ramsey number computation belongs to the quantum complexity class quantum Merlin Arthur.

  11. Comment on ``Adiabatic theory for the bipolaron''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smondyrev, M. A.; Devreese, J. T.

    1996-05-01

    Comments are given on the application of the Bogoliubov-Tyablikov approach to the bipolaron problem in a recent paper by Lakhno [Phys. Rev. B 51, 3512 (1995)]. This author believes that his model (1) is the translation-invariant adiabatic theory of bipolarons and (2) gives asymptotically exact solutions in the adiabatic limit while the other approaches are considered as either phenomenological or variational in nature. Numerical results by Lakhno are in contradiction with all other papers published on the subject because his model leads to much lower energies. Thus, the author concludes that bipolarons ``are more stable than was considered before.'' We prove that both the analytical and the numerical results presented by Lakhno are wrong.

  12. Limitations of some simple adiabatic quantum algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Ioannou, L M; Ioannou, Lawrence M.; Mosca, Michele

    2007-01-01

    Let $H(t)=(1-t/T)H_0 + (t/T)H_1$, $t\\in [0,T]$, be the Hamiltonian governing an adiabatic quantum algorithm, where $H_0$ is diagonal in the Hadamard basis and $H_1$ is diagonal in the computational basis. We prove that $H_0$ and $H_1$ must each have at least two large mutually-orthogonal eigenspaces if the algorithm's running time is to be subexponential in the number of qubits. We also reproduce the optimality proof of Farhi and Gutmann's search algorithm in the context of this adiabatic scheme; because we only consider initial Hamiltonians that are diagonal in the Hadamard basis, our result is slightly stronger than the original.

  13. Finding cliques by quantum adiabatic evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Childs, A M; Goldstone, J; Gutmann, S; Childs, Andrew M.; Farhi, Edward; Goldstone, Jeffrey; Gutmann, Sam

    2002-01-01

    Quantum adiabatic evolution provides a general technique for the solution of combinatorial search problems on quantum computers. We present the results of a numerical study of a particular application of quantum adiabatic evolution, the problem of finding the largest clique in a random graph. An n-vertex random graph has each edge included with probability 1/2, and a clique is a completely connected subgraph. There is no known classical algorithm that finds the largest clique in a random graph with high probability and runs in a time polynomial in n. For the small graphs we are able to investigate (n <= 18), the quantum algorithm appears to require only a quadratic run time.

  14. Ehrenfest's adiabatic hypothesis in Bohr's quantum theory

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez, Enric

    2015-01-01

    It is widely known that Paul Ehrenfest formulated and applied his adiabatic hypothesis in the early 1910s. Niels Bohr, in his first attempt to construct a quantum theory in 1916, used it for fundamental purposes in a paper which eventually did not reach the press. He decided not to publish it after having received the new results by Sommerfeld in Munich. Two years later, Bohr published "On the quantum theory of line-spectra." There, the adiabatic hypothesis played an important role, although it appeared with another name: the principle of mechanical transformability. In the subsequent variations of his theory, Bohr never suppressed this principle completely. We discuss the role of Ehrenfest's principle in the works of Bohr, paying special attention to its relation to the correspondence principle. We will also consider how Ehrenfest faced Bohr's uses of his more celebrated contribution to quantum theory, as well as his own participation in the spreading of Bohr's ideas.

  15. Nanowire Plasmon Excitation by Adiabatic Mode Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Ewold; Spasenović, Marko; Polman, Albert; Kuipers, L. (Kobus)

    2009-05-01

    We show with both experiment and calculation that highly confined surface plasmon polaritons can be efficiently excited on metallic nanowires through the process of mode transformation. One specific mode in a metallic waveguide is identified that adiabatically transforms to the confined nanowire mode as the waveguide width is reduced. Phase- and polarization-sensitive near-field investigation reveals the characteristic antisymmetric polarization nature of the mode and explains the coupling mechanism.

  16. Angle-integrated measurements of the {sup 26}Al(d, n){sup 27}Si reaction cross section: a probe of spectroscopic factors and astrophysical resonance strengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kankainen, A.; Woods, P.J.; Doherty, D.T.; Estrade, A.; Lotay, G. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Nunes, F.; Schatz, H.; Brown, B.A.; Browne, J.; Meisel, Z.; Zegers, R. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Michigan State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Lansing, MI (United States); Michigan State University, JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements, East Lansing, MI (United States); Langer, C.; Montes, F.; Pereira, J.; Stevens, J. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Michigan State University, JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements, East Lansing, MI (United States); Bader, V.; Gade, A.; Stroberg, R.; Scott, M. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Michigan State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Lansing, MI (United States); Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Kontos, A.; Noji, S.; Recchia, F.; Weisshaar, D. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Perdikakis, G. [Michigan State University, JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements, East Lansing, MI (United States); Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI (United States); Redpath, T.; Wimmer, K. [Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI (United States); Seweryniak, D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Measurements of angle-integrated cross sections to discrete states in {sup 27}Si have been performed studying the {sup 26}Al(d, n) reaction in inverse kinematics by tagging states by their characteristic γ-decays using the GRETINA array. Transfer reaction theory has been applied to derive spectroscopic factors for strong single-particle states below the proton threshold, and astrophysical resonances in the {sup 26}Al(p, γ){sup 27}Si reaction. Comparisons are made between predictions of the shell model and known characteristics of the resonances. Overall very good agreement is obtained, indicating this method can be used to make estimates of resonance strengths for key reactions currently largely unconstrained by experiment. (orig.)

  17. Theoretical resonant electron-impact vibrational excitation, dissociative recombination and dissociative excitation cross sections of ro-vibrationally excited BeH+ ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporta, V.; Chakrabarti, K.; Celiberto, R.; Janev, R. K.; Mezei, J. Zs; Niyonzima, S.; Tennyson, J.; Schneider, I. F.

    2017-02-01

    A theoretical study of resonant vibrational excitation, dissociative recombination and dissociative excitation processes of the beryllium monohydride cation, BeH+, induced by electron impact, is reported. Full sets of ro-vibrationally-resolved cross sections and of the corresponding Maxwellian rate coefficients are presented for the three processes. Particular emphasis is given to the high-energy behaviour. Potential curves of {}2{{{Σ }}}+, {}2{{\\Pi }} and {}2{{Δ }} symmetries and the corresponding resonance widths, obtained from R-matrix calculations, provide the input for calculations which use a local complex-potential model for resonant collisions in each of the three symmetries. Rotational motion of nuclei and isotopic effects are also discussed. The relevant results are compared with those obtained using a multichannel quantum defect theory method. Full results are available from the Phys4Entry database.

  18. Stochastic Resonance in a Single-Mode Laser Driven by Quadratic Colored Pump Noise and Quantum Noise with Cross-Correlation Between Real and Imaginary Parts of Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, De-Sheng; Cao, Li; Wu, Da-Jin

    Based on the single-mode laser noise model driven by quadratic colored pump noise and quantum noise with cross-correlation between real and imaginary parts of noise proposed in International Journal of Modern Physics B 20, 5383 (2006) and Phys. Rev. E 73, 023802 (2006), the stochastic resonance (SR) of laser intensity is investigated by virtue of the linearized approximation. The analytic expression of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is calculated. It is found that the phenomena of stochastic resonance respectively exist in the curves of the SNR versus the noise cross-correlation coefficient λp and the SNR versus the pump parameter a, as well as the SNR versus the signal frequency bar {ω } for the model. It is shown that there are three different types of SR in the model: the conventional form of SR, the SR in the broad sense and the bona fide SR.

  19. Measurement of the 54,57Fe(n,γ) Cross Section in the Resolved Resonance Region at CERN n_TOF

    CERN Document Server

    Giubrone, G; Taín, J L; Lederer, C; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Bečvař, F; Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviani, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Duran, I; Dressler, R; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Gurusamy, P; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kivel, N; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Korschinek, G; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Langer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Manousos, A; Massimi, C; Marganiec, J; Martínez, T; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Meaze, M; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondelaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Pignatari, M; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifhart, R; Riego, A; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sarmento, R; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Tagliente, G; Tarrio, D; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiß, C; Wright, T; Žugec, P

    2014-01-01

    Fe-54 and Fe-57 are stable iron isotopes, which play an important role in the nucleosynthesis of the slow neutron capture process (s process). In addition, these nuclei are present in many structural materials, and therefore, the knowledge of their neutron capture cross sections is of importance for reactor design studies. This contribution summarizes the results of the (n,gamma) cross sections of these two isotopes in the resolved resonance region. The experiment was carried out at the CERN n\\_TOF facility using the Pulse-Height Weighting Technique in combination with an experimental set-up optmized for reducing neutron induced backgrounds.

  20. Single-sided Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for condition monitoring of cross-linked polyethylene exposed to aggressive media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, A., E-mail: Alina.Adams@itmc.rwth-aachen.de [Institut für Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie, RWTH Aachen University, Templergraben 55, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Piechatzek, A.; Schmitt, G. [Institut für Instandhaltung und Korrosionsschutztechnik gGmbH, Kalkofen 4, 58638 Iserlohn (Germany); Siegmund, G. [ExxonMobil Production Germany, Riethorst 12, 30659 Hannover (Germany)

    2015-08-05

    The potential of single-sided Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to monitor truly non-invasive changes in polymer materials during aging under aggressive media is for the first time evaluated. For this, the NMR method is used in combination with other condition monitoring methods including mechanical measurements, mass uptake, and differential scanning calorimetry. It is validated by studying for the first time the aging kinetics of silane cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) exposed to media used in oil and gas production and transportation, including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, sulphur solvents, and corrosion inhibitors in combination with CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. All investigated parameters changed, with the strongest effects detected for the NMR chain mobility and in the presence of hydrocarbons. Furthermore, a universal linear correlation curve could be established between the depression of the tensile strength and the chain mobility. This result represents a fundamental step towards establishing single-sided NMR as a new analytical tool for in situ condition monitoring of polyethylene working under sour conditions. The proposed approach can be easily extended to other polymer materials. - Highlights: • The changes in PEX exposed to sour media were quantified for the first time. • The strongest morphological changes in PEX were detected under exposure to hydrocarbon media. • The chain mobility measured truly non-destructively by single-sided NMR showed the highest sensitivity to the aging process. • A universal linear correlation curve was found between the chain mobility and the tensile strength. • Single-sided NMR was validated as a condition monitoring tool.

  1. On the near-threshold peak structure in the differential cross section of $\\phi$-meson photoproduction: missing resonance with non-negligible strangeness content?

    CERN Document Server

    Kiswandhi, Alvin

    2011-01-01

    The details of the analysis, with more extensive results, of the near-threshold bump structure in the forward differential cross section of the phi-meson photoproduction to determine whether it is a signature of a resonance are presented. The analysis is carried out in an effective Lagrangian approach which includes Pomeron and (pi, eta) exchanges in the t channel, and contributions from the s- and u-channel excitation of a postulated nucleon resonance. In addition to the differential cross sections, we use the nine spin-density matrix elements as recently measured, instead of the phi-meson decay angular distributions which depend only on six spin-density matrix elements as was done before, to constrain the resonance parameters. We conclude that indeed the bump structure as reported by LEPS, can only be explained with an assumption of the excitation of a resonance of spin 3/2, as previously reported. However, both parities of +/- can account for the data equally well with almost identical mass of 2.08 +/- 0.0...

  2. Diabatic-At-Construction Method for Diabatic and Adiabatic Ground and Excited States Based on Multistate Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grofe, Adam; Qu, Zexing; Truhlar, Donald G; Li, Hui; Gao, Jiali

    2017-03-14

    We describe a diabatic-at-construction (DAC) strategy for defining diabatic states to determine the adiabatic ground and excited electronic states and their potential energy surfaces using the multistate density functional theory (MSDFT). The DAC approach differs in two fundamental ways from the adiabatic-to-diabatic (ATD) procedures that transform a set of preselected adiabatic electronic states to a new representation. (1) The DAC states are defined in the first computation step to form an active space, whose configuration interaction produces the adiabatic ground and excited states in the second step of MSDFT. Thus, they do not result from a similarity transformation of the adiabatic states as in the ATD procedure; they are the basis for producing the adiabatic states. The appropriateness and completeness of the DAC active space can be validated by comparison with experimental observables of the ground and excited states. (2) The DAC diabatic states are defined using the valence bond characters of the asymptotic dissociation limits of the adiabatic states of interest, and they are strictly maintained at all molecular geometries. Consequently, DAC diabatic states have specific and well-defined physical and chemical meanings that can be used for understanding the nature of the adiabatic states and their energetic components. Here we present results for the four lowest singlet states of LiH and compare them to a well-tested ATD diabatization method, namely the 3-fold way; the comparison reveals both similarities and differences between the ATD diabatic states and the orthogonalized DAC diabatic states. Furthermore, MSDFT can provide a quantitative description of the ground and excited states for LiH with multiple strongly and weakly avoided curve crossings spanning over 10 Å of interatomic separation.

  3. Chemical cross-linking of the urease complex from Helicobacter pylori and analysis by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and molecular modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsohn, Elisabet; Ångström, Jonas; Emmett, Mark R.; Marshall, Alan G.; Nilsson, Carol L.

    2004-05-01

    Chemical cross-linking of proteins is a well-established method for structural mapping of small protein complexes. When combined with mass spectrometry, cross-linking can reveal protein topology and identify contact sites between the peptide surfaces. When applied to surface-exposed proteins from pathogenic organisms, the method can reveal structural details that are useful in vaccine design. In order to investigate the possibilities of applying cross-linking on larger protein complexes, we selected the urease enzyme from Helicobacter pylori as a model. This membrane-associated protein complex consists of two subunits: [alpha] (26.5 kDa) and [beta] (61.7 kDa). Three ([alpha][beta]) heterodimers form a trimeric ([alpha][beta])3 assembly which further associates into a unique dodecameric 1.1 MDa complex composed of four ([alpha][beta])3 units. Cross-linked peptides from trypsin-digested urease complex were analyzed by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) and molecular modeling. Two potential cross-linked peptides (present in the cross-linked sample but undetectable in [alpha], [beta], and native complex) were assigned. Molecular modeling of urease [alpha][beta] complex and trimeric urease units ([alpha][beta])3 revealed a linkage site between the [alpha]-subunit and the [beta]-subunit, and an internal cross-linkage in the [beta]-subunit.

  4. Non-adiabatic effects in near-adiabatic mixed-field orientation and alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maan, Anjali; Ahlawat, Dharamvir Singh; Prasad, Vinod

    2016-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of the impact of a pair of moderate electric fields tilted an angle with respect to one another on a molecule. As a prototype, we consider a molecule with large rotational constant (with corresponding small rotational period) and moderate dipole moment. Within rigid-rotor approximation, the time-dependent Schrodinger equation is solved using fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. We have analysed that lower rotational states are significantly influenced by variation in pulse durations, the tilt angle between the fields and also on the electric field strengths. We also suggest a control scheme of how the rotational dynamics, orientation and alignment of a molecule can be enhanced by a combination of near-adiabatic pulses in comparision to non-adiabatic or adiabatic pulses.

  5. Measurements of the Effect of Adiabat on Shell Decompression in Direct-Drive Implosions on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, D. T.; Hu, S. X.; Radha, P. B.; Davis, A. K.; Craxton, R. S.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Stoeckl, C.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of the effect of adiabat (α) on the shell thickness were performed in direct-drive implosions. The maximum in-flight shell thickness was obtained using a novel technique where the outer and inner surfaces of the shell were simultaneously measured using self-emission images of the imploding target. When reducing the shell's adiabat from α = 6 to α = 4.5 , the shell thickness was measured to decrease from 75 μm to 60 μm, but when decreasing the adiabat further (α = 1.8), the shell thickness was measured to increase to 75 μm. The measured shell thickness, shell trajectories, neutron bang time, and neutron yield were reproduced by two-dimensional simulations that include laser imprint, nonlocal thermal transport, cross-beam energy transfer, and first-principles equation-of-state models. These results show that the decompression of the shell measured for low-adiabat implosions was a result of laser imprint. Additional information on the evolution of the density profile was obtained using x-ray radiography. The backlighter was created with six of the 60 OMEGA laser beams, with the pointings and energies of other beams adjusted to maintain a uniform implosion. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  6. Adiabatic momentum space treatment of a spin-orbit coupled BEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Su-Ju; Greene, Chris

    2013-05-01

    By dressing the atomic spin states with Raman laser fields, experimentalists can create spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) by tuning controllable parameters in an ultracold atomic system. In the presence of spin-orbit coupling, we study the spin dynamics of a harmonically-trapped spinor BEC that can be driven by non-adiabatic Landau-Zener transitions occurring at avoided crossings between the bands.

  7. Exciton spectrum of surface-corrugated quantum wells: the adiabatic self-consistent approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atenco A, N.; Perez R, F. [lnstituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, A.P. J-48, 72570 Puebla (Mexico); Makarov, N.M. [lnstituto de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Priv. 17 Norte No 3417, Col. San Miguel Hueyotlipan, 72050 Puebla (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    A theory for calculating the relaxation frequency {nu} and the shift {delta} {omega} of exciton resonances in quantum wells with finite potential barriers and adiabatic surface disorder is developed. The adiabaticity implies that the correlation length R{sub C} for the well width fluctuations is much larger than the exciton radius a{sub 0} (R{sub C} >> a{sub 0}). Our theory is based on the self-consistent Green's function method, and therefore takes into account the inherent action of the exciton scattering on itself. The self-consistent approach is shown to describe quantitatively the sharp exciton resonance. It also gives the qualitatively correct resonance picture for the transition to the classical limit, as well as within the domain of the classical limit itself. We present and analyze results for h h-exciton in a GaAs quantum well with Al{sub 0.3} Ga{sub 0.7}As barriers. It is established that the self-consistency and finite height of potential barriers significantly influence on the line-shape of exciton resonances, and make the values of {nu} and {delta} {omega} be quite realistic. In particular, the relaxation frequency {nu} for the ground-state resonance has a broad, almost symmetric maximum near the resonance frequency {omega}{sub 0}, while the surface-induced resonance shift {delta} {omega} vanishes near {omega}{sub 0}, and has different signs on the sides of the exciton resonance. (Author) 43 refs., 4 figs.

  8. A multi-dimensional, adiabatic, hydrodynamics code for studying tidal excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Broderick, A E; Broderick, Avery E.; Rathore, Yasser

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a parallel, simple, and fast hydrodynamics code for multi-dimensional, self-gravitating, adiabatic flows. Our primary motivation is the study of the non-linear evolution of white dwarf oscillations excited via tidal resonances, typically over hundreds of stellar dynamical times. Consequently, we require long term stability, low diffusivity, and high algorithmic efficiency. An explicit, Eulerian, finite-difference scheme on a regular Cartesian grid fulfills these requirements. It provides uniform resolution throughout the flow, as well as simplifying the computation of the self-gravitational potential, which is done via spectral methods. In this paper, we describe the numerical scheme and present the results of some diagnostic problems. We also demonstrate the stability of a cold white dwarf in three dimensions over hundreds of dynamical times. Finally, we compare the results of the numerical scheme to the linear theory of adiabatic oscillations, finding numerical quality factors on the order...

  9. Adiabatic approximation for a two-level atom in a light beam

    CERN Document Server

    Aftalion, Amandine

    2011-01-01

    Following the recent experimental realization of synthetic gauge magnetic forces, Jean Dalibard adressed the question whether the adiabatic ansatz could be math- ematically justified for a model of an atom in 2 internal states, shun by a quasi resonant laser beam. In this paper, we derive rigorously the asymptotic model guessed by the physicists, and show that this asymptotic analysis contains the in- formation about the presence of vortices. Surprisingly the main difficulties do not come from the nonlinear part but from the linear Hamiltonian. More precisely, the analysis of the nonlinear minimization problem and its asymptotic reduction to simpler ones, relies on an accurate partition of low and high frequencies (or mo- menta). This requires to reconsider carefully previous mathematical works about the adiabatic limit. Although the estimates are not sharp, this asymptotic analysis provides a good insight about the validity of the asymptotic picture, with respect to the size of the many parameters initially ...

  10. Adiabatic Regularization for Gauge Field and the Conformal Anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Chong-Sun

    2016-01-01

    We construct and provide the adiabatic regularization method for a $U(1)$ gauge field in a conformally flat spacetime by quantizing in the canonical formalism the gauge fixed $U(1)$ theory with mass terms for the gauge fields and the ghost fields. We show that the adiabatic expansion for the mode functions and the adiabatic vacuum can be defined in a similar way using WKB-type solutions as the scalar fields. As an application of the adiabatic method, we compute the trace of the energy momentum tensor and reproduces the known result for the conformal anomaly obtained by the other regularization methods. The availability of the adiabatic expansion scheme for gauge field allows one to study the renormalization of the de-Sitter space maximal superconformal Yang-Mills theory using the adiabatic regularization method.

  11. Bond selective chemistry beyond the adiabatic approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, L.J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    One of the most important challenges in chemistry is to develop predictive ability for the branching between energetically allowed chemical reaction pathways. Such predictive capability, coupled with a fundamental understanding of the important molecular interactions, is essential to the development and utilization of new fuels and the design of efficient combustion processes. Existing transition state and exact quantum theories successfully predict the branching between available product channels for systems in which each reaction coordinate can be adequately described by different paths along a single adiabatic potential energy surface. In particular, unimolecular dissociation following thermal, infrared multiphoton, or overtone excitation in the ground state yields a branching between energetically allowed product channels which can be successfully predicted by the application of statistical theories, i.e. the weakest bond breaks. (The predictions are particularly good for competing reactions in which when there is no saddle point along the reaction coordinates, as in simple bond fission reactions.) The predicted lack of bond selectivity results from the assumption of rapid internal vibrational energy redistribution and the implicit use of a single adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface for the reaction. However, the adiabatic approximation is not valid for the reaction of a wide variety of energetic materials and organic fuels; coupling between the electronic states of the reacting species play a a key role in determining the selectivity of the chemical reactions induced. The work described below investigated the central role played by coupling between electronic states in polyatomic molecules in determining the selective branching between energetically allowed fragmentation pathways in two key systems.

  12. On adiabatic perturbations in the ekpyrotic scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, A.; Mukhanov, V.; Vikman, A.

    2010-02-01

    In a recent paper, Khoury and Steinhardt proposed a way to generate adiabatic cosmological perturbations with a nearly flat spectrum in a contracting Universe. To produce these perturbations they used a regime in which the equation of state exponentially rapidly changed during a short time interval. Leaving aside the singularity problem and the difficult question about the possibility to transmit these perturbations from a contracting Universe to the expanding phase, we will show that the methods used in Khoury are inapplicable for the description of the cosmological evolution and of the process of generation of perturbations in this scenario.

  13. On adiabatic perturbations in the ekpyrotic scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Linde, A; Vikman, A

    2009-01-01

    In a recent paper arXiv:0910.2230, Khoury and Steinhardt proposed a way to generate adiabatic cosmological perturbations with a nearly flat spectrum in a contracting Universe. To produce these perturbations they used a regime in which the equation of state exponentially rapidly changed during a short time interval. Leaving aside the singularity problem and the difficult question about the possibility to transmit these perturbations from a contracting Universe to the expanding phase, we will show that the methods used in arXiv:0910.2230 are inapplicable for the description of the cosmological evolution and of the process of generation of perturbations in this scenario.

  14. Shortcuts to adiabaticity for quantum annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2017-01-01

    We study the Ising Hamiltonian with a transverse field term to simulate the quantum annealing. Using shortcuts to adiabaticity, we design the time dependence of the Hamiltonian. The dynamical invariant is obtained by the mean-field ansatz, and the Hamiltonian is designed by the inverse engineering. We show that the time dependence of physical quantities such as the magnetization is independent of the speed of the Hamiltonian variation in the infinite-range model. We also show that rotating transverse magnetic fields are useful to achieve the ideal time evolution.

  15. Adiabatic quantum algorithm for search engine ranking

    CERN Document Server

    Garnerone, Silvano; Lidar, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm to evaluate the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this quantum algorithm outputs any component of the PageRank vector-and thus the ranking of the corresponding webpage-in a time which scales polylogarithmically in the number of webpages. This would constitute an exponential speed-up with respect to all known classical algorithms designed to evaluate the PageRank.

  16. Adiabatic Wave-Particle Interaction Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Dewar, R L; 10.1585/pfr.4.001

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we calculate and visualize the dynamics of an ensemble of electrons trapping in an electrostatic wave of slowly increasing amplitude, illustrating that, despite disordering of particles in angle during the trapping transition as they pass close to X-points, there is still an adiabatic invariant for the great majority of particles that allows the long-time distribution function to be predicted. Possible application of this approach to recent work on the nonlinear frequency shift of a driven wave is briefly discussed.

  17. Adiabatic geometric phases and response functions

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, S R; Jain, Sudhir R.; Pati, Arun K.

    1998-01-01

    Treating a many-body Fermi system in terms of a single particle in a deforming mean field. We relate adiabatic geometric phase to susceptibility for the noncyclic case, and to its derivative for the cyclic case. Employing the semiclassical expression of susceptibility, the expression for geometric phase for chaotic quantum system immediately follows. Exploiting the well-known association of the absorptive part of susceptibility with dissipation, our relations may provide a quantum mechanical origin of the damping of collective excitations in Fermi systems.

  18. Adiabatic passage in the presence of noise

    CERN Document Server

    Noel, T; Kurz, N; Shu, G; Wright, J; Blinov, B B

    2011-01-01

    We report on an experimental investigation of rapid adiabatic passage (RAP) in a trapped barium ion system. RAP is implemented on the transition from the $6S_{1/2}$ ground state to the metastable $5D_{5/2}$ level by applying a laser at 1.76 $\\mu$m. We focus on the interplay of laser frequency noise and laser power in shaping the effectiveness of RAP, which is commonly assumed to be a robust tool for high efficiency population transfer. However, we note that reaching high state transfer fidelity requires a combination of small laser linewidth and large Rabi frequency.

  19. Quantum Adiabatic Evolution Algorithms with Different Paths

    CERN Document Server

    Farhi, E; Gutmann, S; Farhi, Edward; Goldstone, Jeffrey; Gutmann, Sam

    2002-01-01

    In quantum adiabatic evolution algorithms, the quantum computer follows the ground state of a slowly varying Hamiltonian. The ground state of the initial Hamiltonian is easy to construct; the ground state of the final Hamiltonian encodes the solution of the computational problem. These algorithms have generally been studied in the case where the "straight line" path from initial to final Hamiltonian is taken. But there is no reason not to try paths involving terms that are not linear combinations of the initial and final Hamiltonians. We give several proposals for randomly generating new paths. Using one of these proposals, we convert an algorithmic failure into a success.

  20. Adiabatic quantum computation and quantum phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Latorre, J I; Latorre, Jose Ignacio; Orus, Roman

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the ground state entanglement in a quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm designed to solve the NP-complete Exact Cover problem. The entropy of entanglement seems to obey linear and universal scaling at the point where the mass gap becomes small, suggesting that the system passes near a quantum phase transition. Such a large scaling of entanglement suggests that the effective connectivity of the system diverges as the number of qubits goes to infinity and that this algorithm cannot be efficiently simulated by classical means. On the other hand, entanglement in Grover's algorithm is bounded by a constant.

  1. Generalized Ramsey numbers through adiabatic quantum optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Mani; Macready, William G.; Clark, Lane; Gaitan, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Ramsey theory is an active research area in combinatorics whose central theme is the emergence of order in large disordered structures, with Ramsey numbers marking the threshold at which this order first appears. For generalized Ramsey numbers r( G, H), the emergent order is characterized by graphs G and H. In this paper we: (i) present a quantum algorithm for computing generalized Ramsey numbers by reformulating the computation as a combinatorial optimization problem which is solved using adiabatic quantum optimization; and (ii) determine the Ramsey numbers r({{T}}m,{{T}}n) for trees of order m,n = 6,7,8, most of which were previously unknown.

  2. Relaxation versus adiabatic quantum steady-state preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venuti, Lorenzo Campos; Albash, Tameem; Marvian, Milad; Lidar, Daniel; Zanardi, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Adiabatic preparation of the ground states of many-body Hamiltonians in the closed-system limit is at the heart of adiabatic quantum computation, but in reality systems are always open. This motivates a natural comparison between, on the one hand, adiabatic preparation of steady states of Lindbladian generators and, on the other hand, relaxation towards the same steady states subject to the final Lindbladian of the adiabatic process. In this work we thus adopt the perspective that the goal is the most efficient possible preparation of such steady states, rather than ground states. Using known rigorous bounds for the open-system adiabatic theorem and for mixing times, we are then led to a disturbing conclusion that at first appears to doom efforts to build physical quantum annealers: relaxation seems to always converge faster than adiabatic preparation. However, by carefully estimating the adiabatic preparation time for Lindbladians describing thermalization in the low-temperature limit, we show that there is, after all, room for an adiabatic speedup over relaxation. To test the analytically derived bounds for the adiabatic preparation time and the relaxation time, we numerically study three models: a dissipative quasifree fermionic chain, a single qubit coupled to a thermal bath, and the "spike" problem of n qubits coupled to a thermal bath. Via these models we find that the answer to the "which wins" question depends for each model on the temperature and the system-bath coupling strength. In the case of the "spike" problem we find that relaxation during the adiabatic evolution plays an important role in ensuring a speedup over the final-time relaxation procedure. Thus, relaxation-assisted adiabatic preparation can be more efficient than both pure adiabatic evolution and pure relaxation.

  3. Generating shortcuts to adiabaticity in quantum and classical dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Jarzynski, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Transitionless quantum driving achieves adiabatic evolution in a hurry, using a counter-diabatic Hamiltonian to stifle non-adiabatic transitions. Here this strategy is cast in terms of a generator of adiabatic transport, leading to a classical analogue: dissipationless classical driving. For the single-particle piston, this approach yields simple and exact expressions for both the classical and quantal counter-diabatic terms. These results are further generalized to even-power-law potentials in one degree of freedom.

  4. Exact invariants and adiabatic invariants of the singular Lagrange system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈向炜; 李彦敏

    2003-01-01

    Based on the theory of symmetries and conserved quantities of the singular Lagrange system,the perturbations to the symmetries and adiabatic invariants of the singular Lagrange systems are discussed.Firstly,the concept of higher-order adiabatic invariants of the singular Lagrange system is proposed.Then,the conditions for the existence of the exact invariants and adiabatic invariants are proved,and their forms are given.Finally,an example is presented to illustrate these results.

  5. Correlated mixtures of adiabatic and isocurvature cosmological perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Langlois, D; Langlois, David; Riazuelo, Alain

    2000-01-01

    We examine the consequences of the existence of correlated mixtures of adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations on the CMB and large scale structure. In particular, we consider the four types of ``elementary'' totally correlated hybrid initial conditions, where only one of the four matter species (photons, baryons, neutrinos, CDM) deviates from adiabaticity. We then study the height and position of the acoustic peaks with respect to the large angular scale plateau as a function of the isocurvature to adiabatic ratio.

  6. Photoionization using the xchem approach: Total and partial cross sections of Ne and resonance parameters above the 2 s22 p5 threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marante, Carlos; Klinker, Markus; Kjellsson, Tor; Lindroth, Eva; González-Vázquez, Jesús; Argenti, Luca; Martín, Fernando

    2017-08-01

    The XCHEM approach interfaces well established quantum chemistry packages with scattering numerical methods in order to describe single-ionization processes in atoms and molecules. This should allow one to describe electron correlation in the continuum at the same level of accuracy as quantum chemistry methods do for bound states. Here we have applied this method to study multichannel photoionization of Ne in the vicinity of the autoionizing states lying between the 2 s22 p5 and 2 s 2 p6 ionization thresholds. The calculated total photoionization cross sections are in very good agreement with the absolute measurement of Samson et al. [J. Electron Spectrosc. Relat. Phenom. 123, 265 (2002), 10.1016/S0368-2048(02)00026-9], and with independent benchmark calculations performed at the same level of theory. From these cross sections, we have extracted resonance positions, total autoionization widths, Fano profile parameters, and correlation parameters for the lowest three autoionizing states. The values of these parameters are in good agreement with those reported in earlier theoretical and experimental work. We have also evaluated β asymmetry parameter and partial photoionization cross sections and, from the latter, partial autoionization widths and Starace parameters for the same resonances, not yet available in the literature. Resonant features in the calculated β parameter are in good agreement with the experimental observations. We have found that the three lowest resonances preferentially decay into the 2 p-1ɛ d continuum rather than into the 2 p-1ɛ s one [Phys. Rev. A 89, 043415 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.89.043415], in agreement with previous expectations, and that in the vicinity of the resonances the partial 2 p-1ɛ s cross section can be larger than the 2 p-1ɛ d one, in contrast with the accepted idea that the latter should amply dominate in the whole energy range. These results show the potential of the XCHEM approach to describe highly correlated process

  7. Twist Sensitivity of Cladding-Mode Resonances and Its Cross-Sensitivity to Strain and Temperature in a Mechanically Induced Long-Period Fiber Grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Anitha S.; Sudeep Kumar, V. P.; Joe, Hubert

    2014-09-01

    Twist sensitivity of cladding-mode resonances in a mechanically induced long-period fiber grating formed over a single-mode fiber is experimentally demonstrated and theoretically analyzed. Of the two usual cladding-mode resonances corresponding to LP11 and LP12, higher-order mode LP12 is more sensitive to twist in comparison with the lower-order mode LP11. The extent of down-shifting of resonant wavelengths depends on twist-induced circular birefringence and the modal field distribution of the cladding-modes inside the fiber. When the fiber is severely twisted to 3.5 rad/cm, a shift sensitivity is observed of 1 nm/(rad/cm) for the LP11 mode and 4.23 nm/(rad/cm) for the LP12 mode. The fiber breaks when the twist rate exceeds 3.5 rad/cm. In comparison with LP12, the LP11 resonance is almost independent of the axial strain variation with an ultra-low sensitivity of 0.18 pm/με, and it is also almost insensitive to the temperature variation with a coefficient of 35 pm/°C. Forming the LP11 resonance far away from its cut-off wavelength, a widely tunable band-pass filter is also demonstrated with a very high twist sensitivity of 8.75 nm/(rad/cm) and negligible cross-sensitivity to strain and temperature. The experimental and theoretical results are very useful in selecting sensitive and stable cladding-mode resonances in the design of new mechanically induced long-period fiber gratings based torsion sensors and tunable band-pass filters.

  8. Adiabatic, diabatic field-free and dressed molecular bases in a semiclassical treatment of laser induced transitions near pseudocrossings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1986-07-15

    We study the characteristics of charge exchange processes in ion--atom collisions, induced by a strong laser field whose wavelength is resonant to the splitting at a pseudocrossing of two molecular adiabatic energies, where the transition dipole has a sharp maximum. To calculate the charge exchange cross section we use a semiclassical approach and a molecular expansion for the electronic wave function. Using the formalism of Macias and Riera, and of Ho, Chu, and Laughlin, the properties and practical advantages of field-free and dressed molecular wave functions in that expansion are studied in detail. In practice we have found the former basis to be more advantageous from the computational point of view. A limitation of the Floquet approach of Ho et al. is obtained. As an illustration, we treat O/sup 8 +/+H(1s) charge exchange collisions in presence of a laser field whose frequency is quasiresonant with the energy splitting at the pseudocrossing between the 7isigma and the 6hsigma energy curves. The importance of the (usually neglected) diagonal ac Stark terms is stressed.

  9. A quantum search algorithm based on partial adiabatic evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Ying-Yu; Hu He-Ping; Lu Song-Feng

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents and implements a specified partial adiabatic search algorithm on a quantum circuit. It studies the minimum energy gap between the first excited state and the ground state of the system Hamiltonian and it finds that, in the case of M=1, the algorithm has the same performance as the local adiabatic algorithm. However, the algorithm evolves globally only within a small interval, which implies that it keeps the advantages of global adiabatic algorithms without losing the speedup of the local adiabatic search algorithm.

  10. Magnesium Diboride Superconducting Coils for Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR's) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs) in space applications, it is desirable to have very light weight, small diameter, high current density...

  11. Quantum Adiabatic Algorithms and Large Spin Tunnelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulatov, A.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.

    2003-01-01

    We provide a theoretical study of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm with different evolution paths proposed in this paper. The algorithm is applied to a random binary optimization problem (a version of the 3-Satisfiability problem) where the n-bit cost function is symmetric with respect to the permutation of individual bits. The evolution paths are produced, using the generic control Hamiltonians H (r) that preserve the bit symmetry of the underlying optimization problem. In the case where the ground state of H(0) coincides with the totally-symmetric state of an n-qubit system the algorithm dynamics is completely described in terms of the motion of a spin-n/2. We show that different control Hamiltonians can be parameterized by a set of independent parameters that are expansion coefficients of H (r) in a certain universal set of operators. Only one of these operators can be responsible for avoiding the tunnelling in the spin-n/2 system during the quantum adiabatic algorithm. We show that it is possible to select a coefficient for this operator that guarantees a polynomial complexity of the algorithm for all problem instances. We show that a successful evolution path of the algorithm always corresponds to the trajectory of a classical spin-n/2 and provide a complete characterization of such paths.

  12. The genesis of adiabatic shear bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, P.; Osovski, S.; Venkert, A.; Gärtnerová, V.; Rittel, D.

    2016-11-01

    Adiabatic shear banding (ASB) is a unique dynamic failure mechanism that results in an unpredicted catastrophic failure due to a concentrated shear deformation mode. It is universally considered as a material or structural instability and as such, ASB is hardly controllable or predictable to some extent. ASB is modeled on the premise of stability analyses. The leading paradigm is that a competition between strain (rate) hardening and thermal softening determines the onset of the failure. It was recently shown that microstructural softening transformations, such as dynamic recrystallization, are responsible for adiabatic shear failure. These are dictated by the stored energy of cold work, so that energy considerations can be used to macroscopically model the failure mechanism. The initial mechanisms that lead to final failure are still unknown, as well as the ASB formation mechanism(s). Most of all - is ASB an abrupt instability or rather a gradual transition as would be dictated by microstructural evolutions? This paper reports thorough microstructural characterizations that clearly show the gradual character of the phenomenon, best described as a nucleation and growth failure mechanism, and not as an abrupt instability as previously thought. These observations are coupled to a simple numerical model that illustrates them.

  13. Reliability analysis on resonance for low-pressure compressor rotor blade based on least squares support vector machine with leave-one-out cross-validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Gao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This research article analyzes the resonant reliability at the rotating speed of 6150.0 r/min for low-pressure compressor rotor blade. The aim is to improve the computational efficiency of reliability analysis. This study applies least squares support vector machine to predict the natural frequencies of the low-pressure compressor rotor blade considered. To build a more stable and reliable least squares support vector machine model, leave-one-out cross-validation is introduced to search for the optimal parameters of least squares support vector machine. Least squares support vector machine with leave-one-out cross-validation is presented to analyze the resonant reliability. Additionally, the modal analysis at the rotating speed of 6150.0 r/min for the rotor blade is considered as a tandem system to simplify the analysis and design process, and the randomness of influence factors on frequencies, such as material properties, structural dimension, and operating condition, is taken into consideration. Back-propagation neural network is compared to verify the proposed approach based on the same training and testing sets as least squares support vector machine with leave-one-out cross-validation. Finally, the statistical results prove that the proposed approach is considered to be effective and feasible and can be applied to structural reliability analysis.

  14. Complex angular momentum theory of state-to-state integral cross sections: resonance effects in the F + HD → HF(v' = 3) + D reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolovski, D; Akhmatskaya, E; Echeverría-Arrondo, C; De Fazio, D

    2015-07-28

    State-to-state reactive integral cross sections (ICSs) are often affected by quantum mechanical resonances, especially near a reactive threshold. An ICS is usually obtained by summing partial waves at a given value of energy. For this reason, the knowledge of pole positions and residues in the complex energy plane is not sufficient for a quantitative description of the patterns produced by resonance. Such description is available in terms of the poles of an S-matrix element in the complex plane of the total angular momentum. The approach was recently implemented in a computer code ICS_Regge, available in the public domain [Comput. Phys. Commun., 2014, 185, 2127]. In this paper, we employ the ICS_Regge package to analyse in detail, for the first time, the resonance patterns predicted for integral cross sections (ICSs) of the benchmark F + HD → HF(v' = 3) + D reaction. The v = 0, j = 0, Ω = 0 → v' = 3, j' = 0, 1, 2, and Ω' = 0, 1, 2 transitions are studied for collision energies from 58.54 to 197.54 meV. For these energies, we find several resonances, whose contributions to the ICS vary from symmetric and asymmetric Fano shapes to smooth sinusoidal Regge oscillations. Complex energies of metastable states and Regge pole positions and residues are found by Padé reconstruction of the scattering matrix elements. The accuracy of the ICS_Regge code, relation between complex energies and Regge poles, various types of Regge trajectories, and the origin of the J-shifting approximation are also discussed.

  15. Extracting the cross section angular distributions for 15C high-energy resonance excited via the (18O,16O two-neutron transfer reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carbone D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The 13C(18O,16O15C reaction has been studied at 84 MeV incident energy. The ejectiles have been momentum analized by the MAGNEX spectrometer and 15C excitation energy spectra have been obtained up to about 20 MeV. In the region above the two-neutron separation energy, a bump has been observed at 13.7 MeV. The extracted cross section angular distribution for this structure, obtained by using different models for background, displays a clear oscillating pattern, typical of resonant state of the residual nucleus.

  16. Thermal neutron cross-section and resonance integral of the 152Sm(n,γ)153Sm reaction induced by pulsed neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Do, Nguyen; Khue, Pham Duc; Thanh, Kim Tien; Hien, Nguyen Thi; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Kwangsoo; Shin, Sung-Gyun; Kye, Yong-Uk; Cho, Moo-Hyun

    2017-10-01

    We measured the thermal neutron cross-section (σ0) and resonance integral (I0) of the 152Sm(n,γ)153Sm reaction relative to that of the 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction. Sm and Au foils with and without a cadmium cover of 0.5 mm were irradiated with moderated pulsed neutrons produced from the electron linac. The induced activities of the reaction products were determined via high energy resolution HPGe detector. The present results: σ0,Sm =212±8 b and I0,Sm =3.02±0.19 kb are consistent with most of the existing reference data.

  17. Chaotic jumps in the generalized first adiabatic invariant in current sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittnacher, M. J.; Whipple, E. C.

    1991-01-01

    The present study examines how the changes in the generalized first adiabatic invariant J derived from the separatrix crossing theory can be incorporated into the drift variable approach to generating distribution functions. A method is proposed for determining distribution functions for an ensemble of particles following interaction with the tail current sheet by treating the interaction as a scattering problem characterized by changes in the invariant. Generalized drift velocities are obtained for a 1D tail configuration by using the generalized first invariant. The invariant remained constant except for the discrete changes caused by chaotic scattering as the particles cross the separatrix.

  18. The added value of longitudinal black-blood cardiovascular magnetic resonance angiography in the cross sectional identification of carotid atherosclerotic ulceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hippe Daniel S

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carotid atherosclerotic ulceration is a significant source of stroke. This study evaluates the efficacy of adding longitudinal black-blood (BB cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR angiography to cross-sectional CMR images in the identification of carotid atherosclerotic ulceration. Methods Thirty-two subjects (30 males and two females with ages between 48 and 83 years scheduled for carotid endarterectomy were imaged on a 1.5T GE Signa scanner using multisequence [3D time-of-flight, T1, proton density, T2, contrast enhanced T1], cross-sectional CMR images and longitudinal BB CMR angiography (0.625 × 0.625 mm/pixel. Two rounds of review (round 1: cross-sectional CMR images alone and round 2: cross-sectional CMR images plus longitudinal BB CMR angiography were conducted for the presence and volume measurements of ulceration. Ulceration was defined as a distinct depression into the plaque containing blood flow signal on cross-sectional CMR and longitudinal BB CMR angiography. Results Of the 32 plaques examined by histology, 17 contained 21 ulcers. Using the longitudinal BB CMR angiography sequence in addition to the cross-sectional CMR images in round 2, the sensitivity improved to 80% for ulcers of at least 6 mm3 in volume by histology and 52.4% for all ulcers, compared to 30% and 23.8% in round 1, respectively. There was a slight decline in specificity from 88.2% to 82.3%, though both the positive and negative predictive values increased modestly from 71.4% to 78.6% and from 48.4% to 58.3%, respectively. Conclusion The addition of longitudinal BB CMR angiography to multisequence cross-sectional CMR images increases accuracy in the identification of carotid atherosclerotic ulceration.

  19. Adiabat-shaping in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, K. L.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Casey, D. T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Landen, O. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Berzak-Hopkins, L. F.; Weber, C. R.; Haan, S. W.; Döppner, T. D.; Dixit, S.; Hamza, A. V.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Kroll, J. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    Adiabat-shaping techniques were investigated in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility as a means to improve implosion stability, while still maintaining a low adiabat in the fuel. Adiabat-shaping was accomplished in these indirect drive experiments by altering the ratio of the picket and trough energies in the laser pulse shape, thus driving a decaying first shock in the ablator. This decaying first shock is designed to place the ablation front on a high adiabat while keeping the fuel on a low adiabat. These experiments were conducted using the keyhole experimental platform for both three and four shock laser pulses. This platform enabled direct measurement of the shock velocities driven in the glow-discharge polymer capsule and in the liquid deuterium, the surrogate fuel for a DT ignition target. The measured shock velocities and radiation drive histories are compared to previous three and four shock laser pulses. This comparison indicates that in the case of adiabat shaping the ablation front initially drives a high shock velocity, and therefore, a high shock pressure and adiabat. The shock then decays as it travels through the ablator to pressures similar to the original low-adiabat pulses when it reaches the fuel. This approach takes advantage of initial high ablation velocity, which favors stability, and high-compression, which favors high stagnation pressures.

  20. Constraints on the Adiabatic Temperature Change in Magnetocaloric Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden; Smith, Anders

    2010-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the magnetocaloric effect implies constraints on the allowed variation in the adiabatic temperature change for a magnetocaloric material. An inequality for the derivative of the adiabatic temperature change with respect to temperature is derived for both first- and second...

  1. High Fidelity Adiabatic Quantum Computation via Dynamical Decoupling

    CERN Document Server

    Quiroz, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    We introduce high-order dynamical decoupling strategies for open system adiabatic quantum computation. Our numerical results demonstrate that a judicious choice of high-order dynamical decoupling method, in conjunction with an encoding which allows computation to proceed alongside decoupling, can dramatically enhance the fidelity of adiabatic quantum computation in spite of decoherence.

  2. Quantum adiabatic algorithm for factorization and its experimental implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xinhua; Liao, Zeyang; Xu, Nanyang; Qin, Gan; Zhou, Xianyi; Suter, Dieter; Du, Jiangfeng

    2008-11-28

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm capable of factorizing numbers, using fewer qubits than Shor's algorithm. We implement the algorithm in a NMR quantum information processor and experimentally factorize the number 21. In the range that our classical computer could simulate, the quantum adiabatic algorithm works well, providing evidence that the running time of this algorithm scales polynomially with the problem size.

  3. Sufficient Condition for Validity of Quantum Adiabatic Theorem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Yong

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we attempt to give a sufficient condition of guaranteeing the validity of the proof of the quantum adiabatic theorem. The new sufficient condition can clearly remove the inconsistency and the counterexample of the quantum adiabatic theorem pointed out by Marzlin and Sanders [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004) 160408].

  4. Kinetic Theory Derivation of the Adiabatic Law for Ideal Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Michael I.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses how the adiabatic law for ideal gases can be derived from the assumption of a Maxwell-Boltzmann (or any other) distribution of velocities--in contrast to the usual derivations from thermodynamics alone, and the higher-order effect that leads to one-body viscosity. An elementary derivation of the adiabatic law is given. (Author/DS)

  5. Teleportation of an Unknown Atomic State via Adiabatic Passage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We propose a scheme for teleporting an unknown atomic state via adiabatic passage. Taking advantage of adiabatic passage, the atom has no probability of being excited and thus the atomic spontaneous emission is suppressed.We also show that the fidelity can reach 1 under certain condition.

  6. Collision cross sectional areas from analysis of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance line width: a new method for characterizing molecular structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Voelkel, Jacob E; Dearden, David V

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate a technique for determining molecular collision cross sections via measuring the variation of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) line width with background damping gas pressure, under conditions where the length of the FTICR transient is pressure limited. Key features of our method include monoisotopic isolation of ions, the pulsed introduction of damping gas to a constant pressure using a pulsed leak valve, short excitation events to minimize collisions during the excitation, and proper choice of damping gas (Xe is superior to He). The measurements are reproducible within a few percent, which is sufficient for distinguishing between many structural possibilities and is comparable to the uncertainty in cross sections calculated from computed molecular structures. These techniques complement drift ion mobility measurements obtained on dedicated instruments. They do not require a specialized instrument, but should be easily performed on any FTICR mass spectrometer equipped with a pulsed leak valve.

  7. Adiabatic regularization of functional determinants in cosmology and radiative corrections during inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ali; Kutluk, Emine Seyma

    2015-12-01

    We express the in-in functional determinant giving the one-loop effective potential for a scalar field propagating in a cosmological spacetime in terms of the mode functions specifying the vacuum of the theory and then apply adiabatic regularization to make this bare potential finite. In this setup, the adiabatic regularization offers a particular renormalization prescription that isolates the effects of the cosmic expansion. We apply our findings to determine the radiative corrections to the classical inflaton potentials in scalar field inflationary models and also we derive an effective potential for the superhorizon curvature perturbation ζ encoding its scatterings with the subhorizon modes. Although the resulting modifications to the cosmological observables like non-Gaussianity turn out to be small, they distinctively appear after horizon crossing.

  8. Adiabatic regularization of functional determinants in cosmology and radiative corrections during inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Kaya, Ali

    2015-01-01

    We express the in-in functional determinant giving the one-loop effective potential for a scalar field propagating in a cosmological spacetime in terms of the mode functions specifying the vacuum of the theory and then apply adiabatic regularization to make this bare potential finite. In this setup, the adiabatic regularization offers a particular renormalization prescription that isolates the effects of the cosmic expansion and, unlike the dimensional regularization, it has no infrared issues. We apply our findings to determine the radiative corrections to the classical inflaton potentials in scalar field inflationary models and also we derive an effective potential for the superhorizon curvature perturbation \\zeta\\ encoding its scatterings with the subhorizon modes. Although the resulting modifications to the cosmological observables like nongaussianity turn out to be small, they distinctively appear after horizon crossing.

  9. The adiabatic/entropy decomposition in $P(\\phi^I,X^{IJ})$ theories with multiple sound speeds

    CERN Document Server

    Longden, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We consider $P(\\phi^I,X^{IJ})$ theories of multi-field inflation and ask the question of how to define the adiabatic and entropy perturbations, widely used in calculating the curvature and isocurvature power spectra, in this general context. It is found that when the field perturbations propagate with different speeds, these adiabatic and entropy modes are not generally the fundamental (most natural to canonically quantise) degrees of freedom that propagate with a single speed. The alternative fields which do propagate with a single speed are found to be a rotation in field space of the adiabatic and entropy perturbations. We show how this affects the form of the horizon-crossing power spectrum, when there is not a single "adiabatic sound speed" sourcing the curvature perturbation. Special cases of our results are discussed, including $P(X)$ theories where the adiabatic and entropy perturbations are fundamental. We finally look at physical motivations for considering multi-speed models of inflation, particula...

  10. A non-adiabatic approach to entanglement distribution over long distances

    CERN Document Server

    Razavi, M; Razavi, Mohsen; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2006-01-01

    Entanglement distribution between trapped-atom quantum memories, viz. single atoms in optical cavities, is addressed. In most scenarios, the rate of entanglement distribution depends on the efficiency with which the state of traveling single photons can be transferred to trapped atoms. This loading efficiency is analytically studied for two-level, $V$-level, $\\Lambda$-level, and double-$\\Lambda$-level atomic configurations by means of a system-reservoir approach. An off-resonant non-adiabatic approach to loading $\\Lambda$-level trapped-atom memories is proposed, and the ensuing trade-offs between the atom-light coupling rate and input photon bandwidth for achieving a high loading probability are identified. The non-adiabatic approach allows a broad class of optical sources to be used, and in some cases it provides a higher system throughput than what can be achieved by adiabatic loading mechanisms. The analysis is extended to the case of two double-$\\Lambda$ trapped-atom memories illuminated by a polarization...

  11. Multiqubit gates protected by adiabaticity and dynamical decoupling applicable to donor qubits in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Wayne M.; Montaño, Inès; Muller, Richard P.; Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2015-08-01

    We present a strategy for producing multiqubit gates that promise high fidelity with minimal tuning requirements. Our strategy combines gap protection from the adiabatic theorem with dynamical decoupling in a complementary manner. Energy-level transition errors are protected by adiabaticity and remaining phase errors are mitigated via dynamical decoupling. This is a powerful way to divide and conquer the various error channels. In order to accomplish this without violating a no-go theorem regarding black-box dynamically corrected gates [Phys. Rev. A 80, 032314 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevA.80.032314], we require a robust operating point (sweet spot) in control space where the qubits interact with little sensitivity to noise. There are also energy gap requirements for effective adiabaticity. We apply our strategy to an architecture in Si with P donors where we assume we can shuttle electrons between different donors. Electron spins act as mobile ancillary qubits and P nuclear spins act as long-lived data qubits. This system can have a very robust operating point where the electron spin is bound to a donor in the quadratic Stark shift regime. High fidelity single qubit gates may be performed using well-established global magnetic resonance pulse sequences. Single electron-spin preparation and measurement has also been demonstrated. Putting this all together, we present a robust universal gate set for quantum computation.

  12. Shortcuts to adiabaticity in cutting a spin chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Feng-Hua; Wang, Zhao-Ming; Gu, Yong-Jian

    2017-01-01

    "Shortcuts to adiabaticity" represents a strategy for accelerating a quantum adiabatic process, is useful for preparing or manipulating a quantum state. In this paper, we investigate the adiabaticity in the dynamics of an XY spin chain. During the process of cutting one long chain into two short chains, a "shortcut" can be obtained by applying a sequence of external pulses. The fidelity which measures the adiabaticity can be dramatically enhanced by increasing the pulse strength or pulse duration time. This reliability can be kept for different types of pulses, such as random pulse time interval or random strength. The free choice of the pulse can be explained by the adiabatic representation of the Hamiltonian, and it shows that the control effects are determined by the integral of the control function in the time domain.

  13. An Integrated Development Environment for Adiabatic Quantum Programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humble, Travis S [ORNL; McCaskey, Alex [ORNL; Bennink, Ryan S [ORNL; Billings, Jay Jay [ORNL; D' Azevedo, Eduardo [ORNL; Sullivan, Blair D [ORNL; Klymko, Christine F [ORNL; Seddiqi, Hadayat [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing is a promising route to the computational power afforded by quantum information processing. The recent availability of adiabatic hardware raises the question of how well quantum programs perform. Benchmarking behavior is challenging since the multiple steps to synthesize an adiabatic quantum program are highly tunable. We present an adiabatic quantum programming environment called JADE that provides control over all the steps taken during program development. JADE captures the workflow needed to rigorously benchmark performance while also allowing a variety of problem types, programming techniques, and processor configurations. We have also integrated JADE with a quantum simulation engine that enables program profiling using numerical calculation. The computational engine supports plug-ins for simulation methodologies tailored to various metrics and computing resources. We present the design, integration, and deployment of JADE and discuss its use for benchmarking adiabatic quantum programs.

  14. Thermodynamic Study of Energy Dissipation in Adiabatic Superconductor Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    Because of its extremely high energy efficiency, adiabatic superconductor logic is one of the most promising candidates for the realization of a practical reversible computer. In a previous study, we proposed a logically and physically reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconductor logic, and numerically demonstrated reversible computing. In the numerical calculation, we assumed that the average energy dissipation at finite temperature corresponds to that at zero temperature. However, how the phase difference of a Josephson junction in adiabatic superconductor logic behaves at finite temperature is not yet well understood, and whether thermal noise can induce a nonadiabatic state change remains unclear. In the present study, we investigate energy dissipation in adiabatic superconductor logic at finite temperature through numerical analyses using the Monte Carlo method. We investigate the average and standard deviation of the energy dissipation through both numerical calculation and analytical estimation. Finally, we discuss the minimum energy dissipation required for adiabatic switching operations.

  15. How detrimental is decoherence in adiabatic quantum computation?

    CERN Document Server

    Albash, Tameem

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments with increasingly larger numbers of qubits have sparked renewed interest in adiabatic quantum computation, and in particular quantum annealing. A central question that is repeatedly asked is whether quantum features of the evolution can survive over the long time-scales used for quantum annealing relative to standard measures of the decoherence time. We reconsider the role of decoherence in adiabatic quantum computation and quantum annealing using the adiabatic quantum master equation formalism. We restrict ourselves to the weak-coupling and singular-coupling limits, which correspond to decoherence in the energy eigenbasis and in the computational basis, respectively. We demonstrate that decoherence in the instantaneous energy eigenbasis does not necessarily detrimentally affect adiabatic quantum computation, and in particular that a short single-qubit $T_2$ time need not imply adverse consequences for the success of the quantum adiabatic algorithm. We further demonstrate that boundary canc...

  16. Investigating the Performance of an Adiabatic Quantum Optimization Processor

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, Geordie; Dickson, Neil G; Hamze, Firas; Amin, M H S; Drew-Brook, Marshall; Chudak, Fabian A; Bunyk, Paul I; Macready, William G

    2010-01-01

    We calculate median adiabatic times (in seconds) of a specific superconducting adiabatic quantum processor for an NP-hard Ising spin glass instance class with up to N=128 binary variables. To do so, we ran high performance Quantum Monte Carlo simulations on a large-scale Internet-based computing platform. We compare the median adiabatic times with the median running times of two classical solvers and find that, for problems with up to 128 variables, the adiabatic times for the simulated processor architecture are about 4 and 6 orders of magnitude shorter than the two classical solvers' times. This performance difference shows that, even in the potential absence of a scaling advantage, adiabatic quantum optimization may outperform classical solvers.

  17. Adiabatic logic future trend and system level perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Teichmann, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Adiabatic logic is a potential successor for static CMOS circuit design when it comes to ultra-low-power energy consumption. Future development like the evolutionary shrinking of the minimum feature size as well as revolutionary novel transistor concepts will change the gate level savings gained by adiabatic logic. In addition, the impact of worsening degradation effects has to be considered in the design of adiabatic circuits. The impact of the technology trends on the figures of merit of adiabatic logic, energy saving potential and optimum operating frequency, are investigated, as well as degradation related issues. Adiabatic logic benefits from future devices, is not susceptible to Hot Carrier Injection, and shows less impact of Bias Temperature Instability than static CMOS circuits. Major interest also lies on the efficient generation of the applied power-clock signal. This oscillating power supply can be used to save energy in short idle times by disconnecting circuits. An efficient way to generate the p...

  18. Conformal Symmetries of Adiabatic Modes in Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Hinterbichler, Kurt; Khoury, Justin

    2012-01-01

    We remark on the existence of non-linearly realized conformal symmetries for scalar adiabatic perturbations in cosmology. These conformal symmetries are present for any cosmological background, beyond any slow-roll or quasi-de Sitter approximation. The dilatation transformation shifts the curvature perturbation by a constant, and corresponds to the well-known symmetry under spatial rescaling. We argue that the scalar sector is also invariant under special conformal transformations, which shift the curvature perturbation by a term linear in the spatial coordinates. We discuss whether these conformal symmetries can be extended to include tensor perturbations. Tensor modes introduce their own set of non-linearly realized symmetries. We identify an infinite set of large gauge transformations which maintain the transverse, traceless gauge condition, while shifting the tensor mode non-trivially.

  19. Reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconducting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, N.; Yamanashi, Y.; Yoshikawa, N.

    2014-09-01

    Reversible computing has been studied since Rolf Landauer advanced the argument that has come to be known as Landauer's principle. This principle states that there is no minimum energy dissipation for logic operations in reversible computing, because it is not accompanied by reductions in information entropy. However, until now, no practical reversible logic gates have been demonstrated. One of the problems is that reversible logic gates must be built by using extremely energy-efficient logic devices. Another difficulty is that reversible logic gates must be both logically and physically reversible. Here we propose the first practical reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconducting devices and experimentally demonstrate the logical and physical reversibility of the gate. Additionally, we estimate the energy dissipation of the gate, and discuss the minimum energy dissipation required for reversible logic operations. It is expected that the results of this study will enable reversible computing to move from the theoretical stage into practical usage.

  20. Sliding seal materials for adiabatic engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankford, J.

    1985-01-01

    The sliding friction coefficients and wear rates of promising carbide, oxide, and nitride materials were measured under temperature, environmental, velocity, loading conditions that are representative of the adiabatic engine environment. In order to provide guidance needed to improve materials for this application, the program stressed fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in friction and wear. Microhardness tests were performed on the candidate materials at elevated temperatures, and in atmospheres relevant to the piston seal application, and optical and electron microscopy were used to elucidate the micromechanisms of wear following wear testing. X-ray spectroscopy was used to evaluate interface/environment interactions which seemed to be important in the friction and wear process. Electrical effects in the friction and wear processes were explored in order to evaluate the potential usefulness of such effects in modifying the friction and wear rates in service. However, this factor was found to be of negligible significance in controlling friction and wear.

  1. Entropy in adiabatic regions of convection simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Tanner, Joel D; Demarque, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    One of the largest sources of uncertainty in stellar models is caused by the treatment of convection in stellar envelopes. One dimensional stellar models often make use of the mixing length or equivalent approximations to describe convection, all of which depend on various free parameters. There have been attempts to rectify this by using 3D radiative-hydrodynamic simulations of stellar convection, and in trying to extract an equivalent mixing length from the simulations. In this paper we show that the entropy of the deeper, adiabatic layers in these simulations can be expressed as a simple function of og g and log T_{eff} which holds potential for calibrating stellar models in a simple and more general manner.

  2. Parametric Erosion Investigation: Propellant Adiabatic Flame Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Conroy

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of quasi-independent parameters and their potential influence on erosion in guns have been investigated. Specifically, the effects of flame temperature and the effect of assuming that the Lewis number (ratio of mass-to-heat transport to the surface, Le = 1, has been examined. The adiabatic flame temperature for a propellant was reduced by the addition of a diluent from a high temperature of 3843 K (similar to that of M9 down to 3004 K, which is near the value for M30A1 propellant. Mass fractions of critical species at the surface with and without the assumption of Le = 1 are presented, demonstrating that certain species preferentially reach the surface providing varied conditions for the surface reactions. The results for gun tube bore surface regression qualitatively agree with previous studies and with current experimental data.

  3. Adiabatic scaling relations of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ascasibar, Y; Yepes, G; Müller, V; Gottlöber, S

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to show that, contrary to popular belief, galaxy clusters are **not** expected to be self-similar, even when the only energy sources available are gravity and shock-wave heating. In particular, we investigate the scaling relations between mass, luminosity and temperature of galaxy groups and clusters in the absence of radiative processes. Theoretical expectations are derived from a polytropic model of the intracluster medium and compared with the results of high-resolution adiabatic gasdynamical simulations. It is shown that, in addition to the well-known relation between the mass and concentration of the dark matter halo, the effective polytropic index of the gas also varies systematically with cluster mass, and therefore neither the dark matter nor the gas profiles are exactly self-similar. It is remarkable, though, that the effects of concentration and polytropic index tend to cancel each other, leading to scaling relations whose logarithmic slopes roughly match the predictio...

  4. Adiabatic perturbations in coupled scalar field cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Beyer, Joschka

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive and gauge invariant treatment of perturbations around cosmological scaling solutions for two canonical scalar fields coupled through a common potential in the early universe, in the presence of neutrinos, photons and baryons, but excluding cold dark matter. This setup is relevant for analyzing cosmic perturbations in scalar field models of dark matter with a coupling to a quintessence field. We put strong restrictions on the shape of the common potential and adopt a matrix-eigensystem approach to determine the dominant perturbations modes in such models. Similar to recent results in scenarios where standard cold dark matter couples to quintessence, we show that the stability of the adiabatic perturbation mode can be an issue for this class of scalar field dark matter models, but only for specific choices of the common potential. For an exponential coupling potential, a rather common shape arising naturally in many instances, this problem can be avoided. We explicitly calculate the d...

  5. Adiabatic density-functional perturbation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonze, Xavier

    1995-08-01

    The treatment of adiabatic perturbations within density-functional theory is examined, at arbitrary order of the perturbation expansion. Due to the extremal property of the energy functional, standard variation-perturbation theorems can be used. The different methods (Sternheimer equation, extremal principle, Green's function, and sum over state) for obtaining the perturbation expansion of the wave functions are presented. The invariance of the Hilbert space of occupied wave functions with respect to a unitary transformation leads to the definition of a ``parallel-transport-gauge'' and a ``diagonal-gauge'' perturbation expansion. Then, the general expressions are specialized for the second, third, and fourth derivative of the energy, with an example of application of the method up to third order.

  6. Adiabatic vs. non-adiabatic determination of specific absorption rate of ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natividad, Eva [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza), Sede Campus Rio Ebro, Maria de Luna, 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Castro, Miguel [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza), Sede Campus Rio Ebro, Maria de Luna, 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)], E-mail: mcastro@unizar.es; Mediano, Arturo [Grupo de Electronica de Potencia y Microelectronica (GEPM), Instituto de Investigacion en Ingenieria de Aragon (Universidad de Zaragoza), Maria de Luna, 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    The measurement of temperature variations in adiabatic conditions allows the determination of the specific absorption rate of magnetic nanoparticles and ferrofluids from the correct incremental expression, SAR=(1/m{sub MNP})C({delta}T/{delta}t). However, when measurements take place in non-adiabatic conditions, one must approximate this expression by SAR{approx}C{beta}/m{sub MNP}, where {beta} is the initial slope of the temperature vs. time curve during alternating field application. The errors arising from the use of this approximation were estimated through several experiments with different isolating conditions, temperature sensors and sample-sensor contacts. It is concluded that small to appreciable errors can appear, which are difficult to infer or control.

  7. Adiabatic & non-adiabatic perturbation theory for coherence vector description of neutrino oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Hollenberg, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    The standard wave function approach for the treatment of neutrino oscillations fails in situations where quantum ensembles at a finite temperature with or without an interacting background plasma are encountered. As a first step to treat such phenomena in a novel way, we propose a unified approach to both adiabatic and non-adiabatic two-flavor oscillations in neutrino ensembles with finite temperature and generic (e.g. matter) potentials. Neglecting effects of ensemble decoherence for now we study the evolution of a neutrino ensemble governed by the associated Quantum Kinetic Equations, which apply to systems with finite temperature. The Quantum Kinetic Equations are solved formally using the Magnus expansion and it is shown that a convenient choice of the quantum mechanical picture (e.g. the interaction picture) reveals suitable parameters to characterize the physics of the underlying system (e.g. an effective oscillation length). It is understood that this method also provides a promising starting point for...

  8. Adiabatic Rearrangement of Hollow PV Towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Hendricks

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabatic heating from deep moist convection in the hurricane eyewall produces a towering annular structure of elevated potential vorticity (PV. This structure has been referred to as a hollow PV tower. The sign reversal of the radial gradient of PV satisfies the Charney-Stern necessary condition for combined barotropic-baroclinic instability. For thin enough annular structures, small perturbations grow exponentially, extract energy from the mean flow, and lead to hollow tower breakdown, with significant vortex structural and intensity change. The three-dimensional adiabatic rearrangements of two prototypical hurricane-like hollow PV towers (one thick and one thin are examined in an idealized framework. For both hollow towers, dynamic instability causes air parcels with high PV to be mixed into the eye preferentially at lower levels, where unstable PV wave growth rates are the largest. Little or no mixing is found to occur at upper levels. The mixing at lower and middle levels is most rapid for the breakdown of the thin hollow tower, consistent with previous barotropic results. For both hollow towers, this advective rearrangement of PV affects the tropical cyclone structure and intensity in a number of ways. First, the minimum central pressure and maximum azimuthal mean velocity simultaneously decrease, consistent with previous barotropic results. Secondly, isosurfaces of absolute angular momentum preferentially shift inward at low levels, implying an adiabatic mechanism by which hurricane eyewall tilt can form. Thirdly, a PV bridge, similar to that previously found in full-physics hurricane simulations, develops as a result of mixing at the isentropic levels where unstable PV waves grow most rapidly. Finally, the balanced mass field resulting from the PV rearrangement is warmer in the eye between 900 and 700 hPa. The location of this warming is consistent with observed warm anomalies in the eye, indicating that in certain instances the hurricane

  9. Simple systematization of vibrational excitation cross-section calculations for resonant electron-molecule scattering in the boomerang and impulse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Manabendra; Adhikari, S; Mishra, Manoj K

    2007-01-28

    Vibrational excitation (nu(f), where psi(nu(i))(R,t) approximately =e(-iH(A(2))-(R)t/h phi(nu(i))(R) with time evolution under the influence of the resonance anionic Hamiltonian H(A(2) (-))(A(2) (-)=N(2)(-)/H(2) (-)) implemented using Lanczos and fast Fourier transforms. The target (A(2)) vibrational eigenfunctions phi(nu(i))(R) and phi(nu(f))(R) are calculated using Fourier grid Hamiltonian method applied to potential energy (PE) curves of the neutral target. Application of this simple systematization to calculate vibrational structure in e-N(2) and e-H(2) scattering cross-sections provides mechanistic insights into features underlying presence/absence of structure in e-N(2) and e-H(2) scattering cross-sections. The results obtained with approximate PE curves are in reasonable agreement with experimental/calculated cross-section profiles, and cross correlation functions provide a simple demarcation between the boomerang and impulse models.

  10. Cross-sectional anatomy, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the head of common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) and striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Farré, J M; Gonzalo-Orden, M; Barreiro-Vázquez, J D; Barreiro-Lois, A; André, M; Morell, M; Llarena-Reino, M; Monreal-Pawlowsky, T; Degollada, E

    2015-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to scan seven by-caught dolphin cadavers, belonging to two species: four common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) and three striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba). CT and MRI were obtained with the animals in ventral recumbency. After the imaging procedures, six dolphins were frozen at -20°C and sliced in the same position they were examined. Not only CT and MRI scans, but also cross sections of the heads were obtained in three body planes: transverse (slices of 1 cm thickness) in three dolphins, sagittal (5 cm thickness) in two dolphins and dorsal (5 cm thickness) in two dolphins. Relevant anatomical structures were identified and labelled on each cross section, obtaining a comprehensive bi-dimensional topographical anatomy guide of the main features of the common and the striped dolphin head. Furthermore, the anatomical cross sections were compared with their corresponding CT and MRI images, allowing an imaging identification of most of the anatomical features. CT scans produced an excellent definition of the bony and air-filled structures, while MRI allowed us to successfully identify most of the soft tissue structures in the dolphin's head. This paper provides a detailed anatomical description of the head structures of common and striped dolphins and compares anatomical cross sections with CT and MRI scans, becoming a reference guide for the interpretation of imaging studies.

  11. Measurement of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube in the lumbar spine on magnetic resonance imaging. Comparison between normal, pre- and post-discectomy conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubayashi, Yasutomo [Juntendo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-07-01

    This study evaluated the usefulness of pre- and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of lumbar disc hernia with special attention to measurement of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube. Twenty-five patients (20 men and 5 women; 25 discs) who underwent posterior lumbar discectomy and 73 normal individuals (44 men and 29 women; 219 discs) of a similar age distribution were studied. Axial MRI was mainly used for the measurement of the dural tube. In the patient group, MRI examination was performed 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Assessment of the clinical symptoms was also included and used for comparison with the MRI evaluation. The cross-sectional area was significantly reduced to about 50% of the normal preoperatively. One month postoperatively, there was no significant increase in the size of the area, but after three months, the area increased significantly and progressed to the normal size within a year. One-month postoperatively, MRI examination was not considered useful because of postoperative hematoma and/or edema at the surgical site. The increase in the size of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube correlated well with the improvement in clinical symptoms. Three-months postoperatively, MRI evaluation of the lumbar disc seemed useful and measurement of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube appeared to serve as an indicator of the effectiveness of the surgery. (author)

  12. Thermal Cross Sections and Resonance Integrals for Ag{sup 109}(n,{gamma})Ag{sup 110m} and Several Other Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.G. [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0119 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    In this paper measurements reported from the Rikkyo Research Reactor are reanalysed using a least squares adjustment procedure in which the adjustable parameters were the thermal and epithermal neutron fluences, the epithermal shape parameter and the thermal neutron cross sections and resonance integrals of all the dosimeters, including the gold and cobalt standards. The methodology and the results are described. Nuclear data including cross sections, recommended in ASTM Standard Test Method E 481, for the {sup 59}Co(n,{gamma}){sup 60}Co and Ag{sup 109}(n,{gamma})Ag{sup 110m} reactions were changed in a recent revision of the standard. The change for the silver thermal neutron cross section was very large compared to the previously cited uncertainties. The reference cited in the standard is the only new measurement that has been reported in many years. The value reported there for the 2200 m/s cross section is 4.12 {+-} 0.10 barn. This reevaluation adjusts that value to 3.87 {+-} 0.08 barn. The value in the previous edition of E481, however, was 4.7 barns {+-} 4%. Such a large change greatly affects the neutron fluence values that will be calculated. (author)

  13. Stochastic Resonance in a Single - Mode Laser Driven by Pump Noise and Quantum Noise with Cross-Correlated Real and Imaginary Parts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Qing-Hua; CAO Li; WANG Jun; WU Da-Jin

    2004-01-01

    We present an analytic investigation of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by studying a signal modulated model of a single-mode laser system driven by pump noise and quantum noise with correlated real and imaginary parts,and find there is a maximum in the curve of the dependence of SNR upon the cross-correlation coefficient λq between the real part and the imaginary part, i.e., stochastic resonance appears in the SNR vs. λq curve. Moreover, when the SNR is at the maximum, the cross-correlation coefficient λq = 0, which is coincidentally at the minimum of the mean normalized intensity fluctuation. The influences on stochastic resonance by the intensities of the pump and the quantum noise, the amplitude of the modulation signal, and the net gain of the laser are also studied. Furthermore, in order to ensure that the results obtained in this paper is reliable, the valid range for the linear approximation method is discussed.

  14. Stochastic Resonance in a Single-Mode Laser Driven by Pump Noise and QuantumNoise with Cross-Correlated Real and Imaginary Parts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENGQing-Hua; CAOLi; WANGJun; WUDa-Jin

    2004-01-01

    We present an analytic investigation of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by studying a signal modulated model of a single-mode laser system driven by pump noise and quantum noise with correlated real and imaginary parts,and find there is a maximum in the curve of the dependence of SNR upon the cross-correlation coefficient λq between the real part and the imaginary part, i.e., stochastic resonance appears in the SNR vs. λq curve. Moreover, when the SNR is at the maximum, the cross-correlation coefficient λq = O, which is coincidentally at the minimum of the mean normalized intensity fluctuation. The influences on stochastic resonance by the intensities of the pump and the quantum noise, the amplitude of the modulation signal, and the net gain of the laser are also studied. Furthermore, in order to ensure that the results obtained in this paper is reliable, the valid range for the linear approximation method is discussed.

  15. Measurement of cross sections of p(e,e'π+)n for near pion threshold and high-lying resonances at high Q2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kijun

    2012-04-01

    During the last decade, remarkable experimental data have been collacted in an extensive programs to study the excitation of nucleon resonance (N*) at Jefferson Laboratory through pionelectroproduction using polarized electron beam and unpolarized proton target. The CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) is well suited for the study of a broad range of kinematics in the invariant mass W and photon virtuality Q2 with nearly complete angular coverage for the hadronic decays. Electron scattering allows us to probe the effective degrees of freedom in excited nucleon states from meson-baryon to dressed quarks in terms of varying the distance scale. The study of nucleon structure allows us to understand these effective degrees of freedom. In this proceeding, I present preliminary cross sections for single pion production in mass range of high-lying resonances as well as near the pion threshold. Analysis of Nπ+ cross sections together with Nπ0 and Nππ exclusive electroproduction data, will allow us for the first time to determine electrocouplings of several high-lying excited proton states (W ≥ 1.6 GeV) at photon virtualities that correspond to the transition toward the dominance of quark degrees of freedom. I also present preliminary result on the E0+ multipole near pion threshold at 2.0 GeV2 ≤ Q2 ≤ 4.5 GeV2 using exclusive Nπ+ electroproduction data.

  16. Random Matrix Approach to Quantum Adiabatic Evolution Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulatov, Alexei; Smelyanskiy, Vadier N.

    2004-01-01

    We analyze the power of quantum adiabatic evolution algorithms (Q-QA) for solving random NP-hard optimization problems within a theoretical framework based on the random matrix theory (RMT). We present two types of the driven RMT models. In the first model, the driving Hamiltonian is represented by Brownian motion in the matrix space. We use the Brownian motion model to obtain a description of multiple avoided crossing phenomena. We show that the failure mechanism of the QAA is due to the interaction of the ground state with the "cloud" formed by all the excited states, confirming that in the driven RMT models. the Landau-Zener mechanism of dissipation is not important. We show that the QAEA has a finite probability of success in a certain range of parameters. implying the polynomial complexity of the algorithm. The second model corresponds to the standard QAEA with the problem Hamiltonian taken from the Gaussian Unitary RMT ensemble (GUE). We show that the level dynamics in this model can be mapped onto the dynamics in the Brownian motion model. However, the driven RMT model always leads to the exponential complexity of the algorithm due to the presence of the long-range intertemporal correlations of the eigenvalues. Our results indicate that the weakness of effective transitions is the leading effect that can make the Markovian type QAEA successful.

  17. Applications of pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance to chemistry: multiple-pulse NMR, cross polarization, magic-angle spinning annd instrumental design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, P.D.

    1979-07-01

    Pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has been applied to: (1) Measurements of the prinicpal components of the proton shielding tensors of the hydrides of zirconium chloride and zirconium bromide. Multiple-Pulse techniques have been used to remove static homonuclear dipolar coupling. The anisotropies and isotropic shifts of these tensors have been used to infer the possible locations of the hydrogen within the sandwich-like layers of these unusual compounds. (2) Studies of the oscillatory transfer of magnetic polarization between /sup 1/H and /sup 29/Si in substituted silanes. The technique of J Cross Polarization has been used to enhance sensitivity. The /sup 29/Si NMR shifts of -Si-O- model compounds have been investigated as a possible probe for future studies of the environment of bound oxygen in coal-derived liquids. (3) Measurements of the aromatic fraction of /sup 13/C in whole coals. The techniques of /sup 1/H-/sup 13/C Cross Polarization and Magic-Angle Spinning have been used to enhance sensitivity and remove shift anisotropy. Additional topics described are: (4) Calculation and properties of the broadened lineshape of the shileding Powder Pattern. (5) Calculation of the oscillatory transfer of magnetic polarization for an I-S system. (6) Numerical convolution and its uses. (7) The technique of digital filtering applied in the frequency domain. (8) The designs and properties of four NMR probe-circuits. (9) The design of a single-coil double-resonance probe for combined Magic-Angle Spinning and Cross Polarization. (10) The designs of low Q and high Q rf power amplifiers with emphasis on the rf matching circuitry.

  18. On the General Class of Models of Adiabatic Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng; Liu, Fang

    2016-10-01

    The general class of models of adiabatic evolution was proposed to speed up the usual adiabatic computation in the case of quantum search problem. It was shown [8] that, by temporarily increasing the ground state energy of a time-dependent Hamiltonian to a suitable quantity, the quantum computation can perform the calculation in time complexity O(1). But it is also known that if the overlap between the initial and final states of the system is zero, then the computation based on the generalized models of adiabatic evolution can break down completely. In this paper, we find another severe limitation for this class of adiabatic evolution-based algorithms, which should be taken into account in applications. That is, it is still possible that this kind of evolution designed to deal with the quantum search problem fails completely if the interpolating paths in the system Hamiltonian are chosen inappropriately, while the usual adiabatic evolutions can do the same job relatively effectively. This implies that it is not always recommendable to use nonlinear paths in adiabatic computation. On the contrary, the usual simple adiabatic evolution may be sufficient for effective use.

  19. EXACT AND ADIABATIC INVARIANTS OF FIRST-ORDER LAGRANGE SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈向炜; 尚玫; 梅凤翔

    2001-01-01

    A system of first-order differential equations is expressed in the form of first-order Lagrange equations. Based on the theory of symmetries and conserved quantities of first-order Lagrange systems, the perturbation to the symmetries and adiabatic invariants of first-order Lagrange systems are discussed. Firstly, the concept of higher-order adiabatic invariants of the first-order Lagrange system is proposed. Then, conditions for the existence of the exact and adiabatic invariants are proved, and their forms are given. Finally, an example is presented to illustrate these results.

  20. Adiabatic control of atomic dressed states for transport and sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, N. R.; Rey, A. M.

    2015-08-01

    We describe forms of adiabatic transport that arise for dressed-state atoms in optical lattices. Focusing on the limit of weak tunnel-coupling between nearest-neighbor lattice sites, we explain how adiabatic variation of optical dressing allows control of atomic motion between lattice sites: allowing adiabatic particle transport in a direction that depends on the internal state, and force measurements via spectroscopic preparation and readout. For uniformly filled bands these systems display topologically quantized particle transport. An implementation of the dressing scheme using optical transitions in alkaline-earth atoms is discussed as well as its favorable features for precise force sensing.

  1. Achromatic multiple beam splitting by adiabatic passage in optical waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Rangelov, Andon A

    2012-01-01

    A novel variable achromatic optical beam splitter with one input and $N$ output waveguide channels is introduced. The physical mechanism of this multiple beam splitter is adiabatic passage of light between neighboring optical waveguides in a fashion reminiscent of the technique of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in quantum physics. The input and output waveguides are coupled via a mediator waveguide and the ratios of the light intensities in the output channels are controlled by the couplings of the respective waveguides to the mediator waveguide. Due to its adiabatic nature the beam splitting efficiency is robust to variations in the experimental parameters.

  2. Approximability of optimization problems through adiabatic quantum computation

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz-Santos, William

    2014-01-01

    The adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) is based on the adiabatic theorem to approximate solutions of the Schrödinger equation. The design of an AQC algorithm involves the construction of a Hamiltonian that describes the behavior of the quantum system. This Hamiltonian is expressed as a linear interpolation of an initial Hamiltonian whose ground state is easy to compute, and a final Hamiltonian whose ground state corresponds to the solution of a given combinatorial optimization problem. The adiabatic theorem asserts that if the time evolution of a quantum system described by a Hamiltonian is l

  3. Combined action of time-delay and colored cross-associated multiplicative and additive noises on stability and stochastic resonance for a stochastic metapopulation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kang-Kang; Zong, De-Cai; Wang, Ya-Jun; Li, Sheng-Hong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the transition between the stable state of a big density and the extinction state and stochastic resonance (SR) for a time-delayed metapopulation system disturbed by colored cross-correlated noises are investigated. By applying the fast descent method, the small time-delay approximation and McNamara and Wiesenfeld's SR theory, we investigate the impacts of time-delay, the multiplicative, additive noises and colored cross-correlated noise on the SNR and the shift between the two states of the system. Numerical results show that the multiplicative, additive noises and time-delay can all speed up the transition from the stable state to the extinction state, while the correlation noise and its correlation time can slow down the extinction process of the population system. With respect to SNR, the multiplicative noise always weakens the SR effect, while noise correlation time plays a dual role in motivating the SR phenomenon. Meanwhile, time-delay mainly plays a negative role in stimulating the SR phenomenon. Conversely, it could motivate the SR effect to increase the strength of the cross-correlation noise in the SNR-β plot, while the increase of additive noise intensity will firstly excite SR, and then suppress the SR effect.

  4. Adiabatic quantum algorithm for search engine ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A

    2012-06-08

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in "q-sampling" protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank.

  5. Adiabatic Quantum Algorithm for Search Engine Ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2012-06-01

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log⁡(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in “q-sampling” protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank.

  6. Design of the PIXIE Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Kimball, Mark Oliver; Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan J.; Li, Xiaoyi; DiPirro, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) is a proposed mission to densely map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background. It will operate in a scanning mode from a sun-synchronous orbit, using low temperature detectors (at 0.1 K) and located inside a teslescope that is cooled to approximately 2.73 K - to match the background temperature. A mechanical cryocooler operating at 4.5 K establishes a low base temperature from which two adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) assemblies will cool the telescope and detectors. To achieve continuous scanning capability, the ADRs must operate continuously. Complicating the design are two factors: 1) the need to systematically vary the temperature of various telescope components in order to separate the small polarization signal variations from those that may arise from temperature drifts and changing gradients within the telescope, and 2) the orbital and monthly variations in lunar irradiance into the telescope barrels. These factors require the telescope ADR to reject quasi-continuous heat loads of 2-3 millwatts, while maintaining a peak heat reject rate of less than 12 milliwatts. The detector heat load at 0.1 K is comparatively small at 1-2 microwatts. This paper will describe the 3-stage and 2-stage continuous ADRs that will be used to meet the cooling power and temperature stability requirements of the PIXIE detectors and telescope.

  7. Adiabatic fission barriers in superheavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Jachimowicz, P; Skalski, J

    2016-01-01

    Using the microscopic-macroscopic model based on the deformed Woods-Saxon single-particle potential and the Yukawa-plus-exponential macroscopic energy we calculated static fission barriers $B_{f}$ for 1305 heavy and superheavy nuclei $98\\leq Z \\leq 126$, including even - even, odd - even, even - odd and odd - odd systems. For odd and odd-odd nuclei, adiabatic potential energy surfaces were calculated by a minimization over configurations with one blocked neutron or/and proton on a level from the 10-th below to the 10-th above the Fermi level. The parameters of the model that have been fixed previously by a fit to masses of even-even heavy nuclei were kept unchanged. A search for saddle points has been performed by the "Imaginary Water Flow" method on a basic five-dimensional deformation grid, including triaxiality. Two auxiliary grids were used for checking the effects of the mass asymmetry and hexadecapole non-axiallity. The ground states were found by energy minimization over configurations and deformations...

  8. Topological States and Adiabatic Pumping in Quasicrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Yaakov; Lahini, Yoav; Ringel, Zohar; Verbin, Mor; Zilberberg, Oded

    2012-02-01

    We find a connection between quasicrystals and topological matter, namely that quasicrystals exhibit non-trivial topological phases attributed to dimensions higher than their own [1]. Quasicrystals are materials which are neither ordered nor disordered, i.e. they exhibit only long-range order [2]. This long-range order is usually expressed as a projection from a higher dimensional ordered system. Recently, the unrelated discovery of Topological Insulators [3] defined a new type of materials classified by their topology. We show theoretically and experimentally using photonic lattices, that one-dimensional quasicrystals exhibit topologically-protected boundary states equivalent to the edge states of the two-dimensional Integer Quantum Hall Effect. We harness this property to adiabatically pump light across the quasicrystal, and generalize our results to higher dimensional systems. Hence, quasicrystals offer a new platform for the study of topological phases while their topology may better explain their surface properties.[4pt] [1] Y. E. Kraus, Y. Lahini, Z. Ringel, M. Verbin, and O. Zilberberg, arXiv:1109.5983 (2011).[0pt] [2] C. Janot, Quasicrystals (Clarendon, Oxford, 1994), 2nd ed.[0pt] [3] M. Z. Hasan and C. L. Kane, Rev. Mod. Phys. 82, 3045 (2010).

  9. Vertical and dual-axis vibration of the seated human body: Nonlinearity, cross-axis coupling, and associations between resonances in transmissibility and apparent mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guangtai; Qiu, Yi; Griffin, Michael J.

    2012-12-01

    The vertical apparent mass of the human body exhibits nonlinearity, with the principal resonance frequency reducing as the vibration magnitude increases. Measures of the transmission of vibration to the spine and the pelvis have suggested complex modes are responsible for the dominant resonance during vertical excitation, but the modes present with dual-axis excitation have not been investigated. This study was designed to examine how the apparent mass and transmissibility of the human body depend on the magnitude of vertical excitation and the addition of fore-and-aft excitation, and the relation between the apparent mass and the transmissibility of the body. The movement of the body (over the first, fifth and twelfth thoracic vertebrae, the third lumbar vertebra, and the pelvis) in the fore-and-aft and vertical directions (and in pitch at the pelvis) was measured in 12 male subjects sitting with their hands on their laps during random vertical vibration excitation (over the range 0.25-20 Hz) at three vibration magnitudes (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 m s-2 rms). At the highest magnitude of vertical excitation (1.0 m s-2 rms) the effect of adding fore-aft vibration (at 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 m s-2 rms) was investigated. The forces in the vertical and fore-and-aft directions on the seat surface were also measured so as to calculate apparent masses. Resonances in the apparent mass and transmissibility to the spine and pelvis in the fore-and-aft and vertical directions, and pitch transmissibility to the pelvis, shifted to lower frequencies as the magnitude of vertical excitation increased and as the magnitude of the additional fore-and-aft excitation increased. The nonlinear resonant behaviour of the apparent mass and transmissibility during dual-axis vibration excitation suggests coupling between the principal mode associated with vertical excitation and the cross-axis influence of fore-and-aft excitation. The transmissibility measures are consistent with complex modes

  10. Multiturn extraction and injection by means of adiabatic capture in stable islands of phase space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Cappi

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently a novel approach has been proposed for performing multiturn extraction from a circular machine. Such a technique consists of splitting the beam by means of stable islands created in transverse phase space by magnetic elements creating nonlinear fields, such as sextupoles and octupoles. Provided a slow time variation of the linear tune is applied, adiabatic with respect to the betatron motion, the islands can be moved in phase space and eventually charged particles may be trapped inside the stable structures. This generates a certain number of well-separated beamlets. Originally, this principle was successfully tested using a fourth-order resonance. In this paper the approach is generalized by considering other types of resonances as well as the possibility of performing multiple multiturn extractions. The results of numerical simulations are presented and described in detail. Of course, by time reversal, the proposed approach could be used also for multiturn injection.

  11. Dynamically encircling exceptional points in a waveguide: asymmetric mode switching from the breakdown of adiabaticity

    CERN Document Server

    Doppler, Jörg; Böhm, Julian; Kuhl, Ulrich; Girschik, Adrian; Libisch, Florian; Milburn, Thomas J; Rabl, Peter; Moiseyev, Nimrod; Rotter, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Physical systems with loss or gain feature resonant modes that are decaying or growing exponentially with time. Whenever two such modes coalesce both in their resonant frequency and their rate of decay or growth, a so-called "exceptional point" occurs, around which many fascinating phenomena have recently been reported to arise. Particularly intriguing behavior is predicted to appear when encircling an exceptional point sufficiently slowly, like a state-flip or the accumulation of a geometric phase. Experiments dedicated to this issue could already successfully explore the topological structure of exceptional points, but a full dynamical encircling and the breakdown of adiabaticity inevitably associated with it remained out of reach of any measurement so far. Here we demonstrate that a dynamical encircling of an exceptional point can be mapped onto the problem of scattering through a two-mode waveguide, which allows us for the first time to access the elusive effects occurring in this context. Specifically, w...

  12. Adiabaticity and diabaticity in strong-field ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Karamatskou, Antonia; Santra, Robin

    2013-01-01

    If the photon energy is much less than the electron binding energy, ionization of an atom by a strong optical field is often described in terms of electron tunneling through the potential barrier resulting from the superposition of the atomic potential and the potential associated with the instantaneous electric component of the optical field. In the strict tunneling regime, the electron response to the optical field is said to be adiabatic, and nonadiabatic effects are assumed to be negligible. Here, we investigate to what degree this terminology is consistent with a language based on the so-called adiabatic representation. This representation is commonly used in various fields of physics. For electronically bound states, the adiabatic representation yields discrete potential energy curves that are connected by nonadiabatic transitions. When applying the adiabatic representation to optical strong-field ionization, a conceptual challenge is that the eigenstates of the instantaneous Hamiltonian form a continuu...

  13. Magnesium Diboride Superconducting Coils for Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR's) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators(ADR's) for space it is desirable to have very light weight, small diameter, high current density superconducting wires...

  14. General dynamical description of quasi-adiabatically encircling exceptional points

    CERN Document Server

    Milburn, Thomas J; Holmes, Catherine A; Portolan, Stefano; Rotter, Stefan; Rabl, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The appearance of so-called exceptional points in the complex spectra of non-Hermitian systems is often associated with phenomena that contradict our physical intuition. One example of particular interest is the state-exchange process predicted for an adiabatic encircling of an exceptional point. In this work we analyze this process for the generic system of two coupled oscillator modes with loss or gain. We identify a characteristic system evolution consisting of periods of quasi-stationarity interrupted by abrupt non-adiabatic transitions. Our findings explain the breakdown of the adiabatic theorem as well as the chiral behavior noticed previously in this context, and we provide a unified framework to describe quasi-adiabatic dynamical effects in non-Hermitian systems in a qualitative and quantitative way.

  15. Adiabatic rotation, quantum search, and preparation of superposition states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, M. Stewart

    2007-06-01

    We introduce the idea of using adiabatic rotation to generate superpositions of a large class of quantum states. For quantum computing this is an interesting alternative to the well-studied “straight line” adiabatic evolution. In ways that complement recent results, we show how to efficiently prepare three types of states: Kitaev’s toric code state, the cluster state of the measurement-based computation model, and the history state used in the adiabatic simulation of a quantum circuit. We also show that the method, when adapted for quantum search, provides quadratic speedup as other optimal methods do with the advantages that the problem Hamiltonian is time independent and that the energy gap above the ground state is strictly nondecreasing with time. Likewise the method can be used for optimization as an alternative to the standard adiabatic algorithm.

  16. Adiabatic shear bands localization in materials undergoing deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabov, P. N.; Kudryashov, N. A.; Muratov, R. V.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the adiabatic shear banding phenomenon in composite materials undergoing the high speed shear deformations. The mathematical model of adiabatic shear banding in thermo-visco-plastic material is given. New two step numerical algorithm which is based on the Courant-Isaacson-Rees scheme that allows one to simulate fully localized plastic flow from initial stage of localization is proposed. To test this numerical algorithm we use three benchmark problems. The testing results show the accuracy and efficiency of proposed algorithm. The features of adiabatic shear bands formation in composites are studied. The existence of characteristic depth of localization in composites is shown. Influence of initial temperature distribution on the processes of adiabatic shear bands formation in composites is considered.

  17. Spatial non-adiabatic passage using geometric phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benseny, Albert; Busch, Thomas [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Quantum Systems Unit, Okinawa (Japan); Kiely, Anthony; Ruschhaupt, Andreas [University College Cork, Department of Physics, Cork (Ireland); Zhang, Yongping [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Quantum Systems Unit, Okinawa (Japan); Shanghai University, Department of Physics, Shanghai (China)

    2017-12-15

    Quantum technologies based on adiabatic techniques can be highly effective, but often at the cost of being very slow. Here we introduce a set of experimentally realistic, non-adiabatic protocols for spatial state preparation, which yield the same fidelity as their adiabatic counterparts, but on fast timescales. In particular, we consider a charged particle in a system of three tunnel-coupled quantum wells, where the presence of a magnetic field can induce a geometric phase during the tunnelling processes. We show that this leads to the appearance of complex tunnelling amplitudes and allows for the implementation of spatial non-adiabatic passage. We demonstrate the ability of such a system to transport a particle between two different wells and to generate a delocalised superposition between the three traps with high fidelity in short times. (orig.)

  18. Cyclotron resonant scattering feature simulations. I. Thermally averaged cyclotron scattering cross sections, mean free photon-path tables, and electron momentum sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarm, F -W; Falkner, S; Pottschmidt, K; Wolff, M T; Becker, P A; Sokolova-Lapa, E; Klochkov, D; Ferrigno, C; Fuerst, F; Hemphill, P B; Marcu-Cheatham, D M; Dauser, T; Wilms, J

    2016-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonant scattering features (CRSFs) are observed as absorption-like lines in the spectra of X-ray pulsars. A significant fraction of the computing time for Monte Carlo simulations of these quantum mechanical features is spent on the calculation of the mean free path for each individual photon before scattering, since it involves a complex numerical integration over the scattering cross section and the (thermal) velocity distribution of the scattering electrons. We aim to numerically calculate interpolation tables which can be used in CRSF simulations to sample the mean free path of the scattering photon and the momentum of the scattering electron. The tables also contain all the information required for sampling the scattering electron's final spin. The tables were calculated using an adaptive Simpson integration scheme. The energy and angle grids were refined until a prescribed accuracy is reached. The tables are used by our simulation code to produce artificial CRSF spectra. The electron...

  19. ENTROPY-VORTEX WAVES IN NON-ADIABATIC FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibáñez S, Miguel H., E-mail: mhibanez@yahoo.com [Departamento de Ciencias Básicas, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Caribe, Barranquilla (Colombia)

    2016-02-20

    The Ertel theorem on the vorticity along the flow of adiabatic fluids is generalized for non-adiabatic flows. Several limiting cases are analyzed and the results are applied to flows behind different hydrodynamics fronts, particularly to thermal fronts (heat and cooling fronts). An important conclusion of the present analysis is that vorticity is inherent in the condensation’s (or hot spots) formation by thermal instabilities in plasma flows. Implications for several astrophysical plasmas are outlined.

  20. Adiabatic invariants of the extended KdV equation

    CERN Document Server

    Karczewska, Anna; Infeld, Eryk; Rowlands, George

    2015-01-01

    When the Euler equations for shallow water are taken to the next order, beyond KdV, $\\eta^2$ is no longer an invariant. (It would seem that $\\eta$ is the only one.) However, two adiabatic invariants akin to $\\eta^2$ can be found. Here we present and test them. When the KdV expansion parameters are zero, $\\eta^2$ is recovered from both adiabatic invariants.

  1. A Solved Model to Show Insufficiency of Quantitative Adiabatic Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Long-Jiang; LIU Yu-Zhen; TONG Dian-Min

    2009-01-01

    The adiabatic theorem is a useful tool in processing quantum systems slowly evolving,but its practical application depends on the quantitative condition expressed by Hamiltonian's eigenvalues and eigenstates,which is usually taken as a sufficient condition.Recently,the sumciency of the condition was questioned,and several counterex amples have been reported.Here we present a new solved model to show the insufficiency of the traditional quantitative adiabatic condition.

  2. Adiabatic CMB perturbations in pre-big bang string cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Enqvist, Kari; Enqvist, Kari; Sloth, Martin S.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the pre-big bang scenario with a massive axion field which starts to dominate energy density when oscillating in an instanton-induced potential and subsequently reheats the universe as it decays into photons, thus creating adiabatic CMB perturbations. We find that the fluctuations in the axion field can give rise to a nearly flat spectrum of adiabatic perturbations with a spectral tilt $\\Delta n$ in the range $-0.1 \\lesssim \\Delta n \\lesssim 0.3$.

  3. Preparation of Entangled States of Three Particles by Adiabatic Passage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭建友

    2002-01-01

    We propose a novel technique for the creation of entangled states of three particles, based upon an adiabatic passage induced by a suitably crafted time-dependent external field. We derive the corresponding adiabatic and bare conditions for the preparation of entangled states. We obtain the time evolutions of the energy of the system and the populations involving the initial state and target entangled state.

  4. Cross-sections, spin observables, and helicity amplitudes of the {pi}{sup +}d{r_reversible}pp reaction at the isobar resonance and below

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dortmans, P.J.; Canton, L.; Amos, K.

    1997-06-01

    We have calculated the {pi}{sup +}d{r_reversible} pp reaction cross sections and spin observables from threshold to the {Delta} resonance by considering three types of mechanisms; the impulse (absorption) mechanism, {Delta} rescattering and s-wave {pi} N rescattering. The effect of final state interactions have been included also. While traditionally the first two mechanisms have been included within a sound theoretical basis, the {pi}N s-wave rescattering generally has been treated phenomenologically using a {pi}{pi}NN coupling constant fitted to the low-energy pion-nucleon data. Herein, we treat the isovector component of such a pion rescattering process as being mediated by the {rho}--exchange. Also, in those absorption mechanisms where the pion enters directly without rescattering, we employ a phenomenological cut-off scaling governed by the nucleon coordinates, since at the pion-nucleon vertex the nucleon itself may be off mass shell. Th energy dependence of the total cross section is well explained by the combined effects of the three mechanisms, but we find that this observable is not sensitive enough to give useful insight into fine details of the reaction. We calculated the spin observables of {pi}{sup +}d{r_reversible} pp at a variety of energies spanning the {Delta} resonance, finding such sensitivity to fine details of the calculation that we cannot obtain a complete agreement with the vast experimental data base. A better understanding of the importance of the various aspects of the reaction was obtained when the calculated helicity amplitudes were compared with those extracted via phase-shift-analyses of the {pi}{sup +}d{r_reversible} pp reaction data. (authors). 29 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  5. Are rheumatoid arthritis patients discernible from other early arthritis patients using 1.5T extremity magnetic resonance imaging? a large cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomp, Wouter; Krabben, Annemarie; van der Heijde, Désirée; Huizinga, Tom W J; Bloem, Johan L; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M; Reijnierse, Monique

    2014-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) research. A European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) task force recently suggested that MRI can improve the certainty of RA diagnosis. Because this recommendation may reflect a tendency to use MRI in daily practice, thorough studies on the value of MRI are required. Thus far no large studies have evaluated the accuracy of MRI to differentiate early RA from other patients with early arthritis. We performed a large cross-sectional study to determine whether patients who are clinically classified with RA differ in MRI features compared to patients with other diagnoses. In our study, 179 patients presenting with early arthritis (median symptom duration 15.4 weeks) underwent 1.5T extremity MRI of unilateral wrist, metacarpophalangeal, and metatarsophalangeal joints according to our arthritis protocol, the foot without contrast. Images were scored according to OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring (RAMRIS) by 2 independent readers. Tenosynovitis was also assessed. The main outcome was fulfilling the 1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for RA. Test characteristics and areas under the receiver-operator-characteristic curves (AUC) were evaluated. In subanalyses, the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria were used as outcome, and analyses were stratified for anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA). The ACR 1987 criteria were fulfilled in 43 patients (24.0%). Patients with RA had higher scores for synovitis, tenosynovitis, and bone marrow edema (BME) than patients without RA (p arthritis patients.

  6. Tailoring surface plasmon resonance and dipole cavity plasmon modes of scattering cross section spectra on the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou Chau, Yuan-Fong, E-mail: chou.fong@ubd.edu.bn; Lim, Chee Ming; Kumara, N. T. R. N.; Yoong, Voo Nyuk [Centre for Advanced Material and Energy Sciences, Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Tungku Link, Gadong BE1410, Brunei (Brunei Darussalam); Lee, Chuanyo [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chien Hsin University of Science and Technology, No. 229, Jianxing Rd., Zhongli City, Taoyuan County 32097, Taiwan (China); Huang, Hung Ji; Lin, Chun-Ting [Instrument Technology Research Center, National Applied Research Laboratories, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chiang, Hai-Pang [Institute of Optoelectronic Sciences, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 202, Taiwan (China)

    2016-09-07

    Tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and dipole cavity plasmon modes of the scattering cross section (SCS) spectra on the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod have been numerically investigated by using the finite element method. Various effects, such as the influence of SCS spectra under x- and y-polarizations on the surface of the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod, are discussed in detail. With the single gold-shell nanorod, one can independently tune the relative SCS spectrum width by controlling the rod length and rod diameter, and the surface scattering by varying the shell thickness and polarization direction, as well as the dipole peak energy. These behaviors are consistent with the properties of localized SPRs and offer a way to optically control and produce selected emission wavelengths from the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod. The electric field and magnetic distributions provide us a qualitative idea of the geometrical properties of the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod on plasmon resonance.

  7. Measurement of differential cross sections via p(e,e^'&+circ;)n for studying high-lying resonances at high Q^2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kijun; Burkert, Volker

    2012-10-01

    An extensive experimental programs has been carried out at Jefferson Laboratory to study the excitation resonances using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). Pion electroproduction on protons is sensitive to the resonance excitation and allows us to explore its internal structure. The CLAS is well suited for the study of a broad range of kinematics in the invariant mass W and photon virtuality Q^2 with nearly complete angular coverage for the hadronic decays. Electron scattering allows us to probe the effective degrees of freedom in excited nucleon states from meson-baryon cloud to dressed quarks in terms of varying distance scale. In this talk, we report the differential cross-sections for exclusive single charged pion electroproduction from proton targets. The kinematic range covers Q^2 from 1.7;GeV^2 to 4.5;GeV^2 and W from 1.6;GeV to 2.0;GeV. Separated structure functions are also presented and compared with the present calculations and previous measurements. This work, along with an upcoming analysis of same kinematics from exclusive p0̂ and p&+circ;&-circ; electroproduction will allow the determination of electro-couplings of several high-lying excited proton states, for the first time, at photon virtualities that correspond to transition toward dominance of quark degrees of freedom.

  8. The adiabatic phase mixing and heating of electrons in Buneman turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Che, H.; Goldstein, M. L. [Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M. [IREAP, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    The nonlinear development of the strong Buneman instability and the associated fast electron heating in thin current layers with Ω{sub e}/ω{sub pe}<1 is explored. Phase mixing of the electrons in wave potential troughs and a rapid increase in temperature are observed during the saturation of the instability. We show that the motion of trapped electrons can be described using a Hamiltonian formalism in the adiabatic approximation. The process of separatrix crossing as electrons are trapped and de-trapped is irreversible and guarantees that the resulting electron energy gain is a true heating process.

  9. A connection between mix and adiabat in ICF capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas; Wang, Yi-Ming; Yi, Sunghuan (Austin); Batha, Steven

    2016-10-01

    We study the relationship between instability induced mix, preheat and the adiabat of the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel in fusion capsule experiments. Our studies show that hydrodynamic instability not only directly affects the implosion, hot spot shape and mix, but also affects the thermodynamics of the capsule, such as, the adiabat of the DT fuel, and, in turn, affects the energy partition between the pusher shell (cold DT) and the hot spot. It was found that the adiabat of the DT fuel is sensitive to the amount of mix caused by Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at the material interfaces due to its exponential dependence on the fuel entropy. An upper limit of mix allowed maintaining a low adiabat of DT fuel is derived. Additionally we demonstrated that the use of a high adiabat for the DT fuel in theoretical analysis and with the aid of 1D code simulations could explain some aspects of the 3D effects and mix in the capsule experiments. Furthermore, from the observed neutron images and our physics model, we could infer the adiabat of the DT fuel in the capsule and determine the possible amount of mix in the hot spot (LA-UR-16-24880). This work was conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  10. Measurements of Rayleigh, Compton and resonant Raman scattering cross-sections for 59.536 keV {gamma}-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Prem; Mehta, D.; Singh, N. E-mail: nsingh@pu.ac.in; Puri, S.; Shahi, J.S

    2004-09-01

    The K-L and K-M resonant Raman scattering (RRS) cross-sections have been measured for the first time at the 59.536 keV photon energy in the {sub 70}Yb (B{sub K}=61.332 keV), {sub 71}Lu (B{sub K}=63.316 keV) and {sub 72}Hf (B{sub K}=65.345 keV) elements; B{sub K} being the K-shell binding energy. The K-L and K-M RRS measurements have been performed at the 59 deg. and 133 deg. angles, respectively, to avoid interference of the Compton-scatter peak. The Rayleigh and Compton scattering cross-sections for the 59.536 keV {gamma}-rays have also been measured at both the angles in the atomic region 1{<=}Z{<=}92. Measurements were performed using the reflection-mode geometrical arrangements involving the {sup 241}Am radioisotope as photon source and planar Si(Li) and HPGe detectors. Ratios of the K-M and K-L RRS cross-sections in Yb, Lu and Hf are in general lower than that of the fluorescent K{beta}{sub 1,3,5} (K-M) and K{alpha} (K-L) X-ray transition probabilities. Theoretical Rayleigh scattering cross-sections based on the modified form-factors (MFs) corrected for the anomalous scattering factors (ASFs) and the S-matrix calculations are on an average {approx}15% and {approx}6% higher, respectively, at the 133 deg. angle and exhibit good agreement with the measured data at the 59 deg. angle. Larger deviations {approx}30% and {approx}20%, respectively, are observed at the 133 deg. angle for the {sub 64}Gd, {sub 66}Dy, {sub 67}Ho and {sub 70}Yb elements having the K-shell binding energy in vicinity of the incident photon energy. The measured Compton scattering cross-sections are in general agreement with those calculated using the Klein-Nishina cross-sections and the incoherent scattering function.

  11. Measurement of cross section asymmetry of. gamma. p. -->. p. pi. /sup 0/ reaction in the resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakyan, P.O.; Avetisyan, A.Eh.; Bagdasaryan, A.S.

    1983-11-01

    Energy dependence is measured for asymmetry in cross section of ..gamma..p ..-->.. p..pi../sup 0/ reaction induced by the polarized photon beam at the c. m. s. angle of the ..pi../sup 0/-meson photoproduction, thetasub(..pi..sup(0))*=70 deg in the energy range 0.75-1.3 GeV. The experimental data are compared with various theoretical predictions. The prediction based upon dispersion relations is in reasonable agreement with the result of the experiment.

  12. Measurements of the asymmetry in the. gamma. p. -->. p. pi. /sup 0/ cross section in the resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakyan, R.O.; Avetisyan, A.; Bagdasaryan, A.S.; Vartapetyan, G.A.; Danagulyan, S.S.; Eganov, V.S.; Karapetyan, A.P.; Kosakov, I.K.; Marukyan, G.O.; Matevosyan, M.

    1983-11-01

    The energy dependence of the asymmetry in the cross section for the ..gamma..p..-->..p..pi../sup 0/ reaction induced by a polarized photon beam is measured in the energy region 0.75--1.3 GeV at the neutral-pion emission angle theta(0 = 70/sup 0/ in the c.m. system. The experimental data are compared with various theoretical predictions. A prediction based on the use of fixed-t dispersion relations is in satisfactory agreement with the experimental results.

  13. Off-Resonant Two-Photon Absorption Cross-Section Enhancement of an Organic Chromophore on Gold Nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapalan, Sean T.; Vella, Jarrett H.; Yang, Timothy K.; Dalton, Matthew J.; Haley, Joy E.; Cooper, Thomas M.; Urbas, Augustine M.; Tan, Loon-Seng; Murphy, Catherine J.

    2013-01-01

    Surface-plasmon-initiated interference effects of polyelectrolyte-coated gold nanorods on the two-photon absorption of an organic chromophore were investigated. With polyelectrolyte bearing gold nanorods of 2,4,6 and 8 layers, the role of the plasmonic fields as function of distance on such effects was examined. An unusual distance dependence was found: enhancements in the two-photon cross-section were at a minimum at an intermediate distance, then rose again at a further distance. The observed values of enhancement were compared to theoretical predictions using finite element analysis and showed good agreementdue to constructive and destructive interference effects. PMID:23687561

  14. Development of Efficient and Robust Heteronuclear Cross-Polarization Techniques for Biological Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Sheetal Kumar

    2014-01-01

    of biological macromolecules. A new method for polarization transfer called Rotor Echo Short Pulse IRradiATION mediated Cross-Polarization (RESPIRATIONCP) is introduced with a theoretical explanation of its polarization transfer efficiency. An analysis of robustness towards experimental imperfections......) and Silver Hepta Fluoro Butyrate (SHFB) are presented at high magnetic fields. It is demonstrated that important information about dynamics may be extracted from 19F→13C RESPIRATIONCP buildup curves, which are central to the dynamics studies of important biological and synthetic polymers....

  15. A New Type of Non-Noether Adiabatic Invariants for Disturbed Lagrangian Systems: Adiabatic Invariants of Generalized Lutzky Type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Shao-Kai

    2007-01-01

    For a Lagrangian system with the action of small disturbance, the Lie symmetrical perturbation and a new type of non-Noether adiabatic invariant are presented in general infinitesimal transformation groups. On the basis of the invariance of disturbed Lagrangian systems under general infinitesimal transformations, the determining equations of Lie symmetries of the system are constructed. Based on the definition of higher-order adiabatic invariants of a mechanical system, a new type of adiabatic invariant, i.e. generalized Lutzky adiabatic invariants, of a disturbed Lagrangian system are obtained by investigating the perturbation of Lie symmetries for a Lagrangian system with the action of small disturbance. Finally, an example is given to illustrate the application of the method and results.

  16. Measurements of Cross Sections and Forward-Backward Asymmetries at the Z Resonance and Determination of Electroweak Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Adriani, O; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Balandras, A; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brochu, F; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; Cozzoni, B; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Cucciarelli, S; Dai, T S; van Dalen, J A; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Dufournaud, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hidas, P; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Holzner, G; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Iashvili, I; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Khan, R A; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Koffeman, E; Kopp, A; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Krüger, A; Kuijten, H; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lassila-Perini, K M; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Likhoded, S A; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Lu, W; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Lugnier, L; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Marchesini, P A; Marian, G; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Merk, M; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Musy, M; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Organtini, G; Oulianov, A; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paoloni, A; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Pothier, J; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Raspereza, A V; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Seganti, A; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Sztaricskai, T; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, M; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, A; Zilizi, G; Zöller, M

    2000-01-01

    We report on measurements of hadronic and leptonic cross sections and leptonic forward-backward asymmetries performed with the L3 detector in the years $1993-95$.A total luminosity of 103 pb$^{-1}$ was collected at centre-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s} \\approx m_\\mathrm{Z}$ and $\\sqrt{s} \\approx m_\\mathrm{Z} \\pm 1.8$ GeVwhich corresponds to 2.5 million hadronic and 245 thousand leptonic events selected.These data lead to a significantly improved determination of Z parameters.From the total cross sections, combined with our measurements in $1990-92$,we obtain the final results:%%%\\begin{eqnarr ay*} m_\\mathrm{Z} = 91189.8 \\pm 3.1\\ \\mathrm{MeV} \\, , & & \\Gamma_\\mathrm{Z} = 2502.4 \\pm 4.2\\ \\mathrm{MeV} \\, , \\\\ \\Gamma_\\mathrm{had} = 1741.1 \\pm 3.8\\ \\mathrm{MeV} \\, , & & \\Gamma_\\ell = 84.14 \\pm 0.17\\ \\mathrm{MeV} \\,. \\label{eq:Zpara_abstract}\\end{eqnarray*}%%%An invisible width of $\\Gamma_\\mathrm{inv} = 499.1 \\pm 2.9$ MeV is derived which in the Standard Model yields for the numberof light neutrino spec...

  17. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for the detection of crossing renal vessels in children with symptomatic ureteropelvic junction obstruction: comparison with operative findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calder, Alistair D.; Hiorns, Melanie P.; Olsen, Oystein E. [Hospital for Children NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Abhyankar, Aruna; Mushtaq, Imran [Hospital for Children NHS Trust, Department of Urology, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-15

    Crossing renal vessels (CRV) are associated with ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction, particularly when presentation is beyond the neonatal period. Their presence may influence surgical management. To evaluate the accuracy of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) in the identification of CRV in children requiring surgical treatment of symptomatic UPJ obstruction, against a gold standard of laparoscopic or open surgical findings. We reviewed CE-MRA studies (3-D T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and multiphase 3-D spoiled gradient echo following intravenous gadolinium administration) of 14 children, age range 6-15 years, performed prior to surgery for suspected CRV-related UPJ obstruction. Consensus reviews of the CE-MRA studies were compared with surgical findings. CE-MRA demonstrated CRV at the level of the obstruction in nine and no crossing vessels in five children. These were all verified intraoperatively ({chi}{sup 2} = 14.0; P < 0.001). In eight of the nine patients with CRV there was no evidence of intrinsic obstruction at surgery. In the remaining patient there was fibrosis of the upper ureter. CE-MRA is an accurate means of identifying CRV in children older than 6 years with symptomatic UPJ obstruction. (orig.)

  18. Perturbation to Unified Symmetry and Adiabatic Invariants for Relativistic Hamilton Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ming-Jiang; FANG Jian-Hui; LU Kai; PANG Ting; LIN Peng

    2009-01-01

    Based on the concept of adiabatic invariant, the perturbation to unified symmetry and adiabatic invariants for relativistic Hamilton systems are studied. The definition of the perturbation to unified symmetry for the system is presented, and the criterion of the perturbation to unified symmetry is given. Meanwhile, the Noether adiabatic invariants, the generalized Hojman adiabatic invariants, and the Mei adiabatic invariants for the perturbed system are obtained.

  19. Vibrational-ground-state zero-width resonances for laser filtration: An extended semiclassical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaouadi, Amine; Lefebvre, Roland; Atabek, Osman

    2017-06-01

    A semiclassical model supporting the destructive interference interpretation of zero-width resonances (ZWRs) is extended to wavelengths inducing c--type curve crossing situations in Na2 strong-field dissociation. This opens the possibility to get critical couples of wavelengths λ and field intensities I to reach ZWRs associated with the ground vibrationless level v =0 , that, contrary to other vibrational states (v >0 ), is not attainable for the commonly referred c+-type crossings. The morphology of such ZWRs in the laser (I ,λ ) parameter plane and their usefulness in filtration strategies aiming at molecular cooling down to the ground v =0 state are examined within the frame of an adiabatic transport scheme.

  20. Adiabatic following in two-photon transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayfeh, M.H.; Nayfeh, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    There has been much interest recently in coherent multiphoton transitions in many-level systems. The present work considers the effect of relaxation in the response of a three-level system to a smoothly varying, near-resonant, two-photon field. The relaxation-dependent contributions to the nonlinear refractive index are calculated. It is shown that the coherent interaction of two smoothly varying, near-resonant, two-photon pulses with a three-level system can be described by ''two-photon damped Bloch equations'' which are analogous to those for a one-photon transition in a two-level system except for the presence of a two-photon coupling and a frequency shift. 1 figure. (RWR)

  1. Water in the hydration shell of halide ions has significantly reduced Fermi resonance and moderately enhanced Raman cross section in the OH stretch regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohammed; Singh, Ajay K; Mondal, Jahur A; Sarkar, Sisir K

    2013-08-22

    Water in the presence of electrolytes plays an important role in biological and industrial processes. The properties of water, such as the intermolecular coupling, Fermi resonance (FR), hydrogen-bonding, and Raman cross section were investigated by measuring the Raman spectra in the OD and OH stretch regions in presence of alkali halides (NaX; X = F, Cl, Br, I). It is observed that the changes in spectral characteristics by the addition of NaX in D2O are similar to those obtained by the addition of H2O in D2O. The spectral width decreases significantly by the addition of NaX in D2O (H2O) than that in the isotopically diluted water. Quantitative estimation, on the basis of integrated Raman intensity, revealed that the relative Raman cross section, σ(H)/σ(b) (σ(H) and σ(b) are the average Raman cross section of water in the first hydration shell of X(-) and in bulk, respectively), in D2O and H2O is higher than those in the respective isotopically diluted water. These results suggest that water in the hydration shell has reduced FR and intermolecular coupling compared to those in bulk. In the isotopically diluted water, the relative Raman cross section increases with increase in size of the halide ions (σ(H)/σ(b) = 0.6, 1.1, 1.5, and 1.9 for F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), and I(-), respectively), which is assignable to the enhancement of Raman cross section by charge transfer from halide ions to the hydrating water. Nevertheless, the experimentally determined σ(H)/σ(b) is lower than the calculated values obtained on the basis of the energy of the charge transfer state of water. The weak enhancement of σ(H)/σ(b) signifies that the charge transfer transition in the hydration shell of halide ions causes little change in the OD (OH) bond lengths of hydrating water.

  2. Association between obesity and magnetic resonance imaging defined patellar tendinopathy in community-based adults: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairley, Jessica; Toppi, Jason; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Wluka, Anita E; Giles, Graham G; Cook, Jill; O'Sullivan, Richard; Wang, Yuanyuan

    2014-08-07

    Patellar tendinopathy is a common cause of activity-related anterior knee pain. Evidence is conflicting as to whether obesity is a risk factor for this condition. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between obesity and prevalence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) defined patellar tendinopathy in community-based adults. 297 participants aged 50-79 years with no history of knee pain or injury were recruited from an existing community-based cohort. Measures of obesity included measured weight and body mass index (BMI), self-reported weight at age of 18-21 years and heaviest lifetime weight. Fat-free mass and fat mass were measured using bioelectrical impedance. Participants underwent MRI of the dominant knee. Patellar tendinopathy was defined on both T1- and T2-weighted images. The prevalence of MRI defined patellar tendinopathy was 28.3%. Current weight (OR per kg = 1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.06, P = 0.002), BMI (OR per kg/m2 = 1.10, 95% CI 1.04-1.17, P = 0.002), heaviest lifetime weight (OR per kg = 1.03, 95% CI 1.01-1.05, P = 0.007) and weight at age of 18-21 years (OR per kg = 1.03, 95% CI 1.00-1.07, P = 0.05) were all positively associated with the prevalence of patellar tendinopathy. Neither fat mass nor fat-free mass was associated with patellar tendinopathy. MRI defined patellar tendinopathy is common in community-based adults and is associated with current and past history of obesity assessed by BMI or body weight, but not fat mass. The findings suggest a mechanical pathogenesis of patellar tendinopathy and patellar tendinopathy may be one mechanism for obesity related anterior knee pain.

  3. Neutron Resonance Parameters of 238U and the Calculated Cross Sections from the Reich-Moore Analysis of Experimental Data in the Neutron Energy Range from 0 keV to 20 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrien, H

    2005-12-05

    The neutron resonance parameters of {sup 238}U were obtained from a SAMMY analysis of high-resolution neutron transmission measurements and high-resolution capture cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in the years 1970-1990, and from more recent transmission and capture cross section measurements performed at the Geel Linear Accelerator (GELINA). Compared with previous evaluations, the energy range for this resonance analysis was extended from 10 to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high resolution of the most recent ORELA transmission measurements. The experimental database and the method of analysis are described in this report. The neutron transmissions and the capture cross sections calculated with the resonance parameters are compared with the experimental data. A description is given of the statistical properties of the resonance parameters and of the recommended values of the average parameters. The new evaluation results in a slight decrease of the effective capture resonance integral and improves the prediction of integral thermal benchmarks by 70 pcm to 200 pcm.

  4. Phenomenon of transformed adiabatic shear band surrounded by deformed adiabatic shear band of ductile metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xue-bin

    2008-01-01

    The coexistent phenomenon of deformed and transformed adiabatic shear bands(ASBs) of ductile metal was analyzed using the JOHNSON-COOK model and gradient-dependent plasticity(GDP). The effects of melting point, density, heat capacity and work to heat conversion factor were investigated. Higher work to heat conversion factor, lower density, lower heat capacity and higher melting point lead to wider transformed ASB and higher local plastic shear deformation between deformed and transformed ASBs. Higher work to heat conversion factor, lower density, lower heat capacity and lower melting point cause higher local plastic shear deformation in the deformed ASB. Three reasons for the scatter in experimental data on the ASB width were pointed out and the advantages of the work were discussed. If the transformed ASB width is used to back-calculate the internal length parameter in the GDP, undoubtedly, the parameter will be extremely underestimated.

  5. Investigating the lignocellulosic composition during delignification using confocal raman spectroscopy, cross-polarization magic angle spinning carbon 13 - nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS 13C- NMR) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chunilall, Viren

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available spectroscopy, Cross-Polarization Magic Angle Spinning Carbon 13 - Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CP/MAS 13C-NMR) spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in conjunction with image analysis. The confocal Raman results showed that there were differences...

  6. Global adiabaticity and non-Gaussianity consistency condition

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Antonio Enea; Sasaki, Misao

    2016-01-01

    In the context of single-field inflation, the conservation of the curvature perturbation on comoving slices, $R_c$, on super-horizon scales is one of the assumptions necessary to derive the consistency condition between the squeezed limit of the bispectrum and the spectrum of the primordial curvature perturbation. However, the conservation of $R_c$ holds only after the perturbation has reached the adiabatic limit where the constant mode of $R_c$ dominates over the other (usually decaying) mode. In this case, the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation defined in the thermodynamic sense, $\\delta P_{nad}\\equiv\\delta P-c_w^2\\delta\\rho$ where $c_w^2=\\dot P/\\dot\\rho$, usually becomes also negligible on superhorizon scales. Therefore one might think that the adiabatic limit is the same as thermodynamic adiabaticity. This is in fact not true. In other words, thermodynamic adiabaticity is not a sufficient condition for the conservation of $R_c$ on super-horizon scales. In this paper, we consider models that satisfies $\\d...

  7. Quantum tunneling, adiabatic invariance and black hole spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guo-Ping; Zu, Xiao-Tao [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, School of Physical Electronics, Chengdu (China); Pu, Jin [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, School of Physical Electronics, Chengdu (China); China West Normal University, College of Physics and Space Science, Nanchong (China); Jiang, Qing-Quan [China West Normal University, College of Physics and Space Science, Nanchong (China)

    2017-05-15

    In the tunneling framework, one of us, Jiang, together with Han has studied the black hole spectroscopy via adiabatic invariance, where the adiabatic invariant quantity has been intriguingly obtained by investigating the oscillating velocity of the black hole horizon. In this paper, we attempt to improve Jiang-Han's proposal in two ways. Firstly, we once again examine the fact that, in different types (Schwarzschild and Painleve) of coordinates as well as in different gravity frames, the adiabatic invariant I{sub adia} = circular integral p{sub i}dq{sub i} introduced by Jiang and Han is canonically invariant. Secondly, we attempt to confirm Jiang-Han's proposal reasonably in more general gravity frames (including Einstein's gravity, EGB gravity and HL gravity). Concurrently, for improving this proposal, we interestingly find in more general gravity theories that the entropy of the black hole is an adiabatic invariant action variable, but the horizon area is only an adiabatic invariant. In this sense, we emphasize the concept that the quantum of the black hole entropy is more natural than that of the horizon area. (orig.)

  8. Physics on the adiabatically changed Finslerian manifold and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Lipovka, Anton A

    2016-01-01

    In present paper we confirm our previous result [4] that Planck constant is adiabatic invariant of electromagnetic field propagating on the adiabatically changed Finslerian manifold. Direct calculation from cosmological parameters gives value h=6x10(-27) (erg s). We also confirm that Planck constant (and hence other fundamental constants which depend on h) is varied on time due to changing of geometry. As an example the variation of the fine structure constant is calculated. Its relative variation ((da/dt)/a) consist 1.0x10(-18) (1/s). We show that on the Finsler manifold characterized by adiabatically changed geometry, classical free electromagnetic field is quantized geometrically, from the properties of the manifold in such manner that adiabatic invariant of field is ET=6x10(-27)=h. Electrodynamic equations on the Finslerian manifold are suggested. It is stressed that quantization naturally appears from these equations and is provoked by adiabatically changed geometry of manifold. We consider in details tw...

  9. LETTERS AND COMMENTS: Adiabatic process reversibility: microscopic and macroscopic views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Pereira, Mário G.

    2009-05-01

    The reversibility of adiabatic processes was recently addressed by two publications. In the first (Miranda 2008 Eur. J. Phys. 29 937-43), an equation was derived relating the initial and final volumes and temperatures for adiabatic expansions of an ideal gas, using a microscopic approach. In that relation the parameter r accounts for the process reversibility, ranging between 0 and 1, which corresponds to the free and reversible expansion, respectively. In the second (Anacleto and Pereira 2009 Eur. J. Phys. 30 177-83), the authors have shown that thermodynamics can effectively and efficiently be used to obtain the general law for adiabatic processes carried out by an ideal gas, including compressions, for which r \\ge 1. The present work integrates and extends the aforementioned studies, providing thus further insights into the analysis of the adiabatic process. It is shown that Miranda's work is wholly valid for compressions. In addition, it is demonstrated that the adiabatic reversibility coefficient given in terms of the piston velocity and the root mean square velocity of the gas particles is equivalent to the macroscopic description, given just by the quotient between surroundings and system pressure values.

  10. Adiabaticity and gravity theory independent conservation laws for cosmological perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Antonio Enea; Sasaki, Misao

    2015-01-01

    We carefully study the implications of adiabaticity for the behavior of cosmological perturbations. There are essentially three similar but different definitions of non-adiabaticity: one is appropriate for a thermodynamic fluid $\\delta P_{nad}$, another is for a general matter field $\\delta P_{c,nad}$, and the last one is valid only on superhorizon scales. The first two definitions coincide if $c_s^2=c_w^2$ where $c_s$ is the propagation speed of the perturbation, while $c_w^2=\\dot P/\\dot\\rho$. Assuming the adiabaticity in the general sense, $\\delta P_{c,nad}=0$, we derive a relation between the lapse function in the comoving slicing $A_c$ and $\\delta P_{nad}$ valid for arbitrary matter field in any theory of gravity, by using only momentum conservation. The relation implies that as long as $c_s\

  11. Adiabatic Quantum Computation is Equivalent to Standard Quantum Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonov, D; Kempe, J; Landau, Z; Lloyd, S; Regev, O; Aharonov, Dorit; Dam, Wim van; Kempe, Julia; Landau, Zeph; Lloyd, Seth; Regev, Oded

    2004-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computation has recently attracted attention in the physics and computer science communities, but its computational power has been unknown. We settle this question and describe an efficient adiabatic simulation of any given quantum algorithm, which implies that the adiabatic computation model and the conventional quantum circuit model are polynomially equivalent. Our result can be extended to the physically realistic setting of particles arranged on a two-dimensional grid with nearest neighbor interactions. The equivalence between the models provides a new vantage point from which to tackle the central issues in quantum computation, namely designing new quantum algorithms and constructing fault tolerant quantum computers. In particular, by translating the main open questions in quantum algorithms to the language of spectral gaps of sparse matrices, the result makes quantum algorithmic questions accessible to a wider scientific audience, acquainted with mathematical physics, expander theory a...

  12. Analysis and Simulation of Adiabatic Bend Transitions in Optical Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Lei; LOU Shu-Qin; JIAN Shui-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    A low-loss criterion for bend transitions in optical fibers is proposed. An optical fiber can be tightly bent with low loss to be adiabatic for the fundamental mode, provided that an approximate upper bound on the rate of change of bend curvature for a given bend curvature is satisfied. Two typical adiabatic bend transition paths, the optimum profile and linear profile, are analyzed and studied numerically. A realizable adiabatic transition with an Archimedean spiral profile is introduced for low bend loss in tightly bent optical fibers. Design of the transitions is based on modeling of the propagation and coupling characteristics of the core and cladding modes,which clearly illustrate the physical processes involved.

  13. Applications of chirped Raman adiabatic rapid passage to atom interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotru, Krish; Butts, David L.; Kinast, Joseph M.; Johnson, David M. S.; Radojevic, Antonije M.; Timmons, Brian P.; Stoner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    We present robust atom optics, based on chirped Raman adiabatic rapid passage (ARP), in the context of atom interferometry. Such ARP light pulses drive coherent population transfer between two hyperfine ground states by sweeping the frequency difference of two fixed-intensity optical fields with large single photon detunings. Since adiabatic transfer is less sensitive to atom temperature and non-uniform Raman beam intensity than standard Raman pulses, this approach should improve the stability of atom interferometers operating in dynamic environments. In such applications, chirped Raman ARP may also provide advantages over the previously demonstrated stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) technique, which requires precise modulation of beam intensity and zeroing of the single photon detuning. We demonstrate a clock interferometer with chirped Raman ARP pulses, and compare its stability to that of a conventional Raman pulse interferometer. We also discuss potential improvements to inertially sensitive atom interferometers. Copyright 2011 by The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Semiclassical approximations for adiabatic slow-fast systems

    CERN Document Server

    Teufel, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    In this letter we give a systematic derivation and justification of the semiclassical model for the slow degrees of freedom in adiabatic slow-fast systems first found by Littlejohn and Flynn [5]. The classical Hamiltonian obtains a correction due to the variation of the adiabatic subspaces and the symplectic form is modified by the curvature of the Berry connection. We show that this classical system can be used to approximate quantum mechanical expectations and the time-evolution of operators also in sub-leading order in the combined adiabatic and semiclassical limit. In solid state physics the corresponding semiclassical description of Bloch electrons has led to substantial progress during the recent years, see [1]. Here, as an illustration, we show how to compute the Piezo-current arising from a slow deformation of a crystal in the presence of a constant magnetic field.

  15. Elevated adiabatic T1ρ and T2ρ in articular cartilage are associated with cartilage and bone lesions in early osteoarthritis: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casula, Victor; Nissi, Mikko J; Podlipská, Jana; Haapea, Marianne; Koski, Juhani M; Saarakkala, Simo; Guermazi, Ali; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate adiabatic T1ρ and T2ρ of articular cartilage in symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) patients and asymptomatic volunteers, and to determine their association with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based structural abnormalities in cartilage and bone. A total of 24 subjects (age range: 50-68 years; 12 female) were enrolled, including 12 early OA patients and 12 volunteers with normal joint function. Patients and volunteers underwent 3T MRI. T2 , adiabatic T1ρ , and T2ρ relaxation times of knee articular cartilage were measured. Proton density (PD)- and T1 -weighted MR image series were also obtained and separately evaluated for morphological changes using the MRI OA Knee Scoring (MOAKS) system. Comparisons using the Mann-Whitney nonparametric test were performed after dividing the study participants according to physical symptoms as determined by Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) score or presence of cartilage lesions, bone marrow lesions, or osteophytes. Elevated adiabatic T1ρ and T2ρ relaxation times of articular cartilage were associated with cartilage loss (P = 0.024-0.047), physical symptoms (0.0068-0.035), and osteophytes (0.0039-0.027). Elevated adiabatic T1ρ was also associated with bone marrow lesions (0.033). Preliminary data suggest that elevated adiabatic T1ρ and T2ρ of cartilage are associated with morphological abnormalities of cartilage and bone, and thus may be applicable for in vivo OA research and diagnostics. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;46:678-689. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. Global adiabaticity and non-Gaussianity consistency condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Enea Romano

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the context of single-field inflation, the conservation of the curvature perturbation on comoving slices, Rc, on super-horizon scales is one of the assumptions necessary to derive the consistency condition between the squeezed limit of the bispectrum and the spectrum of the primordial curvature perturbation. However, the conservation of Rc holds only after the perturbation has reached the adiabatic limit where the constant mode of Rc dominates over the other (usually decaying mode. In this case, the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation defined in the thermodynamic sense, δPnad≡δP−cw2δρ where cw2=P˙/ρ˙, usually becomes also negligible on superhorizon scales. Therefore one might think that the adiabatic limit is the same as thermodynamic adiabaticity. This is in fact not true. In other words, thermodynamic adiabaticity is not a sufficient condition for the conservation of Rc on super-horizon scales. In this paper, we consider models that satisfy δPnad=0 on all scales, which we call global adiabaticity (GA, which is guaranteed if cw2=cs2, where cs is the phase velocity of the propagation of the perturbation. A known example is the case of ultra-slow-roll (USR inflation in which cw2=cs2=1. In order to generalize USR we develop a method to find the Lagrangian of GA K-inflation models from the behavior of background quantities as functions of the scale factor. Applying this method we show that there indeed exists a wide class of GA models with cw2=cs2, which allows Rc to grow on superhorizon scales, and hence violates the non-Gaussianity consistency condition.

  17. Global adiabaticity and non-Gaussianity consistency condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Antonio Enea; Mooij, Sander; Sasaki, Misao

    2016-10-01

    In the context of single-field inflation, the conservation of the curvature perturbation on comoving slices, Rc, on super-horizon scales is one of the assumptions necessary to derive the consistency condition between the squeezed limit of the bispectrum and the spectrum of the primordial curvature perturbation. However, the conservation of Rc holds only after the perturbation has reached the adiabatic limit where the constant mode of Rc dominates over the other (usually decaying) mode. In this case, the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation defined in the thermodynamic sense, δPnad ≡ δP - cw2 δρ where cw2 = P ˙ / ρ ˙ , usually becomes also negligible on superhorizon scales. Therefore one might think that the adiabatic limit is the same as thermodynamic adiabaticity. This is in fact not true. In other words, thermodynamic adiabaticity is not a sufficient condition for the conservation of Rc on super-horizon scales. In this paper, we consider models that satisfy δPnad = 0 on all scales, which we call global adiabaticity (GA), which is guaranteed if cw2 = cs2 , where cs is the phase velocity of the propagation of the perturbation. A known example is the case of ultra-slow-roll (USR) inflation in which cw2 = cs2 = 1. In order to generalize USR we develop a method to find the Lagrangian of GA K-inflation models from the behavior of background quantities as functions of the scale factor. Applying this method we show that there indeed exists a wide class of GA models with cw2 = cs2, which allows Rc to grow on superhorizon scales, and hence violates the non-Gaussianity consistency condition.

  18. On the adiabatic theorem when eigenvalues dive into the continuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Decebal Horia; Jensen, Arne; Knörr, Hans Konrad

    For a Wigner-Weisskopf model of an atom consisting of a quantum dot coupled to an energy reservoir described by a three-dimensional Laplacian we study the survival probability of a bound state when the dot energy varies smoothly and adiabatically in time. The initial state corresponds to a discre...... eigenvalue which dives into the continuous spectrum and re-emerges from it as the dot energy is varied in time and finally returns to its initial value. Our main result is that for a large class of couplings, the survival probability of this bound state vanishes in the adiabatic limit....

  19. Microstructure evolution mechanism in adiabatic shear band in TA2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨扬; 熊俊; 杨续跃

    2004-01-01

    The micro structure evolution mechanism in adiabatic shear band in commercial pure titanium (TA2) at high strain rates(γ≈105 - 106/s) were studied. The nanosized recrystallized grains (about 50 nm in diameter) within the center of adiabatic shear band (ASB) were observed by means of transmission electronic microscope (TEM). A Rotational Dynamic Recrystallization (RDR) mechanism can explain the microstructure evolution (i. e. nanosized grains were formed within 5 - 10μs) in ASB. Kinetics calculations indicate that the recrystallized small grains are formed during the deformation and don't undergo significant growth by grain boundary migration after deformation.

  20. Nanoscale resolution for fluorescence microscopy via adiabatic passage

    CERN Document Server

    Rubio, Juan Luis; Ahufinger, Verònica; Mompart, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    We propose the use of the subwavelength localization via adiabatic passage technique for fluorescence microscopy with nanoscale resolution in the far field. This technique uses a {\\Lambda}-type medium coherently coupled to two laser pulses: the pump, with a node in its spatial profile, and the Stokes. The population of the {\\Lambda} system is adiabatically transferred from one ground state to the other except at the node position, yielding a narrow population peak. This coherent localization allows fluorescence imaging with nanometer lateral resolution. We derive an analytical expression to asses the resolution and perform a comparison with the coherent population trapping and the stimulated-emission-depletion techniques.

  1. Adiabatic hyperspherical approach to large-scale nuclear dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    We formulate a fully microscopic approach to large-scale nuclear dynamics using a hyperradius as a collective coordinate. An adiabatic potential is defined by taking account of all possible configurations at a fixed hyperradius, and its hyperradius dependence plays a key role in governing the global nuclear motion. In order to go to larger systems beyond few-body systems, we suggest basis functions of a microscopic multicluster model, propose a method for calculating matrix elements of an adiabatic Hamiltonian with use of Fourier transforms, and test its effectiveness.

  2. Adiabatic fluctuations from cosmic strings in a contracting universe

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenberger, Robert H; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2008-01-01

    We show that adiabatic, super-Hubble, and almost scale invariant density fluctuations are produced by cosmic strings in a contracting universe. An essential point is that isocurvature perturbations produced by topological defects such as cosmic strings on super-Hubble scales lead to a source term which seeds the growth of curvature fluctuations on these scales. Once the symmetry has been restored at high temperatures, the isocurvature seeds disappear, and the fluctuations evolve as adiabatic ones in the expanding phase. Thus, cosmic strings may be resurrected as a mechanism for generating the primordial density fluctuations observed today.

  3. How to Make the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm Fail

    CERN Document Server

    Farhi, E; Gutmann, S; Nagaj, D; Farhi, Edward; Goldstone, Jeffrey; Gutmann, Sam; Nagaj, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The quantum adiabatic algorithm is a Hamiltonian based quantum algorithm designed to find the minimum of a classical cost function whose domain has size N. We show that poor choices for the Hamiltonian can guarantee that the algorithm will not find the minimum if the run time grows more slowly than square root of N. These poor choices are nonlocal and wash out any structure in the cost function to be minimized and the best that can be hoped for is Grover speedup. These failures tell us what not to do when designing quantum adiabatic algorithms.

  4. Construction techniques for adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators using ferric ammonium alum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Grant W.; Timbie, Peter T.

    1999-07-01

    We describe techniques used to fabricate the cold stage of an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator that uses the paramagnetic salt ferric ammonium alum. We discuss the design of a leak-tight housing for the salt as well as a technique for growing ferric ammonium alum crystals that results in a housing filled with >98% refrigerant. These techniques have proven to be reliable in creating robust single-stage refrigerators. Similar techniques can be used for the second stage of a dual-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator.

  5. New design of an adiabatic demagnetization cryostat for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Junya; Sato, Akio; Sahashi, Masashi

    A new adiabatic demagnetization cryostat for cooling (in the region of 0.1 K) spaceborne far-infrared detectors is described. The cryostat contains a superconducting magnetic coil indirectly cooled by liquid helium, with the liquid nitrogen and helium vessels being connected by gas-filled thermal switches; the adiabatic demagnetization cell of the cryostat is set in vacuum at the center of the coil. The magnetic field of 3 T was obtained by a current of 11.5 A. The magnetic salt (single crystals of manganese ammonium alum) was prepared by the falling temperature technique.

  6. Assessment of pulmonary venous stenosis after radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation by magnetic resonance angiography: a comparison of linear and cross-sectional area measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tintera, Jaroslav; Porod, Vaclav; Rolencova, Eva; Fendrych, Pavel [Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Department of Radiology, Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Cihak, Robert; Mlcochova, Hanka; Kautzner, Josef [Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Prague 4 (Czech Republic)

    2006-12-15

    One of the recognised complications of catheter ablation is pulmonary venous stenosis. The aim of this study was to compare two methods of evaluation of pulmonary venous diameter for follow-up assessment of the above complication: (1) a linear approach evaluating two main diameters of the vein, (2) semiautomatically measured cross-sectional area (CSA). The study population consists of 29 patients. All subjects underwent contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CeMRA) of the pulmonary veins (PVs) before and after the ablation; 14 patients were also scanned 3 months later. PV diameter was evaluated from two-dimensional multiplanar reconstructions by measuring either the linear diameter or CSA. A comparison between pulmonary venous CSA and linear measurements revealed a systematic difference in absolute values. This difference was not significant when comparing the relative change CSA and quadratic approximation using linear extents (linear approach). However, a trend towards over-estimation of calibre reduction was documented for the linear approach. Using CSA assessment, significant PV stenosis was found in ten PVs (8%) shortly after ablation. Less significant PV stenosis, ranging from 20 to 50% was documented in other 18 PVs (15%). CeMRA with CSA assessment of the PVs is suitable method for evaluation of PV diameters. (orig.)

  7. Age and gender specific normal values of left ventricular mass, volume and function for gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allansdotter-Johnsson Ase

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about age-specific normal values for left ventricular mass (LVM, end-diastolic volume (EDV, end-systolic volume (ESV, stroke volume (SV and ejection fraction (EF by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR is of importance to differentiate between health and disease and to assess the severity of disease. The aims of the study were to determine age and gender specific normal reference values and to explore the normal physiological variation of these parameters from adolescence to late adulthood, in a cross sectional study. Methods Gradient echo CMR was performed at 1.5 T in 96 healthy volunteers (11–81 years, 50 male. Gender-specific analysis of parameters was undertaken in both absolute values and adjusted for body surface area (BSA. Results Age and gender specific normal ranges for LV volumes, mass and function are presented from the second through the eighth decade of life. LVM, ESV and EDV rose during adolescence and declined in adulthood. SV and EF decreased with age. Compared to adult females, adult males had higher BSA-adjusted values of EDV (p = 0.006 and ESV (p Conclusion LV volumes, mass and function vary over a broad age range in healthy individuals. LV volumes and mass both rise in adolescence and decline with age. EF showed a rapid decline in adolescence compared to changes throughout adulthood. These findings demonstrate the need for age and gender specific normal ranges for clinical use.

  8. Carbon-thirteen cross-polarization magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared studies of thermally modified wood exposed to brown and soft rot fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivonen, Hanne; Nuopponen, Mari; Maunu, Sirkka L; Sundholm, Franciska; Vuorinen, Tapani

    2003-03-01

    Thermally modified wood has many technically interesting properties, such as increased dimensional stability, low equilibrium moisture content, and enhanced biological and weather resistance. This paper describes solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic studies on the decay of heat-treated and untreated pine (Pinus sylvestris) by brown (Poria placenta) and soft rot fungi. Both techniques combined with multivariate data analysis proved to be powerful tools for the study of wood degradation by fungi. When untreated pine was exposed to brown or soft rot fungi, a drastic decay of the cell wall polysaccharides was observed. Brown rot fungus degraded mainly hemicelluloses while soft rot fungus attacked cellulose more extensively. The aromatic region of 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR spectra revealed that the structure of lignin was also altered. New carboxylic structures were formed as a consequence of the decay. The increased biological resistance of pine wood heat-treated at >220 degrees C was observed in the 13C CPMAS NMR and IR spectra.

  9. Measurement of thermal neutron cross section and resonance integral of the reaction {sup 135}Cs(n,{gamma}){sup 136}Cs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Toshio; Nakamura, Shoji; Harada, Hideo [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Hatsukawa, Yuichi; Shinohara, Nobuo; Hata, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Katsutoshi; Motoishi, Shoji; Tanase, Masakazu

    1997-03-01

    The thermal neutron(2,200 m/s neutron) capture cross section({sigma}{sub 0}) and the resonance integral(I{sub 0}) of the reaction {sup 135}Cs(n,{gamma}){sup 136}Cs were measured by an activation method. Targets of radioactive cesium, which include {sup 135}Cs, {sup 137}Cs and stable {sup 133}Cs, were irradiated with reactor neutrons within or without a Cd shield case. The ratio of the number of nuclei of {sup 135}Cs to that of {sup 137}Cs was measured with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. This ratio and the ratio of activity of {sup 136}Cs to that of {sup 137}Cs were used for deduction of the {sigma}{sub 0} and the I{sub 0} of {sup 135}Cs. The {sigma}{sub 0} and the I{sub 0} of the reaction {sup 135}Cs(n,{sigma}){sup 136}Cs were 8.3 {+-} 0.3 barn and 38.1 {+-} 2.6 barn, respectively. (author)

  10. Enhanced optical tuning of modified-geometry resonators clad in blue phase liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptasinski, Joanna; Khoo, Iam-Choon; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2014-09-15

    Active optical tuning of silicon racetrack resonators clad in dye-doped blue phase liquid crystals (BPLCs) is experimentally demonstrated. An adiabatic racetrack resonator geometry that allows for enhanced tuning is presented and analyzed. The resonance shift of an unmodified geometry racetrack is Δλ=0.7 nm, while an adiabatic racetrack achieves a Δλ=1.23 nm resonance shift because of a greater mode overlap with the cladding. The calculated refractive index change of the BPLC is Δn=0.0041 for both geometries.

  11. Trace element mass balance in hydrous adiabatic mantle melting: The Hydrous Adiabatic Mantle Melting Simulator version 1 (HAMMS1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    numerical mass balance calculation model for the adiabatic melting of a dry to hydrous peridotite has been programmed in order to simulate the trace element compositions of basalts from mid-ocean ridges, back-arc basins, ocean islands, and large igneous provinces. The Excel spreadsheet-based calculator, Hydrous Adiabatic Mantle Melting Simulator version 1 (HAMMS1) uses (1) a thermodynamic model of fractional adiabatic melting of mantle peridotite, with (2) the parameterized experimental melting relationships of primitive to depleted mantle sources in terms of pressure, temperature, water content, and degree of partial melting. The trace element composition of the model basalt is calculated from the accumulated incremental melts within the adiabatic melting regime, with consideration for source depletion. The mineralogic mode in the primitive to depleted source mantle in adiabat is calculated using parameterized experimental results. Partition coefficients of the trace elements of mantle minerals are parameterized to melt temperature mostly from a lattice strain model and are tested using the latest compilations of experimental results. The parameters that control the composition of trace elements in the model are as follows: (1) mantle potential temperature, (2) water content in the source mantle, (3) depth of termination of adiabatic melting, and (4) source mantle depletion. HAMMS1 enables us to obtain the above controlling parameters using Monte Carlo fitting calculations and by comparing the calculated basalt compositions to primary basalt compositions. Additionally, HAMMS1 compares melting parameters with a major element model, which uses petrogenetic grids formulated from experimental results, thus providing better constraints on the source conditions.

  12. A high-field adiabatic fast passage ultracold neutron spin flipper for the UCNA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holley, A. T.; Pattie, R. W.; Young, A. R. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Broussard, L. J. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Davis, J. L.; Ito, T. M.; Lyles, J. T. M.; Makela, M.; Morris, C. L.; Mortensen, R.; Saunders, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Hickerson, K.; Mendenhall, M. P. [W. K. Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Liu, C.-Y. [Department of Physics, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States); Mammei, R. R. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Rios, R. [Department of Physics, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho 83209 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    The UCNA collaboration is making a precision measurement of the {beta} asymmetry (A) in free neutron decay using polarized ultracold neutrons (UCN). A critical component of this experiment is an adiabatic fast passage neutron spin flipper capable of efficient operation in ambient magnetic fields on the order of 1 T. The requirement that it operate in a high field necessitated the construction of a free neutron spin flipper based, for the first time, on a birdcage resonator. The design, construction, and initial testing of this spin flipper prior to its use in the first measurement of A with UCN during the 2007 run cycle of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's 800 MeV proton accelerator is detailed. These studies determined the flipping efficiency of the device, averaged over the UCN spectrum present at the location of the spin flipper, to be {epsilon}=0.9985(4).

  13. Exploiting adiabatically switched RF-field for manipulating spin hyperpolarization induced by parahydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiryutin, Alexey S.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Lukzen, Nikita N.; Ivanov, Konstantin L., E-mail: ivanov@tomo.nsc.ru [International Tomography Center SB RAS, Institutskaya 3a, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova 2, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Vieth, Hans-Martin [International Tomography Center SB RAS, Institutskaya 3a, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 14, Berlin 14195 (Germany)

    2015-12-21

    A method for precise manipulation of non-thermal nuclear spin polarization by switching a RF-field is presented. The method harnesses adiabatic correlation of spin states in the rotating frame. A detailed theory behind the technique is outlined; examples of two-spin and three-spin systems prepared in a non-equilibrium state by Para-Hydrogen Induced Polarization (PHIP) are considered. We demonstrate that the method is suitable for converting the initial multiplet polarization of spins into net polarization: compensation of positive and negative lines in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, which is detrimental when the spectral resolution is low, is avoided. Such a conversion is performed for real two-spin and three-spin systems polarized by means of PHIP. Potential applications of the presented technique are discussed for manipulating PHIP and its recent modification termed signal amplification by reversible exchange as well as for preparing and observing long-lived spin states.

  14. Thermal neutron capture cross-section and resonance integral measurements of {sup 139}La(n, γ){sup 140}La and {sup 140}Ce(n, γ){sup 141}Ce using a Am-Be neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panikkath, Priyada; Mohanakrishnan, P. [Manipal University, Manipal Centre for Natural Sciences, Karnataka (India)

    2017-03-15

    Thermal neutron capture cross-sections and resonance integrals of {sup 139}La(n, γ){sup 140}La and {sup 140}Ce (n, γ){sup 141}Ce are measured with respect to reference reactions {sup 197}Au(n, γ){sup 198}Au and {sup 55}Mn(n, γ){sup 56}Mn using the neutron activation technique. Measurements are carried out using neutrons from an Am-Be source located inside a concrete bunker. Two different methods are used for determining self-shielding factors of activation foils as well as for finding the epithermal neutron spectrum shape factor. For {sup 139}La with reference to {sup 197}Au and {sup 55}Mn the measured thermal cross sections are 9.24 ± 0.25 b and 9.28 ± 0.37 b, respectively, while the measured resonance integrals are 12.18 ± 0.67 b and 11.81 ± 0.94 b, respectively. For {sup 140}Ce with reference to {sup 197}Au and {sup 55}Mn the measured thermal cross sections are 0.44 ± 0.01 b and 0.44 ± 0.02 b, respectively, while the measured resonance integrals are 0.55 ± 0.03 b and 0.54 ± 0.04 b, respectively. The present measurements are compared with earlier measurements and evaluations. Presently estimated values confirm the established {sup 139}La(n, γ){sup 140}La cross-sections. The presently measured thermal capture cross-section {sup 140}Ce(n, γ){sup 141}Ce, though lower than the evaluated data, is having higher accuracy compared to previous measurements with large uncertainties. The resonance integral measured is higher (like most previous measurements) than most evaluations requiring a revision of the evaluated data. (orig.)

  15. Thermal neutron capture cross-section and resonance integral measurements of 139La(n, γ)140La and 140Ce(n, γ)141Ce using a Am-Be neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikkath, Priyada; Mohanakrishnan, P.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal neutron capture cross-sections and resonance integrals of 139La(n, γ)140La and 140Ce (n, γ)141Ce are measured with respect to reference reactions 197Au(n, γ)198Au and 55Mn(n, γ)56Mn using the neutron activation technique. Measurements are carried out using neutrons from an Am-Be source located inside a concrete bunker. Two different methods are used for determining self-shielding factors of activation foils as well as for finding the epithermal neutron spectrum shape factor. For 139 La with reference to 197 Au and 55 Mn the measured thermal cross sections are 9.24 ± 0.25 b and 9.28 ± 0.37 b, respectively, while the measured resonance integrals are 12.18 ± 0.67 b and 11.81 ± 0.94 b, respectively. For 140 Ce with reference to 197 Au and 55 Mn the measured thermal cross sections are 0.44 ± 0.01 b and 0.44 ± 0.02 b, respectively, while the measured resonance integrals are 0.55 ± 0.03 b and 0.54 ± 0.04 b, respectively. The present measurements are compared with earlier measurements and evaluations. Presently estimated values confirm the established 139La(n, γ)140La cross-sections. The presently measured thermal capture cross-section 140Ce(n, γ)141Ce , though lower than the evaluated data, is having higher accuracy compared to previous measurements with large uncertainties. The resonance integral measured is higher (like most previous measurements) than most evaluations requiring a revision of the evaluated data.

  16. Adiabatic passage for one-step generation of n-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states of superconducting qubits via quantum Zeno dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin-Lei; Song, Chong; Xu, Jing; Yu, Lin; Ji, Xin; Zhang, Shou

    2016-09-01

    An efficient scheme is proposed for generating n-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states of n superconducting qubits separated by (n-1) coplanar waveguide resonators capacitively via adiabatic passage with the help of quantum Zeno dynamics in one step. In the scheme, it is not necessary to precisely control the time of the whole operation and the Rabi frequencies of classical fields because of the introduction of adiabatic passage. The numerical simulations for three-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state show that the scheme is insensitive to the dissipation of the resonators and the energy relaxation of the superconducting qubits. The three-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state can be deterministically generated with comparatively high fidelity in the current experimental conditions, though the scheme is somewhat sensitive to the dephasing of superconducting qubits.

  17. On Models of Nonlinear Evolution Paths in Adiabatic Quantum Algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jie; LU Song-Feng; Samuel L.Braunstein

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,we study two different nonlinear interpolating paths in adiabatic evolution algorithms for solving a particular class of quantum search problems where both the initial and final Hamiltonian are one-dimensional projector Hamiltonians on the corresponding ground state.If the overlap between the initial state and final state of the quantum system is not equal to zero,both of these models can provide a constant time speedup over the usual adiabatic algorithms by increasing some another corresponding "complexity".But when the initial state has a zero overlap with the solution state in the problem,the second model leads to an infinite time complexity of the algorithm for whatever interpolating functions being applied while the first one can still provide a constant running time.However,inspired by a related reference,a variant of the first model can be constructed which also fails for the problem when the overlap is exactly equal to zero if we want to make up the "intrinsic" fault of the second model — an increase in energy.Two concrete theorems are given to serve as explanations why neither of these two models can improve the usual adiabatic evolution algorithms for the phenomenon above.These just tell us what should be noted when using certain nonlinear evolution paths in adiabatic quantum algorithms for some special kind of problems.

  18. Dark Energy and Dark Matter from an additional adiabatic fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Dunsby, Peter K S; Reverberi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    The Dark Sector is described by an additional barotropic fluid which evolves adiabatically during the universe's history and whose adiabatic exponent $\\gamma$ is derived from the standard definitions of specific heats. Although in general $\\gamma$ is a function of the redshift, the Hubble parameter and its derivatives, we find that our assumptions lead necessarily to solutions with $\\gamma = $ constant in a FLRW universe. The adiabatic fluid acts effectively as the sum of two distinct components, one evolving like non-relativistic matter and the other depending on the value of the adiabatic index. This makes the model particularly interesting as a way of simultaneously explaining the nature of both Dark Energy and Dark Matter, at least at the level of the background cosmology. The $\\Lambda$CDM model is included in this family of theories when $\\gamma = 0$. We fit our model to SNIa, $H(z)$ and BAO data, discussing the model selection criteria. The implications for the early-universe and the growth of small per...

  19. Evolutions of Yang Phase Under Cyclic Condition and Adiabatic Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Shang-Wu; GU Zhi-Yu

    2005-01-01

    There are three non-integrable phases in literatures: Berry phase, Aharonov-Anandan phase, and Yang phase. This article discusses the evolutions of Yang phase under the cyclic condition and the adiabatic condition for the generaltime-dependent harmonic oscillator, thus reveals the intimate relations between these three non-integrable phases.

  20. Reversibility and energy dissipation in adiabatic superconductor logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2017-03-06

    Reversible computing is considered to be a key technology to achieve an extremely high energy efficiency in future computers. In this study, we investigated the relationship between reversibility and energy dissipation in adiabatic superconductor logic. We analyzed the evolution of phase differences of Josephson junctions in the reversible quantum-flux-parametron (RQFP) gate and confirmed that the phase differences can change time reversibly, which indicates that the RQFP gate is physically, as well as logically, reversible. We calculated energy dissipation required for the RQFP gate to perform a logic operation and numerically demonstrated that the energy dissipation can fall below the thermal limit, or the Landauer bound, by lowering operation frequencies. We also investigated the 1-bit-erasure gate as a logically irreversible gate and the quasi-RQFP gate as a physically irreversible gate. We calculated the energy dissipation of these irreversible gates and showed that the energy dissipation of these gate is dominated by non-adiabatic state changes, which are induced by unwanted interactions between gates due to logical or physical irreversibility. Our results show that, in reversible computing using adiabatic superconductor logic, logical and physical reversibility are required to achieve energy dissipation smaller than the Landauer bound without non-adiabatic processes caused by gate interactions.

  1. Dark energy and dark matter from an additional adiabatic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunsby, Peter K. S.; Luongo, Orlando; Reverberi, Lorenzo

    2016-10-01

    The dark sector is described by an additional barotropic fluid which evolves adiabatically during the Universe's history and whose adiabatic exponent γ is derived from the standard definitions of specific heats. Although in general γ is a function of the redshift, the Hubble parameter and its derivatives, we find that our assumptions lead necessarily to solutions with γ =constant in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe. The adiabatic fluid acts effectively as the sum of two distinct components, one evolving like nonrelativistic matter and the other depending on the value of the adiabatic index. This makes the model particularly interesting as a way of simultaneously explaining the nature of both dark energy and dark matter, at least at the level of the background cosmology. The Λ CDM model is included in this family of theories when γ =0 . We fit our model to supernovae Ia, H (z ) and baryonic acoustic oscillation data, discussing the model selection criteria. The implications for the early Universe and the growth of small perturbations in this model are also discussed.

  2. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barends, R; Shabani, A; Lamata, L; Kelly, J; Mezzacapo, A; Las Heras, U; Babbush, R; Fowler, A G; Campbell, B; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Jeffrey, E; Lucero, E; Megrant, A; Mutus, J Y; Neeley, M; Neill, C; O'Malley, P J J; Quintana, C; Roushan, P; Sank, D; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; White, T C; Solano, E; Neven, H; Martinis, John M

    2016-06-09

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  3. Perturbation to Noether Symmetries and Adiabatic Invariants for Birkhoffian Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on El-Nabulsi dynamical model for a non-conservative system, the problem of perturbation to Noether symmetries and adiabatic invariants of a Birkhoffian system under the action of a small disturbance is proposed and studied. Firstly, the El-Nabulsi-Pfaff variational problem from extended exponentially fractional integral is presented and the El-Nabulsi-Birkhoff equations are established. Secondly, the definitions and the criterions criteria of the Noether symmetric transformations and quasisymmetric transformations of the Birkhoffian system are given, and the Noether theorems of the system are established, which reveal the inner relationship between the Noether symmetries and the conserved quantities. Thirdly, the perturbation of Noether symmetries under a small disturbance is studied, and corresponding adiabatic invariants are obtained. As special cases, the deductions in nonconservative Hamiltonian system and nonconservative Lagrangian system and standard Birkhoffian system are given. At the end of the paper, the case known as Hojman-Urrutia problem is discussed to investigate the Noether symmetries and the adiabatic invariants, the perturbation to Noether symmetries and the adiabatic invariants under El-Nabulsi dynamical model.

  4. Adiabatic and diabatic aerosol transport to the Jungfraujoch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugauer, M.; Baltensperger, U.; Furger, M.; Jost, D.T.; Schwikowski, M.; Gaeggeler, H.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Synoptic scale vertical motion, here detected by the geopotential height of the 500 hPa surface, mainly accounts for the aerosol transport to the Jungfraujoch in winter. In summer, diabatic convection provides the dominant vertical transport mechanism. Nevertheless, synoptic scale adiabatic motion still determines whether diabatic convection can develop. (author) 2 figs., 2 refs.

  5. Appearance of gauge fields and forces beyond the adiabatic approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosselin, Pierre [Institut Fourier, UMR 5582 CNRS-UJF, UFR de Mathematiques, Universite Grenoble I, BP74, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres, Cedex (France); Mohrbach, Herve, E-mail: mohrbach@univ-metz.f [Laboratoire de Physique Moleculaire et des Collisions, ICPMB-FR CNRS 2843, Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, 57078 Metz Cedex 3 (France)

    2010-09-03

    We investigate the origin of quantum geometric phases, gauge fields and forces beyond the adiabatic regime. In particular, we extend the notions of geometric magnetic and electric forces discovered in studies of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation to arbitrary quantum systems described by matrix-valued quantum Hamiltonians. The results are illustrated by several physical relevant examples.

  6. A Kinetic Study of the Adiabatic Polymerization of Acrylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, R. A. M.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses theory, procedures, and results for an experiment which demonstrates the application of basic physics to chemical problems. The experiment involves the adiabatic process, in which polymerization carried out in a vacuum flask is compared to the theoretical prediction of the model with the temperature-time curve obtained in practice. (JN)

  7. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barends, R.; Shabani, A.; Lamata, L.; Kelly, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; Heras, U. Las; Babbush, R.; Fowler, A. G.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Lucero, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J. Y.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Solano, E.; Neven, H.; Martinis, John M.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  8. Flat FRW Cosmologies with Adiabatic Matter Creation Kinematic tests

    CERN Document Server

    Lima, J A S

    1999-01-01

    Some observational consequences of a cosmological scenario driven by adiabatic matter creation are investigated. Exact expressions for the lookback time, age of the universe, luminosity distance, angular diameter, and galaxy number counts redshift relations are derived and their meaning discussed in detail. The expressions of the conventional FRW models are significantly modified and provide a powerful method to limit the parameters of the models.

  9. Fast Quasi-Adiabatic Gas Cooling: An Experiment Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oss, S.; Gratton, L. M.; Calza, G.; Lopez-Arias, T.

    2012-01-01

    The well-known experiment of the rapid expansion and cooling of the air contained in a bottle is performed with a rapidly responsive, yet very cheap thermometer. The adiabatic, low temperature limit is approached quite closely and measured with our apparatus. A straightforward theoretical model for this process is also presented and discussed.…

  10. High beta lasing in micropillar cavities with adiabatic layer design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lermer, M.; Gregersen, Niels; Lorke, M.;

    2013-01-01

    We report on lasing in optically pumped adiabatic micropillar cavities, based on the AlAs/GaAs material system. A detailed study of the threshold pump power and the spontaneous emission β factor in the lasing regime for different diameters dc is presented. We demonstrate a reduction of the thresh...

  11. Adiabatic CMB perturbations in pre-big bang string cosmology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enqvist, Kari; Sloth, Martin Snoager

    2001-01-01

    We consider the pre-big bang scenario with a massive axion field which starts to dominate energy density when oscillating in an instanton-induced potential and subsequently reheats the universe as it decays into photons, thus creating adiabatic CMB perturbations. We find that the fluctuations...

  12. High Sensitivity Refractometer Based on TiO₂-Coated Adiabatic Tapered Optical Fiber via ALD Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shan; Pang, Fufei; Huang, Sujuan; Zou, Fang; Guo, Qiang; Wen, Jianxiang; Wang, Tingyun

    2016-08-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology is introduced to fabricate a high sensitivity refractometer based on an adiabatic tapered optical fiber. Different thicknesses of titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanofilm were coated around the tapered fiber precisely and uniformly under different deposition cycles. Attributed to the higher refractive index of the TiO₂ nanofilm compared to that of silica, an asymmetric Fabry-Perot (F-P) resonator could be constructed along the fiber taper. The central wavelength of the F-P resonator could be controlled by adjusting the thickness of the TiO₂ nanofilm. Such a F-P resonator is sensitive to changes in the surrounding refractive index (SRI), which is utilized to realize a high sensitivity refractometer. The refractometer developed by depositing 50.9-nm-thickness TiO₂ on the tapered fiber shows SRI sensitivity as high as 7096 nm/RIU in the SRI range of 1.3373-1.3500. Due to TiO₂'s advantages of high refractive index, lack of toxicity, and good biocompatibility, this refractometer is expected to have wide applications in the biochemical sensing field.

  13. Myocardial triglyceride content at 3 T cardiovascular magnetic resonance and left ventricular systolic function: a cross-sectional study in patients hospitalized with acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pen-An; Lin, Gigin; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Wang, Chao-Hung; Juan, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Yu-Ching; Wu, Ming-Ting; Yang, Lan-Yan; Liu, Min-Hui; Chang, Tsun-Ching; Lin, Yu-Chun; Huang, Yu-Chieh; Huang, Pei-Ching; Wang, Jiun-Jie; Ng, Shu-Hang; Ng, Koon-Kwan

    2016-02-05

    Increased myocardial triglyceride (TG) content has been recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, its relation with cardiac function in patients on recovery from acute heart failure (HF) remains unclear. In this cross-sectional study, we sought to investigate the association between myocardial TG content measured on magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) and left ventricular (LV) function assessed on cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients who were hospitalized with HF. A total of 50 patients who were discharged after hospitalization for acute HF and 21 age- and sex-matched controls were included in the study. Myocardial TG content and LV parameters (function and mass) were measured on a 3.0 T MR scanner. Fatty acid (FA) and unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) content was normalized against water (W) using the LC-Model algorithm. The patient population was dichotomized according to the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, <50% or ≥ 50%). H-MRS data were available for 48 patients and 21 controls. Of the 48 patients, 25 had a LVEF <50% (mean, 31.2%), whereas the remaining 23 had a normal LVEF (mean, 60.2%). Myocardial UFA/W ratio was found to differ significantly in patients with low LVEF, normal LVEF, and controls (0.79% vs. 0.21% vs. 0.14%, respectively, p = 0.02). The myocardial UFA/TG ratio was associated with LV mass (r = 0.39, p < 0.001) and modestly related to LV end-diastolic volume (LVEDV; r = 0.24, p = 0.039). We also identified negative correlations of the myocardial FA/TG ratio with both LV mass (r = -0.39, p < 0.001) and LVEDV (r = -0.24, p = 0.039). As compared with controls, patients who were discharged after hospitalization for acute HF had increased myocardial UFA content; furthermore, UFA was inversely related with LVEF, LV mass and, to a lesser extent, LVEDV. Our study may stimulate further research on the measure of myocardial UFA content by (1)H-MRS for outcome

  14. Perturbation to Noether-Mei Symmetry and Adiabatic Invariants for Nonholonomic Mechanical Systems in Phase Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ming-Jiang; FANG Jian-Hui; LU Kai

    2009-01-01

    Based on the concept of adiabatic invariant, the perturbation to Noether-Mei symmetry and adiabatic invariants for nonholonomic mechanical systems in phase space are studied. The definition of the perturbation to Noether-Mei symmetry for the system is presented, and the criterion of the perturbation to Noether-Mei symmetry is given. Meanwhile, the Noether adiabatic invariants and the Mei adiabatic invariants for the perturbed system are obtained.

  15. Theoretical study of the CsNa molecule: adiabatic and diabatic potential energy and dipole moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabrouk, N; Berriche, H

    2014-09-25

    The adiabatic and diabatic potential energy curves of the low-lying electronic states of the NaCs molecule dissociating into Na (3s, 3p) + Cs (6s, 6p, 5d, 7s, 7p, 6d, 8s, 4f) have been investigated. The molecular calculations are performed using an ab initio approach based on nonempirical pseudopotential, parametrized l-dependent polarization potentials and full configuration interaction calculations through the CIPCI quantum chemistry package. The derived spectroscopic constants (Re, De, Te, ωe, ωexe, and Be) of the ground state and lower excited states are compared with the available theoretical and experimental works. Moreover, accurate permanent and transition dipole moment have been determined as a function of the internuclear distance. The adiabatic permanent dipole moment for the first nine (1)Σ(+) electronic states have shown both ionic characters associated with electron transfer related to Cs(+)Na(-) and Cs(-)Na(+) arrangements. By a simple rotation, the diabatic permanent dipole moment is determined and has revealed a linear behavior, particularly at intermediate and large distances. Many peaks around the avoided crossing locations have been observed for the transition dipole moment between neighbor electronic states.

  16. Adiabatic following in two-photon transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayfeh, M.H.; Nayfeh, A.H.

    1977-03-01

    The coherent interaction of two smoothly varying, near-resonant, two-photon pulses with a three-level system can be described by ''two-photon damped Bloch equations'' which are analogous to those for a one-photon transition in a two-level system except for the presence of a two-photon coupling and a frequency shift. These equations are solved for the cases ..gamma../sub 1/, ..gamma../sub 2/ very-much-less-than ..cap omega.., ..gamma../sub 1/ = ..gamma../sub 2/, and ..gamma../sub 2/k/sup 2/epsilon/sup 4//..cap omega../sup 2/, ..gamma../sub 1/ very-much-less-than ..cap omega.., where ..gamma../sub 1/ and ..gamma../sub 2/ are the atomic energy and phase relaxation widths, respectively, and ..cap omega.. is the Rabi frequency. The leading contribution to the refractive index is intensity dependent, caused by the level shifts inherent in multiphoton processes; it includes a relaxation dependent part which is important at times shorter than ..gamma../sup -1//sub 1/. The second-order contributions depend on the square of the intensity and the time-integrated square of the intensity. The latter contribution, which is relaxation dependent, causes line asymmetry at the long-wavelength wing; it consists of a term proportional to ..gamma../sub 2/-..gamma../sub 1/ and only important at early times and a term proportional to 2..gamma../sub 2/-..gamma../sub 1/.

  17. Perturbation and Adiabatic Invariants of Mei Symmetry for Nonholonomic Mechanical Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Ning; FANG Jian-Hui; WANG Peng

    2007-01-01

    Based on the concept of adiabatic invariant,the perturbation and adiabatic invariants of the Mei symmetry for nonholonomic mechanical systems are studied.The exact invariants of the Mei symmetry for the system without perturbation are given,The perturbation to the Mei symmetry is discussed and the adiabatic invariants of the Mei symmetry for the perturbed system are obtained.

  18. Perturbation to Lie Symmetry and Lutzky Adiabatic Invariants for Lagrange Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Ji-Rong; DING Ning; LI Ran; FANG Jian-Hui; DUAN Yi-Shi; WANG Peng; ZHANG Xiao-Ni

    2008-01-01

    Based on the concept of adiabatic invariant, perturbation to Lie symmetry and Lutzky adiabatic invariants for Lagrange systems are studied by using different methods from those of previous works. Exact invariants induced from Lie symmetry of the system without perturbation are given. Perturbation to Lie symmetry is discussed and Lutzky adiabatic invariants of the system subject to perturbation are obtained.

  19. Upper limit for the cross-section of the overlapping scalar resonances f0(980) and a0(980) produced in proton proton collisions in the range of the reaction threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskal, P.; Adam, H.-H.; Budzanowski, A.; Czyzykiewicz, R.; Grzonka, D.; Janusz, M.; Jarczyk, L.; Kamys, B.; Khoukaz, A.; Kilian, K.; Kolf, C.; Kowina, P.; Lister, T.; Oelert, W.; Piskor-Ignatowicz, C.; Przerwa, J.; Quentmeier, C.; Rozek, T.; Santo, R.; Schepers, G.; Sefzick, T.; Siemaszko, M.; Smyrski, J.; Strzalkowski, A.; Täschner, A.; Winter, P.; Wolke, M.; Wüstner, P.; Zipper, W.

    2003-09-01

    Utilizing a missing mass technique we investigate the pp rightarrow ppX reaction scanning beam energies in the range permitting to create a mass close to that of the f0(980) and a0(980) scalar resonances, but still below the K+K- threshold where they decay dominantly into pipi and pieta mesons, respectively. Prior to the data analysis we introduce a notion of the close to threshold total cross-section for broad resonances. We estimated for the overlapping mesons a0 and f0 the total cross-section to be smaller than 430 nb at excess energy of Q = 5 MeV. The experiment has been performed at the Cooler Synchrotron (COSY) using the COSY-11 facility.

  20. Cyclotron resonant scattering feature simulations. I. Thermally averaged cyclotron scattering cross sections, mean free photon-path tables, and electron momentum sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarm, F.-W.; Schönherr, G.; Falkner, S.; Pottschmidt, K.; Wolff, M. T.; Becker, P. A.; Sokolova-Lapa, E.; Klochkov, D.; Ferrigno, C.; Fürst, F.; Hemphill, P. B.; Marcu-Cheatham, D. M.; Dauser, T.; Wilms, J.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Electron cyclotron resonant scattering features (CRSFs) are observed as absorption-like lines in the spectra of X-ray pulsars. A significant fraction of the computing time for Monte Carlo simulations of these quantum mechanical features is spent on the calculation of the mean free path for each individual photon before scattering, since it involves a complex numerical integration over the scattering cross section and the (thermal) velocity distribution of the scattering electrons. Aims: We aim to numerically calculate interpolation tables which can be used in CRSF simulations to sample the mean free path of the scattering photon and the momentum of the scattering electron. The tables also contain all the information required for sampling the scattering electron's final spin. Methods: The tables were calculated using an adaptive Simpson integration scheme. The energy and angle grids were refined until a prescribed accuracy is reached. The tables are used by our simulation code to produce artificial CRSF spectra. The electron momenta sampled during these simulations were analyzed and justified using theoretically determined boundaries. Results: We present a complete set of tables suited for mean free path calculations of Monte Carlo simulations of the cyclotron scattering process for conditions expected in typical X-ray pulsar accretion columns (0.01 ≤ B/Bcrit ≤ 0.12, where Bcrit = 4.413 × 1013 G, and 3 keV ≤ kBT ≤ 15 keV). The sampling of the tables is chosen such that the results have an estimated relative error of at most 1/15 for all points in the grid. The tables are available online (see link in footnote, page 1). The electronic tables described here are available at http://www.sternwarte.uni-erlangen.de/research/cyclo

  1. The effect of the Fermi resonance on the Raman scattering cross sections of the Fermi doublet ν1 and 2ν2 of liquid carbon disulfide in benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong-Fei; Gao, Shu-Qin; Sun, Cheng-Lin; Jiang, Xiu-Lan; Li, Zuo-Wei

    2012-04-01

    The effect of the Fermi resonance (FR) on the Raman scattering cross sections (RSCSs) of the Fermi doublet ν1, 2ν2 of liquid CS2 in C6H6 using the method of changing the volume concentration of the solution is investigated. We have calculated the RSCSs of the Fermi doublet ν1, 2ν2 using Onsager's theory with the 992 cm(-1) Raman line of C6H6 as the internal standard. The result shows that the RSCS of the ν1 line decreases with decreasing the volume concentration of CS2, while that of the 2ν2 line unexpectedly increases. With decreasing the volume concentration of CS2, two main effects of the solvent effect (SE) and the FR in binary solution that can make the ν1, 2ν2 RSCSs change: the SE, as calculated, reduces both the ν1 and 2ν2 RSCSs; the FR plays a significant role in reducing the ν1 RSCS and enhancing the 2ν2 RSCS. In comparison with our previous investigation [J. Raman Spectrosc. 41 (2010) 776-779], it was found that the stronger the FR is, the more the RSCS of the ν1 decreases and the 2ν2 increases. Thus, we proposed that the result can be best explained by taking into account the effect of the FR on the RSCSs of the Fermi doublet. In addition, this paper also gives an explanation to the experimental results deviating from the theoretical results of the scattering coefficients of CS2 in solvent C6H6 as mentioned in Fini's paper.

  2. Characterization of high-tannin fractions from humus by carbon-13 cross-polarization and magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Klaus; Preston, Caroline M

    2002-01-01

    Condensed tannins can be found in various parts of many plants. Unlike lignin there has been little study of their fate as they enter the soil organic matter pool and their influence on nutrient cycling, especially through their protein-binding properties. We extracted and characterized tannin-rich fractions from humus collected in 1998 from a black spruce [Picea mariana (Mill.) Britton et al.] forest in Canada where a previous study (1995) showed high levels (3.8% by weight) of condensed tannins. A reference tannin purified from black spruce needles was characterized by solution 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a pure procyanidin with mainly cis stereochemistry and an average chain length of four to five units. The colorimetric proanthocyanidin (PA) assay, standardized against the black spruce tannin, showed that both extracted humus fractions had higher tannin contents than the original humus (2.84% and 11.17% vs. 0.08%), and accounted for 32% of humus tannin content. Consistent with the results from the chemical assay, the aqueous fraction showed higher tannin signals in the 13C cross-polarization and magic-angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR spectrum than the emulsified one. As both tannin-rich humus fractions were depleted in N and high in structures derived from lignin and cutin, they did not have properties consistent with recaldtrant tannin-protein complexes proposed as a mechanism for N sequestration in humus. Further studies are needed to establish if tannin-protein structures in humus can be detected or isolated, or if tannins contribute to forest management problems observed in these ecosystems by binding to and slowing down the activity of soil enzymes.

  3. Neutron Thermal Cross Sections, Westcott Factors, Resonance Integrals, Maxwellian Averaged Cross Sections and Astrophysical Reaction Rates Calculated from the ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0, ROSFOND-2010, CENDL-3.1 and EAF-2010 Evaluated Data Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritychenko, B.; Mughabghab, S. F.

    2012-12-01

    We present calculations of neutron thermal cross sections, Westcott factors, resonance integrals, Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates for 843 ENDF materials using data from the major evaluated nuclear libraries and European activation file. Extensive analysis of newly-evaluated neutron reaction cross sections, neutron covariances, and improvements in data processing techniques motivated us to calculate nuclear industry and neutron physics quantities, produce s-process Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates, systematically calculate uncertainties, and provide additional insights on currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations are discussed and new results are presented. Due to space limitations, the present paper contains only calculated Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and their uncertainties. The complete data sets for all results are published in the Brookhaven National Laboratory report.

  4. Neutron Thermal Cross Sections, Westcott Factors, Resonance Integrals, Maxwellian Averaged Cross Sections and Astrophysical Reaction Rates Calculated from the ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0, ROSFOND-2010, CENDL-3.1 and EAF-2010 Evaluated Data Libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritychenko, B. [National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Mughabghab, S.F. [National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    We present calculations of neutron thermal cross sections, Westcott factors, resonance integrals, Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates for 843 ENDF materials using data from the major evaluated nuclear libraries and European activation file. Extensive analysis of newly-evaluated neutron reaction cross sections, neutron covariances, and improvements in data processing techniques motivated us to calculate nuclear industry and neutron physics quantities, produce s-process Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates, systematically calculate uncertainties, and provide additional insights on currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations are discussed and new results are presented. Due to space limitations, the present paper contains only calculated Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and their uncertainties. The complete data sets for all results are published in the Brookhaven National Laboratory report.

  5. Dark energy with non-adiabatic sound speed: initial conditions and detectability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballesteros, Guillermo [Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche ' ' Enrico Fermi' ' , Piazza del Viminale 1, I-00184, Rome (Italy); Lesgourgues, Julien, E-mail: ballesteros@pd.infn.it, E-mail: julien.lesgourgues@cern.ch [CERN, Theory Division, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2010-10-01

    Assuming that the universe contains a dark energy fluid with a constant linear equation of state and a constant sound speed, we study the prospects of detecting dark energy perturbations using CMB data from Planck, cross-correlated with galaxy distribution maps from a survey like LSST. We update previous estimates by carrying a full exploration of the mock data likelihood for key fiducial models. We find that it will only be possible to exclude values of the sound speed very close to zero, while Planck data alone is not powerful enough for achieving any detection, even with lensing extraction. We also discuss the issue of initial conditions for dark energy perturbations in the radiation and matter epochs, generalizing the usual adiabatic conditions to include the sound speed effect. However, for most purposes, the existence of attractor solutions renders the perturbation evolution nearly independent of these initial conditions.

  6. Adiabatic tapered optical fiber fabrication in two step etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenari, Z.; Latifi, H.; Ghamari, S.; Hashemi, R. S.; Doroodmand, F.

    2016-01-01

    A two-step etching method using HF acid and Buffered HF is proposed to fabricate adiabatic biconical optical fiber tapers. Due to the fact that the etching rate in second step is almost 3 times slower than the previous droplet etching method, terminating the fabrication process is controllable enough to achieve a desirable fiber diameter. By monitoring transmitted spectrum, final diameter and adiabaticity of tapers are deduced. Tapers with losses about 0.3 dB in air and 4.2 dB in water are produced. The biconical fiber taper fabricated using this method is used to excite whispering gallery modes (WGMs) on a microsphere surface in an aquatic environment. So that they are suitable to be used in applications like WGM biosensors.

  7. Adiabatic Tip-Plasmon Focusing for Nano-Raman Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berweger, Samuel; Atkin, Joanna M.; Olmon, Robert L.; Raschke, Markus Bernd

    2010-12-16

    True nanoscale optical spectroscopy requires the efficient delivery of light for a spatially nanoconfined excitation. We utilize adiabatic plasmon focusing to concentrate an optical field into the apex of a scanning probe tip of {approx}10 nm in radius. The conical tips with the ability for two-stage optical mode matching of the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) grating-coupling and the adiabatic propagating SPP conversion into a localized SPP at the tip apex represent a special optical antenna concept for far-field transduction into nanoscale excitation. The resulting high nanofocusing efficiency and the spatial separation of the plasmonic grating coupling element on the tip shaft from the near-field apex probe region allows for true background-free nanospectroscopy. As an application, we demonstrate tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) of surface molecules with enhanced contrast and its extension into the near-IR with 800 nm excitation.

  8. Particle creation and non-adiabatic transitions in quantum cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Massar, S

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to compute transitions amplitudes in quantum cosmology, and in particular pair creation amplitudes and radiative transitions. To this end, we apply a double adiabatic development to the solutions of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation restricted to mini-superspace wherein gravity is described by the scale factor $a$. The first development consists in working with instantaneous eigenstates, in $a$, of the matter Hamiltonian. The second development is applied to the gravitational part of the wave function and generalizes the usual WKB approximation. We then obtain an exact equation which replaces the Wheeler-DeWitt equation and determines the evolution, i.e. the dependence in $a$, of the coefficients of this double expansion. When working in the gravitational adiabatic approximation, the simplified equation delivers the unitary evolution of transition amplitudes occurring among instantaneous eigenstates. Upon abandoning this approximation, one finds that there is an additional coupling among ma...

  9. Excitation energies along a range-separated adiabatic connection

    CERN Document Server

    Rebolini, Elisa; Teale, Andrew M; Helgaker, Trygve; Savin, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the variation of total energies and excitationenergies along a range-separated adiabatic connection. This connectionlinks the non-interacting Kohn-Sham electronic system to the physicalinteracting system by progressively switching on theelectron-electron interactions whilst simultaneously adjusting aone-electron effective potential so as to keep the ground-statedensity constant. The interactions are introduced in arange-dependent manner, first introducing predominantly long-range,and then all-range, interactions as the physical system is approached,as opposed to the conventional adiabatic connection where theinteractions are introduced by globally scaling the standard Coulomb interaction.Reference data are reported for the He and Be atoms and the H2molecule, obtained by calculating the short-range effective potentialat the full configuration-interaction level using Lieb'sLegendre-transform approach. As the strength of the electron-electroninteractions increases, the excitation energies, ...

  10. Stimulated Raman adiabatic control of a nuclear spin in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coto, Raul; Jacques, Vincent; Hétet, Gabriel; Maze, Jerónimo R.

    2017-08-01

    Coherent manipulation of nuclear spins is a highly desirable tool for both quantum metrology and quantum computation. However, most of the current techniques to control nuclear spins lack fast speed, impairing their robustness against decoherence. Here, based on stimulated Raman adiabatic passage, and its modification including shortcuts to adiabaticity, we present a fast protocol for the coherent manipulation of nuclear spins. Our proposed Λ scheme is implemented in the microwave domain and its excited-state relaxation can be optically controlled through an external laser excitation. These features allow for the initialization of a nuclear spin starting from a thermal state. Moreover we show how to implement Raman control for performing Ramsey spectroscopy to measure the dynamical and geometric phases acquired by nuclear spins.

  11. Stellar oscillations. II The non-adiabatic case

    CERN Document Server

    Samadi, R; Sonoi, T

    2015-01-01

    A leap forward has been performed due to the space-borne missions, MOST, CoRoT and Kepler. They provided a wealth of observational data, and more precisely oscillation spectra, which have been (and are still) exploited to infer the internal structure of stars. While an adiabatic approach is often sufficient to get information on the stellar equilibrium structures it is not sufficient to get a full understanding of the physics of the oscillation. Indeed, it does not permit one to answer some fundamental questions about the oscillations, such as: What are the physical mechanisms responsible for the pulsations inside stars? What determines the amplitudes? To what extent the adiabatic approximation is valid? All these questions can only be addressed by considering the energy exchanges between the oscillations and the surrounding medium. This lecture therefore aims at considering the energetical aspects of stellar pulsations with particular emphasis on the driving and damping mechanisms. To this end, the full non-...

  12. Multidimensional Study of High-Adiabat OMEGA Cryogenic Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, T. J. B.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Christopherson, A. R.; Knauer, J. P.; Marozas, J. A.; Maximov, A. V.; Mora, A.; Radha, P. B.; Shang, W.; Shvydky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Woo, K. M.; Varchas, G.

    2016-10-01

    Despite recent advances in modeling laser direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, there remains a predictability gap. This is particularly shown by the shortfall in hot-spot pressures inferred from OMEGA cryogenic implosions. To address this, a series of high-adiabat, cryogenic implosions were performed on OMEGA. These shots were performed with and without single-beam smoothing by spectral dispersion, at low and high drive intensities. These shots represent a regime where good agreement with simulation is expected because of the high adiabat. Multidimensional simulations of these shots will be presented with an emphasis on comparison with experimental indicators of departure from spherical symmetry (``1-D-ness''). The roles of short- and long-wavelength perturbations are considered. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  13. On some issues of gravitationally induced adiabatic particle productions

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Supriya; Pramanik, Souvik

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the current accelerating universe driven by the gravitationally induced adiabatic matter creation process. To elaborate the underlying cognitive content, here we consider three models of adiabatic particle creation and constrain the model parameters by fitting the models with the Union 2.1 data set using $\\chi^2$ minimization technique. The models are analyzed by two geometrical and model independent tests, viz., cosmography and $Om$-diagnostic, which are widely used to distinguish the cosmological models from $\\Lambda$CDM. We also compared present values of those model independent parameters with that of the flat $\\Lambda$CDM model. Finally, the validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics and the condition of thermodynamic equilibrium for the particle production models have been tested.

  14. Crack propagation of Ti alloy via adiabatic shear bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, I., E-mail: ivanmendozabravo@gmail.com [Instituto Tecnológico de Veracruz (Mexico); Villalobos, D. [Instituto Tecnológico de Veracruz (Mexico); Alexandrov, B.T. [The Ohio State University (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This study was focused on the characterization of the origin and mechanism of crack propagation as a result of hot induction bending of Ti alloy. Plates of Ti–6Al–4V alloy with 12.5 mm of thickness were submitted to hot induction bending below the beta transus temperature. Optical and scanning electron microscopy analysis showed crack formation in the tensile zone. Microstructural evidence showed that cracks propagate through the adiabatic shear bands by Dimple-Void mechanism. However, voids formation before shear banding also occurred. In both mechanisms adiabatic shear bands are formed via dynamic recrystallization where the alpha–beta interphase works as stress concentrator promoting the formation of dimples and voids.

  15. Improved Refrigerant Characteristics Flow Predictions in Adiabatic Capillary Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shodiya Sulaimon

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study presents improved refrigerant characteristics flow predictions using homogenous flow model in adiabatic capillary tube, used in small vapor compression refrigeration system. The model is based on fundamental equations of mass, momentum and energy. In order to improve the flow predictions, the inception of vaporization in the capillary tube is determined by evaluating initial vapor quality using enthalpy equation of refrigerant at saturation point and the inlet entrance effect of the capillary tube is also accounted for. Comparing this model with experimental data from open literature showed a reasonable agreement. Further comparison of this new model with earlier model of Bansal showed that the present model could be use to improve the performance predictions of refrigerant flow in adiabatic capillary tube.

  16. Adiabatic theory of solitons fed by dispersive waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickartz, Sabrina; Bandelow, Uwe; Amiranashvili, Shalva

    2016-09-01

    We consider scattering of low-amplitude dispersive waves at an intense optical soliton which constitutes a nonlinear perturbation of the refractive index. Specifically, we consider a single-mode optical fiber and a group velocity matched pair: an optical soliton and a nearly perfectly reflected dispersive wave, a fiber-optical analog of the event horizon. By combining (i) an adiabatic approach that is used in soliton perturbation theory and (ii) scattering theory from quantum mechanics, we give a quantitative account of the evolution of all soliton parameters. In particular, we quantify the increase in the soliton peak power that may result in the spontaneous appearance of an extremely large, so-called champion soliton. The presented adiabatic theory agrees well with the numerical solutions of the pulse propagation equation. Moreover, we predict the full frequency band of the scattered dispersive waves and explain an emerging caustic structure in the space-time domain.

  17. Some characteristics of the atmosphere during an adiabatic process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Li; LI Jianping; REN Hongli

    2006-01-01

    Some important characteristics of the atmosphere during an adiabatic process are investigated, which include the invariability of atmospheric entropy range and local surface potential temperature, the conservation of the atmospheric mass intervened between any isentropic surface and the ground, and the isentropic surface intersecting with the ground. The analysis shows that the atmospheric reference state (ARS) for investigation on available potential energy (APE) should be defined objectively as the state which could be approached from the existing atmosphere by adiabatic adjustment, and be related to initial atmospheric state before adjustment. For the initial atmosphere state at any time, its corresponding ARS is different from the one at another time. Based on the above-mentioned conclusions,the reference state proposed by Lorenz cannot be obtained physically, so a new conception, the conditional minimum total potential energy, is put forward in order to objectively investigate atmospheric APE.

  18. DESIGN OF TERNARY COUNTER BASED ON ADIABATIC DOMINO CIRCUIT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Qiankun; Wang Pengjun; Zheng Xuesong

    2013-01-01

    By researching the ternary counter and low power circuit design method,a novel design of low power ternary Domino counter on switch-level is proposed.Firstly,the switch-level structure expression of ternary loop operation circuit with enable pin is derived according to the switch-signal theory,and the one bit ternary counter is obtained combining the ternary adiabatic Domino literal operation circuit and buffer.Then the switch-level structure expression of enable signal circuit is derived,and the four bits ternary counter is obtained by cascade connection.Finally,the circuit is simulated by Spice tool and the output waveforms transform in proper order indicating that the logic function is correct.The energy consumption of the four bits ternary adiabatic Domino counter is 63% less than the conventional Domino counterpart.

  19. Adiabatic Evolution in XXX Spin Chain is Fast

    CERN Document Server

    Korepin, V

    2004-01-01

    Adiabatic theorem of quantum mechanics was used by E. Farhi, J. Goldstone, S. Gutmann and M. Sipser to design quantum algorithms of a new kind. A quantum computer evolves slowly enough, so that it remains in its instantaneous ground state, which tells the solution. We consider XXX Heisenberg spin chain. We rotate magnetic field and change its magnitude. The ground state evolves from a ferromagnetic one into a nontrivial ground state of XXX anti-ferromagnet. This adiabatic evolution goes very gently. Because of SU(2) symmetry and integrability only one mode get exited. We prove that the time of the evolution scales as a square root of number of qubits. This is faster then other known examples.

  20. Robust quantum logic in neutral atoms via adiabatic Rydberg dressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Tyler; Cook, Robert L.; Hankin, Aaron M.; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Biedermann, Grant W.; Deutsch, Ivan H.

    2015-01-01

    We study a scheme for implementing a controlled-Z (cz) gate between two neutral-atom qubits based on the Rydberg blockade mechanism in a manner that is robust to errors caused by atomic motion. By employing adiabatic dressing of the ground electronic state, we can protect the gate from decoherence due to random phase errors that typically arise because of atomic thermal motion. In addition, the adiabatic protocol allows for a Doppler-free configuration that involves counterpropagating lasers in a σ+/σ- orthogonal polarization geometry that further reduces motional errors due to Doppler shifts. The residual motional error is dominated by dipole-dipole forces acting on doubly excited Rydberg atoms when the blockade is imperfect. For reasonable parameters, with qubits encoded into the clock states of 133Cs, we predict that our protocol could produce a cz gate in <10 μ s with error probability on the order of 10-3.

  1. Confinement loss in adiabatic photonic crystal fiber tapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmey, Boris T.; Nguyen, Hong C.; Steel, M. J.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2006-09-01

    We numerically study confinement loss in photonic crystal fiber (PCF) tapers and compare our results with previously published experimental data. Agreement between theory and experiment requires taking into account hole shrinkage during the tapering process, which we measure by using a noninvasive technique. We show that losses are fully explained within the adiabatic approximation and that they are closely linked to the existence of a fundamental core-mode cutoff. This cutoff is equivalent to the core-mode cutoff in depressed-cladding fibers, so that losses in PCF tapers can be obtained semiquantitatively from an equivalent depressed-cladding fiber model. Finally, we discuss the definition of adiabaticity in this open boundary problem.

  2. Experimental Adiabatic Quantum Factorization under Ambient Conditions Based on a Solid-State Single Spin System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kebiao; Xie, Tianyu; Li, Zhaokai; Xu, Xiangkun; Wang, Mengqi; Ye, Xiangyu; Kong, Fei; Geng, Jianpei; Duan, Changkui; Shi, Fazhan; Du, Jiangfeng

    2017-03-31

    The adiabatic quantum computation is a universal and robust method of quantum computing. In this architecture, the problem can be solved by adiabatically evolving the quantum processor from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to that of a final one, which encodes the solution of the problem. Adiabatic quantum computation has been proved to be a compatible candidate for scalable quantum computation. In this Letter, we report on the experimental realization of an adiabatic quantum algorithm on a single solid spin system under ambient conditions. All elements of adiabatic quantum computation, including initial state preparation, adiabatic evolution (simulated by optimal control), and final state read-out, are realized experimentally. As an example, we found the ground state of the problem Hamiltonian S_{z}I_{z} on our adiabatic quantum processor, which can be mapped to the factorization of 35 into its prime factors 5 and 7.

  3. High-Fidelity Entangled Bell States via Shortcuts to Adiabaticity

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Koushik

    2016-01-01

    We present a couple of protocols based on shortcut to adiabaticity techniques for rapid generation of robust entangled Bell states in a system of two two-state systems. Our protocols rely on the so-called transitionless quantum driving (TQD) algorithm and Lewis-Riesenfeld invariant (LRI) method. Both TQD and LRI methods result in high fidelity in population transfer.Our study shows that it is possible to prepare an entangled state in infinitely short time without losing robustness and efficiency.

  4. Excitation energies along a range-separated adiabatic connection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebolini, Elisa, E-mail: rebolini@lct.jussieu.fr; Toulouse, Julien, E-mail: julien.toulouse@upmc.fr; Savin, Andreas, E-mail: savin@lct.jussieu.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7616, Laboratoire de Chimie Théorique, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7616, Laboratoire de Chimie Théorique, F-75005 Paris (France); Teale, Andrew M. [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Helgaker, Trygve [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2014-07-28

    We present a study of the variation of total energies and excitation energies along a range-separated adiabatic connection. This connection links the non-interacting Kohn–Sham electronic system to the physical interacting system by progressively switching on the electron–electron interactions whilst simultaneously adjusting a one-electron effective potential so as to keep the ground-state density constant. The interactions are introduced in a range-dependent manner, first introducing predominantly long-range, and then all-range, interactions as the physical system is approached, as opposed to the conventional adiabatic connection where the interactions are introduced by globally scaling the standard Coulomb interaction. Reference data are reported for the He and Be atoms and the H{sub 2} molecule, obtained by calculating the short-range effective potential at the full configuration-interaction level using Lieb's Legendre-transform approach. As the strength of the electron–electron interactions increases, the excitation energies, calculated for the partially interacting systems along the adiabatic connection, offer increasingly accurate approximations to the exact excitation energies. Importantly, the excitation energies calculated at an intermediate point of the adiabatic connection are much better approximations to the exact excitation energies than are the corresponding Kohn–Sham excitation energies. This is particularly evident in situations involving strong static correlation effects and states with multiple excitation character, such as the dissociating H{sub 2} molecule. These results highlight the utility of long-range interacting reference systems as a starting point for the calculation of excitation energies and are of interest for developing and analyzing practical approximate range-separated density-functional methodologies.

  5. A field theory characterization of interacting adiabatic particles in cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Arteaga, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    We explore the adiabatic particle excitations of an interacting field in a cosmological background. By following the time-evolution of the quantum state corresponding to the particle excitation, we show how the basic properties characterizing the particle propagation can be recovered from the two-point propagators. As an application, we study the background-induced dissipative effects on the propagation of a two-level atom in an expanding universe.

  6. A field theory characterization of interacting adiabatic particles in cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arteaga, Daniel [Departament de Fisica Fonamental and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: darteaga@ub.edu

    2008-08-07

    We explore the adiabatic particle excitations of an interacting field in a cosmological background. By following the time evolution of the quantum state corresponding to the particle excitation, we show how the basic properties characterizing the particle propagation can be recovered from the two-point propagators. As an application, we study the background-induced dissipative effects on the propagation of a two-level atom in an expanding universe.

  7. Adiabatic trapping in coupled kinetic Alfven-acoustic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, H. A.; Ali, Z. [Department of Physics, G.C. University, 54000 Lahore (Pakistan); Masood, W. [COMSATS, Institute of Information Technology, Park Road, Chak Shahzad, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdara Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-03-15

    In the present work, we have discussed the effects of adiabatic trapping of electrons on obliquely propagating Alfven waves in a low {beta} plasma. Using the two potential theory and employing the Sagdeev potential approach, we have investigated the existence of arbitrary amplitude coupled kinetic Alfven-acoustic solitary waves in both the sub and super Alfvenic cases. The results obtained have been analyzed and presented graphically and can be applied to regions of space where the low {beta} assumption holds true.

  8. Mapping the region of instability for adiabatic continuation method

    OpenAIRE

    GUTIÉRREZHERNANDEZ, JUAN PABLO; Fontalvo Alzate, Javier; Gómez García, Miguel Ángel

    2011-01-01

    The pioneer schematic ideas of Kimura and Levenspiel (Ind. Eng. Chem. Proc. Des. Dev., 16 (1977) 145 – 148) have been developed to find numerically the region of instability for adiabatic packed bed reactors. Three different cases of special industrial interest and complexity are presented. The highly exothermic gas-phase reactions: ammonia synthesis, methanol production from syn-gas, and SO₂ oxidation. Equations were parameterized and solved according to a continuation homotopy numerical met...

  9. Hypercomputability of quantum adiabatic processes: Fact versus Prejudices

    CERN Document Server

    Kieu, T D

    2005-01-01

    We give an overview of a quantum adiabatic algorithm for Hilbert's tenth problem, including some discussions on its fundamental aspects and the emphasis on the probabilistic correctness of its findings. For the purpose of illustration, the numerical simulation results of some simple Diophantine equations are presented. We also discuss some prejudicial misunderstandings as well as some plausible difficulties faced by the algorithm in its physical implementation.

  10. Adiabaticity of the ramping process of an ac dipole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tomás

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available ac dipoles in accelerators are used to excite coherent betatron oscillations at a drive frequency close to the tune. If the excitation amplitude is slowly increased to the desired value and slowly decreased back to zero there is no significant emittance growth. The aim of this article is to study the adiabaticity of the ramping process of an ac dipole as a function of the different parameters involved.

  11. Quantum state preparation in semiconductor dots by adiabatic rapid passage

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Yanwen; Piper, I.M.; Ediger, M.; Brereton, P.; Schmidgall, E. R.; Hugues, M.; Hopkinson, M.; Phillips, R.T.

    2010-01-01

    Preparation of a specific quantum state is a required step for a variety of proposed practical uses of quantum dynamics. We report an experimental demonstration of optical quantum state preparation in a semiconductor quantum dot with electrical readout, which contrasts with earlier work based on Rabi flopping in that the method is robust with respect to variation in the optical coupling. We use adiabatic rapid passage, which is capable of inverting single dots to a specified upper level. We d...

  12. Adiabatic pipelining: a key to ternary computing with quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pečar, P; Ramšak, A; Zimic, N; Mraz, M; Lebar Bajec, I

    2008-12-10

    The quantum-dot cellular automaton (QCA), a processing platform based on interacting quantum dots, was introduced by Lent in the mid-1990s. What followed was an exhilarating period with the development of the line, the functionally complete set of logic functions, as well as more complex processing structures, however all in the realm of binary logic. Regardless of these achievements, it has to be acknowledged that the use of binary logic is in computing systems mainly the end result of the technological limitations, which the designers had to cope with in the early days of their design. The first advancement of QCAs to multi-valued (ternary) processing was performed by Lebar Bajec et al, with the argument that processing platforms of the future should not disregard the clear advantages of multi-valued logic. Some of the elementary ternary QCAs, necessary for the construction of more complex processing entities, however, lead to a remarkable increase in size when compared to their binary counterparts. This somewhat negates the advantages gained by entering the ternary computing domain. As it turned out, even the binary QCA had its initial hiccups, which have been solved by the introduction of adiabatic switching and the application of adiabatic pipeline approaches. We present here a study that introduces adiabatic switching into the ternary QCA and employs the adiabatic pipeline approach to successfully solve the issues of elementary ternary QCAs. What is more, the ternary QCAs presented here are sizewise comparable to binary QCAs. This in our view might serve towards their faster adoption.

  13. Adiabatic Compression Sensitivity of AF-M315E

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    is pressurized to specific driving pressures into an accumulator tank above a rapid-opening valve. This valve is placed directly above the burst disc...this mission. Of particular interest is the sensitivity of the propellant at elevated temperatures and the resulting system peak pressures and...dynamic response characteristics. For this study, an adiabatic compression U-tube apparatus was used to determine the driving pressure threshold levels

  14. Characterization of Adiabatic Noise in Charge-Based Coherent Nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arrigo, A.; Falci, G.; Mastellone, A.; Paladino, E.

    2008-10-01

    Low-frequency noise, often with 1/f spectrum, has been recognized as the main mechanism of decoherence in present-day solid state coherent nanodevices. The responsible degrees of freedom are almost static during the coherent time evolution of the device leading to effects analogous to inhomogeneous broadening in NMR. Here we present a characterization of the effects of adiabatic noise exploiting the tunability of nanodevices.

  15. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in physics, chemistry and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolay V. Vitanov; Rangelov, Andon A.; Shore, Bruce W.; Bergmann, Klaas

    2016-01-01

    The technique of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP), which allows efficient and selective population transfer between quantum states without suffering loss due to spontaneous emission, was introduced in 1990 (Gaubatz \\emph{et al.}, J. Chem. Phys. \\textbf{92}, 5363, 1990). Since then STIRAP has emerged as an enabling methodology with widespread successful applications in many fields of physics, chemistry and beyond. This article reviews the many applications of STIRAP emphasizing the ...

  16. Neutrino Production of Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Paschos, E A; Yu, J Y; Paschos, Emmanuel A.; Sakuda, Makoto; Yu, Ji--Young

    2004-01-01

    We take a fresh look at the analysis of resonance production by neutrinos. We consider three resonances $P_{33}, P_{11}$ and $S_{11}$ with a detailed discussion of their form factors. The article presents results for free proton and neutron targets and discusses the corrections which appear on nuclear targets. The Pauli suppression factor is derived in the Fermi gas model and shown to apply to resonance production. The importance of the various resonances is demonstrated with numerical calculations. The $\\Delta$-resonance is described by two formfactors and its differential cross sections are compared with experimental data. The article is self-contained and could be helpful to readers who wish to reproduce and use these cross sections.

  17. Dynamics of Quantum Adiabatic Evolution Algorithm for Number Partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadius; vonToussaint, Udo V.; Timucin, Dogan A.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a general technique to study the dynamics of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm applied to random combinatorial optimization problems in the asymptotic limit of large problem size n. We use as an example the NP-complete Number Partitioning problem and map the algorithm dynamics to that of an auxiliary quantum spin glass system with the slowly varying Hamiltonian. We use a Green function method to obtain the adiabatic eigenstates and the minimum exitation gap, gmin = O(n2(sup -n/2)), corresponding to the exponential complexity of the algorithm for Number Partitioning. The key element of the analysis is the conditional energy distribution computed for the set of all spin configurations generated from a given (ancestor) configuration by simultaneous flipping of a fixed number of spins. For the problem in question this distribution is shown to depend on the ancestor spin configuration only via a certain parameter related to the energy of the configuration. As the result, the algorithm dynamics can be described in terms of one-dimensional quantum diffusion in the energy space. This effect provides a general limitation of a quantum adiabatic computation in random optimization problems. Analytical results are in agreement with the numerical simulation of the algorithm.

  18. Thermal reservoir sizing for adiabatic compressed air energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kere, Amelie; Goetz, Vincent; Py, Xavier; Olives, Regis; Sadiki, Najim [Perpignan Univ. (France). PROMES CNRS UPR 8521; Mercier-Allart, Eric [EDF R et D, Chatou (France)

    2012-07-01

    Despite the operation of the two existing industrial facilities to McIntosh (Alabama), and for more than thirty years, Huntorf (Germany), electricity storage in the form of compressed air in underground cavern (CAES) has not seen the development that was expected in the 80s. The efficiency of this form of storage was with the first generation CAES, less than 50%. The evolving context technique can significantly alter this situation. The new generation so-called Adiabatic CAES (A-CAES) is to retrieve the heat produced by the compression via thermal storage, thus eliminating the necessity of gas to burn and would allow consideration efficiency overall energy of the order of 70%. To date, there is no existing installation of A-CAES. Many studies describe the principal and the general working mode of storage systems by adiabatic compression of air. So, efficiencies of different configurations of adiabatic compression process were analyzed. The aim of this paper is to simulate and analyze the performances of a thermal storage reservoir integrated in the system and adapted to the working conditions of a CAES.

  19. Adiabatic Shear Mechanisms for the Hard Cutting Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Caixu; WANG Bo; LIU Xianli; FENG Huize; CAI Chunbin

    2015-01-01

    The most important consequence of adiabatic shear phenomenon is formation of sawtooth chip. Lots of scholars focused on the formation mechanism of sawtooth, and the research often depended on experimental approach. For the present, the mechanism of sawtooth chip formation still remalns some ambiguous aspects. This study develops a combined numerical and experimental approach to get deeper understanding of sawtooth chip formation mechanism for Polycrystalline Cubic Boron Nitride (PCBN) tools orthogonal cutting hard steel GCr15. By adopting the Johnson-Cook material constitutive equations, the FEM simulation model established in this research effectively overcomes serious element distortions and cell singularity in high straln domaln caused by large material deformation, and the adiabatic shear phenomenon is simulated successfully. Both the formation mechanism and process of sawtooth are simulated. Also, the change features regarding the cutting force as well as its effects on temperature are studied. More specifically, the contact of sawtooth formation frequency with cutting force fluctuation frequency is established. The cutting force and effect of cutting temperature on mechanism of adiabatic shear are investigated. Furthermore, the effects of the cutting condition on sawtooth chip formation are researched. The researching results show that cutting feed has the most important effect on sawtooth chip formation compared with cutting depth and speed. This research contributes a better understanding of mechanism, feature of chip formation in hard turning process, and supplies theoretical basis for the optimization of hard cutting process parameters.

  20. Analysis of adiabatic transfer in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Joyee Ghosh; R Ghosh; Deepak Kumar

    2011-10-01

    A three-level atom in a configuration trapped in an optical cavity forms a basic unit in a number of proposed protocols for quantum information processing. This system allows for efficient storage of cavity photons into long-lived atomic excitations, and their retrieval with high fidelity, in an adiabatic transfer process through the ‘dark state’ by a slow variation of the control laser intensity. We study the full quantum mechanics of this transfer process with a view to examine the non-adiabatic effects arising from inevitable excitations of the system to states involving the upper level of , which is radiative. We find that the fidelity of storage is better, the stronger the control field and the slower the rate of its switching off. On the contrary, unlike the adiabatic notion, retrieval is better with faster rates of switching on of an optimal control field. Also, for retrieval, the behaviour with dissipation is non-monotonic. These results lend themselves to experimental tests. Our exact computations, when applied to slow variations of the control intensity for strong atom–photon couplings, are in very good agreement with Berry’s superadiabatic transfer results without dissipation.