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Sample records for adiabatic quantum computation

  1. Adiabatic Quantum Computation is Equivalent to Standard Quantum Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonov, D; Kempe, J; Landau, Z; Lloyd, S; Regev, O; Aharonov, Dorit; Dam, Wim van; Kempe, Julia; Landau, Zeph; Lloyd, Seth; Regev, Oded

    2004-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computation has recently attracted attention in the physics and computer science communities, but its computational power has been unknown. We settle this question and describe an efficient adiabatic simulation of any given quantum algorithm, which implies that the adiabatic computation model and the conventional quantum circuit model are polynomially equivalent. Our result can be extended to the physically realistic setting of particles arranged on a two-dimensional grid with nearest neighbor interactions. The equivalence between the models provides a new vantage point from which to tackle the central issues in quantum computation, namely designing new quantum algorithms and constructing fault tolerant quantum computers. In particular, by translating the main open questions in quantum algorithms to the language of spectral gaps of sparse matrices, the result makes quantum algorithmic questions accessible to a wider scientific audience, acquainted with mathematical physics, expander theory a...

  2. Ramsey numbers and adiabatic quantum computing

    OpenAIRE

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2011-01-01

    The graph-theoretic Ramsey numbers are notoriously difficult to calculate. In fact, for the two-color Ramsey numbers $R(m,n)$ with $m,n\\geq 3$, only nine are currently known. We present a quantum algorithm for the computation of the Ramsey numbers $R(m,n)$. We show how the computation of $R(m,n)$ can be mapped to a combinatorial optimization problem whose solution can be found using adiabatic quantum evolution. We numerically simulate this adiabatic quantum algorithm and show that it correctl...

  3. Ramsey numbers and adiabatic quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2012-01-01

    The graph-theoretic Ramsey numbers are notoriously difficult to calculate. In fact, for the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m,n) with m, n≥3, only nine are currently known. We present a quantum algorithm for the computation of the Ramsey numbers R(m,n). We show how the computation of R(m,n) can be mapped to a combinatorial optimization problem whose solution can be found using adiabatic quantum evolution. We numerically simulate this adiabatic quantum algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and R(2,s) for 5≤s≤7. We then discuss the algorithm's experimental implementation, and close by showing that Ramsey number computation belongs to the quantum complexity class quantum Merlin Arthur.

  4. Adiabatic Quantum Computing for Random Satisfiability Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Hogg, T

    2003-01-01

    The discrete formulation of adiabatic quantum computing is compared with other search methods, classical and quantum, for random satisfiability (SAT) problems. With the number of steps growing only as the cube of the number of variables, the adiabatic method gives solution probabilities close to one for problem sizes feasible to evaluate. However, for these sizes the minimum energy gaps are fairly large, so may not reflect asymptotic behavior where costs are dominated by tiny gaps. Moreover, the resulting search costs are much higher than other methods, but can be reduced by using fewer steps. Variants of the quantum algorithm that do not match the adiabatic limit give lower costs, on average, and slower growth than the conventional GSAT heuristic method.

  5. Adiabatic graph-state quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC) and holonomic quantum computation (HQC) are two very different computational methods. The computation in MBQC is driven by adaptive measurements executed in a particular order on a large entangled state. In contrast in HQC the system starts in the ground subspace of a Hamiltonian which is slowly changed such that a transformation occurs within the subspace. Following the approach of Bacon and Flammia, we show that any MBQC on a graph state with generalized flow (gflow) can be converted into an adiabatically driven holonomic computation, which we call adiabatic graph-state quantum computation (AGQC). We then investigate how properties of AGQC relate to the properties of MBQC, such as computational depth. We identify a trade-off that can be made between the number of adiabatic steps in AGQC and the norm of H-dot as well as the degree of H, in analogy to the trade-off between the number of measurements and classical post-processing seen in MBQC. Finally the effects of performing AGQC with orderings that differ from standard MBQC are investigated. (paper)

  6. How detrimental is decoherence in adiabatic quantum computation?

    CERN Document Server

    Albash, Tameem

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments with increasingly larger numbers of qubits have sparked renewed interest in adiabatic quantum computation, and in particular quantum annealing. A central question that is repeatedly asked is whether quantum features of the evolution can survive over the long time-scales used for quantum annealing relative to standard measures of the decoherence time. We reconsider the role of decoherence in adiabatic quantum computation and quantum annealing using the adiabatic quantum master equation formalism. We restrict ourselves to the weak-coupling and singular-coupling limits, which correspond to decoherence in the energy eigenbasis and in the computational basis, respectively. We demonstrate that decoherence in the instantaneous energy eigenbasis does not necessarily detrimentally affect adiabatic quantum computation, and in particular that a short single-qubit $T_2$ time need not imply adverse consequences for the success of the quantum adiabatic algorithm. We further demonstrate that boundary canc...

  7. Adiabatic quantum computation and quantum annealing theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    McGeoch, Catherine C

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) is an alternative to the better-known gate model of quantum computation. The two models are polynomially equivalent, but otherwise quite dissimilar: one property that distinguishes AQC from the gate model is its analog nature. Quantum annealing (QA) describes a type of heuristic search algorithm that can be implemented to run in the ``native instruction set'''' of an AQC platform. D-Wave Systems Inc. manufactures {quantum annealing processor chips} that exploit quantum properties to realize QA computations in hardware. The chips form the centerpiece of a nov

  8. High Fidelity Adiabatic Quantum Computation via Dynamical Decoupling

    CERN Document Server

    Quiroz, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    We introduce high-order dynamical decoupling strategies for open system adiabatic quantum computation. Our numerical results demonstrate that a judicious choice of high-order dynamical decoupling method, in conjunction with an encoding which allows computation to proceed alongside decoupling, can dramatically enhance the fidelity of adiabatic quantum computation in spite of decoherence.

  9. Number Partitioning via Quantum Adiabatic Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Toussaint, Udo; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We study both analytically and numerically the complexity of the adiabatic quantum evolution algorithm applied to random instances of combinatorial optimization problems. We use as an example the NP-complete set partition problem and obtain an asymptotic expression for the minimal gap separating the ground and exited states of a system during the execution of the algorithm. We show that for computationally hard problem instances the size of the minimal gap scales exponentially with the problem size. This result is in qualitative agreement with the direct numerical simulation of the algorithm for small instances of the set partition problem. We describe the statistical properties of the optimization problem that are responsible for the exponential behavior of the algorithm.

  10. Graph isomorphism and adiabatic quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2014-03-01

    In the Graph Isomorphism (GI) problem two N-vertex graphs G and G' are given and the task is to determine whether there exists a permutation of the vertices of G that preserves adjacency and maps G --> G'. If yes (no), then G and G' are said to be isomorphic (non-isomorphic). The GI problem is an important problem in computer science and is thought to be of comparable difficulty to integer factorization. We present a quantum algorithm that solves arbitrary instances of GI, and which provides a novel approach to determining all automorphisms of a graph. The algorithm converts a GI instance to a combinatorial optimization problem that can be solved using adiabatic quantum evolution. Numerical simulation of the algorithm's quantum dynamics shows that it correctly distinguishes non-isomorphic graphs; recognizes isomorphic graphs; and finds the automorphism group of a graph. We also discuss the algorithm's experimental implementation and show how it can be leveraged to solve arbitrary instances of the NP-Complete Sub-Graph Isomorphism problem.

  11. Irreconcilable difference between quantum walks and adiabatic quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Thomas G.; Meyer, David A.

    2016-06-01

    Continuous-time quantum walks and adiabatic quantum evolution are two general techniques for quantum computing, both of which are described by Hamiltonians that govern their evolutions by Schrödinger's equation. In the former, the Hamiltonian is fixed, while in the latter, the Hamiltonian varies with time. As a result, their formulations of Grover's algorithm evolve differently through Hilbert space. We show that this difference is fundamental; they cannot be made to evolve along each other's path without introducing structure more powerful than the standard oracle for unstructured search. For an adiabatic quantum evolution to evolve like the quantum walk search algorithm, it must interpolate between three fixed Hamiltonians, one of which is complex and introduces structure that is stronger than the oracle for unstructured search. Conversely, for a quantum walk to evolve along the path of the adiabatic search algorithm, it must be a chiral quantum walk on a weighted, directed star graph with structure that is also stronger than the oracle for unstructured search. Thus, the two techniques, although similar in being described by Hamiltonians that govern their evolution, compute by fundamentally irreconcilable means.

  12. Approximability of optimization problems through adiabatic quantum computation

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz-Santos, William

    2014-01-01

    The adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) is based on the adiabatic theorem to approximate solutions of the Schrödinger equation. The design of an AQC algorithm involves the construction of a Hamiltonian that describes the behavior of the quantum system. This Hamiltonian is expressed as a linear interpolation of an initial Hamiltonian whose ground state is easy to compute, and a final Hamiltonian whose ground state corresponds to the solution of a given combinatorial optimization problem. The adiabatic theorem asserts that if the time evolution of a quantum system described by a Hamiltonian is l

  13. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barends, R; Shabani, A; Lamata, L; Kelly, J; Mezzacapo, A; Las Heras, U; Babbush, R; Fowler, A G; Campbell, B; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Jeffrey, E; Lucero, E; Megrant, A; Mutus, J Y; Neeley, M; Neill, C; O'Malley, P J J; Quintana, C; Roushan, P; Sank, D; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; White, T C; Solano, E; Neven, H; Martinis, John M

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable. PMID:27279216

  14. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barends, R.; Shabani, A.; Lamata, L.; Kelly, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; Heras, U. Las; Babbush, R.; Fowler, A. G.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Lucero, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J. Y.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Solano, E.; Neven, H.; Martinis, John M.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  15. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barends, R; Shabani, A; Lamata, L; Kelly, J; Mezzacapo, A; Las Heras, U; Babbush, R; Fowler, A G; Campbell, B; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Jeffrey, E; Lucero, E; Megrant, A; Mutus, J Y; Neeley, M; Neill, C; O'Malley, P J J; Quintana, C; Roushan, P; Sank, D; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; White, T C; Solano, E; Neven, H; Martinis, John M

    2016-06-08

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  16. Bifurcation-based adiabatic quantum computation with a nonlinear oscillator network: Toward quantum soft computing

    OpenAIRE

    Hayato Goto

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of nonlinear systems qualitatively change depending on their parameters, which is called bifurcation. A quantum-mechanical nonlinear oscillator can yield a quantum superposition of two oscillation states, known as a Schr\\"odinger cat state, via quantum adiabatic evolution through its bifurcation point. Here we propose a quantum computer comprising such quantum nonlinear oscillators, instead of quantum bits, to solve hard combinatorial optimization problems. The nonlinear oscillat...

  17. Adiabatic quantum computing with spin qubits hosted by molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Satoru; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Sugisaki, Kenji; Sato, Kazunobu; Toyota, Kazuo; Shiomi, Daisuke; Takui, Takeji

    2015-01-28

    A molecular spin quantum computer (MSQC) requires electron spin qubits, which pulse-based electron spin/magnetic resonance (ESR/MR) techniques can afford to manipulate for implementing quantum gate operations in open shell molecular entities. Importantly, nuclear spins, which are topologically connected, particularly in organic molecular spin systems, are client qubits, while electron spins play a role of bus qubits. Here, we introduce the implementation for an adiabatic quantum algorithm, suggesting the possible utilization of molecular spins with optimized spin structures for MSQCs. We exemplify the utilization of an adiabatic factorization problem of 21, compared with the corresponding nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) case. Two molecular spins are selected: one is a molecular spin composed of three exchange-coupled electrons as electron-only qubits and the other an electron-bus qubit with two client nuclear spin qubits. Their electronic spin structures are well characterized in terms of the quantum mechanical behaviour in the spin Hamiltonian. The implementation of adiabatic quantum computing/computation (AQC) has, for the first time, been achieved by establishing ESR/MR pulse sequences for effective spin Hamiltonians in a fully controlled manner of spin manipulation. The conquered pulse sequences have been compared with the NMR experiments and shown much faster CPU times corresponding to the interaction strength between the spins. Significant differences are shown in rotational operations and pulse intervals for ESR/MR operations. As a result, we suggest the advantages and possible utilization of the time-evolution based AQC approach for molecular spin quantum computers and molecular spin quantum simulators underlain by sophisticated ESR/MR pulsed spin technology.

  18. Landau-Zener Transitions in an Adiabatic Quantum Computer

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, J; Amin, M. H. S.; Berkley, A. J.; Bunyk, P.; Choi, V.; Harris, R.; Johnson, M. W.; Lanting, T. M.; Lloyd, Seth; ROSE, G

    2008-01-01

    We report an experimental measurement of Landau-Zener transitions on an individual flux qubit within a multi-qubit superconducting chip designed for adiabatic quantum computation. The method used isolates a single qubit, tunes its tunneling amplitude Delta into the limit where Delta is much less than both the temperature T and the decoherence-induced energy level broadening, and forces it to undergo a Landau-Zener transition. We find that the behavior of the qubit agrees to a high degree of a...

  19. Schedule path optimization for adiabatic quantum computing and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adiabatic quantum computing and optimization have garnered much attention recently as possible models for achieving a quantum advantage over classical approaches to optimization and other special purpose computations. Both techniques are probabilistic in nature and the minimum gap between the ground state and first excited state of the system during evolution is a major factor in determining the success probability. In this work we investigate a strategy for increasing the minimum gap and success probability by introducing intermediate Hamiltonians that modify the evolution path between initial and final Hamiltonians. We focus on an optimization problem relevant to recent hardware implementations and present numerical evidence for the existence of a purely local intermediate Hamiltonian that achieve the optimum performance in terms of pushing the minimum gap to one of the end points of the evolution. As a part of this study we develop a convex optimization formulation of the search for optimal adiabatic schedules that makes this computation more tractable, and which may be of independent interest. We further study the effectiveness of random intermediate Hamiltonians on the minimum gap and success probability, and empirically find that random Hamiltonians have a significant probability of increasing the success probability, but only by a modest amount. (paper)

  20. Nonadiabatic corrections to a quantum dot quantum computer working in adiabatic limit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Ávila

    2014-07-01

    The time of operation of an adiabatic quantum computer must be less than the decoherence time, otherwise the computer would be nonoperative. So far, the nonadiabatic corrections to an adiabatic quantum computer are merely theoretical considerations. By the above reason, we consider the particular case of a quantum-dot-confined electron spin qubit working adiabatically in the nanoscale regime (e.g., in the MeV range of energies) and include nonadiabatic corrections in it. If the decoherence times of a quantum dot computer are ∼100 ns [J M Kikkawa and D D Awschalom, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 4313 (1998)] then the predicted number of one qubit gate (primitive) operations of the Loss–DiVincenzo quantum computer in such an interval of time must be > 1010. However, if the quantum-dot-confined electron spin qubit is very excited (i.e., the semiclassical limit) the number of operations of such a computer would be approximately the same as that of a classical computer. Our results suggest that for an adiabatic quantum computer to operate successfully within the decoherence times, it is necessary to take into account nonadiabatic corrections.

  1. Bifurcation-based adiabatic quantum computation with a nonlinear oscillator network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hayato

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of nonlinear systems qualitatively change depending on their parameters, which is called bifurcation. A quantum-mechanical nonlinear oscillator can yield a quantum superposition of two oscillation states, known as a Schrödinger cat state, via quantum adiabatic evolution through its bifurcation point. Here we propose a quantum computer comprising such quantum nonlinear oscillators, instead of quantum bits, to solve hard combinatorial optimization problems. The nonlinear oscillator network finds optimal solutions via quantum adiabatic evolution, where nonlinear terms are increased slowly, in contrast to conventional adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing, where quantum fluctuation terms are decreased slowly. As a result of numerical simulations, it is concluded that quantum superposition and quantum fluctuation work effectively to find optimal solutions. It is also notable that the present computer is analogous to neural computers, which are also networks of nonlinear components. Thus, the present scheme will open new possibilities for quantum computation, nonlinear science, and artificial intelligence.

  2. Bifurcation-based adiabatic quantum computation with a nonlinear oscillator network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hayato

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of nonlinear systems qualitatively change depending on their parameters, which is called bifurcation. A quantum-mechanical nonlinear oscillator can yield a quantum superposition of two oscillation states, known as a Schrödinger cat state, via quantum adiabatic evolution through its bifurcation point. Here we propose a quantum computer comprising such quantum nonlinear oscillators, instead of quantum bits, to solve hard combinatorial optimization problems. The nonlinear oscillator network finds optimal solutions via quantum adiabatic evolution, where nonlinear terms are increased slowly, in contrast to conventional adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing, where quantum fluctuation terms are decreased slowly. As a result of numerical simulations, it is concluded that quantum superposition and quantum fluctuation work effectively to find optimal solutions. It is also notable that the present computer is analogous to neural computers, which are also networks of nonlinear components. Thus, the present scheme will open new possibilities for quantum computation, nonlinear science, and artificial intelligence.

  3. Bifurcation-based adiabatic quantum computation with a nonlinear oscillator network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hayato

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of nonlinear systems qualitatively change depending on their parameters, which is called bifurcation. A quantum-mechanical nonlinear oscillator can yield a quantum superposition of two oscillation states, known as a Schrödinger cat state, via quantum adiabatic evolution through its bifurcation point. Here we propose a quantum computer comprising such quantum nonlinear oscillators, instead of quantum bits, to solve hard combinatorial optimization problems. The nonlinear oscillator network finds optimal solutions via quantum adiabatic evolution, where nonlinear terms are increased slowly, in contrast to conventional adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing, where quantum fluctuation terms are decreased slowly. As a result of numerical simulations, it is concluded that quantum superposition and quantum fluctuation work effectively to find optimal solutions. It is also notable that the present computer is analogous to neural computers, which are also networks of nonlinear components. Thus, the present scheme will open new possibilities for quantum computation, nonlinear science, and artificial intelligence. PMID:26899997

  4. Differential geometric treewidth estimation in adiabatic quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi; Jonckheere, Edmond; Brun, Todd

    2016-07-01

    The D-Wave adiabatic quantum computing platform is designed to solve a particular class of problems—the Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) problems. Due to the particular "Chimera" physical architecture of the D-Wave chip, the logical problem graph at hand needs an extra process called minor embedding in order to be solvable on the D-Wave architecture. The latter problem is itself NP-hard. In this paper, we propose a novel polynomial-time approximation to the closely related treewidth based on the differential geometric concept of Ollivier-Ricci curvature. The latter runs in polynomial time and thus could significantly reduce the overall complexity of determining whether a QUBO problem is minor embeddable, and thus solvable on the D-Wave architecture.

  5. A Random Matrix Model of Adiabatic Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, D R; Lue, W; Williams, C P; Mitchell, David R.; Adami, Christoph; Lue, Waynn; Williams, Colin P.

    2004-01-01

    We present an analysis of the quantum adiabatic algorithm for solving hard instances of 3-SAT (an NP-complete problem) in terms of Random Matrix Theory (RMT). We determine the global regularity of the spectral fluctuations of the instantaneous Hamiltonians encountered during the interpolation between the starting Hamiltonians and the ones whose ground states encode the solutions to the computational problems of interest. At each interpolation point, we quantify the degree of regularity of the average spectral distribution via its Brody parameter, a measure that distinguishes regular (i.e., Poissonian) from chaotic (i.e., Wigner-type) distributions of normalized nearest-neighbor spacings. We find that for hard problem instances, i.e., those having a critical ratio of clauses to variables, the spectral fluctuations typically become irregular across a contiguous region of the interpolation parameter, while the spectrum is regular for easy instances. Within the hard region, RMT may be applied to obtain a mathemat...

  6. Differential geometric treewidth estimation in adiabatic quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi; Jonckheere, Edmond; Brun, Todd

    2016-10-01

    The D-Wave adiabatic quantum computing platform is designed to solve a particular class of problems—the Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) problems. Due to the particular "Chimera" physical architecture of the D-Wave chip, the logical problem graph at hand needs an extra process called minor embedding in order to be solvable on the D-Wave architecture. The latter problem is itself NP-hard. In this paper, we propose a novel polynomial-time approximation to the closely related treewidth based on the differential geometric concept of Ollivier-Ricci curvature. The latter runs in polynomial time and thus could significantly reduce the overall complexity of determining whether a QUBO problem is minor embeddable, and thus solvable on the D-Wave architecture.

  7. Non-adiabatic holonomic quantum computation in linear system-bath coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunfang; Wang, Gangcheng; Wu, Chunfeng; Liu, Haodi; Feng, Xun-Li; Chen, Jing-Ling; Xue, Kang

    2016-02-05

    Non-adiabatic holonomic quantum computation in decoherence-free subspaces protects quantum information from control imprecisions and decoherence. For the non-collective decoherence that each qubit has its own bath, we show the implementations of two non-commutable holonomic single-qubit gates and one holonomic nontrivial two-qubit gate that compose a universal set of non-adiabatic holonomic quantum gates in decoherence-free-subspaces of the decoupling group, with an encoding rate of (N - 2)/N. The proposed scheme is robust against control imprecisions and the non-collective decoherence, and its non-adiabatic property ensures less operation time. We demonstrate that our proposed scheme can be realized by utilizing only two-qubit interactions rather than many-qubit interactions. Our results reduce the complexity of practical implementation of holonomic quantum computation in experiments. We also discuss the physical implementation of our scheme in coupled microcavities.

  8. Adiabatic quantum simulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Biamonte

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In his famous 1981 talk, Feynman proposed that unlike classical computers, which would presumably experience an exponential slowdown when simulating quantum phenomena, a universal quantum simulator would not. An ideal quantum simulator would be controllable, and built using existing technology. In some cases, moving away from gate-model-based implementations of quantum computing may offer a more feasible solution for particular experimental implementations. Here we consider an adiabatic quantum simulator which simulates the ground state properties of sparse Hamiltonians consisting of one- and two-local interaction terms, using sparse Hamiltonians with at most three-local interactions. Properties of such Hamiltonians can be well approximated with Hamiltonians containing only two-local terms. The register holding the simulated ground state is brought adiabatically into interaction with a probe qubit, followed by a single diabatic gate operation on the probe which then undergoes free evolution until measured. This allows one to recover e.g. the ground state energy of the Hamiltonian being simulated. Given a ground state, this scheme can be used to verify the QMA-complete problem LOCAL HAMILTONIAN, and is therefore likely more powerful than classical computing.

  9. High-performance Energy Minimization with Applications to Adiabatic Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, Hector J

    2009-01-01

    Recent proposals explore non-traditional computing based on nature's ability to find ground states in atomic-scale systems. To this end, we (i) design and evaluate new computational techniques to simulate natural energy minimization in spin glasses and (ii) explore their application to study design alternatives in quantum adiabatic computers. Unlike previous work, our algorithms are not limited to planar Ising topologies. In one CPU-day, our branch-and-bound algorithm finds ground states on 100 spins, while our local search approximates ground states on 1,000,000 spins. We use this computational tool as a simulator to study the significance of hyper-couplings in recently implemented adiabatic quantum computers.

  10. Crushing runtimes in adiabatic quantum computation with Energy Landscape Manipulation (ELM): Application to Quantum Factoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattani, Nike; Tanburn, Richard; Lunt, Oliver

    We introduce two methods for speeding up adiabatic quantum computations by increasing the energy between the ground and first excited states. Our methods are even more general. They can be used to shift a Hamiltonian's density of states away from the ground state, so that fewer states occupy the low-lying energies near the minimum, hence allowing for faster adiabatic passages to find the ground state with less risk of getting caught in an undesired low-lying excited state during the passage. Even more generally, our methods can be used to transform a discrete optimization problem into a new one whose unique minimum still encodes the desired answer, but with the objective function's values forming a different landscape. Aspects of the landscape such as the objective function's range, or the values of certain coefficients, or how many different inputs lead to a given output value, can be decreased *or* increased. One of the many examples for which these methods are useful is in finding the ground state of a Hamiltonian using NMR. We apply our methods to an AQC algorithm for integer factorization, and the first method reduces the maximum runtime in our example by up to 754%, and the second method reduces the maximum runtime of another example by up to 250%.

  11. Use of non-adiabatic geometric phase for quantum computing by nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Das, R; Kumar, A; Das, Ranabir; Kumar, Anil

    2005-01-01

    Geometric phases have stimulated researchers for its potential applications in many areas of science. One of them is fault-tolerant quantum computation. A preliminary requisite of quantum computation is the implementation of controlled logic gates by controlled dynamics of qubits. In controlled dynamics, one qubit undergoes coherent evolution and acquires appropriate phase, depending on the state of other qubits. If the evolution is geometric, then the phase acquired depend only on the geometry of the path executed, and is robust against certain types of errors. This phenomenon leads to an inherently fault-tolerant quantum computation. Here we suggest a technique of using non-adiabatic geometric phase for quantum computation, using selective excitation. In a two-qubit system, we selectively evolve a suitable subsystem where the control qubit is in state |1>, through a closed circuit. By this evolution, the target qubit gains a phase controlled by the state of the control qubit. Using these geometric phase gat...

  12. Quantum computation in decoherence-free subspace via cavity-decay-assisted adiabatic passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FENG Xunli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work,a scheme for quantum computation based on cavity QED in a decoherence-free subspaces via using the technique of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP is proposed.To implement universal quantum logic gates that form basic blocks of quantum computation,we suppose two atoms are trapped in a single-mode cavity with large decay rates and are driven by the laser fields.The relatively large cavity decay can be used for the continuous detection of the cavity mode as so-called ″cavity-decay-induced quantum Zeno effect″.The results show that,decoherence induced by the atomic spontaneous emission and cavity decay can be efficiently suppress with the STIRAP technique and the quantum Zeno effect.

  13. Quantum adiabatic machine learning

    CERN Document Server

    Pudenz, Kristen L

    2011-01-01

    We develop an approach to machine learning and anomaly detection via quantum adiabatic evolution. In the training phase we identify an optimal set of weak classifiers, to form a single strong classifier. In the testing phase we adiabatically evolve one or more strong classifiers on a superposition of inputs in order to find certain anomalous elements in the classification space. Both the training and testing phases are executed via quantum adiabatic evolution. We apply and illustrate this approach in detail to the problem of software verification and validation.

  14. Exponential vanishing of the ground-state gap of the quantum random energy model via adiabatic quantum computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adame, J.; Warzel, S., E-mail: warzel@ma.tum.de [Zentrum Mathematik, TU München, Boltzmannstr. 3, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    In this note, we use ideas of Farhi et al. [Int. J. Quantum. Inf. 6, 503 (2008) and Quantum Inf. Comput. 11, 840 (2011)] who link a lower bound on the run time of their quantum adiabatic search algorithm to an upper bound on the energy gap above the ground-state of the generators of this algorithm. We apply these ideas to the quantum random energy model (QREM). Our main result is a simple proof of the conjectured exponential vanishing of the energy gap of the QREM.

  15. Do multipartite correlations speed up adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batle, J.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Farouk, Ahmed; Abutalib, M.; Abdalla, S.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum correlations are thought to be the reason why certain quantum algorithms overcome their classical counterparts. Since the nature of this resource is still not fully understood, we shall investigate how multipartite entanglement and non-locality among qubits vary as the quantum computation runs. We shall encounter that quantum measures on the whole system cannot account for their corresponding speedup.

  16. An Integrated Programming and Development Environment for Adiabatic Quantum Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Humble, Travis S.; McCaskey, Alex J.; Bennink, Ryan S.; Billings, Jay J.; D'Azevedo, Ed F.; Sullivan, Blair D.; Klymko, Christine F.; Seddiqi, Hadayat

    2013-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing is a promising route to the computational power afforded by quantum information processing. The recent availability of adiabatic hardware has raised challenging questions about how to evaluate adiabatic quantum optimization programs. Processor behavior depends on multiple steps to synthesize an adiabatic quantum program, which are each highly tunable. We present an integrated programming and development environment for adiabatic quantum optimization called JADE tha...

  17. Error suppression and error correction in adiabatic quantum computation: non-equilibrium dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarovar, Mohan; Young, Kevin C.

    2013-12-01

    While adiabatic quantum computing (AQC) has some robustness to noise and decoherence, it is widely believed that encoding, error suppression and error correction will be required to scale AQC to large problem sizes. Previous works have established at least two different techniques for error suppression in AQC. In this paper we derive a model for describing the dynamics of encoded AQC and show that previous constructions for error suppression can be unified with this dynamical model. In addition, the model clarifies the mechanisms of error suppression and allows the identification of its weaknesses. In the second half of the paper, we utilize our description of non-equilibrium dynamics in encoded AQC to construct methods for error correction in AQC by cooling local degrees of freedom (qubits). While this is shown to be possible in principle, we also identify the key challenge to this approach: the requirement of high-weight Hamiltonians. Finally, we use our dynamical model to perform a simplified thermal stability analysis of concatenated-stabilizer-code encoded many-body systems for AQC or quantum memories. This work is a companion paper to ‘Error suppression and error correction in adiabatic quantum computation: techniques and challenges (2013 Phys. Rev. X 3 041013)’, which provides a quantum information perspective on the techniques and limitations of error suppression and correction in AQC. In this paper we couch the same results within a dynamical framework, which allows for a detailed analysis of the non-equilibrium dynamics of error suppression and correction in encoded AQC.

  18. Adiabatic Quantum Search in Open Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Dominik S.; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Knap, Michael; Yao, Norman Y.; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2016-10-01

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms represent a promising approach to universal quantum computation. In isolated systems, a key limitation to such algorithms is the presence of avoided level crossings, where gaps become extremely small. In open quantum systems, the fundamental robustness of adiabatic algorithms remains unresolved. Here, we study the dynamics near an avoided level crossing associated with the adiabatic quantum search algorithm, when the system is coupled to a generic environment. At zero temperature, we find that the algorithm remains scalable provided the noise spectral density of the environment decays sufficiently fast at low frequencies. By contrast, higher order scattering processes render the algorithm inefficient at any finite temperature regardless of the spectral density, implying that no quantum speedup can be achieved. Extensions and implications for other adiabatic quantum algorithms will be discussed.

  19. Complexity of the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hen, Itay

    2013-01-01

    The Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm (QAA) has been proposed as a mechanism for efficiently solving optimization problems on a quantum computer. Since adiabatic computation is analog in nature and does not require the design and use of quantum gates, it can be thought of as a simpler and perhaps more profound method for performing quantum computations that might also be easier to implement experimentally. While these features have generated substantial research in QAA, to date there is still a lack of solid evidence that the algorithm can outperform classical optimization algorithms.

  20. Adiabatic quantum simulation of quantum chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-10-13

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions.

  1. An Integrated Development Environment for Adiabatic Quantum Programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humble, Travis S [ORNL; McCaskey, Alex [ORNL; Bennink, Ryan S [ORNL; Billings, Jay Jay [ORNL; D' Azevedo, Eduardo [ORNL; Sullivan, Blair D [ORNL; Klymko, Christine F [ORNL; Seddiqi, Hadayat [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing is a promising route to the computational power afforded by quantum information processing. The recent availability of adiabatic hardware raises the question of how well quantum programs perform. Benchmarking behavior is challenging since the multiple steps to synthesize an adiabatic quantum program are highly tunable. We present an adiabatic quantum programming environment called JADE that provides control over all the steps taken during program development. JADE captures the workflow needed to rigorously benchmark performance while also allowing a variety of problem types, programming techniques, and processor configurations. We have also integrated JADE with a quantum simulation engine that enables program profiling using numerical calculation. The computational engine supports plug-ins for simulation methodologies tailored to various metrics and computing resources. We present the design, integration, and deployment of JADE and discuss its use for benchmarking adiabatic quantum programs.

  2. Quantum adiabatic algorithm for factorization and its experimental implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xinhua; Liao, Zeyang; Xu, Nanyang; Qin, Gan; Zhou, Xianyi; Suter, Dieter; Du, Jiangfeng

    2008-11-28

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm capable of factorizing numbers, using fewer qubits than Shor's algorithm. We implement the algorithm in a NMR quantum information processor and experimentally factorize the number 21. In the range that our classical computer could simulate, the quantum adiabatic algorithm works well, providing evidence that the running time of this algorithm scales polynomially with the problem size. PMID:19113467

  3. Partial differential equations constrained combinatorial optimization on an adiabatic quantum computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Rishabh

    Partial differential equation-constrained combinatorial optimization (PDECCO) problems are a mixture of continuous and discrete optimization problems. PDECCO problems have discrete controls, but since the partial differential equations (PDE) are continuous, the optimization space is continuous as well. Such problems have several applications, such as gas/water network optimization, traffic optimization, micro-chip cooling optimization, etc. Currently, no efficient classical algorithm which guarantees a global minimum for PDECCO problems exists. A new mapping has been developed that transforms PDECCO problem, which only have linear PDEs as constraints, into quadratic unconstrained binary optimization (QUBO) problems that can be solved using an adiabatic quantum optimizer (AQO). The mapping is efficient, it scales polynomially with the size of the PDECCO problem, requires only one PDE solve to form the QUBO problem, and if the QUBO problem is solved correctly and efficiently on an AQO, guarantees a global optimal solution for the original PDECCO problem.

  4. Optimizing adiabaticity in quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    MacKenzie, R; Renaud-Desjardins, L

    2011-01-01

    A condition on the Hamiltonian of a time-dependent quantum mechanical system is derived which, if satisfied, implies optimal adiabaticity (defined below). The condition is expressed in terms of the Hamiltonian and in terms of the evolution operator related to it. Since the latter depends in a complicated way on the Hamiltonian, it is not yet clear how the condition can be used to extract useful information about the optimal Hamiltonian. The condition is tested on an exactly-soluble time-dependent problem (a spin in a magnetic field), where perfectly adiabatic evolution can be easily identified.

  5. Hypergraph Ramsey Numbers and Adiabatic Quantum Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Qu, Ri; Bao, Yan-ru

    2012-01-01

    Gaitan and Clark [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 010501 (2012)] have recently presented a quantum algorithm for the computation of the Ramsey numbers R(m, n) using adiabatic quantum evolution. We consider that the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m, n; r) for r-uniform hypergraphs can be computed by using the similar ways in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 010501 (2012)]. In this comment, we show how the computation of R(m, n; r) can be mapped to a combinatorial optimization problem whose solution be found using adi...

  6. Experimental implementation of an adiabatic quantum optimization algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, M; Hogg, T; Breyta, G; Chuang, I; Steffen, Matthias; Dam, Wim van; Hogg, Tad; Breyta, Greg; Chuang, Isaac

    2003-01-01

    We report the realization of a nuclear magnetic resonance computer with three quantum bits that simulates an adiabatic quantum optimization algorithm. Adiabatic quantum algorithms offer new insight into how quantum resources can be used to solve hard problems. This experiment uses a particularly well suited three quantum bit molecule and was made possible by introducing a technique that encodes general instances of the given optimization problem into an easily applicable Hamiltonian. Our results indicate an optimal run time of the adiabatic algorithm that agrees well with the prediction of a simple decoherence model.

  7. Generalized Ramsey numbers through adiabatic quantum optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Mani; Macready, William G.; Clark, Lane; Gaitan, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Ramsey theory is an active research area in combinatorics whose central theme is the emergence of order in large disordered structures, with Ramsey numbers marking the threshold at which this order first appears. For generalized Ramsey numbers r( G, H), the emergent order is characterized by graphs G and H. In this paper we: (i) present a quantum algorithm for computing generalized Ramsey numbers by reformulating the computation as a combinatorial optimization problem which is solved using adiabatic quantum optimization; and (ii) determine the Ramsey numbers r({{T}}m,{{T}}n) for trees of order m,n = 6,7,8, most of which were previously unknown.

  8. Hamiltonian Dynamics and Adiabatic Invariants for Time-Dependent Superconducting Qubit-Oscillators and Resonators in Quantum Computing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Ryeol Choi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An adiabatic invariant, which is a conserved quantity, is useful for studying quantum and classical properties of dynamical systems. Adiabatic invariants for time-dependent superconducting qubit-oscillator systems and resonators are investigated using the Liouville-von Neumann equation. At first, we derive an invariant for a simple superconducting qubit-oscillator through the introduction of its reduced Hamiltonian. Afterwards, an adiabatic invariant for a nanomechanical resonator linearly interfaced with a superconducting circuit, via a coupling with a time-dependent strength, is evaluated using the technique of unitary transformation. The accuracy of conservation for such invariant quantities is represented in detail. Based on the results of our developments in this paper, perturbation theory is applicable to the research of quantum characteristics of more complicated qubit systems that are described by a time-dependent Hamiltonian involving nonlinear terms.

  9. Adiabatic rotation, quantum search, and preparation of superposition states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, M. Stewart

    2007-06-01

    We introduce the idea of using adiabatic rotation to generate superpositions of a large class of quantum states. For quantum computing this is an interesting alternative to the well-studied “straight line” adiabatic evolution. In ways that complement recent results, we show how to efficiently prepare three types of states: Kitaev’s toric code state, the cluster state of the measurement-based computation model, and the history state used in the adiabatic simulation of a quantum circuit. We also show that the method, when adapted for quantum search, provides quadratic speedup as other optimal methods do with the advantages that the problem Hamiltonian is time independent and that the energy gap above the ground state is strictly nondecreasing with time. Likewise the method can be used for optimization as an alternative to the standard adiabatic algorithm.

  10. Adiabatic quantum optimization with qudits

    CERN Document Server

    Amin, M H S; Smith, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Most realistic solid state devices considered as qubits are not true two-state systems but multi-level systems. They can approximately be considered as qubits only if the energy separation of the upper energy levels from the lowest two is very large. If this condition is not met, the upper states may affect the evolution and therefore cannot be neglected. Here, we consider devices with double-well potential as basic logical elements, and study the effect of higher energy levels, beyond the lowest two, on adiabatic quantum optimization. We show that the extra levels can be modeled by adding additional (ancilla) qubits coupled to the original (logical) qubits. The presence of these levels is shown to have no effect on the final ground state. We also study their influence on the minimum gap for a set of 8-qubit spin glass instances.

  11. Quantum Pumping and Adiabatic Transport in Nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, G.M.M.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis consists of a theoretical exploration of quantum transport phenomena and quantum dynamics in nanostructures. Specifically, we investigate adiabatic quantum pumping of charge in several novel types of nanostructures involving open quantum dots or graphene. For a bilayer of graphene we fin

  12. Adiabatic description of nonspherical quantum dot models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusev, A. A., E-mail: gooseff@jinr.ru; Chuluunbaatar, O.; Vinitsky, S. I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Dvoyan, K. G.; Kazaryan, E. M.; Sarkisyan, H. A. [Russian-Armenian (Slavonic) University (Armenia); Derbov, V. L.; Klombotskaya, A. S.; Serov, V. V. [Saratov State University (Russian Federation)

    2012-10-15

    Within the effective mass approximation an adiabatic description of spheroidal and dumbbell quantum dot models in the regime of strong dimensional quantization is presented using the expansion of the wave function in appropriate sets of single-parameter basis functions. The comparison is given and the peculiarities are considered for spectral and optical characteristics of the models with axially symmetric confining potentials depending on their geometric size, making use of the complete sets of exact and adiabatic quantum numbers in appropriate analytic approximations.

  13. Hierarchical theory of quantum adiabatic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Gong, Jiangbin; Wu, Biao

    2014-12-01

    Quantum adiabatic evolution is a dynamical evolution of a quantum system under slow external driving. According to the quantum adiabatic theorem, no transitions occur between nondegenerate instantaneous energy eigenstates in such a dynamical evolution. However, this is true only when the driving rate is infinitesimally small. For a small nonzero driving rate, there are generally small transition probabilities between the energy eigenstates. We develop a classical mechanics framework to address the small deviations from the quantum adiabatic theorem order by order. A hierarchy of Hamiltonians is constructed iteratively with the zeroth-order Hamiltonian being determined by the original system Hamiltonian. The kth-order deviations are governed by a kth-order Hamiltonian, which depends on the time derivatives of the adiabatic parameters up to the kth-order. Two simple examples, the Landau-Zener model and a spin-1/2 particle in a rotating magnetic field, are used to illustrate our hierarchical theory. Our analysis also exposes a deep, previously unknown connection between classical adiabatic theory and quantum adiabatic theory.

  14. Partial evolution based local adiabatic quantum search

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Jie; Lu Song-Feng; Liu Fang; Yang Li-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Recently,Zhang and Lu provided a quantum search algorithm based on partial adiabatic evolution,which beats the time bound of local adiabatic search when the number of marked items in the unsorted database is larger than one.Later,they found that the above two adiabatic search algorithms had the same time complexity when there is only one marked item in the database.In the present paper,following the idea of Roland and Cerf [Roland J and Cerf N J 2002Phys.Rev.A 65 042308],if within the small symmetric evolution interval defined by Zhang et al.,a local adiabatic evolution is performed instead of the original “global” one,this “new” algorithm exhibits slightly better performance,although they are progressively equivalent with M increasing.In addition,the proof of the optimality for this partial evolution based local adiabatic search when M =1 is also presented.Two other special cases of the adiabatic algorithm obtained by appropriately tuning the evolution interval of partial adiabatic evolution based quantum search,which are found to have the same phenomenon above,are also discussed.

  15. New Dynamical Scaling Universality for Quantum Networks Across Adiabatic Quantum Phase Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Oscar L.; Rodriguez, Ferney J.; Quiroga, Luis; Johnson, Neil F.; Rey, Ana M.

    2014-05-01

    We reveal universal dynamical scaling behavior across adiabatic quantum phase transitions in networks ranging from traditional spatial systems (Ising model) to fully connected ones (Dicke and Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick models). Our findings, which lie beyond traditional critical exponent analysis and adiabatic perturbation approximations, are applicable even where excitations have not yet stabilized and, hence, provide a time-resolved understanding of quantum phase transitions encompassing a wide range of adiabatic regimes. We show explicitly that even though two systems may traditionally belong to the same universality class, they can have very different adiabatic evolutions. This implies that more stringent conditions need to be imposed than at present, both for quantum simulations where one system is used to simulate the other and for adiabatic quantum computing schemes.

  16. Adiabatic Quantum Optimization for Associative Memory Recall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadayat eSeddiqi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO. Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are stored in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.

  17. Adiabatic quantum algorithm for search engine ranking

    CERN Document Server

    Garnerone, Silvano; Lidar, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm to evaluate the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this quantum algorithm outputs any component of the PageRank vector-and thus the ranking of the corresponding webpage-in a time which scales polylogarithmically in the number of webpages. This would constitute an exponential speed-up with respect to all known classical algorithms designed to evaluate the PageRank.

  18. Dynamics of Quantum Adiabatic Evolution Algorithm for Number Partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadius; vonToussaint, Udo V.; Timucin, Dogan A.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a general technique to study the dynamics of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm applied to random combinatorial optimization problems in the asymptotic limit of large problem size n. We use as an example the NP-complete Number Partitioning problem and map the algorithm dynamics to that of an auxiliary quantum spin glass system with the slowly varying Hamiltonian. We use a Green function method to obtain the adiabatic eigenstates and the minimum exitation gap, gmin = O(n2(sup -n/2)), corresponding to the exponential complexity of the algorithm for Number Partitioning. The key element of the analysis is the conditional energy distribution computed for the set of all spin configurations generated from a given (ancestor) configuration by simultaneous flipping of a fixed number of spins. For the problem in question this distribution is shown to depend on the ancestor spin configuration only via a certain parameter related to the energy of the configuration. As the result, the algorithm dynamics can be described in terms of one-dimensional quantum diffusion in the energy space. This effect provides a general limitation of a quantum adiabatic computation in random optimization problems. Analytical results are in agreement with the numerical simulation of the algorithm.

  19. Quantum adiabatic evolution with energy degeneracy levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    A classical-kind phase-space formalism is developed to address the tiny intrinsic dynamical deviation from what is predicted by Wilczek-Zee theorem during quantum adiabatic evolution on degeneracy levels. In this formalism, the Hilbert space and the aggregate of degenerate eigenstates become the classical-kind phase space and a high-dimensional subspace in the phase space, respectively. Compared with the previous analogous study by a different method, the current result is qualitatively different in that the first-order deviation derived here is always perpendicular to the degeneracy subspace. A tripod-scheme Hamiltonian with two degenerate dark states is employed to illustrate the adiabatic deviation with degeneracy levels.

  20. Quantum Adiabatic Pumping by Modulating Tunnel Phase in Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Masahiko; Nakajima, Satoshi; Kubo, Toshihiro; Tokura, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    In a mesoscopic system, under zero bias voltage, a finite charge is transferred by quantum adiabatic pumping by adiabatically and periodically changing two or more control parameters. We obtained expressions for the pumped charge for a ring of three quantum dots (QDs) by choosing the magnetic flux penetrating the ring as one of the control parameters. We found that the pumped charge shows a steplike behavior with respect to the variance of the flux. The value of the step heights is not universal but depends on the trajectory of the control parameters. We discuss the physical origin of this behavior on the basis of the Fano resonant condition of the ring.

  1. Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Steane, A M

    1998-01-01

    The subject of quantum computing brings together ideas from classical information theory, computer science, and quantum physics. This review aims to summarise not just quantum computing, but the whole subject of quantum information theory. It turns out that information theory and quantum mechanics fit together very well. In order to explain their relationship, the review begins with an introduction to classical information theory and computer science, including Shannon's theorem, error correcting codes, Turing machines and computational complexity. The principles of quantum mechanics are then outlined, and the EPR experiment described. The EPR-Bell correlations, and quantum entanglement in general, form the essential new ingredient which distinguishes quantum from classical information theory, and, arguably, quantum from classical physics. Basic quantum information ideas are described, including key distribution, teleportation, data compression, quantum error correction, the universal quantum computer and qua...

  2. Adiabatic Quantum Programming: Minor Embedding With Hard Faults

    OpenAIRE

    Klymko, Christine; Sullivan, Blair D.; Humble, Travis S.

    2012-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum programming defines the time-dependent mapping of a quantum algorithm into an underlying hardware or logical fabric. An essential step is embedding problem-specific information into the quantum logical fabric. We present algorithms for embedding arbitrary instances of the adiabatic quantum optimization algorithm into a square lattice of specialized unit cells. These methods extend with fabric growth while scaling linearly in time and quadratically in footprint. We also provi...

  3. Analysis of adiabatic transfer in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Joyee Ghosh; R Ghosh; Deepak Kumar

    2011-10-01

    A three-level atom in a configuration trapped in an optical cavity forms a basic unit in a number of proposed protocols for quantum information processing. This system allows for efficient storage of cavity photons into long-lived atomic excitations, and their retrieval with high fidelity, in an adiabatic transfer process through the ‘dark state’ by a slow variation of the control laser intensity. We study the full quantum mechanics of this transfer process with a view to examine the non-adiabatic effects arising from inevitable excitations of the system to states involving the upper level of , which is radiative. We find that the fidelity of storage is better, the stronger the control field and the slower the rate of its switching off. On the contrary, unlike the adiabatic notion, retrieval is better with faster rates of switching on of an optimal control field. Also, for retrieval, the behaviour with dissipation is non-monotonic. These results lend themselves to experimental tests. Our exact computations, when applied to slow variations of the control intensity for strong atom–photon couplings, are in very good agreement with Berry’s superadiabatic transfer results without dissipation.

  4. Accuracy vs run time in adiabatic quantum search

    CERN Document Server

    Rezakhani, A T; Lidar, D A

    2010-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms are characterized by their run time and accuracy. The relation between the two is essential for quantifying adiabatic algorithmic performance, yet is often poorly understood. We study the dynamics of a continuous time, adiabatic quantum search algorithm, and find rigorous results relating the accuracy and the run time. Proceeding with estimates, we show that under fairly general circumstances the adiabatic algorithmic error exhibits a behavior with two discernible regimes: the error decreases exponentially for short times, then decreases polynomially for longer times. We show that the well known quadratic speedup over classical search is associated only with the exponential error regime. We illustrate the results through examples of evolution paths derived by minimization of the adiabatic error. We also discuss specific strategies for controlling the adiabatic error and run time.

  5. Reversibility and Adiabatic Computation Trading Time and Space for Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Maozhen; Li, Ming; Vitanyi, Paul

    1996-01-01

    Future miniaturization and mobilization of computing devices requires energy parsimonious `adiabatic' computation. This is contingent on logical reversibility of computation. An example is the idea of quantum computations which are reversible except for the irreversible observation steps. We propose to study quantitatively the exchange of computational resources like time and space for irreversibility in computations. Reversible simulations of irreversible computations are memory intensive. Such (polynomial time) simulations are analysed here in terms of `reversible' pebble games. We show that Bennett's pebbling strategy uses least additional space for the greatest number of simulated steps. We derive a trade-off for storage space versus irreversible erasure. Next we consider reversible computation itself. An alternative proof is provided for the precise expression of the ultimate irreversibility cost of an otherwise reversible computation without restrictions on time and space use. A time-irreversibility tra...

  6. Generalized Ramsey numbers through adiabatic quantum optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Ranjbar, Mani; Macready, William G.; Clark, Lane; Gaitan, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Ramsey theory is an active research area in combinatorics whose central theme is the emergence of order in large disordered structures, with Ramsey numbers marking the threshold at which this order first appears. For generalized Ramsey numbers $r(G,H)$, the emergent order is characterized by graphs $G$ and $H$. In this paper we: (i) present a quantum algorithm for computing generalized Ramsey numbers by reformulating the computation as a combinatorial optimization problem which is solved usin...

  7. A quantum search algorithm based on partial adiabatic evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Ying-Yu; Hu He-Ping; Lu Song-Feng

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents and implements a specified partial adiabatic search algorithm on a quantum circuit. It studies the minimum energy gap between the first excited state and the ground state of the system Hamiltonian and it finds that, in the case of M=1, the algorithm has the same performance as the local adiabatic algorithm. However, the algorithm evolves globally only within a small interval, which implies that it keeps the advantages of global adiabatic algorithms without losing the speedup of the local adiabatic search algorithm.

  8. Communication: Adiabatic and non-adiabatic electron-nuclear motion: Quantum and classical dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Julian; Kaiser, Dustin; Engel, Volker

    2016-05-01

    Using a model for coupled electronic-nuclear motion we investigate the range from negligible to strong non-adiabatic coupling. In the adiabatic case, the quantum dynamics proceeds in a single electronic state, whereas for strong coupling a complete transition between two adiabatic electronic states takes place. It is shown that in all coupling regimes the short-time wave-packet dynamics can be described using ensembles of classical trajectories in the phase space spanned by electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom. We thus provide an example which documents that the quantum concept of non-adiabatic transitions is not necessarily needed if electronic and nuclear motion is treated on the same footing.

  9. Classical Simulation of Quantum Adiabatic Algorithms using Mathematica on GPUs

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz-Pier, Sandra; Gómez-Muñoz, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a simulation environment enhanced with parallel processing which can be used on personal computers, based on a high-level user interface developed on Mathematica\\copyright which is connected to C++ code in order to make our platform capable of communicating with a Graphics Processing Unit. We introduce the reader to the behavior of our proposal by simulating a quantum adiabatic algorithm designed for solving hard instances of the 3-SAT problem. We show that our simulator is capable of significantly increasing the number of qubits that can be simulated using classical hardware. Finally, we present a review of currently available classical simulators of quantum systems together with some justifications, based on our willingness to further understand processing properties of Nature, for devoting resources to building more powerful simulators.

  10. Active quantum walks: a framework for quantum walks with adiabatic quantum evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nan; Song, Fangmin; Li, Xiangdong

    2016-05-01

    We study a new methodology for quantum walk based algorithms. Different from the passive quantum walk, in which a walker is guided by a quantum walk procedure, the new framework that we developed allows the walker to move by an adiabatic procedure of quantum evolution, as an active way. The use of this active quantum walk is helpful to develop new quantum walk based searching and optimization algorithms.

  11. A Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm for Factorization and Its Experimental Implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Xinhua; Liao, Zeyang; Xu, Nanyang; Qin, Gan; Zhou, Xianyi; Suter, Dieter; Du, Jiangfeng

    2008-01-01

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm capable of factorizing numbers, using fewer qubits than Shor's algorithm. We implement the algorithm in an NMR quantum information processor and experimentally factorize the number 21. Numerical simulations indicate that the running time grows only quadratically with the number of qubits.

  12. Quantum Computation and Quantum Information

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yazhen

    2012-01-01

    Quantum computation and quantum information are of great current interest in computer science, mathematics, physical sciences and engineering. They will likely lead to a new wave of technological innovations in communication, computation and cryptography. As the theory of quantum physics is fundamentally stochastic, randomness and uncertainty are deeply rooted in quantum computation, quantum simulation and quantum information. Consequently quantum algorithms are random in nature, and quantum ...

  13. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics with complex quantum trajectories. II. The adiabatic representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamstein, Noa; Tannor, David J. [Department of Chemical Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2012-12-14

    We present a complex quantum trajectory method for treating non-adiabatic dynamics. Each trajectory evolves classically on a single electronic surface but with complex position and momentum. The equations of motion are derived directly from the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, and the population exchange arises naturally from amplitude-transfer terms. In this paper the equations of motion are derived in the adiabatic representation to complement our work in the diabatic representation [N. Zamstein and D. J. Tannor, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A517 (2012)]. We apply our method to two benchmark models introduced by John Tully [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990)], and get very good agreement with converged quantum-mechanical calculations. Specifically, we show that decoherence (spatial separation of wavepackets on different surfaces) is already contained in the equations of motion and does not require ad hoc augmentation.

  14. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics with complex quantum trajectories. II. The adiabatic representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a complex quantum trajectory method for treating non-adiabatic dynamics. Each trajectory evolves classically on a single electronic surface but with complex position and momentum. The equations of motion are derived directly from the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, and the population exchange arises naturally from amplitude-transfer terms. In this paper the equations of motion are derived in the adiabatic representation to complement our work in the diabatic representation [N. Zamstein and D. J. Tannor, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A517 (2012)]. We apply our method to two benchmark models introduced by John Tully [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990)], and get very good agreement with converged quantum-mechanical calculations. Specifically, we show that decoherence (spatial separation of wavepackets on different surfaces) is already contained in the equations of motion and does not require ad hoc augmentation.

  15. Non-adiabatic pumping through interacting quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Cavaliere, Fabio; Governale, Michele; König, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    We study non-adiabatic two-parameter charge and spin pumping through a single-level quantum dot with Coulomb interaction. For the limit of weak tunnel coupling and in the regime of pumping frequencies up to the tunneling rates, $\\Omega \\lesssim \\Gamma/\\hbar$, we perform an exact resummation of contributions of all orders in the pumping frequency. As striking non-adiabatic signatures, we find frequency-dependent phase shifts in the charge and spin currents, which allow for an effective single-...

  16. Quantum Chaos and Quantum Computers

    CERN Document Server

    Shepelyansky, D L

    2001-01-01

    The standard generic quantum computer model is studied analytically and numerically and the border for emergence of quantum chaos, induced by imperfections and residual inter-qubit couplings, is determined. This phenomenon appears in an isolated quantum computer without any external decoherence. The onset of quantum chaos leads to quantum computer hardware melting, strong quantum entropy growth and destruction of computer operability. The time scales for development of quantum chaos and ergodicity are determined. In spite the fact that this phenomenon is rather dangerous for quantum computing it is shown that the quantum chaos border for inter-qubit coupling is exponentially larger than the energy level spacing between quantum computer eigenstates and drops only linearly with the number of qubits n. As a result the ideal multi-qubit structure of the computer remains rather robust against imperfections. This opens a broad parameter region for a possible realization of quantum computer. The obtained results are...

  17. Hypercomputability of quantum adiabatic processes: Fact versus Prejudices

    CERN Document Server

    Kieu, T D

    2005-01-01

    We give an overview of a quantum adiabatic algorithm for Hilbert's tenth problem, including some discussions on its fundamental aspects and the emphasis on the probabilistic correctness of its findings. For the purpose of illustration, the numerical simulation results of some simple Diophantine equations are presented. We also discuss some prejudicial misunderstandings as well as some plausible difficulties faced by the algorithm in its physical implementation.

  18. Geometry of adiabatic Hamiltonians for two-level quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the formulation of the problem of the coherent dynamics of quantum mechanical two-level systems in the adiabatic region in terms of the differential geometry of plane curves. We show that there is a natural plane curve corresponding to the Hamiltonian of the system for which the geometrical quantities have a simple physical interpretation. In particular, the curvature of the curve has the role of the nonadiabatic coupling. (paper)

  19. Quantum pumping with adiabatically modulated barriers in graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Rui; Chen, Huiming

    2009-01-01

    We study the adiabatic quantum pumping characteristics in the graphene modulated by two oscillating gate potentials out of phase. The angular and energy dependence of the pumped current is presented. The direction of the pumped current can be reversed when a high barrier demonstrates stronger transparency than a low one, which results from the Klein paradox. The underlying physics of the pumping process is illuminated.

  20. Using the J1-J2 Quantum Spin Chain as an Adiabatic Quantum Data Bus

    CERN Document Server

    Chancellor, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates numerically a phenomenon which can be used to transport a single q-bit down a J1-J2 Heisenberg spin chain using a quantum adiabatic process. The motivation for investigating such processes comes from the idea that this method of transport could potentially be used as a means of sending data to various parts of a quantum computer made of artificial spins, and that this method could take advantage of the easily prepared ground state at the so called Majumdar-Ghosh point. We examine several annealing protocols for this process and find similar result for all of them. The annealing process works well up to a critical frustration threshold.

  1. Quantum information and computation

    OpenAIRE

    Bub, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    This article deals with theoretical developments in the subject of quantum information and quantum computation, and includes an overview of classical information and some relevant quantum mechanics. The discussion covers topics in quantum communication, quantum cryptography, and quantum computation, and concludes by considering whether a perspective in terms of quantum information sheds new light on the conceptual problems of quantum mechanics.

  2. Unconventional Quantum Computing Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, Seth

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates a variety of unconventional quantum computation devices, including fermionic quantum computers and computers that exploit nonlinear quantum mechanics. It is shown that unconventional quantum computing devices can in principle compute some quantities more rapidly than `conventional' quantum computers.

  3. Quantum Computational Complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Watrous, John

    2008-01-01

    This article surveys quantum computational complexity, with a focus on three fundamental notions: polynomial-time quantum computations, the efficient verification of quantum proofs, and quantum interactive proof systems. Properties of quantum complexity classes based on these notions, such as BQP, QMA, and QIP, are presented. Other topics in quantum complexity, including quantum advice, space-bounded quantum computation, and bounded-depth quantum circuits, are also discussed.

  4. Computing Hypergraph Ramsey Numbers by Using Quantum Circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Qu, Ri; Li, Zong-shang; WANG, Juan; Bao, Yan-ru; Cao, Xiao-chun

    2012-01-01

    Gaitan and Clark [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 010501 (2012)] have recently shown a quantum algorithm for the computation of the Ramsey numbers using adiabatic quantum evolution. We present a quantum algorithm to compute the two-color Ramsey numbers for r-uniform hypergraphs by using the quantum counting circuit.

  5. Non-classical role of potential energy in adiabatic quantum annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arnab

    2009-12-01

    Adiabatic quantum annealing is a paradigm of analog quantum computation, where a given computational job is converted to the task of finding the global minimum of some classical potential energy function and the search for the global potential minimum is performed by employing external kinetic quantum fluctuations and subsequent slow reduction (annealing) of them. In this method, the entire potential energy landscape (PEL) may be accessed simultaneously through a delocalized wave-function, in contrast to a classical search, where the searcher has to visit different points in the landscape (i.e., individual classical configurations) sequentially. Thus in such searches, the role of the potential energy might be significantly different in the two cases. Here we discuss this in the context of searching of a single isolated hole (potential minimum) in a golf-course type gradient free PEL. We show, that the quantum particle would be able to locate the hole faster if the hole is deeper, while the classical particle of course would have no scope to exploit the depth of the hole. We also discuss the effect of the underlying quantum phase transition on the adiabatic dynamics.

  6. Duality Computing in Quantum Computers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Gui-Lu; LIU Yang

    2008-01-01

    In this letter, we propose a duality computing mode, which resembles particle-wave duality property when a quantum system such as a quantum computer passes through a double-slit. In this mode, computing operations are not necessarily unitary. The duality mode provides a natural link between classical computing and quantum computing. In addition, the duality mode provides a new tool for quantum algorithm design.

  7. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  8. Automata and Quantum Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Ambainis, Andris; Yakaryilmaz, Abuzer

    2015-01-01

    Quantum computing is a new model of computation, based on quantum physics. Quantum computers can be exponentially faster than conventional computers for problems such as factoring. Besides full-scale quantum computers, more restricted models such as quantum versions of finite automata have been studied. In this paper, we survey various models of quantum finite automata and their properties. We also provide some open questions and new directions for researchers.

  9. Conceptual aspects of geometric quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöqvist, Erik; Azimi Mousolou, Vahid; Canali, Carlo M.

    2016-07-01

    Geometric quantum computation is the idea that geometric phases can be used to implement quantum gates, i.e., the basic elements of the Boolean network that forms a quantum computer. Although originally thought to be limited to adiabatic evolution, controlled by slowly changing parameters, this form of quantum computation can as well be realized at high speed by using nonadiabatic schemes. Recent advances in quantum gate technology have allowed for experimental demonstrations of different types of geometric gates in adiabatic and nonadiabatic evolution. Here, we address some conceptual issues that arise in the realizations of geometric gates. We examine the appearance of dynamical phases in quantum evolution and point out that not all dynamical phases need to be compensated for in geometric quantum computation. We delineate the relation between Abelian and non-Abelian geometric gates and find an explicit physical example where the two types of gates coincide. We identify differences and similarities between adiabatic and nonadiabatic realizations of quantum computation based on non-Abelian geometric phases.

  10. Conceptual aspects of geometric quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöqvist, Erik; Azimi Mousolou, Vahid; Canali, Carlo M.

    2016-10-01

    Geometric quantum computation is the idea that geometric phases can be used to implement quantum gates, i.e., the basic elements of the Boolean network that forms a quantum computer. Although originally thought to be limited to adiabatic evolution, controlled by slowly changing parameters, this form of quantum computation can as well be realized at high speed by using nonadiabatic schemes. Recent advances in quantum gate technology have allowed for experimental demonstrations of different types of geometric gates in adiabatic and nonadiabatic evolution. Here, we address some conceptual issues that arise in the realizations of geometric gates. We examine the appearance of dynamical phases in quantum evolution and point out that not all dynamical phases need to be compensated for in geometric quantum computation. We delineate the relation between Abelian and non-Abelian geometric gates and find an explicit physical example where the two types of gates coincide. We identify differences and similarities between adiabatic and nonadiabatic realizations of quantum computation based on non-Abelian geometric phases.

  11. Quantum Computing for Computer Architects

    CERN Document Server

    Metodi, Tzvetan

    2011-01-01

    Quantum computers can (in theory) solve certain problems far faster than a classical computer running any known classical algorithm. While existing technologies for building quantum computers are in their infancy, it is not too early to consider their scalability and reliability in the context of the design of large-scale quantum computers. To architect such systems, one must understand what it takes to design and model a balanced, fault-tolerant quantum computer architecture. The goal of this lecture is to provide architectural abstractions for the design of a quantum computer and to explore

  12. Quantum robots and quantum computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benioff, P.

    1998-07-01

    Validation of a presumably universal theory, such as quantum mechanics, requires a quantum mechanical description of systems that carry out theoretical calculations and systems that carry out experiments. The description of quantum computers is under active development. No description of systems to carry out experiments has been given. A small step in this direction is taken here by giving a description of quantum robots as mobile systems with on board quantum computers that interact with different environments. Some properties of these systems are discussed. A specific model based on the literature descriptions of quantum Turing machines is presented.

  13. Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Ladd, Thaddeus D; Laflamme, Raymond; Nakamura, Yasunobu; Monroe, Christopher; O'Brien, Jeremy L; 10.1038/nature08812

    2010-01-01

    Quantum mechanics---the theory describing the fundamental workings of nature---is famously counterintuitive: it predicts that a particle can be in two places at the same time, and that two remote particles can be inextricably and instantaneously linked. These predictions have been the topic of intense metaphysical debate ever since the theory's inception early last century. However, supreme predictive power combined with direct experimental observation of some of these unusual phenomena leave little doubt as to its fundamental correctness. In fact, without quantum mechanics we could not explain the workings of a laser, nor indeed how a fridge magnet operates. Over the last several decades quantum information science has emerged to seek answers to the question: can we gain some advantage by storing, transmitting and processing information encoded in systems that exhibit these unique quantum properties? Today it is understood that the answer is yes. Many research groups around the world are working towards one ...

  14. Study of Quantum Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Anil Patil

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives the detailed information about Quantum computer, and difference between quantum computer and traditional computers, the basis of Quantum computers which are slightly similar but still different from traditional computer. Many research groups are working towards the highly technological goal of building a quantum computer, which would dramatically improve computational power for particular tasks. Quantum computer is very much use full for computation purpose in field of Science and Research. Large amount of data and information will be computed, processing, storing, retrieving, transmitting and displaying information in less time with that much of accuracy which is not provided by traditional computers.

  15. Adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron cell library adopting minimalist design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Naoki, E-mail: takeuchi-naoki-kx@ynu.jp [Institute of Advanced Sciences, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki [Institute of Advanced Sciences, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    We herein build an adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) cell library adopting minimalist design and a symmetric layout. In the proposed minimalist design, every logic cell is designed by arraying four types of building block cells: buffer, NOT, constant, and branch cells. Therefore, minimalist design enables us to effectively build and customize an AQFP cell library. The symmetric layout reduces unwanted parasitic magnetic coupling and ensures a large mutual inductance in an output transformer, which enables very long wiring between logic cells. We design and fabricate several logic circuits using the minimal AQFP cell library so as to test logic cells in the library. Moreover, we experimentally investigate the maximum wiring length between logic cells. Finally, we present an experimental demonstration of an 8-bit carry look-ahead adder designed using the minimal AQFP cell library and demonstrate that the proposed cell library is sufficiently robust to realize large-scale digital circuits.

  16. Adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron cell library adopting minimalist design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We herein build an adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) cell library adopting minimalist design and a symmetric layout. In the proposed minimalist design, every logic cell is designed by arraying four types of building block cells: buffer, NOT, constant, and branch cells. Therefore, minimalist design enables us to effectively build and customize an AQFP cell library. The symmetric layout reduces unwanted parasitic magnetic coupling and ensures a large mutual inductance in an output transformer, which enables very long wiring between logic cells. We design and fabricate several logic circuits using the minimal AQFP cell library so as to test logic cells in the library. Moreover, we experimentally investigate the maximum wiring length between logic cells. Finally, we present an experimental demonstration of an 8-bit carry look-ahead adder designed using the minimal AQFP cell library and demonstrate that the proposed cell library is sufficiently robust to realize large-scale digital circuits

  17. Integrable Quantum Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yong

    2011-01-01

    Integrable quantum computation is defined as quantum computing via the integrable condition, in which two-qubit gates are either nontrivial unitary solutions of the Yang--Baxter equation or the Swap gate (permutation). To make the definition clear, in this article, we explore the physics underlying the quantum circuit model, and then present a unified description on both quantum computing via the Bethe ansatz and quantum computing via the Yang--Baxter equation.

  18. Duality quantum computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this article,we make a review on the development of a newly proposed quantum computer,duality computer,or the duality quantum computer and the duality mode of quantum computers.The duality computer is based on the particle-wave duality principle of quantum mechanics.Compared to an ordinary quantum computer,the duality quantum computer is a quantum computer on the move and passing through a multi-slit.It offers more computing operations than is possible with an ordinary quantum computer.The most two distinct operations are:the quantum division operation and the quantum combiner operation.The division operation divides the wave function of a quantum computer into many attenuated,and identical parts.The combiner operation combines the wave functions in different parts into a single part.The duality mode is a way in which a quantum computer with some extra qubit resource simulates a duality computer.The main structure of duality quantum computer and duality mode,the duality mode,their mathematical description and algorithm designs are reviewed.

  19. Quantum state engineering with flux-biased Josephson phase qubits by Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passages

    CERN Document Server

    Nie, W; Shi, X; Wei, L F

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the scheme of quantum computing based on Stark chirped rapid adiabatic passage (SCRAP) technique [L. F. Wei et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 113601 (2008)] is extensively applied to implement the quantum-state manipulations in the flux-biased Josephson phase qubits. The broken-parity symmetries of bound states in flux-biased Josephson junctions are utilized to conveniently generate the desirable Stark-shifts. Then, assisted by various transition pulses universal quantum logic gates as well as arbitrary quantum-state preparations could be implemented. Compared with the usual PI-pulses operations widely used in the experiments, the adiabatic population passage proposed here is insensitive the details of the applied pulses and thus the desirable population transfers could be satisfyingly implemented. The experimental feasibility of the proposal is also discussed.

  20. Quantum pumping in closed systems, adiabatic transport, and the Kubo formula

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Doron

    2003-01-01

    Quantum pumping in closed systems is considered. We explain that the Kubo formula contains all the physically relevant ingredients for the calculation of the pumped charge ($Q$) within the framework of linear response theory. The relation to the common formulations of adiabatic transport and ``geometric magnetism" is clarified. We distinguish between adiabatic and dissipative contributions to $Q$. On the one hand we observe that adiabatic pumping does not have to be quantized. On the other ha...

  1. Basics of Quantum Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Vedral, Vlatko; Martin B. Plenio

    1998-01-01

    Quantum computers require quantum logic, something fundamentally different to classical Boolean logic. This difference leads to a greater efficiency of quantum computation over its classical counter-part. In this review we explain the basic principles of quantum computation, including the construction of basic gates, and networks. We illustrate the power of quantum algorithms using the simple problem of Deutsch, and explain, again in very simple terms, the well known algorithm of Shor for fac...

  2. Quantum Computation in Computational Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Sadakane, Kunihiko; Sugawara, Noriko; Tokuyama, Takeshi

    2002-01-01

    We discuss applications of quantum computation to geometric data processing. These applications include problems on convex hulls, minimum enclosing balls, linear programming, and intersection problems. Technically, we apply well-known Grover’s algorithm (and its variants) combined with geometric algorithms, and no further knowledge of quantum computing is required. However, revealing these applications and emphasizing potential usefulness of quantum computation in geometric data processing wi...

  3. Quantum information. Teleporation - cryptography - quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics are dealt with: Reality in the test house, quantum teleportation, 100 years of quantum theory, the reality of quanta, interactionless quantum measurement, rules for quantum computers, quantum computers with ions, spintronics with diamond, the limits of the quantum computers, a view into the future of quantum optics. (HSI)

  4. Introduction to Quantum Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekert, A.

    A computation is a physical process. It may be performed by a piece of electronics or on an abacus, or in your brain, but it is a process that takes place in nature and as such it is subject to the laws of physics. Quantum computers are machines that rely on characteristically quantum phenomena, such as quantum interference and quantum entanglement in order to perform computation. In this series of lectures I want to elaborate on the computational power of such machines.

  5. Quantum computing and probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, David K

    2009-11-25

    Over the past two decades, quantum computing has become a popular and promising approach to trying to solve computationally difficult problems. Missing in many descriptions of quantum computing is just how probability enters into the process. Here, we discuss some simple examples of how uncertainty and probability enter, and how this and the ideas of quantum computing challenge our interpretations of quantum mechanics. It is found that this uncertainty can lead to intrinsic decoherence, and this raises challenges for error correction.

  6. Uncertainty In Quantum Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Kak, Subhash

    2002-01-01

    We examine the effect of previous history on starting a computation on a quantum computer. Specifically, we assume that the quantum register has some unknown state on it, and it is required that this state be cleared and replaced by a specific superposition state without any phase uncertainty, as needed by quantum algorithms. We show that, in general, this task is computationally impossible.

  7. Quantum analogue computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendon, Vivien M; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J

    2010-08-13

    We briefly review what a quantum computer is, what it promises to do for us and why it is so hard to build one. Among the first applications anticipated to bear fruit is the quantum simulation of quantum systems. While most quantum computation is an extension of classical digital computation, quantum simulation differs fundamentally in how the data are encoded in the quantum computer. To perform a quantum simulation, the Hilbert space of the system to be simulated is mapped directly onto the Hilbert space of the (logical) qubits in the quantum computer. This type of direct correspondence is how data are encoded in a classical analogue computer. There is no binary encoding, and increasing precision becomes exponentially costly: an extra bit of precision doubles the size of the computer. This has important consequences for both the precision and error-correction requirements of quantum simulation, and significant open questions remain about its practicality. It also means that the quantum version of analogue computers, continuous-variable quantum computers, becomes an equally efficient architecture for quantum simulation. Lessons from past use of classical analogue computers can help us to build better quantum simulators in future.

  8. Rapid adiabatic passage in quantum dots: Influence of scattering and dephasing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuh, K.; Jahnke, F.; Lorke, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical investigations for the realization of population inversion of semiconductor quantum dot ground-state transitions by means of adiabatic passage with chirped optical pulses are presented. While the inversion due to Rabi oscillations depends sensitively on the resonance condition...

  9. Quantum information. Teleportation - cryptography - quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics are dealt with: Reality in the test facility, quantum teleportation, the reality of quanta, interaction-free quantum measurement, rules for quantum computers, quantum computers with ions, spintronics with diamond, the limits of the quantum computers, a view in the future of quantum optics. (HSI)

  10. Simulation of quantum computers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H; Michielsen, K; Hams, AH; Miyashita, S; Saito, K; Landau, DP; Lewis, SP; Schuttler, HB

    2001-01-01

    We describe a simulation approach to study the functioning of Quantum Computer hardware. The latter is modeled by a collection of interacting spin-1/2 objects. The time evolution of this spin system maps one-to-one to a quantum program carried out by the Quantum Computer. Our simulation software con

  11. Simulation of quantum computers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, H. De; Michielsen, K.; Hams, A.H.; Miyashita, S.; Saito, K.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a simulation approach to study the functioning of Quantum Computer hardware. The latter is modeled by a collection of interacting spin-1/2 objects. The time evolution of this spin system maps one-to-one to a quantum program carried out by the Quantum Computer. Our simulation software con

  12. Quantum computing classical physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, David A

    2002-03-15

    In the past decade, quantum algorithms have been found which outperform the best classical solutions known for certain classical problems as well as the best classical methods known for simulation of certain quantum systems. This suggests that they may also speed up the simulation of some classical systems. I describe one class of discrete quantum algorithms which do so--quantum lattice-gas automata--and show how to implement them efficiently on standard quantum computers.

  13. Photonic Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, Stefanie

    2013-05-01

    Quantum physics has revolutionized our understanding of information processing and enables computational speed-ups that are unattainable using classical computers. In this talk I will present a series of experiments in the field of photonic quantum computing. The first experiment is in the field of photonic state engineering and realizes the generation of heralded polarization-entangled photon pairs. It overcomes the limited applicability of photon-based schemes for quantum information processing tasks, which arises from the probabilistic nature of photon generation. The second experiment uses polarization-entangled photonic qubits to implement ``blind quantum computing,'' a new concept in quantum computing. Blind quantum computing enables a nearly-classical client to access the resources of a more computationally-powerful quantum server without divulging the content of the requested computation. Finally, the concept of blind quantum computing is applied to the field of verification. A new method is developed and experimentally demonstrated, which verifies the entangling capabilities of a quantum computer based on a blind Bell test.

  14. Quantum Computation and Quantum Spin Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, Hans De; Michielsen, Kristel; Hams, Anthony; Miyashita, Seiji; Saito, Keiji

    2001-01-01

    We analyze the stability of quantum computations on physically realizable quantum computers by simulating quantum spin models representing quantum computer hardware. Examples of logically identical implementations of the controlled-NOT operation are used to demonstrate that the results of a quantum

  15. Probabilistic Cloning and Quantum Computation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ting; YAN Feng-Li; WANG Zhi-Xi

    2004-01-01

    @@ We discuss the usefulness of quantum cloning and present examples of quantum computation tasks for which the cloning offers an advantage which cannot be matched by any approach that does not resort to quantum cloning.In these quantum computations, we need to distribute quantum information contained in the states about which we have some partial information. To perform quantum computations, we use a state-dependent probabilistic quantum cloning procedure to distribute quantum information in the middle of a quantum computation.

  16. Quantum computer science

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2009-01-01

    In this text we present a technical overview of the emerging field of quantum computation along with new research results by the authors. What distinguishes our presentation from that of others is our focus on the relationship between quantum computation and computer science. Specifically, our emphasis is on the computational model of quantum computing rather than on the engineering issues associated with its physical implementation. We adopt this approach for the same reason that a book on computer programming doesn't cover the theory and physical realization of semiconductors. Another distin

  17. Explorations in quantum computing

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Colin P

    2011-01-01

    By the year 2020, the basic memory components of a computer will be the size of individual atoms. At such scales, the current theory of computation will become invalid. ""Quantum computing"" is reinventing the foundations of computer science and information theory in a way that is consistent with quantum physics - the most accurate model of reality currently known. Remarkably, this theory predicts that quantum computers can perform certain tasks breathtakingly faster than classical computers -- and, better yet, can accomplish mind-boggling feats such as teleporting information, breaking suppos

  18. Quasideterministic generation of maximally entangled states of two mesoscopic atomic ensembles by adiabatic quantum feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce an efficient, quasideterministic scheme to generate maximally entangled states of two atomic ensembles. The scheme is based on quantum nondemolition measurements of total atomic populations and on adiabatic quantum feedback conditioned by the measurements outputs. The high efficiency of the scheme is tested and confirmed numerically for ideal photodetection as well as in the presence of losses

  19. Quasideterministic generation of maximally entangled states of two mesoscopic atomic ensembles by adiabatic quantum feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Di Lisi, Antonio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio; Vitali, David

    2004-01-01

    We introduce an efficient, quasideterministic scheme to generate maximally entangled states of two atomic ensembles. The scheme is based on quantum nondemolition measurements of total atomic populations and on adiabatic quantum feedback conditioned by the measurements outputs. The high efficiency of the scheme is tested and confirmed numerically for ideal photodetection as well as in the presence of losses.

  20. Adiabatic many-body state preparation and information transfer in quantum dot arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Umer; Bayat, Abolfazl; Mancini, Stefano; Bose, Sougato

    2015-04-01

    Quantum simulation of many-body systems are one of the most interesting tasks of quantum technology. Among them is the preparation of a many-body system in its ground state when the vanishing energy gap makes the cooling mechanisms ineffective. Adiabatic theorem, as an alternative to cooling, can be exploited for driving the many-body system to its ground state. In this paper, we study two most common disorders in quantum dot arrays, namely exchange coupling fluctuations and hyperfine interaction, in adiabatic preparation of ground state in such systems. We show that the adiabatic ground-state preparation is highly robust against those disorder effects making it a good analog simulator. Moreover, we also study the adiabatic quantum information transfer, using singlet-triplet states, across a spin chain. In contrast to ground-state preparation the transfer mechanism is highly affected by disorder and in particular, the hyperfine interaction is very destructive for the performance. This suggests that for communication tasks across such arrays adiabatic evolution is not as effective and quantum quenches could be preferable.

  1. Quantum state engineering in a cavity by Stark chirped rapid adiabatic passage

    CERN Document Server

    Amniat-Talab, M; Guérin, S

    2006-01-01

    We propose a robust scheme to generate single-photon Fock states and atom-photon and atom-atom entanglement in atom-cavity systems. We also present a scheme for quantum networking between two cavity nodes using an atomic channel. The mechanism is based on Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passage (SCRAP) and half-SCRAP processes in a microwave cavity. The engineering of these states depends on the design of the adiabatic dynamics through the static and dynamic Stark shifts.

  2. Quantum-dot computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quantum computer would put the latest PC to shame. Not only would such a device be faster than a conventional computer, but by exploiting the quantum-mechanical principle of superposition it could change the way we think about information processing. However, two key goals need to be met before a quantum computer becomes reality. The first is to be able to control the state of a single quantum bit (or 'qubit') and the second is to build a two-qubit gate that can produce 'entanglement' between the qubit states. (U.K.)

  3. Quantum-dot computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milburn, Gerard

    2003-10-01

    A quantum computer would put the latest PC to shame. Not only would such a device be faster than a conventional computer, but by exploiting the quantum-mechanical principle of superposition it could change the way we think about information processing. However, two key goals need to be met before a quantum computer becomes reality. The first is to be able to control the state of a single quantum bit (or 'qubit') and the second is to build a two-qubit gate that can produce 'entanglement' between the qubit states. (U.K.)

  4. Quantum Analog Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum analog computing is based upon similarity between mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics and phenomena to be computed. It exploits a dynamical convergence of several competing phenomena to an attractor which can represent an externum of a function, an image, a solution to a system of ODE, or a stochastic process.

  5. Deterministic implementations of quantum gates with circuit QEDs via Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingwei [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Wei, L.F., E-mail: weilianfu@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Quantum Optoelectronics Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2015-10-23

    Highlights: • A specific SCRAP technique is proposed to realize quantum gates in the circuit QED. • These quantum gates are insensitive to the durations of the applied pluses. • The implemented quantum gates are robustness against the operational imperfections. - Abstract: We show that a set of universal quantum gates could be implemented robustly in a circuit QED system by using Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passage (SCRAP) technique. Under the adiabatic limit we find that the population transfers could be deterministically passaged from one selected quantum states to the others, and thus the desired quantum gates can be implemented. The proposed SCRAP-based gates are insensitive to the details of the operations and thus relax the designs of the applied pulses, operational imperfections, and the decoherence of the system.

  6. Deterministic implementations of quantum gates with circuit QEDs via Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A specific SCRAP technique is proposed to realize quantum gates in the circuit QED. • These quantum gates are insensitive to the durations of the applied pluses. • The implemented quantum gates are robustness against the operational imperfections. - Abstract: We show that a set of universal quantum gates could be implemented robustly in a circuit QED system by using Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passage (SCRAP) technique. Under the adiabatic limit we find that the population transfers could be deterministically passaged from one selected quantum states to the others, and thus the desired quantum gates can be implemented. The proposed SCRAP-based gates are insensitive to the details of the operations and thus relax the designs of the applied pulses, operational imperfections, and the decoherence of the system

  7. Reprint of : Nanomagnet coupled to quantum spin Hall edge: An adiabatic quantum motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrachea, Liliana; von Oppen, Felix

    2016-08-01

    The precessing magnetization of a magnetic islands coupled to a quantum spin Hall edge pumps charge along the edge. Conversely, a bias voltage applied to the edge makes the magnetization precess. We point out that this device realizes an adiabatic quantum motor and discuss the efficiency of its operation based on a scattering matrix approach akin to Landauer-Büttiker theory. Scattering theory provides a microscopic derivation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for the magnetization dynamics of the device, including spin-transfer torque, Gilbert damping, and Langevin torque. We find that the device can be viewed as a Thouless motor, attaining unit efficiency when the chemical potential of the edge states falls into the magnetization-induced gap. For more general parameters, we characterize the device by means of a figure of merit analogous to the ZT value in thermoelectrics.

  8. Nanomagnet coupled to quantum spin Hall edge: An adiabatic quantum motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrachea, Liliana; von Oppen, Felix

    2015-11-01

    The precessing magnetization of a magnetic islands coupled to a quantum spin Hall edge pumps charge along the edge. Conversely, a bias voltage applied to the edge makes the magnetization precess. We point out that this device realizes an adiabatic quantum motor and discuss the efficiency of its operation based on a scattering matrix approach akin to Landauer-Büttiker theory. Scattering theory provides a microscopic derivation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for the magnetization dynamics of the device, including spin-transfer torque, Gilbert damping, and Langevin torque. We find that the device can be viewed as a Thouless motor, attaining unit efficiency when the chemical potential of the edge states falls into the magnetization-induced gap. For more general parameters, we characterize the device by means of a figure of merit analogous to the ZT value in thermoelectrics.

  9. How do quantum numbers generally vary in the adiabatic transformation of an ideal gas?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. Yarman; A. L. Kholmetskii

    2011-01-01

    We continue to analyse the known law of adiabatic transformation for an ideal gas PV5/3 =Constant,where P is the pressure and V is the volume,and following the approach of non-relativistic quantum mechanics which we suggested in a previous work (Yarman et al.2010 Int.J.Phys.Sci.5 1524).We explicitly determine the constant for the general parallelepiped geometry of a container.We also disclose how the quantum numbers associated with molecules of an ideal gas vary through an arbitrary adiabatic transformation.Physical implications of the results obtained are discussed.

  10. Creation and Transfer of Coherence via Technique of Stimulated Raman Adiabatic Passage in Triple Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Si-Cong; Wan, Ren-Gang; Wang, Chun-Liang; Shu, Shi-Li; Wang, Li-Jie; Tong, Chun-Zhu

    2016-12-01

    We propose a scheme for creation and transfer of coherence among ground state and indirect exciton states of triple quantum dots via the technique of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage. Compared with the traditional stimulated Raman adiabatic passage, the Stokes laser pulse is replaced by the tunneling pulse, which can be controlled by the externally applied voltages. By varying the amplitudes and sequences of the pump and tunneling pulses, a complete coherence transfer or an equal coherence distribution among multiple states can be obtained. The investigations can provide further insight for the experimental development of controllable coherence transfer in semiconductor structure and may have potential applications in quantum information processing. PMID:27107772

  11. Robust quantum logic in neutral atoms via adiabatic Rydberg dressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Tyler; Cook, Robert L.; Hankin, Aaron M.; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Biedermann, Grant W.; Deutsch, Ivan H.

    2015-01-01

    We study a scheme for implementing a controlled-Z (cz) gate between two neutral-atom qubits based on the Rydberg blockade mechanism in a manner that is robust to errors caused by atomic motion. By employing adiabatic dressing of the ground electronic state, we can protect the gate from decoherence due to random phase errors that typically arise because of atomic thermal motion. In addition, the adiabatic protocol allows for a Doppler-free configuration that involves counterpropagating lasers in a σ+/σ- orthogonal polarization geometry that further reduces motional errors due to Doppler shifts. The residual motional error is dominated by dipole-dipole forces acting on doubly excited Rydberg atoms when the blockade is imperfect. For reasonable parameters, with qubits encoded into the clock states of 133Cs, we predict that our protocol could produce a cz gate in <10 μ s with error probability on the order of 10-3.

  12. Quantum computing with defects

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, J R; Koehl, W. F.; Varley, J. B.; Janotti, A.; Buckley, B. B.; Van de Walle, C. G.; Awschalom, D. D.

    2010-01-01

    Identifying and designing physical systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information, are critical steps in the development of a quantum computer. Among the possibilities in the solid state, a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV-1) center stands out for its robustness - its quantum state can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. Here we describe how to systematically identify other deep center defects with similar qua...

  13. Quantum computation: Honesty test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2013-11-01

    Alice does not have a quantum computer so she delegates a computation to Bob, who does own one. But how can Alice check whether the computation that Bob performs for her is correct? An experiment with photonic qubits demonstrates such a verification protocol.

  14. Quantum steady computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castagnoli, G. (Dipt. di Informatica, Sistemistica, Telematica, Univ. di Genova, Viale Causa 13, 16145 Genova (IT))

    1991-08-10

    This paper reports that current conceptions of quantum mechanical computers inherit from conventional digital machines two apparently interacting features, machine imperfection and temporal development of the computational process. On account of machine imperfection, the process would become ideally reversible only in the limiting case of zero speed. Therefore the process is irreversible in practice and cannot be considered to be a fundamental quantum one. By giving up classical features and using a linear, reversible and non-sequential representation of the computational process - not realizable in classical machines - the process can be identified with the mathematical form of a quantum steady state. This form of steady quantum computation would seem to have an important bearing on the notion of cognition.

  15. Multi-qubit non-adiabatic holonomic controlled quantum gates in decoherence-free subspaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shi; Cui, Wen-Xue; Guo, Qi; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2016-09-01

    Non-adiabatic holonomic quantum gate in decoherence-free subspaces is of greatly practical importance due to its built-in fault tolerance, coherence stabilization virtues, and short run-time. Here, we propose some compact schemes to implement two- and three-qubit controlled unitary quantum gates and Fredkin gate. For the controlled unitary quantum gates, the unitary operator acting on the target qubit is an arbitrary single-qubit gate operation. The controlled quantum gates can be directly implemented by utilizing non-adiabatic holonomy in decoherence-free subspaces and the required resource for the decoherence-free subspace encoding is minimal by using only two neighboring physical qubits undergoing collective dephasing to encode a logical qubit.

  16. Quantum computing by interrogation

    OpenAIRE

    Supic, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Treball final de màster oficial fet en col·laboració amb Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), Universitat de Barcelona (UB) i Institut de Ciències Fotòniques (ICFO) [ANGLÈS] Quantum information theory forms a bridge between the foundations of quantum mechanics and its promising practical potentials. The extensive theoretical research has been conducted during the last decades and the applications such as quantum key distribution and quantum computing promise to provide real technologic...

  17. Computational Methods for Simulating Quantum Computers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, H. De; Michielsen, K.

    2006-01-01

    This review gives a survey of numerical algorithms and software to simulate quantum computers. It covers the basic concepts of quantum computation and quantum algorithms and includes a few examples that illustrate the use of simulation software for ideal and physical models of quantum computers.

  18. Quantum computers get real

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quantum computer has successfully factorized a number for the first time. Quantum mechanics is an extremely successful theory, but also a troubling one. For many years progress was made by concentrating on the obvious applications, and not worrying too much about the counterintuitive world view that quantum mechanics implies. More recently, however, the development of quantum-information theory has reversed this approach. If we take seriously what quantum mechanics seems to be telling us about the world, we can use this 'quantum weirdness' to do apparently impossible things. Probably the most famous application of quantum mechanics is the quantum computer, which is capable of performing calculations that are impossible with any classical device. At first the questions that quantum computers could tackle were rather esoteric, but in 1994 Peter Shor of AT and T Laboratories showed how a quantum computer could factor large numbers, thus rendering most modern cryptographic systems potentially obsolete. In 1996 David Cory and co-workers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) showed how nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) - a technique best known for its applications in medical imaging and in chemistry - could be used to build small quantum computers. NMR systems are easily controlled by the magnetic component of electromagnetic fields and are only weakly affected by decoherence, and so progress was extremely rapid. Within two years, several two-qubit computers had been developed, and simple algorithms had been implemented. The race was on to build bigger and better NMR quantum computers, and to use them for more interesting tasks. The lead in this race has been held by several different research groups, but has now been decisively claimed by Isaac Chuang's group at Stanford University and IBM's Almaden Research Center in California. Chuang and co-workers have implemented the simplest example of Shor's quantum-factoring algorithm (L Vandersypen 2001 Nature 414

  19. Quantum processing by adiabatic transfer through a manifold of dark states

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Santosh

    2012-01-01

    We consider a network whose nodes are electromagnetic cavities, each coupled to a single three-level atom. The nodes are connected by optical fibers. Each atom is addressed by a control laser, which along with the cavity field drives atomic transitions. The network can be in the form of chain or two and three dimensional arrays of $N$-cavities connected by $N_B$ fibers. Following the work on two-cavity system by Pellizzari, we find that under certain conditions, the system possesses two kinds of dark states. The first kind are $N$ states corresponding to atomic excitations at each node and these are our logical states for quantum processing. The second kind are $N_B$ degenerate dark states on pairs of sites connected by a fibre. By manipulating intensities and phases of control lasers on the cavities, one can pass adiabatically among these dark states due to their degeneracy. This network operates as a $N$-level quantum system in which one can generate computationally useful states by protocols of external co...

  20. From Classical Nonlinear Integrable Systems to Quantum Shortcuts to Adiabaticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Manaka; Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2016-08-01

    Using shortcuts to adiabaticity, we solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation that is reduced to a classical nonlinear integrable equation. For a given time-dependent Hamiltonian, the counterdiabatic term is introduced to prevent nonadiabatic transitions. Using the fact that the equation for the dynamical invariant is equivalent to the Lax equation in nonlinear integrable systems, we obtain the counterdiabatic term exactly. The counterdiabatic term is available when the corresponding Lax pair exists and the solvable systems are classified in a unified and systematic way. Multisoliton potentials obtained from the Korteweg-de Vries equation and isotropic X Y spin chains from the Toda equations are studied in detail.

  1. Scaling-up quantum heat engines efficiently via shortcuts to adiabaticity

    CERN Document Server

    Beau, M; del Campo, A

    2016-01-01

    The finite-time operation of a quantum heat engine that uses a single particle as a working medium generally increases the output power at the expense of inducing friction that lowers the cycle efficiency. We propose to scale up a quantum heat engine utilizing a many-particle working medium in combination with the use of shortcuts to adiabaticity to boost the nonadiabatic performance by eliminating quantum friction and reducing the cycle time. To this end, we first analyze the finite-time thermodynamics of a quantum Otto cycle implemented with a quantum fluid confined in a time-dependent harmonic trap. We show that nonadiabatic effects can be controlled and tailored to match the adiabatic performance using a variety of shortcuts to adiabaticity. As a result, the nonadiabatic dynamics of the scaled-up many-particle quantum heat engine exhibits no friction and the cycle can be run at maximum efficiency with a tunable output power. We demonstrate our results with a working medium consisting of particles with inv...

  2. Scaling-Up Quantum Heat Engines Efficiently via Shortcuts to Adiabaticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Beau

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The finite-time operation of a quantum heat engine that uses a single particle as a working medium generally increases the output power at the expense of inducing friction that lowers the cycle efficiency. We propose to scale up a quantum heat engine utilizing a many-particle working medium in combination with the use of shortcuts to adiabaticity to boost the nonadiabatic performance by eliminating quantum friction and reducing the cycle time. To this end, we first analyze the finite-time thermodynamics of a quantum Otto cycle implemented with a quantum fluid confined in a time-dependent harmonic trap. We show that nonadiabatic effects can be controlled and tailored to match the adiabatic performance using a variety of shortcuts to adiabaticity. As a result, the nonadiabatic dynamics of the scaled-up many-particle quantum heat engine exhibits no friction, and the cycle can be run at maximum efficiency with a tunable output power. We demonstrate our results with a working medium consisting of particles with inverse-square pairwise interactions that includes non-interacting and hard-core bosons as limiting cases.

  3. Efficient shortcuts to adiabatic passage for three-dimensional entanglement generation via transitionless quantum driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shuang; Su, Shi-Lei; Wang, Dong-Yang; Sun, Wen-Mei; Bai, Cheng-Hua; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Shou

    2016-01-01

    We propose an effective scheme of shortcuts to adiabaticity for generating a three-dimensional entanglement of two atoms trapped in a cavity using the transitionless quantum driving (TQD) approach. The key point of this approach is to construct an effective Hamiltonian that drives the dynamics of a system along instantaneous eigenstates of a reference Hamiltonian to reproduce the same final state as that of an adiabatic process within a much shorter time. In this paper, the shortcuts to adiabatic passage are constructed by introducing two auxiliary excited levels in each atom and applying extra cavity modes and classical fields to drive the relevant transitions. Thereby, the three-dimensional entanglement is obtained with a faster rate than that in the adiabatic passage. Moreover, the influences of atomic spontaneous emission and photon loss on the fidelity are discussed by numerical simulation. The results show that the speed of entanglement implementation is greatly improved by the use of adiabatic shortcuts and that this entanglement implementation is robust against decoherence. This will be beneficial to the preparation of high-dimensional entanglement in experiment and provides the necessary conditions for the application of high-dimensional entangled states in quantum information processing. PMID:27499169

  4. Efficient shortcuts to adiabatic passage for three-dimensional entanglement generation via transitionless quantum driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shuang; Su, Shi-Lei; Wang, Dong-Yang; Sun, Wen-Mei; Bai, Cheng-Hua; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Shou

    2016-08-08

    We propose an effective scheme of shortcuts to adiabaticity for generating a three-dimensional entanglement of two atoms trapped in a cavity using the transitionless quantum driving (TQD) approach. The key point of this approach is to construct an effective Hamiltonian that drives the dynamics of a system along instantaneous eigenstates of a reference Hamiltonian to reproduce the same final state as that of an adiabatic process within a much shorter time. In this paper, the shortcuts to adiabatic passage are constructed by introducing two auxiliary excited levels in each atom and applying extra cavity modes and classical fields to drive the relevant transitions. Thereby, the three-dimensional entanglement is obtained with a faster rate than that in the adiabatic passage. Moreover, the influences of atomic spontaneous emission and photon loss on the fidelity are discussed by numerical simulation. The results show that the speed of entanglement implementation is greatly improved by the use of adiabatic shortcuts and that this entanglement implementation is robust against decoherence. This will be beneficial to the preparation of high-dimensional entanglement in experiment and provides the necessary conditions for the application of high-dimensional entangled states in quantum information processing.

  5. Efficient shortcuts to adiabatic passage for three-dimensional entanglement generation via transitionless quantum driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shuang; Su, Shi-Lei; Wang, Dong-Yang; Sun, Wen-Mei; Bai, Cheng-Hua; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Shou

    2016-08-01

    We propose an effective scheme of shortcuts to adiabaticity for generating a three-dimensional entanglement of two atoms trapped in a cavity using the transitionless quantum driving (TQD) approach. The key point of this approach is to construct an effective Hamiltonian that drives the dynamics of a system along instantaneous eigenstates of a reference Hamiltonian to reproduce the same final state as that of an adiabatic process within a much shorter time. In this paper, the shortcuts to adiabatic passage are constructed by introducing two auxiliary excited levels in each atom and applying extra cavity modes and classical fields to drive the relevant transitions. Thereby, the three-dimensional entanglement is obtained with a faster rate than that in the adiabatic passage. Moreover, the influences of atomic spontaneous emission and photon loss on the fidelity are discussed by numerical simulation. The results show that the speed of entanglement implementation is greatly improved by the use of adiabatic shortcuts and that this entanglement implementation is robust against decoherence. This will be beneficial to the preparation of high-dimensional entanglement in experiment and provides the necessary conditions for the application of high-dimensional entangled states in quantum information processing.

  6. Topological Code Architectures for Quantum Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesare, Christopher Anthony

    This dissertation is concerned with quantum computation using many-body quantum systems encoded in topological codes. The interest in these topological systems has increased in recent years as devices in the lab begin to reach the fidelities required for performing arbitrarily long quantum algorithms. The most well-studied system, Kitaev's toric code, provides both a physical substrate for performing universal fault-tolerant quantum computations and a useful pedagogical tool for explaining the way other topological codes work. In this dissertation, I first review the necessary formalism for quantum information and quantum stabilizer codes, and then I introduce two families of topological codes: Kitaev's toric code and Bombin's color codes. I then present three chapters of original work. First, I explore the distinctness of encoding schemes in the color codes. Second, I introduce a model of quantum computation based on the toric code that uses adiabatic interpolations between static Hamiltonians with gaps constant in the system size. Lastly, I describe novel state distillation protocols that are naturally suited for topological architectures and show that they provide resource savings in terms of the number of required ancilla states when compared to more traditional approaches to quantum gate approximation.

  7. Quantum Computers and Quantum Computer Languages: Quantum Assembly Language and Quantum C

    OpenAIRE

    Blaha, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    We show a representation of Quantum Computers defines Quantum Turing Machines with associated Quantum Grammars. We then create examples of Quantum Grammars. Lastly we develop an algebraic approach to high level Quantum Languages using Quantum Assembly language and Quantum C language as examples.

  8. Quantum Computers and Quantum Computer Languages: Quantum Assembly Language and Quantum C Language

    OpenAIRE

    Blaha, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    We show a representation of Quantum Computers defines Quantum Turing Machines with associated Quantum Grammars. We then create examples of Quantum Grammars. Lastly we develop an algebraic approach to high level Quantum Languages using Quantum Assembly language and Quantum C language as examples.

  9. I, Quantum Robot: Quantum Mind control on a Quantum Computer

    OpenAIRE

    Zizzi, Paola

    2008-01-01

    The logic which describes quantum robots is not orthodox quantum logic, but a deductive calculus which reproduces the quantum tasks (computational processes, and actions) taking into account quantum superposition and quantum entanglement. A way toward the realization of intelligent quantum robots is to adopt a quantum metalanguage to control quantum robots. A physical implementation of a quantum metalanguage might be the use of coherent states in brain signals.

  10. From Classical Nonlinear Integrable Systems to Quantum Shortcuts to Adiabaticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Manaka; Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2016-08-12

    Using shortcuts to adiabaticity, we solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation that is reduced to a classical nonlinear integrable equation. For a given time-dependent Hamiltonian, the counterdiabatic term is introduced to prevent nonadiabatic transitions. Using the fact that the equation for the dynamical invariant is equivalent to the Lax equation in nonlinear integrable systems, we obtain the counterdiabatic term exactly. The counterdiabatic term is available when the corresponding Lax pair exists and the solvable systems are classified in a unified and systematic way. Multisoliton potentials obtained from the Korteweg-de Vries equation and isotropic XY spin chains from the Toda equations are studied in detail. PMID:27563938

  11. Adiabatic quantum pump in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon junction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张林

    2015-01-01

    The adiabatic electron transport is theoretically studied in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) junction with two time-dependent pumping electric fields. By modeling a ZGNR p–n junction and applying the Keldysh Green’s function method, we find that a pumped charge current is flowing in the device at a zero external bias, which mainly comes from the photon-assisted tunneling process and the valley selection rule in an even-chain ZGNR junction. The pumped charge current and its ON and OFF states can be efficiently modulated by changing the system parameters such as the pumping frequency, the pumping phase difference, and the Fermi level. A ferromagnetic ZGNR device is also studied to generate a pure spin current and a fully polarized spin current due to the combined spin pump effect and the valley valve effect. Our finding might pave the way to manipulate the degree of freedom of electrons in a graphene-based electronic device.

  12. Quantum Computing using Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhalawany, Ahmed; Leuenberger, Michael

    2013-03-01

    In this work, we propose a theoretical model of two-quantum bit gates for quantum computation using the polarization states of two photons in a microcavity. By letting the two photons interact non-resonantly with four quantum dots inside the cavity, we obtain an effective photon-photon interaction which we exploit for the implementation of an universal XOR gate. The two-photon Hamiltonian is written in terms of the photons' total angular momentum operators and their states are written using the Schwinger representation of the total angular momentum.

  13. Optical quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jeremy L

    2007-12-01

    In 2001, all-optical quantum computing became feasible with the discovery that scalable quantum computing is possible using only single-photon sources, linear optical elements, and single-photon detectors. Although it was in principle scalable, the massive resource overhead made the scheme practically daunting. However, several simplifications were followed by proof-of-principle demonstrations, and recent approaches based on cluster states or error encoding have dramatically reduced this worrying resource overhead, making an all-optical architecture a serious contender for the ultimate goal of a large-scale quantum computer. Key challenges will be the realization of high-efficiency sources of indistinguishable single photons, low-loss, scalable optical circuits, high-efficiency single-photon detectors, and low-loss interfacing of these components.

  14. Adiabatic Markovian Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Oreshkov, Ognyan

    2010-01-01

    We propose a theory of adiabaticity in quantum Markovian dynamics based on a structural decomposition of the Hilbert space induced by the asymptotic behavior of the Lindblad semigroup. A central idea of our approach is that the natural generalization of the concept of eigenspace of the Hamiltonian in the case of Markovian dynamics is a noiseless subsystem with a minimal noisy cofactor. Unlike previous attempts to define adiabaticity for open systems, our approach deals exclusively with physical entities and provides a simple, intuitive picture at the underlying Hilbert-space level, linking the notion of adiabaticity to the theory of noiseless subsystems. As an application of our theory, we propose a framework for decoherence-assisted computation in noiseless codes under general Markovian noise. We also formulate a dissipation-driven approach to holonomic computation based on adiabatic dragging of subsystems that is generally not achievable by non-dissipative means.

  15. Controllable coherent population transfers in superconducting qubits for quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, L F; Johansson, J R; Cen, L X; Ashhab, S; Nori, Franco

    2008-03-21

    We propose an approach to coherently transfer populations between selected quantum states in one- and two-qubit systems by using controllable Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passages. These evolution-time insensitive transfers, assisted by easily implementable single-qubit phase-shift operations, could serve as elementary logic gates for quantum computing. Specifically, this proposal could be conveniently demonstrated with existing Josephson phase qubits. Our proposal can find an immediate application in the readout of these qubits. Indeed, the broken parity symmetries of the bound states in these artificial atoms provide an efficient approach to design the required adiabatic pulses.

  16. Interpolation approach to Hamiltonian-varying quantum systems and the adiabatic theorem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Yu; James, Matthew R. [Australian National University, Research School of Engineering, Canberra (Australia); Miao, Zibo [The University of Melbourne, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Melbourne (Australia); Amini, Nina H. [CNRS, Laboratoire des Signaux et Systemes (L2S) Supelec, Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Ugrinovskii, Valery [University of New South Wales at ADFA, School of Engineering and Information Technology, Canberra (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Quantum control could be implemented by varying the system Hamiltonian. According to adiabatic theorem, a slowly changing Hamiltonian can approximately keep the system at the ground state during the evolution if the initial state is a ground state. In this paper we consider this process as an interpolation between the initial and final Hamiltonians. We use the mean value of a single operator to measure the distance between the final state and the ideal ground state. This measure resembles the excitation energy or excess work performed in thermodynamics, which can be taken as the error of adiabatic approximation. We prove that under certain conditions, this error can be estimated for an arbitrarily given interpolating function. This error estimation could be used as guideline to induce adiabatic evolution. According to our calculation, the adiabatic approximation error is not linearly proportional to the average speed of the variation of the system Hamiltonian and the inverse of the energy gaps in many cases. In particular, we apply this analysis to an example in which the applicability of the adiabatic theorem is questionable. (orig.)

  17. Adiabatic quantum pump in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin

    2015-11-01

    The adiabatic electron transport is theoretically studied in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) junction with two time-dependent pumping electric fields. By modeling a ZGNR p-n junction and applying the Keldysh Green’s function method, we find that a pumped charge current is flowing in the device at a zero external bias, which mainly comes from the photon-assisted tunneling process and the valley selection rule in an even-chain ZGNR junction. The pumped charge current and its ON and OFF states can be efficiently modulated by changing the system parameters such as the pumping frequency, the pumping phase difference, and the Fermi level. A ferromagnetic ZGNR device is also studied to generate a pure spin current and a fully polarized spin current due to the combined spin pump effect and the valley valve effect. Our finding might pave the way to manipulate the degree of freedom of electrons in a graphene-based electronic device. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 110704033), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BK2010416), and the Natural Science Foundation for Colleges and Universities in Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. 13KJB140005).

  18. Quantum probabilistically cloning and computation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this article we make a review on the usefulness of probabilistically cloning and present examples of quantum computation tasks for which quantum cloning offers an advantage which cannot be matched by any approach that does not resort to it.In these quantum computations,one needs to distribute quantum information contained in states about which we have some partial information.To perform quantum computations,one uses state-dependent probabilistic quantum cloning procedure to distribute quantum information in the middle of a quantum computation.And we discuss the achievable efficiencies and the efficient quantum logic network for probabilistic cloning the quantum states used in implementing quantum computation tasks for which cloning provides enhancement in performance.

  19. Demonstration of blind quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, Stefanie; Kashefi, Elham; Broadbent, Anne; Fitzsimons, Joseph F; Zeilinger, Anton; Walther, Philip

    2012-01-20

    Quantum computers, besides offering substantial computational speedups, are also expected to preserve the privacy of a computation. We present an experimental demonstration of blind quantum computing in which the input, computation, and output all remain unknown to the computer. We exploit the conceptual framework of measurement-based quantum computation that enables a client to delegate a computation to a quantum server. Various blind delegated computations, including one- and two-qubit gates and the Deutsch and Grover quantum algorithms, are demonstrated. The client only needs to be able to prepare and transmit individual photonic qubits. Our demonstration is crucial for unconditionally secure quantum cloud computing and might become a key ingredient for real-life applications, especially when considering the challenges of making powerful quantum computers widely available.

  20. Fully quantum non-adiabatic dynamics in electronic-nuclear coherent state basis

    CERN Document Server

    Humeniuk, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Direct dynamics methods using Gaussian wavepackets have to rely only on local properties, such as gradients and hessians at the center of the wavepacket, so as to be compatible with the usual quantum chemistry methods. Matrix elements of the potential energy surfaces between wavepackets therefore usually have to be approximated. It is shown, that if a modified form of valence bond theory is used instead of the usual MO-based theories, the matrix elements can be obtained exactly. This is so because the molecular Hamiltonian only contains the Coulomb potential, for which matrix elements between different basis functions (consisting of Gaussian nuclear and electronic orbitals) are all well-known. In valence bond theory the self-consistent field calculation can be avoided so that the matrix elements are analytical functions of the nuclear coordinates. A method for simulating non-adiabatic quantum dynamics is sketched, where coherent state trajectories are propagated "on the fly" on adiabatic potential energy surf...

  1. Quantum Computation and Spin Physics

    OpenAIRE

    DiVincenzo, David P.

    1996-01-01

    A brief review is given of the physical implementation of quantum computation within spin systems or other two-state quantum systems. The importance of the controlled-NOT or quantum XOR gate as the fundamental primitive operation of quantum logic is emphasized. Recent developments in the use of quantum entanglement to built error-robust quantum states, and the simplest protocol for quantum error correction, are discussed.

  2. Quantum Mobile Crypto-Computation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONGYan; CHENHuanhuan; GUNaijie; MIAOFuyou

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a quantum approach for solving the mobile crypto-computation problem is proposed. In our approach, quantum signature and quantum entanglement have been employed to strengthen the security of mobile computation. Theory analysis shows that our solution is secure against classic and quantum attacks.

  3. Relativistic quantum chemistry on quantum computers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veis, L.; Visnak, J.; Fleig, T.;

    2012-01-01

    The past few years have witnessed a remarkable interest in the application of quantum computing for solving problems in quantum chemistry more efficiently than classical computers allow. Very recently, proof-of-principle experimental realizations have been reported. However, so far only......-Coulomb Hamiltonian on a quantum computer and demonstrate the functionality of the proposed procedure by numerical simulations of computations of the spin-orbit splitting in the SbH molecule. Finally, we propose quantum circuits with three qubits and nine or ten controlled-NOT (CNOT) gates, which implement a proof...

  4. Holographic quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordrup, Karl; Negretti, Antonio; Mølmer, Klaus

    2008-07-25

    We propose to use a single mesoscopic ensemble of trapped polar molecules for quantum computing. A "holographic quantum register" with hundreds of qubits is encoded in collective excitations with definite spatial phase variations. Each phase pattern is uniquely addressed by optical Raman processes with classical optical fields, while one- and two-qubit gates and qubit readout are accomplished by transferring the qubit states to a stripline microwave cavity field and a Cooper pair box where controllable two-level unitary dynamics and detection is governed by classical microwave fields.

  5. Calculating work in adiabatic two-level quantum Markovian master equations: a characteristic function method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei

    2014-09-01

    We present a characteristic function method to calculate the probability density functions of the inclusive work in adiabatic two-level quantum Markovian master equations. These systems are steered by some slowly varying parameters and the dissipations may depend on time. Our theory is based on the interpretation of the quantum jump for the master equations. In addition to the calculation, we also find that the fluctuation properties of the work can be described by the symmetry of the characteristic functions, which is exactly the same as in the case of isolated systems. A periodically driven two-level model is used to demonstrate the method. PMID:25314409

  6. Investigating photonic quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Casey Robert

    The use of photons as qubits is a promising implementation for quantum computation. The inability of photons to interact, especially with the environment, makes them an ideal physical candidate. However, this also makes them a difficult system to perform two qubit gates on. Recent breakthroughs in photonic quantum computing have shown methods around the requirement of direct photon-photon interaction. In this thesis we study three recently discovered schemes for optical quantum computation. We first investigate the so called linear optical quantum computing (LOQC) scheme, exploring a method to improve the original proposal by constructing a photon-number QND detector that succeeds with a high probability. In doing this we present a new type of LOQC teleporter, one that can detect the presence of a single photon in an arbitrary polarisation state when the input state is a sum of vacuum and multi-photon terms. This new type of teleporter is an improvement on the original scheme in that the entangled states required can be made offline with fewer entangling operations. We next investigate the so called quantum bus (qubus) scheme for photonic quantum computing. We show a scheme to measure the party of n qubit states by using a single qubus mode, controlled rotations and displacements. This allows for the syndrome measurements of any stabilizer quantum error correcting code. We extend these results to a fault tolerant scheme to measure an arbitrary Pauli operator of weight n, incorporating so called single bit teleportations. We investigate the construction of a Toffoli gate by using a single qubus mode, controlled rotations and displacements that works with a success probability of at least 25%. We also investigate the use of single bit teleportations to construct a universal set of gates on coherent state type logic and in the construction of cluster states. We finally investigate the optical Zeno gate, a gate that uses the Zeno effect in the form of two photon

  7. Classically-Controlled Quantum Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Perdrix, Simon; Jorrand, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    Quantum computations usually take place under the control of the classical world. We introduce a Classically-controlled Quantum Turing Machine (CQTM) which is a Turing Machine (TM) with a quantum tape for acting on quantum data, and a classical transition function for a formalized classical control. In CQTM, unitary transformations and measurements are allowed. We show that any classical TM is simulated by a CQTM without loss of efficiency. The gap between classical and quantum computations, ...

  8. Quantum Computation and Spin Electronics

    OpenAIRE

    DiVincenzo, David P.; Burkard, Guido; Loss, Daniel; Sukhorukov, Eugene V.

    1999-01-01

    In this chapter we explore the connection between mesoscopic physics and quantum computing. After giving a bibliography providing a general introduction to the subject of quantum information processing, we review the various approaches that are being considered for the experimental implementation of quantum computing and quantum communication in atomic physics, quantum optics, nuclear magnetic resonance, superconductivity, and, especially, normal-electron solid state physics. We discuss five ...

  9. Genetic Algorithms and Quantum Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Giraldi, Gilson A.; Portugal, Renato; Thess, Ricardo N.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, researchers have applied genetic algorithms (GAs) to address some problems in quantum computation. Also, there has been some works in the designing of genetic algorithms based on quantum theoretical concepts and techniques. The so called Quantum Evolutionary Programming has two major sub-areas: Quantum Inspired Genetic Algorithms (QIGAs) and Quantum Genetic Algorithms (QGAs). The former adopts qubit chromosomes as representations and employs quantum gates for the search of the best ...

  10. Quantum computing of semiclassical formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgeot, B; Giraud, O

    2008-04-01

    We show that semiclassical formulas such as the Gutzwiller trace formula can be implemented on a quantum computer more efficiently than on a classical device. We give explicit quantum algorithms which yield quantum observables from classical trajectories, and which alternatively test the semiclassical approximation by computing classical actions from quantum evolution. The gain over classical computation is in general quadratic, and can be larger in some specific cases.

  11. Quantum computing on encrypted data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, K. A. G.; Broadbent, A.; Shalm, L. K.; Yan, Z.; Lavoie, J.; Prevedel, R.; Jennewein, T.; Resch, K. J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to perform computations on encrypted data is a powerful tool for protecting privacy. Recently, protocols to achieve this on classical computing systems have been found. Here, we present an efficient solution to the quantum analogue of this problem that enables arbitrary quantum computations to be carried out on encrypted quantum data. We prove that an untrusted server can implement a universal set of quantum gates on encrypted quantum bits (qubits) without learning any information about the inputs, while the client, knowing the decryption key, can easily decrypt the results of the computation. We experimentally demonstrate, using single photons and linear optics, the encryption and decryption scheme on a set of gates sufficient for arbitrary quantum computations. As our protocol requires few extra resources compared with other schemes it can be easily incorporated into the design of future quantum servers. These results will play a key role in enabling the development of secure distributed quantum systems.

  12. Quantum computing on encrypted data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, K A G; Broadbent, A; Shalm, L K; Yan, Z; Lavoie, J; Prevedel, R; Jennewein, T; Resch, K J

    2014-01-01

    The ability to perform computations on encrypted data is a powerful tool for protecting privacy. Recently, protocols to achieve this on classical computing systems have been found. Here, we present an efficient solution to the quantum analogue of this problem that enables arbitrary quantum computations to be carried out on encrypted quantum data. We prove that an untrusted server can implement a universal set of quantum gates on encrypted quantum bits (qubits) without learning any information about the inputs, while the client, knowing the decryption key, can easily decrypt the results of the computation. We experimentally demonstrate, using single photons and linear optics, the encryption and decryption scheme on a set of gates sufficient for arbitrary quantum computations. As our protocol requires few extra resources compared with other schemes it can be easily incorporated into the design of future quantum servers. These results will play a key role in enabling the development of secure distributed quantum systems.

  13. Pulse-driven near-resonant quantum adiabatic dynamics: lifting of quasi-degeneracy

    CERN Document Server

    Yatsenko, L P; Jauslin, H R

    2003-01-01

    We study the quantum dynamics of a two-level system driven by a pulse that starts near-resonant for small amplitudes, yielding nonadiabatic evolution, and induces an adiabatic evolution for larger amplitudes. This problem is analyzed in terms of lifting of degeneracy for rising amplitudes. It is solved exactly for the case of linear and exponential rising. Approximate solutions are given in the case of power law rising. This allows us to determine approximative formulas for the lineshape of resonant excitation by various forms of pulses such as truncated trig-pulses. We also analyze and explain the various superpositions of states that can be obtained by the Half Stark Chirped Rapid Adiabatic Passage (Half-SCRAP) process.

  14. Quantum computer for dummies (in Russian)

    OpenAIRE

    Grozin, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    An introduction (in Russian) to quantum computers, quantum cryptography, and quantum teleportation for students who have no previous knowledge of these subjects, but know quantum mechanics. Several simple examples are considered in detail using the quantum computer emulator QCL.

  15. Quantum computing with defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J R; Koehl, W F; Varley, J B; Janotti, A; Buckley, B B; Van de Walle, C G; Awschalom, D D

    2010-05-11

    Identifying and designing physical systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information, are critical steps in the development of a quantum computer. Among the possibilities in the solid state, a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-1)) center stands out for its robustness--its quantum state can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. Here we describe how to systematically identify other deep center defects with similar quantum-mechanical properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate defect systems. To illustrate these points in detail, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV(-1) center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). We then discuss the proposed criteria for similar defects in other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors. PMID:20404195

  16. Quantum computing with defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J R; Koehl, W F; Varley, J B; Janotti, A; Buckley, B B; Van de Walle, C G; Awschalom, D D

    2010-05-11

    Identifying and designing physical systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information, are critical steps in the development of a quantum computer. Among the possibilities in the solid state, a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-1)) center stands out for its robustness--its quantum state can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. Here we describe how to systematically identify other deep center defects with similar quantum-mechanical properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate defect systems. To illustrate these points in detail, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV(-1) center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). We then discuss the proposed criteria for similar defects in other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors.

  17. Quantum computation and complexity theory

    OpenAIRE

    Svozil, K.

    1994-01-01

    The Hilbert space formalism of quantum mechanics is reviewed with emphasis on applications to quantum computing. Standard interferomeric techniques are used to construct a physical device capable of universal quantum computation. Some consequences for recursion theory and complexity theory are discussed.

  18. Energy Dissipation in Quantum Computers

    CERN Document Server

    Granik, A

    2003-01-01

    A method is described for calculating the heat generated in a quantum computer due to loss of quantum phase information. Amazingly enough, this heat generation can take place at zero temperature. and may explain why it is impossible to extrax=ct energy from vacuum fluctuations. Implications for optical computers and quantum cosmology are also briefly discussed.

  19. Energy Dissipation in Quantum Computers

    OpenAIRE

    Granik, A.; Chapline, G.

    2003-01-01

    A method is described for calculating the heat generated in a quantum computer due to loss of quantum phase information. Amazingly enough, this heat generation can take place at zero temperature. and may explain why it is impossible to extract energy from vacuum fluctuations. Implications for optical computers and quantum cosmology are also briefly discussed.

  20. Programmable architecture for quantum computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, J.; Wang, L.; Charbon, E.; Wang, B.

    2013-01-01

    A programmable architecture called “quantum FPGA (field-programmable gate array)” (QFPGA) is presented for quantum computing, which is a hybrid model combining the advantages of the qubus system and the measurement-based quantum computation. There are two kinds of buses in QFPGA, the local bus and t

  1. Interfacing External Quantum Devices to a Universal Quantum Computer

    OpenAIRE

    Lagana, Antonio A.; Max A Lohe; Lorenz von Smekal

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme to use external quantum devices using the universal quantum computer previously constructed. We thereby show how the universal quantum computer can utilize networked quantum information resources to carry out local computations. Such information may come from specialized quantum devices or even from remote universal quantum computers. We show how to accomplish this by devising universal quantum computer programs that implement well known oracle based quantum algorithms, na...

  2. Quantum computing for pattern classification

    OpenAIRE

    Schuld, Maria; Sinayskiy, Ilya; Petruccione, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that for certain tasks, quantum computing outperforms classical computing. A growing number of contributions try to use this advantage in order to improve or extend classical machine learning algorithms by methods of quantum information theory. This paper gives a brief introduction into quantum machine learning using the example of pattern classification. We introduce a quantum pattern classification algorithm that draws on Trugenberger's proposal for measuring the Hamming di...

  3. Addition on a Quantum Computer

    CERN Document Server

    Draper, Thomas G

    2000-01-01

    A new method for computing sums on a quantum computer is introduced. This technique uses the quantum Fourier transform and reduces the number of qubits necessary for addition by removing the need for temporary carry bits. This approach also allows the addition of a classical number to a quantum superposition without encoding the classical number in the quantum register. This method also allows for massive parallelization in its execution.

  4. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in an open quantum system: Master equation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A master equation approach to the study of environmental effects in the adiabatic population transfer in three-state systems is presented. A systematic comparison with the non-Hermitian Hamiltonian approach [Vitanov and Stenholm, Phys. Rev. A 56, 1463 (1997)] shows that, in the weak-coupling limit, the two treatments lead to essentially the same results. In contrast, in the strong-damping limit the predictions are quite different: In particular, the counterintuitive sequences in the STIRAP scheme turn out to be much more efficient than expected before. This point is explained in terms of quantum Zeno dynamics.

  5. An explicit model for the adiabatic evolution of quantum observables driven by 1D shape resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Faraj, A; Nier, F

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a linearized version of the transport problem where the Schr\\"{o}dinger-Poisson operator is replaced by a non-autonomous Hamiltonian, slowly varying in time. We consider an explicitly solvable model where a semiclassical island is described by a flat potential barrier, while a time dependent 'delta' interaction is used as a model for a single quantum well. Introducing, in addition to the complex deformation, a further modification formed by artificial interface conditions, we give a reduced equation for the adiabatic evolution of the sheet density of charges accumulating around the interaction point.

  6. Massively parallel quantum computer simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, K.; Michielsen, K.; De Raedt, H.; Trieu, B.; Arnold, G.; Richter, M.; Lippert, Th.; Watanabe, H.; Ito, N.

    2007-01-01

    We describe portable software to simulate universal quantum computers on massive parallel Computers. We illustrate the use of the simulation software by running various quantum algorithms on different computer architectures, such as a IBM BlueGene/L, a IBM Regatta p690+, a Hitachi SR11000/J1, a Cray

  7. Quantum Computational Logics. A Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Chiara, M L D; Leporini, R

    2003-01-01

    Quantum computation has suggested new forms of quantum logic, called quantum computational logics. The basic semantic idea is the following: the meaning of a sentence is identified with a quregister, a system of qubits, representing a possible pure state of a compound quantum system. The generalization to mixed states, which might be useful to analyse entanglement-phenomena, is due to Gudder. Quantum computational logics represent non standard examples of unsharp quantum logic, where the non-contradiction principle is violated, while conjunctions and disjunctions are strongly non-idempotent. In this framework, any sentence of the language gives rise to a quantum tree: a kind of quantum circuit that transforms the quregister associated to the atomic subformulas of the sentence into the quregister associated to the sentence.

  8. Quantum information. Teleportation - cryptography - quantum computer; Quanteninformation. Teleportation - Kryptografie - Quantencomputer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenneker, Carsten (comp.)

    2012-11-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Reality in the test facility, quantum teleportation, the reality of quanta, interaction-free quantum measurement, rules for quantum computers, quantum computers with ions, spintronics with diamond, the limits of the quantum computers, a view in the future of quantum optics. (HSI)

  9. Superposition, Entanglement and Quantum Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Forcer, T.M.; Hey, A. J. G.; Ross, D. A.; P.G.R.Smith

    2002-01-01

    The paper examines the roles played by superposition and entanglement in quantum computing. The analysis is illustrated by discussion of a 'classical' electronic implementation of Grover's quantum search algorithm. It is shown explicitly that the absence of multi-particle entanglement leads to exponentially rising resources for implementing such quantum algorithms.

  10. Accurate Non-adiabatic Quantum Dynamics from Pseudospectral Sampling of Time-dependent Gaussian Basis Sets

    CERN Document Server

    Heaps, Charles W

    2016-01-01

    Quantum molecular dynamics requires an accurate representation of the molecular potential energy surface from a minimal number of electronic structure calculations, particularly for nonadiabatic dynamics where excited states are required. In this paper, we employ pseudospectral sampling of time-dependent Gaussian basis functions for the simulation of non-adiabatic dynamics. Unlike other methods, the pseudospectral Gaussian molecular dynamics tests the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation with $N$ Dirac delta functions located at the centers of the Gaussian functions reducing the scaling of potential energy evaluations from $\\mathcal{O}(N^2)$ to $\\mathcal{O}(N)$. By projecting the Gaussian basis onto discrete points in space, the method is capable of efficiently and quantitatively describing nonadiabatic population transfer and intra-surface quantum coherence. We investigate three model systems; the photodissociation of three coupled Morse oscillators, the bound state dynamics of two coupled Morse oscillators, and a two-d...

  11. Adiabatic quenches and characterization of amplitude excitations in a continuous quantum phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Thai M; Bharath, Hebbe M; Boguslawski, Matthew J; Anquez, Martin; Robbins, Bryce A; Chapman, Michael S

    2016-08-23

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs in a physical system whenever the ground state does not share the symmetry of the underlying theory, e.g., the Hamiltonian. This mechanism gives rise to massless Nambu-Goldstone modes and massive Anderson-Higgs modes. These modes provide a fundamental understanding of matter in the Universe and appear as collective phase or amplitude excitations of an order parameter in a many-body system. The amplitude excitation plays a crucial role in determining the critical exponents governing universal nonequilibrium dynamics in the Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM). Here, we characterize the amplitude excitations in a spin-1 condensate and measure the energy gap for different phases of the quantum phase transition. At the quantum critical point of the transition, finite-size effects lead to a nonzero gap. Our measurements are consistent with this prediction, and furthermore, we demonstrate an adiabatic quench through the phase transition, which is forbidden at the mean field level. This work paves the way toward generating entanglement through an adiabatic phase transition. PMID:27503886

  12. Adiabatic quenches and characterization of amplitude excitations in a continuous quantum phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Thai M.; Bharath, Hebbe M.; Boguslawski, Matthew J.; Anquez, Martin; Robbins, Bryce A.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2016-08-01

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs in a physical system whenever the ground state does not share the symmetry of the underlying theory, e.g., the Hamiltonian. This mechanism gives rise to massless Nambu-Goldstone modes and massive Anderson-Higgs modes. These modes provide a fundamental understanding of matter in the Universe and appear as collective phase or amplitude excitations of an order parameter in a many-body system. The amplitude excitation plays a crucial role in determining the critical exponents governing universal nonequilibrium dynamics in the Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM). Here, we characterize the amplitude excitations in a spin-1 condensate and measure the energy gap for different phases of the quantum phase transition. At the quantum critical point of the transition, finite-size effects lead to a nonzero gap. Our measurements are consistent with this prediction, and furthermore, we demonstrate an adiabatic quench through the phase transition, which is forbidden at the mean field level. This work paves the way toward generating entanglement through an adiabatic phase transition.

  13. Adiabatic quenches and characterization of amplitude excitations in a continuous quantum phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Thai M.; Bharath, Hebbe M.; Boguslawski, Matthew J.; Anquez, Martin; Robbins, Bryce A.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs in a physical system whenever the ground state does not share the symmetry of the underlying theory, e.g., the Hamiltonian. This mechanism gives rise to massless Nambu–Goldstone modes and massive Anderson–Higgs modes. These modes provide a fundamental understanding of matter in the Universe and appear as collective phase or amplitude excitations of an order parameter in a many-body system. The amplitude excitation plays a crucial role in determining the critical exponents governing universal nonequilibrium dynamics in the Kibble–Zurek mechanism (KZM). Here, we characterize the amplitude excitations in a spin-1 condensate and measure the energy gap for different phases of the quantum phase transition. At the quantum critical point of the transition, finite-size effects lead to a nonzero gap. Our measurements are consistent with this prediction, and furthermore, we demonstrate an adiabatic quench through the phase transition, which is forbidden at the mean field level. This work paves the way toward generating entanglement through an adiabatic phase transition. PMID:27503886

  14. Quantum physics, simulation, and computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The ultimate scope and power of computers will be determined by the laws of physics. Quantum computers exploit the rules of quantum mechanics, using quantum coherence and entanglement for new ways of information processing. Up to date, the realization of these systems requires extremely precise control of matter on the atomic scale and a nearly perfect isolation from the environment. The question, to what extent quantum information processing can also be exploited in 'natural' and less controlled systems, including biological ones, is exciting but still open. In this talk, I will present some of our recent work on (quantum) physically and biologically motivated models of information processing. (author)

  15. Quantum Computing over Finite Fields

    CERN Document Server

    James, Roshan P; Sabry, Amr

    2011-01-01

    In recent work, Benjamin Schumacher and Michael~D. Westmoreland investigate a version of quantum mechanics which they call "modal quantum theory" but which we prefer to call "discrete quantum theory". This theory is obtained by instantiating the mathematical framework of Hilbert spaces with a finite field instead of the field of complex numbers. This instantiation collapses much the structure of actual quantum mechanics but retains several of its distinguishing characteristics including the notions of superposition, interference, and entanglement. Furthermore, discrete quantum theory excludes local hidden variable models, has a no-cloning theorem, and can express natural counterparts of quantum information protocols such as superdense coding and teleportation. Our first result is to distill a model of discrete quantum computing from this quantum theory. The model is expressed using a monadic metalanguage built on top of a universal reversible language for finite computations, and hence is directly implementab...

  16. Quantum Computer Using Coupled Quantum Dot Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, N J; Natori, A; Yasunaga, H; Wu*, Nan-Jian

    1999-01-01

    We propose a method for implementation of a quantum computer using artificial molecules. The artificial molecule consists of two coupled quantum dots stacked along z direction and one single electron. One-qubit and two-qubit gates are constructed by one molecule and two coupled molecules, respectively.The ground state and the first excited state of the molecule are used to encode the |0> and |1> states of a qubit. The qubit is manipulated by a resonant electromagnetic wave that is applied directly to the qubit through a microstrip line. The coupling between two qubits in a quantum controlled NOT gate is switched on (off) by floating (grounding) the metal film electrodes. We study the operations of the gates by using a box-shaped quantum dot model and numerically solving a time-dependent Schridinger equation, and demonstrate that the quantum gates can perform the quantum computation. The operating speed of the gates is about one operation per 4ps. The reading operation of the output of the quantum computer can...

  17. Quantum information processing in nanostructures Quantum optics; Quantum computing

    CERN Document Server

    Reina-Estupinan, J H

    2002-01-01

    Since information has been regarded os a physical entity, the field of quantum information theory has blossomed. This brings novel applications, such as quantum computation. This field has attracted the attention of numerous researchers with backgrounds ranging from computer science, mathematics and engineering, to the physical sciences. Thus, we now have an interdisciplinary field where great efforts are being made in order to build devices that should allow for the processing of information at a quantum level, and also in the understanding of the complex structure of some physical processes at a more basic level. This thesis is devoted to the theoretical study of structures at the nanometer-scale, 'nanostructures', through physical processes that mainly involve the solid-state and quantum optics, in order to propose reliable schemes for the processing of quantum information. Initially, the main results of quantum information theory and quantum computation are briefly reviewed. Next, the state-of-the-art of ...

  18. The Physics of Quantum Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falci, Giuseppe; Paladino, Elisabette

    2015-10-01

    Quantum Computation has emerged in the past decades as a consequence of down-scaling of electronic devices to the mesoscopic regime and of advances in the ability of controlling and measuring microscopic quantum systems. QC has many interdisciplinary aspects, ranging from physics and chemistry to mathematics and computer science. In these lecture notes we focus on physical hardware, present day challenges and future directions for design of quantum architectures.

  19. Phantom instabilities in adiabatically driven systems: dynamical sensitivity to computational precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafri, Haider Hasan; Singh, Thounaojam Umeshkanta; Ramaswamy, Ramakrishna

    2012-09-01

    We study the robustness of dynamical phenomena in adiabatically driven nonlinear mappings with skew-product structure. Deviations from true orbits are observed when computations are performed with inadequate numerical precision for monotone, periodic, or quasiperiodic driving. The effect of slow modulation is to "freeze" orbits in long intervals of purely contracting or purely expanding dynamics in the phase space. When computations are carried out with low precision, numerical errors build up phantom instabilities which ultimately force trajectories to depart from the true motion. Thus, the dynamics observed with finite precision computation shows sensitivity to numerical precision: the minimum accuracy required to obtain "true" trajectories is proportional to an internal timescale that can be defined for the adiabatic system.

  20. Avoiding Quantum Chaos in Quantum Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, G P; Izrailev, F M; Tsifrinovich, V I

    2001-01-01

    We study a one-dimensional chain of nuclear $1/2-$spins in an external time-dependent magnetic field. This model is considered as a possible candidate for experimental realization of quantum computation. According to the general theory of interacting particles, one of the most dangerous effects is quantum chaos which can destroy the stability of quantum operations. According to the standard viewpoint, the threshold for the onset of quantum chaos due to an interaction between spins (qubits) strongly decreases with an increase of the number of qubits. Contrary to this opinion, we show that the presence of a magnetic field gradient helps to avoid quantum chaos which turns out to disappear with an increase of the number of qubits. We give analytical estimates which explain this effect, together with numerical data supporting

  1. Quantum entanglement and quantum computational algorithms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arvind

    2001-02-01

    The existence of entangled quantum states gives extra power to quantum computers over their classical counterparts. Quantum entanglement shows up qualitatively at the level of two qubits. We demonstrate that the one- and the two-bit Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm does not require entanglement and can be mapped onto a classical optical scheme. It is only for three and more input bits that the DJ algorithm requires the implementation of entangling transformations and in these cases it is impossible to implement this algorithm classically

  2. Programming Pulse Driven Quantum Computers

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, Seth

    1999-01-01

    Arrays of weakly-coupled quantum systems can be made to compute by subjecting them to a sequence of electromagnetic pulses of well-defined frequency and length. Such pulsed arrays are true quantum computers: bits can be placed in superpositions of 0 and 1, logical operations take place coherently, and dissipation is required only for error correction. Programming such computers is accomplished by selecting the proper sequence of pulses.

  3. Coupled-channels quantum theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic processes: fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestler, D J

    2012-03-22

    The Born-Oppenheimer (BO) description of electronically adiabatic molecular processes predicts a vanishing electronic flux density (j(e)), =1/2∫dR[Δ(b) (x;R) - Δ(a) (x;R)] even though the electrons certainly move in response to the movement of the nuclei. This article, the first of a pair, proposes a quantum-mechanical "coupled-channels" (CC) theory that allows the approximate extraction of j(e) from the electronically adiabatic BO wave function . The CC theory is detailed for H(2)(+), in which case j(e) can be resolved into components associated with two channels α (=a,b), each of which corresponds to the "collision" of an "internal" atom α (proton a or b plus electron) with the other nucleus β (proton b or a). The dynamical role of the electron, which accommodates itself instantaneously to the motion of the nuclei, is submerged in effective electronic probability (population) densities, Δ(α), associated with each channel (α). The Δ(α) densities are determined by the (time-independent) BO electronic energy eigenfunction, which depends parametrically on the configuration of the nuclei, the motion of which is governed by the usual BO nuclear Schrödinger equation. Intuitively appealing formal expressions for the electronic flux density are derived for H(2)(+).

  4. Experimental realization of non-adiabatic universal quantum gates using geometric Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Tu, Tao; Gong, Bo; Zhou, Cheng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-01-07

    High fidelity universal gates for quantum bits form an essential ingredient of quantum information processing. In particular, geometric gates have attracted attention because they have a higher intrinsic resistance to certain errors. However, their realization remains a challenge because of the need for complicated quantum control on a multi-level structure as well as meeting the adiabatic condition within a short decoherence time. Here, we demonstrate non-adiabatic quantum operations for a two-level system by applying a well-controlled geometric Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interferometry. By characterizing the gate quality, we also investigate the operation in the presence of realistic dephasing. Furthermore, the result provides an essential model suitable for understanding an interplay of geometric phase and Landau-Zener-Stückelberg process which are well explored separately.

  5. Non-adiabatic quantum evolution: The S matrix as a geometrical phase factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saadi, Y., E-mail: S_yahiadz@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et Systèmes Dynamiques, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ferhat Abbas de Sétif, Sétif 19000 (Algeria); Maamache, M. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et Systèmes Dynamiques, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ferhat Abbas de Sétif, Sétif 19000 (Algeria)

    2012-03-19

    We present a complete derivation of the exact evolution of quantum mechanics for the case when the underlying spectrum is continuous. We base our discussion on the use of the Weyl eigendifferentials. We show that a quantum system being in an eigenstate of an invariant will remain in the subspace generated by the eigenstates of the invariant, thereby acquiring a generalized non-adiabatic or Aharonov–Anandan geometric phase linked to the diagonal element of the S matrix. The modified Pöschl–Teller potential and the time-dependent linear potential are worked out as illustrations. -- Highlights: ► In this Letter we study the exact quantum evolution for continuous spectra problems. ► We base our discussion on the use of the Weyl eigendifferentials. ► We give a generalized Lewis and Riesenfeld phase for continuous spectra. ► This generalized phase or Aharonov–Anandan geometric phase is linked to the S matrix. ► The modified Pöschl–Teller and the linear potential are worked out as illustrations.

  6. Cryptography, quantum computation and trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Richard J.

    1998-03-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  7. Quantum computation using geometric algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzke, Douglas James

    This dissertation reports that arbitrary Boolean logic equations and operators can be represented in geometric algebra as linear equations composed entirely of orthonormal vectors using only addition and multiplication Geometric algebra is a topologically based algebraic system that naturally incorporates the inner and anticommutative outer products into a real valued geometric product, yet does not rely on complex numbers or matrices. A series of custom tools was designed and built to simplify geometric algebra expressions into a standard sum of products form, and automate the anticommutative geometric product and operations. Using this infrastructure, quantum bits (qubits), quantum registers and EPR-bits (ebits) are expressed symmetrically as geometric algebra expressions. Many known quantum computing gates, measurement operators, and especially the Bell/magic operators are also expressed as geometric products. These results demonstrate that geometric algebra can naturally and faithfully represent the central concepts, objects, and operators necessary for quantum computing, and can facilitate the design and construction of quantum computing tools.

  8. Experimental quantum computing without entanglement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyon, B P; Barbieri, M; Almeida, M P; White, A G

    2008-11-14

    Deterministic quantum computation with one pure qubit (DQC1) is an efficient model of computation that uses highly mixed states. Unlike pure-state models, its power is not derived from the generation of a large amount of entanglement. Instead it has been proposed that other nonclassical correlations are responsible for the computational speedup, and that these can be captured by the quantum discord. In this Letter we implement DQC1 in an all-optical architecture, and experimentally observe the generated correlations. We find no entanglement, but large amounts of quantum discord-except in three cases where an efficient classical simulation is always possible. Our results show that even fully separable, highly mixed, states can contain intrinsically quantum mechanical correlations and that these could offer a valuable resource for quantum information technologies.

  9. An Algebra of Reversible Quantum Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Based on the axiomatization of reversible computing RACP, we generalize it to quantum reversible computing which is called qRACP. By use of the framework of quantum configuration, we show that structural reversibility and quantum state reversibility must be satisfied simultaneously in quantum reversible computation. RACP and qRACP has the same axiomatization modulo the so-called quantum forward-reverse bisimularity, that is, classical reversible computing and quantum reversible computing are ...

  10. Quantum computation: algorithms and implementation in quantum dot devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, John King

    In this thesis, we explore several aspects of both the software and hardware of quantum computation. First, we examine the computational power of multi-particle quantum random walks in terms of distinguishing mathematical graphs. We study both interacting and non-interacting multi-particle walks on strongly regular graphs, proving some limitations on distinguishing powers and presenting extensive numerical evidence indicative of interactions providing more distinguishing power. We then study the recently proposed adiabatic quantum algorithm for Google PageRank, and show that it exhibits power-law scaling for realistic WWW-like graphs. Turning to hardware, we next analyze the thermal physics of two nearby 2D electron gas (2DEG), and show that an analogue of the Coulomb drag effect exists for heat transfer. In some distance and temperature, this heat transfer is more significant than phonon dissipation channels. After that, we study the dephasing of two-electron states in a single silicon quantum dot. Specifically, we consider dephasing due to the electron-phonon coupling and charge noise, separately treating orbital and valley excitations. In an ideal system, dephasing due to charge noise is strongly suppressed due to a vanishing dipole moment. However, introduction of disorder or anharmonicity leads to large effective dipole moments, and hence possibly strong dephasing. Building on this work, we next consider more realistic systems, including structural disorder systems. We present experiment and theory, which demonstrate energy levels that vary with quantum dot translation, implying a structurally disordered system. Finally, we turn to the issues of valley mixing and valley-orbit hybridization, which occurs due to atomic-scale disorder at quantum well interfaces. We develop a new theoretical approach to study these effects, which we name the disorder-expansion technique. We demonstrate that this method successfully reproduces atomistic tight-binding techniques

  11. Quantum computation in photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Angelakis, D G; Yannopapas, V; Ekert, A; Angelakis, Dimitris G.; Santos, Marcelo Franca; Yannopapas, Vassilis; Ekert, Artur

    2004-01-01

    Quantum computers require technologies that offer both sufficient control over coherent quantum phenomena and minimal spurious interactions with the environment. We show, that photons confined to photonic crystals, and in particular to highly efficient waveguides formed from linear chains of defects doped with atoms can generate strong non-linear interactions which allow to implement both single and two qubit quantum gates. The simplicity of the gate switching mechanism, the experimental feasibility of fabricating two dimensional photonic crystal structures and integrability of this device with optoelectronics offers new interesting possibilities for optical quantum information processing networks.

  12. Quantum Computing with Very Noisy Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Knill, E.

    2004-01-01

    In theory, quantum computers can efficiently simulate quantum physics, factor large numbers and estimate integrals, thus solving otherwise intractable computational problems. In practice, quantum computers must operate with noisy devices called ``gates'' that tend to destroy the fragile quantum states needed for computation. The goal of fault-tolerant quantum computing is to compute accurately even when gates have a high probability of error each time they are used. Here we give evidence that...

  13. A quantum computer network

    CERN Document Server

    Kesidis, George

    2009-01-01

    Wong's diffusion network is a stochastic, zero-input Hopfield network with a Gibbs stationary distribution over a bounded, connected continuum. Previously, logarithmic thermal annealing was demonstrated for the diffusion network and digital versions of it were studied and applied to imaging. Recently, "quantum" annealed Markov chains have garnered significant attention because of their improved performance over "pure" thermal annealing. In this note, a joint quantum and thermal version of Wong's diffusion network is described and its convergence properties are studied. Different choices for "auxiliary" functions are discussed, including those of the kinetic type previously associated with quantum annealing.

  14. Physical Realizations of Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Kanemitsu, Shigeru; Salomaa, Martti; Takagi, Shin; Are the DiVincenzo Criteria Fulfilled in 2004 ?

    2006-01-01

    The contributors of this volume are working at the forefront of various realizations of quantum computers. They survey the recent developments in each realization, in the context of the DiVincenzo criteria, including nuclear magnetic resonance, Josephson junctions, quantum dots, and trapped ions. There are also some theoretical contributions which have relevance in the physical realizations of a quantum computer. This book fills the gap between elementary introductions to the subject and highly specialized research papers to allow beginning graduate students to understand the cutting-edge of r

  15. Quantum Computation with Ballistic Electrons

    OpenAIRE

    Ionicioiu, Radu; Amaratunga, Gehan; Udrea, Florin

    2000-01-01

    We describe a solid state implementation of a quantum computer using ballistic single electrons as flying qubits in 1D nanowires. We show how to implement all the steps required for universal quantum computation: preparation of the initial state, measurement of the final state and a universal set of quantum gates. An important advantage of this model is the fact that we do not need ultrafast optoelectronics for gate operations. We use cold programming (or pre-programming), i.e., the gates are...

  16. Faster Quantum Chemistry Simulation on Fault-Tolerant Quantum Computers

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, N. Cody; Whitfield, James D.; McMahon, Peter L.; Yung, Man-Hong; Van Meter, Rodney; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2012-01-01

    Quantum computers can in principle simulate quantum physics exponentially faster than their classical counterparts, but some technical hurdles remain. We propose methods which substantially improve the performance of a particular form of simulation, ab initio quantum chemistry, on fault-tolerant quantum computers; these methods generalize readily to other quantum simulation problems. Quantum teleportation plays a key role in these improvements and is used extensively as a computing resource...

  17. Towards A Theory Of Quantum Computability

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrini, Stefano; Martini, Simone; Masini, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We propose a definition of quantum computable functions as mappings between superpositions of natural numbers to probability distributions of natural numbers. Each function is obtained as a limit of an infinite computation of a quantum Turing machine. The class of quantum computable functions is recursively enumerable, thus opening the door to a quantum computability theory which may follow some of the classical developments.

  18. Accurate non-adiabatic quantum dynamics from pseudospectral sampling of time-dependent Gaussian basis sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, Charles W.; Mazziotti, David A.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum molecular dynamics requires an accurate representation of the molecular potential energy surface from a minimal number of electronic structure calculations, particularly for nonadiabatic dynamics where excited states are required. In this paper, we employ pseudospectral sampling of time-dependent Gaussian basis functions for the simulation of non-adiabatic dynamics. Unlike other methods, the pseudospectral Gaussian molecular dynamics tests the Schrödinger equation with N Dirac delta functions located at the centers of the Gaussian functions reducing the scaling of potential energy evaluations from O ( N 2 ) to O ( N ) . By projecting the Gaussian basis onto discrete points in space, the method is capable of efficiently and quantitatively describing the nonadiabatic population transfer and intra-surface quantum coherence. We investigate three model systems: the photodissociation of three coupled Morse oscillators, the bound state dynamics of two coupled Morse oscillators, and a two-dimensional model for collinear triatomic vibrational dynamics. In all cases, the pseudospectral Gaussian method is in quantitative agreement with numerically exact calculations. The results are promising for nonadiabatic molecular dynamics in molecular systems where strongly correlated ground or excited states require expensive electronic structure calculations.

  19. Warp-Drive Quantum Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Nakahara, M; Kondo, Y; Tanimura, S; Hata, K; Nakahara, Mikio; Vartiainen, Juha J.; Kondo, Yasushi; Tanimura, Shogo; Hata, Kazuya

    2004-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that time-optimal quantum computation is attained by using the Cartan decomposition of a unitary matrix. We extend this approach by noting that the unitary group is compact. This allows us to reduce the execution time of a quantum algorithm $U_{\\rm alg}$ further by adding an extra gate $W$ to it. This gate $W$ sends $U_{\\rm alg}$ to another algorithm $WU_{\\rm alg}$ which is executable in a shorter time than $U_{\\rm alg}$. We call this technique warp-drive. Here we show both theoretically and experimentally that the execution time of Grover's algorithm is reduced in two-qubit NMR quantum computer. Warp-drive is potentially a powerful tool in accelerating algorithms and reducing the errors in any realization. of a quantum computer

  20. Handbook of computational quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, David B

    2005-01-01

    Quantum chemistry forms the basis of molecular modeling, a tool widely used to obtain important chemical information and visual images of molecular systems. Recent advances in computing have resulted in considerable developments in molecular modeling, and these developments have led to significant achievements in the design and synthesis of drugs and catalysts. This comprehensive text provides upper-level undergraduates and graduate students with an introduction to the implementation of quantum ideas in molecular modeling, exploring practical applications alongside theoretical explanations.Wri

  1. QCE : A Simulator for Quantum Computer Hardware

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, Kristel; Raedt, Hans De

    2003-01-01

    The Quantum Computer Emulator (QCE) described in this paper consists of a simulator of a generic, general purpose quantum computer and a graphical user interface. The latter is used to control the simulator, to define the hardware of the quantum computer and to debug and execute quantum algorithms.

  2. On the Problem of Programming Quantum Computers

    OpenAIRE

    De Raedt, Hans; Hams, Anthony; Michielsen, Kristel; MIYASHITA, Seiji; Saito, Keiji

    2000-01-01

    We study effects of the physical realization of quantum computers on their logical operation. Through simulation of physical models of quantum computer hardware, we analyse the difficulties that are encountered in programming physical implementations of quantum computers. We discuss the origin of the instabilities of quantum algorithms and explore physical mechanisms to enlarge the region(s) of stable operation.

  3. Nonadiabatic Geometric Quantum Computation with Asymmetric Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    We propose a method of controlling the dc-SQUID(superconductiong quantum interference device)system by changing the gate voltages,which controls the amplitude of the fictitious magnetic fields Bz,and the externally applied current that produces the piercing magnetic flux Φx for the dc-SQUID system,we have also introduced a physical model for the dc-SQUID system.Using this physical model,one can obtain the non-adiabatic geometric phase gate for the single qubit and the non-adiabatic conditional geometric phase gate (controlled NOT gate) for the two qubits.It is shown that when the gate voltage and the externally applied current of the dc-SQUID system satisfies an appropriate constraint condition,the charge state evolution can be controlled exactly on a dynamic phase free path.The non-adiabatic evolution of the charge states is given as well.

  4. Using a quantum computer to investigate quantum chaos

    OpenAIRE

    Schack, Ruediger

    1997-01-01

    We show that the quantum baker's map, a prototypical map invented for theoretical studies of quantum chaos, has a very simple realization in terms of quantum gates. Chaos in the quantum baker's map could be investigated experimentally on a quantum computer based on only 3 qubits.

  5. The universal quantum driving force to speed up a quantum computation -- The unitary quantum dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Xijia

    2011-01-01

    It is shown in the paper that the unitary quantum dynamics in quantum mechanics is the universal quantum driving force to speed up a quantum computation. This assertion supports strongly in theory that the unitary quantum dynamics is the fundamental and universal principle in nature. On the other hand, the symmetric structure of Hilbert space of a composite quantum system is the quantum-computing resource that is not owned by classical computation. A new quantum-computing speedup theory is se...

  6. Quantum Walks for Computer Scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Venegas-Andraca, Salvador

    2008-01-01

    Quantum computation, one of the latest joint ventures between physics and the theory of computation, is a scientific field whose main goals include the development of hardware and algorithms based on the quantum mechanical properties of those physical systems used to implement such algorithms. Solving difficult tasks (for example, the Satisfiability Problem and other NP-complete problems) requires the development of sophisticated algorithms, many of which employ stochastic processes as their mathematical basis. Discrete random walks are a popular choice among those stochastic processes. Inspir

  7. Atomic physics: A milestone in quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Stephen D.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum computers require many quantum bits to perform complex calculations, but devices with more than a few bits are difficult to program. A device based on five atomic quantum bits shows a way forward. See Letter p.63

  8. Brokered Graph State Quantum Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin, Simon C.; Browne, Dan E.; Fitzsimons, Joe; Morton, John J. L.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a procedure for graph state quantum computing that is tailored to fully exploit the physics of optically active multi-level systems. Leveraging ideas from the literature on distributed computation together with the recent work on probabilistic cluster state synthesis, our model assigns to each physical system two logical qubits: the broker and the client. Groups of brokers negotiate new graph state fragments via a probabilistic optical protocol. Completed fragments are mapped from...

  9. ASCR Workshop on Quantum Computing for Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspuru-Guzik, Alan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Van Dam, Wim [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Farhi, Edward [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gaitan, Frank [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Humble, Travis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jordan, Stephen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Landahl, Andrew J [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Love, Peter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lucas, Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Preskill, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Muller, Richard P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Svore, Krysta [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wiebe, Nathan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Williams, Carl [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This report details the findings of the DOE ASCR Workshop on Quantum Computing for Science that was organized to assess the viability of quantum computing technologies to meet the computational requirements of the DOE’s science and energy mission, and to identify the potential impact of quantum technologies. The workshop was held on February 17-18, 2015, in Bethesda, MD, to solicit input from members of the quantum computing community. The workshop considered models of quantum computation and programming environments, physical science applications relevant to DOE's science mission as well as quantum simulation, and applied mathematics topics including potential quantum algorithms for linear algebra, graph theory, and machine learning. This report summarizes these perspectives into an outlook on the opportunities for quantum computing to impact problems relevant to the DOE’s mission as well as the additional research required to bring quantum computing to the point where it can have such impact.

  10. An Early Quantum Computing Proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Stephen Russell [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Alexander, Francis Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barros, Kipton Marcos [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daniels, Marcus G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gattiker, James R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hamada, Michael Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Howse, James Walter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Loncaric, Josip [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pakin, Scott D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Somma, Rolando Diego [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vernon, Louis James [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-04-04

    The D-Wave 2X is the third generation of quantum processing created by D-Wave. NASA (with Google and USRA) and Lockheed Martin (with USC), both own D-Wave systems. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) purchased a D-Wave 2X in November 2015. The D-Wave 2X processor contains (nominally) 1152 quantum bits (or qubits) and is designed to specifically perform quantum annealing, which is a well-known method for finding a global minimum of an optimization problem. This methodology is based on direct execution of a quantum evolution in experimental quantum hardware. While this can be a powerful method for solving particular kinds of problems, it also means that the D-Wave 2X processor is not a general computing processor and cannot be programmed to perform a wide variety of tasks. It is a highly specialized processor, well beyond what NNSA currently thinks of as an “advanced architecture.”A D-Wave is best described as a quantum optimizer. That is, it uses quantum superposition to find the lowest energy state of a system by repeated doses of power and settling stages. The D-Wave produces multiple solutions to any suitably formulated problem, one of which is the lowest energy state solution (global minimum). Mapping problems onto the D-Wave requires defining an objective function to be minimized and then encoding that function in the Hamiltonian of the D-Wave system. The quantum annealing method is then used to find the lowest energy configuration of the Hamiltonian using the current D-Wave Two, two-level, quantum processor. This is not always an easy thing to do, and the D-Wave Two has significant limitations that restrict problem sizes that can be run and algorithmic choices that can be made. Furthermore, as more people are exploring this technology, it has become clear that it is very difficult to come up with general approaches to optimization that can both utilize the D-Wave and that can do better than highly developed algorithms on conventional computers for

  11. Quantum computation with ions in thermal motion

    OpenAIRE

    Sorensen, Anders; Molmer, Klaus

    1998-01-01

    We propose an implementation of quantum logic gates via virtual vibrational excitations in an ion trap quantum computer. Transition paths involving unpopulated, vibrational states interfere destructively to eliminate the dependence of rates and revolution frequencies on vibrational quantum numbers. As a consequence quantum computation becomes feasible with ions whos vibrations are strongly coupled to a thermal reservoir.

  12. Universal Quantum Computation with Shutter Logic

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    We show that universal quantum logic can be achieved using only linear optics and a quantum shutter device. With these elements, we design a quantum memory for any number of qubits and a CNOT gate which are the basis of a universal quantum computer. An interaction-free model for a quantum shutter is given.

  13. Blind Quantum Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvail, Louis; Arrighi, Pablo

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of "having someone carry out the work of executing a function for you, but without letting him learn anything about your input". Say Alice wants Bob to compute some known function f upon her input x, but wants to prevent Bob from learning anything about x. The situa...

  14. Quantum Chromodynamics: Computational Aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We present a brief introduction to QCD, the QCD phase diagram, and non-equilibrium phenomena in QCD. We emphasize aspects of the theory that can be addressed using computational methods, in particular euclidean path integral Monte Carlo, fluid dynamics, kinetic theory, classical field theory and holographic duality.

  15. Models of quantum computation and quantum programming languages

    OpenAIRE

    Miszczak, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the presented paper is to provide an introduction to the basic computational models used in quantum information theory. We review various models of quantum Turing machine, quantum circuits and quantum random access machine (QRAM) along with their classical counterparts. We also provide an introduction to quantum programming languages, which are developed using the QRAM model. We review the syntax of several existing quantum programming languages and discuss their features and limi...

  16. General Quantum Interference Principle and Duality Computer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Gui-Lu

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we propose a general principle of quantum interference for quantum system, and based on this we propose a new type of computing machine, the duality computer, that may outperform in principle both classical computer and the quantum computer. According to the general principle of quantum interference, the very essence of quantum interference is the interference of thesub-waves of the quantum system itself. A quantum system considered here can be any quantum system: a single microscopic particle, a composite quantum system such as an atom or a molecule, or a loose collection of a few quantum objects such as two independent photons. In the duality computer,the wave of the duality computer is split into several sub-waves and they pass through different routes, where different computing gate operations are performed. These sub-waves are then re-combined to interfere to give the computational results. The quantum computer, however, has only used the particle nature of quantum object. In a duality computer,it may be possible to find a marked item from an unsorted database using only a single query, and all NP-complete problems may have polynomial algorithms. Two proof-of-the-principle designs of the duality computer are presented:the giant molecule scheme and the nonlinear quantum optics scheme. We also propose thought experiment to check the related fundamental issues, the measurement efficiency of a partial wave function.

  17. Quantum mechanics and computation; Quanta y Computacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirac Sasturain, J. I.

    2000-07-01

    We review how some of the basic principles of Quantum Mechanics can be used in the field of computation. In particular, we explain why a quantum computer can perform certain tasks in a much more efficient way than the computers we have available nowadays. We give the requirements for a quantum system to be able to implement a quantum computer and illustrate these requirements in some particular physical situations. (Author) 16 refs.

  18. Cove: A Practical Quantum Computer Programming Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Purkeypile, Matt

    2009-01-01

    While not yet in commercial existence, quantum computers have the ability to solve certain classes of problems that are not efficiently solvable on existing Turing Machine based (classical) computers. For quantum computers to be of use, methods of programming them must exist. Proposals exist for programming quantum computers, but all of the existing ones suffer from flaws that make them impractical in commercial software development environments. Cove is a framework for programming quantum co...

  19. Programming physical realizations of quantum computers

    OpenAIRE

    De Raedt, Hans; Michielsen, Kristel; Hams, Anthony; MIYASHITA, Seiji; Saito, Keiji

    2001-01-01

    We study effects of the physical realization of quantum computers on their logical operation. Through simulation of physical models of quantum computer hardware, we analyze the difficulties that are encountered in programming physical realizations of quantum computers. Examples of logically identical implementations of the controlled-NOT operation and Grover's database search algorithm are used to demonstrate that the results of a quantum computation are unstable with respect to the physical ...

  20. Warp-Drive Quantum Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Nakahara, Mikio; Vartiainen, Juha J.; Kondo, Yasushi; Tanimura, Shogo; Hata, Kazuya

    2004-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that time-optimal quantum computation is attained by using the Cartan decomposition of a unitary matrix. We extend this approach by noting that the unitary group is compact. This allows us to reduce the execution time of a quantum algorithm $U_{\\rm alg}$ further by adding an extra gate $W$ to it. This gate $W$ sends $U_{\\rm alg}$ to another algorithm $WU_{\\rm alg}$ which is executable in a shorter time than $U_{\\rm alg}$. We call this technique warp-drive. Here we s...

  1. Quantum computing from the ground up

    CERN Document Server

    Perry, Riley Tipton

    2012-01-01

    Quantum computing - the application of quantum mechanics to information - represents a fundamental break from classical information and promises to dramatically increase a computer's power. Many difficult problems, such as the factorization of large numbers, have so far resisted attack by classical computers yet are easily solved with quantum computers. If they become feasible, quantum computers will end standard practices such as RSA encryption. Most of the books or papers on quantum computing require (or assume) prior knowledge of certain areas such as linear algebra or quantum mechanics. The majority of the currently-available literature is hard to understand for the average computer enthusiast or interested layman. This text attempts to teach quantum computing from the ground up in an easily readable way, providing a comprehensive tutorial that includes all the necessary mathematics, computer science and physics.

  2. Strange attractor simulated on a quantum computer

    OpenAIRE

    M. Terraneo; Georgeot, B.; D.L. Shepelyansky

    2002-01-01

    We show that dissipative classical dynamics converging to a strange attractor can be simulated on a quantum computer. Such quantum computations allow to investigate efficiently the small scale structure of strange attractors, yielding new information inaccessible to classical computers. This opens new possibilities for quantum simulations of various dissipative processes in nature.

  3. Problems and solutions in quantum computing and quantum information

    CERN Document Server

    Steeb, Willi-Hans

    2012-01-01

    Quantum computing and quantum information are two of the fastest growing and most exciting research fields in physics. Entanglement, teleportation and the possibility of using the non-local behavior of quantum mechanics to factor integers in random polynomial time have also added to this new interest. This book supplies a huge collection of problems in quantum computing and quantum information together with their detailed solutions, which will prove to be invaluable to students as well as researchers in these fields. All the important concepts and topics such as quantum gates and quantum circuits, product Hilbert spaces, entanglement and entanglement measures, deportation, Bell states, Bell inequality, Schmidt decomposition, quantum Fourier transform, magic gate, von Neumann entropy, quantum cryptography, quantum error corrections, number states and Bose operators, coherent states, squeezed states, Gaussian states, POVM measurement, quantum optics networks, beam splitter, phase shifter and Kerr Hamilton opera...

  4. Experimental Demonstration of Blind Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Barz, Stefanie; Broadbent, Anne; Fitzsimons, Joseph F; Zeilinger, Anton; Walther, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Quantum computers, besides offering substantial computational speedups, are also expected to provide the possibility of preserving the privacy of a computation. Here we show the first such experimental demonstration of blind quantum computation where the input, computation, and output all remain unknown to the computer. We exploit the conceptual framework of measurement-based quantum computation that enables a client to delegate a computation to a quantum server. We demonstrate various blind delegated computations, including one- and two-qubit gates and the Deutsch and Grover algorithms. Remarkably, the client only needs to be able to prepare and transmit individual photonic qubits. Our demonstration is crucial for future unconditionally secure quantum cloud computing and might become a key ingredient for real-life applications, especially when considering the challenges of making powerful quantum computers widely available.

  5. Quantum computing and the entanglement frontier

    CERN Document Server

    Preskill, John

    2012-01-01

    Quantum information science explores the frontier of highly complex quantum states, the "entanglement frontier." This study is motivated by the observation (widely believed but unproven) that classical systems cannot simulate highly entangled quantum systems efficiently, and we hope to hasten the day when well controlled quantum systems can perform tasks surpassing what can be done in the classical world. One way to achieve such "quantum supremacy" would be to run an algorithm on a quantum computer which solves a problem with a super-polynomial speedup relative to classical computers, but there may be other ways that can be achieved sooner, such as simulating exotic quantum states of strongly correlated matter. To operate a large scale quantum computer reliably we will need to overcome the debilitating effects of decoherence, which might be done using "standard" quantum hardware protected by quantum error-correcting codes, or by exploiting the nonabelian quantum statistics of anyons realized in solid state sy...

  6. A counterexample and a modification to the adiabatic approximation theorem in quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingold, H.

    1991-01-01

    A counterexample to the adiabatic approximation theorem is given when degeneracies are present. A formulation of an alternative version is proposed. A complete asymptotic decomposition for n dimensional self-adjoint Hamiltonian systems is restated and used.

  7. Quantum dissonance and deterministic quantum computation with a single qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mazhar

    2014-11-01

    Mixed state quantum computation can perform certain tasks which are believed to be efficiently intractable on a classical computer. For a specific model of mixed state quantum computation, namely, deterministic quantum computation with a single qubit (DQC1), recent investigations suggest that quantum correlations other than entanglement might be responsible for the power of DQC1 model. However, strictly speaking, the role of entanglement in this model of computation was not entirely clear. We provide conclusive evidence that there are instances where quantum entanglement is not present in any part of this model, nevertheless we have advantage over classical computation. This establishes the fact that quantum dissonance (a kind of quantum correlations) present in fully separable (FS) states provide power to DQC1 model.

  8. Quantum computing with parafermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Adrian; Loss, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Zd parafermions are exotic non-Abelian quasiparticles generalizing Majorana fermions, which correspond to the case d =2 . In contrast to Majorana fermions, braiding of parafermions with d >2 allows one to perform an entangling gate. This has spurred interest in parafermions, and a variety of condensed matter systems have been proposed as potential hosts for them. In this work, we study the computational power of braiding parafermions more systematically. We make no assumptions on the underlying physical model but derive all our results from the algebraical relations that define parafermions. We find a family of 2 d representations of the braid group that are compatible with these relations. The braiding operators derived this way reproduce those derived previously from physical grounds as special cases. We show that if a d -level qudit is encoded in the fusion space of four parafermions, braiding of these four parafermions allows one to generate the entire single-qudit Clifford group (up to phases), for any d . If d is odd, then we show that in fact the entire many-qudit Clifford group can be generated.

  9. Quantum Computation with Nonlinear Optics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Ke; LIU Yang; LIN Zhen-Quan; ZHANG Wen-Hong; SUN Yun-Fei; ZHANG Cun-Lin; LONG Gui-Lu

    2008-01-01

    We propose a scheme of quantum computation with nonlinear quantum optics. Polarization states of photons are used for qubits. Photons with different frequencies represent different qubits. Single qubit rotation operation is implemented through optical elements like the Faraday polarization rotator. Photons are separated into different optical paths, or merged into a single optical path using dichromatic mirrors. The controlled-NOT gate between two qubits is implemented by the proper combination of parametric up and down conversions. This scheme has the following features: (1) No auxiliary qubits are required in the controlled-NOT gate operation; (2) No measurement is required in the courseof the computation; (3) It is resource efficient and conceptually simple.

  10. Exploiting Locality in Quantum Computation for Quantum Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClean, Jarrod R; Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-12-18

    Accurate prediction of chemical and material properties from first-principles quantum chemistry is a challenging task on traditional computers. Recent developments in quantum computation offer a route toward highly accurate solutions with polynomial cost; however, this solution still carries a large overhead. In this Perspective, we aim to bring together known results about the locality of physical interactions from quantum chemistry with ideas from quantum computation. We show that the utilization of spatial locality combined with the Bravyi-Kitaev transformation offers an improvement in the scaling of known quantum algorithms for quantum chemistry and provides numerical examples to help illustrate this point. We combine these developments to improve the outlook for the future of quantum chemistry on quantum computers.

  11. Diamond NV centers for quantum computing and quantum networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Childress, L.; Hanson, R.

    2013-01-01

    The exotic features of quantum mechanics have the potential to revolutionize information technologies. Using superposition and entanglement, a quantum processor could efficiently tackle problems inaccessible to current-day computers. Nonlocal correlations may be exploited for intrinsically secure co

  12. Quantum ballistic evolution in quantum mechanics application to quantum computers

    CERN Document Server

    Benioff, P

    1996-01-01

    Quantum computers are important examples of processes whose evolution can be described in terms of iterations of single step operators or their adjoints. Based on this, Hamiltonian evolution of processes with associated step operators T is investigated here. The main limitation of this paper is to processes which evolve quantum ballistically, i.e. motion restricted to a collection of nonintersecting or distinct paths on an arbitrary basis. The main goal of this paper is proof of a theorem which gives necessary and sufficient conditions that T must satisfy so that there exists a Hamiltonian description of quantum ballistic evolution for the process, namely, that T is a partial isometry and is orthogonality preserving and stable on some basis. Simple examples of quantum ballistic evolution for quantum Turing machines with one and with more than one type of elementary step are discussed. It is seen that for nondeterministic machines the basis set can be quite complex with much entanglement present. It is also pr...

  13. A theory of quantum gravity based on quantum computation

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, Seth

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a method of unifying quantum mechanics and gravity based on quantum computation. In this theory, fundamental processes are described in terms of pairwise interactions between quantum degrees of freedom. The geometry of space-time is a construct, derived from the underlying quantum information processing. The computation gives rise to a superposition of four-dimensional spacetimes, each of which obeys the Einstein-Regge equations. The theory makes explicit predictions for t...

  14. Quantum computation speedup limits from quantum metrological precision bounds

    OpenAIRE

    Demkowicz-Dobrzanski, Rafal; Markiewicz, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    We propose a scheme for translating metrological precision bounds into lower bounds on query complexity of quantum search algorithms. Within the scheme the link between quadratic performance enhancement in idealized quantum metrological and quantum computing schemes becomes clear. More importantly, we utilize results from the field of quantum metrology on a generic loss of quadratic quantum precision enhancement in presence of decoherence to infer an analogous generic loss of quadratic speed-...

  15. Staying adiabatic with unknown energy gap

    CERN Document Server

    Nehrkorn, J; Ekert, A; Smerzi, A; Fazio, R; Calarco, T

    2011-01-01

    We introduce an algorithm to perform an optimal adiabatic evolution that operates without an apriori knowledge of the system spectrum. By probing the system gap locally, the algorithm maximizes the evolution speed, thus minimizing the total evolution time. We test the algorithm on the Landau-Zener transition and then apply it on the quantum adiabatic computation of 3-SAT: The result is compatible with an exponential speed-up for up to twenty qubits with respect to classical algorithms. We finally study a possible algorithm improvement by combining it with the quantum Zeno effect.

  16. Experimental one-way quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, P; Resch, K J; Rudolph, T; Schenck, E; Weinfurter, H; Vedral, V; Aspelmeyer, M; Zeilinger, A

    2005-03-10

    Standard quantum computation is based on sequences of unitary quantum logic gates that process qubits. The one-way quantum computer proposed by Raussendorf and Briegel is entirely different. It has changed our understanding of the requirements for quantum computation and more generally how we think about quantum physics. This new model requires qubits to be initialized in a highly entangled cluster state. From this point, the quantum computation proceeds by a sequence of single-qubit measurements with classical feedforward of their outcomes. Because of the essential role of measurement, a one-way quantum computer is irreversible. In the one-way quantum computer, the order and choices of measurements determine the algorithm computed. We have experimentally realized four-qubit cluster states encoded into the polarization state of four photons. We characterize the quantum state fully by implementing experimental four-qubit quantum state tomography. Using this cluster state, we demonstrate the feasibility of one-way quantum computing through a universal set of one- and two-qubit operations. Finally, our implementation of Grover's search algorithm demonstrates that one-way quantum computation is ideally suited for such tasks.

  17. Nanophotonic quantum computer based on atomic quantum transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianov, S. N.; Moiseev, S. A.

    2015-10-01

    We propose a scheme of a quantum computer based on nanophotonic elements: two buses in the form of nanowaveguide resonators, two nanosized units of multiatom multiqubit quantum memory and a set of nanoprocessors in the form of photonic quantum transistors, each containing a pair of nanowaveguide ring resonators coupled via a quantum dot. The operation modes of nanoprocessor photonic quantum transistors are theoretically studied and the execution of main logical operations by means of them is demonstrated. We also discuss the prospects of the proposed nanophotonic quantum computer for operating in high-speed optical fibre networks.

  18. Quantum Computing with Very Noisy Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Knill, E

    2004-01-01

    There are quantum algorithms that can efficiently simulate quantum physics, factor large numbers and estimate integrals. As a result, quantum computers can solve otherwise intractable computational problems. One of the main problems of experimental quantum computing is to preserve fragile quantum states in the presence of errors. It is known that if the needed elementary operations (gates) can be implemented with error probabilities below a threshold, then it is possible to efficiently quantum compute with arbitrary accuracy. Here we give evidence that for independent errors the theoretical threshold is well above 3%, which is a significant improvement over that of earlier calculations. However, the resources required at such high error probabilities are excessive. Fortunately, they decrease rapidly with decreasing error probabilities. If we had quantum resources comparable to the considerable resources available in today's digital computers, we could implement non-trivial quantum algorithms at error probabil...

  19. Quantum machine learning what quantum computing means to data mining

    CERN Document Server

    Wittek, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Quantum Machine Learning bridges the gap between abstract developments in quantum computing and the applied research on machine learning. Paring down the complexity of the disciplines involved, it focuses on providing a synthesis that explains the most important machine learning algorithms in a quantum framework. Theoretical advances in quantum computing are hard to follow for computer scientists, and sometimes even for researchers involved in the field. The lack of a step-by-step guide hampers the broader understanding of this emergent interdisciplinary body of research. Quantum Machine L

  20. Fast numerical evaluation of time-derivative non-adiabatic couplings for mixed quantum-classical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a numerical differentiation scheme which eliminates evaluation of overlap determinants in calculating the time-derivative non-adiabatic couplings (TDNACs). Evaluation of these determinants was a bottleneck in previous implementations of mixed quantum-classical methods using numerical differentiation of electronic wave functions in the Slater-determinant representation. The central idea of our approach is, first, to reduce the analytic time derivatives of Slater determinants to time derivatives of molecular orbitals, and then to apply a finite-difference formula. Benchmark calculations prove the efficiency of the proposed scheme showing impressive several-order-of-magnitude speedups of the TDNAC calculation step for midsize molecules.

  1. Universal quantum computation with qudits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, MingXing; Wang, XiaoJun

    2014-09-01

    Quantum circuit model has been widely explored for various quantum applications such as Shors algorithm and Grovers searching algorithm. Most of previous algorithms are based on the qubit systems. Herein a proposal for a universal circuit is given based on the qudit system, which is larger and can store more information. In order to prove its universality for quantum applications, an explicit set of one-qudit and two-qudit gates is provided for the universal qudit computation. The one-qudit gates are general rotation for each two-dimensional subspace while the two-qudit gates are their controlled extensions. In comparison to previous quantum qudit logical gates, each primitive qudit gate is only dependent on two free parameters and may be easily implemented. In experimental implementation, multilevel ions with the linear ion trap model are used to build the qudit systems and use the coupling of neighbored levels for qudit gates. The controlled qudit gates may be realized with the interactions of internal and external coordinates of the ion.

  2. Adiabatic following criterion, estimation of the nonadiabatic excitation fraction and quantum jumps

    CERN Document Server

    Shakhmuratov, R N

    2003-01-01

    An accurate theory describing adiabatic following of the dark, nonabsorbing state in the three-level system is developed. An analytical solution for the wave function of the particle experiencing Raman excitation is found as an expansion in terms of the time varying nonadiabatic perturbation parameter. The solution can be presented as a sum of adiabatic and nonadiabatic parts. Both are estimated quantitatively. It is shown that the limiting value to which the amplitude of the nonadiabatic part tends is equal to the Fourier component of the nonadiabatic perturbation parameter taken at the Rabi frequency of the Raman excitation. The time scale of the variation of both parts is found. While the adiabatic part of the solution varies slowly and follows the change of the nonadiabatic perturbation parameter, the nonadiabatic part appears almost instantly, revealing a jumpwise transition between the dark and bright states. This jump happens when the nonadiabatic perturbation parameter takes its maximum value.

  3. Parallel computing and quantum chromodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bowler, K C

    1999-01-01

    The study of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) remains one of the most challenging topics in elementary particle physics. The lattice formulation of QCD, in which space-time is treated as a four- dimensional hypercubic grid of points, provides the means for a numerical solution from first principles but makes extreme demands upon computational performance. High Performance Computing (HPC) offers us the tantalising prospect of a verification of QCD through the precise reproduction of the known masses of the strongly interacting particles. It is also leading to the development of a phenomenological tool capable of disentangling strong interaction effects from weak interaction effects in the decays of one kind of quark into another, crucial for determining parameters of the standard model of particle physics. The 1980s saw the first attempts to apply parallel architecture computers to lattice QCD. The SIMD and MIMD machines used in these pioneering efforts were the ICL DAP and the Cosmic Cube, respectively. These wer...

  4. Slowly changing potential problems in Quantum Mechanics: Adiabatic theorems, ergodic theorems, and scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, S.; Soffer, A.

    2016-07-01

    We employ the recently developed multi-time scale averaging method to study the large time behavior of slowly changing (in time) Hamiltonians. We treat some known cases in a new way, such as the Zener problem, and we give another proof of the adiabatic theorem in the gapless case. We prove a new uniform ergodic theorem for slowly changing unitary operators. This theorem is then used to derive the adiabatic theorem, do the scattering theory for such Hamiltonians, and prove some classical propagation estimates and asymptotic completeness.

  5. Quantum crystal growing: adiabatic preparation of a bosonic antiferromagnet in the presence of a parabolic inhomogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelmark, Søren; Eckardt, André

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically study the adiabatic preparation of an antiferromagnetic phase in a mixed Mott insulator of two bosonic atom species in a one-dimensional optical lattice. In such a system one can engineer a tunable parabolic inhomogeneity by controlling the difference of the trapping potentials...... felt by the two species. Using numerical simulations we predict that a finite parabolic potential can assist the adiabatic preparation of the antiferromagnet. The optimal strength of the parabolic inhomogeneity depends sensitively on the number imbalance between the two species. We also find...

  6. Non-unitary probabilistic quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingrich, Robert M.; Williams, Colin P.

    2004-01-01

    We present a method for designing quantum circuits that perform non-unitary quantum computations on n-qubit states probabilistically, and give analytic expressions for the success probability and fidelity.

  7. Embracing the quantum limit in silicon computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, John J L; McCamey, Dane R; Eriksson, Mark A; Lyon, Stephen A

    2011-11-16

    Quantum computers hold the promise of massive performance enhancements across a range of applications, from cryptography and databases to revolutionary scientific simulation tools. Such computers would make use of the same quantum mechanical phenomena that pose limitations on the continued shrinking of conventional information processing devices. Many of the key requirements for quantum computing differ markedly from those of conventional computers. However, silicon, which plays a central part in conventional information processing, has many properties that make it a superb platform around which to build a quantum computer.

  8. Zeno effect for quantum computation and control

    CERN Document Server

    Paz-Silva, G A; Lidar, D A

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the quantum Zeno effect can protect specific quantum states from decoherence by using projective measurements. Here we combine the theory of weak measurements with stabilizer quantum error correction and detection codes. We derive rigorous performance bounds which demonstrate that the Zeno effect can be used to protect appropriately encoded arbitrary states to arbitrary accuracy, while at the same time allowing for universal quantum computation or quantum control.

  9. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in a three-level superconducting circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K. S.; Vepsäläinen, A.; Danilin, S.; Paraoanu, G. S.

    2016-02-01

    The adiabatic manipulation of quantum states is a powerful technique that opened up new directions in quantum engineering--enabling tests of fundamental concepts such as geometrical phases and topological transitions, and holding the promise of alternative models of quantum computation. Here we benchmark the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage for circuit quantum electrodynamics by employing the first three levels of a transmon qubit. In this ladder configuration, we demonstrate a population transfer efficiency >80% between the ground state and the second excited state using two adiabatic Gaussian-shaped control microwave pulses. By doing quantum tomography at successive moments during the Raman pulses, we investigate the transfer of the population in time domain. Furthermore, we show that this protocol can be reversed by applying a third adiabatic pulse, we study a hybrid nondiabatic-adiabatic sequence, and we present experimental results for a quasi-degenerate intermediate level.

  10. Effects of adiabatic, relativistic, and quantum electrodynamics interactions on the pair potential and thermophysical properties of helium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cencek, Wojciech; Przybytek, Michał; Komasa, Jacek; Mehl, James B; Jeziorski, Bogumił; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2012-06-14

    The adiabatic, relativistic, and quantum electrodynamics (QED) contributions to the pair potential of helium were computed, fitted separately, and applied, together with the nonrelativistic Born-Oppenheimer (BO) potential, in calculations of thermophysical properties of helium and of the properties of the helium dimer. An analysis of the convergence patterns of the calculations with increasing basis set sizes allowed us to estimate the uncertainties of the total interaction energy to be below 50 ppm for interatomic separations R smaller than 4 bohrs and for the distance R = 5.6 bohrs. For other separations, the relative uncertainties are up to an order of magnitude larger (and obviously still larger near R = 4.8 bohrs where the potential crosses zero) and are dominated by the uncertainties of the nonrelativistic BO component. These estimates also include the contributions from the neglected relativistic and QED terms proportional to the fourth and higher powers of the fine-structure constant α. To obtain such high accuracy, it was necessary to employ explicitly correlated Gaussian expansions containing up to 2400 terms for smaller R (all R in the case of a QED component) and optimized orbital bases up to the cardinal number X = 7 for larger R. Near-exact asymptotic constants were used to describe the large-R behavior of all components. The fitted potential, exhibiting the minimum of -10.996 ± 0.004 K at R = 5.608 0 ± 0.000 1 bohr, was used to determine properties of the very weakly bound (4)He(2) dimer and thermophysical properties of gaseous helium. It is shown that the Casimir-Polder retardation effect, increasing the dimer size by about 2 Å relative to the nonrelativistic BO value, is almost completely accounted for by the inclusion of the Breit-interaction and the Araki-Sucher contributions to the potential, of the order α(2) and α(3), respectively. The remaining retardation effect, of the order of α(4) and higher, is practically negligible for the bound

  11. On the computation of quantum characteristic exponents

    CERN Document Server

    Vilela-Mendes, R; Coutinho, Ricardo

    1998-01-01

    A quantum characteristic exponent may be defined, with the same operational meaning as the classical Lyapunov exponent when the latter is expressed as a functional of densities. Existence conditions and supporting measure properties are discussed as well as the problems encountered in the numerical computation of the quantum exponents. Although an example of true quantum chaos may be exhibited, the taming effect of quantum mechanics on chaos is quite apparent in the computation of the quantum exponents. However, even when the exponents vanish, the functionals used for their definition may still provide a characterization of distinct complexity classes for quantum behavior.

  12. Quantum-mechanical approach to predissociation of water dimers in the vibrational adiabatic representation: Importance of channel interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineo, H.; Niu, Y. L.; Kuo, J. L.; Lin, S. H.; Fujimura, Y.

    2015-08-01

    The results of application of the quantum-mechanical adiabatic theory to vibrational predissociation (VPD) of water dimers, (H2O)2 and (D2O)2, are presented. We consider the VPD processes including the totally symmetric OH mode of the dimer and the bending mode of the fragment. The VPD in the adiabatic representation is induced by breakdown of the vibrational adiabatic approximation, and two types of nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements are involved: one provides the VPD induced by the low-frequency dissociation mode and the other provides the VPD through channel interactions induced by the low-frequency modes. The VPD rate constants were calculated using the Fermi golden rule expression. A closed form for the nonadiabatic transition matrix element between the discrete and continuum states was derived in the Morse potential model. All of the parameters used were obtained from the potential surfaces of the water dimers, which were calculated by the density functional theory procedures. The VPD rate constants for the two processes were calculated in the non-Condon scheme beyond the so-called Condon approximation. The channel interactions in and between the initial and final states were taken into account, and those are found to increase the VPD rates by 3(1) orders of magnitude for the VPD processes in (H2O)2 ((D2O)2). The fraction of the bending-excited donor fragments is larger than that of the bending-excited acceptor fragments. The results obtained by quantum-mechanical approach are compared with both experimental and quasi-classical trajectory calculation results.

  13. DNA as Topological Quantum Computer

    OpenAIRE

    Pitkänen, Matti

    2010-01-01

    This article represents a vision about how DNA might act as a topological quantum computer (tqc). Tqc means that the braidings of braid strands define tqc programs and M-matrix (generalization of S-matrix in zero energy ontology) defining the entanglement between states assignable to the end points of strands define the tqc usually coded as unitary time evolution for Schödinger equation. One can ends up to the model in the following manner. a) Darwinian selection for which the standa...

  14. Quantum fields on the computer

    CERN Document Server

    1992-01-01

    This book provides an overview of recent progress in computer simulations of nonperturbative phenomena in quantum field theory, particularly in the context of the lattice approach. It is a collection of extensive self-contained reviews of various subtopics, including algorithms, spectroscopy, finite temperature physics, Yukawa and chiral theories, bounds on the Higgs meson mass, the renormalization group, and weak decays of hadrons.Physicists with some knowledge of lattice gauge ideas will find this book a useful and interesting source of information on the recent developments in the field.

  15. Physics and computer science: quantum computation and other approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Salvador E. Venegas-Andraca

    2011-01-01

    This is a position paper written as an introduction to the special volume on quantum algorithms I edited for the journal Mathematical Structures in Computer Science (Volume 20 - Special Issue 06 (Quantum Algorithms), 2010).

  16. Photon echo quantum RAM integration in quantum computer

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseev, Sergey A

    2012-01-01

    We have analyzed an efficient integration of the multi-qubit echo quantum memory into the quantum computer scheme on the atomic resonant ensembles in quantum electrodynamics cavity. Here, one atomic ensemble with controllable inhomogeneous broadening is used for the quantum memory node and other atomic ensembles characterized by the homogeneous broadening of the resonant line are used as processing nodes. We have found optimal conditions for efficient integration of multi-qubit quantum memory modified for this analyzed physical scheme and we have determined a specified shape of the self temporal modes providing a perfect reversible transfer of the photon qubits between the quantum memory node and arbitrary processing nodes. The obtained results open the way for realization of full-scale solid state quantum computing based on using the efficient multi-qubit quantum memory.

  17. Helping Students Learn Quantum Mechanics for Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    Quantum information science and technology is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary field drawing researchers from science and engineering fields. Traditional instruction in quantum mechanics is insufficient to prepare students for research in quantum computing because there is a lack of emphasis in the current curriculum on quantum formalism and dynamics. We are investigating the difficulties students have with quantum mechanics and are developing and evaluating quantum interactive learning tutorials (QuILTs) to reduce the difficulties. Our investigation includes interviews with individual students and the development and administration of free-response and multiple-choice tests. We discuss the implications of our research and development project on helping students learn quantum mechanics relevant for quantum computing.

  18. Elementary gates for quantum computation

    CERN Document Server

    Barenco, A; Cleve, R; Di Vincenzo, D P; Margolus, N H; Shor, P W; Sleator, T; Smolin, J A; Weinfurter, H; Barenco, A; Bennett, C H; Cleve, R; DiVincenzo, D P; Margolus, N; Shor, P; Sleator, T; Smolin, J; Weinfurter, H

    1995-01-01

    We show that a set of gates that consists of all one-bit quantum gates (U(2)) and the two-bit exclusive-or gate (that maps Boolean values (x,y) to (x,x \\oplus y)) is universal in the sense that all unitary operations on arbitrarily many bits n (U(2^n)) can be expressed as compositions of these gates. We investigate the number of the above gates required to implement other gates, such as generalized Deutsch-Toffoli gates, that apply a specific U(2) transformation to one input bit if and only if the logical AND of all remaining input bits is satisfied. These gates play a central role in many proposed constructions of quantum computational networks. We derive upper and lower bounds on the exact number of elementary gates required to build up a variety of two-and three-bit quantum gates, the asymptotic number required for n-bit Deutsch-Toffoli gates, and make some observations about the number required for arbitrary n-bit unitary operations.

  19. Brokered Graph State Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Benjamin, S C; Fitzsimons, J; Morton, J J L; Benjamin, Simon C.; Browne, Dan E.; Fitzsimons, Joe; Morton, John J. L.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a procedure for graph state quantum computing that is tailored to fully exploit the physics of optically active multi-level systems. Leveraging ideas from the literature on distributed computation together with the recent work on probabilistic cluster state synthesis, our model assigns to each physical system two logical qubits: the broker and the client. Groups of brokers negotiate new graph state fragments via a probabilistic optical protocol. Completed fragments are mapped from broker to clients via a simple state transition and measurement. The clients, whose role is to store the nascent graph state long term, remain entirely insulated from failures during the brokerage. We describe an implementation in terms of NV-centres in diamond, where brokers and clients are very naturally embodied as electron and nuclear spins.

  20. Quantum Computing in Solid State Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ruggiero, B; Granata, C

    2006-01-01

    The aim of Quantum Computation in Solid State Systems is to report on recent theoretical and experimental results on the macroscopic quantum coherence of mesoscopic systems, as well as on solid state realization of qubits and quantum gates. Particular attention has been given to coherence effects in Josephson devices. Other solid state systems, including quantum dots, optical, ion, and spin devices which exhibit macroscopic quantum coherence are also discussed. Quantum Computation in Solid State Systems discusses experimental implementation of quantum computing and information processing devices, and in particular observations of quantum behavior in several solid state systems. On the theoretical side, the complementary expertise of the contributors provides models of the various structures in connection with the problem of minimizing decoherence.

  1. Quantum computation with two-dimensional graphene quantum dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jie-Sen; Li Zhi-Bing; Yao Dao-Xin

    2012-01-01

    We study an array of graphene nano sheets that form a two-dimensional S =1/2 Kagome spin lattice used for quantum computation.The edge states of the graphene nano sheets axe used to form quantum dots to confine electrons and perform the computation.We propose two schemes of bang-bang control to combat decoherence and realize gate operations on this array of quantum dots.It is shown that both schemes contain a great amount of information for quantum computation.The corresponding gate operations are also proposed.

  2. Quantum computing. Defining and detecting quantum speedup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rønnow, Troels F; Wang, Zhihui; Job, Joshua; Boixo, Sergio; Isakov, Sergei V; Wecker, David; Martinis, John M; Lidar, Daniel A; Troyer, Matthias

    2014-07-25

    The development of small-scale quantum devices raises the question of how to fairly assess and detect quantum speedup. Here, we show how to define and measure quantum speedup and how to avoid pitfalls that might mask or fake such a speedup. We illustrate our discussion with data from tests run on a D-Wave Two device with up to 503 qubits. By using random spin glass instances as a benchmark, we found no evidence of quantum speedup when the entire data set is considered and obtained inconclusive results when comparing subsets of instances on an instance-by-instance basis. Our results do not rule out the possibility of speedup for other classes of problems and illustrate the subtle nature of the quantum speedup question.

  3. Quantum Computational Logics and Possible Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, Maria Luisa Dalla; Giuntini, Roberto; Leporini, Roberto; di Francia, Giuliano Toraldo

    2008-01-01

    In quantum computational logics meanings of formulas are identified with quantum information quantities: systems of qubits or, more generally, mixtures of systems of qubits. We consider two kinds of quantum computational semantics: (1) a compositional semantics, where the meaning of a compound formula is determined by the meanings of its parts; (2) a holistic semantics, which makes essential use of the characteristic “holistic” features of the quantum-theoretic formalism. The compositional and the holistic semantics turn out to characterize the same logic. In this framework, one can introduce the notion of quantum-classical truth table, which corresponds to the most natural way for a quantum computer to calculate classical tautologies. Quantum computational logics can be applied to investigate different kinds of semantic phenomena where holistic, contextual and gestaltic patterns play an essential role (from natural languages to musical compositions).

  4. Molecular Realizations of Quantum Computing 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Mikio; Ota, Yukihiro; Rahimi, Robabeh; Kondo, Yasushi; Tada-Umezaki, Masahito

    2009-06-01

    Liquid-state NMR quantum computer: working principle and some examples / Y. Kondo -- Flux qubits, tunable coupling and beyond / A. O. Niskanen -- Josephson phase qubits, and quantum communication via a resonant cavity / M. A. Sillanpää -- Quantum computing using pulse-based electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR): molecular spin-qubits / K. Sato ... [et al.] -- Fullerene C[symbol]: a possible molecular quantum computer / T. Wakabayashi -- Molecular magnets for quantum computation / T. Kuroda -- Errors in a plausible scheme of quantum gates in Kane's model / Y. Ota -- Yet another formulation for quantum simultaneous noncooperative bimatrix games / A. SaiToh, R. Rahimi, M. Nakahara -- Continuous-variable teleportation of single-photon states and an accidental cloning of a photonic qubit in two-channel teleportation / T. Ide.

  5. Quantum computing with incoherent resources and quantum jumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M F; Cunha, M Terra; Chaves, R; Carvalho, A R R

    2012-04-27

    Spontaneous emission and the inelastic scattering of photons are two natural processes usually associated with decoherence and the reduction in the capacity to process quantum information. Here we show that, when suitably detected, these photons are sufficient to build all the fundamental blocks needed to perform quantum computation in the emitting qubits while protecting them from deleterious dissipative effects. We exemplify this by showing how to efficiently prepare graph states for the implementation of measurement-based quantum computation.

  6. The Heisenberg representation of quantum computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottesman, D.

    1998-06-24

    Since Shor`s discovery of an algorithm to factor numbers on a quantum computer in polynomial time, quantum computation has become a subject of immense interest. Unfortunately, one of the key features of quantum computers--the difficulty of describing them on classical computers--also makes it difficult to describe and understand precisely what can be done with them. A formalism describing the evolution of operators rather than states has proven extremely fruitful in understanding an important class of quantum operations. States used in error correction and certain communication protocols can be described by their stabilizer, a group of tensor products of Pauli matrices. Even this simple group structure is sufficient to allow a rich range of quantum effects, although it falls short of the full power of quantum computation.

  7. Quantum computing with realistically noisy devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knill, E

    2005-03-01

    In theory, quantum computers offer a means of solving problems that would be intractable on conventional computers. Assuming that a quantum computer could be constructed, it would in practice be required to function with noisy devices called 'gates'. These gates cause decoherence of the fragile quantum states that are central to the computer's operation. The goal of so-called 'fault-tolerant quantum computing' is therefore to compute accurately even when the error probability per gate (EPG) is high. Here we report a simple architecture for fault-tolerant quantum computing, providing evidence that accurate quantum computing is possible for EPGs as high as three per cent. Such EPGs have been experimentally demonstrated, but to avoid excessive resource overheads required by the necessary architecture, lower EPGs are needed. Assuming the availability of quantum resources comparable to the digital resources available in today's computers, we show that non-trivial quantum computations at EPGs of as high as one per cent could be implemented.

  8. Quantum Computer Games: Schrodinger Cat and Hounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2012-01-01

    The quantum computer game "Schrodinger cat and hounds" is the quantum extension of the well-known classical game fox and hounds. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. "Schrodinger cat and hounds" demonstrates the effects of superposition, destructive and constructive interference, measurements and…

  9. Nonlinear optics quantum computing with circuit QED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Prabin; Hafezi, Mohammad; Taylor, J M

    2013-02-01

    One approach to quantum information processing is to use photons as quantum bits and rely on linear optical elements for most operations. However, some optical nonlinearity is necessary to enable universal quantum computing. Here, we suggest a circuit-QED approach to nonlinear optics quantum computing in the microwave regime, including a deterministic two-photon phase gate. Our specific example uses a hybrid quantum system comprising a LC resonator coupled to a superconducting flux qubit to implement a nonlinear coupling. Compared to the self-Kerr nonlinearity, we find that our approach has improved tolerance to noise in the qubit while maintaining fast operation.

  10. Quantum computing in a piece of glass

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Warner A; Tison, Christopher; Alsing, Paul M; McDonald, Jonathan R

    2011-01-01

    Quantum gates and simple quantum algorithms can be designed utilizing the diffraction phenomena of a photon within a multiplexed holographic element. The quantum eigenstates we use are the photon's linear momentum (LM) as measured by the number of waves of tilt across the aperture. Two properties of quantum computing within the circuit model make this approach attractive. First, any conditional measurement can be commuted in time with any unitary quantum gate - the timeless nature of quantum computing. Second, photon entanglement can be encoded as a superposition state of a single photon in a higher-dimensional state space afforded by LM. Our theoretical and numerical results indicate that OptiGrate's photo-thermal refractive (PTR) glass is an enabling technology. We will review our previous design of a quantum projection operator and give credence to this approach on a representative quantum gate grounded on coupled-mode theory and numerical simulations, all with parameters consistent with PTR glass. We disc...

  11. An overview of quantum computation models: quantum automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Quantum automata,as theoretical models of quantum computers,include quantum finite automata (QFA),quantum sequential machines (QSM),quantum pushdown automata (QPDA),quantum Turing machines (QTM),quantum cellular automata (QCA),and the others,for example,automata theory based on quantum logic (orthomodular lattice-valued automata).In this paper,we try to outline a basic progress in the research on these models,focusing on QFA,QSM,QPDA,QTM,and orthomodular lattice-valued automata.Also,other models closely relative to them are mentioned.In particular,based on the existing results in the literature,we finally address a number of problems to be studied in future.

  12. Multivariable Optimization: Quantum Annealing & Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Sudip; Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in quantum annealing techniques have been indicating potential advantage of quantum annealing for solving NP-hard optimization problems. In this article we briefly indicate and discuss the beneficial features of quantum annealing techniques and compare them with those of simulated annealing techniques. We then briefly discuss the quantum annealing studies of some model spin glass and kinetically constrained systems.

  13. Quantum Computing: Linear Optics Implementations

    CERN Document Server

    Sundsøy, Pål

    2016-01-01

    One of the main problems that optical quantum computing has to overcome is the efficient construction of two-photon gates. Theoretically these gates can be realized using Kerr-nonlinearities, but the techniques involved are experimentally very difficult. We therefore employ linear optics with projective measurements to generate these non-linearities. The downside is that the measurement-induced nonlinearities achieved with linear optics are less versatile and the success rate can be quite low. This project is mainly the result of a literature study but also a theoretical work on the physics behind quantum optical multiports which is essential for realizing two-photon gates. By applying different postcorrection techniques we increase the probability of success in a modifed non-linear sign shift gate which is foundational for the two photon controlled-NOT gate. We prove that it's not possible to correct the states by only using a single beam splitter. We show that it might be possible to increase the probabilit...

  14. Quantum computing with incoherent resources and quantum jumps

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Marcelo F; Chaves, Rafael; Carvalho, Andre R R

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous emission and the inelastic scattering of photons are two natural processes usually associated with decoherence and the reduction in the capacity to process quantum information. Here we show that when suitably detected, these photons are sufficient to build all the fundamental blocks needed to perform quantum computation in the emitting qubits while protecting them from deleterious dissipative effects. We exemplify by showing how to teleport an unknown quantum state and how to efficiently prepare graph states for the implementation of measurement-based quantum computation.

  15. Geometry of abstraction in quantum computation

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlovic, Dusko

    2010-01-01

    Quantum algorithms are sequences of abstract operations, performed on non-existent computers. They are in obvious need of categorical semantics. We present some steps in this direction, following earlier contributions of Abramsky, Coecke and Selinger. In particular, we analyze function abstraction in quantum computation, which turns out to characterize its classical interfaces. Some quantum algorithms provide feasible solutions of important hard problems, such as factoring and discrete log (which are the building blocks of modern cryptography). It is of a great practical interest to precisely characterize the computational resources needed to execute such quantum algorithms. There are many ideas how to build a quantum computer. Can we prove some necessary conditions? Categorical semantics help with such questions. We show how to implement an important family of quantum algorithms using just abelian groups and relations.

  16. The potential of the quantum computer

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Physics Section of the University of Geneva is continuing its series of lectures, open to the general public, on the most recent developments in the field of physics. The next lecture, given by Professor Michel Devoret of Yale University in the United States, will be on the potential of the quantum computer. The quantum computer is, as yet, a hypothetical machine which would operate on the basic principles of quantum mechanics. Compared to standard computers, it represents a significant gain in computing power for certain complex calculations. Quantum operations can simultaneously explore a very large number of possibilities. The correction of quantum errors, which until recently had been deemed impossible, has now become a well-established technique. Several prototypes for, as yet, very simple quantum processors have been developed. The lecture will begin with a demonstration in the auditorium of the detection of cosmic rays and, in collaboration with Professor E. Ellberger of the Conservatoire de M...

  17. How big is a quantum computer?

    OpenAIRE

    Wallentowitz, S.; Walmsley, I. A.; Eberly, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    Accounting for resources is the central issue in computational efficiency. We point out physical constraints implicit in information readout that have been overlooked in classical computing. The basic particle-counting mode of read-out sets a lower bound on the resources needed to implement a quantum computer. As a consequence, computers based on classical waves are as efficient as those based on single quantum particles.

  18. Adiabatic state preparation study of methylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veis, Libor, E-mail: libor.veis@jh-inst.cas.cz; Pittner, Jiří, E-mail: jiri.pittner@jh-inst.cas.cz [J. Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Dolejškova 3, 18223 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2014-06-07

    Quantum computers attract much attention as they promise to outperform their classical counterparts in solving certain type of problems. One of them with practical applications in quantum chemistry is simulation of complex quantum systems. An essential ingredient of efficient quantum simulation algorithms are initial guesses of the exact wave functions with high enough fidelity. As was proposed in Aspuru-Guzik et al. [Science 309, 1704 (2005)], the exact ground states can in principle be prepared by the adiabatic state preparation method. Here, we apply this approach to preparation of the lowest lying multireference singlet electronic state of methylene and numerically investigate preparation of this state at different molecular geometries. We then propose modifications that lead to speeding up the preparation process. Finally, we decompose the minimal adiabatic state preparation employing the direct mapping in terms of two-qubit interactions.

  19. On the completeness of quantum computation models

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    The notion of computability is stable (i.e. independent of the choice of an indexing) over infinite-dimensional vector spaces provided they have a finite "tensorial dimension". Such vector spaces with a finite tensorial dimension permit to define an absolute notion of completeness for quantum computation models and give a precise meaning to the Church-Turing thesis in the framework of quantum theory. (Extra keywords: quantum programming languages, denotational semantics, universality.)

  20. Accounting Principles are Simulated on Quantum Computers

    OpenAIRE

    Diep, Do Ngoc; Giang, Do Hoang

    2005-01-01

    The paper is devoted to a new idea of simulation of accounting by quantum computing. We expose the actual accounting principles in a pure mathematics language. After that we simulated the accounting principles on quantum computers. We show that all arbitrary accounting actions are exhausted by the described basic actions. The main problem of accounting are reduced to some system of linear equations in the economic model of Leontief. In this simulation we use our constructed quantum Gau\\ss-Jor...

  1. Linear Optics Quantum Computation: an Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, C R; Laflamme, R

    2005-01-01

    We give an overview of linear optics quantum computing, focusing on the results from the original KLM paper. First we give a brief summary of the advances made with optics for quantum computation prior to KLM. We next discuss the KLM linear optics scheme, giving detailed examples. Finally we go through quantum error correction for the LOQC theory, showing how to obtain the threshold when dealing with Z-measurement errors.

  2. Wavelets and Wavelet Packets on Quantum Computers

    OpenAIRE

    Klappenecker, Andreas

    1999-01-01

    We show how periodized wavelet packet transforms and periodized wavelet transforms can be implemented on a quantum computer. Surprisingly, we find that the implementation of wavelet packet transforms is less costly than the implementation of wavelet transforms on a quantum computer.

  3. Quantum computation architecture using optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitenberg, Christof; Kuhr, Stefan; Mølmer, Klaus;

    2011-01-01

    We present a complete architecture for scalable quantum computation with ultracold atoms in optical lattices using optical tweezers focused to the size of a lattice spacing. We discuss three different two-qubit gates based on local collisional interactions. The gates between arbitrary qubits...... quantum computing....

  4. Geometry of the Adiabatic Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Augusto Cesar; Ribeiro, Rafael Antunes; Ribeiro, Clyffe de Assis; Dieguez, Pedro Ruas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and pedagogical derivation of the quantum adiabatic theorem for two-level systems (a single qubit) based on geometrical structures of quantum mechanics developed by Anandan and Aharonov, among others. We have chosen to use only the minimum geometric structure needed for the understanding of the adiabatic theorem for this case.…

  5. Pure spin current induced by adiabatic quantum pumping in zigzag-edged graphene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souma, Satofumi, E-mail: ssouma@harbor.kobe-u.ac.jp; Ogawa, Matsuto [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-05-05

    We show theoretically that pure spin current can be generated in zigzag edged graphene nanoribbons through the adiabatic pumping by edge selective pumping potentials. The origin of such pure spin current is the spin splitting of the edge localized states, which are oppositely spin polarized at opposite edges. In the proposed device, each edge of the ribbon is covered by two independent time-periodic local gate potentials with a definite phase difference, inducing the edge spin polarized current. When the pumping phase difference is opposite in sign between two edges, the total charge currents is zero and the pure edge spin current is generated.

  6. One-step generation of qutrit entanglement via adiabatic passage in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Song-She; Chen Mei-Feng; Jiang Xia-Ping

    2011-01-01

    A scheme is proposed for generating a three-dimensional entangled state for two atoms trapped in a cavity by one step via adiabatic passage.In the scheme,the two atoms are always in ground states and the field mode of the cavity excited is negligible under a certain condition.Therefore,the scheme is very robust against decoherence.Furthermore,it needs neither the exact control of all parameters nor the accurate control of the interaction time.It is shown that qutrit entanglement can be generated with a high fidelity.

  7. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in a Λ system in the presence of quantum noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We exploit a microscopically derived master equation for the study of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in the presence of spontaneous decay from the intermediate state toward the initial and final states and compare our results with the predictions obtained from a phenomenological model used previously [P. A. Ivanov, N. V. Vitanov, and K. Bergmann, Phys. Rev. A 72, 053412 (2005)]. It is shown that our approach predicts a much higher efficiency for counterintuitively ordered pulses, while no significant difference between the two approaches is found for intuitively ordered pulses. These features are readily explained in the dressed-state picture.

  8. Coupled-channels quantum theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic processes: application to the hydrogen molecule ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestler, D J; Kenfack, A; Manz, J; Paulus, B

    2012-03-22

    This article presents the results of the first quantum simulations of the electronic flux density (j(e)) by the "coupled-channels" (CC) theory, the fundamentals of which are presented in the previous article [Diestler, D. J. J. Phys. Chem. A 2012, DOI: 10.1021/jp207843z]. The principal advantage of the CC scheme is that it employs exclusively standard methods of quantum chemistry and quantum dynamics within the framework of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA). The CC theory goes beyond the BOA in that it yields a nonzero j(e) for electronically adiabatic processes, in contradistinction to the BOA itself, which always gives j(e) = 0. The CC is applied to oriented H(2)(+) vibrating in the electronic ground state ((2)Σ(g)(+)), for which the nuclear and electronic flux densities evolve on a common time scale of about 22 fs per vibrational period. The system is chosen as a touchstone for the CC theory, because it is the only one for which highly accurate flux densities have been calculated numerically without invoking the BOA [Barth et al, Chem. Phys. Lett. 2009, 481, 118]. Good agreement between CC and accurate results supports the CC approach, another advantage of which is that it allows a transparent interpretation of the temporal and spatial properties of j(e).

  9. Non-adiabatic quantized charge pumping with tunable-barrier quantum dots: a review of current progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Bernd; Kashcheyevs, Vyacheslavs

    2015-10-01

    Precise manipulation of individual charge carriers in nanoelectronic circuits underpins practical applications of their most basic quantum property--the universality and invariance of the elementary charge. A charge pump generates a net current from periodic external modulation of parameters controlling a nanostructure connected to source and drain leads; in the regime of quantized pumping the current varies in steps of [Formula: see text] as function of control parameters, where [Formula: see text] is the electron charge and f is the frequency of modulation. In recent years, robust and accurate quantized charge pumps have been developed based on semiconductor quantum dots with tunable tunnel barriers. These devices allow modulation of charge exchange rates between the dot and the leads over many orders of magnitude and enable trapping of a precise number of electrons far away from equilibrium with the leads. The corresponding non-adiabatic pumping protocols focus on understanding of separate parts of the pumping cycle associated with charge loading, capture and release. In this report we review realizations, models and metrology applications of quantized charge pumps based on tunable-barrier quantum dots. PMID:26394066

  10. A Study of Quantum Information and Quantum Computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadollah Farahmand

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article we will proceed to check of quantum computers structure i.e. qubits in different states by quantum theory principles and then we will express the qubits representation in different states by Bolch sphere in different aspects and we will achieve the density matrix and the expectation value in direction of z axis and finally we will proceed to collapse phenomena of quantum state in qubit measurement discussion.

  11. Universal quantum computation with little entanglement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Nest, Maarten

    2013-02-01

    We show that universal quantum computation can be achieved in the standard pure-state circuit model while the entanglement entropy of every bipartition is small in each step of the computation. The entanglement entropy required for large-scale quantum computation even tends to zero. Moreover we show that the same conclusion applies to many entanglement measures commonly used in the literature. This includes e.g., the geometric measure, localizable entanglement, multipartite concurrence, squashed entanglement, witness-based measures, and more generally any entanglement measure which is continuous in a certain natural sense. These results demonstrate that many entanglement measures are unsuitable tools to assess the power of quantum computers.

  12. Performing quantum computing experiments in the cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Simon J.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum computing technology has reached a second renaissance in the past five years. Increased interest from both the private and public sector combined with extraordinary theoretical and experimental progress has solidified this technology as a major advancement in the 21st century. As anticipated my many, some of the first realizations of quantum computing technology has occured over the cloud, with users logging onto dedicated hardware over the classical internet. Recently, IBM has released the Quantum Experience, which allows users to access a five-qubit quantum processor. In this paper we take advantage of this online availability of actual quantum hardware and present four quantum information experiments. We utilize the IBM chip to realize protocols in quantum error correction, quantum arithmetic, quantum graph theory, and fault-tolerant quantum computation by accessing the device remotely through the cloud. While the results are subject to significant noise, the correct results are returned from the chip. This demonstrates the power of experimental groups opening up their technology to a wider audience and will hopefully allow for the next stage of development in quantum information technology.

  13. Quantum Computer Condition: Stability, Classical Computation and Norms

    CERN Document Server

    Gilbert, G; Thayer, F J; Weinstein, Yu S; Gilbert, Gerald; Hamrick, Michael; Weinstein, Yaakov S.

    2005-01-01

    The Quantum Computer Condition (QCC) provides a rigorous and completely general framework for carrying out analyses of questions pertaining to fault-tolerance in quantum computers. In this paper we apply the QCC to the problem of fluctuations and systematic errors in the values of characteristic parameters in realistic systems. We show that fault-tolerant quantum computation is possible despite variations in these parameters. We also use the QCC to explicitly show that reliable classical computation can be carried out using as input the results of fault-tolerant, but imperfect, quantum computation. Finally, we consider the advantages and disadvantages of the superoperator and diamond norms in connection with application of the QCC to various quantum information-theoretic problems.

  14. Quantum Computing over Finite Fields

    OpenAIRE

    James, Roshan P.; Ortiz, Gerardo; Sabry, Amr

    2011-01-01

    In recent work, Benjamin Schumacher and Michael~D. Westmoreland investigate a version of quantum mechanics which they call "modal quantum theory" but which we prefer to call "discrete quantum theory". This theory is obtained by instantiating the mathematical framework of Hilbert spaces with a finite field instead of the field of complex numbers. This instantiation collapses much the structure of actual quantum mechanics but retains several of its distinguishing characteristics including the n...

  15. Teleportation of Two Quantum States via the Quantum Computation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Mang; ZHU Xi-Wen; FANG Xi-Ming; YAN Min; SHI Lei

    2000-01-01

    A scheme of teleportation of two unknown quantum states via quantum computation is proposed. The comparison with the former proposals shows that our scheme is more in tune with the original teleportation proposal and the effciency is higher. The teleportation of an unknown entangled state is also discussed.

  16. Cooperative biexciton generation and destructive interference in coupled quantum dots using adiabatic rapid passage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renaud, N.; Grozema, F.C.

    2014-01-01

    We report numerical simulations of biexciton generation in coupled quantum dots (CQDs) placed in a static electric field and excited by a chirped laser pulse. Our simulations explicitly account for exciton-phonon interactions at finite temperature using a non-Markovian quantum jump approach to solve

  17. Resilient Quantum Computation Error Models and Thresholds

    CERN Document Server

    Knill, E H; Zurek, W H; Knill, Emanuel; Laflamme, Raymond; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    1997-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that quantum computers can solve certain types of problems substantially faster than the known classical algorithms. These problems include factoring integers and certain physics simulations. Practical quantum computation requires overcoming the problems of environmental noise and operational errors, problems which appear to be much more severe than in classical computation due to the inherent fragility of quantum superpositions involving many degrees of freedom. Here we show that arbitrarily accurate quantum computations are possible provided that the error per operation is below a threshold value. The result is obtained by combining quantum error-correction, fault tolerant state recovery, fault tolerant encoding of operations and concatenation. It holds under physically realistic assumptions on the errors.

  18. Universal holonomic quantum computing with cat-codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Victor V.; Shu, Chi; Krastanov, Stefan; Shen, Chao; Liu, Ren-Bao; Yang, Zhen-Biao; Schoelkopf, Robert J.; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, Michel H.; Jiang, Liang

    2016-05-01

    Universal computation of a quantum system consisting of superpositions of well-separated coherent states of multiple harmonic oscillators can be achieved by three families of adiabatic holonomic gates. The first gate consists of moving a coherent state around a closed path in phase space, resulting in a relative Berry phase between that state and the other states. The second gate consists of ``colliding'' two coherent states of the same oscillator, resulting in coherent population transfer between them. The third gate is an effective controlled-phase gate on coherent states of two different oscillators. Such gates should be realizable via reservoir engineering of systems which support tunable nonlinearities, such as trapped ions and circuit QED.

  19. Implementation of holonomic quantum computation through engineering and manipulating environment

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Zhang-qi; Peng, Peng

    2007-01-01

    We consider an atom-field coupled system, in which two multilevel atoms are respectively trapped in two distant cavities which are connected by an optical fiber and are shined by a broadband squeezed light. We show that a two-qubit geometric CPHASE gate between the two atoms can be implemented through adiabatically manipulating the squeezed reservoir along a closed loop. The scheme has two remarkable features. First, no matter how small but nonzero the squeezing amplitude is, a CPHASE gate with arbitrary phase shift can always be implemented. Second, in contrast to previous quantum computation schemes, the larger the effective coupling strength between the environment and the atoms is, the more reliable the realized CPHASE gate is.

  20. Quantum computing with defects in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Single spins in semiconductors, in particular associated with defect centers, are promising candidates for practical and scalable implementation of quantum computing even at room temperature. Such an implementation may also use the reliable and well known gate constructions from bulk nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantum computing. Progress in development of quantum processor based on defects in diamond will be discussed. By combining optical microscopy, and magnetic resonance techniques, the first quantum logical operations on single spins in a solid are now demonstrated. The system is perspective for room temperature operation because of a weak dependence of decoherence on temperature (author)

  1. Numerical computation for teaching quantum statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Tyson; Swendsen, Robert H.

    2013-11-01

    The study of ideal quantum gases reveals surprising quantum effects that can be observed in macroscopic systems. The properties of bosons are particularly unusual because a macroscopic number of particles can occupy a single quantum state. We describe a computational approach that supplements the usual analytic derivations applicable in the thermodynamic limit. The approach involves directly summing over the quantum states for finite systems and avoids the need for doing difficult integrals. The results display the unusual behavior of quantum gases even for relatively small systems.

  2. Quantum computing based on semiconductor nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    S.M. Frolov; Plissard, S.R. (Sebastien) (Postdoc); Nadj-Perge, S.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M. (Erik) (Professor)

    2013-01-01

    A quantum computer will have computational power beyond that of conventional computers, which can be exploited for solving important and complex problems, such as predicting the conformations of large biological molecules. Materials play a major role in this emerging technology, as they can enable sophisticated operations, such as control over single degrees of freedom and their quantum states, as well as preservation and coherent transfer of these states between distant nodes. Here we assess...

  3. Computational depth complexity of measurement-based quantum computation

    CERN Document Server

    Browne, Dan E; Perdrix, Simon

    2009-01-01

    We prove that one-way quantum computations have the same computational power as quantum circuits with unbounded fan-out. It demonstrates that the one-way model is not only one of the most promising models of physical realisation, but also a very powerful model of quantum computation. It confirms and completes previous results which have pointed out, for some specific problems, a depth separation between the one-way model and the quantum circuit model. Since one-way model has the same computational power as unbounded quantum fan-out circuits, the quantum Fourier transform can be approximated in constant depth in the one-way model, and thus the factorisation can be done by a polytime probabilistic classical algorithm which has access to a constant-depth one-way quantum computer. The extra power of the one-way model, comparing with the quantum circuit model, comes from its classical-quantum hybrid nature. We show that this extra power is reduced to the capability to perform unbounded classical parity gates in co...

  4. Hyper-parallel photonic quantum computation with coupled quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Bao-Cang; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that a parallel quantum computer is more powerful than a classical one. So far, there are some important works about the construction of universal quantum logic gates, the key elements in quantum computation. However, they are focused on operating on one degree of freedom (DOF) of quantum systems. Here, we investigate the possibility of achieving scalable hyper-parallel quantum computation based on two DOFs of photon systems. We construct a deterministic hyper-controlled-not (hyper-CNOT) gate operating on both the spatial-mode and the polarization DOFs of a two-photon system simultaneously, by exploiting the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). This hyper-CNOT gate is implemented by manipulating the four qubits in the two DOFs of a two-photon system without auxiliary spatial modes or polarization modes. It reduces the operation time and the resources consumed in quantum information processing, and it is more robust against the photonic dissipation noise, compared with the integration of several cascaded CNOT gates in one DOF.

  5. Geometric effects in nonequilibrium electron transfer statistics in adiabatically driven quantum junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Himangshu Prabal; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Harbola, Upendra

    2016-05-01

    Cyclic Pancharatnam-Berry (PB) and adiabatic noncyclic geometric (ANG) effects are investigated in a single electron orbital system connected to two metal contacts with externally driven chemical potential and/or temperatures. The PB contribution doesn't affect the density matrix evolution, but has a quantitative effect on the statistics (fluctuations) of electron transfer. The ANG contribution, on the other hand, affects the net flux across the junction. Unlike the PB, the ANG contribution is nonzero when two parameters are identically driven. Closed analytical expressions are derived for the ANG contribution to the flux, and the PB contribution to the first two leading order fluctuations. Fluctuations can be modified by manipulating the relative phases of the drivings. Interestingly, we find that the fluctuations of the pumped charge do not satisfy the steady state fluctuation theorem in presence of nonzero geometric contribution, but can be recovered for a vanishing geometric contribution even in presence of the external driving.

  6. Quantum state specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadwick, Helen, E-mail: helen.chadwick@epfl.ch; Hundt, P. Morten; Reijzen, Maarten E. van; Yoder, Bruce L.; Beck, Rainer D. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Moléculaire, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-01-21

    Highly efficient preparation of molecules in a specific rovibrationally excited state for gas/surface reactivity measurements is achieved in a molecular beam using tunable infrared (IR) radiation from a single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (cw-OPO). We demonstrate that with appropriate focusing of the IR radiation, molecules in the molecular beam crossing the fixed frequency IR field experience a Doppler tuning that can be adjusted to achieve complete population inversion of a two-level system by rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). A room temperature pyroelectric detector is used to monitor the excited fraction in the molecular beam and the population inversion is detected and quantified using IR bleaching by a second IR-OPO. The second OPO is also used for complete population transfer to an overtone or combination vibration via double resonance excitation using two spatially separated RAP processes.

  7. Faster quantum chemistry simulation on fault-tolerant quantum computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody Jones, N.; Whitfield, James D.; McMahon, Peter L.; Yung, Man-Hong; Van Meter, Rodney; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2012-11-01

    Quantum computers can in principle simulate quantum physics exponentially faster than their classical counterparts, but some technical hurdles remain. We propose methods which substantially improve the performance of a particular form of simulation, ab initio quantum chemistry, on fault-tolerant quantum computers; these methods generalize readily to other quantum simulation problems. Quantum teleportation plays a key role in these improvements and is used extensively as a computing resource. To improve execution time, we examine techniques for constructing arbitrary gates which perform substantially faster than circuits based on the conventional Solovay-Kitaev algorithm (Dawson and Nielsen 2006 Quantum Inform. Comput. 6 81). For a given approximation error ɛ, arbitrary single-qubit gates can be produced fault-tolerantly and using a restricted set of gates in time which is O(log ɛ) or O(log log ɛ) with sufficient parallel preparation of ancillas, constant average depth is possible using a method we call programmable ancilla rotations. Moreover, we construct and analyze efficient implementations of first- and second-quantized simulation algorithms using the fault-tolerant arbitrary gates and other techniques, such as implementing various subroutines in constant time. A specific example we analyze is the ground-state energy calculation for lithium hydride.

  8. Efficient and robust generation of maximally entangled states of two atomic ensembles by adiabatic quantum feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Lisi, A D; Illuminati, F; Vitali, D; Lisi, Antonio Di; Siena, Silvio De; Illuminati, Fabrizio; Vitali, David

    2004-01-01

    We introduce an efficient and robust scheme to generate maximally entangled states of two atomic ensembles. The scheme is based on quantum non-demolition measurements of total atomic populations and on quantum feedback conditioned by the measurements outputs. The high efficiency of the scheme is tested and confirmed numerically for photo-detection with ideal efficiency as well as in the presence of losses.

  9. Adiabatic quantum simulation with a segmented ion trap: Application to long-distance entanglement in quantum spin systems

    OpenAIRE

    Zippilli, S.; Johanning, M.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Wunderlich, Ch.; Illuminati, F.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate theoretically systems of ions in segmented linear Paul traps for the quantum simulation of quantum spin models with tunable interactions. The scheme is entirely general and can be applied to the realization of arbitrary spin-spin interactions. As a specific application we discuss in detail the quantum simulation of models that exhibit long-distance entanglement in the ground state. We show how tailoring of the axial trapping potential allows for generating spin-spin coupling pa...

  10. Materials Frontiers to Empower Quantum Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Antoinette Jane [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sarrao, John Louis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Richardson, Christopher [Laboratory for Physical Sciences, College Park, MD (United States)

    2015-06-11

    This is an exciting time at the nexus of quantum computing and materials research. The materials frontiers described in this report represent a significant advance in electronic materials and our understanding of the interactions between the local material and a manufactured quantum state. Simultaneously, directed efforts to solve materials issues related to quantum computing provide an opportunity to control and probe the fundamental arrangement of matter that will impact all electronic materials. An opportunity exists to extend our understanding of materials functionality from electronic-grade to quantum-grade by achieving a predictive understanding of noise and decoherence in qubits and their origins in materials defects and environmental coupling. Realizing this vision systematically and predictively will be transformative for quantum computing and will represent a qualitative step forward in materials prediction and control.

  11. Quantum computing implementations with neutral particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Negretti, Antonio; Treutlein, Philipp; Calarco, Tommaso

    2011-01-01

    We review quantum information processing with cold neutral particles, that is, atoms or polar molecules. First, we analyze the best suited degrees of freedom of these particles for storing quantum information, and then we discuss both single- and two-qubit gate implementations. We focus our discu...... optimal control theory might be a powerful tool to enhance the speed up of the gate operations as well as to achieve high fidelities required for fault tolerant quantum computation....

  12. Recursive simulation of quantum annealing

    CERN Document Server

    Sowa, A P; Samson, J H; Savel'ev, S E; Zagoskin, A M; Heidel, S; Zúñiga-Anaya, J C

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of the performance of adiabatic annealers is hindered by lack of efficient algorithms for simulating their behaviour. We exploit the analyticity of the standard model for the adiabatic quantum process to develop an efficient recursive method for its numerical simulation in case of both unitary and non-unitary evolution. Numerical simulations show distinctly different distributions for the most important figure of merit of adiabatic quantum computing --- the success probability --- in these two cases.

  13. Quantum computing based on semiconductor nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frolov, S.M.; Plissard, S.R.; Nadj-Perge, S.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    A quantum computer will have computational power beyond that of conventional computers, which can be exploited for solving important and complex problems, such as predicting the conformations of large biological molecules. Materials play a major role in this emerging technology, as they can enable s

  14. Carmichael Numbers on a Quantum Computer

    OpenAIRE

    Carlini, A.; Hosoya, A.

    1999-01-01

    We present a quantum probabilistic algorithm which tests with a polynomial computational complexity whether a given composite number is of the Carmichael type. We also suggest a quantum algorithm which could verify a conjecture by Pomerance, Selfridge and Wagstaff concerning the asymptotic distribution of Carmichael numbers smaller than a given integer.

  15. Directional coupling for quantum computing and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios M

    2008-11-14

    We introduce the concept of directional coupling, i.e., the selective transfer of a state between adjacent quantum wires, in the context of quantum computing and communication. Our analysis rests upon a mathematical analogy between a dual-channel directional coupler and a composite spin system.

  16. An introduction to quantum computing algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Pittenger, Arthur O

    2000-01-01

    In 1994 Peter Shor [65] published a factoring algorithm for a quantum computer that finds the prime factors of a composite integer N more efficiently than is possible with the known algorithms for a classical com­ puter. Since the difficulty of the factoring problem is crucial for the se­ curity of a public key encryption system, interest (and funding) in quan­ tum computing and quantum computation suddenly blossomed. Quan­ tum computing had arrived. The study of the role of quantum mechanics in the theory of computa­ tion seems to have begun in the early 1980s with the publications of Paul Benioff [6]' [7] who considered a quantum mechanical model of computers and the computation process. A related question was discussed shortly thereafter by Richard Feynman [35] who began from a different perspec­ tive by asking what kind of computer should be used to simulate physics. His analysis led him to the belief that with a suitable class of "quantum machines" one could imitate any quantum system.

  17. Universality of Black Hole Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia; Lust, Dieter; Omar, Yasser; Richter, Benedikt

    2016-01-01

    By analyzing the key properties of black holes from the point of view of quantum information, we derive a model-independent picture of black hole quantum computing. It has been noticed that this picture exhibits striking similarities with quantum critical condensates, allowing the use of a common language to describe quantum computing in both systems. We analyze such quantum computing by allowing coupling to external modes, under the condition that the external influence must be soft-enough in order not to offset the basic properties of the system. We derive model-independent bounds on some crucial time-scales, such as the times of gate operation, decoherence, maximal entanglement and total scrambling. We show that for black hole type quantum computers all these time-scales are of the order of the black hole half-life time. Furthermore, we construct explicitly a set of Hamiltonians that generates a universal set of quantum gates for the black hole type computer. We find that the gates work at maximal energy e...

  18. Iterated Gate Teleportation and Blind Quantum Computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Delgado, Carlos A; Fitzsimons, Joseph F

    2015-06-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a user to delegate a computation to an untrusted server while keeping the computation hidden. A number of recent works have sought to establish bounds on the communication requirements necessary to implement blind computation, and a bound based on the no-programming theorem of Nielsen and Chuang has emerged as a natural limiting factor. Here we show that this constraint only holds in limited scenarios, and show how to overcome it using a novel method of iterated gate teleportations. This technique enables drastic reductions in the communication required for distributed quantum protocols, extending beyond the blind computation setting. Applied to blind quantum computation, this technique offers significant efficiency improvements, and in some scenarios offers an exponential reduction in communication requirements. PMID:26196609

  19. Thresholds for Linear Optics Quantum Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Knill, E.; Laflamme, R; Milburn, G.

    2000-01-01

    We previously established that in principle, it is possible to quantum compute using passive linear optics with photo-detectors (quant-ph/0006088). Here we describe techniques based on error detection and correction that greatly improve the resource and device reliability requirements needed for scalability. The resource requirements are analyzed for ideal linear optics quantum computation (LOQC). The coding methods can be integrated both with loss detection and phase error-correction to deal...

  20. Braid group representation on quantum computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aziz, Ryan Kasyfil, E-mail: kasyfilryan@gmail.com [Department of Computational Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia); Muchtadi-Alamsyah, Intan, E-mail: ntan@math.itb.ac.id [Algebra Research Group, Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    There are many studies about topological representation of quantum computation recently. One of diagram representation of quantum computation is by using ZX-Calculus. In this paper we will make a diagrammatical scheme of Dense Coding. We also proved that ZX-Calculus diagram of maximally entangle state satisfies Yang-Baxter Equation and therefore, we can construct a Braid Group representation of set of maximally entangle state.

  1. Quantum Mechanical Nature in Liquid NMR Quantum Computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONGGui-Lu; YANHai-Yang; 等

    2002-01-01

    The quantum nature of bulk ensemble NMR quantum computing-the center of recent heated debate,is addressed.Concepts of the mixed state and entanglement are examined,and the data in a two-qubit liquid NMR quantum computation are analyzed.the main points in this paper are;i) Density matrix describes the "state" of an average particle in an ensemble.It does not describe the state of an individual particle in an ensemble;ii) Entanglement is a property of the wave function of a microscopic particle(such as a molecule in a liquid NMR sample),and separability of the density matrix canot be used to measure the entanglement of mixed ensemble;iii) The state evolution in bulkensemble NMR quantum computation is quantum-mechanical;iv) The coefficient before the effective pure state density matrix,ε,is a measure of the simultaneity of the molecules in an ensemble,It reflets the intensity of the NMR signal and has no significance in quantifying the entanglement in the bulk ensemble NMR system.The decomposition of the density matrix into product states is only an indication that the ensemble can be prepared by an ensemble with the particles unentangeld.We conclude that effective-pure-state NMR quantum computation is genuine,not just classical simulations.

  2. Quantum computation on the edge of a symmetry-protected topological order

    CERN Document Server

    Miyake, Akimasa

    2010-01-01

    We elaborate the idea of quantum computation through measuring the correlation of a gapped ground state, while the bulk Hamiltonian is utilized to stabilize the resource. A simple computational primitive, by pulling out a single spin adiabatically from the bulk followed by its measurement, is shown to make any ground state of the one-dimensional isotropic Haldane phase useful ubiquitously as a quantum logical wire. The primitive is compatible with certain discrete symmetries that are crucial to protect this topological order, and the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg spin-1 chain of a finite length is practically a sufficient resource. Our approach manifests a holographic principle in that the logical information of a universal quantum computer can be written and processed perfectly on the edge state (i.e. boundary) of the system, supported by the persistent entanglement from the bulk even when the ground state and its evolution cannot be exactly analyzed.

  3. Low-Power Adiabatic Computing with Improved Quasistatic Energy Recovery Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shipra Upadhyay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency of adiabatic logic circuits is determined by the adiabatic and non-adiabatic losses incurred by them during the charging and recovery operations. The lesser will be these losses circuit will be more energy efficient. In this paper, a new approach is presented for minimizing power consumption in quasistatic energy recovery logic (QSERL circuit which involves optimization by removing the nonadiabatic losses completely by replacing the diodes with MOSFETs whose gates are controlled by power clocks. Proposed circuit inherits the advantages of quasistatic ERL (QSERL family but is with improved power efficiency and driving ability. In order to demonstrate workability of the newly developed circuit, a 4 × 4 bit array multiplier circuit has been designed. A mathematical expression to calculate energy dissipation in proposed inverter is developed. Performance of the proposed logic (improved quasistatic energy recovery logic (IQSERL is analyzed and compared with CMOS and reported QSERL in their representative inverters and multipliers in VIRTUOSO SPECTRE simulator of Cadence in 0.18 μm UMC technology. In our proposed (IQSERL inverter the power efficiency has been improved to almost 20% up to 50 MHz and 300 fF external load capacitance in comparison to CMOS and QSERL circuits.

  4. Fundamental gravitational limitations to quantum computing

    CERN Document Server

    Gambini, R; Pullin, J; Gambini, Rodolfo; Porto, Rafael A.; Pullin, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    Lloyd has considered the ultimate limitations physics places on quantum computers. He concludes in particular that for an ``ultimate laptop'' (a computer of one liter of volume and one kilogram of mass) the maximum number of operations per second is bounded by $10^{51}$. The limit is derived considering ordinary quantum mechanics. Here we consider additional limits that are placed by quantum gravity ideas, namely the use of a relational notion of time and fundamental gravitational limits that exist on time measurements. We then particularize for the case of an ultimate laptop and show that the maximum number of operations is further constrained to $10^{47}$ per second.

  5. Universal Quantum Computation Using Continuous Dynamical Decoupling

    CERN Document Server

    Fanchini, Felipe F; Caldeira, Amir O

    2010-01-01

    We show, for the first time, that continuous dynamical decoupling can preserve the coherence of a two-qubit state as it evolves during a SWAP quantum operation. Hence, because the Heisenberg exchange interaction alone can be used for achieving universal quantum computation, its combination with continuous dynamical decoupling can also make the computation robust against general environmental perturbations. Furthermore, since the exchange-interaction Hamiltonian is invariant under rotations, the same control-field arrangement used to protect a stationary quantum-memory state can also preserve the coherence of the driven qubits. The simplicity of the required control fields greatly improves prospects for an experimental realization.

  6. Waveguide-QED-Based Photonic Quantum Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huaixiu; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Baranger, Harold U.

    2013-08-01

    We propose a new scheme for quantum computation using flying qubits—propagating photons in a one-dimensional waveguide interacting with matter qubits. Photon-photon interactions are mediated by the coupling to a four-level system, based on which photon-photon π-phase gates (controlled-not) can be implemented for universal quantum computation. We show that high gate fidelity is possible, given recent dramatic experimental progress in superconducting circuits and photonic-crystal waveguides. The proposed system can be an important building block for future on-chip quantum networks.

  7. Shortcut to adiabatic gate teleportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Alan C.; Silva, Raphael D.; Sarandy, Marcelo S.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a shortcut to the adiabatic gate teleportation model of quantum computation. More specifically, we determine fast local counterdiabatic Hamiltonians able to implement teleportation as a universal computational primitive. In this scenario, we provide the counterdiabatic driving for arbitrary n -qubit gates, which allows to achieve universality through a variety of gate sets. Remarkably, our approach maps the superadiabatic Hamiltonian HSA for an arbitrary n -qubit gate teleportation into the implementation of a rotated superadiabatic dynamics of an n -qubit state teleportation. This result is rather general, with the speed of the evolution only dictated by the quantum speed limit. In particular, we analyze the energetic cost for different Hamiltonian interpolations in the context of the energy-time complementarity.

  8. Brain-Computer Interfaces and Quantum Robots

    CERN Document Server

    Pessa, Eliano

    2009-01-01

    The actual (classical) Brain-Computer Interface attempts to use brain signals to drive suitable actuators performing the actions corresponding to subject's intention. However this goal is not fully reached, and when BCI works, it does only in particular situations. The reason of this unsatisfactory result is that intention cannot be conceived simply as a set of classical input-output relationships. It is therefore necessary to resort to quantum theory, allowing the occurrence of stable coherence phenomena, in turn underlying high-level mental processes such as intentions and strategies. More precisely, within the context of a dissipative Quantum Field Theory of brain operation it is possible to introduce generalized coherent states associated, within the framework of logic, to the assertions of a quantum metalanguage. The latter controls the quantum-mechanical computing corresponding to standard mental operation. It thus become possible to conceive a Quantum Cyborg in which a human mind controls, through a qu...

  9. Cat-qubits for quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirrahimi, Mazyar

    2016-08-01

    The development of quantum Josephson circuits has created a strong expectation for reliable processing of quantum information. While this progress has already led to various proof-of-principle experiments on small-scale quantum systems, a major scaling step is required towards many-qubit protocols. Fault-tolerant computation with protected logical qubits usually comes at the expense of a significant overhead in the hardware. Each of the involved physical qubits still needs to satisfy the best achieved properties (coherence times, coupling strengths and tunability). Here, and in the aim of addressing alternative approaches to deal with these obstacles, I overview a series of recent theoretical proposals, and the experimental developments following these proposals, to enable a hardware-efficient paradigm for quantum memory protection and universal quantum computation. xml:lang="fr"

  10. Diamond NV centers for quantum computing and quantum networks

    OpenAIRE

    Childress, Lilian; Hanson, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    The exotic features of quantum mechanics have the potential to revolutionize information technologies. Using superposition and entanglement, a quantum processor could efficiently tackle problems inaccessible to current-day computers. Nonlocal correlations may be exploited for intrinsically secure communication across the globe. Finding and controlling a physical system suitable for fulfi lling these promises is one of the greatest challenges of our time. The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in di...

  11. Robust dynamical decoupling for quantum computing and quantum memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Alexandre M; Alvarez, Gonzalo A; Suter, Dieter

    2011-06-17

    Dynamical decoupling (DD) is a popular technique for protecting qubits from the environment. However, unless special care is taken, experimental errors in the control pulses used in this technique can destroy the quantum information instead of preserving it. Here, we investigate techniques for making DD sequences robust against different types of experimental errors while retaining good decoupling efficiency in a fluctuating environment. We present experimental data from solid-state nuclear spin qubits and introduce a new DD sequence that is suitable for quantum computing and quantum memory.

  12. Quantum Genetic Algorithms for Computer Scientists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Lahoz-Beltra

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic algorithms (GAs are a class of evolutionary algorithms inspired by Darwinian natural selection. They are popular heuristic optimisation methods based on simulated genetic mechanisms, i.e., mutation, crossover, etc. and population dynamical processes such as reproduction, selection, etc. Over the last decade, the possibility to emulate a quantum computer (a computer using quantum-mechanical phenomena to perform operations on data has led to a new class of GAs known as “Quantum Genetic Algorithms” (QGAs. In this review, we present a discussion, future potential, pros and cons of this new class of GAs. The review will be oriented towards computer scientists interested in QGAs “avoiding” the possible difficulties of quantum-mechanical phenomena.

  13. Elements of quantum computing history, theories and engineering applications

    CERN Document Server

    Akama, Seiki

    2015-01-01

    A quantum computer is a computer based on a computational model which uses quantum mechanics, which is a subfield of physics to study phenomena at the micro level. There has been a growing interest on quantum computing in the 1990's, and some quantum computers at the experimental level were recently implemented. Quantum computers enable super-speed computation, and can solve some important problems whose solutions were regarded impossible or intractable with traditional computers. This book provides a quick introduction to quantum computing for readers who have no backgrounds of both theory of computation and quantum mechanics. “Elements of Quantum Computing” presents the history, theories, and engineering applications of quantum computing. The book is suitable to computer scientists, physicist, and software engineers.

  14. Yield analysis of large-scale adiabatic-quantum-flux-parametron logic: The effect of the distribution of the critical current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We performed yield analysis of adiabatic-quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) circuits. • Monte Carlo simulations were conducted assuming the distribution of the critical current. • We made an analytical model for the circuit yield of large-scale AQFP circuits. • AQFP integrated circuits containing more than 1 million gates can be realized. • The standard deviation of the critical current should be less than 1%. - Abstract: We performed yield analysis of large-scale adiabatic-quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) circuits using circuit simulations based on the Monte Carlo method assuming the distribution of the critical current of Josephson junctions. Based on the simulation results, we also made an analytical model for the circuit yield of large-scale AQFP circuits. The yield analysis indicates that AQFP integrated circuits containing 1 million gates can be realized when the interconnect inductance is about 40 pH and the normalized standard deviation of the critical current is less than 1%

  15. Strictly contractive quantum channels and physically realizable quantum computers

    OpenAIRE

    Raginsky, Maxim

    2001-01-01

    We study the robustness of quantum computers under the influence of errors modelled by strictly contractive channels. A channel $T$ is defined to be strictly contractive if, for any pair of density operators $\\rho,\\sigma$ in its domain, $\\| T\\rho - T\\sigma \\|_1 \\le k \\| \\rho-\\sigma \\|_1$ for some $0 \\le k < 1$ (here $\\| \\cdot \\|_1$ denotes the trace norm). In other words, strictly contractive channels render the states of the computer less distinguishable in the sense of quantum detection the...

  16. Efficient quantum circuits for one-way quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanamoto, Tetsufumi; Liu, Yu-Xi; Hu, Xuedong; Nori, Franco

    2009-03-13

    While Ising-type interactions are ideal for implementing controlled phase flip gates in one-way quantum computing, natural interactions between solid-state qubits are most often described by either the XY or the Heisenberg models. We show an efficient way of generating cluster states directly using either the imaginary SWAP (iSWAP) gate for the XY model, or the sqrt[SWAP] gate for the Heisenberg model. Our approach thus makes one-way quantum computing more feasible for solid-state devices.

  17. Computer science approach to quantum control

    OpenAIRE

    Janzing, Dominik

    2006-01-01

    This work considers several hypothetical control processes on the nanoscopic level and show their analogy to computation processes. It shows that measuring certain types of quantum observables is such a complex task that every instrument that is able to perform it would necessarily be an extremely powerful computer.

  18. Qubus ancilla-driven quantum computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Katherine Louise [School of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70808, United States and School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); De, Suvabrata; Kendon, Viv [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Munro, Bill [National Institute of Informatics, 2-1-2 Hitotsubashi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8430, Japan and NTT Basic Research Laboratories, 3-1, Morinosato Wakamiya Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan)

    2014-12-04

    Hybrid matter-optical systems offer a robust, scalable path to quantum computation. Such systems have an ancilla which acts as a bus connecting the qubits. We demonstrate how using a continuous variable qubus as the ancilla provides savings in the total number of operations required when computing with many qubits.

  19. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Sangchul, E-mail: soh@qf.org.qa [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Qatar Foundation, Doha (Qatar); Kais, Sabre, E-mail: kais@purdue.edu [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Qatar Foundation, Doha (Qatar); Department of Chemistry, Department of Physics and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2014-12-14

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  20. Progress in theoretical quantum computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Computing is perhaps one of the most distinguished features that differentiate humans from animals.Aside from counting numbers using fingers and toes,abacus was the first great computing machine of human civilization.

  1. Quantum computations: algorithms and error correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaev, A. Yu

    1997-12-01

    Contents §0. Introduction §1. Abelian problem on the stabilizer §2. Classical models of computations2.1. Boolean schemes and sequences of operations2.2. Reversible computations §3. Quantum formalism3.1. Basic notions and notation3.2. Transformations of mixed states3.3. Accuracy §4. Quantum models of computations4.1. Definitions and basic properties4.2. Construction of various operators from the elements of a basis4.3. Generalized quantum control and universal schemes §5. Measurement operators §6. Polynomial quantum algorithm for the stabilizer problem §7. Computations with perturbations: the choice of a model §8. Quantum codes (definitions and general properties)8.1. Basic notions and ideas8.2. One-to-one codes8.3. Many-to-one codes §9. Symplectic (additive) codes9.1. Algebraic preparation9.2. The basic construction9.3. Error correction procedure9.4. Torus codes §10. Error correction in the computation process: general principles10.1. Definitions and results10.2. Proofs §11. Error correction: concrete procedures11.1. The symplecto-classical case11.2. The case of a complete basis Bibliography

  2. Free spin quantum computation with semiconductor nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, W M; Soo, C; Zhang, Wei-Min; Wu, Yin-Zhong; Soo, Chopin

    2005-01-01

    Taking the excess electron spin in a unit cell of semiconductor multiple quantum-dot structure as a qubit, we can implement scalable quantum computation without resorting to spin-spin interactions. The technique of single electron tunnelings and the structure of quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) are used to create a charge entangled state of two electrons which is then converted into spin entanglement states by using single spin rotations. Deterministic two-qubit quantum gates can also be manipulated using only single spin rotations with help of QCA. A single-short read-out of spin states can be realized by coupling the unit cell to a quantum point contact.

  3. Quantum Computation by Pairing Trapped Ultracold Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯芒; 朱熙文; 高克林; 施磊

    2001-01-01

    Superpositional wavefunction oscillations for the implementation of quantum algorithms modify the desired interference required for the quantum computation. We propose a scheme with trapped ultracold ion-pairs beingqubits to diminish the detrimental effect of the wavefunction oscillations, which is applied to the two-qubitGrover's search. It can be also found that the qubits in our scheme are more robust against the decoherencecaused by the environment, and the model is scalable.

  4. Entanglement and Quantum Computation: An Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, R.B.

    2000-06-27

    This report presents a selective compilation of basic facts from the fields of particle entanglement and quantum information processing prepared for those non-experts in these fields that may have interest in an area of physics showing counterintuitive, ''spooky'' (Einstein's words) behavior. In fact, quantum information processing could, in the near future, provide a new technology to sustain the benefits to the U.S. economy due to advanced computer technology.

  5. Quantum computation of discrete logarithms in semigroups

    OpenAIRE

    Childs, Andrew M.; Ivanyos, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    We describe an efficient quantum algorithm for computing discrete logarithms in semigroups using Shor's algorithms for period finding and discrete log as subroutines. Thus proposed cryptosystems based on the presumed hardness of discrete logarithms in semigroups are insecure against quantum attacks. In contrast, we show that some generalizations of the discrete log problem are hard in semigroups despite being easy in groups. We relate a shifted version of the discrete log problem in semigroup...

  6. Local Search Methods for Quantum Computers

    CERN Document Server

    Hogg, T; Hogg, Tad; Yanik, Mehmet

    1998-01-01

    Local search algorithms use the neighborhood relations among search states and often perform well for a variety of NP-hard combinatorial search problems. This paper shows how quantum computers can also use these neighborhood relations. An example of such a local quantum search is evaluated empirically for the satisfiability (SAT) problem and shown to be particularly effective for highly constrained instances. For problems with an intermediate number of constraints, it is somewhat less effective at exploiting problem structure than incremental quantum methods, in spite of the much smaller search space used by the local method.

  7. Quantum computation with ions in microscopic traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šašura, Marek; Steane, Andrew M.

    2002-12-01

    We discuss a possible experimental realization of fast quantum gates with high fidelity with ions confined in microscopic traps. The original proposal of this physical system for quantum computation comes from Cirac and Zoller (Nature 404, 579 (2000)). In this paper we analyse a sensitivity of the ion-trap quantum gate on various experimental parameters which was omitted in the original proposal. We address imprecision of laser pulses, impact of photon scattering, nonzero temperature effects and influence of laser intensity fluctuations on the total fidelity of the two-qubit phase gate.

  8. Computations in quantum mechanics made easy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsch, H. J.; Rapedius, K.

    2016-09-01

    Convenient and simple numerical techniques for performing quantum computations based on matrix representations of Hilbert space operators are presented and illustrated by various examples. The applications include the calculations of spectral and dynamical properties for one-dimensional and two-dimensional single-particle systems as well as bosonic many-particle and open quantum systems. Due to their technical simplicity these methods are well suited as a tool for teaching quantum mechanics to undergraduates and graduates. Explicit implementations of the presented numerical methods in Matlab are given.

  9. Simulating Grover's Quantum Search in a Classical Computer

    OpenAIRE

    Ningtyas, D. K.; Mutiara, A. B.

    2010-01-01

    The rapid progress of computer science has been accompanied by a corresponding evolution of computation, from classical computation to quantum computation. As quantum computing is on its way to becoming an established discipline of computing science, much effort is being put into the development of new quantum algorithms. One of quantum algorithms is Grover algorithm, which is used for searching an element in an unstructured list of N elements with quadratic speed-up over classical algorithms...

  10. Quantum Mechanical Nature in Liquid NMR Quantum Computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Gui-Lu; YAN Hai-Yang; LI Yan-Song; TU Chang-Cun; ZHU Sheng-Jiang; RUAN Dong; SUN Yang; TAO Jia-Xun; CHEN Hao-Ming

    2002-01-01

    The quantum nature of bulk ensemble NMR quantum computing the center of recent heated debate,is addressed. Concepts of the mixed state and entanglement are examined, and the data in a two-qubit liquid NMRquantum computation are analyzed. The main points in this paper are: i) Density matrix describes the "state" of anaverage particle in an ensemble. It does not describe the state of an individual particle in an ensemble; ii) Entanglementis a property of the wave function of a microscopic particle (such as a molecule in a liquid NMR sample), and separabilityof the density matrix cannot be used to measure the entanglement of mixed ensemble; iii) The state evolution in bulk-ensemble NMRquantum computation is quantum-mechanical; iv) The coefficient before the effective pure state densitymatrix, e, is a measure of the simultaneity of the molecules in an ensemble. It reflects the intensity of the NMR signaland has no significance in quantifying the entanglement in the bulk ensemble NMR system. The decomposition of thedensity matrix into product states is only an indication that the ensemble can be prepared by an ensemble with theparticles unentangled. We conclude that effective-pure-state NMR quantum computation is genuine, not just classicalsimulations.

  11. Theoretical studies for experimental implementation of quantum computing with trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Bryce T.

    Certain quantum many-body physics problems, such as the transverse field Ising model are intractable on a classical computer, meaning that as the number of particles grows, or spins, the amount of memory and computational time required to solve the problem exactly increases faster than a polynomial behavior. However, quantum simulators are being developed to efficiently solve quantum problems that are intractable via conventional computing. Some of the most successful quantum simulators are based on ion traps. Their success depends on the ability to achieve long coherence time, precise spin control, and high fidelity in state preparation. In this work, I present calculations that characterizes the oblate Paul trap that creates two-dimensional Coulomb crystals in a triangular lattice and phonon modes. We also calculate the spin-spin Ising-like interaction that can be generated in the oblate Paul trap using the same techinques as the linear radiofrequency Paul trap. In addition, I discuss two possible challenges that arise in the Penning trap: the effects of defects ( namely when Be+ → BeH+) and the creation of a more uniform spin-spin Ising-like interaction. We show that most properties are not significantly influenced by the appearance of defects, and that by adding two potentials to the Penning trap a more uniform spin-spin Ising-like interaction can be achieved. Next, I discuss techniques tfor preparing the ground state of the Ising-like Hamiltonian. In particular, we explore the use of the bang-bang protocol to prepare the ground state and compare optimized results to conventional adiabatic ramps ( the exponential and locally adiabatic ramp ). The bang-bang optimization in general outperforms the exponential; however the locally adiabatic ramp consistently is somewhat better. However, compared to the locally adiabatic ramp, the bang-bang optimization is simpler to implement, and it has the advantage of providingrovide a simple procedure for estimating the

  12. Distributed Quantum Computation Architecture Using Semiconductor Nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Van Meter, Rodney; Fowler, Austin G; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2009-01-01

    In a large-scale quantum computer, the cost of communications will dominate the performance and resource requirements, place many severe demands on the technology, and constrain the architecture. Unfortunately, fault-tolerant computers based entirely on photons with probabilistic gates, though equipped with "built-in" communication, have very large resource overheads; likewise, computers with reliable probabilistic gates between photons or quantum memories may lack sufficient communication resources in the presence of realistic optical losses. Here, we consider a compromise architecture, in which semiconductor spin qubits are coupled by bright laser pulses through nanophotonic waveguides and cavities using a combination of frequent probabilistic and sparse determinstic entanglement mechanisms. The large photonic resource requirements incurred by the use of probabilistic gates for quantum communication are mitigated in part by the potential high-speed operation of the semiconductor nanophotonic hardware. The s...

  13. Can the human brain do quantum computing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, A F; Massad, E; Coutinho, F A B

    2004-01-01

    The electrical membrane properties have been the key issues in the understanding of the cerebral physiology for more than almost two centuries. But, molecular neurobiology has now discovered that biochemical transactions play an important role in neuronal computations. Quantum computing (QC) is becoming a reality both from the theoretical point of view as well as from practical applications. Quantum mechanics is the most accurate description at atomic level and it lies behind all chemistry that provides the basis for biology ... maybe the magic of entanglement is also crucial for life. The purpose of the present paper is to discuss the dendrite spine as a quantum computing device, taking into account what is known about the physiology of the glutamate receptors and the cascade of biochemical transactions triggered by the glutamate binding to these receptors.

  14. Methodological testing: Are fast quantum computers illusions?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Steven [Tachyon Design Automation, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Popularity of the idea for computers constructed from the principles of QM started with Feynman's 'Lectures On Computation', but he called the idea crazy and dependent on statistical mechanics. In 1987, Feynman published a paper in 'Quantum Implications - Essays in Honor of David Bohm' on negative probabilities which he said gave him cultural shock. The problem with imagined fast quantum computers (QC) is that speed requires both statistical behavior and truth of the mathematical formalism. The Swedish Royal Academy 2012 Nobel Prize in physics press release touted the discovery of methods to control ''individual quantum systems'', to ''measure and control very fragile quantum states'' which enables ''first steps towards building a new type of super fast computer based on quantum physics.'' A number of examples where widely accepted mathematical descriptions have turned out to be problematic are examined: Problems with the use of Oracles in P=NP computational complexity, Paul Finsler's proof of the continuum hypothesis, and Turing's Enigma code breaking versus William tutte's Colossus. I view QC research as faith in computational oracles with wished for properties. Arther Fine's interpretation in 'The Shaky Game' of Einstein's skepticism toward QM is discussed. If Einstein's reality as space-time curvature is correct, then space-time computers will be the next type of super fast computer.

  15. Quantum computing without wavefunctions: time-dependent density functional theory for universal quantum computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, David G; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    We prove that the theorems of TDDFT can be extended to a class of qubit Hamiltonians that are universal for quantum computation. The theorems of TDDFT applied to universal Hamiltonians imply that single-qubit expectation values can be used as the basic variables in quantum computation and information theory, rather than wavefunctions. From a practical standpoint this opens the possibility of approximating observables of interest in quantum computations directly in terms of single-qubit quantities (i.e. as density functionals). Additionally, we also demonstrate that TDDFT provides an exact prescription for simulating universal Hamiltonians with other universal Hamiltonians that have different, and possibly easier-to-realize two-qubit interactions. This establishes the foundations of TDDFT for quantum computation and opens the possibility of developing density functionals for use in quantum algorithms.

  16. Towards universal quantum computation through relativistic motion

    CERN Document Server

    Bruschi, David Edward; Kok, Pieter; Johansson, Göran; Delsing, Per; Fuentes, Ivette

    2013-01-01

    We show how to use relativistic motion to generate continuous variable Gaussian cluster states within cavity modes. Our results can be demonstrated experimentally using superconducting circuits where tunable boundary conditions correspond to mirrors moving with velocities close to the speed of light. In particular, we propose the generation of a quadripartite square cluster state as a first example that can be readily implemented in the laboratory. Since cluster states are universal resources for universal one-way quantum computation, our results pave the way for relativistic quantum computation schemes.

  17. Towards Lagrangian approach to quantum computations

    CERN Document Server

    Vlasov, A Yu

    2003-01-01

    In this work is discussed possibility and actuality of Lagrangian approach to quantum computations. Finite-dimensional Hilbert spaces used in this area provide some challenge for such consideration. The model discussed here can be considered as an analogue of Weyl quantization of field theory via path integral in L. D. Faddeev's approach. Weyl quantization is possible to use also in finite-dimensional case, and some formulas may be simply rewritten with change of integrals to finite sums. On the other hand, there are specific difficulties relevant to finite case. This work has some allusions with phase space models of quantum computations developed last time by different authors.

  18. Ancilla-Driven Universal Quantum Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Anders, Janet; Kashefi, Elham; Browne, Dan E; Andersson, Erika

    2009-01-01

    We propose a method of manipulating a quantum register remotely with the help of a single ancilla that steers the evolution of the register. The fully controlled ancilla qubit is coupled to the computational register solely via a fixed unitary two-qubit interaction, E, and then measured in suitable bases. We characterize all interactions E that induce a unitary, step-wise deterministic measurement back-action on the register sufficient to implement any arbitrary quantum channel. Our scheme offers significant experimental advantages for implementing computations, preparing states and performing generalized measurements as no direct control of the register is required.

  19. Processor core model for quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Man-Hong; Benjamin, Simon C; Bose, Sougato

    2006-06-01

    We describe an architecture based on a processing "core," where multiple qubits interact perpetually, and a separate "store," where qubits exist in isolation. Computation consists of single qubit operations, swaps between the store and the core, and free evolution of the core. This enables computation using physical systems where the entangling interactions are "always on." Alternatively, for switchable systems, our model constitutes a prescription for optimizing many-qubit gates. We discuss implementations of the quantum Fourier transform, Hamiltonian simulation, and quantum error correction.

  20. Random Numbers and Quantum Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, Mark; Glass, David

    2002-01-01

    The topic of random numbers is investigated in such a way as to illustrate links between mathematics, physics and computer science. First, the generation of random numbers by a classical computer using the linear congruential generator and logistic map is considered. It is noted that these procedures yield only pseudo-random numbers since…

  1. Quantum Computing in Non Euclidean Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Resconi, Germano

    2009-01-01

    The recent debate on hyper-computation has raised new questions both on the computational abilities of quantum systems and the Church-Turing Thesis role in Physics. We propose here the idea of geometry of effective physical process as the essentially physical notion of computation. In Quantum mechanics we cannot use the traditional Euclidean geometry but we introduce more sophisticate non Euclidean geometry which include a new kind of information diffuse in the entire universe and that we can represent as Fisher information or active information. We remark that from the Fisher information we can obtain the Bohm and Hiley quantum potential and the classical Schrodinger equation. We can see the quantum phenomena do not affect a limited region of the space but is reflected in a change of the geometry of all the universe. In conclusion any local physical change or physical process is reflected in all the universe by the change of its geometry, This is the deepest meaning of the entanglement in Quantum mechanics a...

  2. The Quantum Socket: Three-Dimensional Wiring for Extensible Quantum Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Béjanin, J. H.; McConkey, T. G.; Rinehart, J. R.; Earnest, C. T.; McRae, C. R. H.; Shiri, D.; Bateman, J. D.; Rohanizadegan, Y.; Penava, B.; Breul, P.; Royak, S.; Zapatka, M; Fowler, A. G.; Mariantoni, M.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum computing architectures are on the verge of scalability, a key requirement for the implementation of a universal quantum computer. The next stage in this quest is the realization of quantum error correction codes, which will mitigate the impact of faulty quantum information on a quantum computer. Architectures with ten or more quantum bits (qubits) have been realized using trapped ions and superconducting circuits. While these implementations are potentially scalable, true scalability...

  3. Quantum error correcting codes and one-way quantum computing: Towards a quantum memory

    CERN Document Server

    Schlingemann, D

    2003-01-01

    For realizing a quantum memory we suggest to first encode quantum information via a quantum error correcting code and then concatenate combined decoding and re-encoding operations. This requires that the encoding and the decoding operation can be performed faster than the typical decoherence time of the underlying system. The computational model underlying the one-way quantum computer, which has been introduced by Hans Briegel and Robert Raussendorf, provides a suitable concept for a fast implementation of quantum error correcting codes. It is shown explicitly in this article is how encoding and decoding operations for stabilizer codes can be realized on a one-way quantum computer. This is based on the graph code representation for stabilizer codes, on the one hand, and the relation between cluster states and graph codes, on the other hand.

  4. A surface code quantum computer in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Charles D; Peretz, Eldad; Hile, Samuel J; House, Matthew G; Fuechsle, Martin; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L

    2015-10-01

    The exceptionally long quantum coherence times of phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubits in silicon, coupled with the proven scalability of silicon-based nano-electronics, make them attractive candidates for large-scale quantum computing. However, the high threshold of topological quantum error correction can only be captured in a two-dimensional array of qubits operating synchronously and in parallel-posing formidable fabrication and control challenges. We present an architecture that addresses these problems through a novel shared-control paradigm that is particularly suited to the natural uniformity of the phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubit states and electronic confinement. The architecture comprises a two-dimensional lattice of donor qubits sandwiched between two vertically separated control layers forming a mutually perpendicular crisscross gate array. Shared-control lines facilitate loading/unloading of single electrons to specific donors, thereby activating multiple qubits in parallel across the array on which the required operations for surface code quantum error correction are carried out by global spin control. The complexities of independent qubit control, wave function engineering, and ad hoc quantum interconnects are explicitly avoided. With many of the basic elements of fabrication and control based on demonstrated techniques and with simulated quantum operation below the surface code error threshold, the architecture represents a new pathway for large-scale quantum information processing in silicon and potentially in other qubit systems where uniformity can be exploited. PMID:26601310

  5. Efficient quantum computing using coherent photon conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Langford, N K; Prevedel, R; Munro, W J; Milburn, G J; Zeilinger, A

    2011-01-01

    Single photons provide excellent quantum information carriers, but current schemes for preparing, processing and measuring them are inefficient. For example, down-conversion provides heralded, but randomly timed single photons, while linear-optics gates are inherently probabilistic. Here, we introduce a deterministic scheme for photonic quantum information. Our single, versatile process---coherent photon conversion---provides a full suite of photonic quantum processing tools, from creating high-quality heralded single- and multiphoton states free of higher-order imperfections to implementing deterministic multiqubit entanglement gates and high-efficiency detection. It fulfils all requirements for a scalable photonic quantum computing architecture. Using photonic crystal fibres, we experimentally demonstrate a four-colour nonlinear process usable for coherent photon conversion and show that current technology provides a feasible path towards deterministic operation. Our scheme, based on interacting bosonic fie...

  6. Adiabatic passage for one-step generation of n-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states of superconducting qubits via quantum Zeno dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin-Lei; Song, Chong; Xu, Jing; Yu, Lin; Ji, Xin; Zhang, Shou

    2016-09-01

    An efficient scheme is proposed for generating n-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states of n superconducting qubits separated by (n-1) coplanar waveguide resonators capacitively via adiabatic passage with the help of quantum Zeno dynamics in one step. In the scheme, it is not necessary to precisely control the time of the whole operation and the Rabi frequencies of classical fields because of the introduction of adiabatic passage. The numerical simulations for three-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state show that the scheme is insensitive to the dissipation of the resonators and the energy relaxation of the superconducting qubits. The three-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state can be deterministically generated with comparatively high fidelity in the current experimental conditions, though the scheme is somewhat sensitive to the dephasing of superconducting qubits.

  7. Dominant Strategies in Two Qubit Quantum Computations

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Faisal Shah

    2014-01-01

    Nash equilibrium is a solution concept in non-strictly competitive, non-cooperative game theory that finds applications in various scientific and engineering disciplines. A non-strictly competitive, non-cooperative game model is presented here for two qubit quantum computations that allows for the characterization of Nash equilibrium in these computations via the inner product of their state space. Nash equilibrium outcomes are optimal under given constraints and therefore offer a game-theore...

  8. Ion photon networks for quantum computing and quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Susan; Hayes, David; Hucul, David; Inlek, I. Volkan; Monroe, Christopher

    2013-03-01

    Quantum information based on ion-trap technology is well regarded for its stability, high detection fidelity, and ease of manipulation. Here we demonstrate a proof of principle experiment for scaling this technology to large numbers of ions in separate traps by linking the ions via photons. We give results for entanglement between distant ions via probabilistic photonic gates that is then swapped between ions in the same trap via deterministic Coulombic gates. We report fidelities above 65% and show encouraging preliminary results for the next stage of experimental improvement. Such a system could be used for quantum computing requiring large numbers of qubits or for quantum repeaters requiring the qubits to be separated by large distances.

  9. The quantum computer game: citizen science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgaard, Sidse; Mølmer, Klaus; Sherson, Jacob

    2013-05-01

    Progress in the field of quantum computation is hampered by daunting technical challenges. Here we present an alternative approach to solving these by enlisting the aid of computer players around the world. We have previously examined a quantum computation architecture involving ultracold atoms in optical lattices and strongly focused tweezers of light. In The Quantum Computer Game (see http://www.scienceathome.org/), we have encapsulated the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the problem in a graphical user interface allowing for easy user input. Players can then search the parameter space with real-time graphical feedback in a game context with a global high-score that rewards short gate times and robustness to experimental errors. The game which is still in a demo version has so far been tried by several hundred players. Extensions of the approach to other models such as Gross-Pitaevskii and Bose-Hubbard are currently under development. The game has also been incorporated into science education at high-school and university level as an alternative method for teaching quantum mechanics. Initial quantitative evaluation results are very positive. AU Ideas Center for Community Driven Research, CODER.

  10. Data Structures in Classical and Quantum Computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fillinger, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    This survey summarizes several results about quantum computing related to (mostly static) data structures. First, we describe classical data structures for the set membership and the predecessor search problems: Perfect Hash tables for set membership by Fredman, Koml\\'{o}s and Szemer\\'{e}di and a da

  11. A simulator for quantum computer hardware

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K.F L; de Raedt, H.A.; De Raedt, K.

    2002-01-01

    We present new examples of the use of the quantum computer (QC) emulator. For educational purposes we describe the implementation of the CNOT and Toffoli gate, two basic building blocks of a QC, on a three qubit NMR-like QC.

  12. Simulations of Probabilities for Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, M.

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that classical probabilities, and in particular, probabilistic Turing machine, can be simulated by combining chaos and non-LIpschitz dynamics, without utilization of any man-made devices (such as random number generators). Self-organizing properties of systems coupling simulated and calculated probabilities and their link to quantum computations are discussed.

  13. Computer animations of quantum field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, E. (Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service de Physique Theorique)

    1992-07-01

    A visualization mehtod for quantum field theories based on the transfer matrix formalism is presented. It generates computer animations simulating the time evolution of complex physical systems subject to local Hamiltonians. The method may be used as a means of gaining insight to theories such as QCD, and as an educational tool in explaining high-energy physics. (orig.).

  14. Geometry of abstraction in quantum computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlovic, D.; Abramsky, S.; Mislove, M.W.

    2012-01-01

    Quantum algorithms are sequences of abstract operations, per­ formed on non-existent computers. They are in obvious need of categorical semantics. We present some steps in this direction, following earlier contribu­ tions of Abramsky, Goecke and Selinger. In particular, we analyze f

  15. Blind quantum computing with weak coherent pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunjko, Vedran; Kashefi, Elham; Leverrier, Anthony

    2012-05-18

    The universal blind quantum computation (UBQC) protocol [A. Broadbent, J. Fitzsimons, and E. Kashefi, in Proceedings of the 50th Annual IEEE Symposiumon Foundations of Computer Science (IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA, USA, 2009), pp. 517-526.] allows a client to perform quantum computation on a remote server. In an ideal setting, perfect privacy is guaranteed if the client is capable of producing specific, randomly chosen single qubit states. While from a theoretical point of view, this may constitute the lowest possible quantum requirement, from a pragmatic point of view, generation of such states to be sent along long distances can never be achieved perfectly. We introduce the concept of ϵ blindness for UBQC, in analogy to the concept of ϵ security developed for other cryptographic protocols, allowing us to characterize the robustness and security properties of the protocol under possible imperfections. We also present a remote blind single qubit preparation protocol with weak coherent pulses for the client to prepare, in a delegated fashion, quantum states arbitrarily close to perfect random single qubit states. This allows us to efficiently achieve ϵ-blind UBQC for any ϵ>0, even if the channel between the client and the server is arbitrarily lossy.

  16. Quantum Computing: Selected Internet Resources for Librarians, Researchers, and the Casually Curious

    OpenAIRE

    Cirasella, Jill

    2009-01-01

    This article is an annotated selection of the most important and informative Internet resources for learning about quantum computing, finding quantum computing literature, and tracking quantum computing news.

  17. Quantum Computation and Information From Theory to Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Imai, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    Recently, the field of quantum computation and information has been developing through a fusion of results from various research fields in theoretical and practical areas. This book consists of the reviews of selected topics charterized by great progress and cover the field from theoretical areas to experimental ones. It contains fundamental areas, quantum query complexity, quantum statistical inference, quantum cloning, quantum entanglement, additivity. It treats three types of quantum security system, quantum public key cryptography, quantum key distribution, and quantum steganography. A photonic system is highlighted for the realization of quantum information processing.

  18. Quantum computation with nuclear spins in quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ, H.

    2008-01-24

    The role of nuclear spins for quantum information processing in quantum dots is theoretically investigated in this thesis. Building on the established fact that the most strongly coupled environment for the potential electron spin quantum bit are the surrounding lattice nuclear spins interacting via the hyperfine interaction, we turn this vice into a virtue by designing schemes for harnessing this strong coupling. In this perspective, the ensemble of nuclear spins can be considered an asset, suitable for an active role in quantum information processing due to its intrinsic long coherence times. We present experimentally feasible protocols for the polarization, i.e. initialization, of the nuclear spins and a quantitative solution to our derived master equation. The polarization limiting destructive interference effects, caused by the collective nature of the nuclear coupling to the electron spin, are studied in detail. Efficient ways of mitigating these constraints are presented, demonstrating that highly polarized nuclear ensembles in quantum dots are feasible. At high, but not perfect, polarization of the nuclei the evolution of an electron spin in contact with the spin bath can be efficiently studied by means of a truncation of the Hilbert space. It is shown that the electron spin can function as a mediator of universal quantum gates for collective nuclear spin qubits, yielding a promising architecture for quantum information processing. Furthermore, we show that at high polarization the hyperfine interaction of electron and nuclear spins resembles the celebrated Jaynes-Cummings model of quantum optics. This result opens the door for transfer of knowledge from the mature field of quantum computation with atoms and photons. Additionally, tailored specifically for the quantum dot environment, we propose a novel scheme for the generation of highly squeezed collective nuclear states. Finally we demonstrate that even an unprepared completely mixed nuclear spin

  19. Quantum computation with nuclear spins in quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of nuclear spins for quantum information processing in quantum dots is theoretically investigated in this thesis. Building on the established fact that the most strongly coupled environment for the potential electron spin quantum bit are the surrounding lattice nuclear spins interacting via the hyperfine interaction, we turn this vice into a virtue by designing schemes for harnessing this strong coupling. In this perspective, the ensemble of nuclear spins can be considered an asset, suitable for an active role in quantum information processing due to its intrinsic long coherence times. We present experimentally feasible protocols for the polarization, i.e. initialization, of the nuclear spins and a quantitative solution to our derived master equation. The polarization limiting destructive interference effects, caused by the collective nature of the nuclear coupling to the electron spin, are studied in detail. Efficient ways of mitigating these constraints are presented, demonstrating that highly polarized nuclear ensembles in quantum dots are feasible. At high, but not perfect, polarization of the nuclei the evolution of an electron spin in contact with the spin bath can be efficiently studied by means of a truncation of the Hilbert space. It is shown that the electron spin can function as a mediator of universal quantum gates for collective nuclear spin qubits, yielding a promising architecture for quantum information processing. Furthermore, we show that at high polarization the hyperfine interaction of electron and nuclear spins resembles the celebrated Jaynes-Cummings model of quantum optics. This result opens the door for transfer of knowledge from the mature field of quantum computation with atoms and photons. Additionally, tailored specifically for the quantum dot environment, we propose a novel scheme for the generation of highly squeezed collective nuclear states. Finally we demonstrate that even an unprepared completely mixed nuclear spin

  20. Adiabatic transport of qubits around a black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Viennot, David

    2016-01-01

    We consider localized qubits evolving around a black hole following a quantum adiabatic dynamics. We develop a geometric structure (based on fibre bundles) permitting to describe the quantum states of a qubit and the spacetime geometry in a single framework. The quantum decoherence induced by the black hole on the qubit is analysed in this framework (the role of the dynamical and geometric phases in this decoherence is treated), especially for the quantum teleportation protocol when one qubit falls to the event horizon. A simple formula to compute the fidelity of the teleportation is derived. The case of a Schwarzschild black hole is analysed.

  1. QCWAVE, a Mathematica quantum computer simulation update

    CERN Document Server

    Tabakin, Frank

    2011-01-01

    This Mathematica 7.0/8.0 package upgrades and extends the quantum computer simulation code called QDENSITY. Use of the density matrix was emphasized in QDENSITY, although that code was also applicable to a quantum state description. In the present version, the quantum state version is stressed and made amenable to future extensions to parallel computer simulations. The add-on QCWAVE extends QDENSITY in several ways. The first way is to describe the action of one, two and three- qubit quantum gates as a set of small ($2 \\times 2, 4\\times 4$ or $8\\times 8$) matrices acting on the $2^{n_q}$ amplitudes for a system of $n_q$ qubits. This procedure was described in our parallel computer simulation QCMPI and is reviewed here. The advantage is that smaller storage demands are made, without loss of speed, and that the procedure can take advantage of message passing interface (MPI) techniques, which will hopefully be generally available in future Mathematica versions. Another extension of QDENSITY provided here is a mu...

  2. Classical simulation of restricted quantum computations

    OpenAIRE

    Nebhwani, Mrityunjaya

    2013-01-01

    Treball final de màster oficial fet en col·laboració amb Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), Universitat de Barcelona (UB) i Institut de Ciències Fotòniques (ICFO) [ANGLÈS] We study restricted models of measurement-based quantum computation; and we investigate whether their output probability distributions can be sampled from efficiently on a classical computer. We find that even for non-adaptive models of MBQC, if this task were feasible then a major conjecture of computational compl...

  3. Deterministic quantum computation with one photonic qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hor-Meyll, M.; Tasca, D. S.; Walborn, S. P.; Ribeiro, P. H. Souto; Santos, M. M.; Duzzioni, E. I.

    2015-07-01

    We show that deterministic quantum computing with one qubit (DQC1) can be experimentally implemented with a spatial light modulator, using the polarization and the transverse spatial degrees of freedom of light. The scheme allows the computation of the trace of a high-dimension matrix, being limited by the resolution of the modulator panel and the technical imperfections. In order to illustrate the method, we compute the normalized trace of unitary matrices and implement the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm. The largest matrix that can be manipulated with our setup is 1080 ×1920 , which is able to represent a system with approximately 21 qubits.

  4. Quantum Computers: A New Paradigm in Information Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh S. Raisinghani

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The word 'quantum' comes from the Latin word quantus meaning 'how much'. Quantum computing is a fundamentally new mode of information processing that can be performed only by harnessing physical phenomena unique to quantum mechanics (especially quantum interference. Paul Benioff of the Argonne National Laboratory first applied quantum theory to computers in 1981 and David Deutsch of Oxford proposed quantum parallel computers in 1985, years before the realization of qubits in 1995. However, it may be well into the 21st century before we see quantum computing used at a commercial level for a variety of reasons discussed in this paper. The subject of quantum computing brings together ideas from classical information theory, computer science, and quantum physics. This paper discusses some of the current advances, applications, and chal-lenges of quantum computing as well as its impact on corporate computing and implications for management. It shows how quantum computing can be utilized to process and store information, as well as impact cryptography for perfectly secure communication, algorithmic searching, factorizing large numbers very rapidly, and simulating quantum-mechanical systems efficiently. A broad interdisciplinary effort will be needed if quantum com-puters are to fulfill their destiny as the world's fastest computing devices.

  5. A repeat-until-success quantum computing scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beige, A [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Lim, Y L [DSO National Laboratories, 20 Science Park Drive, Singapore 118230, Singapore (Singapore); Kwek, L C [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542, Singapore (Singapore)

    2007-06-15

    Recently we proposed a hybrid architecture for quantum computing based on stationary and flying qubits: the repeat-until-success (RUS) quantum computing scheme. The scheme is largely implementation independent. Despite the incompleteness theorem for optical Bell-state measurements in any linear optics set-up, it allows for the implementation of a deterministic entangling gate between distant qubits. Here we review this distributed quantum computation scheme, which is ideally suited for integrated quantum computation and communication purposes.

  6. Solving Random Satisfiability Problems with Quantum Computers

    CERN Document Server

    Hogg, T

    2001-01-01

    Quantum computer algorithms can exploit the structure of random satisfiability problems. This paper extends a previous empirical evaluation of such an algorithm and gives an approximate asymptotic analysis accounting for both the average and variation of amplitudes among search states with the same costs. The analysis predicts good performance, on average, for a variety of problems including those near a phase transition associated with a high concentration of hard cases. Based on empirical evaluation for small problems, modifying the algorithm in light of this analysis improves its performance. The algorithm improves on both GSAT, a commonly used conventional heuristic, and quantum algorithms ignoring problem structure.

  7. Mathematical optics classical, quantum, and computational methods

    CERN Document Server

    Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2012-01-01

    Going beyond standard introductory texts, Mathematical Optics: Classical, Quantum, and Computational Methods brings together many new mathematical techniques from optical science and engineering research. Profusely illustrated, the book makes the material accessible to students and newcomers to the field. Divided into six parts, the text presents state-of-the-art mathematical methods and applications in classical optics, quantum optics, and image processing. Part I describes the use of phase space concepts to characterize optical beams and the application of dynamic programming in optical wave

  8. Solid State Quantum Computing Using Spectral Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Shahriar, M. S.; Hemmer, P. R.; Lloyd, S.; Bowers, J. A.; Craig, A. E.

    2000-01-01

    A quantum computer that stores information on two-state systems called quantum bits or qubits must be able to address and manipulate individual qubits, to effect coherent interactions between pairs of qubits, and to read out the value of qubits.1,2 Current methods for addressing qubits are divided up into spatial methods, as when a laser beam is focused on an individual qubit3,4,5 or spectral methods, as when a nuclear spin in a molecule is addressed using NMR.6,7 The density of qubits addres...

  9. Scheme for Quantum Computing Immune to Decoherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Colin; Vatan, Farrokh

    2008-01-01

    A constructive scheme has been devised to enable mapping of any quantum computation into a spintronic circuit in which the computation is encoded in a basis that is, in principle, immune to quantum decoherence. The scheme is implemented by an algorithm that utilizes multiple physical spins to encode each logical bit in such a way that collective errors affecting all the physical spins do not disturb the logical bit. The scheme is expected to be of use to experimenters working on spintronic implementations of quantum logic. Spintronic computing devices use quantum-mechanical spins (typically, electron spins) to encode logical bits. Bits thus encoded (denoted qubits) are potentially susceptible to errors caused by noise and decoherence. The traditional model of quantum computation is based partly on the assumption that each qubit is implemented by use of a single two-state quantum system, such as an electron or other spin-1.2 particle. It can be surprisingly difficult to achieve certain gate operations . most notably, those of arbitrary 1-qubit gates . in spintronic hardware according to this model. However, ironically, certain 2-qubit interactions (in particular, spin-spin exchange interactions) can be achieved relatively easily in spintronic hardware. Therefore, it would be fortunate if it were possible to implement any 1-qubit gate by use of a spin-spin exchange interaction. While such a direct representation is not possible, it is possible to achieve an arbitrary 1-qubit gate indirectly by means of a sequence of four spin-spin exchange interactions, which could be implemented by use of four exchange gates. Accordingly, the present scheme provides for mapping any 1-qubit gate in the logical basis into an equivalent sequence of at most four spin-spin exchange interactions in the physical (encoded) basis. The complexity of the mathematical derivation of the scheme from basic quantum principles precludes a description within this article; it must suffice to report

  10. Holographic computations of the Quantum Information Metric

    CERN Document Server

    Trivella, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    In this note we show how the Quantum Information Metric can be computed holographically using a perturbative approach. In particular when the deformation of the conformal field theory state is induced by a scalar operator the corresponding bulk configuration reduces to a scalar field perturbatively probing the unperturbed background. We study two concrete examples: a CFT ground state deformed by a primary operator and thermofield double state in $d=2$ deformed by a marginal operator. Finally, we generalize the bulk construction to the case of a multi dimensional parameter space and show that the Quantum Information Metric coincides with the metric of the non-linear sigma model for the corresponding scalar fields.

  11. Efficient quantum computing using coherent photon conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, N K; Ramelow, S; Prevedel, R; Munro, W J; Milburn, G J; Zeilinger, A

    2011-10-12

    Single photons are excellent quantum information carriers: they were used in the earliest demonstrations of entanglement and in the production of the highest-quality entanglement reported so far. However, current schemes for preparing, processing and measuring them are inefficient. For example, down-conversion provides heralded, but randomly timed, single photons, and linear optics gates are inherently probabilistic. Here we introduce a deterministic process--coherent photon conversion (CPC)--that provides a new way to generate and process complex, multiquanta states for photonic quantum information applications. The technique uses classically pumped nonlinearities to induce coherent oscillations between orthogonal states of multiple quantum excitations. One example of CPC, based on a pumped four-wave-mixing interaction, is shown to yield a single, versatile process that provides a full set of photonic quantum processing tools. This set satisfies the DiVincenzo criteria for a scalable quantum computing architecture, including deterministic multiqubit entanglement gates (based on a novel form of photon-photon interaction), high-quality heralded single- and multiphoton states free from higher-order imperfections, and robust, high-efficiency detection. It can also be used to produce heralded multiphoton entanglement, create optically switchable quantum circuits and implement an improved form of down-conversion with reduced higher-order effects. Such tools are valuable building blocks for many quantum-enabled technologies. Finally, using photonic crystal fibres we experimentally demonstrate quantum correlations arising from a four-colour nonlinear process suitable for CPC and use these measurements to study the feasibility of reaching the deterministic regime with current technology. Our scheme, which is based on interacting bosonic fields, is not restricted to optical systems but could also be implemented in optomechanical, electromechanical and superconducting

  12. Noise in Quantum and Classical Computation & Non-locality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unger, F.P.

    2008-01-01

    Quantum computers seem to have capabilities which go beyond those of classical computers. A particular example which is important for cryptography is that quantum computers are able to factor numbers much faster than what seems possible on classical machines. In order to actually build quantum comp

  13. Logic and algebraic structures in quantum computing

    CERN Document Server

    Eskandarian, Ali; Harizanov, Valentina S

    2016-01-01

    Arising from a special session held at the 2010 North American Annual Meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic, this volume is an international cross-disciplinary collaboration with contributions from leading experts exploring connections across their respective fields. Themes range from philosophical examination of the foundations of physics and quantum logic, to exploitations of the methods and structures of operator theory, category theory, and knot theory in an effort to gain insight into the fundamental questions in quantum theory and logic. The book will appeal to researchers and students working in related fields, including logicians, mathematicians, computer scientists, and physicists. A brief introduction provides essential background on quantum mechanics and category theory, which, together with a thematic selection of articles, may also serve as the basic material for a graduate course or seminar.

  14. Photonic entanglement as a resource in quantum computation and quantum communication

    OpenAIRE

    Prevedel, Robert; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Brukner, Caslav; Jennewein, Thomas; Zeilinger, Anton

    2008-01-01

    Entanglement is an essential resource in current experimental implementations for quantum information processing. We review a class of experiments exploiting photonic entanglement, ranging from one-way quantum computing over quantum communication complexity to long-distance quantum communication. We then propose a set of feasible experiments that will underline the advantages of photonic entanglement for quantum information processing.

  15. Photonic Quantum Computation with Waveguide-Linked Optical Cavities and Quantum Dots

    CERN Document Server

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Sato, Yoshiya; Noda, Susumu

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new scheme for solid-state photonic quantum computation in which trapped photons in optical cavities are taken as a quantum bit. Quantum gates can be realized by coupling the cavities with quantum dots through waveguides. The proposed scheme allows programmable and deterministic gate operations and the system can be scaled up to many quantum bits.

  16. Classical model for bulk-ensemble NMR quantum computation

    OpenAIRE

    Schack, R.; Caves, C. M.

    1999-01-01

    We present a classical model for bulk-ensemble NMR quantum computation: the quantum state of the NMR sample is described by a probability distribution over the orientations of classical tops, and quantum gates are described by classical transition probabilities. All NMR quantum computing experiments performed so far with three quantum bits can be accounted for in this classical model. After a few entangling gates, the classical model suffers an exponential decrease of the measured signal, whe...

  17. Q#, a quantum computation package for the .NET platform

    OpenAIRE

    A.S. Tolba; M. Z. Rashad; El-Dosuky, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Quantum computing is a promising approach of computation that is based on equations from Quantum Mechanics. A simulator for quantum algorithms must be capable of performing heavy mathematical matrix transforms. The design of the simulator itself takes one of three forms: Quantum Turing Machine, Network Model or circuit model of connected gates or, Quantum Programming Language, yet, some simulators are hybrid. We studied previous simulators and then we adopt features from three simulators of d...

  18. Solid State Quantum Computing Using Spectral Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Shahriar, M S; Lloyd, S; Bowers, J A; Craig, A E

    2002-01-01

    A quantum computer that stores information on two-state systems called quantum bits or qubits must be able to address and manipulate individual qubits, to effect coherent interactions between pairs of qubits, and to read out the value of qubits.1,2 Current methods for addressing qubits are divided up into spatial methods, as when a laser beam is focused on an individual qubit3,4,5 or spectral methods, as when a nuclear spin in a molecule is addressed using NMR.6,7 The density of qubits addressable spatially is limited by the wavelength of light, and the number of qubits addressable spectrally is limited by spin linewidths. Here, we propose a method for addressing qubits using a method that combines spatial and spectral selectivity. The result is a design for quantum computation that provides the potential for a density of quantum information storage and processing many orders of magnitude greater than that afforded by ion traps or NMR. Specifically, this method uses an ensemble of spectrally resolved atoms in...

  19. Advice Coins for Classical and Quantum Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Aaronson, Scott

    2011-01-01

    We study the power of classical and quantum algorithms equipped with nonuniform advice, in the form of a coin whose bias encodes useful information. This question takes on particular importance in the quantum case, due to a surprising result that we prove: a quantum finite automaton with just two states can be sensitive to arbitrarily small changes in a coin's bias. This contrasts with classical probabilistic finite automata, whose sensitivity to changes in a coin's bias is bounded by a classic 1970 result of Hellman and Cover. Despite this finding, we are able to bound the power of advice coins for space-bounded classical and quantum computation. We define the classes BPPSPACE/coin and BQPSPACE/coin, of languages decidable by classical and quantum polynomial-space machines with advice coins. Our main theorem is that both classes coincide with PSPACE/poly. Proving this result turns out to require substantial machinery. We use an algorithm due to Neff for finding roots of polynomials in NC; a result from algeb...

  20. A Rosetta Stone for Quantum Mechanics with an Introduction to Quantum Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Lomonaco, S J

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of these lecture notes is to provide readers, who have some mathematical background but little or no exposure to quantum mechanics and quantum computation, with enough material to begin reading the research literature in quantum computation and quantum information theory. This paper is a written version of the first of eight one hour lectures given in the American Mathematical Society (AMS) Short Course on Quantum Computation held in conjunction with the Annual Meeting of the AMS in Washington, DC, USA in January 2000, and will appear in the AMS PSAPM volume entitled "Quantum Computation." Part 1 of the paper is an introduction the to the concept of the qubit. Part 2 gives an introduction to quantum mechanics covering such topics as Dirac notation, quantum measurement, Heisenberg uncertainty, Schrodinger's equation, density operators, partial trace, multipartite quantum systems, the Heisenberg versus the Schrodinger picture, quantum entanglement, EPR paradox, quantum entropy. Part 3 gives a brief ...

  1. Strange attractor simulated on a quantum computer

    CERN Document Server

    Terraneo, M; Shepelyansky, D L

    2003-01-01

    Starting from the work of Lorenz, it has been realized that the dynamics of many various dissipative systems converges to so-called strange attractors. These objects are characterized by fractal dimensions and chaotic unstable dynamics of individual trajectories. They appear in nature in very different contexts, including applications to turbulence and weather forecast, molecular dynamics, chaotic chemical reactions, multimode solid state lasers and complex dynamics in ecological systems and physiology. The efficient numerical simulation of such dissipative systems can therefore lead to many important practical applications. Here we study a simple deterministic model where dynamics converges to a strange attractor, and show that it can be efficiently simulated on a quantum computer. Even if the dynamics on the attractor is unstable, dissipative and irreversible, a realistic quantum computer can simulate it in a reversible way, and, already with 70 qubits, will provide access to new informations unaccessible f...

  2. Universal quantum gates for Single Cooper Pair Box based quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echternach, P.; Williams, C. P.; Dultz, S. C.; Braunstein, S.; Dowling, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a method for achieving arbitrary 1-qubit gates and controlled-NOT gates within the context of the Single Cooper Pair Box (SCB) approach to quantum computing. Such gates are sufficient to support universal quantum computation.

  3. Non-unitary probabilistic quantum computing circuit and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Colin P. (Inventor); Gingrich, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A quantum circuit performing quantum computation in a quantum computer. A chosen transformation of an initial n-qubit state is probabilistically obtained. The circuit comprises a unitary quantum operator obtained from a non-unitary quantum operator, operating on an n-qubit state and an ancilla state. When operation on the ancilla state provides a success condition, computation is stopped. When operation on the ancilla state provides a failure condition, computation is performed again on the ancilla state and the n-qubit state obtained in the previous computation, until a success condition is obtained.

  4. Brain-Computer Interfaces and Quantum Robots

    OpenAIRE

    Pessa, Eliano; Zizzi, Paola

    2009-01-01

    The actual (classical) Brain-Computer Interface attempts to use brain signals to drive suitable actuators performing the actions corresponding to subject's intention. However this goal is not fully reached, and when BCI works, it does only in particular situations. The reason of this unsatisfactory result is that intention cannot be conceived simply as a set of classical input-output relationships. It is therefore necessary to resort to quantum theory, allowing the occurrence of stable cohere...

  5. Nuclear spin quantum computing with trapped ions

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Kunling; Feng, Mang; Mintert, Florian; Wunderlich, Christof

    2011-01-01

    Quantum computing with qubits encoded in nuclear spins of trapped ions is studied with particular attention to the Yb$^+$ ion. For this purpose we consider the Paschen-Back regime (strong magnetic field) and employ a high-field approximation in this treatment. An efficient scheme is proposed to carry out gate operations on an array of trapped ions, and the feasibility of generating the required high magnetic field is discussed.

  6. PREFACE: Quantum Information, Communication, Computation and Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, F.; Fannes, M.; Floreanini, R.; Petritis, D.

    2007-07-01

    The application of quantum mechanics to information related fields such as communication, computation and cryptography is a fast growing line of research that has been witnessing an outburst of theoretical and experimental results, with possible practical applications. On the one hand, quantum cryptography with its impact on secrecy of transmission is having its first important actual implementations; on the other hand, the recent advances in quantum optics, ion trapping, BEC manipulation, spin and quantum dot technologies allow us to put to direct test a great deal of theoretical ideas and results. These achievements have stimulated a reborn interest in various aspects of quantum mechanics, creating a unique interplay between physics, both theoretical and experimental, mathematics, information theory and computer science. In view of all these developments, it appeared timely to organize a meeting where graduate students and young researchers could be exposed to the fundamentals of the theory, while senior experts could exchange their latest results. The activity was structured as a school followed by a workshop, and took place at The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) and The International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste, Italy, from 12-23 June 2006. The meeting was part of the activity of the Joint European Master Curriculum Development Programme in Quantum Information, Communication, Cryptography and Computation, involving the Universities of Cergy-Pontoise (France), Chania (Greece), Leuven (Belgium), Rennes1 (France) and Trieste (Italy). This special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical collects 22 contributions from well known experts who took part in the workshop. They summarize the present day status of the research in the manifold aspects of quantum information. The issue is opened by two review articles, the first by G Adesso and F Illuminati discussing entanglement in continuous variable

  7. A Geometric Algebra Perspective On Quantum Computational Gates And Universality In Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Cafaro, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the utility of geometric (Clifford) algebras (GA) methods in two specific applications to quantum information science. First, using the multiparticle spacetime algebra (MSTA, the geometric algebra of a relativistic configuration space), we present an explicit algebraic description of one and two-qubit quantum states together with a MSTA characterization of one and two-qubit quantum computational gates. Second, using the above mentioned characterization and the GA description of the Lie algebras SO(3) and SU(2) based on the rotor group Spin+(3, 0) formalism, we reexamine Boykin's proof of universality of quantum gates. We conclude that the MSTA approach does lead to a useful conceptual unification where the complex qubit space and the complex space of unitary operators acting on them become united, with both being made just by multivectors in real space. Finally, the GA approach to rotations based on the rotor group does bring conceptual and computational advantages compared to standard vectoria...

  8. Interactive Quantum Mechanics Quantum Experiments on the Computer

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, S; Dahmen, H.D

    2011-01-01

    Extra Materials available on extras.springer.com INTERACTIVE QUANTUM MECHANICS allows students to perform their own quantum-physics experiments on their computer, in vivid 3D color graphics. Topics covered include: •        harmonic waves and wave packets, •        free particles as well as bound states and scattering in various potentials in one and three dimensions (both stationary and time dependent), •        two-particle systems, coupled harmonic oscillators, •        distinguishable and indistinguishable particles, •        coherent and squeezed states in time-dependent motion, •        quantized angular momentum, •        spin and magnetic resonance, •        hybridization. For the present edition the physics scope has been widened appreciably. Moreover, INTERQUANTA can now produce user-defined movies of quantum-mechanical situations. Movies can be viewed directly and also be saved to be shown later in any browser. Sections on spec...

  9. Invalidity of the quantitative adiabatic condition and general conditions for adiabatic approximations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dafa

    2016-05-01

    The adiabatic theorem was proposed about 90 years ago and has played an important role in quantum physics. The quantitative adiabatic condition constructed from eigenstates and eigenvalues of a Hamiltonian is a traditional tool to estimate adiabaticity and has proven to be the necessary and sufficient condition for adiabaticity. However, recently the condition has become a controversial subject. In this paper, we list some expressions to estimate the validity of the adiabatic approximation. We show that the quantitative adiabatic condition is invalid for the adiabatic approximation via the Euclidean distance between the adiabatic state and the evolution state. Furthermore, we deduce general necessary and sufficient conditions for the validity of the adiabatic approximation by different definitions.

  10. Applicability of Rydberg atoms to quantum computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabtsev, Igor I.; Tretyakov, Denis B.; Beterov, Ilya I.

    2005-01-01

    The applicability of Rydberg atoms to quantum computers is examined from an experimental point of view. In many recent theoretical proposals, the excitation of atoms into highly excited Rydberg states was considered as a way to achieve quantum entanglement in cold atomic ensembles via dipole-dipole interactions that could be strong for Rydberg atoms. Appropriate conditions to realize a conditional quantum phase gate have been analysed. We also present the results of modelling experiments on microwave spectroscopy of single- and multi-atom excitations at the one-photon 37S1/2 → 37P1/2 and two-photon 37S1/2 → 38S1/2 transitions in an ensemble of a few sodium Rydberg atoms. The microwave spectra were investigated for various final states of the ensemble initially prepared in its ground state. The results may be applied to the studies on collective laser excitation of ground-state atoms aiming to realize quantum gates.

  11. Software Systems for High-performance Quantum Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humble, Travis S [ORNL; Britt, Keith A [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Quantum computing promises new opportunities for solving hard computational problems, but harnessing this novelty requires breakthrough concepts in the design, operation, and application of computing systems. We define some of the challenges facing the development of quantum computing systems as well as software-based approaches that can be used to overcome these challenges. Following a brief overview of the state of the art, we present models for the quantum programming and execution models, the development of architectures for hybrid high-performance computing systems, and the realization of software stacks for quantum networking. This leads to a discussion of the role that conventional computing plays in the quantum paradigm and how some of the current challenges for exascale computing overlap with those facing quantum computing.

  12. Towards A Novel Environment For Simulation Of Quantum Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Patrzyk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze existing quantum computer simulation techniquesand their realizations to minimize the impact of the exponentialcomplexity of simulated quantum computations. As a result of thisinvestigation, we propose a quantum computer simulator with an integrateddevelopment environment - QuIDE - supporting development of algorithms forfuture quantum computers. The simulator simplifies building and testingquantum circuits and understand quantum algorithms in an efficient way.The development environment provides  flexibility of source codeedition and ease of graphical building of circuit diagrams.  We alsodescribe and analyze the complexity of algorithms used for simulationand present performance results of the simulator as well as results ofits deployment during university classes.

  13. Non-adiabatic generation of NOON states in a Tonks-Girardeau gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, James; Benseny, Albert; Gillet, Jérémie; Swain, Jacob; Busch, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Adiabatic techniques can be used to control quantum states with high fidelity while exercising limited control over the parameters of a system. However, because these techniques are slow compared to other timescales in the system, they are usually not suitable for creating highly unstable states or performing time-critical processes. Both of these situations arise in quantum information processing, where entangled states may be isolated from the environment only for a short time and where quantum computers require high-fidelity operations to be performed quickly. Recently it has been shown that techniques like optimal control and shortcuts to adiabaticity can be used to prepare quantum states non-adiabatically with high fidelity. Here we present two examples of how these techniques can be used to create maximally entangled many-body NOON states in one-dimensional Tonks-Girardeau gases. Dedicated to the memory of Marvin D Girardeau.

  14. Review on the study of entanglement in quantum computation speedup

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING ShengChao; JIN Zhi

    2007-01-01

    The role the quantum entanglement plays in quantum computation speedup has been widely disputed.Some believe that quantum computation's speedup over classical computation is impossible if entanglement is absent, while others claim that the presence of entanglement is not a necessary condition for some quantum algorithms.This paper discusses this problem systematically.Simulating quantum computation with classical resources is analyzed and entanglement in known algorithms is reviewed.It is concluded that the presence of entanglement is a necessary but not sufficient condition in the pure state or pseudo-pure state quantum computation speedup.The case with the mixed state remains open.Further work on quantum computation will benefit from the presented results.

  15. Multiple-server Flexible Blind Quantum Computation in Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiaoqin; Li, Qin; Wu, Chunhui; Yu, Fang; He, Jinjun; Sun, Zhiyuan

    2016-06-01

    Blind quantum computation (BQC) can allow a client with limited quantum power to delegate his quantum computation to a powerful server and still keep his own data private. In this paper, we present a multiple-server flexible BQC protocol, where a client who only needs the ability of accessing qua ntum channels can delegate the computational task to a number of servers. Especially, the client's quantum computation also can be achieved even when one or more delegated quantum servers break down in networks. In other words, when connections to certain quantum servers are lost, clients can adjust flexibly and delegate their quantum computation to other servers. Obviously it is trivial that the computation will be unsuccessful if all servers are interrupted.

  16. Computational quantum-classical boundary of complex and noisy quantum systems

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2014-01-01

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on...

  17. Computational costs of data definition at the quantum - classical interface

    OpenAIRE

    Fields, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Model-independent semantic requirements for user specification and interpretation of data before and after quantum computations are characterized. Classical computational costs of assigning classical data values to quantum registers and to run-time parameters passed across a classical-to-quantum application programming interface are derived. It is shown that the classical computational costs of data definition equal or exceed the classical computational cost of solving the problem of interest...

  18. Globally controlled artificial semiconducting molecules as quantum computers

    OpenAIRE

    Tribollet, Jerome

    2005-01-01

    Quantum computers are expected to be considerably more efficient than classical computers for the execution of some specific tasks. The difficulty in the practical implementation of thoose computers is to build a microscopic quantum system that can be controlled at a larger mesoscopic scale. Here I show that vertical lines of donor atoms embedded in an appropriate Zinc Oxide semiconductor structure can constitute artificial molecules that are as many copy of the same quantum computer. In this...

  19. Milestones Toward Majorana-Based Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasen, David; Hell, Michael; Mishmash, Ryan V.; Higginbotham, Andrew; Danon, Jeroen; Leijnse, Martin; Jespersen, Thomas S.; Folk, Joshua A.; Marcus, Charles M.; Flensberg, Karsten; Alicea, Jason

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a scheme for preparation, manipulation, and read out of Majorana zero modes in semiconducting wires with mesoscopic superconducting islands. Our approach synthesizes recent advances in materials growth with tools commonly used in quantum-dot experiments, including gate control of tunnel barriers and Coulomb effects, charge sensing, and charge pumping. We outline a sequence of milestones interpolating between zero-mode detection and quantum computing that includes (1) detection of fusion rules for non-Abelian anyons using either proximal charge sensors or pumped current, (2) validation of a prototype topological qubit, and (3) demonstration of non-Abelian statistics by braiding in a branched geometry. The first two milestones require only a single wire with two islands, and additionally enable sensitive measurements of the system's excitation gap, quasiparticle poisoning rates, residual Majorana zero-mode splittings, and topological-qubit coherence times. These pre-braiding experiments can be adapted to other manipulation and read out schemes as well.

  20. Computing the Exit Complexity of Knowledge in Distributed Quantum Computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Distributed Quantum computers abide from the exit complexity of the knowledge. The exit complexity is the accrue of the nodal information needed to clarify the total egress system with deference to a distinguished exit node. The core objective of this paper is to compile an arrogant methodology for assessing the exit complexity of the knowledge in distributed quantum computers. The proposed methodology is based on contouring the knowledge using the unlabeled binary trees, hence building an benchmarked and a computer based model. The proposed methodology dramatizes knowledge autocratically calculates the exit complexity. The methodology consists of several amphitheaters, starting with detecting the baron aspect of the tree of others entitled express knowledge and then measure the volume of information and the complexity of behavior destining from the bargain of information. Then calculate egress resulting from episodes that do not lead to the withdrawal of the information. In the end is calculated total egress complexity and then appraised total exit complexity of the system. Given the complexity of the operations within the Distributed Computing Quantity, this research addresses effective transactions that could affect the three-dimensional behavior of knowledge. The results materialized that the best affair where total exit complexity as minimal as possible is a picture of a binary tree is entitled at the rate of positive and negative cardinal points medium value. It could be argued that these cardinal points should not amass the upper bound apex or minimum.

  1. Semiquantum key distribution with secure delegated quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Chan, Wai Hong; Zhang, Shengyu

    2016-01-01

    Semiquantum key distribution allows a quantum party to share a random key with a “classical” party who only can prepare and measure qubits in the computational basis or reorder some qubits when he has access to a quantum channel. In this work, we present a protocol where a secret key can be established between a quantum user and an almost classical user who only needs the quantum ability to access quantum channels, by securely delegating quantum computation to a quantum server. We show the proposed protocol is robust even when the delegated quantum server is a powerful adversary, and is experimentally feasible with current technology. As one party of our protocol is the most quantum-resource efficient, it can be more practical and significantly widen the applicability scope of quantum key distribution.

  2. One-way quantum computing in the optical frequency comb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menicucci, Nicolas C; Flammia, Steven T; Pfister, Olivier

    2008-09-26

    One-way quantum computing allows any quantum algorithm to be implemented easily using just measurements. The difficult part is creating the universal resource, a cluster state, on which the measurements are made. We propose a scalable method that uses a single, multimode optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The method is very efficient and generates a continuous-variable cluster state, universal for quantum computation, with quantum information encoded in the quadratures of the optical frequency comb of the OPO.

  3. Extending scientific computing system with structural quantum programming capabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Gawron, P.; Klamka, J.; Miszczak, J. A.; Winiarczyk, R.

    2010-01-01

    We present a basic high-level structures used for developing quantum programming languages. The presented structures are commonly used in many existing quantum programming languages and we use quantum pseudo-code based on QCL quantum programming language to describe them. We also present the implementation of introduced structures in GNU Octave language for scientific computing. Procedures used in the implementation are available as a package quantum-octave, providing a library of functions, ...

  4. The Quantum Socket: Three-Dimensional Wiring for Extensible Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Béjanin, J H; Rinehart, J R; Earnest, C T; McRae, C R H; Shiri, D; Bateman, J D; Rohanizadegan, Y; Penava, B; Breul, P; Royak, S; Zapatka, M; Fowler, A G; Mariantoni, M

    2016-01-01

    Quantum computing architectures are on the verge of scalability, a key requirement for the implementation of a universal quantum computer. The next stage in this quest is the realization of quantum error correction codes, which will mitigate the impact of faulty quantum information on a quantum computer. Architectures with ten or more quantum bits (qubits) have been realized using trapped ions and superconducting circuits. While these implementations are potentially scalable, true scalability will require systems engineering to combine quantum and classical hardware. One technology demanding imminent efforts is the realization of a suitable wiring method for the control and measurement of a large number of qubits. In this work, we introduce an interconnect solution for solid-state qubits: The quantum socket. The quantum socket fully exploits the third dimension to connect classical electronics to qubits with higher density and better performance than two-dimensional methods based on wire bonding. The quantum ...

  5. Reversible logic synthesis methodologies with application to quantum computing

    CERN Document Server

    Taha, Saleem Mohammed Ridha

    2016-01-01

    This book opens the door to a new interesting and ambitious world of reversible and quantum computing research. It presents the state of the art required to travel around that world safely. Top world universities, companies and government institutions  are in a race of developing new methodologies, algorithms and circuits on reversible logic, quantum logic, reversible and quantum computing and nano-technologies. In this book, twelve reversible logic synthesis methodologies are presented for the first time in a single literature with some new proposals. Also, the sequential reversible logic circuitries are discussed for the first time in a book. Reversible logic plays an important role in quantum computing. Any progress in the domain of reversible logic can be directly applied to quantum logic. One of the goals of this book is to show the application of reversible logic in quantum computing. A new implementation of wavelet and multiwavelet transforms using quantum computing is performed for this purpose. Rese...

  6. Measurement-only verifiable blind quantum computing with quantum input verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2016-10-01

    Verifiable blind quantum computing is a secure delegated quantum computing where a client with a limited quantum technology delegates her quantum computing to a server who has a universal quantum computer. The client's privacy is protected (blindness), and the correctness of the computation is verifiable by the client despite her limited quantum technology (verifiability). There are mainly two types of protocols for verifiable blind quantum computing: the protocol where the client has only to generate single-qubit states and the protocol where the client needs only the ability of single-qubit measurements. The latter is called the measurement-only verifiable blind quantum computing. If the input of the client's quantum computing is a quantum state, whose classical efficient description is not known to the client, there was no way for the measurement-only client to verify the correctness of the input. Here we introduce a protocol of measurement-only verifiable blind quantum computing where the correctness of the quantum input is also verifiable.

  7. Quantum-statistical equation-of-state models of dense plasmas: high-pressure Hugoniot shock adiabats

    CERN Document Server

    Pain, Jean-Christophe

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed comparison of two self-consistent equation-of-state models which differ from their electronic contribution: the atom in a spherical cell and the atom in a jellium of charges. It is shown that both models are well suited for the calculation of Hugoniot shock adiabats in the high pressure range (1 Mbar-10 Gbar), and that the atom-in-a-jellium model provides a better treatment of pressure ionization. Comparisons with experimental data are also presented. Shell effects on shock adiabats are reviewed in the light of these models. They lead to additional features not only in the variations of pressure versus density, but also in the variations of shock velocity versus particle velocity. Moreover, such effects are found to be responsible for enhancement of the electronic specific heat.

  8. Quantum Computing, $NP$-complete Problems and Chaotic Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ohya, M; Ohya, Masanori; Volovich, Igor V.

    1999-01-01

    An approach to the solution of NP-complete problems based on quantumcomputing and chaotic dynamics is proposed. We consider the satisfiabilityproblem and argue that the problem, in principle, can be solved in polynomialtime if we combine the quantum computer with the chaotic dynamics amplifierbased on the logistic map. We discuss a possible implementation of such achaotic quantum computation by using the atomic quantum computer with quantumgates described by the Hartree-Fock equations. In this case, in principle, onecan build not only standard linear quantum gates but also nonlinear gates andmoreover they obey to Fermi statistics. This new type of entaglement relatedwith Fermi statistics can be interesting also for quantum communication theory.

  9. Quantum Computation: Particle and Wave Aspects of Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Apoorva

    2011-01-01

    The driving force in the pursuit for quantum computation is the exciting possibility that quantum algorithms can be more efficient than their classical analogues. Research on the subject has unraveled several aspects of how that can happen. Clever quantum algorithms have been discovered in recent years, although not systematically, and the field remains under active investigation. Richard Feynman was one of the pioneers who foresaw the power of quantum computers. In this issue dedicated to him, I give an introduction to how particle and wave aspects contribute to the power of quantum computers. Shor's and Grover's algorithms are analysed as examples.

  10. Lecture Script: Introduction to Computational Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Schmied, Roman

    2014-01-01

    This document is the lecture script of a one-semester course taught at the University of Basel in the Fall semesters of 2012 and 2013. It is aimed at advanced students of physics who are familiar with the concepts and notations of quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanics lectures can often be separated into two classes. In the first class you get to know Schroedinger's equation and find the form and dynamics of simple physical systems (square well, harmonic oscillator, hydrogen atom); most calculations are analytic and inspired by calculations originally done in the 1920s and 1930s. In the second class you learn about large systems such as molecular structures, crystalline solids, or lattice models; these calculations are usually so complicated that it is difficult for the student to understand them in all detail. This lecture tries to bridge the gap between simple analytic calculations and complicated large-scale computations. We will revisit most of the problems encountered in introductory quantum mechanics, fo...

  11. Quantum computing accelerator I/O : LDRD 52750 final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Modine, Normand Arthur; Ganti, Anand; Pierson, Lyndon George; Tigges, Christopher P.

    2003-12-01

    In a superposition of quantum states, a bit can be in both the states '0' and '1' at the same time. This feature of the quantum bit or qubit has no parallel in classical systems. Currently, quantum computers consisting of 4 to 7 qubits in a 'quantum computing register' have been built. Innovative algorithms suited to quantum computing are now beginning to emerge, applicable to sorting and cryptanalysis, and other applications. A framework for overcoming slightly inaccurate quantum gate interactions and for causing quantum states to survive interactions with surrounding environment is emerging, called quantum error correction. Thus there is the potential for rapid advances in this field. Although quantum information processing can be applied to secure communication links (quantum cryptography) and to crack conventional cryptosystems, the first few computing applications will likely involve a 'quantum computing accelerator' similar to a 'floating point arithmetic accelerator' interfaced to a conventional Von Neumann computer architecture. This research is to develop a roadmap for applying Sandia's capabilities to the solution of some of the problems associated with maintaining quantum information, and with getting data into and out of such a 'quantum computing accelerator'. We propose to focus this work on 'quantum I/O technologies' by applying quantum optics on semiconductor nanostructures to leverage Sandia's expertise in semiconductor microelectronic/photonic fabrication techniques, as well as its expertise in information theory, processing, and algorithms. The work will be guided by understanding of practical requirements of computing and communication architectures. This effort will incorporate ongoing collaboration between 9000, 6000 and 1000 and between junior and senior personnel. Follow-on work to fabricate and evaluate appropriate experimental nano/microstructures will be

  12. From Transistor to Trapped-ion Computers for Quantum Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    M.-H. Yung; Casanova, J.; A. Mezzacapo; McClean, J.; Lamata, L.; Aspuru-Guzik, A.; Solano, E.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, quantum chemistry has progressed through the development of computational methods based on modern digital computers. However, these methods can hardly fulfill the exponentially-growing resource requirements when applied to large quantum systems. As pointed out by Feynman, this restriction is intrinsic to all computational models based on classical physics. Recently, the rapid advancement of trapped-ion technologies has opened new possibilities for quantum control...

  13. Topological quantum computing with only one mobile quasiparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, S H; Bonesteel, N E; Freedman, M H; Petrovic, N; Hormozi, L

    2006-02-24

    In a topological quantum computer, universal quantum computation is performed by dragging quasiparticle excitations of certain two dimensional systems around each other to form braids of their world lines in 2 + 1 dimensional space-time. In this Letter we show that any such quantum computation that can be done by braiding n identical quasiparticles can also be done by moving a single quasiparticle around n - 1 other identical quasiparticles whose positions remain fixed.

  14. Control aspects of quantum computing using pure and mixed states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte-Herbrüggen, Thomas; Marx, Raimund; Fahmy, Amr; Kauffman, Louis; Lomonaco, Samuel; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J

    2012-10-13

    Steering quantum dynamics such that the target states solve classically hard problems is paramount to quantum simulation and computation. And beyond, quantum control is also essential to pave the way to quantum technologies. Here, important control techniques are reviewed and presented in a unified frame covering quantum computational gate synthesis and spectroscopic state transfer alike. We emphasize that it does not matter whether the quantum states of interest are pure or not. While pure states underly the design of quantum circuits, ensemble mixtures of quantum states can be exploited in a more recent class of algorithms: it is illustrated by characterizing the Jones polynomial in order to distinguish between different (classes of) knots. Further applications include Josephson elements, cavity grids, ion traps and nitrogen vacancy centres in scenarios of closed as well as open quantum systems.

  15. Semiclassical approximations for adiabatic slow-fast systems

    CERN Document Server

    Teufel, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    In this letter we give a systematic derivation and justification of the semiclassical model for the slow degrees of freedom in adiabatic slow-fast systems first found by Littlejohn and Flynn [5]. The classical Hamiltonian obtains a correction due to the variation of the adiabatic subspaces and the symplectic form is modified by the curvature of the Berry connection. We show that this classical system can be used to approximate quantum mechanical expectations and the time-evolution of operators also in sub-leading order in the combined adiabatic and semiclassical limit. In solid state physics the corresponding semiclassical description of Bloch electrons has led to substantial progress during the recent years, see [1]. Here, as an illustration, we show how to compute the Piezo-current arising from a slow deformation of a crystal in the presence of a constant magnetic field.

  16. Quantum Annealing and Computation: A Brief Documentary Note

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Asim

    2013-01-01

    Major breakthrough in quantum computation has recently been achieved using quantum annealing to develop analog quantum computers instead of gate based computers. After a short introduction to quantum computation, we retrace very briefly the history of these developments and discuss the Indian researches in this connection and provide some interesting documents (in the Figs.) obtained from a chosen set of high impact papers (and also some recent news etc. blogs appearing in the Internet). This note is also designed to supplement an earlier note by Bose (Science and Culture, 79, pp. 337-378, 2013).

  17. Computer science approach to quantum control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janzing, D.

    2006-07-01

    Whereas it is obvious that every computation process is a physical process it has hardly been recognized that many complex physical processes bear similarities to computation processes. This is in particular true for the control of physical systems on the nanoscopic level: usually the system can only be accessed via a rather limited set of elementary control operations and for many purposes only a concatenation of a large number of these basic operations will implement the desired process. This concatenation is in many cases quite similar to building complex programs from elementary steps and principles for designing algorithm may thus be a paradigm for designing control processes. For instance, one can decrease the temperature of one part of a molecule by transferring its heat to the remaining part where it is then dissipated to the environment. But the implementation of such a process involves a complex sequence of electromagnetic pulses. This work considers several hypothetical control processes on the nanoscopic level and show their analogy to computation processes. We show that measuring certain types of quantum observables is such a complex task that every instrument that is able to perform it would necessarily be an extremely powerful computer. Likewise, the implementation of a heat engine on the nanoscale requires to process the heat in a way that is similar to information processing and it can be shown that heat engines with maximal efficiency would be powerful computers, too. In the same way as problems in computer science can be classified by complexity classes we can also classify control problems according to their complexity. Moreover, we directly relate these complexity classes for control problems to the classes in computer science. Unifying notions of complexity in computer science and physics has therefore two aspects: on the one hand, computer science methods help to analyze the complexity of physical processes. On the other hand, reasonable

  18. Classical and quantum computing with C++ and Java simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Hardy, Y

    2001-01-01

    Classical and Quantum computing provides a self-contained, systematic and comprehensive introduction to all the subjects and techniques important in scientific computing. The style and presentation are readily accessible to undergraduates and graduates. A large number of examples, accompanied by complete C++ and Java code wherever possible, cover every topic. Features and benefits: - Comprehensive coverage of the theory with many examples - Topics in classical computing include boolean algebra, gates, circuits, latches, error detection and correction, neural networks, Turing machines, cryptography, genetic algorithms - For the first time, genetic expression programming is presented in a textbook - Topics in quantum computing include mathematical foundations, quantum algorithms, quantum information theory, hardware used in quantum computing This book serves as a textbook for courses in scientific computing and is also very suitable for self-study. Students, professionals and practitioners in computer...

  19. A Blueprint for a Topologically Fault-tolerant Quantum Computer

    CERN Document Server

    Bonderson, Parsa; Freedman, Michael; Nayak, Chetan

    2010-01-01

    The advancement of information processing into the realm of quantum mechanics promises a transcendence in computational power that will enable problems to be solved which are completely beyond the known abilities of any "classical" computer, including any potential non-quantum technologies the future may bring. However, the fragility of quantum states poses a challenging obstacle for realization of a fault-tolerant quantum computer. The topological approach to quantum computation proposes to surmount this obstacle by using special physical systems -- non-Abelian topologically ordered phases of matter -- that would provide intrinsic fault-tolerance at the hardware level. The so-called "Ising-type" non-Abelian topological order is likely to be physically realized in a number of systems, but it can only provide a universal gate set (a requisite for quantum computation) if one has the ability to perform certain dynamical topology-changing operations on the system. Until now, practical methods of implementing thes...

  20. Quantum Genetics in terms of Quantum Reversible Automata and Quantum Computation of Genetic Codes and Reverse Transcription

    CERN Document Server

    Baianu,I C

    2004-01-01

    The concepts of quantum automata and quantum computation are studied in the context of quantum genetics and genetic networks with nonlinear dynamics. In previous publications (Baianu,1971a, b) the formal concept of quantum automaton and quantum computation, respectively, were introduced and their possible implications for genetic processes and metabolic activities in living cells and organisms were considered. This was followed by a report on quantum and abstract, symbolic computation based on the theory of categories, functors and natural transformations (Baianu,1971b; 1977; 1987; 2004; Baianu et al, 2004). The notions of topological semigroup, quantum automaton, or quantum computer, were then suggested with a view to their potential applications to the analogous simulation of biological systems, and especially genetic activities and nonlinear dynamics in genetic networks. Further, detailed studies of nonlinear dynamics in genetic networks were carried out in categories of n-valued, Lukasiewicz Logic Algebra...

  1. Simply Explain the computation Ability of Quantum Computation%浅释量子计算的计算能力

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    匡春光

    2001-01-01

    Quantum computation is a new field of computer science. It is given attention to for its powerful computation ability. The paper explains the cause of its powerful computation ability by giving two typical quantum computation algorithms.

  2. Exploring the Quantum Speed Limit with Computer Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Jakob Winther Hedemann; Pedersen, Mads Kock; Munch, Michael Kulmback;

    2016-01-01

    in quantum physics. Quantum Moves aims to use human players to find solutions to a class of problems associated with quantum computing. Players discover novel solution strategies which numerical optimizations fail to find. Guided by player strategies, a new low-dimensional heuristic optimization method...

  3. Consequences and Limitations of Conventional Computers and their Solutions through Quantum Computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh BARDE

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Quantum computer is the current topic of research in the field of computational science, which uses principles of quantum mechanics. Quantum computers will be much more powerful than the classical computer due to its enormous computational speed. Recent developments in quantum computers which are based on the laws of quantum mechanics, shows different ways of performing efficient calculations along with the various results which are not possible on the classical computers in an efficient period of time. One of the most striking results that have obtained on the quantum computers is the prime factorization of the large integer in a polynomial time. The idea of involvement of the quantum mechanics for the computational purpose is outlined briefly in the present work that reflects the importance and advantages of the next generation of the 21st century classical computers, named as quantum computers, in terms of the cost as well as time period required for the computation purpose. Present paper presents a quantum computer simulator for executing the limitations of classical computer with respect to time and the number of digits of a composite integer used for calculating its prime factors.

  4. QCMPI: A parallel environment for quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabakin, Frank; Juliá-Díaz, Bruno

    2009-06-01

    QCMPI is a quantum computer (QC) simulation package written in Fortran 90 with parallel processing capabilities. It is an accessible research tool that permits rapid evaluation of quantum algorithms for a large number of qubits and for various "noise" scenarios. The prime motivation for developing QCMPI is to facilitate numerical examination of not only how QC algorithms work, but also to include noise, decoherence, and attenuation effects and to evaluate the efficacy of error correction schemes. The present work builds on an earlier Mathematica code QDENSITY, which is mainly a pedagogic tool. In that earlier work, although the density matrix formulation was featured, the description using state vectors was also provided. In QCMPI, the stress is on state vectors, in order to employ a large number of qubits. The parallel processing feature is implemented by using the Message-Passing Interface (MPI) protocol. A description of how to spread the wave function components over many processors is provided, along with how to efficiently describe the action of general one- and two-qubit operators on these state vectors. These operators include the standard Pauli, Hadamard, CNOT and CPHASE gates and also Quantum Fourier transformation. These operators make up the actions needed in QC. Codes for Grover's search and Shor's factoring algorithms are provided as examples. A major feature of this work is that concurrent versions of the algorithms can be evaluated with each version subject to alternate noise effects, which corresponds to the idea of solving a stochastic Schrödinger equation. The density matrix for the ensemble of such noise cases is constructed using parallel distribution methods to evaluate its eigenvalues and associated entropy. Potential applications of this powerful tool include studies of the stability and correction of QC processes using Hamiltonian based dynamics. Program summaryProgram title: QCMPI Catalogue identifier: AECS_v1_0 Program summary URL

  5. Progress in silicon-based quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R G; Brenner, R; Buehler, T M; Chan, V; Curson, N J; Dzurak, A S; Gauja, E; Goan, H S; Greentree, A D; Hallam, T; Hamilton, A R; Hollenberg, L C L; Jamieson, D N; McCallum, J C; Milburn, G J; O'Brien, J L; Oberbeck, L; Pakes, C I; Prawer, S D; Reilly, D J; Ruess, F J; Schofield, S R; Simmons, M Y; Stanley, F E; Starrett, R P; Wellard, C; Yang, C

    2003-07-15

    We review progress at the Australian Centre for Quantum Computer Technology towards the fabrication and demonstration of spin qubits and charge qubits based on phosphorus donor atoms embedded in intrinsic silicon. Fabrication is being pursued via two complementary pathways: a 'top-down' approach for near-term production of few-qubit demonstration devices and a 'bottom-up' approach for large-scale qubit arrays with sub-nanometre precision. The 'top-down' approach employs a low-energy (keV) ion beam to implant the phosphorus atoms. Single-atom control during implantation is achieved by monitoring on-chip detector electrodes, integrated within the device structure. In contrast, the 'bottom-up' approach uses scanning tunnelling microscope lithography and epitaxial silicon overgrowth to construct devices at an atomic scale. In both cases, surface electrodes control the qubit using voltage pulses, and dual single-electron transistors operating near the quantum limit provide fast read-out with spurious-signal rejection.

  6. Magnetic qubits as hardware for quantum computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose two potential realisations for quantum bits based on nanometre scale magnetic particles of large spin S and high anisotropy molecular clusters. In case (1) the bit-value basis states vertical bar-0> and vertical bar-1> are the ground and first excited spin states Sz = S and S-1, separated by an energy gap given by the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) frequency. In case (2), when there is significant tunnelling through the anisotropy barrier, the qubit states correspond to the symmetric, vertical bar-0>, and antisymmetric, vertical bar-1>, combinations of the two-fold degenerate ground state Sz = ± S. In each case the temperature of operation must be low compared to the energy gap, Δ, between the states vertical bar-0> and vertical bar-1>. The gap Δ in case (2) can be controlled with an external magnetic field perpendicular to the easy axis of the molecular cluster. The states of different molecular clusters and magnetic particles may be entangled by connecting them by superconducting lines with Josephson switches, leading to the potential for quantum computing hardware. (author)

  7. Finding Matches between Two Databases on a Quantum Computer

    CERN Document Server

    Heiligman, M

    2000-01-01

    Given two unsorted lists each of length N that have a single common entry, a quantum computer can find that matching element with a work factor of $O(N^{3/4}\\log N)$ (measured in quantum memory accesses and accesses to each list). The amount of quantum memory required is $O(N^{1/2})$. The quantum algorithm that accomplishes this consists of an inner Grover search combined with a partial sort all sitting inside of an outer Grover search.

  8. Spacetime at the Planck Scale: The Quantum Computer View

    OpenAIRE

    Zizzi, Paola

    2003-01-01

    We assume that space-time at the Planck scale is discrete, quantised in Planck units and "qubitsed" (each pixel of Planck area encodes one qubit), that is, quantum space-time can be viewed as a quantum computer. Within this model, one finds that quantum space-time itself is entangled, and can quantum-evaluate Boolean functions which are the laws of Physics in their discrete and fundamental form.

  9. Applying quantitative semantics to higher-order quantum computing

    OpenAIRE

    Pagani, Michele; Selinger, Peter; Valiron, Benoît

    2013-01-01

    Finding a denotational semantics for higher order quantum computation is a long-standing problem in the semantics of quantum programming languages. Most past approaches to this problem fell short in one way or another, either limiting the language to an unusably small finitary fragment, or giving up important features of quantum physics such as entanglement. In this paper, we propose a denotational semantics for a quantum lambda calculus with recursion and an infinite data type, using constru...

  10. On the "principle of the quantumness", the quantumness of Relativity, and the computational grand-unification

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

    2010-01-01

    I argue that the program on operational foundations of Quantum Mechanics should have top-priority, and that the Lucien Hardy's program on Quantum Gravity should be paralleled by an analogous program on Quantum Field Theory (QFT), which needs to be reformulated, notwithstanding its experimental success. In this paper, after reviewing recently proposed operational "principles of the quantumness", I address the problem on whether Quantum Mechanics and Special Relativity are unrelated theories, or instead, if the one implies the other. I show how Special Relativity can be indeed derived from Quantum Mechanics, within the computational paradigm "the universe is a huge quantum computer", reformulating QFT as a Quantum-Circuit Field Theory (QCFT). In QCFT Special Relativity emerges from the fabric of the computational network, which also naturally embeds gauge invariance, and even the quantization rule and the Plank constant, which resort to being properties of the underlying causal tapestry of space-time. In this w...

  11. A scheme for efficient quantum computation with linear optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knill, E.; Laflamme, R.; Milburn, G. J.

    2001-01-01

    Quantum computers promise to increase greatly the efficiency of solving problems such as factoring large integers, combinatorial optimization and quantum physics simulation. One of the greatest challenges now is to implement the basic quantum-computational elements in a physical system and to demonstrate that they can be reliably and scalably controlled. One of the earliest proposals for quantum computation is based on implementing a quantum bit with two optical modes containing one photon. The proposal is appealing because of the ease with which photon interference can be observed. Until now, it suffered from the requirement for non-linear couplings between optical modes containing few photons. Here we show that efficient quantum computation is possible using only beam splitters, phase shifters, single photon sources and photo-detectors. Our methods exploit feedback from photo-detectors and are robust against errors from photon loss and detector inefficiency. The basic elements are accessible to experimental investigation with current technology.

  12. Practical experimental certification of computational quantum gates via twirling

    CERN Document Server

    Moussa, Osama; Ryan, Colm A; Laflamme, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    Due to the technical difficulty of building large quantum computers, it is important to be able to estimate how faithful a given implementation is to an ideal quantum computer. The common approach of completely characterizing the computation process via quantum process tomography requires an exponential amount of resources, and thus is not practical even for relatively small devices. We solve this problem by demonstrating that twirling experiments previously used to characterize the average fidelity of quantum memories efficiently can be easily adapted to estimate the average fidelity of the experimental implementation of important quantum computation processes, such as unitaries in the Clifford group, in a practical and efficient manner with applicability in current quantum devices. Using this procedure, we demonstrate state-of-the-art coherent control of an ensemble of magnetic moments of nuclear spins in a single crystal solid by implementing the encoding operation for a 3 qubit code with only a 1% degrada...

  13. Demonstration of measurement-only blind quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greganti, Chiara; Roehsner, Marie-Christine; Barz, Stefanie; Morimae, Tomoyuki; Walther, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Blind quantum computing allows for secure cloud networks of quasi-classical clients and a fully fledged quantum server. Recently, a new protocol has been proposed, which requires a client to perform only measurements. We demonstrate a proof-of-principle implementation of this measurement-only blind quantum computing, exploiting a photonic setup to generate four-qubit cluster states for computation and verification. Feasible technological requirements for the client and the device-independent blindness make this scheme very applicable for future secure quantum networks.

  14. Parallel Photonic Quantum Computation Assisted by Quantum Dots in One-Side Optical Microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-07-01

    Universal quantum logic gates are important elements for a quantum computer. In contrast to previous constructions on one degree of freedom (DOF) of quantum systems, we investigate the possibility of parallel quantum computations dependent on two DOFs of photon systems. We construct deterministic hyper-controlled-not (hyper-CNOT) gates operating on the spatial-mode and the polarization DOFs of two-photon or one-photon systems by exploring the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in one-sided optical microcavities. These hyper-CNOT gates show that the quantum states of two DOFs can be viewed as independent qubits without requiring auxiliary DOFs in theory. This result can reduce the quantum resources by half for quantum applications with large qubit systems, such as the quantum Shor algorithm.

  15. Refocusing schemes for holonomic quantum computation in presence of dissipation

    OpenAIRE

    Cen, Li-Xiang; Zanardi, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    The effects of dissipation on a holonomic quantum computation scheme are analyzed within the quantum-jump approach. We extend to the non-Abelian case the refocusing strategies formerly introduced for (Abelian) geometric computation. We show how double loop symmetrization schemes allow one to get rid of the unwanted influence of dissipation in the no-jump trajectory.

  16. Demonstration of a small programmable quantum computer with atomic qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, S; Linke, N M; Figgatt, C; Landsman, K A; Wright, K; Monroe, C

    2016-08-01

    Quantum computers can solve certain problems more efficiently than any possible conventional computer. Small quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on multiple quantum computing platforms, many specifically tailored in hardware to implement a particular algorithm or execute a limited number of computational paths. Here we demonstrate a five-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer that can be programmed in software to implement arbitrary quantum algorithms by executing any sequence of universal quantum logic gates. We compile algorithms into a fully connected set of gate operations that are native to the hardware and have a mean fidelity of 98 per cent. Reconfiguring these gate sequences provides the flexibility to implement a variety of algorithms without altering the hardware. As examples, we implement the Deutsch-Jozsa and Bernstein-Vazirani algorithms with average success rates of 95 and 90 per cent, respectively. We also perform a coherent quantum Fourier transform on five trapped-ion qubits for phase estimation and period finding with average fidelities of 62 and 84 per cent, respectively. This small quantum computer can be scaled to larger numbers of qubits within a single register, and can be further expanded by connecting several such modules through ion shuttling or photonic quantum channels. PMID:27488798

  17. Demonstration of a small programmable quantum computer with atomic qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, S.; Linke, N. M.; Figgatt, C.; Landsman, K. A.; Wright, K.; Monroe, C.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum computers can solve certain problems more efficiently than any possible conventional computer. Small quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on multiple quantum computing platforms, many specifically tailored in hardware to implement a particular algorithm or execute a limited number of computational paths. Here we demonstrate a five-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer that can be programmed in software to implement arbitrary quantum algorithms by executing any sequence of universal quantum logic gates. We compile algorithms into a fully connected set of gate operations that are native to the hardware and have a mean fidelity of 98 per cent. Reconfiguring these gate sequences provides the flexibility to implement a variety of algorithms without altering the hardware. As examples, we implement the Deutsch–Jozsa and Bernstein–Vazirani algorithms with average success rates of 95 and 90 per cent, respectively. We also perform a coherent quantum Fourier transform on five trapped-ion qubits for phase estimation and period finding with average fidelities of 62 and 84 per cent, respectively. This small quantum computer can be scaled to larger numbers of qubits within a single register, and can be further expanded by connecting several such modules through ion shuttling or photonic quantum channels.

  18. Demonstration of a small programmable quantum computer with atomic qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, S.; Linke, N. M.; Figgatt, C.; Landsman, K. A.; Wright, K.; Monroe, C.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum computers can solve certain problems more efficiently than any possible conventional computer. Small quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on multiple quantum computing platforms, many specifically tailored in hardware to implement a particular algorithm or execute a limited number of computational paths. Here we demonstrate a five-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer that can be programmed in software to implement arbitrary quantum algorithms by executing any sequence of universal quantum logic gates. We compile algorithms into a fully connected set of gate operations that are native to the hardware and have a mean fidelity of 98 per cent. Reconfiguring these gate sequences provides the flexibility to implement a variety of algorithms without altering the hardware. As examples, we implement the Deutsch-Jozsa and Bernstein-Vazirani algorithms with average success rates of 95 and 90 per cent, respectively. We also perform a coherent quantum Fourier transform on five trapped-ion qubits for phase estimation and period finding with average fidelities of 62 and 84 per cent, respectively. This small quantum computer can be scaled to larger numbers of qubits within a single register, and can be further expanded by connecting several such modules through ion shuttling or photonic quantum channels.

  19. Universal Quantum Computing with Arbitrary Continuous-Variable Encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan; Plenio, Martin B.

    2016-09-01

    Implementing a qubit quantum computer in continuous-variable systems conventionally requires the engineering of specific interactions according to the encoding basis states. In this work, we present a unified formalism to conduct universal quantum computation with a fixed set of operations but arbitrary encoding. By storing a qubit in the parity of two or four qumodes, all computing processes can be implemented by basis state preparations, continuous-variable exponential-swap operations, and swap tests. Our formalism inherits the advantages that the quantum information is decoupled from collective noise, and logical qubits with different encodings can be brought to interact without decoding. We also propose a possible implementation of the required operations by using interactions that are available in a variety of continuous-variable systems. Our work separates the "hardware" problem of engineering quantum-computing-universal interactions, from the "software" problem of designing encodings for specific purposes. The development of quantum computer architecture could hence be simplified.

  20. Popescu-Rohrlich correlations imply efficient instantaneous nonlocal quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Anne

    2016-08-01

    In instantaneous nonlocal quantum computation, two parties cooperate in order to perform a quantum computation on their joint inputs, while being restricted to a single round of simultaneous communication. Previous results showed that instantaneous nonlocal quantum computation is possible, at the cost of an exponential amount of prior shared entanglement (in the size of the input). Here, we show that a linear amount of entanglement suffices, (in the size of the computation), as long as the parties share nonlocal correlations as given by the Popescu-Rohrlich box. This means that communication is not required for efficient instantaneous nonlocal quantum computation. Exploiting the well-known relation to position-based cryptography, our result also implies the impossibility of secure position-based cryptography against adversaries with nonsignaling correlations. Furthermore, our construction establishes a quantum analog of the classical communication complexity collapse under nonsignaling correlations.

  1. Universal Quantum Computing with Arbitrary Continuous-Variable Encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan; Plenio, Martin B

    2016-09-01

    Implementing a qubit quantum computer in continuous-variable systems conventionally requires the engineering of specific interactions according to the encoding basis states. In this work, we present a unified formalism to conduct universal quantum computation with a fixed set of operations but arbitrary encoding. By storing a qubit in the parity of two or four qumodes, all computing processes can be implemented by basis state preparations, continuous-variable exponential-swap operations, and swap tests. Our formalism inherits the advantages that the quantum information is decoupled from collective noise, and logical qubits with different encodings can be brought to interact without decoding. We also propose a possible implementation of the required operations by using interactions that are available in a variety of continuous-variable systems. Our work separates the "hardware" problem of engineering quantum-computing-universal interactions, from the "software" problem of designing encodings for specific purposes. The development of quantum computer architecture could hence be simplified.

  2. Cluster State Quantum Computation and the Repeat-Until Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwek, L. C.

    Cluster state computation or the one way quantum computation (1WQC) relies on an initially highly entangled state (called a cluster state) and an appropriate sequence of single qubit measurements along different directions, together with feed-forward based on the measurement results, to realize a quantum computation process. The final result of the computation is obtained by measuring the last remaining qubits in the computational basis. In this short tutorial on cluster state quantum computation, we will also describe the basic ideas of a cluster state and proceed to describe how a single qubit operation can be done on a cluster state. Recently, we proposed a repeat-until-success (RUS) scheme that could effectively be used to realize one-way quantum computer on a hybrid system of photons and atoms. We will briefly describe this RUS scheme and show how it can be used to entangled two distant stationary qubits.

  3. Implementation of controlled SWAP gates for quantum fingerprinting and photonic quantum computation

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, B

    2006-01-01

    We propose a scheme to implement quantum controlled SWAP gates by directing single-photon pulses to a two-sided cavity with a single trapped atom. The resultant gates can be used to realize quantum fingerprinting and universal photonic quantum computation. The performance of the scheme is characterized under realistic experimental noise with the requirements well within the reach of the current technology.

  4. Is Quantum Mechanics Falsifiable? A computational perspective on the foundations of Quantum Mechanic

    OpenAIRE

    Dorit Aharonov; Umesh Vazirani

    2013-01-01

    Quantum computation teaches us that quantum mechanics exhibits exponential complexity. We argue that the standard scientific paradigm of "predict and verify" cannot be applied to testing quantum mechanics in this limit of high complexity. We describe how QM can be tested in this regime by extending the usual scientific paradigm to include {\\it interactive experiments}.

  5. The 2004 Latsis Symposium: Quantum optics for Communication and Computing

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    1-3 March 2004 Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne Auditoire SG1 The field of Quantum Optics covers topics that extend from basic physical concepts, regarding the quantum description of light, matter, and light-matter interaction, to the applications of these concepts in future information and communication technologies. This field is of primary importance for science and society for two reasons. Firstly, it brings a deeper physical understanding of the fundamental aspects of modern quantum physics. Secondly, it offers perspectives for the invention and implementation of new devices and systems in the fields of communications, information management and computing. The themes that will be addressed in the Latsis Symposium on Quantum Optics are quantum communications, quantum computation, and quantum photonic devices. The objective of the symposium is to give an overview of this fascinating and rapidly evolving field. The different talks will establish links between new fundamental c...

  6. The 2004 Latsis Symposium: Quantum optics for Communication and Computing

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    1-3 March 2004 Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne Auditoire SG1 The field of Quantum Optics covers topics that extend from basic physical concepts, regarding the quantum description of light, matter, and light-matter interaction, to the applications of these concepts in future information and communication technologies. This field is of primary importance for science and society for two reasons. Firstly, it brings a deeper physical understanding of the fundamental aspects of modern quantum physics. Secondly, it offers perspectives for the invention and implementation of new devices and systems in the fields of communications, information management and computing. The themes that will be addressed in the Latsis Symposium on Quantum Optics are quantum communications, quantum computation, and quantum photonic devices. The objective of the symposium is to give an overview of this fascinating and rapidly evolving field. The different talks will establish links between new fundamental ...

  7. The 2004 Latsis Symposium: Quantum optics for Communication and Computing

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    1-3 March 2004 Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne Auditoire SG1 The field of Quantum Optics covers topics that extend from basic physical concepts, regarding the quantum description of light, matter, and light-matter interaction, to the applications of these concepts in future information and communication technologies. This field is of primary importance for science and society for two reasons. Firstly, it brings a deeper physical understanding of the fundamental aspects of modern quantum physics. Secondly, it offers perspectives for the invention and implementation of new devices and systems in the fields of communications, information management and computing. The themes that will be addressed in the Latsis Symposium on Quantum Optics are quantum communications, quantum computation, and quantum photonic devices. The objective of the symposium is to give an overview of this fascinating and rapidly evolving field. The different talks will establish links between new fundamental...

  8. Experimental magic state distillation for fault-tolerant quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Alexandre M; Zhang, Jingfu; Ryan, Colm A; Laflamme, Raymond

    2011-01-25

    Any physical quantum device for quantum information processing (QIP) is subject to errors in implementation. In order to be reliable and efficient, quantum computers will need error-correcting or error-avoiding methods. Fault-tolerance achieved through quantum error correction will be an integral part of quantum computers. Of the many methods that have been discovered to implement it, a highly successful approach has been to use transversal gates and specific initial states. A critical element for its implementation is the availability of high-fidelity initial states, such as |0〉 and the 'magic state'. Here, we report an experiment, performed in a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantum processor, showing sufficient quantum control to improve the fidelity of imperfect initial magic states by distilling five of them into one with higher fidelity.

  9. Continuous-variable quantum computing in optical time-frequency modes using quantum memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Peter C; Kolthammer, W Steven; Nunn, Joshua; Barbieri, Marco; Datta, Animesh; Walmsley, Ian A

    2014-09-26

    We develop a scheme for time-frequency encoded continuous-variable cluster-state quantum computing using quantum memories. In particular, we propose a method to produce, manipulate, and measure two-dimensional cluster states in a single spatial mode by exploiting the intrinsic time-frequency selectivity of Raman quantum memories. Time-frequency encoding enables the scheme to be extremely compact, requiring a number of memories that are a linear function of only the number of different frequencies in which the computational state is encoded, independent of its temporal duration. We therefore show that quantum memories can be a powerful component for scalable photonic quantum information processing architectures.

  10. Optimizing qubit resources for quantum chemistry simulations in second quantization on a quantum computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Nikolaj; Fuhrer, Andreas; Staar, Peter; Tavernelli, Ivano

    2016-07-01

    Quantum chemistry simulations on a quantum computer suffer from the overhead needed for encoding the Fermionic problem in a system of qubits. By exploiting the block diagonality of a Fermionic Hamiltonian, we show that the number of required qubits can be reduced while the number of terms in the Hamiltonian will increase. All operations for this reduction can be performed in operator space. The scheme is conceived as a pre-computational step that would be performed prior to the actual quantum simulation. We apply this scheme to reduce the number of qubits necessary to simulate both the Hamiltonian of the two-site Fermi-Hubbard model and the hydrogen molecule. Both quantum systems can then be simulated with a two-qubit quantum computer. Despite the increase in the number of Hamiltonian terms, the scheme still remains a useful tool to reduce the dimensionality of specific quantum systems for quantum simulators with a limited number of resources.

  11. Quantum computing with acceptor spins in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salfi, Joe; Tong, Mengyang; Rogge, Sven; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2016-06-01

    The states of a boron acceptor near a Si/SiO2 interface, which bind two low-energy Kramers pairs, have exceptional properties for encoding quantum information and, with the aid of strain, both heavy hole and light hole-based spin qubits can be designed. Whereas a light-hole spin qubit was introduced recently (arXiv:1508.04259), here we present analytical and numerical results proving that a heavy-hole spin qubit can be reliably initialised, rotated and entangled by electrical means alone. This is due to strong Rashba-like spin–orbit interaction terms enabled by the interface inversion asymmetry. Single qubit rotations rely on electric-dipole spin resonance (EDSR), which is strongly enhanced by interface-induced spin–orbit terms. Entanglement can be accomplished by Coulomb exchange, coupling to a resonator, or spin–orbit induced dipole–dipole interactions. By analysing the qubit sensitivity to charge noise, we demonstrate that interface-induced spin–orbit terms are responsible for sweet spots in the dephasing time {T}2* as a function of the top gate electric field, which are close to maxima in the EDSR strength, where the EDSR gate has high fidelity. We show that both qubits can be described using the same starting Hamiltonian, and by comparing their properties we show that the complex interplay of bulk and interface-induced spin–orbit terms allows a high degree of electrical control and makes acceptors potential candidates for scalable quantum computation in Si.

  12. Quantum computing with acceptor spins in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salfi, Joe; Tong, Mengyang; Rogge, Sven; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2016-06-17

    The states of a boron acceptor near a Si/SiO2 interface, which bind two low-energy Kramers pairs, have exceptional properties for encoding quantum information and, with the aid of strain, both heavy hole and light hole-based spin qubits can be designed. Whereas a light-hole spin qubit was introduced recently (arXiv:1508.04259), here we present analytical and numerical results proving that a heavy-hole spin qubit can be reliably initialised, rotated and entangled by electrical means alone. This is due to strong Rashba-like spin-orbit interaction terms enabled by the interface inversion asymmetry. Single qubit rotations rely on electric-dipole spin resonance (EDSR), which is strongly enhanced by interface-induced spin-orbit terms. Entanglement can be accomplished by Coulomb exchange, coupling to a resonator, or spin-orbit induced dipole-dipole interactions. By analysing the qubit sensitivity to charge noise, we demonstrate that interface-induced spin-orbit terms are responsible for sweet spots in the dephasing time [Formula: see text] as a function of the top gate electric field, which are close to maxima in the EDSR strength, where the EDSR gate has high fidelity. We show that both qubits can be described using the same starting Hamiltonian, and by comparing their properties we show that the complex interplay of bulk and interface-induced spin-orbit terms allows a high degree of electrical control and makes acceptors potential candidates for scalable quantum computation in Si. PMID:27171901

  13. Quantum computing with acceptor spins in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salfi, Joe; Tong, Mengyang; Rogge, Sven; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2016-06-17

    The states of a boron acceptor near a Si/SiO2 interface, which bind two low-energy Kramers pairs, have exceptional properties for encoding quantum information and, with the aid of strain, both heavy hole and light hole-based spin qubits can be designed. Whereas a light-hole spin qubit was introduced recently (arXiv:1508.04259), here we present analytical and numerical results proving that a heavy-hole spin qubit can be reliably initialised, rotated and entangled by electrical means alone. This is due to strong Rashba-like spin-orbit interaction terms enabled by the interface inversion asymmetry. Single qubit rotations rely on electric-dipole spin resonance (EDSR), which is strongly enhanced by interface-induced spin-orbit terms. Entanglement can be accomplished by Coulomb exchange, coupling to a resonator, or spin-orbit induced dipole-dipole interactions. By analysing the qubit sensitivity to charge noise, we demonstrate that interface-induced spin-orbit terms are responsible for sweet spots in the dephasing time [Formula: see text] as a function of the top gate electric field, which are close to maxima in the EDSR strength, where the EDSR gate has high fidelity. We show that both qubits can be described using the same starting Hamiltonian, and by comparing their properties we show that the complex interplay of bulk and interface-induced spin-orbit terms allows a high degree of electrical control and makes acceptors potential candidates for scalable quantum computation in Si.

  14. Quantum computation with mesoscopic superposition states

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, M. C.; Munro, W. J.

    2000-01-01

    We present a strategy to engineer a simple cavity-QED two-bit universal quantum gate using mesoscopic distinct quantum superposition states. The dissipative effect on decoherence and amplitude damping of the quantum bits are analyzed and the critical parameters are presented.

  15. Quantum toys for quantum computing: persistent currents controled by spin chirality

    OpenAIRE

    Tatara, Gen; Garcia, N.

    2003-01-01

    Quantum devices and computers will need operational units in different architectural configurations for their functioning. The unit should be a simple ``quantum toy'', easy to handle superposition states. Here a novel such unit of quantum mechanical flux state (or persistent current) in a conducting ring with three ferromagnetic quantum dots is presented. The state is labeled by the two direction of the persistent current, which is driven by the spin chirality of the dots, and is controled by...

  16. Implementation of holonomic quantum computation through engineering and manipulating the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhang-Qi; Li, Fu-Li; Peng, Peng

    2007-12-01

    We consider an atom-field coupled system in which two pairs of four-level atoms are respectively driven by laser fields and trapped in two distant cavities that are connected by an optical fiber. First, we show that an effective squeezing reservoir can be engineered under appropriate conditions. Then, we show that a two-qubit geometric controlled-PHASE (CPHASE) gate between the atoms in the two cavities can be implemented through adiabatically manipulating the engineered reservoir along a closed loop. This scheme that combines an engineering environment with decoherence-free space and geometric phase quantum computation together has the following remarkable feature: a CPHASE gate with arbitrary phase shift is implemented by simply changing the strength and relative phase of the driving fields.

  17. On Computational Power of Quantum Read-Once Branching Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Ablayev

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we review our current results concerning the computational power of quantum read-once branching programs. First of all, based on the circuit presentation of quantum branching programs and our variant of quantum fingerprinting technique, we show that any Boolean function with linear polynomial presentation can be computed by a quantum read-once branching program using a relatively small (usually logarithmic in the size of input number of qubits. Then we show that the described class of Boolean functions is closed under the polynomial projections.

  18. Statistical constraints on state preparation for a quantum computer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subhash Kak

    2001-10-01

    Quantum computing algorithms require that the quantum register be initially present in a superposition state. To achieve this, we consider the practical problem of creating a coherent superposition state of several qubits. We show that the constraints of quantum statistics require that the entropy of the system be brought down when several independent qubits are assembled together. In particular, we have: (i) not all initial states are realizable as pure states; (ii) the temperature of the system must be reduced. These factors, in addition to decoherence and sensitivity to errors, must be considered in the implementation of quantum computers.

  19. Quantum simulation of a three-body interaction Hamiltonian on an NMR quantum computer

    CERN Document Server

    Tseng, C H; Sharf, Y; Knill, E H; Laflamme, R; Havel, T F; Cory, D G

    2000-01-01

    Extensions of average Hamiltonian theory to quantum computation permit the design of arbitrary Hamiltonians, allowing rotations throughout a large Hilbert space. In this way, the kinematics and dynamics of any quantum system may be simulated by a quantum computer. A basis mapping between the systems dictates the average Hamiltonian in the quantum computer needed to implement the desired Hamiltonian in the simulated system. The flexibility of the procedure is illustrated with NMR on 13-C labelled Alanine by creating the non-physical Hamiltonian ZZZ corresponding to a three body interaction.

  20. Quantum dynamical simulation of non-adiabatic proton transfers in aqueous solution methodology, molecular models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Billeter, S R

    1998-01-01

    This thesis describes the methodology of quantum dynamical (QD) simulation of proton transfers in aqueous solutions, its implementation in the simulation program QDGROMOS and its application to protonated water and aqueous solutions of acetic acid. QDGROMOS is based on the GROMOS96 molecular dynamics (MD) program package. Many of the solutions to partial problems such as the representation of the quantum state, the solution of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation, the forces from the quantum subsystem, the time-ordering of the propagations and the correlations between the subsystems, are complementary. In chapter 1, various numerical propagation algorithms for solving the time-dependent Schrodinger equation under the influence of a constant Hamilton operator are compared against each other, mainly in one dimension. A Chebysheff series expansion and the expansion in terms of eigenstates of the Hamilton operator were found to be most stable. Chapter 2 describes the theory, the methods and the algorithms of Q...