WorldWideScience

Sample records for adiabatic burning velocity

  1. Numerical Study on Laminar Burning Velocity and Flame Stability of Premixed Methane/Ethylene/Air Flames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈珊珊; 蒋勇; 邱榕; 安江涛

    2012-01-01

    A numerical study on premixed methane/ethylene/air flames with various ethylene fractions and equivalence ratios was conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The effects of ethylene addition on laminar burning velocity, flame structure and flame stability under the condition of lean burning were investigated. The results show that the laminar burning velocity increases with ethylene fraction, especially at a large equivalence ratio. More ethylene addition gives rise to higher concentrations of H, O and OH radicals in the flame, which significantly promotes chemical reactions, and a linear correlation exists between the laminar burning velocity and the maximum H + OH concentration in the reaction zone. With the increase of ethylene fraction, the adiabatic flame temperature is raised, while the inner layer temperature becomes lower, contributing to the enhancement of combustion. Markstein length and Markstein number, representative of the flame stability, increase as more ethylene is added, indicating the tendency of flame stability to improve with ethylene addition.

  2. Laminar burning velocities and flame instabilities of butanol isomers-air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Xiaolei; Huang, Zuohua; Wu, Si; Li, Qianqian [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Laminar burning velocities and flame instabilities of the butanol-air premixed flames and its isomers are investigated using the spherically expanding flame with central ignition at initial temperature of 428 K and initial pressures of 0.10 MPa, 0.25 MPa, 0.50 MPa and 0.75 MPa. Laminar burning velocities and sensitivity factor of n-butanol-air mixtures are computed using a newly developed kinetic mechanism. Unstretched laminar burning velocity, adiabatic temperature, Lewis number, Markstein length, critical flame radius and Peclet number are obtained over a wide range of equivalence ratios. Effect of molecular structure on laminar burning velocity of the isomers of butanol is analyzed from the aspect of C-H bond dissociation energy. Study indicates that although adiabatic flame temperatures of the isomers of butanol are the same, laminar burning velocities give an obvious difference among the isomers of butanol. This indicates that molecular structure has a large influence on laminar burning velocities of the isomers of butanol. Branching (-CH3) will decrease laminar burning velocity. Hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the terminal carbon atoms gives higher laminar burning velocity compared to that attaching to the inner carbon atoms. Calculated dissociation bond energies show that terminal C-H bonds have larger bond energies than that of inner C-H bonds. n-Butanol, no branching and with hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the terminal carbon atom, gives the largest laminar burning velocity. tert-Butanol, with highly branching and hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the inner carbon atom, gives the lowest laminar burning velocity. Laminar burning velocities of iso-butanol and sec-butanol are between those of n-butanol and tert-butanol. The instant of transition to cellularity is experimentally determined for the isomers of butanol and subsequently interpreted on the basis of hydrodynamic and diffusion-thermal instabilities. Little effect

  3. High-velocity H I clouds and the adiabatic theory of galaxy formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroshkevich, A.G.; Shandarin, S.F.

    1979-05-01

    The intergalactic interpretation of high-velocity H I clouds is examined in terms of the evolutionary theory of galaxy formation. From 21-cm line measurements and the representation of the intergalactic medium according to the adiabatic theory of galaxy formation (the ''pancake'' theory), parameters (density, mass, radius, entropy, distance) are calculated for various clouds, regarded as quasistationary. The observational and theoretical estimates are consistent. The assumption that many H I clouds are extragalactic is in good accord with the evolutionary theory.

  4. Enhancement of burning velocity by dissociated oxygen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Haruaki; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Sasaki, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    Green technology, such as preventing global warming, has been developed for years. Researches on plasma assisted combustion is one of the technologies and have been done for investigating more efficient combustion, more efficient use of fossil fuel with plasmas or applying electric fields. In the ignition time delay analyses with the dissociated oxygen atoms which is generated by non-equilibrium plasma had significant effect on the ignition time. In this paper, dissociated oxygen could effect on burning velocity or not has been examined using CHEMKIN. As a result, no effect can be seen with dissociation degree of lower than 10-3. But there is an effect on the enhancement of burning velocity with higher degree of 10-3. At the dissociation degree of 5×10-2, the burning velocity is enhanced at a factor of 1.24. And it is found that the distributions of each species in front of preheat zone are completely different. The combustion process is proceeded several steps in advance, and generation of H2O, CO and CO2 can be seen before combustion in higher dissociation case. This work was supported by KAKENHI (22340170).

  5. Normal zone propagation in adiabatic superconducting magnets: Pt. 1; Normal zone propagation velocity in superconducting composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Z.P.; Iwasa, Y. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab. Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center)

    1991-09-01

    A normal zone propagation model has been developed for superconducting composites under adiabatic conditions. It is based on the Whetstone-Roos model, originally developed for normal zone propagation in adiabatic wires of unclad superconductor. The model takes into account the temperature and magnetic field dependent material properties, for both superconductor and matrix metal. Analytical results agree well with experimental data. (author).

  6. Molecular characterization and quantification using state of the art solid-state adiabatic TOBSY NMR in burn trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righi, Valeria; Andronesi, Ovidiu; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Tzika, A Aria

    2009-12-01

    We describe a novel solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method that maximizes the advantages of high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HRMAS), relative conventional liquid-state NMR approaches, when applied to intact biopsies of skeletal muscle specimens collected from burn trauma patients. This novel method, termed optimized adiabatic TOtal through Bond correlation SpectroscopY (TOBSY) solid-state NMR pulse sequence for two-dimensional (2D) 1H-1H homonuclear scalar-coupling longitudinal isotropic mixing, was demonstrated to provide a 40-60% improvement in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) relative to its liquid-state analogue TOCSY (TOtal Correlation SpectroscopY). Using 1- and 2-dimensional HRMAS NMR experiments, we identified several metabolites in burned tissues. Quantification of metabolites in burned tissues showed increased levels of lipid compounds, intracellular metabolites (e.g., taurine and phosphocreatine) and substantially decreased water-soluble metabolites (e.g., glutathione, carnosine, glucose, glutamine/glutamate and alanine). These findings demonstrate that HRMAS NMR Spectroscopy using TOBSY is a feasible technique that reveals new insights into the pathophysiology of burn trauma. Moreover, this method has applications that facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  7. Measurements of the laminar burning velocity of hydrogen-air premixed flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pareja, Jhon; Burbano, Hugo J. [Science and Technology of Gases and Rational Use of Energy Group, Faculty of Engineering, University of Antioquia, Calle 67 N 53, 108 Bloque 20, 447 Medellin (Colombia); Ogami, Yasuhiro [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    Experimental and numerical studies on laminar burning velocities of hydrogen-air mixtures were performed at standard pressure and room temperature varying the equivalence ratio from 0.8 to 3.0. The flames were generated using a contoured slot-type nozzle burner (4 mm x 10 mm). Measurements of laminar burning velocity were conducted using particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) combined with Schlieren photography. This technique provides the information of instantaneous local burning velocities in the whole region of the flame front, and laminar burning velocities were determined using the mean value of local burning velocities in the region of non-stretch. Additionally, average laminar burning velocities were determined using the angle method and compared with the data obtained with the PTV method. Numerical calculations were also conducted using detailed reaction mechanisms and transport properties. The experimental results from the PTV method are in good agreement with the numerical results at every equivalence ratio of the range of study. Differences between the results obtained with the angle method and those with the PTV method are reasonably small when the effects of flame stretch and curvature are reduced by using a contoured slot-type nozzle. (author)

  8. The Role of Molecule Clustering by Hydrogen Bond in Hydrous Ethanol on Laminar Burning Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Made Suarta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of hydrogen bond molecule clustering in laminar burning velocities was observed. The water in hydrous ethanol can change the interaction between water-ethanol molecules. A certain amount of water can become oxygenated which increases the burning velocity. The hydrogen bond interaction pattern of ethanol and water molecules was modeled. Based on the molecular model, azeotropic behavior emerges from ethanol-water hydrogen bond, which is at a 95.1%v composition. The interaction with water molecule causes the ethanol molecule to be clustered with centered oxygenated compound. So, it supplies extra oxygen and provides intermolecular empty spaces that are easily infiltrated by the air. In the azeotropic composition, the molecular bond chain is the shortest, so hypothetically the burning velocity is anticipated to increase. The laminar burning velocity of ethanol fuel was tested in a cylindrical explosion bomb in lean, stoichiometric, and rich mixtures. The experimental result showed that the maximum burning velocity occurred at hydrous ethanol of 95.5%v composition. This discrepancy is the result of the addition of energy from 7.7% free ethanol molecules that are not clustered. At the rich mixture, the burning velocity of this composition is higher than that of anhydrous ethanol.

  9. Coronary Flow Velocity Reserve in Burn Injury: A Prospective Clinical Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliskan, Mustafa; Turk, Emin; Karagulle, Erdal; Ciftci, Ozgur; Oguz, Hakan; Kostek, Osman; Moray, Gokhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    The authors sought to evaluate coronary microvascular function and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction using transthoracic Doppler echocardiography in burn patients. In this study, 32 adult burn patients with partial or full-thickness scald burns that were hospitalized and treated were included. The control group was matched for age and sex and was composed of otherwise healthy volunteers. Transthoracic Doppler echocardiography examinations and simultaneous laboratory tests for cardiac evaluation were performed on the sixth month after burn injury as well as with the control group. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels were significantly higher in the burn patients than in controls (5.17 ± 3.86 vs 2.42 ± 1.78; P = .001). Lateral isovolumic relaxation time was significantly higher in the burn injury group than in the control group (92.7 ± 15.7 vs 85.5 ± 8.3; P = .03). Baseline coronary diastolic peak flow velocity of the left anterior descending artery was similar in both groups. However, hyperemic diastolic peak flow velocity and coronary flow velocity reserve (2.26 ± 0.48 vs 2.94 ± 0.47; P < .001) were significantly lower in the burn injury group than in the control group. Coronary flow velocity reserve was significantly and inversely correlated with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, burn ratio, creatinine, and mitral A-wave max velocity. At the sixth month of treatment, burn patients had high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels during this period, suggesting that inflammation still exists. In addition, subclinical coronary microvascular and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction can occur in burn patients without traditional cardiovascular risk factors. However, these results must be supported by additional studies.

  10. A Hypothetical Burning-Velocity Formula for Very Lean Hydrogen-Air Mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Forman; Williams, Forman A; Grcar, Joseph F

    2008-06-30

    Very lean hydrogen-air mixtures experience strong diffusive-thermal types of cellular instabilities that tend to increase the laminar burning velocity above the value that applies to steady, planar laminar flames that are homogeneous in transverse directions. Flame balls constitute an extreme limit of evolution of cellular flames. To account qualitatively for the ultimate effect of diffusive-thermal instability, a model is proposed in which the flame is a steadily propagating, planar, hexagonal, close-packed array of flame balls, each burning as if it were an isolated, stationary, ideal flame ball in an infinite, quiescent atmosphere. An expression for the laminar burning velocity is derived from this model, which theoretically may provide an upper limit for the experimental burning velocity.

  11. Measurements and correlations of turbulent burning velocities over wide ranges of fuels and elevated pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Bradley, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The implosion technique has been used to extend measurements of turbulent burning velocities over greater ranges of fuels and pressures. Measurements have been made up to 3.5 MPa and at strain rate Markstein numbers as low as 23. The implosion technique, with spark ignition at two opposite wall positions within a fan-stirred spherical bomb is capable of measuring turbulent burning velocities, at higher pressures than is possible with central ignition. Pressure records and schlieren high speed photography define the rate of burning and the smoothed area of the flame front. The first aim of the study was to extend the previous measurements with ethanol and propane-air, with further measurements over wider ranges of fuels and equivalence ratios with mixtures of hydrogen, methane, 10% hydrogen-90% methane, toluene, and i-octane, with air. The second aim was to study further the low turbulence regime in which turbulent burning co-exists with laminar flame instabilities. Correlations are presented of turbulent burning velocity normalised by the effective rms turbulent velocity acting on the flame front, ut=u0k , with the Karlovitz stretch factor, K, for different strain rate Markstein numbers, a decrease in which increases ut=u0k . Experimental correlations are presented for the present measurements, combined with previous ones. Different burning regimes are also identified, extending from that of mixed turbulence/laminar instability at low values of K to that at high values of K, in which ut=u0k is gradually reduced due to increasing localised flame extinctions. © 2012 The Combustion Institute.

  12. Laminar burning velocities at elevated pressures for gasoline and gasoline surrogates associated with RON

    KAUST Repository

    Mannaa, Ossama

    2015-06-01

    The development and validation of a new gasoline surrogate using laminar flame speed as a target parameter is presented. Laminar burning velocities were measured using a constant-volume spherical vessel with ignition at the center of the vessel. Tested fuels included iso-octane, n-heptane, toluene, various mixtures of primary reference fuels (PRFs) and toluene reference fuels (TRFs) and three gasoline fuels of 70, 85 and 95 RON (FACE J, C and F) at the initial temperature of 358K and pressures up to 0.6MPa in the equivalence ratio ranging from 0.8 to 1.6. Normalized laminar burning velocity data were mapped into a tri-component mixture space at different experimental conditions to allocate different gasoline surrogates for different gasoline fuels, having RON of 70, 85 and 95. The surrogates of TRF-70-4 (17.94% iso-C8H18 +42.06% n-C7H16 +40% C7H8), TRF-85-1 (77.4% iso-C8H18 +17.6% n-C7H16 +5% C7H8), and TRF-95-1 (88.47% iso-C8H18 +6.53% n-C7H16 +5% C7H8) of RON 70, 85 and 95, respectively, are shown to successfully emulate the burning rate characteristics of the gasoline fuels associated with these RONs under the various experimental conditions investigated. An empirical correlation was derived to obtain laminar burning velocities at pressures that are experimentally unattainable as high as 3.0MPa. Laminar burning velocities were comparable to the simulated values for lean and stoichiometric flames but they were relatively higher than the simulated values for rich flames. A flame instability assessment was conducted by determining Markstein length, critical Pecklet number, and critical Karlovitz number at the onset of flame instability.

  13. Effect of Inhibitors on Biogas Laminar Burning Velocity and Flammability Limits in Spark Ignited Premix Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willyanto Anggono

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogas is the natural byproduct of the decomposition of vegetation or animal manure, of which there are almost in exhaustable supplies in the world, and which does not contribute CO2 or other greenhouse gases to global warming or climate change. Biogas contains 66.4% flammable gas (CH4 and 33.6% inhibitors (CO2 and N2. This study focuses on the effects of inhibitors on biogas laminar burning velocity and flammability limits in spark ignited premix combustion. Spherically expanding laminar premixed flames, freely propagating from spark ignition sources in initially quiescent biogas–air mixtures, are continuously recorded by a high-speed digital camera. Initially, all the experiments in this paper were performed using inhibitorless biogas (biogas without inhibitors at room temperature, at reduced pressure (0.5 atm and at various equivalence ratios (ϕ from the lower flammable limit to the upper flammable limit. The results are compared with those from biogas (containing inhibitors flames at reduced pressure, inhibitorless biogas flames at atmospheric pressure (1 atm, and biogas flames at atmospheric pressure to emphasize the effect of inhibitors on biogas laminar burning velocity and flammability limits. Compared to an inhibitorless biogas-air mixtures, in the biogas-air mixtures, the presence of inhibitors cause a reduction in the laminar burning velocity and the flammable limits become narrower.

  14. An Experimental Measurement on Laminar Burning Velocities and Markstein Length of Iso-Butane-Air Mixtures at Ambient Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousif Alaeldeen Altag

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, experimental investigation on laminar combustion of iso-butane-air mixtures was conducted in constant volume explosion vessel. The experiments were conducted at wide range of equivalence ratios ranging between Ф = 0.6 and 1.4 and atmospheric pressure of 0.1 MPa and ambient temperature of 303K. Using spherically expanding flame method, flame parameters including stretched, unstretched flame propagation speeds, laminar burning velocities and Markstein length were calculated. For laminar burning velocities the method of error bars of 95% confidence level was applied. In addition, values of Markstein lengths were measured in wide range of equivalence ratios to study the influence of stretch rate on flame instability and burning velocity. It was found that the stretched flame speed and laminar burning velocities increased with equivalence ratios and the peak value was obtained at equivalence ratio of Ф = 1.1. The Markstein length decreased with the increases in equivalence ratios, which indicates that the diffusion thermal flame instability increased at high equivalence ratios in richer mixture side. However, the total deviations in the laminar burning velocities have discrepancies of 1.2-2.9% for all investigated mixtures.

  15. Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    A burn is damage to your body's tissues caused by heat, chemicals, electricity, sunlight, or radiation. Scalds from hot ... and gases are the most common causes of burns. Another kind is an inhalation injury, caused by ...

  16. Thermal Structure and Burning Velocity of Flames in Non-volatile Fuel Suspensions

    CERN Document Server

    Soo, Michael J; Goroshin, Samuel; Frost, David L; Bergthorson, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    Flame propagation through a non-volatile solid-fuel suspension is studied using a simplified, time-dependent numerical model that considers the influence of both diffusional and kinetic rates on the particle combustion process. It is assumed that particles react via a single-step, first-order Arrhenius surface reaction with an oxidizer delivered to the particle surface through gas diffusion. Unlike the majority of models previously developed for flames in suspensions, no external parameters are imposed, such as particle ignition temperature, combustion time, or the assumption of either kinetic- or diffusion-limited particle combustion regimes. Instead, it is demonstrated that these parameters are characteristic values of the flame propagation problem that must be solved together with the burning velocity, and that the a priori imposition of these parameters from single-particle combustion data may result in erroneous predictions. It is also shown that both diffusive and kinetic reaction regimes can alternate ...

  17. Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help prevent burns: Install smoke alarms in your home. Check and change batteries regularly. Teach children about fire safety and the danger of matches and fireworks. Keep children from climbing on top of a stove ...

  18. Asymptotic Analysis of Transport Properties and Burning Velocities for Premixed Hydrocarbon Flames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Y. Law; H.K. Ma

    2001-01-01

    Based on premixed flame, the theoretical model of transport properties with temperature variation was established inside a preheated zone. Lewis number of the deficient-to-stoichiometric hydrocarbon/air mixture has been theoretically predicted over a wide range of preheated temperature. These predictions are compared with the experimental data on transport properties that exist in the literature. The response of the burning velocity to flame stretch can be parameterized by the laminar flame speed and Markstein length. Therefore, if the laminar flame speed and Markstein number could be accurately simulated by using an analytic expression of characterized temperature, equivalence ratio, and Lewis number, the results are applicable to the prediction of methane,acetylene, ethylene, ethane, and propane flames. Expanding previous studies on the extinction ofpremixed flames under the influence of stretch and incomplete reaction, the results were further classified and rescaled. Finally, it could be inferred that parameter Pq, the rescaled extinction Karlovitz number could be used to explain the degree of flame quench.

  19. The Role of Hydrogen Bonding on Laminar Burning Velocity of Hydrous and Anhydrous Ethanol Fuel with Small Addition of n-Heptane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Made Suarta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular structure of mixed hydrous and anhydrous ethanol with up to 10% v n-heptane had been studied. The burning velocity was examined in a cylindrical explosion combustion chamber. The result showed that the burning velocity of hydrous ethanol is higher than anhydrous ethanol and n-heptane at stoichiometric, rich, and very rich mixtures. The burning velocity of hydrous ethanol with n-heptane drops drastically compared to the burning velocity of anhydrous ethanol with n-heptane. It is caused by two reasons. Firstly, there was a composition change of azeotropic hydrous ethanol molecules within the mixture of fuel. Secondly, at the same volume the number of ethanol molecules in hydrous ethanol was less than in anhydrous ethanol at the same composition of the n-heptane in the mixture. At the mixture of anhydrous ethanol with n-heptane, the burning velocity decreases proportionally to the addition of the n-heptane composition. The burning velocity is between the velocities of anhydrous ethanol and n-heptane. It shows that the burning velocity of anhydrous ethanol mixed with n-heptane is only influenced by the mixture composition.

  20. Measurement of burning velocity for bare strand casted with a frozen mixture of nano/micro-aluminum particles and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Jin Yong; Lee, Byeong Jun; Song, Dong Joo [Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Combustion characteristics of a mixture of nano- and micron-sized aluminum powder in ice were experimentally studied. Round barshaped bare strand was casted with a frozen mixture of aluminum and water and then electrically ignited in the air or argon environment. Propagating flame was recorded using a camcorder with an optical filter. Burning rate, defined as the slope in the graph of average flame position movement versus time, was also evaluated. The burning velocity peaked at equivalence ratio of 0.8. Flame propagation velocity increased with a pressure exponent of 0.61 for = 0.8 and pressure range of 0.1-0.8 MPa. For nano/micro-mixture at = 0.8, flame propagation was not feasible if the mass fraction of micron-sized particles in fuel is higher than 0.5.

  1. Measurement of laminar burning velocities and analysis of flame stabilities for hydrogen-air-diluent premixed mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU ErJiang; HUANG ZuoHua; HE JiaJia; JIN Chun; MIAO HaiYan; WANG XiBin

    2009-01-01

    The laminar burning velocities and Markstein lengths of the hydrogen-air-diluent mixtures were meas-ured at different equivalence ratios (0.4-1.5), different diluents (N2, CO2 and 15%CO2+85%N2) and di-lution ratios (0, 0.05, 0.10 and 0.15) by using the outwardly expanding flame. The influences of flame stretch rate on the flame propagation characteristics were analyzed. The results show that both the laminar burning velocities and the Markstein lengths of the hydrogen-air-diluent mixtures decrease with the increase of dilution ratio. The decrease in Markstein lengths means that adding diluents into the hydrogen-air mixtures will decrease the diffusional-thermal instability of the flame front. For a specified dilution ratio, the laminar burning velocities give their maximum values at an equivalence ratio of 1.8. The Markstein lengths increase with the increase of the equivalence ratio monotonously regardless of the diluents. The study shows that CO2 as the diluent has a greater impact on the laminar flame speed and the flame front stability than N2 as the diluent.

  2. The influence of CO2 in biogas flammability limit and laminar burning velocity in spark ignited premix combustion at various pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggono, W.; Wardana, I. N. G.; Lawes, M.; Hughes, K. J.; Wahyudi, S.; Hamidi, N.; Hayakawa, A.

    2016-03-01

    Biogas is an alternative energy source that is sustainable and renewable containing more than 50% CH4 and its biggest impurity or inhibitor is CO2. Demands for replacing fossil fuels require an improved fundamental understanding of its combustion processes. Flammability limits and laminar burning velocities are important characteristics in these processes. Thus, this research focused on the effects of CO2 on biogas flammability limits and laminar burning velocities in spark ignited premixed combustion. Biogas was burned in a spark ignited spherical combustion bomb. Spherically expanding laminar premixed flames, freely propagating from spark ignition in initial, were continuously recorded by a high-speed digital camera. The combustion bomb was filled with biogas-air mixtures at various pressures, CO2 levels and equivalence ratios (ϕ) at ambient temperature. The results were also compared to those of the previous study into inhibitorless biogas (methane) at various pressures and equivalence ratios (ϕ). Either the flammable areas become narrower with increased percentages of carbon dioxide or the pressure become lower. In biogas with 50% CO2 content, there was no biogas flame propagation for any equivalence ratio at reduced pressure (0.5 atm). The results show that the laminar burning velocity at the same equivalence ratio declined in respect with the increased level of CO2. The laminar burning velocities were higher at the same equivalence ratio by reducing the initial pressure.

  3. Elementary examples of adiabatic invariance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, F.S. (Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA (USA) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (USA))

    1990-04-01

    Simple classical one-dimensional systems subject to adiabatic (gradual) perturbations are examined. The first examples are well known: the adiabatic invariance of the product {ital E}{tau} of energy {ital E} and period {tau} for the simple pendulum and for the simple harmonic oscillator. Next, the adiabatic invariants of the vertical bouncer are found---a ball bouncing elastically from the floor of a rising elevator having slowly varying velocity and acceleration. These examples lead to consideration of adiabatic invariance for one-dimensional systems with potentials of the form {ital V}={ital ax}{sup {ital n}}, with {ital a}={ital a}({ital t}) slowly varying in time. Then, the horizontal bouncer is considered---a mass sliding on a smooth floor, bouncing back and forth between two impenetrable walls, one of which is slowly moving. This example is generalized to a particle in a bound state of a general potential with one slowly moving turning point.'' Finally, circular motion of a charged particle in a magnetic field slowly varying in time under three different configurations is considered: (a) a free particle in a uniform field; (b) a free particle in a nonuniform betatron'' field; and (c) a particle constrained to a circular orbit in a uniform field.

  4. Quasi-adiabatic transport in Mercury's magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcourt, Dominique; Malova, Helmi; Zelenyi, Lev

    2017-04-01

    MESSENGER observations have revealed that the magnetotail of Mercury is fairly dynamical, possibly subjected to series of magnetic field line dipolarization on time scales of a few seconds. Because of the sharp reversal of the magnetic field, ions may not travel adiabatically in this region of space, and their behavior can be organized according to different categories. Among these categories, quasi-adiabatic (Speiser) ions are such that they experience negligible net change of magnetic moment upon crossing of the field reversal and can thus travel back to low altitudes. We examine the robustness of this quasi-adiabatic behavior during magnetic field line dipolarization where ions are subjected to a large induced electric field. We demonstrate that, although this surging electric field possibly yields substantial nonadiabatic heating, quasi-adiabaticity is robust for ions with velocities larger than the peak ExB drift speed, a behavior that we refer to as "strong" quasi-adiabaticity (as opposed to "weak" quasi-adiabaticity that is violated during dipolarization). We show that the impulsive energization of such quasi-adiabatic ions during dipolarization events can lead to prominent energy-time dispersion structures at low altitudes.

  5. Laminar Burning Velocities of Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE) Gasoline and Gasoline Surrogates with and without Ethanol Blending Associated with Octane Rating

    KAUST Repository

    Mannaa, Ossama A.

    2016-05-04

    Laminar burning velocities of fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE) C gasoline and of several blends of surrogate toluene reference fuels (TRFs) (n-heptane, iso-octane, and toluene mixtures) of the same research octane number are presented. Effects of ethanol addition on laminar flame speed of FACE-C and its surrogate are addressed. Measurements were conducted using a constant volume spherical combustion vessel in the constant pressure, stable flame regime at an initial temperature of 358 K and initial pressures up to 0.6 MPa with the equivalence ratios ranging from 0.8 to 1.6. Comparable values in the laminar burning velocities were measured for the FACE-C gasoline and the proposed surrogate fuel (17.60% n-heptane + 77.40% iso-octane + 5% toluene) over the range of experimental conditions. Sensitivity of flame propagation to total stretch rate effects and thermo-diffusive instability was quantified by determining Markstein length. Two percentages of an oxygenated fuel of ethanol as an additive, namely, 60 vol% and 85 vol% were investigated. The addition of ethanol to FACE-C and its surrogate TRF-1 (17.60% n-heptane + 77.40% iso-octane + 5% toluene) resulted in a relatively similar increase in the laminar burning velocities. The high-pressure measured values of Markstein length for the studied fuels blended with ethanol showed minimal influence of ethanol addition on the flame’s response to stretch rate and thermo-diffusive instability. © 2016 Taylor & Francis.

  6. Isothermal and Adiabatic Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNairy, William W.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the working of the Adiabatic Gas Law Apparatus, a useful tool for measuring the pressure, temperature, and volume of a variety of gases undergoing compressions and expansions. Describes the adaptation of this apparatus to perform isothermal measurements and discusses the theory behind the adiabatic and isothermal processes. (JRH)

  7. Adiabat-shaping in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, K. L.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Casey, D. T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Landen, O. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Berzak-Hopkins, L. F.; Weber, C. R.; Haan, S. W.; Döppner, T. D.; Dixit, S.; Hamza, A. V.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Kroll, J. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    Adiabat-shaping techniques were investigated in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility as a means to improve implosion stability, while still maintaining a low adiabat in the fuel. Adiabat-shaping was accomplished in these indirect drive experiments by altering the ratio of the picket and trough energies in the laser pulse shape, thus driving a decaying first shock in the ablator. This decaying first shock is designed to place the ablation front on a high adiabat while keeping the fuel on a low adiabat. These experiments were conducted using the keyhole experimental platform for both three and four shock laser pulses. This platform enabled direct measurement of the shock velocities driven in the glow-discharge polymer capsule and in the liquid deuterium, the surrogate fuel for a DT ignition target. The measured shock velocities and radiation drive histories are compared to previous three and four shock laser pulses. This comparison indicates that in the case of adiabat shaping the ablation front initially drives a high shock velocity, and therefore, a high shock pressure and adiabat. The shock then decays as it travels through the ablator to pressures similar to the original low-adiabat pulses when it reaches the fuel. This approach takes advantage of initial high ablation velocity, which favors stability, and high-compression, which favors high stagnation pressures.

  8. Kinetic Theory Derivation of the Adiabatic Law for Ideal Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Michael I.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses how the adiabatic law for ideal gases can be derived from the assumption of a Maxwell-Boltzmann (or any other) distribution of velocities--in contrast to the usual derivations from thermodynamics alone, and the higher-order effect that leads to one-body viscosity. An elementary derivation of the adiabatic law is given. (Author/DS)

  9. Adiabatic turbocompound diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamo, R.; Bryzik, W.

    1984-02-01

    The research and development of an adiabatic turbocompound engine have shown that the concept is feasible. The ability to meet the performance and sociability goals of the future power plants has been demonstrated. Low brake specific fuel consumption, low smoke and particulates, better NO /SUB x/ -BSFC trade-off, excellent multifuel capability, white smoke suppression, and potentially lower maintenance and greater reliability and durability are some of the attributes. The absence of the water cooling system adds to its attractiveness because of lower installed weight, cost, and reduction in parasitic losses. The operating environment of an adiabatic engine is shown as the basis for analysis and designing of adiabatic components. The types of material which can satisfy the needs of an adiabatic engine are presented. These materials include high temperature metals, high performance ceramics, and glass ceramics. The use of a turbocompound system to utilize the increased exhaust energy of an adiabatic engine is covered. A minimum fuel consumption of 0.285 lb/bhp-hr was achieved at 200 psi BMEP. Although the technical feasibility and viability of an adiabatic engine was demonstrated, the adiabatic diesel engine has problems which must be solved before it becomes a commercially viable product. These problem areas where more work is required are discussed.

  10. Quantum adiabatic machine learning

    CERN Document Server

    Pudenz, Kristen L

    2011-01-01

    We develop an approach to machine learning and anomaly detection via quantum adiabatic evolution. In the training phase we identify an optimal set of weak classifiers, to form a single strong classifier. In the testing phase we adiabatically evolve one or more strong classifiers on a superposition of inputs in order to find certain anomalous elements in the classification space. Both the training and testing phases are executed via quantum adiabatic evolution. We apply and illustrate this approach in detail to the problem of software verification and validation.

  11. Adiabatic markovian dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreshkov, Ognyan; Calsamiglia, John

    2010-07-30

    We propose a theory of adiabaticity in quantum markovian dynamics based on a decomposition of the Hilbert space induced by the asymptotic behavior of the Lindblad semigroup. A central idea of our approach is that the natural generalization of the concept of eigenspace of the Hamiltonian in the case of markovian dynamics is a noiseless subsystem with a minimal noisy cofactor. Unlike previous attempts to define adiabaticity for open systems, our approach deals exclusively with physical entities and provides a simple, intuitive picture at the Hilbert-space level, linking the notion of adiabaticity to the theory of noiseless subsystems. As two applications of our theory, we propose a general framework for decoherence-assisted computation in noiseless codes and a dissipation-driven approach to holonomic computation based on adiabatic dragging of subsystems that is generally not achievable by nondissipative means.

  12. Quench propagation analysis in adiabatic superconducting windings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiyama, A.; Matsumura, H.; Takita, W. (Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Waseda Univ., Tokyo (JP)); Iwasa, Y (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab.)

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports the basic postulate of the author's quench simulation code, developed to analyze normal-zone propagation in adiabatic magnets which is the code's computation may be immensely simplified without sacrifice in accuracy by aggregating all thermal properties of the winding affecting normal-zone propagation into a single parameter of the transverse quench velocity. In order to verify this postulate, a finite element method (FEM) analysis has been applied to solve the temporal and spatial evolution of temperature within a section of an adiabatic magnet winding.

  13. Adiabatic quantum computing

    OpenAIRE

    Lobe, Elisabeth; Stollenwerk, Tobias; Tröltzsch, Anke

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, the field of adiabatic quantum computing has gained importance due to the advances in the realisation of such machines, especially by the company D-Wave Systems. These machines are suited to solve discrete optimisation problems which are typically very hard to solve on a classical computer. Due to the quantum nature of the device it is assumed that there is a substantial speedup compared to classical HPC facilities. We explain the basic principles of adiabatic ...

  14. Adiabatic quantum computation along quasienergies

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Atushi

    2009-01-01

    The parametric deformations of quasienergies and eigenvectors of unitary operators are applied to the design of quantum adiabatic algorithms. The conventional, standard adiabatic quantum computation proceeds along eigenenergies of parameter-dependent Hamiltonians. By contrast, discrete adiabatic computation utilizes adiabatic passage along the quasienergies of parameter-dependent unitary operators. For example, such computation can be realized by a concatenation of parameterized quantum circuits, with an adiabatic though inevitably discrete change of the parameter. A design principle of adiabatic passage along quasienergy is recently proposed: Cheon's quasienergy and eigenspace anholonomies on unitary operators is available to realize anholonomic adiabatic algorithms [Tanaka and Miyamoto, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 160407 (2007)], which compose a nontrivial family of discrete adiabatic algorithms. It is straightforward to port a standard adiabatic algorithm to an anholonomic adiabatic one, except an introduction of...

  15. Determination of the Burning Velocity Domain of a Statistically Stationary Turbulent Premixed Flame in Presence of Counter-Gradient Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sabel'nikov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims at providing a complete picture of the various propagation scenarios that a statistically stationary turbulent premixed flame may possibly undergo. By explicitly splitting the scalar turbulent flux between its gradient and counter-gradient contributions, the scalar governing equation is rewritten as an ordinary differential equation in the phase space. Then, an analysis of the characteristic equations in the vicinity of the reactants and products side is carried out. The domain of existence of the propagation velocity is then determined and positioned over the relevant Bray number range. It is shown in particular that when a counter-gradient transport at the cold leading edge of the flame is dominant, there still exists a possibility of observing a steady regime of propagation. This conclusion is compatible with recent experimental data and observations based on the analysis of direct numerical simulations.

  16. Semiconductor adiabatic qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Malcolm S.; Witzel, Wayne; Jacobson, Noah Tobias; Ganti, Anand; Landahl, Andrew J.; Lilly, Michael; Nguyen, Khoi Thi; Bishop, Nathaniel; Carr, Stephen M.; Bussmann, Ezra; Nielsen, Erik; Levy, James Ewers; Blume-Kohout, Robin J.; Rahman, Rajib

    2016-12-27

    A quantum computing device that includes a plurality of semiconductor adiabatic qubits is described herein. The qubits are programmed with local biases and coupling terms between qubits that represent a problem of interest. The qubits are initialized by way of a tuneable parameter, a local tunnel coupling within each qubit, such that the qubits remain in a ground energy state, and that initial state is represented by the qubits being in a superposition of |0> and |1> states. The parameter is altered over time adiabatically or such that relaxation mechanisms maintain a large fraction of ground state occupation through decreasing the tunnel coupling barrier within each qubit with the appropriate schedule. The final state when tunnel coupling is effectively zero represents the solution state to the problem represented in the |0> and |1> basis, which can be accurately read at each qubit location.

  17. Adiabatic Quantum Simulators

    CERN Document Server

    Biamonte, J D; Whitfield, J D; Fitzsimons, J; Aspuru-Guzik, A

    2010-01-01

    In his famous 1981 talk, Feynman proposed that unlike classical computers, which would presumably experience an exponential slowdown when simulating quantum phenomena, a universal quantum simulator would not. An ideal quantum simulator would be error resistant, easily controllable, and built using existing technology. Moving away from gate-model and projective measurement based implementations of quantum computing may offer a less resource-intensive, and consequently a more feasible solution. Here we consider an adiabatic quantum simulator which simulates the ground state properties of sparse Hamiltonians consisting of one- and two-body interaction terms, using sparse Hamiltonians with at most three-body interactions. Properties of such Hamiltonians can be well approximated with Hamiltonians containing only two-local terms. The register holding the simulated ground state is brought adiabatically into interaction with a probe qubit, followed by a single diabatic gate operation on the probe which then undergoes...

  18. Plasma adiabatic lapse rate

    CERN Document Server

    Amendt, Peter; Wilks, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The plasma analog of an adiabatic lapse rate (or temperature variation with height) in atmospheric physics is obtained. A new source of plasma temperature gradient in a binary ion species mixture is found that is proportional to the concentration gradient and difference in average ionization states . Application to inertial-confinement-fusion implosions indicates a potentially strong effect in plastic (CH) ablators that is not modeled with mainline (single-fluid) simulations. An associated plasma thermodiffusion coefficient is derived, and charge-state diffusion in a single-species plasma is also predicted.

  19. Nonresonance adiabatic photon trap

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, S S; Burdakov, A V; Ushkova, M Yu

    2016-01-01

    Concept of high efficiency photon storage based on adiabatic confinement between concave mirrors is presented and experimentally investigated. The approach is insensitive to typical for Fabri-Perot cells requirements on quality of accumulated radiation, tolerance of resonator elements and their stability. Experiments have been carried out with the trap, which consists from opposed concave cylindrical mirrors and conjugated with them spherical mirrors. In result, high efficiency for accumulation of radiation with large angular spread and spectrum width has been confirmed. As radiation source a commercial fiber laser has been used.

  20. Thermodynamic optimisation and computational analysis of irreversibilities in a small-scale wood-fired circulating fluidised bed adiabatic combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Baloyi, J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of irreversibilities generated due to combustion in an adiabatic combustor burning wood was conducted. This was done for a reactant mixture varying from a rich to a lean mixture. A non-adiabatic non-premixed combustion model of a...

  1. Adiabatic quantum simulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Biamonte

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In his famous 1981 talk, Feynman proposed that unlike classical computers, which would presumably experience an exponential slowdown when simulating quantum phenomena, a universal quantum simulator would not. An ideal quantum simulator would be controllable, and built using existing technology. In some cases, moving away from gate-model-based implementations of quantum computing may offer a more feasible solution for particular experimental implementations. Here we consider an adiabatic quantum simulator which simulates the ground state properties of sparse Hamiltonians consisting of one- and two-local interaction terms, using sparse Hamiltonians with at most three-local interactions. Properties of such Hamiltonians can be well approximated with Hamiltonians containing only two-local terms. The register holding the simulated ground state is brought adiabatically into interaction with a probe qubit, followed by a single diabatic gate operation on the probe which then undergoes free evolution until measured. This allows one to recover e.g. the ground state energy of the Hamiltonian being simulated. Given a ground state, this scheme can be used to verify the QMA-complete problem LOCAL HAMILTONIAN, and is therefore likely more powerful than classical computing.

  2. Burn Pits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Burn Pits Burn Pits Registry Studies Photo: U.S. Department ... the health of deployed Veterans. Health effects from burn pit smoke Toxins in burn pit smoke may ...

  3. Burn Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Now Help keep local seniors safe from fire! Burn Survivor Support If you are reading this, chances ... year – a burn injury. Learn more Fire and Burn Prevention Each year, the Burn Institute provides fire ...

  4. Adiabatic paths and pseudoholomorphic curves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Armen; G.; Sergeev

    2005-01-01

    We consider the (2+1)-dimensional Abelian Higgs model, governed by the Ginzburg-Landau action functional and describe the adiabatic limit construction for this model. Then we switch to the 4-dimensional case and Show that the Taubes correspondence may be considered as a (2+2)-dimensional analogue of the adiabatic limit construction.

  5. Geometry of the Adiabatic Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Augusto Cesar; Ribeiro, Rafael Antunes; Ribeiro, Clyffe de Assis; Dieguez, Pedro Ruas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and pedagogical derivation of the quantum adiabatic theorem for two-level systems (a single qubit) based on geometrical structures of quantum mechanics developed by Anandan and Aharonov, among others. We have chosen to use only the minimum geometric structure needed for the understanding of the adiabatic theorem for this case.…

  6. Adiabatic Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Pinski, Sebastian D

    2011-01-01

    Adiabatic Quantum Computing (AQC) is a relatively new subject in the world of quantum computing, let alone Physics. Inspiration for this project has come from recent controversy around D-Wave Systems in British Columbia, Canada, who claim to have built a working AQC which is now commercially available and hope to be distributing a 1024 qubit chip by the end of 2008. Their 16 qubit chip was demonstrated online for the Supercomputing 2007 conference within which a few small problems were solved; although the explanations that journalists and critics received were minimal and very little was divulged in the question and answer session. This 'unconvincing' demonstration has caused physicists and computer scientists to hit back at D-Wave. The aim of this project is to give an introduction to the historic advances in classical and quantum computing and to explore the methods of AQC. Through numerical simulations an algorithm for the Max Independent Set problem is empirically obtained.

  7. LETTERS AND COMMENTS: Adiabatic process reversibility: microscopic and macroscopic views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Pereira, Mário G.

    2009-05-01

    The reversibility of adiabatic processes was recently addressed by two publications. In the first (Miranda 2008 Eur. J. Phys. 29 937-43), an equation was derived relating the initial and final volumes and temperatures for adiabatic expansions of an ideal gas, using a microscopic approach. In that relation the parameter r accounts for the process reversibility, ranging between 0 and 1, which corresponds to the free and reversible expansion, respectively. In the second (Anacleto and Pereira 2009 Eur. J. Phys. 30 177-83), the authors have shown that thermodynamics can effectively and efficiently be used to obtain the general law for adiabatic processes carried out by an ideal gas, including compressions, for which r \\ge 1. The present work integrates and extends the aforementioned studies, providing thus further insights into the analysis of the adiabatic process. It is shown that Miranda's work is wholly valid for compressions. In addition, it is demonstrated that the adiabatic reversibility coefficient given in terms of the piston velocity and the root mean square velocity of the gas particles is equivalent to the macroscopic description, given just by the quotient between surroundings and system pressure values.

  8. Partial Burn Laws in Propellant Erosive Burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Finjakov

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and computer methods were developed for investigating the combustion phenomena in the propellants which burn in streams of hot gas flowing along the burn surfaces of the propellants. The experimental investigations allowed establishment of different dependencies for erosive burning. Computer solutions of the problem for double-base (DB propellants showed a good agreement with the experimental results. The suggested variant of modified theory considers the change of heat release in solids, the real burn surface roughness, the nonisothermality of boundary layer and the effect of gas mass blow from the propellant burn surface into the gas stream. This modified theory was used for studying burn laws at 30-1000 atm and up to gas stream sound velocities for different DB propellants. It was found that gas stream leads to splitting of the propellant burn laws, m = bp/sup v/. Pressure power (v, in this case depends on gas stream velocity (W, diameter of the propellant tube canal (d and gas stream temperature (T/sub w/. It is because of this that these burn laws were named partial burn laws. They have the form (m = bp/sup w(omega/ w,d,T/sub w/ -const. The dependencies w(omega = f(w,d,T/sub w/ were obtained by the modified theory. It was found that omega values mainly decrease when pressure increases beginning from ~200 to 400 atm and they can decrease up to w(omega = 0,1- 0,3. Similar results can be obtained for composite propellants.

  9. Performance analysis of adiabatic engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudhakar, V.

    1984-01-01

    As the development of the adiabatic diesel engine continues with a goal of 65% reduction in net in-cylinder heat transfer over a cooled engine, several uncooled engines with intermediate levels of reduced heat transfer were studied. Some aspects and results of the adiabatic diesel engine cycle simulation are discussed. Performance test data and simulation results are compared for a conventionally cooled and uncooled Cummins NH-450 turbocompound engines. Exhaust emissions were also measured and compared.

  10. Quantum tunneling, adiabatic invariance and black hole spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guo-Ping; Zu, Xiao-Tao [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, School of Physical Electronics, Chengdu (China); Pu, Jin [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, School of Physical Electronics, Chengdu (China); China West Normal University, College of Physics and Space Science, Nanchong (China); Jiang, Qing-Quan [China West Normal University, College of Physics and Space Science, Nanchong (China)

    2017-05-15

    In the tunneling framework, one of us, Jiang, together with Han has studied the black hole spectroscopy via adiabatic invariance, where the adiabatic invariant quantity has been intriguingly obtained by investigating the oscillating velocity of the black hole horizon. In this paper, we attempt to improve Jiang-Han's proposal in two ways. Firstly, we once again examine the fact that, in different types (Schwarzschild and Painleve) of coordinates as well as in different gravity frames, the adiabatic invariant I{sub adia} = circular integral p{sub i}dq{sub i} introduced by Jiang and Han is canonically invariant. Secondly, we attempt to confirm Jiang-Han's proposal reasonably in more general gravity frames (including Einstein's gravity, EGB gravity and HL gravity). Concurrently, for improving this proposal, we interestingly find in more general gravity theories that the entropy of the black hole is an adiabatic invariant action variable, but the horizon area is only an adiabatic invariant. In this sense, we emphasize the concept that the quantum of the black hole entropy is more natural than that of the horizon area. (orig.)

  11. Non-adiabatic primordial fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noller, Johannes; Magueijo, Joao, E-mail: johannes.noller08@imperial.ac.uk [Theoretical Physics Group, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-21

    We consider general mixtures of isocurvature and adiabatic cosmological perturbations. With a minimal assumption set consisting of the linearized Einstein equations and a primordial perfect fluid we derive the second-order action and its curvature variables. We also allow for varying equation of state and speed of sound profiles. The derivation is therefore carried out at the same level of generality that has been achieved for adiabatic modes before. As a result we find a new conserved super-horizon quantity and relate it to the adiabatically conserved curvature perturbation. Finally we demonstrate how the formalism can be applied by considering a Chaplygin gas-like primordial matter model, finding two scale-invariant solutions for structure formation.

  12. Analysis of Adiabatic Batch Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erald Gjonaj

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A mixture of acetic anhydride is reacted with excess water in an adiabatic batch reactor to form an exothermic reaction. The concentration of acetic anhydride and the temperature inside the adiabatic batch reactor are calculated with an initial temperature of 20°C, an initial temperature of 30°C, and with a cooling jacket maintaining the temperature at a constant of 20°C. The graphs of the three different scenarios show that the highest temperatures will cause the reaction to occur faster.

  13. Adiabatic theory for the bipolaron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakhno, V.D. (Institute of Mathematical Problems of Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino Moscow Region, 142292 (Russian Federation))

    1995-02-01

    A translation-invariant adiabatic theory is constructed for the bipolaron. It is shown that motions in the bipolaron are divided: the relative electron coordinates describe fast electron oscillations in the induced polarization well and the center of mass coordinates represent slow electron movement followed by polarization. Nonlinear differential bipolaron equations are derived which are asymptotically exact in the adiabatic limit. Particlelike solutions of these equations correspond to the bipolaron bound state. The exact solution yields the value of the ion critical parameter [eta]=0.31 for which the bipolaron state is stable, where [eta]=[epsilon][sub [infinity

  14. Sliding seal materials for adiabatic engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankford, J.

    1985-01-01

    The sliding friction coefficients and wear rates of promising carbide, oxide, and nitride materials were measured under temperature, environmental, velocity, loading conditions that are representative of the adiabatic engine environment. In order to provide guidance needed to improve materials for this application, the program stressed fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in friction and wear. Microhardness tests were performed on the candidate materials at elevated temperatures, and in atmospheres relevant to the piston seal application, and optical and electron microscopy were used to elucidate the micromechanisms of wear following wear testing. X-ray spectroscopy was used to evaluate interface/environment interactions which seemed to be important in the friction and wear process. Electrical effects in the friction and wear processes were explored in order to evaluate the potential usefulness of such effects in modifying the friction and wear rates in service. However, this factor was found to be of negligible significance in controlling friction and wear.

  15. A Many Particle Adiabatic Invariant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    1999-01-01

    For a system of N charged particles moving in a homogeneous, sufficiently strong magnetic field, a many-particle adiabatic invariant constrains the collisional exchange of energy between the degrees of freedom perpendicular to and parallel to the magnetic field. A description of the phenomenon...

  16. Global adiabaticity and non-Gaussianity consistency condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Enea Romano

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the context of single-field inflation, the conservation of the curvature perturbation on comoving slices, Rc, on super-horizon scales is one of the assumptions necessary to derive the consistency condition between the squeezed limit of the bispectrum and the spectrum of the primordial curvature perturbation. However, the conservation of Rc holds only after the perturbation has reached the adiabatic limit where the constant mode of Rc dominates over the other (usually decaying mode. In this case, the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation defined in the thermodynamic sense, δPnad≡δP−cw2δρ where cw2=P˙/ρ˙, usually becomes also negligible on superhorizon scales. Therefore one might think that the adiabatic limit is the same as thermodynamic adiabaticity. This is in fact not true. In other words, thermodynamic adiabaticity is not a sufficient condition for the conservation of Rc on super-horizon scales. In this paper, we consider models that satisfy δPnad=0 on all scales, which we call global adiabaticity (GA, which is guaranteed if cw2=cs2, where cs is the phase velocity of the propagation of the perturbation. A known example is the case of ultra-slow-roll (USR inflation in which cw2=cs2=1. In order to generalize USR we develop a method to find the Lagrangian of GA K-inflation models from the behavior of background quantities as functions of the scale factor. Applying this method we show that there indeed exists a wide class of GA models with cw2=cs2, which allows Rc to grow on superhorizon scales, and hence violates the non-Gaussianity consistency condition.

  17. Global adiabaticity and non-Gaussianity consistency condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Antonio Enea; Mooij, Sander; Sasaki, Misao

    2016-10-01

    In the context of single-field inflation, the conservation of the curvature perturbation on comoving slices, Rc, on super-horizon scales is one of the assumptions necessary to derive the consistency condition between the squeezed limit of the bispectrum and the spectrum of the primordial curvature perturbation. However, the conservation of Rc holds only after the perturbation has reached the adiabatic limit where the constant mode of Rc dominates over the other (usually decaying) mode. In this case, the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation defined in the thermodynamic sense, δPnad ≡ δP - cw2 δρ where cw2 = P ˙ / ρ ˙ , usually becomes also negligible on superhorizon scales. Therefore one might think that the adiabatic limit is the same as thermodynamic adiabaticity. This is in fact not true. In other words, thermodynamic adiabaticity is not a sufficient condition for the conservation of Rc on super-horizon scales. In this paper, we consider models that satisfy δPnad = 0 on all scales, which we call global adiabaticity (GA), which is guaranteed if cw2 = cs2 , where cs is the phase velocity of the propagation of the perturbation. A known example is the case of ultra-slow-roll (USR) inflation in which cw2 = cs2 = 1. In order to generalize USR we develop a method to find the Lagrangian of GA K-inflation models from the behavior of background quantities as functions of the scale factor. Applying this method we show that there indeed exists a wide class of GA models with cw2 = cs2, which allows Rc to grow on superhorizon scales, and hence violates the non-Gaussianity consistency condition.

  18. Alpha Heating and TN Burn in NIF Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas; Wang, Yi-Ming; Merrill, Frank; Cerjan, Charlie; Batha, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Sustainable TN burn requires alpha-particle energy deposition in the hot fuel. Recently, we developed an analytic model to estimate the neutron yield generated by the alpha-particle energy deposited in the hot spot, in terms of the measured total neutron yield, the adiabat of the cold fuel and the peak implosion kinetic energy of the pusher. Our alpha heating model has been applied to a number of inertial confinement fusion capsule experiments performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Our model predictions are consistent with the post-shot calibrated code simulations and experimental data. We have also studied the uncertainty and sensitivities of alpha heating on various physics parameters, such as the adiabat of cold fuel, total neutron yield and peak implosion velocity. Our analysis demonstrates that the alpha particle heating was appreciable in only high-foot experiments. Based on our work, we will discuss paths and parameters to reach ignition at NIF (LA-UR-15-25507). This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  19. Under and over-adiabatic electrons through a perpendicular collisionless shock: theory versus simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Savoini

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Test particle simulations are performed in order to analyze in detail the dynamics of transmitted electrons through a supercritical, strictly perpendicular, collisionless shock. In addition to adiabatic particles, two distinct nonadiabatic populations are observed surprisingly: (i first, an over-adiabatic population characterized by an increase in the gyrating velocity higher than that expected from the conservation of the magnetic moment µ, and (ii second, an under-adiabatic population characterized by a decrease in this velocity. Results show that both nonadiabatic populations have their pitch angle more aligned along the magnetic field than the adiabatic one at the time these hit the shock front. The formation of "under" and "over-adiabatic" particles strongly depends on their local injection conditions through the large amplitude cross-shock potential present within the shock front. A simplified theoretical model validates these results and points out the important role of the electric field as seen by the electrons. A classification shows that both nonadiabatic electrons are issued from the core part of the upstream distributionÊ function. In contrast, suprathermal and tail electrons only contribute to the adiabatic population; nevertheless, the core part of the upstream distribution contributes at a lower percentage to the adiabatic electrons. Under-adiabatic electrons are characterized by small injection angles θinj≤90°, whereas "over-adiabatic" particles have high injection angles θinj>90° (where θinj is the angle between the local gyrating velocity vector and the shock normal.

  20. Digital Waveguide Adiabatic Passage Part 1: Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Vaitkus, Jesse A; Greentree, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Spatial adiabatic passage represents a new way to design integrated photonic devices. In conventional adiabatic passage designs require smoothly varying waveguide separations. Here we show modelling of adiabatic passage devices where the waveguide separation is varied digitally. Despite digitisation, our designs show robustness against variations in the input wavelength and refractive index contrast of the waveguides relative to the cladding. This approach to spatial adiabatic passage opens new design strategies and hence the potential for new photonics devices.

  1. Solitary shock waves and adiabatic phase transition in lipid interfaces and nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Shamit; Kang, Kevin Heeyong; Schneider, Matthias F

    2015-01-01

    This study shows that the stability of solitary waves excited in a lipid monolayer near a phase transition requires positive curvature of the adiabats, a known necessary condition in shock compression science. It is further shown that the condition results in a threshold for excitation, saturation of the wave's amplitude, and the splitting of the wave at the phase boundaries. Splitting in particular confirms that a hydrated lipid interface can undergo condensation on adiabatic heating, thus showing retrograde behavior. Finally, using the theoretical insights and state dependence of conduction velocity in nerves, the curvature of the adiabatic state diagram is shown to be closely tied to the thermodynamic blockage of nerve pulse propagation.

  2. Scald Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safety Tips & Info Scald Burns Thousands of scald burns occur annually, and ALL are preventable! The two high-risk populations are children under the age ... the single most important factor in preventing scald burns. Increased awareness is the key to scald prevention! ...

  3. Thermal reservoir sizing for adiabatic compressed air energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kere, Amelie; Goetz, Vincent; Py, Xavier; Olives, Regis; Sadiki, Najim [Perpignan Univ. (France). PROMES CNRS UPR 8521; Mercier-Allart, Eric [EDF R et D, Chatou (France)

    2012-07-01

    Despite the operation of the two existing industrial facilities to McIntosh (Alabama), and for more than thirty years, Huntorf (Germany), electricity storage in the form of compressed air in underground cavern (CAES) has not seen the development that was expected in the 80s. The efficiency of this form of storage was with the first generation CAES, less than 50%. The evolving context technique can significantly alter this situation. The new generation so-called Adiabatic CAES (A-CAES) is to retrieve the heat produced by the compression via thermal storage, thus eliminating the necessity of gas to burn and would allow consideration efficiency overall energy of the order of 70%. To date, there is no existing installation of A-CAES. Many studies describe the principal and the general working mode of storage systems by adiabatic compression of air. So, efficiencies of different configurations of adiabatic compression process were analyzed. The aim of this paper is to simulate and analyze the performances of a thermal storage reservoir integrated in the system and adapted to the working conditions of a CAES.

  4. Burn Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koray Aydemir

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burn injuries are important in terms of causing serious disability and threatening life. With the establishment of modern burn treatment units and advances in acute care management contributed to a reduced mortality rate over the last decades. As a result of improved outcome, more attention has to be given to a comprehensive burn rehabilitation program. Burn rehabilitation is a process that starts from day of admission and continues for months or sometimes years after the initial event. The term ‘burn rehabilitation’ incorporates the physical, physiological and social aspects of care. Burns can leave a patient with severely debilitating and deforming contractures, which can lead to significant disability when left untreated. Burn rehabilitation aims to prevent the possible complications, minimalize joint contractures and deformities, increase range of motion, control hypertrophic scarring, achieve the best possible functional capacity and to regain the patients vocational and recreational activities. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 70-7

  5. Adiabatic Rearrangement of Hollow PV Towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Hendricks

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabatic heating from deep moist convection in the hurricane eyewall produces a towering annular structure of elevated potential vorticity (PV. This structure has been referred to as a hollow PV tower. The sign reversal of the radial gradient of PV satisfies the Charney-Stern necessary condition for combined barotropic-baroclinic instability. For thin enough annular structures, small perturbations grow exponentially, extract energy from the mean flow, and lead to hollow tower breakdown, with significant vortex structural and intensity change. The three-dimensional adiabatic rearrangements of two prototypical hurricane-like hollow PV towers (one thick and one thin are examined in an idealized framework. For both hollow towers, dynamic instability causes air parcels with high PV to be mixed into the eye preferentially at lower levels, where unstable PV wave growth rates are the largest. Little or no mixing is found to occur at upper levels. The mixing at lower and middle levels is most rapid for the breakdown of the thin hollow tower, consistent with previous barotropic results. For both hollow towers, this advective rearrangement of PV affects the tropical cyclone structure and intensity in a number of ways. First, the minimum central pressure and maximum azimuthal mean velocity simultaneously decrease, consistent with previous barotropic results. Secondly, isosurfaces of absolute angular momentum preferentially shift inward at low levels, implying an adiabatic mechanism by which hurricane eyewall tilt can form. Thirdly, a PV bridge, similar to that previously found in full-physics hurricane simulations, develops as a result of mixing at the isentropic levels where unstable PV waves grow most rapidly. Finally, the balanced mass field resulting from the PV rearrangement is warmer in the eye between 900 and 700 hPa. The location of this warming is consistent with observed warm anomalies in the eye, indicating that in certain instances the hurricane

  6. Experimental Investigation of Adiabatic Shear Banding at Different Impact Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    obtained for XC18 steel are compared with results for a mild steel reported by Campbell and Ferguson [48] ; composition of En3B (British Standards...chemical composition of the supplied VAR4340 steel was as follows : C 0.42 ; Ni 1.74 ; Cr 0.89 ; Mn 0.46: Si 0.28 ; S 0.001 ; P 0.009 (% wt.). About...7] C. Fressengeas, Analyse dynamique 61asto-viscoplastique de l’h6tdrogdndit6 de la ddforma- tion plastique de cisalllement, Proc. Int. Conf. on

  7. Invalidity of the quantitative adiabatic condition and general conditions for adiabatic approximations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dafa

    2016-05-01

    The adiabatic theorem was proposed about 90 years ago and has played an important role in quantum physics. The quantitative adiabatic condition constructed from eigenstates and eigenvalues of a Hamiltonian is a traditional tool to estimate adiabaticity and has proven to be the necessary and sufficient condition for adiabaticity. However, recently the condition has become a controversial subject. In this paper, we list some expressions to estimate the validity of the adiabatic approximation. We show that the quantitative adiabatic condition is invalid for the adiabatic approximation via the Euclidean distance between the adiabatic state and the evolution state. Furthermore, we deduce general necessary and sufficient conditions for the validity of the adiabatic approximation by different definitions.

  8. Adiabatic theory of solitons fed by dispersive waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickartz, Sabrina; Bandelow, Uwe; Amiranashvili, Shalva

    2016-09-01

    We consider scattering of low-amplitude dispersive waves at an intense optical soliton which constitutes a nonlinear perturbation of the refractive index. Specifically, we consider a single-mode optical fiber and a group velocity matched pair: an optical soliton and a nearly perfectly reflected dispersive wave, a fiber-optical analog of the event horizon. By combining (i) an adiabatic approach that is used in soliton perturbation theory and (ii) scattering theory from quantum mechanics, we give a quantitative account of the evolution of all soliton parameters. In particular, we quantify the increase in the soliton peak power that may result in the spontaneous appearance of an extremely large, so-called champion soliton. The presented adiabatic theory agrees well with the numerical solutions of the pulse propagation equation. Moreover, we predict the full frequency band of the scattered dispersive waves and explain an emerging caustic structure in the space-time domain.

  9. Adiabatic Wankel type rotary engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, R.; Badgley, P.; Doup, D.

    1988-01-01

    This SBIR Phase program accomplished the objective of advancing the technology of the Wankel type rotary engine for aircraft applications through the use of adiabatic engine technology. Based on the results of this program, technology is in place to provide a rotor and side and intermediate housings with thermal barrier coatings. A detailed cycle analysis of the NASA 1007R Direct Injection Stratified Charge (DISC) rotary engine was performed which concluded that applying thermal barrier coatings to the rotor should be successful and that it was unlikely that the rotor housing could be successfully run with thermal barrier coatings as the thermal stresses were extensive.

  10. Theory of Adiabatic Fountain Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gary A.

    2017-01-01

    The theory of "Adiabatic Fountain Resonance" with superfluid ^4{He} is clarified. In this geometry a film region between two silicon wafers bonded at their outer edge opens up to a central region with a free surface. We find that the resonance in this system is not a Helmholtz resonance as claimed by Gasparini et al., but in fact is a fourth sound resonance. We postulate that it occurs at relatively low frequency because the thin silicon wafers flex appreciably from the pressure oscillations of the sound wave.

  11. Amplitudes of solar-like oscillations in red giants: Departures from the quasi-adiabatic approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barban C.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available CoRoT and Kepler measurements reveal us that the amplitudes of solar-like oscillations detected in red giant stars scale from stars to stars in a characteristic way. This observed scaling relation is not yet fully understood but constitutes potentially a powerful diagnostic about mode physics. Quasi-adiabatic theoretical scaling relations in terms of mode amplitudes result in systematic and large differences with the measurements performed for red giant stars. The use of a non-adiabatic intensity-velocity relation derived from a non-adiabatic pulsation code significantly reduces the discrepancy with the CoRoT measurements. The origin of the remaining difference is still unknown. Departure from adiabatic eigenfunction is a very likely explanation that is investigated in the present work using a 3D hydrodynamical model of the surface layers of a representative red giant star.

  12. On the topology of adiabatic passage

    CERN Document Server

    Yatsenko, L P; Jauslin, H R

    2002-01-01

    We examine the topology of eigenenergy surfaces characterizing the population transfer processes based on adiabatic passage. We show that this topology is the essential feature for the analysis of the population transfers and the prediction of its final result. We reinterpret diverse known processes, such as stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP), frequency-chirped adiabatic passage and Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passage (SCRAP). Moreover, using this picture, we display new related possibilities of transfer. In particular, we show that we can selectively control the level which will be populated in STIRAP process in Lambda or V systems by the choice of the peak amplitudes or the pulse sequence.

  13. (Hybrid) Baryons Quantum Numbers and Adiabatic Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Page, P R

    1999-01-01

    We construct (hybrid) baryons in the flux-tube model of Isgur and Paton. In the limit of adiabatic quark motion, we build proper eigenstates of orbital angular momentum and indicate the flavour, spin, chirality and J^P of (hybrid) baryons. The adiabatic potential is calculated as a function of the quark positions.

  14. Cummins/Tacom advanced adiabatic engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamo, R.; Bryzik, W.

    1984-01-01

    Cummins Engine Company, Inc. and the U.S. Army have been jointly developing an adiabatic turbocompound engine during the last nine years. Although progress in the early years was slow, recent developments in the field of advanced ceramics have made it possible to make steady progress. It is now possible to reconsider the temperature limitation imposed on current heat engines and its subsequent influence on higher engine efficiency when using an exhaust energy utilization system. This paper presents an adiabatic turbocompound diesel engine concept in which high-performance ceramics are used in its design. The adiabatic turbocompound engine will enable higher operating temperatures, reduced heat loss, and higher exhaust energy recovery, resulting in higher thermal engine efficiency. This paper indicates that the careful selection of ceramics in engine design is essential. Adiabatic engine materials requirements are defined and the possible ceramic materials which will satisfy these requirements are identified. Examples in design considerations of engine components are illustrated. In addition to these important points, the use of ceramic coatings in the design of engine components. The first generation adiabatic engine with ceramic coatings is described. The advanced adiabatic engine with minimum friction features utilizaing ceramics is also presented. The advanced ceramic turbocharger turbine rotor as well as the oilless ceramic bearing design is described. Finally, the current status of the advanced adiabatic engine program culminating in the AA750 V-8 adiabatic engine is presented.

  15. On a Nonlinear Model in Adiabatic Evolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Song-Feng

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we study a kind of nonlinear model of adiabatic evolution in quantum search problem. As will be seen here, for this problem, there always exists a possibility that this nonlinear model can successfully solve the problem, while the linear model can not. Also in the same setting, when the overlap between the initial state and the final stare is sufficiently large, a simple linear adiabatic evolution can achieve O(1) time efficiency, but infinite time complexity for the nonlinear model of adiabatic evolution is needed. This tells us, it is not always a wise choice to use nonlinear interpolations in adiabatic algorithms. Sometimes, simple linear adiabatic evolutions may be sufficient for using. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 61402188 and 61173050. The first author also gratefully acknowledges the support from the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation under Grant No. 2014M552041

  16. PIPER Continuous Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Mark O.; Shirron, Peter J.; Canavan, Edgar R.; James, Bryan L.; Sampson, Michael A.; Letmate, Richard V.

    2017-01-01

    We report upon the development and testing of a 4-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) capable of continuous cooling at 0.100 Kelvin. This cooler is being built to cool the detector array aboard NASA's Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) observatory. The goal of this balloon mission is to measure the primordial gravitational waves that should exist if the theory of cosmological inflation is correct. At altitude, the ADR will hold the array of transition-edge sensors at 100 mK continuously while periodically rejecting heat to a 1.2 K pumped helium bath. During testing on ground, the array is held at the same temperature but heat is rejected to a 4.2 K helium bath indicating the flexibility in this coolers design.

  17. Quenching in coupled adiabatic coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.E.C.

    1985-03-01

    The prediction of the effects of a quench on stress and temperature is an important aspect of the design of superconducting magnets. Of particular interest, and the exclusive topic of this study, is the prediction of the effects of quenching in coupled adiabatic coils, such as the multi-section windings of a high field NMR spectrometer magnet. The predictive methods used here are based on the measurement of the time of propagation of quench between turns. From this measurement an approximate algorithum for the propagation time is used in a code which solves the linear differential equations for the coil currents and calculates the movement of normal zone boundaries and hence the associated winding resistance.

  18. Quantum Computation by Adiabatic Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Farhi, E; Gutmann, S; Sipser, M; Farhi, Edward; Goldstone, Jeffrey; Gutmann, Sam; Sipser, Michael

    2000-01-01

    We give a quantum algorithm for solving instances of the satisfiability problem, based on adiabatic evolution. The evolution of the quantum state is governed by a time-dependent Hamiltonian that interpolates between an initial Hamiltonian, whose ground state is easy to construct, and a final Hamiltonian, whose ground state encodes the satisfying assignment. To ensure that the system evolves to the desired final ground state, the evolution time must be big enough. The time required depends on the minimum energy difference between the two lowest states of the interpolating Hamiltonian. We are unable to estimate this gap in general. We give some special symmetric cases of the satisfiability problem where the symmetry allows us to estimate the gap and we show that, in these cases, our algorithm runs in polynomial time.

  19. Prediction of mean flow data for adiabatic 2-D compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Motallebi, F.

    1997-01-01

    This book presents a method for the prediction of mean flow data (i.e. skin friction, velocity profile and shape parameter) for adiabatic two-dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers at zero pressure gradient. The transformed law of the wall, law of the lake, the van Driest model for the

  20. Prediction of mean flow data for adiabatic 2-D compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Motallebi, F.

    1997-01-01

    This book presents a method for the prediction of mean flow data (i.e. skin friction, velocity profile and shape parameter) for adiabatic two-dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers at zero pressure gradient. The transformed law of the wall, law of the lake, the van Driest model for the c

  1. Partial evolution based local adiabatic quantum search

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Jie; Lu Song-Feng; Liu Fang; Yang Li-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Recently,Zhang and Lu provided a quantum search algorithm based on partial adiabatic evolution,which beats the time bound of local adiabatic search when the number of marked items in the unsorted database is larger than one.Later,they found that the above two adiabatic search algorithms had the same time complexity when there is only one marked item in the database.In the present paper,following the idea of Roland and Cerf [Roland J and Cerf N J 2002Phys.Rev.A 65 042308],if within the small symmetric evolution interval defined by Zhang et al.,a local adiabatic evolution is performed instead of the original “global” one,this “new” algorithm exhibits slightly better performance,although they are progressively equivalent with M increasing.In addition,the proof of the optimality for this partial evolution based local adiabatic search when M =1 is also presented.Two other special cases of the adiabatic algorithm obtained by appropriately tuning the evolution interval of partial adiabatic evolution based quantum search,which are found to have the same phenomenon above,are also discussed.

  2. Adiabatic theorems for generators of contracting evolutions

    CERN Document Server

    Avron, J E; Graf, G M; Grech, P

    2011-01-01

    We develop an adiabatic theory for generators of contracting evolution on Banach spaces. This provides a uniform framework for a host of adiabatic theorems ranging from unitary quantum evolutions through quantum evolutions of open systems generated by Lindbladians all the way to classically driven stochastic systems. In all these cases the adiabatic evolution approximates, to lowest order, the natural notion of parallel transport in the manifold of instantaneous stationary states. The dynamics in the manifold of instantaneous stationary states and transversal to it have distinct characteristics: The former is irreversible and the latter is transient in a sense that we explain. Both the gapped and gapless cases are considered. Some applications are discussed.

  3. Digital Waveguide Adiabatic Passage Part 2: Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, Vincent; Chaboyer, Zachary J; Nguyen, Thach; Dawes, Judith M; Withford, Michael J; Greentree, Andrew D; Steel, M J

    2016-01-01

    Using a femtosecond laser writing technique, we fabricate and characterise three-waveguide digital adiabatic passage devices, with the central waveguide digitised into five discrete waveguidelets. Strongly asymmetric behaviour was observed, devices operated with high fidelity in the counter-intuitive scheme while strongly suppressing transmission in the intuitive. The low differential loss of the digital adiabatic passage designs potentially offers additional functionality for adiabatic passage based devices. These devices operate with a high contrast ($>\\!90\\%$) over a 60~nm bandwidth, centered at $\\sim 823$~nm.

  4. Energy consumption for shortcuts to adiabaticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrontegui, E.; Lizuain, I.; González-Resines, S.; Tobalina, A.; Ruschhaupt, A.; Kosloff, R.; Muga, J. G.

    2017-08-01

    Shortcuts to adiabaticity let a system reach the results of a slow adiabatic process in a shorter time. We propose to quantify the "energy cost" of the shortcut by the energy consumption of the system enlarged by including the control device. A mechanical model where the dynamics of the system and control device can be explicitly described illustrates that a broad range of possible values for the consumption is possible, including zero (above the adiabatic energy increment) when friction is negligible and the energy given away as negative power is stored and reused by perfect regenerative braking.

  5. Thermoelectric Effects under Adiabatic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Levy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates not fully explained voltage offsets observed by several researchers during the measurement of the Seebeck coefficient of high Z materials. These offsets, traditionally attributed to faulty laboratory procedures, have proven to have an irreducible component that cannot be fully eliminated in spite of careful laboratory procedures. In fact, these offsets are commonly observed and routinely subtracted out of commercially available Seebeck measurement systems. This paper offers a possible explanation based on the spontaneous formation of an adiabatic temperature gradient in the presence of a force field. The diffusion-diffusion heat transport mechanism is formulated and applied to predict two new thermoelectric effects. The first is the existence of a temperature gradient across a potential barrier in a semiconductor and the second is the Onsager reciprocal of the first, that is, the presence of a measureable voltage that arises across a junction when the temperature gradient is forced to zero by a thermal clamp. Suggested future research includes strategies for utilizing the new thermoelectric effects.

  6. Adiabatic Quantum Search in Open Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Dominik S; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Knap, Michael; Yao, Norman Y; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2016-10-07

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms represent a promising approach to universal quantum computation. In isolated systems, a key limitation to such algorithms is the presence of avoided level crossings, where gaps become extremely small. In open quantum systems, the fundamental robustness of adiabatic algorithms remains unresolved. Here, we study the dynamics near an avoided level crossing associated with the adiabatic quantum search algorithm, when the system is coupled to a generic environment. At zero temperature, we find that the algorithm remains scalable provided the noise spectral density of the environment decays sufficiently fast at low frequencies. By contrast, higher order scattering processes render the algorithm inefficient at any finite temperature regardless of the spectral density, implying that no quantum speedup can be achieved. Extensions and implications for other adiabatic quantum algorithms will be discussed.

  7. Adiabatic hydrodynamics: The eightfold way to dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Haehl, Felix M; Rangamani, Mukund

    2015-01-01

    We provide a complete solution to hydrodynamic transport at all orders in the gradient expansion compatible with the second law constraint. The key new ingredient we introduce is the notion of adiabaticity, which allows us to take hydrodynamics off-shell. Adiabatic fluids are such that off-shell dynamics of the fluid compensates for entropy production. The space of adiabatic fluids is quite rich, and admits a decomposition into seven distinct classes. Together with the dissipative class this establishes the eightfold way of hydrodynamic transport. Furthermore, recent results guarantee that dissipative terms beyond leading order in the gradient expansion are agnostic of the second law. While this completes a transport taxonomy, we go on to argue for a new symmetry principle, an Abelian gauge invariance that guarantees adiabaticity in hydrodynamics. We suggest that this symmetry is the macroscopic manifestation of the microscopic KMS invariance. We demonstrate its utility by explicitly constructing effective ac...

  8. Adiabatic quantum gates and Boolean functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrecut, M; Ali, M K [Department of Physics, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB, T1K 3M4 (Canada)

    2004-06-25

    We discuss the logical implementation of quantum gates and Boolean functions in the framework of quantum adiabatic method, which uses the language of ground states, spectral gaps and Hamiltonians instead of the standard unitary transformation language. (letter to the editor)

  9. Adiabatic Quantum Search in Open Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Dominik S.; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Knap, Michael; Yao, Norman Y.; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2016-10-01

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms represent a promising approach to universal quantum computation. In isolated systems, a key limitation to such algorithms is the presence of avoided level crossings, where gaps become extremely small. In open quantum systems, the fundamental robustness of adiabatic algorithms remains unresolved. Here, we study the dynamics near an avoided level crossing associated with the adiabatic quantum search algorithm, when the system is coupled to a generic environment. At zero temperature, we find that the algorithm remains scalable provided the noise spectral density of the environment decays sufficiently fast at low frequencies. By contrast, higher order scattering processes render the algorithm inefficient at any finite temperature regardless of the spectral density, implying that no quantum speedup can be achieved. Extensions and implications for other adiabatic quantum algorithms will be discussed.

  10. Shell-structure effects on high-pressure Rankine-Hugoniot shock adiabats

    CERN Document Server

    Pain, J C

    2007-01-01

    Rankine-Hugoniot shock adiabats are calculated in the pressure range 1 Mbar-10 Gbar with two atomic-structure models: the atom in a spherical cell and the atom in a jellium of charges. These quantum self-consistent-field models include shell effects, which have a strong impact on pressure and shock velocity along the shock adiabat. Comparisons with experimental data are presented and quantum effects are interpreted in terms of electronic specific heat. A simple analytical estimate for the maximum compression is proposed, depending on initial density, atomic weight and atomic number.

  11. Faster computation of adiabatic EMRIs using resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Grossman, Rebecca; Perez-Giz, Gabe

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the prohibitive computational cost of producing adiabatic extreme mass ratio inspirals, we explain how a judicious use of resonant orbits can dramatically expedite both that calculation and the generation of snapshot gravitational waves from geodesic sources. In the course of our argument, we clarify the resolution of a lingering debate on the appropriate adiabatic averaging prescription in favor of torus averaging over time averaging.

  12. Quantum Adiabatic Evolution Algorithms versus Simulated Annealing

    CERN Document Server

    Farhi, E; Gutmann, S; Farhi, Edward; Goldstone, Jeffrey; Gutmann, Sam

    2002-01-01

    We explain why quantum adiabatic evolution and simulated annealing perform similarly in certain examples of searching for the minimum of a cost function of n bits. In these examples each bit is treated symmetrically so the cost function depends only on the Hamming weight of the n bits. We also give two examples, closely related to these, where the similarity breaks down in that the quantum adiabatic algorithm succeeds in polynomial time whereas simulated annealing requires exponential time.

  13. Hierarchical theory of quantum adiabatic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Gong, Jiangbin; Wu, Biao

    2014-12-01

    Quantum adiabatic evolution is a dynamical evolution of a quantum system under slow external driving. According to the quantum adiabatic theorem, no transitions occur between nondegenerate instantaneous energy eigenstates in such a dynamical evolution. However, this is true only when the driving rate is infinitesimally small. For a small nonzero driving rate, there are generally small transition probabilities between the energy eigenstates. We develop a classical mechanics framework to address the small deviations from the quantum adiabatic theorem order by order. A hierarchy of Hamiltonians is constructed iteratively with the zeroth-order Hamiltonian being determined by the original system Hamiltonian. The kth-order deviations are governed by a kth-order Hamiltonian, which depends on the time derivatives of the adiabatic parameters up to the kth-order. Two simple examples, the Landau-Zener model and a spin-1/2 particle in a rotating magnetic field, are used to illustrate our hierarchical theory. Our analysis also exposes a deep, previously unknown connection between classical adiabatic theory and quantum adiabatic theory.

  14. Burns (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Burns KidsHealth > For Parents > Burns A A A What's ... outlets, etc.) overexposure to the sun Types of Burns Burns are often categorized as first-, second-, or ...

  15. Adiabatic mixed-field orientation of ground-state-selected carbonyl sulfide molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Kienitz, Jens S; Mullins, Terry; Długołęcki, Karol; González-Férez, Rosario; Küpper, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrated strong adiabatic mixed-field orientation of carbonyl sulfide molecules (OCS) in their absolute ground state of $\\text{N}_{\\text{up}}/\\text{N}_{\\text{tot}}=0.882$. OCS was oriented in combined non-resonant laser and static electric fields inside a two-plate velocity map imaging spectrometer. The transition from non-adiabatic to adiabatic orientation for the rotational ground state was studied by varying the applied laser and static electric field. Above static electric field strengths of 10~kV/cm and laser intensities of $10^{11} \\text{W/cm}^2$ the observed degree of orientation reached a plateau. These results are in good agreement with computational solutions of the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation.

  16. Solving the transport without transit quantum paradox of the spatial adiabatic passage technique

    CERN Document Server

    Benseny, Albert; Oriols, Xavier; Mompart, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    We discuss and solve the transport without transit quantum paradox recently introduced in the context of the adiabatic transport of a single particle or a Bose--Einstein condensate between the two extreme traps of a triple-well potential. To this aim, we address the corresponding quantum dynamics in terms of Bohmian trajectories and show that transport always implies transit through the middle well, in full agreement with the quantum continuity equation. This adiabatic quantum transport presents a very counterintuitive effect: by slowing down the total time duration of the transport process, ultra-high Bohmian velocities are achieved such that, in the limit of perfect adiabaticity, relativistic corrections are needed to properly address the transfer process while avoiding superluminal matter wave propagation.

  17. Changes in the adiabatic invariant and streamline chaos in confined incompressible Stokes flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainshtein, D. L.; Vasiliev, A. A.; Neishtadt, A. I.

    1996-03-01

    The steady incompressible flow in a unit sphere introduced by Bajer and Moffatt [J. Fluid Mech. 212, 337 (1990)] is discussed. The velocity field of this flow differs by a small perturbation from an integrable field whose streamlines are almost all closed. The unperturbed flow has two stationary saddle points (poles of the sphere) and a two-dimensional separatrix passing through them. The entire interior of the unit sphere becomes the domain of streamline chaos for an arbitrarily small perturbation. This phenomenon is explained by the nonconservation of a certain adiabatic invariant that undergoes a jump when a streamline crosses a small neighborhood of the separatrix of the unperturbed flow. An asymptotic formula is obtained for the jump in the adiabatic invariant. The accumulation of such jumps in the course of repeated crossings of the separatrix results in the complete breaking of adiabatic invariance and streamline chaos.

  18. Assessment of total efficiency in adiabatic engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitianiec, W.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents influence of ceramic coating in all surfaces of the combustion chamber of SI four-stroke engine on working parameters mainly on heat balance and total efficiency. Three cases of engine were considered: standard without ceramic coating, fully adiabatic combustion chamber and engine with different thickness of ceramic coating. Consideration of adiabatic or semi-adiabatic engine was connected with mathematical modelling of heat transfer from the cylinder gas to the cooling medium. This model takes into account changeable convection coefficient based on the experimental formulas of Woschni, heat conductivity of multi-layer walls and also small effect of radiation in SI engines. The simulation model was elaborated with full heat transfer to the cooling medium and unsteady gas flow in the engine intake and exhaust systems. The computer program taking into account 0D model of engine processes in the cylinder and 1D model of gas flow was elaborated for determination of many basic engine thermodynamic parameters for Suzuki DR-Z400S 400 cc SI engine. The paper presents calculation results of influence of the ceramic coating thickness on indicated pressure, specific fuel consumption, cooling and exhaust heat losses. Next it were presented comparisons of effective power, heat losses in the cooling and exhaust systems, total efficiency in function of engine rotational speed and also comparison of temperature inside the cylinder for standard, semi-adiabatic and full adiabatic engine. On the basis of the achieved results it was found higher total efficiency of adiabatic engines at 2500 rpm from 27% for standard engine to 37% for full adiabatic engine.

  19. On criterion of modal adiabaticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Ning(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Pierce, A. D., Extension of the method of normal modes to sound propagation in an almost-stratified medium, J. Acoust.Soc. Am., 1965, 37: 19-27.[2]Wang, D. Z. , Shang, E. C., Underwater Acoustics (in Chinese), Beijing: Science Press, 1981.[3]Zhang Renhe, Li Fenghua, Beam-displacement rya-mode theory of sound propagation in shallow water, Science in China, Ser.A, 1999, 42(7): 739-749.[4]Zhou Jixun, Zhang Xuezhen, Rogers P., Resonance interaction of sound waves with internal solitons in coastal zone, J.Acoust. Soc. Am., 1991, 90: 2042-2054.[5]Shang, E. C., Wang, Y. Y., The impact of mesoscale oceanic structure on global-scale acoustic propagation, in Theoretical and Computational Acoustics (ed. Ding Lee et al. ), Singapore: World Scientific Publishing Co. , 1996, 409-431.[6]Milder, D. M., Ray and wave invariants for SOFAR channel propagation, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 1969, 46: 1259-1263.[7]Nag l, A., Milder, D. M., Adiabatic mode theory of underwater sound propagation in a range-dependent environment, J.Acoust. Soc. Am., 1978, 63: 739-749.[8]Brekhovskikh, L. M., Waves in Layered Media, 2nd ed., New York: Academic Press Inc., 1973.[9]Brekhovskikh, L. M., Lysanov, Yu., Fundamental of Ocean Acoustics, Ch. 7, Sec. 7.2, Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1982.[10]Evans, R. B., A coupled mode solution for acoustic propagation in a wave-guide with stepwise depth variations of a penerable bottom, J. Acoust. Soc. A.m., 1983, 74: 188-195.[11]Jensen, F. B., Kuperman, W. A., Porter, M. B. et al., Computational Ocean Acoustics, New York: Springer-Verlag,1992.[12]Wang Ning, Inverse scattering problem for the coupled second order ODE, Journal of The Physical Society of Japan, 1995, 64(12): 4907-4915.

  20. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Glimm, J. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3600 (United States); Cheng, B.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    We determine the dependence of key Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hot spot simulation properties on the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat, here modified by addition of energy to the cold shell. Variation of this parameter reduces the simulation to experiment discrepancy in some, but not all, experimentally inferred quantities. Using simulations with radiation drives tuned to match experimental shots N120321 and N120405 from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), we carry out sets of simulations with varying amounts of added entropy and examine the sensitivities of important experimental quantities. Neutron yields, burn widths, hot spot densities, and pressures follow a trend approaching their experimentally inferred quantities. Ion temperatures and areal densities are sensitive to the adiabat changes, but do not necessarily converge to their experimental quantities with the added entropy. This suggests that a modification to the simulation adiabat is one of, but not the only explanation of the observed simulation to experiment discrepancies. In addition, we use a theoretical model to predict 3D mix and observe a slight trend toward less mixing as the entropy is enhanced. Instantaneous quantities are assessed at the time of maximum neutron production, determined dynamically within each simulation. These trends contribute to ICF science, as an effort to understand the NIC simulation to experiment discrepancy, and in their relation to the high foot experiments, which features a higher adiabat in the experimental design and an improved neutron yield in the experimental results.

  1. Burning vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Priyanka; Hobday, Dorian; O'Connor, Edmund Fitzgerald; D'Cruz, David

    2016-04-26

    We present the case of a 69-year-old man who was found collapsed close to a heat source and admitted to hospital for severe sepsis. He was also found to have widespread blistering and ulceration of his right leg; however, a history was unobtainable due to reduced consciousness levels. The leg lesions had the initial appearance of mixed depth burns and a management plan was made to transfer the patient to a burns unit for debridement. It was subsequently noted that the patient had a previous diagnosis of seropositive erosive rheumatoid arthritis. A biopsy of the leg lesion was performed and a diagnosis of rheumatoid vasculitis confirmed. Treatment with systemic steroids, intravenous antibiotics and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for severe hypogammaglobulinaemia was started, and the patient was not transferred for surgical debridement. Rheumatoid vasculitis is a rare and extremely serious complication of rheumatoid arthritis that can manifest in a number of ways, occasionally mimicking other conditions. This case is essential to raise awareness of rare, severe rheumatoid vasculitis and of the potential for its misdiagnosis as a mixed depth burn.

  2. Erosive burning of solid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Merrill K.

    1993-01-01

    Presented here is a review of the experimental and modeling work concerning erosive burning of solid propellants (augmentation of burning rate by flow of product gases across a burning surface). A brief introduction describes the motor design problems caused by this phenomenon, particularly for low port/throat area ratio motors and nozzleless motors. Various experimental techniques for measuring crossflow sensitivity of solid propellant burning rates are described, with the conclusion that accurate simulation of the flow, including upstream flow development, in actual motors is important since the degree of erosive burning depends not only on local mean crossflow velocity and propellant nature, but also upon this upstream development. In the modeling area, a brief review of simplified models and correlating equations is presented, followed by a description of more complex numerical analysis models. Both composite and double-base propellant models are reviewed. A second generation composite model is shown to give good agreement with data obtained in a series of tests in which composite propellant composition and heterogeneity (particle size distribution) were systematically varied. Finally, the use of numerical models for the development of erosive burning correlations is described, and a brief discussion of scaling is presented.

  3. Fast forward to the classical adiabatic invariant

    CERN Document Server

    Jarzynski, Christopher; Patra, Ayoti; Subaşı, Yiğit

    2016-01-01

    We show how the classical action, an adiabatic invariant, can be preserved under non-adiabatic conditions. Specifically, for a time-dependent Hamiltonian $H = p^2/2m + U(q,t)$ in one degree of freedom, and for an arbitrary choice of action $I_0$, we construct a "fast-forward" potential energy function $V_{\\rm FF}(q,t)$ that, when added to $H$, guides all trajectories with initial action $I_0$ to end with the same value of action. We use this result to construct a local dynamical invariant $J(q,p,t)$ whose value remains constant along these trajectories. We illustrate our results with numerical simulations. Finally, we sketch how our classical results may be used to design approximate quantum shortcuts to adiabaticity.

  4. Rapid adiabatic passage without level crossing

    CERN Document Server

    Rangelov, A A; Shore, B W

    2009-01-01

    We present a method for achieving complete population transfer in a two-state quantum system via adiabatic time evolution in which, contrary to conventional rapid adiabatic passage produced by chirped pulses, there occurs no crossing of diabatic energy curves: there is no sign change of the detuning. Instead, we use structured pulses, in which, in addition to satisfying conditions for adiabatic evolution, there occurs a sign change of the Rabi frequency when the detuning is zero. We present simulations that offer simple geometrical interpretation of the two-dimensional motion of the Bloch vector for this system, illustrating how both complete population inversion and complete population return occur for different choices of structured pulses.

  5. Adiabatic optimization versus diffusion Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarret, Michael; Jordan, Stephen P.; Lackey, Brad

    2016-10-01

    Most experimental and theoretical studies of adiabatic optimization use stoquastic Hamiltonians, whose ground states are expressible using only real nonnegative amplitudes. This raises a question as to whether classical Monte Carlo methods can simulate stoquastic adiabatic algorithms with polynomial overhead. Here we analyze diffusion Monte Carlo algorithms. We argue that, based on differences between L1 and L2 normalized states, these algorithms suffer from certain obstructions preventing them from efficiently simulating stoquastic adiabatic evolution in generality. In practice however, we obtain good performance by introducing a method that we call Substochastic Monte Carlo. In fact, our simulations are good classical optimization algorithms in their own right, competitive with the best previously known heuristic solvers for MAX-k -SAT at k =2 ,3 ,4 .

  6. Nonadiabatic exchange dynamics during adiabatic frequency sweeps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara, Thomas M

    2016-04-01

    A Bloch equation analysis that includes relaxation and exchange effects during an adiabatic frequency swept pulse is presented. For a large class of sweeps, relaxation can be incorporated using simple first order perturbation theory. For anisochronous exchange, new expressions are derived for exchange augmented rotating frame relaxation. For isochronous exchange between sites with distinct relaxation rate constants outside the extreme narrowing limit, simple criteria for adiabatic exchange are derived and demonstrate that frequency sweeps commonly in use may not be adiabatic with regard to exchange unless the exchange rates are much larger than the relaxation rates. Otherwise, accurate assessment of the sensitivity to exchange dynamics will require numerical integration of the rate equations. Examples of this situation are given for experimentally relevant parameters believed to hold for in-vivo tissue. These results are of significance in the study of exchange induced contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  7. Energy efficiency of adiabatic superconductor logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Adiabatic superconductor logic (ASL), including adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) logic, exhibits high energy efficiency because its bit energy can be decreased below the thermal energy through adiabatic switching operations. In the present paper, we present the general scaling laws of ASL and compare the energy efficiency of ASL with those of other energy-efficient logics. Also, we discuss the minimum energy-delay product (EDP) of ASL at finite temperature. Our study shows that there is a maximum temperature at which the EDP can reach the quantum limit given by ħ/2, which is dependent on the superconductor material and the Josephson junction quality, and that it is reasonable to operate ASL at cryogenic temperatures in order to achieve an EDP that approaches ħ/2.

  8. CONCERNING THE STABILITY OF THE BURNING REGIME OF A POWDER IN A SEMICLOSED SPACE,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1ccount the temperature distribution in the pooder, the effect of this distribucion on the burning velocity, and the relation between the burning...velocity and the pressure. The burning is sh6wn to be unstable al low pressures. A criterion depending on the free v6lume of the chamber and on the area

  9. Complexity of the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hen, Itay

    2013-01-01

    The Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm (QAA) has been proposed as a mechanism for efficiently solving optimization problems on a quantum computer. Since adiabatic computation is analog in nature and does not require the design and use of quantum gates, it can be thought of as a simpler and perhaps more profound method for performing quantum computations that might also be easier to implement experimentally. While these features have generated substantial research in QAA, to date there is still a lack of solid evidence that the algorithm can outperform classical optimization algorithms.

  10. Markovian quantum master equation beyond adiabatic regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Yuge, Tatsuro; Ogawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    By introducing a temporal change time scale τA(t ) for the time-dependent system Hamiltonian, a general formulation of the Markovian quantum master equation is given to go well beyond the adiabatic regime. In appropriate situations, the framework is well justified even if τA(t ) is faster than the decay time scale of the bath correlation function. An application to the dissipative Landau-Zener model demonstrates this general result. The findings are applicable to a wide range of fields, providing a basis for quantum control beyond the adiabatic regime.

  11. Adiabatic Quantum Computation: Coherent Control Back Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Debabrata

    2013-01-01

    Though attractive from scalability aspects, optical approaches to quantum computing are highly prone to decoherence and rapid population loss due to nonradiative processes such as vibrational redistribution. We show that such effects can be reduced by adiabatic coherent control, in which quantum interference between multiple excitation pathways is used to cancel coupling to the unwanted, non-radiative channels. We focus on experimentally demonstrated adiabatic controlled population transfer experiments wherein the details on the coherence aspects are yet to be explored theoretically but are important for quantum computation. Such quantum computing schemes also form a back-action connection to coherent control developments. PMID:23788822

  12. Adiabatic hyperspherical analysis of realistic nuclear potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Daily, K M; Greene, Chris H

    2015-01-01

    Using the hyperspherical adiabatic method with the realistic nuclear potentials Argonne V14, Argonne V18, and Argonne V18 with the Urbana IX three-body potential, we calculate the adiabatic potentials and the triton bound state energies. We find that a discrete variable representation with the slow variable discretization method along the hyperradial degree of freedom results in energies consistent with the literature. However, using a Laguerre basis results in missing energy, even when extrapolated to an infinite number of basis functions and channels. We do not include the isospin $T=3/2$ contribution in our analysis.

  13. On adiabatic invariant in generalized Galileon theories

    CERN Document Server

    Ema, Yohei; Mukaida, Kyohei; Nakayama, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    We consider background dynamics of generalized Galileon theories in the context of inflation, where gravity and inflaton are non-minimally coupled to each other. In the inflaton oscillation regime, the Hubble parameter and energy density oscillate violently in many cases, in contrast to the Einstein gravity with minimally coupled inflaton. However, we find that there is an adiabatic invariant in the inflaton oscillation regime in any generalized Galileon theory. This adiabatic invariant is useful in estimating the expansion law of the universe and also the particle production rate due to the oscillation of the Hubble parameter.

  14. First Aid: Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old First Aid: Burns KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Burns A A A Scald burns from hot water and other liquids are the most common burns in early childhood. Because burns range from mild ...

  15. First Aid: Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old First Aid: Burns KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Burns Print A A A Scald burns from hot water and other liquids are the most common burns in early childhood. Because burns range from mild to life threatening, ...

  16. Improving the positive feedback adiabatic logic familiy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fischer

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Positive Feedback Adiabatic Logic (PFAL shows the lowest energy dissipation among adiabatic logic families based on cross-coupled transistors, due to the reduction of both adiabatic and non-adiabatic losses. The dissipation primarily depends on the resistance of the charging path, which consists of a single p-channel MOSFET during the recovery phase. In this paper, a new logic family called Improved PFAL (IPFAL is proposed, where all n- and pchannel devices are swapped so that the charge can be recovered through an n-channel MOSFET. This allows to decrease the resistance of the charging path up to a factor of 2, and it enables a significant reduction of the energy dissipation. Simulations based on a 0.13µm CMOS process confirm the improvements in terms of power consumption over a large frequency range. However, the same simple design rule, which enables in PFAL an additional reduction of the dissipation by optimal transistor sizing, does not apply to IPFAL. Therefore, the influence of several sources of dissipation for a generic IPFAL gate is illustrated and discussed, in order to lower the power consumption and achieve better performance.

  17. Semi adiabatic theory of seasonal Markov processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talkner, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The dynamics of many natural and technical systems are essentially influenced by a periodic forcing. Analytic solutions of the equations of motion for periodically driven systems are generally not known. Simulations, numerical solutions or in some limiting cases approximate analytic solutions represent the known approaches to study the dynamics of such systems. Besides the regime of weak periodic forces where linear response theory works, the limit of a slow driving force can often be treated analytically using an adiabatic approximation. For this approximation to hold all intrinsic processes must be fast on the time-scale of a period of the external driving force. We developed a perturbation theory for periodically driven Markovian systems that covers the adiabatic regime but also works if the system has a single slow mode that may even be slower than the driving force. We call it the semi adiabatic approximation. Some results of this approximation for a system exhibiting stochastic resonance which usually takes place within the semi adiabatic regime are indicated. (author) 1 fig., 8 refs.

  18. Startup of an industrial adiabatic tubular reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwijs, J.W.; Berg, van den H.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamic behaviour of an adiabatic tubular plant reactor during the startup is demonstrated, together with the impact of a feed-pump failure of one of the reactants. A dynamic model of the reactor system is presented, and the system response is calculated as a function of experimentally-determine

  19. A Diffusion Equation for Quantum Adiabatic Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, S R

    1998-01-01

    For ergodic adiabatic quantum systems, we study the evolution of energy distribution as the system evolves in time. Starting from the von Neumann equation for the density operator, we obtain the quantum analogue of the Smoluchowski equation on coarse-graining over the energy spectrum. This result brings out the precise notion of quantum diffusion.

  20. Quantum Pumping and Adiabatic Transport in Nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, G.M.M.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis consists of a theoretical exploration of quantum transport phenomena and quantum dynamics in nanostructures. Specifically, we investigate adiabatic quantum pumping of charge in several novel types of nanostructures involving open quantum dots or graphene. For a bilayer of graphene we fin

  1. Adiabatic limits,vanishing theorems and the noncommutative residue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,we compute the adiabatic limit of the scalar curvature and prove several vanishing theorems by taking adiabatic limits.As an application,we give a Kastler-Kalau-Walze type theorem for foliations.

  2. Adiabatic and Non-adiabatic quenches in a Spin-1 Bose Einstein Condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguslawski, Matthew; Hebbe Madhusudhana, Bharath; Anquez, Martin; Robbins, Bryce; Barrios, Maryrose; Hoang, Thai; Chapman, Michael

    2016-05-01

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is observed in a wide range of phenomena. We have studied the dynamics of a spin-1 ferromagnetic Bose-Einstein condensate for both adiabatic and non-adiabatic quenches through a QPT. At the quantum critical point (QCP), finite size effects lead to a non-zero gap, which makes an adiabatic quench possible through the QPT. We experimentally demonstrate such a quench, which is forbidden at the mean field level. For faster quenches through the QCP, the vanishing energy gap causes the reaction timescale of the system to diverge, preventing the system from adiabatically following the ground state. We measure the temporal evolution of the spin populations for different quench speeds and determine the exponents characterizing the scaling of the onset of excitations, which are in good agreement with the predictions of Kibble-Zurek mechanism.

  3. Energy velocity and group velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宇

    1995-01-01

    A new Lagrangian method for studying the relationship between the energy velocity and the group velocity is described. It is proved that under the usual quasistatic electric field, the energy velocity is identical to the group velocity for acoustic waves in anisotropic piezoelectric (or non-piezoelectric) media.

  4. Fixed-point adiabatic quantum search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalzell, Alexander M.; Yoder, Theodore J.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2017-01-01

    Fixed-point quantum search algorithms succeed at finding one of M target items among N total items even when the run time of the algorithm is longer than necessary. While the famous Grover's algorithm can search quadratically faster than a classical computer, it lacks the fixed-point property—the fraction of target items must be known precisely to know when to terminate the algorithm. Recently, Yoder, Low, and Chuang [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 210501 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.210501] gave an optimal gate-model search algorithm with the fixed-point property. Previously, it had been discovered by Roland and Cerf [Phys. Rev. A 65, 042308 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevA.65.042308] that an adiabatic quantum algorithm, operating by continuously varying a Hamiltonian, can reproduce the quadratic speedup of gate-model Grover search. We ask, can an adiabatic algorithm also reproduce the fixed-point property? We show that the answer depends on what interpolation schedule is used, so as in the gate model, there are both fixed-point and non-fixed-point versions of adiabatic search, only some of which attain the quadratic quantum speedup. Guided by geometric intuition on the Bloch sphere, we rigorously justify our claims with an explicit upper bound on the error in the adiabatic approximation. We also show that the fixed-point adiabatic search algorithm can be simulated in the gate model with neither loss of the quadratic Grover speedup nor of the fixed-point property. Finally, we discuss natural uses of fixed-point algorithms such as preparation of a relatively prime state and oblivious amplitude amplification.

  5. Stabilization of Thin-Shell Implosions Using a High-Foot Adiabat-Shaped Drive on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafon, Marion; Gauthier, Pascal; Masse, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    The High Foot (HF) campaign on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has improved the neutron yield by an order of magnitude as compared to the implosions reported during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) while dramatically lowering the ablation-front instability growth. However, this yield increase came at the expense of reduced fuel compression due to higher fuel adiabat. Thinner shell adiabat-shaped HF implosions have been designed to combine the ablation front stability benefits of the current HF pulses with the demonstrated high fuel compressibility of the NIC implosions and increased implosion velocity. This is accomplished by using a hybrid adiabat-shaping technique which both lowers the laser power between the first and second pulses to enhance the ablative stabilization at early times and precisely tailors the rise-to-peak drive to prevent undesired shocks from propagating in the fuel and depositing additional entropy. Ablation front growth factor spectra are generated from two-dimensional simulations with the FCI2 radiation hydrodynamics code. Linear analysis of the instability growth demonstrates that adiabat-shaped pulses provide a path to control and reduce ablation front instability growth while placing the fuel on a lower adiabat to achieve the alpha-heating-dominated regime. Adiabat-shaped pulses without picket are also investigated as a potential way to enhance the stability of the holhraum walls at early times.

  6. Burns (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Child What Kids Say About: Handling Stress Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias Community Service: A Family's Guide to Getting ... What's in this article? Common Causes Types of Burns First-Degree Burns Second-Degree Burns ...

  7. Hojman Exact Invariants and Adiabatic Invariants of Hamilton System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The perturbation to Lie symmetry and adiabatic invariants are studied. Based on the concept of higherorder adiabatic invariants of mechanical systems with action of a small perturbation, the perturbation to Lie symmetry is studied, and Hojman adiabatic invariants of Hamilton system are obtained. An example is given to illustrate the application of the results.

  8. Non-adiabatic geometrical quantum gates in semiconductor quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Solinas, P; Zanghì, N; Rossi, F; Solinas, Paolo; Zanardi, Paolo; Zanghì, Nino; Rossi, Fausto

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we study the implementation of non-adiabatic geometrical quantum gates with in semiconductor quantum dots. Different quantum information enconding/manipulation schemes exploiting excitonic degrees of freedom are discussed. By means of the Aharanov-Anandan geometrical phase one can avoid the limitations of adiabatic schemes relying on adiabatic Berry phase; fast geometrical quantum gates can be in principle implemented

  9. Quantum-Classical Correspondence of Shortcuts to Adiabaticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Manaka; Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2017-04-01

    We formulate the theory of shortcuts to adiabaticity in classical mechanics. For a reference Hamiltonian, the counterdiabatic term is constructed from the dispersionless Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) hierarchy. Then the adiabatic theorem holds exactly for an arbitrary choice of time-dependent parameters. We use the Hamilton-Jacobi theory to define the generalized action. The action is independent of the history of the parameters and is directly related to the adiabatic invariant. The dispersionless KdV hierarchy is obtained from the classical limit of the KdV hierarchy for the quantum shortcuts to adiabaticity. This correspondence suggests some relation between the quantum and classical adiabatic theorems.

  10. Non-adiabatic perturbations in multi-component perfect fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshelev, N.A., E-mail: koshna71@inbox.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy str 42, 432970 (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-01

    The evolution of non-adiabatic perturbations in models with multiple coupled perfect fluids with non-adiabatic sound speed is considered. Instead of splitting the entropy perturbation into relative and intrinsic parts, we introduce a set of symmetric quantities, which also govern the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation in models with energy transfer. We write the gauge invariant equations for the variables that determine on a large scale the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation and the rate of changes of the comoving curvature perturbation. The analysis of evolution of the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation has been made for several particular models.

  11. Adiabatic quantum simulation of quantum chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-10-13

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions.

  12. Adiabatic Quantum Optimization for Associative Memory Recall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadayat eSeddiqi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO. Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are stored in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.

  13. Adiabatic Theorem for Quantum Spin Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, S.; De Roeck, W.; Fraas, M.

    2017-08-01

    The first proof of the quantum adiabatic theorem was given as early as 1928. Today, this theorem is increasingly applied in a many-body context, e.g., in quantum annealing and in studies of topological properties of matter. In this setup, the rate of variation ɛ of local terms is indeed small compared to the gap, but the rate of variation of the total, extensive Hamiltonian, is not. Therefore, applications to many-body systems are not covered by the proofs and arguments in the literature. In this Letter, we prove a version of the adiabatic theorem for gapped ground states of interacting quantum spin systems, under assumptions that remain valid in the thermodynamic limit. As an application, we give a mathematical proof of Kubo's linear response formula for a broad class of gapped interacting systems. We predict that the density of nonadiabatic excitations is exponentially small in the driving rate and the scaling of the exponent depends on the dimension.

  14. Adiabatic Quantum Optimization for Associative Memory Recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis

    2014-12-01

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are stored in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.

  15. Ramsey numbers and adiabatic quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2012-01-06

    The graph-theoretic Ramsey numbers are notoriously difficult to calculate. In fact, for the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m,n) with m, n≥3, only nine are currently known. We present a quantum algorithm for the computation of the Ramsey numbers R(m,n). We show how the computation of R(m,n) can be mapped to a combinatorial optimization problem whose solution can be found using adiabatic quantum evolution. We numerically simulate this adiabatic quantum algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and R(2,s) for 5≤s≤7. We then discuss the algorithm's experimental implementation, and close by showing that Ramsey number computation belongs to the quantum complexity class quantum Merlin Arthur.

  16. Comment on ``Adiabatic theory for the bipolaron''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smondyrev, M. A.; Devreese, J. T.

    1996-05-01

    Comments are given on the application of the Bogoliubov-Tyablikov approach to the bipolaron problem in a recent paper by Lakhno [Phys. Rev. B 51, 3512 (1995)]. This author believes that his model (1) is the translation-invariant adiabatic theory of bipolarons and (2) gives asymptotically exact solutions in the adiabatic limit while the other approaches are considered as either phenomenological or variational in nature. Numerical results by Lakhno are in contradiction with all other papers published on the subject because his model leads to much lower energies. Thus, the author concludes that bipolarons ``are more stable than was considered before.'' We prove that both the analytical and the numerical results presented by Lakhno are wrong.

  17. Limitations of some simple adiabatic quantum algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Ioannou, L M; Ioannou, Lawrence M.; Mosca, Michele

    2007-01-01

    Let $H(t)=(1-t/T)H_0 + (t/T)H_1$, $t\\in [0,T]$, be the Hamiltonian governing an adiabatic quantum algorithm, where $H_0$ is diagonal in the Hadamard basis and $H_1$ is diagonal in the computational basis. We prove that $H_0$ and $H_1$ must each have at least two large mutually-orthogonal eigenspaces if the algorithm's running time is to be subexponential in the number of qubits. We also reproduce the optimality proof of Farhi and Gutmann's search algorithm in the context of this adiabatic scheme; because we only consider initial Hamiltonians that are diagonal in the Hadamard basis, our result is slightly stronger than the original.

  18. Finding cliques by quantum adiabatic evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Childs, A M; Goldstone, J; Gutmann, S; Childs, Andrew M.; Farhi, Edward; Goldstone, Jeffrey; Gutmann, Sam

    2002-01-01

    Quantum adiabatic evolution provides a general technique for the solution of combinatorial search problems on quantum computers. We present the results of a numerical study of a particular application of quantum adiabatic evolution, the problem of finding the largest clique in a random graph. An n-vertex random graph has each edge included with probability 1/2, and a clique is a completely connected subgraph. There is no known classical algorithm that finds the largest clique in a random graph with high probability and runs in a time polynomial in n. For the small graphs we are able to investigate (n <= 18), the quantum algorithm appears to require only a quadratic run time.

  19. Ehrenfest's adiabatic hypothesis in Bohr's quantum theory

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez, Enric

    2015-01-01

    It is widely known that Paul Ehrenfest formulated and applied his adiabatic hypothesis in the early 1910s. Niels Bohr, in his first attempt to construct a quantum theory in 1916, used it for fundamental purposes in a paper which eventually did not reach the press. He decided not to publish it after having received the new results by Sommerfeld in Munich. Two years later, Bohr published "On the quantum theory of line-spectra." There, the adiabatic hypothesis played an important role, although it appeared with another name: the principle of mechanical transformability. In the subsequent variations of his theory, Bohr never suppressed this principle completely. We discuss the role of Ehrenfest's principle in the works of Bohr, paying special attention to its relation to the correspondence principle. We will also consider how Ehrenfest faced Bohr's uses of his more celebrated contribution to quantum theory, as well as his own participation in the spreading of Bohr's ideas.

  20. Nanowire Plasmon Excitation by Adiabatic Mode Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Ewold; Spasenović, Marko; Polman, Albert; Kuipers, L. (Kobus)

    2009-05-01

    We show with both experiment and calculation that highly confined surface plasmon polaritons can be efficiently excited on metallic nanowires through the process of mode transformation. One specific mode in a metallic waveguide is identified that adiabatically transforms to the confined nanowire mode as the waveguide width is reduced. Phase- and polarization-sensitive near-field investigation reveals the characteristic antisymmetric polarization nature of the mode and explains the coupling mechanism.

  1. On the Propagation of Blast Wave in Earth′s Atmosphere: Adiabatic and Isothermal Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Sharma

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Adiabatic and isothermal propagations of spherical blast wave produced due to a nuclear explosion have been studied using the Energy hypothesis of Thomas, in the nonuniform atmosphere of the earth. The explosion is considered at different heights. Entropy production is also calculated along with the strength and velocity of the shock. In both the cases; for adiabatic and isothermal flows, it has been found that shock strength and shock velocity are larger at larger heights of explosion, in comparison to smaller heights of explosion. Isothermal propagation leads to a smaller value of shock strength and shock velocity in comparison to the adiabatic propagation. For the adiabatic case, the production of entropy is higher at higher heights of explosion, which goes on decreasing as the shock moves away from the point of explosion. However for the isothermal shock, the calculation of entropy production shows negative values. With negative values for the isothermal case, the production of entropy is smaller at higher heights of explosion, which goes on increasing as the shock moves away from the point of explosion. Directional study of the shock motion and entropy production show that in both the cases of adiabatic and isothermal flow, shock strength and shock velocity are larger in upward motion of the shock, in comparison to the downward motion of the shock. For adiabatic flow, entropy production is larger in upward motion of the shock; whereas, with negative values, entropy production is smaller in upward motion of the isothermal shock. For the adiabatic case, the profiles of shock strength, shock velocity and entropy production are smooth and have the largest value in vertically upward direction and have the lowest value in vertically downward direction, forming the oval shape. For the isothermal case, the profiles of shock strength and shock velocity show similar trend as that for adiabatic case but the profile of entropy production shows opposite

  2. Non-adiabatic effects in near-adiabatic mixed-field orientation and alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maan, Anjali; Ahlawat, Dharamvir Singh; Prasad, Vinod

    2016-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of the impact of a pair of moderate electric fields tilted an angle with respect to one another on a molecule. As a prototype, we consider a molecule with large rotational constant (with corresponding small rotational period) and moderate dipole moment. Within rigid-rotor approximation, the time-dependent Schrodinger equation is solved using fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. We have analysed that lower rotational states are significantly influenced by variation in pulse durations, the tilt angle between the fields and also on the electric field strengths. We also suggest a control scheme of how the rotational dynamics, orientation and alignment of a molecule can be enhanced by a combination of near-adiabatic pulses in comparision to non-adiabatic or adiabatic pulses.

  3. A `fast-burning' mechanism for magnetic diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Bo; Kan, Ming-xian; Wang, Gang-hua; Zhao, Jian-heng

    2016-01-01

    Fast-burning mechanism describes the rapid penetration, with a sharp-shaped wave-front, of a strong magnetic field into a conductive metal whose electric resistance poses an abrupt rise at some critical temperature. With its wave-front sweeping over a solid metal, the fast-burning can melt or vaporize the metal very rapidly. This paper derives formulas for the existence conditions and wave-front velocity of a fast-burning.

  4. Burn Injuries: Burn Depth, Physiopathology and Type of Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemalettin Koltka

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A significant burn injury is a serious and mortal event. The most important threat to life is hypovolemic shock with complex pathophysiologic mechanisms. Burn depth is classified as first, second, or third degree. Local inflammatory response results a vasodilatation and an increase in vascular permeability. A burn injury is a three dimensional ischemic wound. Zone of coagulation is the zone with maximum damage. Zone of stasis consists of damaged but viable tissues, the tissue is salvageable. In zone of hyperemia tissue perfusion is increased. At the beginning, cardiac output falls and systemic vascular resistance increases; cardiac performance improves as hypovolemia is corrected with fluid resuscitation. While cardiac output increases systemic vascular resistance falls below normal values and a hypermetabolic state develops. Pulmonary vascular resistance increases immediately after thermal injury and this is more prolonged. To avoid secondary pulmonary complications, the smallest resuscitation volume of fluids that maintains adequate tissue perfusion should be given. Changes parallel to the cardiovascular response develop in other organ systems. The reasons of burn injury can be thermal, electrical, chemical or radiation. It is important to know the exact mechanism of burn injury because of different therapies for a specific cause. In this review information about burn depth, local and systemic responses to burn injury and major causes of burn injury are presented. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl:1-6

  5. Non-adiabatic dynamics close to conical intersections and the surface hopping perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Pedro eMalhado

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Conical intersections play a major role in the current understanding of electronic de-excitation in polyatomic molecules, and thus in the description of photochemistry and photo physics of molecular systems. This article reviews aspects of the basic theory underlying the description of non-adiabatic transitions at conical intersections, with particular emphasis on the important case when the dynamics of the nuclei are treated classically. Within this classical nuclear motion framework, the main aspects of the surface hopping methodology in the conical intersection context are presented. The emerging picture from this treatment is that of electronic transitions around conical intersections dominated by the interplay of the nuclear velocity and the derivative non-adiabatic coupling vector field.

  6. Temperature dependent parameters of stability and protection in an adiabatic niobium titanium coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, J.N. IV. (Michelin, Greenville, SC (US)); Tahara, Y. (Mitsubishi Electric Ako Works, Ako (JP)); Williams, J.E.C.; Iwasa, Y. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab.)

    1991-03-01

    Experiments were performed to determine temperature-dependent parameters of stability and protection in a small adiabatic niobium titanium test magnet. Quench propagation velocity and minimum quench energy were measured as a function of operating temperature, transport current, and magnetic field. The operating temperature was controlled in an isothermal environment between 4.2 K and {approximately} 8 K. An existing computer code was modified to accurately predict the magnet's behavior within the temperature range. The aim of the paper is to develop improved analytical models of the effect of temperature parameters on stability in order to expand the author's understanding of thermal behaviors of adiabatic magnets operating at temperatures up to {approximately} 100 K.

  7. Emergency in Burn; Burn in Emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalcin Bayram

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Physicians who first meet with burned patients are often emergency service employees. When the patient was admitted to emergency service, especially in patients with major burn injury, is a matter should be dealt with strongly. Before sending the patients to a burn center, some interventions could became life saving which should be done as a first line treatment. Herein, review of the literature related to emergency burn treatment was performed and presented to all physicians as a summary guide. In addition, some questions such as how should be physician, who first meet with the burned patient, evaluated the patient, what should be physician paid attention, which principles should be employed for fluid replacement, how should be approached to burn wound are tried to be addressed. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(3.000: 365-368

  8. Adiabatic Regularization for Gauge Field and the Conformal Anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Chong-Sun

    2016-01-01

    We construct and provide the adiabatic regularization method for a $U(1)$ gauge field in a conformally flat spacetime by quantizing in the canonical formalism the gauge fixed $U(1)$ theory with mass terms for the gauge fields and the ghost fields. We show that the adiabatic expansion for the mode functions and the adiabatic vacuum can be defined in a similar way using WKB-type solutions as the scalar fields. As an application of the adiabatic method, we compute the trace of the energy momentum tensor and reproduces the known result for the conformal anomaly obtained by the other regularization methods. The availability of the adiabatic expansion scheme for gauge field allows one to study the renormalization of the de-Sitter space maximal superconformal Yang-Mills theory using the adiabatic regularization method.

  9. Bond selective chemistry beyond the adiabatic approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, L.J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    One of the most important challenges in chemistry is to develop predictive ability for the branching between energetically allowed chemical reaction pathways. Such predictive capability, coupled with a fundamental understanding of the important molecular interactions, is essential to the development and utilization of new fuels and the design of efficient combustion processes. Existing transition state and exact quantum theories successfully predict the branching between available product channels for systems in which each reaction coordinate can be adequately described by different paths along a single adiabatic potential energy surface. In particular, unimolecular dissociation following thermal, infrared multiphoton, or overtone excitation in the ground state yields a branching between energetically allowed product channels which can be successfully predicted by the application of statistical theories, i.e. the weakest bond breaks. (The predictions are particularly good for competing reactions in which when there is no saddle point along the reaction coordinates, as in simple bond fission reactions.) The predicted lack of bond selectivity results from the assumption of rapid internal vibrational energy redistribution and the implicit use of a single adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface for the reaction. However, the adiabatic approximation is not valid for the reaction of a wide variety of energetic materials and organic fuels; coupling between the electronic states of the reacting species play a a key role in determining the selectivity of the chemical reactions induced. The work described below investigated the central role played by coupling between electronic states in polyatomic molecules in determining the selective branching between energetically allowed fragmentation pathways in two key systems.

  10. On adiabatic perturbations in the ekpyrotic scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, A.; Mukhanov, V.; Vikman, A.

    2010-02-01

    In a recent paper, Khoury and Steinhardt proposed a way to generate adiabatic cosmological perturbations with a nearly flat spectrum in a contracting Universe. To produce these perturbations they used a regime in which the equation of state exponentially rapidly changed during a short time interval. Leaving aside the singularity problem and the difficult question about the possibility to transmit these perturbations from a contracting Universe to the expanding phase, we will show that the methods used in Khoury are inapplicable for the description of the cosmological evolution and of the process of generation of perturbations in this scenario.

  11. On adiabatic perturbations in the ekpyrotic scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Linde, A; Vikman, A

    2009-01-01

    In a recent paper arXiv:0910.2230, Khoury and Steinhardt proposed a way to generate adiabatic cosmological perturbations with a nearly flat spectrum in a contracting Universe. To produce these perturbations they used a regime in which the equation of state exponentially rapidly changed during a short time interval. Leaving aside the singularity problem and the difficult question about the possibility to transmit these perturbations from a contracting Universe to the expanding phase, we will show that the methods used in arXiv:0910.2230 are inapplicable for the description of the cosmological evolution and of the process of generation of perturbations in this scenario.

  12. Shortcuts to adiabaticity for quantum annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2017-01-01

    We study the Ising Hamiltonian with a transverse field term to simulate the quantum annealing. Using shortcuts to adiabaticity, we design the time dependence of the Hamiltonian. The dynamical invariant is obtained by the mean-field ansatz, and the Hamiltonian is designed by the inverse engineering. We show that the time dependence of physical quantities such as the magnetization is independent of the speed of the Hamiltonian variation in the infinite-range model. We also show that rotating transverse magnetic fields are useful to achieve the ideal time evolution.

  13. Adiabatic quantum algorithm for search engine ranking

    CERN Document Server

    Garnerone, Silvano; Lidar, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm to evaluate the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this quantum algorithm outputs any component of the PageRank vector-and thus the ranking of the corresponding webpage-in a time which scales polylogarithmically in the number of webpages. This would constitute an exponential speed-up with respect to all known classical algorithms designed to evaluate the PageRank.

  14. Adiabatic Wave-Particle Interaction Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Dewar, R L; 10.1585/pfr.4.001

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we calculate and visualize the dynamics of an ensemble of electrons trapping in an electrostatic wave of slowly increasing amplitude, illustrating that, despite disordering of particles in angle during the trapping transition as they pass close to X-points, there is still an adiabatic invariant for the great majority of particles that allows the long-time distribution function to be predicted. Possible application of this approach to recent work on the nonlinear frequency shift of a driven wave is briefly discussed.

  15. Adiabatic geometric phases and response functions

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, S R; Jain, Sudhir R.; Pati, Arun K.

    1998-01-01

    Treating a many-body Fermi system in terms of a single particle in a deforming mean field. We relate adiabatic geometric phase to susceptibility for the noncyclic case, and to its derivative for the cyclic case. Employing the semiclassical expression of susceptibility, the expression for geometric phase for chaotic quantum system immediately follows. Exploiting the well-known association of the absorptive part of susceptibility with dissipation, our relations may provide a quantum mechanical origin of the damping of collective excitations in Fermi systems.

  16. Adiabatic passage in the presence of noise

    CERN Document Server

    Noel, T; Kurz, N; Shu, G; Wright, J; Blinov, B B

    2011-01-01

    We report on an experimental investigation of rapid adiabatic passage (RAP) in a trapped barium ion system. RAP is implemented on the transition from the $6S_{1/2}$ ground state to the metastable $5D_{5/2}$ level by applying a laser at 1.76 $\\mu$m. We focus on the interplay of laser frequency noise and laser power in shaping the effectiveness of RAP, which is commonly assumed to be a robust tool for high efficiency population transfer. However, we note that reaching high state transfer fidelity requires a combination of small laser linewidth and large Rabi frequency.

  17. Quantum Adiabatic Evolution Algorithms with Different Paths

    CERN Document Server

    Farhi, E; Gutmann, S; Farhi, Edward; Goldstone, Jeffrey; Gutmann, Sam

    2002-01-01

    In quantum adiabatic evolution algorithms, the quantum computer follows the ground state of a slowly varying Hamiltonian. The ground state of the initial Hamiltonian is easy to construct; the ground state of the final Hamiltonian encodes the solution of the computational problem. These algorithms have generally been studied in the case where the "straight line" path from initial to final Hamiltonian is taken. But there is no reason not to try paths involving terms that are not linear combinations of the initial and final Hamiltonians. We give several proposals for randomly generating new paths. Using one of these proposals, we convert an algorithmic failure into a success.

  18. Adiabatic quantum computation and quantum phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Latorre, J I; Latorre, Jose Ignacio; Orus, Roman

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the ground state entanglement in a quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm designed to solve the NP-complete Exact Cover problem. The entropy of entanglement seems to obey linear and universal scaling at the point where the mass gap becomes small, suggesting that the system passes near a quantum phase transition. Such a large scaling of entanglement suggests that the effective connectivity of the system diverges as the number of qubits goes to infinity and that this algorithm cannot be efficiently simulated by classical means. On the other hand, entanglement in Grover's algorithm is bounded by a constant.

  19. Generalized Ramsey numbers through adiabatic quantum optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Mani; Macready, William G.; Clark, Lane; Gaitan, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Ramsey theory is an active research area in combinatorics whose central theme is the emergence of order in large disordered structures, with Ramsey numbers marking the threshold at which this order first appears. For generalized Ramsey numbers r( G, H), the emergent order is characterized by graphs G and H. In this paper we: (i) present a quantum algorithm for computing generalized Ramsey numbers by reformulating the computation as a combinatorial optimization problem which is solved using adiabatic quantum optimization; and (ii) determine the Ramsey numbers r({{T}}m,{{T}}n) for trees of order m,n = 6,7,8, most of which were previously unknown.

  20. Relaxation versus adiabatic quantum steady-state preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venuti, Lorenzo Campos; Albash, Tameem; Marvian, Milad; Lidar, Daniel; Zanardi, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Adiabatic preparation of the ground states of many-body Hamiltonians in the closed-system limit is at the heart of adiabatic quantum computation, but in reality systems are always open. This motivates a natural comparison between, on the one hand, adiabatic preparation of steady states of Lindbladian generators and, on the other hand, relaxation towards the same steady states subject to the final Lindbladian of the adiabatic process. In this work we thus adopt the perspective that the goal is the most efficient possible preparation of such steady states, rather than ground states. Using known rigorous bounds for the open-system adiabatic theorem and for mixing times, we are then led to a disturbing conclusion that at first appears to doom efforts to build physical quantum annealers: relaxation seems to always converge faster than adiabatic preparation. However, by carefully estimating the adiabatic preparation time for Lindbladians describing thermalization in the low-temperature limit, we show that there is, after all, room for an adiabatic speedup over relaxation. To test the analytically derived bounds for the adiabatic preparation time and the relaxation time, we numerically study three models: a dissipative quasifree fermionic chain, a single qubit coupled to a thermal bath, and the "spike" problem of n qubits coupled to a thermal bath. Via these models we find that the answer to the "which wins" question depends for each model on the temperature and the system-bath coupling strength. In the case of the "spike" problem we find that relaxation during the adiabatic evolution plays an important role in ensuring a speedup over the final-time relaxation procedure. Thus, relaxation-assisted adiabatic preparation can be more efficient than both pure adiabatic evolution and pure relaxation.

  1. Generating shortcuts to adiabaticity in quantum and classical dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Jarzynski, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Transitionless quantum driving achieves adiabatic evolution in a hurry, using a counter-diabatic Hamiltonian to stifle non-adiabatic transitions. Here this strategy is cast in terms of a generator of adiabatic transport, leading to a classical analogue: dissipationless classical driving. For the single-particle piston, this approach yields simple and exact expressions for both the classical and quantal counter-diabatic terms. These results are further generalized to even-power-law potentials in one degree of freedom.

  2. Exact invariants and adiabatic invariants of the singular Lagrange system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈向炜; 李彦敏

    2003-01-01

    Based on the theory of symmetries and conserved quantities of the singular Lagrange system,the perturbations to the symmetries and adiabatic invariants of the singular Lagrange systems are discussed.Firstly,the concept of higher-order adiabatic invariants of the singular Lagrange system is proposed.Then,the conditions for the existence of the exact invariants and adiabatic invariants are proved,and their forms are given.Finally,an example is presented to illustrate these results.

  3. Correlated mixtures of adiabatic and isocurvature cosmological perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Langlois, D; Langlois, David; Riazuelo, Alain

    2000-01-01

    We examine the consequences of the existence of correlated mixtures of adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations on the CMB and large scale structure. In particular, we consider the four types of ``elementary'' totally correlated hybrid initial conditions, where only one of the four matter species (photons, baryons, neutrinos, CDM) deviates from adiabaticity. We then study the height and position of the acoustic peaks with respect to the large angular scale plateau as a function of the isocurvature to adiabatic ratio.

  4. A quantum search algorithm based on partial adiabatic evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Ying-Yu; Hu He-Ping; Lu Song-Feng

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents and implements a specified partial adiabatic search algorithm on a quantum circuit. It studies the minimum energy gap between the first excited state and the ground state of the system Hamiltonian and it finds that, in the case of M=1, the algorithm has the same performance as the local adiabatic algorithm. However, the algorithm evolves globally only within a small interval, which implies that it keeps the advantages of global adiabatic algorithms without losing the speedup of the local adiabatic search algorithm.

  5. Magnesium Diboride Superconducting Coils for Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR's) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs) in space applications, it is desirable to have very light weight, small diameter, high current density...

  6. Erosive Burning Study Utilizing Ultrasonic Measurement Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furfaro, James A.

    2003-01-01

    A 6-segment subscale motor was developed to generate a range of internal environments from which multiple propellants could be characterized for erosive burning. The motor test bed was designed to provide a high Mach number, high mass flux environment. Propellant regression rates were monitored for each segment utilizing ultrasonic measurement techniques. These data were obtained for three propellants RSRM, ETM- 03, and Castor@ IVA, which span two propellant types, PBAN (polybutadiene acrylonitrile) and HTPB (hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene). The characterization of these propellants indicates a remarkably similar erosive burning response to the induced flow environment. Propellant burnrates for each type had a conventional response with respect to pressure up to a bulk flow velocity threshold. Each propellant, however, had a unique threshold at which it would experience an increase in observed propellant burn rate. Above the observed threshold each propellant again demonstrated a similar enhanced burn rate response corresponding to the local flow environment.

  7. Quantum Adiabatic Algorithms and Large Spin Tunnelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulatov, A.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.

    2003-01-01

    We provide a theoretical study of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm with different evolution paths proposed in this paper. The algorithm is applied to a random binary optimization problem (a version of the 3-Satisfiability problem) where the n-bit cost function is symmetric with respect to the permutation of individual bits. The evolution paths are produced, using the generic control Hamiltonians H (r) that preserve the bit symmetry of the underlying optimization problem. In the case where the ground state of H(0) coincides with the totally-symmetric state of an n-qubit system the algorithm dynamics is completely described in terms of the motion of a spin-n/2. We show that different control Hamiltonians can be parameterized by a set of independent parameters that are expansion coefficients of H (r) in a certain universal set of operators. Only one of these operators can be responsible for avoiding the tunnelling in the spin-n/2 system during the quantum adiabatic algorithm. We show that it is possible to select a coefficient for this operator that guarantees a polynomial complexity of the algorithm for all problem instances. We show that a successful evolution path of the algorithm always corresponds to the trajectory of a classical spin-n/2 and provide a complete characterization of such paths.

  8. The genesis of adiabatic shear bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, P.; Osovski, S.; Venkert, A.; Gärtnerová, V.; Rittel, D.

    2016-11-01

    Adiabatic shear banding (ASB) is a unique dynamic failure mechanism that results in an unpredicted catastrophic failure due to a concentrated shear deformation mode. It is universally considered as a material or structural instability and as such, ASB is hardly controllable or predictable to some extent. ASB is modeled on the premise of stability analyses. The leading paradigm is that a competition between strain (rate) hardening and thermal softening determines the onset of the failure. It was recently shown that microstructural softening transformations, such as dynamic recrystallization, are responsible for adiabatic shear failure. These are dictated by the stored energy of cold work, so that energy considerations can be used to macroscopically model the failure mechanism. The initial mechanisms that lead to final failure are still unknown, as well as the ASB formation mechanism(s). Most of all - is ASB an abrupt instability or rather a gradual transition as would be dictated by microstructural evolutions? This paper reports thorough microstructural characterizations that clearly show the gradual character of the phenomenon, best described as a nucleation and growth failure mechanism, and not as an abrupt instability as previously thought. These observations are coupled to a simple numerical model that illustrates them.

  9. The scaling of the threshold conditions for solid propellant erosive burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, L. D.; Nguyen, M. H.; Cohen, N. S.

    1988-01-01

    Rocket test firings were performed to measure the transition length threshold conditions while systematically varying various rocket motor parameters. These include the crossflow velocity, the chamber pressure, the propellant nonerosive burning rate, the propellant surface roughness, and the motor port diameter. The erosive burning trends with varying propellant burning rate, motor chamber pressure, and mass flow rate are consistent with published results.

  10. Crude oil burning mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gelderen, Laurens; Malmquist, L.M.V.; Jomaas, Grunde

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve predictions for the burning efficiency and the residue composition of in-situ burning of crude oil, the burning mechanism of crude oil was studied in relation to the composition of its hydrocarbon mixture, before, during and after the burning. The surface temperature, flame...... to the predictions of four conceptual models that describe the burning mechanism of multicomponent fuels. Based on the comparisons, hydrocarbon liquids were found to be best described by the Equilibrium Flash Vaporization model, showing a constant gas composition and gasification rate. The multicomponent fuels...... followed the diffusion-limited gasification model, showing a change in the hydrocarbon composition of the fuel and its evaporating gases, as well as a decreasing gasification rate, as the burning progressed. This burning mechanism implies that the residue composition and burning efficiency mainly depend...

  11. Learn Not To Burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Nancy; Hendricks, Charlotte M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the "Learn Not to Burn Preschool Program," a low-cost fire safety awareness and burn prevention curriculum for young children. The program promotes eight burn prevention methods--including practicing an escape plan--using developmentally appropriate learning objectives to increase children's fire safety knowledge, skill, and…

  12. Economics of pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Michael J; Phillips, Linda G

    2008-07-01

    Sustaining a burn injury sets in motion a cycle of pain, disfigurement, and a search for survival. In pediatric burns, the injury extends to the parents where fear, ignorance, and helplessness forever change their lives. Pediatric burn injuries are caused by fire, hot liquids, clothing irons, hair curlers, caustic substances like drain cleaner, the grounding of an electrical source, and exposure to radiation. Efficiency in the delivery of pediatric burn care is critical. Maximizing resource utilization means continual self-evaluation and economic analysis of therapeutic modalities. Griffiths et al found that most childhood burns are due to scalds, which can be treated for $1061 per percent burn. Paddock et al reduced the cost of treating superficial pediatric burns and reduced the length of stay in hospital using silver-impregnated gauze over traditional methods. Barrett et al found improved cosmesis of skin grafts using cultured epithelial autografts but at a substantially increased cost. Corpron et al showed that pediatric burn units that treat burns >10% total body surface area and operative treatment of pediatric burns regardless of size generate positive revenue. There is a paucity of evidentiary pediatric burn economic data. More research is needed to address areas of pediatric burn care inefficiency. Improving knowledge of cost in all health care endeavors will create competition and drive down expenditures.

  13. Minor burns - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the burn: Use cool water, not ice. The extreme cold from ice can injure the tissue even more. If possible, especially if the burn is caused by chemicals, hold the burned skin under cool running water for 10 to 15 minutes until it ...

  14. Optimization of burn referrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiband, Hanna K; Lundin, Kira; Alsbjørn, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Correct estimation of the severity of burns is important to obtain the right treatment of the patient and to avoid over- and undertriage. In this study we aimed to assess how often the guidelines for referral of burn injured patients are met at the national burn centre (NBC), Denmar...

  15. Epidemiology of burns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dokter, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to understand the epidemiology, treatment and outcomes of specialized burn care in The Netherlands. This thesis is mainly based on historical data of the burn centre in Rotterdam from 1986, combined with historical data from the burn centres in Groningen and Beverwijk from

  16. Reactive burn models and ignition & growth concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw M.S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastic-bonded explosives are heterogeneous materials. Experimentally, shock initiation is sensitive to small amounts of porosity, due to the formation of hot spots (small localized regions of high temperature. This leads to the Ignition & Growth concept, introduced by LeeTarver in 1980, as the basis for reactive burn models. A homo- genized burn rate needs to account for three meso-scale physical effects: (i the density of active hot spots or burn centers; (ii the growth of the burn fronts triggered by the burn centers; (iii a geometric factor that accounts for the overlap of deflagration wavelets from adjacent burn centers. These effects can be combined and the burn model defined by specifying the reaction progress variable λ = g(s as a function of a dimensionless reaction length s(t = rbc/ℓbc, rather than by specifying an explicit burn rate. The length scale ℓbc(Ps = [Nbc(Ps]−1/3 is the average distance between burn centers, where Nbc is the number density of burn centers activated by the lead shock. The reaction length rbc(t = ∫t0 D(P(t′dt′ is the distance the burn front propagates from a single burn center, where D(P is the deflagration speed as a function of the local pressure and t is the time since the shock arrival. A key implementation issue is how to determine the lead shock strength in conjunction with a shock capturing scheme. We have developed a robust algorithm for this purpose based on the Hugoniot jump condition for the energy. The algorithm utilizes the time dependence of density, pressure and energy within each cell. The method is independent of the numerical dissipation used for shock capturing. It is local and can be used in one or more space dimensions. The burn model has a small number of parameters which can be calibrated to fit velocity gauge data from shock initiation experiments.

  17. Constraints on the Adiabatic Temperature Change in Magnetocaloric Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden; Smith, Anders

    2010-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the magnetocaloric effect implies constraints on the allowed variation in the adiabatic temperature change for a magnetocaloric material. An inequality for the derivative of the adiabatic temperature change with respect to temperature is derived for both first- and second...

  18. High Fidelity Adiabatic Quantum Computation via Dynamical Decoupling

    CERN Document Server

    Quiroz, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    We introduce high-order dynamical decoupling strategies for open system adiabatic quantum computation. Our numerical results demonstrate that a judicious choice of high-order dynamical decoupling method, in conjunction with an encoding which allows computation to proceed alongside decoupling, can dramatically enhance the fidelity of adiabatic quantum computation in spite of decoherence.

  19. Quantum adiabatic algorithm for factorization and its experimental implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xinhua; Liao, Zeyang; Xu, Nanyang; Qin, Gan; Zhou, Xianyi; Suter, Dieter; Du, Jiangfeng

    2008-11-28

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm capable of factorizing numbers, using fewer qubits than Shor's algorithm. We implement the algorithm in a NMR quantum information processor and experimentally factorize the number 21. In the range that our classical computer could simulate, the quantum adiabatic algorithm works well, providing evidence that the running time of this algorithm scales polynomially with the problem size.

  20. Sufficient Condition for Validity of Quantum Adiabatic Theorem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Yong

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we attempt to give a sufficient condition of guaranteeing the validity of the proof of the quantum adiabatic theorem. The new sufficient condition can clearly remove the inconsistency and the counterexample of the quantum adiabatic theorem pointed out by Marzlin and Sanders [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004) 160408].

  1. Teleportation of an Unknown Atomic State via Adiabatic Passage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We propose a scheme for teleporting an unknown atomic state via adiabatic passage. Taking advantage of adiabatic passage, the atom has no probability of being excited and thus the atomic spontaneous emission is suppressed.We also show that the fidelity can reach 1 under certain condition.

  2. Quantum-statistical equation-of-state models of dense plasmas: high-pressure Hugoniot shock adiabats

    CERN Document Server

    Pain, Jean-Christophe

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed comparison of two self-consistent equation-of-state models which differ from their electronic contribution: the atom in a spherical cell and the atom in a jellium of charges. It is shown that both models are well suited for the calculation of Hugoniot shock adiabats in the high pressure range (1 Mbar-10 Gbar), and that the atom-in-a-jellium model provides a better treatment of pressure ionization. Comparisons with experimental data are also presented. Shell effects on shock adiabats are reviewed in the light of these models. They lead to additional features not only in the variations of pressure versus density, but also in the variations of shock velocity versus particle velocity. Moreover, such effects are found to be responsible for enhancement of the electronic specific heat.

  3. Chaotic jumps in the generalized first adiabatic invariant in current sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittnacher, M. J.; Whipple, E. C.

    1991-01-01

    The present study examines how the changes in the generalized first adiabatic invariant J derived from the separatrix crossing theory can be incorporated into the drift variable approach to generating distribution functions. A method is proposed for determining distribution functions for an ensemble of particles following interaction with the tail current sheet by treating the interaction as a scattering problem characterized by changes in the invariant. Generalized drift velocities are obtained for a 1D tail configuration by using the generalized first invariant. The invariant remained constant except for the discrete changes caused by chaotic scattering as the particles cross the separatrix.

  4. Large-Area Atom Interferometry with Frequency-Swept Raman Adiabatic Passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotru, Krish; Butts, David L; Kinast, Joseph M; Stoner, Richard E

    2015-09-04

    We demonstrate light-pulse atom interferometry with large-momentum-transfer atom optics based on stimulated Raman transitions and frequency-swept adiabatic rapid passage. Our atom optics have produced momentum splittings of up to 30 photon recoil momenta in an acceleration-sensitive interferometer for laser cooled atoms. We experimentally verify the enhancement of phase shift per unit acceleration and characterize interferometer contrast loss. By forgoing evaporative cooling and velocity selection, this method lowers the atom shot-noise-limited measurement uncertainty and enables large-area atom interferometry at higher data rates.

  5. Shortcuts to adiabaticity in cutting a spin chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Feng-Hua; Wang, Zhao-Ming; Gu, Yong-Jian

    2017-01-01

    "Shortcuts to adiabaticity" represents a strategy for accelerating a quantum adiabatic process, is useful for preparing or manipulating a quantum state. In this paper, we investigate the adiabaticity in the dynamics of an XY spin chain. During the process of cutting one long chain into two short chains, a "shortcut" can be obtained by applying a sequence of external pulses. The fidelity which measures the adiabaticity can be dramatically enhanced by increasing the pulse strength or pulse duration time. This reliability can be kept for different types of pulses, such as random pulse time interval or random strength. The free choice of the pulse can be explained by the adiabatic representation of the Hamiltonian, and it shows that the control effects are determined by the integral of the control function in the time domain.

  6. An Integrated Development Environment for Adiabatic Quantum Programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humble, Travis S [ORNL; McCaskey, Alex [ORNL; Bennink, Ryan S [ORNL; Billings, Jay Jay [ORNL; D' Azevedo, Eduardo [ORNL; Sullivan, Blair D [ORNL; Klymko, Christine F [ORNL; Seddiqi, Hadayat [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing is a promising route to the computational power afforded by quantum information processing. The recent availability of adiabatic hardware raises the question of how well quantum programs perform. Benchmarking behavior is challenging since the multiple steps to synthesize an adiabatic quantum program are highly tunable. We present an adiabatic quantum programming environment called JADE that provides control over all the steps taken during program development. JADE captures the workflow needed to rigorously benchmark performance while also allowing a variety of problem types, programming techniques, and processor configurations. We have also integrated JADE with a quantum simulation engine that enables program profiling using numerical calculation. The computational engine supports plug-ins for simulation methodologies tailored to various metrics and computing resources. We present the design, integration, and deployment of JADE and discuss its use for benchmarking adiabatic quantum programs.

  7. Thermodynamic Study of Energy Dissipation in Adiabatic Superconductor Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    Because of its extremely high energy efficiency, adiabatic superconductor logic is one of the most promising candidates for the realization of a practical reversible computer. In a previous study, we proposed a logically and physically reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconductor logic, and numerically demonstrated reversible computing. In the numerical calculation, we assumed that the average energy dissipation at finite temperature corresponds to that at zero temperature. However, how the phase difference of a Josephson junction in adiabatic superconductor logic behaves at finite temperature is not yet well understood, and whether thermal noise can induce a nonadiabatic state change remains unclear. In the present study, we investigate energy dissipation in adiabatic superconductor logic at finite temperature through numerical analyses using the Monte Carlo method. We investigate the average and standard deviation of the energy dissipation through both numerical calculation and analytical estimation. Finally, we discuss the minimum energy dissipation required for adiabatic switching operations.

  8. How detrimental is decoherence in adiabatic quantum computation?

    CERN Document Server

    Albash, Tameem

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments with increasingly larger numbers of qubits have sparked renewed interest in adiabatic quantum computation, and in particular quantum annealing. A central question that is repeatedly asked is whether quantum features of the evolution can survive over the long time-scales used for quantum annealing relative to standard measures of the decoherence time. We reconsider the role of decoherence in adiabatic quantum computation and quantum annealing using the adiabatic quantum master equation formalism. We restrict ourselves to the weak-coupling and singular-coupling limits, which correspond to decoherence in the energy eigenbasis and in the computational basis, respectively. We demonstrate that decoherence in the instantaneous energy eigenbasis does not necessarily detrimentally affect adiabatic quantum computation, and in particular that a short single-qubit $T_2$ time need not imply adverse consequences for the success of the quantum adiabatic algorithm. We further demonstrate that boundary canc...

  9. Investigating the Performance of an Adiabatic Quantum Optimization Processor

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, Geordie; Dickson, Neil G; Hamze, Firas; Amin, M H S; Drew-Brook, Marshall; Chudak, Fabian A; Bunyk, Paul I; Macready, William G

    2010-01-01

    We calculate median adiabatic times (in seconds) of a specific superconducting adiabatic quantum processor for an NP-hard Ising spin glass instance class with up to N=128 binary variables. To do so, we ran high performance Quantum Monte Carlo simulations on a large-scale Internet-based computing platform. We compare the median adiabatic times with the median running times of two classical solvers and find that, for problems with up to 128 variables, the adiabatic times for the simulated processor architecture are about 4 and 6 orders of magnitude shorter than the two classical solvers' times. This performance difference shows that, even in the potential absence of a scaling advantage, adiabatic quantum optimization may outperform classical solvers.

  10. Adiabatic logic future trend and system level perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Teichmann, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Adiabatic logic is a potential successor for static CMOS circuit design when it comes to ultra-low-power energy consumption. Future development like the evolutionary shrinking of the minimum feature size as well as revolutionary novel transistor concepts will change the gate level savings gained by adiabatic logic. In addition, the impact of worsening degradation effects has to be considered in the design of adiabatic circuits. The impact of the technology trends on the figures of merit of adiabatic logic, energy saving potential and optimum operating frequency, are investigated, as well as degradation related issues. Adiabatic logic benefits from future devices, is not susceptible to Hot Carrier Injection, and shows less impact of Bias Temperature Instability than static CMOS circuits. Major interest also lies on the efficient generation of the applied power-clock signal. This oscillating power supply can be used to save energy in short idle times by disconnecting circuits. An efficient way to generate the p...

  11. Conformal Symmetries of Adiabatic Modes in Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Hinterbichler, Kurt; Khoury, Justin

    2012-01-01

    We remark on the existence of non-linearly realized conformal symmetries for scalar adiabatic perturbations in cosmology. These conformal symmetries are present for any cosmological background, beyond any slow-roll or quasi-de Sitter approximation. The dilatation transformation shifts the curvature perturbation by a constant, and corresponds to the well-known symmetry under spatial rescaling. We argue that the scalar sector is also invariant under special conformal transformations, which shift the curvature perturbation by a term linear in the spatial coordinates. We discuss whether these conformal symmetries can be extended to include tensor perturbations. Tensor modes introduce their own set of non-linearly realized symmetries. We identify an infinite set of large gauge transformations which maintain the transverse, traceless gauge condition, while shifting the tensor mode non-trivially.

  12. Adiabatic/diabatic polarization beam splitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRose, Christopher; Cai, Hong

    2017-09-12

    The various presented herein relate to an on-chip polarization beam splitter (PBS), which is adiabatic for the transverse magnetic (TM) mode and diabatic for the transverse electric (TE) mode. The PBS comprises a through waveguide and a cross waveguide, wherein an electromagnetic beam comprising TE mode and TM mode components is applied to an input port of the through waveguide. The PBS can be utilized to separate the TE mode component from the TM mode component, wherein the TE mode component exits the PBS via an output port of the through waveguide, and the TM mode component exits the PBS via an output port of the cross waveguide. The PBS has a structure that is tolerant to manufacturing variations and exhibits high polarization extinction ratios over a wide bandwidth.

  13. Multiplicity features of adiabatic autothermal reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovo, M.; Balakotaiah, V. (Houston Univ., TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    In this paper singularity theory, large activation energy asymptotic, and numerical methods are used to present a comprehensive study of the steady-state multiplicity features of three classical adiabatic autothermal reactor models: tubular reactor with internal heat exchange, tubular reactor with external heat exchange, and the CSTR with external heat exchange. Specifically, the authors derive the exact uniqueness-multiplicity boundary, determine typical cross-sections of the bifurcation set, and classify the different types of bifurcation diagrams of conversion vs. residence time. Asymptotic (limiting) models are used to determine analytical expressions for the uniqueness boundary and the ignition and extinction points. The analytical results are used to present simple, explicit and accurate expressions defining the boundary of the region of autothermal operation in the physical parameter space.

  14. Reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconducting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, N.; Yamanashi, Y.; Yoshikawa, N.

    2014-09-01

    Reversible computing has been studied since Rolf Landauer advanced the argument that has come to be known as Landauer's principle. This principle states that there is no minimum energy dissipation for logic operations in reversible computing, because it is not accompanied by reductions in information entropy. However, until now, no practical reversible logic gates have been demonstrated. One of the problems is that reversible logic gates must be built by using extremely energy-efficient logic devices. Another difficulty is that reversible logic gates must be both logically and physically reversible. Here we propose the first practical reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconducting devices and experimentally demonstrate the logical and physical reversibility of the gate. Additionally, we estimate the energy dissipation of the gate, and discuss the minimum energy dissipation required for reversible logic operations. It is expected that the results of this study will enable reversible computing to move from the theoretical stage into practical usage.

  15. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlak, Mariusz [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Gagarina 7, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas [Department of Chemical Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Moiseyev, Nimrod [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Faculty of Physics, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment {sup 4}He(1s2s {sup 3}S) + HD(1s{sup 2}) → {sup 4}He(1s{sup 2}) + HD{sup +}(1s) + e{sup −} [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings.

  16. Entropy in adiabatic regions of convection simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Tanner, Joel D; Demarque, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    One of the largest sources of uncertainty in stellar models is caused by the treatment of convection in stellar envelopes. One dimensional stellar models often make use of the mixing length or equivalent approximations to describe convection, all of which depend on various free parameters. There have been attempts to rectify this by using 3D radiative-hydrodynamic simulations of stellar convection, and in trying to extract an equivalent mixing length from the simulations. In this paper we show that the entropy of the deeper, adiabatic layers in these simulations can be expressed as a simple function of og g and log T_{eff} which holds potential for calibrating stellar models in a simple and more general manner.

  17. Parametric Erosion Investigation: Propellant Adiabatic Flame Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Conroy

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of quasi-independent parameters and their potential influence on erosion in guns have been investigated. Specifically, the effects of flame temperature and the effect of assuming that the Lewis number (ratio of mass-to-heat transport to the surface, Le = 1, has been examined. The adiabatic flame temperature for a propellant was reduced by the addition of a diluent from a high temperature of 3843 K (similar to that of M9 down to 3004 K, which is near the value for M30A1 propellant. Mass fractions of critical species at the surface with and without the assumption of Le = 1 are presented, demonstrating that certain species preferentially reach the surface providing varied conditions for the surface reactions. The results for gun tube bore surface regression qualitatively agree with previous studies and with current experimental data.

  18. Adiabatic scaling relations of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ascasibar, Y; Yepes, G; Müller, V; Gottlöber, S

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to show that, contrary to popular belief, galaxy clusters are **not** expected to be self-similar, even when the only energy sources available are gravity and shock-wave heating. In particular, we investigate the scaling relations between mass, luminosity and temperature of galaxy groups and clusters in the absence of radiative processes. Theoretical expectations are derived from a polytropic model of the intracluster medium and compared with the results of high-resolution adiabatic gasdynamical simulations. It is shown that, in addition to the well-known relation between the mass and concentration of the dark matter halo, the effective polytropic index of the gas also varies systematically with cluster mass, and therefore neither the dark matter nor the gas profiles are exactly self-similar. It is remarkable, though, that the effects of concentration and polytropic index tend to cancel each other, leading to scaling relations whose logarithmic slopes roughly match the predictio...

  19. Adiabatic perturbations in coupled scalar field cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Beyer, Joschka

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive and gauge invariant treatment of perturbations around cosmological scaling solutions for two canonical scalar fields coupled through a common potential in the early universe, in the presence of neutrinos, photons and baryons, but excluding cold dark matter. This setup is relevant for analyzing cosmic perturbations in scalar field models of dark matter with a coupling to a quintessence field. We put strong restrictions on the shape of the common potential and adopt a matrix-eigensystem approach to determine the dominant perturbations modes in such models. Similar to recent results in scenarios where standard cold dark matter couples to quintessence, we show that the stability of the adiabatic perturbation mode can be an issue for this class of scalar field dark matter models, but only for specific choices of the common potential. For an exponential coupling potential, a rather common shape arising naturally in many instances, this problem can be avoided. We explicitly calculate the d...

  20. Adiabatic density-functional perturbation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonze, Xavier

    1995-08-01

    The treatment of adiabatic perturbations within density-functional theory is examined, at arbitrary order of the perturbation expansion. Due to the extremal property of the energy functional, standard variation-perturbation theorems can be used. The different methods (Sternheimer equation, extremal principle, Green's function, and sum over state) for obtaining the perturbation expansion of the wave functions are presented. The invariance of the Hilbert space of occupied wave functions with respect to a unitary transformation leads to the definition of a ``parallel-transport-gauge'' and a ``diagonal-gauge'' perturbation expansion. Then, the general expressions are specialized for the second, third, and fourth derivative of the energy, with an example of application of the method up to third order.

  1. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for SIRTF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbie, P. T.; Bernstein, G. M.; Richards, P. L.

    1989-02-01

    An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) has been proposed to cool bolometric infrared detectors on the multiband imaging photometer of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). One such refrigerator has been built which uses a ferric ammonium alum salt pill suspended by nylon threads in a 3-T solenoid. The resonant modes of this suspension are above 100 Hz. The heat leak to the salt pill is less than 0.5 microW. The system has a hold time at 0.1K of more than 12 h. The cold stage temperature is regulated with a feedback loop that controls the magnetic field. A second, similar refrigerator is being built at a SIRTF prototype to fly on a ballon-borne telescope. It will use a ferromagnetic shield. The possibility of using a high-Tc solenoid-actuated heat switch is also discussed.

  2. Adiabatic vs. non-adiabatic determination of specific absorption rate of ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natividad, Eva [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza), Sede Campus Rio Ebro, Maria de Luna, 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Castro, Miguel [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza), Sede Campus Rio Ebro, Maria de Luna, 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)], E-mail: mcastro@unizar.es; Mediano, Arturo [Grupo de Electronica de Potencia y Microelectronica (GEPM), Instituto de Investigacion en Ingenieria de Aragon (Universidad de Zaragoza), Maria de Luna, 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    The measurement of temperature variations in adiabatic conditions allows the determination of the specific absorption rate of magnetic nanoparticles and ferrofluids from the correct incremental expression, SAR=(1/m{sub MNP})C({delta}T/{delta}t). However, when measurements take place in non-adiabatic conditions, one must approximate this expression by SAR{approx}C{beta}/m{sub MNP}, where {beta} is the initial slope of the temperature vs. time curve during alternating field application. The errors arising from the use of this approximation were estimated through several experiments with different isolating conditions, temperature sensors and sample-sensor contacts. It is concluded that small to appreciable errors can appear, which are difficult to infer or control.

  3. Adiabatic & non-adiabatic perturbation theory for coherence vector description of neutrino oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Hollenberg, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    The standard wave function approach for the treatment of neutrino oscillations fails in situations where quantum ensembles at a finite temperature with or without an interacting background plasma are encountered. As a first step to treat such phenomena in a novel way, we propose a unified approach to both adiabatic and non-adiabatic two-flavor oscillations in neutrino ensembles with finite temperature and generic (e.g. matter) potentials. Neglecting effects of ensemble decoherence for now we study the evolution of a neutrino ensemble governed by the associated Quantum Kinetic Equations, which apply to systems with finite temperature. The Quantum Kinetic Equations are solved formally using the Magnus expansion and it is shown that a convenient choice of the quantum mechanical picture (e.g. the interaction picture) reveals suitable parameters to characterize the physics of the underlying system (e.g. an effective oscillation length). It is understood that this method also provides a promising starting point for...

  4. The distinctive feature of long time adiabatic modulation in the context of cnoidal wave and Akhmediev breaser interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, V. A.; Petnikova, V. M.

    2017-02-01

    For a nonintegrable system of two coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations the adiabatic approximation is extended for long time interaction. The method enables analytical description of the modulation of a cnoidal wave by Akhmediev breather in an isotropic nonlinear gyrotropic medium with Kerr nonlinearity and second-order group-velocity dispersion. The conditions which must be fulfilled for stable propagation of the obtained solution with amplitude and frequency modulation are determined.

  5. [The pain from burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latarjet, J

    2002-03-01

    The painful events associated with the treatment of a severe burn can, because of their long-lasting and repetitive characteristics, be one of the most excruciating experiences in clinical practice. Moreover, burn pain has been shown to be detrimental to burn patients. Although nociception and peripheral hyperalgesia are considered the major causes of burn pain, the study of more hypothetical mechanisms like central hyperalgesia and neuropathic pain may lead to a better understanding of burn pain symptoms and to new therapeutic approaches. Continuous pain and intermittent pain due to therapeutic procedures are two distinct components of burn pain. They have to be evaluated and managed separately. Although continuous pain is by far less severe than intermittent pain, the treatment is, in both cases, essentially pharmacological relying basically on opioids. Because of wide intra- and inter-individual variations, protocols will have to leave large possibilities of adaptation for each case, systematic pain evaluation being mandatory to achieve the best risk/benefit ratio. Surprisingly, the dose of medication decreases only slowly with time, a burn often remaining painful for long periods after healing. Non pharmacological treatments are often useful and sometimes indispensable adjuncts; but their rationale and their feasibility depends entirely on previous optimal pharmacological control of burn pain. Several recent studies show that burn pain management is inadequate in most burn centres.

  6. On the General Class of Models of Adiabatic Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng; Liu, Fang

    2016-10-01

    The general class of models of adiabatic evolution was proposed to speed up the usual adiabatic computation in the case of quantum search problem. It was shown [8] that, by temporarily increasing the ground state energy of a time-dependent Hamiltonian to a suitable quantity, the quantum computation can perform the calculation in time complexity O(1). But it is also known that if the overlap between the initial and final states of the system is zero, then the computation based on the generalized models of adiabatic evolution can break down completely. In this paper, we find another severe limitation for this class of adiabatic evolution-based algorithms, which should be taken into account in applications. That is, it is still possible that this kind of evolution designed to deal with the quantum search problem fails completely if the interpolating paths in the system Hamiltonian are chosen inappropriately, while the usual adiabatic evolutions can do the same job relatively effectively. This implies that it is not always recommendable to use nonlinear paths in adiabatic computation. On the contrary, the usual simple adiabatic evolution may be sufficient for effective use.

  7. Burns and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrocal, M

    1997-01-01

    This is a report of the first descriptive analytic study of a group of 183 burn patients, treated in the Burn Unit at the University Hospital of Cartagena, Colombia during the period since January 1985 until December 1990. There is presented experience with the selected group of 24 patients in whom the diagnosis of burn was associated with epilepsy. There is also analysed and described the gravity of the scars sequels, neurological disorders, the complication of the burn and an impact of this problem on the patient, his (her) family and the community. It is very important to report that there was found Neurocisticercosis in 66.6% of the group of burn patients with epilepsy, and it is probably the first risk factor of burn in this group.

  8. EXACT AND ADIABATIC INVARIANTS OF FIRST-ORDER LAGRANGE SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈向炜; 尚玫; 梅凤翔

    2001-01-01

    A system of first-order differential equations is expressed in the form of first-order Lagrange equations. Based on the theory of symmetries and conserved quantities of first-order Lagrange systems, the perturbation to the symmetries and adiabatic invariants of first-order Lagrange systems are discussed. Firstly, the concept of higher-order adiabatic invariants of the first-order Lagrange system is proposed. Then, conditions for the existence of the exact and adiabatic invariants are proved, and their forms are given. Finally, an example is presented to illustrate these results.

  9. Adiabatic control of atomic dressed states for transport and sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, N. R.; Rey, A. M.

    2015-08-01

    We describe forms of adiabatic transport that arise for dressed-state atoms in optical lattices. Focusing on the limit of weak tunnel-coupling between nearest-neighbor lattice sites, we explain how adiabatic variation of optical dressing allows control of atomic motion between lattice sites: allowing adiabatic particle transport in a direction that depends on the internal state, and force measurements via spectroscopic preparation and readout. For uniformly filled bands these systems display topologically quantized particle transport. An implementation of the dressing scheme using optical transitions in alkaline-earth atoms is discussed as well as its favorable features for precise force sensing.

  10. Achromatic multiple beam splitting by adiabatic passage in optical waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Rangelov, Andon A

    2012-01-01

    A novel variable achromatic optical beam splitter with one input and $N$ output waveguide channels is introduced. The physical mechanism of this multiple beam splitter is adiabatic passage of light between neighboring optical waveguides in a fashion reminiscent of the technique of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in quantum physics. The input and output waveguides are coupled via a mediator waveguide and the ratios of the light intensities in the output channels are controlled by the couplings of the respective waveguides to the mediator waveguide. Due to its adiabatic nature the beam splitting efficiency is robust to variations in the experimental parameters.

  11. Approximability of optimization problems through adiabatic quantum computation

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz-Santos, William

    2014-01-01

    The adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) is based on the adiabatic theorem to approximate solutions of the Schrödinger equation. The design of an AQC algorithm involves the construction of a Hamiltonian that describes the behavior of the quantum system. This Hamiltonian is expressed as a linear interpolation of an initial Hamiltonian whose ground state is easy to compute, and a final Hamiltonian whose ground state corresponds to the solution of a given combinatorial optimization problem. The adiabatic theorem asserts that if the time evolution of a quantum system described by a Hamiltonian is l

  12. Thin and superthin ion current sheets. Quasi-adiabatic and nonadiabatic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Zelenyi

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin anisotropic current sheets (CSs are phenomena of the general occurrence in the magnetospheric tail. We develop an analytical theory of the self-consistent thin CSs. General solitions of the Grad-Shafranov equation are obtained in a quasi-adiabatic approximation which neglects the jumps of the sheet adiabatic invariant Iz This is possible if the anisotropy of the initial distribution function is not too strong. The resulting structure of the thin CSs is interpreted as a sum of negative dia- and positive paramagnetic currents flowing near the neutral plane. In the immediate vicinity of the magnetic field reversal region the paramagnetic current arising from the meandering motion of the ions on Speiser orbits dominates. The maximum CS thick-ness is achieved in the case of weak plasma anisotropy and is of the order of the thermal ion gyroradius outside the sheet. A unified picture of thin CS scalings includes both the quasi-adiabatic regimes of weak and strong anisotropies and the nonadiabatic limit of super-strong anisotropy of the source ion distribution. The later limit corresponds to the case of almost field-aligned initial distribution, when the ratio of the drift velocity outside the CS to the thermal ion velocity exceeds the ratio of the magnetic field outside the CS to its value in-side the CS (vD/vT> B0/Bn. In this regime the jumps of Iz, become essential, and the current sheet thickness is approaching to some small but finite value, which depends upon the parameter Bn /B0. Convective electric field increases the effective anisotropy of the source distribution and might produce the essential CS thinning which could have important implications for the sub-storm dynamics.

  13. The Burning Saints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xygalatas, Dimitris

    . Carrying the sacred icons of the saints, participants dance over hot coals as the saint moves them. The Burning Saints presents an analysis of these rituals and the psychology behind them. Based on long-term fieldwork, The Burning Saints traces the historical development and sociocultural context......, The Burning Saints presents a highly original analysis of how mental processes can shape social and religious behaviour....

  14. Management of Hand Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Irmak

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The hand is one of the most frequently affected body parts by burn injuries with a rate of 80% among all burn wounds. Early and effective treatment ensures the best chance of survival as well as a good functional prognosis. The aim of this study was to determine the epidemiology, variation, relationship between etiology and hospital stay, clinical features, and management of hand burns. Material and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted the University of Health Sciences; Şişli Hamidiye Etfal Application and Research Center, Departmant of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery and the Intensive Burn Care Unit between April 2009 and April 2014. Burns were assessed based on etiology, anatomical location, percentage of total body surface area affected, and depth of injury. Treatment was categorized as conservative, elective operative, or urgent operative. Results: In the study period, 788 patients were admitted to our Burn Unit. Of these, 240 were females (30.5% and 548 were males (69.5%. The most common type of burn injury in this study was thermal injury (695 cases; 88.2%, followed by electrical injury (67 cases; 8.5%, and chemical, frictional or unknown injuries (26 cases; 3.3%. Majority (more than 85% of the patients had second-degree burns, and some had third-degree burns. Conclusions: Burns commonly affect the hands, and many functional problems may develop if appropriate basic treatments are neglected. The best treatment for burns is prevention. Appropriate indoor arrangement and simple but effective measures that can be taken at home can significantly reduce burn trauma exposure.

  15. Management of Outpatient Burns

    OpenAIRE

    Waslen, G. D.

    1986-01-01

    The severity of burns depends on the depth and extent of body surface involved. The total body surface area (TBSA) involved can be estimated by the ‘rule of nines’; body locations are 9% of body surface or multiples of nine. Depth and TBSA can be used to classify burns as minor, moderate, or critical. Diagnosis depends on history and physical examination. Most burns can be treated in an outpatient setting. Treatment should include debriding necrotic tissue, preventing infection and encouragin...

  16. Characteristics of nonlinear dust acoustic waves in a Lorentzian dusty plasma with effect of adiabatic and nonadiabatic grain charge fluctuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raicharan Denra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, characteristics of small amplitude nonlinear dust acoustic wave have been investigated in a unmagnetized, collisionless, Lorentzian dusty plasma where electrons and ions are inertialess and modeled by generalized Lorentzian Kappa distribution. Dust grains are inertial and equilibrium dust charge is negative. Both adiabatic and nonadiabatic fluctuation of charges on dust grains have been taken under consideration. For adiabatic dust charge variation reductive perturbation analysis gives rise to a KdV equation that governs the nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves having soliton solutions. For nonadiabatic dust charge variation nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic wave obeys KdV-Burger equation and gives rise to dust acoustic shock waves. Numerical estimation for adiabatic grain charge variation shows the existence of rarefied soliton whose amplitude and width varies with grain charges. Amplitude and width of the soliton have been plotted for different electron Kappa indices keeping ion velocity distribution Maxwellian. For non adiabatic dust charge variation, ratio of the coefficients of Burger term and dispersion term have been plotted against charge fluctuation for different kappa indices. All these results approach to the results of Maxwellian plasma if both electron and ion kappa tends to infinity.

  17. Characteristics of nonlinear dust acoustic waves in a Lorentzian dusty plasma with effect of adiabatic and nonadiabatic grain charge fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denra, Raicharan; Paul, Samit; Sarkar, Susmita

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, characteristics of small amplitude nonlinear dust acoustic wave have been investigated in a unmagnetized, collisionless, Lorentzian dusty plasma where electrons and ions are inertialess and modeled by generalized Lorentzian Kappa distribution. Dust grains are inertial and equilibrium dust charge is negative. Both adiabatic and nonadiabatic fluctuation of charges on dust grains have been taken under consideration. For adiabatic dust charge variation reductive perturbation analysis gives rise to a KdV equation that governs the nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves having soliton solutions. For nonadiabatic dust charge variation nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic wave obeys KdV-Burger equation and gives rise to dust acoustic shock waves. Numerical estimation for adiabatic grain charge variation shows the existence of rarefied soliton whose amplitude and width varies with grain charges. Amplitude and width of the soliton have been plotted for different electron Kappa indices keeping ion velocity distribution Maxwellian. For non adiabatic dust charge variation, ratio of the coefficients of Burger term and dispersion term have been plotted against charge fluctuation for different kappa indices. All these results approach to the results of Maxwellian plasma if both electron and ion kappa tends to infinity.

  18. Burns in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghsoudi, Hemmat; Samnia, Roya; Garadaghi, Abasad; Kianvar, Hadi

    2006-03-01

    A 9-year prospective study of burns in pregnant women hospitalized at the Sina hospital burn center was conducted to determine the etiology and outcome of pregnant patients. Fifty-one patients (27.45% self-inflicted, 72.55% unintentional) were identified and stratified by age, burn size, presence or absence of inhalation injury, trimester of pregnancy, maternal and fetal mortality, and cause of burn. The mean patient age was 24.2 years. There were 20 maternal deaths and 23 fetal deaths. The majority of which (maternal: 13 and fetal: 13) were among self-inflicted burned pregnant women. The mean burn size was 37.7%, and was significantly larger for nonsurvivors of mother than survivors (68.8% versus 17.6%; pburned body surface area exceeds 40%, both maternal and fetal mortality reaches 100%. Inhalation injuries were strongly associated with large burns, and were presents in all suicide patients. Kerosene ignition (68.6% of all patients, 100% of self-inflicted patients) was the most common type of burn. Large burn size was the strongest predictor of mortality of mother and fetus followed by the presence of inhalation injury.

  19. Adiabatic quantum algorithm for search engine ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A

    2012-06-08

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in "q-sampling" protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank.

  20. Adiabatic Quantum Algorithm for Search Engine Ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2012-06-01

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log⁡(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in “q-sampling” protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank.

  1. Design of the PIXIE Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Kimball, Mark Oliver; Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan J.; Li, Xiaoyi; DiPirro, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) is a proposed mission to densely map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background. It will operate in a scanning mode from a sun-synchronous orbit, using low temperature detectors (at 0.1 K) and located inside a teslescope that is cooled to approximately 2.73 K - to match the background temperature. A mechanical cryocooler operating at 4.5 K establishes a low base temperature from which two adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) assemblies will cool the telescope and detectors. To achieve continuous scanning capability, the ADRs must operate continuously. Complicating the design are two factors: 1) the need to systematically vary the temperature of various telescope components in order to separate the small polarization signal variations from those that may arise from temperature drifts and changing gradients within the telescope, and 2) the orbital and monthly variations in lunar irradiance into the telescope barrels. These factors require the telescope ADR to reject quasi-continuous heat loads of 2-3 millwatts, while maintaining a peak heat reject rate of less than 12 milliwatts. The detector heat load at 0.1 K is comparatively small at 1-2 microwatts. This paper will describe the 3-stage and 2-stage continuous ADRs that will be used to meet the cooling power and temperature stability requirements of the PIXIE detectors and telescope.

  2. Adiabatic fission barriers in superheavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Jachimowicz, P; Skalski, J

    2016-01-01

    Using the microscopic-macroscopic model based on the deformed Woods-Saxon single-particle potential and the Yukawa-plus-exponential macroscopic energy we calculated static fission barriers $B_{f}$ for 1305 heavy and superheavy nuclei $98\\leq Z \\leq 126$, including even - even, odd - even, even - odd and odd - odd systems. For odd and odd-odd nuclei, adiabatic potential energy surfaces were calculated by a minimization over configurations with one blocked neutron or/and proton on a level from the 10-th below to the 10-th above the Fermi level. The parameters of the model that have been fixed previously by a fit to masses of even-even heavy nuclei were kept unchanged. A search for saddle points has been performed by the "Imaginary Water Flow" method on a basic five-dimensional deformation grid, including triaxiality. Two auxiliary grids were used for checking the effects of the mass asymmetry and hexadecapole non-axiallity. The ground states were found by energy minimization over configurations and deformations...

  3. Topological States and Adiabatic Pumping in Quasicrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Yaakov; Lahini, Yoav; Ringel, Zohar; Verbin, Mor; Zilberberg, Oded

    2012-02-01

    We find a connection between quasicrystals and topological matter, namely that quasicrystals exhibit non-trivial topological phases attributed to dimensions higher than their own [1]. Quasicrystals are materials which are neither ordered nor disordered, i.e. they exhibit only long-range order [2]. This long-range order is usually expressed as a projection from a higher dimensional ordered system. Recently, the unrelated discovery of Topological Insulators [3] defined a new type of materials classified by their topology. We show theoretically and experimentally using photonic lattices, that one-dimensional quasicrystals exhibit topologically-protected boundary states equivalent to the edge states of the two-dimensional Integer Quantum Hall Effect. We harness this property to adiabatically pump light across the quasicrystal, and generalize our results to higher dimensional systems. Hence, quasicrystals offer a new platform for the study of topological phases while their topology may better explain their surface properties.[4pt] [1] Y. E. Kraus, Y. Lahini, Z. Ringel, M. Verbin, and O. Zilberberg, arXiv:1109.5983 (2011).[0pt] [2] C. Janot, Quasicrystals (Clarendon, Oxford, 1994), 2nd ed.[0pt] [3] M. Z. Hasan and C. L. Kane, Rev. Mod. Phys. 82, 3045 (2010).

  4. Adiabatic hydrodynamic modes in dielectric environment in a random electric field

    CERN Document Server

    Stupka, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Dielectric is considered in the electric field that has equal to zero the first moment and different from zero the second moment of strength in an equilibrium. The equations of ideal hydrodynamics are obtained in such a field for the case of the neglect of dissipative effects. A new variable - the second moment of electric field strength is included in the Euler equation. A temporal equation for this variable is obtained on the basis of Maxwell equations in the hydrodynamic approximation. Adiabatic one-dimensional waves of small amplitude are studied in this system. Proceeding from the theoretical estimation of the intracrystalline field in an ionic crystal the good consent of the obtained numerical values of transversal velocity of this wave with transversal velocity of sound for isotropic crystals of alkali halides is found.

  5. Burns and military clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, A D

    2001-02-01

    Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment. The risks during combat are well recognised, but the handling of fuel, oil, munitions and other hot or flammable materials during peacetime deployment and training also imposes an inherent risk of accidental burn injury. Over the last hundred years, the burn threat in combat has ranged from nuclear weapons to small shoulder-launched missiles. Materials such as napalm and white phosphorus plainly present a risk of burn, but the threat extends to encompass personnel in vehicles attacked by anti-armour weapons, large missiles, fuel-air explosives and detonations/conflagrations on weapons platforms such as ships. Large numbers of burn casualties were caused at Pearl Harbor, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Vietnam, during the Arab/Israeli Wars and in the Falkland Islands conflict. The threat from burns is unlikely to diminish, indeed new developments in weapons seek to exploit the vulnerability of the serviceman and servicewoman to burns. Clothing can be a barrier to some types of burn--both inherently in the properties of the material, but also by trapping air between clothing layers. Conversely, ignition of the clothing may exacerbate a burn. There is hearsay that burnt clothing products within a wound may complicate the clinical management, or that materials that melt (thermoplastic materials) should not be worn if there is a burn threat. This paper explores the incidence of burn injury, the mechanisms of heat transfer to bare skin and skin covered by materials, and the published evidence for the complication of wound management by materials. Even light-weight combat clothing can offer significant protection to skin from short duration flash burns; the most vulnerable areas are the parts of the body not covered--face and hands. Multilayered combat clothing can offer significant protection for short periods from engulfment by flames; lightweight tropical wear with few layers offers little protection. Under

  6. Low-power adiabatic 9T static random access memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Takahashi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors propose a novel static random access memory (SRAM that employs the adiabatic logic principle. To reduce energy dissipation, the proposed adiabatic SRAM is driven by two trapezoidal-wave pulses. The cell structure of the proposed SRAM has two high-value resistors based on a p-type metal-oxide semiconductor transistor, a cross-coupled n-type metal-oxide semiconductor (NMOS pair and an NMOS switch to reduce the short-circuit current. The inclusion of a transmission-gate controlled by a write word line signal allows the proposed circuit to operate as an adiabatic SRAM during data writing. Simulation results show that the energy dissipation of the proposed SRAM is lower than that of a conventional adiabatic SRAM.

  7. Adiabaticity and diabaticity in strong-field ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Karamatskou, Antonia; Santra, Robin

    2013-01-01

    If the photon energy is much less than the electron binding energy, ionization of an atom by a strong optical field is often described in terms of electron tunneling through the potential barrier resulting from the superposition of the atomic potential and the potential associated with the instantaneous electric component of the optical field. In the strict tunneling regime, the electron response to the optical field is said to be adiabatic, and nonadiabatic effects are assumed to be negligible. Here, we investigate to what degree this terminology is consistent with a language based on the so-called adiabatic representation. This representation is commonly used in various fields of physics. For electronically bound states, the adiabatic representation yields discrete potential energy curves that are connected by nonadiabatic transitions. When applying the adiabatic representation to optical strong-field ionization, a conceptual challenge is that the eigenstates of the instantaneous Hamiltonian form a continuu...

  8. Magnesium Diboride Superconducting Coils for Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR's) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators(ADR's) for space it is desirable to have very light weight, small diameter, high current density superconducting wires...

  9. General dynamical description of quasi-adiabatically encircling exceptional points

    CERN Document Server

    Milburn, Thomas J; Holmes, Catherine A; Portolan, Stefano; Rotter, Stefan; Rabl, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The appearance of so-called exceptional points in the complex spectra of non-Hermitian systems is often associated with phenomena that contradict our physical intuition. One example of particular interest is the state-exchange process predicted for an adiabatic encircling of an exceptional point. In this work we analyze this process for the generic system of two coupled oscillator modes with loss or gain. We identify a characteristic system evolution consisting of periods of quasi-stationarity interrupted by abrupt non-adiabatic transitions. Our findings explain the breakdown of the adiabatic theorem as well as the chiral behavior noticed previously in this context, and we provide a unified framework to describe quasi-adiabatic dynamical effects in non-Hermitian systems in a qualitative and quantitative way.

  10. Adiabatic rotation, quantum search, and preparation of superposition states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, M. Stewart

    2007-06-01

    We introduce the idea of using adiabatic rotation to generate superpositions of a large class of quantum states. For quantum computing this is an interesting alternative to the well-studied “straight line” adiabatic evolution. In ways that complement recent results, we show how to efficiently prepare three types of states: Kitaev’s toric code state, the cluster state of the measurement-based computation model, and the history state used in the adiabatic simulation of a quantum circuit. We also show that the method, when adapted for quantum search, provides quadratic speedup as other optimal methods do with the advantages that the problem Hamiltonian is time independent and that the energy gap above the ground state is strictly nondecreasing with time. Likewise the method can be used for optimization as an alternative to the standard adiabatic algorithm.

  11. Adiabatic shear bands localization in materials undergoing deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabov, P. N.; Kudryashov, N. A.; Muratov, R. V.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the adiabatic shear banding phenomenon in composite materials undergoing the high speed shear deformations. The mathematical model of adiabatic shear banding in thermo-visco-plastic material is given. New two step numerical algorithm which is based on the Courant-Isaacson-Rees scheme that allows one to simulate fully localized plastic flow from initial stage of localization is proposed. To test this numerical algorithm we use three benchmark problems. The testing results show the accuracy and efficiency of proposed algorithm. The features of adiabatic shear bands formation in composites are studied. The existence of characteristic depth of localization in composites is shown. Influence of initial temperature distribution on the processes of adiabatic shear bands formation in composites is considered.

  12. Spatial non-adiabatic passage using geometric phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benseny, Albert; Busch, Thomas [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Quantum Systems Unit, Okinawa (Japan); Kiely, Anthony; Ruschhaupt, Andreas [University College Cork, Department of Physics, Cork (Ireland); Zhang, Yongping [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Quantum Systems Unit, Okinawa (Japan); Shanghai University, Department of Physics, Shanghai (China)

    2017-12-15

    Quantum technologies based on adiabatic techniques can be highly effective, but often at the cost of being very slow. Here we introduce a set of experimentally realistic, non-adiabatic protocols for spatial state preparation, which yield the same fidelity as their adiabatic counterparts, but on fast timescales. In particular, we consider a charged particle in a system of three tunnel-coupled quantum wells, where the presence of a magnetic field can induce a geometric phase during the tunnelling processes. We show that this leads to the appearance of complex tunnelling amplitudes and allows for the implementation of spatial non-adiabatic passage. We demonstrate the ability of such a system to transport a particle between two different wells and to generate a delocalised superposition between the three traps with high fidelity in short times. (orig.)

  13. Dependence of adiabatic population transfer on pulse profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Dasgupta; T kushwaha; D Goswami

    2006-06-01

    Control of population transfer by rapid adiabatic passage has been an established technique wherein the exact amplitude profile of the shaped pulse is considered to be insignificant. We study the effect of ultrafast shaped pulses for two-level systems, by density-matrix approach. However, we find that adiabaticity depends simultaneously on pulse profile as well as the frequency modulation under non-resonant conditions.

  14. ENTROPY-VORTEX WAVES IN NON-ADIABATIC FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibáñez S, Miguel H., E-mail: mhibanez@yahoo.com [Departamento de Ciencias Básicas, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Caribe, Barranquilla (Colombia)

    2016-02-20

    The Ertel theorem on the vorticity along the flow of adiabatic fluids is generalized for non-adiabatic flows. Several limiting cases are analyzed and the results are applied to flows behind different hydrodynamics fronts, particularly to thermal fronts (heat and cooling fronts). An important conclusion of the present analysis is that vorticity is inherent in the condensation’s (or hot spots) formation by thermal instabilities in plasma flows. Implications for several astrophysical plasmas are outlined.

  15. Adiabatic invariants of the extended KdV equation

    CERN Document Server

    Karczewska, Anna; Infeld, Eryk; Rowlands, George

    2015-01-01

    When the Euler equations for shallow water are taken to the next order, beyond KdV, $\\eta^2$ is no longer an invariant. (It would seem that $\\eta$ is the only one.) However, two adiabatic invariants akin to $\\eta^2$ can be found. Here we present and test them. When the KdV expansion parameters are zero, $\\eta^2$ is recovered from both adiabatic invariants.

  16. A Solved Model to Show Insufficiency of Quantitative Adiabatic Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Long-Jiang; LIU Yu-Zhen; TONG Dian-Min

    2009-01-01

    The adiabatic theorem is a useful tool in processing quantum systems slowly evolving,but its practical application depends on the quantitative condition expressed by Hamiltonian's eigenvalues and eigenstates,which is usually taken as a sufficient condition.Recently,the sumciency of the condition was questioned,and several counterex amples have been reported.Here we present a new solved model to show the insufficiency of the traditional quantitative adiabatic condition.

  17. Adiabatic CMB perturbations in pre-big bang string cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Enqvist, Kari; Enqvist, Kari; Sloth, Martin S.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the pre-big bang scenario with a massive axion field which starts to dominate energy density when oscillating in an instanton-induced potential and subsequently reheats the universe as it decays into photons, thus creating adiabatic CMB perturbations. We find that the fluctuations in the axion field can give rise to a nearly flat spectrum of adiabatic perturbations with a spectral tilt $\\Delta n$ in the range $-0.1 \\lesssim \\Delta n \\lesssim 0.3$.

  18. Preparation of Entangled States of Three Particles by Adiabatic Passage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭建友

    2002-01-01

    We propose a novel technique for the creation of entangled states of three particles, based upon an adiabatic passage induced by a suitably crafted time-dependent external field. We derive the corresponding adiabatic and bare conditions for the preparation of entangled states. We obtain the time evolutions of the energy of the system and the populations involving the initial state and target entangled state.

  19. Critical issues in burn care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, James H

    2008-01-01

    Burn care, especially for serious burn injuries, represents a considerable challenge for the healthcare system. The American Burn Association has established a number of strategies for the management of burn patients and dedicates its efforts and resources to promoting and supporting burn-related research, education, care, rehabilitation, and prevention, often in collaboration with other organizations. The American Burn Association has recommended that patients with serious burns be referred to a designated burn center, ie, a hospital outfitted with specialized personnel and equipment dedicated to burn care. Burn centers have been operational for over 50 years, but the complexity and costs of providing specialized burn care have given rise to a number of critical administrative and political issues. These include logistical limitations imposed by the uneven national distribution of burn centers and a potential shortage of burn beds, both during everyday conditions and in the event of a mass disaster. Burn surgeon shortages have also been identified, stemming, in part, from a lack of specialized burn care training opportunities. There is currently a lack of quality outcome data to support evidence-based recommendations for burn care, and burn care centers are compromised by problems obtaining reimbursement for the care of uninsured and publicly insured out-of-state burn patients. Initiatives are underway to maintain efficient burn care facilities that are fully funded, easily accessible, and most importantly, provide optimal, evidence-based care on a daily basis, and are well-equipped to handle a surge of patients during a disaster situation.

  20. A connection between mix and adiabat in ICF capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas; Wang, Yi-Ming; Yi, Sunghuan (Austin); Batha, Steven

    2016-10-01

    We study the relationship between instability induced mix, preheat and the adiabat of the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel in fusion capsule experiments. Our studies show that hydrodynamic instability not only directly affects the implosion, hot spot shape and mix, but also affects the thermodynamics of the capsule, such as, the adiabat of the DT fuel, and, in turn, affects the energy partition between the pusher shell (cold DT) and the hot spot. It was found that the adiabat of the DT fuel is sensitive to the amount of mix caused by Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at the material interfaces due to its exponential dependence on the fuel entropy. An upper limit of mix allowed maintaining a low adiabat of DT fuel is derived. Additionally we demonstrated that the use of a high adiabat for the DT fuel in theoretical analysis and with the aid of 1D code simulations could explain some aspects of the 3D effects and mix in the capsule experiments. Furthermore, from the observed neutron images and our physics model, we could infer the adiabat of the DT fuel in the capsule and determine the possible amount of mix in the hot spot (LA-UR-16-24880). This work was conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  1. Pain in burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latarjet, J; Choinère, M

    1995-08-01

    While severe pain is a constant component of the burn injury, inadequate pain management has been shown to be detrimental to burn patients. Pain-generating mechanisms in burns include nociception, primary and secondary hyperalgesia and neuropathy. The clinical studies of burn pain characteristics reveal very clear-cut differences between continuous pain and pain due to therapeutic procedures which have to be treated separately. Some of the main features of burn pain are: (1) its long-lasting course, often exceeding healing time, (2) the repetition of highly nociceptive procedures which can lead to severe psychological disturbances if pain control is inappropriate. Pharmaco-therapy with opioids is the mainstay for analgesia in burned patients, but non-pharmacological techniques may be useful adjuncts. Routine pain evaluation is mandatory for efficient and safe analgesia. Special attention must be given to pain in burned children which remains too often underestimated and undertreated. More educational efforts from physicians and nursing staff are necessary to improve pain management in burned patients.

  2. Nutrition of burned patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudaviciene, Daiva; Rimdeika, Rytis; Adamonis, Kestutis

    2004-01-01

    Burns form 5-12% of all traumas. About 2,200 of patients are annually hospitalized in Lithuania. In most cases people of the employable age get burned. The treatment is often long-lasting, and afterwards recovered patients often have invalidity from burn sequels. The mortality of hospitalized burned patients is about 10%. The most common causes of death are pulmonary edema, pneumonia, sepsis and multiorgan failure. All these complications are related with insufficient nutrition. These complications are extremely frequent and dangerous for patients with more than 20% of body burned. The nutritional support of burned patient gives a possibility to increase the survival probability, to decrease complication rate and hospitalization time. Currently in Lithuania there are no standards for burned patient nutrition. More attention is given to strategy of surgical strategy and techniques, as well as antibiotic therapy. This article is the review of the different aspects of artificial nutrition of burned patient: indications, modes of nutrition, mixtures and terms of nutritional support.

  3. Burning mouth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K A Kamala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is multifactorial in origin which is typically characterized by burning and painful sensation in an oral cavity demonstrating clinically normal mucosa. Although the cause of BMS is not known, a complex association of biological and psychological factors has been identified, suggesting the existence of a multifactorial etiology. As the symptom of oral burning is seen in various pathological conditions, it is essential for a clinician to be aware of how to differentiate between symptom of oral burning and BMS. An interdisciplinary and systematic approach is required for better patient management. The purpose of this study was to provide the practitioner with an understanding of the local, systemic, and psychosocial factors which may be responsible for oral burning associated with BMS, and review of treatment modalities, therefore providing a foundation for diagnosis and treatment of BMS.

  4. Hand chemical burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Elliot P; Chhabra, A Bobby

    2015-03-01

    There is a vast and ever-expanding variety of potentially harmful chemicals in the military, industrial, and domestic landscape. Chemical burns make up a small proportion of all skin burns, yet they can cause substantial morbidity and mortality. Additionally, the hand and upper extremity are the most frequently involved parts of the body in chemical burns, and therefore these injuries may lead to severe temporary or permanent loss of function. Despite this fact, discussion of the care of these injuries is sparse in the hand surgery literature. Although most chemical burns require only first response and wound care, some require the attention of a specialist for surgical debridement and, occasionally, skin coverage and reconstruction. Exposure to certain chemicals carries the risk of substantial systemic toxicity and even mortality. Understanding the difference between thermal and chemical burns, as well as special considerations for specific compounds, will improve patient treatment outcomes.

  5. [Chickenpox, burns and grafts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Zegers, J; Fidel Avendaño, L

    1979-01-01

    An outbreak of chickenpox that occurred at the Burns Repair Surgery Unit, Department of Children's Surgery, Hospital R. del Río, between June and November, 1975, is reported. 27 cases of burned children were studied, including analysis of correlations of the stages and outcome of the disease (varicela), the trauma (burns) and the graft (repair surgery). As a result, the authors emphasize the following findings: 1. Burns and their repair are not aggravating factors for varicella. In a small number of cases the exanthema looked more confluent in the graft surgical areas and in the first degree burns healing spontaneously. 2. Usually there was an uneventful outcome of graft repair surgery on a varicella patient, either during the incubation period, the acme or the convalescence. 3. The fact that the outmost intensity of secondary viremia of varicella occurs before the onset of exanthemia, that is, during the late incubation period, is confirmed.

  6. Crude oil burning mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gelderen, Laurens; Malmquist, Linus Mattias Valdemar; Jomaas, Grunde

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve predictions for the burning efficiency and the residue composition of in-situ burning of crude oil, the burning mechanism of crude oil was studied in relation to the composition of its hydrocarbon mixture, before, during and after the burning. The surface temperature, flame...... height, mass loss rate and residues of three hydrocarbon liquids (n-octane, dodecane and hexadecane), two crude oils (DUC and REBCO) and one hydrocarbon liquid mixture of the aforementioned hydrocarbon liquids were studied using the Crude Oil Flammability Apparatus. The experimental results were compared...... to the predictions of four conceptual models that describe the burning mechanism of multicomponent fuels. Based on the comparisons, hydrocarbon liquids were found to be best described by the Equilibrium Flash Vaporization model, showing a constant gas composition and gasification rate. The multicomponent fuels...

  7. A New Type of Non-Noether Adiabatic Invariants for Disturbed Lagrangian Systems: Adiabatic Invariants of Generalized Lutzky Type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Shao-Kai

    2007-01-01

    For a Lagrangian system with the action of small disturbance, the Lie symmetrical perturbation and a new type of non-Noether adiabatic invariant are presented in general infinitesimal transformation groups. On the basis of the invariance of disturbed Lagrangian systems under general infinitesimal transformations, the determining equations of Lie symmetries of the system are constructed. Based on the definition of higher-order adiabatic invariants of a mechanical system, a new type of adiabatic invariant, i.e. generalized Lutzky adiabatic invariants, of a disturbed Lagrangian system are obtained by investigating the perturbation of Lie symmetries for a Lagrangian system with the action of small disturbance. Finally, an example is given to illustrate the application of the method and results.

  8. Perturbation to Unified Symmetry and Adiabatic Invariants for Relativistic Hamilton Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ming-Jiang; FANG Jian-Hui; LU Kai; PANG Ting; LIN Peng

    2009-01-01

    Based on the concept of adiabatic invariant, the perturbation to unified symmetry and adiabatic invariants for relativistic Hamilton systems are studied. The definition of the perturbation to unified symmetry for the system is presented, and the criterion of the perturbation to unified symmetry is given. Meanwhile, the Noether adiabatic invariants, the generalized Hojman adiabatic invariants, and the Mei adiabatic invariants for the perturbed system are obtained.

  9. First results of radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium implosions with a 3-shock adiabat-shaped drive at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Döppner, T.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Bachmann, B.; Baker, K. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bond, E.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Dixit, S. N.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jancaitis, K. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2015-08-15

    Radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium plastic capsule implosions were carried out using a new, 3-shock “adiabat-shaped” drive on the National Ignition Facility. The purpose of adiabat shaping is to use a stronger first shock, reducing hydrodynamic instability growth in the ablator. The shock can decay before reaching the deuterium-tritium fuel leaving it on a low adiabat and allowing higher fuel compression. The fuel areal density was improved by ∼25% with this new drive compared to similar “high-foot” implosions, while neutron yield was improved by more than 4 times, compared to “low-foot” implosions driven at the same compression and implosion velocity.

  10. Comparative study on direct burning of oil shale and coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Ahmad; Al Asfar, Jamil

    2017-07-01

    A comparative study of the direct burning processes of oil shale and coal in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) was done in this study using ANSYS Fluent software to solve numerically the governing equations of continuity, momentum, energy and mass diffusion using finite volume method. The model was built based on an existing experimental combustion burner unit. The model was validated by comparing the theoretical results of oil shale with proved experimental results from the combustion unit. It was found that the temperature contours of the combustion process showed that the adiabatic flame temperature was 1080 K for oil shale compared with 2260 K for coal, while the obtained experimental results of temperatures at various locations of burner during the direct burning of oil shale showed that the maximum temperature reached 962 K for oil shale. These results were used in economic and environmental analysis which show that oil shale may be used as alternative fuel for coal in cement industry in Jordan.

  11. Non-adiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics of supersonic beam epitaxy of silicon carbide at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taioli, Simone; Garberoglio, Giovanni; Simonucci, Stefano; a Beccara, Silvio; Aversa, Lucrezia; Nardi, Marco; Verucchi, Roberto; Iannotta, Salvatore; Dapor, Maurizio; Alfè, Dario

    2013-01-28

    In this work, we investigate the processes leading to the room-temperature growth of silicon carbide thin films by supersonic molecular beam epitaxy technique. We present experimental data showing that the collision of fullerene on a silicon surface induces strong chemical-physical perturbations and, for sufficient velocity, disruption of molecular bonds, and cage breaking with formation of nanostructures with different stoichiometric character. We show that in these out-of-equilibrium conditions, it is necessary to go beyond the standard implementations of density functional theory, as ab initio methods based on the Born-Oppenheimer approximation fail to capture the excited-state dynamics. In particular, we analyse the Si-C(60) collision within the non-adiabatic nuclear dynamics framework, where stochastic hops occur between adiabatic surfaces calculated with time-dependent density functional theory. This theoretical description of the C(60) impact on the Si surface is in good agreement with our experimental findings.

  12. Prescribed burning plan : Stillwater NWR : de Braga Burn Unit 67

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This 1991 Annual Prescribed Burning Plan for Stillwater NWR calls for all 67 acres of the de Braga burn unit to be burned. The objective of this burn is to remove...

  13. Wall-wake velocity profile for compressible non-adiabatic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, C. C.; Childs, M. E.

    1975-01-01

    A form of the wall-wake profile, which is applicable to flows with heat transfer, and for which a variation in y = O at y = delta, was suggested. The modified profile, which takes into account the effect of turbulent Prandtl number, was found to provide a good representation of experimental data for a wide range numbers and heat transfer. The Cf values which are determined by a least squares fit of the profile to the data agree well with values which were measured by the floating element technique. In addition, the values of delta determined by the fit correspond more closely to the outer edge of the viscous flow region than those obtained with earlier versions of the wall-wake profile.

  14. Performance of Indirectly-Driven Capsule Implosions on NIF Using Adiabat-Shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, Harry

    2015-11-01

    Indirectly-driven capsule implosions are being conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Early experiments conducted during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) were driven by a laser pulse with a relatively low-power initial foot (``low-foot''), which was designed to keep the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel on a low adiabat to achieve a high fuel areal density (ρR). These implosions were successful in achieving high ρR, but fell significantly short of the predicted neutron yield. A leading candidate to explain this degraded performance was ablation front instability growth, which can lead to the mixing of ablator material with the DT fuel layer and in extreme cases into the central DT hot spot. A subsequent campaign employing a modified laser pulse with increased power in the foot (``high-foot'') was designed to reduce the adverse effects of ablation front instability growth. These implosions have been very successful, increasing neutron yields by more than an order of magnitude, but at the expense of reduced fuel compression. To bridge these two regimes, a series of implosions have been designed to simultaneously achieve both high stability and high ρR. These implosions employ adiabat-shaping, where the driving laser pulse is high in the initial picket similar to the high-foot to retain the favorable stability properties at the ablation front. The remainder of the foot is similar to that of the low-foot, driving a lower velocity shock into the DT fuel to keep the adiabat low and compression high. This talk will present results and analysis of these implosions and will discuss implications for improved implosion performance. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Phenomenon of transformed adiabatic shear band surrounded by deformed adiabatic shear band of ductile metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xue-bin

    2008-01-01

    The coexistent phenomenon of deformed and transformed adiabatic shear bands(ASBs) of ductile metal was analyzed using the JOHNSON-COOK model and gradient-dependent plasticity(GDP). The effects of melting point, density, heat capacity and work to heat conversion factor were investigated. Higher work to heat conversion factor, lower density, lower heat capacity and higher melting point lead to wider transformed ASB and higher local plastic shear deformation between deformed and transformed ASBs. Higher work to heat conversion factor, lower density, lower heat capacity and lower melting point cause higher local plastic shear deformation in the deformed ASB. Three reasons for the scatter in experimental data on the ASB width were pointed out and the advantages of the work were discussed. If the transformed ASB width is used to back-calculate the internal length parameter in the GDP, undoubtedly, the parameter will be extremely underestimated.

  16. Global adiabaticity and non-Gaussianity consistency condition

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Antonio Enea; Sasaki, Misao

    2016-01-01

    In the context of single-field inflation, the conservation of the curvature perturbation on comoving slices, $R_c$, on super-horizon scales is one of the assumptions necessary to derive the consistency condition between the squeezed limit of the bispectrum and the spectrum of the primordial curvature perturbation. However, the conservation of $R_c$ holds only after the perturbation has reached the adiabatic limit where the constant mode of $R_c$ dominates over the other (usually decaying) mode. In this case, the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation defined in the thermodynamic sense, $\\delta P_{nad}\\equiv\\delta P-c_w^2\\delta\\rho$ where $c_w^2=\\dot P/\\dot\\rho$, usually becomes also negligible on superhorizon scales. Therefore one might think that the adiabatic limit is the same as thermodynamic adiabaticity. This is in fact not true. In other words, thermodynamic adiabaticity is not a sufficient condition for the conservation of $R_c$ on super-horizon scales. In this paper, we consider models that satisfies $\\d...

  17. Physics on the adiabatically changed Finslerian manifold and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Lipovka, Anton A

    2016-01-01

    In present paper we confirm our previous result [4] that Planck constant is adiabatic invariant of electromagnetic field propagating on the adiabatically changed Finslerian manifold. Direct calculation from cosmological parameters gives value h=6x10(-27) (erg s). We also confirm that Planck constant (and hence other fundamental constants which depend on h) is varied on time due to changing of geometry. As an example the variation of the fine structure constant is calculated. Its relative variation ((da/dt)/a) consist 1.0x10(-18) (1/s). We show that on the Finsler manifold characterized by adiabatically changed geometry, classical free electromagnetic field is quantized geometrically, from the properties of the manifold in such manner that adiabatic invariant of field is ET=6x10(-27)=h. Electrodynamic equations on the Finslerian manifold are suggested. It is stressed that quantization naturally appears from these equations and is provoked by adiabatically changed geometry of manifold. We consider in details tw...

  18. Interplay between electric and magnetic effect in adiabatic polaritonic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Alabastri, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We report on the possibility of realizing adiabatic compression of polaritonic wave on a metallic conical nano-structure through an oscillating electric potential (quasi dynamic regime). By comparing this result with an electromagnetic wave excitation, we were able to relate the classical lighting-rod effect to adiabatic compression. Furthermore, we show that while the magnetic contribution plays a marginal role in the formation of adiabatic compression, it provides a blue shift in the spectral region. In particular, magnetic permeability can be used as a free parameter for tuning the polaritonic resonances. The peculiar form of adiabatic compression is instead dictated by both the source and the metal permittivity. The analysis is performed by starting from a simple electrostatic system to end with the complete electromagnetic one through intermediate situations such as the quasi-electrostatic and quasi-dynamic regimes. Each configuration is defined by a particular set of equations which allows to clearly determine the individual role played by the electric and magnetic contribution in the generation of adiabatic compression. We notice that these findings can be applied for the realization of a THz nano-metric generator. © 2013 Optical Society of America.

  19. PBXN-110 Burn Rate Estimate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glascoe, E

    2008-08-11

    It is estimated that PBXN-110 will burn laminarly with a burn function of B = (0.6-1.3)*P{sup 1.0} (B is the burn rate in mm/s and P is pressure in MPa). This paper provides a brief discussion of how this burn behavior was estimated.

  20. Management of burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiestl, Clemens; Meuli, Martin; Trop, Marija; Neuhaus, Kathrin

    2013-10-01

    Small and moderate scalds in toddlers are still the most frequent thermal injuries the pediatric surgeons have to face today. Over the last years, surgical treatment of these patients has changed in many aspects. Due to new dressing materials and new surgical treatment strategies that are particularly suitable for children, today, far better functional and aesthetic long-term results are possible. While small and moderate thermal injuries can be treated in most European pediatric surgical departments, the severely burned child must be transferred to a specialized, ideally pediatric, burn center, where a well-trained multidisciplinary team under the leadership of a (ideally pediatric) burn surgeon cares for these highly demanding patients. In future, tissue engineered full thickness skin analogues will most likely play an important role, in pediatric burn as well as postburn reconstructive surgery.

  1. Burn Wise Awareness Kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health and safety outreach materials in the form of an awareness kit. Designed specifically for state, local, and tribal air agencies working to reduce wood smoke pollution, it includes best burn tips, social media m

  2. Molten Metal Burns

    OpenAIRE

    Kahn, Arthur M.; McCrady-Kahn, Virginia L.

    1981-01-01

    Molten metal burns are a frequent industrial injury among workers in foundries. The injury is typically small but very deep. Usually the depth and seriousness of these injuries is not recognized immediately by emergency department or industrial clinic physicians.

  3. New Fashioned Book Burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Reports on results of a teacher's experiment in book burning as a lesson accompanying the teaching of Ray Bradbury's "Fahrenheit 451." Discusses student reactions and the purpose of or justification for the experimental lesson. (TB)

  4. Accidental burns during surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Erhan; O'Dey, Dan Mon; Pallua, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to increase awareness of intraoperative burns during standard procedures, to discuss their possible causes and warning signs and to provide recommendations for prevention and procedures to follow after their occurrence. A total of 19 patients associated with intraoperative burn accidents were treated surgically and analyzed after a mean follow-up of 5 +/- 3.5 months. Review included retrospective patient chart analysis, clinical examination, and technical device and equipment testing. A total of 15 patients recently underwent cardiac surgery, and 4 pediatric patients recovered after standard surgical procedures. A total of 15 patients had superficial and 4 presented with deep dermal or full-thickness burns. The average injured TBSA was 2.1 +/- 1% (range, 0.5-4%). Delay between primary surgery and consultation of plastic surgeons was 4.5 +/- 3.4 days. A total of 44% required surgery, including débridment, skin grafting or musculocutaneous gluteus maximus flaps, and the remaining patients were treated conservatively. Successful durable soft-tissue coverage of the burn region was achieved in 18 patients, and 1 patient died after a course of pneumonia. Technical analysis demonstrated one malfunctioning electrosurgical device, one incorrect positioned neutral electrode, three incidents occurred after moisture under the negative electrode, eight burns occurred during surgery while fluid or blood created alternate current pathways, five accidents were chemical burns after skin preparation with Betadine solution, and in one case, the cause was not clear. The surgical team should pay more attention to the probability of burns during surgery. Early patient examination and immediate involvement of plastic and burn surgeons may prevent further complications or ease handling after the occurrence.

  5. Smartphone applications in burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurzer, Paul; Parvizi, Daryousch; Lumenta, David B; Giretzlehner, Michael; Branski, Ludwik K; Finnerty, Celeste C; Herndon, David N; Tuca, Alexandru; Rappl, Thomas; Smolle, Christian; Kamolz, Lars P

    2015-08-01

    Since the introduction of applications (apps) for smartphones, the popularity of medical apps has been rising. The aim of this review was to demonstrate the current availability of apps related to burns on Google's Android and Apple's iOS store as well as to include a review of their developers, features, and costs. A systematic online review of Google Play Store and Apple's App Store was performed by using the following search terms: "burn," "burns," "thermal," and the German word "Verbrennung." All apps that were programmed for use as medical apps for burns were included. The review was performed from 25 February until 1 March 2014. A closer look at the free and paid calculation apps including a standardized patient was performed. Four types of apps were identified: calculators, information apps, book/journal apps, and games. In Google Play Store, 31 apps were related to burns, of which 20 were calculation apps (eight for estimating the total body surface area (TBSA) and nine for total fluid requirement (TFR)). In Apple's App Store, under the category of medicine, 39 apps were related to burns, of which 21 were calculation apps (19 for estimating the TBSA and 17 for calculating the TFR). In 19 out of 32 available calculation apps, our study showed a correlation of the calculated TFR compared to our standardized patient. The review demonstrated that many apps for medical burns are available in both common app stores. Even free available calculation apps may provide a more objective and reproducible procedure compared to manual/subjective estimations, although there is still a lack of data security especially in personal data entered in calculation apps. Further clinical studies including smartphone apps for burns should be performed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  6. Burn mouse models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, Henrik; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third-degree b......Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third......-degree burn injury was induced with a hot-air blower. The third-degree burn was confirmed histologically. At 48 h, a decline in the concentration of peripheral blood leucocytes was observed in the group of mice with burn wound. The reduction was ascribed to the decline in concentration of polymorphonuclear...... neutrophil leucocytes and monocytes. When infecting the skin with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a dissemination of bacteria was observed only in the burn wound group. Histological characterization of the skin showed an increased polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes dominated inflammation in the group of mice...

  7. Ideal quantum gas in expanding cavity: nature of non-adiabatic force

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, K; Sobirov, Z A; Matrasulov, D U; Monnai, T

    2011-01-01

    We consider a quantum gas of non-interacting particles confined in the expanding cavity, and investigate the nature of the non-adiabatic force which is generated from the gas and acts on the cavity wall. Firstly, with use of the time-dependent canonical transformation which transforms the expanding cavity to the non-expanding one, we can define the force operator. Secondly, applying the perturbative theory which works when the cavity wall begins to move at time origin, we find that the non-adiabatic force is quadratic in the wall velocity and thereby does not break the time-reversal symmetry, in contrast with the general belief. Finally, using an assembly of the transitionless quantum states, we obtain the nonadiabatic force exactly. The exact result justifies the validity of both the definition of force operator and the issue of the perturbative theory. The mysterious mechanism of nonadiabatic transition with use of transitionless quantum states is also explained. The study is done on both cases of the hard-...

  8. Adiabaticity and gravity theory independent conservation laws for cosmological perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Antonio Enea; Sasaki, Misao

    2015-01-01

    We carefully study the implications of adiabaticity for the behavior of cosmological perturbations. There are essentially three similar but different definitions of non-adiabaticity: one is appropriate for a thermodynamic fluid $\\delta P_{nad}$, another is for a general matter field $\\delta P_{c,nad}$, and the last one is valid only on superhorizon scales. The first two definitions coincide if $c_s^2=c_w^2$ where $c_s$ is the propagation speed of the perturbation, while $c_w^2=\\dot P/\\dot\\rho$. Assuming the adiabaticity in the general sense, $\\delta P_{c,nad}=0$, we derive a relation between the lapse function in the comoving slicing $A_c$ and $\\delta P_{nad}$ valid for arbitrary matter field in any theory of gravity, by using only momentum conservation. The relation implies that as long as $c_s\

  9. Adiabatic Quantum Computation is Equivalent to Standard Quantum Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonov, D; Kempe, J; Landau, Z; Lloyd, S; Regev, O; Aharonov, Dorit; Dam, Wim van; Kempe, Julia; Landau, Zeph; Lloyd, Seth; Regev, Oded

    2004-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computation has recently attracted attention in the physics and computer science communities, but its computational power has been unknown. We settle this question and describe an efficient adiabatic simulation of any given quantum algorithm, which implies that the adiabatic computation model and the conventional quantum circuit model are polynomially equivalent. Our result can be extended to the physically realistic setting of particles arranged on a two-dimensional grid with nearest neighbor interactions. The equivalence between the models provides a new vantage point from which to tackle the central issues in quantum computation, namely designing new quantum algorithms and constructing fault tolerant quantum computers. In particular, by translating the main open questions in quantum algorithms to the language of spectral gaps of sparse matrices, the result makes quantum algorithmic questions accessible to a wider scientific audience, acquainted with mathematical physics, expander theory a...

  10. Dynamics of charged particles in an adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haofei Wei

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Charged-particle motion is studied in the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of a well-matched, intense charged-particle beam and an applied periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field. The beam is assumed to be in a state of adiabatic thermal equilibrium. The phase space is analyzed and compared with that of the well-known Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV-type beam equilibrium. It is found that the widths of nonlinear resonances in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium are narrower than those in the KV-type beam equilibrium. Numerical evidence is presented, indicating almost complete elimination of chaotic particle motion in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium.

  11. Analysis and Simulation of Adiabatic Bend Transitions in Optical Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Lei; LOU Shu-Qin; JIAN Shui-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    A low-loss criterion for bend transitions in optical fibers is proposed. An optical fiber can be tightly bent with low loss to be adiabatic for the fundamental mode, provided that an approximate upper bound on the rate of change of bend curvature for a given bend curvature is satisfied. Two typical adiabatic bend transition paths, the optimum profile and linear profile, are analyzed and studied numerically. A realizable adiabatic transition with an Archimedean spiral profile is introduced for low bend loss in tightly bent optical fibers. Design of the transitions is based on modeling of the propagation and coupling characteristics of the core and cladding modes,which clearly illustrate the physical processes involved.

  12. Applications of chirped Raman adiabatic rapid passage to atom interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotru, Krish; Butts, David L.; Kinast, Joseph M.; Johnson, David M. S.; Radojevic, Antonije M.; Timmons, Brian P.; Stoner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    We present robust atom optics, based on chirped Raman adiabatic rapid passage (ARP), in the context of atom interferometry. Such ARP light pulses drive coherent population transfer between two hyperfine ground states by sweeping the frequency difference of two fixed-intensity optical fields with large single photon detunings. Since adiabatic transfer is less sensitive to atom temperature and non-uniform Raman beam intensity than standard Raman pulses, this approach should improve the stability of atom interferometers operating in dynamic environments. In such applications, chirped Raman ARP may also provide advantages over the previously demonstrated stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) technique, which requires precise modulation of beam intensity and zeroing of the single photon detuning. We demonstrate a clock interferometer with chirped Raman ARP pulses, and compare its stability to that of a conventional Raman pulse interferometer. We also discuss potential improvements to inertially sensitive atom interferometers. Copyright 2011 by The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Semiclassical approximations for adiabatic slow-fast systems

    CERN Document Server

    Teufel, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    In this letter we give a systematic derivation and justification of the semiclassical model for the slow degrees of freedom in adiabatic slow-fast systems first found by Littlejohn and Flynn [5]. The classical Hamiltonian obtains a correction due to the variation of the adiabatic subspaces and the symplectic form is modified by the curvature of the Berry connection. We show that this classical system can be used to approximate quantum mechanical expectations and the time-evolution of operators also in sub-leading order in the combined adiabatic and semiclassical limit. In solid state physics the corresponding semiclassical description of Bloch electrons has led to substantial progress during the recent years, see [1]. Here, as an illustration, we show how to compute the Piezo-current arising from a slow deformation of a crystal in the presence of a constant magnetic field.

  14. Burns Caused by Medical Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    fear of litigation, patients with such injuries, even if the injuries are minor, arc often referred to a burn center for care. Burn injury...the potential burn hazards found elsewhere in the hospital. Even fewer studies have addressed the burn risks posed by medical therapy administered...35. Mills GH, Ralph S). Bums due to pulse oximetry [ letter ]. Anaesthesia 1992j47:276·7. 36. Shdlock: FG, Kana! E. Burns associated with the use of

  15. On the adiabatic theorem when eigenvalues dive into the continuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Decebal Horia; Jensen, Arne; Knörr, Hans Konrad

    For a Wigner-Weisskopf model of an atom consisting of a quantum dot coupled to an energy reservoir described by a three-dimensional Laplacian we study the survival probability of a bound state when the dot energy varies smoothly and adiabatically in time. The initial state corresponds to a discre...... eigenvalue which dives into the continuous spectrum and re-emerges from it as the dot energy is varied in time and finally returns to its initial value. Our main result is that for a large class of couplings, the survival probability of this bound state vanishes in the adiabatic limit....

  16. Microstructure evolution mechanism in adiabatic shear band in TA2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨扬; 熊俊; 杨续跃

    2004-01-01

    The micro structure evolution mechanism in adiabatic shear band in commercial pure titanium (TA2) at high strain rates(γ≈105 - 106/s) were studied. The nanosized recrystallized grains (about 50 nm in diameter) within the center of adiabatic shear band (ASB) were observed by means of transmission electronic microscope (TEM). A Rotational Dynamic Recrystallization (RDR) mechanism can explain the microstructure evolution (i. e. nanosized grains were formed within 5 - 10μs) in ASB. Kinetics calculations indicate that the recrystallized small grains are formed during the deformation and don't undergo significant growth by grain boundary migration after deformation.

  17. Nanoscale resolution for fluorescence microscopy via adiabatic passage

    CERN Document Server

    Rubio, Juan Luis; Ahufinger, Verònica; Mompart, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    We propose the use of the subwavelength localization via adiabatic passage technique for fluorescence microscopy with nanoscale resolution in the far field. This technique uses a {\\Lambda}-type medium coherently coupled to two laser pulses: the pump, with a node in its spatial profile, and the Stokes. The population of the {\\Lambda} system is adiabatically transferred from one ground state to the other except at the node position, yielding a narrow population peak. This coherent localization allows fluorescence imaging with nanometer lateral resolution. We derive an analytical expression to asses the resolution and perform a comparison with the coherent population trapping and the stimulated-emission-depletion techniques.

  18. Adiabatic hyperspherical approach to large-scale nuclear dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    We formulate a fully microscopic approach to large-scale nuclear dynamics using a hyperradius as a collective coordinate. An adiabatic potential is defined by taking account of all possible configurations at a fixed hyperradius, and its hyperradius dependence plays a key role in governing the global nuclear motion. In order to go to larger systems beyond few-body systems, we suggest basis functions of a microscopic multicluster model, propose a method for calculating matrix elements of an adiabatic Hamiltonian with use of Fourier transforms, and test its effectiveness.

  19. Adiabatic fluctuations from cosmic strings in a contracting universe

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenberger, Robert H; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2008-01-01

    We show that adiabatic, super-Hubble, and almost scale invariant density fluctuations are produced by cosmic strings in a contracting universe. An essential point is that isocurvature perturbations produced by topological defects such as cosmic strings on super-Hubble scales lead to a source term which seeds the growth of curvature fluctuations on these scales. Once the symmetry has been restored at high temperatures, the isocurvature seeds disappear, and the fluctuations evolve as adiabatic ones in the expanding phase. Thus, cosmic strings may be resurrected as a mechanism for generating the primordial density fluctuations observed today.

  20. How to Make the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm Fail

    CERN Document Server

    Farhi, E; Gutmann, S; Nagaj, D; Farhi, Edward; Goldstone, Jeffrey; Gutmann, Sam; Nagaj, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The quantum adiabatic algorithm is a Hamiltonian based quantum algorithm designed to find the minimum of a classical cost function whose domain has size N. We show that poor choices for the Hamiltonian can guarantee that the algorithm will not find the minimum if the run time grows more slowly than square root of N. These poor choices are nonlocal and wash out any structure in the cost function to be minimized and the best that can be hoped for is Grover speedup. These failures tell us what not to do when designing quantum adiabatic algorithms.

  1. Construction techniques for adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators using ferric ammonium alum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Grant W.; Timbie, Peter T.

    1999-07-01

    We describe techniques used to fabricate the cold stage of an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator that uses the paramagnetic salt ferric ammonium alum. We discuss the design of a leak-tight housing for the salt as well as a technique for growing ferric ammonium alum crystals that results in a housing filled with >98% refrigerant. These techniques have proven to be reliable in creating robust single-stage refrigerators. Similar techniques can be used for the second stage of a dual-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator.

  2. New design of an adiabatic demagnetization cryostat for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Junya; Sato, Akio; Sahashi, Masashi

    A new adiabatic demagnetization cryostat for cooling (in the region of 0.1 K) spaceborne far-infrared detectors is described. The cryostat contains a superconducting magnetic coil indirectly cooled by liquid helium, with the liquid nitrogen and helium vessels being connected by gas-filled thermal switches; the adiabatic demagnetization cell of the cryostat is set in vacuum at the center of the coil. The magnetic field of 3 T was obtained by a current of 11.5 A. The magnetic salt (single crystals of manganese ammonium alum) was prepared by the falling temperature technique.

  3. Trace element mass balance in hydrous adiabatic mantle melting: The Hydrous Adiabatic Mantle Melting Simulator version 1 (HAMMS1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    numerical mass balance calculation model for the adiabatic melting of a dry to hydrous peridotite has been programmed in order to simulate the trace element compositions of basalts from mid-ocean ridges, back-arc basins, ocean islands, and large igneous provinces. The Excel spreadsheet-based calculator, Hydrous Adiabatic Mantle Melting Simulator version 1 (HAMMS1) uses (1) a thermodynamic model of fractional adiabatic melting of mantle peridotite, with (2) the parameterized experimental melting relationships of primitive to depleted mantle sources in terms of pressure, temperature, water content, and degree of partial melting. The trace element composition of the model basalt is calculated from the accumulated incremental melts within the adiabatic melting regime, with consideration for source depletion. The mineralogic mode in the primitive to depleted source mantle in adiabat is calculated using parameterized experimental results. Partition coefficients of the trace elements of mantle minerals are parameterized to melt temperature mostly from a lattice strain model and are tested using the latest compilations of experimental results. The parameters that control the composition of trace elements in the model are as follows: (1) mantle potential temperature, (2) water content in the source mantle, (3) depth of termination of adiabatic melting, and (4) source mantle depletion. HAMMS1 enables us to obtain the above controlling parameters using Monte Carlo fitting calculations and by comparing the calculated basalt compositions to primary basalt compositions. Additionally, HAMMS1 compares melting parameters with a major element model, which uses petrogenetic grids formulated from experimental results, thus providing better constraints on the source conditions.

  4. Finite element analysis of solitary wave propagation by acoustic velocity method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruoka, Akira; Uchiyama, Ichiro; Kawahara, Mutsuto

    2017-01-01

    There is discontinuity between compressible and incompressible states in fluid flows. If we subtract the thermal effect from compressible fluid flows, we obtain adiabatic fluid flows, from which incompressible fluid flows are obtained if we let the acoustic velocity tend to infinity. Thus, we employ the idea of adiabatic fluid flows to solve incompressible flows. In the computation, the physical value of the acoustic velocity is employed. This idea corresponds to an extension of artificial compressibility under physical considerations. We present the new SUPG formulation of adiabatic fluid flows, by which not only the effect of SUPG but also those of PSPG and LSIC of incompressible fluid flows are derived. After the numerical verifications, three-dimensional solitary wave propagations are computed. Close agreement between computed and experimental values is obtained.

  5. On Models of Nonlinear Evolution Paths in Adiabatic Quantum Algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jie; LU Song-Feng; Samuel L.Braunstein

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,we study two different nonlinear interpolating paths in adiabatic evolution algorithms for solving a particular class of quantum search problems where both the initial and final Hamiltonian are one-dimensional projector Hamiltonians on the corresponding ground state.If the overlap between the initial state and final state of the quantum system is not equal to zero,both of these models can provide a constant time speedup over the usual adiabatic algorithms by increasing some another corresponding "complexity".But when the initial state has a zero overlap with the solution state in the problem,the second model leads to an infinite time complexity of the algorithm for whatever interpolating functions being applied while the first one can still provide a constant running time.However,inspired by a related reference,a variant of the first model can be constructed which also fails for the problem when the overlap is exactly equal to zero if we want to make up the "intrinsic" fault of the second model — an increase in energy.Two concrete theorems are given to serve as explanations why neither of these two models can improve the usual adiabatic evolution algorithms for the phenomenon above.These just tell us what should be noted when using certain nonlinear evolution paths in adiabatic quantum algorithms for some special kind of problems.

  6. Dark Energy and Dark Matter from an additional adiabatic fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Dunsby, Peter K S; Reverberi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    The Dark Sector is described by an additional barotropic fluid which evolves adiabatically during the universe's history and whose adiabatic exponent $\\gamma$ is derived from the standard definitions of specific heats. Although in general $\\gamma$ is a function of the redshift, the Hubble parameter and its derivatives, we find that our assumptions lead necessarily to solutions with $\\gamma = $ constant in a FLRW universe. The adiabatic fluid acts effectively as the sum of two distinct components, one evolving like non-relativistic matter and the other depending on the value of the adiabatic index. This makes the model particularly interesting as a way of simultaneously explaining the nature of both Dark Energy and Dark Matter, at least at the level of the background cosmology. The $\\Lambda$CDM model is included in this family of theories when $\\gamma = 0$. We fit our model to SNIa, $H(z)$ and BAO data, discussing the model selection criteria. The implications for the early-universe and the growth of small per...

  7. Evolutions of Yang Phase Under Cyclic Condition and Adiabatic Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Shang-Wu; GU Zhi-Yu

    2005-01-01

    There are three non-integrable phases in literatures: Berry phase, Aharonov-Anandan phase, and Yang phase. This article discusses the evolutions of Yang phase under the cyclic condition and the adiabatic condition for the generaltime-dependent harmonic oscillator, thus reveals the intimate relations between these three non-integrable phases.

  8. Reversibility and energy dissipation in adiabatic superconductor logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2017-03-06

    Reversible computing is considered to be a key technology to achieve an extremely high energy efficiency in future computers. In this study, we investigated the relationship between reversibility and energy dissipation in adiabatic superconductor logic. We analyzed the evolution of phase differences of Josephson junctions in the reversible quantum-flux-parametron (RQFP) gate and confirmed that the phase differences can change time reversibly, which indicates that the RQFP gate is physically, as well as logically, reversible. We calculated energy dissipation required for the RQFP gate to perform a logic operation and numerically demonstrated that the energy dissipation can fall below the thermal limit, or the Landauer bound, by lowering operation frequencies. We also investigated the 1-bit-erasure gate as a logically irreversible gate and the quasi-RQFP gate as a physically irreversible gate. We calculated the energy dissipation of these irreversible gates and showed that the energy dissipation of these gate is dominated by non-adiabatic state changes, which are induced by unwanted interactions between gates due to logical or physical irreversibility. Our results show that, in reversible computing using adiabatic superconductor logic, logical and physical reversibility are required to achieve energy dissipation smaller than the Landauer bound without non-adiabatic processes caused by gate interactions.

  9. Dark energy and dark matter from an additional adiabatic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunsby, Peter K. S.; Luongo, Orlando; Reverberi, Lorenzo

    2016-10-01

    The dark sector is described by an additional barotropic fluid which evolves adiabatically during the Universe's history and whose adiabatic exponent γ is derived from the standard definitions of specific heats. Although in general γ is a function of the redshift, the Hubble parameter and its derivatives, we find that our assumptions lead necessarily to solutions with γ =constant in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe. The adiabatic fluid acts effectively as the sum of two distinct components, one evolving like nonrelativistic matter and the other depending on the value of the adiabatic index. This makes the model particularly interesting as a way of simultaneously explaining the nature of both dark energy and dark matter, at least at the level of the background cosmology. The Λ CDM model is included in this family of theories when γ =0 . We fit our model to supernovae Ia, H (z ) and baryonic acoustic oscillation data, discussing the model selection criteria. The implications for the early Universe and the growth of small perturbations in this model are also discussed.

  10. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barends, R; Shabani, A; Lamata, L; Kelly, J; Mezzacapo, A; Las Heras, U; Babbush, R; Fowler, A G; Campbell, B; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Jeffrey, E; Lucero, E; Megrant, A; Mutus, J Y; Neeley, M; Neill, C; O'Malley, P J J; Quintana, C; Roushan, P; Sank, D; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; White, T C; Solano, E; Neven, H; Martinis, John M

    2016-06-09

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  11. Perturbation to Noether Symmetries and Adiabatic Invariants for Birkhoffian Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on El-Nabulsi dynamical model for a non-conservative system, the problem of perturbation to Noether symmetries and adiabatic invariants of a Birkhoffian system under the action of a small disturbance is proposed and studied. Firstly, the El-Nabulsi-Pfaff variational problem from extended exponentially fractional integral is presented and the El-Nabulsi-Birkhoff equations are established. Secondly, the definitions and the criterions criteria of the Noether symmetric transformations and quasisymmetric transformations of the Birkhoffian system are given, and the Noether theorems of the system are established, which reveal the inner relationship between the Noether symmetries and the conserved quantities. Thirdly, the perturbation of Noether symmetries under a small disturbance is studied, and corresponding adiabatic invariants are obtained. As special cases, the deductions in nonconservative Hamiltonian system and nonconservative Lagrangian system and standard Birkhoffian system are given. At the end of the paper, the case known as Hojman-Urrutia problem is discussed to investigate the Noether symmetries and the adiabatic invariants, the perturbation to Noether symmetries and the adiabatic invariants under El-Nabulsi dynamical model.

  12. Adiabatic and diabatic aerosol transport to the Jungfraujoch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugauer, M.; Baltensperger, U.; Furger, M.; Jost, D.T.; Schwikowski, M.; Gaeggeler, H.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Synoptic scale vertical motion, here detected by the geopotential height of the 500 hPa surface, mainly accounts for the aerosol transport to the Jungfraujoch in winter. In summer, diabatic convection provides the dominant vertical transport mechanism. Nevertheless, synoptic scale adiabatic motion still determines whether diabatic convection can develop. (author) 2 figs., 2 refs.

  13. Appearance of gauge fields and forces beyond the adiabatic approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosselin, Pierre [Institut Fourier, UMR 5582 CNRS-UJF, UFR de Mathematiques, Universite Grenoble I, BP74, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres, Cedex (France); Mohrbach, Herve, E-mail: mohrbach@univ-metz.f [Laboratoire de Physique Moleculaire et des Collisions, ICPMB-FR CNRS 2843, Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, 57078 Metz Cedex 3 (France)

    2010-09-03

    We investigate the origin of quantum geometric phases, gauge fields and forces beyond the adiabatic regime. In particular, we extend the notions of geometric magnetic and electric forces discovered in studies of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation to arbitrary quantum systems described by matrix-valued quantum Hamiltonians. The results are illustrated by several physical relevant examples.

  14. A Kinetic Study of the Adiabatic Polymerization of Acrylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, R. A. M.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses theory, procedures, and results for an experiment which demonstrates the application of basic physics to chemical problems. The experiment involves the adiabatic process, in which polymerization carried out in a vacuum flask is compared to the theoretical prediction of the model with the temperature-time curve obtained in practice. (JN)

  15. Adiabatic frequency conversion with a sign flip in the coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristova, H. S.; Rangelov, A. A.; Montemezzani, G.; Vitanov, N. V.

    2016-09-01

    Adiabatic frequency conversion is a method recently developed in nonlinear optics [H. Suchowski, D. Oron, A. Arie, and Y. Silberberg, Phys. Rev. A 78, 063821 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevA.78.063821], using ideas from the technique of rapid adiabatic passage (RAP) via a level crossing in quantum physics. In this method, the coupling coefficients are constant and the phase mismatch is chirped adiabatically. In this work, we propose another method for adiabatic frequency conversion, in which the phase mismatch is constant and the coupling is a pulse-shaped function with a sign flip (i.e., a phase step of π ) at its maximum. Compared to the RAP method, our technique has comparable efficiency but it is simpler to implement for it only needs two bulk crystals with opposite χ(2 ) nonlinearity. Moreover, because our technique requires constant nonzero frequency mismatch and has zero conversion efficiency on exact frequency matching, it can be used as a frequency filter.

  16. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barends, R.; Shabani, A.; Lamata, L.; Kelly, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; Heras, U. Las; Babbush, R.; Fowler, A. G.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Lucero, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J. Y.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Solano, E.; Neven, H.; Martinis, John M.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  17. Flat FRW Cosmologies with Adiabatic Matter Creation Kinematic tests

    CERN Document Server

    Lima, J A S

    1999-01-01

    Some observational consequences of a cosmological scenario driven by adiabatic matter creation are investigated. Exact expressions for the lookback time, age of the universe, luminosity distance, angular diameter, and galaxy number counts redshift relations are derived and their meaning discussed in detail. The expressions of the conventional FRW models are significantly modified and provide a powerful method to limit the parameters of the models.

  18. Fast Quasi-Adiabatic Gas Cooling: An Experiment Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oss, S.; Gratton, L. M.; Calza, G.; Lopez-Arias, T.

    2012-01-01

    The well-known experiment of the rapid expansion and cooling of the air contained in a bottle is performed with a rapidly responsive, yet very cheap thermometer. The adiabatic, low temperature limit is approached quite closely and measured with our apparatus. A straightforward theoretical model for this process is also presented and discussed.…

  19. High beta lasing in micropillar cavities with adiabatic layer design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lermer, M.; Gregersen, Niels; Lorke, M.;

    2013-01-01

    We report on lasing in optically pumped adiabatic micropillar cavities, based on the AlAs/GaAs material system. A detailed study of the threshold pump power and the spontaneous emission β factor in the lasing regime for different diameters dc is presented. We demonstrate a reduction of the thresh...

  20. Adiabatic CMB perturbations in pre-big bang string cosmology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enqvist, Kari; Sloth, Martin Snoager

    2001-01-01

    We consider the pre-big bang scenario with a massive axion field which starts to dominate energy density when oscillating in an instanton-induced potential and subsequently reheats the universe as it decays into photons, thus creating adiabatic CMB perturbations. We find that the fluctuations...

  1. Psychiatric aspects of burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalal P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Burn injuries and their subsequent treatment cause one of the most excruciating forms of pain imaginable. The psychological aspects of burn injury have been researched in different parts of the world, producing different outcomes. Studies have shown that greater levels of acute pain are associated with negative long-term psychological effects such as acute stress disorder, depression, suicidal ideation, and post-traumatic stress disorder for as long as 2 years after the initial burn injury. The concept of allostatic load is presented as a potential explanation for the relationship between acute pain and subsequent psychological outcomes. A biopsychosocial model is also presented as a means of obtaining better inpatient pain management and helping to mediate this relationship.

  2. Bacteriological profile of burn patients at Yekatit 12 Hospital Burn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    injuries, creating a formidable public health problem. (3). Despite major ... change with time. Thus, to have an in-depth knowledge .... Table 4: Antibiotic resistance pattern of bacterial isolates from burn wound at Yekatit 12 hospital burn center.

  3. Coherent diagnostics of burned skin: experiments with phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednov, Andrey A.; Cheng, Cecil; Ulyanov, Sergey S.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2000-04-01

    Modeling of skin burns has been realized in this study. Autocorrelation functions of intensity fluctuations of scattered light were measured for two-layered turbid media. The first layer served as a model of motionless scatterers whereas the second one simulated dynamic light scattering. This medium was used as a model of skin burns. A theory related quasi-elastic light scattering measurements to cutaneous blood flow was used. The dependencies of statistical properties of Doppler signal on the properties of skin burns as well as on the velocity of cutaneous blood flow has ben investigated. Predictions were verified by measurements both of dynamic and stationary light scattering in model media. Experimental results might be used as a basis for blood micro circulation diagnostics as well as for precise measurements of a depth of burned skin.

  4. Perturbation to Noether-Mei Symmetry and Adiabatic Invariants for Nonholonomic Mechanical Systems in Phase Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ming-Jiang; FANG Jian-Hui; LU Kai

    2009-01-01

    Based on the concept of adiabatic invariant, the perturbation to Noether-Mei symmetry and adiabatic invariants for nonholonomic mechanical systems in phase space are studied. The definition of the perturbation to Noether-Mei symmetry for the system is presented, and the criterion of the perturbation to Noether-Mei symmetry is given. Meanwhile, the Noether adiabatic invariants and the Mei adiabatic invariants for the perturbed system are obtained.

  5. An assessment of burn care professionals' attitudes to major burn.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, A D

    2008-06-01

    The resuscitation of severe burn remains a controversial area within the burn care profession. There is ongoing debate as to what percentage burn is associated with a sufficient quality of life to support initial resuscitation efforts. We conducted a survey of delegates at the 39th Annual Meeting of the British Burns Association (2005), regarding attitudes towards resuscitation following major burns. Respondents were asked the maximum percentage total body surface area (TBSA) burn beyond which they would not wish to be resuscitated. They were also asked what maximum TBSA they perceived to be commensurate with an acceptable quality of life (QOL). One hundred and forty three of 300 delegates responded to the questionnaire. Thirty three percent of respondents would not wish to be resuscitated with 50-75% TBSA burns or greater. A further 35% would not wish to have life-sustaining intervention with 75-95% TBSA burns or greater. The remaining 32% indicated that they would not want resuscitation with TBSA burns>95%. Regardless of TBSA affected, 16% would not wish resuscitation if they had full thickness facial burns, a further 10% did not want resuscitation if both their hands and faces were affected. Our survey demonstrates the diversity of personal preference amongst burn care professionals. This would suggest that a unifying philosophy regarding the resuscitation of extensive burns will remain elusive.

  6. Perturbation and Adiabatic Invariants of Mei Symmetry for Nonholonomic Mechanical Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Ning; FANG Jian-Hui; WANG Peng

    2007-01-01

    Based on the concept of adiabatic invariant,the perturbation and adiabatic invariants of the Mei symmetry for nonholonomic mechanical systems are studied.The exact invariants of the Mei symmetry for the system without perturbation are given,The perturbation to the Mei symmetry is discussed and the adiabatic invariants of the Mei symmetry for the perturbed system are obtained.

  7. Perturbation to Lie Symmetry and Lutzky Adiabatic Invariants for Lagrange Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Ji-Rong; DING Ning; LI Ran; FANG Jian-Hui; DUAN Yi-Shi; WANG Peng; ZHANG Xiao-Ni

    2008-01-01

    Based on the concept of adiabatic invariant, perturbation to Lie symmetry and Lutzky adiabatic invariants for Lagrange systems are studied by using different methods from those of previous works. Exact invariants induced from Lie symmetry of the system without perturbation are given. Perturbation to Lie symmetry is discussed and Lutzky adiabatic invariants of the system subject to perturbation are obtained.

  8. Back Bay Wilderness burning support

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a memorandum concerning prescribed burns between members of the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife. It states that burning should be supported...

  9. Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Professionals Phoenix Society is the leader in connecting the burn recovery community and creating resources for survivors. Since 1977, we have partnered with survivors, families, health care professionals, burn centers, and the fire ...

  10. Hair bleaching and skin burning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Forster, K; Lingitz, R; Prattes, G; Schneider, G; Sutter, S; Schintler, M; Trop, M

    2012-01-01

    .... We report a unique case of a 16-yr-old girl who suffered full-thickness chemical and thermal burns to the nape of her neck and superficial burns to the occiput after her hair had been dyed blond...

  11. The year in burns 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Steven E

    2009-12-01

    For 2008, approximately 1200 original burn research articles were published in scientific journals using the English language. This article reviews those with the most impact on burn treatment according to the Editor of one of the major journals (Burns). As in the previous year's review, articles were divided into the following topic areas: epidemiology, wound characterisation, critical care physiology, inhalation injury, infection, metabolism and nutrition, psychological considerations, pain management, rehabilitation, and burn reconstruction. Each selected article is mentioned briefly with editorial comment.

  12. TIRES, OPEN BURNING

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chapter describes available information on the health effects from open burning of rubber tires. It concentrates on the three known sources of detailed measurements: (1) a small-scale emissions characterization study performed by the U.S. EPA in a facility designed to simulat...

  13. Chemical burn or reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000059.htm Chemical burn or reaction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chemicals that touch skin can lead to a reaction on the skin, throughout the body, or both. ...

  14. PLASTIC SURGERY AND BURNS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    Objective Endotoxin as the inciting agentof cytokines and other mediators, whose highlevel expression correlates with the septicshock and MOF, has been the one of leadingcauses of death in ICU. Methods For treatingsepsis and MOF caused by endotoxin, the anti-lipid A of LPS antibody was used. 19 burned

  15. Modern management of paediatric burns

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-01

    Mar 1, 2010 ... Jackson's. 3-dimensional burn wound model describes 3 zones: • a central zone ... the burn.7 Care must be taken not to induce hypothermia in larger burns – especially in .... Fluid therapy thereafter consists of 2 components ...

  16. Reactive burn models and ignition & growth concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shaw, Milton S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Plastic-bonded explosives are heterogeneous materials. Experimentally, shock initiation is sensitive to small amounts of porosity, due to the formation of hot spots (small localized regions of high temperature). This leads to the Ignition and Growth concept, introduced by Lee and Tarver in 1980, as the basis for reactive burn models. A homogeneized burn rate needs to account for three mesoscale physical effects (i) the density of burnt hot spots, which depends on the lead shock strength; (ii) the growth of the burn fronts triggered by hot spots, which depends on the local deflagration speed; (iii) a geometric factor that accounts for the overlap of deflagration wavelets from adjacent hot spots. These effects can be combined and the burn model defined by specifying the reaction progress variable {lambda}(t) as a function of a dimensionless reaction length {tau}{sub hs}(t)/{ell}{sub hs}, rather than by xpecifying an explicit burn rate. The length scale {ell}{sub hs} is the average distance between hot spots, which is proportional to [N{sub hs}(P{sub s})]{sup -1/3}, where N{sub hs} is the number density of hot spots activated by the lead shock. The reaction length {tau}{sub hs}(t) = {line_integral}{sub 0}{sup t} D(P(t'))dt' is the distance the burn front propagates from a single hot spot, where D is the deflagration speed and t is the time since the shock arrival. A key implementation issue is how to determine the lead shock strength in conjunction with a shock capturing scheme. They have developed a robust algorithm for this purpose based on the Hugoniot jump condition for the energy. The algorithm utilizes the time dependence of density, pressure and energy within each cell. The method is independent of the numerical dissipation used for shock capturing. It is local and can be used in one or more space dimensions. The burn model has a small number of parameters which can be calibrated to fit velocity gauge data from shock initiation experiments.

  17. Burn epidemiology and cost of medication in paediatric burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Zeliha; Sağlam, Zeynep

    2012-09-01

    Burns are common injuries that cause problems to societies throughout the world. In order to reduce the cost of burn treatment in children, it is extremely important to determine the burn epidemiology and the cost of medicines used in burn treatment. The present study used a retrospective design, with data collected from medical records of 140 paediatric patients admitted to a burn centre between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2009. Medical records were examined to determine burn epidemiology, medication administered, dosage, and duration of use. Descriptive statistical analysis was completed for all variables; chi-square was used to examine the relationship between certain variables. It was found that 62.7% of paediatric burns occur in the kitchen, with 70.7% involving boiling water; 55.7% of cases resulted in third-degree burns, 19.3% required grafting, and mean duration of hospital stay was 27.5 ± 1.2 days. Medication costs varied between $1.38 US dollars (USD) and $14,159.09, total drug cost was $46,148.03 and average cost per patient was $329.63. In this study, the medication cost for burn patients was found to be relatively high, with antibiotics comprising the vast majority of medication expenditure. Most paediatric burns are preventable, so it is vital to educate families about potential household hazards that can be addressed to reduce the risk of a burn. Programmes are also recommended to reduce costs and the inappropriate prescribing of medication.

  18. The year in burns 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Steven E; Arnoldo, Brett D

    2012-12-01

    For 2011, approximately 1746 original research articles in burns were published in English in scientific journals. This article reviews those with the most potential impact on for burn therapeutics and outcomes according to the Editor of one of the major journals (Burns) and his colleague. As done previously, articles were found and divided into these topic areas: epidemiology of injury and burn prevention, wound and scar characterisation, acute care and critical care, inhalation injury, infection, psychological considerations, pain and itching management, rehabilitation and long-term outcomes, and burn reconstruction. Each selected article is mentioned briefly with editorial comment.

  19. Adiabatic tapered optical fiber fabrication in two step etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenari, Z.; Latifi, H.; Ghamari, S.; Hashemi, R. S.; Doroodmand, F.

    2016-01-01

    A two-step etching method using HF acid and Buffered HF is proposed to fabricate adiabatic biconical optical fiber tapers. Due to the fact that the etching rate in second step is almost 3 times slower than the previous droplet etching method, terminating the fabrication process is controllable enough to achieve a desirable fiber diameter. By monitoring transmitted spectrum, final diameter and adiabaticity of tapers are deduced. Tapers with losses about 0.3 dB in air and 4.2 dB in water are produced. The biconical fiber taper fabricated using this method is used to excite whispering gallery modes (WGMs) on a microsphere surface in an aquatic environment. So that they are suitable to be used in applications like WGM biosensors.

  20. Linear response of galactic halos to adiabatic gravitational perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Murali, C; Murali, Chigurupati; Tremaine, Scott

    1997-01-01

    We determine the response of a self-similar isothermal stellar system to small adiabatic gravitational perturbations. For odd spherical harmonics, the response is identical to the response of the analogous isothermal fluid system. For even spherical harmonics, the response can be regarded as an infinite series of wavetrains in $\\log r$, implying alternating compression and rarefaction in equal logarithmic radius intervals. Partly because of the oscillatory nature of the solutions, tidal fields from external sources are not strongly amplified by an intervening isothermal stellar system, except at radii can even screen the external tidal field in a manner analogous to Debye screening. As Weinberg has pointed out, individual resonances in a stellar system can strongly amplify external tidal fields over a limited radial range, but we cannot address this possibility because we examine only adiabatic perturbations. We also discuss the application of our method to the halo response caused by the slow growth of an em...

  1. Adiabatic Tip-Plasmon Focusing for Nano-Raman Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berweger, Samuel; Atkin, Joanna M.; Olmon, Robert L.; Raschke, Markus Bernd

    2010-12-16

    True nanoscale optical spectroscopy requires the efficient delivery of light for a spatially nanoconfined excitation. We utilize adiabatic plasmon focusing to concentrate an optical field into the apex of a scanning probe tip of {approx}10 nm in radius. The conical tips with the ability for two-stage optical mode matching of the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) grating-coupling and the adiabatic propagating SPP conversion into a localized SPP at the tip apex represent a special optical antenna concept for far-field transduction into nanoscale excitation. The resulting high nanofocusing efficiency and the spatial separation of the plasmonic grating coupling element on the tip shaft from the near-field apex probe region allows for true background-free nanospectroscopy. As an application, we demonstrate tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) of surface molecules with enhanced contrast and its extension into the near-IR with 800 nm excitation.

  2. Particle creation and non-adiabatic transitions in quantum cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Massar, S

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to compute transitions amplitudes in quantum cosmology, and in particular pair creation amplitudes and radiative transitions. To this end, we apply a double adiabatic development to the solutions of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation restricted to mini-superspace wherein gravity is described by the scale factor $a$. The first development consists in working with instantaneous eigenstates, in $a$, of the matter Hamiltonian. The second development is applied to the gravitational part of the wave function and generalizes the usual WKB approximation. We then obtain an exact equation which replaces the Wheeler-DeWitt equation and determines the evolution, i.e. the dependence in $a$, of the coefficients of this double expansion. When working in the gravitational adiabatic approximation, the simplified equation delivers the unitary evolution of transition amplitudes occurring among instantaneous eigenstates. Upon abandoning this approximation, one finds that there is an additional coupling among ma...

  3. Excitation energies along a range-separated adiabatic connection

    CERN Document Server

    Rebolini, Elisa; Teale, Andrew M; Helgaker, Trygve; Savin, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the variation of total energies and excitationenergies along a range-separated adiabatic connection. This connectionlinks the non-interacting Kohn-Sham electronic system to the physicalinteracting system by progressively switching on theelectron-electron interactions whilst simultaneously adjusting aone-electron effective potential so as to keep the ground-statedensity constant. The interactions are introduced in arange-dependent manner, first introducing predominantly long-range,and then all-range, interactions as the physical system is approached,as opposed to the conventional adiabatic connection where theinteractions are introduced by globally scaling the standard Coulomb interaction.Reference data are reported for the He and Be atoms and the H2molecule, obtained by calculating the short-range effective potentialat the full configuration-interaction level using Lieb'sLegendre-transform approach. As the strength of the electron-electroninteractions increases, the excitation energies, ...

  4. Stimulated Raman adiabatic control of a nuclear spin in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coto, Raul; Jacques, Vincent; Hétet, Gabriel; Maze, Jerónimo R.

    2017-08-01

    Coherent manipulation of nuclear spins is a highly desirable tool for both quantum metrology and quantum computation. However, most of the current techniques to control nuclear spins lack fast speed, impairing their robustness against decoherence. Here, based on stimulated Raman adiabatic passage, and its modification including shortcuts to adiabaticity, we present a fast protocol for the coherent manipulation of nuclear spins. Our proposed Λ scheme is implemented in the microwave domain and its excited-state relaxation can be optically controlled through an external laser excitation. These features allow for the initialization of a nuclear spin starting from a thermal state. Moreover we show how to implement Raman control for performing Ramsey spectroscopy to measure the dynamical and geometric phases acquired by nuclear spins.

  5. Stellar oscillations. II The non-adiabatic case

    CERN Document Server

    Samadi, R; Sonoi, T

    2015-01-01

    A leap forward has been performed due to the space-borne missions, MOST, CoRoT and Kepler. They provided a wealth of observational data, and more precisely oscillation spectra, which have been (and are still) exploited to infer the internal structure of stars. While an adiabatic approach is often sufficient to get information on the stellar equilibrium structures it is not sufficient to get a full understanding of the physics of the oscillation. Indeed, it does not permit one to answer some fundamental questions about the oscillations, such as: What are the physical mechanisms responsible for the pulsations inside stars? What determines the amplitudes? To what extent the adiabatic approximation is valid? All these questions can only be addressed by considering the energy exchanges between the oscillations and the surrounding medium. This lecture therefore aims at considering the energetical aspects of stellar pulsations with particular emphasis on the driving and damping mechanisms. To this end, the full non-...

  6. Multidimensional Study of High-Adiabat OMEGA Cryogenic Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, T. J. B.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Christopherson, A. R.; Knauer, J. P.; Marozas, J. A.; Maximov, A. V.; Mora, A.; Radha, P. B.; Shang, W.; Shvydky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Woo, K. M.; Varchas, G.

    2016-10-01

    Despite recent advances in modeling laser direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, there remains a predictability gap. This is particularly shown by the shortfall in hot-spot pressures inferred from OMEGA cryogenic implosions. To address this, a series of high-adiabat, cryogenic implosions were performed on OMEGA. These shots were performed with and without single-beam smoothing by spectral dispersion, at low and high drive intensities. These shots represent a regime where good agreement with simulation is expected because of the high adiabat. Multidimensional simulations of these shots will be presented with an emphasis on comparison with experimental indicators of departure from spherical symmetry (``1-D-ness''). The roles of short- and long-wavelength perturbations are considered. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  7. On some issues of gravitationally induced adiabatic particle productions

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Supriya; Pramanik, Souvik

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the current accelerating universe driven by the gravitationally induced adiabatic matter creation process. To elaborate the underlying cognitive content, here we consider three models of adiabatic particle creation and constrain the model parameters by fitting the models with the Union 2.1 data set using $\\chi^2$ minimization technique. The models are analyzed by two geometrical and model independent tests, viz., cosmography and $Om$-diagnostic, which are widely used to distinguish the cosmological models from $\\Lambda$CDM. We also compared present values of those model independent parameters with that of the flat $\\Lambda$CDM model. Finally, the validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics and the condition of thermodynamic equilibrium for the particle production models have been tested.

  8. Crack propagation of Ti alloy via adiabatic shear bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, I., E-mail: ivanmendozabravo@gmail.com [Instituto Tecnológico de Veracruz (Mexico); Villalobos, D. [Instituto Tecnológico de Veracruz (Mexico); Alexandrov, B.T. [The Ohio State University (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This study was focused on the characterization of the origin and mechanism of crack propagation as a result of hot induction bending of Ti alloy. Plates of Ti–6Al–4V alloy with 12.5 mm of thickness were submitted to hot induction bending below the beta transus temperature. Optical and scanning electron microscopy analysis showed crack formation in the tensile zone. Microstructural evidence showed that cracks propagate through the adiabatic shear bands by Dimple-Void mechanism. However, voids formation before shear banding also occurred. In both mechanisms adiabatic shear bands are formed via dynamic recrystallization where the alpha–beta interphase works as stress concentrator promoting the formation of dimples and voids.

  9. Improved Refrigerant Characteristics Flow Predictions in Adiabatic Capillary Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shodiya Sulaimon

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study presents improved refrigerant characteristics flow predictions using homogenous flow model in adiabatic capillary tube, used in small vapor compression refrigeration system. The model is based on fundamental equations of mass, momentum and energy. In order to improve the flow predictions, the inception of vaporization in the capillary tube is determined by evaluating initial vapor quality using enthalpy equation of refrigerant at saturation point and the inlet entrance effect of the capillary tube is also accounted for. Comparing this model with experimental data from open literature showed a reasonable agreement. Further comparison of this new model with earlier model of Bansal showed that the present model could be use to improve the performance predictions of refrigerant flow in adiabatic capillary tube.

  10. Some characteristics of the atmosphere during an adiabatic process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Li; LI Jianping; REN Hongli

    2006-01-01

    Some important characteristics of the atmosphere during an adiabatic process are investigated, which include the invariability of atmospheric entropy range and local surface potential temperature, the conservation of the atmospheric mass intervened between any isentropic surface and the ground, and the isentropic surface intersecting with the ground. The analysis shows that the atmospheric reference state (ARS) for investigation on available potential energy (APE) should be defined objectively as the state which could be approached from the existing atmosphere by adiabatic adjustment, and be related to initial atmospheric state before adjustment. For the initial atmosphere state at any time, its corresponding ARS is different from the one at another time. Based on the above-mentioned conclusions,the reference state proposed by Lorenz cannot be obtained physically, so a new conception, the conditional minimum total potential energy, is put forward in order to objectively investigate atmospheric APE.

  11. DESIGN OF TERNARY COUNTER BASED ON ADIABATIC DOMINO CIRCUIT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Qiankun; Wang Pengjun; Zheng Xuesong

    2013-01-01

    By researching the ternary counter and low power circuit design method,a novel design of low power ternary Domino counter on switch-level is proposed.Firstly,the switch-level structure expression of ternary loop operation circuit with enable pin is derived according to the switch-signal theory,and the one bit ternary counter is obtained combining the ternary adiabatic Domino literal operation circuit and buffer.Then the switch-level structure expression of enable signal circuit is derived,and the four bits ternary counter is obtained by cascade connection.Finally,the circuit is simulated by Spice tool and the output waveforms transform in proper order indicating that the logic function is correct.The energy consumption of the four bits ternary adiabatic Domino counter is 63% less than the conventional Domino counterpart.

  12. Adiabatic Evolution in XXX Spin Chain is Fast

    CERN Document Server

    Korepin, V

    2004-01-01

    Adiabatic theorem of quantum mechanics was used by E. Farhi, J. Goldstone, S. Gutmann and M. Sipser to design quantum algorithms of a new kind. A quantum computer evolves slowly enough, so that it remains in its instantaneous ground state, which tells the solution. We consider XXX Heisenberg spin chain. We rotate magnetic field and change its magnitude. The ground state evolves from a ferromagnetic one into a nontrivial ground state of XXX anti-ferromagnet. This adiabatic evolution goes very gently. Because of SU(2) symmetry and integrability only one mode get exited. We prove that the time of the evolution scales as a square root of number of qubits. This is faster then other known examples.

  13. Robust quantum logic in neutral atoms via adiabatic Rydberg dressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Tyler; Cook, Robert L.; Hankin, Aaron M.; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Biedermann, Grant W.; Deutsch, Ivan H.

    2015-01-01

    We study a scheme for implementing a controlled-Z (cz) gate between two neutral-atom qubits based on the Rydberg blockade mechanism in a manner that is robust to errors caused by atomic motion. By employing adiabatic dressing of the ground electronic state, we can protect the gate from decoherence due to random phase errors that typically arise because of atomic thermal motion. In addition, the adiabatic protocol allows for a Doppler-free configuration that involves counterpropagating lasers in a σ+/σ- orthogonal polarization geometry that further reduces motional errors due to Doppler shifts. The residual motional error is dominated by dipole-dipole forces acting on doubly excited Rydberg atoms when the blockade is imperfect. For reasonable parameters, with qubits encoded into the clock states of 133Cs, we predict that our protocol could produce a cz gate in <10 μ s with error probability on the order of 10-3.

  14. Confinement loss in adiabatic photonic crystal fiber tapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmey, Boris T.; Nguyen, Hong C.; Steel, M. J.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2006-09-01

    We numerically study confinement loss in photonic crystal fiber (PCF) tapers and compare our results with previously published experimental data. Agreement between theory and experiment requires taking into account hole shrinkage during the tapering process, which we measure by using a noninvasive technique. We show that losses are fully explained within the adiabatic approximation and that they are closely linked to the existence of a fundamental core-mode cutoff. This cutoff is equivalent to the core-mode cutoff in depressed-cladding fibers, so that losses in PCF tapers can be obtained semiquantitatively from an equivalent depressed-cladding fiber model. Finally, we discuss the definition of adiabaticity in this open boundary problem.

  15. Experimental Adiabatic Quantum Factorization under Ambient Conditions Based on a Solid-State Single Spin System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kebiao; Xie, Tianyu; Li, Zhaokai; Xu, Xiangkun; Wang, Mengqi; Ye, Xiangyu; Kong, Fei; Geng, Jianpei; Duan, Changkui; Shi, Fazhan; Du, Jiangfeng

    2017-03-31

    The adiabatic quantum computation is a universal and robust method of quantum computing. In this architecture, the problem can be solved by adiabatically evolving the quantum processor from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to that of a final one, which encodes the solution of the problem. Adiabatic quantum computation has been proved to be a compatible candidate for scalable quantum computation. In this Letter, we report on the experimental realization of an adiabatic quantum algorithm on a single solid spin system under ambient conditions. All elements of adiabatic quantum computation, including initial state preparation, adiabatic evolution (simulated by optimal control), and final state read-out, are realized experimentally. As an example, we found the ground state of the problem Hamiltonian S_{z}I_{z} on our adiabatic quantum processor, which can be mapped to the factorization of 35 into its prime factors 5 and 7.

  16. Burning Characteristics of Ammonium-Nitrate-Based Composite Propellants with a Hydroxyl-Terminated Polybutadiene/Polytetrahydrofuran Blend Binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Kohga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium-nitrate-(AN- based composite propellants prepared with a hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB/polytetrahydrofuran (PTHF blend binder have unique thermal decomposition characteristics. In this study, the burning characteristics of AN/HTPB/PTHF propellants are investigated. The specific impulse and adiabatic flame temperature of an AN-based propellant theoretically increases with an increase in the proportion of PTHF in the HTPB/PTHF blend. With an AN/HTPB propellant, a solid residue is left on the burning surface of the propellant, and the shape of this residue is similar to that of the propellant. On the other hand, an AN/HTPB/PTHF propellant does not leave a solid residue. The burning rates of the AN/HTPB/PTHF propellant are not markedly different from those of the AN/HTPB propellant because some of the liquefied HTPB/PTHF binder cover the burning surface and impede decomposition and combustion. The burning rates of an AN/HTPB/PTHF propellant with a burning catalyst are higher than those of an AN/HTPB propellant supplemented with a catalyst. The beneficial effect of the blend binder on the burning characteristics is clarified upon the addition of a catalyst. The catalyst suppresses the negative influence of the liquefied binder that covers the burning surface. Thus, HTPB/PTHF blend binders are useful in improving the performance of AN-based propellants.

  17. High-Fidelity Entangled Bell States via Shortcuts to Adiabaticity

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Koushik

    2016-01-01

    We present a couple of protocols based on shortcut to adiabaticity techniques for rapid generation of robust entangled Bell states in a system of two two-state systems. Our protocols rely on the so-called transitionless quantum driving (TQD) algorithm and Lewis-Riesenfeld invariant (LRI) method. Both TQD and LRI methods result in high fidelity in population transfer.Our study shows that it is possible to prepare an entangled state in infinitely short time without losing robustness and efficiency.

  18. Excitation energies along a range-separated adiabatic connection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebolini, Elisa, E-mail: rebolini@lct.jussieu.fr; Toulouse, Julien, E-mail: julien.toulouse@upmc.fr; Savin, Andreas, E-mail: savin@lct.jussieu.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7616, Laboratoire de Chimie Théorique, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7616, Laboratoire de Chimie Théorique, F-75005 Paris (France); Teale, Andrew M. [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Helgaker, Trygve [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2014-07-28

    We present a study of the variation of total energies and excitation energies along a range-separated adiabatic connection. This connection links the non-interacting Kohn–Sham electronic system to the physical interacting system by progressively switching on the electron–electron interactions whilst simultaneously adjusting a one-electron effective potential so as to keep the ground-state density constant. The interactions are introduced in a range-dependent manner, first introducing predominantly long-range, and then all-range, interactions as the physical system is approached, as opposed to the conventional adiabatic connection where the interactions are introduced by globally scaling the standard Coulomb interaction. Reference data are reported for the He and Be atoms and the H{sub 2} molecule, obtained by calculating the short-range effective potential at the full configuration-interaction level using Lieb's Legendre-transform approach. As the strength of the electron–electron interactions increases, the excitation energies, calculated for the partially interacting systems along the adiabatic connection, offer increasingly accurate approximations to the exact excitation energies. Importantly, the excitation energies calculated at an intermediate point of the adiabatic connection are much better approximations to the exact excitation energies than are the corresponding Kohn–Sham excitation energies. This is particularly evident in situations involving strong static correlation effects and states with multiple excitation character, such as the dissociating H{sub 2} molecule. These results highlight the utility of long-range interacting reference systems as a starting point for the calculation of excitation energies and are of interest for developing and analyzing practical approximate range-separated density-functional methodologies.

  19. A field theory characterization of interacting adiabatic particles in cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Arteaga, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    We explore the adiabatic particle excitations of an interacting field in a cosmological background. By following the time-evolution of the quantum state corresponding to the particle excitation, we show how the basic properties characterizing the particle propagation can be recovered from the two-point propagators. As an application, we study the background-induced dissipative effects on the propagation of a two-level atom in an expanding universe.

  20. A field theory characterization of interacting adiabatic particles in cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arteaga, Daniel [Departament de Fisica Fonamental and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: darteaga@ub.edu

    2008-08-07

    We explore the adiabatic particle excitations of an interacting field in a cosmological background. By following the time evolution of the quantum state corresponding to the particle excitation, we show how the basic properties characterizing the particle propagation can be recovered from the two-point propagators. As an application, we study the background-induced dissipative effects on the propagation of a two-level atom in an expanding universe.

  1. Adiabatic trapping in coupled kinetic Alfven-acoustic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, H. A.; Ali, Z. [Department of Physics, G.C. University, 54000 Lahore (Pakistan); Masood, W. [COMSATS, Institute of Information Technology, Park Road, Chak Shahzad, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdara Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-03-15

    In the present work, we have discussed the effects of adiabatic trapping of electrons on obliquely propagating Alfven waves in a low {beta} plasma. Using the two potential theory and employing the Sagdeev potential approach, we have investigated the existence of arbitrary amplitude coupled kinetic Alfven-acoustic solitary waves in both the sub and super Alfvenic cases. The results obtained have been analyzed and presented graphically and can be applied to regions of space where the low {beta} assumption holds true.

  2. Mapping the region of instability for adiabatic continuation method

    OpenAIRE

    GUTIÉRREZHERNANDEZ, JUAN PABLO; Fontalvo Alzate, Javier; Gómez García, Miguel Ángel

    2011-01-01

    The pioneer schematic ideas of Kimura and Levenspiel (Ind. Eng. Chem. Proc. Des. Dev., 16 (1977) 145 – 148) have been developed to find numerically the region of instability for adiabatic packed bed reactors. Three different cases of special industrial interest and complexity are presented. The highly exothermic gas-phase reactions: ammonia synthesis, methanol production from syn-gas, and SO₂ oxidation. Equations were parameterized and solved according to a continuation homotopy numerical met...

  3. Hypercomputability of quantum adiabatic processes: Fact versus Prejudices

    CERN Document Server

    Kieu, T D

    2005-01-01

    We give an overview of a quantum adiabatic algorithm for Hilbert's tenth problem, including some discussions on its fundamental aspects and the emphasis on the probabilistic correctness of its findings. For the purpose of illustration, the numerical simulation results of some simple Diophantine equations are presented. We also discuss some prejudicial misunderstandings as well as some plausible difficulties faced by the algorithm in its physical implementation.

  4. Adiabaticity of the ramping process of an ac dipole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tomás

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available ac dipoles in accelerators are used to excite coherent betatron oscillations at a drive frequency close to the tune. If the excitation amplitude is slowly increased to the desired value and slowly decreased back to zero there is no significant emittance growth. The aim of this article is to study the adiabaticity of the ramping process of an ac dipole as a function of the different parameters involved.

  5. Quantum state preparation in semiconductor dots by adiabatic rapid passage

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Yanwen; Piper, I.M.; Ediger, M.; Brereton, P.; Schmidgall, E. R.; Hugues, M.; Hopkinson, M.; Phillips, R.T.

    2010-01-01

    Preparation of a specific quantum state is a required step for a variety of proposed practical uses of quantum dynamics. We report an experimental demonstration of optical quantum state preparation in a semiconductor quantum dot with electrical readout, which contrasts with earlier work based on Rabi flopping in that the method is robust with respect to variation in the optical coupling. We use adiabatic rapid passage, which is capable of inverting single dots to a specified upper level. We d...

  6. Adiabatic pipelining: a key to ternary computing with quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pečar, P; Ramšak, A; Zimic, N; Mraz, M; Lebar Bajec, I

    2008-12-10

    The quantum-dot cellular automaton (QCA), a processing platform based on interacting quantum dots, was introduced by Lent in the mid-1990s. What followed was an exhilarating period with the development of the line, the functionally complete set of logic functions, as well as more complex processing structures, however all in the realm of binary logic. Regardless of these achievements, it has to be acknowledged that the use of binary logic is in computing systems mainly the end result of the technological limitations, which the designers had to cope with in the early days of their design. The first advancement of QCAs to multi-valued (ternary) processing was performed by Lebar Bajec et al, with the argument that processing platforms of the future should not disregard the clear advantages of multi-valued logic. Some of the elementary ternary QCAs, necessary for the construction of more complex processing entities, however, lead to a remarkable increase in size when compared to their binary counterparts. This somewhat negates the advantages gained by entering the ternary computing domain. As it turned out, even the binary QCA had its initial hiccups, which have been solved by the introduction of adiabatic switching and the application of adiabatic pipeline approaches. We present here a study that introduces adiabatic switching into the ternary QCA and employs the adiabatic pipeline approach to successfully solve the issues of elementary ternary QCAs. What is more, the ternary QCAs presented here are sizewise comparable to binary QCAs. This in our view might serve towards their faster adoption.

  7. Adiabatic Compression Sensitivity of AF-M315E

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    is pressurized to specific driving pressures into an accumulator tank above a rapid-opening valve. This valve is placed directly above the burst disc...this mission. Of particular interest is the sensitivity of the propellant at elevated temperatures and the resulting system peak pressures and...dynamic response characteristics. For this study, an adiabatic compression U-tube apparatus was used to determine the driving pressure threshold levels

  8. Characterization of Adiabatic Noise in Charge-Based Coherent Nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arrigo, A.; Falci, G.; Mastellone, A.; Paladino, E.

    2008-10-01

    Low-frequency noise, often with 1/f spectrum, has been recognized as the main mechanism of decoherence in present-day solid state coherent nanodevices. The responsible degrees of freedom are almost static during the coherent time evolution of the device leading to effects analogous to inhomogeneous broadening in NMR. Here we present a characterization of the effects of adiabatic noise exploiting the tunability of nanodevices.

  9. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in physics, chemistry and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolay V. Vitanov; Rangelov, Andon A.; Shore, Bruce W.; Bergmann, Klaas

    2016-01-01

    The technique of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP), which allows efficient and selective population transfer between quantum states without suffering loss due to spontaneous emission, was introduced in 1990 (Gaubatz \\emph{et al.}, J. Chem. Phys. \\textbf{92}, 5363, 1990). Since then STIRAP has emerged as an enabling methodology with widespread successful applications in many fields of physics, chemistry and beyond. This article reviews the many applications of STIRAP emphasizing the ...

  10. Adiabatic embedment of nanomechanical resonators in photonic microring cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Xiong, Chi; Li, Mo; Rooks, Michael; Tang, Hong X

    2014-01-01

    We report a circuit cavity optomechanical system in which a nanomechanical resonator is adiabatically embedded inside an optical ring resonator with ultralow transition loss. The nanomechanical device forms part of the top layer of a horizontal silicon slot ring resonator, which enables dispersive coupling to the dielectric substrate via a tapered nanogap. Our measurements show nearly uncompromised optical quality factors (Q) after the release of the mechanical beam.

  11. TIGER Burned Brightly in JAMIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Sandra L.; Kashiwagi, Takashi

    2001-01-01

    The Transition From Ignition to Flame Growth Under External Radiation in 3D (TIGER- 3D) experiment, which is slated to fly aboard the International Space Station, conducted a series of highly successful tests in collaboration with the University of Hokkaido using Japan's 10-sec JAMIC drop tower. The tests were conducted to test engineering versions of advanced flight diagnostics such as an infrared camera for detailed surface temperature measurements and an infrared spectroscopic array for gas-phase species concentrations and temperatures based on detailed spectral emissions in the near infrared. Shown in the top figure is a visible light image and in the bottom figure is an infrared image at 3.8 mm obtained during the microgravity tests. The images show flames burning across cellulose samples against a slow wind of a few centimeters per second (wind is from right to left). These flow velocities are typical of spacecraft ventilation systems that provide fresh air for the astronauts. The samples are ignited across the center with a hot wire, and the flame is allowed to spread upwind and/or downwind. As these images show, the flames prefer to spread upwind, into the fresh air, which is the exact opposite of flames on Earth, which spread much faster downwind, or with the airflow, as in forest fires.

  12. Velocity anticipation in the optimal velocity model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Li-yun; WENG Xu-dan; LI Qing-ding

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,the velocity anticipation in the optimal velocity model (OVM) is investigated.The driver adjusts the velocity of his vehicle by the desired headway,which depends on both instantaneous headway and relative velocity.The effect of relative velocity is measured by a sensitivity function.A specific form of the sensitivity function is supposed and the involved parameters are determined by the both numerical simulation and empirical data.It is shown that inclusion of velocity anticipation enhances the stability of traffic flow.Numerical simulations show a good agreement with empirical data.This model provides a better description of real traffic,including the acceleration process from standing states and the deceleration process approaching a stopped car.

  13. Dynamics of Quantum Adiabatic Evolution Algorithm for Number Partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadius; vonToussaint, Udo V.; Timucin, Dogan A.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a general technique to study the dynamics of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm applied to random combinatorial optimization problems in the asymptotic limit of large problem size n. We use as an example the NP-complete Number Partitioning problem and map the algorithm dynamics to that of an auxiliary quantum spin glass system with the slowly varying Hamiltonian. We use a Green function method to obtain the adiabatic eigenstates and the minimum exitation gap, gmin = O(n2(sup -n/2)), corresponding to the exponential complexity of the algorithm for Number Partitioning. The key element of the analysis is the conditional energy distribution computed for the set of all spin configurations generated from a given (ancestor) configuration by simultaneous flipping of a fixed number of spins. For the problem in question this distribution is shown to depend on the ancestor spin configuration only via a certain parameter related to the energy of the configuration. As the result, the algorithm dynamics can be described in terms of one-dimensional quantum diffusion in the energy space. This effect provides a general limitation of a quantum adiabatic computation in random optimization problems. Analytical results are in agreement with the numerical simulation of the algorithm.

  14. Adiabatic Shear Mechanisms for the Hard Cutting Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Caixu; WANG Bo; LIU Xianli; FENG Huize; CAI Chunbin

    2015-01-01

    The most important consequence of adiabatic shear phenomenon is formation of sawtooth chip. Lots of scholars focused on the formation mechanism of sawtooth, and the research often depended on experimental approach. For the present, the mechanism of sawtooth chip formation still remalns some ambiguous aspects. This study develops a combined numerical and experimental approach to get deeper understanding of sawtooth chip formation mechanism for Polycrystalline Cubic Boron Nitride (PCBN) tools orthogonal cutting hard steel GCr15. By adopting the Johnson-Cook material constitutive equations, the FEM simulation model established in this research effectively overcomes serious element distortions and cell singularity in high straln domaln caused by large material deformation, and the adiabatic shear phenomenon is simulated successfully. Both the formation mechanism and process of sawtooth are simulated. Also, the change features regarding the cutting force as well as its effects on temperature are studied. More specifically, the contact of sawtooth formation frequency with cutting force fluctuation frequency is established. The cutting force and effect of cutting temperature on mechanism of adiabatic shear are investigated. Furthermore, the effects of the cutting condition on sawtooth chip formation are researched. The researching results show that cutting feed has the most important effect on sawtooth chip formation compared with cutting depth and speed. This research contributes a better understanding of mechanism, feature of chip formation in hard turning process, and supplies theoretical basis for the optimization of hard cutting process parameters.

  15. Analysis of adiabatic transfer in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Joyee Ghosh; R Ghosh; Deepak Kumar

    2011-10-01

    A three-level atom in a configuration trapped in an optical cavity forms a basic unit in a number of proposed protocols for quantum information processing. This system allows for efficient storage of cavity photons into long-lived atomic excitations, and their retrieval with high fidelity, in an adiabatic transfer process through the ‘dark state’ by a slow variation of the control laser intensity. We study the full quantum mechanics of this transfer process with a view to examine the non-adiabatic effects arising from inevitable excitations of the system to states involving the upper level of , which is radiative. We find that the fidelity of storage is better, the stronger the control field and the slower the rate of its switching off. On the contrary, unlike the adiabatic notion, retrieval is better with faster rates of switching on of an optimal control field. Also, for retrieval, the behaviour with dissipation is non-monotonic. These results lend themselves to experimental tests. Our exact computations, when applied to slow variations of the control intensity for strong atom–photon couplings, are in very good agreement with Berry’s superadiabatic transfer results without dissipation.

  16. Numerical study of polaron problem in the adiabatic limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsiglio, Frank; Li, Zhou; Blois, Cindy; Baillie, Devin

    2010-03-01

    We study the polaron problem in a one dimensional chain and on a two dimensional square lattice. The models we have used are the Holstein model and the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model. By a variational procedure based on the Lanczos method, we are able to examine the polaron problem in the limit when the mass of the ion is very large, i.e. close to the adiabatic limit. It is known that for the Holstein model there is no phase transition [1] for any nonzero phonon energy. It is also known that for the one dimensional Holstein or SSH model there will be long range order [2] (e.g. dimerization) in the adiabatic limit at half-filling. It is then interesting to study the long range order on a two dimensional square lattice in and away from the adiabatic limit. Moreover, recent progress for the single polaron near an impurity (disorder) [3] make it an interesting problem for studying bond length disorder which can change the hopping energy in a specific direction in the Holstein model. Reference: [1] H. Lowen, Phys.Rev.B 37, 8661 (1988) [2] J.E.Hirsch and E. Frandkin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 402 (1982) [3]A.S.Mishchenko et.al Phys.Rev.B 79(2009) 180301(R)

  17. Non-Adiabatic Molecular Dynamics Methods for Materials Discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furche, Filipp [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Parker, Shane M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Muuronen, Mikko J. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Roy, Saswata [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2017-04-04

    The flow of radiative energy in light-driven materials such as photosensitizer dyes or photocatalysts is governed by non-adiabatic transitions between electronic states and cannot be described within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation commonly used in electronic structure theory. The non-adiabatic molecular dynamics (NAMD) methods based on Tully surface hopping and time-dependent density functional theory developed in this project have greatly extended the range of molecular materials that can be tackled by NAMD simulations. New algorithms to compute molecular excited state and response properties efficiently were developed. Fundamental limitations of common non-linear response methods were discovered and characterized. Methods for accurate computations of vibronic spectra of materials such as black absorbers were developed and applied. It was shown that open-shell TDDFT methods capture bond breaking in NAMD simulations, a longstanding challenge for single-reference molecular dynamics simulations. The methods developed in this project were applied to study the photodissociation of acetaldehyde and revealed that non-adiabatic effects are experimentally observable in fragment kinetic energy distributions. Finally, the project enabled the first detailed NAMD simulations of photocatalytic water oxidation by titania nanoclusters, uncovering the mechanism of this fundamentally important reaction for fuel generation and storage.

  18. Adiabatic invariants for the regular region of the Dicke model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastarrachea-Magnani, M. A.; Relaño, A.; Lerma-Hernández, S.; López-del-Carpio, B.; Chávez-Carlos, J.; Hirsch, J. G.

    2017-04-01

    Adiabatic invariants for the non-integrable Dicke model are introduced. They are shown to provide approximate second integrals of motion in the energy region where the system exhibits a regular dynamics. This low-energy region, present for any set of values of the Hamiltonian parameters is described both with a semiclassical and a full quantum analysis in a broad region of the parameter space. Peres lattices in this region exhibit that many observables vary smoothly with energy, along distinct lines which beg for a formal description. It is demonstrated how the adiabatic invariants provide a rationale to their presence in many cases. They are built employing the Born–Oppenheimer approximation, valid when a fast system is coupled to a much slower one. As the Dicke model has one bosonic and one fermionic degree of freedom, two versions of the approximation are used, depending on which one is the faster. In both cases a noticeably accord with exact numerical results is obtained. The employment of the adiabatic invariants provides a simple and clear theoretical framework to study the physical phenomenology associated to these regimes, far beyond the energies where a quadratic approximation around the minimal energy configuration can be used.

  19. Non-adiabatic oscillations of compact stars in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Gualtieri, L; Miniutti, G

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a formalism to study non-adiabatic, non-radial oscillations of compact stars in the frequency domain including the effects of thermal diffusion in a general relativistic framework. When a general equation of state depending on temperature is used, the perturbations of the fluid result in heat flux which is coupled with the spacetime geometry through the Einstein field equations. Our results show that the frequency of the first pressure (p) and gravity (g) oscillation modes is significantly affected by thermal diffusion, while that of the fundamental (f) mode is basically unaltered due to the global nature of that oscillation. The damping time of the oscillations is generally much smaller than in the adiabatic case (more than two orders of magnitude for the p- and g-modes) reflecting the effect of thermal dissipation. Both the isothermal and adiabatic limits are recovered in our treatment and we study in more detail the intermediate regime. Our formalism finds its natural astrophysical applic...

  20. Steam bottoming cycle for an adiabatic diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, E.; Demler, R.; Krepchin, I.; Walker, D.

    1984-03-01

    A study of steam bottoming cycles using adiabatic diesel engine exhaust heat projected substantial performance and economic benefits for long haul trucks. A parametric analysis of steam cycle and system component variables, system cost, size and performance was conducted. An 811 K/6.90 MPa state-of-the-art reciprocating expander steam system with a monotube boiler and radiator core condenser was selected for preliminary design. When applied to a NASA specified turbo-charged adiabatic diesel the bottoming system increased the diesel output by almost 18%. In a comparison of the costs of the diesel with bottoming system (TC/B) and a NASA specified turbocompound adiabatic diesel with after-cooling with the same total output, the annual fuel savings less the added maintenance cost was determined to cover the increased initial cost of the TC/B system in a payback period of 2.3 years. Also during this program steam bottoming system freeze protection strategies were developed, technological advances required for improved system reliability were considered and the cost and performance of advanced systems were evaluated.

  1. Quantum Adiabatic Algorithms, Small Gaps, and Different Paths

    CERN Document Server

    Farhi, Edward; Gosset, David; Gutmann, Sam; Meyer, Harvey B; Shor, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We construct a set of instances of 3SAT which are not solved efficiently using the simplest quantum adiabatic algorithm. These instances are obtained by picking random clauses all consistent with two disparate planted solutions and then penalizing one of them with a single additional clause. We argue that by randomly modifying the beginning Hamiltonian, one obtains (with substantial probability) an adiabatic path that removes this difficulty. This suggests that the quantum adiabatic algorithm should in general be run on each instance with many different random paths leading to the problem Hamiltonian. We do not know whether this trick will help for a random instance of 3SAT (as opposed to an instance from the particular set we consider), especially if the instance has an exponential number of disparate assignments that violate few clauses. We use a continuous imaginary time Quantum Monte Carlo algorithm in a novel way to numerically investigate the ground state as well as the first excited state of our system...

  2. Canonical fluid thermodynamics. [variational principles of stability for compressible adiabatic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, L. A.

    1974-01-01

    The space-time integral of the thermodynamic pressure plays in a certain sense the role of the thermodynamic potential for compressible adiabatic flow. The stability criterion can be converted into a variational minimum principle by requiring the molar free-enthalpy and temperature to be generalized velocities. In the fluid context, the definition of proper-time differentiation involves the fluid velocity expressed in terms of three particle identity parameters. The pressure function is then converted into a functional which is the Lagrangian density of the variational principle. Being also a minimum principle, the variational principle provides a means for comparing the relative stability of different flows. For boundary conditions with a high degree of symmetry, as in the case of a uniformly expanding spherical gas box, the most stable flow is a rectilinear flow for which the world-trajectory of each particle is a straight line. Since the behavior of the interior of a freely expanding cosmic cloud may be expected to be similar to that of the fluid in the spherical box of gas, this suggests that the cosmic principle is a consequence of the laws of thermodynamics, rather than just an ad hoc postulate.

  3. Assessing burn depth in tattooed burn lesions with LASCA Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezdorn, N; Limbourg, A; Paprottka, F J; Könneker; Ipaktchi, R; Vogt, P M

    2016-09-30

    Tattoos are on the rise, and so are patients with tattooed burn lesions. A proper assessment with regard to burn depth is often impeded by the tattoo dye. Laser speckle contrast analysis (LASCA) is a technique that evaluates burn lesions via relative perfusion analysis. We assessed the effect of tattoo skin pigmentation on LASCA perfusion imaging in a multicolour tattooed patient. Depth of burn lesions in multi-coloured tattooed and untattooed skin was assessed using LASCA. Relative perfusion was measured in perfusion units (PU) and compared to various pigment colours, then correlated with the clinical evaluation of the lesion. Superficial partial thickness burn (SPTB) lesions showed significantly elevated perfusion units (PU) compared to normal skin; deep partial thickness burns showed decreased PU levels. PU of various tattoo pigments to normal skin showed either significantly lower values (blue, red, pink) or significantly increased values (black) whereas orange and yellow pigment showed values comparable to normal skin. In SPTB, black and blue pigment showed reduced perfusion; yellow pigment was similar to normal SPTB burn. Deep partial thickness burn (DPTB) lesions in tattoos did not show significant differences to normal DPTB lesions for black, green and red. Tattoo pigments alter the results of perfusion patterns assessed with LASCA both in normal and burned skin. Yellow pigments do not seem to interfere with LASCA assessment. However proper determination of burn depth both in SPTB and DPTB by LASCA is limited by the heterogenic alterations of the various pigment colours.

  4. [Hydrofluoric acid burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holla, Robin; Gorter, Ramon R; Tenhagen, Mark; Vloemans, A F P M Jos; Breederveld, Roelf S

    2016-01-01

    Hydrofluoric acid is increasingly used as a rust remover and detergent. Dermal contact with hydrofluoric acid results in a chemical burn characterized by severe pain and deep tissue necrosis. It may cause electrolyte imbalances with lethal consequences. It is important to identify high-risk patients. 'High risk' is defined as a total affected body area > 3% or exposure to hydrofluoric acid in a concentration > 50%. We present the cases of three male patients (26, 31, and 39 years old) with hydrofluoric acid burns of varying severity and describe the subsequent treatments. The application of calcium gluconate 2.5% gel to the skin is the cornerstone of the treatment, reducing pain as well as improving wound healing. Nails should be thoroughly inspected and possibly removed if the nail is involved, to ensure proper healing. In high-risk patients, plasma calcium levels should be evaluated and cardiac monitoring is indicated.

  5. [Burning mouth syndrome (glossalgia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (glossalgia) is manifested by oral pin and tingling sensations, numbness and even burning and severe pains, more frequently in the tongue. Unpleasant sensations may involve the anterior two thirds of the tongue or be extended to the front part of the hard palate and the mucous membrane of the lower lip. This condition is characterized by "mirror" and "food dominant" symptoms, disordered salivation, dysgeusia, or psychological disorders. The disease shows a chronic course. Its etiology may be multifactorial. There are no universally accepted diagnostic criteria; the diagnosis of glossalgia is made to rule out all other causes. A thorough examination should be conducted to establish a differential diagnosis. Glossalgia occurs primarily in middle-aged and elderly people. Women get sick much more frequently than men of the same age. Glossalgia remains difficult to treat. Continuous symptomatic treatment and follow-up help relieve its symptoms.

  6. Revisiting the theory of the evolution of pick-up ion distributions: magnetic or adiabatic cooling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the phasespace behaviour of heliospheric pick-up ions after the time of their injection as newly created ions into the solar wind bulk flow from either charge exchange or photoionization of interplanetary neutral atoms. As interaction with the ambient MHD wave fields we allow for rapid pitch angle diffusion, but for the beginning of this paper we shall neglect the effect of quasilinear or nonlinear energy diffusion (Fermi-2 acceleration induced by counterflowing ambient waves. In the up-to-now literature connected with the convection of pick-up ions by the solar wind only adiabatic cooling of these ions is considered which in the solar wind frame takes care of filling the gap between the injection energy and energies of the thermal bulk of solar wind ions. Here we reinvestigate the basics of the theory behind this assumption of adiabatic pick-up ion reactions and correlated predictions derived from it. We then compare it with the new assumption of a pure magnetic cooling of pick-up ions simply resulting from their being convected in an interplanetary magnetic field which decreases in magnitude with increase of solar distance. We compare the results for pick-up ion distribution functions derived along both ways and can point out essential differences of observational and diagnostic relevance. Furthermore we then include stochastic acceleration processes by wave-particle interactions. As we can show, magnetic cooling in conjunction with diffusive acceleration by wave-particle interaction allows for an unbroken power law with the unique power index γ=−5 beginning from lowest velocities up to highest energy particles of about 100 KeV which just marginally can be in resonance with magnetoacoustic turbulences. Consequences for the resulting pick-up ion pressures are also analysed.

  7. Impact of mixing state and hygroscopicity on CCN activity of biomass burning aerosol in Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Gácita, Madeleine; Longo, Karla M.; Freire, Julliana L. M.; Freitas, Saulo R.; Martin, Scot T.

    2017-02-01

    Smoke aerosols prevail throughout Amazonia because of widespread biomass burning during the dry season, and external mixing, low variability in the particle size distribution and low particle hygroscopicity are typical. There can be profound effects on cloud properties. This study uses an adiabatic cloud model to simulate the activation of smoke particles as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) for three hypothetical case studies, chosen as to resemble biomass burning aerosol observations in Amazonia. The relative importance of variability in hygroscopicity, mixing state, and activation kinetics for the activated fraction and maximum supersaturation is assessed. For a population with κp = 0.04, an overestimation of the cloud droplet number concentration Nd for the three selected case studies between 22.4 ± 1.4 and 54.3 ± 3.7 % was obtained when assuming a hygroscopicity parameter κp = 0.20. Assuming internal mixing of the aerosol population led to overestimations of up to 20 % of Nd when a group of particles with medium hygroscopicity was present in the externally mixed population cases. However, the overestimations were below 10 % for external mixtures between very low and low-hygroscopicity particles, as seems to be the case for Amazon smoke particles. Kinetic limitations were significant for medium- and high-hygroscopicity particles, and much lower for very low and low-hygroscopicity particles. When particles were assumed to be at equilibrium and to respond instantly to changes in the air parcel supersaturation, the overestimation of the droplet concentration was up to ˜ 100 % in internally mixed populations, and up to ˜ 250 % in externally mixed ones, being larger for the higher values of hygroscopicity. In addition, a perceptible delay between the times when maximum supersaturation and maximum aerosol activated fraction are reached was noticed and, for aerosol populations with effective hygroscopicity κpeff higher than a certain threshold value, the delay in

  8. Double Glow Plasma Surface Alloyed Burn-resistant Titanium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ping-ze; XU Zhong; HE Zhi-yong; ZHANG Gao-hui

    2004-01-01

    Conventional titanium alloy may be ignited and burnt under high temperature, high pressure and high gas flow velocity condition. In order to avoid this problem, we have developed a new kind of burn-resistant titanium alloy-double glow plasma surface alloying burn-resistant titanium alloy. Alloying element Cr, Mo, Cu are induced into the Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6.5Al-0.3Mo-l.5Zr-0.25Si substrates according to double glow discharge phenomenon, Ti-Cr ,Ti-Mo, Ti-Cu binary burn-resistant alloy layers are formed on the surface of Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6.5Al-0.3Mo-l.5Zr-0.25Si alloys. The depth of the surface burn-resistant alloy layer can reach to above 200 microns and alloying element concentration can reach 90%.Burn-resistant property experiments reveal that if Cr concentration reach to 14%, Cu concentration reach to 12%, Mo concentration reach to 10% in the alloying layers, ignition and burn of titanium alloy can be effectively avoided.

  9. Double Glow Plasma Surface Alloyed Burn-resistant Titanium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGPing-ze; XUZhong; HEZhi-yong; ZHANGGao-hui

    2004-01-01

    Conventional titanium alloy may be ignited and burnt under high temperature, high pressure and high gas flow velocity condition. In order to avoid this problem, we have developed a new kind of burn-resistant titanium alloy-double glow plasma surface alloying burn-resistant titanium alloy. Alloying element Cr, Mo, Cu are induced into the Ti-6A1-4V and Ti-6.5Al-0.3Mo-1.5Zr-0.25Si substrates according to double glow discharge phenomenon, Ti-Cr ,Ti-Mo, Ti-Cu binary burn-resistant alloy layers are formed on the surface of Ti-6A1-4V and Ti-6.5Al-0.3Mo-1.5Zr-0.25Si alloys. The depth of the surface burn-resistant alloy layer can reach to above 200 microns and alloying element concentration can reach 90%. Burn-resistant property experiments reveal that if Cr concentration reach to 14%, Cu concentration reach to 12%, Mo concentration reach to 10% in the alloying layers, ignition and burn of titanium alloy can be effectively avoided.

  10. Amplitudes of solar-like oscillations in red-giant stars: Evidences for non-adiabatic effects using CoRoT observations

    CERN Document Server

    Samadi, R; Dupret, M -A; Ludwig, H -G; Baudin, F; Caffau, E; Goupil, M -J; Barban, C

    2012-01-01

    A growing number of solar-like oscillations has been detected in red-giant stars thanks to CoRoT and Kepler space-crafts. The seismic data gathered by CoRoT on red-giant stars allow us to test mode driving theory in different physical conditions than main-sequence stars. Using a set of 3D hydrodynamical models representative of the upper layers of sub- and red-giant stars, we compute the acoustic modes energy supply rate (Pmax). Assuming adiabatic pulsations and using global stellar models where the surface stratification comes from the 3D hydrodynamical models, mode amplitude is computed in terms of surface velocity. The latter is then converted into intensity fluctuations using either a simplified adiabatic scaling relation or a non-adiabatic one. Given L and M (the luminosity and mass respectively), the energy supply rate Pmax is found to scale as (L/M)^(2.6) for both main-sequence and red-giant stars, extending previous results by Samadi et al. (2007). The theoretical amplitudes in velocity under-estimate...

  11. The hair color-highlighting burn: a unique burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, W

    2000-01-01

    A unique, preventable, 2.8 x 3.7-cm, full-thickness scalp burn resulted after a woman underwent a professional color-highlighting procedure at a hair salon. The burn appeared to result from scalp contact with aluminum foil that had been overheated by a hair dryer during the procedure. The wound required debridement and skin grafting and 3 subsequent serial excisions to eliminate the resulting area of burn scar alopecia. The preventive aspects of this injury are discussed.

  12. Assessment of burn depth and burn wound healing potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monstrey, Stan; Hoeksema, Henk; Verbelen, Jos; Pirayesh, Ali; Blondeel, Phillip

    2008-09-01

    The depth of a burn wound and/or its healing potential are the most important determinants of the therapeutic management and of the residual morbidity or scarring. Traditionally, burn surgeons divide burns into superficial which heal by rapid re-epithelialization with minimal scarring and deep burns requiring surgical therapy. Clinical assessment remains the most frequent technique to measure the depth of a burn wound although this has been shown to be accurate in only 60-75% of the cases, even when carried out by an experienced burn surgeon. In this article we review all current modalities useful to provide an objective assessment of the burn wound depth, from simple clinical evaluation to biopsy and histology and to various perfusion measurement techniques such as thermography, vital dyes, video angiography, video microscopy, and laser Doppler techniques. The different needs according to the different diagnostic situations are considered. It is concluded that for the initial emergency assessment, the use of telemetry and simple burn photographs are the best option, that for research purposes a wide range of different techniques can be used but that, most importantly, for the actual treatment decisions, laser Doppler imaging is the only technique that has been shown to accurately predict wound outcome with a large weight of evidence. Moreover this technique has been approved for burn depth assessment by regulatory bodies including the FDA.

  13. [The organization of burn care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latarjet, Jacques

    2002-12-15

    In 2002, the organisation of burn care is confronted to a great deficiency in burn epidemiological datas. The main mechanisms of hospitalized burns are somehow wellknown in industrialized countries: about 60% scalds and 30% flame burns; as well as the place of occurrence (60% at home, and 20% at work), and the risk groups (3 times more important for the age group 0-4 years old). The incidence of burns needing medical care (all levels) (250/100,000 inh/yr) or hospitalization (15-20/100,000 inh/yr) is much more uncertain. The statistics of Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG), for hospitalized patients will allow in France very shortly to know more about the most rational ways of dispatching and treating them. They already show that only 30% of hospitalized burned patients are treated in specialized facilities.

  14. [Epidemiology of burns in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latarjet, Jacques; Ravat, François

    2012-01-01

    As with most traumas, the epidemiology of the "burn" health-event has long been neglected by public health doctors and rarely considered by burns specialists. There were therefore few verified data and many approximations and preconceived ideas. The gathering of information recently undertaken in France enables the reliability of the data to be improved and the diagnostic and demographic elements relating to hospitalised patients with burns to be established.

  15. Genital burns and vaginal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, R; Manandhar, V; Wittgenstein, F; Fortney, J A; Fukushima, C

    1995-07-01

    Obstetric complications may result from burn scarring in the genital area. Women in developing countries typically squat around cooking fires, and burns are common. This recent case in Nepal describes obstructed labor in a young woman whose genital area had extensive scarring from a cooking fire injury. Proper antenatal assessment by health care providers can reduce the risk to mothers and infants of the consequences of a birth canal damaged or obstructed by burn scarring.

  16. Curbing Inflammation in Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayme A. Farina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients who suffer from severe burns develop metabolic imbalances and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS which can result in multiple organ failure and death. Research aimed at reducing the inflammatory process has yielded new insight into burn injury therapies. In this review, we discuss strategies used to curb inflammation in burn injuries and note that further studies with high quality evidence are necessary.

  17. Nutrition Support in Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Aydoğan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Severe burn trauma causes serious metabolic derangements. Increased metabolic rate which is apart of a pathophysiologic characteristic of burn trauma results in protein-energy malnutrition. This situation causes impaired wound healing, muscle and fat tissue’s breakdown, growth retardation in children and infections. Nutrition support is vital in the treatment strategies of burn victims to prevent high mortal and disabling complications in this devastating trauma. Our aim in this study is to review management of nutrition in burn victims. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2012; 10: 74-83

  18. A primer on burn resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacomo Ferdinand

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the early 1900s, the scope of burn resuscitation has evolved dramatically. Due to various advances in pre-hospital care and training, under-resuscitation of patients with severe burns is now relatively uncommon. Over-resuscitation, otherwise known as "fluid creep", has emerged as one of the most important problems during the initial phases of burn care over the past decade. To avoid the complications of over-resuscitation, careful hourly titration of fluid rates based on compilation of various clinical end points by a bedside provider is vital. The aim of this review is to provide a practical approach to the resuscitation of severely burned patients.

  19. Ice & Fire: the Burning Question

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gelderen, Laurens; Jomaas, Grunde

    2017-01-01

    With the Arctic opening up to new shipping routes and increased oil exploration and production due to climate change, the risk of an Arctic oil spill is increasing. Of the classic oil spill response methods (mechanical recovery, dispersants and in-situ burning), in-situ burning is considered...... to be particularly a suitable response method in the Arctic. In-situ burning aims to remove the oil from the marine environment by burning it from the water surface. A recent Ph.D. thesis from the Technical University of Denmark has provided some new insights with respect to the fire science behind this response...

  20. Marginally Stable Nuclear Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Altamirano, D.

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear X-ray bursts result from unstable nuclear burning of the material accreted on neutron stars in some low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Theory predicts that close to the boundary of stability oscillatory burning can occur. This marginally stable regime has so far been identified in only a small number of sources. We present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the bursting, high-inclination LMXB 4U 1323-619 that reveal for the first time in this source the signature of marginally stable burning. The source was observed during two successive RXTE orbits for approximately 5 ksec beginning at 10:14:01 UTC on March 28, 2011. Significant mHz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) at a frequency of 8.1 mHz are detected for approximately 1600 s from the beginning of the observation until the occurrence of a thermonuclear X-ray burst at 10:42:22 UTC. The mHz oscillations are not detected following the X-ray burst. The average fractional rms amplitude of the mHz QPOs is 6.4% (3 - 20 keV), and the amplitude increases to about 8% below 10 keV.This phenomenology is strikingly similar to that seen in the LMXB 4U 1636-53. Indeed, the frequency of the mHz QPOs in 4U 1323-619 prior to the X-ray burst is very similar to the transition frequency between mHz QPO and bursts found in 4U 1636-53 by Altamirano et al. (2008). These results strongly suggest that the observed QPOs in 4U 1323-619 are, like those in 4U 1636-53, due to marginally stable nuclear burning. We also explore the dependence of the energy spectrum on the oscillation phase, and we place the present observations within the context of the spectral evolution of the accretion-powered flux from the source.

  1. Exercise following burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lateur, Barbara J; Shore, Wendy S

    2011-05-01

    Fatigue is a major barrier to recovery for burned individuals. Studies indicate that a slow return to normal or near-normal muscle strength is the natural course of recovery. With no special interventions, other than the "usual care" tailored to the needs of the individual, postburn patients will make gradual improvement in strength and aerobic capacity. Using the principle of initial condition (the worse the initial condition, the greater the response to exercise intervention) the authors outline an augmented exercise program that should result in a robust improvement in aerobic capacity.

  2. Oral Rehydration Therapy in Burn Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-24

    Burn Any Degree Involving 20-29 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 30-39 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 40-49 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 50-59 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 60-65 Percent of Body Surface

  3. How to manage burns in primary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Waitzman, A. A.; Neligan, P C

    1993-01-01

    Burns are common injuries; more than 200,000 occur in Canada annually. Nearly all burn injuries can be managed on on outpatient basis. Appropriate treatment depends on burn depth, extent, and location. Special types of burns, such as chemical, tar, and electrical injuries, need specific management strategies. Prevention through education is important to reduce the incidence of burns.

  4. Shortcuts to adiabaticity by counterdiabatic driving for trapped-ion displacement in phase space

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Shuoming; Lv, Dingshun; Del Campo, Adolfo; Kim, Kihwan

    2016-09-01

    The application of adiabatic protocols in quantum technologies is severely limited by environmental sources of noise and decoherence. Shortcuts to adiabaticity by counterdiabatic driving constitute a powerful alternative that speed up time-evolution while mimicking adiabatic dynamics. Here we report the experimental implementation of counterdiabatic driving in a continuous variable system, a shortcut to the adiabatic transport of a trapped ion in phase space. The resulting dynamics is equivalent to a `fast-motion video' of the adiabatic trajectory. The robustness of this protocol is shown to surpass that of competing schemes based on classical local controls and Fourier optimization methods. Our results demonstrate that shortcuts to adiabaticity provide a robust speedup of quantum protocols of wide applicability in quantum technologies.

  5. Shortcuts to Adiabaticity by Counterdiabatic Driving in Trapped-ion Transport

    CERN Document Server

    An, Shuoming; del Campo, Adolfo; Kim, Kihwan

    2016-01-01

    Adiabatic dynamics plays an essential role in quantum technologies. By driving a quantum system slowly, the quantum evolution can be engineered with suppressed excitation. Yet, environmentally-induced decoherence limits the implementation of adiabatic protocols. Shortcuts to adiabaticity (STA) have the potential to revolutionize quantum technologies by speeding up the time evolution while mimicking adiabatic dynamics. These nonadiabatic protocols can be engineered by means an auxiliary control field is used to tailor excitations. Here we present the first experimental realization of counterdiabatic driving in a continuous variable system, implementing a shortcut to the adiabatic transport of a trapped ion, in which nonadiabatic transitions are suppressed during all stages of the process. The resulting dynamics is equivalent to a "fast-motion video" of the adiabatic trajectory. We experimentally demonstrate the enhanced robustness of the protocol with respect to alternative approaches based on classical local ...

  6. Applications of Adiabatic Approximation to One- and Two-electron Phenomena in Strong Laser Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bondar, Denys

    2010-01-01

    The adiabatic approximation is a natural approach for the description of phenomena induced by low frequency laser radiation because the ratio of the laser frequency to the characteristic frequency of an atom or a molecule is a small parameter. Since the main aim of this work is the study of ionization phenomena, the version of the adiabatic approximation that can account for the transition from a bound state to the continuum must be employed. Despite much work in this topic, a universally accepted adiabatic approach of bound-free transitions is lacking. Hence, based on Savichev's modified adiabatic approximation [Sov. Phys. JETP 73, 803 (1991)], we first of all derive the most convenient form of the adiabatic approximation for the problems at hand. Connections of the obtained result with the quasiclassical approximation and other previous investigations are discussed. Then, such an adiabatic approximation is applied to single-electron ionization and non-sequential double ionization of atoms in a strong low fr...

  7. Adiabatic quantum computing with spin qubits hosted by molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Satoru; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Sugisaki, Kenji; Sato, Kazunobu; Toyota, Kazuo; Shiomi, Daisuke; Takui, Takeji

    2015-01-28

    A molecular spin quantum computer (MSQC) requires electron spin qubits, which pulse-based electron spin/magnetic resonance (ESR/MR) techniques can afford to manipulate for implementing quantum gate operations in open shell molecular entities. Importantly, nuclear spins, which are topologically connected, particularly in organic molecular spin systems, are client qubits, while electron spins play a role of bus qubits. Here, we introduce the implementation for an adiabatic quantum algorithm, suggesting the possible utilization of molecular spins with optimized spin structures for MSQCs. We exemplify the utilization of an adiabatic factorization problem of 21, compared with the corresponding nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) case. Two molecular spins are selected: one is a molecular spin composed of three exchange-coupled electrons as electron-only qubits and the other an electron-bus qubit with two client nuclear spin qubits. Their electronic spin structures are well characterized in terms of the quantum mechanical behaviour in the spin Hamiltonian. The implementation of adiabatic quantum computing/computation (AQC) has, for the first time, been achieved by establishing ESR/MR pulse sequences for effective spin Hamiltonians in a fully controlled manner of spin manipulation. The conquered pulse sequences have been compared with the NMR experiments and shown much faster CPU times corresponding to the interaction strength between the spins. Significant differences are shown in rotational operations and pulse intervals for ESR/MR operations. As a result, we suggest the advantages and possible utilization of the time-evolution based AQC approach for molecular spin quantum computers and molecular spin quantum simulators underlain by sophisticated ESR/MR pulsed spin technology.

  8. Plasma heating via adiabatic magnetic compression-expansion cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avinash, K.; Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2016-06-01

    Heating of collisionless plasmas in closed adiabatic magnetic cycle comprising of a quasi static compression followed by a non quasi static constrained expansion against a constant external pressure is proposed. Thermodynamic constraints are derived to show that the plasma always gains heat in cycles having at least one non quasi static process. The turbulent relaxation of the plasma to the equilibrium state at the end of the non quasi static expansion is discussed and verified via 1D Particle in Cell (PIC) simulations. Applications of this scheme to heating plasmas in open configurations (mirror machines) and closed configurations (tokamak, reverse field pinche) are discussed.

  9. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage analogues in classical physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangelov, A A [University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Vitanov, N V [Department of Physics, Sofia University, James Bourchier 5 blvd., 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Shore, B W [618 Escondido Cir., Livermore, CA (United States)

    2009-03-14

    Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) is a well-established technique for producing coherent population transfer in a three-state quantum system. We here exploit the resemblance between the Schroedinger equation for such a quantum system and the Newton equation of motion for a classical system undergoing torque to discuss several classical analogues of STIRAP, notably the motion of a moving charged particle subject to the Lorentz force of a quasistatic magnetic field, the orientation of a magnetic moment in a slowly varying magnetic field and the Coriolis effect. Like STIRAP, these phenomena occur for counterintuitive motion of the torque and are robustly insensitive to small changes in the interaction properties.

  10. Analysis of interference in attosecond transient absorption in adiabatic condition

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Wenpu; Wang, Xiaowei; Zhao, Zengxiu

    2015-01-01

    We simulate the transient absorption of attosecond pulses of infrared laser-dressed atoms by considering a three-level system with the adiabatic approximation. We study the delay-dependent interference features in the transient absorption spectra of helium atoms from the perspective of the coherent interaction processes between the attosecond pulse and the quasi-harmonics, and find that many features of the interference fringes in the absorption spectra of the attosecond pulse can be attributed to the coherence phase difference. And the modulation signals of laser-induced sidebands of the dark state is found related to the dark state with population modulated by the dressing field.

  11. From Classical Nonlinear Integrable Systems to Quantum Shortcuts to Adiabaticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Manaka; Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2016-08-01

    Using shortcuts to adiabaticity, we solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation that is reduced to a classical nonlinear integrable equation. For a given time-dependent Hamiltonian, the counterdiabatic term is introduced to prevent nonadiabatic transitions. Using the fact that the equation for the dynamical invariant is equivalent to the Lax equation in nonlinear integrable systems, we obtain the counterdiabatic term exactly. The counterdiabatic term is available when the corresponding Lax pair exists and the solvable systems are classified in a unified and systematic way. Multisoliton potentials obtained from the Korteweg-de Vries equation and isotropic X Y spin chains from the Toda equations are studied in detail.

  12. Diabatic Versus Adiabatic Calculation of Torsion-Vibration Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougen, Jon T.

    2013-06-01

    The introductory part of this talk will deal briefly with two historical topics: (i) use of the words adiabatic, nonadiabatic, and diabatic in thermodynamics and quantum mechanics, and (ii) application of diabatic and adiabatic ideas to vibrational energy level calculations for a pair of diatomic-molecule potential energy curves exhibiting an avoided crossing. The main part of the talk will be devoted to recent work with Li-Hong Xu and Ron Lees on how ab initio projected frequency calculations for small-amplitude vibrations along the large-amplitude internal rotation path in methanol can best be used to help guide experimental assignments and fits in the IR vibrational spectrum. The three CH stretching vibrations for CH_{3}OH can conveniently be represented as coefficients multiplying three different types of basis vibrations, i.e., as coefficients of: (i) the local mode C-H_i bond displacements δr_{i} for hydrogens H_{1}, H_{2} and H_{3} of the methyl top, (ii) symmetrized linear combinations of the three δr_{i} of species A_{1} oplus E in the permutation-inversion group G_{6} = C_{3v} appropriate for methanol, or (iii) symmetrized linear combinations of the three δr_{i} of species 2A_{1} oplus A_{2} in the permutation-inversion group G_{6}. In this talk, we will focus on diabatic and adiabatic computations for the A_{1} oplus E basis vibrations of case (ii) above. We will briefly explain how Jahn-Teller-like and Renner-Teller-like torsion-vibration interaction terms occurring in the potential energy expression in the diabatic calculation become torsion-vibration Coriolis interaction terms occurring in the kinetic energy expression of the adiabatic calculations, and also show how, for algebraically solvable parameter choices, the same energy levels are obtained from either calculation. A final conclusion as to which approach is computationally superior for the numerical data given in a quantum chemistry output file has not yet been arrived at.

  13. Power comparison of CMOS and adiabatic full adder circuit

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, Sunil Gavaskar; 10.5121/vlsic.2011.2306

    2011-01-01

    Full adders are important components in applications such as digital signal processors (DSP) architectures and microprocessors. Apart from the basic addition adders also used in performing useful operations such as subtraction, multiplication, division, address calculation, etc. In most of these systems the adder lies in the critical path that determines the overall performance of the system. In this paper conventional complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and adiabatic adder circuits are analyzed in terms of power and transistor count using 0.18UM technology.

  14. Adiabatic transport of qubits around a black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Viennot, David

    2016-01-01

    We consider localized qubits evolving around a black hole following a quantum adiabatic dynamics. We develop a geometric structure (based on fibre bundles) permitting to describe the quantum states of a qubit and the spacetime geometry in a single framework. The quantum decoherence induced by the black hole on the qubit is analysed in this framework (the role of the dynamical and geometric phases in this decoherence is treated), especially for the quantum teleportation protocol when one qubit falls to the event horizon. A simple formula to compute the fidelity of the teleportation is derived. The case of a Schwarzschild black hole is analysed.

  15. Adiabatic regularization of power spectra in nonminimally coupled chaotic inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinea, Allan L.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the effect of adiabatic regularization on both the tensor- and scalar-perturbation power spectra in nonminimally coupled chaotic inflation. Similar to that of the minimally coupled general single-field inflation, we find that the subtraction term is suppressed by an exponentially decaying factor involving the number of e -folds. By following the subtraction term long enough beyond horizon crossing, the regularized power spectrum tends to the ``bare'' power spectrum. This study justifies the use of the unregularized (``bare'') power spectrum in standard calculations.

  16. Adiabaticity and Reversibility Studies for Beam Splitting using Stable Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Franchi, A; Giovannozzi, M

    2008-01-01

    At the CERN Proton Synchrotron, a series of beam experiments proved beam splitting by crossing the one-fourth resonance. Depending on the speed at which the horizontal resonance is crossed, the splitting process is more or less adiabatic, and a different fraction of the initial beam is trapped in the islands. Experiments prove that when the trapping process is reversed and the islands merged together, the final distribution features thick tails. The beam population in such tails is correlated to the speed of the resonance crossing and to the fraction of the beam trapped in the stable islands. Experiments and possible theoretical explanations are discussed.

  17. Metallization of Nanofilms in Strong Adiabatic Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durach, Maxim; Rusina, Anastasia; Kling, Matthias F.; Stockman, Mark I.

    2010-08-01

    We introduce an effect of metallization of dielectric nanofilms by strong, adiabatically varying electric fields. The metallization causes optical properties of a dielectric film to become similar to those of a plasmonic metal (strong absorption and negative permittivity at low optical frequencies). This is a quantum effect, which is exponentially size-dependent, occurring at fields on the order of 0.1V/Å and pulse durations ranging from ˜1fs to ˜10ns for a film thickness of 3-10 nm.

  18. Adiabatic regularisation of power spectra in nonminimally coupled chaotic inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Alinea, Allan L

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effect of adiabatic regularisation on both the tensor- and scalar-perturbation power spectra in \\textit{nonminimally} coupled chaotic inflation. Similar to that of the \\textit{minimally} coupled general single-field inflation, we find that the subtraction term is suppressed by an exponentially decaying factor involving the number of $ e $-folds. By following the subtraction term long enough beyond horizon crossing, the regularised power spectrum tends to the "bare" power spectrum. This study justifies the use of the unregularised ("bare") power spectrum in standard calculations.

  19. Adiabatic invariants in stellar dynamics. 2: Gravitational shocking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Martin D.

    1994-01-01

    A new theory of gravitational shocking based on time-dependent perturbation theory shows that the changes in energy and angular momentum due to a slowly varying disturbance are not exponentially small for stellar dynamical systems in general. It predicts significant shock heating by slowly varying perturbations previously thought to be negligible according to the adiabatic criterion. The theory extends the scenarios traditionally computed only with the impulse approximation and is applicable to a wide class of disturbances. The approach is applied specifically to the problem of disk shocking of star clusters.

  20. Nonlinear effects generation in non-adiabatically tapered fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palací, Jesús; Mas, Sara; Monzón-Hernández, David; Martí, Javier

    2015-12-01

    Nonlinear effects are observed in a non-adiabatically tapered optical fibre. The designed structure allows for the introduction of self-phase modulation, which is observed through pulse breaking and spectral broadening, in approximately a centimetre of propagation using a commercial telecom laser. These devices are simple to fabricate and suitable to generate and control a variety of nonlinear effects in practical applications because they do not experience short-term degradation as previously reported approaches. Experimental and theoretical results are obtained, showing a good agreement.

  1. Adiabatic quantum computation and quantum annealing theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    McGeoch, Catherine C

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) is an alternative to the better-known gate model of quantum computation. The two models are polynomially equivalent, but otherwise quite dissimilar: one property that distinguishes AQC from the gate model is its analog nature. Quantum annealing (QA) describes a type of heuristic search algorithm that can be implemented to run in the ``native instruction set'''' of an AQC platform. D-Wave Systems Inc. manufactures {quantum annealing processor chips} that exploit quantum properties to realize QA computations in hardware. The chips form the centerpiece of a nov

  2. ADELE adiabatic compressed air energy storage. Status and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, Sebastian [General Electric Deutschland Holding GmbH, Garching (Germany). GE Global Research Renewable Energy Systems Lab.; Marquardt, Roland; Moser, Peter [RWE Power AG, Essen (Germany). Research and Development Innovative Power Plant Technology

    2013-06-01

    This paper gives an overview about compressed air energy storage (CAES) technology and a summary of the ADELE programme, a multi-year R and D programme undertaken by a consortium led by RWE Power to develop adiabatic (A) CAES technology and commercialise the first plant. The ACAES technology is to utilise waste heat developing upon compression in order to increase the entire efficiency. The ADELE-ING project is to provide the basis for making the decision on the construction of a 85 MW prototype. (orig.)

  3. Adiabatic Passage of Collective Excitations in Atomic Ensembles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIYong; MIAOYuan-Xiu; SUNChang-Pu

    2004-01-01

    We describe a theoretical scheme that allows for transfer of quantum states of atomic collective excitation between two macroscopic atomic ensembles localized in two spatially-separated domains. The conception is based on the occurrence of double-exciton dark states due to the collective destructive quantum interference of the emissions from the two atomic ensembles. With an adiabatically coherence manipulation for the atom-field couplings by stimulated Rmann scattering, the dark states will extrapolate from an exciton state of an ensemble to that of another. This realizes the transport of quantum information among atomic ensembles.

  4. Adiabatic Passage of Collective Excitations in Atomic Ensembles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong; MIAO Yuan-Xiu; SUN Chang-Pu

    2004-01-01

    We describe a theoretical scheme that allows for transfer of quantum states of atomic collective excitation between two macroscopic atomic ensembles localized in two spatially-separated domains. The conception is based on the occurrence of double-exciton dark states due to the collective destructive quantum interference of the emissions from the two atomic ensembles. With an adiabatically coherence manipulation for the atom-field couplings by stimulated Ramann scattering, the dark states will extrapolate from an exciton state of an ensemble to that of another. This realizes the transport of quantum information among atomic ensembles.

  5. Fast CNOT gate via shortcuts to adiabatic passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Xia, Yan; Chen, Ye-Hong; Song, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Based on the shortcuts to adiabatic passage, we propose a scheme for directly implementing a controlled-not (CNOT) gate in a cavity quantum electrodynamics system. Moreover, we generalize the scheme to realize a CNOT gate in two separate cavities connected by an optical fiber. The strictly numerical simulation shows that the schemes are fast and insensitive to the decoherence caused by atomic spontaneous emission and photon leakage. In addition, the schemes can provide a theoretical basis for the manipulation of the multiqubit quantum gates in distant nodes of a quantum network.

  6. Non-adiabatic study of the Kepler subgiant KIC 6442183

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grosjean M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the precision of Kepler observations, [3] were able to measure the linewidth and amplitude of individual modes (including mixed modes in several subgiant power spectra. We perform a forward modelling of a Kepler subgiant based on surface properties and observed frequencies. Non-adiabatic computations including a time- dependent treatment of convection give the lifetimes of radial and non-radial modes. Next, combining the lifetimes and inertias with a stochastic excitation model gives the amplitudes of the modes. We can now directly compare theoretical and observed linewidths and amplitudes of mixed-modes to obtain new constraints on our theoretical models.

  7. Salt materials testing for a spacecraft adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, M. L.; Kittel, P.; Roellig, T.

    As part of a technology development effort to qualify adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators for use in a NASA spacecraft, such as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility, a study of low temperature characteristics, heat capacity and resistance to dehydration was conducted for different salt materials. This report includes results of testing with cerrous metaphosphate, several synthetic rubies, and chromic potassium alum (CPA). Preliminary results show that CPA may be suitable for long-term spacecraft use, provided that the salt is property encapsulated. Methods of salt pill construction and testing for all materials are discussed, as well as reliability tests. Also, the temperature regulation scheme and the test cryostat design are briefly discussed.

  8. Perturbation to Symmetries and Adiabatic Invariants of Nonholonomic System in Terms of Quasi-coordinates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on the theory of Lie symmetries and conserved quantities, the exact invariants and adiabatic invariants of nonholonomic system in terms of quasi-coordinates are studied. The perturbation to symmetries for the nonholonomic system in terms of quasi-coordinates under small excitation is discussed. The concept of high-order adiabatic invariant is presented, and the forms of exact invariants and adiabatic invariants as well as the conditions for their existence are given. Then the corresponding inverse problem is studied.

  9. Perturbation to Symmetries and Adiabatic Invariants of Nonholonomic Dynamical System of Relative Motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiang-Wei; WANG Ming-Quan; WANG Xin-Min

    2005-01-01

    Based on the theory of symmetries and conserved quantities, the exact invariants and adiabatic invariants of nonholonomic dynamical system of relative motion are studied. The perturbation to symmetries for the nonholonomic dynamical system of relative motion under small excitation is discussed. The concept of high-order adiabatic invariant is presented, and the form of exact invariants and adiabatic invariants as well as the conditions for their existence are given. Then the corresponding inverse problem is studied.

  10. Perturbation to Lie Symmetry and Generalized Hojman Adiabatic Invariants for Relativistic Hamilton System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yu-Sheng; ZHANG Xiao-Ni; YUAN Bao-He; FANG Jian-Hui; YANG Guo-Hong; LIN Peng; PANG Ting

    2008-01-01

    Based on the concept of higher-order adiabatic invariants of mechanical system with action of a small perturbation, the perturbation to Lie symmetry and generalized Hojman adiabatic invariants for the relativistic Hamilton system are studied. Perturbation to Lie symmetry is discussed under general infinitesimal transformation of groups in which time is variable. The form and the criterion of generalized Hojman adiabatic invariants for this system are obtained. Finally, an example is given to illustrate the results.

  11. Lie symmetries, perturbation to symmetries and adiabatic invariants of Poincaré equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Xiang-Wei; Liu Cui-Mei; Li Yan-Min

    2006-01-01

    Based on the invariance of differential equations under infinitesimal transformations,Lie symmetry,laws of conservations,perturbation to the symmetries and adiabatic invariants of Poincaré equations are presented.The concepts of Lie symmetry and higher order adiabatic invariants of Poincaré equations are proposed.The conditions for existence of the exact invariants and adiabatic invariants are proved,and their forms are also given.In addition,an example is presented to illustrate these results.

  12. Perturbation to Lie Symmetry and Adiabatic Invariants for General Holonomic Mechanical Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Ning; FANG Jian-Hui; WANG Peng; ZHANG Xiao-Ni

    2007-01-01

    Based on the concept of adiabatic invariant, the perturbation to the Lie symmetry and adiabatic invariants for general holonomic mechanical systems are studied. The exact invariants induced directly from the Lie symmetry of the system without perturbation are given. The perturbation to the Lie symmetry is discussed and the adiabatic invariants that have the different form from that in [Act. Phys. Sin. 55 (2006) 3236 (in Chinese)] of the perturbed system, are obtained.

  13. Exact invariants and adiabatic invariants of dynamical system of relative motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Xiang-Wei; Wang Xin-Min; Wang Ming-Quan

    2004-01-01

    Based on the theory of symmetries and conserved quantities, the exact inwriants and adiabatic inwriants of a dynamical system of relative motion are studied. The perturbation to symmetries for the dynamical system of relative motion under small excitation is discussed. The concept of high-order adiabatic invariant is presented, and the form of exact invariants and adiabatic invariants as well as the conditions for their existence are given. Then the corresponding inverse problem is studied.

  14. Adiabatic heavy-ion fusion potentials for fusion at deep sub-barrier energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S V S Sastry; S Kailas; A K Mohanty; A Saxena

    2005-01-01

    The recently reported unusual behaviour of fusion cross-sections at extreme sub-barrier energies has been examined. The adiabatic limit of fusion barriers has been determined from experimental data using the barrier penetration model. These adiabatic barriers are consistent with the adiabatic fusion barriers derived from the modified Wilzynska–Wilzynski prescription. The fusion barrier systematics has been obtained for a wide range of heavy-ion systems.

  15. Bad advice; bad burn: a new problem in burn prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, L; Slater, H; Goldfarb, I W

    1990-01-01

    Deep partial-thickness burns had been inflicted on the perineal area of an infant who was recently treated in our Burn Center. The burns were a result of advice to the patient's mother by a pediatrician. The doctor told her to use a hair dryer to prevent diaper rash. We surveyed pediatricians, well-baby clinics, and pediatric nurse practitioners in our area and found that approximately half of them advised the use of hair dryers to treat or prevent diaper rash. We tested four widely available hand-held hair dryers to determine potential for inflicting burn injury. All of the dryers are capable of delivering air heated to at least 53 degrees C after 2 minutes of use. We believe that warnings against the use of hair dryers for perineal hygiene should be included in burn prevention programs.

  16. High-velocity clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, BP; vanWoerden, H

    1997-01-01

    High-velocity clouds (HVCs) consist of neutral hydrogen (HI) at velocities incompatible with a simple model of differential galactic rotation; in practice one uses \\v(LSR)\\ greater than or equal to 90 km/s to define HVCs. This review describes the main features of the sky and velocity distributions,

  17. Transverse Spectral Velocity Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    A transverse oscillation (TO)-based method for calculating the velocity spectrum for fully transverse flow is described. Current methods yield the mean velocity at one position, whereas the new method reveals the transverse velocity spectrum as a function of time at one spatial location. A convex...

  18. Adiabatic invariants of generalized Lutzky type for disturbed holonomic nonconservative systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Shao-Kai; Cai Jian-Le; Jia Li-Qun

    2008-01-01

    Based on the definition of higher-order adiabatic invariants of a mechanical system,a new type of adiabatic invariants,i.e.generalized Lutzky adiabatic invariants,of a disturbed holonomic nonconservative mechanical system are obtained by investigating the perturbation of Lie symmetries for a holonomic nonconservative mechanical system with the action of small disturbance.The adiabatic invaxiants and the exact invariants of the Lutzky type of some special cases,for example,the Lie point symmetrical transformations,the special Lie symmetrical transformations,and the Lagrange system,are given.And an example is given to illustrate the application of the method and results.

  19. Fast adiabatic quantum state transfer and entanglement generation between two atoms via dressed states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin-Lei; Ji, Xin; Zhang, Shou

    2017-01-01

    We propose a dressed-state scheme to achieve shortcuts to adiabaticity in atom-cavity quantum electrodynamics for speeding up adiabatic two-atom quantum state transfer and maximum entanglement generation. Compared with stimulated Raman adiabatic passage, the dressed-state scheme greatly shortens the operation time in a non-adiabatic way. By means of some numerical simulations, we determine the parameters which can guarantee the feasibility and efficiency both in theory and experiment. Besides, numerical simulations also show the scheme is robust against the variations in the parameters, atomic spontaneous emissions and the photon leakages from the cavity.

  20. A new type of adiabatic invariants for nonconservative systems of generalized classical mechanics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yi

    2006-01-01

    The perturbations to symmetries and adiabatic invariants for nonconservative systems of generalized classical mechanics are studied. The exact invariant in the form of Hojman from a particular Lie symmetry for an undisturbed system of generalized mechanics is given. Based on the concept of high-order adiabatic invariant in generalized mechanics, the perturbation to Lie symmetry for the system under the action of small disturbance is investigated, and a new adiabatic invariant for the nonconservative system of generalized classical mechanics is obtained, which can be called the Hojman adiabatic invariant. An example is also given to illustrate the application of the results.

  1. Clinker burning kinetics and mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telschow, S.

    2012-07-01

    The industrial cement process is subject to several changes in order to reduce the high energy consumption and thereby increase the profitability of cement production. These changes also affect the core of the entire cement producing process: the clinker formation in the rotary kiln. Thus, in order to maintain or even improve clinker quality (and output), we need a better understanding of the development of clinker properties inside the kiln to react upon the impact of process changes. Clinker formation in industrial rotary kilns is very complex due to a vast number of interacting parameters: kiln dimensions, rotation velocity, temperature, gas composition, heat transfer phenomena, etc. These conditions can only be partly simulated in ordinary lab-scale experiments. Thus, the objectives of this project have been to establish test equipment to simulate the industrial clinker burning process on a laboratory scale and to conduct clinker formation experiments in order to derive knowledge on gradual clinker property development, as a function of different process parameters. A new lab-scale setup rotary kiln simulator (RKS) was designed and built for this purpose. It is assembled of two parts: an ordinary lab-scale heating furnace and a sample motion system. The motion system consists of a SiC tube, which moves the sample, placed in a Pt/Rh-crucible, at a chosen velocity through the heating furnace. Simultaneously, the sample is rotated around its horizontal axis with a chosen rotation velocity. The heating furnace consists of five individual heating zones, which are set to obtain a temperature ramp from {approx}00-1540 deg. C. Furthermore, the atmosphere in the system can be set to any mixture of N2, O2 and CO{sup 2}. Thus, the rotary kiln simulator features most important parameters of the industrial cement rotary kiln (ICRK): gradual temperature increase, rotation velocity and gas phase composition. An investigation of clinker formation vs. heating profile and

  2. Burn, thermal - close-up (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first degree burns cause only reddening of the epidermis (outer layer of the skin), as seen in this photograph. Second degree burns cause blistering and extend into the dermis (lower layer of skin). Third degree burns cause ...

  3. Nutritional management of the burn patient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    role include: evaporative water loss from the burn wound, bacterial contamination of the burn ... leucocytes and fibroblasts in the burned area.2 Providing exogenous glucose ... immune function, poor wound healing and exacerbation of protein.

  4. Fires and Burns Involving Home Medical Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nfpa.org Fires and Burns Involving Home Medical Oxygen The air is normally 21% oxygen. Oxygen is not flammable, but fire needs it to burn. ¾ When more oxygen is present, any fire that starts will burn ...

  5. Corneal Protection for Burn Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Houston, TX Purpose:Patients with severe facial burns often suffer indirect damage to their eyes. Burn wound contracture of the periocular skin...periocular muscles , are injured and the protective blink reflex is lost. With loss of the blink reflex the patient quickly develops exposure keratitis

  6. Wanted: Clean Coal Burning Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    China is intent on developing clean coal burning technology, an objective it can achieve through installing desulfurization facilities at coal-burning power plants that will control SO2 emissions and environmental pollution. According to kuo Yi, deputy director general of the Department of Science and Technology of the State Environmental Protection Agency, China is a major coal-buming country:

  7. Adiabatic Compression of Compact Tori for Current Drive and Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Simon; McNab, Angus; Miller, Kenneth; Ziemba, Tim

    2008-11-01

    Several critical issues stand in the development path for compact tori. An important one is the production of strong magnetic fields, (or large flux amplifications) by use of a low current source. The Pulsed Build-up Experiment is a Phase II SBIR project in which we aim to show a new means for generating strong magnetic fields from a low current source, namely, the repetitive injection of helicity-bearing plasma that also undergoes an acceleration and compression. In the Phase I SBIR, advanced computations were benchmarked against analytic theory and run to determine the best means for the acceleration and compression of a compact torus plasma. The study included detailed simulations of magnetic reconnection. In Phase II, an experiment has been designed and is being built to produce strong magnetic fields in a spheromak by the repetitive injection of magnetic helicity from a low current coaxial plasma source. The plasma will be accelerated and compressed in a similar manner to a traveling wave adiabatic compression scheme that was previously applied to a mirror plasma [1]. [1] P. M. Bellan Scalings for a Traveling Mirror Adiabatic Magnetic Compressor Rev. Sci. Instrum. 53(8) 1214 (1982) Work supported by DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-06ER84449.

  8. Breakdown of the adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer approximation in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisana, Simone; Lazzeri, Michele; Casiraghi, Cinzia; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Geim, A. K.; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Mauri, Francesco

    2007-03-01

    The adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer approximation (ABO) has been the standard ansatz to describe the interaction between electrons and nuclei since the early days of quantum mechanics. ABO assumes that the lighter electrons adjust adiabatically to the motion of the heavier nuclei, remaining at any time in their instantaneous ground state. ABO is well justified when the energy gap between ground and excited electronic states is larger than the energy scale of the nuclear motion. In metals, the gap is zero and phenomena beyond ABO (such as phonon-mediated superconductivity or phonon-induced renormalization of the electronic properties) occur. The use of ABO to describe lattice motion in metals is, therefore, questionable. In spite of this, ABO has proved effective for the accurate determination of chemical reactions, molecular dynamics and phonon frequencies in a wide range of metallic systems. Here, we show that ABO fails in graphene. Graphene, recently discovered in the free state, is a zero-bandgap semiconductor that becomes a metal if the Fermi energy is tuned applying a gate voltage, Vg. This induces a stiffening of the Raman G peak that cannot be described within ABO.

  9. General background conditions for K-bounce and adiabaticity

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Antonio Enea

    2016-01-01

    We study the background conditions for a bounce in a single scalar field model with a generalized kinetic term $K(X)$. At the background level we impose the existence of two turning points where the derivative of the Hubble parameter $H$ changes sign and of a bounce point where the Hubble parameter vanishes. We find the conditions for $K(X)$ and the potential which ensure the above requirements. We then give the examples of two models constructed according to these conditions. One is based on a quadratic $K$, and the other on a $K$ which is avoiding divergences of the second time derivative of the scalar field, which may otherwise occur. An appropriate choice of the initial conditions can lead to a sequence of consecutive bounces. In models where the bounce occurs when the potential is not constant, large non adiabatic perturbations are produced, which can in turn source the growth of anisotropies. In the region where these models have a constant potential they became adiabatic on any scale and because of thi...

  10. Shortcut to adiabaticity for an anisotropic unitary Fermi gas

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Shujin; Yu, Qianli; Wu, Haibin

    2016-01-01

    Coherent control of complex quantum systems is a fundamental requirement in quantum information processing and engineering. Recently developed notion of shortcut to adiabaticity (STA) has spawned intriguing prospects. So far, the most experimental investigations of STA are implemented in the ideal thermal gas or the weakly interacting ultracold Bose gases. Here we report the first demonstration of a many-body STA in a 3D anisotropically trapped unitary Fermi gas. A new dynamical scaling law is demonstrated on such a strongly interacting quantum gas. By simply engineering the frequency aspect ratio of a harmonic trap, the dynamics of the gas can be manipulated and the many-body state can be transferred adiabatically from one stationary state to another one in short time scale without the excitation. The universal scaling both for non-interacting and unitary Fermi gas is also verified. This could be very important for future many-body quantum engineering and the exploration of the fundamental law of the thermod...

  11. Adiabatic Berry Phase and Hannay Angle for Open Paths

    CERN Document Server

    Pati, A K

    1998-01-01

    We obtain the adiabatic Berry phase by defining a generalised gauge potential whose line integral gives the phase holonomy for arbitrary evolutions of parameters. Keeping in mind that for classical integrable systems it is hardly clear how to obtain open-path Hannay angle, we establish a connection between the open-path Berry phase and Hannay angle by using the parametrised coherent state approach. Using the semiclassical wavefunction we analyse the open-path Berry phase and obtain the open-path Hannay angle. Further, by expressing the adiabatic Berry phase in terms of the commutator of instantaneous projectors with its differential and using Wigner representation of operators we obtain the Poisson bracket between distribution function and its differential. This enables us to talk about the classical limit of the phase holonomy which yields the angle holonomy for open-paths. An operational definition of Hannay angle is provided based on the idea of classical limit of quantum mechanical inner product. A probab...

  12. The 0.1K bolometers cooled by adiabatic demagnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, T.; Lesyna, L.; Kittel, P.; Werner, M.

    1983-01-01

    The most straightforward way of reducing the noise equivalent power of bolometers is to lower their operating temperature. We have been exploring the possibility of using conventionally constructed bolometers at ultra-low temperatures to achieve NEP's suitable to the background environment of cooled space telescopes. We have chosen the technique of adiabatic demagnetization of a paramagnetic salt as a gravity independent, compact, and low power way to achieve temperatures below pumped He-3 (0.3 K). The demagnetization cryostat we used was capable of reaching temperatures below 0.08 K using Chromium Potassium Alum as a salt from a starting temperature of 1.5 K and a starting magnetic field of 30,000 gauss. Computer control of the magnetic field decay allowed a temperature of 0.2 K to be maintained to within 0.5 mK over a time period exceeding 14 hours. The refrigerator duty cycle was over 90 percent at this temperature. The success of these tests has motivated us to construct a more compact portable adiabatic demagnetization cryostat capable of bolometer optical tests and use at the 5m Hale telescope at 1mm wavelengths.

  13. The 0.1K bolometers cooled by adiabatic demagnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, T.; Lesyna, L.; Kittel, P.; Werner, M.

    1983-01-01

    The most straightforward way of reducing the noise equivalent power of bolometers is to lower their operating temperature. We have been exploring the possibility of using conventionally constructed bolometers at ultra-low temperatures to achieve NEP's suitable to the background environment of cooled space telescopes. We have chosen the technique of adiabatic demagnetization of a paramagnetic salt as a gravity independent, compact, and low power way to achieve temperatures below pumped He-3 (0.3 K). The demagnetization cryostat we used was capable of reaching temperatures below 0.08 K using Chromium Potassium Alum as a salt from a starting temperature of 1.5 K and a starting magnetic field of 30,000 gauss. Computer control of the magnetic field decay allowed a temperature of 0.2 K to be maintained to within 0.5 mK over a time period exceeding 14 hours. The refrigerator duty cycle was over 90 percent at this temperature. The success of these tests has motivated us to construct a more compact portable adiabatic demagnetization cryostat capable of bolometer optical tests and use at the 5m Hale telescope at 1mm wavelengths.

  14. The year in burns 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Steven E; Phelan, Herbert A; Arnoldo, Brett D

    2014-12-01

    Approximately 3415 research articles were published with burns in the title, abstract, and/or keyword in 2013. We have continued to see an increase in this number; the following reviews articles selected from these by the Editor of one of the major journals (Burns) and colleagues that in their opinion are most likely to have effects on burn care treatment and understanding. As we have done before, articles were found and divided into the following topic areas: epidemiology of injury and burn prevention, wound and scar characterization, acute care and critical care, inhalation injury, infection, psychological considerations, pain and itching management, rehabilitation and long-term outcomes, and burn reconstruction. The articles are mentioned briefly with notes from the authors; readers are referred to the full papers for details.

  15. The biology of burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Lars H; Bhavsar, Dhaval; Mailänder, Peter

    2010-09-01

    Burn injury is a complex traumatic event with various local and systemic effects, affecting several organ systems beyond the skin. The pathophysiology of the burn patient shows the full spectrum of the complexity of inflammatory response reactions. In the acute phase, inflammation mechanism may have negative effects because of capillary leak, the propagation of inhalation injury and the development of multiple organ failure. Attempts to mediate these processes remain a central subject of burn care research. Conversely, inflammation is a necessary prologue and component in the later-stage processes of wound healing. In this review, we are attempting to present the current science of burn wound pathophysiology and wound healing. We also describe the evolution of innovative strategies for burn management.

  16. Pressure anisotropy and small spatial scales induced by velocity shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sarto, D.; Pegoraro, F.; Califano, F.

    2016-05-01

    By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show that a sheared velocity field can provide an effective mechanism that makes the initial isotropic pressure nongyrotropic. This is distinct from the usual gyrotropic anisotropy related to the fluid compressibility and usually accounted for in double-adiabatic models. We determine the time evolution of the pressure agyrotropy and discuss how the propagation of "magnetoelastic perturbations" can affect the pressure tensor anisotropization and its spatial filamentation, which are due to the action of both the magnetic field and the flow strain tensor. We support this analysis with a numerical integration of the nonlinear equations describing the pressure tensor evolution.

  17. Density and adiabatic compressibility of the immiscible molten AgBr+LiCl mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanov, Victor P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation). Inst. of High-Temperature Electrochemistry; Ural Federal Univ., Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kulik, Nina P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation). Inst. of High-Temperature Electrochemistry

    2017-07-01

    The adiabatic compressibility, β, of the immiscible liquid mixture 0.52 LiCl+0.48 AgBr (the top of the miscibility gap) was experimentally investigated in the temperature range from the melting point to the critical mixing temperature using the sound velocity values, u, measured by the pulse method, and the density quantities, ρ, which were determined using the hydrostatic weight procedure based on the relationship β = u{sup -2}ρ{sup -1}. It is shown that the coefficients of the temperature dependencies for the compressibility and density of the upper and lower equilibrium phases have opposite signs because of the superposition of the intensity of the thermal motion of the ions and the change in the composition of the phases. The differences, Δβ and Δρ, in the magnitudes of the compressibility and density for the equilibrium phases decrease with temperature elevation. The temperature dependencies of the compressibility and density difference are described using the empirical equations Δβ ∼ (T{sub c}-T){sup 0.438} and Δρ ∼ (T{sub c}-T){sup 0.439}.

  18. The relationship between the adiabatic bulk modulus and enthalpy for mantle-related minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Orson L.

    1989-07-01

    It is found that the adiabatic bulk modulus, KS, is linear with enthalpy over a wide temperature range: up to at least 1825 K, the present limit of the measurement of the bulk modulus. This correlation is shown to hold for Al2O3, MgO, and Mg2SiO4. Since the enthalpy is listed in thermodynamic tables up to 3000 K, one can reasonably safely extrapolate KS up to lower mantle temperatures using this correlation. This correlation was anticipated in a theoretical 1966 paper, where the definition of the anharmonic parameter δ S was made in terms of properties which vary with temperature, δ _s = - left( {1/{α K_S }} right)left( {{δ K}/{δ T}} right)_{P'} where α is the volume coefficient of thermal expansion. The correlation was first confirmed for polycrystalline oxides in an experimental 1966 paper. Since the isotropic shear modulus, G, is linear with T, it is possible to estimate the sound velocities in the temperature regime just below the melting point.

  19. Flow regimes of adiabatic gas-liquid two-phase under rolling conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chaoxing; Yan, Changqi; Sun, Licheng; Xing, Dianchuan; Wang, Yang; Tian, Daogui

    2013-07-01

    Characteristics of adiabatic air/water two-phase flow regimes under vertical and rolling motion conditions were investigated experimentally. Test sections are two rectangular ducts with the gaps of 1.41 and 10 mm, respectively, and a circular tube with 25 mm diameter. Flow regimes were recorded by a high speed CCD-camera and were identified by examining the video images. The experimental results indicate that the characteristics of flow patterns in 10 mm wide rectangular duct under vertical condition are very similar to those in circular tube, but different from the 1.41 mm wide rectangular duct. Channel size has a significant influence on flow pattern transition, boundary of which in rectangular channels tends asymptotically towards that in the circular tube with increasing the width of narrow side. Flow patterns in rolling channels are similar to each other, nevertheless, the effect of rolling motion on flow pattern transition are significantly various. Due to the remarkable influences of the friction shear stress and surface tension in the narrow gap duct, detailed flow pattern maps of which under vertical and rolling conditions are indistinguishable. While for the circular tube with 25 mm diameter, the transition from bubbly to slug flow occurs at a higher superficial liquid velocity and the churn flow covers more area on the flow regime map as the rolling period decreases.

  20. Adiabatic compressibility of an immiscible molten NaCl-AgI salt mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, V. P.; Tkachev, N. K.; Kulik, N. P.; Peshkina, K. G.

    2016-08-01

    Adiabatic compressibility β of an immiscible 0.5NaCl + 0.5AgI liquid mixture in the immiscibility range is studied experimentally and theoretically using the model of charged hard spheres. The compressibility is calculated by the relationship β = 1/ u 2ρ studied using sound velocity u measured by a pulse method and density ρ determined by hydrostatic weighing. It is shown that the compressibility of the upper phase decreases and that of the lower phase increases when the temperature increases because of the superposition of the effects of the thermal motion of ions and the phase compositions. The temperature dependence of the difference between the compressibilities of the equilibrium phases is described using the empirical equation Δβ = ( T c- T)0.442, which is close to the mean-field theory description. The results of the model calculations adequately reproduce the experimentally observed temperature dependence of the compressibility of the coexisting phases. However, the theoretically predicted critical exponent (1/2) differs from the experimentally determined exponent by 13%. These results are discussed in terms of the nature of chemical bond in silver iodide.

  1. Adiabatic Quasi-Spherical Compressions Driven by Magnetic Pressure for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NASH,THOMAS J.

    2000-11-01

    The magnetic implosion of a high-Z quasi-spherical shell filled with DT fuel by the 20-MA Z accelerator can heat the fuel to near-ignition temperature. The attainable implosion velocity on Z, 13-cm/{micro}s, is fast enough that thermal losses from the fuel to the shell are small. The high-Z shell traps radiation losses from the fuel, and the fuel reaches a high enough density to reabsorb the trapped radiation. The implosion is then nearly adiabatic. In this case the temperature of the fuel increases as the square of the convergence. The initial temperature of the fuel is set by the heating of an ion acoustic wave to be about 200-eV after a convergence of 4. To reach the ignition temperature of 5-keV an additional convergence of 5 is required. The implosion dynamics of the quasi-spherical implosion is modeled with the 2-D radiation hydrodynamic code LASNEX. LASNEX shows an 8-mm diameter quasi-spherical tungsten shell on Z driving 6-atmospheres of DT fuel nearly to ignition at 3.5-keV with a convergence of 20. The convergence is limited by mass flow along the surface of the quasi-spherical shell. With a convergence of 20 the final spot size is 400-{micro}m in diameter.

  2. Adiabatic Quasi-Spherical Compressions Driven by Magnetic Pressure for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NASH,THOMAS J.

    2000-11-01

    The magnetic implosion of a high-Z quasi-spherical shell filled with DT fuel by the 20-MA Z accelerator can heat the fuel to near-ignition temperature. The attainable implosion velocity on Z, 13-cm/{micro}s, is fast enough that thermal losses from the fuel to the shell are small. The high-Z shell traps radiation losses from the fuel, and the fuel reaches a high enough density to reabsorb the trapped radiation. The implosion is then nearly adiabatic. In this case the temperature of the fuel increases as the square of the convergence. The initial temperature of the fuel is set by the heating of an ion acoustic wave to be about 200-eV after a convergence of 4. To reach the ignition temperature of 5-keV an additional convergence of 5 is required. The implosion dynamics of the quasi-spherical implosion is modeled with the 2-D radiation hydrodynamic code LASNEX. LASNEX shows an 8-mm diameter quasi-spherical tungsten shell on Z driving 6-atmospheres of DT fuel nearly to ignition at 3.5-keV with a convergence of 20. The convergence is limited by mass flow along the surface of the quasi-spherical shell. With a convergence of 20 the final spot size is 400-{micro}m in diameter.

  3. Diagnosing Implosion Velocity and Ablator Dynamics at NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Gary; Hayes, Anna; Jungman, Jerry; Wilson, Doug; Wilhelmy, Jerry; Bradley, Paul; Rundberg, Bob; Cerjan, Charlie

    2009-10-01

    An enhanced understanding of the environment in a burning NIF capsule is of interest to both astrophysics and thermonuclear ignition. In this talk we introduce a new diagnostic idea, designed to measure dynamic aspects of the capsule implosion that are not currently accessible. During the burn,the NIF capsule ablator is moving relative to the 14.1 MeV dt neutrons that are traversing the capsule. The resulting neutron-ablator Doppler shift causes a few unique nuclear reactions to become sensitive detectors of the ablator velocity at peak burn time. The ``point-design'' capsule at the NIF will be based on a ^9Be ablator, and the ^9Be(n,p)^9Li reaction has an energy threshold of 14.2 MeV, making it the ideal probe. As discussed in detail below, differences in the ablator velocity lead to significant differences in the rate of ^9Li production. We present techniques for measuring this ^9Li implosion velocity diagnostic at the NIF. The same experimental techniques, measuring neutron reactions on the ablator material, will allow us to determine other important dynamical quantities, such as the areal density and approximate thickness of the ablator at peak burn.

  4. Second Law Analysis of Adiabatic and Non-Adiabatic Pipeline Flows of Unstable and Surfactant-Stabilized Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajinder Pal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Entropy generation, and hence exergy destruction, in adiabatic flow of unstable and surfactant-stabilized emulsions was investigated experimentally in different diameter pipes. Four types of emulsion systems are investigated covering a broad range of the dispersed-phase concentration: (a unstable oil-in-water (O/W emulsions without surfactant; (b surfactant-stabilized O/W emulsions; (c unstable water-in-oil (W/O emulsions without surfactant; and (d surfactant-stabilized W/O emulsions. The entropy generation rate per unit pipe length is affected by the type of the emulsion as well as its stability. Unstable emulsions without any surfactant present at the interface generate less entropy in the turbulent regime as compared with the surfactant-stabilized emulsions of the same viscosity and density. The effect of surfactant is particularly severe in the case of W/O emulsions. In the turbulent regime, the rate of entropy generation in unstable W/O emulsions is much lower in comparison with that observed in the stable W/O emulsions. A significant delay in the transition from laminar to turbulent regime is also observed in the case of unstable W/O emulsion. Finally, the analysis and simulation results are presented on non-adiabatic pipeline flow of emulsions.

  5. Functional Outcomes Following Burn Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Colleen M; Parry, Ingrid; Richard, Reginald

    Major advances in functional recovery following burn injury over the last ten years include the development of conceptual framework for disability assessment and its application burn recovery, the description of the long-term outcomes in the burn population, and progress in basic science research leading to new treatments that improve long-term functional outcomes. Future tasks and challenges include the development of common data elements and standards for burn recovery in order to measure and optimize the path toward functional recovery. The development of patient-reported outcome measures with benchmarks for recovery over time has the potential to improve patient-provider communication and quality of patient-centered care. The study of burn recovery should include an examination of resiliency along with the study of disabilities following burn injury. Better understanding of the mechanisms, impact and modulation of hypermetabolism and inflammation following burn injury is essential to improve functional recovery. Continued basic science and clinical research must focus on scar modulation and skin replacements and address recalcitriant problems such as heterotopic ossification. Health tracking technologies should be leveraged to understand and optimize physical therapy interventions.

  6. Sedation and Analgesia in Burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özkan Akıncı

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burn injury is one of the most serious injuries that mankind may face. In addition to serious inflammation, excessive fluid loss, presence of hemodynamic instability due to intercurrent factors such as debridements, infections and organ failure, very different levels and intensities of pain, psychological problems such as traumatic stress disorder, depression, delirium at different levels that occur in patient with severe burn are the factors which make it difficult to provide the patient comfort. In addition to a mild to moderate level of baseline permanent pain in burn patients, which is due to tissue damage, there is procedural pain as well, which occurs by treatments such as grafting and dressings, that are severe, short-term burst style 'breakthrough' pain. Movement and tactile stimuli are also seen in burn injury as an effect to sensitize the peripheral and central nervous system. Even though many burn centers have established protocols to struggle with the pain, studies show that pain relief still inadequate in burn patients. Therefore, the treatment of burn pain and the prevention of possible emergence of future psychiatric problems suc as post-traumatic stress disorder, the sedative and anxiolytic agents should be used as a recommendation according to the needs and hemodynamic status of individual patient. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 26-30

  7. Rehabilitation of the burn patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Procter Fiona

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation is an essential and integral part of burn treatment. It is not something which takes place following healing of skin grafts or discharge from hospital; instead it is a process that starts from day one of admission and continues for months and sometimes years after the initial event. Burns rehabilitation is not something which is completed by one or two individuals but should be a team approach, incorporating the patient and when appropriate, their family. The term ′Burns Rehabilitation′ incorporates the physical, psychological and social aspects of care and it is common for burn patients to experience difficulties in one or all of these areas following a burn injury. Burns can leave a patient with severely debilitating and deforming contractures, which can lead to significant disability when left untreated. The aims of burn rehabilitation are to minimise the adverse effects caused by the injury in terms of maintaining range of movement, minimising contracture development and impact of scarring, maximising functional ability, maximising psychological wellbeing, maximising social integration

  8. Topical agents in burn care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momčilović Dragan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Understanding of fluid shifts and recognition of the importance of early and appropriate fluid replacement therapy have significantly reduced mortality in the early post burn period. After the bum patient successfully passes the resuscitation period, the burn wound represents the greatest threat to survival. History Since the dawn of civilization, man has been trying to find an agent which would help burn wounds heal, and at the same time, not harm general condition of the injured. It was not until the XX century, after the discovery of antibiotics, when this condition was fulfilled. In 1968, combining silver and sulfadiazine, fox made silver-sulfadiazine, which is a 1% hydro-soluble cream and a superior agent in topical treatment of burns today. Current topical agents None of the topical antimicrobial agents available today, alone or combined, have the characteristics of ideal prophylactic agents, but they eliminate colonization of burn wound, and invasive infections are infrequent. With an excellent spectrum of activity, low toxicity, and ease of application with minimal pain, silver-sulfadiazine is still the most frequently used topical agent. Conclusion The incidence of invasive infections and overall mortality have been significantly reduced after introduction of topical burn wound antimicrobial agents into practice. In most burn patients the drug of choice for prophylaxis is silver sulfadiazine. Other agents may be useful in certain clinical situations.

  9. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions and adiabatic magnetization dynamics in molecular magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H; Miyashita, S; Michielsen, K; Machida, M

    A microscopic model of the molecular magnet V-15 is used to study mechanisms for the adiabatic change of the magnetization in time-dependent magnetic fields. The effects of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, the most plausible source for the energy-level repulsions that lead to adiabatic changes

  10. Design of indirectly driven, high-compression Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions with improved hydrodynamic stability using a 4-shock adiabat-shaped drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milovich, J. L., E-mail: milovich1@llnl.gov; Robey, H. F.; Clark, D. S.; Baker, K. L.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C.; Field, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Peterson, J. L.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Experimental results from indirectly driven ignition implosions during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] achieved a record compression of the central deuterium-tritium fuel layer with measured areal densities up to 1.2 g/cm{sup 2}, but with significantly lower total neutron yields (between 1.5 × 10{sup 14} and 5.5 × 10{sup 14}) than predicted, approximately 10% of the 2D simulated yield. An order of magnitude improvement in the neutron yield was subsequently obtained in the “high-foot” experiments [O. A. Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)]. However, this yield was obtained at the expense of fuel compression due to deliberately higher fuel adiabat. In this paper, the design of an adiabat-shaped implosion is presented, in which the laser pulse is tailored to achieve similar resistance to ablation-front instability growth, but with a low fuel adiabat to achieve high compression. Comparison with measured performance shows a factor of 3–10× improvement in the neutron yield (>40% of predicted simulated yield) over similar NIC implosions, while maintaining a reasonable fuel compression of >1 g/cm{sup 2}. Extension of these designs to higher laser power and energy is discussed to further explore the trade-off between increased implosion velocity and the deleterious effects of hydrodynamic instabilities.

  11. Design of indirectly driven, high-compression Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions with improved hydrodynamic stability using a 4-shock adiabat-shaped drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Clark, D. S.; Baker, K. L.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C.; Field, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Peterson, J. L.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental results from indirectly driven ignition implosions during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] achieved a record compression of the central deuterium-tritium fuel layer with measured areal densities up to 1.2 g/cm2, but with significantly lower total neutron yields (between 1.5 × 1014 and 5.5 × 1014) than predicted, approximately 10% of the 2D simulated yield. An order of magnitude improvement in the neutron yield was subsequently obtained in the "high-foot" experiments [O. A. Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)]. However, this yield was obtained at the expense of fuel compression due to deliberately higher fuel adiabat. In this paper, the design of an adiabat-shaped implosion is presented, in which the laser pulse is tailored to achieve similar resistance to ablation-front instability growth, but with a low fuel adiabat to achieve high compression. Comparison with measured performance shows a factor of 3-10× improvement in the neutron yield (>40% of predicted simulated yield) over similar NIC implosions, while maintaining a reasonable fuel compression of >1 g/cm2. Extension of these designs to higher laser power and energy is discussed to further explore the trade-off between increased implosion velocity and the deleterious effects of hydrodynamic instabilities.

  12. Velocity selective optical pumping

    OpenAIRE

    Aminoff, C. G.; Pinard, M.

    1982-01-01

    We consider optical pumping with a quasi monochromatic tunable light beam, in the low intensity limit where a rate equation regime is obtained The velocity selective optical pumping (V.S.O.P.) introduces a correlation between atomic velocity and internal variables in the ground (or metastable) state. The aim of this article is to evaluate these atomic observables (orientation, alignment, population) as a function of velocity, using a phenomenological description of the relaxation effect of co...

  13. Using electric fields for pulse compression and group velocity control

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Qian; Thuresson, Axel; Rippe, Lars; Kröll, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we experimentally demonstrate a new way of controlling the group velocity of an optical pulse by using a combination of spectral hole burning, slow light effect and linear Stark effect in a rare-earth-ion-doped crystal. The group velocity can be changed continuously by a factor of 20 without significant pulse distortion or absorption of the pulse energy. With a similar technique, an optical pulse can also be compressed in time. Theoretical simulations were developed to simulate the group velocity control and the pulse compression processes. The group velocity as well as the pulse reshaping are solely controlled by external voltages which makes it promising in quantum information and quantum communication processes. It is also proposed that the group velocity can be changed even more in an Er doped crystal while at the same time having a transmission band matching the telecommunication wavelength.

  14. Colloids in Acute Burn Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartotto, Robert; Greenhalgh, David

    2016-10-01

    Colloids have been used in varying capacities throughout the history of formula-based burn resuscitation. There is sound experimental evidence that demonstrates colloids' ability to improve intravascular colloid osmotic pressure, expand intravascular volume, reduce resuscitation requirements, and limit edema in unburned tissue following a major burn. Fresh frozen plasma appears to be a useful and effective immediate burn resuscitation fluid but its benefits must be weighed against its costs, and risks of viral transmission and acute lung injury. Albumin, in contrast, is less expensive and safer and has demonstrated ability to reduce resuscitation requirements and possibly limit edema-related morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hair bleaching and skin burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, K; Lingitz, R; Prattes, G; Schneider, G; Sutter, S; Schintler, M; Trop, M

    2012-12-31

    Hairdressing-related burns are preventable and therefore each case is one too many. We report a unique case of a 16-yr-old girl who suffered full-thickness chemical and thermal burns to the nape of her neck and superficial burns to the occiput after her hair had been dyed blond and placed under a dryer to accelerate the highlighting procedure. The wound on the nape of the neck required surgical debridement and skin grafting. The grafted area resulted in subsequent scar formation.

  16. [Reconstruction of facial burn sequelae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyatier, J L; Comparin, J P; Boulos, J P; Bichet, J C; Jacquin, F

    2001-06-01

    The deep burns of the face can lead to horrible scars functionally and aesthetically. Treatment of these scars need several surgical interventions frequently and during many years. In our region we deal with this type of wounds as team work, multidisciplinary approach carrying out many process starting by emergency treatment of acute burns till the social rehabilitation. The expansion technique was great help in improving the shape of scars, by using the expanding skin as full thickness grafts. Reconstruction of the anatomical units and application of aesthetic techniques (like rhinoplasty, lifting, tattooing and autologous fat injections) participate equally in improving the quality of results. Many examples of treatments of burns scars are shown.

  17. New Dynamical Scaling Universality for Quantum Networks Across Adiabatic Quantum Phase Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Oscar L.; Rodriguez, Ferney J.; Quiroga, Luis; Johnson, Neil F.; Rey, Ana M.

    2014-05-01

    We reveal universal dynamical scaling behavior across adiabatic quantum phase transitions in networks ranging from traditional spatial systems (Ising model) to fully connected ones (Dicke and Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick models). Our findings, which lie beyond traditional critical exponent analysis and adiabatic perturbation approximations, are applicable even where excitations have not yet stabilized and, hence, provide a time-resolved understanding of quantum phase transitions encompassing a wide range of adiabatic regimes. We show explicitly that even though two systems may traditionally belong to the same universality class, they can have very different adiabatic evolutions. This implies that more stringent conditions need to be imposed than at present, both for quantum simulations where one system is used to simulate the other and for adiabatic quantum computing schemes.

  18. Duality in adiabatic level crossing Quantum coherence and complete reflection

    CERN Document Server

    Fujikawa, K; Fujikawa, Kazuo; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    1997-01-01

    A field dependent su(2) gauge transformation connects between the adiabatic and diabatic pictures in the (Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg) level crossing problem. It is pointed out that weak and strong level crossing interactions are interchanged under this transformation, and thus realizing a naive strong and weak duality. A reliable perturbation theory is thus formulated in the both limits of weak and strong interactions. Main characteristics of the level crossing phenomena such as the Landau-Zener formula including its numerical coefficient are well-described by simple perturbation theory without referring to Stokes phenomena. We also show that quantum coherence in a double well potential is generally suppressed by the effect of level crossing, which is analogous to the effect of Ohmic dissipation on quantum coherence.

  19. Diabatic and Adiabatic Collective Motion in a Model Pairing System

    CERN Document Server

    Nakatsukasa, T; Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Walet, Niels R.

    1998-01-01

    Large amplitude collective motion is investigated for a model pairing Hamiltonian containing an avoided level crossing. A classical theory of collective motion for the adiabatic limit is applied utilising either a time-dependent mean-field theory or a direct parametrisation of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. A modified local harmonic equation is formulated to take account of the Nambu-Goldstone mode. It turns out that in some cases the system selects a diabatic path. Requantizing the collective Hamiltonian, a reasonable agreement with an exact calculation for the low-lying levels are obtained for both weak and strong pairing force. This improves on results of the conventional Born-Oppenheimer approximation.

  20. Adiabaticity and gravity theory independent conservation laws for cosmological perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Enea Romano

    2016-04-01

    We then consider an example in which cw=cs, where δPnad=δPc,nad=0 exactly, but the equivalence between Rc and ζ no longer holds. Namely we consider the so-called ultra slow-roll inflation. In this case both Rc and ζ are not conserved. In particular, as for ζ, we find that it is crucial to take into account the next-to-leading order term in ζ's spatial gradient expansion to show its non-conservation, even on superhorizon scales. This is an example of the fact that adiabaticity (in the thermodynamic sense is not always enough to ensure the conservation of Rc or ζ.

  1. Reversibility and Adiabatic Computation Trading Time and Space for Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Maozhen; Li, Ming; Vitanyi, Paul

    1996-01-01

    Future miniaturization and mobilization of computing devices requires energy parsimonious `adiabatic' computation. This is contingent on logical reversibility of computation. An example is the idea of quantum computations which are reversible except for the irreversible observation steps. We propose to study quantitatively the exchange of computational resources like time and space for irreversibility in computations. Reversible simulations of irreversible computations are memory intensive. Such (polynomial time) simulations are analysed here in terms of `reversible' pebble games. We show that Bennett's pebbling strategy uses least additional space for the greatest number of simulated steps. We derive a trade-off for storage space versus irreversible erasure. Next we consider reversible computation itself. An alternative proof is provided for the precise expression of the ultimate irreversibility cost of an otherwise reversible computation without restrictions on time and space use. A time-irreversibility tra...

  2. Optical waveguide device with an adiabatically-varying width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts; Michael R. , Nielson; Gregory N.

    2011-05-10

    Optical waveguide devices are disclosed which utilize an optical waveguide having a waveguide bend therein with a width that varies adiabatically between a minimum value and a maximum value of the width. One or more connecting members can be attached to the waveguide bend near the maximum value of the width thereof to support the waveguide bend or to supply electrical power to an impurity-doped region located within the waveguide bend near the maximum value of the width. The impurity-doped region can form an electrical heater or a semiconductor junction which can be activated with a voltage to provide a variable optical path length in the optical waveguide. The optical waveguide devices can be used to form a tunable interferometer (e.g. a Mach-Zehnder interferometer) which can be used for optical modulation or switching. The optical waveguide devices can also be used to form an optical delay line.

  3. Adiabatic pumping of Chern-Simons axion coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherinejad, Maryam; Vanderbilt, David

    2015-03-06

    We study the adiabatic pumping of the Chern-Simons axion (CSA) coupling along a parametric loop characterized by a nonzero second Chern number C^{(2)} from the viewpoint of the hybrid Wannier representation, in which the Wannier charge centers are visualized as sheets defined over a projected 2D Brillouin zone. We derive a new formula for the CSA coupling, expressing it as an integral involving Berry curvatures and potentials defined on the Wannier charge center sheets. We show that a loop characterized by a nonzero C^{(2)} requires a series of sheet-touching events at which 2π quanta of Berry curvature are passed from sheet to sheet, in such a way that e^{2}/h units of CSA coupling are pumped by a lattice vector by the end of the cycle. We illustrate these behaviors via explicit calculations on a model tight-binding Hamiltonian and discuss their implications.

  4. Diffusion of the adiabatic invariant for modulated symplectic maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazzani, A.; Brini, F.; Turchetti, G. [University of Bologna, INFN sezione di Bologna via Irnerio n.46, I-40126 Bologna (Italy)

    1997-02-01

    We consider the diffusion of the orbits due to a slow modulation of a parameter in an almost integrable symplectic map. This phenomenon (modulational diffusion) is relevant for the stability of the betatronic motion when the ripples are present in the feeding currents of the magnets. In the limit of a slow periodic modulation when the theory of Neishtadt applies, the diffusion takes place in the region swept by a nonlinear resonance and a random walk is defined in the space of the adiabatic invariant. The effect of the boundaries is reproduced by introducing an absorbing boundary condition (dynamical aperture) or a reflecting boundary condition. The analytical result for the action distribution function reproduces very well the numerical distribution function both when the diffusion takes place in a bounded region and when the orbits reach the dynamical aperture. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Yang-Mills moduli space in the adiabatic limit

    CERN Document Server

    Lechtenfeld, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    We consider the Yang-Mills equations for a matrix gauge group $G$ inside the future light cone of 4-dimensional Minkowski space, which can be viewed as a Lorentzian cone $C(H^3)$ over the 3-dimensional hyperbolic space $H^3$. Using the conformal equivalence of $C(H^3)$ and the cylinder $R\\times H^3$, we show that, in the adiabatic limit when the metric on $H^3$ is scaled down, classical Yang-Mills dynamics is described by geodesic motion in the infinite-dimensional group manifold $C^\\infty (S^2_\\infty,G)$ of smooth maps from the boundary 2-sphere $S^2_\\infty=\\partial H^3$ into the gauge group $G$.

  6. Properties of a two stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, H.; Ueda, S.; Arai, R.; Li, J.; Saito, A. T.; Nakagome, H.; Numazawa, T.

    2015-12-01

    Currently, many space missions using cryogenic temperatures are being planned. In particular, high resolution sensors such as Transition Edge Sensors need very low temperatures, below 100 mK. It is well known that the adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) is one of most useful tools for producing ultra-low temperatures in space because it is gravity independent. We studied a continuous ADR system consisting of 4 stages and demonstrated it could provide continuous temperatures around 100 mK. However, there was some heat leakage from the power leads which resulted in reduced cooling power. Our efforts to upgrade our ADR system are presented. We show the effect of using the HTS power leads and discuss a cascaded Carnot cycle consisting of 2 ADR units.

  7. Influence of coherent adiabatic excitation on femtosecond transient signals

    CERN Document Server

    Conde, A Peralta; Longarte, A

    2016-01-01

    The transient signals derived from femtosecond pump-probe experiments are analyzed in terms of the coherent evolution of the energy levels perturbed by the excitation pulse. The model system is treated as the sum of independent two-level subsystems that evolve adiabatically or are permanently excited, depending on the detuning from the central wavelength of the excitation laser. This approach will allow us to explain numerically and analytically the convergence between the coherent and incoherent (rate equations) treatments for complex multi-level systems. It will be also shown that the parameter that determines the validity of the incoherent treatment is the distribution of states outside and inside the laser bandwidth, rather than the density of states as it is commonly accepted.

  8. Adiabatic quantum pump in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon junction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张林

    2015-01-01

    The adiabatic electron transport is theoretically studied in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) junction with two time-dependent pumping electric fields. By modeling a ZGNR p–n junction and applying the Keldysh Green’s function method, we find that a pumped charge current is flowing in the device at a zero external bias, which mainly comes from the photon-assisted tunneling process and the valley selection rule in an even-chain ZGNR junction. The pumped charge current and its ON and OFF states can be efficiently modulated by changing the system parameters such as the pumping frequency, the pumping phase difference, and the Fermi level. A ferromagnetic ZGNR device is also studied to generate a pure spin current and a fully polarized spin current due to the combined spin pump effect and the valley valve effect. Our finding might pave the way to manipulate the degree of freedom of electrons in a graphene-based electronic device.

  9. Adiabatic Dynamics of Edge Waves in Photonic Graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Ablowitz, M J; Ma, Y -P

    2014-01-01

    The propagation of localized edge modes in photonic honeycomb lattices, formed from an array of adiabatically varying periodic helical waveguides, is considered. Asymptotic analysis leads to an explicit description of the underlying dynamics. Depending on parameters, edge states can exist over an entire period or only part of a period; in the latter case an edge mode can effectively disintegrate and scatter into the bulk. In the presence of nonlinearity, a `time'-dependent one-dimensional nonlinear Schr\\"odinger (NLS) equation describes the envelope dynamics of edge modes. When the average of the `time varying' coefficients yields a focusing NLS equation, soliton propagation is exhibited. For both linear and nonlinear systems, certain long lived traveling modes with minimal backscattering are found; they exhibit properties of topologically protected states.

  10. Cosmological consequences of an adiabatic matter creation process

    CERN Document Server

    Nunes, Rafael C

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the cosmological consequences of a continuous matter creation associated with the production of particles by the gravitational field acting on the quantum vacuum. To illustrate this, three phenomenological models are considered. An equivalent scalar field description is presented for each models. The effects on the cosmic microwave background power spectrum are analyzed for the first time in the context of adiabatic matter creation cosmology. Further, we introduce a model independent treatment, $Om$, which depends only on the Hubble expansion rate and the cosmological redshift to distinguish any cosmological model from $\\Lambda$CDM by providing a null test for the cosmological constant, meaning that, for any two redshifts $z_1$, $z_2$, $Om (z)$ is same, i.e. $Om (z_1)- Om (z_2)= 0$. Also, this diagnostic can differentiate between several cosmological models by indicating their quintessential/ phantom behavior without knowing the accurate value of the matter density, and the presen...

  11. A Random Matrix Model of Adiabatic Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, D R; Lue, W; Williams, C P; Mitchell, David R.; Adami, Christoph; Lue, Waynn; Williams, Colin P.

    2004-01-01

    We present an analysis of the quantum adiabatic algorithm for solving hard instances of 3-SAT (an NP-complete problem) in terms of Random Matrix Theory (RMT). We determine the global regularity of the spectral fluctuations of the instantaneous Hamiltonians encountered during the interpolation between the starting Hamiltonians and the ones whose ground states encode the solutions to the computational problems of interest. At each interpolation point, we quantify the degree of regularity of the average spectral distribution via its Brody parameter, a measure that distinguishes regular (i.e., Poissonian) from chaotic (i.e., Wigner-type) distributions of normalized nearest-neighbor spacings. We find that for hard problem instances, i.e., those having a critical ratio of clauses to variables, the spectral fluctuations typically become irregular across a contiguous region of the interpolation parameter, while the spectrum is regular for easy instances. Within the hard region, RMT may be applied to obtain a mathemat...

  12. Adiabatic approximation for the Rabi model with broken inversion symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li-Tuo; Yang, Zhen-Biao; Wu, Huai-Zhi

    2017-01-01

    We study the properties and behavior of the Rabi model with broken inversion symmetry. Using an adiabatic approximation approach, we explore the high-frequency qubit and oscillator regimes, and obtain analytical solutions for the qubit-oscillator system. We demonstrate that, due to broken inversion symmetry, the positions of two potentials and zero-point energies in the oscillators become asymmetric and have a quadratic dependence on the mean dipole moments within the high-frequency oscillator regime. Furthermore, we find that there is a critical point above which the qubit-oscillator system becomes unstable, and the position of this critical point has a quadratic dependence on the mean dipole moments within the high-frequency qubit regime. Finally, we verify this critical point based on the method of semiclassical approximation.

  13. Hydroxylamine nitrate self-catalytic kinetics study with adiabatic calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijun; Wei, Chunyang; Guo, Yuyan; Rogers, William J; Sam Mannan, M

    2009-03-15

    Hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) is an important member of the hydroxylamine compound family with applications that include equipment decontamination in the nuclear industry and aqueous or solid propellants. Due to its instability and autocatalytic behavior, HAN has been involved in several incidents at the Hanford and Savannah River Site (SRS) [Technical Report on Hydroxylamine Nitrate, US Department of Energy, 1998]. Much research has been conducted on HAN in different areas, such as combustion mechanism, decomposition mechanism, and runaway behavior. However, the autocatalytic decomposition behavior of HAN at runaway stage has not been fully addressed due to its highly exothermic and rapid decomposition behavior. This work is focused on extracting HAN autocatalytic kinetics and analyzing HAN critical behavior from adiabatic calorimetry measurements. A lumped autocatalytic kinetic model for HAN and associated model parameters are determined. Also the storage and handling critical conditions of diluted HAN solution without metal presence are quantified.

  14. Adiabatic Floquet model for the optical response in femtosecond filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The standard model of femtosecond filamentation is based on phenomenological assumptions which suggest that the ionization-induced carriers can be treated as free according to the Drude model, while the nonlinear response of the bound carriers follows the all-optical Kerr effect. Here, we demonstrate that the additional plasma generated at a multiphoton resonance dominates the saturation of the nonlinear refractive index. Since resonances are not captured by the standard model, we propose a modification of the latter in which ionization enhancements can be accounted for by an ionization rate obtained from non-Hermitian Floquet theory. In the adiabatic regime of long pulse envelopes, this augmented standard model is in excellent agreement with direct quantum mechanical simulations. Since our proposal maintains the structure of the standard model, it can be easily incorporated into existing codes of filament simulation.

  15. On the adiabatic ionization energy of the propargyl radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacovella, U.; Gans, B.; Merkt, F.

    2013-08-01

    The photoionization and pulsed-field-ionization zero-kinetic-energy photoelectron spectra of the propargyl radical have been recorded in the vicinity of the origin of the tilde{X}^+ ^1A_1 leftarrow tilde{X} ^2B_1 photoionizing transition. An internally cold sample of propargyl with a rotational temperature of ˜45 K was produced in a supersonic expansion of 1,3-butadiene in helium. Propargyl was generated by excimer laser (ArF, 193 nm) photolysis of 1,3-butadiene in a quartz capillary mounted at the exit of a pulsed valve. The rotational structure of the origin band of the photoelectron spectrum was partially resolved and an improved value of the adiabatic ionization energy of propargyl (EI/hc = 70174.5(20) cm-1) was determined.

  16. Effect of Poisson noise on adiabatic quantum control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, A.; Muga, J. G.; Ruschhaupt, A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a detailed derivation of the master equation describing a general time-dependent quantum system with classical Poisson white noise and outline its various properties. We discuss the limiting cases of Poisson white noise and provide approximations for the different noise strength regimes. We show that using the eigenstates of the noise superoperator as a basis can be a useful way of expressing the master equation. Using this, we simulate various settings to illustrate different effects of Poisson noise. In particular, we show a dip in the fidelity as a function of noise strength where high fidelity can occur in the strong-noise regime for some cases. We also investigate recent claims [J. Jing et al., Phys. Rev. A 89, 032110 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.89.032110] that this type of noise may improve rather than destroy adiabaticity.

  17. Adiabatic Cooling for Rovibrational Spectroscopy of Molecular Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, Karin

    2017-01-01

    The field of cold molecular ions is a fast growing one, with applications in high resolution spectroscopy and metrology, the search for time variations of fundamental constants, cold chemistry and collisions, and quantum information processing, to name a few. The study of single molecular ions...... is attractive as it enables one to push the limits of spectroscopic accuracy. Non-destructive spectroscopic detection of molecular ions can be achieved by co-trapping with an easier to detect atomic ion. The ion chain has coupled motion, and transitions which change both the internal and motional states...... to the measured heating rates, almost perfectly fitting existing heating rate theory. Further, the same model successfully predicted the heating rates of the in-phase mode of a two-ion crystal, indicating that we can use it to predict the heating rates in experiments on molecule-atom chains. Adiabatic cooling...

  18. Filtering of matter wave vibrational states via spatial adiabatic passage

    CERN Document Server

    Loiko, Yu; Corbalán, R; Birkl, G; Mompart, J; 10.1103/PhysRevA.83.033629

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the filtering of the vibrational states of a cold atom in an optical trap, by chaining this trap with two empty ones and controlling adiabatically the tunneling. Matter wave filtering is performed by selectively transferring the population of the highest populated vibrational state to the most distant trap while the population of the rest of the states remains in the initial trap. Analytical conditions for two-state filtering are derived and then applied to an arbitrary number of populated bound states. Realistic numerical simulations close to state-of-the-art experimental arrangements are performed by modeling the triple well with time dependent P\\"oschl-Teller potentials. In addition to filtering of vibrational states, we discuss applications for quantum tomography of the initial population distribution and engineering of atomic Fock states that, eventually, could be used for tunneling assisted evaporative cooling.

  19. Differential geometric treewidth estimation in adiabatic quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi; Jonckheere, Edmond; Brun, Todd

    2016-10-01

    The D-Wave adiabatic quantum computing platform is designed to solve a particular class of problems—the Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) problems. Due to the particular "Chimera" physical architecture of the D-Wave chip, the logical problem graph at hand needs an extra process called minor embedding in order to be solvable on the D-Wave architecture. The latter problem is itself NP-hard. In this paper, we propose a novel polynomial-time approximation to the closely related treewidth based on the differential geometric concept of Ollivier-Ricci curvature. The latter runs in polynomial time and thus could significantly reduce the overall complexity of determining whether a QUBO problem is minor embeddable, and thus solvable on the D-Wave architecture.

  20. Adiabatic pumping solutions in global AdS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carracedo, Pablo; Mas, Javier; Musso, Daniele; Serantes, Alexandre

    2017-05-01

    We construct a family of very simple stationary solutions to gravity coupled to a massless scalar field in global AdS. They involve a constantly rising source for the scalar field at the boundary and thereby we name them pumping solutions. We construct them numerically in D = 4. They are regular and, generically, have negative mass. We perform a study of linear and nonlinear stability and find both stable and unstable branches. In the latter case, solutions belonging to different sub-branches can either decay to black holes or to limiting cycles. This observation motivates the search for non-stationary exactly timeperiodic solutions which we actually construct. We clarify the role of pumping solutions in the context of quasistatic adiabatic quenches. In D = 3 the pumping solutions can be related to other previously known solutions, like magnetic or translationally-breaking backgrounds. From this we derive an analytic expression.

  1. Wigner phase space distribution via classical adiabatic switching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Amartya [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, 600 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Makri, Nancy [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, 600 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois, 1110 W. Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    Evaluation of the Wigner phase space density for systems of many degrees of freedom presents an extremely demanding task because of the oscillatory nature of the Fourier-type integral. We propose a simple and efficient, approximate procedure for generating the Wigner distribution that avoids the computational difficulties associated with the Wigner transform. Starting from a suitable zeroth-order Hamiltonian, for which the Wigner density is available (either analytically or numerically), the phase space distribution is propagated in time via classical trajectories, while the perturbation is gradually switched on. According to the classical adiabatic theorem, each trajectory maintains a constant action if the perturbation is switched on infinitely slowly. We show that the adiabatic switching procedure produces the exact Wigner density for harmonic oscillator eigenstates and also for eigenstates of anharmonic Hamiltonians within the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation. We generalize the approach to finite temperature by introducing a density rescaling factor that depends on the energy of each trajectory. Time-dependent properties are obtained simply by continuing the integration of each trajectory under the full target Hamiltonian. Further, by construction, the generated approximate Wigner distribution is invariant under classical propagation, and thus, thermodynamic properties are strictly preserved. Numerical tests on one-dimensional and dissipative systems indicate that the method produces results in very good agreement with those obtained by full quantum mechanical methods over a wide temperature range. The method is simple and efficient, as it requires no input besides the force fields required for classical trajectory integration, and is ideal for use in quasiclassical trajectory calculations.

  2. Simulation of a multi-stage adiabatic reactor with inter-stage quenching for dimethyl ether synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Ziyang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adiabatic fixed-bed reactor has proven commercially successful in large scale production of catalytic dehydration of methanol to dimethyl ether. A one dimensional pseudo-homogeneous model of an industrial reactor of dimethyl ether synthesis has been established. To verify the proposed model, the simulation results have been compared to available data from an industrial reactor. A good agreement has been found between them. The distribution of the catalyst bed temperature and concentration of each component was obtained under conditions of inlet temperature 260°C, reaction pressure 1.2MPa and gaseous hourly space velocity 950.7 h-1. With inlet catalyst bed temperature 240-280°C, operating pressure 0.6-1.8MPa and gaseous hourly space velocity 831.8-1069.5 h-1, the influence of these reaction conditions on temperature distribution of the reactor catalytic bed, outlet methanol conversion and the dimethyl ether yield were calculated. The results show that, with the rise of inlet temperature (240-280°C and operating pressure (0.6-1.8MPa, the outlet conversion of methanol, the hot spot temperature and the DME yield increased. The increase of gaseous hourly space velocity (831.8-1069.5 h-1 leads to a decrease in the hot spot temperature of catalytic bed and the outlet conversion of methanol. But the DME yield rise initially and then descend.

  3. Assignment of Side-Chain Conformation Using Adiabatic Energy Mapping, Free Energy Perturbation, and Molecular Dynamic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimurer, Thomas M.; Günther, Peter H.; Sørensen, Morten Dahl

    1999-01-01

    adiabatic mapping, conformational change, essentialdynamics, free energy simulations, Kunitz type inhibitor *ga3(VI)......adiabatic mapping, conformational change, essentialdynamics, free energy simulations, Kunitz type inhibitor *ga3(VI)...

  4. Hair dryer burns in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, P R

    1990-11-01

    Three children with burn injuries caused by home hair dryers are described. In one patient the injury was believed to be accidental, and in the other two cases the injuries were deliberately caused by a caretaker. The lack of prior experience with hair dryer burns initially led to suspicion of other causes. The characteristics of each case aided in the final determination of accidental vs nonaccidental injury. These cases prompted testing of home hair dryers to determine their heat output. At the highest heat settings, the dryers rapidly generated temperatures in excess of 110 degrees C. After the dryers were turned off, the protective grills maintained sufficient temperatures to cause full-thickness burns for up to 2 minutes. These cases and the results of testing demonstrate that hair dryers must be added to the list of known causes of accidental and nonaccidental burns in children.

  5. The Burning Truth(s)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pathophysiology caused by a severe burn is complicated and involves changes in all ... The interstitial pressure and intravascular oncotic pressures decrease while the ... South African Family Practice 2014; 56(6):24-26. Open Access ...

  6. Chemistry of Cigarette Burning Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen P

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette-burning and the smoke-formation processes and smoke composition are important topics for understanding cigarette performance. This paper proposes the molecular formulas representing the active components of bright, burley, and Oriental tobaccos and a basic chemistry model of the cigarette burning processes. Previous knowledge of the cigarette burning processes and smoke formation helped to establish parameters in deriving the basic chemistry equations. The proposed chemistry provides a brief view of the mechanisms of the cigarette burning during puffing and interpuff smoldering, and can be used to interpret and predict the smoke composition for cigarettes made from bright, burley, and Oriental tobaccos. Based on the proposed chemistry, the effect of ventilation on smoke component deliveries is discussed and the reaction heat of the puffing process is estimated.

  7. Burns, hypertrophic scar and galactorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Hamid; Nourizad, Samad; Momeni, Mahnoush; Rahbar, Hosein; Momeni, Mazdak; Farhadi, Khosro

    2013-07-01

    An 18-year-old woman was admitted to Motahari Burn Center suffering from 30% burns. Treatment modalities were carried out for the patient and she was discharged after 20 days. Three to four months later she developed hypertrophic scar on her chest and upper limbs. At the same time she developed galactorrhea in both breasts and had a disturbed menstrual cycle four months post-burn. On investigation, we found hyperprolactinemia and no other reasons for the high level of prolactin were detected.She received treatment for both the hypertrophic scar and the severe itching she was experiencing. After seven months, her prolactin level had decreased but had not returned to the normal level. It seems that refractory hypertrophic scar is related to the high level of prolactin in burns patients.

  8. Burns, hypertrophic scar and galactorrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Karimi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available An 18-year old woman was admitted to Motahari Burn Center suffering from 30% burns. Treatment modalities were carried out for the patient and she was discharged after 20 days. Three to four months later she developed hypertrophic scar on her chest and upper limbs .At the same time she developed galactorrhea in both breasts and had a disturbed menstrual cycle four months post-burn. On investigation, we found hyperprolactinemia and no other reasons for the high level of prolactin were detected. She received treatment for both the hypertrophic scar and the severe itching she was experiencing. After seven months, her prolactin level had decreased but had not returned to the normal level. It seems that refractory hypertrophic scar is related to the high level of prolactin in burns patients.

  9. Regimes Of Helium Burning

    CERN Document Server

    Timmes, F X

    2000-01-01

    The burning regimes encountered by laminar deflagrations and ZND detonations propagating through helium-rich compositions in the presence of buoyancy-driven turbulence are analyzed. Particular attention is given to models of X-ray bursts which start with a thermonuclear runaway on the surface of a neutron star, and the thin shell helium instability of intermediate-mass stars. In the X-ray burst case, turbulent deflagrations propagating in the lateral or radial directions encounter a transition from the distributed regime to the flamlet regime at a density of 10^8 g cm^{-3}. In the radial direction, the purely laminar deflagration width is larger than the pressure scale height for densities smaller than 10^6 g cm^{-3}. Self-sustained laminar deflagrations travelling in the radial direction cannot exist below this density. Similarily, the planar ZND detonation width becomes larger than the pressure scale height at 10^7 g cm^{-3}, suggesting that a steady-state, self-sustained detonations cannot come into exista...

  10. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...

  11. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...

  12. Corneal Protection for Burn Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Amniotic Membrane for the Treatment of Severe Exposure Keratopathy in the New Zealand White Rabbit Introduction: Patients with severe facial burns...often suffer indirect damage to their eyes as a sequela of ocular surface exposure keratopathy. Burn wound contracture of the periocular skin causes...inflammatory properties, amniotic membrane has developed into a mainstay of treatment to help maintain the ocular surface when skin grafting is delayed

  13. Treatment of Palm Burns in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Argirova, M.; Hadzhiyski, O.

    2005-01-01

    The timing and methods of treatment of palm burns in children vary widely. From January 2002 to November 2004, 492 children with burns - 125 of them with hand burns or other body burns - were hospitalized and treated at the N.I. Pirogov Clinic for Burns and Plastic Surgery in Bulgaria. Fifty-four children (for a total of 73 burned hands) presented isolated palm burns.Twenty-two hands were operated on. In this review we present the incidence, causes, treatment methods, functional results, and ...

  14. Theoretical description of adiabatic laser alignment and mixed-field orientation: the need for a non-adiabatic model

    CERN Document Server

    Omiste, J J; Schmelcher, P; González-Férez, R; Holmegaard, L; Nielsen, J H; Stapelfeldt, H; Küpper, J

    2011-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of recent laser-alignment and mixed-field-orientation experiments of asymmetric top molecules. In these experiments, pendular states were created using linearly polarized strong ac electric fields from pulsed lasers in combination with weak electrostatic fields. We compare the outcome of our calculations with experimental results obtained for the prototypical large molecule benzonitrile (C$_7$H$_5$N) [J.L. Hansen et al, Phys. Rev. A, 83, 023406 (2011)] and explore the directional properties of the molecular ensemble for several field configurations, i.e., for various field strengths and angles between ac and dc fields. For perpendicular fields one obtains pure alignment, which is well reproduced by the simulations. For tilted fields, we show that a fully adiabatic description of the process does not reproduce the experimentally observed orientation, and it is mandatory to use a diabatic model for population transfer between rotational states. We develop such a model and compare ...

  15. Chemical and Common Burns in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shan

    2017-05-01

    Burns are a common cause of preventable morbidity and mortality in children. Thermal and chemical burns are the most common types of burns. Their clinical appearance can be similar and the treatment is largely similar. Thermal burns in children occur primarily after exposure to a hot surface or liquid, or contact with fire. Burns are typically classified based on the depth and total body surface area, and the severity and onset of the burn can also depend on the temperature and duration of contact. Chemical burns are caused by chemicals-most commonly acids and alkalis-that can damage the skin on contact. In children, the most common cause of chemical burns is from household products such as toilet bowl cleaners, drain cleaners, detergents, and bleaches. Mild chemical burns generally cause redness and pain and can look similar to other common rashes or skin infections, whereas severe chemical burns are more extreme and may cause redness, blistering, skin peeling, and swelling.

  16. Burn treatment in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, M; Lumenta, D B; Andel, H; Kamolz, L P; Frey, M

    2009-12-01

    The population of elderly patients is expected to rise continuously over the next decades due to global demographic changes. The elderly seem to be most vulnerable to burns and their management remains undoubtedly a challenge. A clear age margin for elderly patients is not yet defined, but most studies adhere to the inclusion of patients 65 years and above, but the general condition and social situation must be taken into account. The understanding of the physiological basis of aging and its related pathophysiological changes has only marginally influenced treatment and decision making in elderly burn patients. When looking at treatment regimens currently applied in elderly burn patients, the discussion of standards in intensive care as well as surgical strategies is ongoing. However, trends towards a moderate, non-aggressive resuscitation approach and careful inclusion of key parameters like physiological age, pre-burn functional status and premorbid conditions, seem to be useful guidelines for interdisciplinary treatment decisions. Once ordered for surgical treatment, the amount of body surface area operated in one session should be adapted to the general status of the patient. Even if older burn victims have a reported higher mortality rate than younger patients, improved therapeutic options have contributed to a reduced mortality rate even in the elderly over the last decades. As a result of improved outcome, more attention has to be given to a comprehensive rehabilitation program. This review will give an overview of the current literature and will draw attention to specific topics related to this important subpopulation of burn patients.

  17. DIFFERENTIATING PERIMORTEM AND POSTMORTEM BURNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahmaji Master

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most challenging cases in forensic medicine is ascertaining the cause of death of burnt bodies under suspicious circumstances. The key questions that arise at the time of investigation include: 1  Was the person alive or dead prior to fire accident?  Did the victim die because of burn?  If death was not related to burns, could burns play a role in causing death?  Were the burns sustained accidentally, did the person commit suicide or was the person murdered?  Are the circumstances suggesting an attempt to conceal crime?  How was the fire started?  How was the victim identified?  In case of mass fatalities, who died first? Postmortem burning of corpses is supposed to be one of the ways to hide a crime. Differentiating the actual cause of death in burn patients is therefore important. Medical examiners usually focus on the defining the changes that occur in tissues while forensic anthropologists deal with the changes related to the bone with or without any the influence of other tissues. Under the circumstances of fire, differentiating the perimortem trauma from that of postmortem cause of bone fractures is vital in determining the cause and motive of death

  18. Iron metabolism in burned children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte, J A; Ibáñez, L; Ras, M R; Aulesa, C; Vinzo, J; Iglesias, J; Carol, J

    1999-07-01

    The administration of iron supplementation in children with burns has been a subject of controversy. Recent studies argue against its use in the acute phase of stress. To assess whether iron metabolism parameters show significant differences in the acute phase and the recovery phase of burn, 21 patients (age range: 17 months to 13 years) with burns of more than 10% of body surface who had not received blood transfusions or iron supplementation were studied. Sideraemia, ferritin, transferrin, transferrin saturation index (TSI) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were assessed both in the acute and the recovery phase after burn. Sideraemia, transferrin, and TSI were significantly lower in the acute than in the recovery phase (17.3 +/- 3 vs 53.8 +/- 6.6 microg/dL, 190.5 +/- 15 vs 287.9 +/- 14.3 mg/dL and 7.7 +/- 1.3 vs 15.4 +/- 1.6%, P 1.5 vs 0.7 +/- 0.2 mg/dL, P = 0.016 and P 2 years), the observed differences persisted. Hyposideraemia is a frequent finding in the acute phase of paediatric burns and is accompanied by increased ferritin levels and decreased transferrin concentrations. The low iron values tend to recover without the use of iron supplementation suggesting an endogenous block of iron release in the acute phase and indicates that iron therapy should be not recommended in the initial period of stress of the burned patient.

  19. Derivation and evaluation of an approximate analysis for three-dimensional viscous subsonic flow with large secondary velocities. [finite difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, O. L.; Briley, W. R.; Mcdonald, H.

    1978-01-01

    An approximate analysis is presented for calculating three-dimensional, low Mach number, laminar viscous flows in curved passages with large secondary flows and corner boundary layers. The analysis is based on the decomposition of the overall velocity field into inviscid and viscous components with the overall velocity being determined from superposition. An incompressible vorticity transport equation is used to estimate inviscid secondary flow velocities to be used as corrections to the potential flow velocity field. A parabolized streamwise momentum equation coupled to an adiabatic energy equation and global continuity equation is used to obtain an approximate viscous correction to the pressure and longitudinal velocity fields. A collateral flow assumption is invoked to estimate the viscous correction to the transverse velocity fields. The approximate analysis is solved numerically using an implicit ADI solution for the viscous pressure and velocity fields. An iterative ADI procedure is used to solve for the inviscid secondary vorticity and velocity fields. This method was applied to computing the flow within a turbine vane passage with inlet flow conditions of M = 0.1 and M = 0.25, Re = 1000 and adiabatic walls, and for a constant radius curved rectangular duct with R/D = 12 and 14 and with inlet flow conditions of M = 0.1, Re = 1000, and adiabatic walls.

  20. Burn Injury Arise From Flying Balloon Toys

    OpenAIRE

    Yalcin Kulahci; Fatih Zor; Mehmet Bozkurt; Serdar Ozturk; Mustafa Sengezer

    2007-01-01

    Many of peoples are faced minor or major burn injuries in their life. Even the most widespread burn cause is flame injuries, too different burn cause pointed out in literature like Acetylen burns. The cases which imply in literature, mostly causes from explosion of high pressure acetylene tube, metal oxygene patch flame or carbide lamp using from cave explorers. An interesting acetylene burn cause in Turkey was publised by the authors. This cases was to come into being from flying toy balloon...