WorldWideScience

Sample records for adhesive resin cement

  1. Statistical failure analysis of adhesive resin cement bonded dental ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yaou; Katsube, Noriko; Seghi, Robert R.; Rokhlin, Stanislav I.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this work is to quantitatively examine the effect of adhesive resin cement on the probability of crack initiation from the internal surface of ceramic dental restorations. The possible crack bridging mechanism and residual stress effect of the resin cement on the ceramic surface are examined. Based on the fracture-mechanics-based failure probability model, we predict the failure probability of glass-ceramic disks bonded to simulated dentin subjected to indentation loads. The theor...

  2. Simulated Wear of Self-Adhesive Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamizawa, T; Barkmeier, W W; Latta, M A; Berry, T P; Tsujimoto, A; Miyazaki, M

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary areas of concern with luting agents is marginal gap erosion and attrition. The purpose of this laboratory study was to evaluate bulk and marginal slit (gap) generalized wear of self-adhesive resin cements. Three self-adhesive resin cements were used in this study: G-CEM LinkAce (LA), Maxcem Elite (ME), and RelyX Unicem2 Automix (RU). A custom stainless-steel fixture with a cavity 4.5 mm in diameter and 4 mm deep was used for simulated generalized (bulk) wear. For simulated marginal gap wear, a two-piece stainless-steel custom fixture was designed with a slit (gap) 300 μm wide and 3 mm in length. For both wear models, 20 specimens each for each of the three adhesive cements were made for both light-cure and chemical-cure techniques. The cured cements were polished with a series of carbide papers to a 4000-grit surface and subjected to 100,000 cycles using the slit (gap) wear model and 400,000 cycles for generalized (bulk) wear in a Leinfelder-Suzuki (Alabama machine) wear simulator (maximum load of 78.5 N). Flat-ended stainless-steel antagonists were used in a water slurry of poly(methylmethacrylate) beads for simulation of generalized contact-free area wear with both wear models. Before and after the wear challenges, the specimens were profiled with a Proscan 2100 noncontact profilometer, and wear (volume loss [VL] and mean facet depth [FD]) was determined using AnSur 3D software. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc tests were used for data analysis for the two wear models. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine polished surfaces of the resin cements and the worn surfaces after the wear challenges. The two-way ANOVA of VL using the generalized (bulk) wear model showed a significant effect among the three resin cement materials for the factor of resin cement (p<0.001) and the interaction of the cement and cure method (p<0.001), but not for the cure method (p=0.465). The two-way ANOVA for FD also found a

  3. Effects of mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements on stress distribution in fiber-reinforced composite adhesive fixed partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Daiichiro; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Vallittu, Pekka K; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Using finite element analysis (FEA), this study investigated the effects of the mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements on stress distributions in fiber-reinforced resin composite (FRC) adhesive fixed partial dentures (AFPDs). Two adhesive resin cements were compared: Super-Bond C&B and Panavia Fluoro Cement. The AFPD consisted of a pontic to replace a maxillary right lateral incisor and retainers on a maxillary central incisor and canine. FRC framework was made of isotropic, continuous, unidirectional E-glass fibers. Maximum principal stresses were calculated using finite element method (FEM). Test results revealed that differences in the mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements led to different stress distributions at the cement interfaces between AFPD and abutment teeth. Clinical implication of these findings suggested that the safety and longevity of an AFPD depended on choosing an adhesive resin cement with the appropriate mechanical properties. PMID:22447051

  4. Retention of overdenture posts cemented with self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Mohamed Ezzat; El-Mowafy, Omar; Fenton, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of two self-adhesive resin cements on the retention of overdenture anchor posts after 30 days of aging in water. Forty caries-free human canines were randomly assigned to four test groups. Uni-Anchor posts were cemented to specimens in groups A and B with Breeze and Maxcem self-adhesive resin cements, respectively. In groups C and D, Fuji glass-ionomer cement and Fleck's zinc phosphate cement were used, respectively. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 30 days. Each specimen was loaded in tension in an Instron universal testing machine. The maximum force required to dislodge each post was recorded. Means and standard deviations (SDs) were calculated and data were statistically analyzed with analysis of variance (ANOVA). Means and SDs were 706.5 +/- 204.6 N for Breeze, 585.1 +/- 213.5 N for Maxcem, 449.2 +/- 181.1 N for Fuji, and 330.4 +/- 120.6 N for Fleck's. ANOVA revealed significant differences among the means (P < .0003). Adhesive failure was observed with all groups except group A, in which eight specimens underwent a cohesive fracture of the dentin. Breeze cement (group A) resulted in the highest retention force and most frequent cohesive failure and thus would be expected to clinically perform in a superior manner.

  5. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Material and Methods Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Results Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (p0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. Conclusions The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Key words:Bond strength, self-adhesive cement, silane, dentin, indirect composite. PMID:26855700

  6. Does hybridized dentin affect bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Valle, Accácio-Lins; de Andrade, Gustavo-Henrique-Barbosa; Vidotti, Hugo-Alberto; Só, Marcus-Vinícius-Reis; Pereira, Jefferson-Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Evaluate the influence of different hybridization bonding techniques of a self-adhesive resin cement. Material and Methods 30 human health molars were divided into six groups (n=10). The specimens received three longitudinal sections, allowing insertion of central cuts in PVC matrices. Each group received a different dentin pretreatment according to the manufacturer’s recommendations, except the control group (G1), as follows. G2 - a 3-step total-etch adhesive system (Optibond™ FL, Kerr); G3 - a 3-step total-etch adhesive system (Adper™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE); G4 - a 2-step total-etch adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE); G5 - a single-step self-etching system (Bond Force, Tokuyama); and G6 - universal bonding system (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then, cylinders made of self-adhesive resin cement with polypropylene matrix was cemented in all groups (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). Bond strength was assessed by submitting the specimens to micro-shear test and was characterized according to the fracture pattern observed through optical microscopy. Results The results were submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis test, which indicated a statistically significant difference between the groups (p=0.04), and Tukey’s multiple comparisons, which indicated a statistically significant difference between G1 and G3 (pcement, especially when used Adper™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose system. Key words:Bonding, self-adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:27703609

  7. Comparative Shear-Bond Strength of Six Dental Self-Adhesive Resin Cements to Zirconia

    OpenAIRE

    Si-Eun Lee; Ji-Hyeon Bae; Jae-Won Choi; Yong-Chan Jeon; Chang-Mo Jeong; Mi-Jung Yoon; Jung-Bo Huh

    2015-01-01

    This study compared shear bond strength (SBS) of six self-adhesive resin cements (SARC) and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) to zirconia before and after thermocycling. The cylinder shape (Φ 2.35 mm × 3 mm) of six SARCs (G-CEM LinkAce (GLA), Maxcem Elite (MAX), Clearfil SA Luting (CSL), PermaCem 2.0 (PM2), Rely-X U200 (RXU), Smartcem 2 (SC2)) were bonded to the top surface of the zirconia specimens with light-curing. RMGIC (Fujicem (FJC)) was bonded to the specimens with self-c...

  8. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cafer Türkmen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group: direct composite resin restoration (Alert with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive, Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia luted with a resin cement (Cement-It combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond, Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. RESULTS: The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7 showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05. The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. CONCLUSION: The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces.

  9. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    TÜRKMEN, Cafer; DURKAN, Meral; CİMİLLİ, Hale; ÖKSÜZ, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. Material and Methods Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group): direct composite resin restoration (Alert) with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive), Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia) luted with a resin cement (Cement-It) combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond), Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively) onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. Results The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7) showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05). The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. Conclusion The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces. PMID:21710095

  10. Comparative Shear-Bond Strength of Six Dental Self-Adhesive Resin Cements to Zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Eun Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compared shear bond strength (SBS of six self-adhesive resin cements (SARC and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC to zirconia before and after thermocycling. The cylinder shape (Φ 2.35 mm × 3 mm of six SARCs (G-CEM LinkAce (GLA, Maxcem Elite (MAX, Clearfil SA Luting (CSL, PermaCem 2.0 (PM2, Rely-X U200 (RXU, Smartcem 2 (SC2 were bonded to the top surface of the zirconia specimens with light-curing. RMGIC (Fujicem (FJC was bonded to the specimens with self-curing. The shear bond strength of all cemented specimens was measured with universal testing machine. Half of the specimens were thermocycled 5000 times before shear bonding strength testing. Fractured surfaces were examined with a field-emission SEM (10,000× and analyzed by energy dispersive x-ray analysis. MAX, PM2, SC2 group without thermocycling and GLA, MAX, PM2 group with thermocycling showed adhesive failure, but GLA, CSL, RXU, FJC group without thermocycling and SLC, RXU, SC2, FJC group with thermocycling indicated cohesive failure. Within the limitation of this study, All of SARCs except MAX demonstrated higher bond strength than that of RMGIC regardless of thermocycling. Also, SARC containing MDP monomers (CSL retained better bonds than other cements.

  11. In-vitro evaluation of an experimental method for bonding of orthodontic brackets with self-adhesive resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barat Ali Ramazanzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-adhesive resin cements do not require the surface treatment of teeth and are said to release fluoride, which makes them suitable candidates for bonding of orthodontic brackets. The objectives of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS of self-adhesive resin cements on etched on non-etched surfaces in vitro and to assess their fluoride release features. Materials and Methods: Four fluoride-releasing dual-cure self-adhesive resin cements were investigated. For SBS experiment, 135 freshly extracted human maxillary premolars were used and divided into nine groups of 15 teeth. In the control group, brackets were cemented by Transbond XT (3M Unitek, USA, in four groups self-adhesive resin cements were used without acid-etching and in four groups self-adhesive cements were applied on acid-etched surfaces and the brackets were then deboned in shear with a testing machine. Adhesive remnant index (ARI scores were also calculated. For fluoride release investigation, 6 discs were prepared for each self-adhesive cement. Transbond XT and Fuji Ortho LC (GC, Japan served as negative and positive control groups, respectively. The fluoride release of each disc into 5 ml of de-ionized water was measured at days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 56 using a fluoride ion-selective electrode connected to an ion analyzer. To prevent cumulative measurements, the storage solutions were changed daily. Results: The SBS of brackets cemented with Transbond XT were significantly higher compared to self-adhesives applied on non-etched surfaces (P<0.001. However, when the self-adhesive resin cements were used with enamel etching, no significant differences was found in the SBS compared to Transbond XT, except for Breeze. The comparisons of the ARI scores indicated that bracket failure modes were significantly different between the etched and non-etched groups. All self-adhesive cements released clinically sufficient amounts of fluoride for an extended

  12. Adhesion of 10-MDP containing resin cements to dentin with and without the etch-and-rinse technique

    OpenAIRE

    Volkan TURP; Sen, Deniz; Tuncelli, Betul; Özcan, Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study evaluated the adhesion of 10-MDP containing self-etch and self-adhesive resin cements to dentin with and without the use of etch-and-rinse technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS Human third molars (N=180) were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=30 per group). Conventional (Panavia F2.0, Kuraray-PAN) and self-adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA, Kuraray-CSA) were bonded to dentin surfaces either after application of 3-step etch-and-rinse (35% H3PO4 + ED Primer) or two-step self-etc...

  13. Effects of etching and adhesive applications on the bond strength between composite resin and glass-ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijen Pamir

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study determined the effects of various surface treatment modalities on the bond strength of composite resins to glass-ionomer cements. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Conventional (KetacTM Molar Quick ApplicapTM or resin-modified (PhotacTM Fil Quick AplicapTM glass-ionomer cements were prepared. Two-step etch-rinse & bond adhesive (AdperTM Single Bond 2 or single-step self-etching adhesive (AdperTM PromptTM L-PopTM was applied to the set cements. In the etch-rinse & bond group, the sample surfaces were pre-treated as follows: (1 no etching, (2 15 s of etching with 35% phosphoric acid, (3 30 s of etching, and (4 60 s of etching. Following the placement of the composite resin (FiltekTM Z250, the bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine and the data obtained were analyzed with the two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by the Tukey's HSD post hoc analysis (p=0.05. Then, the fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: The bond strength of the composite resin to the conventional glass-ionomer cement was significantly lower than that to the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (p0.05. However, a greater bond strength was obtained with 30 s of phosphoric acid application. CONCLUSIONS: The resin-modified glass-ionomer cement improved the bond strength of the composite resin to the glass-ionomer cement. Both etch-rinse & bond and self-etching adhesives may be used effectively in the lamination of glass-ionomer cements. However, an etching time of at least 30 s appears to be optimal.

  14. Heat treatment of pre-hydrolyzed silane increases adhesion of phosphate monomer-based resin cement to glass ceramic

    OpenAIRE

    de Carvalho, Rodrigo Furtado; Caroline COTES; Kimpara, Estevão Tomomitsu; Leite, Fabíola Pessoa Pereira; Özcan, Mutlu

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different forms of heat treatment on a pre-hydrolyzed silane to improve the adhesion of phosphate monomer-based (MDP) resin cement to glass ceramic. Resin and feldspathic ceramic blocks (n=48, n=6 for bond test, n=2 for microscopy) were randomly divided into 6 groups and subject to surface treatments: G1: Hydrofluoric acid (HF) 9.6% for 20 s + Silane + MDP resin cement (Panavia F); G2: HF 9.6% for 20 s + Silane + Heat Treatment (oven) + Panavia F; G3: Sil...

  15. Conventional dual-cure versus self-adhesive resin cements in dentin bond integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Andreza Talaveira da Silva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available During post preparation, the root canal is exposed to the oral cavity, and endodontic treatment may fail because of coronal leakage, bacterial infection and sealing inability of the luting cement. OBJECTIVE: this study quantified the interfacial continuity produced with conventional dual-cure and self-adhesive resin cements in the cervical (C, medium (M and apical (A thirds of the root. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty single-rooted human teeth were restored using Reforpost # 01 conical glass-fiber posts and different materials (N=10 per group: group AC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + AllCem; group ARC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + RelyX ARC; group U100=RelyX U100; and group MXC=Maxcem Elite. After being kept in 100% humidity at 37°C for 72 hours, the samples were sectioned parallel to their longitudinal axis and positive epoxy resin replicas were made. The scanning electron micrographs of each third section of the teeth were combined using Image Analyst software and measured with AutoCAD-2002. We obtained percentage values of the interfacial continuity. RESULTS: Interfacial continuity was similar in the apical, medium and cervical thirds of the roots within the groups (Friedman test, p>0.05. Comparison of the different cements in a same root third showed that interfacial continuity was lower in MXC (C=45.5%; M=48.5%; A=47.3% than in AC (C=85.9%, M=81.8% and A=76.0%, ARC (C=83.8%, M=82.4% and A=75.0% and U100 (C=84.1%, M=82.4% and A=77.3% (Kruskal-Wallis test, p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Allcem, Rely X ARC and U100 provide the best cementation; cementation was similar among root portions; in practical terms, U100 is the best resin because it combines good cementation and easy application and none of the cements provides complete interfacial continuity.

  16. Direct Tensile Strength and Characteristics of Dentin Restored with All-Ceramic, Resin-Composite, and Cast Metal Prostheses Cemented with Resin Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morakot Piemjai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A dentin-cement-prosthesis complex restored with either all-porcelain, cured resin-composite, or cast base metal alloy and cemented with either of the different resin cements was trimmed into a mini-dumbbell shape for tensile testing. The fractured surfaces and characterization of the dentin-cement interface of bonded specimens were investigated using a Scanning Electron Microscope. A significantly higher tensile strength of all-porcelain (12.5 ± 2.2 MPa than that of cast metal (9.2 ± 3.5 MPa restorations was revealed with cohesive failure in the cement and failure at the prosthesis-cement interface in Super-Bond C&B group. No significant difference in tensile strength was found among the types of restorations using the other three cements with adhesive failure on the dentin side and cohesive failure in the cured resin. SEM micrographs demonstrated the consistent hybridized dentin in Super-Bond C&B specimens that could resist degradation when immersed in hydrochloric acid followed by NaOCl solutions whereas a detached and degraded interfacial layer was found for the other cements. The results suggest that when complete hybridization of resin into dentin occurs tensile strength at the dentin-cement is higher than at the cement-prosthesis interfaces. The impermeable hybridized dentin can protect the underlying dentin and pulp from acid demineralization, even if detachment of the prosthesis has occurred.

  17. Bond strength durability of self-etching adhesives and resin cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina de Andrade Lima Chaves

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar within a short (24 h and long period of evaluation (90 days. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10. The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y, producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm² cross-sectional area, which were subjected to µTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The µTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05. RESULTS: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, p<0.001. All eight experimental means (MPa were compared by the Tukey's test (p<0.05 and the following results were obtained: Tyrian-One Step Plus /C&B/24 h (22.4±7.3; Tyrian-One Step Plus /Variolink II/24 h (39.4±11.6; Xeno III/C&B/24 h (40.3±12.9; Xeno III/Variolink II/24 h (25.8±10.5; Tyrian-One Step Plus /C&B/90 d (22.1±12.8 Tyrian-One Step Plus/VariolinkII/90 d (24.2±14.2; Xeno III/C&B/90 d (27.0±13.5; Xeno III/Variolink II/90 d (33.0±8.9. CONCLUSIONS: Xeno III/Variolink II was the luting agent/adhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water.

  18. Si-based thin film coating on Y-TZP: Influence of deposition parameters on adhesion of resin cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, José Renato Cavalcanti, E-mail: joserenatocq@hotmail.com [Potiguar University, Department of Biotechnology, Natal (Brazil); Nogueira Junior, Lafayette [São Paulo State University, Department of Prosthodontics and Dental Materials, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Massi, Marcos [Federal University of São Paulo, Institute of Science and Technology, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Silva, Alecssandro de Moura; Bottino, Marco Antonio [São Paulo State University, Department of Prosthodontics and Dental Materials, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Sobrinho, Argemiro Soares da Silva [Technological Institute of Aeronautics, Department of Physics, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Özcan, Mutlu [University of Zurich, Dental Materials Unit, Center for Dental and Oral Medicine, Clinic for Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics and Dental Materials Science, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated the influence of deposition parameters for Si-based thin films using magnetron sputtering for coating zirconia and subsequent adhesion of resin cement. Zirconia ceramic blocks were randomly divided into 8 groups and specimens were either ground finished and polished or conditioned using air-abrasion with alumina particles coated with silica. In the remaining groups, the polished specimens were coated with Si-based film coating with argon/oxygen magnetron discharge at 8:1 or 20:1 flux. In one group, Si-based film coating was performed on air-abraded surfaces. After application of bonding agent, resin cement was bonded. Profilometry, goniometry, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy analysis were performed on the conditioned zirconia surfaces. Adhesion of resin cement to zirconia was tested using shear bond test and debonded surfaces were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy. Si-based film coating applied on air-abraded rough zirconia surfaces increased the adhesion of the resin cement (22.78 ± 5.2 MPa) compared to those of other methods (0–14.62 MPa) (p = 0.05). Mixed type of failures were more frequent in Si film coated groups on either polished or air-abraded groups. Si-based thin films increased wettability compared to the control group but did not change the roughness, considering the parameters evaluated. Deposition parameters of Si-based thin film and after application of air-abrasion influenced the initial adhesion of resin cement to zirconia.

  19. Si-based thin film coating on Y-TZP: Influence of deposition parameters on adhesion of resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, José Renato Cavalcanti; Nogueira Junior, Lafayette; Massi, Marcos; Silva, Alecssandro de Moura; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Sobrinho, Argemiro Soares da Silva; Özcan, Mutlu

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated the influence of deposition parameters for Si-based thin films using magnetron sputtering for coating zirconia and subsequent adhesion of resin cement. Zirconia ceramic blocks were randomly divided into 8 groups and specimens were either ground finished and polished or conditioned using air-abrasion with alumina particles coated with silica. In the remaining groups, the polished specimens were coated with Si-based film coating with argon/oxygen magnetron discharge at 8:1 or 20:1 flux. In one group, Si-based film coating was performed on air-abraded surfaces. After application of bonding agent, resin cement was bonded. Profilometry, goniometry, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy analysis were performed on the conditioned zirconia surfaces. Adhesion of resin cement to zirconia was tested using shear bond test and debonded surfaces were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy. Si-based film coating applied on air-abraded rough zirconia surfaces increased the adhesion of the resin cement (22.78 ± 5.2 MPa) compared to those of other methods (0-14.62 MPa) (p = 0.05). Mixed type of failures were more frequent in Si film coated groups on either polished or air-abraded groups. Si-based thin films increased wettability compared to the control group but did not change the roughness, considering the parameters evaluated. Deposition parameters of Si-based thin film and after application of air-abrasion influenced the initial adhesion of resin cement to zirconia.

  20. Immediate and delayed photoactivation of self-adhesive resin cements and retention of glass-fiber posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Faria-e-Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of immediate and delayed photoactivation of self-adhesive resin cements (SARCs on the retention of glass-fiber posts luted into root canals. Bovine incisors were endodontically treated, and post holes of 9 mm in depth were prepared. Fiber posts were luted using one of two SARCs, BisCem(r (Bisco Inc., Schaumburg, USA or RelyX Unicem clicker (3M ESPE, Saint Paul, USA, or a regular (etch-and-rinse resin cement (AllCem; FGM, Joinvile, Brazil. Photoactivation was performed immediately, or at 5 or 10 min after cementation. Root/post specimens were transversely sectioned 7 days after luting into 1-mm-thick slices, which were submitted to push-out testing in a mechanical testing machine. Bond strength data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' method (α = 0.05. Immediate photoactivation resulted in the highest bond strength for Unicem. BisCem(r demonstrated higher bond strength values when photoactivated after a 10-min delay. Immediate photoactivation yielded the lowest bond strengths for AllCem, although no differences in bond strength were observed between photoactivation delayed by 5 and 10 min. In conclusion, the moment of resin cement photoactivation may affect the intraradicular retention of fiber posts, depending upon the resin cement used for luting.

  1. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 2: Effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Asuka; Matsumoto, Mariko; Higashi, Mami; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning on resin cement bonding to CAD/CAM resin blocks. One of two resin cements, PANAVIA V5 (PV5) or PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX (PSA), were bonded to one of 24 CAD/CAM blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK). Each cement group was divided into four subgroups: no cleaning (Ctl), ultrasonic cleaning (Uc), acid cleaning (Ac) and Uc+Ac. Micro-tensile bond strengths (µTBSs) were measured immediately and 1, 3, and 6 months after water storage. Block surfaces after each treatment were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (psandblasting was effective in removing residual alumina particles, it did not affect the long-term bonding durability with non-contaminated CAD/CAM resin blocks. PMID:26830822

  2. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 1: Effects of sandblasting and silanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Mami; Matsumoto, Mariko; Kawaguchi, Asuka; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of sandblasting and silanization on resin cement bond strengths to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Twenty four blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK) were divided into two resin cement groups (PANAVIA V5 [PV5] and PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX [PSA]), and further divided into four subgroups representing different surface treatment methods: no treatment (Ctl), silanization (Si), sandblasting (Sb), and Sb+Si. After resin application, microtensile bond strengths (μTBSs) were measured immediately, 1, 3 and 6 months after water storage. In addition, surfaces resulting from each of the treatment methods were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Three-way analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (psandblasting roughened surfaces. PMID:26830821

  3. Analysis of Self-Adhesive Resin Cement Microshear Bond Strength on Leucite-Reinforced Glass-Ceramic with/without Pure Silane Primer or Universal Adhesive Surface Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS of self-adhesive resin (SA cement on leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic using silane or universal adhesive. Materials and Methods. Ceramic blocks were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid and divided into three groups (n=16: (1 negative control (NC without treatment; (2 Single Bond Universal (SBU; (3 RelyX Ceramic Primer as positive control (PC. RelyX Unicem resin cement was light-cured, and μSBS was evaluated with/without thermocycling. The μSBS was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. The fractured surfaces were examined using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results. Without thermocycling, μSBS was highest for PC (30.50 MPa ± 3.40, followed by SBU (27.33 MPa ± 2.81 and NC (20.18 MPa ± 2.01 (P0.05. PC and NC predominantly fractured by cohesive failure within the ceramic and mixed failure, respectively. Conclusion. SBU treatment improves μSBS between SA cement and glass ceramics, but to a lower value than PC, and the improvement is eradicated by thermocycling. NC exhibited the lowest μSBS, which remained unchanged after thermocycling.

  4. Analysis of Self-Adhesive Resin Cement Microshear Bond Strength on Leucite-Reinforced Glass-Ceramic with/without Pure Silane Primer or Universal Adhesive Surface Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Woo, Jung-Soo; Yi, Young-Ah; Hwang, Ji-Yun; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of self-adhesive resin (SA) cement on leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic using silane or universal adhesive. Materials and Methods. Ceramic blocks were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid and divided into three groups (n = 16): (1) negative control (NC) without treatment; (2) Single Bond Universal (SBU); (3) RelyX Ceramic Primer as positive control (PC). RelyX Unicem resin cement was light-cured, and μSBS was evaluated with/without thermocycling. The μSBS was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. The fractured surfaces were examined using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results. Without thermocycling, μSBS was highest for PC (30.50 MPa ± 3.40), followed by SBU (27.33 MPa ± 2.81) and NC (20.18 MPa ± 2.01) (P 0.05). PC and NC predominantly fractured by cohesive failure within the ceramic and mixed failure, respectively. Conclusion. SBU treatment improves μSBS between SA cement and glass ceramics, but to a lower value than PC, and the improvement is eradicated by thermocycling. NC exhibited the lowest μSBS, which remained unchanged after thermocycling. PMID:26557660

  5. Push-out bond strength of quartz fibre posts to root canal dentin using total-etch and self-adhesive resin cements

    OpenAIRE

    Kahnamouei, Mehdi A.; Mohammadi, Narmin; Navimipour, Elmira J.; Shakerifar, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Several adhesive systems are available for cementation of fibre posts into the root canal. The aim of the present study was to investigate the push-out bond strengths of quartz fibre posts to root dentin with the use of different total-etch and self-adhesive resin cements. Study Design: Ninety single-rooted human premolars were endodontically treated and standardized post-spaces were prepared. Fibre posts were cemented with different luting agents: total-etch (Nexus NX3, Duo-Link,...

  6. Effect of various surface conditioning methods on the adhesion of dual-cure resin cement with MDP functional monomer to zirconia after thermal aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Nijhuis, Henk; Felipe Valandro, Luiz

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of chairside and laboratory types of surface conditioning methods on the adhesion of dual-cure resin cement with MDP functional monomer to zirconia ceramic after thermocycling. Disk-shaped (diameter: 10 mm, thickness: 2 mm) Y-TZP ceramics (Lava(TM), 3M ESPE) were used

  7. In vitro comparative bond strength of contemporary self-adhesive resin cements to zirconium oxide ceramic with and without air-particle abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatz, Markus B; Phark, Jin-Ho; Ozer, Fusun; Mante, Francis K; Saleh, Najeed; Bergler, Michael; Sadan, Avishai

    2010-04-01

    This study compared shear bond strengths of six self-adhesive resin cements to zirconium oxide ceramic with and without air-particle abrasion. One hundred twenty zirconia samples were air-abraded (group SB; n = 60) or left untreated (group NO). Composite cylinders were bonded to the zirconia samples with either BisCem (BC), Maxcem (MC), G-Cem (GC), RelyX Unicem Clicker (RUC), RelyX Unicem Applicator (RUA), or Clearfil SA Cement (CSA). Shear bond strength was tested after thermocycling, and data were analyzed with analysis of variance and Holm-Sidak pairwise comparisons. Without abrasion, RUA (8.0 MPa), GC (7.9 MPa), and CSA (7.6 MPa) revealed significantly higher bond strengths than the other cements. Air-particle abrasion increased bond strengths for all test cements (p CSA (18.4 MPa) revealed the highest bond strengths in group SB. Bond strengths of self-adhesive resin cements to zirconia were increased by air-particle abrasion. Cements containing adhesive monomers (MDP/4-META) were superior to other compositions. PMID:19415350

  8. Shear Bond Strength of MDP-Containing Self-Adhesive Resin Cement and Y-TZP Ceramics: Effect of Phosphate Monomer-Containing Primers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Soo Ahn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different phosphate monomer-containing primers on the shear bond strength between yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP ceramics and MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement. Materials and Methods. Y-TZP ceramic surfaces were ground flat with #600-grit SiC paper and divided into six groups (n=10. They were treated as follows: untreated (control, Metal/Zirconia Primer, Z-PRIME Plus, air abrasion, Metal/Zirconia Primer with air abrasion, and Z-PRIME Plus with air abrasion. MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement was applied to the surface-treated Y-TZP specimens. After thermocycling, a shear bond strength test was performed. The surfaces of the Y-TZP specimens were analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. The bond strength values were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and the Student–Newman–Keuls multiple comparison test (P<0.05. Results. The Z-PRIME Plus treatment combined with air abrasion produced the highest bond strength, followed by Z-PRIME Plus application, Metal/Zirconia Primer combined with air abrasion, air abrasion alone, and, lastly, Metal/Zirconia Primer application. The control group yielded the lowest results (P<0.05. Conclusion. The application of MDP-containing primer resulted in increased bond strength between Y-TZP ceramics and MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cements.

  9. Comparison of resin cement adhesion to Y-TZP ceramic following manufacturers' instructions of the cements only

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Kerkdijk, Sandra; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate the bond strength of four resin materials with various chemical compositions following the manufacturers' instructions only and (2) to test their durability in dry and thermal aged conditions when they were bonded to zirconia ceramic. Four types of r

  10. Cement paste-epoxy adhesive interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Djouani, Fatma; CONNAN, Carole; Delamar, Michel; CHEHIMI, Mohamed M; BENZARTI, Karim

    2011-01-01

    In the field of civil engineering, the durability of concrete assemblies using adhesives is widely conditioned by the properties of the interface between the resin and the mineral support (concrete). In this context we studied first the molecular interactions at the interface between an epoxy resin and cement pastes by several approaches based on XPS and IR spectroscopies, DSC, and inverse gas chromatography (IGC). XPS showed evidence of crosslinking of the polymer at the surface of hardened ...

  11. Analytical method to estimate resin cement diffusion into dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Ferraz, Larissa Cristina; Ubaldini, Adriana Lemos Mori; de Oliveira, Bruna Medeiros Bertol; Neto, Antonio Medina; Sato, Fracielle; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2016-05-01

    This study analyzed the diffusion of two resin luting agents (resin cements) into dentin, with the aim of presenting an analytical method for estimating the thickness of the diffusion zone. Class V cavities were prepared in the buccal and lingual surfaces of molars (n=9). Indirect composite inlays were luted into the cavities with either a self-adhesive or a self-etch resin cement. The teeth were sectioned bucco-lingually and the cement-dentin interface was analyzed by using micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) and scanning electron microscopy. Evolution of peak intensities of the Raman bands, collected from the functional groups corresponding to the resin monomer (C–O–C, 1113 cm-1) present in the cements, and the mineral content (P–O, 961 cm-1) in dentin were sigmoid shaped functions. A Boltzmann function (BF) was then fitted to the peaks encountered at 1113 cm-1 to estimate the resin cement diffusion into dentin. The BF identified a resin cement-dentin diffusion zone of 1.8±0.4 μm for the self-adhesive cement and 2.5±0.3 μm for the self-etch cement. This analysis allowed the authors to estimate the diffusion of the resin cements into the dentin. Fitting the MRS data to the BF contributed to and is relevant for future studies of the adhesive interface.

  12. The influence of ultrasound on removal of prefabricated metal post cemented with different resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atiyeh Feiz

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Ultrasonic energy did not decrease the retention of posts cemented with Panavia or Maxcem Elite cements. Furthermore, it seems that there is no significant difference between removal force of self-etch (Panavia and the self-etch self-adhesive (Maxcem Elite resin cements.

  13. Effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement lining and composite layering technique on the adhesive interface of lateral wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Marinho AZEVEDO

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Interface integrity can be maintained by setting the composite in a layering technique and using liners. Objective The aim of this in vitro study was to verify the effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC lining and composite layering technique on the bond strength of the dentin/resin adhesive interface of lateral walls of occlusal restorations. Material and Methods Occlusal cavities were prepared in 52 extracted sound human molars, randomly assigned into 4 groups: Group 2H (control – no lining + two horizontal layers; Group 4O: no lining + four oblique layers; Group V-2H: RMGIC lining (Vitrebond + two horizontal layers; and Group V-4O: RMGIC lining (Vitrebond + four oblique layers. Resin composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE was placed after application of an adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE dyed with a fluorescent reagent (Rhodamine B to allow confocal microscopy analysis. The teeth were stored in deionized water at 37oC for 24 hours before being sectioned into 0.8 mm slices. One slice of each tooth was randomly selected for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM analysis. The other slices were sectioned into 0.8 mm x 0.8 mm sticks to microtensile bond strength test (MPa. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Fisher's test. Results There was no statistical difference on bond strength among groups (p>0.05. CLSM analysis showed no significant statistical difference regarding the presence of gap at the interface dentin/resin among groups. Conclusions RMGIC lining and composite layering techniques showed no effect on the microtensile bond strength and gap formation at the adhesive interface of lateral walls of high C-factor occlusal restorations.

  14. Thin and thick layers of resin-based sealer cement bonded to root dentine compared: Adhesive behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, Epita S; Palamara, Joseph E A; Messer, Harold H

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate tensile and shear bond strengths of one epoxy (AH) and two methacrylate resin-based sealers (EZ and RS) in thin and thick layers bonded to root dentine. An alignment device was prepared for accurate positioning of 20 root dentine cylinders in a predefined gap of 0.1 or 1 mm. Sealer was placed in the interface. Bond strength tests were conducted. Mode of failures and representative surfaces were evaluated. Data were analysed using anova and post-hoc tests, with P layer of sealer produced higher bond strength, except for the shear bond strength of EZ. Significant differences between thin and thick layers were found only in tensile bond strengths of AH and RS. Mixed type of failure was constantly found with all sealers. Bond strengths of thick layers of resin-based sealers to root dentine tended to be higher than with thin layers.

  15. Microshear bond strength between restorative composites and resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Nazareno GARCIA

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The techniques of adhesive cementationhave been widely used in dental restoration. The purpose of this studywas to evaluate the microshear bond strength between restorativecomposites and resin cements. Material and methods: Twenty composites blocks were prepared in order to obtain a flat surface, using 600-grid sandpaper. The samples were randomly divided in four groups(n=15 according to the experimental groups: [1] Z250 block + Single Bond + cylinder of RelyX ARC; [2] Z250 block + Single Bond + cylinder of Panavia F; [3] Clearfil AP-X block + Clearfil SE Bond adhesive + cylinder of RelyX ARC; [4] Clearfil AP-X block + Clearfil SE Bond adhesive + cylinder of Panavia F. The adhesive systems and the resin cements were applied according to the experimental groups, using a Tygon matrix.The samples were stored in distilled water at 37±2ºC for 24 hours.Microshear bond strengths were determined using an apparatus attached to an Instron universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Results: The results obtained in MPa (SD were statistically analyzed (ANOVA and Tukey test, p<0.05, and showed the following results: [1] 39.76 (5.34; [2] 45.01 (8.53; [3] 46.39 (9.22; [4]45.78 (9.06.There was no statistically significant difference between groups [1] and [2]; and between groups [3] and [4]. However, there was statistically significant difference between groups [1] and [3]. Conclusion:When Clearfil AP-X block was used with Clearfil SE Bond adhesive or RelyX resin cement, the microshear bond strength values were higher.The results suggest that in the union of the resin cements to the restorative composites, hydrophobic adhesives are necessary.

  16. Does Adhesive Resin Application Contribute to Resin Bond Durability on Etched and Silanized Feldspathic Ceramic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Ozcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Kimpara, Estevao Tomomitsu

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the effect of adhesive application and aging on the bond durability of resin cement to etched and silanized feldspathic ceramic. Materials and Methods: Twenty blocks (6.4 x 6.4 x 4.8 mm) of feldspathic ceramic (Vita VM7) were produced. The ceramic surfaces were conditioned with 10

  17. Effect of filler size on wear resistance of resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, K; Suzuki, S; Katoh, Y

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of filler size on the wear of resin cements. Materials tested included four experimental dual-cure resin cements (Kuraray) consisting of different-sized filler particles. A rectangular box cavity was prepared on the flattened occlusal surface of extracted human molars. Ceramic inlays for the cavities were fabricated using the Cerec 2 system. The Cerec inlays were cemented with the respective cements and adhesive systems according to the manufacturer's directions. The restored surface was finished by wet-grinding with an 800-grit silicon carbide paper. Six specimens were prepared for each resin cement. Half of the specimens were subjected to a three-body wear test for 200,000 cycles, and the others were subjected to a toothbrush abrasion test for 30,000 cycles. The worn surface of each restoration was scanned by a profilometer (Surfcom 475 A) at eight different points for each restoration. The wear value was determined by measuring the vertical gap depth on the profilometric tracings. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe's test. The results showed that, with increase of filler size, the wear value decreased in the toothbrush test and increased in the three-body wear test. The cement with 0.04-microm filler exhibited the lowest wear value among the materials in the three-body wear test, and the same wear value as the cement with 0.97-microm filler in the toothbrush test. Based upon the results of this study, it is concluded that the wear of resin cements was affected by the filler size as well as the mode of wear test.

  18. Advanced cement solidification technique for spent resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past 40 years, the nuclear facilities of China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) produced an amount of radioactive organic resins, a kind of problematic stream in nuclear industry. As these facilities were stepping into decommissioning, the treatment of the spent organic resins was put on the agenda. The various routes for spent resin treatment such as incineration, advanced oxidation, cement immobilization, etc, were considered. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages when applied in the treatment of spent resins. Since the quantities of the spent organic resins were relatively small and an experience with variety of cementation processes existed in CIAE, predominately for immobilization of the evaporated concentrates, the option of direct encapsulation of the spent organic resins into cementitious materials was adopted in 2003, as a preferred method from the point of view of saving the on the cost of the disposal. In order to realize the end goal, the main work consisted of: the survey of the source terms; cementitious material formula investigation; and the process development. This work, which was undertaken in the following years, is addressed as follows. Source terms of the spent resins in CIAE were to be made clear firstly. The results showed that a total of 24-29 m3 of spent resins was generated and accumulated in the past 40 years. Spent resin arose from two research reactors (heavy water reactor and light water reactor), and from the waste management plant. The amount of the spent resins from the heavy water reactor was 1m3 or so, but its radioactive concentration was high to ∼108-∼109Bq/m3. Two kinds of cements, ASC and OPC cement were selected next, as the solidifying matrix to be investigated. A mixture surface response approach was employed to design experiment and interpret data. In comparison, ASC was superior to OPC cement and it displayed preferable performances to encapsulate spent resins. The optimum formulation is:1) resin

  19. Silver nanoparticles in resin luting cements: Antibacterial and physiochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Francine-Couto-Lima; Alves, Denise-Ramos-Silveira; Estrela, Cyntia-Rodrigues-Araújo; Estrela, Carlos; Carrião, Marcus-Santos; Bakuzis, Andris-Figueiroa; Lopes, Lawrence-Gonzaga

    2016-01-01

    Background Silver has a long history of use in medicine as an antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory agent. Silver nanoparticles (NAg) offer the possibility to control the formation oral biofilms through the use of nanoparticles with biocidal, anti-adhesive, and delivery abilities. This study aims to evaluate the antibacterial effect of resin luting cements with and without NAg, and their influence on color, sorption and solubility. Material and Methods NAg were incorporated to two dual-cured resin cements (RelyX ARC (RA) color A1 and RelyX U200 (RU) color A2) in two concentrations (0.05% and 0.07%, in weight), obtaining six experimental groups. Disc specimens (1x6mm) were obtained to verify the antibacterial effect against Streptococcus mutans in BHI broth after immersion for 1min, 5min, 1h, 6h, and 24h (n=3), through optical density readings. Specimens were evaluated for color changes after addition of NAg with a spectrophotometer (n=10). Sorption and solubility tests were also performed, considering storage in water or 75% ethanol for 28 days (n=5), according to ISO 4049:2010. Data were subjected to statistical analysis with ANOVA and Tukey (p=0.05). Results The optical density of the culture broths indicated bacterial growth, with and without NAg. NAg produced significant color change on the resin cements, especially in RA. Solubility values were very low for all groups, while sorption values raised with NAg. The cements with NAg did not show antibacterial activity against S. mutans. They also showed perceptible color change and higher sorption than the materials without NAg. Conclusions The resin luting cements with NAg addition did not show antibacterial activity against SS. mutans. They also showed perceptible color change and higher sorption than the materials without NAg. Key words:Silver, resin cements, products with antimicrobial action, solubility, color perception tests. PMID:27703610

  20. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last seven years, Low Oxidation State Metal Ion reagents (LOMI) have been used to decontaminate the 100 MW(e) Steam Generating Heavy Water Ractor (SGHWR) at Winfrith. The use of these reagents has resulted in a dilute ionic solution containing activation products which are produced by corrosion of metallic components in the reactor. It has been demonstrated that the amount of activity in the solution can be reduced using organic ion exchanger resins. These resins consist of a cross linked polystyrene with sulphonic acid or quaternary ammonium function groups and can be successfully immobilised in blended cement systems. The formulation which has been developed is produced from a 9 to 1 blend of ground granulated blast furnace slag (BFS) and ordinary Portland cement (OPC) containing 28% ion exchange resin in the water saturated form. If 6% Microsilica is added to the blended cement the waste loading can be increased to 36 w/o. (author)

  1. Bond strength of a resin cement to a cured composite inlay material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latta, M A; Barkmeier, W W

    1994-08-01

    Although resin cements have been effectively bonded to mineralized tooth structures, bonding to a cured composite material has remained a challenge. This study evaluated the shear bond strength of a resin cement bonded to a cured composite inlay material by use of a variety of composite surface treatments: (1) hydrofluoric acid/60 seconds, (2) ammonium bifluoride/60 seconds, (3) resin adhesive, (4) microabrasion with 50 microns aluminum oxide, and (5) microabrasion with 50 microns aluminum oxide and application of a resin adhesive. The resin cement was also bonded to human enamel that was etched with phosphoric acid. Scanning electron microscopy examinations were completed to evaluate the effects of the composite surface treatments. The results indicated that microabrasion of a cured composite enhances bonding of a resin cement. The bond strength of a resin cement to a composite surface that was air abraded with aluminum oxide, with or without the application of a resin adhesive, was higher than surface treatments with hydrofluoric acid or ammonium bifluoride. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that an irregular surface on the composite was created with aluminum oxide air abrasion.

  2. Treatment of a Vertical Root Fracture Using Dual-Curing Resin Cement: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Moradi Majd

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Vertical root fracture (VRF is one of the most frustrating complications of root canal treatment. The prognosis of the root with VRF is poor therefore tooth extraction and root amputation are usually the only treatment options. However, bonding of the fracture line with adhesive resin cement during the intentional replantation procedure was recently suggested as an alternative to tooth extraction. Methods. A vertically fractured left maxillary incisor was carefully extracted, fracture line was treated with adhesive resin cement, a retrograde cavity was produced and filled with calcium-enriched mixture (CEM cement, and tooth was replanted. Results. After 12 months the tooth was asymptomatic. The size of periapical radiolucency was noticeably reduced and there was no clinical sign of ankylosis. Conclusion. Using adhesive resin cement to bond the fracture lines extraorally in roots with VRF and intentional replantation of the reconstructed teeth could be considered as an alternative to tooth extraction, especially for anterior teeth.

  3. Interfacial chemistry of epoxy adhesives on hydrated cement paste

    OpenAIRE

    Djouani, Fatma; CONNAN, Carole; CHEHIMI, Mohamed M; BENZARTI, Karim

    2008-01-01

    Epoxy resins [diglycidylether of bisphenol A, (DGEBA)] are the main adhesives used in civil engineering for the repair of damaged concrete structures (bridges, walls) or for assembly applications. Their interfacial molecular interactions with cement-type substrates are thus of prime importance and require surface- and interface-sensitive characterisation tools. In this context, we report an XPS, FTIR and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) study of the interfacial chemistry of stoichiomet...

  4. 牙本质保护膜在全瓷冠牙体预备后的作用%The dental adhesive resin cement after dental preparation of all-ceramic crown

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄田河; 刘继华

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the protective effect of dental adhesive resin cement on dentin surface afterpreparation for all-ceramic crown.Methods 63 patients with 82 teeth prepared for all-ceramic crown were divided intogroups A and B in time sequence.Group A ( 32 patients,42 teeth )was applied with dental adhesive resin cement and group B ( 31 patients,40 teeth )was applied with Gluma desensitizer.Visual analog scale ( VAS )was used to assess th e sensitivity degree of the prepared teeth using tactile test and air blast test.The results were analyzed using a statistics software.Results In groups A and B,significant differences were found between the baseline VAS value of tactile test and air blast test ( pre-treatment ) and the value gained after both tests ( P< 0.05 ).No significant difference was fo und between group A and group B in the VAS value ( P> 0.05 ).Conclusions Dental adhesive resin cement can markedlyrelieve the symptoms of dentin hypersensitivity after dental preparation of all-ceramic crown.%目的 评价牙本质保护膜在全瓷冠修复的活髓牙备牙后牙本质面的保护作用.方法 选择63例行全瓷冠修复的患者,共82颗活髓牙,按就诊顺序随机分为A组和B组.A组32例(42颗牙),备牙后涂布牙本质保护膜;B组31例(40颗牙),备牙后涂布Gluma脱敏剂.采用可视分级评价法(VAS)评价探针刺激以及空气刺激预备牙的敏感程度.结果 A组:治疗前、后探针刺激以及空气刺激VAS值比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).B组:治疗前、后探针刺激以及空气刺激VAS值比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).A组和B组间,探针刺激以及空气刺激VAS值比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 牙本质保护膜能显著降低全瓷冠修复的活髓牙牙体预备后的牙本质敏感症状.

  5. Influence of Temporary Cements on the Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Cement to the Metal Coronal Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Raniel Fernandes; De Aguiar, Caio Rocha; Jacob, Eduardo Santana; Macedo, Ana Paula; De Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello; Antunes, Rossana Pereira de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    This research evaluated the influence of temporary cements (eugenol-containing [EC] or eugenol-free [EF]) on the tensile strength of Ni-Cr copings fixed with self-adhesive resin cement to the metal coronal substrate. Thirty-six temporary crowns were divided into 4 groups (n=9) according to the temporary cements: Provy, Dentsply (eugenol-containing), Temp Cem, Vigodent (eugenol-containing), RelyX Temp NE, 3M ESPE (eugenol-free) and Temp Bond NE, Kerr Corp (eugenol-free). After 24 h of temporary cementation, tensile strength tests were performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min and 1 kN (100 kgf) load cell. Afterwards, the cast metal cores were cleaned by scraping with curettes and air jet. Thirty-six Ni-Cr copings were cemented to the cast metal cores with self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). Tensile strength tests were performed again. In the temporary cementation, Temp Bond NE (12.91 ± 2.54) and Temp Cem (12.22 ± 2.96) presented the highest values of tensile strength and were statistically similar to each other (p>0.05). Statistically significant difference (pcementation of Ni-Cr copings with self-adhesive resin cement. In addition, Temp Cem (120.68 ± 48.27) and RelyX Temp NE (103.04 ± 26.09) showed intermediate tensile strength values. In conclusion, the Provy eugenol-containing temporary cement was associated with the highest bond strength among the resin cements when Ni-Cr copings were cemented to cast metal cores. However, the eugenol cannot be considered a determining factor in increased bond strength, since the other tested cements (1 eugenol-containing and 2 eugenol-free) were similar. PMID:26963209

  6. Bond strength of resin cements to leucitereinforced ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Nazareno Garcia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS of two resin cements to four leucite-reinforced ceramics. Material and methods: Forty ceramic blocks (4 mm wide, 14 mm length and 2 mm thick were used and the samples abraded with aluminum oxide (90 µm. The samples were divided into eight groups (n = 5. Two resin cements (conventional RelyX ARC and self-adhesive RelyX U100 – 3M ESPE were bonded to Creapress (CRE-Creation/Klema, Finesse All-Ceramic (FIN-Dentsply/ Ceramco, IPS Empress Esthetic (IEE-Ivoclar Vivadent and Vita PM9 (PM9-Vita. For all groups and in each ceramic block, after application of 10% hydrofluoric acid and silanation, three Tygon tubings were positioned over the ceramics, which were filled in with the resin cements (light-cure for 40 s. The tubings were removed to expose the specimens in format of cylinders (area: 0.38 mm2 and samples were stored in relative humidity at 24±2 °C for one week. After this period, each sample was attached to testing machine and the specimens were submitted to shear bond test (applied at the base of the specimen/cement cylinder with a thin wire/0.2 mm at speed of 0.5 mm/ min, until failure. The results were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (resin cements and ceramic systems and Tukey test (p<0.05. Results: The means (SD were (in MPa: ARC + CRE = 32.1±4.3; ARC + FIN = 28.3±3.7; ARC + IEE = 25.9±4.4; ARC + PM9 = 22.2±2.1; U100 + CRE = 38.0±5.2; U100 + FIN = 36.9±2.8; U100 + IEE = 38.4±2.9; U100 + PM9 = 34.3 ±7.3. U100 showed higher SBS to ceramics than ARC. U100 had higher SBS when applied on IEE ceramic than on PM9. For ARC, SBS obtained with CRE was higher than with IEE and PM9. Conclusion: RelyX U100 can provide higher SBS to leucite-reinforced ceramics than conventional resin cement. The resin cements applied on the PM9 ceramic surface resulted in lower SBS.

  7. Evaluation of tensile retention of Y-TZP crowns cemented on resin composite cores: effect of the cement and Y-TZP surface conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippe, M P; Amaral, R; Oliveira, F S; Cesar, P F; Scotti, R; Valandro, L F; Bottino, M A

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of the cement type (adhesive resin, self-adhesive, glass ionomer, and zinc phosphate) on the retention of crowns made of yttria-stabilized polycrystalline tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP). Therefore, 108 freshly extracted molars were embedded in acrylic resin, perpendicular to their long axis, and prepared for full crowns: the crown preparations were removed and reconstructed using composite resin plus fiber posts with dimensions identical to the prepared dentin. The preparations were impressed using addition silicone, and Y-TZP copings were produced, which presented a special setup for the tensile testing. Cementation was performed with two adhesive resin cements (Multilink Automix, Ivoclar-Vivadent; RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA), one self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100, 3M ESPE), one glass ionomer based cement (RelyX Luting, 3M ESPE), and one zinc phosphate cement (Cimento de Zinco, SS White, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). For the resin cement groups, the inner surfaces of the crowns were subjected to three surface treatments: cleaning with isopropyl alcohol, tribochemical silica coating, or application of a thin low-fusing glass porcelain layer plus silanization. After 24 hours, all groups were subjected to thermocycling (6000 cycles) and included in a special device for tensile testing in a universal testing machine to test the retention of the infrastructure. After testing, the failure modes of all samples were analyzed under a stereomicroscope. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed that the surface treatment and cement type (α=0.05) affected the tensile retention results. The Multilink cement presented the highest tensile retention values, but that result was not statistically different from RelyX ARC. The surface treatment was statistically relevant only for the Multilink cement. The cement choice was shown to be more important than the crown surface treatment for cementation of a Y-TZP crown to a composite resin substrate. PMID

  8. Posterior adhesive composite resin: a historic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusayama, T

    1990-11-01

    Since development of the BIS-GMA composite resin, there have been many innovations to improve the physical properties for posterior use. Subsequent development of a caries detector and chemically adhesive composite resin has further revolutionally raised the value of composite resin restoration, replacing the traditional restorative system of mechanical approach by the new system of biological approach. In this system only the infected irreversibly deteriorated insensitive tissue, stainable with the caries detector, is removed painlessly. The cavity is immediately filled with the composite resin with no further tissue reduction for retention or resistance form or extension for prevention. Both enamel and dentin walls are etched by a single etchant without lining. The chemical adhesion to the cavity margin and wall minimizes the marginal failure in size and prevalence and prevents secondary caries penetration along the wall. The chemically adhesive composite resin is thus a useful restorative material much kinder to teeth than amalgam.

  9. Seating load parameters impact on dental ceramic reinforcement conferred by cementation with resin-cements.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2010-09-01

    Cementation of all-ceramic restorations with resin-cements has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of fracture in service. The aim was to investigate the influence of loading force and loading duration applied during cementation on the reinforcement conferred by a resin-cement on a leucite reinforced glass-ceramic.

  10. Do resin cements influence the cuspal deflection of teeth restored with composite resin inlays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rosa, Helen C V; Marcondes, Maurem L; de Souza, Niélli C; Weber, João B B; Spohr, Ana M

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different resin cements on the cuspal deflection of endodontically treated teeth restored with composite resin inlays. Sixty upper premolars were randomly divided into five groups (n=12): 1 - sound teeth; 2 - cavity; 3 - Rely X ARC; 4 - RelyX Unicem; 5 - SeT. The teeth from groups 2, 3, 4 and 5 received a MOD preparation and endodontic treatment. Impressions were made with vinyl polysiloxane and poured using type IV die stone in groups 3, 4 and 5. Inlays with composite resin were built over each cast and luted with the resin cements. A 200 N load was applied on the occlusal surface, and cuspal deflection was measured using a micrometer. After 24 h, cuspal deflection was measured again using a 300 N load. The Student t-test showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the 200 N and 300 N occlusal loads only for the sound teeth group (p = 0.389) and the RelyX ARC group (p = 0.188). ANOVA and Tukey'test showed that the sound teeth had the lowest mean cuspal deflection, differing statistically from the other groups (p<0.05). The highest cuspal deflections were obtained in the SeT group and the cavity group, with no statistical difference between them. Intermediate values were obtained in RelyX ARC group and RelyX Unicem group, which differed statistically. The self-adhesive resin cements RelyX Unicem and SeT showed less capacity to maintain the stiffness of the tooth/restoration complex than the conventional resin cement RelyX ARC. PMID:25950160

  11. Bond strength of a resin cement to dentin using the resin coating technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Batitucci dos Santos-Daroz

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of a resin cement to dentin using different adhesive systems (AS in the presence or absence of a low-viscosity composite liner (Protect Liner F - PLF applied over the bonded dentin. The adhesive systems selected were: AdheSE/Vivadent (AD; Clearfil Protect Bond/Kuraray (CP; One-Up Bond F/Tokuyama (OU; Single Bond/3M ESPE (SB; Tyrian SPE/One-Step Plus/Bisco (TY; Xeno III/Dentsply (XE and Unifil Bond/GC (UN. After removing the labial and lingual enamel surfaces of bovine incisors, dentin fragments were prepared and randomly divided into 15 groups (n = 8. The dentin substrates were bonded with the AS and the PLF was applied or not before application of the resin cement (Panavia F, Kuraray. In the control group, the ED Primer (ED and the resin cement without PLF were used. The AS, PLF and resin cement tested were used according to the manufacturers' instructions, and all treated dentin surfaces were temporized. After water storage for one week, three cylinders of resin cement were applied to each bonded dentin surface, using tygon tubing molds. The specimens were subjected to micro-shear testing and the data were statistically analyzed (two-way ANOVA, Tukey and Dunnett tests, p < 0.05. The observed mean shear bond strengths in MPa were: ED: 20.2 ± 2.3; AD: 30.3 ± 6.5; CP: 25.3 ± 4.4; OU: 28.3 ± 6.6; SB: 25.6 ± 6.9; TY: 24.5 ± 2.5; XE: 17.3 ± 3.4; UN: 28.4 ± 6.2; AD+PLF: 32.8 ± 4.1; CP+PLF: 29.9 ± 3.9; OU+PLF: 34.1 ± 4.1; SB+PLF: 29.5 ± 8.2; TY+PLF: 29.2 ± 3.9; XE+PLF: 32.8 ± 6.7; UN+PLF: 32.2 ± 4.5. The bond strength of the resin cement to dentin using the tested AS was increased when the low-viscosity composite liner was applied.

  12. Influence of storage times on bond strength of resin cements to root canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Coêlho Bandéca

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The resin cements are responsible to retention of the indirect materials decreasing marginal leakage, increasing failure resistance compared with conventional cementation. The cementation within root canal is very hard due unfavorable conditions regarding the application of adhesive techniques caused by inadequate access. Therefore, considering the possibility to decrease steps of cementation, this study was performed to evaluate the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX TM U100, 3M ESPE and resin cement combined with self-ecthing adhesive system (Panavia® F 2.0, Kuraray light-cured with Quartz Tungsten Halogen (QTH following storage at 37 °C immediately after light-curing, 24 and 48 hours and 7 days. The root canals were prepared to receive the glass fiber post in the depth of 10 mm, irrigated with 17% EDTA and NaOCl, rinsed with distilled water and dried using paper points. The roots were perpendicularly sectioned into approximately 1 mm thick sections, obtaining ninety-six slices (n = 12. The slices were trimmed using a cylindrical diamond bur in the proximal surfaces until it touched the post and attached into a device, which were mounted on a strength tester (Bisco and loaded in tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure occurred at specimens. The analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests showed significant statistical differences (P .05. The resin cements 24 and 48 hours after light-curing were statistically similar among themselves (P > .05. The both resin cement showed similar bond strength into root canal on different storage times. The highest bond strength values of the resin cements were showed 7 days after curing.

  13. Microtensile Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Luting Cements to Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Abo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to compare the bond strengths of the self-adhesive luting cements between ceramics and resin cores and examine their relation to the cement thickness. Three self-adhesive luting cements (Smartcem, Maxcem, and G-CEM and a resin cement (Panavia F 2.0 for control were used in the paper. The thickness of the cements was controlled in approximately 25, 50, 100, or 200 μm. Each 10 specimens were made according to the manufacturers’ instructions and stored in water at 37°C. After 24 hours, microtensile bond strength (μTBS was measured. There were significant differences in cements. Three self-adhesive cements showed significantly lower μTBSs than control that required both etching and priming before cementation (Tukey, <0.05. The cement thickness of 50 or 100 μm tended to induce the highest μTBSs for each self-adhesive luting cements though no difference was found.

  14. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE SOUZA, Grace; BRAGA, Roberto Ruggiero; CESAR, Paulo Francisco; LOPES, Guilherme Carpena

    2015-01-01

    Resin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC) under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used. PMID:26398507

  15. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace DE SOUZA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractResin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used.

  16. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement: final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% Ordinary Portland Cement 84% gg Blast Furnace Slag, 6% Microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This information was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the product's properties. (author)

  17. Effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of zirconia to three resin cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadjoo, Nisa

    Statement of problem: There are no standard guidelines for material selection to obtain acceptable bonding to high-strength zirconium oxide ceramic. Studies suggest resin cements in combination with MDP-containing primer is a reasonable choice, however, the other cements cannot be rejected and need further investigation. Objective: The purpose of this in vitro study was the evaluation of the shear bond strength of three composite resin cements to zirconia ceramic after using different surface conditioning methods. Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty sintered Y-TZP ceramic (IPS e.max ZirCAD) squares (8 x 8 x 4 mm) were embedded in acrylic molds, then divided into three groups (n=40) based on the type of cement used. Within each group, the specimens were divided into four subgroups (n=10) and treated as follows: (1) Air abrasion with 50microm aluminum oxide (Al2O 3) particles (ALO); (2) Air abrasion + Scotchbond Universal adhesive (SBU); (3) Air abrasion + Monobond Plus (MBP); (4) Air abrasion + Z-Prime Plus (ZPP). Composite cylinders were used as carriers to bond to conditioned ceramic using (1) RelyX Ultimate adhesive resin cement (RX); (2) Panavia SA self-adhesive resin cement (PSA); (3) Calibra esthetic cement (CAL). The bonded specimens were submerged in distilled water and subjected to 24-hour incubation period at 37°C. All specimens were stressed in shear at a constant crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA. The bond strength values (MPa), means and standard deviations were calculated and data were analyzed using analysis of variance with Fisher's PLSD multiple comparison test at the 0.05 level of significance. The nature of failure was recorded. Results: The two-way ANOVA showed Panavia SA to have the highest strength at 44.3 +/- 16.9 MPa (presin cement, Panavia SA, yielded the strongest bond to Y-TZP ceramic when compared to adhesive (RelyX Ultimate) or esthetic (Calibra) resin cements. Air

  18. Bond strength of fibre glass and carbon fibre posts to the root canal walls using different resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Ana Paula; Cecchin, Doglas; Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti; Naves, Lucas Zago; Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the bond strength of fibre glass and carbon fibre posts in the root canal walls cemented with self-adhesive (RelyX-Unicem) and chemical (Cement-Post) resin cements. Forty maxillary canines were divided into four groups according to the cement and post used and submitted to the push-out test (0.5 mm min(-1)). The data were submitted to statistical analysis (2-way ANOVA, Bonferroni--PFibre glass presented the best results when cemented with RelyX-Unicem and Cement-Post (Pfibre glass posts and RelyX-Unicem.

  19. Resin cementation of zirconia ceramics with different bonding agents

    OpenAIRE

    Tanış, Merve Çakırbay; Akay, Canan; Karakış, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sandblasting and different chemical bonding agents on shear bond strength of zirconia and conventional resin cement. In this study, 35 zirconia specimens were treated as follows: Group I: control; Group II: sandblasting; Group III: sandblasting + Monobond S; Group IV: sandblasting + Monobond Plus; Group V: sandblasting + Z-Prime Plus. The specimens in each group were bonded with conventional composite resin cement Variolink II. After cement...

  20. Microleakage of adhesive resinous materials in root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Gilbert Wong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare the in vitro micro-leakage resistance of adhesive resin materials to long-used zinc oxide-eugenol and epoxy resin sealers. Materials and Methods: Seven materials, five test (Real Seal, Real Seal XT, Panavia F 2.0, Infinity Syringeable, GCEM and two controls (Tubliseal, AH Plus, were evaluated for micro-leakage resistance in a bovine incisor root model, with 12 roots per material. Teeth were root canal treated, stored in water, artificially aged by thermal-cycling, stained with silver nitrate, sectioned to yield eight measurement points per tooth (four coronal and four apical, giving 672 measurement points. Stain penetration was measured using digital positioners and a toolmakers microscope; then analyzed using descriptive statistics, two-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons testing ( P < 0.05. Results: All modern adhesive resinous materials leaked significantly less than long-used zinc oxide-eugenol and epoxy resin sealers ( P < 0.05. Mean leakage values and their associated (standard deviations in mm were: Infinity Syringeable 2.5 (1.5, Real Seal XT 3.2 (1.4, Real Seal 3.4 (1.6, Panavia F 2.0 3.8 (2.7, GCEM 4.2 (1.8, Tubli-seal 5.4 (2.8, AH Plus 6.3 (2.3. Overall, more leakage occurred apically than coronally ( P < 0.0001. Many materials exhibited dimensional instability: Marked contraction, expansion, or lack of cohesion. Conclusion: A variety of adhesive resinous materials, endodontic sealers and crown cements, reduced micro-leakage in comparison to long and widely used zinc oxide- eugenol and epoxy sealers.

  1. Effect of Curing Mode on Shear Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Cement to Composite Blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Jin-Young Kim; Ga-Young Cho; Byoung-Duck Roh; Yooseok Shin

    2016-01-01

    To overcome the disadvantages of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) processed indirect restorations using glass-ceramics and other ceramics, resin nano ceramic, which has high strength and wear resistance with improved polish retention and optical properties, was introduced. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength and fracture pattern of indirect CAD/CAM composite blocks cemented with two self-etch adhesive cements with different curing mode...

  2. Evaluation of polymerization shrinkage of resin cements through in vitro and in situ experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, A. P. G. O.; Karam, L. Z.; Pulido, C. A.; Gomes, O. M. M.; Kalinowski, H. J.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavior of two types of resin cements , conventional dual and dual self adhesive, through in vitro and in situ experiments. For the in vitro assay were selected two resin cements that were handled and dispensed over a mylar strip supported by a glass plate. The Bragg grating sensors were positioned and another portion of cement. was placed, covered by another mylar strip. For the in situ experiment 16 single-rooted teeth were selected who were divided into 2 groups: group 1 - conventional dual resin cement Relyx ARC and group 2 - dual self adhesive resin cement Relyx U200 ( 3M/ESPE ). The teeth were treated and prepared to receive the intracanal posts. Two Bragg grating sensors were recorded and introduced into the root canal at different apical and coronal positions. The results showed that the in vitro experiment presented similar values of polymerization shrinkage that the in situ experiment made in cervical position; whereas Relyx ARC resulted lower values compared to Relyx U200; and cervical position showed higher shrinkage than the apical.

  3. Epoxy-resin adhesive and method for bonding using such an epoxy resin adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhowmik, S.; Poulis, J.A.; Benedictus, R.

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to an epoxy resin adhesive comprising a dotation of nano-substances, wherein the nano- substances are selected from the group comprising carbon-fibre nanotubes, carbon nano-fibres, silicate nano powders, and wherein the nano-substances are dispersed in the adhesive with a weigh

  4. Effect of adhesive resin type for bonding to zirconia using two surface pretreatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Samimi; A. Hasankhani; J.P. Matinlinna; H. Mirmohammadi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This laboratory study evaluated the short-term adhesive properties of one 10-MDP-containing and two MDP-free resin composite cements, using two types of zirconia surface pretreatments. Materials and Methods: Eighteen sintered zirconia disks (Procera, Nobel Biocare) were randomly divided int

  5. An evaluation of retention and marginal seating of Ni-Cr alloy cast restorations using three different luting cements: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikash K Pattanaik

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Marginal seating of adhesive resin cement was significantly greater than that of zinc phosphate and resin-modified GIC. Retentive strength of adhesive resin cement and resin-modified GIC was significantly greater than that of zinc phosphate There was no significant difference of retentive strength between adhesive resin cement and resin-modified GIC.

  6. Correlation between the cytotoxicity of self-etching resin cements and the degree of conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís FSA Morgan

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: These results indicate that photopolymerization of dual cure self-etching resin cements decrease toxic effects on cell culture. Adequate photopolymerization should be considered during cementation when using dual polymerization self-etching resin cements.

  7. Effect of resin cement, aging process and root level on the bond strength of the resin-fiber posts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuhim, Khalid Salman

    Background. Little is known about the long-term clinical bonding effectiveness of the Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts cemented with self-etch adhesive systems. Bond stability and longevity of the cemented post are adversely affected by physical and chemical factors over time, such as expansion and contraction stresses caused by thermal changes and occlusal load. This clinical condition can be simulated in vitro by thermocyclic loading; and bonding effectiveness can be evaluated by applying the micropush out test. Therefore, more in vitro studies are needed to evaluate the bond strength of the fiber posts cemented with different resin cement systems after simulating the artificial aging induced by thermocycling. The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two different resin cement systems (total etch, and self-etch resin cement system) used for cementation of fiber reinforced composite posts in three different aging periods using thermocycling. Methods. Following IRB approval, sixty freshly extracted bicuspid single rooted natural teeth were endodontically treated, and the post-spaces were prepared to receive a fiber-post cemented with either a total etch resin cement (Rely-X Ultimate) or with a self-etch resin cement (Rely-X Unicem). No thermocycling, 20,000 and 40,000 cycles was used to age the specimens. Teeth were randomly allocated into six different groups: G1 - Control: Rely-X Ultimate cement with no thermocycling. G2: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 20,000 thermocycling. G3: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 40,000 thermocycling. G4: Rely-X Unicem cement. G5: Rely-X Unicem cement. G6: Rely-X Unicem cement. Microtensile bond strength determined using a micropush out test on a universal testing machine (MTS). Additionally, the failure mode of each specimen was observed under a stereomicroscope (Olympus) at 40x magnification. Finally, one representative sample was randomly selected from each of the five failure modes for scanning

  8. Effects of curing mode of resin cements on the bond strength of a titanium post: An intraradicular study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazal Reza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare push-out bond strength between self-cured and dual-cured resin cement using a titanium post. Background: Dual-cured resin cements have been found to be less polymerized in the absence of light; thus the bond strength of cements would be compromised due to the absence of light with a metallic post. Materials and Methods: Ten extracted teeth were prepared for cement titanium PARAPOST, of five specimens each, with Panavia F [dual-cured (PF] and Rely×Luting 2 [self-cured resin-modified glass ionomer luting cement (RL]; the push-out bond strength (PBS at three different levels of the sectioned roots was measured. The failure modes were observed and the significance of the differences in bond strength of the two types of cement at each level and at different levels of the same type was analyzed with non-parametric tests. Results: The push-out bond strength of the RL group was greater at all the three levels; with significant differences at the coronal and middle levels (P<0.05. No significant differences in PBS at different levels of the same group were observed. Cement material around the post was obvious in the PF group. The failure mode was mostly adhesive between the post and resin cement in the RL group. Conclusion: Bond strength was greater with self-cured, resin-modified glass ionomer luting cement, using titanium post.

  9. Restoration of non-carious cervical lesions with ceramic inlays: A possible model for clinical testing of adhesive cements

    OpenAIRE

    Michal Staninec; Tsuji, Grant H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: There are many luting cements coming to market which claim to be adhesive, but there is no clinical protocol currently for testing these claims. There is a standardized protocol for testing direct restorations bonded to dentin and it is used extensively. Case Report: We describe a clinical procedure for restoring a non-carious cervical lesion (NCCL) with a ceramic inlay using Computer-Aided Design and Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology and an adhesive resin cement...

  10. Adhesive Cementation of Indirect Composite Inlays and Onlays: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcangelo, Camillo; Vanini, Lorenzo; Casinelli, Matteo; Frascaria, Massimo; De Angelis, Francesco; Vadini, Mirco; D'Amario, Maurizio

    2015-09-01

    The authors conducted a literature review focused on materials and techniques used in adhesive cementation for indirect composite resin restorations. It was based on English language sources and involved a search of online databases in Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Scopus using related topic keywords in different combinations; it was supplemented by a traditional search of peer-reviewed journals and cross-referenced with the articles accessed. The purpose of most research on adhesive systems has been to learn more about increased bond strength and simplified application methods. Adherent surface treatments before cementation are necessary to obtain high survival and success rates of indirect composite resin. Each step of the clinical and laboratory procedures can have an impact on longevity and the esthetic results of indirect restorations. Cementation seems to be the most critical step, and its long-term success relies on adherence to the clinical protocols. The authors concluded that in terms of survival rate and esthetic long-term outcomes, indirect composite resin techniques have proven to be clinically acceptable. However, the correct management of adhesive cementation protocols requires knowledge of adhesive principles and adherence to the clinical protocol in order to obtain durable bonding between tooth structure and restorative materials. PMID:26355440

  11. Bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic with different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usumez, Aslıhan; Hamdemirci, Nermin; Koroglu, Bilge Yuksel; Simsek, Irfan; Parlar, Ozge; Sari, Tugrul

    2013-01-01

    Zirconia-based ceramics offer strong restorations in dentistry, but the adhesive bond strength of resin cements to such ceramics is not optimal. This study evaluated the influence of surface treatments on the bond strength of resin cement to yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP) ceramic. Seventy-five plates of Y-TZP ceramic were randomly assigned to five groups (n = 15) according to the surface treatments [airborne particle abrasion, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser irradiation (Fidelis Plus 3, Fotona; 2 W, 200 mJ, 10 Hz, with two different pulse durations 180 or 320 μs), glaze applied, and then 9.5 % hydrofluoric acid gel conditioned, control]. One specimen from each group was randomly selected, and specimens were evaluated with x-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. The resin cement (Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Kuraray) was adhered onto the zirconia surfaces with its corresponding adhesive components. Shear bond strength of each sample was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Bond strengths were analyzed through one-way ANOVA/Tukey tests. Surface treatments significantly modified the topography of the Y-TZP ceramic. The Nd:YAG laser-irradiated specimens resulted in both increased surface roughness and bond strength of the resin cement. The highest surface roughness and bond strength values were achieved with short pulse duration. Nd:YAG laser irradiation increased both surface roughness of Y-TZP surfaces and bond strength of resin cement to the zirconia surface.

  12. Bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic with different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usumez, Aslıhan; Hamdemirci, Nermin; Koroglu, Bilge Yuksel; Simsek, Irfan; Parlar, Ozge; Sari, Tugrul

    2013-01-01

    Zirconia-based ceramics offer strong restorations in dentistry, but the adhesive bond strength of resin cements to such ceramics is not optimal. This study evaluated the influence of surface treatments on the bond strength of resin cement to yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP) ceramic. Seventy-five plates of Y-TZP ceramic were randomly assigned to five groups (n = 15) according to the surface treatments [airborne particle abrasion, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser irradiation (Fidelis Plus 3, Fotona; 2 W, 200 mJ, 10 Hz, with two different pulse durations 180 or 320 μs), glaze applied, and then 9.5 % hydrofluoric acid gel conditioned, control]. One specimen from each group was randomly selected, and specimens were evaluated with x-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. The resin cement (Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Kuraray) was adhered onto the zirconia surfaces with its corresponding adhesive components. Shear bond strength of each sample was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Bond strengths were analyzed through one-way ANOVA/Tukey tests. Surface treatments significantly modified the topography of the Y-TZP ceramic. The Nd:YAG laser-irradiated specimens resulted in both increased surface roughness and bond strength of the resin cement. The highest surface roughness and bond strength values were achieved with short pulse duration. Nd:YAG laser irradiation increased both surface roughness of Y-TZP surfaces and bond strength of resin cement to the zirconia surface. PMID:22718473

  13. Comparison of the microshear bond strength of two resin cements to Cercon and Zirkonzahn ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Nokar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Nowadays, the application of all ceramic restorations are being raised, because of their physical characteristics, such as translucency and good appearance. Numerous researchers investigated the impact of surface treatments on the bond strength of zirconia ceramic with resin cements. The aim of this study was to compare the microshear bond strength of Cercon and Zirkonzahn (two kind of zirconia ceramics, to two types of resin cements after thermocycling.   Materials and Methods: In this study, 24 rectangular specimens were made from each group of Cercon and Zirkonzahn ceramics. After sandblasting, these specimens were connected to 3×1 mm2 composite cylinders by two resin cements (Panavia F2 and Rely X Unicem2. After performing a thermocycling regime for 5000 cycles (5-55 ◦ C, the microshear bond strengths were measured by a universal testing machine. The mode of failures were determined by a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA.   Results: Type of ceramics had no significant impact on the microshear bond strength (P=0.317. The highest bond strengths in both ceramics were obtained with Reply X Unicem (P=0.035. The predominant failure mode was adhesive between the cement and ceramic.   Conclusion: Type of resin cement had a significant effect on their bond strengths to zirconia ceramics.

  14. Solidification of Spent Ion Exchange Resin Using ASC Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周耀中; 云桂春; 叶裕才

    2002-01-01

    Ion exchange resins (IERs) have been widely used in nuclear facilities. However, the spent radioactive IERs result in major quantities of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. This article describes a laboratory experimental study on solidification processing of IERs using a new type of cement named ASC cement. The strength of the cementation matrix is in the range of 18-20 MPa (28 d); the loading of the spent IER in the cement-resin matrix is over 45% and leaching rates of 137Cs, 90Sr and 60Co are 7.92×10-5, 5.7×10-6, and 1.19×10-8 cm/d. The results show that ASC cement can be a preferable cementation material for immobilization of radioactive spent IER.

  15. Clinical observation of Hybrid Coat dental adhesive resin cement on postoperative hypersensitivity in vital teeth preparation for crown restoration%劲润牙本质保护膜防治牙体预备后牙本质敏感的近期疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛薇

    2012-01-01

    目的 评价劲润牙本质保护膜(Hybrid coat)对活髓基牙预备后牙本质敏感的防治效果.方法 将54例(共115颗)进行固定桥修复行牙体预备的基牙,对缺牙区两侧基牙随机分组,试验组在牙体预备后表面用劲润牙本质保护膜处理,对照组牙体预备后不做任何处理,所有基牙均采用暂时冠修复,备牙后和10天试戴修复体时观察治疗效果,评定疗效,并对戴牙前评定的疗效进行统计学分析.结果 经劲润牙本质保护膜处理过的基牙牙本质敏感症状明显改善,两次疗效比价,有效率差别有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 劲润牙本质保护膜可以有效防治活髓基牙预备后的牙本质敏感症状,值得在临床上推广应用.%Objective To evaluate the effect in preventing dentin hypersentivity by using Hybrid coat dental adhesive resin cement on prepared vital pulp abutment teeth. Methods 115 prepared vital pulp abutment teeth of 54 cases were randomly divided into experiment group and control group: One was treated with Hybrid coat dental adhesive resin cement, and the other was without any treatment as control. All of the prepared abutment teeth were protected by temporary crown or bridge. To evaluate the effect of hypersensitivity wheri try in the terminal restotations 10 days later. Then the results were analyzed using statistics software. Results After 10 days, the symptom of dentin hypersentivity by using Hybrid coat dental adhesive resin cement in experiment group was obviously alleviated. Conclusion Conclusion: Dentin hypersentivity can be effectively released by using Hybrid coat dental adhesive resin cement after tooth prepartion.

  16. Influence of endodontic sealer composition and time of fiber post cementation on sealer adhesiveness to bovine root dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ricardo Abreu da; Barreto, Mirela Sangoi; Moraes, Rafael do Amaral; Broch, Juliana; Bier, Carlos Alexandre Souza; Só, Marcus Vinícius Reis; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the influence of the type of endodontic sealer (salicylate resin-based sealer vs. two endodontic sealers) and the time of fiber post cementation after root filling on the post adhesion to bovine root dentin. Sixty bovine roots were assigned to six groups (n=10), considering an experimental design with two factors (factorial 3x2): endodontic sealer factor in three levels [epoxy resin-based sealer (AH Plus), eugenol-based sealer (Endofill), and salicylate resin-based sealer plus mineral trioxide aggregate - MTA (MTA Fillapex)] and time for post cementation factor in two levels (immediate post cementation or 15 days after root canal filling). After post cementation, 2-mm-thick slices were produced and submitted to push-out test. The failure modes were analyzed under a 40× stereomicroscope and scored as: adhesive at cement/dentin interface; adhesive at cement/post interface; cement cohesive; post cohesive; dentin cohesive; or mixed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests (α=0.05). When the fiber posts were cemented immediately after the root canal filling, the bond strengths were similar, independent of the endodontic sealer type. However, after 15 days, the epoxy resin-based sealer presented higher bond strength than the other sealers (pcement interface (89.4%). The time elapsed between the root canal filling and post cementation has no influence on post/root dentin adhesion. On the contrary, the type of endodontic sealer can influence the adhesion between fiber posts and root dentin. PMID:23969913

  17. Candida albicans adhesion to composite resin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürgers, Ralf; Schneider-Brachert, Wulf; Rosentritt, Martin; Handel, Gerhard; Hahnel, Sebastian

    2009-09-01

    The adhesion of Candida albicans to dental restorative materials in the human oral cavity may promote the occurrence of oral candidosis. This study aimed to compare the susceptibility of 14 commonly used composite resin materials (two compomers, one ormocer, one novel silorane, and ten conventional hybrid composites) to adhere Candida albicans. Differences in the amount of adhering fungi should be related to surface roughness, hydrophobicity, and the type of matrix. Cylindrical specimens of each material were made according to the manufacturers' instructions. Surface roughness R (a) was assessed by perthometer measurements and the degree of hydrophobicity by computerized contact angle analysis. Specimens were incubated with a reference strain of C. albicans (DMSZ 1386), and adhering fungi were quantified by using a bioluminometric assay in combination with an automated plate reader. Statistical differences were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were calculated to assess correlations. Median R (a) of the tested composite resin materials ranged between 0.04 and 0.23 microm, median contact angles between 69.2 degrees and 86.9 degrees . The two compomers and the ormocer showed lower luminescence intensities indicating less adhesion of fungi than all tested conventional hybrid composites. No conclusive correlation was found between surface roughness, hydrophobicity, and the amount of adhering C. albicans.

  18. Ceramic inlay movement during polymerization of resin luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, J A; Munksgaard, E C

    1995-06-01

    In cavities with no support for inlays, polymerization contraction of the resin cement may move the ceramic inlay axially. The purpose of this study was to determine the velocity and extent of such movement. Cylindrical ceramic inlays were placed in dentin cavities filled with one of four commercially available resin composite cements. An initial standardized 200-microns-thick cement film was created. The movement of the ceramic inlay during polymerization of one of the resin cements was measured by a dial gauge. The velocity of the inlay movement decreased exponentially with time and with a velocity constant of 0.09 min-1. The majority of the movement occurred within the first 12 min after photopolymerization and probably continued for several days, reaching an estimated value of 5.8 microns. After 1-2 d of water storage, 1-2-microns contraction gaps at the cavity floors were observed microscopically for every cement used. It is concluded that in cavities without support for the inlay, about 2/3 of the resin cement contraction results in movement of the inlay and about 1/3 results in formation of gaps at the cavity floors.

  19. Comparing the Effect of a Resin Based Sealer on Crown Retention for Three Types of Cements: An In Vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Pankaj; Thummar, Mansukh; Shah, Dipti; Pitti, Varun

    2013-01-01

    To determine the effect of resin based sealer on retention of casting cemented with three different luting agents. 55 extracted molar teeth were prepared with a flat occlusal surface, 20° taper and 4 mm axial height. The axial surface of each specimen was determined. The specimen were then distributed into five groups based on decreasing surface area, so each cementation group contained 11 specimens with similar mean axial surface area. A two-step, single bottle universal adhesive system (One...

  20. Comparing the effect of a resin based sealer on crown retention for three types of cements: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pankaj; Thummar, Mansukh; Shah, Dipti; Pitti, Varun

    2013-09-01

    To determine the effect of resin based sealer on retention of casting cemented with three different luting agents. 55 extracted molar teeth were prepared with a flat occlusal surface, 20° taper and 4 mm axial height. The axial surface of each specimen was determined. The specimen were then distributed into five groups based on decreasing surface area, so each cementation group contained 11 specimens with similar mean axial surface area. A two-step, single bottle universal adhesive system (One-Step-Resinomer, Bisco) was used to seal dentin after the tooth preparation. Sealer was not used on the control specimens except for the modified-resin cement (Resinomer, Bisco) specimens that required use of adhesive with cementation. Using ceramometal (Wirobond(®), BEGO), a casting was produced for each specimen and cemented with either zinc phosphate (Harvard), glass ionomer (Vivaglass) or modified resin cement (Resinomer) with single bottle adhesive. All the castings were cemented with a force of 20 kg. Castings were thermal cycled at 5 and 55 °C for 2,500 cycles and were then removed along the path of insertion using a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. A single-factor ANOVA was used with a = 0.05. The nature of failure was also recorded. The mean stress removal for non sealed zinc phosphate, sealed zinc phosphate, non sealed glass ionomer, sealed glass ionomer and modified resin cement was found to be 3.56, 1.92, 2.40, 4.26, 6.95 MPa respectively. Zinc phosphate cement remained principally on the castings when the tooth surface was treated with the sealer and was found on both the tooth and the casting when the sealer was not used. Fracture of root before dislodgement was seen in 9 of 11 specimens with modified resin cement. Resin sealer decreases the retention of the castings when used with zinc phosphate and increases it when used with glass ionomer cement. The highest mean dislodgement force was measured with modified resin cement. PMID:24431752

  1. Effect of the cross-linking silane concentration in a novel silane system on bonding resin-composite cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matinlinna, Jukka; Ozcan, Mutlu; Lassila, Lippo; Kalk, Warner; Vallittu, Pekka

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Four experimental blends of an organo-functional silane monomer with a non-functional cross-linking silane monomer (a novel silane system) were evaluated as adhesion promoters in an experiment in which a resin-composite cement was bonded to silica-coated titanium. Material and Methods. 3-

  2. Effect of various surface treatments of tooth – colored posts on bonding strength of resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirzaei M.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Various studies have shown that reliable bond at the root - post - core interfaces are critical for the clinical success of post - retained restorations. Severe stress concentration at post - cement interface increases post debonding from the root. To form a bonded unit that reduces the risk of fracture, it is important to optimize the adhesion. Therefore, some post surface treatments have been proposed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of various surface treatments of tooth - colored posts on the bonding of resin cement. "nMaterials and Methods: In this interventional study, 144 tooth colored posts were used in 18 groups (8 samples in each group. The posts included quartz fiber (Matchpost, glass fiber (Glassix, and zirconia ceramic (Cosmopost and the resin cement was Panavia F 2.0. The posts received the following surface treatments: 1- No surface treatment (control group, 2- Etching with HF and silane, 3- Sandblasting with Cojet sand, 4- Sandblasting with Cojet sand and application of silane, 5- Sandblasting with alumina particles, 6- Sandblasting with alumina particles and application of silane. Then, posts were cemented into acrylic molds with Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The specimens were placed in water for 2 days and debonded in pull - out test. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA followed by Tamhane and Tukey HSD. Failure modes were observed under a stereomicroscope (10 . P<0.05 was considered as the significant level. "nResults: Surface treatments (sandblasting with Cojet and alumina particles ,with or without silane resulted in improved bond strength of resin cement to glass fiber post (Glassix and zirconia ceramic (Cosmopost [p<0/05], but not to the quartz fiber post (Matchpost. In general, higher bond strengths resulted in a to higher percentage of cohesive failures within the cement. "nConclusion: Based on the results of this study, sandblasting with cojet and alumina

  3. Physical and chemical durability of cement impregnated epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immobilization of simulation radioactive waste contains Cs and Sr with cement impregnated epoxy resin has been done. Low level liquid waste in 30% weight mixed cement homogeneously and then set in its curing time about 28 days. Waste from was impregnated with epoxy resin (Bisphenol-A-diglycidylether) and use Triethylenteramin as catalyst. the sample of cement impregnated epoxy resin 2.5 cm x 2.5 cm in diameter and length was tested by Paul Weber. The compressive strength was obtained of 4.08 kN.cm-2. The sochxlet apparatus was run on flow rate of 300 ml/hour at 100oC and during 24 hours. The leaching rate of Cs was round on 5.5 x 10-4 g.cm-2.d-1 and Sr was 6.1 x 10-4 g.cm-2.d-1 (author)

  4. Evaluation of marginal leakage between a flowable composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro VOLPATO

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate, in vitro, the leakage between a flowable composite resin (Fill Magic Flow® and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Vitremer®. Forty extracted human premolars were selected for this study. The teeth were randomly assigned into two groups. Class cavities were prepared with margin extended apically. All teeth were subjected to thermocycling with 250 cycles. Afterwards, the teeth were submitted to a basic fuccina 0,5% to be analyzed to the infiltration degree throughout the walls of the preparation. The results showed that resin-modified glass ionomer cements present the worst results (p < 0,05.

  5. In-vitro study of resin-modified glass ionomer cements for cementation of orthodontic bands. Isolation, surplus removal and humidity as factors influencing the bond strength between enamel, cement and metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebmann, S M; Jost-Brinkmann, P G

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate different light-cured and chemically cured resin-modified glass ionomer cements used for the cementation of orthodontic bands and to analyze various factors influencing the adhesive strength between enamel, cement and stainless steel. Four resin-modified glass ionomers (Fuji Ortho LC/GC, Fuji Duet/GC, Unitek Multi-Cure Glass Ionomer Orthodontic Band Cement/3M Unitek, Vitremer/3M) and 1 compomer (Band-Lok/Reliance) were examined. Flattened and polished bovine teeth embedded in polyurethane resin were used as enamel specimens. Before cementation, 50% of the specimens were moistened with the aerosol of an inhalation device, while the rest were dried with compressed air. Stainless steel cylinders (CrNi 18 10) were perpendicularly bonded onto the polished enamel using a custom-made cementation device and immediately topped with a pressure of 0.25 MPa. The cement was isolated with either Ketac Glaze/ESPE, Fuji Coat/GC, Cacao Butter/GC, Dryfoil/Jalenko or Final Varnish/VOCO, or was left uncoated. Eight minutes after the beginning of mixing, either the surplus cement was removed with a scalpel or surplus removal was simulated with ultrasound. After 24 hours storage in a water bath at 37 degrees C and 1,000 thermocycles the shear bond strength was determined. Significant differences with respect to the shear bond strength were found among the following cements, ranking from highest to lowest: Fuji Duet, Unitek cement > Fuji Ortho LC > Vitremer > Band-Lok. The application of a barrier coating significantly increased the shear bond strength of all cements except Fuji Ortho LC. The light-cured resin Ketac Glaze proved to be the most effective barrier coating. A dry enamel surface increased the bond strength of all investigated cements except Unitek cement. The use of ultrasound led to no significant reduction in shear bond strength in comparison with surplus removal with a scalpel. PMID:10546417

  6. Evaluation of resin adhesion to zirconia ceramic using some organosilanes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matinlinna, Jukka P.; Heikkinen, Mo; Ozcan, Mutlu; Lassila, Lippo V. J.; Vallittu, Pekka K.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated and compared the effect of three trialkoxysilane coupling agents on the bond strength of a Bis-GMA-based unfilled resin and a dimethacrylate-based resin composite luting cement to a zirconia ceramics (Procera(R) AllZircon, Nobel Biocare, Goteborg, Sweden). Methods. S

  7. Comparative study to evaluate shear bond strength of RMGIC to composite resin using different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj G Chandak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study is to compare and evaluate the role of new dental adhesives to bond composite to the resinmodified glass inomer cement (RMGIC. Materials and Methods: Thirty specimens were prepared on acrylic blocks, with wells prepared in it by drilling holes, to retain the RMGIC. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups of ten specimens each. In Group a thin layer of selfetch adhesive (3M ESPE was applied between the RMGIC and the composite resin FILTEK P60 (3M SPE. In Group II, total etch adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2, 3M ESPE was applied, and in Group III, there was no application of any adhesive between RMGIC and the composite resin. After curing all the specimens, the shear bond strength was measured using an Instron universal testing machine. Results: The results were drawn and tabulated using ANOVA-fishers and Dunnet D statistical tests.The maximum shear bond strength values were recorded in Group I specimens with self-etch adhesive showing a mean value of 2.74 when compared to the Group II adhesive (Total etch showing a mean shear strength of value 1.89, where no adhesive was used, showed a minimum mean shear bond strength of 1.42. There was a great and significant difference between Group I and Group II (P value 0.05 whereas, both Group I and Group II showed a vast and significant difference from Group III (P value = 0-001. Conclusion: Hence, this present study concludes that application of self-etch adhesive (3M ESPE, U.S.A in between RMGIC and composite resin increases the shear bond strength between RMGIC and the resin composites, as compared to the total-etch type adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2,3M ESPE, U.S.A as well as without application of the adhesive agent.

  8. Effect of Resin Coating and Chlorhexidine on Microleakage of Two Resin Cements after Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Shafie

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluating the effect of resin coating and chlorhexidine on microleakage of two resin cements after water storage.Materials and Methods: Standardized class V cavities were prepared on facial and lingual surfaces of one hundred twenty intact human molars with gingival margins placed 1mm below the cemento-enamel junction. Indirect composite inlays were fabricated and thespecimens were randomly assigned into 6 groups. In Groups 1 to 4, inlays were cemented with Panavia F2.0 cement. G1: according to the manufacturer’s instruction. G2: with light cured resin on the ED primer. G3: chlorhexidine application before priming. G4: withchlorhexidine application before priming and light cured resin on primer. G5: inlays were cemented with Nexus 2 resin cement. G6: chlorhexidine application after etching. Each group was divided into two subgroups based on the 24-hour and 6-month water storagetime. After preparation for microleakage test, the teeth were sectioned and evaluated at both margins under a 20×stereomicroscope. Dye penetration was scored using 0-3 criteria.The data was analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and complementary Dunn tests.Results: There was significantly less leakage in G2 and G4 than the Panavia F2.0 control group at gingival margins after 6 months (P<0.05. There was no significant differences in leakage between G1 and G3 at both margins after 24 hours and 6 months storage. After 6months, G6 revealed significantly less leakage than G5 at gingival margins (P=0.033. In general, gingival margins showed more leakage than occlusal margins.Conclusion: Additionally, resin coating in self-etch (Panavia F2.0 and chlorhexidine application in etch-rinse (Nexus resin cement reduced microleakage at gingival margins after storage.

  9. Effect of root canal rinsing protocol on dentin bond strength of two resin cements using three different method of test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Sheikhi, Mohammadreza; Soleimani, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Background Different studies have used different tests to evaluate bond strength of resin cements to root dentin. In this in vitrostudy, three different tests were used to evaluate the bond strength of two resin cements to root dentin using two root dentin irrigation protocols. Material and Methods Ninety-six intact single-rooted teeth were selected for this study. Forty-eight teeth, with a root length of 15mm, were randomly divided into two groups and irrigated with normal saline or 2.5% sodium hypochlorite solutions during root canal preparation, respectively. For each 12 specimens from each group, fiber post #1 was bonded using an etch-and-rinse (Duo-Link) and a self-adhesive (BisCem) resin cement, respectively. After incubation, two specimens were prepared for the push-out test from the middle thirds of the roots. In another 24 teeth, after two 1.5-mm sections were prepared from the middle thirds of the prepared roots, sections of the post were bonded in two subgroups with each of the cements mentioned above and the samples were prepared for the pull-out test. For shear test, the crowns of 48 teeth were cut away, the dentin surfaces were prepared, the two irrigation solutions were used, and the resin cements were bonded. Data collected from the three tests were evaluated by ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey and Weibull tests (α=0.05). Results There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values between the three bond strength tests (P0.05). Conclusions Under the limitations of the present study, the method of the test used had an effect on the recorded bond strength between the resin cement and root dentin. Cement type and irrigation protocol resulted in similar variations with all the tests. Push-out and shear tests exhibited more coherent results. Key words:Bond strength, endodontically treated tooth, fiber post, resin cement, sodium hypochlorite. PMID:27398173

  10. Bond strength of resin cements to noble and base metal alloys with different surface treatments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkhondeh Raeisosadat

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The bond strength of resin cements to metal alloys depends on the type of the metal, conditioning methods and the adhesive resins used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of resin cements to base and noble metal alloys after sand blasting or application of silano-pen.Cylinders of light cured Z 250 composite were cemented to "Degubond 4" (Au Pd and "Verabond" (Ni Cr alloys by either RelyX Unicem or Panavia F2, after sandblasting or treating the alloys with Silano-Pen. The shear bond strengths were evaluated. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and t tests at a significance level of P<0.05.When the alloys were treated by Silano-Pen, RelyX Unicem showed a higher bond strength for Degubond 4 (P=0.021 and Verabond (P< 0.001. No significant difference was observed in the bond strength of Panavia F2 to the alloys after either of surface treatments, Degubond 4 (P=0.291 and Verabond (P=0.899. Panavia F2 showed a higher bond strength to sandblasted Verabond compared to RelyX Unicem (P=0.003. The bond strength of RelyX Unicem was significantly higher to Silano-Pen treated Verabond (P=0.011. The bond strength of the cements to sandblasted Degubond 4 showed no significant difference (P=0.59. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated Degubond 4 (P=0.035.The bond strength of resin cements to Verabond alloy was significantly higher than Degubond 4. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated alloys. Surface treatments of the alloys did not affect the bond strength of Panavia F2.

  11. Influence of different luting protocols on shear bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing resin nanoceramic material to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Poggio

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, conventional resin cements (coupled with etch and rinse or self-etch adhesives showed better shear strength values compared to self-adhesive resin cements. Furthermore, conventional resin cements used together with a self-etch adhesive reported the highest values of adhesion.

  12. The Evaluation of a Resin-modified Glass Ionome Cement for Bonding Orthodontic Brackets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fujun; PENG Youjian; PENG Bin

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the shear bond strength(SBS)and bond failure interface after the debonding of orthodontic brackets with a resin-modified glass ionomer cement(RMGIC)under six bonding conditions,140 premolar teeth were randomly divided into seven groups.The brackets of all groups,except for control group,were bonded using a RMGIC.The teeth were debonded using a universal testing machine.The shear bond strength,adhesive remnant index(ARI)and enamel fracture were examined for each debonding.A significant difference existed in SBS under wet and dry condi-tions in two groups of Fuji Ortho LC.Different degree of enamel fracture was seen in groups of Fuji Ortho LC(dry/37%phosphoric acid treated)after debonding.Bond failed predominantly at the enamel-adhesive interface,except for phosphoric acid treated groups.The RMGIC achieve a clinically effective adhesion in orthodontics under different bonding conditions.

  13. Effects of Mechanical and Chemical Pretreatments of Zirconia or Fiber Posts on Resin Cement Bonding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Li

    Full Text Available The bonding strength between resin cement and posts is important for post and core restorations. An important method of improving the bonding strength is the use of various surface pretreatments of the post. In this study, the surfaces of zirconia (fiber posts were treated by mechanical and/or chemical methods such as sandblasting and silanization. The bonding strength between the zirconia (fiber post and the resin cement was measured by a push-out method after thermocycling based on the adhesion to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The zirconia and fiber posts exhibited different bonding strengths after sandblasting and/or silanization because of the different strengths and chemical structures. The zirconia post showed a high bonding strength of up to 17.1 MPa after a combined treatment of sandblasting and silanization because of the rough surface and covalent bonds at the interface. This effect was also enhanced by using 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilylethane for the formation of a flexible layer at the interface. In contrast, a high bonding strength of 13.9 MPa was obtained for the fiber post treated by silane agents because the sandblasting treatment resulted in damage to the fiber post, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the improvement in the bonding strength between the post and the resin cement could be controlled by different chemical and/or mechanical treatments. Enhanced bonding strength depended on covalent bonding and the surface roughness. A zirconia post with high bonding strength could potentially be used for the restoration of teeth in the future.

  14. Effects of Mechanical and Chemical Pretreatments of Zirconia or Fiber Posts on Resin Cement Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Zhou, Hui; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chen; Sun, Ying Chun; Gao, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The bonding strength between resin cement and posts is important for post and core restorations. An important method of improving the bonding strength is the use of various surface pretreatments of the post. In this study, the surfaces of zirconia (fiber) posts were treated by mechanical and/or chemical methods such as sandblasting and silanization. The bonding strength between the zirconia (fiber) post and the resin cement was measured by a push-out method after thermocycling based on the adhesion to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The zirconia and fiber posts exhibited different bonding strengths after sandblasting and/or silanization because of the different strengths and chemical structures. The zirconia post showed a high bonding strength of up to 17.1 MPa after a combined treatment of sandblasting and silanization because of the rough surface and covalent bonds at the interface. This effect was also enhanced by using 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane for the formation of a flexible layer at the interface. In contrast, a high bonding strength of 13.9 MPa was obtained for the fiber post treated by silane agents because the sandblasting treatment resulted in damage to the fiber post, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the improvement in the bonding strength between the post and the resin cement could be controlled by different chemical and/or mechanical treatments. Enhanced bonding strength depended on covalent bonding and the surface roughness. A zirconia post with high bonding strength could potentially be used for the restoration of teeth in the future. PMID:26066349

  15. Assessment of Tensile Bond Strength of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Resin to Enamel Using Two Types of Resin Cements and Three Surface Treatment Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Ghaffari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resin-bonded bridgework with a metal framework is one of the most conservative ways to replace a tooth with intact abutments. Visibility of metal substructure and debonding are the complications of these bridgeworks. Today, with the introduction of fiber-reinforced composite resins, it is possible to overcome these complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite resin materials (FRC to enamel. Methods: Seventy-two labial cross-sections were prepared from intact extracted teeth. Seventy-two rectangular samples of cured Vectris were prepared and their thickness was increased by adding Targis. The samples were divided into 3 groups for three different surface treatments: sandblasting, etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid, and roughening with a round tapered diamond bur. Each group was then divided into two subgroups for bonding to etched enamel by Enforce and Variolink II resin cements. Instron universal testing machine was used to apply a tensile force. The fracture force was recorded and the mode of failure was identified under a reflective microscope. Results: There were no significant differences in bond strength between the three surface treatment groups (P=0.53. The mean bond strength of Variolink II cement was greater than that of Enforce (P=0.04. There was no relationship between the failure modes (cohesive and adhesive and the two cement types. There was some association between surface treatment and failure mode. There were adhesive failures in sandblasted and diamond-roughened groups and the cohesive failure was dominant in the etched group. Conclusion: It is recommended that restorations made of fiber-reinforced composite resin be cemented with VariolinkII and surface-treated by hydrofluoric acid. Keywords: Tensile bond strength; surface treatment methods; fiber-reinforced composite resin

  16. Effect of Self-etching Adhesives on the Bond Strength of Glass-Ionomer Cements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jaberi Ansari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Adequate bond strength between glass ionomer cements and composite resin is necessary for the success of the sandwich technique.This study assessed the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin to glass-ionomer cements (GIC using self-etch adhesives with different pH values.One hundred specimens (6×4×2 mm were made using Fuji II and Fuji II LC GICs and treated with different adhesives as follows: Group 1:Fuji II+ Adper Prompt L-Pop, Group-2: Fuji II+SE bond, Group-3: Fuji II + AdheSE, Group-4:Fuji II+ Protect bond, Group-5: Fuji II + Single bond, Group-6:Fuji II LC+ Adper Prompt LPop, Group-7: Fuji II LC+SE bond, Group-8:Fuji II LC+ AdheSE, Group-9: Fuji II LC+ Protect bond, and Group-10: Fuji II LC+ Single bond. Each group consisted of 10 specimens. A cylinder of Z100 composite resin was placed on each sample and light cured. After 24 hours of water storage (37°C, the specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength tests (0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test.The mean micro-shear bond strength of groups 1-10 was 11.66±1.79, 16.50±1.85, 18.47±1.77, 13.95±1.77, 15.27±1.49, 15.14±0.90, 20.03±1.19, 17.48±3.00, 16.24±1.98 and 16.03±1.49 MPa, respectively. There were significant differences between groups 1 and 7 (P0.05. Fuji II LC showed higher bond strength than Fuji II (P<0.05.Type of self-etch adhesive had no significant effect on micro-shear bond strength of glass-ionomer to composite resin. Resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC exhibited higher bond strength than the conventional GIC.

  17. Restoration of non-carious cervical lesions with ceramic inlays: A possible model for clinical testing of adhesive cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Staninec

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are many luting cements coming to market which claim to be adhesive, but there is no clinical protocol currently for testing these claims. There is a standardized protocol for testing direct restorations bonded to dentin and it is used extensively. Case Report: We describe a clinical procedure for restoring a non-carious cervical lesion (NCCL with a ceramic inlay using Computer-Aided Design and Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAD-CAM technology and an adhesive resin cement.The procedure was straightforward and the result was good at one month. Discussion: NCCL′s can be restored with CAD-CAM technology in one appointment. This technique can be used to clinically test adhesion of luting cements to dentin, similarly to the current standard for direct restorations.

  18. Deformation of a dental ceramic following adhesive cementation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2010-01-01

    Stress-induced changes imparted in a \\'dentin-bonded-crown\\' material during sintering, annealing, pre-cementation surface modification, and resin coating have been visualized by profilometry. The hypothesis tested was that operative techniques modify the stressing pattern throughout the material thickness. We polished the upper surfaces of 10 ceramic discs to remove surface imperfections before using a contact profilometer (40-nm resolution) to measure the \\'flatness\\'. Discs were re-profiled after annealing and after alumina particle air-abrasion and resin-coating of the \\'fit\\' surface. Polished surfaces were convex, with a mean deflection of 8.4 + or - 1.5 microm. Mean deflection was significantly reduced (P = 0.029) following alumina particle air-abrasion and increased (P < 0.001) on resin-coating. Polishing induced a tensile stress state, resulting in surface convexity. Alumina particle air-abrasion reduced the relative tensile stress state of the contralateral polished surface. Resin-polymerization generated compression within the resin-ceramic \\'hybrid layer\\' and tension in the polished surface and is likely to contribute to the strengthening of ceramics by resin-based cements.

  19. Shear bond strength between alumina substrate and prosthodontic resin composites with various adhesive resin systems

    OpenAIRE

    AlJehani, Yousef A.; Baskaradoss, Jagan K; Geevarghese, Amrita; AlShehry, Marey A; Pekka K. Vallittu

    2015-01-01

    Background With the increase in demand for cosmetics and esthetics, resin composite restorations and all-ceramic restorations have become an important treatment alternative. Taking into consideration the large number of prosthodontic and adhesive resins currently available, the strength and durability of these materials needs to be evaluated. This laboratory study presents the shear bond strengths of a range of veneering resin composites bonded to all-ceramic core material using different adh...

  20. Cytotoxicity evaluation of five different dual-cured resin cements used for fiber posts cementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dioguardi, M; Perrone, D; Troiano, G; Laino, L; Ardito, F; Lauritano, F; Cicciù, M; Muzio, L Lo

    2015-01-01

    Custom-cast posts and cores are usually used to treat endodontically treated teeth. However, several researches have underlined how these devices may be a much higher elastic modulus than the supporting dentine and the difference in the modulus could lead to stress concentrating in the cement lute, leading to failure. The role of the cement seems to play a fundamental role in order to transfer the strength during the chewing phases. Aim of this research is to record the rate of cytotoxicity of five different dual-cured resin cements used for fiber posts cementation. We tested the cytotoxicity of this five materials on MG63 osteoblast-like cells through two different methods: MTT ([3-4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide succinate) assay which tests for mitochondrial enzyme activity6 and xCELLigence® system. PMID:26309592

  1. Hydroxyapatite composite resin cement augmentation of pedicle screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Alexander W L; Gillies, R Mark; Svehla, Martin J; Saito, Masanobu; Walsh, William R

    2003-01-01

    Pedicle screw stability is poor in osteopenic vertebrae attributable, in part, to low screw-bone interface strength. The current authors examined cement augmentation using a low curing temperature hydroxyapatite and bis-phenol-A glycidol methacrylate-based composite resin. This cement may stiffen the screw-bone interface and reduce the harmful effects associated with polymethylmethacrylate regarding temperature and toxic monomer. Thirty-five lumbar vertebrae from human cadavers were instrumented with pedicle screws, with one pedicle previously injected with cement and the other as the control. Caudocephalad toggling of +/- 1 mm for 1600 cycles was applied to the pedicle screws, and the resulting forces supported by the implant-bone interface were captured by a load cell. A curve was constructed from the peak caudal load for each cycle and three mechanical measures parameterized this curve: (1) initial load; (2) rate of load decay during the first 400 cycles; and (3) final load. The initial load increased by 16% as a result of cement augmentation, the final load increased by 65%, and the rate of load decay decreased by 59%. Cement augmentation of pedicle screws increased the stiffness and stability of the screw-bone interface. PMID:12579026

  2. Effects of barriers on chemical and biological properties of two dual resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocca, Giuseppina; Iori, Andrea; Rossini, Carlo; Martorana, Giuseppe E; Ciasca, Gabriele; Arcovito, Alessandro; Cordaro, Massimo; Lupi, Alessandro; Marigo, Luca

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the degree of conversion, monomer release, and cytotoxicity of two dual-cure resin cements (Cement-One and SmartCem2), light-cured across two indirect restorative materials in an attempt to simulate in vitro the clinical conditions. The results obtained show that the degree of conversion was influenced by both barriers, but the effect of the composite material was greater than that of the ceramic one. The amount of monomers released from the polymerized materials in the absence of barriers was significantly lower than that released in the presence of either the ceramic or the composite barrier. However, a higher amount of monomers was released in the presence of the ceramic barrier. All materials, in all the experimental conditions employed, induced slight cytotoxicity (5-10%) on human pulp cells. Our examinations showed that the two resin cements had similar chemical and biological properties. The decreased degree of conversion of the dual-curing self-adhesive composite showed that the light-curing component of these materials has an important role in the polymerization process. In clinical practice, it is therefore important to pay attention to the thickness of the material used for the reconstruction.

  3. Bond strength between zirconium ceramic and dual resinous cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Galan Junior

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the influence of different surface treatments on the bond strength between the resinous cement Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan and the structure of In-Ceram YZ (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany. Methods: Fifteen ceramic blocks were assessed: Group 1, finishing with abrasive paper; Group 2, finishing, airborne Al2O3 particle abrasion and silanization; Group 3, finishing, airborne particle abrasion, silicatization and silanization. After treatment, the blocks received cementation of resin composite cylinders with Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan and were submitted to the shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine. Results: The results were statistically analyzed (ANOVA and multiple comparison Student-Newman-Keuls test: Group 1 (9.66 ± 1.67 MPa < Group 2 (16.61 ± 3.38 MPa = Group 3 (19.23 ± 5.69 MPa, with p = 0.007. Conclusion: The structures of the In-Ceram YZ system (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany associated with Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan require previous etching to achieve greater bond strength between the ceramic and cement, and this treatment may be performed with airborne particle abrasion I or traditional silicatization, both followed by silanization.

  4. Immobilization in cement of ion exchange resins from Spanish nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange materials used at nuclear power plants can be immobilized in cements less expensive than polymer matrices. Cement solidification of spent ion exchange resins shows swelling and cracking troubles (during setting time, or of storage). The objective of this study was to select the types of cement that produce the best quality on immobilization of three kinds of resins and to set up cement formulations containing the maximum possible loading of resin. Four cements were selected to carried out the study. After a study of hydration-dehydration phenomena of ion exchange resins, a systematic work has been carried out on immobilization. Tests were performed to study compressive strength and underwater stability by changing water/cement ratio and resin/cement ratio. Mixtures made with water, cement and resin only were loaded with 10% by weight dry resin. Mixtures with higher loadings show poor workability. Tests were carried out by adding organic plasticizers and silica products to improve waste loading. Plasticizers reduced water demand and silica products permit the use of more water. Leaching tests have been performed at 40OC. In conclusion Blast Furnace Slag is the best cement for immobilization of ion exchange resin both bead and powdered form for mechanical strength, stability and leaching

  5. Synthesis of melamine-glucose resin adhesive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Shuanhu; ZHANG; Lei

    2005-01-01

    The synthesis of a novel melamine-glucose adhesive that is similar to urea-formaldehyde adhesive is reported in this paper. The conditions of synthesis, such as the initial pH, the quantity of catalyst, the temperature of reaction, the percentage of each reactant and the time of reaction, were optimized by using the orthogonal experimental method.

  6. Tangential adhesion strength of cement mortars in masonry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derkach V.N.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The initial shear strength (tangential adhesion and the angle of internal friction in the horizontal plane of mortar joints are among important characteristics, determining the masonry strength and stiffness qualities in case of share. These characteristics influence largely over the limit state approach of buildings and facilities during seismic activity and over wind, crane and other load, causing the panel frame distortion in frame buildings with masonry infill.In the paper the experimental studies results of tangential adhesion strength of cement mortars with solid and hollow ceramic bricks, porous stones, calcium silicate bricks and cellular concrete blocks are presented. This research gives experimental dependences of mortar adhesive strength with mentioned types of masonry units on compressive strength of cement mortar. There is also the comparison of the obtained results with Russian and foreign standards in this paper.

  7. Chemical adhesion rather than mechanical retention enhances resin bond durability of a dental glass-ceramic with leucite crystallites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, X F [Department of Prosthodontics, The Stomatological Hospital Affiliated Medical School, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yoshida, K [Division of Applied Prosthodontics, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8588 (Japan); Gu, N, E-mail: mengsoar@nju.edu.c [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Biomaterials and Devices, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2010-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of chemical adhesion by a silane coupler and mechanical retention by hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching on the bond durability of resin to a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystallites. Half of the ceramic plates were etched with 4.8% HFA (HFA group) for 60 s, and the other half were not treated (NoHFA group). The scale of their surface roughness and rough area was measured by a 3D laser scanning microscope. These plates then received one of the following two bond procedures to form four bond test groups: HFA/cement, NoHFA/cement, HFA/silane/cement and NoHFA/silane/cement. The associated micro-shear bond strength and bond failure modes were tested after 0 and 30 000 thermal water bath cycles. Four different silane/cement systems (Monobond S/Variolink II, GC Ceramic Primer/Linkmax HV, Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Porcelain Liner M/SuperBond C and B) were used. The data for each silane/cement system were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. HFA treatment significantly increased the surface R{sub a} and R{sub y} values and the rough area of the ceramic plates compared with NoHFA treatment. After 30 000 thermal water bath cycles, the bond strength of all the test groups except the HFA/Linkmax HV group was significantly reduced, while the HFA/Linkmax HV group showed only adhesive interface failure. The other HFA/cement groups and all NoHFA/cement groups lost bond strength completely, and all NoHFA/silane/cement groups with chemical adhesion had significantly higher bond strength and more ceramic cohesive failures than the respective HFA/cement groups with mechanical retention. The result of the HFA/silane/cement groups with both chemical adhesion and mechanical retention revealed that HFA treatment could enhance the bond durability of resin/silanized glass ceramics, which might result from the increase of the chemical adhesion area on the ceramic rough surface and subsequently reduced degradation speed of the silane

  8. Chemical adhesion rather than mechanical retention enhances resin bond durability of a dental glass-ceramic with leucite crystallites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of chemical adhesion by a silane coupler and mechanical retention by hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching on the bond durability of resin to a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystallites. Half of the ceramic plates were etched with 4.8% HFA (HFA group) for 60 s, and the other half were not treated (NoHFA group). The scale of their surface roughness and rough area was measured by a 3D laser scanning microscope. These plates then received one of the following two bond procedures to form four bond test groups: HFA/cement, NoHFA/cement, HFA/silane/cement and NoHFA/silane/cement. The associated micro-shear bond strength and bond failure modes were tested after 0 and 30 000 thermal water bath cycles. Four different silane/cement systems (Monobond S/Variolink II, GC Ceramic Primer/Linkmax HV, Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Porcelain Liner M/SuperBond C and B) were used. The data for each silane/cement system were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. HFA treatment significantly increased the surface Ra and Ry values and the rough area of the ceramic plates compared with NoHFA treatment. After 30 000 thermal water bath cycles, the bond strength of all the test groups except the HFA/Linkmax HV group was significantly reduced, while the HFA/Linkmax HV group showed only adhesive interface failure. The other HFA/cement groups and all NoHFA/cement groups lost bond strength completely, and all NoHFA/silane/cement groups with chemical adhesion had significantly higher bond strength and more ceramic cohesive failures than the respective HFA/cement groups with mechanical retention. The result of the HFA/silane/cement groups with both chemical adhesion and mechanical retention revealed that HFA treatment could enhance the bond durability of resin/silanized glass ceramics, which might result from the increase of the chemical adhesion area on the ceramic rough surface and subsequently reduced degradation speed of the silane coupler

  9. Surface roughness and wear of resin cements after toothbrush abrasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Kiyoshi ISHIKIRIAMA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased surface roughness and wear of resin cements may cause failure of indirect restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the surface roughness change and the vertical wear of four resin cements subjected to mechanical toothbrushing abrasion. Ten rectangular specimens (15 × 5 × 4 mm were fabricated according to manufacturer instructions for each group (n = 10: Nexus 3, Kerr (NX3; RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE (ARC; RelyX U100, 3M ESPE (U100; and Variolink II, Ivoclar/Vivadent (VL2. Initial roughness (Ra, µm was obtained through 5 readings with a roughness meter. Specimens were then subjected to toothbrushing abrasion (100,000 cycles, and further evaluation was conducted for final roughness. Vertical wear (µm was quantified by 3 readings of the real profile between control and brushed surfaces. Data were subjected to analysis of variance, followed by Tukey’s test (p < 0.05. The Pearson correlation test was performed between the surface roughness change and wear (p < 0.05. The mean values of initial/final roughness (Ra, µm/wear (µm were as follows: NX3 (0.078/0.127/23.175; ARC (0.086/0.246/20.263; U100 (0.296/0.589/16.952; and VL2 (0.313/0.512/22.876. Toothbrushing abrasion increased surface roughness and wear of all resin cements tested, although no correlation was found between those variables. Vertical wear was similar among groups; however, it was considered high and may lead to gap formation in indirect restorations.

  10. Comparison of the Amount of Fluoride Release from Nanofilled Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Conventional and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumitha Upadhyay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate and compare the amount of fluoride release of conventional, resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cements.Materials and Methods: Tablets of glass-ionomer cements were immersed in deionized water and incubated at 37◦C. After 1, 2, 7, 15 and 30 days, fluoride ion was measured under normal atmospheric conditions by fluoride ion selective electrode. Buffer (TISAB II was used to decomplex the fluoride ion and to provide a constant background ionic strength and to maintain the pH of water between 5.0 and 5.5 as the fluoride electrode is sensitive to changes in pH. Statistical evaluation was carried out by one way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance using SPSS 11.0. The significance level was set at p< 0.05.Results: The release of fluoride was highest on day 1 and there was a sudden fall on day 2 in all three groups. Initially fluoride release from conven-tional glass-ionomer cement was highest compared to the other two glass-ionomer cements, but the amount drastically reduced over the period. Although the amount of fluoride release was less than both the resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass-ionomer cement, the release was sustained consistently for 30 daysConclusion: The cumulative fluoride release of nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement was very less compared to the conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements and Nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement released less but steady fluoride as compared to other resin modified glass ionomer cements.

  11. 21 CFR 872.3750 - Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3750 Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner. (a) Identification. A bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner is a...

  12. Cariogenic bacteria degrade dental resin composites and adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbia, M; Ma, D; Cvitkovitch, D G; Santerre, J P; Finer, Y

    2013-11-01

    A major reason for dental resin composite restoration replacement is related to secondary caries promoted by acid production from bacteria including Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). We hypothesized that S. mutans has esterase activities that degrade dental resin composites and adhesives. Standardized specimens of resin composite (Z250), total-etch (Scotchbond Multipurpose, SB), and self-etch (Easybond, EB) adhesives were incubated with S. mutans UA159 or uninoculated culture medium (control) for up to 30 days. Quantification of the BisGMA-derived biodegradation by-product, bishydroxy-propoxy-phenyl-propane (BisHPPP), was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Surface analysis of the specimens was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). S. mutans was shown to have esterase activities in levels comparable with those found in human saliva. A trend of increasing BisHPPP release throughout the incubation period was observed for all materials and was more elevated in the presence of bacteria vs. control medium for EB and Z250, but not for SB (p < .05). SEM confirmed the increased degradation of all materials with S. mutans UA159 vs. control. S. mutans has esterase activities at levels that degrade resin composites and adhesives; degree of degradation was dependent on the material's chemical formulation. This finding suggests that the resin-dentin interface could be compromised by oral bacteria that contribute to the progression of secondary caries.

  13. Adhesion strength improvement of epoxy resin reinforced with nanoelastomeric copolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Elastomeric nanoparticle (ENP) was prepared via miniemulsion polymerization. → ENP was added to epoxy resin (ER) with different amounts. → The lap shear strength (LSS) of different ENP/ER was measured. → The fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). - Abstract: Nano-sized copoly(styrene-butylacrylate-ethylenglycoldimethacrylate) (St-BA-EGDMA) particles were added at different contents to improve the toughness of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A epoxy resin (ER) using piperidine as a curing agent. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) proved that nanoelastomer was finely dispersed in the epoxy adhesive. To compare the adhesion strength of different adherents utilizing both modified and unmodified epoxy adhesive, the lap shear strength (LSS) test was measured as a function of elastomeric nanoparticles (ENP) amount. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and FTIR were used to investigate the interface morphology and chemical composition of adherent and epoxy adhesive. The result indicated that the adhesion strength was increased dramatically by addition of nanoparticles compared with that of pure epoxy adhesive. The highest adhesion strength was obtained with 20 wt% elastomeric nanoparticles. It was found that reinforcement with nanoparticles improved the fracture toughness.

  14. Adhesion strength improvement of epoxy resin reinforced with nanoelastomeric copolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoee, Sepideh, E-mail: Khoee@Khayam.ut.ac.ir [Polymer Laboratory, Chemistry Department, School of Science, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14155-6455, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hassani, Narges [Polymer Laboratory, Chemistry Department, School of Science, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14155-6455, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-09-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Elastomeric nanoparticle (ENP) was prepared via miniemulsion polymerization. {yields} ENP was added to epoxy resin (ER) with different amounts. {yields} The lap shear strength (LSS) of different ENP/ER was measured. {yields} The fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). - Abstract: Nano-sized copoly(styrene-butylacrylate-ethylenglycoldimethacrylate) (St-BA-EGDMA) particles were added at different contents to improve the toughness of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A epoxy resin (ER) using piperidine as a curing agent. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) proved that nanoelastomer was finely dispersed in the epoxy adhesive. To compare the adhesion strength of different adherents utilizing both modified and unmodified epoxy adhesive, the lap shear strength (LSS) test was measured as a function of elastomeric nanoparticles (ENP) amount. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and FTIR were used to investigate the interface morphology and chemical composition of adherent and epoxy adhesive. The result indicated that the adhesion strength was increased dramatically by addition of nanoparticles compared with that of pure epoxy adhesive. The highest adhesion strength was obtained with 20 wt% elastomeric nanoparticles. It was found that reinforcement with nanoparticles improved the fracture toughness.

  15. A new resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement for use with orthodontic attachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M; Silverman, E

    1997-08-01

    Resin cements are commonly used to bond orthodontic appliances. However, etching enamel and bracket bonding is an extremely technique-sensitive process. Moisture and saliva control, particularly in the gingival third of posterior teeth, is difficult and time-consuming, but is critical to success. Recently, a light-cure resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement was shown to perform with equal bonding capacity. This is accomplished in a wet field, without etching, and with the glass ionomer feature of fluoride release. Now, a self-cure resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement has been introduced. The self-cure cement will provide equal clinical success in areas where light curing is not possible or desired. This article compares traditional resin cements and glass ionomer cements for bonding orthodontic appliances.

  16. Effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on bond durability of fiber posts cemented with etch-and-rinse adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Sarafraz, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was undertaken to investigate whether use of an adhesive penetration enhancer, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), improves bond stability of fiber posts to root dentin using two two-step etch-and-rinse resin cements. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty human maxillary central incisor roots were randomly divided into 4 groups after endodontic treatment and post space preparation, based on the fiber post/cement used with and without DMSO pretreatment. Acid-etched root dentin was treated with 5% DMSO aqueous solution for 60 seconds or with distilled water (control) prior to the application of Excite DSC/Variolink II or One-Step Plus/Duo-link for post cementation. After micro-slicing the bonded root dentin, push-out bond strength (P-OBS) test was performed immediately or after 1-year of water storage in each group. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Student's t-test (α=.05). RESULTS A significant effect of time, DMSO treatment, and treatment × time interaction were observed (P.05). CONCLUSION DMSO-wet bonding might be a beneficial method in preserving the stability of resin-dentin bond strength over time when fiber post is cemented with the tested etch-and-rinse adhesive cements. PMID:27555893

  17. Effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on bond durability of fiber posts cemented with etch-and-rinse adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Sarafraz, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was undertaken to investigate whether use of an adhesive penetration enhancer, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), improves bond stability of fiber posts to root dentin using two two-step etch-and-rinse resin cements. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty human maxillary central incisor roots were randomly divided into 4 groups after endodontic treatment and post space preparation, based on the fiber post/cement used with and without DMSO pretreatment. Acid-etched root dentin was treated with 5% DMSO aqueous solution for 60 seconds or with distilled water (control) prior to the application of Excite DSC/Variolink II or One-Step Plus/Duo-link for post cementation. After micro-slicing the bonded root dentin, push-out bond strength (P-OBS) test was performed immediately or after 1-year of water storage in each group. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Student's t-test (α=.05). RESULTS A significant effect of time, DMSO treatment, and treatment × time interaction were observed (P.05). CONCLUSION DMSO-wet bonding might be a beneficial method in preserving the stability of resin-dentin bond strength over time when fiber post is cemented with the tested etch-and-rinse adhesive cements.

  18. Color agreement between nanofluorapatite ceramic discs associated with try-in pastes and with resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Rigoni

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro color agreement between nanofluorapatite ceramic discs (e.max Ceram / Ivoclar Vivadent / A2 associated with try-in pastes and those bonded with resin cements (Vitique / DMG/ try-in shade A2½ and cement shade A2½, Variolink II / Ivoclar Vivadent / try-in shade A1 and cement shade A1, and Choice 2 / Bisco / try-in shade A2 and cement shade A2, and to evaluate the shade stability of the discs bonded with resin cements. The shades of composite resin discs (Lliss / FGM / A2 and nanofluorapatite ceramic discs with try-in pastes or cements were evaluated according to the Vita Classical shade guide by a digital spectrophotometer (Micro EspectroShade, MHT immediately after placing the try-in pastes or resin cements between composite resin discs and ceramic discs. Other evaluations were performed at 2, 5, and 6 day intervals after cementation with the resin cements. All ceramic discs that received try-in pastes presented an A2 shade. There was no statistical difference in the shade of the ceramic specimens fixed with different cements at the different intervals, as evaluated by the Friedman test (p > 0.05. Two try-in pastes presented shade compatibility with those recommended by the manufacturers. There was no similarity of shades between the ceramic discs with try-in pastes and those with the respective resin cements. Shade stability was observed in ceramic discs with resin cements within the intervals evaluated.

  19. Resistance to bond degradation between dual-cure resin cements and pre-treated sintered CAD-CAM dental ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Raquel; Monticelli, Francesca; Osorio, Estrella; Toledano, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the bond stability of resin cements when luted to glass-reinforced alumina and zirconia CAD/CAM dental ceramics. Study design: Eighteen glass-infiltrated alumina and eighteen densely sintered zirconia blocks were randomly conditioned as follows: Group 1: No treatment; Group 2: Sandblasting (125 µm Al2O3-particles); and Group 3: Silica-coating (50 µm silica-modified Al2O3-particles). Composite samples were randomly bonded to the pre-treated ceramic surfaces using different resin cements: Subgroup 1: Clearfil Esthetic Cement (CEC); Subgroup 2: RelyX Unicem (RXU); and Subgroup 3: Calibra (CAL). After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into 1 ± 0.1 mm2 sticks. One-half of the beams were tested for microtensile bond strength (MTBS). The remaining one-half was immersed in 10 % NaOCl aqueous solution (NaOClaq) for 5 h before testing. The fracture pattern and morphology of the debonded surfaces were assessed with a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). A multiple ANOVA was conducted to analyze the contributions of ceramic composition, surface treatment, resin cement type, and chemical challenging to MTBS. The Tukey test was run for multiple comparisons (p < 0.05). Results: After 24 h, CEC luted to pre-treated zirconia achieved the highest MTBS. Using RXU, alumina and zirconia registered comparable MTBS. CAL failed prematurely, except when luted to sandblasted zirconia. After NaOClaq storage, CEC significantly lowered MTBS when luted to zirconia or alumina. RXU decreased MTBS only when bonded to silica-coated alumina. CAL recorded 100 % of pre-testing failures. Micromorphological alterations were evident after NaOClaq immersion. Conclusions: Resin-ceramic interfacial longevity depended on cement selection rather than on surface pre-treatments. The MDP-containing and the self-adhesive resin cements were both suitable for luting CAD/CAM ceramics. Despite both cements being prone to degradation, RXU luted to zirconia or untreated or

  20. Curing time effect on the fraction of 137Cs from cement-ion exchange resins-bentonite clay composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plećaš Ilija

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess the safety of disposal of radioactive waste material in cement, curing conditions and time of leaching radionuclides 137Cs have been studied. Leaching tests in cement-ion exchange resins-bentonite matrix, were carried out in accordance with a method recommended by IAEA. Curing conditions and curing time prior to commencing the leaching test are critically important in leach studies since the extent of hydration of the cement materials determines how much hydration product develops and whether it is available to block the pore network, thereby reducing leaching. Incremental leaching rates Rn[cm/d] of 137Cs from cement-ion exchange resins-bentonite matrix after 240 days were measured. The results presented in this paper are examples of results obtained in a 30-year concrete testing project which will influence the design of the engineer trenches system for future central Serbian radioactive waste storing centre.

  1. Effect of sandblasting, silica coating, and laser treatment on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Nasrin; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Heidari, Solmaz; Khoshro, Kimia

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of laser irradiation as well as other surface treatment methods on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to the two types of resin cements. Zirconia ceramic blocks (ICE Zirkon) were sintered according to the manufacturer's instructions and duplicated in resin composites. The ceramic specimens were divided into four groups according to the following surface treatments: no surface treatment (control), sandblasting with alumina, silica coating plus silanization, and Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The specimens were divided equally and then bonded with Panavia F2.0 (self-etching resin cement) and Clearfil SA Luting (self-adhesive resin cement) to the composite blocks. The bonded ceramic-composite blocks were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 72 h, cut to prepare bar-shaped specimens with a bonding area of approximately 1 mm(2), and thermocycled for 3000 cycles between 5 and 55 °C, and the microtensile bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test. The results showed that the self-adhesive resin cement used in this study did not improve the microtensile bond strength when the zirconia surface was sandblasted by alumina. The use of the Nd:YAG laser did not enhance the bond strength between the zirconia and both types of resin cements. In addition, silica coating of the zirconia surfaces plus silane application significantly improved the bond strength regardless of the type of resin cement utilized. PMID:26690357

  2. Color changes in resin cement polymerized with different curing lights under indirect restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Bayindir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of different interface materials and curing units on color changes in a resin cement material. Materials and Methods: Three interface materials and different curing systems, quartz-tungsten-halogen and polywave and monowave light-emitting diode (LED light curing units, were studied at two-time intervals. Polystyrene strip was used as a control group. All measurements were made on a white background for standard color measurement. According to the CIE LFNx01aFNx01bFNx01 color space, the baseline color values of each specimen were measured. Differences between the measurements were calculated as ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA and Duncan′s tests (α = 0.05 with SPSS 20.0 software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA. ANOVA revealed significance for interface materials and curing units and time for ΔE (P 0.05. Monowave LED exhibited significantly higher color changes than the other units ([P < 0.05] [ΔE 2.94 ± 0.44]. QTH promoted composite specimens significantly less color change ([P < 0.05] [ΔE 0.87 ± 0.41]. Conclusion: This study concluded that color of resin cement used in the adhesion of indirect restorations was affected by curing device light and indirect restoration material type.

  3. Bond strength and fracture analysis between resin cements and root canal dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Guilherme Carpena; Ballarin, Andressa; Baratieri, Luiz N

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this research is to evaluate bond strength between translucent fibre posts (White Post DC, FGM or FRC Postec Plus, Ivoclar/Vivadent) and intraradicular dentin at three different levels (cervical, middle and apical) using a dual-cure (AllCem, FGM) or self-curing (Multilink, Ivoclar/Vivadent) resin cement. Also, the fracture type after push-out test was analysed under SEM. Thirty-two extracted single-root teeth were selected. After undergoing endodontic therapy, they were randomly divided into four groups according to their post type and resin cement. Root canals were etched using 37% phosphoric acid, and Excite DSC adhesive (Ivoclar/Vivadent) was applied in all groups. The root was sectioned to obtain nine 1-mm-thick slices (three per third: coronal, middle, apical). All slices were subjected to push-out tests. Data were analysed using two-way anova. The mean bond strengths vary from 6.6 (4.6) MPa [apical] to 11.9 (5.9) MPa [cervical]. There were no significant differences between groups. Pearson χ(2)-test revealed significant differences in fracture types for all groups (P < 0.0001). The apical third had the lowest bond strengths and it was also shown to be the most critical region for luting fibre posts. PMID:22432821

  4. Adhesive luting of all-ceramic restorations--the impact of cementation variables and short-term water storage on the strength of a feldspathic dental ceramic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the impact of resin cement luting variables and short-term water storage on the strength of an adhesively luted all-ceramic restorative material. An understanding of the strengthening mechanisms will result in optimisation of operative techniques and materials selection criteria.

  5. Analysis of residual stress in the resin of metal-resin adhesion structures by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hiroki; Endo, Kazuhiko; Nagano-Takebe, Futami; Ida, Yusuke; Kakino, Ken; Narita, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    The residual stress caused by polymerization shrinkage and thermal contraction of a heat-curing resin containing 4-META on a metal-resin structure was measured by a scanning acoustic microscope. The tensile residual stress in the resin occurred within 70 µm of the adhesion interface with a flat plate specimen. The maximum tensile stress was about 58 MPa at the interface. On a metal plate specimen with retention holes, ring-like cracks in the resin occurred around the retention holes with the adhesive specimen and many linear cracks occurred in the resin vertical to the longitudinal direction of the metal frame with the non-adhesive specimens. There was tensile residual stress on the resin surface at the center of the retention holes of the adhesion specimen, indicating that the stress in the specimen with surface treatment for adhesion was higher than in that without surface treatment.

  6. Analysis of residual stress in the resin of metal-resin adhesion structures by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hiroki; Endo, Kazuhiko; Nagano-Takebe, Futami; Ida, Yusuke; Kakino, Ken; Narita, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    The residual stress caused by polymerization shrinkage and thermal contraction of a heat-curing resin containing 4-META on a metal-resin structure was measured by a scanning acoustic microscope. The tensile residual stress in the resin occurred within 70 µm of the adhesion interface with a flat plate specimen. The maximum tensile stress was about 58 MPa at the interface. On a metal plate specimen with retention holes, ring-like cracks in the resin occurred around the retention holes with the adhesive specimen and many linear cracks occurred in the resin vertical to the longitudinal direction of the metal frame with the non-adhesive specimens. There was tensile residual stress on the resin surface at the center of the retention holes of the adhesion specimen, indicating that the stress in the specimen with surface treatment for adhesion was higher than in that without surface treatment. PMID:24240901

  7. Influence of Pre-Sintered Zirconia Surface Conditioning on Shear Bond Strength to Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomofumi Sawada

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite on zirconia surface to which a specific conditioner was applied before sintering. After sintering of either conditioner-coated or uncoated specimens, both groups were divided into three subgroups by their respective surface modifications (n = 10 per group: no further treatment; etched with hydrofluoric acid; and sandblasted with 50 µm Al2O3 particles. Surfaces were characterized by measuring different surface roughness parameters (e.g., Ra and Rmax and water contact angles. Half of the specimens underwent thermocycling (10,000 cycles, 5–55 °C after self-adhesive resin cement build-up. The SBSs were measured using a universal testing machine, and the failure modes were analyzed by microscopy. Data were analyzed by nonparametric and parametric tests followed by post-hoc comparisons (α = 0.05. Conditioner-coated specimens increased both surface roughness and hydrophilicity (p < 0.01. In the non-thermocycled condition, sandblasted surfaces showed higher SBSs than other modifications, irrespective of conditioner application (p < 0.05. Adhesive fractures were commonly observed in the specimens. Thermocycling favored debonding and decreased SBSs. However, conditioner-coated specimens upon sandblasting showed the highest SBS (p < 0.05 and mixed fractures were partially observed. The combination of conditioner application before sintering and sandblasting after sintering showed the highest shear bond strength and indicated improvements concerning the failure mode.

  8. Effect of Resin Cement Porosity on Retention of Glass-Fiber Posts to Root Dentin: An Experimental and Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Natércia Rezende; Aguiar, Grazielle Crystine Rodrigues; Rodrigues, Monise de Paula; Bicalho, Aline Aredes; Soares, Priscilla Barbosa Ferreira; Veríssimo, Crisnicaw; Soares, Carlos José

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of porosity of self-adhesive resin on the stress distribution, post retention and failure mode of fiber post cemented to human root dentin. Ten human central upper incisors with circular root canal were selected. They were sectioned with 15 mm and were endodontically filled. The roots were scanned using micro-CT after post space preparation for root filling remaining evaluation. Fiber posts were cemented using self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X U200, 3M-ESPE). Two 1-mm-thick slices from the cervical, medium and apical thirds were scanned for resin cement bubbles volume measurements and submitted to a push-out test (PBS). Three operators using stereomicroscopy and confocal laser microscopy classified the failure mode. Stress distributions during the push-out test were analyzed using 3D finite element analysis. PBS values (MPa) were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests and the failure modes using the Kappa coefficient to assess inter-operator agreement. Chi-square test was used to determine significant differences between the methods ( = 0.05). Push-out bond strength was significantly affected by the bubbles presence in all root depth (pstress concentration was higher when the bubbles were present. Adhesive dentin/resin cement interface failure was the most frequent type of failure. Confocal microscopy was better than stereomicroscopy for failure analysis. Bubbles generated during resin cement insertion into the root canal negatively affect the stress distribution and the bond strength. The use of confocal microscopy is recommended for failure analysis. PMID:26963208

  9. Comparison of the resin cement bond strength to an indirect composites treated by Er;YAG laser and sandblast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansure Mirzaee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Indirect composites are designed to overcome the shortcomings of direct composites such as polymerization shrinkage and low degree of conversion. But, good adhesion of resin cements to indirect composites is still difficult. This research was designed to assess the effect of different powers of Er;YAG laser compared with sandblasting. On the micro tensil bond strength of resin cement to indirect composites.   Materials and Methods: Specimens were prepred using dental resin composite (Gradia GC and metallic mold (15×5×5 mm and were cured according to the manufacturer’s instructions. 24 blocks were prepared and randomly divided into 12 groups. G1:no treatment (as control, G 2-6: Er; YAG laser irradiation (2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Watt, G7: sandblast. Two composite blocks were bonded to each other with Panavia F.2. resin cement. The cylindrical sections with dimensions of 1 mm were tested in a microtensile bond strength tester device using 0.5 mm/min speed until fracture points. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and T-test.   Results: Interaction between lasers irradiation and sandblast treatments were significant (P0.05 whether samples were sandblasted or not. Samples which received 300 mJ of laser showed lower bond strength compared with no laser treatment. Other groups showed no significant difference (P>0.05.   Conclusion: It seems that application of sandblast with proper variables, is a good way to improve bond strength.Laser application had no influence in improving the bond strength between the indirect composite and resin cement.

  10. The effect of different onset times on the bonding properties of a self-adhesive resin cement%不同光固化起始时间对自粘接树脂水门汀牙本质粘接性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵三军; 孙建伟; 陈吉华

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of different onset time on the shear bond strength and micro-morphology of a self-adhesive resin cement ClearfilTM SA Cement-dentin bond. Methods: The buccal and lingual dentin discs of 30 molars extracted freshly were sectioned with low-speed saw under running water. The resin cement was applied to bonding surfaces at different onset time. The bonded specimens were prepared for shear bonding strength test and each specimen was sectioned occluso-gingivally into two slabs for SEM observation. Results: The dentin bond strength values(MPa) of ClearfilTM SA Cement at onset time of 0, 15, 30, 45 and 60 s were 10.09 ± 3.20, 10.65 ± 3.83, 11.12 ± 4.09, 11.57 ± 3.10 and 11.67 ± 4.08 respectively( P > 0.05). Conclusion: Thc different onset times from 0 s to 60 s have no effect on the dentin shear bonding strength of ClearfilTM SA Cement.%目的:比较不同光照起始时间对自粘接树脂水门汀ClearfilTM SA Cement与牙本质的粘接强度及粘接界面微观形态的影响.方法:选取30 颗新鲜拔除无龋损人磨牙,每个牙齿标本切取颊、舌侧牙本质试件片各1 片,用树脂水门汀粘接处理后1,分别静置0、15、30、45、60 s后光照固化;在SEM下观察其粘接界面;进行剪切强度测试.结果:自粘接树脂水门汀ClearfilTM SA Cement与牙本质的粘接强度随光固化起始时间的延长而增加:静置0 s为(10.09±3.20) MPa、15 s为(10.65±3.83) MPa、30 s为(11.12±4.09) MPa、45 s为(11.57±3.10) MPa、60 s为(11.67±4.08) MPa,但相差均不显著(P>0.05).结论:0~60 s之间不同光固化起始时间对自粘接树脂水门汀ClearfilTM SA Cement与牙本质的粘接性能无显著影响.

  11. Adhesive Bonding of Aluminium Alloy A5754 by Epoxy Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Michalec

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Joining thin sheets of aluminium and its alloys is a promising area in the field of joining materials. Nowadays, joining methods that do not melt the material itself are increasingly being utilised. This paper deals with adhesive bonding of aluminium alloy A5754 by two-component epoxy resins. Theresults show that joints bonded by Hysol 9466 have appropriate mechanical properties, but that joints bonded by Hysol 9492 have better thermal stability.

  12. Temporary zinc oxide-eugenol cement: eugenol quantity in dentin and bond strength of resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Tamara; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Malinovskii, Vladimir; Flury, Simon; Häner, Robert; Lussi, Adrian

    2013-08-01

    Uptake of eugenol from eugenol-containing temporary materials may reduce the adhesion of subsequent resin-based restorations. This study investigated the effect of duration of exposure to zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) cement on the quantity of eugenol retained in dentin and on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of the resin composite. The ZOE cement (IRM Caps) was applied onto the dentin of human molars (21 per group) for 1, 7, or 28 d. One half of each molar was used to determine the quantity of eugenol (by spectrofluorimetry) and the other half was used for μTBS testing. The ZOE-exposed dentin was treated with either OptiBond FL using phosphoric acid (H₃PO₄) or with Gluma Classic using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) conditioning. One group without conditioning (for eugenol quantity) and two groups not exposed to ZOE (for eugenol quantity and μTBS testing) served as controls. The quantity of eugenol ranged between 0.33 and 2.9 nmol mg⁻¹ of dentin (median values). No effect of the duration of exposure to ZOE was found. Conditioning with H₃PO₄ or EDTA significantly reduced the quantity of eugenol in dentin. Nevertheless, for OptiBond FL, exposure to ZOE significantly decreased the μTBS, regardless of the duration of exposure. For Gluma Classic, the μTBS decreased after exposure to ZOE for 7 and 28 d. OptiBond FL yielded a significantly higher μTBS than did Gluma Classic. Thus, ZOE should be avoided in cavities later to be restored with resin-based materials. PMID:23841789

  13. Temporary zinc oxide-eugenol cement: eugenol quantity in dentin and bond strength of resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Tamara; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Malinovskii, Vladimir; Flury, Simon; Häner, Robert; Lussi, Adrian

    2013-08-01

    Uptake of eugenol from eugenol-containing temporary materials may reduce the adhesion of subsequent resin-based restorations. This study investigated the effect of duration of exposure to zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) cement on the quantity of eugenol retained in dentin and on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of the resin composite. The ZOE cement (IRM Caps) was applied onto the dentin of human molars (21 per group) for 1, 7, or 28 d. One half of each molar was used to determine the quantity of eugenol (by spectrofluorimetry) and the other half was used for μTBS testing. The ZOE-exposed dentin was treated with either OptiBond FL using phosphoric acid (H₃PO₄) or with Gluma Classic using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) conditioning. One group without conditioning (for eugenol quantity) and two groups not exposed to ZOE (for eugenol quantity and μTBS testing) served as controls. The quantity of eugenol ranged between 0.33 and 2.9 nmol mg⁻¹ of dentin (median values). No effect of the duration of exposure to ZOE was found. Conditioning with H₃PO₄ or EDTA significantly reduced the quantity of eugenol in dentin. Nevertheless, for OptiBond FL, exposure to ZOE significantly decreased the μTBS, regardless of the duration of exposure. For Gluma Classic, the μTBS decreased after exposure to ZOE for 7 and 28 d. OptiBond FL yielded a significantly higher μTBS than did Gluma Classic. Thus, ZOE should be avoided in cavities later to be restored with resin-based materials.

  14. Long-term dentin retention of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement in non-carious cervical lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dijken, J.W.V. van; Pallesen, U.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical long-term retention to dentin of seven adhesive systems.......The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical long-term retention to dentin of seven adhesive systems....

  15. Slag cement matrix for immobilisation of spent organic ion exchange resins from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent IX resins from nuclear power reactors are highly active solid wastes generated during operations of water cooled nuclear power plants. Direct immobilisation of spent IX resins in slag cement matrix was investigated. Slag cement matrix formulations were optimised for mixed, K+ and borate resins by evaluating leaching characteristics, porosity, hydraulic conductivity etc. The 137cesium leaching characteristics of slag cement matrices developed in this study gave the average leach rates of the order of 10-4 g/cm2/d and leachability indices of 8.4 to 9.6. The 137cesium behaviour was in accordance with the porosity and hydraulic conductivity of matrix. The laboratory study revealed that these tests can be effectively used to shortlist cement matrix formulations for long term 137cesium leach tests. The results showed that slag cement matrix can be satisfactorily used to immobilise spent resins arising from PHWR and PWR/VVER type reactors. The selected formulations were successfully deployed to prepare full size (200 litre) slag cement matrix block incorporating 100 litres of mixed IX resins. The compressive strengths of core drilled samples were 64 to 118 kg/cm2 which satisfactorily meet the safety requirements. The study has shown that the slag cement matrix has potential to replace the polymer matrix making treatment of spent IX resins cost effective. (author)

  16. Influence of dentin contamination by temporary cements on the bond strength of adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josimeri Hebling

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin contaminated by temporary cements with or without eugenol. Method: Flat dentin surfaces were obtained from twenty-four human third molars. With exception of the control group (n=8, the surfaces were covered with Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA or Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA and kept in an oven at 37oC for seven days. After removing the cements, the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA or Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan were applied in accordance with the manufacturers’ recommendations, and then the crowns were constructed in of resin composite. The teeth were sectioned into specimens with a cross-sectional bond area of 0.81mm2, which were sub mitted to microtensile testing in a mechanical test machine at an actuator speed of 0.5mm/min. The data were analyzed by t- and ANOVA tests, complemented by Tukey tests (α=0.05. Results: For Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA, bond strength did not differ statistically (p>0.05 for all the experimental conditions. For Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan, only the Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA Group showed significantly lower bond strength (30.1±13.8 MPa in comparison with the other groups; control (38.9±13.5 MPa and Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA (42.1±11.0 MPa, which showed no significant difference between them.Conclusion: It was concluded that the previous covering of dentin with temporary cement containing eugenol had a deleterious effect on the adhesive performance of the self-etching system only.

  17. 49 CFR 173.173 - Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.173 Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins. (a) When..., paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins must be packaged as follows: (1) As prescribed...

  18. The influence of silane evaporation procedures on microtensile bond strength between a dental ceramic and a resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Carolina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the influence of silane evaporation procedures on bond strength between a dental ceramic and a chemically activated resin cement. Materials and Methods: Eighteen blocks (6 mm Χ 14 mm Χ 14 mm of ceramic IPS Empress 2 were cemented (C and B to composite resin (InTen-S blocks using a chemical adhesive system (Lok. Six groups were analyzed, each with three blocks divided according to ceramic surface treatment: two control groups (no treatment, NT; 10% hydrofluoric acid plus silane Monobond-S dried at room temperature, HFS; the other four groups comprised different evaporation patterns (silane rinsed and dried at room temperature, SRT; silane rinsed in boiling water and dried as before, SBRT; silane rinsed with boiling water and heat dried at 50°C, SBH; silane dried at 50 ± 5°C, rinsed in boiling water and dried at room temperature, SHBRT. The cemented blocks were sectioned to obtain specimens for microtensile test 7 days after cementation and were stored in water for 30 days prior to testing. Fracture patterns were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Statistics and Results: All blocks of NT debonded during sectioning. One way ANOVA tests showed higher bond strengths for HFS than for the other groups. SBRT and SBH were statistically similar, with higher bond strengths than SRT and SHBRT. Failures were 100% adhesive in SRT and SHBRT. Cohesive failures within the "adhesive zone" were detected in HFS (30%, SBRT (24% and SBH (40%. Conclusion: Silane treatment enhanced bond strength in all conditions evaluated, showing best results with HF etching.

  19. Resin content in cement liquids of resin-modified glass ionomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, K; Fujishima, A; Suzuki, M; Inoue, M; Sasa, R; Miyazaki, T

    1999-09-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses were conducted on four kinds of resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) cement liquids, LC, LC II, LC III (hereinafter referred to as LCs) and VM, using HPLC and laser Raman spectroscopic methods. HPLC revealed that among the RMGI liquids LCs contain 31-32% HEMA (2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate), and VM contains 18% of the same. The composition of RMGI cement liquids varied significantly between manufacturers. In Raman spectroscopic analyses, the spectra of liquids of various ratios of polyacrylic acid and HEMA were measured, and calculations were made on the peak intensity ratios of C=C stretch vibration to C=O stretch vibration, common in both HEMA and polyacrylic acid. The composition ratio of polycarboxylic acid to HEMA of commercial glass ionomer cements was assessed by the regression curve generated by a combination of peak intensity ratios and composition ratios. In addition, Raman spectroscopy was able to identity the differences in form of the methacryloyloxy group. PMID:10786135

  20. Effects of Mechanical and Chemical Pretreatments of Zirconia or Fiber Posts on Resin Cement Bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Rui Li; Hui Zhou; Wei Wei; Chen Wang,; Ying Chun Sun; Ping Gao

    2015-01-01

    The bonding strength between resin cement and posts is important for post and core restorations. An important method of improving the bonding strength is the use of various surface pretreatments of the post. In this study, the surfaces of zirconia (fiber) posts were treated by mechanical and/or chemical methods such as sandblasting and silanization. The bonding strength between the zirconia (fiber) post and the resin cement was measured by a push-out method after thermocycling based on the ad...

  1. Comparison the Effects of Different Root Canal Irrigants on the Retention of Quarts Fiber Posts Cemented by Resin Cement

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdi Shirinzad; Zahed Mohammadi; Loghman Rezaei-Soufi; Mehdi Rasekh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Root canal irrigants could change the structure of root dentin and affect the posts retention the purpose of this study was to compare the effects of three different endodontic irrigants on the retention of quarts fiber posts cemented by different resin cements. Materials & Methods: In this in-vitro study, 10 mm long post spaces were prepared in root canals of 120 premolars after endodontic therapy and cutting the crowns at the cementoenamel junction. The teeth were randomly div...

  2. The behavior of implant-supported dentures and abutments using the cemented cylinder technique with different resinous cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivete Aparecida de Mathias Sartori

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the behavior of implant-supported dentures and their components, made by cemented cylinder technique, using threetypes of resin cements. Methods: Fifty three patients, of whom 26 were women and 27 men, aged between 25 and 82 years. Results: With partial (54.43% and total (45.57% implant-supported dentures, of the Cone Morse, external and internal hexagon types (Neodent®, Curitiba, Brazil, totaling 237 fixations, were analyzed. The resin cements used were Panavia® (21.94%, EnForce® (58.23% and Rely X® (19.83% and the components were used in accordance with the Laboratory Immediate Loading - Neodent® sequence. The period of time of denture use ranged between 1 and 5 years. The results reported that 5(2.1% cylinders were loosened from metal structure (both belonging to Rely X group, 2(0.48% implants were lost after the first year of use, 16(6.75% denture retention screws wereloosened and 31(13.08% abutment screws were unloosened.Conclusion: The reasons for these failures probably are: metal structure internal retention failure, occlusal pattern, cementation technique and loading conditions. The cemented cylinder technique was effective when used in partial and total implant-supported rehabilitations, keeping prosthetic components stable, despite the resin cement utilized. However, further clinical studies must be conducted.

  3. Interfacial adhesion of dental ceramic-resin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, Alvaro

    The clinical success of resin bonding procedures for indirect ceramic restorations and ceramic repairs depends on the quality and durability of the bond between the ceramic and the resin. The quality of this bond will depend upon the bonding mechanisms that are controlled in part by the surface treatment that promotes micromechanical and/or chemical bonding to the substrate. The objective of this study is to correlate interfacial toughness (K A) with fracture surface morphological parameters of the dental ceramic-resin systems as a function of ceramic surface treatment. The analytical procedures focused on characterizing the microstructure and fracture properties of EmpressRTM ceramics (a leucite-based core ceramic, two lithia disilicate-based core ceramics, and a glass veneer) and determining the ceramic-resin adhesion zone bond strength characteristics. Microstructure and composition are controlling factors in the development of micromechanical retention produced by etching. Silane treated ceramics negated the effect of surface roughening produced by etching, inducing lower surface energy of the ceramic and, reduced bonding effectiveness. There was a positive correlation between WA, tensile bond strength (a), and KA, i.e., higher mean WA value, and higher mean sigma and KA values. This study suggests that (1) the sigma and KA values for ceramic bonded to resin are affected by the ceramic microstructure and the ceramic surface treatments; (2) the definition of the adhesion zone is essential to classify the modes of failure, which should be an integral component of all failure analyses; (3) the microtensile test may be preferable to conventional shear or flexural tests as an indicator of composite-ceramic bond quality; and (4) careful microscopic analysis of fracture surfaces and an x-ray dot map can produce a more consistent and complete description of the fracture process and interpretation of the modes of failure. The mode of failure and fractographic analyses

  4. Modification of resin modified glass ionomer cement by addition of bioactive glass nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valanezhad, Alireza; Odatsu, Tetsuro; Udoh, Koichi; Shiraishi, Takanobu; Sawase, Takashi; Watanabe, Ikuya

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, sol-gel derived nanoparticle calcium silicate bioactive glass was added to the resin-modified light cure glass-ionomer cement to assess the influence of additional bioactive glass nanoparticles on the mechanical and biological properties of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. The fabricated bioactive glass nanoparticles added resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (GICs) were immersed in the phosphate buffer solution for 28 days to mimic real condition for the mechanical properties. Resin-modified GICs containing 3, 5 and 10 % bioactive glass nanoparticles improved the flexural strength compared to the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement and the samples containing 15 and 20 % bioactive glass nanoparticles before and after immersing in the phosphate buffer solution. Characterization of the samples successfully expressed the cause of the critical condition for mechanical properties. Cell study clarified that resin-modified glass-ionomer cement with high concentrations of bioactive glass nanoparticles has higher cell viability and better cell morphology compare to control groups. The results for mechanical properties and toxicity approved that the considering in selection of an optimum condition would have been a more satisfying conclusion for this study.

  5. Influence of post and resin cement on stress distribution of maxillary central incisors restored with direct resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spazzin, A O; Galafassi, D; de Meira-Júnior, A D; Braz, R; Garbin, C A

    2009-01-01

    The current study evaluated the influence of two endodontic post systems and the elastic modulus and film thickness of resin cement on stress distribution in a maxillary central incisor (MCI) restored with direct resin composite using finite element analysis (FEA). A three-dimensional model of an MCI with a coronary fracture and supporting structures was performed. A static chewing pressure of 2.16 N/mm2 was applied to two areas on the palatal surface of the composite restoration. Zirconia ceramic (ZC) and glass fiber (GF) posts were considered. The stress distribution was analyzed in the post, dentin and cement layer when ZC and GF posts were fixed to the root canals using resin cements of different elastic moduli (7.0 and 18.6 GPa) and different layer thicknesses (70 and 200 microm). The different post materials presented a significant influence on stress distribution with lesser stress concentration when using the GF post. The higher elastic modulus cement created higher stress levels within itself. The cement thicknesses did not present significant changes. PMID:19363979

  6. Effects of layering technique on the shade of resin overlays and the microhardness of dual cure resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoon-Sang Chang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the color of layered resin overlays and to test the early microhardness of dual cure resin cement (DCRC light cured through the layered resin overlays. Resin overlays of 1.5 mm thickness were fabricated with the A3 shade of Z350 (Group 1L, the A3B and A3E shades of Supreme XT (Group 2L, and the A3, E3, and T1 shades of Sinfony (Group 3L using one, two, and three layers, respectively (n = 7. Each layer of the resin overlays was set in equal thickness. The color of the resin overlays was measured with a colorimeter and compared with an A3 shade resin denture tooth. DCRC was light cured through the resin overlays, and the early microhardness of the DCRC was measured. The ΔE value between the denture tooth and the resin overlays and the Vickers hardness number (VHN of the DCRC were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD test. The color differences were 8.9 ± 0.5, 5.3 ± 1.0, and 7.3 ± 0.5 and the VHNs were 19.4 ± 1.1, 21.1 ± 0.9, and 29.3 ± 0.6 for Groups 1L, 2L, and 3L, respectively. Therefore, to match the designated tooth color of resin inlays and to increase the early microhardness of DCRC, layered resin inlays are more appropriate than single-dentin-layer resin inlays. However, the translucent layer should be used cautiously because the color difference of resin inlays with a translucent layer was affected more than those without a translucent layer.

  7. An evaluation of commercial and experimental resin-modified glass-ionomer cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchanavasita, Widchaya

    Glass-ionomer cement (GIG) has become widely accepted as a restorative material due to its bonding ability and sustained release of fluoride. The cement is, however, sensitive to moisture imbalance and lacks toughness. Recently, resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RMGIC) have been introduced. These materials contain monomeric species, such as 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) in addition to the components of the conventional glass-ionomer cements. Disadvantages of RMGICs include a relatively high contraction and exotherm on polymerisation. HEMA is known to be cytotoxic, leading to problems of biocompatibility, and polyHEMA swells on exposure to water, leading to dimensional instability of the cements. Addressing these problems is important in the development of the RMGICs. Using alternative monomers to replace or reduce the amount of HEMA used in the current RMGIC formulations would be appropriate. This study was divided into two parts. Initially certain properties such as water sorption, micro-hardness, flexural strength and polymerisation exotherm of commercially available RMGICs were evaluated. Long-term storage of RMGICs in aqueous solutions resulted in their high water uptakes and solubilities and large volumetric expansions. However, the surface hardness and strengths of the restorative grade RMGICs were not affected on storage in distilled water. When the materials were immersed in artificial saliva, significantly higher water uptake were obtained; the equilibrium water uptake were not reached after 20 months. As a consequence, plastic behaviour and reduced surface hardness were observed. The RMGICs also produced high exotherm during polymerisation. The second part of the study investigated the use of an experimental resin as an alternative to HEMA. The experimental resin has the advantage of low toxicity to the pulp and relatively low polymerisation shrinkage. This study compared the polymerisations of the resin and HEMA, and of mixtures of these two

  8. Chemical and dimensional evolution of cationic ions exchange resins in cement pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange resins (IERs) are widely used by the nuclear industry to decontaminate radioactive effluents. After use they are usually encapsulated in cementitious materials. However, the solidified waste forms can exhibit a strong expansion, possibly leading to cracking. Its origin is not well understood as well as the conditions when it occurs.In this work, the interactions between cationic resins in the Na+ or Ca2+ form and tricalcium silicate (C3S), Portland cement (CEM I) or Blast furnace slag cement (CEM III/C) are investigated at an early age in order to gain a better understanding of the expansion process.The results show that during the hydration of a paste of C3S or CEM I containing IERs in the Na+ form, the resins exhibit a transient expansion of small magnitude due to the decrease in the osmotic pressure of the interstitial solution. This expansion, which occurs just after cement setting, is sufficient to damage the material which is poorly consolidated for several reasons: small hydration degree, precipitation of less cohesive sodium bearing C-S-H, heterogeneous microstructure with highly porous zones and lastly cleavable crystals of portlandite at the interface between resins and paste. This expansion can be prevented by performing a calcium pretreatment of the resins or by using a CEM III/C cement with a slower rate of hydration than that of Portland cement. (author)

  9. Effect of interchanging two composite resin system with a dentine adhesive.

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson L; Soh G

    1990-01-01

    There is a tendency to interchange dentine adhesives and composite resins when using composite resins for restorations. This study used marginal contraction gaps to test the effect of changing composite resins with a dentine adhesive. Cylindrical butt-joint cavities were prepared entirely in dentine using extracted human teeth. Two groups of control cavities (30 cavities per group) were restored with Prisma-Bond/Prisma-Fil and Heliobond/Heliomolar respectively. Two groups of test cavities (30...

  10. Shear bond strength of two resin cements to human root dentin using three dentin bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogos, C; Stavrianos, C; Kolokouris, I; Economides, N; Papadoyannis, I

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the bond strength of two resin cements to human root dentin when used with three bonding agents. The materials used were Rely X ARC and Perma Cem, two one-bottle bonding agents (Single Bond, Bond-1) and one self-etching bonding agent (Clearfil SE Bond). The dentin was obtained from single rooted human teeth, and the specimens were treated with either 15% EDTA or 37% phosphoric acid to remove the smear layer, except in groups where the self-etching bonding agent was used. The resin cements were placed on dentin surfaces with the use of bonding agents. Shear bond strength (SBS) was tested using a single plane shear test assembly. The dentin specimens were divided into 10 groups. Eight groups were pre-treated with EDTA or phosphoric acid to remove the smear layer, followed by a bonding agent (Bond-1 or Single Bond) and resin cement (Rely X or Perma Cem). In the two remaining groups, the smear layer was left intact, and the two resins cements were used in combination with the self-etching bonding agent (Clearfil SE Bond). No statistically significant differences were observed among the eight groups treated with one-bottle bonding agents. The mean bond strengths of the two groups treated with the self-etching bonding agent did not differ significantly from each other but were both significantly greater than the bond strengths of all the other groups. The results of this study also showed that EDTA can be used as an alternative to phosphoric acid in bonding procedures for resin cements. However, the bond strengths of resin cements, in combination with a self-etching bonding agent, were significantly greater than those of the same cements when used with one-bottle bonding agents.

  11. Effect of Sandblasting on Shear Bond Strength Composite Resin Veneer

    OpenAIRE

    Octarina Octarina; Andi Soufyan; Yosi Kusuma Eriwati

    2013-01-01

    Attachment between restoration and enamel surface in indirect resin composite veneer restoration (IRCV) is obtained using multi-step (MS) resin cement. Recently, a one step self-adhesive dual-cured resin cement (SADRC) was introduced. Objective: To determine the effect of sandblasting on shear bond strength (SBS) of IRCV to enamel using MS resin cement and SADRC. Methods: Forty specimens of buccal surface of enamel human were light-cured in Solidilite chamber and were divided into two groups...

  12. Formulation of lignin phenol formaldehyde resins as a wood adhesive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the potential of reducing phenol with lignin in phenol formaldehyde resin formulation. The physical and chemical properties between lignin phenol formaldehyde resin (LPF) and commercial phenol formaldehyde resin (CPF) were compared. Phenol had been replaced by lignin [that was extracted from black liquor of oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB)] in synthesizing resin with a ratio lignin to phenol 1:1. The IR spectra showed that there were similarities in functional groups between LPF resin and CPF resin. The comparison of physical strength properties via tensile strength test between LPF resin and CPF resin showed that the newly formulated resin has higher bonding strength compared to commercial resin. Kinematics viscosity test showed that LPF resin has lower kinematics viscosity compared to CPF resin in 21 days storage time. SEM images for both resin showed similarities in the effect of resin penetration into woods vessel existed. (author)

  13. Casting granular ion exchange resins with medium-active waste in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medium active waste from nuclear power stations in Sweden is trapped in granular ion exchange resins. The resin is mixed with cement paste and cast in a concrete shell which is cubic and has an edge dimension of 1.2 m. In some cases the ion exchange cement mortar has cracked. The report presents laboratory sutdies of the properties of the ion exchange resin and the mortar. Also the leaching of the moulds has been investigated. It was shown that a mixture with a water cement ratio higher than about 0.5 swells considerably during the first weeks after casting. The diffusion constant for cesium 137 has been determined at 3.10-4 cm2/24-hour period in conjunction with exposure of the mould and mortar to sea water. The Swedish language report has 400 pages with 90 figures and 30 tables. (author)

  14. Failure in a composite resin-dentin adhesive bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composites are drawing more and more attention as preferred materials for teeth restoration. The success of teeth restoration has been generally limited by the Composite Resin-Dentin bond strength. A testing device has been developped to allow a satisfactory testing method for evaluating bonding strength in tension and shear, which led to reproducible results. A comparaison between different bond systems has shown no significant difference in the tensile and the shear strength as well as in the fracture behavior. Moreover, results showed difference between tensile and shear strength, when considering one same bond system. Failure mode examination turned out to be, either cohesive (composite rupture), or adhesive (interface rupture) or both (mixed rupture). (orig.)

  15. Correlation between Microleakage and Absolute Marginal Discrepancy in Zirconia Crowns Cemented with Four Resin Luting Cements: An In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Martínez-Rus; Guillermo, Pradíes

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate microleakage and absolute marginal discrepancy (AMD) and to assess correlation between AMD and microleakage with four resin luting cements. Material and Methods. 20 extracted human third molars were prepared for full-coverage crowns. 20 zirconia copings were made (LAVA, 3M ESPE) and cemented. Specimens were randomly allocated for each used type of cement into 4 groups, RelyX® (Rx), Multilink® (Mk), PANAVIA 2.1® (P), and Maxcem® (Mx) and immersed in 10% safranin for 72 hours. 20x magnification lenses were used to observe microleakage areas (μm2) and images software was used to measure AMD areas (μm). Discrepancy and microleakage between the cements were compared with one-way ANOVA test with confidence interval of 95%. Results. Rx Group showed microleakage has lowest value and AMD has highest value. P Group showed microleakage has the highest value and Mk Group presented AMD has lowest value. There were no significative differences between the cements. There were no linear correlations between microleakage and AMD; however a complex regression statistical model obtained allowed formulating an association between both variables (microleakage = AMD0,896). Conclusions. No significative differences were found among 4 types of cements. No linear correlations between AMD and microleakage were found. Clinical Significance. AMD is not easily related to microleakage. Characteristics of cements are fundamental to decreasing of microleakage values. PMID:27721830

  16. Adhesion of polycarboxylate-based dental cements to enamel: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemt, T; Stålblad, P A; Oilo, G

    1986-06-01

    The bond strength of two polycarboxylate and two glass ionomer cements to enamel in vivo has been measured by a tensile test method. The four cements were used to cement small stainless steel cylinders onto the facial surfaces of 11 and 21. The cylinders were removed by a tensile force applied by a handpiece containing a semi-conductor sensory unit. The results showed that all cements gave two sets of bond strength values, either a good bond corresponding to a cohesive failure, or a weak bond corresponding to an adhesive failure. The mean bond strength values were lower than those recorded in vitro, and differences among the cements were limited. PMID:3519712

  17. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated posts on bonding of resin cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeld, Anne; Asmussen, Erik;

    2004-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of various surface treatments of prefabricated posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White) and zirconia (Cerapost) on the bonding of two resin cements: ParaPost Cement and Panavia F by a diametral tensile strength (DTS) test...... by the application of a primer or in the form of the Cojet system. After surface treatment, the post was embedded in a cylinder of resin cement (diameter = 4.0 mm, height = 4.0 mm). The surface-treated post was centered in the resin cement-filled mold with the aid of fixation apparatus. Fifteen minutes from...... the start of mixing the resin cement, the specimen was freed from the mold and stored in water at 37 degrees C for seven days. Following water storage, the specimen was wet-ground to a final length of approximately 3 mm. The DTS of specimens was determined in a Universal Testing Machine. The bonding...

  18. Post cementation sensitivity evaluation of glass Ionomer, zinc phosphate and resin modified glass Ionomer luting cements under class II inlays: An in vivo comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekhar V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to compare the patient-perceived post-cementation sensitivity of class II metal restorations preoperatively, immediately after cementation, one week after cementation and one month after cementation with (1 Glass Ionomer luting cement (2 Zinc Phosphate cement and (3 Resin-modified Glass Ionomer luting cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients, irrespective of sex, in the age group of 15-50 years were selected and the teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 20 each. Twenty inlay cast restorations were cemented with three different luting cements. The criteria adapted to measure tooth sensitivity in the present study were objective examination for sensitivity.(1 Cold water test (2 Compressed air test and (3 Biting pressure test. Results: The patients with restorations cemented with Resin-modified Glass ionomer demonstrated the least postoperative sensitivity when compared with Glass Ionomer and zinc phosphate cement at all different intervals of time evaluated by different tests. Conclusion: The patients with restorations cemented with resin-modified Glass ionomer demonstrated the least postoperative sensitivity.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of cement slurries additives with epoxy resins - kinetics, thermodynamic and calorimetric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cement has been used in the world, presenting a wide versatility. However, due to its chemical nature, it is subject to several types of chemical damages, especially for agents of acidic nature. With the purpose of increase its life-time, new cement slurries have been modified with the addition of specific additives. The objective of this work is to modify cement slurries with epoxy resins, which promote higher resistance of those materials in relation to acid attacks. Three cement slurries were synthesized with epoxy resins and a standard slurries, which was composed by cement and water. After 30 days of hydration, the samples were characterized by XDR, FTIR and thermal analysis (TG and DSC). The hydration processes of the cement slurries were studied by heat-conduction microcalorimetry. A kinetic study of HCl interaction with the new slurries were performed by the batch methodology at 25, 35, 45 e 55 deg C. It was verified that the addition of the polymers delayed the processes of hydration of the slurries, decreasing the flow of heat released as a function of the amount of added resin and, increased the resistance of those slurries to the acid attack. (author)

  20. Cement solidification method for liquid waste generated from primary loop resin elution process of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since primary loop resin waste is eluted by sulfuric acid in The Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Mihama, Takahama and Ohi nuclear power station, liquid waste containing large amounts of sodium sulfate (Na2SO4) was stored in these plants. This liquid waste is planned to be solidified with cement, thus, we have carried out the cement solidification tests by use of some cement materials, and discussed a range of chemical composition and crud concentration of waste solution from resin elution process. In cases of using alumina cement material and ordinary portland cement material for solidification, properties of solidification have been examined and leaching tests of solid form for sulfate ion has been carried out. Volume reduction ratio of over 0.5 was achieved for 5 to 25wt% of sulfate ion and <5,000ppm of borate. Lithium ion restrained the solidification delay by borate. Based on this study, we concluded that these cement materials are applicable to all range of composition of waste solution from the resin elution process. (author)

  1. [The influence of the adhesive resin for the deformation of the metallic plate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hideshima, M

    1990-06-01

    From both vital and denture sides, the design of denture in dental clinic needs taking care of various viewpoints; alleviation of the adverse effect on the periodontium is necessary on the vital side, and prevention of possible rupture of the denture at its functioning and taking hygienic measures are necessary on the denture side. Utilization of the metal and adhesive, 4-META containing resin (hereinafter referred to as adhesive resin) in the design of denture has been reported to be not only hygienically advantageous because of difficult adhesiveness of bacterial flora due to solid union between the metal and the resin, but also less in danger of the denture rupture from its finishing line portion. However, a few reports have been made on the analysis of the correlation between the mechanical strength of the whole of denture and the use of adhesive resin and on the deformation of the metallic frame due to curing shrinkage of adhesive resin. In the present study, in terms of these problems, utilizing the modal analysis applying a vibrato-logical technique and the strain gauge device appropriate for the determination of the time-course, samples of chrome-cobalt alloy and of partial denture were examined for the influence of inserted adhesive and non-adhesive resins upon them. The following results were obtained: 1. The results of the determination by the strain gauge method revealed that the insertion of adhesive resin tended to have more displacement volume for more insertion volume and for thinner chrome-cobalt alloy sample and that of non-adhesive resin had practically no adhesive force, suggesting a small deformation of the sample due to curing shrinkage, with little interlocking force. 2. The results of modal analysis revealed that the insertion of the adhesive resin onto the denture sample led to an increase in mechanical strength and a rigid body modality of the activity at the finishing line portion compared with the non-adhesive resin. 3. From the results

  2. Influence of the feldspathic ceramic thickness and shade on the microhardness of dual resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Carlos José; da Silva, Natéricia Rezende; Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the microhardness of a dual resin cement under the influence of thickness and shade of a feldspathic ceramic. Ninety-five bovine incisors were selected; the crowns, with the roots removed, were embedded in a polystyrene resin and were randomly divided into 19 groups (n=5). On the buccal surface, a standardized cavity, 4.0 mm in diameter and 1.0 mm in depth, was prepared. Ceramic restorations (Noritake Ex 3) were manufactured with 4.0 mm diameter and 1, 2 and 4-mm thicknesses at shades A1, A2, A3, A3.5 and A4. A dual resin cement (Rely X-ARC) was inserted into the prepared cavity. A mylar strip was positioned over the prepared cavity, and light curing was performed for 40 seconds following the protocols: controls-without insertion of the restoration at distances of 0.0, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mm. The remaining groups had the restorations positioned between the resin cement and light source during polymerization. The Vickers hardness test was performed on the cement layer with 50 g of load application for 30 seconds, with 5 indentations for each sample. Two-way ANOVA (5 x 3) and Tukey test (alpha = 0.05) were used to compare the results. The chemical curing of the dual resin cement was not sufficient to compensate for the energy attenuation promoted by the interposition of A3.5 and A4 ceramic material with 4-mm of thickness. The thickness had a greater influence on the cement microhardness than the ceramic restoration shade. PMID:16802648

  3. Effects of Surface Treatments on the Bond Strength Between Resin Cement and a New Zirconia-reinforced Lithium Silicate Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T P; Anami, L C; Melo, R M; Valandro, L F; Bottino, M A

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of surface treatments on the bond strength between the new zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate ceramic (ZLS) and resin cement. VITA Suprinity blocks were crystallized according to the manufacturer's instructions and randomly assigned to six groups (N=36; n=6), according to the surface treatment to be performed and aging conditions: HF20, 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 seconds, baseline (control); HF20tc, 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 seconds, aging; HF40, 10% hydrofluoric acid for 40 seconds, baseline; HF40tc, 10% hydrofluoric acid for 40 seconds, aging; CJ, CoJet sandblasting (25 seconds, 2.5 bar, 15-mm distance), baseline; and CJtc, CoJet sandblasting (25 seconds, 2.5 bar, 15-mm distance), aging. All specimens were silanized (Monobond S) and cemented with Panavia F to newly polymerized Z250 resin blocks. After specimens were immersed for 24 hours in distilled water at 37° C, 1-mm(2) cross-section microbars were obtained by means of a cutting machine under constant cooling. Baseline groups were immediately tested, whereas "tc" groups were used to analyze the effect of aging on bond strength (10,000 thermal cycles, 5/55°C, 30-second bath). The microtensile bond strength test was performed with a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min), and bond strength (MPa) was calculated when the load-to-failure (N) was divided by the adhesive area (mm(2)). We also evaluated the surface roughness (Sa, average roughness; Str, texture aspect ratio; Sdr, developed interfacial area ratio) and the contact angle resulting from the treatments. Data were statistically analyzed by one- or two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (all α=5%). The failure mode of each specimen was evaluated by stereomicroscopy, and representative specimens were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The microtensile bond strength was affected by the surface conditioning (p<0.0001), storage condition (p<0.0001), and the interaction between them (p=0.0012). The

  4. Application of mixture design to optimize cementation of simulated spent radioactive ion exchange resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAN Xue-Ying; BAO Liang-Jin; LIN Mei-Qiong; James D.NAVRATIL

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of a mixture design for spent resin immobilization in cement as well as to examine the cement-slag-ash system for spent resin solidification. Eighteen distinct combinations, consisting of Portland cement, blast furnace slag, fly ash, organic ion exchange resins and water, were selected by a mixture design computer procedure to compose representative experiment points. The measured properties of solidified forms resulting from the combinations included 28-day compressive strength, 42-day immersion strength,42-day immersion weight and slump. These data were fit to a mathematic model with the aid of Scheffe quadratic polynomial, and the effects of each ingredient on the measured properties were identified through an analysis of the response trace plots and contour plots. Utilization of an optimality function singled out an optimal combination comprising water=0.16(wt/wt), slag=0.21, ash=0.10, cement=0.27 and resin=0.26 from which the resulting response was 1 1MPa for the 28-day strength, 110mm for the slump and 5.4% for the 42-day increase in strength.

  5. Corrosion of steel drums containing cemented ion-exchange resins as intermediate level nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffó, G.S. [Departamento de Materiales, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Tecnológicas – CONICET, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Farina, S.B., E-mail: farina@cnea.gov.ar [Departamento de Materiales, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Tecnológicas – CONICET, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Schulz, F.M. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Tecnológicas – CONICET, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • There are no works related to the corrosion of drums containing radioactive waste. • Chloride induces high corrosion rate and after 1 year it drops abruptly. • Decrease in the corrosion rate is due to the lack of water to sustain the process. • Cementated ion-exchange resins do not pose risks of corrosion of the steel drums. -- Abstract: Exhausted ion-exchange resins used in nuclear reactors are immobilized by cementation before being stored. They are contained in steel drums that may undergo internal corrosion depending on the presence of certain contaminants. The objective of this work is to evaluate the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins with different aggressive species. The corrosion potential and the corrosion rate of the steel, and the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored for 900 days. Results show that the cementation of ion-exchange resins seems not to pose special risks regarding the corrosion of the steel drums.

  6. Effect of Ultrasonic Versus Manual Cementation on the Fracture Strength of Resin Composite Laminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M.; Mese, A.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of conventional versus ultrasonic cementation techniques on the fracture strength of resin composite laminates. In addition, the failure modes were assessed. Window-type preparations I mm above the cemento-enamel junction were made on intact human maxillary central in

  7. Can a soda-lime glass be used to demonstrate how patterns of strength dependence are influenced by pre-cementation and resin-cementation variables?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hooi, Paul

    2013-01-01

    To determine how the variability in biaxial flexure strength of a soda-lime glass analogue for a PLV and DBC material was influenced by precementation operative variables and following resin-cement coating.

  8. Handling sticky Resin by Stingless Bees: Adhesive Properties of Surface Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARKUS GASTAUER

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Many Stingless Bees (Hymenoptera: Meliponini like Tetragonisca angustula collect resin to defend their nests against intruders like ants or Robber Bees. Small portions of resin are attached to intruders bodies and extremities causing their immobilization. It has been observed that resin is removed easily from the bee's mandible but adheres strongly to the intruder's cuticle. We tested the hypothesis that resin sticks lesser to the mandibles of Stingless Bees than to the surface of intruders due to special surface structures or adhesive properties of these structures. The surface structures of the mandible of T. angustula and the trochanter of Camponotus sericeiventris were studied by scanning electron microscopy. To measure adhesion properties, selected surfaces were fixed on a fine glass pin and withdrawn from a glass tip covered with resin. The deformation of the glass pin indicates adhesion forces operating between the resin and the selective surface. The absolute value of the forces is computed from the glass pin's stiffness. It has been shown that resin sticks more to the smooth mandible of the bee than to the structured trochanter of the ant. A new hypothesis to be tested says that the bees might lubricate their mandibles with nectar or honey to reduce the resin's adhesion temporarily.

  9. Comparison the Effects of Different Root Canal Irrigants on the Retention of Quarts Fiber Posts Cemented by Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Shirinzad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Root canal irrigants could change the structure of root dentin and affect the posts retention the purpose of this study was to compare the effects of three different endodontic irrigants on the retention of quarts fiber posts cemented by different resin cements. Materials & Methods: In this in-vitro study, 10 mm long post spaces were prepared in root canals of 120 premolars after endodontic therapy and cutting the crowns at the cementoenamel junction. The teeth were randomly divided into four equal groups based on the irrigants as follows: distilled water, 2% chlorhexidine, 0.25% iodine and 1% NaOCl. Quarts fiber posts were cemented by Panavia F2. Samples were stored at 370c and humidity of 100% for one week. After thermocycling, the retention of fiber posts were measured by tensile test and modes of failure were reported. Data were analyzed by One-Way ANOVA, Tukey and Fisher's exact tests.Results: The mean and standard deviation of the posts retention were 367.08±63.07, 377.59±72.02, 363.11±68.53 and 342.89±74.94 for distilled water, chlorhexidine 2%, iodine 0.25% and sodium hypochlorite, respectively. One-way ANOVA showed that there was a significant difference among the groups (P<0.001. The results of Tukey test showed that posts retention was significantly higher after rinsing by chlorhexidine (P<0.01Conclusion: According to the results of this study, chlorhexidine rinse had a favorable effect on retention of posts cemented by resin cement.

  10. Determination of Water Diffusion Coefficients and Dynamics in Adhesive/ Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Resin Composite Joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chao; WANG Zhi; WANG Jing; SU Tao

    2007-01-01

    To determinate the water diffusion coefficients and dynamics in adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis(EDX) is used to establish the content change of oxygen in the adhesive in adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints. As water is made up of oxygen and hydrogen, the water diffusion coefficients and dynamics in adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints can be obtained from the change in the content of oxygen in the adhesive during humidity aging, via EDX analysis. The authors have calculated the water diffusion coefficients and dynamics in the adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints with the aid of both energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The determined results with EDX analysis are almost the same as those determined with elemental analysis and the results also show that the durability of the adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints subjected to silane coupling agent treatment is better than those subjected to sand paper burnishing treatment and chemical oxidation treatment.

  11. Hardness of resin cement cured under different thickness of lithium disilicate-based ceramic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xuan; WANG Fu

    2011-01-01

    Background The lithium disilicate-based ceramic is a newly developed all-ceramic material,which is lithium disilicate-based and could be used for fabricating almost all kinds of restorations.The extent of light attenuation by ceramic material was material-dependent.Ceramic materials with different crystal composition or crystalline content would exhibit distinct light-absorbing characteristics.The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of ceramic thickness and light-curing time on the polymerization of a dual-curing resin luting material with a lithium disilicate-based ceramic.Methods A lithium disilicate-based ceramic was used in this study.The light attenuation caused by ceramic with different thickness was determined using a spectral radiometer.The commercial dual-cured resin cement was light-cured directly or through ceramic discs with different thickness (1,2 and 3 mm,respectively) for different times (10,20,30,40,50 and 60 seconds,respectively).The polymerization efficiency of resin cement was expressed in terms as Vickers hardness (VHN) measured after 24 hours storage.Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's HSD tests were used to determine differences.Results Intensity of polymerizing light transmitted through ceramic discs was reduced from 584 mW/cm2 to about 216 mW/cm2,80 mW/cm2 and 52 mW/cm2 at thicknesses of 1 mm,2 mm and 3 mm,respectively.Resin cement specimens self-cured alone showed significantly lower hardness values.When resin cement was light-cured through ceramic discs with a thickness of 1 mm,2 mm and 3 mm,no further increasing in hardness values was observed when light-curing time was more than 30 seconds,40 seconds and 60 seconds,respectively.Conclusions Within the limitation of the present study,ceramic thickness and light-curing time had remarkable influence on the polymerization of dual-cured resin cement.When resin cement is light-cured beneath a lithium disilicate ceramic with different thickness,prolonging light

  12. Factors affecting on bond strength of glass fiber post cemented with different resin cements to root canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavijo, V. R. G.; Bandéca, M. C.; Calixto, L. R.; Nadalin, M. R.; Saade, E. G.; Oliveira-Junior, O. B.; Andrade, M. F.

    2009-09-01

    Luting materials provides the retention of endodontic post. However, the failures of endodontic posts predominantly occurred are the losses of retention. Thus, the alternating use to remove the smear layer, open the dentine tubules, and/or etch the inter-tubular dentine can be provided by EDTA. This study was performed to evaluate effect of EDTA on bond strength of glass fiber post cemented with different resin cements to root canal. Fifty bovine incisors were selected and the crowns were removed to obtain a remaining 14-mm-height root. The roots were randomly distributed into five groups: GI: RelyX™ ARC/LED; GII: RelyX™ U100/LED; GIII EDTA/RelyX™ U100/LED; GIV: Multilink™; and GV: EDTA/Multlink™. After endodontic treatment, the post space was prepared with the drills designated for the quartz-coated-carbon-fiber post Aestheti-Post®. Before application of resin cements, root canals were irrigated with 17% EDTA (GIII and GV) during 1 min, rinsed with distilled water and dried using paper points. The light-cured materials were light-activated with UltraLume LED 5 (Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah) with power density of 1315 mW/cm2. Specimens were perpendicularly sectioned into approximately 1 mm thick sections and the stubs were performed on Universal Testing Machine. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s post-hoc tests showed significant statistical different between RelyX™ ARC (GI) and RelyX™ U100 independent of the pre-treatment (GII to GIII) ( P 0.05) to all resin cements between the Cervical to Apical regions (GI to GV). The use of 17% EDTA showed no difference significant between the resin cements evaluated (GII to GIII; GIV to GV). Within the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that the use of EDTA did not provide efficiency on bond strength. The RelyX™ ARC showed higher bond strength values than RelyX™ U100.

  13. Fracture frequency and longevity of fractured resin composite, polyacid-modified resin composite, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement class IV restorations: an up to 14 years of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture frequency and longevity of fractured class IV resin composite (RC), polyacid-modified resin composite (compomer; PMRC), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) restorations in a longitudinal long-term follow-up. Eighty-five class IV RC (43...

  14. Influence of surface roughness on streptococcal adhesion forces to composite resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, Li; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Ren, Yijin

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine streptococcal adhesion forces with composite resins with different surface roughness. METHODS: Polishing and grinding were applied to obtain smooth (roughness 20 nm), moderately rough (150 nm) and rough (350 nm) surfaces of two orthodontic, light-cured composites. Adhesion fo

  15. EFFECT OF FLUORIDE-CONTAINING DESENSITIZING AGENTS ON THE BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN-BASED CEMENTS TO DENTIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraç, Duygu; Külünk, Safak; Saraç, Y. Sinasi; Karakas, Özlem

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of desensitizing agents containing different amounts of fluoride on the shear bond strength of a dual polymerized resin cement and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) to dentin. Material and Methods: One hundred human molars were mounted in acrylic resin blocks and prepared until the dentin surface was exposed. The specimens were treated with one of four desensitizing agents: Bifluorid 12, Fluoridin, Thermoline and PrepEze. The remaining 20 specimens served as untreated controls. All groups were further divided into 2 subgroups in which a dual polymerized resin cement (Bifix QM) or a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (AVANTO) was used. The shear bond strength (MPa) was measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed statistically with a 2-way ANOVA, Tukey HSD test and regression analysis (α=0.05). The effect of the desensitizing agents on the dentin surface was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Results: The fluoride-containing desensitizing agents affected the bond strength of the resin-based cements to dentin (p<0.001). PrepEze showed the highest bond strength values in all groups (p<0.001). Conclusion: Regression analysis showed a reverse relation between bond strength values of resin cements to dentin and the amount of fluoride in the desensitizing agent (p<0.05). PMID:19936532

  16. New composite grouting materials:Modified urea-formaldehyde resin with cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Hongfei; Jiang Zhenquan; Zhu Shuyun; Yao Pu; Sun Qiang

    2012-01-01

    A new composite two component grout comprised of modified urea-formaldehyde resin and cement was formulated to take account of the advantages and disadvantages of both the cement grout and the chemical grout.The new grout is designed for water blocking by reinforcing as well as seepage control by bore grouting.The A component consists of a modified urea-formaldehyde resin A component,some cement,and some water.The B component is an alkaline coagulant.An orthogonal test of four factors at three levels showed that gel time increased with increased water content and with urea-formaldehyde resin content.Gel time decreased at increased levels of alkaline coagulant.The A component of this new composite grout is stable over time.A mixed cross-over test showed that as the volume ratio of A to B increases the gel time falls at first but then increases.The solid strength decreases with increasing levels of the B component.The solid strength increases over time and becomes stable by the 28th day after mixing.The viscosity increases with increasing levels of resin A component.The increase is exponential and may be fit to;μ = 8.162e0.0286x.

  17. Effect of Coloring–by-Dipping on Microtensile Bond Strength of Zirconia to Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoo Mahshid

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Studies on the effect of coloring procedures on the bond strength of zirconia to resin cement are lacking in the literature. This study evaluated the effect of dipping of zirconia ceramic in different liquid color shades on the microtensile bond strength (MTBS of zirconia ceramic to resin cement.Materials and Methods: This in vitro study was conducted on 100 microbar specimens divided into five groups of B2, C1, D4, A3 and control (not colored. To prepare the microbars, 20 white zirconia ceramic blocks, measuring 5×11×11 mm, were dipped in A3, B2, C1 or D4 liquid color shades for 10 seconds (five blocks for each color shade and five blocks were not colored as controls. All the zirconia blocks were sintered in a sintering furnace. Composite blocks of similar dimensions were fabricated and bonded to zirconia ceramic blocks using Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. Zirconia-cement-composite blocks were sectioned into microbars measuring 1×1×10 mm. The MTBS of microbars was measured by a testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. All tests were carried out at 0.05 level of significance.Results: Statistically significant differences were found among the groups in MTBS (P<0.001. The D4 group had the highest MTBS value (39.16 ± 6.52 MPa.Conclusion: Dipping affected the MTBS of zirconia ceramic to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement; however, a similar pattern of change was not seen due to the different liquid color shades.

  18. CURING EFFICIENCY OF DUAL-CURE RESIN CEMENT UNDER ZIRCONIA WITH TWO DIFFERENT LIGHT CURING UNITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar GÜLTEKİN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Adequate polymerization is a crucial factor in obtaining optimal physical properties and a satisfying clinical performance from composite resin materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the polymerization efficiency of dual-cure resin cement cured with two different light curing units under zirconia structures having differing thicknesses. Materials and Methods: 4 zirconia discs framework in 4 mm diameter and in 0.5 mm, 1 mm and 1.5 mm thickness were prepared using computer-aided design system. One of the 0.5 mm-thick substructures was left as mono-layered whereas others were layered with feldspathic porcelain of same thickness and ceramic samples with 4 different thicknesses (0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2.0 mm were prepared. For each group (n=12 resin cement was light cured in polytetrafluoroethylene molds using Light Emitting Diode (LED or Quartz-Tungsten Halogen (QHT light curing units under each of 4 zirconia based discs (n=96. The values of depth of cure (in mm and the Vickers Hardness Number values (VHN were evaluated for each specimen. Results: The use of LED curing unit produced a greater depth of cure compared to QTH under ceramic discs with 0.5 and 1 mm thickness (p<0.05.At 100μm and 300 μm depth, the LED unit produced significantly greater VHN values compared to the QTH unit (p<0.05. At 500 μm depth, the difference between the VHN values of LED and QTH groups were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Light curing may not result in adequate resin cement polymerization under thick zirconia structures. LED light sources should be preferred over QTH for curing dual-cure resin cements, especially for those under thicker zirconia restorations.

  19. Film Thickness and Flow Properties of Resin-Based Cements at Different Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagheri R.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: For a luting agent to allow complete seating of prosthetic restorations, it must obtain an appropriate flow rate maintaining a minimum film thickness. The performance of recently introduced luting agents in this regard has not been evaluated. Purpose: To measure and compare the film thickness and flow properties of seven resin-containing luting cements at different temperatures (37°C, 25°C and10°C. Material and Methods: Specimens were prepared from five resin luting cements; seT (SDI, Panavia F (Kuraray, Varioloink II (Ivoclar, Maxcem (Kerr, Nexus2 (Kerr and two resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements (RM-GICs; GC Fuji Plus (GC Corporation, and RelyX Luting 2 (3 M/ESPE. The film thickness and flow rate of each cement (n=15 was determined using the test described in ISO at three different temperatures. Results: There was a linear correlation between film thickness and flow rate for most of the materials. Cooling increased fluidity of almost all materials while the effect of temperature on film thickness was material dependent. At 37°C, all products revealed a film thickness of less than 25µm except for GC Fuji Plus. At 25°C, all cements pro-duced a film thickness of less than 27 µm except for seT. At 10°C, apart from seT and Rely X Luting 2, the remaining cements showed a film thickness smaller than 20 µm.Conclusion: Cooling increased fluidity of almost all materials, however. the film thickness did not exceed 35 µm in either condition, in spite of the lowest film thickness being demonstrated at the lowest temperature.

  20. Effect of blastfurnace slag addition to Portland cement for cationic exchange resins encapsulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan L.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the nuclear industry, cement-based materials are extensively used to encapsulate spent ion exchange resins (IERs before their final disposal in a repository. It is well known that the cement has to be carefully selected to prevent any deleterious expansion of the solidified waste form, but the reasons for this possible expansion are not clearly established. This work aims at filling the gap. The swelling pressure of IERs is first investigated as a function of ions exchange and ionic strength. It is shown that pressures of a few tenths of MPa can be produced by decreases in the ionic strength of the bulk solution, or by ion exchanges (2Na+ instead of Ca2+, Na+ instead of K+. Then, the chemical evolution of cationic resins initially in the Na+ form is characterized in CEM I (Portland cement and CEM III (Portland cement + blastfurnace slag cements at early age and an explanation is proposed for the better stability of CEM III material.

  1. Changes in degree of conversion and microhardness of dental resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yong Li; Kim, Young Kyung; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2010-01-01

    There are few studies available on the post-light activation or post-mix polymerization of dental resin cements as a function of time. This in vitro study evaluated the successive changes in the degree of conversion (DC) and microhardness during polymerization of six commercial resin cements (light-cured [Choice 2, RelyX Veneer], chemical-cured [Multilink, C&B Cement] and dual-cured [Calibra, RelyX ARC]) within the first 24 hours and up to seven days. Resin specimens were prepared for Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and microhardness testing to determine the DC and Vickers hardness (VH), respectively. The light-cured materials or mixed pastes of the dual-cured materials were irradiated with a light-curing unit (Elipar TriLight) through a precured composite overlay for 40 seconds. The FTIR spectra and microhardness readings were taken at specified times: 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 minutes; 24 hours and after two days and seven days. According to the FTIR study, most of the curing reaction of Choice 2 and RelyX Veneer occurred within 10 and 30 minutes, respectively. Multilink, C&B Cement and Calibra exhibited gradual increases in the DC up to 24 hours, with no further statistically significant increase (p > 0.05). RelyX ARC attained a DC value within five minutes, similar to that at seven days (p > 0.05). Choice 2 and RelyXARC showed gradual increases in the VH, up to 15 minutes, with no further significant change over the remaining observation time (p > 0.05). For RelyX Veneer, Multilink, C&B Cement and Calibra, there were no significant increases in the VH value after 24 hours (p > 0.05). The light-cured materials produced significantly higher DC values than the chemical-cured materials (p < 0.05). The DC values of the two dual-cured resin cements were significantly different from each other (p < 0.001). The results suggest that the significant polymerization reaction was finished within 24 hours post-mix or post-light activation for all resin

  2. Effect of axial groove and resin luting cements on the retention of complete cast metal crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Rajkumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The design of the tooth preparation and the cementing medium are important consid-erations in the retention of crowns and fixed partial dentures. The purpose of this invitro study was to determine the effect of axial groove on the retention of complete cast metal crowns using two resin luting cements. Methods: Forty freshly extracted intact human molar teeth were prepared in their long axis to receive complete cast metal crowns. The specimens were randomly divided into two groups (one control and one study group. An axial groove of uniform size and shape was made on the prepared teeth under the study group. Axial surface area of prepared teeth specimens was measured. Complete cast metal crowns were fabricated for each specimen. Specimens of each group were divided into subgroups of 10 samples and were cemented with two resin luting cements, RelyX Unicem® and Calibra®, re-spectively. The cemented crowns were loaded in tension using a Universal Instron testing machine. The maximal tensile strength was recorded. Data were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test (α=0.05. Results: No significant differences in the tensile stress values were noted between the control (mean: 5.76±0.392 MPa and study (mean: 5.93±0.751 MPa groups cemented with RelyX Unicem. No sig-nificant differences in the tensile stress values were noted between the control (mean: 4.92±0.641 MPa and study (mean: 5.15 ±0.478 MPa groups cemented with Calibra. However, significant dif-ference in the tensile stress values was found between the two resin cements in the control and study groups. Conclusion: Axial groove placed in tooth preparations for resin bonded complete cast metal crowns had no statistically significant effect on retention. The use of (RelyX Unicem® yielded greater reten-tion values when compared to Calibra®.

  3. A study on the compatibility between one-bottle dentin adhesives and composite resins using micro-shear bond strength

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Minju; Shin, Yooseok; Park, Jeong-Won; Roh, Byoung-Duck

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study was performed to determine whether the combined use of one-bottle self-etch adhesives and composite resins from same manufacturers have better bond strengths than combinations of adhesive and resins from different manufacturers. Materials and Methods 25 experimental micro-shear bond test groups were made from combinations of five dentin adhesives and five composite resins with extracted human molars stored in saline for 24 hr. Testing was performed using the wire-loop me...

  4. Correlation between the degree of conversion and the elution of leachable components from dental resin-based cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOSOVKA OBRADOVIĆ-DJURIČIĆ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the possible correlation between the degree of conversion (DC and the amount of substances eluted from three commercial cured resin-based cements. The DC of the various resin-based cements was measured by Raman spectroscopy, while the quantity of unreacted monomers released from the cement matrix (triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, TEGDMA, urethane dimethacrylate, UDMA, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, HEMA and bisphenol A was determined by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC. The obtained results, after multiple statistical evaluation (one way ANOVA, LSD post hoc test, showed no significant differences in the DC values between the resin cements. On the contrary, the results of the HPLC analysis depicted statistically significant differences between the three materials with respect to the amount of leached monomers. In addition, no correlation between the DC and the amount of eluted substances from the tested cured composite cements was found.

  5. Effect of cements on fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Mouhat, Mathieu; Nergård, John Magnus; Lægreid, Solveig Jenssen; Kanno, Taro; Milleding, Percy; Örtengren, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The present study investigated the effect of cements on fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns in relation to their compressive strength. Materials and methods Four different cements were tested: zinc phosphate cement (ZPC), glass-ionomer cement (GIC), self-adhesive resin-based cement (SRC) and resin-based cement (RC). RC was used in both dual cure mode (RC-D) and chemical cure mode (RC-C). First, the compressive strength of each cement was tested according to a...

  6. The effect of resin cements and primer on retentive force of zirconia copings bonded to zirconia abutments with insufficient retention

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seung-Mi; Yoon, Ji-Young; Lee, Myung-Hyun; Oh, Nam-Sik

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of resin cements and primer on the retentive force of zirconia copings bonded to zirconia abutments with insufficient retention. MATERIALS AND METHODS Zirconia blocks (Lava, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) were obtained and forty sets of zirconia abutments and copings were fabricated using CAD/CAM technology. They were grouped into 4 categories as follows, depending on the types of resin cements used, and whether the primer is applie...

  7. Bond strength of resin cement to dentin and to surface-treated posts of titanium alloy, glass fiber, and zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Asmussen, Erik;

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of two resin cements (ParaPost Cement and Panavia F) to posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White), and zirconia (Cerapost), and to dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After embedding, planar surface...

  8. Shear bond strength of three dual-cured resin cements to dentin analyzed by finite element analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A. Jongsma; N. de Jager; C.J. Kleverlaan; P. Pallav; A.J. Feilzer

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the shear bond strength to bovine dentin of dual-cured resin cements cured in different circumstances, the contraction stress and volumetric shrinkage in both polymerization modes, and to review the failure stress distribution at the cement-tooth interface with finite element

  9. Transient and residual stresses in a pressable glass-ceramic before and after resin-cement coating determined using profilometry.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-05-01

    The effect of heat-pressing and subsequent pre-cementation (acid-etching) and resin-cementation operative techniques on the development of transient and residual stresses in different thicknesses of a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic were characterised using profilometry prior to biaxial flexure strength (BFS) determination.

  10. Adhesion of resin composites to biomaterials in dentistry: an evaluation of surface conditioning methods

    OpenAIRE

    Özcan, Mutlu

    2003-01-01

    Since previous investigations revealed that most clinical failures in adhesively luted ceramic restorations initiate from the cementation or internal surfaces, the study presented in Chapter II evaluated the effect of three different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of a Bis-GMA based luting cement to glass ceramics, glass infiltrated alumina, glass infiltrated ZrO2 reinforced alumina. The three conditioning methods assesed were: (1) HF acid etching, (2) Air-borne particle ab...

  11. MICROLEAKAGE OF CLASS V RESIN-MODIFIED GLASS IONOMER CEMENT AND COMPOMER RESTORATIONS IN VITRO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Ling; LU Yi; LU Qun; XU Qi-hua

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess the microleakage of Class Ⅴ restorations made with two resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs) and two polyacid-modified composite resins (PMCRs). Methods Restorations of the four materials ( GC Fuji H LC, VitremerTM, Dyract AP and F2000TM ) were placed in facial Class Ⅴ cavity preparations in forty noncarious human molar teeth. Teeth were randomly assigned to 4 experimental groups of 10 teeth each. After thermal cycling( × 20, 5 -55℃ ), the interface between dentin and restorations was spattercoated with gold and observed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Then the square and average width of margin gaps of central 1/3 interface were recorded with image analysis software. Results The data indicated no significant differences between all the restorative materials for both occlusal and gingival margins. Further analysis revealed there were statistically significant differences between occlusal margins and gingival margins for VitremerTM and Dyract AP, respectively. Conclusion None of the tested materials guaranteed margins free of microleakage. Resin-modified glass ionomer cements showed similar margin gaps to the polyacid-modified composite resins tested.

  12. [Stress profile during curing contraction of composite resin adhesives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzelmann, K H; Hickel, R

    1990-11-01

    The wall-to-wall curing contraction of thin composite resin layers was recorded with a tensometer. The composite resin was applied to cylindrically shaped ceramic sample holders with diameters of 3 mm, 4 mm and 8 mm. The distances of the sample holders was set at 50 microns, 100 microns, 150 microns, 200 microns and 300 microns. The shrinkage stress recordings clearly show that the shrinkage forces are governed by the distance of the sample holders and not by the volume or the configuration factor of the composite resin layers.

  13. Immobilisation in cement of ion exchange resins arising from the purification of reagents used for the decontamination of reactor circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the programme is to show that ion exchange resins used to remove activity from decontaminating agents used in water reactors can be successfully immobilised in cement. To achieve this, blends of Ordinary Portland Cement and ground granulated Blast Furnace Slag (ratio 9:1) have been used. Improvements in the properties of the product and the waste loading of 50 w/o damp resin can be achieved using microsilica, a finely divided form of silicon dioxide, as an additive to the blended cement. This report contains data on the effects of anion resins, and mixed anion/cation resins, on the performance of the cemented product. The effects of organic acids, especially picolinic and formic acids, bound to anion resins have also been investigated. In addition, formulations developed have been assessed at commercial scale (200 litres of cemented product) for their process and product characteristics. The final part of the report deals with the long-term product performance of samples prepared from cation resins which are now nearly one year old. (author)

  14. The Feasibility of Modified Magnesia-Phosphate Cement as a Heat Resistant Adhesive for Strengthening Concrete with Carbon Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailian Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available External bonding of carbon fiber sheets has become a popular technique for strengthening concrete structures all over the world. Epoxy adhesive, which is used to bond the carbon fiber sheets and concrete, deteriorates rapidly when being exposed to high temperatures. This paper presents a high-temperature-resistant modified magnesia-phosphate cement (MPC with the compressive strength that does not decrease at the temperature of 600 °C. The bond properties of both the modified MPC and the epoxy adhesive between externally bonded carbon fiber sheets and concrete were evaluated by using a double-shear test method after exposure to elevating temperatures from 105 °C to 500 °C. The results showed that the bond strength of the modified MPC at room temperature (RT is much higher than that of the epoxy resin. Full carbonation with almost 0 MPa was detected for the epoxy sample after the exposure to 300 °C, while only 40% reduction of bond strength was tested for the modified MPC sample. Although the modified MPC specimens failed through interlaminar slip of fiber strips instead of complete debonding, the MPC specimens performed higher bond strength than epoxy resin at ambient temperature, and retained much higher bond strength at elevated temperatures. It could be concluded that it is feasible to strengthen concrete structural members with externally bonded carbon fiber sheets using the modified MPC instead of epoxy adhesive. Furthermore, the use of the modified MPC as the binder between carbon fiber sheets and concrete can be less expensive and an ecologically friendly alternative.

  15. Study on Curing Kinetics of Heat-resistant Flexible Polyamide Modified Epoxy Resin Adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effects of numerous variables affecting the reaction rate of heat-resistant flexible modified epoxy resin adhesive, the curing kinetics of polyamide modified epoxy resin was studied. The heat-resistant flexible modified epoxy resin adhesive cured at room-temperature was prepared with epoxy resin, polysulfide rubber and organosilicone as adhesive component, polyamide as main curing agent and addition of different modified filler and the curing agent containing benzene ring structure. The curing kinetics of polyamide modified epoxy resin was studied by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC at different heating speeds and the characteristic temperatures of the curing process were analyzed and confirmed. the kinetics parameters of activation energy was calculated using Flynn-Wall-Ozawa equation and Kissinger equation, respectively, then the kinetic model of curing reaction was built as d&alpha/dt = 4.38×107 exp (-57740/RT (1-&alpha0.93, the results show that the two-parameter model is adequate to represent the curing reaction process, the model can well describe the curing reaction process of the studied resin. The DSC curves obtained using the experimental data show a good agreement with that theoretically calculated. The research results will provide theoretical basis for the choice of manufacturing process and the optimization of processing window.

  16. Effect of femtosecond laser beam angle on bond strength of zirconia-resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Yusuf Z; Kepceoglu, Abdullah; Yavuz, Tevfik; Aslan, Muhammed A; Demirtag, Zulfikar; Kılıc, Hamdi S; Usumez, Aslihan

    2015-11-01

    Yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramic is widely used as an all-ceramic core material because of its enhanced mechanical and aesthetic properties. The bond strength of Y-TZP restorations affects long-term success; hence, surface treatment is required on ceramic boundaries. This study evaluated the effect of different laser beam angles on Y-TZP-resin cement shear bond strength (SBS). Forty plates of Y-TZP ceramics were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 10). A femtosecond amplifier laser pulse was applied on Y-TZP surface with different incidence angles (90°, 75°, 60°, 45°). The resin cement was adhered onto the zirconia surfaces. The SBS of each sample was measured using universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The SBS was analyzed through one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA)/Tukey tests. The results showed that the degree of laser beam angle affects the SBS of resin cement to Y-TZP. The laser beam was applied to a surface with a 45° angle which resulted in significantly higher SBS (18.2 ± 1.43 MPa) than other groups (at 90° angulation (10.79 ± 1.8 MPa), at 75° (13.48 ± 1.2 MPa) and at 60° (15.85 ± 0.81 MPa); p cement and the ceramic material, as well as the orifice.

  17. Effects of coronal substrates and water storage on the microhardness of a resin cement used for luting ceramic crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Menezes de MENDONÇA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Composite resin and metallic posts are the materials most employed for reconstruction of teeth presenting partial or total destruction of crowns. Resin-based cements have been widely used for cementation of ceramic crowns. The success of cementation depends on the achievement of adequate cement curing. Objectives: To evaluate the microhardness of Variolink® II (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein, used for cementing ceramic crowns onto three different coronal substrate preparations (dentin, metal, and composite resin, after 7 days and 3 months of water storage. The evaluation was performed along the cement line in the cervical, medium and occlusal thirds on the buccal and lingual aspects, and on the occlusal surface. Material and Methods: Thirty molars were distributed in three groups (N=10 according to the type of coronal substrate: Group D- the prepared surfaces were kept in dentin; Groups M (metal and R (resin- the crowns were sectioned at the level of the cementoenamel junction and restored with metallic cast posts or resin build-up cores, respectively. The crowns were fabricated in ceramic IPS e.max® Press (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein and luted with Variolink II. After 7 days of water storage, 5 specimens of each group were sectioned in buccolingual direction for microhardness measurements. The other specimens (N=5 were kept stored in deionized water at 37ºC for three months, followed by sectioning and microhardness measurements. Results: Data were first analyzed by three-way ANOVA that did not reveal significant differences between thirds and occlusal surface (p=0.231. Two-way ANOVA showed significant effect of substrates (p<0.001 and the Tukey test revealed that microhardness was significantly lower when crowns were cemented on resin cores and tested after 7 days of water storage (p=0.007. Conclusion: The type of material employed for coronal reconstruction of preparations for prosthetic purposes may influence the

  18. Effect of eugenol-based endodontic sealer on the adhesion of intraradicular posts cemented after different periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Lustosa Lima Dias

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated in vitro the influence of an eugenol-based sealer (EndoFill on the retention of stainless steel prefabricated posts cemented with zinc phosphate and resin-based (Panavia F cements after different periods of root canal obturation, using the pull-out test. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty upper canines were decoronated and the roots were embedded in resin blocks. The specimens were distributed into 3 groups, according to the period elapsed between canal obturation and post cementation: Group I - immediately; Group II - 72 h and Group III - 4 months. The groups were subdivided according to the type of cement used for post cementation: A - zinc phosphate and B - Panavia F. Following the experimental periods, specimens were subjected to pullout test in an Instron machine with application of tensile force at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until post dislodgement. The maximum forces required for post removal were recorded (kN and means were subjected to statistical analysis by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer test (α=0.001 RESULTS: There were statistically significant differences (p0.05 were found between the three post cementation periods, regardless of the cement. CONCLUSIONS: It was concluded that the eugenol-based sealer influenced the tensile strength of the posts cemented with the resin cement, but had no influence on the time waited between root canal obturation and post space preparation/post cementation.

  19. A Confocal Microscopic Evaluation of the Dehydration Effect on Conventional, Resin Reinforced Powder/Liquid and Paste to Paste Glass Ionomer Luting Cements

    OpenAIRE

    George, Liza; Kandaswamy, D

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dehydration of resin-modified glass ionomer powder/liquid system, resin-modified glass ionomer paste/paste luting cements in three different quantities and to compare them with a conventional glass ionomer luting cement using confocal laser scanning microscope. Materials and Methods: A conventional glass ionomer (Group I), a resin modified powder/liquid system (Group II), and a resin-modified paste/paste system (Group III) we...

  20. Effect of various surface treatments of tooth – colored posts on bonding strength of resin cement

    OpenAIRE

    Mirzaei M.; Yassini E.; Ghavam M; Pahlavan A.; Hasani Tabatabaie M.; Arami S; Kermanshah H.; Esmaieli B.

    2008-01-01

    "nBackground and Aim: Various studies have shown that reliable bond at the root - post - core interfaces are critical for the clinical success of post - retained restorations. Severe stress concentration at post - cement interface increases post debonding from the root. To form a bonded unit that reduces the risk of fracture, it is important to optimize the adhesion. Therefore, some post surface treatments have been proposed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of ...

  1. Adhesion of resin composites to biomaterials in dentistry : an evaluation of surface conditioning methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özcan, Mutlu

    2003-01-01

    Since previous investigations revealed that most clinical failures in adhesively luted ceramic restorations initiate from the cementation or internal surfaces, the study presented in Chapter II evaluated the effect of three different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of a Bis-GMA bas

  2. Adhesion properties of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR/Standard Malaysian Rubber (SMR L-based adhesives in the presence of phenol formaldehyde resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The adhesion properties, i. e. viscosity, tack and peel strength of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR/Standard Malaysian Rubber (SMR L-based pressure-sensitive adhesive was studied using phenol formaldehyde resin as the tackifying resin. Toluene was used as the solvent throughout the experiment. SBR composition in SBR/SMR L blend used was 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100%. Three different resin loadings, i. e. 40, 80 and 120 parts per hundred parts of rubber (phr were used in the adhesive formulation. The viscosity of adhesive was determined by a HAAKE Rotary Viscometer whereas loop tack and peel strength of paper/polyethylene terephthalate (PET film were measured using a Lloyd Adhesion Tester operating at 30 cm/min. Results indicate that the viscosity of adhesive decreases with increasing % SBR whereas loop tack passes through a maximum value at 20% SBR for all resin loadings. Except for the control sample (without resin, the peel strength shows a maximum value at 60% SBR for the three modes of peel tests. For a fixed % SBR, adhesive sample containing 40 phr phenol formaldehyde resin always exhibits the highest loop tack and peel strength, an observation which is associated to the optimum wettability of adhesive on the substrate.

  3. Cytotoxicity Comparison of Harvard Zinc Phosphate Cement Versus Panavia F2 and Rely X Plus Resin Cements on Rat L929-fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Akbar-zadeh Baghban

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Resin cements, regardless of their biocompatibility, have been widely used inrestorative dentistry during the recent years. These cements contain hydroxy ethyl methacrylate(HEMA molecules which are claimed to penetrate into dentinal tubules and mayaffect dental pulp. Since tooth preparation for metal ceramic restorations involves a largesurface of the tooth, cytotoxicity of these cements would be more important in fixed prosthodontictreatments. The purpose of this study was to compare the cytotoxicity of tworesin cements (Panavia F2 and Rely X Plus versus zinc phosphate cement (Harvardusing rat L929-fibroblasts in vitro.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, ninety hollow glass cylinders (internaldiameter 5-mm, height 2-mm were made and divided into three groups. Each group wasfilled with one of three experimental cements; Harvard Zinc Phosphate cement, PanaviaF2 resin cement and Rely X Plus resin cement. L929- Fibroblast were passaged and subsequentlycultured in 6-well plates of 5×105 cells each. The culture medium was RPMI_1640. All samples were incubated in CO2. Using enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay(ELISA and (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay,the cytotoxicity of the cements was investigated at 1 hour, 24 hours and one week post exposure.Statistical analyses were performed via two-way ANOVA and honestly significantdifference (HSD Tukey tests.Results: This study revealed significant differences between the three cements at the differenttime intervals. Harvard cement displayed the greatest cytotoxicity at all three intervals.After 1 hour Panavia F2 showed the next greatest cytotoxicity, but after 24-hours and oneweekintervals Rely X Plus showed the next greatest cytotoxicity. The results further showedthat cytotoxicity decreased significantly in the Panavia F2 group with time (p<0.005, cytotoxicityincreased significantly in the Rely X Plus group with time (p<0.001, and the

  4. COMPOSITE RESIN BOND STRENGTH TO ETCHED DENTINWITH ONE SELF PRIMING ADHESIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P SAMIMI

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of this study was to compare shear bond strength of composite resins to etched dentin in both dry and wet dentin surface with active and inactive application of a single-bottle adhesive resin (Single Bond, 3M Dental products. Methods. Fourthy four intact human extracted molars and premolars teeth were selected. The facial surfaces of the teeth were grounded with diamond bur to expose dentin. Then specimens were divided into four groups of 11 numbers (9 Molars and 2 Premolars. All the samples were etched with Phosphoric Acid Gel 35% and then rinsed for 10 seconds. The following stages were carried out for each group: Group I (Active-Dry: After rinsing, air drying of dentin surface for 15 seconds, active priming of adhesive resin for 15 seconds, air drying for 5 seconds, the adhesive resin layer was light cured for 10 seconds. Group III (Inactive-Dry:After rinsing, air drying of dentin surface for 15 seconds, adhesive resin was applied and air dryied for 5 seconds, the adhesive layer was light cured for 10 seconds. Group III (Active-Wet:After rinsing, removal of excess water of dentin surface with a cotton roll, active priming of adhesive resin for 15 seconds and air drying for 5 seconds, the adhesive layer was light cured for 10 seconds. Group IV (Inactive-Wet:After rinsing, removal of excess water of dentin surface with a cotton roll, the adhesive resin was applied and air dryied for 5 seconds and then cured for 10 seconds. After adhesive resin application, composite resin (Z250, 3M Dental products was applied on prepared surface with cylindrical molds (with internal diameter of 2.8mm, & height of 5mm and light-cured for 100 seconds (5x20s. The samples were then thermocycled. They were located in 6±3c water .temperature for 10 seconds and then 15 seconds in inviromental temperature, 10s in 55±3c water temperature and then were located at room temperature for 15s. This test was repeated for 100s. All of the specimens

  5. BACTERIAL ADHESION TO DENTAL AMALGAM AND 3 RESIN COMPOSITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SULJAK, JP; REID, G; WOOD, SM; MCCONNELL, RJ; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ

    1995-01-01

    Objectives: The ability of three oral bacteria to adhere to hydrophobic amalgam (water contact angle 60 degrees) and hydrophobic resin composites (Prisma-AP.H 56 degrees, Herculite XRV 82 degrees and Z100 89 degrees) was compared using an in vitro assay. Methods and results: Following preincubation

  6. Influence of inorganic filler content on the radiopacity of dental resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtos, Gabriel; Baldea, Bogdan; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Laura; Moldovan, Marioara; Prejmerean, Cristina; Nica, Luminita

    2012-01-01

    Digital radiography was used to measure the radiopacity of 18 resin cements to determine the influence of inorganic filler content on radiopacity. Four disk specimens (n=4) of each light-curing cement were digitally radiographed alongside an aluminum step wedge using an intraoral sensor (XIOS Plus, Sirona, Germany), and their mean gray value measured. Percentage of filler by weight was determined using an analytical combustion furnace. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). All materials were more radiopaque than dentin and 12 materials were more radiopaque than enamel. Filler percentage ranged between 17.36 to 53.56 vol% and radiopacity between 1.02 to 3.40 mm Al. There were no statistically significant differences in inorganic filler percentage and radiopacity among the different shades of the same material (p>0.05), but the highest radiopacity was measured for the material which contained a higher percentage of filler.

  7. Comparative study of the radiopacity of resin cements used in aesthetic dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterde-Hernández, Manuel; Cabanillas-Casabella, Cristina; Pallares-Sabater, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to compare the radiopacity of 6 modern resin cements with that of human enamel and dentine using the Digora digital radiography system, to verify whether they meet the requirements of ANSI/ADA specification no. 27/1993 and the ISO 4049/2000 standard and assess whether their radiopacity is influenced by the thickness of the cement employed. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three 3-thickness samples (0.5, 1 and 1.5 mm) were fabricated for each material. The individual cement samples were radiographed on the CCD sensor next to the aluminium wedge and the tooth samples. Five radiographs were made of each sample and therefore five readings of radiographic density were taken for each thickness of the materials. The radiopacity was measured in pixels using Digora 2.6 software. The calibration curve obtained from the mean values of each step of the wedge made it possible to obtain the equivalent in mm of aluminium for each mm of the luting material. RESULTS With the exception of Variolink Veneer Medium Value 0, all the cements studied were more radiopaque than enamel and dentin (Pdentin. PMID:27350854

  8. Study of Japanese and Serbia bentonite on the fraction of 137Cs from cement-ion exchange resins-bentonite clay mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching tests in cement-ion exchange resins-bentonite matrix, were carried out in accordance with a method recommended by IAEA. The cement specimens were prepared from construction cement which is basically a standard Portland cement. The cement was mixed with saturated wet cation exchange resins, (100 g. of dry resins +100 g. of water containing 137Cs) and two bentonite clay, from Serbia, and another from Japan. After each leaching period the radioactivity in the leachant was measured. All results exhibit practically the same general characteristics. An enhanced initial period of leaching occurs during the first 25-30 days or so, followed by a distinct reduction in the leach rate which is broadly maintained up to the long period of leaching. The leach behaviour of cement-mortar materials can be explained as a combination of two processes: surface wash-off, which is not diffusion controlled, followed by a static diffusion stage. Enhanced initial period of leaching can be explained in terms of a rapid equilibrium being established between spaces present in the surface pores of the Portland cement and ions in solution in the leachant; hence the term wash-off. It is the second stage which is controlled by diffusion that dominates the long-term leaching behaviour of the material. We also prove that increasing amount of bentonite causes a significant reduction in the leaching rate, because of bentonite good sorption characteristics and ion selectivity. We showed that the bentonite from Serbia can successfully be used for the immobilisation of radioactive waste with same quality as Japanese bentonite

  9. Solidification of radioactive resins by using ASC cement and zeolite blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solidification of simulated spent radioactive resins is investigated using ASC cement and zeolite blends. The compress strengths and leaching rates of the solidified objects with various added amount of zeolite were compared. The microstructures of the matrix were investigated by SEM in order to explain the effect of zeolite amount on the performance of solidified object. The experimental results indicate that the addition of zeolite causes a structural shift of solidified object from pinhead crystal to layer crystal, and addition of 10%-20% zeolite can decrease the leaching rate of Cs greatly, however, it had little influence on the compress strengths. (authors)

  10. Comparison of Microleakage and Thickness of Resin Cement in Ceramic Inlays with Various Temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Alaghemand, Homayoun; Abolghasemzadeh, Faezeh; Pakdel, Farzaneh; Judi Chelan, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Microleakage is still one of the major problems of composite-based restorations.This study compared the microleakage and thickness of resin cement in ceramic inlays with various temperatures. Materials and methods. Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual aspects of thirty human molars with occlusal margins in enamel and gingival margins in dentin (3 mm wide, 5 mm long and 2 mm deep). Laboratory-made inlays (LMI) were used for buccal cavities, and CAD/CAM ...

  11. Influence of resin cement shade on the color and translucency of ceramic veneers

    Science.gov (United States)

    HERNANDES, Daiana Kelly Lopes; ARRAIS, Cesar Augusto Galvão; de LIMA, Erick; CESAR, Paulo Francisco; RODRIGUES, José Augusto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective This in vitro study evaluated the effect of two different shades of resin cement (RC- A1 and A3) layer on color change, translucency parameter (TP), and chroma of low (LT) and high (HT) translucent reinforced lithium disilicate ceramic laminates. Material and Methods One dual-cured RC (Variolink II, A1- and A3-shade, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied to 1-mm thick ceramic discs to create thin RC films (100 µm thick) under the ceramics. The RC was exposed to light from a LED curing unit. Color change (ΔE) of ceramic discs was measured according to CIEL*a*b* system with a standard illuminant D65 in reflectance mode in a spectrophotometer, operating in the light range of 360-740 nm, equipped with an integrating sphere. The color difference between black (B) and white (W) background readings was used for TP analysis, while chroma was calculated by the formula C* ab=(a*2+b*2)½. ΔE of 3.3 was set as the threshold of clinically unacceptable. The results were evaluated by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. Results HT ceramics showed higher ΔE and higher TP than LT ceramics. A3-shade RC promoted higher ΔE than A1-shade cement, regardless of the ceramic translucency. No significant difference in TP was noted between ceramic discs with A1- and those with A3-shade cement. Ceramic with underlying RC showed lower TP than discs without RC. HT ceramics showed lower chroma than LT ceramics, regardless of the resin cement shade. The presence of A3-shade RC resulted in higher chroma than the presence of A1-shade RC. Conclusions Darker underlying RC layer promoted more pronounced changes in ceramic translucency, chroma, and shade of high translucent ceramic veneers. These differences may not be clinically differentiable. PMID:27556211

  12. Adhesion strategy and early bond strengths of glass-fiber posts luted into root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Faria-e-Silva

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of coinitiator solutions and self-adhesive resin cement on the early retention of glass-fiber posts. Cylindrical glass-fiber posts were luted into 40 incisor roots with different adhesion strategies (n = 10: SB2, Single Bond 2 + conventional resin cement (RelyX ARC; AP, Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus (SBMP activator + primer + ARC; APC, SBMP activator + primer + catalyst + ARC; and UNI, self-adhesive cement (RelyX Unicem. Pull-out bond strength results at 10 min after cementation showed APC > UNI > SB2 = AP (P < 0.05. The adhesion strategy significantly affected early bonding to root canals.

  13. Microleakage of two self-adhesive cements in the enamel and dentin after 24 hours and two months.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jaberi Ansari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Microleakage is a main cause of restorative treatment failure. In this study, we compared occlusal and cervical microleakage of two self-adhesive cements after 24 hours and two months.In this in-vitro experimental study, class II inlay cavities were prepared on 60 sound human third molars. Composite inlays were fabricated with Z100 composite resin. The teeth were randomly assigned to six groups. RelyX-Arc (control, RelyX-Unicem and Maxcem were used for the first three groups and specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. The same cements were used for the remaining three groups, but the specimens were stored for 2 months. The teeth were subjected to 500 thermal cycles (5°C and 55°C and immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin for 24 hours and then sectioned mesiodistally and dye penetration was evaluated in a class II cavity with occlusal and cervical margins using X20 magnification stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests.After 24 hours, cements had significant differences only in cervical margin microleakage (P=0.0001 and microleakage of RelyX-Unicem and Maxcem was significantly more than that of RelyX-Arc (both P=0.0001. Cervical microleakage in RelyX-Unicem and Maxcem was greater than occlusal (P=0.0001 and P=0.001, respectively. Microleakage was not significantly different between the occlusal and cervical margins after 2 months.Cervical microleakage was greater than occlusal in RelyX-Unicem and Maxcem after 24h. The greatest microleakage was reported for the cervical margin of RelyX-Unicem after 24 hours.

  14. Effects of curing protocol and storage time on the micro-hardness of resin cements used to lute fiber-reinforced resin posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Barbosa Ramos

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the micro-hardness profile of two dual cure resin cements (RelyX - U100®, 3M-eSPe and Panavia F 2.0®, Kuraray used for cementing fiberreinforced resin posts (Fibrekor® - Jeneric Pentron under three different curing protocols and two water storage times. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty 16mm long bovine incisor roots were endodontically treated and prepared for cementation of the Fibrekor posts. The cements were mixed as instructed, dispensed in the canal, the posts were seated and the curing performed as follows: a no light activation; b light-activation immediately after seating the post, and; c light-activation delayed 5 minutes after seating the post. The teeth were stored in water and retrieved for analysis after 7 days and 3 months. The roots were longitudinally sectioned and the microhardness was determined at the cervical, middle and apical regions along the cement line. The data was analyzed by the three-way ANOVA test (curing mode, storage time and thirds for each cement. The Tukey test was used for the post-hoc analysis. RESULTS: Light-activation resulted in a significant increase in the microhardness. This was more evident for the cervical region and for the Panavia cement. Storage in water for 3 months caused a reduction of the micro-hardness for both cements. The U100 cement showed less variation in the micro-hardness regardless of the curing protocol and storage time. CONCLUSIONS: The micro-hardness of the cements was affected by the curing and storage variables and were material-dependent.

  15. Effect of root canal rinsing protocol on dentin bond strength of two resin cements using three different method of test

    OpenAIRE

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Sheikhi, Mohammadreza; Khalilian-Gourtani, Amirhossein; Soleimani, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Background Different studies have used different tests to evaluate bond strength of resin cements to root dentin. In this in vitrostudy, three different tests were used to evaluate the bond strength of two resin cements to root dentin using two root dentin irrigation protocols. Material and Methods Ninety-six intact single-rooted teeth were selected for this study. Forty-eight teeth, with a root length of 15mm, were randomly divided into two groups and irrigated with normal saline or 2.5% sod...

  16. The influence of four dual-cure resin cements and surface treatment selection to bond strength of fiber post

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chang; Liu, Hong; Qian, Yue-Tong; Zhu, Song; Zhao, Su-Qian

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we evaluate the influence of post surface pre-treatments on the bond strength of four different cements to glass fiber posts. Eighty extracted human maxillary central incisors and canines were endodontically treated and standardized post spaces were prepared. Four post pre-treatments were tested: (i) no pre-treatment (NS, control), (ii) sandblasting (SA), (iii) silanization (SI) and (iv) sandblasting followed by silanization (SS). Per pre-treatment, four dual-cure resin cements...

  17. [Comparative in vitro evaluation of modern glass ionomer cements for adhesion strength and fluoride release].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitkov, M Yu; Rusanov, F S; Poyurovskaya, I Ya

    2016-01-01

    The study proved similar adhesion strength and fluoride release level in aqueous extracts of glass ionomer cements Cemion (VladMiVa, Russia), Glassin Rest (Omega-Dent, Russia), Cemfil 10 (StomaDent, Russia) and Fuji VIII (GC Corporation, Japan). Despite of close concentrations of fluoride in glasses, the rate of fluoride release in water from calcium and calcium-barium glasses is much higher than that of strontium glasses. PMID:27239999

  18. Microencapsulation of 2-octylcyanoacrylate tissue adhesive for self-healing acrylic bone cement

    OpenAIRE

    Brochu, Alice B. W.; Chyan, William J.; Reichert, William M

    2012-01-01

    Here, we report the first phase of developing self-healing acrylic bone cement: the preparation and characterization of polyurethane (PUR) microcapsules containing a medical cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive. Capsules were prepared by interfacial polymerization of a toluene-2,4-diisocyanate-based polyurethane prepolymer with 1,4-butanediol to encapsulate 2-octylcyanoacrylate (OCA). Various capsule characteristics, including: resultant morphology, average size and size distribution, shell thicknes...

  19. Evaluation of sealing ability of two temporary resin-based cements used in Endodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Mariana Ramos Bitencourt

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The outcome of endodontic treatment is related to the sealing ability of temporary dental restoration, which aims to prevent bacterial infiltration and recontamination of the root canal system.Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sealing ability of two temporary resin-based cements: Fill Magic Tempo and Bioplic.Material and methods: Twenty-four third molars were used, and twenty-two of them were opened to the pulp chamber (resulting in a class I cavity and randomly divided: group 1 was restored using Fill Magic Tempo (n = 10 and group 2 was restored using Bioplic (n = 10.The negative control group was not opened (n = 2, and the positive control group was opened but not restored (n = 2. Then the root and apex of the teeth were varnished to become impermeable. All samples were immersed in 2% methylene blue and kept at 37°C for 72h.After longitudinal sectioning, the linear leakage was measured in mm.In sequence, the statistical analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney test with a level of significance of 5%. Results: Most part of the samples showed leakage of 1 mm, and only the negative control group showed total leakage. There was no significant difference between the tested materials. Conclusion: It is possible to conclude that both resin-based cements showed satisfactory results on sealing ability during endodontic treatment.

  20. Influence of the interposition of ceramic spacers on the degree of conversion and the hardness of resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Angelica Milani Calgaro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated: I the effect of photo-activation through ceramics on the degree of conversion (DC and on the Knoop hardness (KHN of light- and dual-cured resin cements; and II two different protocols for obtaining the spectra of uncured materials, to determine the DC of a dual-cured resin cement. Thin films of cements were photo-activated through ceramics [feldspathic porcelain (FP; lithium disilicate glass-ceramics of low translucency (e.max-LT, medium opacity (e.max-MO and high translucency (e.max-HT; glass-infiltrated alumina composite (IC and polycrystalline zirconia (ZR] with thicknesses of 1.5 and 2.0 mm. DC was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. Two protocols were used to obtain the spectra of the uncured materials: I base and catalyst pastes were mixed, and II thin films of base and catalyst pastes were obtained separately, and an average was obtained. KHN assessment was performed with cylindrical specimens. The results were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α= 0.05. The light-cured cement showed higher DC (61.9% than the dual-cured cement (55.7%. The DC varied as follows: FP (65.4%, e.max-HT (65.1%, e.max-LT (61.8%, e.max-MO (60.9%, ZR (54.8%, and IC (44.9%. The light-cured cement showed lower KHN (22.0 than the dual-cured (25.6 cement. The cements cured under 1.5 mm spacers showed higher KHN (26.2 than when polymerized under 2.0 mm ceramics (21.3. Regarding the two protocols, there were significant differences only in three groups. Thus, both methods can be considered appropriate. The physical and mechanical properties of resin cements may be affected by the thickness and microstructure of the ceramic material interposed during photo-activation.

  1. The Influence of Nano-Al2O3 Additive on the Adhesion between Epoxy Resin and Steel Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAILan-lan; LINGGuo-ping

    2004-01-01

    The influence of nano-A1203 additive on the adhesion between epoxy resin and steel substrate has been investigated. The results of tensile testing indicated that the adhesion strength was increased dramatically by addition of Al2O3 nanoparticles in epoxy resin compared with that of the unmodified resin. The highest adhesion strength was obtained with 1 wt% nano-Al2O3 added in epoxy adhesive, more than two times higher than that of the unmodified. Scanning electronic microscope (SEM) revealed that a boundary layer exists between epoxy and steel substrate, energy spectrum analysis indicates there is enrichment of the nano-Al2O3 particle. Those results confirmed that the nano-Al2O3 additive was closely related to the change of interface morphology and the improvement of adhesion strength. The reason for adhesion improvement was also be discussed.

  2. The Influence of Nano-Al2O3 Additive on the Adhesion between Epoxy Resin and Steel Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAI Lan-lan; LING Guo-ping

    2004-01-01

    The influence of nano-Al2O3 additive on the adhesion between epoxy resin and steel substrate has been investigated. The results of tensile testing indicated that the adhesion strength was increased dramatically by addition of Al2O3 nanoparticles in epoxy resin compared with that of the unmodified resin. The highest adhesion strength was obtained with 1 wt% nano-Al2O3 added in epoxy adhesive, more than two times higher than that of the unmodified. Scanning electronic microscope (SEM) revealed that a boundary layer exists between epoxy and steel substrate, energy spectrum analysis indicates there is enrichment of the nano-Al2O3 particle. Those results confirmed that the nano-Al2O3 additive was closely related to the change of interface morphology and the improvement of adhesion strength. The reason for adhesion improvement was also be discussed.

  3. Effect of surface roughness and adhesive system on repair potential of silorane-based resin composite

    OpenAIRE

    Mobarak, Enas H.

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the influence of surface roughness and adhesive system on the repair strength of silorane-based resin composite. Twenty-four substrate discs from silorane-based FiltekP90 were made and stored for 24 h. Half of the discs were roughened against 320 grit SiC paper while the other half was polished against 4000 grit SiC paper. All discs were etched with phosphoric acid. Repair resin composite, FiltekP90 or FiltekZ250, was bonded to the treated surfaces using t...

  4. Assessment of the Shear Bond Strength between Nanofilled Composite Bonded to Glass-ionomer Cement Using Self-etch Adhesive with Different pHs and Total-Etch Adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Sharafeddin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: In the sandwich technique, the undesirable bond between the composite resin and glass-ionomer cement (GIc is one of the most important factors which lead to the failure of restoration. Total-etch and self-etch adhesives may improve the bond strength based on their pH. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between the nanofilled composite resin and GIc using different adhesives. Materials and Method: In this experimental study, 40 specimens (6×6mm in 4 groups (n=10 were prepared in acrylic mold. Each specimen contained conventional GI ChemFil Superior with a height of 3mm, bonded to Z350 composite resin with a height measured 3mm. In order to bond the composite to the GI, the following adhesives were used, respectively: A: mild Clearfil SE Bond self-etch (pH=2, B: intermediate OptiBond self-etch (pH=1.4, C: strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (pH=1, and D: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch (pH=7.2. The shear bond strength was measured by using universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test were used to analyze the data (p< 0.05. Results: The shear bond strength in group A was significantly higher than group B (p= 0.002, C (p< 0.001, and D (p< 0.001. Moreover, the shear bond strength of groups A and B (self-etch was significantly different from group D (total-etch (p< 0.001; and C (self-etch with D (p= 0.024. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that applying the mild self-etch adhesive between the composite and the GIc results in stronger shear bond strength compared to intermediate and strong self-etch adhesives. Moreover, the self-etch adhesive increased the shear bond strength between composite resin and GIc more significantly than total-etch adhesive.

  5. Optical fiber sensors and their application in monitoring stress build-up in dental resin cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottevaere, H.; Tabak, M.; Fernandez Fernandez, A.; Berghmans, F.; Thienpont, H.

    2005-09-01

    The field of optical fiber sensing is highly diverse and this diversity is perceived as a great advantage over more conventional sensors in that an optical sensor can be tailored to measure any of a myriad of physical parameters. In this paper we present a niche application for optical fiber sensors in the domain of biophotonics, namely the monitoring of stress build-up during the curing process of dental resin cements. We discuss the origin of this stress build-up and the problems it can cause when treating patients. Optical fiber sensors aim at excelling in two kind of applications: firstly to perform quality control on batch produced dental cements and measure their total material shrinkage, secondly to monitor the hardening of the cement during in-vivo measurements resulting in the dynamic measurement of the shrinkage and to control the stress in a facing based restoration. We therefore investigated two types of optical fiber sensors as alternatives to conventional measurement techniques; namely polarimetric optical fiber sensors and fiber Bragg gratings written in polarization maintaining fibers. After discussing the results obtained with both optical fiber sensors, we will conclude with a critical assessment of the suitability of the two proposed sensing configurations for multi-parameter stress monitoring.

  6. Clinical Effect of Dental Adhesive on Marginal Integrity in Class I And Class II Resin-Composite Restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Manchorova-Veleva Neshka A.; Vladimirov Stoyan B.; Keskinova Donka А.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dental adhesives are believed to influence marginal adaptation and marginal discoloration when used under posterior resin-based composite restorations. Studies on the latest adhesive systems reveal that the group of the three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (3-E&RA) and the one-step self-etch adhesive (1-SEA) have entirely different bonding mechanisms, as well as different bond strength and resistance to chemical, thermal and mechanical factors. STUDY OBJECTIVES: A hypothesis that a ...

  7. Paucity of Nanolayering in Resin-Dentin Interfaces of MDP-based Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, F; Zhou, L; Zhang, Z; Niu, L; Zhang, L; Chen, C; Zhou, J; Yang, H; Wang, X; Fu, B; Huang, C; Pashley, D H; Tay, F R

    2016-04-01

    Self-assembled nanolayering structures have been reported in resin-dentin interfaces created by adhesives that contain 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP). These structures have been hypothesized to contribute to bond durability. The objective of the present study was to determine the extent of nanolayering in resin-dentin interfaces after application of commercialized 10-MDP-containing self-etch and universal adhesives to human dentin. Seven commercialized adhesives were examined: Adhese Universal (Ivoclar-Vivadent), All-Bond Universal (Bisco, Inc.), Clearfil SE Bond 2, Clearfil S3 Bond Plus, Clearfil Universal Bond (all from Kuraray Noritake Dental Inc.), G-Premio Bond (GC Corp.), and Scotchbond Universal (3M ESPE). Each adhesive was applied in the self-etch mode on midcoronal dentin according to the respective manufacturer's instructions. Bonded specimens (n = 6) were covered with flowable resin composite, processed for transmission electron microscopy, and examined at 30 random sites without staining. Thin-film glancing angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to detect the characteristic peaks exhibited by nanolayering (n = 4). The control consisted of 15%wt, 10%wt, and 5%wt 10-MDP (DM Healthcare Products, Inc.) dissolved in a mixed solvent (ethanol and water weight ratio 9:8, with photoinitiators). Experimental primers were applied to dentin for 20 s, covered with hydrophobic resin layer, and examined in the same manner. Profuse nanolayering with highly ordered periodicity (~3.7 nm wide) was observed adjacent to partially dissolved apatite crystallites in dentin treated with the 15% 10-MDP primer. Three peaks in the 2θ range of 2.40° (3.68 nm), 4.78° (1.85 nm), and 7.18° (1.23 nm) were identified from thin-film XRD. Reduction in the extent of nanolayering was observed in the 10% and 5% 10-MDP experimental primer-dentin interface along with lower intensity XRD peaks. Nanolayering and characteristic XRD peaks were rarely observed in

  8. Comparison of microleakage and thickness of resin cement in ceramic inlays with various temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaghemand, Homayoun; Abolghasemzadeh, Faezeh; Pakdel, Farzaneh; Judi Chelan, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Microleakage is still one of the major problems of composite-based restorations.This study compared the microleakage and thickness of resin cement in ceramic inlays with various temperatures. Materials and methods. Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual aspects of thirty human molars with occlusal margins in enamel and gingival margins in dentin (3 mm wide, 5 mm long and 2 mm deep). Laboratory-made inlays (LMI) were used for buccal cavities, and CAD/CAM inlays (CMI) were used for lingual cavities. All the cavities were divided into six groups (n=10): 1) LMI at -5°C; 2) LMI at 50°C; 3) LMI at room temperature (25°C); 4) CMI at -5°C; 5) CMI at 50°C; 6) CMI at room temperature (25°C). Inlays were bonded to cavities in a pulp pressure- and temperature-simulating device. After thermocycling and dye penetration, the teeth were divided into two mesiodistal halves. Amount of dye penetration and film thickness were measured under a stereomicroscope and analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon and Spearman's correlation tests ( = 0.05). Results. There were no statistically significant differences in leakage between different inlay temperatures (P > 0.05). The mean cement thickness in laboratory-made inlays (gingival margin, 83.7 ± 11 and occlusal margin, 84.7 ± 19) was greater than that in CAD/CAM inlays (gingival margin, 69 ± 16 and occlusal margin, 84.7 ± 16). No correlation was found be-tween cement thickness and microleakage either in enamel or dentin for any of the ceramic systems. Conclusion. Differences in inlay temperature had no effect on microleakage. CAD/CAM inlays had lower cement thickness than laboratory-made inlays, but this was not related to their microleakage. PMID:25024839

  9. Comparison of microleakage and thickness of resin cement in ceramic inlays with various temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaghemand, Homayoun; Abolghasemzadeh, Faezeh; Pakdel, Farzaneh; Judi Chelan, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Microleakage is still one of the major problems of composite-based restorations.This study compared the microleakage and thickness of resin cement in ceramic inlays with various temperatures. Materials and methods. Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual aspects of thirty human molars with occlusal margins in enamel and gingival margins in dentin (3 mm wide, 5 mm long and 2 mm deep). Laboratory-made inlays (LMI) were used for buccal cavities, and CAD/CAM inlays (CMI) were used for lingual cavities. All the cavities were divided into six groups (n=10): 1) LMI at -5°C; 2) LMI at 50°C; 3) LMI at room temperature (25°C); 4) CMI at -5°C; 5) CMI at 50°C; 6) CMI at room temperature (25°C). Inlays were bonded to cavities in a pulp pressure- and temperature-simulating device. After thermocycling and dye penetration, the teeth were divided into two mesiodistal halves. Amount of dye penetration and film thickness were measured under a stereomicroscope and analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon and Spearman's correlation tests ( = 0.05). Results. There were no statistically significant differences in leakage between different inlay temperatures (P > 0.05). The mean cement thickness in laboratory-made inlays (gingival margin, 83.7 ± 11 and occlusal margin, 84.7 ± 19) was greater than that in CAD/CAM inlays (gingival margin, 69 ± 16 and occlusal margin, 84.7 ± 16). No correlation was found be-tween cement thickness and microleakage either in enamel or dentin for any of the ceramic systems. Conclusion. Differences in inlay temperature had no effect on microleakage. CAD/CAM inlays had lower cement thickness than laboratory-made inlays, but this was not related to their microleakage.

  10. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to glass infiltrated zirconia-reinforced ceramic : The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, R; Ozcan, M; Bottino, MA; Valandro, LF

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to a glass-infiltrated zirconia-reinforced alumina-based core ceramic. Methods. Thirty blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm) of In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (In-Ceram Zirconia-INC-ZR, VI

  11. Bond strength of a resin cement to high-alumina and zirconia-reinforced ceramics: The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valandro, L.F.; Ozcan, M.; Bottino, M.C.; Bottino, M.A.; Scotti, R.; Della Bona, A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to three high-strength core ceramics: high alumina-based (In-Ceram Alumina, Procera AllCeram) and zirconia-reinforced alumina-based (in-Ceram Zirconia) ce

  12. Bond strength of a resin cement to high-alumina and zirconia-reinforced ceramics : The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felipe Valandro, Luiz; Ozcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Cicero; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Scotti, Roberto; Della Bona, Alvaro

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to three high-strength core ceramics: high alumina-based (In-Ceram Alumina, Procera AllCeram) and zirconia-reinforced alumina-based (in-Ceram Zirconia) ce

  13. Influence of cementation variables on fatigue of simulated two-unit cantilever resin-bonded fixed partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Dalen; A.J. Feilzer; C.J. Kleverlaan

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the influence of various combinations of surface pretreatment and luting cement on flexural fatigue limits of two-unit CoCr cantilever resin-bonded fixed partial dentures. METHODS: Cyclic fatigue tests were performed at 1 Hz on an ACTA fatigue tester. The staircase test method

  14. The Study of the Adhesive Activity and Modification Possibilities of Melamine-Urea-Formaldehyde (MUF), Urea-Formaldehyde (UF) Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Kajaks, J; Kolbins, A

    2014-01-01

    Two types of thermosetting resins MUF and UF have been used as glues for birch wood veneer. As resins modifiers polyvinylacetate emulsion (PVA), polyvinylbutiral (PVB) (powder and solution), rubber latex, adipic (Ad) and sebacic (Seb) acids have been utilized. For glued system shear strength and deformation, bending properties and impact strength have been tested. The best properties: adhesive activity and elasticity have been shown by resins modified with PVB powder, rubber latex, adipic and...

  15. Conventional and Contemporary Luting Cements: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Ladha, Komal; Verma, Mahesh

    2010-01-01

    Long-term clinical success of fixed prosthodontic restorations is influenced by many factors, one important factor being the selection of an appropriate luting agent. No single luting agent is capable of meeting all the stringent requirements, which is one reason why there is such a wide choice of luting agents currently available from conventional water-based to contemporary adhesive resin cements. Introduction of adhesive resin systems has completely changed the face of fixed prosthodontic ...

  16. Effect of different light curing methods on mechanical and physical properties of resin-cements polymerized through ceramic discs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isil Cekic-nagas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the polimerization ability of three different light-curing units (quartz tungsten halogen, light-emitting diodes and plasma arc and their exposure modes (high-intensity and soft-start by determination of microhardness, water sorption and solubility, and diametral tensile strength of 5 dual-curing resin cements. Material and methods: A total of 720 disc-shaped samples (1 mm height and 5 mm diameter were prepared from different dual-curing resin cements (Duolink, Nexus, Bifix-QM, Panavia F and RelyX Unicem. Photoactivation was performed by using quartz tungsten halogen (high-power and soft-up modes, light-emitting diode (standard and exponential modes and plasma arc (normal and ramp-curing modes curing units through ceramic discs. Then the samples (n=8/per group were stored dry in the dark at 37°C for 24 h. The Vickers hardness test was performed on the resin cement layer with a microhardness tester (Shimadzu HMV. For sorption and solubility tests; the samples were stored in a desiccator at 37°C and weighed to a constant mass. The samples were weighed both before and after being immersed in deionized water for different periods of time (24 h and 7 days and being desiccated. The diametral tensile strength of the samples was tested in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed statistically by nonparametric Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at 5% significance level. RESULTS: Resin cement and light-curing unit had significant effects (p0.05 were obtained with different modes of LCUs. Conclusion: The study indicates that polymerization of resin cements with different light-curing units may result in various polymer structures, and consequently different mechanical and physical properties.

  17. Bonding between oxide ceramics and adhesive cement systems: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papia, Evaggelia; Larsson, Christel; du Toit, Madeleine; Vult von Steyern, Per

    2014-02-01

    The following aims were set for this systematic literature review: (a) to make an inventory of existing methods to achieve bondable surfaces on oxide ceramics and (b) to evaluate which methods might provide sufficient bond strength. Current literature of in vitro studies regarding bond strength achieved using different surface treatments on oxide ceramics in combination with adhesive cement systems was selected from PubMed and systematically analyzed and completed with reference tracking. The total number of publications included for aim a was 127 studies, 23 of which were used for aim b. The surface treatments are divided into seven main groups: as-produced, grinding/polishing, airborne particle abrasion, surface coating, laser treatment, acid treatment, and primer treatment. There are large variations, making comparison of the studies difficult. An as-produced surface of oxide ceramic needs to be surface treated to achieve durable bond strength. Abrasive surface treatment and/or silica-coating treatment with the use of primer treatment can provide sufficient bond strength for bonding oxide ceramics. This conclusion, however, needs to be confirmed by clinical studies. There is no universal surface treatment. Consideration should be given to the specific materials to be cemented and to the adhesive cement system to be used.

  18. Surface characterization of the cement for retention of implant supported dental prostheses: In vitro evaluation of cement roughness and surface free energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brajkovic, Denis [Clinic for Dentistry, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Svetozara Markovica 69, 34000 Kragujevac (Serbia); Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 4/2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Kisic, Danilo [Laboratory for Atomic Physics, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinca”, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Zelic, Ksenija; Djuric, Marija [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 4/2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Rakocevic, Zlatko, E-mail: zlatkora@vinca.rs [Laboratory for Atomic Physics, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinca”, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Surface free energy and surface roughness influence bacterial adhesion. • Bacterial colonization causes periimplantitis and implant loss. • Zinc-based, glass-ionomers and resin-cements were investigated. • Glass-ionomers-cements present the lowest values of surface free energy and roughness. • Glass-ionomer-cements surface properties result with reduced bacterial adhesion. - Abstract: Background: Material surface free energy and surface roughness strongly influence the bacterial adhesion in oral cavity. The aim of this study was to analyze these two parameters in various commercial luting agents used for cementation of implant restorations. Materials and methods: Zinc-based, glass-ionomers, resin modified glass-ionomer and resin-cements were investigated. Contact angle and surface free energy were measured by contact angle analyzer using Image J software program. Materials’ average roughness and fractal dimension were calculated based on Atomic Force Microscope topography images. Results: Zinc phosphate cements presented significantly higher total surface free energy and significantly lower dispersive component of surface free energy compared to other groups, while resin-cements showed significantly lower polar component than other groups. The surface roughness and fractal dimension values were statistically the highest in the zinc phosphate cements and the lowest for the glass-ionomers cements. Conclusion: Glass-ionomers-cements presented lower values of surface free energy and surface roughness than zinc phosphate and resin cements, indicating that their surfaces are less prone to biofilm adhesion. Practical implications: Within limitations of an in vitro trial, our results indicate that glass-ionomers-cements could be the cements of choice for fixation of cement retained implant restorations due to superior surface properties compared to zinc phosphate and resin cements, which may result in reduced plaque formation

  19. Surface characterization of the cement for retention of implant supported dental prostheses: In vitro evaluation of cement roughness and surface free energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Surface free energy and surface roughness influence bacterial adhesion. • Bacterial colonization causes periimplantitis and implant loss. • Zinc-based, glass-ionomers and resin-cements were investigated. • Glass-ionomers-cements present the lowest values of surface free energy and roughness. • Glass-ionomer-cements surface properties result with reduced bacterial adhesion. - Abstract: Background: Material surface free energy and surface roughness strongly influence the bacterial adhesion in oral cavity. The aim of this study was to analyze these two parameters in various commercial luting agents used for cementation of implant restorations. Materials and methods: Zinc-based, glass-ionomers, resin modified glass-ionomer and resin-cements were investigated. Contact angle and surface free energy were measured by contact angle analyzer using Image J software program. Materials’ average roughness and fractal dimension were calculated based on Atomic Force Microscope topography images. Results: Zinc phosphate cements presented significantly higher total surface free energy and significantly lower dispersive component of surface free energy compared to other groups, while resin-cements showed significantly lower polar component than other groups. The surface roughness and fractal dimension values were statistically the highest in the zinc phosphate cements and the lowest for the glass-ionomers cements. Conclusion: Glass-ionomers-cements presented lower values of surface free energy and surface roughness than zinc phosphate and resin cements, indicating that their surfaces are less prone to biofilm adhesion. Practical implications: Within limitations of an in vitro trial, our results indicate that glass-ionomers-cements could be the cements of choice for fixation of cement retained implant restorations due to superior surface properties compared to zinc phosphate and resin cements, which may result in reduced plaque formation

  20. Fluoride release and uptake from glass ionomer cements and composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidlich, P; Miranda, L A; Maltz, M; Samuel, S M

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate fluoride release and uptake from 4 glass ionomer cements (GICs)--Vitremer (VIT), Fuji II LC (FII LC), Fuji IX (FIX), Chelon Fill (CHE)--and 2 composite resins (CRs)--Heliomolar (H) and Zeta-100 (Z-100). Eight discs (8 mm x 2 mm) were made of each material and were stored in plastic vials containing artificial saliva at 37 degrees C. In group 1 (N = 3), the specimens were immersed in artificial saliva which was changed daily for 25 days. In group 2 (N = 5), besides receiving the same treatment as group 1, the specimens were immersed, after 24 hours, in a fluoride solution (1% NaF) for 1 min before daily saliva change. An ion-specific electrode (9609 BN-Orion) connected to an ion analyzer (SA-720 Procyon) was used to determine the amount of fluoride released at days 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25. Data were analyzed using two way ANOVA and Friedman's test. GICs released more fluoride during the first day and after this period the mean fluoride released decreased. Composite resin H released fluoride during the first day only and Z-100 did not release fluoride. In terms of NaF treatment, CRs did not show fluoride uptake, whereas the GICs showed fluoride uptake (VIT = FII LC = CHE > FIX). PMID:11210268

  1. Retentive strength of luting cements for stainless steel crowns: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Priya; Kondae, Sapna; Gupta, Kamal Kishore

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated and compared the retentive strength of three luting cements. A total of forty five freshly extracted human primary molars were used in this study. The teeth were prepared to receive stainless steel crowns. They were then randomly divided into three groups, of fifteen teeth each, so as to receive the three different luting cements: conventional glass ionomer resin modified glass ionomer and adhesive resin. The teeth were then stored in artificial saliva for twenty four hours. The retentive strength of the crowns was determined by using a specially designed Instron Universal Testing Machine (Model 1011). The data was statistically analyzed using ANOVA to evaluate retentive strength for each cement and Tukey test for pair wise comparison. It was concluded that retentive strength of adhesive resin cement and resin modified glass ionomer cement was significantly higher than that of the conventional glass ionomer cement.

  2. Influence of ozone and paracetic acid disinfection on adhesion of resilient liners to acrylic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of paracetic acid (PAA) and ozone disinfection on the tensile bond strength (TBS) of silicone-based resilient liners to acrylic resins. MATERIALS AND METHODS One hundred and twenty dumbbell shaped heat-polymerized acrylic resins were prepared. From the mid segment of the specimens, 3 mm of acrylic were grinded off and separated parts were reattached by resilient liners. The specimens were divided into 2 control (control1, control7) and 4 test groups of PAA and ozone disinfection (PAA1, PAA7, ozone1 and ozone7; n=10). While control groups were immersed in distilled water for 10 min (control1) and 7 days (control7), test groups were subjected to PAA (16 g/L) or ozone rich water (4 mg/L) for 1 cycle (10 min for PAA and 60 min for ozone) per day for 7 days prior to tensile tests. Measurements of the TBS were analyzed using 3-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. RESULTS Adhesive strength of Mollosil decreased significantly by application of ozone disinfection. PAA disinfection had no negative effect on the TBS values of Mollosil and Molloplast B to acrylic resin. Single application of ozone disinfection did not have any negative effect on TBS values of Molloplast B, but prolonged exposure to ozone decreased its adhesive strength. CONCLUSION The adhesion of resilient liners to acrylic was not adversely affected by PAA disinfection. Immersion in ozonated water significantly decreased TBS of Mollosil. Prolonged exposure to ozone negatively affects adhesion of Molloplast B to denture base materials. PMID:27555898

  3. An Investigation on Load Bearing Capacities of Cement and Resin Grouted Rock Bolts Installed in Weak Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyoncu Erguler, Guzide; Abiddin Erguler, Zeynal

    2015-04-01

    Rock bolts have been considered one of indispensable support method to improve load bearing capacity of many underground engineering projects, and thus, various types of them have been developed until now for different purposes. Although mechanically anchored rock bolts can be successfully installed to prevent structurally controlled instabilities in hard rocks, in comparison with cement and resin grouted rock bolts, these types of anchors are not so effective in weak rocks characterized by relatively low mechanical properties. In order to investigate the applicability and to measure relative performance of cement and resin grouted rock bolts into weak and heavily jointed rock mass, a research program mainly consisting of pull-out tests was performed in a metal mine in Turkey. The rock materials excavated in this underground mining were described as basalt, tuff, ore dominated volcanic rocks and dacite. To achieve more representative results for rock materials found in this mining and openings excavated in varied dimensions, the pull-out tests were conducted on rock bolts used in many different locations where more convergences were measured and deformation dependent instability was expected to cause greater engineering problems. It is well known that the capacity of rock bolts depends on the length, diameter and density of the bolt pattern, and so considering the thickness of plastic zone in the studied openings, the length and diameter of rock bolts were taken as 2.4 m. and 25 mm., respectively. The spacing between rows changed between 70 and 180 cm. In this study, totally twenty five pull-out tests were performed to have a general understanding about axial load bearing capacity and support reaction curves of cement and resin grouted rock bolts. When pull load-displacement curves belongs to cement and resin grouted rock bolts were compared with each other, it was determined that cement grouted rock bolts carry more load ranging between 115.6 kN and 127.5 kN with

  4. Immobilisation in cement of ion exchange resins arising from the purification of reagents, used for the decontamination of reactor circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination of reactors normally results in large volumes of liquid effluent. At present the most effective method of reducing the volume of waste is to remove the activity by passing the solution through an ion exchange column. The aim of the programme at present is to show that ion exchange resins used to remove activity from decontaminating agents can be successfully immobilised in cement. To achieve this, blends of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and ground granulated Blast Furnace Slag (BFS) will be used initially. Initial results presented in a previous report showed that BFS blended with OPC in the ratio 9:1 produced a satisfactory product containing 40% ion exchange resin. Further work has now been undertaken to improve the product's properties and the waste loading. The use of microsilica, a finely divided form of silicon dioxide, has also been investigated as an additive to cement. This has resulted in a further improvement in the product's properties. The mechanical and rheological properties of waste forms incorporating microsilica have been investigated. The final part of the report deals with the immobilisation of ion exchange resin which has been treated with simulant decontaminating solution, together with an assessment of the effect of picolinic acid and formic acid on cement hydration. A new technique for measuring the expansion of grouts in the first 48 hours curing has been evaluated. (author)

  5. The Effects of Exposure Time on the Surface Microhardness of Three Dual-Cured Dental Resin Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus C. Bandéca

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the exposure time of light-curing of the polymers used for cementation on microhardness test in different storage times. The polymers (specifically called resin cements were RelyX ARC, RelyX U100, and SET. Five specimens of each group were prepared and photo-polymerized with exposure times of 20 s and 180 s, using a LED polymerization unit with wavelength of 440 ~ 480 nm and light output was consistently 1,500 mW/cm2. The Vickers hardness test was performed in a MMT-3 Microhardness Tester. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05. The values of RelyX ARC showed statistically significant difference to groups with light exposure when considering only chemical cure (p < 0.05. The groups with light exposure (20 s and 180 s showed no significant difference between them (p > 0.05. The RelyX U100 cured only chemically showed statistically significant difference between 48 h and 7 days (p < 0.05. The SET resin cement showed no significant difference to groups without light exposure for all storage times (p > 0.05. The values of hardening of the dual-cured resin cements improved after setting by light and chemical activation demonstrating the importance of light curing.

  6. Influence of Photoinitiator and Light-Curing Source on Bond Strength of Experimental Resin Cements to Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segreto, Dario Raimundo; Naufel, Fabiana Scarparo; Brandt, William Cunha; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the bond strength (BS) of experimental resin cements formulated with different photoinitiators when activated by two kinds of light-curing units (LCUs) through a ceramic material. Seven resin blends with different camphorquinone (CQ) and/or phenylpropanedione (PPD) concentrations (weight) were prepared: C5: 0.5% CQ; C8: 0.8% CQ; P5: 0.5% PPD; P8: 0.8% PPD; C1P4: 0.1% CQ and 0.4% PPD; C4P1: 0.4% CQ and 0.1% PPD; C4P4: 0.4% CQ and 0.4% PPD. Two LCUs were used: one quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH - 850 mW/cm²) and one light-emitting diode (LED - 1300 mW/cm²). The microtensile bond strength of each blend was assessed. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The BS values did not exhibit significant differences for LCUs, regardless of the photoinitiator type. Three cements showed significant differences: P5 and C5 had higher BS with QTH, and C4P1 with LED. For QTH, P5 showed the highest and C1P4 the lowest BS. For the LED, C4P1 showed the highest BS of all the cements. The results indicated that PPD was a viable alternative in the formulation of photocured resin cements, reducing or eliminating CQ that is yellowish without impairing the bond strength. Furthermore, both LED and QTH were effective in curing resin cements that contain PPD or CQ. PMID:27007352

  7. Mechanical Strength of Particleboard Produced from Fonio Husk with Gum Arabic Resin Adhesive as Binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndububa E. E

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fonio (“Acha” husk passing through a maximum 4mm sieve aperture was blended with an adhesive liquid resin of gum Arabic to form Fonio Husk Particleboard (FHP samples. The resin binder was a product of crushed balls of gum Arabic that was mixed with water at ratio 4:3 by weight. The resin was introduced at percentage levels of 20%, 25%, 30%, 35%, 40% and 45% by weight. After pressing, heat treatments and curing, the particleboard samples were tested for mechanical strengths. The compressive strength ranged from 0.057N/mm2 at 20% level to 0.369N/mm2 at 45% level. Tensile strength increased steadily with increase in resin levels peaking at 0.792 N/mm2 for 45% level. The flexural strength followed the same trend peaking at 45% level with 3.697 N/mm2 . Some of the values met the minimum values prescribed by British, American and European Standards. The boards may not be used as load bearing materials but will be better suited as internal wall partitions and ceiling materials.

  8. Shear bond strength of Biodentine, ProRoot MTA, glass ionomer cement and composite resin on human dentine ex vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Kaup, Markus; Dammann, Christoph Heinrich; Schäfer, Edgar; Dammaschke, Till, 1965-

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of Biodentine, ProRoot MTA (MTA), glass ionomer cement (GIC) and composite resin (CR) on dentine. Methods 120 extracted human third molars were embedded in cold-cured-resin and grinned down to the dentine. For each material 30 specimens were produced in standardised height and width and the materials were applied according to manufacturers´ instructions on the dentine samples. Only in the CR group a self-etching dentine...

  9. Microencapsulation of 2-octylcyanoacrylate tissue adhesive for self-healing acrylic bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochu, Alice B W; Chyan, William J; Reichert, William M

    2012-10-01

    Here, we report the first phase of developing self-healing acrylic bone cement: the preparation and characterization of polyurethane (PUR) microcapsules containing a medical cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive. Capsules were prepared by interfacial polymerization of a toluene-2,4-diisocyanate-based polyurethane prepolymer with 1,4-butanediol to encapsulate 2-octylcyanoacrylate (OCA). Various capsule characteristics, including: resultant morphology, average size and size distribution, shell thickness, content and reactivity of encapsulated agent, and shelf life are investigated and their reliance on solvent type and amount, surfactant type and amount, temperature, pH, agitation rate, reaction time, and mode of addition of the oil phase to the aqueous phase are presented. Capsules had average diameters ranging from 74 to 222 μm and average shell thicknesses ranging from 1.5 to 6 μm. The capsule content was determined via thermogravimetric analysis and subsequent analysis of the capsules following up to 8 weeks storage revealed minimal loss of core contents. Mechanical testing of OCA-containing capsules showed individual capsules withstood compressive forces up to a few tenths of Newtons, and the contents released from crushed capsules generated tensile adhesive forces of a few Newtons. Capsules were successfully mixed into the poly(methyl methacrylate) bone cement, surviving the mixing process, exposure to methyl methacrylate monomer, and the resulting exothermic matrix curing. PMID:22807313

  10. Microleakage of Different Self-Adhesive Materials for Lithium Disilicate CAD/CAM Crowns

    OpenAIRE

    Naumova, Ella A.; Alexander Valta; Katharina Schaper; Arnold, Wolfgang H.; Andree Piwowarczyk

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the microleakage and marginal gap of various luting materials after cementing ceramic crowns. Methods: Cervical margins of human molars were designed as circular chamfers. Cementation of full-contour ceramic crowns was conducted with zinc-phosphate cement (Harvard cement), resin cement (Panavia F 2.0) and self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, BifixSE, MaxCem Elite, PermaCem2.0, G-Cem). Aging of specimens was performed in artificial saliva, at 37 °C for four weeks...

  11. Influence of different luting protocols on shear bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing resin nanoceramic material to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Claudio; Pigozzo, Marco; Ceci, Matteo; Scribante, Andrea; Beltrami, Riccardo; Chiesa, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of three different luting protocols on shear bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) resin nanoceramic (RNC) material to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 30 disks were milled from RNC blocks (Lava Ultimate/3M ESPE) with CAD/CAM technology. The disks were subsequently cemented to the exposed dentin of 30 recently extracted bovine permanent mandibular incisors. The specimens were randomly assigned into 3 groups of 10 teeth each. In Group 1, disks were cemented using a total-etch protocol (Scotchbond™ Universal Etchant phosphoric acid + Scotchbond Universal Adhesive + RelyX™ Ultimate conventional resin cement); in Group 2, disks were cemented using a self-etch protocol (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive + RelyX™ Ultimate conventional resin cement); in Group 3, disks were cemented using a self-adhesive protocol (RelyX™ Unicem 2 Automix self-adhesive resin cement). All cemented specimens were placed in a universal testing machine (Instron Universal Testing Machine 3343) and submitted to a shear bond strength test to check the strength of adhesion between the two substrates, dentin, and RNC disks. Specimens were stressed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with analysis of variance and post-hoc Tukey's test at a level of significance of 0.05. Results: Post-hoc Tukey testing showed that the highest shear strength values (P < 0.001) were reported in Group 2. The lowest data (P < 0.001) were recorded in Group 3. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, conventional resin cements (coupled with etch and rinse or self-etch adhesives) showed better shear strength values compared to self-adhesive resin cements. Furthermore, conventional resin cements used together with a self-etch adhesive reported the highest values of adhesion. PMID:27076822

  12. Reduction of bacterial adhesion on dental composite resins by silicon-oxygen thin film coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandracci, Pietro; Mussano, Federico; Ceruti, Paola; Pirri, Candido F; Carossa, Stefano

    2015-01-29

    Adhesion of bacteria on dental materials can be reduced by modifying the physical and chemical characteristics of their surfaces, either through the application of specific surface treatments or by the deposition of thin film coatings. Since this approach does not rely on the use of drugs or antimicrobial agents embedded in the materials, its duration is not limited by their possible depletion. Moreover it avoids the risks related to possible cytotoxic effects elicited by antibacterial substances released from the surface and diffused in the surrounding tissues. In this work, the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus mitis was studied on four composite resins, commonly used for manufacturing dental prostheses. The surfaces of dental materials were modified through the deposition of a-SiO(x) thin films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The chemical bonding structure of the coatings was analyzed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The morphology of the dental materials before and after the coating deposition was assessed by means of optical microscopy and high-resolution mechanical profilometry, while their wettability was investigated by contact angle measurements. The sample roughness was not altered after coating deposition, while a noticeable increase of wettability was detected for all the samples. Also, the adhesion of S. mitis decreased in a statistically significant way on the coated samples, when compared to the uncoated ones, which did not occur for S. mutans. Within the limitations of this study, a-SiO(x) coatings may affect the adhesion of bacteria such as S. mitis, possibly by changing the wettability of the composite resins investigated.

  13. Evaluation of the sealing ability of resin cement used as a root canal sealer: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Vinod Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was designed to evaluate the apical seal of root canals obturated with resin cement as a root canal sealer and compare with that of the glass ionomer and zinc oxide eugenol sealers using a cold lateral condensation gutta-percha technique. Background: Successful root canal treatment requires three-dimensional obturation of the root canal system with nonirritating biomaterials. None of the available materials are capable of providing a fluid tight seal. Materials and Methods: The prepared teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 15 each to be obturated using three different sealers. Group I: zinc oxide eugenol (Tubliseal, Group II: Glass ionomer (Ketac Endo, and Group III: resin cement (C & B Superbond. All the specimens were stored in 100% relative humidity at 37° for 24 h. The specimens were placed in 2% methylene blue dye for 48 h and sectioned. The dye penetration was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Results: The "Kruskal-Wallis" test was carried out to test the equality of mean. All the specimens showed dye leakage, and there was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.0001 among the groups. The specimens in Group III showed a minimal leakage and the specimens in Group I showed a maximum leakage. Conclusion: Resin cement sealed the root canals significantly better when compared with zinc oxide eugenol and glass ionomer sealers.

  14. Effect of ceramic type, thickness, and time of irradiation on degree of polymerization of dual – cure resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Rashi; Taneja, Sonali; Kumari, Manju

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of ceramic type, thickness, and time of irradiation on degree of polymerization of dual-cure resin cement. Materials and Methods: Dual-cure resin cement (SoloCem) was used to prepare disk-shaped samples (0.5 mm thick × 5 mm diameter). Study group samples (n = 5) were light-cured for 40, 60, and 80 s through all ceramic leucite-reinforced (Cergo Kiss), lithium disilicate-reinforced (IPS e.max), and monolithic zirconia-reinforced (Ziecon) of three thicknesses (2, 3, and 4 mm). Negative control group samples were cured through metal disks and positive control samples were cured without the presence of ceramic. The degree of conversion (DC) was evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The recorded data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance, followed by post hoc analysis (Tukey HSD). Results and Conclusion: Greatest light transmission and DC were seen through Cergo Kiss, followed by IPS e.max Press and Ziecon, with insignificant difference between the latter two. The attenuation of light irradiance increased with increasing thickness of ceramic disks, with statistically significant values between 3 and 4 mm. Increasing time of irradiation to cure dual-cure resin cement did not always result in greater degree of polymerization. PMID:27656058

  15. Effect of ceramic type, thickness, and time of irradiation on degree of polymerization of dual – cure resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Rashi; Taneja, Sonali; Kumari, Manju

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of ceramic type, thickness, and time of irradiation on degree of polymerization of dual-cure resin cement. Materials and Methods: Dual-cure resin cement (SoloCem) was used to prepare disk-shaped samples (0.5 mm thick × 5 mm diameter). Study group samples (n = 5) were light-cured for 40, 60, and 80 s through all ceramic leucite-reinforced (Cergo Kiss), lithium disilicate-reinforced (IPS e.max), and monolithic zirconia-reinforced (Ziecon) of three thicknesses (2, 3, and 4 mm). Negative control group samples were cured through metal disks and positive control samples were cured without the presence of ceramic. The degree of conversion (DC) was evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The recorded data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance, followed by post hoc analysis (Tukey HSD). Results and Conclusion: Greatest light transmission and DC were seen through Cergo Kiss, followed by IPS e.max Press and Ziecon, with insignificant difference between the latter two. The attenuation of light irradiance increased with increasing thickness of ceramic disks, with statistically significant values between 3 and 4 mm. Increasing time of irradiation to cure dual-cure resin cement did not always result in greater degree of polymerization.

  16. Retention of Root Canal Posts: Effect of Cement Film Thickness, Luting Cement, and Post Pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahafi, A; Benetti, A R; Flury, S; Peutzfeldt, A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the cement film thickness of a zinc phosphate or a resin cement on retention of untreated and pretreated root canal posts. Prefabricated zirconia posts (CosmoPost: 1.4 mm) and two types of luting cements (a zinc phosphate cement [DeTrey Zinc] and a self-etch adhesive resin cement [Panavia F2.0]) were used. After removal of the crowns of 360 extracted premolars, canines, or incisors, the root canals were prepared with a parallel-sided drill system to three different final diameters. Half the posts did not receive any pretreatment. The other half received tribochemical silicate coating according to the manufacturer's instructions. Posts were then luted in the prepared root canals (n=30 per group). Following water storage at 37°C for seven days, retention of the posts was determined by the pull-out method. Irrespective of the luting cement, pretreatment with tribochemical silicate coating significantly increased retention of the posts. Increased cement film thickness resulted in decreased retention of untreated posts and of pretreated posts luted with zinc phosphate cement. Increased cement film thickness had no influence on retention of pretreated posts luted with resin cement. Thus, retention of the posts was influenced by the type of luting cement, by the cement film thickness, and by the post pretreatment. PMID:25764045

  17. Modeling of the interaction between chemical and mechanical behavior of ion exchange resins encapsulated into a cement-based matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange resins (IER) are widely used in the nuclear industry to purge non directly storable infected effluents. IER then become a solid waste which could be stored as any classical nuclear waste. One way of conditioning consists in embedding it into a cement paste matrix. This process raises some concerns regarding the cohesiveness of the composite. Once embedded, the IER might indeed interact with the cement paste which would lead, in some cases, to the swelling of the composite. This thesis has been set up to address this potential issue, with the aim to develop a numerical tool able to predict the mechanical behavior of this kind of material. This work only focuses on the long term behavior and more specifically on the potential degradations of the cement paste/IER composite due to cationic IER. (author)

  18. Effect of light-curing method and indirect veneering materials on the Knoop hardness of a resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Tetsu Iriyama

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the Knoop hardness of a dual-cured resin cement (Rely-X ARC activated solely by chemical reaction (control group or by chemical / physical mode, light-cured through a 1.5 mm thick ceramic (HeraCeram or composite (Artglass disc. Light curing was carried out using conventional halogen light (XL2500 for 40 s (QTH; light emitting diodes (Ultrablue Is for 40 s (LED; and Xenon plasma arc (Apollo 95E for 3 s (PAC. Bovine incisors had their buccal face flattened and hybridized. On this surface a rubber mold (5 mm in diameter and 1 mm in height was bulk filled with the resin cement. A polyester strip was seated for direct light curing or through the discs of veneering materials. After dry storage in the dark (24 h 37°C, the samples (n = 5 were sectioned for hardness (KHN measurements, taken in a microhardness tester (50 gF load 15 s. The data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05. The cement presented higher Knoop hardness values with Artglass for QTH and LED, compared to HeraCeram. The control group and the PAC/Artglass group showed lower hardness values compared to the groups light-cured with QTH and LED. PAC/HeraCeram resulted in the worst combination for cement hardness values.

  19. The influence of four dual-cure resin cements and surface treatment selection to bond strength of fiber post

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Liu; Hong Liu; Yue-Tong Qian; Song Zhu; Su-Qian Zhao

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluate the influence of post surface pre-treatments on the bond strength of four different cements to glass fiber posts. Eighty extracted human maxillary central incisors and canines were endodontically treated and standardized post spaces were prepared. Four post pre-treatments were tested:(i) no pre-treatment (NS, control), (ii) sandblasting (SA), (iii) silanization (SI) and (iv) sandblasting followed by silanization (SS). Per pre-treatment, four dual-cure resin cements were used for luting posts:DMG LUXACORE Smartmix Dual, Multilink Automix, RelyX Unicem and Panavia F2.0. All the specimens were subjected to micro push-out test. Two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc tests were performed (a50.05) to analyze the data. Bond strength was significantly affected by the type of resin cement, and bond strengths of RelyX Unicem and Panavia F2.0 to the fiber posts were significantly higher than the other cement groups. Sandblasting significantly increased the bond strength of DMG group to the fiber posts.

  20. Chemically vapour deposited diamond coatings on cemented tungsten carbides: Substrate pretreatments, adhesion and cutting performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of diamond films onto Co-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) tools and wear parts presents several problems due to interfacial graphitization induced by the binder phase and thermal expansion mismatch of diamond and WC-Co. Methods used to improve diamond film adhesion include substrate-modification processes that create a three-dimensional compositionally graded interface. This paper reviews substrate pretreatments and adhesion issues of chemically vapour deposited diamond films on WC-Co. The combined effect of pretreatments and substrate microstructure on the adhesive toughness and wear rate of CVD diamond in dry machining of highly abrasive materials was analyzed. The role of diamond film surface morphology on chip evacuation in dry milling of ceramics was also investigated by comparing feed forces of coated and uncoated mills. The overall tribological performance of diamond coated mills depended on coating microstructure and smoothness. The use of smother films did allow to reduce cutting forces by facilitating chip evacuation

  1. Investigation of the immobilization of the radioactive ion exchange resins into specific cement using the mixture response surface approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to assess a kind of specific cement (ASC) extensively and recommend a suitable formula for the immobilization of the radioactive ion exchange resins from China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). A mixture response surface approach was employed to design the experiment and interpret the results. Compared with the blend composed of ordinary Portland cement (OPC), an optimum combination, resin: .17 (dry wt/wt); ASC: .43; zeolite: .10, and water: .30, was determined within a series of restrictions for such properties as the slump, the 28-d compressive strength, the water immersion, the thaw-freeze resistance, the irradiation resistance, and the leaching rate. The diffusivities of 137Cs and 60Co of the waste forms resulting from the formula were 2.72E-06 (cm2/d) and 1.63E-07 (cm2/d) after 123 d, respectively. The loading amount of spent resins in the ASC form was larger than that in the OPC form by 5% under the equal performance indexes. The microanalysis indicated that there were many interlaced columnlike crystals (ettringites) developed in ASC-resin concrete. This structure could enhance the strength and stabilization of the waste forms significantly. (author)

  2. Modelling of the interaction between chemical and mechanical behaviour of ion exchange resins incorporated into a cement-based matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Bescop P.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a predictive model, based on experimental data, to determine the macroscopic mechanical behavior of a material made up of ion exchange resins solidified into a CEM III cement paste. Some observations have shown that in some cases, a significant macroscopic expansion of this composite material may be expected, due to internal pressures generated in the resin. To build the model, we made the choice to break down the problem in two scale’s studies. The first deals with the mechanical behavior of the different heterogeneities of the composite, i.e. the resin and the cement paste. The second upscales the information from the heterogeneities to the Representative Elementary Volume (REV of the composite. The heterogeneities effects are taken into account in the REV by applying a homogenization method derived from the Eshelby theory combined with an interaction coefficient drawn from the poroelasticity theory. At the first scale, from the second thermodynamic law, a formulation is developed to estimate the resin microscopic swelling. The model response is illustrated on a simple example showing the impact of the calculated internal pressure, on the macroscopic strain.

  3. Effect of Bioactive Glass air Abrasion on Shear Bond Strength of Two Adhesive Resins to Decalcified Enamel

    OpenAIRE

    Alireza Eshghi; Maryam Khoroushi; Alireza Rezvani

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Bioactive glass air abrasion is a conservative technique to remove initial decalcified tissue and caries. This study examined the shear bond strength of composite resin to sound and decalcified enamel air-abraded by bioactive glass (BAG) or alumina using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight permanent molars were root-amputated and sectioned mesiodistally. The obtained 96 specimens were mounted in acrylic resin; the buccal and lingual surfaces r...

  4. Comparison of Elastic Modulus and Compressive Strength of Ariadent and Harvard Polycarboxylate Cement and Vitremer Resin Modified Glass Ionomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadian Khoshemehr Leila

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Luting agents are used to attach indirect restoration into or on the tooth. Poor mechanical properties of cement may be a cause of fracture of this layer and lead to caries and restoration removal. The purpose of this study was to compare the elastic modulus and compressive strength of Ariadent (A Poly and Harvard polycarboxylate (H Poly cements and Vitremer resin modified glass ionomer (RGl.Materials & Methods: In this experimental study 15 specimens were prepared form each experimental cement in Laboratory of Tehran Oil Refining Company. The cylindrical specimens were compressed in Instron machine after 24 hours. Elastic modulus and compressive strength were calculated from stress/strain curve of each specimen. One way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used for statistical analysis and P values<0.05 were considered to be statistically significant.Results: The mean elastic modulus and mean compressive strength were 2.2 GPa and 87.8MPa in H poly, 2.4 GPa and 56.5 MPa in A Poly, and 0.8GPa and 105.6 MPa in RGI, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that compressive strength and elastic modulus of both polycarboxylate cements were significantly different from hybrid ionomer (P<0.05, but the difference between elastic modulus of two types of polycarboxilate cements was not statistically significant. Compressive strength of two polycarboxilate cements were significantly different (P<0.05. Conclusion: An ideal lutting agent must have the best mechanical properties. Between the tested luttins RGl cement had the lowest elastic modulus and the highest compressive strength, but the A poly cement had the highest elastic modulus and the lowest compressive strength. Therefore none of them was the best.

  5. Laboratorial comparison of color stability of resin composites after rebonding with two different adhesive materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azita Kaviani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Discoloration of resin composites is considered to be the major factor in esthetic restoration failures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the color stability of resin composites after rebonding with two different adhesive materials. Materials and Methods: Forty five composite disc samples were divided into three groups (n=15. The surface of specimens was finished by polishing disc and rubber. In group 1, any additional phase was not performed. In group 2, composite discs were etched by %37 orthophosphoric acid, then Margin- bond was used for rebonding. In group 3, the etching procedure was in the same manner used for group 2, but Permaseal was used after etching. After the first phase of spectrophotometric measurement, the specimens were dipped in coffee mix for 3 weeks for aging the specimens. Then the second phase of spectrophotometric evaluation was performed. Collected data was analyzed using one-way ANOVA test followed by Tukey test. P<0.05 was considered as the level of significance. Results: The mean total color difference (∆E observed in groups 1 to 3 were 1.4±0.34, 5.24±1.51, and 7.44±1.34, respectively. Statistical significant differences were shown between the groups (P<0.001. Conclusion: Rebonding with adhesive materials used in this study did not increase the color stability of composite restorations.

  6. En face optical coherence tomography investigation of interface fiber posts/adhesive cement/root canal wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negruţiu, Meda; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin; Rominu, Mihai; Markovic, Dubravka; Pop, Daniela; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2009-07-01

    This study analyzes the adaptation and gap width between fiber posts, adhesive luting cement and root canal wall using optical coherence tomography. The results prove the importance of assessing the quality of the interface after each process of fiber post luting.

  7. Resin Bonding of Self-Etch Adhesives to Bovine Dentin Bleached from Pulp Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruyama, Akiko; Kato, Junji; Takemoto, Shinji; Oda, Yutaka; Kawada, Eiji; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Furusawa, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of 1-step self-etch adhesives (1-SEAs) and 2-step self-etch adhesives (2-SEAs) to pulp chamber dentin immediately after bleaching with 2 types of common bleaching techniques. Pulp chamber dentin of bovine teeth was bleached using 30% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution with quartz-tungsten-halogen light-curing unit (Group 1) and 3.5% H2O2-containing titanium dioxide (TiO2) (Pyrenees®) activated with 405-nm violet diode laser for 15 min (Group 2). Unbleached specimens were placed in distilled water for 15 min and used as controls. After treatment, dentin was bonded with resin composite using 1-SEA or 2-SEA and stored in water at 37°C for 24 h. Each specimen was sectioned and trimmed to an hourglass-shape and μTBS was measured. Fractured specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope to determine fracture modes. All specimens in Group 1 failed before proper bonding tests. In Group 2, the μTBS of 2-SEA was significantly greater (with no failed specimens) than 1-SEA (where 21 out of 36 failed). These results indicate that 2-SEA is a better adhesive system than 1-SEA on bleached dentin. Our results also demonstrated that application of H2O2 significantly decreases bond strength of resin to dentin; however, in the case of nonvital tooth bleaching, Pyrenees® is a better alternative to the conventional 30% H2O2 bleaching. PMID:27747220

  8. Sealing of adhesive systems in ferric sulfate-contaminated dentinal margins in class V composite resin restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadman, Niloofar; Farzin Ebrahimi, Shahram; Mollaie, Najmeh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hemostatic agents are applied to prepare an isolated bleeding-free condition during dental treatments and can influence adhesive restorations. This study evaluated the effect of a hemostatic agent (ViscoStat) on microleakage of contaminated dentinal margin of class V composite resin restorations with three adhesives. Methods. Sixty freshly extracted human molars were selected and class V cavities (3×3×1.5 mm) were prepared on buccal and lingual surfaces. Gingival margins of the cavities were placed below the cementoenamel junction. The teeth were divided into six groups randomly. The adhesives were Excite, AdheSE and AdheSE One. In three groups, the gingival walls of the cavities were contaminated with ViscoStat and then rinsed. The cavities were restored with composite resin and light-cured. After storage in distilled water (37°C) for 24 hours and polishing, the samples were thermocycled and sealed with nail varnish. Then they were stored in 1% basic fuchsin for 24 hours, rinsed and mounted in self-cured acryl resin, followed by sectioning buccolingually. Dye penetration was observed under a stereomicroscope and scored. Data were statistically analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Peffects on dentin microleakage (P > 0.05). In the contaminated groups, Excite had significantly less microleakage than the others (P = 0.003). AdheSE and AdheSE One did not exhibit significant difference in microleakage (P > 0.05). Conclusion. ViscoStat hemostatic agent increased dentinal microleakage in AdheSE and AdheSE One adhesives with no effect on Excite. PMID:27092210

  9. [Adhesion of sealer cements to dentin with and without smear layer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettleman, B H; Messer, H H; ElDeeb, M E

    1991-01-01

    The influence of a smear layer on the adhesion of sealer cements to dentin was assessed in recently extracted human anterior teeth. A total of 120 samples was tested, 40 per sealer; 20 each with and without the smear layer. The teeth were split longitudinally, and the internal surfaces were ground flat. One-half of each tooth was left with the smear layer intact, while the other half had the smear removed by washing for 3 min with 17% EDTA followed by 5.25% NaOCI. Evidence of the ability to remove the smear layer was verified by scanning electron microscopy. Using a specially designed jig, the sealer was placed into a 4-mm wide x 4 mm deep well which was then set onto the tooth. PMID:1659858

  10. [Adhesion of sealer cements to dentin with and without smear layer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettleman, B H; Messer, H H; ElDeeb, M E

    1991-01-01

    The influence of a smear layer on the adhesion of sealer cements to dentin was assessed in recently extracted human anterior teeth. A total of 120 samples was tested, 40 per sealer; 20 each with and without the smear layer. The teeth were split longitudinally, and the internal surfaces were ground flat. One-half of each tooth was left with the smear layer intact, while the other half had the smear removed by washing for 3 min with 17% EDTA followed by 5.25% NaOCI. Evidence of the ability to remove the smear layer was verified by scanning electron microscopy. Using a specially designed jig, the sealer was placed into a 4-mm wide x 4 mm deep well which was then set onto the tooth.

  11. Effect of glycine pretreatment on the shear bond strength of a CAD/CAM resin nano ceramic material to dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Ceci, Matteo; Pigozzo, Marco; Scribante, Andrea; Beltrami, Riccardo; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco; Poggio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of glycine pretreatment on the shear bond strength between dentin and a CAD/CAM resin nano ceramic material (LavaTM Ultimate Restorative), bonded together with adhesive cements using three different luting protocols (total-etch; self-etch; self-adhesive). Material and Methods Thirty cylinders were milled from resin nano ceramic blocks with CAD/CAM technology. The cylinders were subsequently cemented to the exposed dentin of 30 bo...

  12. Effect of glycine pretreatment on the shear bond strength of a CAD/CAM resin nano ceramic material to dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Ceci, Matteo; Pigozzo, Marco; Scribante, Andrea; Beltrami, Riccardo; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco; Poggio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of glycine pretreatment on the shear bond strength between dentin and a CAD/CAM resin nano ceramic material (LavaTM Ultimate Restorative), bonded together with adhesive cements using three different luting protocols (total-etch; self-etch; self-adhesive). Material and Methods: Thirty cylinders were milled from resin nano ceramic blocks with CAD/CAM technology. The cylinders were subsequently cemented...

  13. Effect of different adhesive systems on microleakage at the amalgam/composite resin interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Ambrose, E R; Elbadrawy, H E

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different bonding systems on teh microleakage at the amalgam/composite interface. The microleakage at the amalgam/composite resin interface was evaluated with a quantitative dye penetration method. Amalgam cylinders were made and a 2 mm composite base was added after the application of five different bonding systems to the roughened interface of the amalgam cylinders. The cylinders were filled with an exact volume of 0.05% fuchsin solution, and the total weight of the sample was measured. The cylinders were placed on a filter paper with the composite base down and evaluated for leakage after 1, 3, 6, and 24 hours. Weight loss and coloring of the filter paper represented microleakage. The results indicated that the application of Prisma Universal Bond 2 adhesive, Cover Up II, or Amalgambond (groups E, F, and G) reduced the amount of microleakage significantly as compared to the groups in which no adhesive system, 3M Porcelain Repair Kit (with and without acid etching of the amalgam surface), or Prisma Universal Bond 2 primer and adhesive (groups A, B, C or D) was applied. PMID:8332537

  14. Marginal microleakage of resin-modified glass-ionomer and composite resin restorations: Effect of using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Khoroushi; Tayebeh Mansouri Karvandi; Bentolhoda Kamali; Hamid Mazaheri

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Previous studies have shown that dental adhesives increase the bond strength of resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) restorative materials to dentin. This in vitro study has evaluated the effect of etch-and-rinse and self-etch bonding systems v/s cavity conditioner, and in comparison to similar composite resin restorations on maintaining the marginal sealing of RMGI restorations. Materials and Methods: 98 rectangular cavities (2.5×3×1.5 mm) were prepared on buccal and palatal a...

  15. Shear Bond Strengths of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resins to Feldspathic Porcelain using Different Adhesive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Shakur Shahabi, Maryam; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournagi Azar, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Use of porcelain as inlays, laminates and metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns is common in modern dentistry. The high cost of ceramic restorations, time limitations and difficulty of removing these restorations result in delays in replacing fractured restorations; therefore, their repair is indicated. The aim of the present study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two types of composite resins (methacrylate-based and silorane-based) to porcelain, using three adhesive types. Materials and methods. A total of 156 samples of feldspathic porcelain surfaces were prepared with air-abrasion and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=26). In groups 1-3, Z250 composite resin was used to repair porcelain samples with Ad-per Single Bond 2 (ASB), Clearfil SE Bond (CSB) and Silorane Adhesive (SA) as the bonding systems, afterapplication of silane, respectively. In groups 4-6, the same adhesives were used in the same manner with Filtek Silorane composite resin. Finally, the shear bond strengths of the samples were measured. Two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests were used to compare bond strengths between the groups with different adhesives at P<0.05. Results. There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values in terms of the adhesive type (P<0.001). In addition, the interactive effect of the adhesive type and composite resin type had no significant effect on bond strength (P=0.602). Conclusion. The results of the present study showed the highest repair bond strength values to porcelain with both composite resin types with the application of SA and ASB. PMID:26697151

  16. Shear Bond Strengths of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resins to Feldspathic Porcelain using Different Adhesive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Shakur Shahabi, Maryam; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournagi Azar, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Use of porcelain as inlays, laminates and metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns is common in modern dentistry. The high cost of ceramic restorations, time limitations and difficulty of removing these restorations result in delays in replacing fractured restorations; therefore, their repair is indicated. The aim of the present study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two types of composite resins (methacrylate-based and silorane-based) to porcelain, using three adhesive types. Materials and methods. A total of 156 samples of feldspathic porcelain surfaces were prepared with air-abrasion and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=26). In groups 1-3, Z250 composite resin was used to repair porcelain samples with Ad-per Single Bond 2 (ASB), Clearfil SE Bond (CSB) and Silorane Adhesive (SA) as the bonding systems, afterapplication of silane, respectively. In groups 4-6, the same adhesives were used in the same manner with Filtek Silorane composite resin. Finally, the shear bond strengths of the samples were measured. Two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests were used to compare bond strengths between the groups with different adhesives at P<0.05. Results. There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values in terms of the adhesive type (P<0.001). In addition, the interactive effect of the adhesive type and composite resin type had no significant effect on bond strength (P=0.602). Conclusion. The results of the present study showed the highest repair bond strength values to porcelain with both composite resin types with the application of SA and ASB. PMID:26697151

  17. Three dimensional color measurement of porcelain laminate restorations using resin cements with shade modifiers: a laboratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalali H.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: With the introduction of porcelain veneers to fulfill patients’ esthetic needs, question raises about the ability of the veneers to cover the substructure discoloration. It seems that using shade modifiers under the porcelain veneers can neutralize the discoloration. The goal of this study was to determine the efficacy of shade modifiers in correcting tooth discoloration, when used with resin cements under porcelain veneers. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 60 porcelain discs with two thicknesses of 0.7 mm and 2 mm (30 porcelain of each thickness were made from ceramco porcelain powder. 40 of them were in A2 shade and 20 were made by the mixture of A2 shade porcelain powder and porcelain stain to represent tooth discoloration. Then all the laminate discs (0.7 mm were cemented over the 2 mm thick discs to make groups of 10 samples as followed: 1- The first group: laminate discs + resin cement + 2mm thick discs with A2 shade. 2- The second group: laminate discs + resin cement + 2mm thick discolored discs. 3- The third group: laminate discs+ resin cement+ shade modifier+ 2mm thick discolored discs. The color of 30 specimens was measured by spectrophotometer in 2 conditions. 1- To include the specular reflection (SCI. 2- To exclude specular reflection (SCE. In each condition the specimens were measured on both a white background (W and a black one (B. The mean color differences (E of each specimen in the second and third group with the specimens of the first group were calculated. Data were analyzed using Paired sample t-test and P<0.05 of significance. Results: Color measurements showed that in SCIW condition L was significantly different among the three groups except the first and the third. In SCEW condition all the parameters showed significant differences. In SCIB condition, E was not significantly different between the second and the third groups. Hue (h parameter wasn’t different between groups

  18. Do blood contamination and haemostatic agents affect microtensile bond strength of dual cured resin cement to dentin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    KİLİC, Kerem; ARSLAN, Soley; DEMETOGLU, Goknil Alkan; ZARARSIZ, Gokmen; KESİM, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of blood contamination and haemostatic agents such as Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the microtensile bond strength between dual cured resin cement-dentin interface. Material and Methods: Twelve pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramics were luted to flat occlusal dentin surfaces with Panavia F under the following conditions: Control Group: no contamination, Group Blood: blood contamination, Group ABS: ABS contamination Group H2O2: H2O2 contamination. The specimens were sectioned to the beams and microtensile testing was carried out. Failure modes were classified under stereomicroscope. Two specimens were randomly selected from each group, and SEM analyses were performed. Results: There were significant differences in microtensile bond strengths (µTBS) between the control and blood-contaminated groups (p0.05). Conclusions: Contamination by blood of dentin surface prior to bonding reduced the bond strength between resin cement and the dentin. Ankaferd Blood Stoper and H2O2 could be used safely as blood stopping agents during cementation of all-ceramics to dentin to prevent bond failure due to blood contamination. PMID:23559118

  19. Do blood contamination and haemostatic agents affect microtensile bond strength of dual cured resin cement to dentin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerem KiLiC

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of blood contamination and haemostatic agents such as Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 on the microtensile bond strength between dual cured resin cement-dentin interface. Material and Methods Twelve pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramics were luted to flat occlusal dentin surfaces with Panavia F under the following conditions: Control Group: no contamination, Group Blood: blood contamination, Group ABS: ABS contamination Group H2O2: H2O2 contamination. The specimens were sectioned to the beams and microtensile testing was carried out. Failure modes were classified under stereomicroscope. Two specimens were randomly selected from each group, and SEM analyses were performed. Results There were significant differences in microtensile bond strengths (µTBS between the control and blood-contaminated groups (p0.05. Conclusions Contamination by blood of dentin surface prior to bonding reduced the bond strength between resin cement and the dentin. Ankaferd Blood Stoper and H2O2 could be used safely as blood stopping agents during cementation of all-ceramics to dentin to prevent bond failure due to blood contamination.

  20. 5-year results comparing mineral trioxide aggregate and adhesive resin composite for root-end sealing in apical surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Arx, Thomas; Hänni, Stefan; Jensen, Simon Storgård

    2014-01-01

    observers). Two different methods of root-end preparation and filling (primary study parameters) were to be compared (mineral trioxide aggregate [MTA] vs adhesive resin composite [COMP]) without randomization. RESULTS: A total of 271 patients and teeth from a 1-year follow-up sample of 339 could be re...

  1. Effects of surface treatments, thermocycling, and cyclic loading on the bond strength of a resin cement bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarda, G B; Correr, A B; Gonçalves, L S; Costa, A R; Borges, G A; Sinhoreti, M A C; Correr-Sobrinho, L

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives : The aim of this present study was to investigate the effect of two surface treatments, fatigue and thermocycling, on the microtensile bond strength of a newly introduced lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) and a dual-cured resin cement. Methods : A total of 18 ceramic blocks (10 mm long × 7 mm wide × 3.0 mm thick) were fabricated and divided into six groups (n=3): groups 1, 2, and 3-air particle abraded for five seconds with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles; groups 4, 5, and 6-acid etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 seconds. A silane coupling agent was applied onto all specimens and allowed to dry for five seconds, and the ceramic blocks were bonded to a block of composite Tetric N-Ceram (Ivoclar Vivadent) with RelyX ARC (3M ESPE) resin cement and placed under a 500-g static load for two minutes. The cement excess was removed with a disposable microbrush, and four periods of light activation for 40 seconds each were performed at right angles using an LED curing unit (UltraLume LED 5, Ultradent) with a final 40 second light exposure from the top surface. All of the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. Groups 2 and 5 were submitted to 3,000 thermal cycles between 5°C and 55°C, and groups 3 and 6 were submitted to a fatigue test of 100,000 cycles at 2 Hz. Specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonding area to obtain beams with a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2) (30 beams per group) and submitted to a microtensile bond strength test in a testing machine (EZ Test) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test (p≤0.05). Results : The microtensile bond strength values (MPa) were 26.9 ± 6.9, 22.2 ± 7.8, and 21.2 ± 9.1 for groups 1-3 and 35.0 ± 9.6, 24.3 ± 8.9, and 23.9 ± 6.3 for groups 4-6. For the control group, fatigue testing and thermocycling produced a predominance of adhesive failures. Fatigue and

  2. Effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two self-etch adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooran Samimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dual-cured composite resins are similar to self-cured composite resins in some of their clinical applications due to inadequate irradiation, lack of irradiation, or delayed irradiation. Therefore, incompatibility with self-etch adhesives (SEAs should be taken into account with their use. On the other, the extent of dentin dehydration has a great role in the quality of adhesion of these resin materials to dentin. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two SEAs. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 dentinal specimens were prepared from extracted intact third molars. Half of the samples were dehydrated in ethanol with increasing concentrations. Then Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB and Prompt L-Pop (PLP adhesives were applied in the two groups. Cylindrical composite resin specimens were cured using three polymerization modes: (1 Immediate light-curing, (2 delayed light-curing after 20 min, and (3 self-curing. Bond strength was measured using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Duncan post hoc tests. Statistical significance was defined at P 0.05. PLP showed significant differences between subgroups with the lowest bond strength in hydrated dentin with delayed light-curing and self-cured mode of polymerization. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, a delay in composite resin light-curing or using chemically cured composite resin had a deleterious effect on dentin bond strength of single-step SEAs used in the study.

  3. Effect of delayed insertion of composite resin on the bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Alves CAMPOS

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Etch-and-rinse adhesive systems are characterized bythe dental acid etching previously to the monomer application. Thesematerials can be classified as 3-step (when primer and bond are applied separately or 2-step (when the primer and bond functions are carried out by a single component. Objective: To determine the influence of immediate or delayed insertion of restorative material on the values of bond strength of 2-step and 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive systems using the microtensile test. Material and methods: Bovine incisors were used, which had its vestibular surface abraded to obtain a flat dentin surface. 3-step (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose – SMP; Optibond FL – OFL; Bond-It – BIT and 2-step (Single-Bond – SB; Optibond Solo Plus – OSP; Bond-1 – B1 etch-and-rinse adhesive systems were used, and composite resin (Z-350 was adhered to this substrate at two different times: immediately and later (after 24 hours. Procedures were performed with simulated physiological pulpal pressure. Results were submitted to statistical analysis through Anova and Tukey’s test (p < 0.05. Results: When the composite resin was immediately inserted all the adhesive systems showed similar results. 3-step adhesive systems did not show reduction in bond strength values related to delayed insertion of composite. On the other hand, 2-step adhesive systems showed significant reduction in the values of bond strength. Reduction was around 30.24% to SB, 27.19% to OSP and 28.21% to B1. Conclusion: 2-step etch-and-rinse adhesive systems should be used very carefully. It is advisable to insert and polymerize the composite resin immediately after the conclusion of adhesive procedure.

  4. Influence of energy density of different light sources on knoop hardness of a dual-cured resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Piva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Knoop hardness of a dual-cured resin-based luting cement irradiated with different light sources as well energy density through a ceramic sample. Three light-curing unit (LCUs were tested: tungsten halogen light (HAL, light-emitting diode (LED and xenon plasma-arc (PAC lamp. Disc-shaped specimens were fabricated from a resin-based cement (Enforce. Three energy doses were used by modifying the irradiance (I of each LCU and the irradiation time (T: 24 Jcm-2 (I/2x2T, 24 Jcm-2 (IxT and 48 Jcm-2 (Ix2T. Energy doses were applied through a 2.0-mm-thick ceramic sample (Duceram Plus. Three groups underwent direct irradiation over the resin cement with the different LCUs and a chemically-activated group served as a control. Thirteen groups were tested (n=10. Knoop hardness number (KHN means were obtained from cross-sectional areas. Two-way ANOVA and the Holm-Sidak method were used for statistical comparisons of activation mode and energy doses (a=5%. Application of 48 J.cm-2 energy dose through the ceramic using LED (50.5±2.8 and HAL (50.9±3.7 produced significantly higher KHN means (p<0.05 than the control (44.7±3.8. LED showed statistically similar performance to HAL. Only HAL showed a relationship between the increase of LCU energy dose and hardness increase.

  5. Dentin Bond Strength of Two One-Bottle Adhesives after Delayed Activation of Light-Cured Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Shafiei

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Adverse surface interactions between one-bottle adhesives and chemical-cured composites may occur with delayed light activation of light-cured composites. The purpose of this study was to assess the Effects of delayed activation of light-cured compositeson shear bond strength of two one-bottle adhesives with different acidity to bovine dentin.Materials and Methods: Flat dentin surface was prepared on sixty-six bovine incisors using 600 grit carbide papers. Prime&Bond NT, and One-Step adhesives and resin composite were applied in six groups: 1 immediate curing of the composite, 2 the composite was left 2.5 minutes over the cured adhesive before light activation, 3 prior to delayed activation of the composite, the cured adhesive was covered with a layer of nonacidic hydrophobic porcelain bonding resin (Choice 2 and cured immediately. After thermocycling,shear bond strength (SBS test was performed using a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were analyzed with Friedmans two-way Non-parametric ANOVA.Results: The SBS of delayed activation of Prime&Bond was significantly lower than immediate activated (P<0.05. Decrease in the SBS of One-Step was not statistically significant after delayed activation. The SBS of delayed activation of Prime&Bond and One-Step with an additional resin layer was significantly higher than delayed activation (P<0.001.Conclusion: The bond strength of Prime&Bond might be compromised by the higher acidity of this adhesive during the 2.5 minutes delayed activation of light-cured composite.Addition of a layer of hydrophobic resin compensated the effect of delayed activation andimproved the bond strength.

  6. Effect of various amounts of nanosilver incorporation on the mechanical properties of resin modified glass-ionomer cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roza Haghgoo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Metallic nano-particles show exclusive biological, chemical and physical characteristic. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effect of various amounts of nanosilver incorporation (0 (as control, 20, 40, 80, 120, 200 ppm on the mechanical Properties ( compressive and flexural strength of resin modified Glass ionomer Cement.   Materials and Methods: Based on ISO 4049 and ISO 9971 for polyalkenoid cements, 90 cases in each group were prepared for the flexural and compressive strength. Specimens in 6 groups with different amounts of nanosilver (20, 40, 80, 120 and 200 ppm and control (Fuji II LC improved, stored in distilled water at 37 ° C for 1 day and 30 days. Flexural strength, using a three-point bending method, Modulus of elasticity and the compressive strength were measured by universal testing machine (Zwick with crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey post HOC test.   Results: The flexural strength and modulus of various amounts of nanosilver incorporation of resin modified glass-ionomer cement were not significantly different (P>0.05. The compressive strength of incorporating of20 ppm compared with control (P=0.01, 40 ppm (P=0.02 and 80 ppm compared with control (P<0.001 were increased. The flexural strength and compressive strength of Fuji II LC, containing nanosilver particles were increased after 1 day and 1 month significantly (P<0.001.   Conclusion: Incorporation of 20 to 80 ppm nanosilver into Fuji II LC had increased mechanical properties compared to the original cement.

  7. Effect of Light Intensity on the Degree of Conversion of Dual-cured Resin Cement at Different Depths with the use of Translucent Fiber Posts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Bahari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of different light intensities on the degree of conversion (DC of dual-cured resin cement at different depths of translucent fiber posts.Thirty translucent fiber posts were randomly assigned into three (n=10 groups. They were cemented in the simulated canal spaces using Duo-Link dual-cured resin cement. The cement was light-cured under 600, 800 and 1100 mW/cm(2 light intensities for 40 seconds. DC of the resin cement was calculated at cervical, middle and apical thirds using the spectra of FT-Raman spectrometer. Data were analyzed by repeated measurement ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α=0.05.In all the groups, the least DC was obtained at the apical region. There were no significant differences in the DC with different light intensities between the cervical and middle regions (p>0.05. However, in the apical region, the DC in both 800 and 1100 mw/cm(2 was similar (p>0.05, but greater with 600 mW/cm(2 light intensity (p=0.02 and p<0.001, respectively.In comparison with the light intensity of 600 mW/cm(2, the light intensity of 800 mW/cm(2 significantly increased the DC of dual-cured resin cement in the apical region. However, DC was not significantly different between 800 and 1100 mw/cm(2 light intensities. If the resin cement, especially in the apical areas is not sufficiently cured, microleakage might increase and post retention might be jeopardized. In comparison with 600 mW/cm(2 light intensity, 800 mW/cm(2 significantly increases DC at the apical third that might be clinically beneficial.

  8. Effects of non-thermal atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma on the adhesion and durability of resin composite to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Geum-Jun; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Sung-No; Chun, Bae-Hyeock; Kim, Chang-Keun; Seo, Deog-Gyu; Son, Ho-Hyun; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of low-power, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NT-APP) treatments, in pulsed and conventional modes, on the adhesion of resin composite to dentin and on the durability of the bond between resin composite and dentin. A pencil-type NT-APP jet was applied in pulsed and conventional modes to acid-etched dentin. The microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of resin composite to dentin was evaluated at 24 h and after thermocycling in one control group (no plasma) and in two experimental groups (pulsed plasma and conventional plasma groups) using the Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus Adhesive System. Data were analyzed using two-factor repeated-measures anova and Weibull statistics. Fractured surfaces and the bonded interfaces were evaluated using a field-emission scanning electron microscope. Although there were no significant differences between the plasma treatment groups, the plasma treatment improved the MTBS compared with the control group. After thermocycling, the MTBS did not decrease in the control or conventional plasma group but increased in the pulsed plasma group. Thermocycling increased the Weibull moduli of plasma-treated groups. In conclusion, plasma treatment using NT-APP improved the adhesion of resin composite to dentin. Using a pulsed energy source, the energy delivered to the dentin was effectively reduced without any reduction in bond strength or durability.

  9. Effect of Bioactive Glass air Abrasion on Shear Bond Strength of Two Adhesive Resins to Decalcified Enamel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Eshghi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glass air abrasion is a conservative technique to remove initial decalcified tissue and caries. This study examined the shear bond strength of composite resin to sound and decalcified enamel air-abraded by bioactive glass (BAG or alumina using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives.Forty-eight permanent molars were root-amputated and sectioned mesiodistally. The obtained 96 specimens were mounted in acrylic resin; the buccal and lingual surfaces remained exposed. A demineralizing solution was used to decalcify half the specimens. Both sound and decalcified specimens were divided into two groups of alumina and bioactive glass air abrasion. In each group, the specimens were subdivided into two subgroups of Clearfil SE Bond or OptiBond FL adhesives (n=12. Composite resin cylinders were bonded on enamel surfaces cured and underwent thermocycling. The specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 and three-way ANOVA (α=0.05. Similar to the experimental groups, the enamel surface of one specimen underwent SEM evaluation.No significant differences were observed in composite resin bond strength subsequent to alumina or bioactive glass air abrasion preparation techniques (P=0.987. There were no statistically significant differences between the bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive groups (P=1. Also, decalcified or intact enamel groups had no significant difference (P=0.918. However, SEM analysis showed much less enamel irregularities with BAG air abrasion compared to alumina air abrasion.Under the limitations of this study, preparation of both intact and decalcified enamel surfaces with bioactive glass air abrasion results in similar bond strength of composite resin in comparison with alumina air abrasion using etch-&-rinse or self-etch adhesives.

  10. Leaching behavior of {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs from spent ion exchange resins in cement-bentonite clay matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plecas, Ilija E-mail: iplecas@vin.bg.ac.yu; Pavlovic, Radojko; Pavlovic, Snezana

    2004-05-01

    The leach rate of {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs from two different ion exchange resins: (a) spent cation exchange resins and (b) spent mix bead ion exchange resins in cement-bentonite matrix has been studied. The solidification matrix was a standard Portland cement mixed with 290-350 kg/m{sup 3} spent cation exchange resins, with or without 2-5% of bentonite clay. The leach rates from the cement-bentonite matrix as {sup 60}Co: (4.2-7.3) x 10{sup -5} cm/d, and for {sup 137}Cs: (3.2-6.6) x 10{sup -5} cm/d, after 245 days were measured. From the leaching data the apparent diffusivity of cobalt and cesium in cement-bentonite clay matrix with a waste load of 290-350 kg/m{sup 3} spent cation exchange resins was measured as {sup 60}Co: (1.0-4.0) x 10{sup -6} cm{sup 2}/d and for {sup 137}Cs: (0.5-2.6) x 10{sup -4} cm{sup 2}/d after 245 days. These results are part of a 20-year mortar and concrete testing project which will influence the design of radioactive waste management for a future Serbian radioactive waste disposal center.

  11. Marginal microleakage of resin-modified glass-ionomer and composite resin restorations: Effect of using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Previous studies have shown that dental adhesives increase the bond strength of resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI restorative materials to dentin. This in vitro study has evaluated the effect of etch-and-rinse and self-etch bonding systems v/s cavity conditioner, and in comparison to similar composite resin restorations on maintaining the marginal sealing of RMGI restorations. Materials and Methods: 98 rectangular cavities (2.5×3×1.5 mm were prepared on buccal and palatal aspects of 49 human maxillary premolars, randomly divided into 7 groups (N=14. The cavities in groups 1, 2 and 3 were restored using a composite resin (APX. The cavities in groups 4, 5, 6 and 7 were restored using a resin-modified glass-ionomer (Fuji II LC. Before restoring, adhesive systems (Optibond FL = OFL, three-step etch-and-rinse; One Step Plus = OSP, two-step etch-and-rinse; Clearfil Protect Bond = CPB, two-step self-etch were used as bonding agents in groups 1-6 as follow: OFL in groups 1 and 4, OSP in groups 2 and 5, and CPB in groups 3 and 6, respectively. The specimens in group 7 were restored with GC cavity conditioner and Fuji II LC. All the specimens were thermo-cycled for 1000 cycles. Microleakage scores were determined using dye penetration method. Statistical analyzes were carried out with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α=0.05. Results: There were significant differences in microleakage scores at both enamel and dentinal margins between the study groups (P<0.05. The lowest microleakage scores at enamel and dentin margins of RMGI restorations were observed in group 6. Conclusion: Use of two-step self-etch adhesive, prior to restoring cervical cavities with RMGIC, seems to be more efficacious than the conventional cavity conditioner in decreasing marginal microleakage.

  12. Effect of a CO2 Laser on the Inhibition of Root Surface Caries Adjacent to Restorations of Glass Ionomer Cement or Composite Resin: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, L C; Araújo, F C; Zancopé, B R; Hanashiro, F S; Nobre-dos-Santos, M; Youssef, M N; Souza-Zaroni, W C

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of CO2 laser irradiation on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement (GIC) or composite resin (CR) restorations. 40 dental blocks were divided into 4 groups: G1 (negative control): cavity preparation + adhesive restoration with CR; G2: (positive control) cavity preparation + GIC restoration; G3: equal to group 1 + CO2 laser with 6 J/cm(2); G4: equal to group 2 + CO2 laser. The blocks were submitted to thermal and pH cycling. Dental demineralization around restorations was quantified using microhardness analyses and Light-Induced Fluorescence (QLF). The groups showed no significant differences in mineral loss at depths between 20 μm and 40 μm. At 60 μm, G2 and G3 ≠ G1, but G4 = G1, G2 and G3. At 80 μm, G4 ≠ G1, and at 100 μm, G4 = G2 = G1. At 140 and 220 μm, G2, G3, and G4 = G1. The averages obtained using QFL in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 0.637, 0.162, 0.095, and 0.048, respectively. QLF and microhardness analyses showed that CO2 laser irradiation reduced mineral loss around the CR restorations but that it did not increase the anticariogenic effect of GIC restorations. PMID:26347900

  13. Effect of a CO2 Laser on the Inhibition of Root Surface Caries Adjacent to Restorations of Glass Ionomer Cement or Composite Resin: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of CO2 laser irradiation on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement (GIC or composite resin (CR restorations. 40 dental blocks were divided into 4 groups: G1 (negative control: cavity preparation + adhesive restoration with CR; G2: (positive control cavity preparation + GIC restoration; G3: equal to group 1 + CO2 laser with 6 J/cm2; G4: equal to group 2 + CO2 laser. The blocks were submitted to thermal and pH cycling. Dental demineralization around restorations was quantified using microhardness analyses and Light-Induced Fluorescence (QLF. The groups showed no significant differences in mineral loss at depths between 20 μm and 40 μm. At 60 μm, G2 and G3 ≠ G1, but G4 = G1, G2 and G3. At 80 μm, G4 ≠ G1, and at 100 μm, G4 = G2 = G1. At 140 and 220 μm, G2, G3, and G4 = G1. The averages obtained using QFL in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 0.637, 0.162, 0.095, and 0.048, respectively. QLF and microhardness analyses showed that CO2 laser irradiation reduced mineral loss around the CR restorations but that it did not increase the anticariogenic effect of GIC restorations.

  14. Leach studies on cement-solidified ion exchange resins from decontamination processes at operating nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of varying pH and leachant compositions on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents were determined for cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small scale waste-form specimens were collected during waste solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station. The collected specimens were leach tested, and their compressive strength was measured in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's ''Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1), from the Low-Level Waste Management Branch. Leachates from these studies were analyzed for radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to assess the leachability of these waste form constituents. Leachants used for the study were deionized water, simulated seawater, and groundwater compositions similar to those found at Barnwell, South Carolina and Hanford, Washington. Results of this study indicate that initial leachant pH does not affect leachate pH or releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms. However, differences in leachant composition and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. In addition, results from this study indicate that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents observed for forms that disintegrated were similar to those for forms that maintained their general physical integrity

  15. Acrylic resin guide for locating the abutment screw access channel of cement-retained implant prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ayman; Maroulakos, Georgios; Garaicoa, Jorge

    2016-05-01

    Abutment screw loosening represents a common and challenging technical complication of cement-retained implant prostheses. This article describes the fabrication of a simple and accurate poly(methyl methacrylate) guide for identifying the location and angulation of the abutment screw access channel of a cement-retained implant prosthesis with a loosened abutment screw. PMID:26794698

  16. Advanced zinc-doped adhesives for high performance at the resin-carious dentin interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel; Osorio, Estrella; García-Godoy, Franklin; Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Aguilera, Fátima S

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the remineralization ability of an etch-and-rinse Zn-doped resin applied on caries-affected dentin (CAD). CAD surfaces were subjected to: (i) 37% phosphoric acid (PA) or (ii) 0.5M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). 10wt% ZnO nanoparticles or 2wt% ZnCl2 were added into the adhesive Single Bond (SB), to create the following groups: PA+SB, PA+SB-ZnO, PA+SB-ZnCl2, EDTA+SB, EDTA+SB-ZnO, EDTA+SB-ZnCl2. Bonded interfaces were submitted to mechanical loading or stored during 24h. Remineralization of the bonded interfaces was studied by AFM nano-indentation (hardness and Young׳s modulus), Raman spectroscopy [mapping with principal component analysis (PCA), and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA)] and Masson׳s trichrome staining technique. Dentin samples treated with PA+SB-ZnO attained the highest values of nano-mechanical properties. Load cycling increased both mineralization and crystallographic maturity at the interface; this effect was specially noticed when using ZnCl2-doped resin in EDTA-treated carious dentin. Crosslinking attained higher frequencies indicating better conformation and organization of collagen in specimens treated with PA+SB-ZnO, after load cycling. Trichrome staining technique depicted a deeper demineralized dentin fringe that became reduced after loading, and it was not observable in EDTA+SB groups. Multivariate analysis confirmed de homogenizing effect of load cycling in the percentage of variances, traces of centroids and distribution of clusters, especially in specimens treated with EDTA+SB-ZnCl2. PMID:27232828

  17. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength, between IPS-Empress2 ceramics and three dual-cured resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajimiragha H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Cementation is one of the most critical steps of the porcelain restoration technique. However, limited information is available concerning the bond strength of current ceramic bonding systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of three dual-cure resin cements to IPS-Empress2 ceramics. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 30 pairs of IPS-Empress 2 ceramic discs were fabricated with 10 and 8 mm diameters and 2.5 mm thickness. After sandblasting and ultrasonic cleaning, the surfaces of all specimens were etched with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 60 seconds. Then, the three groups of 10 bonded specimens were prepared ceramic bonding resin systems including Panavia F2, Variolink II and Rely X ARC. After storage in 37±1c water for 24 hours and thermocycling in 5c and 55c water for 500 cycles with 1-minute dwell time, the shear bond strengths were determined using Instron machine at speed of 0.5mm/min. Data were analyzed by One Way ANOVA test. For multiple paired comparisons, the Tukey HSD method was used. The mode of failure was evaluated by scanning electro microscope (SEM. P<0.05 was considered as the limit of significance. Result: Significant differences were found between different cement types (P<0.05. Variolink II provided the highest bonding values with IPS-Empress2. A combination of different modes of failure was observed. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, according to the highest mode of cohesive failure, Variolink II seems to have the strongest bond with IPS-Empress2 ceramics.

  18. The effect of oxalate desensitizers on the microleakage of resin composite restorations bonded by etch and rinse adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Motamedi, Mehran; Alavi, Ali Asghar; Namvar, Babak

    2010-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of an oxalate desensitizer (OX) on the marginal microleakage of resin composite restorations bonded by two three-step and two two-step etch and rinse adhesives. Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 126 extracted premolars at the cementoenamel junction and randomly divided into nine groups of 14 each. In the control groups (1-4), four adhesives were applied, respectively, including Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP), Optibond FL (OBFL), One-Step Plus (OS) and Excite (EX). In the experimental groups (5-8), the same adhesives, in combination with OX (BisBlock), were applied. And, in one group, OX was applied without any adhesive, as the negative control group (9). All the groups were restored with a resin composite. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water and thermocycling, the samples were placed in 1% methylene blue dye solution. The dye penetration was evaluated using a stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed using non-parametric tests. The OX application, in combination with OBFL and EX, resulted in significantly increasing microleakage at the gingival margins (p 0.05). At the occlusal margins, no significant difference in microleakage was observed after OX application for each of four adhesives (p > 0.05). PMID:21180008

  19. Microtensile strength of resin cement bond to indirect composite treated by different output powers of Er:YAG laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garshasbzadeh, Nazanin Zeinab; Mirzaie, Mansoreh; Yassini, Esmaeil; Shahabi, Sima; Benedicenti, Stefano; Angiero, Francesca; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2016-04-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effect of different output powers of Er:YAG laser on microtensile bonding strength of indirect composite to resin cements.36 indirect composite blocks (GC Gradia DA2, Japan) size 15 × 10 × 10 mm(3) were constructed, and divided into 12 groups, as follows:G1: control group (no treatment); Groups G2 to G6: treated with Er:YAG laser (2,940 nm) in noncontact mode, frequency 20 Hz, pulse duration 470 µs, with output power ranging from 2W to 6W; Groups G7 sandblasting, Groups 8 to G12: as Groups G2 to G 6 with preparatory sandblasting. One specimen from each group was analyzed by SEM; each specimen was fixed to a specialized metal jig using cyanoacrylate (Mitreapel, Beta Kimya San. Ve TIC, Iran) and debonded under tension with a universal testing machine (Zwick, Germany) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm min(-1). Sandblasting and laser can improve bond strength above an energy level of 150 mJ. SEM evaluation of laser-treated specimens showed irregularities and deep undercuts. T test analysis showed no significant difference between sandblasted and non-sandblasted group, with laser output power of 0, 100, or 150 mJ (P = 0.666, P = 0.875, and P =  .069); in the specimens irradiated with energy output of 200, 250, or 300 mJ, sandblasted specimens showed higher bond strength than non-sandblasted ones. The results demonstrate that, in composite resin irradiated with laser at energy output of 200-300 mJ, sandblasting might be a suitable procedure to enhance bond strength of resin cement. PMID:26873266

  20. Effect of air polishing on the fluoride release of (resin-modified) glass ionomer cements and of a polyacid-modified composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost-Brinkmann, P G

    1998-06-01

    Eight different conventional and resin-modified glass ionomers as well as a polyacid-modified composite were air polished and their fluoride release was determined in comparison to untreated controls. The air polishing was done with two different devices at medium and maximum setting for powder and water. Ninety discs of 1.5 mm thickness and 7.0 mm diameter were produced from each cement. These discs were stored in 5 ml deionized water at 37 degrees C. After 1 day and 1, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks, the specimens were transferred into new vials with fresh deionized water. From the 4th week onward, the specimens (except for the untreated controls) were air polished on half of their upper and lower surfaces for 2 s each before being put into a new vial. After 20 weeks the fluoride released during the previous 4 weeks was determined with a fluoride ion-sensitive electrode. With the exception of Ketac-Cem, all cements released significantly more fluoride ions after air polishing, irrespective of the devices' settings. The differences in the amount of fluoride released among the investigated materials were greater than the changes in fluoride release patterns caused by air polishing. Air polishing increased the fluoride release by 20-60% in most of the materials investigated. PMID:15490782

  1. Bonding of a mica-based castable ceramic material with a tri-n-butylborane-initiated adhesive resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, T; Matsumura, H; Atsuta, M

    1996-07-01

    Adhesive bonding of a mica-based castable ceramic material (Olympus Castable Ceramics, OCC) was evaluated in vitro with the use of a silane primer in conjunction with an adhesive luting material. The primer contained a silane coupler and 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META), while the methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based luting agent was initiated with a tri-n-butylborane derivative (TBB) and contained 4-META (4-META/MMA-TBB resin). Ceramic specimens were sanded with No. 600 silicon carbide paper followed by blasting with alumina and/or etching with ammonium bifluoride. The specimens were bonded with various combinations and shear bond strengths were determined. Both priming and alumina blasting enhanced the bond between 4-META resin and OCC. Although etching with ammonium bifluoride roughened the ceramic surface, this procedure did not improve the bond strength. Electron probe microanalysis of the ceramic surface revealed a decrease in silicon and aluminium elements after etching with ammonium bifluoride.

  2. Adhesive strength of total knee endoprostheses to bone cement - analysis of metallic and ceramic femoral components under worst-case conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergschmidt, Philipp; Dammer, Rebecca; Zietz, Carmen; Finze, Susanne; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    Evaluation of the adhesive strength of femoral components to the bone cement is a relevant parameter for predicting implant safety. In the present experimental study, three types of cemented femoral components (metallic, ceramic and silica/silane-layered ceramic) of the bicondylar Multigen Plus knee system, implanted on composite femora were analysed. A pull-off test with the femoral components was performed after different load and several cementing conditions (four groups and n=3 components of each metallic, ceramic and silica/silane-layered ceramic in each group). Pull-off forces were comparable for the metallic and the silica/silane-layered ceramic femoral components (mean 4769 N and 4298 N) under standard test condition, whereas uncoated ceramic femoral components showed reduced pull-off forces (mean 2322 N). Loading under worst-case conditions led to decreased adhesive strength by loosening of the interface implant and bone cement using uncoated metallic and ceramic femoral components, respectively. Silica/silane-coated ceramic components were stably fixed even under worst-case conditions. Loading under high flexion angles can induce interfacial tensile stress, which could promote early implant loosening. In conclusion, a silica/silane-coating layer on the femoral component increased their adhesive strength to bone cement. Thicker cement mantles (>2 mm) reduce adhesive strength of the femoral component and can increase the risk of cement break-off. PMID:25781660

  3. Application of light-cured dental adhesive resin for mounting electrodes or microdialysis probes in chronic experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Tetsu; Okanoya, Kazuo; Tani, Jun

    2007-01-01

    In chronic recording experiments, self-curing dental acrylic resins have been used as a mounting base of electrodes or microdialysis-probes. Since these acrylics do not bond to the bone, screws have been used as anchors. However, in small experimental animals like finches or mouse, their craniums are very fragile and can not successfully hold the anchors. In this report, we propose a new application of light-curing dental resins for mounting base of electrodes or microdialysis probes in chronic experiments. This material allows direct bonding to the cranium. Therefore, anchor screws are not required and surgical field can be reduced considerably. Past experiences show that the bonding effect maintains more than 2 months. Conventional resin's window of time when the materials are pliable and workable is a few minutes. However, the window of working time for these dental adhesives is significantly wider and adjustable.

  4. Investigation into the Effect of Use of Metal Primer on Adhesion of Heat Cure Acrylic Resin to Cast Titanium: An In Vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Podder, Sudipto; Goel, Preeti; Kar, Sunil; Bhattacharyya, Jayanta

    2013-01-01

    The availability of adhesive primers capable of bonding chemically to base metal alloys without well defined passive oxide surface film has been improved significantly over the last decade. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to compare and evaluate the effect of metal primer on adhesion of heat cure acrylic resin to cast titanium. Shear bond strength test was conducted on 80 commercially pure titanium cast metal heat-cure acrylic resin discs treated with different surface treatments. The...

  5. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to feldpathic ceramic after different etching and silanization regimens in dry and aged conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brentel, Aline Scalone; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Alarca, Lilian Guimaraes; Amaral, Regina; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the durability of bond strength between resin cement and a feldspathic ceramic submitted to different etching regimens with and without silane coupling agent application. Methods. Thirty-two blocks (6.4 mm x 6.4 mm x 4.8 mm) were fabricated using a microparticulate f

  6. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to silica-coated and silanized in-ceram zirconia before and after aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Ozcan, Mutlu; Amaral, Regina; Pereira Leite, Fabiola Pessoa; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared the microtensile bond strength of resin-based cement (Panavia F) to silica-coated, silanized, glass-infiltrated high-alumina zirconia (In-Ceram Zirconia) ceramic in dry conditions and after various aging regimens. Materials and Methods: The specimens were placed in 1 of

  7. Pressure sensitive adhesive using light color, low softening point petroleum hydrocarbon resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahner, M.E.

    1987-07-28

    This patent describes an adhesive composition comprising from about 20% to about 80% by weight of a copolymer and, correspondingly, from about 80% to about 20% by weight of a tackifying petroleum hydrocarbon resin having a softening point of from 0/sup 0/C to about 40/sup 0/C. It has a number average molecular weight of from about 100 to about 600, and a Gardner color less than about 7 prepared by the aluminum chloride catalyzed Friedel Crafts polymerization of a hydrocarbon feed comprising: (a) from about 5% to about 75% by weight of C/sub 8/ to C/sub 10/ vinyl aromatic hydrocarbon stream; (b) from about 10% to about 35% by weight of a piperylene concentrate; and (c) from about 25% to about 70% by weight of a C/sub 4/ to C/sub 8/ monoolefin chain transfer agent of the formula RR'C=CHR'' where R and R' are C/sub 1/ to C/sub 5/ alkyl, and R'' is H or C/sub 1/ to C/sub 4/ alkyl group.

  8. 4种玻璃离子水门汀对ITI基台与金属内冠之间粘接力的比较研究%A comparative study on adhesive force of cast crown copings cemented to ITI abutments using four glass ionomer cements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程耀; 傅柏平

    2014-01-01

    目的:研究4种玻璃离子类水门汀对ITI种植系统标准颈粘接固位基台和金属内冠之间的粘接力。方法将10只金属内冠与10只I T I标准颈粘接固位基台分别使用以下4种水门汀进行交叉粘固:A组为玻璃离子水门汀(日本);B组为树脂加强型玻璃离子水门汀(美国);C组为暂时粘固用玻璃离子水门汀(日本);D组为玻璃离子水门汀(德国);粘固后测试并记录样本粘接力(N),同时观察并记录粘固界面的断裂模式,最后,对粘接力进行统计学处理。所有内冠和基台经清洗后重复使用。结果4种水门汀的粘接力及由大至小的排列顺序为C组(183.6±29.4) N>D组(153.4±36.2) N>B组(144.4±41.1) N>A组(109.9±25.7)N,其中C组的粘接力最高,A组的粘接力最低,A组显著低于其它3种水门汀(PD(153.4±36.2N)>B(144.4±41.1N)>A (109.9±25.7N). Group C produced the highest adhesive force, while group A exhibited the lowest adhesive force, significantly lower than other three luting cements(P<0.05). The fracture surface observation shows that group A and D fractured at the interface of cement and abutments, while group B and C exhibited as“mixed fracture”mode. Conclusion Both conventional glass ionomer cement and resin-modified glass ionomer cements possessed the clinically acceptable adhesive forces, while the provisional glass ionomer luting cements was not suitable for the provisional cementation of implant crowns due to the too high adhesive force.

  9. Improving adhesion between luting cement and zirconia-based ceramic with an alternative surface treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurealice Rosa Maria MARTINS

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of an alternative surface treatment on the microshear bond strength (μsbs of zirconia-based ceramic. Thirty-five zirconia disks were assigned to five groups according to the following treatments: Control (CO, glass and silane were not applied to the zirconia surface; G1, air blasted with 100μm glass beads + glaze + silane; G2, a gel containing 15% (by weight glass beads applied to the ceramic surface + glaze + silane; G3, a gel containing 25% (by weight glass beads applied to the ceramic surface + glaze + silane; and G4, a gel containing 50% (by weight glass beads applied to the ceramic surface + glaze + silane. The specimens were built up using RelyX ARC®, according to the manufacturer’s recommendations, and inserted in an elastomeric mold with an inner diameter of 0.8 mm. The μsbs test was performed using a testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. ANOVA and Tukey’s test (p < 0.05 were applied to the bond strength values (in MPa. CO (15.6 ± 4.1 showed the lowest μsbs value. There were no statistical differences between the G1 (24.9 ± 7.4, G2 (24.9 ± 2.3, G3 (35.0 ± 10.3 and G4 (35.3 ± 6.0 experimental groups. Those groups submitted to surface treatments with higher concentrations of glass showed a lower frequency of adhesive failures. In conclusion, the glass application improved the interaction between the ceramic and the luting cement.

  10. The Crack Self-healing Properties of Cement-based Material with EVA Heat-melt Adhesive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Xiongzhou; SUN Wei; ZUO Xiaobao; LI Hua

    2011-01-01

    An experimental program was carried out to investigate whether EVA(ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer)heat-melt adhesive can potentially act as a self-healing agent in cement-based material.The effects of incorporation of EVA and heating on the properties of mortar were studied.Self-healing capacity of EVA specimens was also verified.The experimental results show that the addition of EVA would not greatly affect original characteristics of the matrix when EVA content was less than 5%;the interface between EVA and cement matrix was well improved after heating,which allows a significant improvement in flexural strength and toughness of specimen;pre-damaged specimens in various degrees(30%,50% and 70%)were effectively repaired by EVA and the repair efficiency all exceeded 100%.

  11. Application of linear alkyl benzenesulfonic acid resin in chloroprene adhesives%烷基苯酸树脂在氯丁型胶粘剂中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    凌辉; 钟锋; 李军; 陈亮; 刘根伸

    2015-01-01

    以烷基苯酸树脂部分取代酚醛树脂,探讨烷基苯酸树脂和酚醛树脂的混合比对氯丁型胶粘剂粘剂性能的影响。结果表明,当混合树脂中烷基苯酸树脂用量为20%~30%时,胶粘剂综合性能较优。%Using the alkyl benzenesulfonic acid resin partly instead of the phenolic resin, the effect of mixing proportion of benzenesulfonic acid resin and phenolic resin on the performance of chloroprene adhesives was discussed. The results showed that when the benzenesulfonic acid resin content was 20%~30%, the comprehensive performance of adhesives was optimal.

  12. PVD-Alumina Coatings on Cemented Carbide Cutting Tools: A Study About the Effect on Friction and Adhesion Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    S.E. Cordes

    2012-01-01

    Crystalline PVD γ-alumina coatings are interesting for machining operations due to their outstanding characteristics, such as high hot hardness, high thermal stability and low tendency to adhesion. In the present work (Ti,Al)N/γ-Al2O3-coatings are deposited on cemented carbide by means of MSIP. Objectives of this work are to study the effects of coating and cutting fluid regarding friction in tribological tests and to study the wear mechanisms and cutting performance of γ-Al2O3-based coated c...

  13. The influence of surface standardization of lithium disilicate glass ceramic on bond strength to a dual resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brum, R; Mazur, R; Almeida, J; Borges, G; Caldas, D

    2011-01-01

    In vitro studies to assess bond strength between resins and ceramics have used surfaces that have been ground flat to ensure standardization; however, in patients, ceramic surfaces are irregular. The effect of a polished and unpolished ceramic on bond strength needs to be investigated. Sixty ceramic specimens (20×5×2 mm) were made and divided into two groups. One group was ground with 220- to 2000-grit wet silicon carbide paper and polished with 3-, 1-, and ¼-μm diamond paste; the other group was neither ground nor polished. Each group was divided into three subgroups: treated polished controls (PC) and untreated unpolished controls (UPC), polished (PE) and unpolished specimens (UPE) etched with hydrofluoric acid, and polished (PS) and unpolished specimens (UPS) sandblasted with alumina. Resin cement cylinders were built over each specimen. Shear bond strength was measured, and the fractured site was analyzed. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc tests were performed. PE (44.47 ± 5.91 MPa) and UPE (39.70 ± 5.46 MPa) had the highest mean bond strength. PS (31.05 ± 8.81 MPa), UPC (29.11 ± 8.11 MPa), and UPS (26.41 ± 7.31 MPa) were statistically similar, and PC (24.96 ± 8.17 MPa) was the lowest. Hydrofluoric acid provides the highest bond strength regardless of whether the surface is polished or not. PMID:21819200

  14. Cytotoxicity evaluation of luting resin cements on bovine dental pulp-derived cells (bDPCs) by real-time cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan Malkoç, Meral; Demir, Necla; Şengün, Abdulkadir; Bozkurt, Şerife Buket; Hakki, Sema Sezen

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the cytotoxicity of resin cements on dental pulp-derived cells (bDPCs), Bifix QM (BQM), Choice 2(C2), RelyX U200(RU200), Maxcem Elite(ME), and Multilink Automix(MA) were tested. The materials were incubated in DMEM for 72 h. A real-time cell analyzer was used to evaluate cell survival. The statistical analyses used were one-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer tests. BQM, RU200, and ME demonstrated a significant decrease in the bDPCs' index at 24 and 72 h (p≤0.001). These materials were found to be the most toxic resin cements, as compared to the control and other tested materials (C2 and MA). However, C2 and MA showed a better survival rate, compared to BQM, RU200, and ME, and had lower cell index than the control group. The cytotoxic effects of resin cements on pulpa should be evaluated during the selection of proper cements. PMID:25736260

  15. Effect of reduced exposure times on the cytotoxicity of resin luting cements cured by high-power led

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulfem Ergun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Applications of resin luting agents and high-power light-emitting diodes (LED light-curing units (LCUs have increased considerably over the last few years. However, it is not clear whether the effect of reduced exposure time on cytotoxicity of such products have adequate biocompatibility to meet clinical success. This study aimed at assessing the effect of reduced curing time of five resin luting cements (RLCs polymerized by high-power LED curing unit on the viability of a cell of L-929 fibroblast cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Disc-shaped samples were prepared in polytetrafluoroethylene moulds with cylindrical cavities. The samples were irradiated from the top through the ceramic discs and acetate strips using LED LCU for 20 s (50% of the manufacturer's recommended exposure time and 40 s (100% exposure time. After curing, the samples were transferred into a culture medium for 24 h. The eluates were obtained and pipetted onto L-929 fibroblast cultures (3x10(4 per well and incubated for evaluating after 24 h. Measurements were performed by dimethylthiazol diphenyltetrazolium assay. Statistical significance was determined by two-way ANOVA and two independent samples were compared by t-test. RESULTS: Results showed that eluates of most of the materials polymerized for 20 s (except Rely X Unicem and Illusion reduced to a higher extent cell viability compared to samples of the same materials polymerized for 40 s. Illusion exhibited the least cytotoxicity for 20 s exposure time compared to the control (culture without samples followed by Rely X Unicem and Rely X ARC (90.81%, 88.90%, and 83.11%, respectively. For Rely X ARC, Duolink and Lute-It 40 s exposure time was better (t=-1.262 p=0,276; t=-9.399 p=0.001; and t=-20.418 p<0.001, respectively. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that reduction of curing time significantly enhances the cytotoxicity of the studied resin cement materials, therefore compromising their clinical

  16. Effect of glycine pretreatment on the shear bond strength of a CAD/CAM resin nano ceramic material to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceci, Matteo; Pigozzo, Marco; Scribante, Andrea; Beltrami, Riccardo; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of glycine pretreatment on the shear bond strength between dentin and a CAD/CAM resin nano ceramic material (LavaTM Ultimate Restorative), bonded together with adhesive cements using three different luting protocols (total-etch; self-etch; self-adhesive). Material and Methods Thirty cylinders were milled from resin nano ceramic blocks with CAD/CAM technology. The cylinders were subsequently cemented to the exposed dentin of 30 bovine permanent mandibular incisors. The specimens were assigned into six groups of five teeth each according to luting procedure and dentin pretreatment. In the first two groups (A1, A2) 10 cylinders were cemented using a total-etch protocol; in groups B1 and B2, 10 cylinders were cemented using a self-etch protocol; in groups C1 and C2, 10 cylinders were cemented using a self-adhesive protocol; in groups A1, B1 and C1 the dentinal surface was also treated with glycine powder. All cemented specimens were submitted to a shear bond strength test. Statistical analysis was performed with Stata 9.0 software. Results ANOVA showed the presence of significant differences among the various groups (P <0.0001). Conclusions Glycine did not change the different bond strength demonstrated by the various luting protocols tested. Conventional resin composite cements used together with a self-etch adhesive reported the highest values. However the use of glycine seems to increase the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements. Key words:Adhesive cements, CAD/CAM, glycine, luting system, resin nano ceramic, shear bond strength. PMID:27034754

  17. Impact of Resin Content on Swelling Pressure of Three Layer Perticleboard Bonded with Urea-Formaldehyde Adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergej Medved

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available When particleboards are exposed to water or moist environment, they tend to swell and expand in all directions. The degree of swelling or expansion depends on the type of adhesive used, its share, and the time of exposure and pressure used at hot pressing. The expansion of particleboard, exposed to water or high moisture content, is accompanied by swelling and/or expansion pressure. The purpose of this paper is to present the impact of adhesive share on thickness swelling and swelling pressure of three layer particleboard bonded with ureaformaldehyde adhesive. The resin content was altered in both layers; in core layer it was between 6 and 9 %, and in surface layer between 11 and 13 %. Thickness swelling and swelling pressure were determined with 24-hour immersion test. For the swelling pressure measurement, special force gauge device was used. The biggest changes in swelling and pressure were observed when the resin content was changed in core layer. The fastest change in swelling and swelling pressure was observed in the fi rst few hours after immersion in water.

  18. 18-year survival of posterior composite resin restorations with and without glass ionomer cement as base.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sande, F.H. van de; Rosa Rodolpho, P.A. Da; Basso, G.R.; Patias, R.; Rosa, Q.F. da; Demarco, F.F.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Cenci, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Advantages and disadvantages of using intermediate layers underneath resin-composite restorations have been presented under different perspectives. Yet, few long-term clinical studies evaluated the effect of glass-ionomer bases on restoration survival. The present study investigated the i

  19. Comparative Evaluation of Microleakage Between Nano-Ionomer, Giomer and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement in Class V Cavities- CLSM Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Archana; Thumu, Jayaprakash; Velagula, Lakshmi Deepa; Bolla, Nagesh; Varri, Sujana; Kasaraneni, Srikanth; Nalli, Siva Venkata Malathi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Marginal integrity of adhesive restorative materials provides better sealing ability for enamel and dentin and plays an important role in success of restoration in Class V cavities. Restorative material with good marginal adaptation improves the longevity of restorations. Aim Aim of this study was to evaluate microleakage in Class V cavities which were restored with Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC), Giomer and Nano-Ionomer. Materials and Methods This in-vitro study was performed on 60 human maxillary and mandibular premolars which were extracted for orthodontic reasons. A standard wedge shaped defect was prepared on the buccal surfaces of teeth with the gingival margin placed near Cemento Enamel Junction (CEJ). Teeth were divided into three groups of 20 each and restored with RMGIC, Giomer and Nano-Ionomer and were subjected to thermocycling. Teeth were then immersed in 0.5% Rhodamine B dye for 48 hours. They were sectioned longitudinally from the middle of cavity into mesial and distal parts. The sections were observed under Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) to evaluate microleakage. Depth of dye penetration was measured in millimeters. Statistical Analysis The data was analysed using the Kruskal Wallis test. Pair wise comparison was done with Mann Whitney U Test. A p-value<0.05 is taken as statistically significant. Results Nano-Ionomer showed less microleakage which was statistically significant when compared to Giomer (p=0.0050). Statistically no significant difference was found between Nano Ionomer and RMGIC (p=0.3550). There was statistically significant difference between RMGIC and Giomer (p=0.0450). Conclusion Nano-Ionomer and RMGIC showed significantly less leakage and better adaptation than Giomer and there was no statistically significant difference between Nano-Ionomer and RMGIC. PMID:27437363

  20. Streptococcus mutans counts in plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement or resin-based composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Machado Mota

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU (colony forming units in the saliva and plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with a glass ionomer cement - GIC (Fuji Ortho or a resin-based composite - RC (Concise. Twenty male and female patients, aged 12 to 20 years, participated in the study. Saliva was collected before and after placement of appliances. Plaque was collected from areas adjacent to brackets and saliva was again collected on the 15th, 30th, and 45th day after placement. On the 30th day, 0.4% stannous fluoride gel was applied for 4 minutes. No significant modification in the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU in saliva was observed after placement of the fixed orthodontic appliances. On the 15th day, the percentage of Streptococcus mutans CFU in plaque was statistically lower in sites adjacent to GIC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.365 than in those adjacent to RC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.935. No evidence was found of a contribution of GIC to the reduction of CFU in plaque after the 15th day. Topical application of stannous fluoride gel on the 30th day reduced the number of CFU in saliva, but not in plaque. This study suggests that the antimicrobial activity of GIC occurs only in the initial phase and is not responsible for a long-term anticariogenic property.

  1. The effect of acrylic latex-based polymer on cow blood adhesive resins for wood composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, J.; Lin, H. L.; Feng, G. Z.; Gunasekaran, S.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, alkali-modified cow blood adhesive (BA) and blood adhesive/acrylic latex-based adhesive (BA/ALB) were prepared. The physicochemical and adhesion properties of cow blood adhesive such as UV- visible spectra, particle size, viscosity were evaluated; share strength, water resistance were tested. UV- visible spectra indicates that the strong bonding strength of BA/ALB appeared after incorporating; the particle size of adhesive decreased with the increase of ALB concentration, by mixing ALB and BA, hydrophilic polymer tends locate or extand the protein chains and provide stability of the particles; viscosity decreased as shear rate increased in concordance with a pseudoplastic behavior; both at dry and soak conditions, BA and ALB/BA show significant difference changes when mass fraction of ALB in blend adhesive was over 30% (p cow blood and acrylic latex-based adhesive significantly increased the strength and water resistance of the resulting wood.

  2. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation on bond strength of fiber post: Evaluation of surface characteristic and bonded area of fiber post with resin cement

    OpenAIRE

    Reza, Fazal; Ibrahim, Nur Sukainah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Fiber post is cemented to a root canal to restore coronal tooth structure. This research aims to evaluate the effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on bond strength of fiber post with resin cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 of the two types of fiber posts, namely, FRC Prostec (FRC) and Fiber KOR (KOR), were used for the experiment. UV irradiation was applied on top of the fiber post surface for 0, 15, 20, and 30 min. The irradiated surface of the fiber posts (n = 5) wer...

  3. Transmission of composite polymerization contraction force through a flowable composite and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Castañeda-Espinosa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual contraction force during polymerization of a composite resin (Z-250, a flowable composite (Filtek Flow, FF and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitrebond, VB, and the transmission of Z-250 composite resin polymerization contraction force through different thicknesses of FF and VB. The experiment setup consisted of two identical parallel steel plates connected to a universal testing machine. One was fixed to a transversal base and the other to the equipment's cross head. The evaluated materials were inserted into a 1-mm space between the steel plates or between the inferior steel plate and a previously polymerized layer of an intermediate material (either FF or VB adhered to the upper steel plate. The composite resin was light-cured with a halogen lamp with light intensity of 500 mW/cm² for 60 s. A force/time graph was obtained for each sample for up to 120 s. Seven groups of 10 specimens each were evaluated: G1: Z-250; G2: FF; G3: VB; G4: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm layer of FF; G5: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of FF; G6: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm of VB; G7: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of VB. They were averaged and compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test at a = 0.05. The obtained contraction forces were: G1: 6.3N + 0.2N; G2: 9.8 + 0.2N; G3: 1.8 + 0.2N; G4: 6.8N + 0.2N; G5: 6.9N + 0.3N; G6: 4.0N + 0.4N and G7: 2.8N + 0.4N. The use of VB as an intermediate layer promoted a significant decrease in polymerization contraction force values of the restorative system, regardless of material thickness. The use of FF as an intermediate layer promoted an increase in polymerization contraction force values with both material thicknesses.

  4. Transmission of composite polymerization contraction force through a flowable composite and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Pereira, Rosana Aparecida; Cavalcanti, Ana Paula; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual contraction force during polymerization of a composite resin (Z-250), a flowable composite (Filtek Flow, FF) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitrebond, VB), and the transmission of Z-250 composite resin polymerization contraction force through different thicknesses of FF and VB. The experiment setup consisted of two identical parallel steel plates connected to a universal testing machine. One was fixed to a transversal base and the other to the equipment's cross head. The evaluated materials were inserted into a 1-mm space between the steel plates or between the inferior steel plate and a previously polymerized layer of an intermediate material (either FF or VB) adhered to the upper steel plate. The composite resin was light-cured with a halogen lamp with light intensity of 500 mW/cm(2) for 60 s. A force/time graph was obtained for each sample for up to 120 s. Seven groups of 10 specimens each were evaluated: G1: Z-250; G2: FF; G3: VB; G4: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm layer of FF; G5: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of FF; G6: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm of VB; G7: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of VB. They were averaged and compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test at a = 0.05. The obtained contraction forces were: G1: 6.3N + 0.2N; G2: 9.8 + 0.2N; G3: 1.8 + 0.2N; G4: 6.8N + 0.2N; G5: 6.9N + 0.3N; G6: 4.0N + 0.4N and G7: 2.8N + 0.4N. The use of VB as an intermediate layer promoted a significant decrease in polymerization contraction force values of the restorative system, regardless of material thickness. The use of FF as an intermediate layer promoted an increase in polymerization contraction force values with both material thicknesses.

  5. Effects of tooth quality, tooth structure, and cement mixing ratios on dental adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Hamandi, Rola Riad

    1995-01-01

    Experiments were performed on a number of bovine dentin specimens with the intent of understanding the effects of dentin quality and preparation on dentinal adhesion. Dentin quality was evaluated by measuring its wetting characteristics and hardness properties. The effects of chemical treatment, thermal dehydration and rehydration on dentin quality were examined. The contribution of enamel to adhesion was evaluated by comparing the adhesion of dentin samples that had the enamel...

  6. Adhesion of resin composite to hydrofluoric acid-exposed enamel and dentin in repair protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracoglu, A; Ozcan, M; Kumbuloglu, O; Turkun, M

    2011-01-01

    Intraoral repairs of ceramic fixed-dental-prostheses (FDP) often include cervical recessions that require pretreatment of the exposed tooth surfaces either before or after the ceramic is conditioned with hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel. The sequence of repair protocol may cross-contaminate the exposed etched enamel or dentin surfaces during the application or rinsing process and thereby affect the adhesion. This study evaluated the influence of HF acid gel with two concentrations on bond strengths of composite to enamel and dentin. Human third molars (N=100, n=10 per group) with similar sizes were selected and randomly divided into 10 groups. Flat surfaces of enamel and dentin were created by wet ground finishing. Before or after the enamel (E) or dentin (D) was conditioned with phosphoric acid (P), substrate surfaces were conditioned with either 9.5% HF (HF(9.5)) or 5% HF (HF(5)). Subsequently, a bonding agent (B) was applied. The experimental groups by conditioning sequence were as follows where the first letter of the group abbreviation represents the substrate (E or D) followed by the acid type and concentration: group 1 (EPHF(9.5)), group 2 (EPHF(5)), group 3 (EHF(9.5)P), group 4 (EHF(5)P), group 5 (DPHF(9.5)), group 6 (DPHF(5)), group 7 (DHF(9.5)P), and group 8 (DHF(5)P). Group 9 (EPB) and group 10 (DPB) acted as the control groups. Repair resin was adhered incrementally onto the conditioned enamel and dentin in polyethylene molds. Each layer was photo-polymerized for 40 seconds. All specimens were thermocycled (×1000, 5°-55°C) and subjected to shear test (universal testing machine, 1 mm/min). Specimens that debonded during thermocycling were considered as 0 MPa. The bond strength data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test and failure types using the chi-square test (α=0.05). Overall, the bond results (MPa) were lower on dentin than on enamel (pacid gels were applied prior to phosphoric acid (EHF(9.5)P: 5.0 ± 1.1, EHF(5)P: 3.6 ± 0.1) (pacid gel impairs the

  7. Resin-dentin bond strength of 10 contemporary etch-and-rinse adhesive systems after one year of water storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Silvia Terra; Cubas, Gloria Beatriz de Azevedo; Flores, Josiane Barcelos; Montemezzo, Murieli Leonor; Pinto, Marcia Bueno; Piva, Evandro

    2010-01-01

    To compare the resin-dentin bond degradation of 10 contemporary etch-and-rinse adhesive systems after one year of water storage, 100 bovine incisors were randomly separated into 10 groups and their superficial coronal dentin was exposed. According to manufacturers' instructions, dentin surfaces were bonded with one of seven two-step etch-and-rinse adhesives or one of three three-step etch-and-rinse adhesives. Composite buildups were constructed incrementally. Restored teeth were sectioned to obtain sticks (0.5 mm²). The specimens were subjected to a microtensile bond strength test after storage in distilled water (at 37°C) for one year. Data (MPa) were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Tukey's tests at α = 0.05. Of the adhesives tested, One Step, All Bond 2, and Optibond FL attained the highest bond strength to dentin after one year in water storage, while Magic Bond DE and Master Bond presented a high number of premature debonded flaws. PMID:21062710

  8. Application of light-cure resin-modified glass ionomer cement in orthodontic practice%光固化树脂加强型玻璃离子水门汀在正牙学实践中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单丽华; 崔占琴; 沈庆华; 高琪; 邱志香

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) cements have higher bond strength, especially can release fluoride. But there are fewer reports of the clinical application for the prevention of decalcification.OBJECTIVE: To test the benefit from using RMGI cement instead of a conventional composite resin in bracket bonding for patients with malocclusion, and observe bracket-failure rates and decalcification on enamel surfaces at pretreatment and at debonding.DESIGN: Observational and comparative trial.SETTING: The Second Hospital Affiliated to Hebei Medical University.PARTICIPANTS: Forty successive patients (358 teeth) with malocclusion admitted to the Department of Orthodontics in the Second Hospital Affiliated to Hebei Medical University, were selected for the study from July to August in 2002. All the patients (21 females and 19 males, mean age 16 years) had normal and complete anterior teeth, good oral hygiene. There were no obvious differences in bilateral teeth. Informed consents were obtained from all the subjects. The experiment was also approved by the ethical committee of the hospital. Experimental materials were RMGI adhesive (Fuji, GC, Japan, Lot 0005111) and composite resin cement (enamel adhesive of Beijing and Tianjin, Tianjin product, Lot 020402). Brackets produced from Hangzhou 3B and 37% phosphoric acid were used.METHODS: ①Bonding brackets: Subjects selected according to random procedure were divided into two groups, each with 20. GroupⅠ: The left buccal surfaces bonded with light-cure RMGI were etching for 30 seconds with 37% phosphoric acid, rinsed with water; the right buccal surfaces bonded with composite resin cement were etching for 60 seconds with 37% phosphoric acid, rinsed with water and dried; Group Ⅱ: After etching for 30 seconds with 37% phosphoric acid, the right buccal surfaces were rinsed with water and bonded brackets with light-cure RMGI. The left buccal surfaces were bonded brackets with composite resin cement after etching

  9. Fluoride rechargability of a non-resin auto-cured glass ionomer cement from a fluoridated dentifrice: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In addition to their fluoride-releasing properties, glass ionomer cement (GICs have the ability to reuptake and release fluorides from commonly used sources like fluoridated dentifrices. This property has the potential to provide a continuous low concentration of fluoride in the saliva aiding in caries prevention. The superior fluoride-recharging abilities of resin-modified GICs over conventional GICs have been documented. The manufacturer of a non-resin, auto-cured GIC (GC Fuji VII claims fluoride release from the product to be about six times that of conventional GIC. It was hypothesized that perhaps this high fluoride release could translate into a high reuptake and release, when exposed to a 1 000 ppm fluoridated dentifrice every day, thus providing increased fluoride levels in saliva. Aims: This study therefore examined fluoride-recharging abilities of the non-resin, auto-cured glass ionomer cement from a 1 000 ppm fluoridated dentifrice and compared it with resin-modified glass ionomer cement. Materials and Methods: Twelve glass ionomer discs each of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (GC Fuji II L C, Group 1 and the non-resin, auto-cured glass ionomer cement (GC Fuji VII, Group 2 were prepared with precise dimensions of 9 x 2 mm. The 12 specimens in each group were further subdivided into two subgroups of six each. Subgroup A involved no fluoride treatment (Control. Subgroup B involved application of a 1 000 ppm dentifrice for 2 minutes twice daily with a soft toothbrush. The disc-specimens were then suspended in airtight plastic bottles containing exactly 20 ml double distilled water. The fluoride concentration of the water in which the specimen discs were immersed was measured by means of a fluoride ion selective electrode connected to an ion selective electrode meter/digital ion analyzer at 1, 2, 7, 15, and 30 days. Statistical Analysis: It was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis Test. Results and Conclusion: Fuji VII

  10. Light-activation through indirect ceramic restorations: does the overexposure compensate for the attenuation in light intensity during resin cement polymerization?

    OpenAIRE

    Albano Luis Novaes Bueno; Cesar Augusto Galvão Arrais; Ana Carolina Tedesco Jorge; Andre Figueiredo Reis; Cristiane Mariote Amaral

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effects of light exposure through simulated indirect ceramic restorations (SICR) on hardness (KHN) of dual-cured resin cements (RCs), immediately after light-activation and 24 h later. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three dual-cured RCs were evaluated: Eco-Link (Ivoclar Vivadent), Rely X ARC (3M ESPE), and Panavia F (Kuraray Medical Inc.). The RCs were manipulated in accordance to the manufacturers' instructions and were placed into cylindrical acrylic matrixes (1-...

  11. A comparative evaluation of the retention of metallic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement under different enamel preparations: A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Padmaja Sharma; Ashima Valiathan; Ankit Arora; Sachin Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: For orthodontists, the ideal bonding material should be less moisture-sensitive and should release fluoride, thereby reducing unfavorable iatrogenic decalcification. Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGICs), due to their ability to bond in the presence of saliva and blood can be a very good bonding agent for orthodontic attachments especially in the areas of mouth, which are difficult to access. Moreover, their fluoride releasing property makes them an ideal bonding agent f...

  12. Thio-urethane oligomers improve the properties of light-cured resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Ataís; Consani, Rafael L; Martim, Gedalias C; Pfeifer, Carmem S

    2015-05-01

    Thio-urethanes were synthesized by combining 1,6-hexanediol-diissocyante (aliphatic) with pentaerythritol tetra-3-mercaptopropionate (PETMP) or 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene (aromatic) with trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate (TMP), at 1:2 isocyanate:thiol, leaving pendant thiols. Oligomers were added at 10-30 phr to BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA (5:3:2, BUT). 25 wt% silanated inorganic fillers were added. Commercial cement (Relyx Veneer, 3M-ESPE) was also evaluated with 10-20 phr of aromatic oligomer. Near-IR was used to follow methacrylate conversion (DC) and rate of polymerization (Rpmax). Mechanical properties were evaluated in three-point bending (ISO 4049) for flexural strength/modulus (FS/FM, and toughness), and notched specimens (ASTM Standard E399-90) for fracture toughness (KIC). Polymerization stress (PS) was measured on the Bioman. Volumetric shrinkage (VS, %) was measured with the bonded disk technique. Results were analyzed with ANOVA/Tukey's test (α=5%). In general terms, for BUT cements, conversion and mechanical properties in flexure increased for selected groups with the addition of thio-urethane oligomers. The aromatic versions resulted in greater FS/FM than aliphatic. Fracture toughness increased by two-fold in the experimental groups (from 1.17 ± 0.36 MPam(1/2) to around 3.23 ± 0.22 MPam(1/2)). Rpmax decreased with the addition of thio-urethanes, though the vitrification point was not statistically different from the control. VS and PS decreased with both oligomers. For the commercial cement, 20 phr of oligomer increased DC, vitrification, reduced Rpmax and also significantly increased KIC, and reduced PS and FM. Thio-urethane oligomers were shown to favorably modify conventional dimethacrylate networks. Significant reductions in polymerization stress were achieved at the same time conversion and fracture toughness increased.

  13. Sticky issues in construction : Investigations on adhesive-mineral interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    CHEHIMI, MM; DJOUANI, F; N'NEGUE, M; Dubois, J.; BENZARTI, K

    2006-01-01

    This contribution reports on the study of molecular interactions of structural adhesive components with hardened cement pastes based on an ordinary Portland cement (OPC). The epoxy resin (R) was a diglycidylether of bisphenol A type (DGEBA,) chosen with = 0.14 and diethylenetetramine (TETA) was used as the hardener (H). The surface chemical composition and energy of the hardened OPC were determined by XPS and inverse gas chromatography (IGC), respectively, prior and after coating with R and/...

  14. The sealing ability of novel Kryptonite adhesive bone cement as a retrograde filling material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, İsmail; Keskin, Cangül; Güler, Buğra

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study evaluated the ability of Kryptonite bone cement in sealing retrograde cavities. Methods. The root canals of one hundred extracted human maxillary incisor teeth were instrumented up to master apical file #40 using Mtwo rotary system and obturated with gutta-percha and AHPlus sealer by cold lateral compaction method. The specimens were assigned to one control group and four experimental groups based on the retrograde filling materials (n=20). The specimens were immersed in 0.5% Rhodamine B solution for 48h. Then the specimens were divided longitudinally into two parts and the depth of dye penetration was assessed under ×10 magnification. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni tests. Results. There were statistically significant difference between the experimental groups and the control group (P0.05). Conclusion. Kryptonite cement provided optimal apical seal in a manner similar to MTA, amalgam and IRM when used as a retrograde filling cement. PMID:27651886

  15. Candida albicans biofilms and MMA surface treatment influence the adhesion of soft denture liners to PMMA resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinna de Mendonça e Bertolini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Candida albicans biofilms and methyl methacrylate (MMA pretreatment on the bond strength between soft denture liners and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA resin was analyzed. Specimens were prepared and randomly divided with respect to PMMA pretreatment, soft liner type (silicone-based or PMMA-based, and presence or absence of a C. albicans biofilm. Samples were composed of a soft denture liner bonded between two PMMA bars. Specimens (n = 10 were incubated to produce a C. albicans biofilm or stored in sterile PBS for 12 days. The tensile bond strength test was performed and failure type was determined using a stereomicroscope. Surface roughness (SR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis were performed on denture liners (n = 8. Highest bond strength was observed in samples containing a silicone-based soft liner and stored in PBS, regardless of pretreatment (p < 0.01. Silicone-based specimens mostly underwent adhesive failures, while samples containing PMMA-based liners predominantly underwent cohesive failures. The silicone-based specimens SR decreased after 12 days of biofilm accumulation or PBS storage, while the SR of PMMA-based soft liners increased (p < 0.01. The PMMA-based soft liners surfaces presented sharp valleys and depressions, while silicone-based specimens surfaces exhibited more gentle features. In vitro exposure to C. albicans biofilms reduced the adhesion of denture liners to PMMA resin, and MMA pretreatment is recommended during relining procedures.

  16. Thermoplastic Epoxide Resin in the Presence of Polyethylene Glycol as Hot-melt Adhesive in Clean Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.S. Mukherjee

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Pollution caused by the process involving handling of solvents is considered as one of the most serious ecological problems. In this perspective, thermoplastic epoxide resins were synthesized from the controlled reaction of bisphenol A, epichlorohydrine, and 3,5 dimethylaniline with a view to prepare ingredients for hot melt adhesive was designated as HMA/(Subscript35' Addition of polyethylene glycol (20 Wt per cent of molecular weight 6000 (PEG6K in the blend was found to be optimum towards providing maximum tensile lap shear strength with reference to aluminium/adhesive/aluminium bonding with a value of 5.05MPa. The matrix of the blend remains optically transparent till the content of PEG6K remains up to 20 Wt per cent; however beyond 20 Wt percent of PEG6k, the matrix becomes opaque with the appearance of spherulities due to presence of excess PEG6K in the blend. Interestingly, blends containing <= 20 Wt percent PEG6K showed no endotherm below 100 (DegreeC even though the melting point of pristine PEG6K is 55 (degreeC. FTIR data revealed the interactive role of PEG6K with the epoxide resin.

  17. A review of the development of radical photopolymerization initiators used for designing light-curing dental adhesives and resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemura, Kunio; Endo, Takeshi

    2010-10-01

    This paper reviews our recent studies on radical photopolymerization initiators, which are used in the design of light-curing dental adhesives and resin composites, by collating information of related studies from original scientific papers, reviews, and patent literature. The photopolymerization reactivities of acylphosphine oxide (APO) and bisacylphosphine oxide (BAPO) derivatives, and D,L-camphorquinone (CQ)/tertiary amine were investigated, and no significant differences in degree of conversion (DC) were found between BAPO and CQ/amine system (p>0.05). In addition, a novel 7,7-dimethyl-2,3-dioxobicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-1-carbonyldiphenyl phosphine oxide (DOHC-DPPO=CQ-APO) was synthesized and its ultraviolet and visible (UV-VIS) spectral behavior was investigated. CQ-APO possessed two maximum absorption wavelengths (λmax) at 350-500 nm [372 nm (from APO group) and 475 nm (from CQ moiety)], and CQ-APO-containing resins exhibited good photopolymerization reactivity, excellent color tone, relaxed operation time, and high mechanical strength. It was also found that a newly synthesized, water-soluble photoinitiator (APO-Na) improved adhesion to ground dentin. PMID:20859059

  18. Effect of aluminum chloride hemostatic agent on microleakage of class V composite resin restorations bonded with all-in-one adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Bahari, Mahmood; Pournaghi-Azar, Fatemeh; Mozafari, Aysan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Since hemostatic agents can induce changes on enamel and dentin surfaces and influence composite resin adhesion, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the aluminum chloride hemostatic agent on the gingival margin microleakage of class V (Cl V) composite resin restorations bonded with all-in-one adhesive. Study design: Cl V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 60 sound bovine permanent incisors. Gingival margins of the cavities were placed 1.5 mm apical to the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). The teeth were randomly divided into two groups of 30. In group 1, the cavities were restored without the application of a hemostatic agent; in group 2, the cavities were restored after the application of the hemostatic agent. In both groups all-in-one adhesive and Z250 composite resin were used to restore the cavities with the incremental technique. After finishing and polishing, the samples underwent a thermocycling procedure, followed by immersion in 2% basic fuschin solution for 24 hours. The samples were sectioned and gingival microleakage was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. The non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare microleakage between the two groups. Statistical significance was defined at Padhesive with aluminum chloride hemostatic agent significantly increases restoration gingival margin microleakage. Key words:All-in-one adhesive resin, composite resin restoration, hemostatic agent, microleakage. PMID:22322497

  19. Effect of novel chitosan-fluoroaluminosilicate resin modified glass ionomer cement supplemented with translationally controlled tumor protein on pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanachottrakul, Nattaporn; Chotigeat, Wilaiwan; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn

    2014-04-01

    Dental materials that can promote cell proliferation and function is required for regenerative pulp therapy. Resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), a broadly used liner or restorative material, can cause apoptosis to pulp cells mainly due to HEMA (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate), the released residual monomer. Recent studies found that chitosan and albumin could promote release of protein in GIC while translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) has an anti-apoptotic activity against HEMA. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of chitosan and albumin modified RMGIC (Exp-RMGIC) supplemented with TCTP on pulp cell viability and mineralization. Exp-RMGIC+TCTP was composed of RMGIC powder incorporated with 15 % of chitosan, 5 % albumin and supplemented with TCTP mixed with the same liquid components of RMGIC. The effect of each specimen on pulp cells was examined using the Transwell plate. From the MTT assay, Exp-RMGIC+TCTP had the highest percentages of viable cells (P supplemented with TCTP had less cytotoxicity than RMGIC and can protect cells from apoptosis better than RMGIC supplemented with TCTP.

  20. Effects of air abrasion with alumina or glass beads on surface characteristics of CAD/CAM composite materials and the bond strength of resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARAO Nobuaki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The study aimed to evaluate effects of air abrasion with alumina or glass beads on bond strengths of resin cements to CAD/CAM composite materials. Material and Methods CAD/CAM composite block materials [Cerasmart (CS and Block HC (BHC] were pretreated as follows: (a no treatment (None, (b application of a ceramic primer (CP, (c alumina-blasting at 0.2 MPa (AB, (d AB followed by CP (AB+CP, and (e glass-beads blasting at 0.4 MPa (GBB followed by CP (GBB+CP. The composite specimens were bonded to resin composite disks using resin cements [G-CEM Cerasmart (GCCS and ResiCem (RC]. The bond strengths after 24 h (TC 0 and after thermal cycling (TC 10,000 at 4–60°C were measured by shear tests. Three-way ANOVA and the Tukey compromise post hoc tests were used to analyze statistically significant differences between groups (α=0.05. Results For both CAD/CAM composite materials, the None group exhibited a significant decrease in bond strength after TC 10,000 (p0.05. The AB+CP group showed a significantly higher bond strength after TC 10,000 than did the AB group for RC (p<0.05, but not for GCCS. The GBB+CP group showed the highest bond strength for both thermal cyclings (p<0.05. Conclusions Air abrasion with glass beads was more effective in increasing bond durability between the resin cements and CAD/CAM composite materials than was using an alumina powder and a CP.

  1. Effect of Resin Cement Pre-heating on the Push-out Bond Strength of Fiber Post to Root Canal Dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Nooroloyouni, Ahmad; Pornaghi Azar, Fatemeh; Sajjadi Oskoee, Jafar; Pirzadeh Ashraf, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Various factors influence the interfacial bond between the fiber posts and root canal dentin. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of pre-warming of resin cement on the push-out bond strength of fiber posts to various segments of root canal dentin. Materials and methods. In this in vitro study, 40 single-rooted human premolars were decoronated and underwent root canal treatment along with post space preparation. The samples were randomly divided into two groups: In group 1, Panavia F 2.0 cement was used at room temperature; in group 2, the same cement was warmed to 55‒60°C before mixing. After fiber posts were placed and cemented in the root canals, 3 dentin/post sections (coronal, middle and apical) with a thickness of 3 mm were prepared. A universal testing machine was used to measure push-out bond strength in MPa. Data was analyzed using two-factor ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test at α=0.05. Results. The mean value of push-out bond strength was high at room temperature, and the differences in the means of push-out bond strength values between the resin cement temperatures and between different root segments in each temperature were significant (Pcement up to 55-60°C reduced push-out bond strength to root canal dentin. In addition, in each temperature group bond strengths decreased from coronal to apical segments. PMID:26889360

  2. Clinical results with two different methods of root-end preparation and filling in apical surgery: mineral trioxide aggregate and adhesive resin composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Arx, Thomas; Hänni, Stefan; Jensen, Simon Storgård

    2010-01-01

    The aim of apical surgery is to hermetically seal the root canal system after root-end resection, thereby enabling periradicular healing. The objective of this nonrandomized prospective clinical study was to report results of 2 different root-end preparation and filling methods, ie, mineral triox...... trioxide aggregate (MTA) and an adhesive resin composite (Retroplast)....

  3. First study on gene expression of cement proteins and potential adhesion-related genes of a membranous-based barnacle as revealed from Next-Generation Sequencing technology

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Hsiu Chin

    2013-12-12

    This is the first study applying Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology to survey the kinds, expression location, and pattern of adhesion-related genes in a membranous-based barnacle. A total of 77,528,326 and 59,244,468 raw sequence reads of total RNA were generated from the prosoma and the basis of Tetraclita japonica formosana, respectively. In addition, 55,441 and 67,774 genes were further assembled and analyzed. The combined sequence data from both body parts generates a total of 79,833 genes of which 47.7% were shared. Homologues of barnacle cement proteins - CP-19K, -52K, and -100K - were found and all were dominantly expressed at the basis where the cement gland complex is located. This is the main area where transcripts of cement proteins and other potential adhesion-related genes were detected. The absence of another common barnacle cement protein, CP-20K, in the adult transcriptome suggested a possible life-stage restricted gene function and/or a different mechanism in adhesion between membranous-based and calcareous-based barnacles. © 2013 © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

  4. The Effect of Hydrofluoric Acid Concentration on the Bond Strength and Morphology of the Surface and Interface of Glass Ceramics to a Resin Cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundfeld Neto, D; Naves, L Z; Costa, A R; Correr, A B; Consani, S; Borges, G A; Correr-Sobrinho, L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of various concentrations of hydrofluoric acid (HF) on the surface/interface morphology and μ-shear bond strength (μSBS) between IPS Empress Esthetic (EST) (Ivoclar Vivadent) and IPS e.max Press (EMX) (Ivoclar Vivadent) ceramics and resin cement. Ceramic blocks were divided into 12 groups for each kind of ceramic. Six different HF concentrations were evaluated: 1%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, and 15%. All groups were silanated after etching, and half of the specimens within each group received a thin layer of unfilled resin (UR). Three resin cement cylinders were prepared on each ceramic block for μSBS testing. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. The μSBS test was carried out in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture. The data were submitted to three-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons were performed using the Tukey post hoc test (p0.05). When evaluating UR, μSBS mean was significantly higher and better infiltration was observed on the etched surfaces. No statistical difference was found between the ceramics. The HF concentration and UR influenced the bond strength and surface/interface morphology.

  5. Effect of pH on the release of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resins collected from operating nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are presented on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small-scale waste--form specimens collected during solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station were leach-tested and subjected to compressive strength testing in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's ''Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1). Samples of untreated resin waste collected from each solidification vessel before the solidification process were analyzed for concentrations of radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to determine the quantities of these chemicals in the waste-form specimens. The chelating agents included oxalic, citric, and picolinic acids. In order to determine the effect of leachant chemical composition and pH on the stability and leachability of the waste forms, waste-form specimens were leached in various leachants. Results of this study indicate that differences in pH do not affect releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms, but that differences in leachant chemistry and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. Also, this study indicates that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents are similar for waste- form specimens that decomposed and those that retained their general physical form. 36 refs., 60 figs., 28 tabs

  6. Candida albicans biofilms and MMA surface treatment influence the adhesion of soft denture liners to PMMA resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça e Bertolini, Martinna de; Cavalcanti, Yuri Wanderley; Bordin, Dimorvan; Silva, Wander José da; Cury, Altair Antoninha Del Bel

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Candida albicans biofilms and methyl methacrylate (MMA) pretreatment on the bond strength between soft denture liners and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resin was analyzed. Specimens were prepared and randomly divided with respect to PMMA pretreatment, soft liner type (silicone-based or PMMA-based), and presence or absence of a C. albicans biofilm. Samples were composed of a soft denture liner bonded between two PMMA bars. Specimens (n = 10) were incubated to produce a C. albicans biofilm or stored in sterile PBS for 12 days. The tensile bond strength test was performed and failure type was determined using a stereomicroscope. Surface roughness (SR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis were performed on denture liners (n = 8). Highest bond strength was observed in samples containing a silicone-based soft liner and stored in PBS, regardless of pretreatment (p PMMA-based liners predominantly underwent cohesive failures. The silicone-based specimens SR decreased after 12 days of biofilm accumulation or PBS storage, while the SR of PMMA-based soft liners increased (p PMMA-based soft liners surfaces presented sharp valleys and depressions, while silicone-based specimens surfaces exhibited more gentle features. In vitro exposure to C. albicans biofilms reduced the adhesion of denture liners to PMMA resin, and MMA pretreatment is recommended during relining procedures.

  7. Bond strength of resin modified glass ionomer cement to primary dentin after cutting with different bur types and dentin conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Di Nicoló

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different bur types and acid etching protocols on the shear bond strength (SBS of a resin modified glass ionomer cement (RM-GIC to primary dentin. Forty-eight clinically sound human primary molars were selected and randomly assigned to four groups (n=12. In G1, the lingual surface of the teeth was cut with a carbide bur until a 2.0-mm-diameter dentin area was exposed, followed by the application of RM-GIC (Vitremer - 3M/ESPE prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens of G2, received the same treatment of G1, however the dentin was conditioned with phosphoric acid. In groups G3 and G4 the same procedures of G1 and G2 were conducted respectively, nevertheless dentin cutting was made with a diamond bur. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24h, and then tested in a universal testing machine. SBS. data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA (= 5% and indicated that SBS values of RM-GIC bonded to primary dentin cut with different burs were not statistically different, but the specimens that were conditioned with phosphoric acid presented SBS values significantly higher that those without conditioning. To observe micromorphologic characteristics of the effects of dentin surface cut by diamond or carbide rotary instruments and conditioners treatment, some specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Smear layer was present in all specimens regardless of the type of rotary instrument used for dentin cutting, and specimens etched with phosphoric acid presented more effective removal of smear layer. It was concluded that SBS of a RM-GIC to primary dentin was affected by the acid conditioning but the bur type had no influence.

  8. Inhibitory effect of coated mannan against the adhesion of Candida biofilms to denture base resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Maki; Ohshima, Tomoko; Maeda, Nobuko; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2013-01-01

    The adherence of Candida on dentures is related to diseases such as denture stomatitis and aspiration pneumonia. Mannan is a major component of the Candida cell surface, and contributes to the cell adherence. A previous report indicated that the adherence of C. albicans to culture dishes was inhibited by the coating them with mannan. The purpose of this study was to examine the adhesion inhibitory effect of mannan coating on acrylic denture surfaces against C. albicans and C. glabrata. The amount of Candida attached on the acrylic surfaces coated with mannan was calibrated by culture methods. Mannan showed significant inhibitory effects on Candida adhesion in both the yeast and hyphal form in a concentration-dependent manner, and the durability of the inhibitory effect continued for three days. These results suggest that mannan coating on the denture base acrylic can prevent Candida adhesion on the denture.

  9. High energy radiation cure of resin systems for structural adhesives and composite applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation cure polymerisation of a commercial diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F epoxy resin has been achieved using a 60Co irradiation source, compounding the monomer with few percentage of an onium salt catalyst. The cure process has been monitored by a gamma-calorimetric technique and systems irradiated at doses corresponding to different positions in the gamma-calorimetric curve have been characterised via solubility tests and dynamic mechanical torsion analysis. Changes in both the measured gel fractions and tan δ values were associated with the progress of polymerisation and crosslinking reactions and these were dose dependent. Furthermore, systems irradiated at lower doses exhibited a latent thermal reactivity, undergoing further crosslinking by high temperature treatments, thus suggesting that synergy by the combination of radiation and thermal cure can help to achieve the desired applicative properties of these systems. These results have been discussed in the light of the most accredited radiation-induced polymerisation mechanisms for epoxy resins.

  10. High energy radiation cure of resin systems for structural adhesives and composite applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dispenza, C. E-mail: dispenza@dicpm.unipa.it; Scro, F.; Valenza, A.; Spadaro, G

    2002-01-01

    Radiation cure polymerisation of a commercial diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F epoxy resin has been achieved using a {sup 60}Co irradiation source, compounding the monomer with few percentage of an onium salt catalyst. The cure process has been monitored by a gamma-calorimetric technique and systems irradiated at doses corresponding to different positions in the gamma-calorimetric curve have been characterised via solubility tests and dynamic mechanical torsion analysis. Changes in both the measured gel fractions and tan {delta} values were associated with the progress of polymerisation and crosslinking reactions and these were dose dependent. Furthermore, systems irradiated at lower doses exhibited a latent thermal reactivity, undergoing further crosslinking by high temperature treatments, thus suggesting that synergy by the combination of radiation and thermal cure can help to achieve the desired applicative properties of these systems. These results have been discussed in the light of the most accredited radiation-induced polymerisation mechanisms for epoxy resins.

  11. 不同树脂粘接剂对纤维桩粘接强度及断裂界面的作用%Effects of different resin cements on bonding strength and failure modes of fiber posts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘莉; 陈小冬

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The good performance of resin cements used to cement fiber-posts has been confirmed, but the adhesive properties of different kinds of resin cements remain different. OBJECTIVE:To compare the shear bond strength of three resin cements (Bisco One-step, Clearfil DC, 3M ESPE RelyX Unicem) used to cement fiber posts and to observe their adhesive properties. METHODS:Fifteen extracted teeth were selected and the crowns were removed with a diamond bur 1-mm coronal to the cemento-enamel junction fol owed by endodontic treatment. Then the teeth were randomly divided into three groups (n=5). Glass fiber posts were cemented respectively with three resin cements, and after embedding, the roots were cut into 2-mm-thick sections for push-out tests. The mean shear bonding strengths were compared, and the failure modes were recorded and analyzed under a high-power microscope. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Mean bonding strengths were (4.69±1.85) MPa for Bisco One-step group, Clearfil DC, (6.10±0.36) MPa for Clearfil DC group, and (7.04±0.92) MPa for 3M ESPE RelyX Unicem group. The bonding strengths of RelyX Unicem and Clearfil DC groups were significantly greater than that of Bisco One-step group (P  目的:比较Bisco One-step、Clearfil DC及3M RelyX Unicem三种树脂粘接系统对纤维桩的剪切粘接强度,研究纤维桩与根管壁牙本质间的粘接性能。  方法:将15颗人离体牙在釉牙骨质界冠方1 mm处与牙体长轴方向垂直去除牙冠,磨平,常规热牙胶技术根管治疗后,随机分为3组,分别采用Bisco One-step、Clearfil DC及3M RelyX Unicem树脂粘接剂将玻璃纤维桩黏固于根管内,包埋后分别切片制备2 mm厚的样本,采用微推出法测试各组样本的粘接剪切强度;在高倍显微镜下观察所有被测样本的破坏类型。  结果与结论:Bisco One-step粘接剂组、Clearfil DC粘接剂组及3M RelyX Unicem粘接剂组的粘接强度分别为(4.69±1.85),(6.10

  12. Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    As the body moves, tissues or organs inside are normally able to shift around each other. This is because these tissues have ... occur if the adhesions cause an organ or body part to: Twist Pull ... unable to move normally The risk of forming adhesions is high ...

  13. In vitro evaluation of marginal microleakage in class V restorations with composite resin in bovine teeth. Laser irradiation influences and the adhesive system in the dentin pre-treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microleakage is one of the most important reasons to restorations failure, it is the responsible for marginal colors changing, new caries, hipersensibility and pulpar diseases. Several techniques and materials have been studied to eliminate or, at least, to decrease microleakage. The cavities preparation with Er:YAG laser and autoconditioning adhesive are some of these techniques and materials. This research has the objective to compare, in vitro, microleakage in class V cavities, prepared with high rotation (conventional treatment), Er:YAG laser (Enamel-400 mj/2 Hz/128,38 J/Cm2, Dentin 250 mJ/ 2 Hz/ 80,24 J/Cm2) and the treatment made at dentin with autoconditioning adhesive (Clerafil SE Bond) using Er:YAG laser (with water or not water) or not using Er:YAG laser. It was used 48 bovines teeth with cavities prepared in vestibular face and gingival wall on cement enamel junction and oclusal wall on enamel. The materials used were autoconditioning adhesive (Clerafil SE Bond) and composite resin Z250. Teeth were divided into four groups of twelve samples each one, according to dentin treatment. Group 1 - Conventional cavity and autoconditioning adhesive. Group 2- Cavity prepared with Er: YAG laser and autoconditioning adhesive. Group 3 - Cavity prepared with Er:YAG laser and dentin conditioning with Er:YAG laser associated to water and autoconditioning adhesive. Group 4 - Cavity prepared with Er:YAG laser and dentin conditioning with Er: YAG laser without water and associated to autoconditioning adhesive. Teeth were restored and stocked at 37 deg C, thermocycled and placed into a 50% silver nitrate solution. Right after, teeth were sliced and evaluated on a stereo microscopic magnifying glass in order to see microleakage degree trying to follow a score from 0 to 3. The findings were submitted to Fisher, Anderson-Darling tests and to the not parametric Sen and Puri test. The results indicated that in gingival edge, the Group 2 showed less microleakage than others ones

  14. Bonding of Glass Ceramic and Indirect Composite to Non-aged and Aged Resin Composite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, Marco; Ozcan, Mutlu; Muis, Maarten; Kalk, Warner

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Since adhesion of the restorative materials to pre-polymerized or aged resin composites presents a challenge to the clinicians, existing restorations are often removed and remade prior to cementation of fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). This study evaluated bond strength of non-aged and aged

  15. Comparison of the Shear Bond Strength of Light-cured and Chemically-cured Resin Adhesive%光固化和化学固化树脂粘接剂剪切强度的对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张隆祺; 王野平

    2001-01-01

    Objective To compare the shear bond strength of light-cured and chemically-cured resin adhesive. Methods Twenty recently extracted human premolars were randomly divided into two groups of 10 each.: Group A, using the chemically-cured resin adhesive (Jing Jinenamel adhesive) and Group B, using the light-cured resin adhesive (Transbond XT,3M Unitek). The brackets were bonded to prepared enamel surfaces and the samples were placed in a water bath at 37℃ for 24 hours, then measured the shear bond strength and assessed the remaining adhesive after debonded. Results The shear bond strength and assessing the remaining adhesive after debonded both had no statistical significanct difference between two adhesives. Conclusion The light-cured and the chemically-cured resin adhesive both have strong bond strength, but the light-cured resin adhesive has the advantage to offer more sufficient time for positioning and bonding the brackets, so it is recommended for using.%-05)。结论光固化和化学固化树脂粘接剂均具有较强的粘接强度,但光固化树脂粘接剂能够为托槽的定位和粘接提供充足的时间,推荐使用。

  16. Method for recovering and using lignin in adhesive resins by extracting demethylated lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Herbert A.

    1991-01-01

    Lignin, or a lignin derived material, which has been significantly demethylated (e.g., the demethylated lignin found in the raffinate produced as a by-product of dimethyl sulfide production which can be carried out using the spent liquor from wood pulping operations) can be isolated by a process wherein an organic solvent is added to a lignin-containing aqueous solution. The organic solvent is typically a polar, and at least a partially water-immiscible substance such as, for example, ethyl acetate. The resulting lignin-containing aqueous solution/organic solvent mixture is acidified to produce a water layer which is discarded and an organic solvent layer which contains the demethylated lignin. Upon its recovery, the demethylated lignin is preferably dried and stored until it is used (along with an alkali, an aldehyde and an adhesive filler) in compounding an adhesive of the type generally used in the manufacture of plywood.

  17. Microtensile bond strength of current adhesive systems when compared to cohesive strength of sound dentin and a resin-based composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Eduardo Capel Cardoso

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS to dentin of 4 adhesive systems, the micromorphology of the adhesive/dentin interface and to compare the results to the µTS (cohesive strength of sound dentin and resin composite. Occlusal surfaces of 24 extracted caries-free human molars were cut flat to expose the dentin surface. They were randomly assigned to 4 groups (n = 6: Adper Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus (MP, Adper Single Bond (SB, Clearfil Protect Bond (CP and Adper Prompt (AP. Adhesive systems were applied and "crowns" were built using Z100. Other 5 human molars were sectioned to obtain square-shaped dentin blocks and 5 resin blocks were built using a composite resin, Z100. After storage in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h, stick-shaped specimens were obtained for all groups (n = 5 with 0.8 mm² and subjected to µTBS or µTS test. Results were analyzed using One-Way ANOVA and Tukey's test at p 0.05. The lowest result was found for AP (27.4 + 4.7 MPa, although not statistically different from MP. Most specimens (89.4% showed predominant adhesive failure. None of the systems tested reached the µTS values of dentin (108.5 + 9.4 MPa and Z100 (86.5 + 3.6 MPa. Bonded interfaces showed lower µTBS than those µTS of dentin and resin composite blocks. The all-in-one self-etching adhesive had the lowest µTBS.

  18. Production on pressure sensitive adhesives (PSA) from palm oil based resin - a prepolymer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various low T sub g acrylate and methacrylate monomers were mixed with epoxidized palm oil acrylate (EPOLA) with the ratio of 50/50 prior to curing with an electron beam (EB) irradiation. Methacrylate monomers such as dicyclopentenyloxyethyl methacrylate (DCPOEMA) and isobornyl methacrylate (ISBMA), although displayed relatively high adhesive properties but were finally excluded from being further utilised as monomers for PSA because of a very slow curing speed. Literally, it is suggested that poorer adhesive performances of the cured films made from 50/50:EPOLA/monomer mixture as compared to that of 100% monomer was attributed to the lack of compatibility between EPOLA and that particular monomers. Further compatibility investigations were continued using formulations prepared via prepolymer route cured by an ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and the results showed that several monoacrylate monomers with polar and non-polar groups exhibited high curing speed as well as good compatibility with EPOLA as shown by their cured film properties such as; surface tackiness, peel adhesion and creep resistance. It is also suggested that these monomers were acting as surfactants for EPOLA which consequently enhance their compatibility upon mixing

  19. A study on the cementation of the regenerated cesium activity containing ferric, generated from elution of spent ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the studies on the cementation of the regenerated activity, 50 mL of 0.3 μCi Cs was taken with different strengths of ferric, viz. 0.5 N to 11 N,. The pH of the cement and ferric solutions of different strength was studied. Compressive strength studies of the cement blocks showed that at all strengths of ferric used for making the cement blocks, it was maximum at the 4th week and hence the curing time was fixed as 4 weeks

  20. Improving adhesion between luting cement and zirconia-based ceramic with an alternative surface treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Aurealice Rosa Maria; Gotti, Valéria Bisinoto; Shimano, Marcos Massao; Borges, Gilberto Antônio; Gonçalves, Luciano de Souza

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of an alternative surface treatment on the microshear bond strength (μsbs) of zirconia-based ceramic. Thirty-five zirconia disks were assigned to five groups according to the following treatments: Control (CO), glass and silane were not applied to the zirconia surface; G1, air blasted with 100μm glass beads + glaze + silane; G2, a gel containing 15% (by weight) glass beads applied to the ceramic surface + glaze + silane; G3, a gel containing 25% (by weight) glass beads applied to the ceramic surface + glaze + silane; and G4, a gel containing 50% (by weight) glass beads applied to the ceramic surface + glaze + silane. The specimens were built up using RelyX ARC®, according to the manufacturer's recommendations, and inserted in an elastomeric mold with an inner diameter of 0.8 mm. The μsbs test was performed using a testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. ANOVA and Tukey's test (p ceramic and the luting cement. PMID:25859635

  1. Microtensile bond strength and micromorphologic analysis of surface-treated resin nanoceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joon-Ho

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different surface treatment methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to resin nanoceramic (RNC). MATERIALS AND METHODS RNC onlays (Lava Ultimate) (n=30) were treated using air abrasion with and without a universal adhesive, or HF etching followed by a universal adhesive with and without a silane coupling agent, or tribological silica coating with and without a universal adhesive, and divided into 6 groups. Onlays were luted with resin cement to dentin surfaces. A microtensile bond strength test was performed and evaluated by one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (α=.05). A nanoscratch test, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used for micromorphologic analysis (α=.05). The roughness and elemental proportion were evaluated by Kruskal–Wallis test and Mann–Whitney U test. RESULTS Tribological silica coating showed the highest roughness, followed by air abrasion and HF etching. After HF etching, the RNC surface presented a decrease in oxygen, silicon, and zirconium ratio with increasing carbon ratio. Air abrasion with universal adhesive showed the highest bond strength followed by tribological silica coating with universal adhesive. HF etching with universal adhesive showed the lowest bond strength. CONCLUSION An improved understanding of the effect of surface treatment of RNC could enhance the durability of resin bonding when used for indirect restorations. When using RNC for restoration, effective and systemic surface roughening methods and an appropriate adhesive are required.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of cement slurries additives with epoxy resins - kinetics, thermodynamic and calorimetric analysis; Sintese e caracterizacao de pastas de cimento aditivadas com resinas epoxi - analises cineticas, termodinamicas e calorimetricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, A.M.G.; Andrade Junior, M.A.S.; Cestari, A.R.; Vieira, E.F.S., E-mail: macleybiane@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Cement has been used in the world, presenting a wide versatility. However, due to its chemical nature, it is subject to several types of chemical damages, especially for agents of acidic nature. With the purpose of increase its life-time, new cement slurries have been modified with the addition of specific additives. The objective of this work is to modify cement slurries with epoxy resins, which promote higher resistance of those materials in relation to acid attacks. Three cement slurries were synthesized with epoxy resins and a standard slurries, which was composed by cement and water. After 30 days of hydration, the samples were characterized by XDR, FTIR and thermal analysis (TG and DSC). The hydration processes of the cement slurries were studied by heat-conduction microcalorimetry. A kinetic study of HCl interaction with the new slurries were performed by the batch methodology at 25, 35, 45 e 55 deg C. It was verified that the addition of the polymers delayed the processes of hydration of the slurries, decreasing the flow of heat released as a function of the amount of added resin and, increased the resistance of those slurries to the acid attack. (author)

  3. Impact of various luting cements on the fixed dentures bonding strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krunić Nebojša

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Various luting cements are used to fix dental crowns to prepared teeth, and should provide an adhesive bond to the tooth structure giving reliable retention. The aim of this study was to establish in vitro which type of the tested luting cement provided the strongest adhesive bond of the prepared teeth to the fixed denture. Methods. Testing was carried out on the sample of 100 intact human premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons. The preparation of the teeth was performed by a heavy-duty machine. The surfaces of the prepared teeth were mathematically calculated. Dental crowns from the Nickel-Chromium- Molybenum (Ni-Cr-Mo alloy were made in a standard fashion, and fixed to prepared teeth (two samples of each group with 5 different types of luting cements. The strength of force applyed to separate the cast crowns from the prepared teeth was measured by an electronic dynamometer, after 7 days. Results. The obtained results revealed the connection between the type of luting cement and the values of retention power. The best adhesive bond under the constant convergence angle of the prepared teeth was provided by the resin cement. Conclusion. When choosing a luting cement for fixing dental crowns to prepared teeth, the advantage should be given to the resin cement in case the glassionomers are not available.

  4. Evaluation of microshear bond strength of resin composites to enamel of dental adhesive systems associated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassimiro-Silva, Patricia F.; Zezell, Denise M.; Monteiro, Gabriela Q. d. M.; Benetti, Carolina; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of resin composite to enamel etching by Er,Cr:YSGG laser with the use of two differents adhesives systems. Fifty freshly extracted human molars halves were embedded in acrylic resin before preparation for the study, making a total of up to 100 available samples. The specimens were randomly assigned into six groups (η=10) according to substrate pre-treatment and adhesive system on the enamel. A two-step self-etching primer system (Clearfil SE Bond) and a universal adhesive used as an etch-andrinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond Universal) were applied to the nonirradiated enamel surface according to manufacturer's instructions, as control groups (Control CF and Control SB, respectively). For the other groups, enamel surfaces were previously irradiated with the Er,Cr:YSGG laser with 0.5 W, 75 mJ and 66 J/cm2 (CF 5 Hz and SB 5 Hz) and 1.25 W, 50 mJ and 44 J/cm2 (CF 15 Hz and SB 15 Hz). Irradiation was performed under air (50%) and water (50%) cooling. An independent t-test was performed to compare the adhesive systems. Mean μSBS ± sd (MPa) for each group was 16.857 +/- 2.61, 17.87 +/- 5.83, 12.23 +/- 2.02, 9.88 +/- 2.26, 15.94 +/- 1.98, 17.62 +/- 2.10, respectively. The control groups and the 50 mJ laser groups showed no statistically significant differences, regardless of the adhesive system used. The results obtained lead us to affirm that the bonding interaction of adhesives to enamel depends not only on the morphological aspects of the dental surface, but also on the characteristics of the adhesive employed and the parameters of the laser.

  5. Preparation of the UF Resin Adhesives Modified with Oxidated Starch%氧化淀粉改性脲醛树脂胶的研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李来丙; 龚必珍

    2001-01-01

    介绍了以氧化淀粉作为改性剂对脲醛树脂胶进行改性 的方法,提高了脲醛树脂胶的耐水性、抗老化性及粘接强度, 同时降低了游离甲醛含量。%This article discusses method to modify UF resin adhesives with the power of oxidated starch as modifier, in order to improve the adhesive strength, the water resistance and anti- ageing property, and at the same time to lower the content of free- formaldehyde.

  6. A technique for the management of screw access opening in cement-retained implant restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Kermanshah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Abutment screw loosening has been considered as a common complication of implant-supported dental prostheses. This problem is more important in cement-retained implant restorations due to their invisible position of the screw access opening. Case Report: This report describes a modified retrievability method for cement-retained implant restorations in the event of abutment screw loosening. The screw access opening was marked with ceramic stain and its porcelain surface was treated using hydrofluoric acid (HF, silane, and adhesive to bond to composite resin. Discussion: The present modified technique facilitates screw access opening and improves the bond between the porcelain and composite resin.

  7. Effect of Sandblasting on Shear Bond Strength Composite Resin Veneer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octarina Octarina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Attachment between restoration and enamel surface in indirect resin composite veneer restoration (IRCV is obtained using multi-step (MS resin cement. Recently, a one step self-adhesive dual-cured resin cement (SADRC was introduced. Objective: To determine the effect of sandblasting on shear bond strength (SBS of IRCV to enamel using MS resin cement and SADRC. Methods: Forty specimens of buccal surface of enamel human were light-cured in Solidilite chamber and were divided into two groups: IRCV without sandblasting (n=20 and with sandblasting for 10 seconds (n=20 and then bonded to enamel using MS (n=10 and SADRC (n=10, respectively. After 24h SBS of specimens were tested using a Universal Testing Machine. Data were analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA. Results: The average SBS value of IRCV without SB and bonded with MS was 18.95+7.80MPa and MS with SB was 19.30+ SB (4.85+2.12MPa and SADRC with SB (9.57+3.45MPa(p<0.05. Conclusion: increased SBS VIRK to enamel using MS resin cement than SADRC.  

  8. Push-out bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin using glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Ricardo PEREIRA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin after cementation with glass ionomer (GICs and resinmodified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty human maxillary canines were transversally sectioned at 15 mm from the apex. Canals were prepared with a step back technique until the application of a #55 K-file and filled. Post spaces were prepared and specimens were divided into five groups according to the cement used for post cementation: Luting & Lining Cement; Fuji II LC Improved; RelyX Luting; Ketac Cem; and Ionoseal. After cementation of the glass fiber posts, all roots were stored at 100% humidity until testing. For push-out test, 1-mm thick slices were produced. The push-out test was performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute and the values (MPa were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Levene's tests and by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: Fiber posts cemented using Luting & Lining Cement, Fuji II LC Improved, and Ketac Cem presented the highest bond strength to root dentin, followed by RelyX Luting. Ionoseal presented the lowest bond strength values (P>0.05. The post level did not influence the bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin (P=0.148. The major cause of failure was cohesive at the cement for all GICs and RMGICs. CONCLUSIONS: Except for Ionoseal, all cements provided satisfactory bond strength values.

  9. XPS study on the weakest zone in the adhesion structure between resin containing 4-META and precious metal alloys treated with different surface modification methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, H; Endo, K; Yamane, Y; Kawashima, I

    2001-03-01

    Three precious metal alloys, Type IV gold alloy, 14 K gold alloy, and silver-based alloy, were treated with different surface modifications including a metal primer (VBATDT) application, a SiOx coating method, high-temperature oxidation, modification method with a liquid Ga-Sn alloy, and tin electroplating. Then thin PMMA films were bonded with a resin containing 4-META. Water durability at the adhesion interface was evaluated after water immersion, followed by thermal cycling used liquid nitrogen. The weakest zone at the interface was investigated using XPS only for the Ag-Pd alloy specimens that had been surface-treated with as-polishing, adhesive primer, and the SiOx coating method, since peeling of the PMMA film on the surface of specimens surface-treated by other methods was not observed. Metal elements were detected from the resin side at the adhesion interface. The chemical states of Cu in the resin before argon ion etching were characterized as metal oxides and/or states of chemical interaction with 4-META, VBATDT, or SiOx. PMID:11441491

  10. Interaction of anti-adhesive silicone films with UV embossing resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The durability of two silicone films, which were formed from silicone-based release agents with different molecular weights (MW), as anti-adhesive coatings for molds used for UV embossing was investigated. Flat electroless nickel-plated polyester stamp and UV-curable polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) were the mold and molding material, respectively. The surface chemical composition of the silicone films and the PEGDA moldings was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as a function of molding times using the same nickelized polyester stamp. Silicone transfer was found to occur from the silicone films to the moldings with increased number of moldings. The silicone film formed from the release agent with the higher MW had the poorer durability. Two mechanisms are proposed for the material transfer

  11. Eight-year randomized clinical evaluation of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations bonded with a one-step self-etch or a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aimof this study is to observe the durability of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations, placed with two different adhesive systems, in an 8-year follow-up. Methods: Seventy-eight participants received at random at least two Class II restorations of the ormocer......-based nanohybrid resin composite (Ceram X) bonded with either a one-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno III) or a control two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (Excite). The 165 restorations were evaluated using slightly modified United States Public Health Services (USPHS) criteria at baseline and then yearly during 8 years...... and no significant difference in overall clinical performance between the two adhesives. Fracture was the main reason for failure. Clinical relevance: The one-step self-etch adhesive showed a good long-term clinical effectiveness in combination with the nanohybrid resin composite in Class II restorations....

  12. Avaliação in vitro da microinfiltração em cavidades de classe V restauradas com diferentes combinações de resina composta e cimento de ionômero de vidro In vitro evaluation of marginal leakage in class V restorations using different combinations of composite resin and glass ionomer cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Régia Luzia ZANATA

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available O propósito deste estudo foi comparar o padrão de microinfiltração em restaurações classe V usando diferentes combinações de cimento ionomérico/resina composta. Cinqüenta cavidades foram preparadas nas superfícies vestibular e lingual de caninos e de pré-molares recém-extraídos. A margem gengival dos preparos estendeu-se até a dentina/cemento, e a margem oclusal localizou-se em esmalte. As cavidades foram restauradas como se segue: cimentos ionoméricos restauradores modificados por componentes resinosos (Fuji II LC e Vitremer; sistema adesivo/resina composta (Scotchbond Multi-Uso/Silux Plus; técnica sanduíche empregando-se o sistema adesivo/resina composta descrito, com um cimento ionomérico forrador (Vitrebond e GC Lining LC. Os espécimes foram armazenados em água destilada, polidos, submetidos à ciclagem térmica e imersos em fucsina. A extensão de penetração do corante foi classificada segundo o critério de escores, e os dados foram analisados estatisticamente, não sendo observadas diferenças significativas tanto entre materiais como entre margens.The purpose of this study was to compare the microleakage of class V restorations using different combinations of glass ionomer/composite resin. Fifty cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual aspects of recently extracted premolars and canines. The gingival margins of the preparations were extended into the cementum, and the occlusal margins were kept at the enamel level. The teeth were then divided into five groups and restored as follows: resin-modified glass ionomer cement restorative materials (Fuji II LC and Vitremer; composite resin/adhesive system (Scotchbond Multipurpose/Silux Plus; sandwich technique using the same composite resin/adhesive system and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement liner material (Vitrebond and GC Lining LC. The teeth were stored in distilled water, finished and thermocycled prior to immersion in a 2% basic fuchsin solution. The

  13. Effect of biological contamination on dentine bond strength of adhesive resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schalkwyk, J H; Botha, F S; van der Vyver, P J; de Wet, F A; Botha, S J

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the effect of saliva (S) and blood (B) contamination on the dentine bond strength of two single-component dentine bonding systems. The occlusal thirds of 120 recently extracted, human molars were removed with a low speed saw and subsequently embedded in Bencor rings by means of self-curing, acrylic resin. The occlusal surfaces were ground wet on 600-grit silicone carbide paper in a polishing machine to expose superficial dentine and to create a smear layer. The teeth were randomly divided into 12 groups (n = 10). All the dentine surfaces were etched with 34% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds rinsed with water, air-dried for 3 seconds, leaving the surfaces visibly moist. For the control groups (C) the etched dentine surfaces were treated with either, Scotchbond 1 (SB1, 3M) or Prime & Bond NT (PBNT, Dentsply) according to the manufacturer's instructions. In the contaminated groups, the saliva or blood was applied by means of a disposable brush, left undisturbed for 1 minute, and the excess then thinned by air spray. The dentine bonding systems were then applied, also according to manufacturer's instructions. Composite (Z250 and TPH) and Compomer (F2000 and Dyract AP (D-AP)) stubs were packed and cured incrementally to the corresponding pretreated dentine surfaces. All specimens were stored for 24 hours under water at 37 degrees C. The bonds were then stressed to failure with a Zwick testing machine, operating at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fractured samples were examined in a Scanning Electron Microscope. The data were statistically analysed (Student-t test). The mean SBS (MPa) were. SB1 with Z250: C = 19.1 +/- 4.4; S = 17.3 +/- 3.5; B = 2.6 +/- 0.9; SB1 with F2000: C = 11.8 +/- 3.3; S = 9.7 +/- 1.8; B = 4.7 +/- 1.6. PBNT with TPH: C = 9.2 +/- 3.2; S = 6.5 +/- 3.0; B = 4.3 +/- 1.5; PBNT with D-AP: C = 10.2 +/- 3.6; S = 9.3 +/- 2.9 and B = 7.3 +/- 2.5. There was no statistical significant difference in shear bond

  14. In vitro fluoride release from a different kind of conventional and resin modified glass-ionomer cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selimović-Dragaš, Mediha; Hasić-Branković, Lajla; Korać, Fehim; Đapo, Nermin; Huseinbegović, Amina; Kobašlija, Sedin; Lekić, Meliha; Hatibović-Kofman, Šahza

    2013-01-01

    Fluoride release is important characteristic of glass-ionomer cements. Quantity of fluoride ions released from the glass-ionomer cements has major importance in definition of their biological activity. The objectives of this study were to define the quantity of fluoride ions released from the experimental glass-ionomer cements and to define the effect of fluoride ions released from the experimental glass-ionomer cements on their cytotoxicity. Concentrations of the fluoride ions released in the evaluated glass-ionomer cements were measured indirectly, by the fluoride-selective WTW, F500 electrode potential, combined with reference R503/D electrode. Statistical analyses of F-ion concentrations released by all glass-ionomers evaluated at two time points, after 8 and after 24 hours, show statistically higher fluoride releases from RMGICs: Vitrebond, Fuji II LC and Fuji Plus, when compared to conventional glass-ionomer cements: Fuji Triage, Fuji IX GP Fast and Ketac Silver, both after 8 and after 24 hours. Correlation coefficient between concentrations of fluoride ion released by evaluated glass-ionomer cements and cytotoxic response of UMR-106 osteoblast cell-line are relatively high, but do not reach levels of biological significance. Correlation between concentrations of fluoride ion released and cytotoxic response of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cell line after 8 hours is high, positive and statistically significant for conventional GICs, Fuji Triage and Fuji IX GP Fast, and RMGIC, Fuji II LC. Statistically significant Correlation coefficient between concentrations of fluoride ion released and cytotoxic response of NIH3T3 cell line after 24 hours is defined for RMGIC Fuji II LC only. PMID:23988173

  15. In vitro fluoride release from a different kind of conventional and resin modified glass-ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selimović-Dragaš, Mediha; Hasić-Branković, Lajla; Korać, Fehim; Đapo, Nermin; Huseinbegović, Amina; Kobašlija, Sedin; Lekić, Meliha; Hatibović-Kofman, Šahza

    2013-08-01

    Fluoride release is important characteristic of glass-ionomer cements. Quantity of fluoride ions released from the glass-ionomer cements has major importance in definition of their biological activity. The objectives of this study were to define the quantity of fluoride ions released from the experimental glass-ionomer cements and to define the effect of fluoride ions released from the experimental glass-ionomer cements on their cytotoxicity. Concentrations of the fluoride ions released in the evaluated glass-ionomer cements were measured indirectly, by the fluoride-selective WTW, F500 electrode potential, combined with reference R503/D electrode. Statistical analyses of F-ion concentrations released by all glass-ionomers evaluated at two time points, after 8 and after 24 hours, show statistically higher fluoride releases from RMGICs: Vitrebond, Fuji II LC and Fuji Plus, when compared to conventional glass-ionomer cements: Fuji Triage, Fuji IX GP Fast and Ketac Silver, both after 8 and after 24 hours. Correlation coefficient between concentrations of fluoride ion released by evaluated glass-ionomer cements and cytotoxic response of UMR-106 osteoblast cell-line are relatively high, but do not reach levels of biological significance. Correlation between concentrations of fluoride ion released and cytotoxic response of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cell line after 8 hours is high, positive and statistically significant for conventional GICs, Fuji Triage and Fuji IX GP Fast, and RMGIC, Fuji II LC. Statistically significant Correlation coefficient between concentrations of fluoride ion released and cytotoxic response of NIH3T3 cell line after 24 hours is defined for RMGIC Fuji II LC only.

  16. Eroded dentin does not jeopardize the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Barros Cruz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials to sound and eroded dentin. Thirty-six bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated in 2 groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva and eroded dentin (pH cycling model - 3× / cola drink for 7 days. Specimens were then reassigned according to restorative material: glass ionomer cement (KetacTM Molar Easy Mix, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (VitremerTM or adhesive system with resin composite (Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z250. Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over the dentin and filled with the material. The microshear bond test was performed after 24 h of water storage at 37ºC. The failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×. Bond strength data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05. Eroded dentin showed bond strength values similar to those for sound dentin for all materials. The adhesive system showed the highest bond strength values, regardless of the substrate (p < 0.0001. For all groups, the adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. In conclusion, adhesive materials may be used in eroded dentin without jeopardizing the bonding quality. It is preferable to use an etch-and-rinse adhesive system because it shows the highest bond strength values compared with the glass ionomer cements tested.

  17. Environmental Protection Phenolic Resin Synthesis of Adhesive%环保型酚醛树脂胶粘剂的合成

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建锋

    2011-01-01

    The starch, formaldehyde, phenol as raw materials is introduced, in acidic conditions, hydrolysis of starch into D - glucose, glucose dehydration to generate HMF with phenol synthesis of phenolic resin adhesive, synthetic adhesive bond performance and is not modified compared to phenolic resin adhesive. There is not much change, and to reduce the amount of formaldehyde, to reduce costs. Intended to be the subject of partial replacement of starch synthesis of starch modified phenolic formaldehyde resin adhesive, through the study of formaldehyde in the amount of orthogonal test, starch dosage, pH and other factors affect the performance of samples to identify the optimum formulation.%通过对介绍以淀粉、甲醛、苯酚为原料,在酸性条件下,淀粉水解成D-葡萄糖,脱水生成羟甲基糠醛,与苯酚合成酚醛树脂胶粘剂,合成胶粘剂的粘结性能与未改性的酚醛树脂胶粘剂相比较,没有多大变化,而且减少甲醛的用量,降低了成本.本课题拟用淀粉部分取代甲醛合成淀粉改性酚醛树脂胶粘剂,通过正交试验研究甲醛用量、淀粉用量、pH等因素对样品性能的影响,找出最佳工艺配方.

  18. Brushing abrasion of luting cements under neutral and acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchalla, W; Attin, T; Hellwig, E

    2000-01-01

    Four resin based materials (Compolute Aplicap, ESPE; Variolink Ultra, Vivadent; C&B Metabond, Parkell and Panavia 21, Kuraray), two carboxylate cements (Poly-F Plus, Dentsply DeTrey and Durelon Maxicap, ESPE), two glass-ionomer cements (Fuji I, GC and Ketac-Cem Aplicap, ESPE), one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer, 3M) one polyacid-modified resin composite (Dyract Cem, Dentsply DeTrey) and one zinc phosphate cement (Harvard, Richter & Hoffmann) were investigated according to their brushing resistance after storage in neutral and acidic buffer solutions. For this purpose 24 cylindrical acrylic molds were each filled with the materials. After hardening, the samples were stored for seven days in 100% relative humidity and at 37 degrees C. Subsequently, they were ground flat and polished. Then each specimen was covered with an adhesive tape leaving a 4 mm wide window on the cement surface. Twelve samples of each material were stored for 24 hours in a buffer solution with a pH of 6.8. The remaining 12 samples were placed in a buffer with a pH of 3.0. All specimens were then subjected to a three media brushing abrasion (2,000 strokes) in an automatic brushing machine. Storage and brushing were performed three times. After 6,000 brushing strokes per specimen, the tape was removed. Brushing abrasion was measured with a computerized laser profilometer and statistically analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey's Standardized Range Test (p < or = 0.05). The highest brushing abrasion was found for the two carboxylate cements. The lowest brushing abrasion was found for one resin based material, Compolute Aplicap. With the exception of three resin-based materials, a lower pH led to a higher brushing abrasion.

  19. COMPARISON OF BOND STRENGTH OF COMMERCIALLY PURE TITANIUM AND NICKEL CHROMIUM ALLOY WITH THREE DIFFERENT LUTING CEMENTS: AN IN-VITRO STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Metal ceramic fixed dental prosthesis remains widely used for oral rehabilitation. The type of alloy used to fabricate the metal substructure of the crown also affects its retention. The aim of this study is to compare the bond strength of commercially pure titanium and nickel chromium plates cemented with three different cements and to comparatively evaluate the bond strength of each luting cement. METHODS Specimens of each metal were divided into three groups, which received one of the following luting techniques: Group 1 (CPTi and Group 2 (NiCr with resin cement; Group 3 (CPTi and Group 4 (NiCr with Glass Ionomer Cement; Group 5 (CPTi and Group 6 (NiCr with Zinc phosphate cement. The bonded specimens were submitted for the bond strength tests conducted with a Universal Testing Machine with a shear mode under a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Debonded specimens were examined under electron microscope. RESULT The results indicate that Group 1 and 2 have significantly higher values than Group 3, 4, 5 and 6. Also, Group 3 and 4 have significantly higher values when compared to Group 5 and 6. Whereas, there was no significant difference between Group 1 and 2, Group 3 and 4 as well as Group 5 and 6. The scanning electron microscope illustrated the different modes of fracture that occurred at the metal cement interface. Resin cement showed predominantly cohesive failure. Glass ionomer cement showed a mixed mode of both cohesive and adhesive fracture and Zinc phosphate cement also showed mixed mode of fracture with predominantly adhesive failure. CONCLUSIONS Resin cements showed the most superior bond with both commercially pure titanium and nickel chromium metal. Zinc phosphate cement showed the lowest bond strength with both the metals. There was no significant difference observed between the cement bond with different metals.

  20. Randomized 3-year Clinical Evaluation of Class I and II Posterior Resin Restorations Placed with a Bulk-fill Resin Composite and a One-step Self-etching Adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan Wv; Pallesen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the 3-year clinical durability of the flowable bulk-fill resin composite SDR in Class I and Class II restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-eight pairs of Class I and 62 pairs of Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female patients (mean age 52.4 years......). Each patient received at least two extended Class I or Class II restorations that were as similar as possible. In all cavities, a one-step self-etching adhesive (XenoV+) was applied. One of the cavities of each pair was randomly assigned to receive the flowable bulk-fill resin composite SDR...... in increments up to 4 mm as needed to fill the cavity 2 mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with an ormocer-based nanohybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, only the resin composite CeramX mono+ was placed in 2 mm increments. The restorations were...

  1. The effect of CO2 laser irradiation plus fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement or composite resin restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, S. R.; Moraes, M.; Hanashiro, F. S.; Youssef, M. N.; Brugnera Junior, A.; Nobre-dos-Santos, M.; de Souza-Zaroni, W. C.

    2016-02-01

    Although the cariostatic effects of CO2 laser on the root surface have been shown, there is scarce information regarding its effects on root secondary caries. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of the association of CO2 laser and a fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to composite-resin or glass-ionomer-cement restorations. Dental blocks of human roots were divided into two groups: composite resin (CR) or glass ionomer cement (GIC). Subsequently, the blocks were divided into four subgroups (n  =  10): C, non-fluoride dentifrice; FD, fluoride dentifrice; L, CO2 laser with an energy density of 6.0 J cm-2  +  non-fluoride dentifrice; and L  +  FD, CO2 laser  +  fluoride dentifrice. The blocks were subjected to pH cycling to simulate a high cariogenic challenge. Dental demineralization around the restorations was quantified by microhardness analysis. The results were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey-Kramer test (p  ⩽  0.05). As for mineral loss, it can be observed that all the groups that were treated with a fluoride dentifrice and laser, used alone or not, were statistically similar and superior to the RC-C group. It was concluded that CO2 laser irradiation and a fluoride dentifrice used alone or combined with each other are efficient surface treatments for preventing secondary root caries, regardless of the restorative material used.

  2. Influence of marginal fit and cement types on microleakage of all-ceramic crown systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ece Yüksel

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of both marginal fit and cementing with different luting agents on the microleakage of all-ceramic crown systems. Thirty-six extracted upper central incisors were prepared for full-coverage crowns and were divided into three groups. Group 1: CAD/CAM-fabricated ZrO2, Group 2: Heat-pressed lithium-disilicate, and Group 3: Cast Cr-Co copings as the control group. Copings were made following standard techniques, and groups were assigned cementation with either self-adhesive resin cement (A or glass-ionomer luting cement (B. The specimens were subjected to thermocycling, immersed in basic fuchsin solution, sectioned mesiodistally and buccolingually. The surface of each section was digitally photographed under a stereomicroscope. Microleakage was scored using a five-point scale, and the marginal gap was measured using image analysis software. Data were statistically analyzed using 2-way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney U tests (α: 0.05. The marginal discrepancy of each group was 82.7 ± 7 µm, 92.6 ± 4 µm and 96.5 ± 7 µm respectively. Group 1 showed significantly smaller gaps than Group 3 (P = 0.042. Self-adhesive resin cement (A showed a lower level of microleakage than glass-ionomer luting cement (B in all groups (P = 0.029. Microleakage scores of '0' were 83% for 1A, 50% for 1B, 50% for 2A, 16% for 2B, 33% for 3A and none for 3B. Marginal discrepancy and cement type both had significant effects on microleakage. Lower levels of microleakage were recorded with self-adhesive resin cement, while CAD/CAM-fabricated ZrO2 copings showed smaller marginal discrepancy and less microleakage in comparison to cast Cr-Co.

  3. 环氧树脂改性苯-丙乳液胶粘剂的制备%Preparation of Epoxy Resin Modifying Styrene -Butyl Acrylate Emulsion Adhesive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘波

    2012-01-01

    The epoxy resin modifying styrene -butyl acrylate emulsion adhesive was prepared by emulsion polymerization method. The effects of initiator content, complex emulsifier content, styrene/butyl acrylate mass ratio and exposy resin content on the peeling strength of the adhesive were discussed. The optimum polymerization formula were optimized by orthogonal experiment. The fourier - transform infrared (FTIR) were applied to characterize the compositions of it. The results showed that the obtained product had a excellent adhesion strength.%通过乳液聚合的方法制备出环氧树脂改性苯-丙乳液胶粘剂。采用正交实验方法分析不同引发剂加入量、复合乳化剂加入量、苯乙烯/丙烯酸丁酯质量比、环氧树脂加入量等因素对其剥离强度的影响,优化出最佳聚合配方。采用红外光谱(FTIR)对其组成进行表征,结果表明:所得产品具有良好的粘结强度等性能。

  4. Photocurable bioactive bone cement based on hydroxyethyl methacrylate-poly(acrylic/maleic) acid resin and mesoporous sol gel-derived bioactive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesaraki, S

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports on strong and bioactive bone cement based on ternary bioactive SiO2-CaO-P2O5 glass particles and a photocurable resin comprising hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and poly(acrylic/maleic) acid. The as-cured composite represented a compressive strength of about 95 MPa but it weakened during soaking in simulated body fluid, SBF, qua its compressive strength reached to about 20 MPa after immersing for 30 days. Biodegradability of the composite was confirmed by reducing its initial weight (~32%) as well as decreasing the molecular weight of early cured resin during the soaking procedure. The composite exhibited in vitro calcium phosphate precipitation in the form of nanosized carbonated hydroxyapatite, which indicates its bone bonding ability. Proliferation of calvarium-derived newborn rat osteoblasts seeded on top of the composite was observed during incubation at 37 °C, meanwhile, an adequate cell supporting ability was found. Consequently, it seems that the produced composite is an appropriate alternative for bone defect injuries, because of its good cell responses, high compressive strength and ongoing biodegradability, though more in vivo experiments are essential to confirm this assumption. PMID:27040248

  5. In vitro quantitative evaluation of marginal microleakage in class II restorations confected with a glass ionomer cement and two composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BIJELLA Maria Fernanda Borro

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated, in vitro, marginal microleakage in class II restorations confected with the glass ionomer cement Vitremer and with the composite resins Ariston pHc and P-60. The aims of the study were to assess the effect of thermocycling on those materials and to evaluate two methods utilized in the analysis of dye penetration. Sixty premolars divided in three groups were utilized; the teeth had proximal cavities whose cervical walls were located 1 mm below the cementoenamel junction. Half of the test specimens from each group underwent thermocycling; the other half remained in deionized water, at 37ºC. The specimens were immersed, for 24 hours, in a basic 0.5% fuchsin solution at 37ºC. For the analysis of microleakage, the specimens were sectioned in a mesio-distal direction, and the observation was carried out with the software Imagetools. The results were evaluated through the 2-way ANOVA and through the Tukey?s test. All groups presented marginal microleakage. The smallest values were obtained with Vitremer, followed by those obtained with the composite resins P-60 and Ariston pHc. There was no statistically significant difference caused by thermocycling, and the method of maximum infiltration was the best for detecting the extension of microleakage.

  6. SEM/XPS analysis of fractured adhesively bonded graphite fibre surface resin-rich/graphite fibre composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devilbiss, T. A.; Wightman, J. P.; Progar, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    Samples of graphite fiber-reinforced polyimide were fabricated allowing the resin to accumulate at the composite surface. These surface resin-rich composites were then bonded together and tested for lap shear strength both before and after thermal aging. Lap shear strength did not appear to show a significant improvement over that previously recorded for resin-poor samples and was shown to decrease with increasing aging time and temperature.

  7. Tensile strength of thin resin composite layers as a function of layer thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alster, D; Feilzer, A J; De Gee, A J; Davidson, C L

    1995-11-01

    As a rule, cast restorations do not allow for free curing contraction of the resin composite luting cement. In a rigid situation, the resulting contraction stress is inversely proportional to the resin layer thickness. Adhesive technology has demonstrated, however, that thin joints may be considerably stronger than thicker ones. To investigate the effects of layer thickness and contraction stress on the tensile strength of resin composite joints, we cured cylindrical samples of a chemically initiated resin composite (Clearfil F2) in restrained conditions and subsequently loaded them in tension. The samples had a diameter of 5.35 mm and thicknesses of 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, and 700 microns, 1.4 mm, or 2.7 mm. None of the samples fractured due to contraction stress prior to tensile loading. Tensile strength decreased gradually from 62 +/- 2 MPa for the 50-microns layer to 31 +/- 4 MPa for the 2.7-mm layer. The failures were exclusively cohesive in resin for layers between 50 and 400 microns thick. Between 500 and 700 microns, the failures were cohesive or mixed adhesive/cohesive, while the 1.4- and 2.7-mm layers always failed in a mixed adhesive/cohesive mode. For the resin composite tested, the contraction stress did not endanger the cohesive strength. It was concluded that if adhesion to tooth structure were improved, thinner adhesive joints might enhance the clinical success of luted restorations.

  8. Influence of Different Types of Resin Luting Agents on Color Stability of Ceramic Laminate Veneers Subjected to Accelerated Artificial Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silami, Francisca Daniele Jardilino; Tonani, Rafaella; Alandia-Román, Carla Cecilia; Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of accelerated aging (AAA) on the color stability of resin cements for bonding ceramic laminate veneers of different thicknesses. The occlusal surfaces of 80 healthy human molars were flattened. Ceramic laminate veneers (IPS e-max Ceram) of two thicknesses (0.5 and 1.0 mm) were bonded with three types of luting agents: light-cured, conventional dual and self-adhesive dual cement. Teeth without restorations and cement samples (0.5 mm) were used as control. After initial color evaluations, the samples were subjected to AAA for 580 h. After this, new color readouts were made, and the color stability (ΔE) and luminosity (ΔL) data were analyzed. The greatest color changes (pveneers were fixed with light-cured cement and the lowest when 1.0 mm veneers were fixed with conventional dual cement. There was no influence of the restoration thickness when the self-adhesive dual cement was used. When veneers were compared with the control groups, it was verified that the cement samples presented the greatest alterations (p<0.05) in comparison with both substrates and restored teeth. Therefore, it was concluded that the thickness of the restoration influences color and luminosity changes for conventional dual and light-cured cements. The changes in self-adhesive cement do not depend on restoration thickness. PMID:27007354

  9. The effect of stromelysin-1 (MMP-3) on non-collagenous extracellular matrix proteins of demineralized dentin and the adhesive properties of restorative resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukpessi, T; Menashi, S; Camoin, L; Tencate, J M; Goldberg, M; Chaussain-Miller, C

    2008-11-01

    Dentin non-collagenous matrix components (NCPs) are structural proteins involved in the formation, the architecture and the mineralization of the extracellular matrix (ECM). We investigated here how recombinant metalloproteinase stromelysin-1, also termed MMP-3, initiates the release of ECM molecules from artificially demineralized human dentin. Analysis of the supernatants by Western blotting reveals that MMP-3 extracts PGs (decorin, biglycan), and also a series of phosphorylated proteins: dentin sialoprotein (DSP), osteopontin (OPN), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and MEPE, but neither dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1), another member of the SIBLING family, nor osteocalcin (OC), a non-phosphorylated matrix molecule. After treatment of dentin surfaces by MMP-3, scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of resin replica shows an increased penetration of the resin into the dentin tubules when compared to surfaces only treated by demineralizing solutions. This preclinical investigation suggests that MMP-3 may be used to improve the adhesive properties of restorative materials.

  10. Eight-year randomized clinical evaluation of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations bonded with a one-step self-etch or a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aimof this study is to observe the durability of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations, placed with two different adhesive systems, in an 8-year follow-up. Methods: Seventy-eight participants received at random at least two Class II restorations of the ormocer-based nan......Objectives: The aimof this study is to observe the durability of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations, placed with two different adhesive systems, in an 8-year follow-up. Methods: Seventy-eight participants received at random at least two Class II restorations of the ormocer......-based nanohybrid resin composite (Ceram X) bonded with either a one-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno III) or a control two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (Excite). The 165 restorations were evaluated using slightly modified United States Public Health Services (USPHS) criteria at baseline and then yearly during 8 years...... and no significant difference in overall clinical performance between the two adhesives. Fracture was the main reason for failure. Clinical relevance: The one-step self-etch adhesive showed a good long-term clinical effectiveness in combination with the nanohybrid resin composite in Class II restorations....

  11. Study on high-performance acrylic resin anchor adhesive%高性能丙烯酸酯锚固胶的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱本玮; 邝生鲁

    2011-01-01

    High-performance anchor adhesive was prepared with acrylic resin as primary material. The storage stability of adhesive was tested. The effect of environmental temperature on curing time was studied. The bonding capacity to dry, moist and underwater concrete substrates was measured. The adhesive possesses the features of low-temperature curing, faster strength growing and good adhesion capability to moist or underwater concrete.%以丙烯酸酯为主体材料制备了高性能建筑锚固胶.测试了锚固胶的贮存稳定性,研究了环境温度对固化时间的影响,并测试了锚固胶对干、湿及水下混凝土基材的粘接性能.结果表明,该胶低温固化性能好、强度增长快、粘接强度高,特别适合动态荷载和低温环境下使用.

  12. Continuous and scalable fabrication of bioinspired dry adhesives via a roll-to-roll process with modulated ultraviolet-curable resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hoon; Hwang, Insol; Lee, Jeong Hyeon; Lee, Dael; Lim, Haneol; Tahk, Dongha; Sung, Minho; Bae, Won-Gyu; Choi, Se-Jin; Kwak, Moon Kyu; Jeong, Hoon Eui

    2014-08-27

    A simple yet scalable strategy for fabricating dry adhesives with mushroom-shaped micropillars is achieved by a combination of the roll-to-roll process and modulated UV-curable elastic poly(urethane acrylate) (e-PUA) resin. The e-PUA combines the major benefits of commercial PUA and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). It not only can be cured within a few seconds like commercial PUA but also possesses good mechanical properties comparable to those of PDMS. A roll-type fabrication system equipped with a rollable mold and a UV exposure unit is also developed for the continuous process. By integrating the roll-to-roll process with the e-PUA, dry adhesives with spatulate tips in the form of a thin flexible film can be generated in a highly continuous and scalable manner. The fabricated dry adhesives with mushroom-shaped microstructures exhibit a strong pull-off strength of up to ∼38.7 N cm(-2) on the glass surface as well as high durability without any noticeable degradation. Furthermore, an automated substrate transportation system equipped with the dry adhesives can transport a 300 mm Si wafer over 10,000 repeating cycles with high accuracy.

  13. Influence of different kinds of rosins and hydrogenated resins on the setting time of Grossman cements Influência de diferentes tipos de breus e resinas hidrogenadas sobre o tempo de endurecimento dos cimentos do tipo Grossman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Damião SOUSA NETO

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect on the setting time by the addition of different kinds of rosin and hydrogenated resin on the Grossman cement powder was evaluated. The experiments were carried out following the American Dental Association’s specification number 57 for root canal sealers. For this analysis, different Grossman cement powders were prepared using different rosins (X, WW and WG and hydrogenated resins (Staybelite and Staybelite ester 10. The study of the physicochemical properties of the Grossman cements obtained the different kinds of rosins and hydrogenated resins interference on the cement’s setting time. The hydrogenated resin, having a higher pH, increased the setting time of the cement when compared to the X, WW and WG rosins.No presente estudo, analisou-se o efeito da adição de diferentes tipos de breus e resinas hidrogenadas ao pó do cimento de GROSSMAN sobre o tempo de endurecimento. Os experimentos foram realizados de acordo com a Especificação 57 para materiais obturadores de canais radiculares da American Dental Association (ADA. Para análise, foram aviados pós do cimento de GROSSMAN com diferentes tipos de breu (X, WW e WG e resinas hidrogenadas (Stabylite e Stabylite éster 10. Os estudos das propriedades físico-químicas dos cimentos tipo GROSSMAN obtidos de diferentes tipos de breus e resinas hidrogenadas interferem no tempo de endurecimento do cimento. A resina hidrogenada, obtida do processo de hidrogenação tem o pH mais alto, provocando um aumento do tempo de endurecimento do cimento em relação aos breus tipo X, WW e WG, que têm pH mais ácido.

  14. The research on the bond durability between self-adhesive cements and zirconia ceramic%自粘接树脂水门汀与二氧化锆陶瓷间粘接耐久性的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    景页; 孟翔峰

    2013-01-01

      目的比较不同自粘接树脂水门汀与二氧化锆陶瓷间的粘接强度和耐久能力。方法二氧化锆陶瓷片经烧结、研磨后,接受50μm Al2O3颗粒喷砂处理。使用激光共聚焦显微镜对研磨、喷砂处理的陶瓷表面粗糙度进行测量。研磨、喷砂处理的陶瓷片分别与5种自粘接树脂水门汀: Biscem(BC)、 G-Cem(GC)、 RelyX U100(RU)、Multilink Speed(MS)、 Maxcem(MC)进行粘接。每组粘接试件分为2个亚组分别接受0、10000次冷热循环后进行剪切粘接强度测量。使用单因素方差和独立样本t检验对数据进行分析。结果喷砂处理明显增加了陶瓷表面粗糙度指标Ra值(P<0.001)。冷热循环降低了所有实验组的粘接强度(P<0.001),其中研磨处理陶瓷片与MS组的粘接强度明显高于与BC组、 GC组、 RU组和MC组(P<0.001),喷砂处理明显提高了BC组、 GC组、 RU组和MC组的粘接强度(P<0.001)。结论不同自粘接树脂水门汀与二氧化锆陶瓷间的粘接耐久能力存在明显差异,其粘接耐久能力不完全受陶瓷表面喷砂处理的影响。%Objective To compare the bond durability of five self-adhesive resin cements to polished and sand-blasted zirconia ceramic. Methods Zirconia ceramic samples were sintered and polished. Half of polished ceramic samples were sandblasted with 50μm alumina particles. The roughness of polished and sandblasted zirconia ceramic surface was measured by 3D-laser scanning microscope. The polished and sandblasted ceramic samples were bonded to composite cylinders with either Biscem(BC), G-Cem(GC), RelyX U100(RU), Multilink Speed(MS) or Maxcem (MC). The samples divided into two subgroups to receive respectively shear test after 0 and 10 000 time thermal cy-cles. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA test and independent sample t test. Results Air abrasion signifi-cantly increased Ra of zirconia ceramic surface(P<0

  15. Application of Light-cured Dental Adhesive Resin for Mounting Electrodes or Microdialysis Probes in Chronic Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Okumura, Tetsu; Okanoya, Kazuo; Tani, Jun

    2007-01-01

    In chronic recording experiments, self-curing dental acrylic resins have been used as a mounting base of electrodes or microdialysis-probes. Since these acrylics do not bond to the bone, screws have been used as anchors. However, in small experimental animals like finches or mouse, their craniums are very fragile and can not successfully hold the anchors. In this report, we propose a new application of light-curing dental resins for mounting base of electrodes or microdialysis probes in chron...

  16. A comparative evaluation of the retention of metallic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement under different enamel preparations: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmaja Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: For orthodontists, the ideal bonding material should be less moisture-sensitive and should release fluoride, thereby reducing unfavorable iatrogenic decalcification. Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGICs, due to their ability to bond in the presence of saliva and blood can be a very good bonding agent for orthodontic attachments especially in the areas of mouth, which are difficult to access. Moreover, their fluoride releasing property makes them an ideal bonding agent for patients with poor oral hygiene. However, their immediate bond strength is said to be too low to immediately ligate the initial wire, which could increase the total number of appointments. The effect of sandblasting and the use of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCL on the immediate bond failure of RMGIC clinically have not been reported in the literature until the date. This investigation intended to assess the effect of sandblasting (of the bracket base and enamel and NaOCL on the rate of bond failure (with immediate ligation at 30 min of Fuji Ortho LC and its comparison with that of conventional light cured composite resin over a period of 1 year. Materials and Methods: 400 sample teeth were further divided into 4 groups of 100 each and bonded as follows: (1 Group 1: Normal metallic brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (2 Group 2: Sandblasted bracket base and enamel surface, brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (3 Group 3: Deproteinized enamel surface using sodium hypochlorite and brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (4 Group 4: Normal metallic bracket bonded with Transbond XT after etching enamel with 37% phosphoric acid. This group served as control group. Results and Conclusion: Results showed that sandblasting the bracket base and enamel, can significantly reduce the bond failure rate of RMGIC.

  17. Bonding ability of adhesive resins to caries-affected and caries-infected dentin Capacidade de união de resinas adesivas à dentina afetada e infectada por cárie

    OpenAIRE

    Masahiro Yoshiyama; Junichi Doi; Yoshihiro Nishitani; Toshiyuku Itota; Franklin R Tay; Ricardo Marins Carvalho; PASHLEY David H.

    2004-01-01

    Hybridized dentin permits dental treatments that were previously impossible with conventional techniques, opening new frontiers in modern adhesive dentistry. We have investigated the adhesive property of current bonding systems to caries-infected dentin by a microtensile bond strength test (µTBS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and suggested that bonding resin could infiltrate into caries-infected dentin partially to embed carious bacteria within hybrid layers. We have named this ...

  18. Radiographic appearance of commonly used cements in implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pette, Gregory A; Ganeles, Jeffrey; Norkin, Frederic J

    2013-01-01

    Cement-retained restorations allow for a conventional fixed partial denture approach to restoring dental implants. However, inadequate removal of excess cement at the time of cementation may introduce a severe complication: cement-induced peri-implantitis. Radiopaque cements are more easily detected on radiographs and should improve the recognition of extravasated cement at the time of insertion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of commercially available cements in vitro. Eighteen different cements commonly used for luting restorations to implants were tested at both 0.5- and 1.0-mm thicknesses. The cements examined were zinc oxide eugenol, zinc oxide, zinc polycarboxylate, zinc phosphate, resin-reinforced glass ionomer, urethane resin, resin, and composite resin. Two samples of each cement thickness underwent standardized radiography next to an aluminum step wedge as a reference. The mean grayscale value of each of the nine 1-mm steps in the step wedge were used as reference values and compared to each of the cement samples. Temp Bond Clear (resin), IMProv (urethane resin), Premier Implant Cement (resin), and Temrex NE (resin) were not radiographically detectable at either sample thickness. Cements containing zinc were the most detectable upon radiographic analysis. There are significant differences in the radiopacity of many commonly used cements. Since cementinduced peri-implantitis can lead to late implant failure, cements that can be visualized radiographically may reduce the incidence of this problem.

  19. Microleakage of Composite Resin Restorations Using a Type of Fifth and Two Types of Seventh Generations of Adhesive Systems: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Tabari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In recent dentin adhesive systems etching of enamel/dentin are achieved simultaneously. The objective was to evaluate the microleakage of composite restorations using Single Bond2 (5th generation, Clearfil S3 Bond and G Bond (7th generation. Methods: Class V cavities were prepared on  45 extracted intact premolars with gingival margins at the cementoenamel junction and they were randomly divided into 3 groups (n=15 based on the type of adhesives: Single Bond2 (5th generation, Clearfil S3 Bond and G Bond (7th generation. After applying the adhesives, the cavities were filled with Z250 composite resin. The occlusal and gingival microleakage was evaluated using 2% basic fuchsin staining technique. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Bonferroni corrected Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: The mean rank of occlusal microleakage exhibited significant differences by comparison of G Bond, Clearfil S3 Bond and Single Bond2 (21.07, 30.67 and 17.27, respectively (P=0.005. There was a significant difference in gingival microleakage of different bonding agents (34.40, 17.83 and 16.77 for G Bond, Clearfil S3 Bond and Single Bond2, respectively (P

  20. Comparing the reinforcing effects of a resin modified glassionomer cement, Flowable compomer, and Flowable composite in the restoration of calcium hydroxide-treated immature roots in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Prathibha Rani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and sixty human permanent central incisors were enlarged to a 120 file size after crown removal procedure to simulate immature teeth. The root canals were filled with calcium hydroxide and stored for 15 days (phase I, 30 days (phase II, 90 days (phase III, and 180 days (Phase IV. At the end of these selected time periods, calcium hydroxide was cleaned off the root canals of forty teeth that were randomly selected and obturated with gutta-percha points in the apical 2 mm of the root canals with a sealer. The specimens were further equally divided into four groups. Unrestored Group I served as control and the root canals of teeth in the other three group specimens were reinforced with resin modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC (Group II, Flowable Compomer (Group III, and Flowable Composite (Group IV, respectively, using a translucent curing post. All specimens were subjected to compressive force using an Instron Testing machine, until fracture occurred. All the materials evaluated substantially reinforced the root specimens compared to the control. At the end of 180 days, Flowable composites showed maximum reinforcement compared to the other groups; however, no significant differences were found between the reinforcement capabilities of Flowable Compomer and RMGIC.

  1. [Bonding strength of metal frameworks and adhesive agents in the resin-bonded bridge technic. 3. Comparative research on various retention mechanisms and adhesive systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirz, J; Besimo, C; Schmidli, F

    1989-01-01

    In fixed denture prosthetics, macro- and micromechanical as well as chemical adhesive mechanisms may be used between metal and bonding agent. The in vitro research presented here determines the adhesive strength of six different bonding agents and five different retention mechanisms on twelve precious and nonprecious metal alloys using shearing stress. The evaluation of the results should help to assess the suitability of the various combinations of materials and anchoring methods for the fixation of adhesive bridges. On the basis of the adhesive strengths and the examination of the various clinical advantages and disadvantages of the different methods that were analyzed, the electrolytic etching of nonprecious metal alloys appears to be particularly suitable for fixed denture prostheses. An efficient combination between alloy and bonding agent is of particular importance in this area. Macromechanical mesh and negative retentions can only be used to a limited clinical extent due to their high space requirements. Very good results were produced by the preconditioning of inner anchor surfaces with silanes. Sandblasting, however, provided unsatisfactory shear-stress results over a broad front independently of the type of alloy.

  2. Effect of pre-heated dual-cured resin cements on the bond strength of indirect restorations to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Morais

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effects of resin luting agents (LA polymerized using increased temperature on the in vitro microtensile bond strength (mTBS of indirect restorations to dentin. The occlusal dentin surfaces of 40 human third molars were exposed and flattened. The teeth were assigned to 8 groups (n = 5 according to the LA temperature (25°C o r 50°C, curing mode (dual- or self-curing mode, and product (Excite DSC/Variolink II [VII] and XP Bond/Calibra [Cal]. The bonding agents were applied to the dentin surfaces according to manufacturers' instructions. For preheated groups, the LAs were heated to 50°C, subsequently mixed on a heated stirrer surface, and applied to the previously heated pre-polymerized resin discs (2 mm thickness, TPH-Spectrum. The discs were bonded to the dentin surfaces, and the LAs were either exposed to a curing light according to manufacturers' instructions or allowed to self-cure. Specimens were stored in relative humidity at 37°C for 7 days. Specimens were mesio-distally and bucco-lingually sectioned to obtain multiple bonded beams with a 1-mm² cross-sectional area for mTBS testing. Data (MPa were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (a = 5% for each product. Specimen failure patterns were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope. VII groups showed higher mTBS at 50°C than at 25°C regardless of curing mode (p = 0.05. Cal groups showed similar mTBS at 25°C and 50°C in all activation modes. The use of some dual-polymerizing LAs at 50°C may improve the mTBS of indirect restorations to dentin.

  3. Effect of delayed insertion of composite resin on the bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesive systems

    OpenAIRE

    Edson Alves de CAMPOS; SAAD, José Roberto Cury; Sizenando Toledo PORTO NETO; Campos, Lucas Arrais; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Etch-and-rinse adhesive systems are characterized bythe dental acid etching previously to the monomer application. Thesematerials can be classified as 3-step (when primer and bond are applied separately) or 2-step (when the primer and bond functions are carried out by a single component). Objective: To determine the influence of immediate or delayed insertion of restorative material on the values of bond strength of 2-step and 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive systems using the mic...

  4. Four-year clinical evaluation of Class II nano-hybrid resin composite restorations bonded with a one-step self-etch and a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this prospective clinical trial was to evaluate the 4-year clinical performance of an ormocer-based nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X; Dentsply/DeTrey) in Class II restorations placed with a one-step self-etch (Xeno III; Dentsply/DeTrey) and two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive...

  5. Eight-year randomized clinical evaluation of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations bonded with a one-step self-etch or a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aimof this study is to observe the durability of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations, placed with two different adhesive systems, in an 8-year follow-up. Methods: Seventy-eight participants received at random at least two Class II restorations of the ormocer-based nan...

  6. Study on epoxy resin adhesive with high temperature curing%高温固化环氧树脂胶粘剂的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李佳; 季铁正; 陈立新

    2011-01-01

    以酚醛环氧树脂(F-51)、不同种类的固化剂和填料等为主要原料,配制不同的EP(环氧树脂)双组分复合材料修补用胶粘剂.采用单因素试验法优选出制备EP胶粘剂的较佳工艺条件.结果表明:当m(F-51)∶m(固化剂PA651 )=100∶55、m(气相白炭黑)∶m(高岭土)=15∶80时,制成的EP双组分胶粘剂可在较高温度(室温/1 d→170 ℃/1 h)条件下固化,其剪切强度为13.8 MPa、压缩强度为85.1 MPa和压缩模量为5.7 GPa,并且其凝胶时间较长、流动性控制性较好、耐介质浸泡性和操作方便性俱佳,完全满足复合材料修补用胶粘剂的使用要求.%With novolac epoxy resin(F-51),different types of curing agents and fillers as main raw materials, a series of two-component EP(epoxy resin) adhesives for repairing composite were confected. The better process conditions of preparing EP adhesive were preferred by single-factor experiment. The results showed that the two-component EP adhesive could cured at higher temperature (room temperature for 1 d->-170 °C for 1 h) and could all meet application requirements of adhesive for repairing composite because its shear strength was 13.8 Mpa, compressive strength was 85.1 Mpa and compression modulus was 5.7 Gpa,gelation time was longer,liquidity control was better,medium resistance and operation convenience were all good when mass ratios of m(F-51)'-m{curing agent PA651) and m(gas phase white carbon black):m( (kaolin) were 100=55 and 15:80 respectively.

  7. Pulpal responses to bacterial contamination following dentin bridging beneath hard-setting calcium hydroxide and self-etching adhesive resin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitasako, Yuichi; Ikeda, Masaomi; Tagami, Junji

    2008-04-01

    To evaluate the pulp healing to bacterial contamination beneath a hard-setting calcium hydroxide (DY: Dycal, L.D. Caulk Co.) and a self-etching adhesive resin (2V: Clearfil Liner Bond 2V, Kuraray Medical Inc.) following dentin bridge formation. Class V cavities were prepared on 30 monkey teeth, and the pulps were exposed with a carbide bur through the cavity floor. Each exposed pulp was capped with either DY or 2V. The cavities were restored with a hybrid resin composite. The resin composite was removed at 180 days after capping, and then cavities were left open to the oral environment for 2 weeks to obtain bacteria contamination DY (BDY) and 2V (B2V; n = 10). A non-bacterial-contaminated group capped with DY was used as control. After bacterial challenges, inflammatory cell infiltration, incidence and differentiation of dentin bridges were evaluated histologically. There were significant differences in the presence of inflammatory cell infiltration among all groups (P < 0.05). No moderate or severe inflammatory reaction was found in Group DY. Group BDY showed moderate or severe inflammatory cell infiltration in 50%, and showed four necrotic specimens. Although no statistically significant difference was found in the formation and differentiation of dentin bridges among all groups, tunnel defects in dentin bridges were detected in 70% (DY), 80% (BDY), and 50% (B2V). Group B2V showed a significantly lower presence of inflammatory cell infiltration than Group BDY (P < 0.05). Bonding agent is supposed to seal the exposure site, and the remaining bonding agent on the cavities was effective as the barrier in the dentin bridges after bacterial challenges.

  8. Fluoride release from restorative materials coated with an adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Letícia Algarves; Weidlich, Patrícia; Samuel, Susana Maria Werner; Maltz, Marisa

    2002-01-01

    The retention of both fluoride resins and resin-modified glass ionomer cements to dental tissues can be improved by the association of an adhesive system which promotes the bonding between the resin component and dentin, forming a hybrid layer. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate if the presence of the adhesive, being part of the hybrid layer composition, interfered with the fluoride released to tooth tissues. The restorative materials studied were: Vitremer (3M), Heliomolar (Vivadent) and Z100 (3M) using an adhesive application (Scotch Bond MultiPurpose Plus--3M). Ten discs of each material were prepared: 5 were covered with the adhesive and 5 were not. The discs were immersed in individual flasks containing artificial saliva which was changed daily. Fluoride release was measured at days 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 by a fluoride combined electrode (9609 BN--Orion) coupled to an ion analyzer (SA-720 Procyon). One-way ANOVA and the Student-Newman-Keuls test were applied to compare the materials. The results showed that the use of a dental adhesive significantly decreased the fluoride release of Vitremer and reduced the fluoride release of Heliomolar to undetectable levels with the methodology used. PMID:11870961

  9. Light-activation through indirect ceramic restorations: does the overexposure compensate for the attenuation in light intensity during resin cement polymerization?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albano Luis Novaes Bueno

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effects of light exposure through simulated indirect ceramic restorations (SICR on hardness (KHN of dual-cured resin cements (RCs, immediately after light-activation and 24 h later. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three dual-cured RCs were evaluated: Eco-Link (Ivoclar Vivadent, Rely X ARC (3M ESPE, and Panavia F (Kuraray Medical Inc.. The RCs were manipulated in accordance to the manufacturers' instructions and were placed into cylindrical acrylic matrixes (1-mm-thick and 4-mm diameter. The RC light-activation (Optilux 501; Demetron Kerr was performed through a glass slide for 120 s (control group, or through 2-mm or 4-mm thick SICRs (IPS Empress II; Ivoclar Vivadent. The specimens were submitted to KHN analysis immediately and 24 h after light-activation. The data obtained at the 2 evaluation intervals were submitted to 2-way ANOVA repeated measures and post-hoc Tukey's test (pre-set alpha of 5%. RESULTS: Lower KHN was observed when light-activation was performed through SICRs for Eco-Link at all evaluation intervals and for Rely X ARC 24 h later. For Panavia F, no significant difference in KHN was observed between control and experimental groups, regardless of evaluation interval. Most groups exhibited higher KHN after 24 h than immediately after light-activation, with the exception of Rely X ARC light-activated through SICR, as no significant difference in KHN was found between evaluation intervals. CONCLUSIONS: Light overexposure did not compensate for light intensity attenuation due to the presence of SICR when Rely X and Eco-Link were used. Although hardness of such RCs increased over a 24-h interval, the RCs subjected to light overexposure did not reach the hardness values exhibited after direct light exposure.

  10. Effect of an experimental adhesive resin containing multi-ion releasing fillers on direct pulp-capping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Satoki; Shinkai, Koichi; Suzuki, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate pulpal healing and reparative dentin formation after 14 and 28 days in exposed rat pulp directly capped with an experimentally developed all-in-one adhesive containing surface reaction-type pre-reacted glass-ionomer (S-PRG) filler. The four experimental groups and the control group were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by the Steel-Dwass post-hoc test to compare the histopathological score. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the histopathological score at 14 and 28 days for each observation item. All experimental adhesives containing S-PRG fillers developed for direct pulp capping showed no pulpal inflammation. After 14 days, the experimental adhesives containing S-PRG fillers and the control group formed tertiary dentin around the exposed pulp. After 28 days, the experimental adhesives containing 13 and 27 wt% of S-PRG fillers formed dentin bridge equal to the control. PMID:27252005

  11. Microleakage of Different Self-Adhesive Materials for Lithium Disilicate CAD/CAM Crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella A. Naumova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the microleakage and marginal gap of various luting materials after cementing ceramic crowns. Methods: Cervical margins of human molars were designed as circular chamfers. Cementation of full-contour ceramic crowns was conducted with zinc-phosphate cement (Harvard cement, resin cement (Panavia F 2.0 and self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, BifixSE, MaxCem Elite, PermaCem2.0, G-Cem. Aging of specimens was performed in artificial saliva, at 37 °C for four weeks and thermocycling. The marginal gap was measured with a scanning electron microscope and silver precipitation within the microleakage. All data were compared statistically. Results: Independent of the margin preparation, the highest median value for microleakage was 320.2 μm (Harvard cement, and the lowest was 0 μm (Panavia F 2.0. The median value for enamel was 0 µm and for dentin 270.9 μm (p < 0.001, which was independent of the luting material. The marginal and absolute marginal gaps were not significantly different between the tested materials. There was no correlation between microleakage and the marginal gaps. Conclusion: Significant differences in microleakage were found between the tested luting materials (p < 0.05. Independent from the luting materials, the microleakage in dentin showed significantly higher values than in enamel.

  12. In vitro evaluation of marginal microleakage in class V restorations with composite resin in bovine teeth. Laser irradiation influences and the adhesive system in the dentin pre-treatment; Avaliacao in vitro da microinfiltracao marginal em restauracoes de classe V com resina composta em dentes bovinos. Influencia da irradiacao laser e sistema adesivo no pre-tratamento dentinario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Wendell Lima de

    2003-07-01

    Microleakage is one of the most important reasons to restorations failure, it is the responsible for marginal colors changing, new caries, hipersensibility and pulpar diseases. Several techniques and materials have been studied to eliminate or, at least, to decrease microleakage. The cavities preparation with Er:YAG laser and autoconditioning adhesive are some of these techniques and materials. This research has the objective to compare, in vitro, microleakage in class V cavities, prepared with high rotation (conventional treatment), Er:YAG laser (Enamel-400 mj/2 Hz/128,38 J/Cm{sup 2}, Dentin 250 mJ/ 2 Hz/ 80,24 J/Cm{sup 2}) and the treatment made at dentin with autoconditioning adhesive (Clerafil SE Bond) using Er:YAG laser (with water or not water) or not using Er:YAG laser. It was used 48 bovines teeth with cavities prepared in vestibular face and gingival wall on cement enamel junction and oclusal wall on enamel. The materials used were autoconditioning adhesive (Clerafil SE Bond) and composite resin Z250. Teeth were divided into four groups of twelve samples each one, according to dentin treatment. Group 1 - Conventional cavity and autoconditioning adhesive. Group 2- Cavity prepared with Er: YAG laser and autoconditioning adhesive. Group 3 - Cavity prepared with Er:YAG laser and dentin conditioning with Er:YAG laser associated to water and autoconditioning adhesive. Group 4 - Cavity prepared with Er:YAG laser and dentin conditioning with Er: YAG laser without water and associated to autoconditioning adhesive. Teeth were restored and stocked at 37 deg C, thermocycled and placed into a 50% silver nitrate solution. Right after, teeth were sliced and evaluated on a stereo microscopic magnifying glass in order to see microleakage degree trying to follow a score from 0 to 3. The findings were submitted to Fisher, Anderson-Darling tests and to the not parametric Sen and Puri test. The results indicated that in gingival edge, the Group 2 showed less microleakage than

  13. Glass-ionomer Cements in Restorative Dentistry: A Critical Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuhaiza, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Glass-ionomer cements (GICs) are mainstream restorative materials that are bioactive and have a wide range of uses, such as lining, bonding, sealing, luting or restoring a tooth. Although the major characteristics of GICs for the wider applications in dentistry are adhesion to tooth structure, fluoride releasing capacity and tooth-colored restorations, the sensitivity to moisture, inherent opacity, long-term wear and strength are not as adequate as desired. They have undergone remarkable changes in their composition, such as the addition of metallic ions or resin components to their composition, which contributed to improve their physical properties and diversified their use as a restorative material of great clinical applicability. The light-cured polymer reinforced materials appear to have substantial benefits, while retaining the advantages of fluoride release and adhesion. Further research should be directed towards improving the properties, such as strength and esthetics without altering its inherent qualities, such as adhesion and fluoride releasing capabilities. PMID:27340169

  14. Sellado marginal en restauraciones indirectas, cementadas con dos sistemas adhesivos diferentes Marginal sealing in indirect restorations, cemented with two different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ehrmantraut Nogales

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Propósito: El propósito de esta investigación fue realizar un estudio in vitro del sellado marginal de 80 incrustaciones de resina compuesta cementadas con resina compuesta fluida utilizando un sistema adhesivo autograbante (Go!, SDI, Australia y un sistema adhesivo con grabado ácido total (Stae, SDI, Australia. Método: Las piezas dentarias restauradas fueron puestas en una estufa a 37ºC y 100% de humedad relativa durante 48 horas para simular las condiciones bucales. Luego fueron sometidas a termociclado, en una solución de azul de metileno al 1%. Posteriormente las muestras fueron cortadas en sentido vestíbulo lingual o palatino, para ser observadas bajo un microscopio óptico, para evaluar la interfase diente restauración midiendo los porcentajes de filtración para ambos grupos. Resultados: Los resultados fueron analizados estadísticamente mediante el t-test de Student obteniéndose diferencias significativas entre los dos grupos estudiados. Conclusión: Todos los cuerpos de prueba presentaron algún grado de filtración marginal, sin embargo el grupo que utilizó un sistema adhesivo autograbante demostró tener valores significativamente mayores de filtración que el grupo que utilizó el sistema convencional.Aim: The purpose of this research was to study the marginal sealing in 80 composite resin inlay, bonded with flow composite resin using a Self-etch fluid (Go!, SDI, Australia versus a total-etching system (Stae, SDI, Australia. Method: The samples were placed in an oven at 37ºC and 100% humidity for 48 hours, after which the samples were thermocycled in a methylene blue 1% solution. This cycle was repeated 80 times. The samples were cut transversally, the restorations were observed trough an optical microscope to calculate the percentage of filtration in relation to the total length of the cavity to the axial wall. Results: The results were statistically analyzed by Student t-test. And there were significant differences in

  15. Tensile bond srength between composite resin using different adhesive systems
    Avaliação da resistência à ruptura por tração entre resina composta e diversos adesivos dentinários

    OpenAIRE

    Patrícia Dias; Raul Santos de Sá; Jorge Augusto César; Guilherme Augusto de Barros Nolasco; Fátima Cristina de Sá

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was evaluate the tensile bond strength (TBS) among nine adhesive systems and one composite resin. The groups were made as follows: Single Bond/3M (G1), Etch & Prime 3.0 /Degussa (G2), Bond 1/Jeneric/Pentron (G3), Prime & Bond 2.1/Dentsply (G4), OptiBond FL/Kerr (G5), Stae/SDI (G6), Snap Bond/ Copalite-Cooley & Cooley (G7), Prime & Bond NT/Dentsply (G8), Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus/3M (G9). The control group (G10) was made only with the composite resin (Z100/3M). One hu...

  16. Resin-modified and conventional glass ionomer restorations in primary teeth: 8-year results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, V.; Manscher, E.; Teglers, P.T.

    2004-01-01

    clinical trial, cariostatic effects, dental restorations, glass ionomer cement, long-term behaviour, pedodontics, resin-modified glass ionomer......clinical trial, cariostatic effects, dental restorations, glass ionomer cement, long-term behaviour, pedodontics, resin-modified glass ionomer...

  17. Effect of one-bottle adhesive systems on the fluoride release of a resin-modified glass ionomer Efeito dos sistemas adesivos de frasco único na liberação de flúor de um cimento de ionômero de vidro modificado por resina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Wang

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available A dhesive systems associated to resin-modified glass ionomer cements are employed for the achievement of a higher bond strength to dentin. Despite this benefit, other properties should not be damaged. This study aimed at evaluating the short-time fluoride release of a resin-modified glass ionomer cement coated with two one-bottle adhesive systems in a pH cycling system. Four combinations were investigated: G1: Vitremer (V; G2: Vitremer + Primer (VP; G3: Vitremer + Single Bond (VSB and G4: Vitremer + Prime & Bond 2.1 (VPB. SB is a fluoride-free and PB is a fluoride-containing system. After preparation of the Vitremer specimens, two coats of the selected adhesive system were carefully applied and light-cured. Specimens were immersed in demineralizing solution for 6 hours followed by immersion in remineralizing solution for 18 hours, totalizing the 15-day cycle. All groups released fluoride in a similar pattern, with a greater release in the beginning and decreasing with time. VP showed the greatest fluoride release, followed by V, with no statistical difference. VSB and VPB released less fluoride compared to V and VP, with statistical difference. Regardless the one-bottle adhesive system, application of coating decreased the fluoride release from the resin-modified glass ionomer cements. This suggests that this combination would reduce the beneficial effect of the restorative material to the walls around the restoration.Sistemas adesivos são associados aos cimentos de ionômero de vidro modificados por resina para a obtenção de maior resistência adesiva à dentina. Apesar deste benefício, outras propriedades não devem ser prejudicadas. Este estudo se propôs a avaliar a liberação de flúor a curto prazo de um cimento de ionômero de vidro modificado por resina coberto com dois diferentes sistemas adesivos em um modelo de ciclagem de pH. Quatro associações foram testadas: G1: Vitremer (V; G2: Vitremer + Primer (VP; G3: Vitremer + Single

  18. Adhesive bonding of resin composite to various titanium surfaces using different metal conditioners and a surface modification system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hercules Jorge ALMILHATTI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the effect of three metal conditioners on the shear bond strength (SBS of a prosthetic composite material to cpTi grade I having three surface treatments. Material and Methods: One hundred sixty eight rivet-shaped specimens (8.0x2.0 mm were cast and subjected to polishing (P or sandblasting with either 50 mm (50SB or 250 mm (250SB Al2O3. The metal conditioners Metal Photo Primer (MPP, Cesead II Opaque Primer (OP, Targis Link (TL, and one surface modification system Siloc (S, were applied to the specimen surfaces, which were covered with four 1-mm thick layers of resin composite. The resin layers were exposed to curing light for 90 s separately. Seven specimens from each experimental group were stored in water at 37ºC for 24 h while the other 7 specimens were subjected to 5,000 thermal cycles consisting of water baths at 4ºC and 60ºC (n=7. All specimens were subjected to SBS test (0.5 mm/min until failure occurred, and further 28 specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. Data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Tukey's test (α=0.05. Results: On 50SB surfaces, OP groups showed higher SBS means than MPP (P<0.05, while no significant difference was found among OP, S, and TL groups. On 250SB surfaces, OP and TL groups exhibited higher SBS than MPP and S (P<0.05. No significant difference in SBS was found between OP and TL groups nor between MPP and S groups. The use of conditioners on 250SB surfaces resulted in higher SBS means than the use of the same products on 50SB surfaces (P<0.05. Conclusion: Sandblasting associated with the use of metal conditioners improves SBS of resin composites to cpTi.

  19. Retention of radicular posts varying the application technique of the adhesive system and luting agent Retenção de pinos radiculares variando-se a técnica de aplicação do sistema adesivo e do agente cimentante

    OpenAIRE

    Tabajara Sabbag Fonseca; Edson Alfredo; Luiz Pascoal Vansan; Ricardo Gariba Silva; Yara T. Correa Silva Sousa; Paulo César Saquy; Manoel D. Sousa-Neto

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the retention of intracanal cast posts cemented with dual-cure resin varying the application method of the primer/adhesive solution and luting agent in the prosthetic space prepared to receive the posts. Sixty endodontically treated maxillary canines had their crowns discarded, and their roots were embedded in acrylic resin. The prosthetic spaces were prepared with Largo burs mounted on a low-speed handpiece coupled to a parallelometer in order to maintain length...

  20. Retention of oral microorganisms on conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer cements Retenção de microrganismos bucais em cimentos de ionômero de vidro convencionais e modificados por resina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise PEDRINI

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Secondary caries are a worldwide public and socioeconomic problem. The placement of restorations can lead to the development of environmental conditions favorable to microbial colonization, especially on the tooth/restoration interface, which is a predisposing factor for secondary caries. The aim of this study was to evaluate microbial retention on conventional (Chelon-Fil and Vidrion R and resin-modified (Vitremer and Fuji II LC glass-ionomer cements, in situ, using a hybrid composite resin (Z100 as a control. Twelve volunteers wore Hawley appliances with specimens made of all tested filling materials for 7 days. The specimens were then removed from the appliances and transferred to tubes containing 2.0 ml of Ringer-PRAS. Microorganisms from the samples were inoculated onto blood agar and Mitis Salivarius Bacitracin agar and incubated under anaerobiosis (90% N2, 10% CO2, at 37°C, for 10 and 2 days, respectively. The resin-modified glass-ionomer cements and the composite resin retained the same levels of microorganisms on their surfaces. The resin-modified glass-ionomers retained less mutans streptococci than the composite resin and conventional glass-ionomer cements. The conventional glass-ionomer cements retained less mutans streptococci than the composite resin, but that difference was not statistically significant.A cárie secundária representa problema de saúde pública e socioeconômico no mundo. A restauração de dentes acometidos por cárie pode criar condições favoráveis à proliferação microbiana na superfície do material restaurador ou na interface dente/restauração, criando ambiente propício para o estabelecimento de cárie secundária. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a capacidade de retenção de placa bacteriana em cimentos de ionômero de vidro convencionais (Chelon-Fil e Vidrion R e modificados por resina (Vitremer e Fuji II LC e de resina composta híbrida (Z100, utilizada como controle. Nos testes de reten

  1. Effect of different blood contaminated adherent surface treatments on shear bond strength of compomer and composite resin to dentin, using a self etching adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortazavi V.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Blood contamination is a common problem in dentistry that can decrease bond strength dramatically which may be affected by methods of decontamination as well. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the influence of blood contamination on shear bond strength of composite and compomer to dentin using Prompt L-Pop as an adhesive system. Also, to assess the effectiveness of different surface treatments on the bond strength. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 120 molar teeth were sectioned to provide flat occlusal dentinal surfaces. Specimens were embedded in acrylic resin with the flat surface exposed. The dentinal expose surfaces were polished to 600 grit. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups of twelve specimens (F1–F5 for compomer material and five other groups (Z1- Z5 for composite resin. After application of Promt L-Pop to dentinal surfaces of specimens, the surfaces in all groups, except for F1 and Z1, (as controls were contaminated with human blood and then one of the following surface treatments was applied. Groups F2 and Z2 without any treatment, groups F3 and Z3 rinsing with water, groups F4 and Z4 rinsing with water and reapplication of adhesive, groups F5 and Z5 rinsing with NaOCl and using Prompt L-Pop again. Restorative materials were applied to treated surfaces using plastic molds. After thermocycling, shear bond strengths, mode of failures and morphology of dentin-material interfaces were evaluated. The data were statistically analyzed using Factorial analysis of Variance, One-Way ANOVA, Duncan, T-student and Chi-Square tests with P<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: Compomer showed statistically significant higher bond strength in comparison to composite (P<0.001. Duncan test showed significant differences between all compomer groups, except between groups F4 and F5, and between all composite groups except for groups Z1 and Z4 and for groups Z2 and Z3

  2. Comparison of shear bond strength between zirconia ceramics and three resin luting cements%氧化锆陶瓷与三种树脂粘接剂粘接剪切强度比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张金明; 陈利民; 高平

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the bondig strength of zirconia ceramics with three kinds of luting cement materials.Methods Blocks of sintered zirconia ceranucs were cut and randomly divided into three groups with 32 slices in each.After being treated with sandbLasting, they were bonded with three kinds of luting cements respectively.After preserved in 37℃ distilled water for 24 hours and 30 days, the shear bonding strength of these specimens was tesred and the data were analyzed with SAS9.12 software package and the bond sections were observed under scanning electron microscope.Results Two - way ANOVA revealed that the group of PanaviaTMF could attain the best shear bonding strength: (31.36 ±3.49) MPa (after 24 hours) and (29.52 ± 3.44) MPa ( after 1 month).Superbond C & B had the high initial shear bond strength ( 31.85 ± 3.61) MPa ( after 24 hours) but low long - term bond strength (21.32±2.58)MPa (after 1month).The one - step self erosion adhesive RelyX Unicem was proved to have the lowest initial bond strength ( 13.29 ± 3.05) MPa ( after 24 hours) , but the strength could last longer.Conclusion Resin luting cement containing phosphate monomer ( MDP) can provide zirconia ceramics a strong and long - lasting bonding.The cement without inorganic filler can get good bonding strength too, but cant last long.%目的 探讨适合牙科氧化锆陶瓷的粘接材料.方法 将烧结后的氧化锆陶瓷片分为3组,每组32片,分别采用三种自酸蚀粘接剂RelyX Unicem、PanaviaTM F、Superbond C & B与喷砂后的氧化锆陶瓷片粘接,水浴24h和水浴30d后,测试其粘接剪切强度.数据用SAS9.12软件进行统计学分析,粘接断面用扫描电镜观察.结果 PanaviaTM F树脂粘接材料粘接强度最好,分别为(31.36±3.49)MPa(水浴24h)、(29.52±3.44)MPa(水浴30d).Superbond C & B能够取得较好的初期粘接强度(31.85 ±3.61)MPa(水浴24h),但水浴30d后明显下降至(21.32 ±2.58)MPa,P<0.05.RelyX Unicem的初期(水浴24h

  3. Influence of activation modes on diametral tensile strength of dual-curing resin cements Influência dos métodos de ativação na resistência à tração diametral de cimentos resinosos duais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Garcia Fonseca

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In metallic restorations, the polymerization of dual-curing resin cements depends exclusively on chemical activation. The effect of the lack of photoactivation on the strength of these cements has been rarely studied. This study evaluated the influence of activation modes on the diametral tensile strength (DTS of dual-curing resin cements. Base and catalyst pastes of Panavia F, Variolink II, Scotchbond Resin Cement, Rely X and Enforce were mixed and inserted into cylindrical metal moulds (4 x 2 mm. Cements were either: 1 not exposed to light (chemical activation = self-cured groups or 2 photoactivated through mylar strips (chemical and photo-activation = dual-cured groups (n = 10. After a 24 h storage in 37ºC distilled water, specimens were subjected to compressive load in a testing machine. A self-curing resin cement (Cement-It and a zinc phosphate cement served as controls. Comparative analyses were performed: 1 between the activation modes for each dual-curing resin cement, using Student’s t test; 2 among the self-cured groups of the dual-curing resin cements and the control groups, using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (alpha = 0.05. The dual-cured groups of Scotchbond Resin Cement (53.3 MPa, Variolink II (48.4 MPa and Rely X (51.6 MPa showed higher DTS than that of self-cured groups (44.6, 40.4 and 44.5 MPa respectively (p 0.05. The self-cured groups of all the dual-curing resin cements presented statistically the same DTS as that of Cement-It (44.1 MPa (p > 0.05, and higher DTS than that of zinc phosphate (4.2 MPa. Scotchbond Resin Cement, Variolink II and Rely X depended on photoactivation to achieve maximum DTS. In the absence of light, all the dual-curing resin cements presented higher DTS than that of zinc phosphate and statistically the same as that of Cement-It (p > 0.05.Em restaurações metálicas, a polimerização dos cimentos resinosos duais depende exclusivamente da ativação química. Há poucas pesquisas sobre o efeito

  4. 5-year clinical performance of resin composite versus resin modified glass ionomer restorative system in non-carious cervical lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Eduardo Batista; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi;

    2006-01-01

    To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions.......To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions....

  5. Comparison of the effect of shear bond strength with silane and other three chemical presurface treatments of a glass fiber-reinforced post on adhesion with a resin-based luting agent: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhavi Ramkrishna Belwalkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Loss of retention has been cited to be the most common cause of the failure of postretained restoration with irreversible consequences when materials with different compositions are in intimate contact at the post/adhesive interface. With this background, a study was conducted to improve the adhesion at the resin phase of fiber posts using silane and other chemical pretreatments. Materials and Methods: Hundred glass fiber-reinforced posts were tested with 4 different protocols (n = 25 using silane as a control (Group A and other three experimental groups, namely, Group B-20% potassium permanganate, Group C-4% hydrofluoric acid, and Group D-10% hydrogen peroxide were pretreated on the postsurface followed by silanization. These specimens were bonded with dual-polymerizing resin-based luting agent, which were then loaded at the crosshead speed of 1 mm/min to record the shear bond strength at the post/adhesive interface. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test for multiple group comparisons and the post hoc Bonferroni test for pairwise comparisons (P < 0.05. Results: Group B showed more influence on the shear bond strength when compared to other protocols, respectively (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Alone silanization as a surface treatment did not improve the bond strength. Combination of chemical presurface treatments followed by silanization significantly enhanced the bond strength at the post/adhesive interface.

  6. Comparison of the effect of shear bond strength with silane and other three chemical presurface treatments of a glass fiber-reinforced post on adhesion with a resin-based luting agent: An in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belwalkar, Vaibhavi Ramkrishna; Gade, Jaykumar; Mankar, Nikhil Purushottam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Loss of retention has been cited to be the most common cause of the failure of postretained restoration with irreversible consequences when materials with different compositions are in intimate contact at the post/adhesive interface. With this background, a study was conducted to improve the adhesion at the resin phase of fiber posts using silane and other chemical pretreatments. Materials and Methods: Hundred glass fiber-reinforced posts were tested with 4 different protocols (n = 25) using silane as a control (Group A) and other three experimental groups, namely, Group B-20% potassium permanganate, Group C-4% hydrofluoric acid, and Group D-10% hydrogen peroxide were pretreated on the postsurface followed by silanization. These specimens were bonded with dual-polymerizing resin-based luting agent, which were then loaded at the crosshead speed of 1 mm/min to record the shear bond strength at the post/adhesive interface. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test for multiple group comparisons and the post hoc Bonferroni test for pairwise comparisons (P < 0.05). Results: Group B showed more influence on the shear bond strength when compared to other protocols, respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Alone silanization as a surface treatment did not improve the bond strength. Combination of chemical presurface treatments followed by silanization significantly enhanced the bond strength at the post/adhesive interface. PMID:27307666

  7. Cementing porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadachkoria, D

    2009-12-01

    The clinical success of fixed prosthodontic restorations can be complex and involve multifaceted procedures. Preparation design, oral hygiene/micro flora, mechanical forces, and restorative materials are only a few of the factors which contribute to overall success. One key factor to success is choosing the proper cement. Popular use of cements for PFM crowns has shifted from zinc phosphate and glass ionomer cements to resin-reinforced glass ionomer, or RRGI, cements. This change has been rapid and profound. Dental cements have always been less than ideal materials, but this is shift to the relatively new RRGI category justified. Resin-reinforced glass ionomer (RRGI) cements appear to be better than zinc phosphate and glass ionomer cements when placing porcelain-to-metal crowns. RRGI cements, such as RelyX Luting, Fuji Plus and Vitremer Luting Cement, satisfy more of the ideal characteristics of PFM cementation than any other previous cement. Expansion of all three cements has not caused any apparent problems with the cements when used with PFM or metal crowns, but these cements, however, should be avoided when cementing all-ceramic crowns. PMID:20090144

  8. 不同树脂粘结剂及硅烷偶联剂对玻璃纤维桩与牙本质粘结强度的影响%Effect of different resin cements and silane coupling agents on bond strength of glass fiber post to root dentin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许诺; 胡书海; 杨洋; 任翔; 左恩俊

    2011-01-01

    [ Objective] To evaluate the influence of different resin cements and silane coupling agents on bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin. [Methods] Twenty -four sound single rooted teeth that had similar dimensions were selected. The coronal aspects were removed. After endodontic treatment and canal preparation,24 MATCHPOST glass fiber posts were cemented to the root canals. According to the different silane coupling agent,24 teeth root were randomly divided into two equal main groups of 12 each: A group (two components) and B group (single component). Teeth root from the two main groups were randomly distributed into there equal subgroups according to different resin cement: RU group (RelyX Unicem self - adhesive system) ; PF group (Panavia - F self - etching system) and DL group (DUO - LINK total - etching system). Each root was cut perpendicular to the long axis to obtain 3 slices with 3.0- mm - thick as test specimens. Specimens of each test group (n = 12) were loaded in an universal testing machine for push - out test. The dates obtained were submitted to the two - way ANOVA and multiple comparison (α = 0.05 ). Failure modes of specimens were observed and recorded. [ Results] Bond strength values ( Mpa) of six test groups from the highest to the lowest were as follows; B - RU (14. 8 ±5.17),B-PF (9.77±4.77),A-RU (9.42±4.93) ,A-PF (8.69 ±3.40) ,B - DL (5.71 ±2.71) and A-DL (5.22 ± 1.69). Silane coupling agent (compared A and B group,P =0.014) and resin cement (compared RU、PF and DL group,P =0.000) significantly effected bond strength,whereas the interaction between these two factors was not significant (P = 0.079). Post - hoc test revealed that significant differences (P < 0.05) could be found between every two groups of three (RU,PF and DL). [Conclusion] Self-adhesive resin cement (RU) show the better bond strength than self-etching (DL) and total - etching (PF). One - component silane coupling agent should be recommended in clinical.%[目

  9. Evaluation of the effect of denture adhesives on surface roughness of two chemically different denture base resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Mahmoud; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of four commercially available denture adhesives (DAs) on surface roughness of two chemically different denture base materials. Materials and Methods: Fifty specimens of heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate, and another fifty specimens of light-cured urethane dimethacrylate were divided into five groups (n = 10), each was immersed in four prepared DAs (Corega Super Cream, Corega Ultra Powder, Olivafix Cream, Protefix Cream) as well as distilled water (control group). The mean surface roughness (Ra) of the polished and unpolished surfaces of the specimens was recorded using profilometer device. T-test for paired observation was used to indicate any changes in surface roughness between the baseline and after 30 days of immersion in the DA. Results: Almost all the tested DAs had no significant effect on the roughness of polished and unpolished surfaces of both denture base materials. The Corega super cream DA produced significant increase in the roughness of the polished surfaces of both types of acrylic specimens (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The majority of the investigated DAs appears not to affect the surface roughness of denture base materials. Only Corega super cream DA produced detectable increase in the roughness of polished surfaces of denture base specimens. PMID:27403047

  10. Effect of different adhesive strategies on microtensile bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing blocks bonded to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roperto, Renato; Akkus, Anna; Akkus, Ozan; Lang, Lisa; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damiao; Teich, Sorin; Porto, Thiago Soares

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of ceramic and composite computer aided design-computer aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) blocks bonded to dentin using different adhesive strategies. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 30 crowns of sound freshly extracted human molars were sectioned horizontally 3 mm above the cementoenamel junction to produce flat dentin surfaces. Ceramic and composite CAD/CAM blocks, size 14, were sectioned into slices of 3 mm thick. Before bonding, CAD/CAM block surfaces were treated according to the manufacturer's instructions. Groups were created based on the adhesive strategy used: Group 1 (GI) - conventional resin cement + total-etch adhesive system, Group 2 (GII) - conventional resin cement + self-etch adhesive system, and Group 3 (GIII) - self-adhesive resin cement with no adhesive. Bonded specimens were stored in 100% humidity for 24h at 37΀C, and then sectioned with a slow-speed diamond saw to obtain 1 mm × 1 mm × 6 mm microsticks. Microtensile testing was then conducted using a microtensile tester. μTBS values were expressed in MPa and analyzed by one-way ANOVA with post hoc (Tukey) test at the 5% significance level. Results: Mean values and standard deviations of μTBS (MPa) were 17.68 (±2.71) for GI/ceramic; 17.62 (±3.99) for GI/composite; 13.61 (±6.92) for GII/composite; 12.22 (±4.24) for GII/ceramic; 7.47 (±2.29) for GIII/composite; and 6.48 (±3.10) for GIII/ceramic; ANOVA indicated significant differences among the adhesive modality and block interaction (P CAD/CAM restorations, either composite or ceramic, can be significantly affected by different adhesive strategies used. PMID:27076825

  11. Análisis Térmico y Propiedades Adhesivas de Resinas Fenol-Resorcinol-Formaldehído Thermal Analysis and Adhesive Properties of Phenol-Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H Lisperguer

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un estudio sobre la relación entre las características térmicas de curado y las propiedades adhesivas de dos resinas fenol-resorcinol-formaldehído (PRF, con diferente contenido de resorcinol, sintetizadas en laboratorio. El curado de las resinas fue estudiado mediante calorimetría diferencial de barrido (DSC y las propiedades adhesivas fueron ensayadas en vigas laminadas de Pino radiata impregnadas con sales de cobre, cromo y arsénico (CCA. Las resinas PRF con mayor contenido de resorcinol (25% en peso presentan un solo máximo exotérmico de curado a 94º C y sus uniones adhesivas presentan alta resistencia a la tracción y a los ensayos de delaminación. Resinas con menor contenido de resorcinol (15%, presentan dos máximos exotérmicos de curado a 104 y 158º C, buena resistencia a la tracción pero baja resistencia en las pruebas de delaminación con valores sobre el 5% permitido por la norma.A study is presented on the relation between thermal curing characteristics and adhesive properties of two laboratory-synthesized phenol-resorcinol-formaldehyde resins (PRF having different resorcinol contents. Resin curing was evaluated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and adhesive properties were tested in laminated Pinus radiata beams impregnated with copper, chromium, and arsenic (CCA salts. The PRF resins having the higher resorcinol content (25% showed a single exothermic peak at 94°C, and its adhesive joints showed high resistance to traction and delaminating tests. Resin with lower resorcinol content (15% showed a double exothermic peak at 99°C and 158°C, with good traction resistance but low resistance in delaminating tests, showing values over the 5% limit required by the norm.

  12. Simple Heat Treatment of Zirconia Ceramic Pre-Treated with Silane Primer to Improve Resin Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jung-Yun; Son, Jun Sik; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2015-01-01

    Establishing a strong resin bond to dental zirconia ceramic remains difficult. Previous studies have shown that the conventional application of silane does not work well with zirconia. This paper reports that a silane pre-treatment of dental zirconia ceramic combined with subsequent heat treatment has potential as an adhesive cementation protocol for improving zirconia-resin bonding. Among the various concentrations (0.1 to 16 vol%) of experimental γ-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (γ-MPTS) primers assessed, the 1% solution was found to be the most effective in terms of the shear bond strength of the resin cement to dental zirconia ceramic. A high shear bond strength (approx. 30 MPa) was obtained when zirconia specimens were pre-treated with this primer and then heat-treated in a furnace for 60 min at 150 degrees C. Heat treatment appeared to remove the hydrophilic constituents from the silane film formed on the zirconia ceramic surface and accelerate the condensation reactions between the silanol groups of the hydrolyzed silane molecules at the zirconia/resin interface, finally making a more desirable surface for bonding with resin. This estimation was supported by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of the silanes prepared in this study.

  13. The Experiment of Creep with Glass Ionomer Cement and Light-cured Composite Resin%玻璃离子水门汀与光固化复合树脂的蠕变实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁杰; 李新颖; 李鹏; 罗民

    2014-01-01

    通过蠕变实验得出了光固化型玻璃离子水门汀试样、银粉玻璃离子水门汀试样、光固化复合树脂试样的蠕变数据、蠕变曲线,建立了各组试样的蠕变函数方程,对比分析三种材料的蠕变特性,为临床提供蠕变力学参数。取光固化型玻璃离子水门汀试样、银粉玻璃离子水门汀试样、光固化复合树脂试样各10个,在电子万能试验机上进行蠕变实验,模拟人体温在36.5±1℃的温度下,以0.1 Mpa/s 的应力增加速度对试样施加应力,每个试样采集100个实验数据,以归一化分析的方法处理蠕变数据,拟合蠕变曲线。光固化型玻璃离子水门汀试样7200 s蠕变量为0.301%,银粉玻璃离子水门汀试样7200 s蠕变量为0.262%,光固化复合树脂试样7200 s蠕变量为0.230%,光固化型玻璃离子水门汀试样7200 s蠕变量大于银粉玻璃离子水门汀试样7200 s蠕变量,光固化复合树脂试样7200 s蠕变量差异显著(P<0.05)。各组试样蠕变曲线是以指数关系变化的。光固化型玻璃离子水门汀由于采用了光化处理,改善了其蠕变特性。%To get the creep data and the creep curves by creep test with the light cured glass ionomer cement specimen,the glass ionomer cement specimen and the light cured composite resin sample,we established the creep equation of different sample,and we analyzed the creep characteristics of three kinds of materials,which provide a clinical creep parameters were analyed.10 glass ionomer cement specimen of the light cared,10 glass ionomer cement specimen,and the 10 specimen of light cured composite resin sample were taken,and we conducted creep experiments in electronic universal testing machine.We simulated human body temperature at a tem-perature of 36.5 ±0.5 ℃ and applied to the specimen stress with stress increasing speed of 0.1Mpa/s,then 100 experimental data in each of samples were collected,then the

  14. Study of thermocycling effect on the bond strength between an aluminous ceramic and a resin cement Estudo do efeito da ciclagem térmica na resistência da união adesiva entre uma cerâmica aluminizada e um cimento resinoso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Daniel Andreatta Filho

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of thermocycling on the bond strength between Procera AllCeram (Nobel-Biocare and a resin cement (Panavia F, Kuraray CO. Nine ceramic blocks with dimensions of 5x6x6mm were conditioned at one face with Rocatec System (Espe. After, they were luted with Panavia F to composite resin blocks (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray CO. The nine groups formed by ceramic, cement and composite resin were split up obtaining 75 samples with dimensions of 12x1x1mm and adhesive surface presenting 1mm²±0.1mm² of area. The samples were divided into 3 groups (n=25: G1 - 14 days in distilled water at 37ºC; G2 - 6,000 cycles in water (5ºC - 55ºC - 30s; G3 - 12,000 cycles in water (5ºC - 55ºC - 30s. The samples were tested in a universal testing machine (EMIC at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey tests. The results indicated that mean values of rupture tension (MPa of G1 (10.71 ± 3.54 did not differ statistically (p Este trabalho avaliou o efeito da ciclagem térmica sobre a resistência adesiva entre a cerâmica aluminizada (Procera AllCeram, Nobel-Biocare e um cimento resinoso (Panavia F, Kuraray CO. Nove blocos de cerâmica, com dimensões de 5x6x6mm, foram condicionados em uma de suas faces com o Sistema Rocatec (ESPE. A seguir foram cimentados a blocos de resina composta (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray CO. Os conjuntos cerâmica-cimento-resina foram cortados em 75 corpos-de-prova com formato retangular com dimensões de 12x1x1mm e superfície adesiva apresentando 1mm² ± 0,1mm². Os corpos-de-prova foram divididos em três grupos (n=25: G1 - 14 dias em água destilada a 37ºC, G2 - 6000 ciclos em água (5ºC e 55ºC e G3 - 12000 ciclos em água (5ºC e 55ºC. Os corpos-de-prova foram ensaiados sob velocidade de 1mm/min em máquina de ensaio universal (EMIC. Os dados foram tratados estatisticamente com os testes de Anova e Tukey e indicaram que os valores médios de tensão de rupturas (MPa de G1 (10,71 ± 3

  15. 不同树脂黏结剂对纤维桩冠向微渗漏及黏结强度的影响%Effects of different resin cements on the coronal microleakage and bonding strength of fiber posts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高士军; 宗婉翘; 王冬霞; 侯玉泽; 肖媛媛; 薛钢; 黄艳军; 姜家真

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:At present, there are stil differences in the studies of total-etch, self-etch and self-bonding resin cement effect on the coronal microleakage and bonding strength of fiber posts. OBJECTIVE:To evaluate the coronal microleakage and the bonding strength of fiber posts treated with three kinds of resin cements. METHODS:Total y 32 upper incisors were randomly divided into five groups, including three experimental groups and two control groups. After the root canal preparation, three kinds of resin cements (EMBRACE WetBond, LuxaCore, Medental Multi-cure) were used to fiber posts with the bond diameter of 1.4 mm. Stereomicroscope was used to observe the microleakage. Then, the specimens were cut into 2 mm wafer along the axis of tooth, and universal testing machine for push-out test was used to observe the failure mode. In the positive control group, no root canal preparation was done, the root was coated with nail polish, and the crown was directly exposed to the dye. In the negative control group, no root canal preparation was done, the root canal orifice was covered with the resin, the tooth was overal coated with nail polish and then embedded 1 mm below the section. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:The microleakage was observed in al the three resin cements, Medental Multi-cure showed the least microleakage and LuxaCore showed the largest microleakage, and there was significantly different among the three kinds of resin cements (P  目的:评价全酸蚀、自酸蚀及自黏结3种树脂黏结剂对纤维桩黏固后冠向微渗漏及黏结强度影响。  方法:将32颗人离体上前牙随机分成5组,其中3组为实验组,2组为对照组。实验组离体牙经根管预备后,选用全酸蚀、自酸蚀及自黏结3种树脂黏结剂分别黏结直径为1.4 mm的玻璃纤维桩。体视显微镜下观察试件各剖面的微渗漏情况,再将实验组试件沿垂直牙长轴方向切成厚度为2 mm的薄片,万能材料测试机进

  16. Cement Conundrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    China aims to streamline the crowded cement industry Policymakers are looking to build a concrete wall around the cement-making industry as they seek to solidify the fluid cement market and cut excessive production.

  17. 环氧树脂对玻璃纤维/水泥复合材料界面性能的影响%THE INFLUENCES OF EPOXY RESIN ON THE INTERFACIAL PROPERTIES OF FIBERGLASS/CEMENT COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马莉; 江晓禹

    2012-01-01

    在细观单纤维拔出实验基础上,利用ANSYS有限元程序,结合生死单元方法,对环氧树脂接枝处理的玻璃纤维/水泥基复合材料纤维拔出行为进行数值模拟,获得了界面理想结合/界面非理想结合下的拔出荷载-位移曲线.讨论了环氧树脂光滑接枝与粗糙接枝对玻璃纤维/水泥基复合材料界面强度的影响,研究表明,环氧树脂接枝不仅具有良好的界面结合性,还具有良好的机械嵌合性.%Based on the single fiber representative volume element of fiber reinforced composites, the single fiber pull-out test of fiberglass/cement composites were numerically simulated by using finite element code ANSYS and considering different embedment length. According to experimental data of fiberglass/cement composites, the numerical simulation is reasonable. The effect of graft on the single fiber pull-out of the composite was discussed. Moreover, based on the results of micro-experiments for fiber/matrix interfaces, the single fiber pull-out tests of fiberglass/cement composites were numerically simulated by using finite element code ANSYS and the method of element birth and death. The load-displacement curves were obtained for perfectly bonded interfaces and non-perfectly bonded interfaces. The influences of smooth and rough epoxy graft on the interfacial shear strengh of fiberglass/cement composites were discussed, compared with no graft, the interfacial shear strength results indicated that the smooth epoxy graft improves by 30% and the rough grafted epoxy resin improves by 90%. The results show that epoxy graft not only has good interfacial combination, but also has good mechanical embed effects.

  18. Effects of cement-curing mode and light-curing unit on the bond durability of ceramic cemented to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Pestana Passos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different light-curing units and resin cement curing types on the bond durability of a feldspathic ceramic bonded to dentin. The crowns of 40 human molars were sectioned, exposing the dentin. Forty ceramic blocks of VITA VM7 were produced according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The ceramic surface was etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid / 60s and silanized. The dentin was treated with 37% phosphoric acid / 15s, and the adhesive was applied. The ceramic blocks were divided and cemented to dentin according to resin cement / RC curing type (dual- and photo-cured, light-curing unit (halogen light / QTH and LED, and storage conditions (dry and storage / 150 days + 12,000 cycles / thermocycling. All blocks were stored in distilled water (37°C / 24h and sectioned (n = 10: G1 - QTH + RC Photo, G2 - QTH + RC Dual, G3 - LED + RC Photo, G4 - LED + RC Dual. Groups G5, G6, G7, and G8 were obtained exactly as G1 through G4, respectively, and then stored and thermocycled. Microtensile bond strength tests were performed (EMIC, and data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%. The bond strength values (MPa were: G1 - 12.95 (6.40ab; G2 - 12.02 (4.59ab; G3 - 13.09 (5.62ab; G4 - 15.96 (6.32a; G5 - 6.22 (5.90c; G6 - 9.48 (5.99bc; G7 - 12.78 (11.30ab; and G8 - 8.34 (5.98bc. The same superscript letters indicate no significant differences. Different light-curing units affected the bond strength between ceramic cemented to dentin when the photo-cured cement was used, and only after aging (LED > QTH. There was no difference between the effects of dual- and photo-cured resin-luting agents on the microtensile bond strength of the cement used in this study.

  19. Microscopic evaluation regarding time behavior of orthodontic cements used for disjunctor cementing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Bartok

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to fulfill their function, orthodontic devices must be cemented on teeth using orthodontic rings. The retention of the orthodontic ring is influenced mainly by the type of dental-ring adhesion. This study was initiated to determine possible microleakage events while using zinc phosphate cement Adhesor (Spofa Dental, conventional glass ionomer Ketac Cem (3M ESPE and Fuji Ortho (GC and a compomer Transbond Plus (3M Unitek. The results of the study are consistent with those reported in the literature reference, the compomer is the preferred adhesive material for cementing the orthodontic rings, compared to conventional glass ionomer cements and zinc-phosphate cement.

  20. Preparation and performance of epoxy resin adhesive with novel polyamides%新型聚酰胺环氧树脂胶粘剂的制备及性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘大娟; 李桢林; 严辉; 石玉界; 杨蓓; 范和平

    2012-01-01

      用熔融缩聚法以己二酸分别与二乙烯三胺、三乙烯四胺及多乙烯多胺反应,合成了三种新型低粘度、低毒性、室温固化的固化剂PA1、PA2、PA3。讨论了三种固化剂分别固化环氧树脂,其用量对于胶粘剂固化速率、粘接性能及胶液的流动性能的影响,研究出固化剂与环氧树脂的最佳配比。结果显示,在固化速率方面PA1﹥PA2﹥PA3,在粘接性能方面PA2﹥PA1﹥PA3,在胶液的流动性方面,三种固化剂配制的胶粘剂的固含量接近,它们的适用期长、加热能快速固化,用该胶制备的包封膜经过处理后,综合性能较好,可以满足FPC加工生产的使用需要。%  This paper introduced the synthesis of three novel low viscosity, low toxicity, and room temperature curable epoxy resin, long application period, heating quick curing epoxy resin curing agent PA1, PA2, PA3. The amine value, viscosity, acid number, infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry of three curing agents were analyzed. Analysis was discussed about these three curing agents cured epoxy resin. The adhesive dosage for the curing rate, adhesive and adhesive liquid flow properties, research the best curing the best ratio of agent and epoxy resin were studied. The results showed:the curing rate of PA1>PA2>PA3, PA2>PA1, Bonding Properties>PA3. In the glue liquid flow , these preparation of solid content of three kinds of curing agents are nearly, the coverlay are not too big difference after processing. The films of the fast curing epoxy have long application period and can be cured fast, good property for FPC manufacturers.

  1. Avaliação da interação entre resina composta e diferentes adesivos dentinários Evaluation of the interaction between composite resin and different dentin adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Lourenço RIBEIRO

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a resistência à tração de quatro diferentes sistemas adesivos. Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus, 3M (Grupo 1, Prime & Bond 2.0, Dentsply (Grupo 2 ProBOND, Dentsply (Grupo 3, PAAMA 2, (Grupo 4 foram usados com a resina composta Glacier (SDI. Um grupo sem a utilização de qualquer sistema adesivo serviu como controle (Grupo 5. Cinqüenta espécimes foram divididos em cinco grupos com dez espécimes cada. Uma matriz de aço inoxidável com 6,0 mm de diâmetro e 1,0 mm de profundidade foi usada para se obterem dois discos de resina composta. A resina composta foi inserida em uma metade da matriz em pequenas porções e fotopolimerizada por 40 segundos. Os adesivos foram então aplicados na superfície dos discos de resina, seguindo a instrução dos fabricantes. A segunda parte da matriz foi colocada em posição e preenchida com a resina composta. Após uma hora, a matriz foi adaptada em um dispositivo especial na máquina de ensaios Kratos para determinar a resistência de união, a uma velocidade de 0,05 mm/min. Os resultados, expressos em kgf, foram: Grupo 1 (3,99 ± 1,47, Grupo 2 (4,24 ± 2,00, Grupo 3 (3,84 ± 0,88, Grupo 4 (4,33 ± 1,23 e Grupo 5 (4,21 ± 1,38. Os resultados foram analisados pelo teste estatístico ANOVA a um critério. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significante (p The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tensile bond strength of four different adhesive systems. Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus, 3M (Group 1, Prime & Bond 2.0, Dentsply (Group 2, ProBOND, Dentsply (Group 3, PAAMA 2, SDI (Group 4 were used with GLACIER (SDI composite resin. One group without any adhesive was used as control (Group 5. Fifty specimens were divided into 5 groups of 10 each. A stainless steel split matrix with 6.00 mm diameter and 1.00 mm depth was used to obtain two discs of composite resin. The composite resin was applied into one half of the matrix in small portions and light cured for 40 seconds

  2. Effect of surface treatments of laboratory-fabricated composites on the microtensile bond strength to a luting resin cement Efeito dos tratamentos de superfície de resinas compostas de laboratório na resistência a microtração de um agente de fixação resinoso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos José Soares

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of different surface treatments on composite resin on the microtensile bond strength to a luting resin cement. Two laboratory composites for indirect restorations, Solidex and Targis, and a conventional composite, Filtek Z250, were tested. Forty-eight composite resin blocks (5.0 x 5.0 x 5.0mm were incrementally manufactured, which were randomly divided into six groups, according to the surface treatments: 1- control, 600-grit SiC paper (C; 2- silane priming (SI; 3- sandblasting with 50 mm Al2O3 for 10s (SA; 4- etching with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 60 s (HF; 5- HF + SI; 6 - SA + SI. Composite blocks submitted to similar surface treatments were bonded together with the resin adhesive Single Bond and Rely X luting composite. A 500-g load was applied for 5 minutes and the samples were light-cured for 40s. The bonded blocks were serially sectioned into 3 slabs with 0.9mm of thickness perpendicularly to the bonded interface (n = 12. Slabs were trimmed to a dumbbell shape and tested in tension at 0.5mm/min. For all composites tested, the application of a silane primer after sandblasting provided the highest bond strength means.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a influência de diferentes tratamentos de superfície na resistência de união de resinas compostas a um agente de fixação resinoso. Dois compósitos de laboratório, Solidex e Targis, e um compósito convencional, Filtek Z250, foram testados. Quarenta e oito blocos de resina composta (5.0 x 5.0 x 5.0mm foram confeccionados através da técnica incremental, para cada compósito testado, e foram aleatoriamente divididos em 6 grupos. Os blocos foram submetidos a seis tratamentos de superfície: 1 - Controle, Lixa 600-SiC (C; 2 - Silanização (SI; 3 - Jateamento com Al2O3 50µm por 10 segundos (SA; 4 - Condicionamento com ácido fluorídrico por 60 segundos (HF; 5 - HF + SI; 6 - SA + SI. Blocos submetidos ao mesmo tratamento foram

  3. Water dynamics in glass ionomer cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, M. C.; Jacobsen, J.; Momsen, N. C. R.; Benetti, A. R.; Telling, M. T. F.; Seydel, T.; Bordallo, H. N.

    2016-07-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are an alternative for preventive dentistry. However, these dental cements are complex systems where important motions related to the different states of the hydrogen atoms evolve in a confined porous structure. In this paper, we studied the water dynamics of two different liquids used to prepare either conventional or resin-modified glass ionomer cement. By combining thermal analysis with neutron scattering data we were able to relate the water structure in the liquids to the materials properties.

  4. Cerâmicas ácido resistentes: a busca por cimentação resinosa adesiva Acid resistant ceramics: the search for resinous adhesive cementation

    OpenAIRE

    A. S. Malheiros; F. P. Fialho; R. R. J. Tavarez

    2013-01-01

    A eliminação da fase vítrea das cerâmicas odontológicas tornou-as resistentes à fratura, mas também ácido resistentes, o que neste último caso dificulta a cimentação resinosa adesiva. A busca por métodos para condicionar estas cerâmicas tem estimulado inúmeros trabalhos científicos. O tratamento da superfície cerâmica, a descontaminação da superfície e a escolha dos agentes de união e cimentação estão entre os itens considerados importantes. As pesquisas dos últimos cinco anos mostram que ain...

  5. Microleakage of Resin- Modified Glass Ionomer Cement and Compomer Restorations in vitro%改良型玻璃离子水门汀及复合体的边缘微漏研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆忆; 丁玲; 陆群

    2001-01-01

    目的比较两种树脂改良型玻璃离子水门汀及两种树脂复合体边缘封闭性。方法选用40颗成人离体恒磨牙,制备V类洞型,分别用两种树脂改良型光固化玻璃离子水门汀(GCFujiⅡLC和Vitremer TM)及两种多元酸修饰的树脂复合体(Dyract复合体和F2000复合体)充填,经冷热交替试验(5~55℃,循环20次),采用1%碱性品红染料渗入法观察充填体与牙体洞壁间边缘微漏。结果在V类洞壁及龈壁4种不同材料的边缘封闭性存在显著差异(P=0.026,P=0.000),壁侧GC FGCiⅡLC组显著优于其它各组,龈壁侧Dyract复合体组显著比其它各组差。结论牙面的不同处理及充填材料的聚合收缩、吸水率以及热膨胀系数的差异等都是影响微漏的因素。树脂改良型光固化玻璃离子水门汀边缘封闭性优于树脂复合体。%Objective To evaluate the marginal integrity of restoration in two types of mate- rials, or resin- modified glass ionomer cement and polyacid- modified composite resin (compomer). Methods Restorations of four kinds of material (GC Fuji Ⅱ LC, VitremerTM, Dyract compomer and F2000 compomer) were placed in the facial Class V cavity preparations in forty noncarious human molar teeth. The teeth were randomly assigned to 4 experimental groups of 10 teeth each. After thermal cy- cling( × 20,5 ~55℃ ), the teeth were immersed in 1% basic fuchsin dye for 24 hours at room tempera- ture. Staining along the teeth restoration interface was recorded. Results The data indicated signifi- cant differences between all the restorative materials for both occlusal and gingival scores ( P=0.026, P = 0. 000)respectively. Further analysis revealed there were statistically significant differences between GC Fuji Ⅱ LC and others on occlusal margins versus Dyract compomer and others on gingival margins. Conclusion Factors such as dental conditioning, rates of water absorption and thermal coefficient were related to

  6. Preparation and performance of epoxy resin adhesive with high peeling strength for FCCL%挠性覆铜板用高剥离强度环氧胶的制备及性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王成; 俞娟; 王晓东; 黄培

    2011-01-01

    用液体端羧基丁腈橡胶(CTBN)对环氧树脂E-51进行改性,合成了CTBN/E-51预聚物。采用红外光谱、示差扫描量热仪、万能试验机及电子显微镜表征了产物结构,确定了固化工艺,研究了预聚反应温度、时间,CTBN含量对环氧胶剥离强度的影响,并观察了剥离断面的形貌。结果表明,CTBN质量分数为15%,预聚温度为90℃,反应时间2 h所制得环氧胶的剥离强度最高,其粘接强度随预聚时间的增加而增加。该胶可满足挠性覆铜板的生产需要。%The epoxy resin E-51 was modified with liquid carboxyl-terminated poly(butadiene-co-acrylonitrile)(CTBN)-and the prepolymer was synthesized.The structure of the propolymer was characterized by FTIR.The curing precess was determined by DSC.The effects of the prepolymerization temperature,time and the CTBN contents on the peeling strength of the epoxy adhesive were investigated by universal testing machine.The morphology of stripping cross-section was observed by SEM.The result showed the optimum preparation conditions for epoxy adhesive were as followed:15% mass fraction of CTBN,prepolymerization temperature 90 ℃and reaction time 2 h and the peeling strength of the epoxy adhesive reached the maximum.The adhesive strength was increased with the increasing of prepolymerization time.The adhesives could meet the needs of FCCL production.

  7. MTA和Super-Bond C&B树脂修补后磨牙纵裂隙的临床效果%Outcomes of repairing vertical fractured molars' fissure with MTA and Super-Bond C&B resin cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘思逸; 赵晓花; 李琴; 曹寅

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the outcomes of repairing vertical fractured molars fissure with mineral trioxide aggregate(MTA) and Super-Bond C&-B resin cement Methods A total of 108 extracted vertical fractured molars was equally randomized into 3 groups of A( the fissures were filled with MTA) ,B(the fissures were filled with Super-Bond C&-B) and C(the fissures were filled with zinc phosphate). Results The success rate was 100% in 1 to 3 months after reparing in three groups. In 24 months after reparing, the success rate remained to be 100% in groups of A and B, but which was much lower in group C (58. 3% for maxillary first molars mandibular column,50. 0% for first molars maxillary column,28. 6% for second molars mandibular column, 28. 6% for second molars column) (P<0. 05). Conclusion The efficacy of filling the fissures of vertical fractured molars with MTA and Super-Bond C&-B resin cement is better than zinc phosphate.%目的 探讨用三氧化物聚合体(MTA)和Super-Bond C&B树脂修补纵裂后磨牙裂缝的临床效果.方法 108颗纵裂牙随机均分为三组,分别用MTA充填(A组)、Super-Bond C&B树脂水门汀(B组)或直接用磷酸锌充填(C组)修补裂缝.结果 治疗后1-3个月,三组的成功率均达到100%.治疗后24个月时,A组和B组的成功率均为100%;但C组的成功率分别为上颌第一后磨牙58.3%、下颌第一后磨牙50.0%、上颌第二后磨牙28.6%、下颌第二后磨牙28.6%.A组和B组的成功率高于C组(P<0.05).结论 后磨牙纵裂用MTA和Super-Bond C&B树脂修补纵裂疗效明显优于用磷酸锌直接充填.

  8. Propriedades mecânicas de materiais compósitos à base de cimento Portland e resina epoxi Mechanical properties of composite materials based on portland cement and epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. Panzera

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available O estudo de materiais de alto desempenho e multifuncionais, como os compósitos poliméricos cimentícios, tem sido o foco de inúmeras pesquisas na indústria da construção civil. Este trabalho investiga o efeito da combinação de uma fase polimérica termorrígida, uma resina epóxi, com cimento Portland branco estrutural, seguido da avaliação da resistência à compressão e módulo de elasticidade. Este compósito, quando comparado individualmente com as suas matérias-prima originais, promove um aumento da resistência mecânica à compressão, redução da massa específica e, também uma mudança significativa do comportamento mecânico. As mudanças nas propriedades mecânicas estão associadas à hidratação da fase cimentícia na presença da resina, fato comprovado através da análise espectroscópica na região do infravermelho.The study of multi-functional materials of high performance, as the polymeric-cementitious composites, has been the focus of several researches in the industry of the civil engineering. This work investigates the effect of the combination of a thermorigid epoxy phase and the white Portland cement, followed by the evaluation of its compressive strength and modulus of elasticity. This composite, when the phases are individually compared, provides an increase of the compressive strength, a reduction of the density, and a significant change of the mechanical behaviour. The changes in mechanical behaviour are associated with the hydration of cement in the presence of resin, which was evident after infrared spectroscopy analysis.

  9. Underwater adhesion: The barnacle way

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.

    rosa and demonstrated the stimulatory effect of dopamine and noradrenaline on such secretion. Their study indicated exocytosis to be the major mode of cement secretion and suggest that gradual, localized exocytotic secretion of cement triggered... by catecholaminergic neurons to be the key mechanism during permanent attachment by barnacle cyprids [51]. Properties of barnacle adhesive The resistance to chemical breakdown by barnacle adhesive caused a major problem in its characterization. However...

  10. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Benetti, Ana Raquel;

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces of the e......The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces...... of the experimental groups were contaminated with saliva and air-dried, and then submitted to: (G1) rinsing with water and drying; (G2) application of an adhesive system; (G3) rinsing and drying, abrasion with finishing disks, etching and application of adhesive system; (G4) rinsing and drying, etching, application......-resin interfaces with saliva significantly reduced shear strength, especially after prolonged storage (p...

  11. Nanotechnology strategies for antibacterial and remineralizing composites and adhesives to tackle dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lei; Zhang, Ke; Weir, Michael D; Melo, Mary Anne S; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H K

    2015-03-01

    Dental caries is the most widespread disease and an economic burden. Nanotechnology is promising to inhibit caries by controlling biofilm acids and enhancing remineralization. Nanoparticles of silver were incorporated into composites/adhesives, along with quaternary ammonium methacrylates (QAMs), to combat biofilms. Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) released calcium/phosphate ions, remineralized tooth-lesions and neutralized acids. By combining nanoparticles of silver/QAM/NACP, a new class of composites and adhesives with antibacterial and remineralization double benefits was developed. Various other nanoparticles including metal and oxide nanoparticles such as ZnO and TiO2, as well as polyethylenimine nanoparticles and their antibacterial capabilities in dental resins were also reviewed. These nanoparticles are promising for incorporation into dental composites/cements/sealants/bases/liners/adhesives. Therefore, nanotechnology has potential to significantly improve restorative and preventive dentistry.

  12. THE SYNTHESIS OF MODIFIED DIPHENYL OXIDE RESIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAOMingfei; LIUZhifang; 等

    2002-01-01

    Modified diphenyl oxide resin was synthesized by co-polymerization of unsaturated acid and diphenyl oxide derivants.And then modified bismaleimide resin and expoxide linear phenolic resin were added into modified diphenyl oxide resin to co-polymerized and modify once more.The system was applied in composites.Their properties wrer investigated and found that they met the requirements as a heat-resisting adhesive.

  13. Extraoral Cementation Technique to Minimize Cement-Associated Peri-implant Marginal Bone Loss: Can a Thin Layer of Zinc Oxide Cement Provide Sufficient Retention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Eberhard; Ratka-Krüger, Petra; Weigl, Paul; Woelber, Johan

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the use of laboratory-fabricated crown intaglio replicas for extraorally prepared cementation of fixed restorations to implants. This technique minimizes excess cement and may therefore reduce the risk of cement-related marginal peri-implant bone loss. It is unclear whether the remaining thin layer of luting agent provides sufficient retention if low-adhesive zinc oxide (ZnO) cement is used. In 85 consecutive patients, 113 single crowns were cemented to implants using extraoral cementation technique (ECT) and ZnO cement. All patients were followed for 6 months and investigated for decementation. Seven events of decementation (incidence: 6.19%) were found in 7 patients (8.24%). ECT may represent a viable cementation technique for implant-supported single crowns, even using low-adhesion cements. PMID:27479343

  14. Pulpal response of dogs primary teeth to an adhesive system or to a calcium hydroxide cement Resposta pulpar de dentes decíduos de cães a um sistema adesivo ou ao cimento de hidróxido de cálcio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosângela Almeida RIBEIRO

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the pulpal response of dogs primary teeth to an adhesive system or to a calcium hidroxide cement after mechanic exposure of the pulp. Three mongrel dogs were used and ten class V cavities were prepared on their teeth. A mechanic pulp exposure was produced with a sterile exploratory probe in the central portion of each cavity and bleeding was controlled with dry sterile cotton pellets. Enamel, dentin and the site of the pulp exposure of five teeth were etched with 35% phosphoric acid followed by the application of an adhesive system (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose - 3M. In the other five teeth, calcium hydroxide cement (Hydro C - Dentsply was applied on the site of the pulp exposition before application of the adhesive system (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose - 3M. All teeth were restored with a resin composite (Z-100 - 3M. After 7, 30 or 45 days the dogs were anesthetized and perfused with saline followed by a solution of neutral buffered formalin. Maxilla and mandible were sectioned into three parts and placed in a solution for demineralization. Following bone demineralization, all teeth were cut, trimmed, embedded in paraffin and longitudinally cut. Then, the teeth were stained with hematoxilin and eosin and observed under a light microscope. The results obtained with the treatments proposed in this study showed the presence and persistence of an inflammatory response of different intensities at the three experimental periods. There was no variation in the inflammatory response regarding the different treatments performed.O objetivo deste estudo foi de avaliar a resposta pulpar de dentes decíduos de cães à um sistema adesivo ou a um cimento de hidróxido de cálcio após exposição mecânica da polpa. Foram utilizados três cães sem raça definida, e nestes foram realizados dez preparos cavitários classe V. Uma exposição pulpar mecânica foi produzida com uma sonda exploradora esterilizada, na porção central

  15. Glass ionomer cements and their role in the restoration of non-carious cervical lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Fávaro Francisconi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer based materials are clinically popular in several areas of restorative dentistry, but restoration of cervical lesions has proven particularly successful. Various etiologies, conformations, locations and structural characteristics make non-carious cervical lesions more challenging to adhesive restorative procedures and marginal seal in the long run. Due to their characteristics, glass ionomer cements (GICs have precise indication for these cases. Moreover, the use of a GIC base underneath composite resin, the so-called "sandwich" or mixed technique, allows associating the good characteristics of composite resins and GICs, and has been considered quite useful in the restoration of non-carious cervical defects. The aim of this paper is to critically review the literature and discuss peculiar features of GICs regarding their role in the restoration of non-carious cervical lesions.

  16. PPDA型多官能环氧树脂的合成及其胶粘剂的研制%Synthesis of PPDA type multifunctional epoxy resin and development of its adhesive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴冯; 虞鑫海

    2014-01-01

    The PPDA type multifunctional epoxy resin (TGPPDA) was successfully synthesized by two-step method, then its viscosity, epoxy value and volatile matter were tested separately. The results showed that the product TGPPDA epoxy resin was a transparently yellow-brown viscous liquid, whose yield was 90%~92%, epoxy value was 0.89~0.95 ,and volatile matter was 0.91%~0.95%; On the other hand,based on multifunctional epoxy resin TGPPDA, a new epoxy adhesive TPA was obtained by adding the reactive diluent CE793, BAPP, MTHPA and DMP-30.In addition,the others being the same, replacing TGPPDA with TGDDM made the other epoxy adhesive TMA. Finally, their viscosity,gel time, contact angle, water absorption,dielectric properties and variable temperature tensile shear strength were also studied. The results indicated that the adhesive TPA had lower viscosity, better liquidity than TMA, which made it easier glue and have more excellent processibility in the application. What’s more,in comparison to TMA the gel time of TPA was longer than TMA which implied the curing reaction rate of TPA adhesive was more suitable. Within the range from room temperature to 220℃ ,TPA owned higher adhesive strength than TMA. The cured epoxy adhesive TPA and TMA both possessed better hydrophobicity and electrical properties.%通过2步法合成出PPDA型多官能环氧树脂TGPPDA,并对其黏度、环氧值及挥发分进行了测试。结果表明,合成的环氧树脂TGPPDA为透明的黄褐色黏稠液体,产率为90%~92%,黏度为259 mPa s 80℃,环氧值为0.89~0.95 mol/100g,挥发分为0.91%~0.95%。此外,基于多官能环氧树脂TGPPDA,采用活性稀释剂CE793、2,2-双[4-4-氨基苯氧基苯基]丙烷 BAPP 、甲基四氢苯酐(MTHPA)与2,4,6-三二甲氨基甲基苯酚 DMP-30制得了新型的TPA环氧树脂胶粘剂;另外,利用商品化的TGDDM多官能环氧树脂代替TGPPDA多官能环氧树脂,制得了TMA环氧树脂胶粘剂,并对其黏度、凝

  17. Orthodontic Cements and Demineralization: An In Vitro Comparative Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhavathi, V; Jacob, Josy; Kiran, M. Shashi; Ramakrishnan, Murugesan; Sethi, Esha; Krishnan, C S

    2015-01-01

    Background: Comparison of the demineralization potential of four luting cements, i.e. zinc phosphate, conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC), resin-modified GIC and acid modified composite resin. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 75 extracted premolar teeth, which were grouped into five, each group containing 15 teeth. Groups were non-banded control, teeth cemented with the above-mentioned cements. These were incubated at 37°C for 30 days in sealable plastic containers, afte...

  18. 不同酸蚀粘接系统对流动树脂行窝沟封闭的影响%The influence of different etching adhesive systems on flowable resin used as pit and fissure sealant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李洁; 谷建琦; 王琳; 于雪; 董青

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the effects of the flowable resin used as pit and fissure sealant using different etching adhesive systems.Methods:60 caries-free extracted human premolars were randomly divided into 4 groups(n =1 5)and treated by Gluma, NT and 3M-Z350 flowable resin(group A);Clearifil SE Bond adhesive and 3M-Z350 flowable resin(group B),phosphoric acid etching,3M-Z350 flowable resin and phosphoric acid etching(group C)and 3Mconcise sealant(group D)respectively.After pro-cessing the tooth surface the pit and fissue of 1 0 sample in each group were sealed.The microleakage was measured by 1 % methyl-ene blue staining(n =8).The material-enamel interface was observed by SEM(n =2).The shear bond strength of the column-shaped samples with the diameter and the height of 3 mm(n =5)on the mesial or dental surface was examined by a test machine. The sealant cartridges and flowable resin cartridges with the diameter and height of 4 mm were used for the crushing strength exami-nation(n =1 0).Results:There was no significant difference in the microleakage among the 4 groups.SEMobservation showed that the resin tags of group A were long and dense and the resin tags of group B were short and sparse,bubbles and cracks were found on the local site in group A and B.The resin tags of group C were long and thin,but combined with tooth tightly;the resin tags of group D were short and dense;the penetration was poor at the bottom of the fissures in the 4 groups.The shear bond strength of Group A was the highest(P 0.05).The compressive strength of flowable resin groups was higher than that of fissure seal-ant group(P <0.05).Conclusion:The shear bond strength and compressive strength of all-etching bonding system combined with flowable resin is superior to that of self-etching bonding system combined with flowable resin and the traditional sealant.Using Prime&Bond NT bond after acid etching may improve the shear bonding strength.%目的:探讨不同酸蚀粘接系统对流动树脂

  19. Pressurization of bioactive bone cement in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, H; Iida, H; Kawanabe, K; Okada, Y; Oka, M; Masuda, T; Kitamura, Y; Nakamura, T

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a bioactive bone cement consisting of MgO-CaO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 glass-ceramic powder (AW glass-ceramic powder), silica glass powder as an inorganic filler, and bisphenol-a-glycidyl methacrylate (bis-GMA) based resin as an organic matrix. The efficacy of this bioactive bone cement was investigated by evaluating its pressurization in a 5-mm hole and small pores using a simulated acetabular cavity. Two types of acetabular components were used (flanged and unflanged sockets) and a commercially available polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement (CMW 1 Radiopaque Bone Cement) was selected as a comparative control. Bioactive bone cement exerted greater intrusion volume in 5-mm holes than PMMA bone cement in both the flanged and unflanged sockets 10 minutes after pressurization (p anchor holes than PMMA bone cement.

  20. A Review of Glass-Ionomer Cements for Clinical Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharanbir K. Sidhu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is an updated review of the published literature on glass-ionomer cements and covers their structure, properties and clinical uses within dentistry, with an emphasis on findings from the last five years or so. Glass-ionomers are shown to set by an acid-base reaction within 2–3 min and to form hard, reasonably strong materials with acceptable appearance. They release fluoride and are bioactive, so that they gradually develop a strong, durable interfacial ion-exchange layer at the interface with the tooth, which is responsible for their adhesion. Modified forms of glass-ionomers, namely resin-modified glass-ionomers and glass carbomer, are also described and their properties and applications covered. Physical properties of the resin-modified glass-ionomers are shown to be good, and comparable with those of conventional glass-ionomers, but biocompatibility is somewhat compromised by the presence of the resin component, 2 hydroxyethyl methacrylate. Properties of glass carbomer appear to be slightly inferior to those of the best modern conventional glass-ionomers, and there is not yet sufficient information to determine how their bioactivity compares, although they have been formulated to enhance this particular feature.

  1. Resina fluida autoadhesiva utilizada como sellante de fosas y fisuras: Estudio de microinfiltración Self-adhesive flowable composite-resin as a fissure sealant: A microleakage study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D De Nordenflycht

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Evaluar la capacidad de sellado de una resina fluida autoadhesiva (Fusio Liquid Dentin, Pentron Clinical utilizada como sellante de fosas y fisuras con distintos acondicionamientos de la superficie de esmalte. Materiales y Métodos: Se seleccionaron 140 terceros molares recientemente extraídos, los que fueron distribuidos aleatoriamente en cuatro grupos (n=35 y recibieron una técnica de acondicionamiento del esmalte y aplicación de un sellante. Se establecieron los siguientes grupos: Grupo 1, grabado ácido y aplicación de sellante (Clinpro, 3M ESPE; Grupo 2, grabado ácido y aplicación de resina autoadhesiva (Fusio Liquid Dentin, Pentron Clinical; Grupo 3, aplicación de resina autoadhesiva; Grupo 4, microarenado del esmalte y aplicación de resina autoadhesiva. Los dientes sellados fueron termociclados (500 ciclos, 5-55°C, y posteriormente sumergidos en solución de nitrato de plata amoniacal por 24 h (pH=14 y luego en revelador radiográfico (GBX, Kodak por 8h. Posteriormente, los dientes fueron cortados para obtener 2 láminas por diente que fueron observadas bajo magnificación (4x y analizadas digitalmente para evaluar la microinfiltración y la penetración en la fisura. Los resultados fueron analizados estadísticamente (ANOVA, Dunnett, pAim: To evaluate the sealing ability of a self-adhesive flowable composite-resin (Fusio Liquid Dentin, Pentron Clinical with different conditioning treatments of the enamel surface used as a fissure sealant. Materials and Method: 140 recently extracted human third molars were selected and randomly divided into four groups (n=35. Each group received an enamel conditioning treatment and a sealant application. The following groups were established: Group 1, acid etching and sealant application (Clinpro, 3M ESPE; Group 2, acid etching and self-adhesive flowable composite-resin (Fusio Liquid Dentin, Pentron Clinical; Group 3, self-adhesive flowable composite-resin; Group 4, sandblasting and

  2. Direct pulp capping effect with experimentally developed adhesive resin systems containing reparative dentin-promoting agents on rat pulp: mixed amounts of additives and their effect on wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Yoshihisa; Shinkai, Koichi; Suzuki, Masaya; Kato, Chikage; Katoh, Yoshiroh

    2011-07-01

    This study examined the wound-healing process of exposed rat pulp when treated with experimental adhesive resin systems. The experimental direct pulp capping adhesive resin systems were composed of primer-I, primer-II and an experimental bonding agent. Primer-I was Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) primer containing 1.0 or 5.0 wt% CaCl(2), and primer-II was CSE primer containing 0.1, 1.0 or 5.0 wt% compound of equal mole of pA and pB with synthetic peptides derived from dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1). Primer-I containing 1.0 and 5.0 wt% CaCl(2) was assigned to the experimental groups 1-3 and 4-6, respectively. Primer-II containing 0.1, 1.0 or 5.0 wt% compound of pA and pB was assigned to the experimental groups 1 and 4, 2 and 5, and 3 and 6, respectively. In all experimental groups, CSE bond containing 10 wt% hydroxyapatite powder was used as the experimental bonding agent. The positive control teeth were capped with calcium hydroxide preparation (Dycal), and the negative control teeth were capped with CSE. The specimens were alternately stained with Mayer's H&E and the enhanced polymer one-step staining methods. Experimental groups 1, 4, 5 and 6 showed a higher level of reparative dentin formation compared to the negative control 14 days postoperatively. At 28 days postoperatively, all experimental groups showed the formation of extensive reparative dentin, and experimental groups 4, 5 and 6 demonstrated similar dentin bridge formation as that of the positive control. How quickly reparative dentin formation occurs may depend on the concentration of CaCl(2) and the compound of pA and pB in the experimental primer.

  3. Synthesis of Sucrose Urea Resin Adhesive by Using Ultrasonic Irradiation Technology%利用超声波辐射技术合成蔗糖尿素树脂胶

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔鑫; 郭元平

    2015-01-01

    以蔗糖代替甲醛,酸性条件下经加热、机械搅拌,在超声波环境下合成无公害的绿色蔗糖脲醛树脂胶黏剂。用单因素实验法获得最佳合成反应条件: pH=3,催化剂用量为1.0%,蔗糖与尿素物质的量配比为4:1,超声波时间为30 min。通过正交分解法对树脂胶的固化条件进行了研究。实验固化结果为:固化质量分数为9%,固化温度为110℃,固化时间1.5 h。合成产品经过紫外光谱和红外光谱表征确定为目标产品。%Taking sugar instead of formaldehyde, heating and mechanical agitating under acidity conditions, pollution-free green sugar cane, urea formaldehyde resin adhesive glue agent was synthetized in ultrasonic environment. The best synthesis conditions were obtained using single factor experiment method as follows:pH=3 , dosage of catalyst was 1. 0%, sucrose and molar ratio of urea was 4:1 , ultrasonic time was 30 min. Method of resin adhesive curing conditions was studied through the orthogonal decomposition. Experimental curing result showed that the curing quality score was 9%, curing temperature was 110 ℃, curing time was 1. 5 h. Synthetic products were confirmed as target products through UV spectroscopy and characterization.

  4. Preparation and performance of epoxy resin conductive adhesive with fast-curing feature at low temperature%低温快速固化环氧导电胶的制备与性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张博; 党智敏

    2011-01-01

    采用E-51型环氧树脂为导电胶基体树脂,低分子量聚酰胺树脂(PA)为固化剂,填加经硅烷偶联剂KH550改性后的纳米级和微米级铜粉及助剂制备导电胶。首次采用了液态固化剂(低分子量的聚酰胺酯),以解决导电胶制备过程中填料受限的难题。通过正交试验方法探讨了导电胶中导电填料的含量、导电填料配比、硅烷偶联剂用量和还原剂添加量对导电胶粘接性能和导电性能的影响,对导电胶的制备工艺进行了优化,获得了制备导电胶的最佳方案。测试结果表明该导电胶能够在60℃下4h内快速固化。在填料质量分数为65%时,导电胶具有最低的体积电阻率3.6×10-4Ω·cm;导电胶的抗剪切强度达到17.6MPa。在温度为85℃、湿度(RH)85%的环境下经过1000h老化测试后的结果表明导电胶电导率的变化和剪切强度的变化均不超过10%。%A thermoset type isotropic conductive adhesive(ICA) was prepared by epoxy resin E-51 as the matrix,nanosized and microsized copper powder modified by silane coupling KH550 as the conductive fillers,polyamide resin with low molecular weight as the curing agent,and some other additives.A new liquid curing agent,polyamide resin with low molecular weight,was used which solved some difficult problems during the preparation of ICA,such as limit of quantity of conductive fillers.The effects of different factors such as curing agent,silane coupling agent,reducer,and conductive filler on the bonding performance and the conductivity for conductive adhesive were discussed by the orthogonal experiments.The preparation parameters of the conductive adhesive were optimized,and the optimal preparation parameters for the conductive adhesive was obtained.The results show that optimum conditions of conductive adhesive are composed of 65% of nano-and micro-copper powder with curing time for 4 hours at 60 ℃.The adhesion strength reaches 17.6 MPa and the bulk

  5. Influence of Immediate Dentin Sealing on the Shear Bond Strength of Pressed Ceramic Luted to Dentin with Self-Etch Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Dalby

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine the effect of immediate dentin sealing (IDS, with dentin bonding agents (DBAs applied to freshly cut dentin, on the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RelyX Unicem (RXU cement. Method. Eighty extracted noncarious third molars were ground flat to expose the occlusal dentin surfaces. The teeth were randomly allocated to five groups (A to E of sixteen teeth each. Groups A to D were allocated a dentin bonding agent (Optibond FL, One Coat Bond, Single Bond, or Go! that was applied to the dentin surface to mimic the clinical procedure of IDS. These specimen groups then had etched glass ceramic discs (Authentic luted to the sealed dentin surface using RXU. Group E (control had etched glass ceramic discs luted to the dentin surface (without a dentin bonding agent using RXU following the manufacturer’s instructions. All specimens were stored for one week in distilled water at room temperature and then shear stressed at a constant cross-head speed of 1 mm per minute until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey HSD method (0.05 in the SBS between the test groups (A–D or the control (group E. Conclusion. IDS using the dentin bonding agents tested does not statistically (>0.05 affect the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RXU when compared to the control.

  6. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to glass-ionomer cement using self-etching bonding agents with different pH: In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deivanayagam Kandaswamy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the bonding ability of composite to unset glass-ionomer cement (GIC using different self-etching bonding systems. Materials and Methods: One hundred samples of composite bonded to unset GIC were prepared and were divided into four groups. In Group A, composite was bonded to unset GIC employing a strong (pH 1 self-etch primer was used. In Group B, intermediary strong (pH 1.4 self-etch primer was employed. In Group C and D, mild (pH 2 and (pH 2.2 self-etch primer was employed. Shear bond strength analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Results: Statistical analysis performed with one way analysis of variance and Tukey′s test showed that the bond strength of composite to unset GIC was significantly higher for the mild self-etch primer group. In addition, energy dispersive x-ray (EDX analysis was used to determine the composition of various structural phases identified by FE-SEM along the GIC-bonding agent interfaces. Conclusion: Hence this present study concludes that clinically the use of mild self-etching bonding agent over unset GIC has improved bond strength compared to the use of strong and intermediate self-etching bonding agent.

  7. Effect of temporary cements on the shear bond strength of luting cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Fiori-Júnior

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate, by shear bond strength (SBS testing, the influence of different types of temporary cements on the final cementation using conventional and self-etching resin-based luting cements. Material and Methods: Forty human teeth divided in two halves were assigned to 8 groups (n=10: I and V (no temporary cementation; II and VI: Ca(OH2-based cement; III and VII: zinc oxide (ZO-based cement; IV and VIII: ZO-eugenol (ZOE-based cement. Final cementation was done with RelyX ARC cement (groups I to IV and RelyX Unicem cement (groups V to VIII. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. RESULTS: Means were (MPa: I - 3.80 (±1.481; II - 5.24 (±2.297; III - 6.98 (±1.885; IV - 6.54 (±1.459; V - 5.22 (±2.465; VI - 4.48 (±1.705; VII - 6.29 (±2.280; VIII - 2.47 (±2.076. Comparison of the groups that had the same temporary cementation (Groups II and VI; III and VII; IV and VIII showed statistically significant difference (p0.05 for the different luting cements (RelyX TM ARC and RelyX TM Unicem. The groups that had no temporary cementation (Groups I and V did not differ significantly from each other either (p>0.05. CONCLUSION: When temporary cementation was done with ZO- or ZOE-based cements and final cementation was done with RelyX ARC, there was an increase in the SBS compared to the control. In the groups cemented with RelyX Unicem, however, the use of a ZOE-based temporary cement affected negatively the SBS of the luting agent used for final cementation.

  8. Effect of thermocycling on the bond strength of a glass-infiltrated ceramic and a resin luting cement Efeito da ciclagem térmica sobre a resistência de união entre uma cerâmica infiltrada com vidro e um cimento resinoso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Daniel Andreatta Filho

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of thermocycling on the bond strength between the surface of the glass-infiltrated alumina ceramic In-Ceram (VITA and the Panavia F resin cement (Kuraray CO.. Four 5x6x6mm In-Ceram blocks were obtained. One of the 6x6mm faces of each block was conditioned with Cojet - System (tribochemical silica coating, ESPE-3M and then luted under a constant 750g pressure with Panavia F cement to another identical face of a resin composit block (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray obtained by reproduction of the ceramic one from Express (3M addition curing silicone impressions. The four sets so formed by ceramic, luting cement and resin have been each one serially sectioned in 20 sticks so that the adhesive surface in each presented 1mm² of area. The samples were divided in 2 groups (n=10: G1- stored for 7 days in deionized water at 36 ± 2ºC; G2 - thermocycled 1500 times between 5 and 55ºC dwell times. The microtensile tests were accomplished in an universal testing machine (EMIC at a crosshead speed of 0,5 mm/min. The results showed that the mean tensile bond strength values (MPa for the group G2: (22,815 ± 5,254 had not statistically differ of the values of group G1: (25,628 ± 3,353 (t = 1,427; gl = 18; p-value = 0,171, at the level of a= 5%. It can be concluded that the thermocycling technique used in the present experiment had not produced statistically significant differences between the bond strength results of the specimens obtained by the two used techniques.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o efeito da ciclagem térmica sobre a resistência de adesão entre a superfície da cerâmica In-Ceram Alumina (VITA e o cimento resinoso Panavia F (Kuraray. Foram confeccionados quatro blocos de cerâmica In-Ceram com dimensões de 5x6x6mm. Uma das faces com 6x6mm de cada bloco cerâmico, após condicionamento com o sistema Cojet (ESPE-3M (jateamento com óxido de alumínio/jateamento com óxido de s

  9. Using a scanning microbeam and a CdZnTe array for nuclear reaction measurements of water diffusion into an adhesive resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauntlett, F.E. [Department of Physics, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: F.Gauntlett@surrey.ac.uk; Rihawy, M.S. [Department of Physics, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Clough, A.S. [Department of Physics, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Liljedahl, C.D.M. [Centre for Materials Surfaces and Structural Systems, School of Engineering, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Crocombe, A.D. [Centre for Materials Surfaces and Structural Systems, School of Engineering, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    The reaction D({sup 3}He, p){alpha} has been used with a {sup 3}He microbeam to investigate water ingress into epoxy resin, used as a bonding agent between aluminium plates. To facilitate this for low beam currents ({approx}150 pA), a unique large solid angle CdZnTe detector array is described which has been designed and built at Surrey for in vacuo proton detection.

  10. Using a scanning microbeam and a CdZnTe array for nuclear reaction measurements of water diffusion into an adhesive resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction D(3He, p)α has been used with a 3He microbeam to investigate water ingress into epoxy resin, used as a bonding agent between aluminium plates. To facilitate this for low beam currents (∼150 pA), a unique large solid angle CdZnTe detector array is described which has been designed and built at Surrey for in vacuo proton detection

  11. Influence of Immediate Dentin Sealing on the Shear Bond Strength of Pressed Ceramic Luted to Dentin with Self-Etch Resin Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby, Robert; Ellakwa, Ayman; Millar, Brian; Martin, F. Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To examine the effect of immediate dentin sealing (IDS), with dentin bonding agents (DBAs) applied to freshly cut dentin, on the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RelyX Unicem (RXU) cement. Method. Eighty extracted noncarious third molars were ground flat to expose the occlusal dentin surfaces. The teeth were randomly allocated to five groups (A to E) of sixteen teeth each. Groups A to D were allocated a dentin bonding agent (Optibond FL, One Coat Bond, Single Bond, or Go!) that was applied to the dentin surface to mimic the clinical procedure of IDS. These specimen groups then had etched glass ceramic discs (Authentic) luted to the sealed dentin surface using RXU. Group E (control) had etched glass ceramic discs luted to the dentin surface (without a dentin bonding agent) using RXU following the manufacturer's instructions. All specimens were stored for one week in distilled water at room temperature and then shear stressed at a constant cross-head speed of 1 mm per minute until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey HSD method (P Optibond FL (Group A) and Go! (Group D). There was no statistical difference (P > 0.05) in the SBS between the test groups (A–D) or the control (group E). Conclusion. IDS using the dentin bonding agents tested does not statistically (P > 0.05) affect the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RXU when compared to the control. PMID:22287963

  12. Practical clinical considerations of luting cements: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lad, Pritam P; Kamath, Maya; Tarale, Kavita; Kusugal, Preethi B

    2014-02-01

    The longevity of fixed partial denture depends on the type of luting cement used with tooth preparation. The clinician's understating of various cements, their advantages and disadvantages is of utmost importance. In recent years, many luting agents cements have been introduced claiming clinically better performance than existing materials due to improved characteristics. Both conventional and contemporary dental luting cements are discussed here. The various agents discussed are: Zinc phosphate, Zinc polycarboxylate, Zinc oxide-eugenol, Glass-ionomer, Resin modified GIC, Compomers and Resin cement. The purpose of this article is to provide a discussion that provides a clinical perspective of luting cements currently available to help the general practitioner make smarter and appropriate choices. How to cite the article: Lad PP, Kamath M, Tarale K, Kusugal PB. Practical clinical considerations of luting cements: A review. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):116-20. PMID:24653615

  13. Effect of artificial saliva contamination on adhesion of dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, Kisaki; Karibe, Hiroyuki; Ogata, Kiyokazu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of artificial saliva contamination on three restorative materials, namely, a glass ionomer cement (GIC), a resin-modified GIC (RMGIC), and a composite resin (CR), for which two different etching adhesive systems were used. Thus, three surface conditions were created on bovine teeth using artificial saliva: control, mild saliva contamination, and severe saliva contamination. The dentin bond strength for CR was significantly lower after artificial saliva contamination. There were, however, no significant differences among the three surface conditions in terms of the dentin and enamel bond strengths of GIC and RMGIC. Moreover, CR exhibited significantly greater microleakage after artificial saliva contamination, whereas no significant differences were found in GIC and RMGIC. The results showed that artificial saliva contamination did not affect the shear bond strengths of GIC and RMGIC or their degrees of microleakage.

  14. 3种树脂粘接水门汀与铸造纯钛粘接强度研究%Shear Bond Strength of Three Resin Cements to the Casting Pure Titanium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宁; 刘晓; 骆小平

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the shear bond strength of three resin cements to the casting pure titanium. Methods: Two sizes of specimens were fabricated by casting, with diameter in 4mm and 5mm respectively, and then were cut into titanium discs with thickness in 3 mm. The titanium surfaces were polished with SiC sand papers under running water. Then the surface were treated by sandblasting or not. The two size of titanium discs were ultrasonic cleaned and bonded in pairs with the resin-based cements Super-Bond C&.B, Panavia F, and Rely X Unicem. The specimens were then stored in distilled water (37℃ ) for 24h. Shear bond strengths were determined before and after thermocycling. The surface of different treatments were observed with scanning electron microscope. The mean bond strengths were compared using ANOVA. Results: The highest shear bond strength was that of pure titanium sandblasted or not to Panavia F (26. 62±3. 40MPa,23. 71±5. 28MPa respectively). After 5000 thermocycles, the shear bond strengths of pure titanium sandblasted to Panavia F was the highest (27. 12±8. 68MPa). After 5000 thermocycles, the shear bond strengths of pure titanium without sandblast to Super-Bond C&-B or Rely X Unicem was the lowest, and the rate of failure during thermocycling was 12. 5%. Conclusion: In this study the shear bond strength of Panavia F to casting pure titanium was higher than that of other resin cements.%目的:研究3种复合树脂粘固剂与铸造纯钛的粘接强度.方法:用牙科铸钛的方法制作直径分别为4 mm和5 mm的钛棒,切割成长度为4 mm的小钛片.2种规格的钛片配对粘接面用400~1200目碳化硅砂纸在流水下打磨抛光,使之呈均匀一致的平面.50μm氧化铝喷砂,另一组表面不喷砂作为对照,分别使用Super-BondC&B、Panavia F、Rely X Unicem 3种复合树脂粘固剂粘接.扫描电镜观察喷砂前后铸造纯钛的表面形态.复合树脂粘接剂固化后经37℃恒温水浴24 h以及5000次5~55℃

  15. Silane primers rather than heat treatment contribute to adhesive bonding between tri-n-butylborane resin and a machinable leucite-reinforced ceramic

    OpenAIRE

    Sakai, Miyuki; Taira, Yohsuke; Sawase, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of silane primers with and without heat treatment on bonding between a resin and a leucite-reinforced ceramic (GN-Ceram). Six dental primers (GC Ceramic Primer, GP; Clearfl Ceramic Primer, CP; RelyX Ceramic Primer, RP; Tokuso Ceramic Primer, TP; Shofu Porcelain Primer, SP; and Porcelain Liner M, PM) and five experimental primers (MDS, MTS, MDES, MTES, and ATS) were evaluated. GN-Ceram specimen was primed, heated at 100°C for 60 min ...

  16. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of dental cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosavljević Radivoje D.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare in vitro the characteristics of different types of luting cements (zinc phosphate, glass-ionomer and resin based composite cement using scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis and microleakage for the quality range of materials. Dental cements were mixed in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and formed with posts in dental root canals of extracted teeth. The quality of cement was determined by SEM observation on horizontal sectioned roots with fixed posts according to specific pore and marginal gap diameter. The microleakage was measured on specimens immersed in Lofler (methylene blue solution. The mean values of the maximal diameter of pores, marginal gaps and microleakage of conventional cements are remarkably larger in comparison with composite luting agents. In conclusion, the quality and efficiency of composite luting agents in comparison with conventional cements are more successful in protecting the interior of tooth from penetration of oral fluids, bacteria and bacterial toxins into unprotected dentine.

  17. Alkali Lignin / Urea-formaldehyde Resin Adhesive Synthesis Research%碱木素/尿醛树脂胶黏剂的合成研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方惠兰

    2012-01-01

    利用制浆黑液中的碱木素为主要原料,经过羟甲基化改性,甲醛缩合制备纤维板胶黏剂,探索改性木素胶黏剂粘结效果。用正交试验方案设计对碱木素改性、胶黏剂制备工艺进行优化。研究表明:将碱木素进行羟甲基化改性,其活性明显提高。最佳的优化条件:甲醛用量7mmol·g-llignin,pH值10,反应温度70℃,反应时间120min;改性碱木素最佳的加入量比例为20%。用碱木素制备改性木素胶黏剂可利用造纸黑液木素资源,而且具有广泛的应用前景。%Use of lignin from pulping black liquor as main raw material, through hydroxymethylation modification, formaldehyde board, preparation of condensation adhesive bonding effect of modified lignin and adhesives. With orthogonal experiment design scheme of alkali lignin, adhesive modification preparation technology was optimized. Research shows that: formaldehyde dosage is 7 mmol for 1 g lignin, and pH, tempertature and reaction time is pH 10.0, 70℃ and 120 min. Modification of alkali lignin and best of 20 percent. With alkali lignin were modified lignin and adhesive paper heiye lignin and available resources, but also has the broad application prospect.