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Sample records for adhesive resin cement

  1. Ultramorphology of pre-treated adhesive interfaces between self-adhesive resin cement and tooth structures

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira,Carolina Nemesio de Barros; DALEPRANE,Bruno; MIRANDA,Giovani Lana Peixoto de; Magalhães,Cláudia Silami de; Moreira, Allyson Nogueira

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Convencional resin cements can be used in combination with a total-etch system in a conventional mode or as self-adhesive resin cements. The latter are less technique sensitive and able to bond to dental tissues without previous treatment or adhesive layer and requires only a single step to be applied to dental structures. Objective To compare qualitatively the adhesive interfaces of two self-adhesive resin cements and one conventional resin cement after different toot...

  2. Durability of adhesion between feldspathic ceramic and resin cements: effect of adhesive resin, polymerization mode of resin cement, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlei, Aleska; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Özcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2013-04-01

    Adhesive cementation is an important step for restorations made of feldspathic ceramic as it increases the strength of such materials. Incorrect selection of the adhesive resin and the resin cement to adhere to the ceramic surface and their durability against aging can affect the adhesion between these materials and the clinical performance. This study evaluated the effect of adhesive resins with different pHs, resin cements with different polymerization modes, and aging on the bond strength to feldspathic ceramic. One surface of feldspathic ceramic blocks (VM7) (N = 90) (6.4 × 6.4 × 4.8 mm(3) ) was conditioned with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 seconds, washed/dried, and silanized. Three adhesive resins (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus [SBMP], pH: 5.6; Single Bond [SB], pH: 3.4; and Prime&Bond NT [NT], pH: 1.7) were applied on the ceramic surfaces (n = 30 per adhesive). For each adhesive group, three resin cements with different polymerization modes were applied (n = 10 per cement): photo-polymerized (Variolink II base), dual polymerized (Variolink II base + catalyst), and chemically polymerized (C&B). The bonded ceramic blocks were stored in water (37°C) for 24 hours and sectioned to produce beam specimens (cross-sectional bonded area: 1 ± 0.1 mm(2) ). The beams of each block were randomly divided into two conditions: Dry, microtensile test immediately after cutting; TC, test was performed after thermocycling (12,000×, 5°C to 55°C) and water storage at 37°C for 150 days. Considering the three factors of the study (adhesive [3 levels], resin cement [3 levels], aging [2 levels]), 18 groups were studied. The microtensile bond strength data were analyzed using 3-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (α= 0.05). Adhesive resin type (p cement affected the mean bond strength (p= 0.0003) (3-way ANOVA). The NT adhesive associated with the chemically polymerized resin cement in both dry (8.8 ± 6.8 MPa) and aged conditions (6.9 ± 5.9 MPa) presented statistically lower

  3. Film thickness of resin cements used with adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahra, Vivian N; Abate, Pablo F; Macchi, Ricardo L

    2008-01-01

    The final film thickness of a resin adhesive and a resin cement could be affected by previous polymerization of the adhesive systems on dentin surfaces. The aim of this work was to evaluate changes in the film thickness of dual resin based cements with their adhesives as a function of polymerization of the latter on dentin surfaces. The materials used were: RelyX ARC (R) + Single Bond (SB) and Variolink base (VB) and high (HV) or low (LV) viscosity catalyst + Syntac Classic (S) or Excite DSC (E); 56 human dentin discs and 56 composite resin discs (Z250). Dentin disc surfaces were treated with 35% phosphoric acid (except for S) and the adhesive system was either polymerized or not polymerized. A 0.05 ml increment of cement mixture was placed on the dentin disc and covered with the resin disc. A 25 N load was applied for ten minutes and then, the combined thickness was measured with a digital micrometer. Sample size (n) was 4 for each cement or condition. A two-way analysis of variance was performed with a level of significance of p adhesive layer, were: R+SB: 16.50 (2.64) and 17.00 (1.41); VB+S: 21.75 (5.37) and 62.25 (0.95); VB LV+S: 24.50 (3.87) and 72.75 (1.89); VB HV+S: 28.75 (8.46) and 93.00 (53.63); VB+E: 31.75 (8.38) and 42.75 (4.34); VB LV+E: 47.75 (2.50) and 45.75 (3.20); VB HV+E: 49.25 (25.50) and 45.75 (2.75). Significant differences (p cements and polymerization condition as well as for the interaction between them. Instructions regarding polymerization of the adhesive layer must be followed when adhesive systems are used in combination with dual polymerized resin based cements. Otherwise, final film thickness of the adhesive and the resin cement could be affected.

  4. Simulated Wear of Self-Adhesive Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamizawa, T; Barkmeier, W W; Latta, M A; Berry, T P; Tsujimoto, A; Miyazaki, M

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary areas of concern with luting agents is marginal gap erosion and attrition. The purpose of this laboratory study was to evaluate bulk and marginal slit (gap) generalized wear of self-adhesive resin cements. Three self-adhesive resin cements were used in this study: G-CEM LinkAce (LA), Maxcem Elite (ME), and RelyX Unicem2 Automix (RU). A custom stainless-steel fixture with a cavity 4.5 mm in diameter and 4 mm deep was used for simulated generalized (bulk) wear. For simulated marginal gap wear, a two-piece stainless-steel custom fixture was designed with a slit (gap) 300 μm wide and 3 mm in length. For both wear models, 20 specimens each for each of the three adhesive cements were made for both light-cure and chemical-cure techniques. The cured cements were polished with a series of carbide papers to a 4000-grit surface and subjected to 100,000 cycles using the slit (gap) wear model and 400,000 cycles for generalized (bulk) wear in a Leinfelder-Suzuki (Alabama machine) wear simulator (maximum load of 78.5 N). Flat-ended stainless-steel antagonists were used in a water slurry of poly(methylmethacrylate) beads for simulation of generalized contact-free area wear with both wear models. Before and after the wear challenges, the specimens were profiled with a Proscan 2100 noncontact profilometer, and wear (volume loss [VL] and mean facet depth [FD]) was determined using AnSur 3D software. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc tests were used for data analysis for the two wear models. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine polished surfaces of the resin cements and the worn surfaces after the wear challenges. The two-way ANOVA of VL using the generalized (bulk) wear model showed a significant effect among the three resin cement materials for the factor of resin cement (pcement and cure method (pcement (pcement and cure method (pcements and the resultant effect of the wear challenges. The worn surfaces of each cement were

  5. Self-adhesive resin cements: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Felix; Behr, Michael

    2015-02-01

    To review the performance of self-adhesive luting agents to determine their clinical evidence. In March 2013, we conducted a literature search by means of PubMed and manually searched German and English medical journals using general search terms (e.g., "self-adhesive resin cements"), detailed search terms (e.g., clinical study "self-adhesive resin cement"), and brand name search terms (clinical study AND "brand name of the cement"). The resulting lists of articles were manually searched for clinical studies. Because of the low number of relevant articles, we decided to broaden our search by including in vitro studies based on a thermal cycling and mechanical loading (TCML) design. The search using the six general search terms yielded a list with over 100 studies with only 13 in vivo studies and 6 in vitro studies based on a TCML design. The other studies either did not comply with the requirements or were not in vitro studies based on a TCML design. Two more in vivo studies could be added after the brand name search. Altogether, 15 in vivo studies and 6 in vitro studies were included in our analysis. Because of the low number of studies available, the clinical evidence of self-adhesive luting agents cannot be assessed in a sufficient manner. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  6. Adhesive bonding of resin cements to cast titanium with adhesive primers

    OpenAIRE

    Di Francescantonio,Marina; Oliveira,Marcelo Tavares de; Daroz,Luiz Gustavo Dias; Henriques, Guilherme Elias Pessanha; Giannini,Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of adhesive primer applications on the bond strength of resin cements to cast titanium. Four adhesive primers - Metaltite, Metal Primer II, Alloy Primer and Ceramic Primer - and their respective resin cements - Bistite II DC, Link Max, Panavia F 2.0, RelyX Unicem and RelyX ARC - were tested. Cast plates were prepared from titanium ingots (n=6 specimens/cement) and had their surfaces airborne-particle abraded with Al2O3 (50 μ m). Three...

  7. Dental Cements for Luting and Bonding Restorations: Self-Adhesive Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Adriana P; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2017-10-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements combine easy application of conventional luting materials with improved mechanical properties and bonding capability of resin cements. The presence of functional acidic monomers, dual cure setting mechanism, and fillers capable of neutralizing the initial low pH of the cement are essential elements of the material and should be understood when selecting the ideal luting material for each clinical situation. This article addresses the most relevant aspects of self-adhesive resin cements and their potential impact on clinical performance. Although few clinical studies are available to establish solid clinical evidence, the information presented provides clinical guidance in the dynamic environment of material development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Microleakage of porcelain and composite machined crowns cemented with self-adhesive or conventional resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazy, Mohamed; El-Mowafy, Omar; Roperto, Renato

    2010-10-01

    Resistance of machined crowns to microleakage when cemented with new self-adhesive cements has not been fully investigated. This study evaluated microleakage of machined crowns milled from porcelain and composite blocks and bonded to teeth with self-adhesive and conventional resin cement. Thirty-two freshly extracted premolars of similar shape and size were sterilized and mounted in resin blocks. Teeth received standard crown preparations with 1-mm circumferential shoulder finish line, flat occlusal surface reduced by 2 mm, and ideal angle of convergence. Prepared teeth were divided into two equal groups and assigned to either porcelain (Vita Mark II, Vident) or composite (Paradigm MZ100, 3M ESPE) blocks for crown fabrication. Optical impressions were captured for each tooth with the intraoral camera of a CEREC 3D machine. Crowns were designed and milled from both materials. Each group was then subdivided into two subgroups (n = 8) according to cement used (self-adhesive resin cement, RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE or resin cement with self-etching adhesive, Panavia F 2.0, Kuraray). Following seating, a 5-kg weight was applied on the occlusal surface of the crown for 5 minutes. Specimens were then stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours. Specimens were thermocycled for 3000 cycles between 5°C and 55°C, then coated with nail varnish and immersed in a 2.0% basic red fuchsine dye solution for 24 hours. Teeth were then rinsed and sectioned mesiodistally and assessed under magnification for microleakage. A five-point scale was used to score degree of microleakage. Data were statistically analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test. Crown material had no significant effect on microleakage (p= 0.67); however, cement type had a significant effect (p resin cement with separate primer/bonding agent resulted in significantly lower microleakage scores, irrespective of crown material. © 2010 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  9. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to tooth structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Hattar

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Regardless of their clinical simplicity, the self-adhesive resin cements examined in this study exhibit limited bond performance to tooth structures; therefore, these cements must be used with caution.

  10. Ultramorphology of pre-treated adhesive interfaces between self-adhesive resin cement and tooth structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Nemesio de Barros PEREIRA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Convencional resin cements can be used in combination with a total-etch system in a conventional mode or as self-adhesive resin cements. The latter are less technique sensitive and able to bond to dental tissues without previous treatment or adhesive layer and requires only a single step to be applied to dental structures. Objective To compare qualitatively the adhesive interfaces of two self-adhesive resin cements and one conventional resin cement after different tooth surface treatments under scanning electron microscopy. Material and method 42 crowns of bovine incisors were sectioned and flattened exposing enamel (E or dentine (D substrate. Subgroups were defined according to conditioning type and time: E1—no treatment, E2—37% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds, E3—37% phosphoric acid for 30 seconds; D1—no treatment, D2—37% phosphoric acid for 5 seconds; D3—11.5% polyacrylic acid for 15 seconds. A resin block was bonded to each substrate using the self-adhesive resin cements RelyX U100 (3M ESPE and RelyX U200 (3M ESPE. As a reference hybrid layer, six resin blocks were luted with RelyX ARC and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose adhesive system (3M ESPE (enamel—EA; dentine—DA. After aging for 7 days in a moist environment at 37±1°C, samples were prepared for microscopy analysis. Result and Discussion In the ARC specimens, there was hybrid layer formation in both EA and DA. U100 E1 showed gaps at the adhesive interface, while E2 and E3 showed interaction for both self-adhesive cements. There was superficial interaction with bothU100 and U200 in D1, while in D2 and D3, resin tags were only observed in the case of U100. Conclusion It was concluded that substrate conditioning may enhance the interaction between self-adhesive resin cements and dental tissues, although this is not the case for RelyX U200 and dentine.

  11. Mechanical properties of new self-adhesive resin-based cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Kazumichi; Kinuta, Soichiro; Nishida, Hisataka; Miyamae, Morihiro; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the bonding strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, water absorption and the expansion after water storage of new self-adhesive resin cements to commercially available dental cements. Two types (hand-mix and auto-mix) of new self-adhesive resin cements (SAC-H and SAC-A, Kuraray Medical), one conventional resin cement (Panavia F2.0), three self-adhesive resin cements (Relyx Unicem, Maxcem and G-Cem), and two resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (Fuji Luting S and Vitremer) were used. Shear bond strengths, flexural strengths and elastic moduli (ISO 4049), water absorption (ISO 4049), and the expansion rate after water storage were investigated. Both SAC-H and SAC-A provided adhesion to enamel and dentin, and had the same bond strength to gold alloy and zirconia as conventional resin cements. SAC-H and SAC-A had greater flexural strengths (86.4-93.5MPa) than commercial self-adhesive resin cements or glass-ionomer cements. The elastic moduli of self-adhesive and glass-ionomer cements were 5.2-7.4GPa and 2.3-3.4GPa, respectively. The water absorption of SAC-H and SAC-A (26.3-27.7microg/mm(3)) were significantly lower than commercial self-adhesive resin cements. SAC-H and SAC-A showed significantly lower expansion rates (0.17-0.26%) than commercial self-adhesive cements and glass-ionomer cements after 4 weeks water storage. It is suggested that the new self-adhesive resin cements exhibited a favorable bonding capability and mechanical properties.

  12. Early hardness of self-adhesive resin cements cured under indirect resin composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giráldez, Isabel; Ceballos, Laura; Garrido, Miguel A; Rodríguez, Jesús

    2011-04-01

    To determine the influence of curing mode on the surface hardness of seven resin cements used to lute indirect composite restorations. Seven commercial dual-curing resin cements were tested: two were total-etch (RelyX ARC [3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA] and Variolink II [Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein]); one was self-etch (Multilink Automix [Ivoclar Vivadent]), and four were self-adhesive (RelyX Unicem [3M ESPE], Maxcem Elite [Kerr Corp., Orange, CA, USA], SmartCem2 [Dentsply, Detrey, GmbH, Konstanz, Germany], and G-Cem [GC CORPORATION, Itabashi-Ku, Tokyo, Japan]). Three specimens (0.5 × 6.5mm) of each material were prepared for each of three experimental groups: Group 1 (cements allowed to self cure); Group 2 (cements light-cured for 40 seconds); and Group 3 (cements light-cured for 80 seconds). All specimens were cured through a 4-mm-thick composite cylinder (Filtek Z250-A3). Surface microhardness numbers were determined at 20 min after preparation. Results were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keuls tests (pcement tested (pcements studied, and these values increased even further with a doubling of irradiation time. Self-adhesive cements exhibited different behavior according to the curing mode. RelyX Unicem was highly sensitive to light irradiation, showing the lowest mean values in the self-curing mode. After light irradiation for 40 or 80 seconds, Maxcem Elite exhibited the lowest mean hardness values of all the resin cements tested. The microhardness of resin cements is highly dependent on the brand. Dual-curing resin cements should always be light irradiated for longer periods than that recommended by manufacturers. Dual-curing resin cements should always be light-cured for longer irradiation times, as light irradiation for 80 seconds yields the highest microhardness values in comparison with self-curing or light irradiation for 40 seconds. However, some self-adhesive resin cements exhibit low microhardness values when used

  13. Influence of technique and manipulation on self-adhesive resin cements used to cement intraradicular posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiratori, Fábio Kenji; Valle, Accácio Lins do; Pegoraro, Thiago Amadei; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo

    2013-07-01

    Resin cements are widely used to cement intraradicular posts, but bond strength is significantly influenced by the technique and material used for cementation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of 3 self-adhesive cements used to cement intraradicular glass fiber posts. The cements all required different application and handling techniques. Forty-five human maxillary canines were selected and randomly divided into 3 groups n= 15 by drawing lots: Group BIS - Biscem, Group BRE - Breeze, and Group MAX - Maxcem. Each group was divided into 3 subgroups according to application and handling techniques: Sub-group A - Automix/Point tip applicator, Sub-group L - Handmix/Lentulo, and Sub-group C - Handmix/Centrix. Cementation of the posts was performed according to the manufacturers' instructions. The push-out test was performed with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min, and bond strength was expressed in megapascals. The results were evaluated by 2-way ANOVA and the all pairwise multiple comparison procedures (Tukey test) (α=.05). Breeze cement showed the highest average for the subgroups A, L, and C when compared to the Biscem cement and Maxcem Elite (Pinfluence the bond strength of different self-adhesive cements when used for intraradicular post cementation. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Research on bond durability among different core materials and zirconia ceramic cemented by self-adhesive resin cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinyu, Luo; Xiangfeng, Meng

    2017-02-01

    This research estimated shear bond durability of zirconia and different substrates cemented by two self-adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA Luting and RelyX U100) before and after aging conditioning. Machined zirconia ceramic discs were cemented with four kinds of core material (cobalt-chromium alloy, flowable composite resin core material, packable composite resin, and dentin) with two self-adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA Luting and RelyX U100). All specimens were divided into eight test groups, and each test group was divided into two subgroups. Each subgroup was subjected to shear test before and after 10 000 thermal cycles. All factors (core materials, cements, and thermal cycle) significantly influenced bond durability of zirconia ceramic (P0.05); observed shear bond strength was significantly higher than those of other substrates (P0.05). Different core materials and self-adhesive resin cements can significantly affect bond durability of zirconia ceramic. 
.

  15. Sorption and solubility characteristics of self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marghalani, Hanadi Y

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate some sorption characteristics [sorption (S), solubility (SL) and the percentages of mass change (M(g)%), solubility (SL%) as well as sorbed liquid (S%)] of self-adhesive resin cements when immersed in distilled water and lactic acid. A disc-shaped specimen of each self-adhesive resin cements [G-Cem (GC), SmartCem™ 2 (SC2), RelyX™ U100 (R1), RelyX™ Unicem 2 (RU2)] were prepared in a split-Teflon mold and irradiated by an Optilux 501 light cure at 580mW/cm(2) for 40s in eight overlapping sections each side. The volume of each specimen was calculated and placed inside a desiccator containing anhydrous calcium chloride, then weighed on an analytical electronic balance. Two independent groups were established according to the immersion media or liquids (distilled water and 0.01M lactic acid) maintained at 37°C for the time intervals: 1, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 168h, where the sorption (S) property (μg/mm(3)) was calculated. However, the SL, M(g)%, SL% and S% were measured after 168h of immersion. The data were statistically analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA, one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's test (pcements with some border significances (p>0.05). The highest liquid's sorption was exhibited by GC material after immersion in lactic acid for 168h period followed by SC2 (37.83 and 34.15μg/mm(3), respectively), while the lowest sorption was presented by RU2 cement after 1h immersion period in water (3.89μg/mm(3)). Stereomicroscope showed homogenous surface topography in RU2 and R1 samples, while some striated cracks and microvoids were observed in GC and SC2 materials, respectively. The SL values followed this order: RU2adhesive cement that can provide less sorption and solubility values will help the dentist to choose the most suitable luting material for indirect restorations. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to composite submitted to different surface pretreatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Hugo dos Santos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Extensively destroyed teeth are commonly restored with composite resin before cavity preparation for indirect restorations. The longevity of the restoration can be related to the proper bonding of the resin cement to the composite. This study aimed to evaluate the microshear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements to composite resin. Materials and Methods Composite discs were subject to one of six different surface pretreatments: none (control, 35% phosphoric acid etching for 30 seconds (PA, application of silane (silane, PA + silane, PA + adhesive, or PA + silane + adhesive (n = 6. A silicone mold containing a cylindrical orifice (1 mm2 diameter was placed over the composite resin. RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE or BisCem (Bisco Inc. self-adhesive resin cement was inserted into the orifices and light-cured. Self-adhesive cement cylinders were submitted to shear loading. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05. Results Independent of the cement used, the PA + Silane + Adhesive group showed higher microshear bond strength than those of the PA and PA + Silane groups. There was no difference among the other treatments. Unicem presented higher bond strength than BisCem for all experimental conditions. Conclusions Pretreatments of the composite resin surface might have an effect on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to this substrate.

  17. Adhesive Durability Inside the Root Canal Using Self-adhesive Resin Cements for Luting Fiber Posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitter, K; Maletic, A; Neumann, K; Breschi, L; Sterzenbach, G; Taschner, M

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of various self-adhesive resin cements on the push-out bond strengths and nanoleakage expression at the luting interfaces of fiber posts immediately and after one year of aging. One hundred forty-four extracted human anterior teeth were endodontically treated. After post space preparation, fiber posts were luted using five commercially available self-adhesive resin (SAR) cements and a core build-up material applied with a self-etch adhesive (BF: Bifix SE/Rebilda Post, VOCO; CSA: Clearfil SA Cement/Rely X Fiber Post, 3M ESPE; RX: RelyX Unicem 2/Rely X Fiber Post, 3M ESPE; SPC: Speed Cem/FRC Postec, Ivoclar Vivadent; SMC: Smart Cem/X Post, Dentsply; RB: Rebilda DC-Futurabond/Rebilda Post; n=22). For each group, half of the specimens were subjected to thermocycling (TC) (5°C-55°C, 10,000 cycles) and stored humid for one year at 37°C. Push-out bond strength data of six slices (thickness 1 mm) per root and nanoleakage expression of representative specimens were evaluated after 24 hours (baseline) and after TC and storage for one year (aging), respectively. Bond strength differed significantly among resin cements (pFiber post luting using SAR cements demonstrated reliable bond strengths. Product-specific differences and initial degradation effects could be demonstrated.

  18. Effect of temporary cements on the microtensile bond strength of self-etching and self-adhesive resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Edilausson Moreno; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Lima, Darlon Martins; Bauer, José

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of self-etching and self-adhesive resin cement systems to dentin affected by the presence of remnants of either eugenol-containing or eugenol-free temporary cements. Thirty extracted teeth were obtained and a flat dentin surface was exposed on each tooth. Acrylic blocks were fabricated and cemented either with one of two temporary cements, one zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE) and one eugenol free (ZOE-free), or without cement (control). After cementation, specimens were stored in water at 37°C for 1 week. The restorations and remnants of temporary cements were removed and dentin surfaces were cleaned with pumice. Resin composite blocks were cemented to the bonded dentin surfaces with one of two resin cements, either self-etching (Panavia F 2.0) or self-adhesive (RelyX U-100). After 24 h, the specimens were sectioned to obtain beams for submission to µTBS. The fracture mode was evaluated under a stereoscopic loupe and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Data from µTBS were submitted to two-way repeated-measure ANOVA and the Tukey test (alpha = 0.05). The cross-product interaction was statistically significant (p cements reduced the bond strength to Panavia self-etching resin cements only (p cements did not interfere in the bond strength to dentin of self-adhesive resin cements.

  19. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements.

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    Fuentes, María-Victoria; Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-02-01

    No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (pcement applied and surface treatment did not significantly affect dentin bond strength (p>0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Bond strength, self-adhesive cement, silane, dentin, indirect composite.

  20. Mechanical Properties and Sliding-impact Wear Resistance of Self-adhesive Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuichi, T; Takamizawa, T; Tsujimoto, A; Miyazaki, M; Barkmeier, W W; Latta, M A

    2016-01-01

    The present study determined the mechanical properties and impact-sliding wear characteristics of self-adhesive resin cements. Five self-adhesive resin cements were used: G-CEM LinkAce, BeautiCem SA, Maxcem Elite, Clearfil SA Automix, and RelyX Unicem 2. Clearfil Esthetic Cement was employed as a control material. Six specimens for each resin cement were used to determine flexural strength, elastic modulus, and resilience according to ISO specification #4049. Ten specimens for each resin cement were used to determine the wear characteristics using an impact-sliding wear testing apparatus. Wear was generated using a stainless-steel ball bearing mounted inside a collet assembly. The maximum facet depth and volume loss were determined using a noncontact profilometer in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Data were evaluated using analysis of variance followed by the Tukey honestly significantly different test (α=0.05). The flexural strength of the resin cements ranged from 68.4 to 144.2 MPa; the elastic modulus ranged from 4.4 to 10.6 GPa; and the resilience ranged from 4.5 to 12.0 MJ/m(3). The results for the maximum facet depth ranged from 25.2 to 235.9 μm, and volume loss ranged from 0.0107 to 0.5258 mm(3). The flexural properties and wear resistance were found to vary depending upon the self-adhesive resin cement tested. The self-adhesive cements tended to have lower mechanical properties than the conventional resin cement. All self-adhesive resin cements, apart from G-CEM LinkAce, demonstrated significantly poorer wear resistance than did the conventional resin cement.

  1. Interaction between total-etch and self-etch adhesives and conventional and self-adhesive resin cements

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes [UNESP; Pinto, Léia Quintanilha [UNESP; Leonel, André Gilberto [UNESP; Pucci, César Rogério [UNESP; Borges, Alessandra Bühler [UNESP

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the bond strength to enamel between resin cements combined with total-etch and self-etch adhesive systems and a self-adhesive cement. Eighty bovine incisors had their buccal surface ground flat exposing a plane area in the enamel. Eighty Artglass resin cylinders measuring 3 mm in diameter and 4 mm in height were fabricated. The teeth were divided into eight groups of 10 teeth each and the resin cylinders were cemented with different adhesive systems and re...

  2. Longevity of metal-ceramic crowns cemented with self-adhesive resin cement: a prospective clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondani, Lucas Pradebon; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Wandsher, Vinicius Felipe; Pereira, Gabriel Kalil; Valandro, Luis Felipe; Bergoli, César Dalmolin

    2017-04-10

    Resin cements are often used for single crown cementation due to their physical properties. Self-adhesive resin cements gained widespread due to their simplified technique compared to regular resin cement. However, there is lacking clinical evidence about the long-term behavior of this material. The aim of this prospective clinical trial was to assess the survival rates of metal-ceramic crowns cemented with self-adhesive resin cement up to six years. One hundred and twenty-nine subjects received 152 metal-ceramic crowns. The cementation procedures were standardized and performed by previously trained operators. The crowns were assessed as to primary outcome (debonding) and FDI criteria. Statistical analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier statistics and descriptive analysis. Three failures occurred (debonding), resulting in a 97.6% survival rate. FDI criteria assessment resulted in scores 1 and 2 (acceptable clinical evaluation) for all surviving crowns. The use of self-adhesive resin cement is a feasible alternative for metal-ceramic crowns cementation, achieving high and adequate survival rates.

  3. Association of different primers and resin cements for adhesive bonding to zirconia ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Fernando Akio; Bello-Silva, Marina Stella; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos; Miranda Junior, Walter Gomes; Cesar, Paulo Francisco

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) to zirconia ceramics using different associations of primers and resin cements. Two blocks of LAVA zirconia (3Y-TZP) were randomly submitted to an application of three different commercially available primers: Alloy Primer (AP), Z-Prime Plus (ZP), and Signum Zirconia Bond (SZB). Nonprimed specimens were considered controls. After treatment, the 80 specimens (5 mm × 5 mm × 2 mm) were randomly cemented with one of the resin cements: Panavia F, Multilink, seT, and NX3. For cementation, cylinders of resin cement were built on the ceramic surfaces using the SDI SBS apparatus. The specimens were submitted to the SBS test. Fractured surfaces were observed under stereomicroscopy to determine the failure mode, and mean bond strength values were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α = 0.05). Signum Zirconia Bond had the highest SBS compared to all other primers and the control group, regardless of the resin cement used. The highest values were obtained when associating Panavia F with Signum Zirconia Bond. Alloy Primer increased bonding values when associated with seT cement only. When no primer was used, no statistical difference was observed among resin cements. All specimens fractured due to adhesive failure. Signum Zirconia Bond is capable of increasing bonding values of resin cements to zirconia ceramics. Its association with Panavia F shows enhanced results when considering short-term adhesion to zirconia.

  4. Microleakage around zirconia crown margins after ultrasonic scaling with self-adhesive resin or resin modified glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Bright; Goldstein, Ronald; Lin, Chee Paul; Byreddy, Sudha; Lawson, Nathaniel C

    2017-12-01

    To measure microleakage around zirconia crown margins cemented with self-adhesive resin or resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) cement after ultrasonic scaling. 16 molars were prepared for crowns (margin 0.5 mm coronal of cementum-enamel junction). Preparations were digitally scanned and zirconia crowns milled. Specimens were divided into two groups (n = 8): self-adhesive resin (RelyX Unicem 2) or resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) (RelyX Luting Plus) cements. After cementation, specimens were ultrasonic scaled with a piezoelectric device (60 s, hand pressure). After thermocycling (20,000 cycles/5-55°C), specimens were immersed in 5 wt% fuchsine dye before sectioning bucco-lingually. Microleakage was examined under 40× light magnification. Statistical comparisons were made using a paired t test and a two-sample t test (α = .05). Ultrasonic scaling did not alter microleakage at the margins of crowns (P = .31). There was no significant difference in microleakage of scaled and untreated margins with the use of different cements (P = .21). The amount of microleakage around margins that were scaled was not significantly different between cements (P = .14). Untreated margins of crowns cemented with RelyX Luting Plus showed a significantly higher microleakage than those cemented with RelyX Unicem 2 (P = .005). Piezoelectric ultrasonic scaling did not increase microleakage at the margin of zirconia crowns cemented with self-adhesive resin or RMGI cements. Piezoelectric ultrasonic scaling around zirconia crowns did not impact marginal microleakage cemented with self-adhesive resin or RMGI cements. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Simplified cementation of lithium disilicate crowns: Retention with various adhesive resin cement combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Glen H; Lepe, Xavier; Patterson, Amanda; Schäfer, Oliver

    2017-09-27

    A composite resin cement and matching self-etch adhesive was developed to simplify the dependable retention of lithium disilicate crowns. The efficacy of this new system is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine whether lithium disilicate crowns cemented with a new composite resin and adhesive system and 2 other popular systems provide clinically acceptable crown retention after long-term aging with monthly thermocycling. Extracted human molars were prepared with a flat occlusal surface, 20-degree convergence, and 4 mm axial length. The axio-occlusal line angle was slightly rounded. The preparation surface area was determined by optical scanning and the analysis of the standard tessellation language (STL) files. The specimens were distributed into 3 cement groups (n=12) to obtain equal mean surface areas. Lithium disilicate crowns (IPS e.max Press) were fabricated for each preparation, etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid for 15 seconds, and cleaned. Cement systems were RelyX Ultimate with Scotch Bond Universal (3M Dental Products); Monobond S, Multilink Automix with Multilink Primer A and B (Ivoclar Vivadent AG); and NX3 Nexus with OptiBond XTR (Kerr Corp). Each adhesive provided self-etching of the dentin. Before cementation, the prepared specimens were stored in 35°C water. A force of 196 N was used to cement the crowns, and the specimens were polymerized in a 35°C oven at 100% humidity. After 24 hours of storage at 100% humidity, the cemented crowns were thermocycled (5°C to 55°C) for 5000 cycles each month for 6 months. The crowns were removed axially at 0.5 mm/min. The removal force was recorded and the dislodgement stress calculated using the preparation surface area. The type of cement failure was recorded, and the data were analyzed by 1-way ANOVA and the chi-square test (α=.05) after the equality of variances had been assessed with the Levene test. The Levene test was nonsignificant (P=.936). The ANOVA revealed the mean removal

  6. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to tooth structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattar, Susan; Hatamleh, Muhanad M; Sawair, Faleh; Al-Rabab'ah, Mohammad

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the strength of the bond between newly introduced self-adhesive resin cements and tooth structures (i.e., enamel and dentin). Three self-adhesive cements (SmartCem2, RelyX Unicem, seT SDI) were tested. Cylindrical-shaped cement specimens (diameter, 3 mm; height, 3 mm) were bonded to enamel and dentin. Test specimens were incubated at 37 °C for 24 h. The shear bond strength (SBS) was tested in a Zwick Roll testing machine. Results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and t-test. Statistically significant differences were defined at the α = 0.05 level. Bond failures were categorized as adhesive, cohesive, or mixed. The SBS values ranged from 3.76 to 6.81 MPa for cements bonded to enamel and from 4.48 to 5.94 MPa for cements bonded to dentin (p > 0.05 between surfaces). There were no statistically significant differences between the SBS values to enamel versus dentin for any given cement type. All cements exhibited adhesive failure at the resin/tooth interface. Regardless of their clinical simplicity, the self-adhesive resin cements examined in this study exhibit limited bond performance to tooth structures; therefore, these cements must be used with caution.

  7. Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Zirconia Ceramic Using Adhesive Primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, Ariovaldo; Brito, Rui Barbosa; Kina, Sidney; Andrade, Oswaldo Scopin; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Carvalho, Andreia Assis; Giannini, Marcelo

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the influence of adhesive primers on the microshear bond strength of resin cements to zirconia ceramic. Fifty zirconia plates (12 mm × 5 mm × 1.5 mm thick) of a commercially available zirconium oxide ceramic (ZirCad) were sintered, sandblasted with aluminum oxide particles, and cleaned ultrasonically before bonding. The plates were randomly divided into five groups of 10. Three resin cements were selected (RelyX ARC, Multilink Automix, Clearfil SA Cement self-adhesive resin cement), along with two primers (Metal-Zirconia Primer, Alloy Primer) and one control group. The primers and resin cements were used according to manufacturers' recommendations. The control group comprised the conventional resin cement (RelyX ARC) without adhesive primer. Test cylinders (0.75 mm diameter × 1 mm high) were formed on zirconia surfaces by filling cylindrical Tygon tube molds with resin cement. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C, then tested for shear strength on a Shimadzu EZ Test testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. Bond strength data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Dunnett's test (5%). The bond strength means in MPa (± s.d.) were: RelyX ARC: 28.1 (6.6); Multilink Automix: 37.6 (4.5); Multilink Automix + Metal-Zirconia Primer: 55.7 (4.0); Clearfil SA Cement: 46.2 (3.3); and Clearfil SA Cement + Alloy Primer: 47.0 (4.1). Metal-Zirconia Primer increased the bond strength of Multilink Automix resin cement to zirconia, but no effect was observed for Alloy Primer using Clearfil SA Cement. RelyX ARC showed the lowest bond strength to zirconia. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  8. Bond strength of a composite resin to glass ionomer cements using different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina de Oliveira BECCI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Glass ionomer cements are often used as a base or cavity lining prior to restorative material. Objective To evaluate the bond strength of a composite resin to different glass ionomer cements, when using a two-step conventional and self-etching adhesive systems. Material and method Three glass ionomer cements (Ketac Molar Easymix, Vitremer and Vitrebond, the composite resin Filtek Z350 XT and the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond 2, Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Easy One were used. As negative control, resin was bonded to cement without using an adhesive system. Holes (4 mm diameter, 2 mm deep prepared in acrilic bloks were filled with the glass ionomer cements (n=12/group. On the surface, an area of 1mm in diameter was delimited, the adhesive system was applied, and a specimen of composite resin with 1 mm height was made. After 24 hours storage (37 °C and 100% humidity, the microshear test was performed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test for comparison between groups (α=0.05. Result The adhesive systems significantly improved the bond strenght of composite resin to glass ionomer cements (p≤0.001. There was no significant difference in bond strength when self-etching adhesive systems were compared with the simplified etch-and-rinse adhesive, except for Vitrebond where Clearfil SE Bond determined higher bond strength when compared to Adper Single Bond 2 (p=0.003. Conclusion Self-etching adhesive systems are a good option for establishing the bond between the composite resin and the glass ionomer cement.

  9. [Curing mode of universal adhesives affects the bond strength of resin cements to dentin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Z R; Tian, F C; Zhang, L; Han, B; Wang, X Y

    2017-02-18

    To determine the effects of curing mode of one-step and two-step universal adhesives on the micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) of different dual-cure resin cements to dentin. One-step universal adhesive Single Bond Universal (SBU), and two-step universal adhesive OptiBond Versa (VSA) were chosen as the subjects, one-step self-etching adhesive OptiBond All in One (AIO) and two-step self-etching adhesive Clearfil SE Bond (SEB) were control groups, and two dual-cure resin cements RelyX Ultimate (RLX) and Nexus 3 Universal (NX3) were used in this study. In this study, 80 extracted human molars were selected and the dentin surface was exposed using diamond saw. The teeth were divided into 16 groups according to the adhesives (AIO, SBU, SEB, VSA), cure modes of adhesives (light cure, non-light cure) and resin cements (RLX, NX3). The adhesives were applied on the dentin surface following the instruction and whether light cured or not, then the resin cements were applied on the adhesives with 1 mm thickness and light cured (650 mW/cm(2) for 20 s. A resin was built up (5 mm) on the cements and light cured layer by layer. After water storage for 24 h, the specimens were cut into resin-cement-dentin strips with a cross sectional area of 1 mm×1 mm and the μTBS was measured. Regarding one-step universal adhesive (SBU) light cured, the μTBS with RLX [(35.45±7.04) MPa] or NX3 [(26.84±10.39) MPa] were higher than SBU non-light cured with RLX [(17.93±8.93) MPa)] or NX3 [(10.07±5.89) MPa, Padhesive (VSA) and control adhesive (SEB), curing mode did not affect the μTBS when used with either RLX or NX3 (25.98-32.24 MPa, P>0.05). Curing mode of one-step universal adhesive may affect the μTBS between dual-cure resin cements and dentin, while for two-step universal adhesive, the curing mode and the type of resin cements did not influence the μTBS.

  10. Titanium dioxide nanotubes addition to self-adhesive resin cement: Effect on physical and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Tonello, Carla M; Lisboa-Filho, Paulo N; Arruda, Larisa B; Tokuhara, Cintia K; Oliveira, Rodrigo C; Furuse, Adilson Y; Rubo, José H; Borges, Ana Flávia S

    2017-07-01

    This study has investigated the influence of Titanium dioxide nanotubes (TiO 2 -nt) addition to self-adhesive resin cement on the degree of conversion, water sorption, and water solubility, mechanical and biological properties. A commercially available auto-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200™, 3M ESPE) was reinforced with varying amounts of nanotubes (0.3, 0.6, 0.9wt%) and evaluated at different curing modes (self- and dual cure). The DC in different times (3, 6, 9, 12 and 15min), water sorption (Ws) and solubility (Sl), 3-point flexural strength (σf), elastic modulus (E), Knoop microhardness (H) and viability of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts were performed to characterize the resin cement. Reinforced self-adhesive resin cement, regardless of concentration, increased the DC for the self- and dual-curing modes at all times studied. The concentration of the TiO 2 -nt and the curing mode did not influence the Ws and Sl. Regarding σf, concentrations of both 0.3 and 0.9wt% for self-curing mode resulted in data similar to that of dual-curing unreinforced cement. The E increased with the addition of 0.9wt% for self-cure mode and H increased with 0.6 and 0.9wt% for both curing modes. Cytotoxicity assays revealed that reinforced cements were biocompatible. TiO 2 -nt reinforced self-adhesive resin cement are promising materials for use in indirect dental restorations. Taken together, self-adhesive resin cement reinforced with TiO 2 -nt exhibited physicochemical and mechanical properties superior to those of unreinforced cements, without compromising their cellular viability. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of temperature change among different adhesive resin cement during polymerization process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Alkurt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the intra-pulpal temperature changes in adhesive resin cements during polymerization. Materials and Methods: Dentin surface was prepared with extracted human mandibular third molars. Adhesive resin cements (Panavia F 2.0, Panavia SA, and RelyX U200 were applied to the dentin surface and polymerized under IPS e.max Press restoration. K-type thermocouple wire was positioned in the pulpal chamber to measure temperature change (n = 7. The temperature data were recorded (0.0001 sensible and stored on a computer every 0.1 second for sixteen minutes. Differences between the baseline temperature and temperatures of various time points (2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 minute were determined and mean temperature changes were calculated. At various time intervals, the differences in temperature values among the adhesive resin cements were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey honestly test (α = 0.05. Results: Significant differences were found among the time points and resin cements (P < 0.05. Temperature values of the Pan SA group were significantly higher than Pan F and RelyX (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Result of the study on self-adhesive and self-etch adhesive resin cements exhibited a safety intra-pulpal temperature change.

  12. Luting glass ceramic restorations using a self-adhesive resin cement under different dentin conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarda, Guilherme B; Gonçalves, Luciano S; Correr, Américo B; Moraes, Rafael R; Sinhoreti, Mário A C; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the bond strength of ceramic restorations luted using a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE) under different dentin conditions. In the experimental groups, ceramic restorations were luted to bovine incisors with RelyX Unicem under the following conditions: [Dry dentin]: surface was dried using air stream for 15 s; [Moist dentin]: excess dentin moisture was removed with absorbent paper; [Bonding agent]: Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray) self-etching adhesive system was previously applied to dentin. In the Control group, cementation was done using an etch-and-rinse adhesive (Excite DSC) and Variolink II resin cement (Ivoclar Vivadent). Photoactivation of the resin cements was performed with UltraLume LED 5 unit (Ultradent). The restorations (n=5 per group) were sectioned into beams and microtensile testing was carried out. Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's test (padhesive failures was observed for the "bonding agent" and "dry dentin" groups. The "moist dentin" group presented predominantly cohesive failures within the luting material. The previous application of a self-etching adhesive showed no significant effect. Only excess dentin moisture should be removed for the cementation of ceramic restorations with self-adhesive resin cements.

  13. Effect of dentin adhesives used as sealers and provisional cementation on bond strength of a resin cement to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieffi, Nicoletta; Sadek, Fernanda; Monticelli, Francesca; Goracci, Cecilia; Grandini, Simone; Davidson, Carel; Tay, Franklin R; Ferrari, Marco

    2006-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of dentin adhesives employed as resin sealers and provisional cementation on the bond strengths of a resin cement to dentin. A two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (Excite DSC--Group 1) and two-step self-etch adhesive (AdheSE--Group 2) were applied to exposed dentin surfaces prepared from human molars (N=4). Water was used instead of a resin sealer in control Groups 3 and 4. A eugenol-free provisional cement (except for Group 4) was applied to the treated surfaces. After storing in distilled water for 1 week, the provisional cement was removed and cylindrical composite blocks were luted with a resin cement (Variolink II). 0.9 x 0.9 mm sticks were produced from these luted specimens for microtensile bond testing and SEM examination. One-way ANOVA revealed that neither the resin sealer nor the temporary eugenol-free cement had a negative effect on the final bond strength (P> 0.05). Mixed failures were predominantly identified from SEM.

  14. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite to resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using three different resin adhesives vs. glass-ionomer based adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical success of sandwich technique depends on the strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC bonding to both dentin and resin composite. Therefore, the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite bonded to RMGIC utilizing different resin adhesives versus a GIC-based adhesive was compared. Materials and methods: In this in vitro study, 84 holes (5×2 mm were prepared in acrylic blocks, randomly divided into seven groups (n=12 and filled with RMGIC (Light-Cured Universal Restorative, GC. In the Group I; no adhesive was applied on the RMGIC. In the Group II, non-etched and Group III was etched with phosphoric acid. In groups II and III, after rinsing, etch-and-rinse adhesive (OptiBond Solo Plus; in the Group IV; a two-step self-etch adhesive (OptiBond XTR and in Group V; a one-step self-etch (OptiBond All-in-One were applied on the cement surfaces. Group VI; a GIC-based adhesive (Fuji Bond LC was painted over the cement surface and cured. Group VII; the GIC-based adhesive was brushed over RMGIC followed by the placement of resin composite and co-cured. Afterward; resin composite (Point 4 cylinders were placed on the treated cement surfaces. The specimens were placed in 100% humidity at 37 ± 1°C and thermo cycled. The shear bond test was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min and calculated in MPa; the specimens were examined to determine mode of failure. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Results: The maximum (24.62±3.70 MPa and minimum (18.15±3.38 MPa SBS mean values were recorded for OptiBond XTR adhesive and the control group, respectively. The pairwise comparisons showed no significant differences between the groups that bonded with different adhesives. The adhesive failure was the most common failure mode observed. Conclusion: This study suggests that GIC-based adhesive could be applied over RMGIC as co-cure technique for sandwich restorations in lieu of employing the resin

  15. Bonding to glass ionomer cements using resin-based adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Burrow, M F; Palamara, J E A; Thomas, C D L

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the microshear bond strengths (MSBS) of four self-etching adhesives (Adper Scotchbond SE [SSE], Clearfil SE Bond [CSE], Clearfil S3 Bond [CS3] and One Coat 7.0 [OC]) and an etch-and-rinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond Plus [SB]) when bonded to two conventional glass ionomer cements (GICs) (Fuji IX GP EXTRA and Riva Self Cure). The null hypothesis tested was there is no difference in the adhesive ability of an etch-and-rinse adhesive and self-etching adhesives when bonded to GIC for up to 6 months. The GICs were embedded in type III dental stone and wet ground with 1200-grit SiC paper. Twenty specimens were bonded for each adhesive according to manufacturers' instructions with a 1.5-mm bonding diameter. Specimens were stored at 100% humidity for 24 hours, 1 month, or 6 months. Microshear bond strengths were obtained using a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The results were calculated and analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD test. SB had significantly lower MSBS than the four self-etching adhesives for all storage periods. MSBS at 6 months for SB was significantly lower than at 1 month. There were no significant differences in MSBS among the self-etching adhesives. Cohesive failure within GIC was the most common failure mode observed. SB showed a lower bond strength than the self-etching adhesives when bonded to conventional GICs for all storage periods. This might be a result of the phosphoric acid etching. However, cohesive strength of GIC was a limiting factor for the MSBS outcomes.

  16. Influence of plasma pretreatment on shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to polyetheretherketone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, B; Bähr, N; Beuer, F; Wimmer, T; Eichberger, M; Gernet, W; Jahn, D; Schmidlin, P R

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the adhesion between PEEK and two self-adhesive resin cements after plasma treatment. Eight hundred sixty-four polyetheretherketone (PEEK) disks were cut and polished to silicon carbide (SIC) P4000. One half of the specimens were randomly selected and pretreated with plasma, whereas the remaining 432 specimens remained untreated. Subsequently, specimens were randomly allocated to four groups (n = 108/group): Visio.link (Bredent), Signum PEEK Bond (Heraeus Kulzer), Ambarino P60 (Creamed), and a control group without additional treatment. Half of the specimens of each group (n = 54) were then cemented with either RelyX Unicem Automix 2 (3 M ESPE) or with Clearfil SA (Kuraray). All specimens were stored in water for 24 h (37 °C). Afterwards, specimens were divided into three groups (n = 18) for different aging levels: (1) no aging (baseline measurement), (2) thermal aging for 5,000 cycles (5/55 °C), and (3) thermal aging for 10,000 cycles (5/55 °C). Thereafter, shear bond strengths (SBS) were measured, and failure types (adhesive, mixed, and cohesive) were assessed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, four- and one-way ANOVA followed by a post hoc Scheffé test (p Visio.link or Signum PEEK Bond showed predominantly mixed failure types. Control groups, plasma treated, or treated using Ambarino P60 groups fractured predominantly adhesively. The use of methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based adhesives allows bonding between PEEK and self-adhesive resin cements. Plasma treatment has no impact on bond to resin cements. PEEK reconstructions can be cemented using self-adhesive resin cements combined with pretreatment with MMA-based adhesives.

  17. Effect of oxalate desensitizer on the bonding durability of adhesive resin cements to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Memarpour, Mahtab; Doozandeh, Maryam

    2012-07-01

    This study investigated whether the tubular occluding effect of oxalate desensitizer (OX) during adhesive cementation improved bonding of a self-etch and two etch-and-rinse resin cements to dentin after 6 months. A flat dentin surface was prepared on 120 extracted premolars, which were randomly divided into six groups of 20 teeth each according to the adhesive resin cement system used: ED primer II/Panavia F2.0, Excite DSC (Ex DSC)/Variolink II, and One-Step Plus (OS Plus)/Duolink, with or without OX (BisBlock) application. After cementation of an indirect composite rod, two subgroups (n=10) were tested after 24 h and 6 months of water storage plus thermocycling, and shear bond strengths were recorded in MPa. Statistical tests showed that although oxalate had a borderline significant negative effect on initial bonding of ED primer II/Panavia F2.0, it significantly improved bonding durability (p0.05). Combining an oxalate desensitizer with three types of resin cements had different effects on bond strength to dentin after aging, depending on the interaction of oxalate with the adhesive system associated to the resin cement. Copyright © 2011 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to tooth structure

    OpenAIRE

    Hattar, Susan; Hatamleh, Muhanad M.; Sawair, Faleh; Al-Rabab’ah, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the strength of the bond between newly introduced self-adhesive resin cements and tooth structures (i.e., enamel and dentin). Methods: Three self-adhesive cements (SmartCem2, RelyX Unicem, seT SDI) were tested. Cylindrical-shaped cement specimens (diameter, 3 mm; height, 3 mm) were bonded to enamel and dentin. Test specimens were incubated at 37 °C for 24 h. The shear bond strength (SBS) was tested in a Zwick Roll testing machine. Results w...

  19. Monkey pulpal response to an MMA-based resin cement as adhesive luting for indirect restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yasushi; Seki, Yuichi; Uzzaman, Mohammed Akhtar; Sattabanasuk, Vanthana; Sasafuchi, Yasutaka; Foxton, Richard M; Otsuki, Masayuki; Tagami, Junji

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the pulpal response to a newly-developed MMA resin cement (MultiBond, Tokuyama) when used for adhesively luting composite resin inlays. Cervical cavities were prepared in monkey teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups. In the experimental group, a self-etching primer and a resin cement were applied to the cavities, and then hybrid composite inlays (Estenia, Kuraray) were inserted using freshly mixed resin cement. In the other groups, a zinc oxide/eugenol cement (Eugedain, Showa Yakuhin Kakou) or a glass-ionomer cement (Fuji II, GC) was used to fill the cavity. The teeth were then extracted after 3, 30, and 90 days, fixed in 10% buffered formalin solution, and prepared using routine histological techniques. Five-mum-thick sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, or Brown & Brenn gram stain for bacterial observation. Histopathological reactions in the pulp tissue and bacterial penetration along the cavity walls were assessed using a standardized score. No serious inflammatory reactions in the pulp, such as necrosis or abscess formation, were observed in any of the experimental periods, except for 1 case after 30 days, in which a pulpal exposure was suspected. Disarrangement of the odontoblast layer and deposition of reparative dentin were the major reactions observed in this specimen. No bacterial penetration along the cavity walls was detected. The monkey pulpal response and in vivo sealing ability of the MMA resin cement in combination with the self-etching primer was considered as good as that of the glass-ionomer cement. The new MMA resin cement showed acceptable biological compatibility to the monkey pulp when used to adhesively lute composite resin inlays.

  20. The effects of desensitizing resin, resin sealing, and provisional cement on the bond strength of dentin luted with self-adhesive and conventional resincements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Irena; Oendra, Andrea E Hernandez; Stawarczyk, Bogna; Hämmerle, Christoph H F

    2012-04-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements were designed to bond without any pretreatment of dentin. However, pretreatments such as the application of desensitizing resin or the resin sealing of dentin with priming/bonding solutions might influence the bonding quality of these self-adhesive resin cements. Little is known about the effect of dentin pretreatment on the bond quality of self-adhesive resin cements. This study evaluated whether dentin desensitizing or sealing methods influenced the shear bond strength of 1 self-adhesive and 2 conventional resin cements. One-hundred and eighty human molars were assigned to 5 different pretreatment groups: 1) freshly ground dentin, 2) glutaraldehyde/hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) desensitized dentin (Gluma), 3) contamination of desensitized dentin with provisional cement, 4) sealed dentin (dual bonding technique), and 5) contamination of sealed dentin with provisional cement. The shear bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem; RXU) and 2 conventional resin cements (Variolink II; VAR, Panavia 21; PAN) was assessed for each pretreatment group (n=12 per cement types). Two-way ANOVA and 1-way ANOVA together with the post hoc Tukey multiple comparison (α=.05) were performed. On freshly ground dentin, PAN exhibited the highest shear bond strength values (Pdentin (Pdentin increased the bond strength of RXU but had no significant effect on VAR or PAN. RXU exhibited the highest mean bond strength after the contamination of resin-sealed dentin by provisional cement. Glutaraldehyde/HEMA treatment and resin sealing of dentin have a beneficial effect on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement (RXU). Contamination of dentin with provisional cement has no influence on the bond strength of the self-adhesive resin cement (RXU) or VAR but lowered the bond strength of PAN. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Luting glass ceramic restorations using a self-adhesive resin cement under different dentin conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme B Guarda

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the bond strength of ceramic restorations luted using a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE under different dentin conditions. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the experimental groups, ceramic restorations were luted to bovine incisors with RelyX Unicem under the following conditions: [Dry dentin]: surface was dried using air stream for 15 s; [Moist dentin]: excess dentin moisture was removed with absorbent paper; [Bonding agent]: Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray self-etching adhesive system was previously applied to dentin. In the Control group, cementation was done using an etch-and-rinse adhesive (Excite DSC and Variolink II resin cement (Ivoclar Vivadent. Photoactivation of the resin cements was performed with UltraLume LED 5 unit (Ultradent. The restorations (n=5 per group were sectioned into beams and microtensile testing was carried out. Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's test (p<0.05. Failure modes were classifed under Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM (x120 magnifcation. RESULTS: The bond strength was dependent on the moisture status of the dentin. Bond strength in the "dry dentin group" was signifcantly lower than that of all other groups, which showed similar results. A predominance of mixed failures was detected for the control group, while a predominance of adhesive failures was observed for the "bonding agent" and "dry dentin" groups. The "moist dentin" group presented predominantly cohesive failures within the luting material. The previous application of a self-etching adhesive showed no signifcant effect. CONCLUSIONS: Only excess dentin moisture should be removed for the cementation of ceramic restorations with self-adhesive resin cements.

  2. Water sorption and water solubility of self-etching and self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulou, Aikaterini; Vrochari, Areti D; Hellwig, Elmar; Stampf, Susanne; Polydorou, Olga

    2015-11-01

    The long-term success of indirect restorations depends on the clinical behavior of luting cements. In the oral environment, properties such as water sorption and solubility negatively affect the cements' clinical performance over time, jeopardizing the restoration's longevity. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the water sorption and solubility characteristics of self-etching, self-adhesive, and conventional resin cements. One conventional (Calibra), 1 self-etching (Panavia F), and 2 self-adhesive (Clearfil SA, G-Cem Automix) dual-polymerized resin cements were used. Fourteen disks of each material were prepared. Water sorption and solubility were calculated according to International Organization for Standards (ISO) specification 4049:2009. According to the water sorption test, all materials were found to interact with water. No statistically significant differences were found between the water sorption of Panavia F and Clearfil SA (P=.911). These cements exhibited higher water sorption values than the other materials (Psolubility (Psolubility values than the other materials. G-Cem Automix and Calibra exhibited negative solubility. However, all water sorption and solubility values were below the threshold values proposed by the ISO standard. Within the limitations of the present in vitro study, the interaction of resin cements with water is not type-related (conventional, self-etching, or self-adhesive). Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Shear bond strength of three self-adhesive resin cements to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokh, Asefzadeh; Mohsen, Merati; Soheil, Salari; Nazanin, Bashardoost

    2012-01-01

    The result of the studies concerning the bonding of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin is controversial. To assess in vitro shear bond strength (SBS) of three self-adhesive dual-cured resin cements to dentin compared to a currently used dual-cured resin cement, using SBS test. The extant study is an experimental in vitro one on extracted human third molars dentin. 40 intact human third molars were selected and randomly divided into 4 groups of 10. Buccal dentin surfaces were exposed perpendicular to the long axis and prepared with SiC papers. A translucent plastic ring, was placed over the dentin surfaces. Group I (Control group): After 15 s of etching and application of Excite DSC Bond (Ex), Variolink II (Var II) resin cement was injected into the plastic ring and was light cured for 40 s. Group II: RelyX Unicem (RX) was injected into the plastic ring and after 30 s, was light cured for 40 s. Group III: Maxcem (Mc) was injected into the plastic ring and after 30 s, was light cured for 40 s. Group IV: Multilink Sprint (MS) was injected into the plastic ring and after 30 s, was light cured for 40 s. After thermal cycling, SBS were measured with a universal testing machine. Statistical computations were conducted according to Student's t-test. The mean SBS and standard deviations (in parentheses) for groups I, II, III, and IV were 12.95 (2.64), 6.73 (0.79), 3.01 (0.90), 4.60 (0.75) MPa, respectively. Statistical analysis, revealed that: (1) the mean SBS of Var II were significantly higher than the other groups (P0.05). Bond strength of three self-adhesive resin cements was significantly lower than the conventional total-etch resin cement. RX significantly performed better SBS than Mc and MS to dentin.

  4. Tensile Bond Strength of Self Adhesive Resin Cement After Various Surface Treatment of Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhri, Sahil; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In self adhesive resin cements adhesion is achieved to dental surface without surface pre-treatment, and requires only single step application. This makes the luting procedure less technique-sensitive and decreases postoperative sensitivity. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of self adhesive resin after surface treatment of enamel for bonding base metal alloy. Materials and Methods On the labial surface of 64 central incisor rectangular base metal block of dimension 6 mm length, 5mm width and 1 mm height was cemented with RelyX U200 and Maxcem Elite self adhesive cements with and without surface treatment of enamel. Surface treatment of enamel was application of etchant, one step bonding agent and both. Tensile bond strength of specimen was measured with universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Results Least tensile bond strength (MPa) was in control group i.e. 1.33 (0.32) & 1.59 (0.299), Highest bond strength observed when enamel treated with both etchant and bonding agent i.e. 2.72 (0.43) & 2.97 (0.19) for Relyx U200 and Elite cement. When alone etchant and bonding agent were applied alone bond strength is 2.19 (0.18) & 2.24 (0.47) for Relyx U200, and 2.38 (0.27) 2.49 (0.16) for Max-cem elite. Mean bond strength was higher in case of Max-cem Elite as compared to RelyX U200 resin cement, although differences were non–significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion Surface treatment of enamel increases the bond strength of self adhesive resin cement. PMID:26894165

  5. Comparative Shear-Bond Strength of Six Dental Self-Adhesive Resin Cements to Zirconia

    OpenAIRE

    Si-Eun Lee; Ji-Hyeon Bae; Jae-Won Choi; Yong-Chan Jeon; Chang-Mo Jeong; Mi-Jung Yoon; Jung-Bo Huh

    2015-01-01

    This study compared shear bond strength (SBS) of six self-adhesive resin cements (SARC) and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) to zirconia before and after thermocycling. The cylinder shape (Φ 2.35 mm × 3 mm) of six SARCs (G-CEM LinkAce (GLA), Maxcem Elite (MAX), Clearfil SA Luting (CSL), PermaCem 2.0 (PM2), Rely-X U200 (RXU), Smartcem 2 (SC2)) were bonded to the top surface of the zirconia specimens with light-curing. RMGIC (Fujicem (FJC)) was bonded to the specimens with self-c...

  6. Shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to base metal alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattar, Susan; Hatamleh, Muhanad; Khraisat, Ameen; Al-Rabab'ah, Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    Many self-adhesive cements have been introduced in the past few years, with little or no data regarding their clinical performance. This study investigated the shear bond strength of some recently introduced self-adhesive resin cements. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of self-adhesive and conventional resin-based cements to a base metal alloy. Four groups (10-12 each) that comprised 3 self-adhesive cements (SmartCem2; RelyX Unicem; seT SDI) and a conventional resin-based cement (RelyX ARC) were tested. Cylindrical cement specimens (diameter, 3 mm; height, 3 mm) were applied to nickel-free base metal alloy (Sheradent) disks with a diameter of 12 mm, and the surface was treated with airborne-particle abrasion of 50 μm aluminum oxide. The metal disks were fixed in brass molds specifically designed for the shear bond test device. Test specimens were incubated at 37°C for 24 hours and then the shear bond was tested with a Zwick Roll testing machine at a 0.8 mm/min cross-head speed. In addition, bond failures were investigated and categorized as adhesive, cohesive, or mixed. Shear bond strengths were calculated by dividing the maximum debonding force over the cross-sectional area of each specimen. One-way ANOVA and the Tukey (honestly significant difference) post hoc test were used to test statistical significant differences among the groups (α=.05). Statistical analysis showed significant differences among different resin cements (F=14.34, Padhesive in nature, which occurred at the resin-metal interface. The early bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements varied significantly among the tested materials. SmartCem2 showed the highest bond strength, which was 4 times the strength observed for seT SDI. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Storage Temperature on the Shelf Life of Self-adhesive Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Fusun; Ovecoglu, Hesna Sazak; Daneshmehr, Leila; Sinmazisik, Gulden; Kashyap, Kanupriya; Iriboz, Emre; Blatz, Markus B

    2015-12-01

    To compare the bonding performance of three new self-adhesive resin cements to human dentin after storage under two different conditions. Buccal, lingual, mesial, and distal dentin surfaces of 36 human molars were abraded to directly below the enamel with #600 SiC papers. The teeth were divided into two main test groups. In the first test group (FT), the cements were kept in a refrigerator (6 ± 2°C) for three months and then used for the test. The remainder of the cements was kept at a constant room temperature of 19 ± 2°C for an additional three months, and then used again for the second test group (ST). Each test group comprised 6 teeth and 24 dentin sections. The cements Clearfil SA (CSA), G-Cem (GC), and Bis-Cem (BC) were applied to the surfaces according to the manufacturers' recommendations. After application of the cements to the flat dentin surfaces and light curing, shear bond strengths were determined at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Bond strengths were then calculated and expressed in MPa. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests. To investigate the cement/ dentin interfaces using SEM, the buccal surfaces of three additional teeth were used for each test group. The bond strength values of cement groups were significantly different for the FT and ST groups (p adhesive resin cements.

  8. Push-out bond strength of different translucent fiber posts cemented with self-adhesive resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzo, João Fernando; Pedriali, Maria Beatriz Bergonse Pereira; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Moura, Sandra Kiss; de de Carvalho, Rodrigo Varella

    2016-01-01

    Evaluate the bond strength of different translucent fiber posts in the cervical, middle, and apical root thirds cemented with self-adhesive resin cement. Sixty single-rooted teeth were randomly divided into five groups according to the fiber post used: Reforpost (opaque [control]), exacto, white post, radix, and Macro-Lock Illusion X-RO. The roots were subjected to chemomechanical preparation and cemented with self-adhesive resin cement. The teeth were sectioned into slices of the different root thirds and tested for bond strength (push-out). Two-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni test were used to verify statistical differences between groups (P 0.05). However, the performance of the posts demonstrated a significant difference (P fiber posts had the same performance irrespective of the root third evaluated. The predominant failure pattern was adhesive between resin cement and root dentin. In general, the different translucent fiber posts showed the same performance. Yet, translucent fiber posts did not show superior bond strength compared with the opaque fiber post in any of the root thirds evaluated.

  9. Hydrogen bonds of a novel resin cement contribute to high adhesion strength to human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Che; Wang, Da-Ming; Lin, Yu-Chen; Dai, Chi-An; Cheng, Kuo-Chung; Hu, Mei-Shan; Lee, Bor-Shiunn

    2016-01-01

    The detachment of fiber posts from root canals is primarily caused by the loss of adhesion between dentin and cement; therefore, the purpose of this study was to formulate a novel resin cement that improves the bond strength of fiber posts to the dentin-cement interface. Three concentrations (30, 35, and 40wt.%) of bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)-ethyl] phosphate (2MP) were prepared as dentin bonding agent components. Isobornyl acrylate (IBOA) and ethylhexylacrylate (EHA) were used as key components to fabricate the resin cement (named IE cement). The adhesive strengths of IE cement to coronal and root canal dentin were tested after placement of specimens in a water bath at 100% humidity and 37°C for either 24h or 5 months. The microtensile bond test, the push-out bond test, and the fracture toughness test were performed. Four commercially available resin cements (Nexus(®) third generation (NX3), Variolink II, RelyX Unicem, and Panavia F 2.0) were used for comparisons. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyze the interaction of collagen extracted from human dentin and 2MP as well as the fracture surfaces of the specimens submitted to the microtensile bond test. The 35% concentration of 2MP, in combination with IBOA and EHA, was the most effective for improving the IE cement's bond strength to dentin. The XPS results revealed that the phosphate groups of 2MP formed hydrogen bonds with the collagen and that such bonds prominently decreased in number in the specimens that were stored for 5 months. The combination of 2MP, IBOA, and EHA can effectively increase the adhesive strength of IE cement to dentin via hydrogen bond formation. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. In vitro Evaluation of Stainless Steel Crowns cemented with Resin-modified Glass Ionomer and Two New Self-adhesive Resin Cements

    OpenAIRE

    Pathak, Sidhant; Shashibhushan, KK; Poornima, P; Reddy, VV Subba

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess and compare the retentive strength of two dual-polymerized self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE & SmartCem2, Dentsply Caulk) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC; RelyX Luting 2, 3M ESPE) on stainless steel crown (SSC). Materials and methods Thirty extracted teeth were mounted on cold cured acrylic resin blocks exposing the crown till the cemento-enamel junction. Pretrimmed, precontoured SSC was selected for a particular tooth. Standardized tooth prepara...

  11. In vitro shear bond strength of three self-adhesive resin cements and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement to various prosthodontic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Camila; Patel, Manthan; D'Silva, Eric

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of three self-adhesive resin cements and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) to different prosthodontic substrates. The substrates base metal, noble metal, zirconia, ceramic, and resin composite were used for bonding with different cements (n=12). Specimens were placed in a bonding jig, which was filled with one of four cements (RelyX Unicem, Multilink Automix, Maxcem Elite, and FujiCEM Automix). Both light-polymerizing (LP) and self-polymerizing (SP) setting reactions were tested. Shear bond strength was measured at 15 minutes and 24 hours in a testing device at a test speed of 1 mm/min and expressed in MPa. A Student t-test and a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to evaluate differences between setting reactions, between testing times, and among cements irrespective of other factors. Generalized linear regression model and Tukey tests were used for multifactorial analysis. Significantly higher mean SBS were demonstrated for LP mode relative to SP mode (pcement, substrate, and setting reaction) and all their interactions had a significant effect on the bond strength (padhesive resin cements (padhesive resin cements compared to the RMGICs. Bond strengths also varied depending on the substrate, indicating that selection of luting cement should be partially dictated by the substrate and the setting reaction.

  12. Addition of benzalkonium chloride to self-adhesive resin-cements: some clinically relevant properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz Ahmet, Serra; Mutluay, M Murat; Seyfioglu Polat, Zelal; Seseogullari Dirihan, Roda; Bek, Bulent; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu

    2014-11-01

    The clinical survival rates of the adhesive restorations are limited due to the deterioration of resin-dentin bonds over time, partly due to the endogenous enzymatic activity of dentin. Recently, benzalkonium chloride (BAC) has been shown to effectively inhibit endogenous protease activity of dentin. This study evaluated the effect of different concentrations of benzalkonium chloride (BAC) on the degree of conversion (DC), vickers hardness (VH), setting time (ST) and biaxial flexural strength (FS) of two self-adhesive resin luting cements (RC). Two RC SpeedCEM (Ivoclar-Vivadent) and BisCem (Bisco) were modified by addition of 0.1, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2 wt% BAC. The luting cements without the addition of BAC served as control. The DC (FT-IR/ATR from the bottom of the resin disc), vickers hardness (from top and bottom of the light-cured specimen), setting time (ISO 4049) and biaxial flexural strength (0.6 × 6 mm discs) of the specimens were tested. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukeys HSD. DC results were in the range of 70-80%, with some significant changes in BisCem (p adhesive resin luting cements during the mixing procedure does not significantly affect the degree of conversion or flexural strength of the luting agent and may be a good option to improve the durability of adhesive interface.

  13. Influence of Er,Cr: YSGG laser on bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Coelho Bandéca

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the bond strength of fiber post previously laser treated root canals. Forty single-rooted bovine teeth were endodontically treated, randomly and equally divided into two main groups according to the type of pretreatment: G1: 2.5% NaOCl (control group; and G2: Er,Cr:YSGG laser. Each group was further subdivided into 2 groups based on the category of adhesive systems/ luting materials used: a: an etch-and-rinse resin cement (Single Bond/RelyX ARC; 3M ESPE, and b: a self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X Unicem; 3M ESPE. Three 1.5 mm thick slabs were obtained per root and the push-out test was performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until post dislodgement occurred. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's test at a pre-set alpha of 0.05. Analysis of variance showed no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05 among the groups G1a (25.44 ± 2.35 and G1b (23.62 ± 3.48, G2a (11.77 ± 2.67 and G2b (9.93 ± 3.37. Fractures were observed at the interface between the dentin and the resin in all groups. The Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation did not influence on the bond strength of the resin cements and the etch-and-rinse resin cement had better results on bond strength than self-adhesive resin cement.

  14. In vitro Evaluation of Stainless Steel Crowns cemented with Resin-modified Glass Ionomer and Two New Self-adhesive Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Sidhant; Shashibhushan, K K; Poornima, P; Reddy, Vv Subba

    2016-01-01

    To assess and compare the retentive strength of two dual-polymerized self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE & SmartCem2, Dentsply Caulk) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC; RelyX Luting 2, 3M ESPE) on stainless steel crown (SSC). Thirty extracted teeth were mounted on cold cured acrylic resin blocks exposing the crown till the cemento-enamel junction. Pretrimmed, precontoured SSC was selected for a particular tooth. Standardized tooth preparation for SSC was performed by single operator. The crowns were then luted with either RelyX U200 or SmartCem2 or RelyX Luting 2 cement. Retentive strength was tested using Instron universal testing machine. The retentive strength values were recorded and calculated by the formula: Load/Area. One-way analysis of variance was used for multiple comparisons followed by post hoc Tukey's test for groupwise comparisons. Unpaired t-test was used for intergroup comparisons. RelyX U200 showed significantly higher retentive strength than rest of the two cements (p 0.05). The retentive strength of dual-polymerized self-adhesive resin cements was better than RMGIC, and RelyX U200 significantly improved crown retention when compared with SmartCem2 and RelyX Luting 2. Pathak S, Shashibhushan KK, Poornima P, Reddy VVS. In vitro Evaluation of Stainless Steel Crowns cemented with Resin-modified Glass Ionomer and Two New Self-adhesive Resin Cements. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(3):197-200.

  15. The effect of time between handling and photoactivation on self-adhesive resin cement properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Fonseca, Andrea Soares Quirino; Mizrahi, Jamil; Menezes, Livia Rodrigues; Valente, Lisia Lorea; de Moraes, Rafael Ratto; Schneider, Luis Felipe

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the degree of conversion, absorption, and solubility in water of self-adhesive resin cements subjected to different time intervals between material preparation and the photoactivation procedure. Two dual self-adhesive resin cements were tested: RelyX Unicem and SmartCem2. The degree of conversion as a function of time was evaluated by Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy using the attenuated total reflectance technique. Three time intervals between handling and photoactivation were applied: Group 1 = immediately; Group 2 = a 1-minute interval; Group 3 = a 4-minute interval. All specimens were irradiated with a light-emitting diode source for 40 seconds. Thirty discs of each cement (1 mm thick × 6 mm diameter, n = 10) were prepared for the absorption and solubility tests. These specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 90 days. The results were subjected to ANOVA with two factors (material and activation time intervals) and Tukey's test (95% significance). The 4-minute interval significantly reduced the degree of conversion of SmartCem2 (30.6% ± 8.3%). No other significant changes were observed for the degree of conversion; however, the time intervals before photoactivation interfered significantly in the water absorption of the RelyX Unicem specimens but not the SmartCem2 specimens. The time intervals did not affect the solubility of either cement. In all cases, SmartCem2 had higher solubility than RelyX Unicem. The time interval between handling and photoactivation significantly influenced the degree of conversion and water sorption of the resin-based cements. In general, one can say that the self-adhesive resin cements should be photoactivated as soon as possible after the material handling process. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  16. Microleakage of ceramic inlays luted with different resin cements and dentin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uludag, Bulent; Ozturk, Ozge; Ozturk, A Nilgun

    2009-10-01

    Despite recent advances in adhesive dentistry, resin cement/dentin adhesive combinations are not able to prevent microleakage in ceramic inlays. Marginal quality of tooth-colored restorations in large Class II cavities is satisfactory in enamel margins, but microleakage in dentin margins remains a concern. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microleakage of all-ceramic inlays luted with 2 dual-polymerizing resin cements or 1 autopolymerizing resin cement in combination with different dentin adhesives. One hundred and twenty extracted human mandibular third molars were used in this study. Teeth were prepared to receive Class II MOD inlays with enamel gingival margins on 1 proximal surface and dentin gingival margins on the other surface. One hundred and twenty prepared teeth were divided into 3 groups of 40; 1 group for each resin cement: RelyX ARC, Variolink II, or Panavia 21. Each of the 3 groups were further divided into 4 dentin adhesive groups; Single Bond, ExciTE DSC, ED Primer, or Admira Bond. Each of the resin cements were used in combination with the 4 dentin adhesives, and IPS Empress ceramic inlays were placed with 12 different cement/adhesive combinations. After 1000 thermal cycles in a 5 degrees -55 degrees C water bath with a dwell time of 30 seconds, all specimens were subjected to cyclic axial mechanical loading. Then the restored teeth were stored in 0.5% basic fuchsin solution for 24 hours. The extent of dye penetration along the margins was measured with a stereomicroscope at x40 magnification. The data were evaluated statistically using repeated-measures ANOVA and Duncan tests (alpha=.05). Microleakage at dentin margins was greater than that at enamel margins (Pcements showed significantly lower microleakage results than Panavia 21 with all dentin adhesives in enamel margins. For dentin margins, Variolink II/Admira Bond combination showed the lowest microleakage value in dentin (P<.05). The overall microleakage at the enamel margins was

  17. Durability of microtensile bond to nonetched and etched feldspar ceramic: self-adhesive resin cements vs conventional resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Rodrigo Othávio; Castilho, Anderson A; Fernandes, Virgílio V; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of thermocycling (TC), self-adhesive resin cements and surface conditioning on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) between feldspathic ceramic blocks and resin cements. Fifty-six feldspathic ceramic blocks (10 x 7 x 5 mm) (Vita Mark II) were divided into groups according to the factors "resin cement" (3 cements) and "surface conditioning" (no conditioning or conditioning [10% hydrofluoric acid etching for 5 min + silanization]) (n = 8): group 1: conditioning+Variolink II (control group); group 2: no conditioning+Biscem; group 3: no conditioning+RelyX U100; group 4: no conditioning+Maxcem Elite; group 5: conditioning+ Biscem; group 6: conditioning+RelyX U100; group 7: conditioning+Maxcem Elite. The ceramic-cement blocks were sectioned to produce non-trimmed bar specimens (adhered cross-sectional area: 1 ± 0.1 mm2), which were divided into two storage conditions: dry, μTBS immediately after cutting; TC (12,000x, 5°C/55°C). Statistical significance was determined using two-way ANOVA (7 strategies and 2 storage conditions) and the post-hoc Tukey test (p cement and thermocycling affected the μTBS significantly (p = 0.001). In the dry condition, group 5 (18 ± 6.5 MPa) presented the lowest values of μTBS when compared to the other groups. TC decreased the mean μTBS values significantly (p cements tested (9.7 ± 2.3 to 22.1 ± 6.3 MPa), except for the resin cement RelyX U100 (22.1 ± 6.3 MPa). In groups 3 and 4, it was not possible to measure μTBS, since these groups had 100% pre-test failures during sectioning. Moreover, the same occurred in group 2 after TC, where 100% failure was observed during thermocycling (spontaneous failures). Hydrofluoric acid etching and silanization of the feldspathic ceramic surface are essential for bonding self-adhesive resin cement to a feldspathic ceramic, regardless of the resin cement used. Non-etched ceramic is not recommended.

  18. Reducing the incompatibility between two-step adhesives and resin composite luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Eugenio Jose; Reis, Alessandra; Arana-Correa, Beatriz Elena; Sepúlveda-Navarro, Wilmer Fabian; Higashi, Cristian; Gomes, João Carlos; Loguercio, Alessandro D

    2010-10-01

    To determine whether the adverse interaction between a two-step/acidic etch-and-rinse adhesive (One-Step Plus [OS], Bisco) and chemically cured resin luting cement [Variolink II, Ivoclar Vivadent] can improve adhesive coupling by reducing the dentin permeability with an oxalate desensitizer (BisBlock, Bisco). After exposing dentin on the occlusal surfaces of human third molars, bonding was performed on either oxalate treated (BB) or nontreated (NB) demineralized dentin. A resin luting cement was placed in the format of a crown following the light-curing mode (only with the base syringe [LC]) or the chemically curing mode (mixture of base and catalyst syringes [CC]). The activation of the LC or CC cements was either immediately [IM], meaning soon after the placement of LC and the initial set of CC cement (5 min), or after a delay of 20 min [DP] for both modes of polymerization. Five teeth were assigned to each experimental condition. Teeth were sectioned to obtain sticks with a cross-sectional area of 0.95 mm2, which were tested using the microtensile bond strength test soon after the specified periods of polymerization. The bond strength values of each adhesive were analyzed by three-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). Fractographic analysis of the specimens was performed using SEM. The delayed polymerization (for both LC and CC cements) produced low bond strength values compared to IM activation. When the BB was employed, the bond strength values of the CC cement was approximately doubled, while the BB did not affect the bond strength of the LC cement. Bond strength values of LC cements were higher than CC. The use of BB significantly improved the bond strength of CC cement only. The morphological observations confirmed the bond strength results. A myriad of voids could be detected in the luting cement side when BB was not applied, except for the immediately light-cured group. The use of an oxalate desensitizer (BisBlock) reduced the

  19. Influence of shade of adhesive resin cement on its polymerization shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ender Akan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Resin cements have the ability to bond to the tooth structure and to several indirect restorative materials and they are available in different transparency and shades. However, polymerization shrinkage remains to be a problem that leads to gap formation at the margins of restoration, and accordingly microleakage may occur. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the shade of adhesive resin cement on its polymerization shrinkage. Five shades (Group 1: universal; Group 2: brown; Group 3: clear; Group 4: opaque white; Group 5: opaque yellow of a dual-cure composite cement system (Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan were studied with 10 specimens of each shade. Volumetric shrinkages of the composite cements of these five shades were evaluated using a video-imaging device (Acu-Vol; Bisco, Inc. by measuring the volumes before and after polymerization. Different shades displayed different volumetric shrinkages. Group 5 (2.62% and Group 2 (3.96% displayed the lowest and highest shrinkage percentages, respectively, with their respective shrinkage values being significantly different from those of the other groups (p < 0.05. The obtained results indicate that the shade of resin cement does affect its degree of polymerization shrinkage.

  20. Microtensile bond strength of glass fiber posts cemented with self-adhesive and self-etching resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitter, Suellen; Sousa-Neto, Manoel D; Roperto, Renato C; Silva-Sousa, Yara T; El-Mowafy, Omar

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the bond strength of glass fiber posts to intraradicular dentin when cemented with self-etching and self-adhesive resin cements. Forty-eight single-rooted human teeth were decoronated, endodontically treated, post-space prepared and divided into 8 groups (n = 6). The glass fiber posts used were: Exacto (EA) (Angelus) and everStick (ES) (StichTeck), which were cemented with two self-adhesive resin cements: BisCem (BIS) (Bisco) and Rely-X Unicem (UNI) (3M/ESPE), and two self-etching resin cements: Esthetic Cementing System NAC100 (NAC) (Kuraray) and Panavia-F (PAN) (Kuraray). Specimens were thermocycled between 5°C and 55 °C for 1000 cycles and stored in water at 37°C for 1 month. Four 1-mm-thick (in cross section) rods were obtained from the cervical region of the roots. Specimens were then subjected to microtensile testing in a special machine (BISCO; Schaumburg, IL, USA) or a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Microtensile bond strength (μTBS) data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests. Means (and SD) of μTBS (MPa) were: EA/PAN: 10.3 (4.1), EA/NAC: 14 (5.1) EA/BIS: 16.4 (4.8), EA/UNI: 19.8 (5.1), ES/PAN: 25.9 (6.1), ES/NAC: 29.1 (7), ES/BIS: 28.9 (6), ES/UNI: 30.5 (6.6). ANOVA indicated significant differences among the groups (p post were significantly higher than those obtained with EA (p post (p > 0.05). μTBS values obtained with ES post were significantly higher than those obtained with EA post irrespective of the resin cement used. everStick posts resulted in the highest mean μTBS values with all cements. Self-adhesive cements performed well in terms of bond strength.

  1. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

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    Cafer Türkmen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group: direct composite resin restoration (Alert with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive, Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia luted with a resin cement (Cement-It combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond, Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. RESULTS: The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7 showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05. The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. CONCLUSION: The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces.

  2. [Hardness development of self-adhesive resin cement in simulated root canal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hong; Lan, Weidong; Meng, Xiangfeng

    2012-06-01

    To compare the hardness development of dual-cured self-adhesive and universal resin cement in simulated root canal. The light-proof half-cylinder steel slot with one end open were syringed and filled respectively by self-adhesive A (RelyX Unicem), B (BisCem) and universal C (DUOLINK) resin cements, then the open end of slot was irradiated directly by a light unit for 20 s. Specimens were stored in a light-proof box for 0.5 h, Knoop microhardness was measured along the vertical surfaces of specimens from 1 mm to 10mm depth at 1 mm intervals. The same measurements were taken at 24 h and 120 h after irradiation. Data were analyzed by One-way ANOVA. Hardness of each group decreased with the increase of simulated canal depth (Phardness showed no significant change between 5 mm and more depth of group A, between 4 mm and more depth of group B and C. The increase of hardness for each group was more rapid within 0.5 h after irradiation, thereafter the hardness increased gradually to maximum at 24 h. At 120 h after irradiation, hardness of group C was greater than that of other two groups at more than 1 mm depth (Phardness has significant difference between self-adhesive and universal resin cements, however their hardness development is similar.

  3. Effect of conditioner on microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonial, Daniela; Ghiggi, Paula Cristine; Lise, André Amorim; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Oshima, Hugo Mitsuo Silva; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2010-01-01

    Evaluate, in vitro, the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of RelyX ARC conventional resin cement and RelyX Unicem and Maxcem self-adhesive resin cements to dentin, and the influence of polyacrylic acid pretreatment on the µTBS. Flat dentin surfaces were obtained in 15 third molars which were randomly divided into 5 groups: Group 1 - RelyX ARC (control); Group 2 - RelyX Unicem; Group 3 - Maxcem Elite; Group 4 - 22.5% polyacrylic acid and RelyX Unicem; Group 5 - 22.5% polyacrylic acid and Maxcem Elite. A block of composite resin was built over the resin cements. The samples were sectioned to obtain beams, and 20 specimens for each group were submitted to µTBS on a universal testing machine. Failure modes were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. According to ANOVA and Tukey test, the highest µTBS mean (MPa) was obtained with RelyX ARC (21.38), which did not differ statistically from Maxcem Elite with polyacrylic acid pretreatment (19.22) and RelyX Unicem with polyacrylic acid pretreatment (17.75) (p>0.05). The latter two groups did not differ statistically from RelyX Unicem (16.98) (p>0.05). The lowest mean was obtained for Maxcem Elite (6.43), which differed statistically from the other groups (padhesive for Maxcem Elite without polyacrylic acid pretreatment, and mixed failures were predominant in the other groups. RelyX ARC achieved higher µTBS to dentin in comparison to the self-adhesive resin cements. Polyacrylic acid pretreatment was effective in improving the µTBS of Maxcem Elite, but did not influence the µTBS for RelyX Unicem.

  4. Effect of dentin surface modification on the microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broyles, Allison C; Pavan, Sabrina; Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina

    2013-01-01

    To explore the potential to modify human dentin surface as a means of improving the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of resin cement to dentin. Sound human molars were collected, and their occlusal surfaces were ground flat to expose polished dentin. Indirect composite resin cylinders were cemented to the teeth with RelyX Unicem or G-Cem self-adhesive cements following dentin surface treatments: 6.5% grape-seed extract, 5% glutaraldehyde, or 25% polyacrylic acid and control (no pretreatment). After 24 hours, the teeth were sectioned into beams to produce a cross-sectional area of 1.0 mm(2). Specimens of each group (n = 25) were individually mounted on a jig and placed on a tensile testing machine. A tensile force was applied to failure at a 1 mm/min crosshead speed. The use of polyacrylic acid on dentin prior to cementation with RelyX Unicem resulted in a statistically significant increase in μTBS compared to the control group (p= 0.0282). Polyacrylic acid (p= 0.0016) or glutaraldehyde (p= 0.0043) resulted in a statistically significant increase in μTBS of G-Cem to dentin when compared to the control group. Treatment with grape-seed extract did not result in a statistically significant increase in μTBS for either cement (p > 0.05). Priming dentin surfaces prior to the use of self-adhesive resin cements may be a promising means of improving μTBS. In addition, it was concluded that the results of this study are material dependent as well as being dependent of the type of dentin primer. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  5. Shear bond strength of self-adhesive resins compared to resin cements with etch and rinse adhesives to enamel and dentin in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lührs, A-K; Guhr, S; Günay, H; Geurtsen, W

    2010-04-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements should ease the placement of dental restorations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate their shear bond strength to enamel and dentin. Sixty molars were randomly assigned to 12 test groups (each n = 10), and the approximal surfaces were ground flat to get an enamel and dentin surface with a diameter of at least 4 mm. Ceramic specimens were bonded to the surfaces with either Variolink/Syntac Classic (VSC), Panavia F2.0 (PAF), RelyX Unicem (RLX), Maxcem Elite (MCE), iCem (IC), or an experimental self-adhesive resin cement (EXP). The shear bond strength (crosshead speed: 1 mm/min) was measured after 24-h storage in NaCl (37 degrees C). The fracture modes were determined with a stereomicroscope (magnification, 8-50-fold). VSC had the highest shear bond strength within the enamel groups (42.9 +/- 9 MPa) and IC the lowest (10.5 +/- 4.2 MPa, p bond strength was determined for VSC (39.2 +/- 8.9 MPa, p bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements was inferior compared to conventional composite resin cements.

  6. Bond strength durability of self-etching adhesives and resin cements to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima; de Melo, Renata Marques; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Camargo, Fernanda Pelógia; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Balducci, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply) and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco) self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond) or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar) within a short (24 h) and long period of evaluation (90 days). Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10). The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y), producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm(2) cross-sectional area, which were subjected to microTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The microTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (alpha= 0.05). The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, padhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water.

  7. Comparative Shear-Bond Strength of Six Dental Self-Adhesive Resin Cements to Zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Si-Eun; Bae, Ji-Hyeon; Choi, Jae-Won; Jeon, Yong-Chan; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Yoon, Mi-Jung; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    This study compared shear bond strength (SBS) of six self-adhesive resin cements (SARC) and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) to zirconia before and after thermocycling. The cylinder shape (Φ 2.35 mm × 3 mm) of six SARCs (G-CEM LinkAce (GLA), Maxcem Elite (MAX), Clearfil SA Luting (CSL), PermaCem 2.0 (PM2), Rely-X U200 (RXU), Smartcem 2 (SC2)) were bonded to the top surface of the zirconia specimens with light-curing. RMGIC (Fujicem (FJC)) was bonded to the specimens with self-curing. The shear bond strength of all cemented specimens was measured with universal testing machine. Half of the specimens were thermocycled 5000 times before shear bonding strength testing. Fractured surfaces were examined with a field-emission SEM (10,000×) and analyzed by energy dispersive x-ray analysis. MAX, PM2, SC2 group without thermocycling and GLA, MAX, PM2 group with thermocycling showed adhesive failure, but GLA, CSL, RXU, FJC group without thermocycling and SLC, RXU, SC2, FJC group with thermocycling indicated cohesive failure. Within the limitation of this study, All of SARCs except MAX demonstrated higher bond strength than that of RMGIC regardless of thermocycling. Also, SARC containing MDP monomers (CSL) retained better bonds than other cements.

  8. Comparative Shear-Bond Strength of Six Dental Self-Adhesive Resin Cements to Zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Eun Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compared shear bond strength (SBS of six self-adhesive resin cements (SARC and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC to zirconia before and after thermocycling. The cylinder shape (Φ 2.35 mm × 3 mm of six SARCs (G-CEM LinkAce (GLA, Maxcem Elite (MAX, Clearfil SA Luting (CSL, PermaCem 2.0 (PM2, Rely-X U200 (RXU, Smartcem 2 (SC2 were bonded to the top surface of the zirconia specimens with light-curing. RMGIC (Fujicem (FJC was bonded to the specimens with self-curing. The shear bond strength of all cemented specimens was measured with universal testing machine. Half of the specimens were thermocycled 5000 times before shear bonding strength testing. Fractured surfaces were examined with a field-emission SEM (10,000× and analyzed by energy dispersive x-ray analysis. MAX, PM2, SC2 group without thermocycling and GLA, MAX, PM2 group with thermocycling showed adhesive failure, but GLA, CSL, RXU, FJC group without thermocycling and SLC, RXU, SC2, FJC group with thermocycling indicated cohesive failure. Within the limitation of this study, All of SARCs except MAX demonstrated higher bond strength than that of RMGIC regardless of thermocycling. Also, SARC containing MDP monomers (CSL retained better bonds than other cements.

  9. IPS Empress inlays luted with a self-adhesive resin cement after 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taschner, Michael; Frankenberger, Roland; García-Godoy, Franklin; Rosenbusch, Silke; Petschelt, Anselm; Krämer, Norbert

    2009-02-01

    To prospectively compare the clinical performance of two different resin composites for luting IPS Empress inlays and onlays. 83 IPS Empress restorations were placed in 30 subjects. All restorations were inserted under rubber dam. 43 inlays/onlays were luted with a self-adhesive resin cement [RelyX Unicem (RX)]. A multistep adhesive (Syntac) was used with Variolink II low viscosity (SV) and served as control (n=40). The restorations were evaluated after 2 weeks: Baseline = 1st recall (R1), after 6 months (R2) and after 1 year (R3) by two calibrated examiners using the modified USPHS criteria. From R1 to R3, one failure was noticed in the SV group (R2) due to marginal enamel chipping. After 1 year of clinical service, SV revealed significantly better results regarding color match and integrity inlay (Mann-Whitney U-test, P0.05).

  10. In-vitro evaluation of an experimental method for bonding of orthodontic brackets with self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazanzadeh, Barat Ali; Merati, Mohsen; Shafaee, Hooman; Dogon, Leon; Sohrabi, Keyvan

    2013-01-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements do not require the surface treatment of teeth and are said to release fluoride, which makes them suitable candidates for bonding of orthodontic brackets. The objectives of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of self-adhesive resin cements on etched on non-etched surfaces in vitro and to assess their fluoride release features. Four fluoride-releasing dual-cure self-adhesive resin cements were investigated. For SBS experiment, 135 freshly extracted human maxillary premolars were used and divided into nine groups of 15 teeth. In the control group, brackets were cemented by Transbond XT (3M Unitek, USA), in four groups self-adhesive resin cements were used without acid-etching and in four groups self-adhesive cements were applied on acid-etched surfaces and the brackets were then deboned in shear with a testing machine. Adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were also calculated. For fluoride release investigation, 6 discs were prepared for each self-adhesive cement. Transbond XT and Fuji Ortho LC (GC, Japan) served as negative and positive control groups, respectively. The fluoride release of each disc into 5 ml of deionized water was measured at days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 56 using a fluoride ion-selective electrode connected to an ion analyzer. To prevent cumulative measurements, the storage solutions were changed daily. The SBS of brackets cemented with Transbond XT were significantly higher compared to self-adhesives applied on non-etched surfaces (Padhesive resin cements were used with enamel etching, no significant differences was found in the SBS compared to Transbond XT, except for Breeze. The comparisons of the ARI scores indicated that bracket failure modes were significantly different between the etched and non-etched groups. All self-adhesive cements released clinically sufficient amounts of fluoride for an extended period of time. For the tested cements, the strongest bonds were obtained by enamel acid

  11. Adhesion of 10-MDP containing resin cements to dentin with and without the etch-and-rinse technique

    OpenAIRE

    Turp, Volkan; Sen, Deniz; Tuncelli, Betul; Özcan, Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study evaluated the adhesion of 10-MDP containing self-etch and self-adhesive resin cements to dentin with and without the use of etch-and-rinse technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Human third molars (N=180) were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=30 per group). Conventional (Panavia F2.0, Kuraray-PAN) and self-adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA, Kuraray-CSA) were bonded to dentin surfaces either after application of 3-step etch-and-rinse (35% H3PO4 + ED Primer) or two-step sel...

  12. Adhesion of conventional and simplified resin-based luting cements to superficial and deep dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Mutlu; Mese, Ayse

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated the bond strengths of conventional (chemically and dual-polymerized) and simplified resin-based luting cements with their corresponding adhesives to superficial dentin (SD) and deep dentin (DD). Recently extracted third molars (N = 70, n = 10 per group) were obtained and prepared for testing procedures. After using their corresponding etchants, primers, and/or adhesive systems, the conventional and simplified cements (Variolink II [group A, conventional], Bifix QM [group B, conventional], Panavia F2.0 [group C, conventional], Multilink Automix [group D, simplified], Superbond C&B [group E, conventional], Clearfil Esthetic Cement [group F, simplified], Ketac-Fil [group G, conventional]) were adhered incrementally onto the dentin surfaces using polyethylene molds (inner diameter 3.5 mm, height 5 mm) and polymerized accordingly. Resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) acted as the control material. Shear bond strengths (1 mm/min) were determined after 500 times of thermocycling. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used to analyze the data (α = 0.05). Bond strength (MPa) results were significantly affected by the cement types and their corresponding adhesive systems (p ≤ 0.05). The shear bond strengths (MPa ± SD) for groups A-G were 14.6 ± 3.8, 18.9 ± 3.9, 5.5 ± 4.5, 3.1 ± 3.6, 1.1 ± 2.5, 15.5 ± 2.6, 7 ± 4.3 and 7.1 ± 5.8, 15.1 ± 7.8, 8.4 ± 7.3, 7.5 ± 7.3, 4.9 ± 5.1, 12.5 ± 2.1, 6 ± 2.6 for SD and DD, respectively. The level of dentin depth did not decrease the bond strength significantly (p > 0.05) for all cements, except for Variolink II (p dentin compared to conventional resin cements tested.

  13. Bond strength of resin cements to Co-Cr and Ni-Cr metal alloys using adhesive primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francescantonio, Marina; de Oliveira, Marcelo Tavares; Garcia, Rubens Nazareno; Romanini, José Carlos; da Silva, Nelson Renato França Alves; Giannini, Marcelo

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of adhesive primers (APs) applied to Co-Cr and Ni-Cr metal alloys on the bond strength of resin cements to alloys. Eight cementing systems were evaluated, consisting of four resin cements (Bistite II DC, LinkMax, Panavia F 2.0, RelyX Unicem) with or without their respective APs (Metaltite, Metal Primer II, Alloy Primer, Ceramic Primer). The two types of dental alloys (Co-Cr, Ni-Cr) were cast in plate specimens (10 x 5 x 1 mm(3)) from resin patterns. After casting, the plates were sandblasted with aluminum oxide (100 microm) and randomly divided into eight groups (n = 6). Each surface to be bonded was treated with one of eight cementing systems. Three resin cement cylinders (0.5 mm high, 0.75 mm diameter) were built on each bonded metal alloy surface, using a Tygon tubing mold. After water storage for 24 hours, specimens were subjected to micro-shear testing. Data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's studentized range test. The application of Metal Primer II resulted in a significantly higher bond strength for LinkMax resin cement when applied in both metal alloys. In general, the cementing systems had higher bond strengths in Co-Cr alloy than in Ni-Cr. The use of AP between alloy metal surfaces and resin cements did not increase the bond strength for most cementing systems evaluated.

  14. Intra-radicular dentin treatments and retention of fiber posts with self-adhesive resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Faria-e-Silva

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of treating intraradicular dentin with irrigating solutions on the retention of glass-fiber posts luted with self-adhesive resin cement. Bovine incisors were endodontically treated, and 9-mm-deep postholes were prepared. Before inserting the cement, the root canals were irrigated with various solutions: 11.5% polyacrylic acid for 30 s, 17% EDTA for 60 s, or 5% NaOCl for 60 s, respectively. Irrigation with distilled water was used in the control group. After all specimens had been rinsed with distilled water, the excess moisture was removed and the posts were luted using either BisCem (Bisco or RelyX Unicem clicker (3M ESPE. Seven days after luting, the specimens were sectioned transversally into 1-mm-thick slices, which were submitted to push-out testing on a mechanical testing machine. Bond strength data (n = 6 per group were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' test (α = 0.05. For Unicem, EDTA showed lower bond strength than the other solutions, which had similar results. For BisCem, EDTA showed higher bond strength than the other treatments, while application of NaOCl yielded higher bond strength than polyacrylic acid whereas the control group had intermediate results. In conclusion, irrigating root canals before insertion of self-adhesive resin cements, especially EDTA, might interfere with retention of the fiber posts.

  15. Bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Virgílio Vilas Boas; Rodrigues, José Roberto; da Silva, João Maurício Ferraz; Pagani, Clovis; Souza, Rodrigo Othávio Assunção

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of surface treatments and thermocycling on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of self-adhesive resin cement to human enamel and dentin. Eighty human third molars were selected. The crowns of 40 teeth were transversally sectioned, exposing the mid-coronal dentin. The buccal surfaces of the other 40 teeth were grinded to obtain a 5 mm2 flat enamel area. Eighty resin blocks were produced and cemented to the dental surfaces with RelyX Unicem, then grouped according to the surface treatment (n=10): UnicemC with no conditioning, UnicemP with 37% phosphoric acid/15 s, and UnicemPA with 37% phosphoric acid/15 s plus adhesive bonding (Single Bond 2). There were two control groups, one for enamel and the other for dentin: VR with 37% phosphoric acid/15 s plus adhesive bonding (Single Bond 2) plus Variolink II. The enamel-dentin resin cement blocks were sectioned to produce non-trimmed bar specimens, which were divided into two storage conditions: dry, μTBS immediately after cutting; TC (5,000 x; 5°C/55°C). The samples were submitted to μTBS, and data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test. The results showed statistical differences between UnicemC and the others. UnicemPA and VR showed better bond strength to dentin during the period before and after thermocycling, respectively. For the enamel, UnicemP showed better bond strength for both situations. Only for UnicemPA did the thermocycling significantly decrease the bond strength values. Within the limits of this study, it could be concluded that the bond strength is influenced by the surface treatments, and that thermocycling decreases the bond strength of all groups, but significantly only for UnicemPA.

  16. In vitro evaluation of the bonding durability of self-adhesive resin cement to titanium using highly accelerated life test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bonding durability of three self-adhesive resin cements to titanium using the Highly Accelerated Life Test (HALT). The following self-adhesive resin cements were used to bond pairs of titanium blocks together according to manufacturers' instructions: RelyX Unicem, Breeze, and Clearfil SA Luting. After storage in water at 37°C for 24 h, bonded specimens (n=15) immersed in 37°C water were subjected to cyclic shear load testing regimes of 20, 30, or 40 kg using a fatigue testing machine. Cyclic loading continued until failure occurred, and the number of cycles taken to reach failure was recorded. The bonding durability of a self-adhesive resin cement to titanium was largely influenced by the weight of impact load. HALT showed that Clearfil SA Luting, which contained MDP monomer, yielded the highest median bonding lifetime to titanium.

  17. Effect of curing mode on the micro-mechanical properties of dual-cured self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, Nicoleta; Simon, Alexander

    2012-04-01

    Light supplying to luting resin cements is impeded in several clinical situations, causing us to question whether materials can properly be cured to achieve adequately (or adequate) mechanical properties. The aim of this study was therefore to analyse the effect of light on the micro-mechanical properties of eight popular dual-cured self-adhesive resin cements by comparing them with two conventional, also dual-cured, resin cements. Four different curing procedures were applied: auto-polymerisation (dark curing) and light curing (LED unit, Freelight 2, 20 s) by applying the unit directly on the samples' surface, at a distance of 5 and 10 mm. Twenty minutes after curing, the samples were stored for 1 week at 37°C in a water-saturated atmosphere. The micro-mechanical properties-Vickers hardness, modulus of elasticity, creep and elastic/plastic deformation-were measured. Data were analysed with multivariate ANOVA followed by Tukey's test and partial eta-squared statistics (p cement-conventional or self-adhesive-was generally low. The influence of light on the polymerisation process was material dependent, with four different behaviour patterns to be distinguished. As a material category, significantly higher micro-mechanical properties were measured for the conventional compared to the self-adhesive resin cements, although this difference was low. Within the self-adhesive resin cements group, the variation in micro-mechanical properties was high. The selection of suitable resin cements should be done by considering, besides its adhesive properties, its micro-mechanical properties and curing behaviour also.

  18. Adhesive quality of self-adhesive and conventional adhesive resin cement to Y-TZP ceramic before and after aging conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; May, Liliana Gressler; Barca, Diana Capelli; Ozcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the adhesive quality of simplified self-adhesive and conventional resin cements to Y-TZP in dry and aged conditions. Y-TZP ceramic blocks (N = 192) (5 x 5 x 2 mm) were embedded in acrylic resin and randomly divided into two groups, based on surface conditioning: 96% isopropanol or chairside tribochemical silica coating and silanization. Conditioned ceramics were divided into four groups to receive the resin cements (Panavia F 2.0, Variolink II, RelyX U100 and Maxcem). After 24 hours, half of the specimens (n = 12) from each group were submitted to shear bond strength testing (0.5 mm/minute). The remaining specimens were tested after 90 days of water storage at 37 degrees C and thermocycling (12,000x, 5 degrees C-55 degrees C). Failure types were then assessed. The data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and the Tukey's test (alpha = 0.05). Significant effects of ceramic conditioning, cement type and storage conditions were observed (p adhesion varied, depending on the adhesive cement type.

  19. Effects of etching and adhesive applications on the bond strength between composite resin and glass-ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamir, Tijen; Sen, Bilge Hakan; Evcin, Ozgür

    2012-01-01

    This study determined the effects of various surface treatment modalities on the bond strength of composite resins to glass-ionomer cements. Conventional (Ketac Molar Quick Applicap) or resin-modified (Photac Fil Quick Aplicap) glass-ionomer cements were prepared. Two-step etch-rinse & bond adhesive (Adper Single Bond 2) or single-step self-etching adhesive (Adper Prompt L-Pop) was applied to the set cements. In the etch-rinse & bond group, the sample surfaces were pre-treated as follows: (1) no etching, (2) 15 s of etching with 35% phosphoric acid, (3) 30 s of etching, and (4) 60 s of etching. Following the placement of the composite resin (Filtek Z250), the bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine and the data obtained were analyzed with the two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by the Tukey's HSD post hoc analysis (p=0.05). Then, the fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The bond strength of the composite resin to the conventional glass-ionomer cement was significantly lower than that to the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (padhesives at any etching time (p>0.05). However, a greater bond strength was obtained with 30 s of phosphoric acid application. The resin-modified glass-ionomer cement improved the bond strength of the composite resin to the glass-ionomer cement. Both etch-rinse & bond and self-etching adhesives may be used effectively in the lamination of glass-ionomer cements. However, an etching time of at least 30 s appears to be optimal.

  20. Effects of etching and adhesive applications on the bond strength between composite resin and glass-ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijen Pamir

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study determined the effects of various surface treatment modalities on the bond strength of composite resins to glass-ionomer cements. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Conventional (KetacTM Molar Quick ApplicapTM or resin-modified (PhotacTM Fil Quick AplicapTM glass-ionomer cements were prepared. Two-step etch-rinse & bond adhesive (AdperTM Single Bond 2 or single-step self-etching adhesive (AdperTM PromptTM L-PopTM was applied to the set cements. In the etch-rinse & bond group, the sample surfaces were pre-treated as follows: (1 no etching, (2 15 s of etching with 35% phosphoric acid, (3 30 s of etching, and (4 60 s of etching. Following the placement of the composite resin (FiltekTM Z250, the bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine and the data obtained were analyzed with the two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by the Tukey's HSD post hoc analysis (p=0.05. Then, the fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: The bond strength of the composite resin to the conventional glass-ionomer cement was significantly lower than that to the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (p0.05. However, a greater bond strength was obtained with 30 s of phosphoric acid application. CONCLUSIONS: The resin-modified glass-ionomer cement improved the bond strength of the composite resin to the glass-ionomer cement. Both etch-rinse & bond and self-etching adhesives may be used effectively in the lamination of glass-ionomer cements. However, an etching time of at least 30 s appears to be optimal.

  1. Dentin deproteinization effect on bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Sampaio Lisboa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of deproteinization on the bond strength between self-adhesive resin cements and dentin surfaces that were untreated (control, acid-etched, or acid-etched and subjected to a post-etch deproteinization treatment. Cylinders of RelyX Unicem or BisCem (n = 6 cement were build-up on the dentin surfaces and tested to determine shear strength. The results were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%. While neither dentin pretreatment improved the bond strength for RelyX Unicem, deproteinization treatments resulted in greater bond strength in BisCem specimens while acid etching alone did not improve the performance of the material.

  2. Push-out bond strength of CAD/CAM-ceramic luted to dentin with self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Simon; Lussi, Adrian; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Zimmerli, Brigitte

    2010-09-01

    This study evaluated the initial and the artificially aged push-out bond strength between ceramic and dentin produced by one of five resin cements. Two-hundred direct ceramic restorations (IPS Empress CAD) were luted to standardized Class I cavities in extracted human molars using one of four self-adhesive cements (SpeedCEM, RelyX Unicem Aplicap, SmartCem2 and iCEM) or a reference etch-and-rinse resin cement (Syntac/Variolink II) (n=40/cement). Push-out bond strength (PBS) was measured (1) after 24h water storage (non-aged group; n=20/cement) or (2) after artificial ageing with 5000 thermal cycles followed by 6 months humid storage (aged group; n=20/cement). Nonparametrical ANOVA and pairwise Wilcoxon rank-sum tests with Bonferroni-Holm adjustment were applied for statistical analysis. The significance level was set at alpha=0.05. In addition, failure mode and fracture pattern were analyzed by stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscopy. Whereas no statistically significant effect of storage condition was found (p=0.441), there was a significant effect of resin cement (pcements. Syntac/Variolink II showed significantly higher PBS than SmartCEM2 (padhesive failure of cements at the dentin interface except for RelyX Unicem which in most cases showed cohesive failure in ceramic. The resin cements showed marked differences in push-out bond strength when used for luting ceramic restorations to dentin. Variolink II with the etch-and-rinse adhesive Syntac did not perform better than three of the four self-adhesive resin cements tested. Copyright 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bonding efficacy of new self-etching, self-adhesive dual-curing resin cements to dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Paula; Fernandes, Virgílio Vilas; Torres, Carlos Rocha; Pagani, Clovis

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of the union between two new self-etching self-adhesive resin cements and enamel using the microtensile bond strength test. Buccal enamel of 80 bovine teeth was submitted to finishing and polishing with metallographic paper to a refinement of #600, in order to obtain a 5-mm2 flat area. Blocks (2 x 4 x 4 mm) of laboratory composite resin were cemented to enamel according to different protocols: (1) untreated enamel + RelyX Unicem cement (RX group); (2) untreated enamel + Bifix SE cement (BF group); (3) enamel acid etching and application of resin adhesive Single Bond + RelyX Unicem (RXA group); (4) enamel acid etching and application of resin adhesive Solobond M + Bifix SE (BFA group). After 7 days of storage in distillated water at 37°C, the blocks were sectioned for obtaining microbar specimens with an adhesive area of 1 mm2 (n = 120). Specimens were submitted to the microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results (in MPa) were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test. Enamel pre-treatment with phosphoric acid and resin adhesive (27.9 and 30.3 for RXA and BFA groups) significantly improved (p ≤ 0.05) the adhesion of both cements to enamel compared to the union achieved with as-polished enamel (9.9 and 6.0 for RX and BF). Enamel pre-treatment with acid etching and the application of resin adhesive significantly improved the bond efficacy of both luting agents compared to the union achieved with as-polished enamel.

  4. Long-term bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to intraradicular dentin pretreated with chlorhexidine and ethanol

    OpenAIRE

    SANTOS, Mariah Carvalho Guimarães dos; AMARAL, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; Turssi,Cecília Pedroso; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Self-adhesive resin cements do not require prior preparation of the tooth surface, therefore dentin pretreatments may influence long-term bond strength. Objective To evaluate the influence of 100% ethanol (ET) and 2% chlorhexidine (CL) treatment of intraradicular dentin on the long-term bond strength (BS) of a self-adhesive resin cement (SRC). Material and method 80 bovine roots were restored with fiber posts and SRC (U200 3M/ESPE) and distributed into 4 groups accord...

  5. Effect of hydrophilicity on the compatibility between a dual-curing resin cement and one-bottle simplified adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Suh, Byoung In

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of the hydrophilicity of adhesives on the compatibility between one-bottle simplified adhesives and a dual-curing resin cement. Three experimental and two commercial adhesives (All-Bond Universal, OptiBond Allin- One) with the same or similar pH and various degrees of hydrophilicity were tested in this study. Extracted human dentin was treated with each adhesive and bonded with a dual-curing resin cement (Duolink), which was either light cured or chemically (self) cured (n = 10). Shear bond strength was tested using the Ultradent jig method, and failure modes were determined using a stereomicroscope. Water contact angle (as a measure of hydrophilicity/-phobicity) was measured on a fully cured adhesive (n = 10). The data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test. The quantitative relationship between the hydrophilicity and bond strength differences was analyzed (confidence level 95%). Among the experimental adhesives, differences in bond strengths between light-curing and self-curing modes were larger for the more hydrophilic adhesives. For the commercial adhesives, Optibond All-in-One had a lower contact angle than All-bond Universal (p Universal were 29.6 and 31.5, respectively (light cured), and 1.9 and 30.0, respectively (self-cured). Adhesive failure was a predominant mode for all adhesives except for All-Bond Universal. Regression analysis indicated a linear correlation between adhesives' hydrophilicity and bond strength differences (p adhesives were less compatible (larger bond strength differences between different curing modes) with this dual-curing resin cement. All-bond Universal is more hydrophobic than Optibond All-in-One and it is compatible with this self-/dual-curing resin cement.

  6. Conventional dual-cure versus self-adhesive resin cements in dentin bond integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Andreza Talaveira da Silva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available During post preparation, the root canal is exposed to the oral cavity, and endodontic treatment may fail because of coronal leakage, bacterial infection and sealing inability of the luting cement. OBJECTIVE: this study quantified the interfacial continuity produced with conventional dual-cure and self-adhesive resin cements in the cervical (C, medium (M and apical (A thirds of the root. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty single-rooted human teeth were restored using Reforpost # 01 conical glass-fiber posts and different materials (N=10 per group: group AC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + AllCem; group ARC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + RelyX ARC; group U100=RelyX U100; and group MXC=Maxcem Elite. After being kept in 100% humidity at 37°C for 72 hours, the samples were sectioned parallel to their longitudinal axis and positive epoxy resin replicas were made. The scanning electron micrographs of each third section of the teeth were combined using Image Analyst software and measured with AutoCAD-2002. We obtained percentage values of the interfacial continuity. RESULTS: Interfacial continuity was similar in the apical, medium and cervical thirds of the roots within the groups (Friedman test, p>0.05. Comparison of the different cements in a same root third showed that interfacial continuity was lower in MXC (C=45.5%; M=48.5%; A=47.3% than in AC (C=85.9%, M=81.8% and A=76.0%, ARC (C=83.8%, M=82.4% and A=75.0% and U100 (C=84.1%, M=82.4% and A=77.3% (Kruskal-Wallis test, p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Allcem, Rely X ARC and U100 provide the best cementation; cementation was similar among root portions; in practical terms, U100 is the best resin because it combines good cementation and easy application and none of the cements provides complete interfacial continuity.

  7. Effect of storage times and mechanical load cycling on dentin bond strength of conventional and self-adhesive resin luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Thaiane R; André, Carolina B; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Arrais, César A G; Ambrosano, Gláucia M B; Giannini, Marcelo

    2014-05-01

    The lack of long-term bond stability between resin cements and dentin may compromise the success of indirect restorations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term storage in artificial saliva and mechanical load cycling on the microtensile bond strength of conventional and self-adhesive resin cements to dentin. The occlusal dentin surfaces of 128 human molars were exposed and flattened. The teeth were assigned to 16 groups (n=8) according to resin cement and in vitro aging strategy. Two self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem and Clearfil SA Cement) and 2 conventional cementing systems (RelyX ARC and Clearfil Esthetic Cement) were used. Resin cements were applied to prepolymerized indirect resin disks, which were bonded to the dentin surfaces and light polymerized. The control groups were represented by immediate microtensile bond strength (24 hours) and aging methods were performed with mechanical load cycling or storage in artificial saliva (1 year and 2 years). Bonded beams were tested in tension until failure. Data (MPa) were analyzed by Proc Mixed for repeated measures and the Tukey-Kramer test (α=.05). The self-adhesive resin cements exhibited higher microtensile bond strength than conventional cementing systems for all conditions studied. The microtensile bond strength of RelyX ARC and self-adhesive resin cements did not decrease after storage in artificial saliva and mechanical load cycling. The Clearfil Esthetic Cement showed the lowest microtensile bond strength and a significant reduction after 2 years of storage in artificial saliva. The storage times and mechanical load cycling did not affect the microtensile bond strength of self-adhesives and RelyX ARC resin cements. The highest microtensile bond strength was obtained for self-adhesive resin cements, with no significant difference between them. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of Intracanal Irrigants on Bond Strength of Fiber Posts Cemented With a Self-adhesive Resin Cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, M S; Rosa, R A; Seballos, V G; Machado, E; Valandro, L F; Kaizer, O B; Só, Mvr; Bier, Cas

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of five intracanal irrigants on bond strength of fiber posts cemented with newer self-adhesive resin cement. A total of 60 extracted, single-rooted human premolars, sectioned at 14 mm, were prepared with the ProTaper Universal system with a size F3 instrument and filled with an F3 master cone and AH Plus. The root canal filling was partially removed, leaving 4 mm of apical gutta-percha. Specimens were randomly assigned to five groups (n=12), according to the solution used for dentin surface treatment before fiber post cementation, as follows: EDTA 17% (EDTA); QMix (QM); SmearClear (SC); 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and 0.9% saline solution (SS). Ultrasonic activation was performed (three times, 20 seconds each), and root canals were dried with paper points. Fiber posts were cemented with RelyX U200. In one specimen per group, rhodamine B dye was mixed with RelyX U200 to provide adequate fluorescence for confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) assessment. Specimens were transversally sectioned and three slices were obtained, one for each root third. Next, a push-out test was performed. A stereomicroscope and CLSM were used to analyze the failure modes and to illustrate the pattern of infiltration of RelyX U200 into dentinal tubules, respectively. Bond strength means were calculated, and analysis of variance and Bonferroni tests were used for statistical analysis. SS showed the highest mean bond strength values (11.5±5.3), superior to QM (5.1±3.1) and SC (5.1±3.3). NaOCl presented intermediary bond strength values (9.7±5.0), similar to EDTA (7.7±2.9) and SS. QM and SC showed the lowest mean bond strength (pfiber post cementation with self-adhesive resin cement, whereas chelating solutions, such as EDTA, QM, and SC, cause a decrease in bond strength.

  9. Direct Tensile Strength and Characteristics of Dentin Restored with All-Ceramic, Resin-Composite, and Cast Metal Prostheses Cemented with Resin Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morakot Piemjai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A dentin-cement-prosthesis complex restored with either all-porcelain, cured resin-composite, or cast base metal alloy and cemented with either of the different resin cements was trimmed into a mini-dumbbell shape for tensile testing. The fractured surfaces and characterization of the dentin-cement interface of bonded specimens were investigated using a Scanning Electron Microscope. A significantly higher tensile strength of all-porcelain (12.5 ± 2.2 MPa than that of cast metal (9.2 ± 3.5 MPa restorations was revealed with cohesive failure in the cement and failure at the prosthesis-cement interface in Super-Bond C&B group. No significant difference in tensile strength was found among the types of restorations using the other three cements with adhesive failure on the dentin side and cohesive failure in the cured resin. SEM micrographs demonstrated the consistent hybridized dentin in Super-Bond C&B specimens that could resist degradation when immersed in hydrochloric acid followed by NaOCl solutions whereas a detached and degraded interfacial layer was found for the other cements. The results suggest that when complete hybridization of resin into dentin occurs tensile strength at the dentin-cement is higher than at the cement-prosthesis interfaces. The impermeable hybridized dentin can protect the underlying dentin and pulp from acid demineralization, even if detachment of the prosthesis has occurred.

  10. Direct Tensile Strength and Characteristics of Dentin Restored with All-Ceramic, Resin-Composite, and Cast Metal Prostheses Cemented with Resin Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piemjai, Morakot; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    A dentin-cement-prosthesis complex restored with either all-porcelain, cured resin-composite, or cast base metal alloy and cemented with either of the different resin cements was trimmed into a mini-dumbbell shape for tensile testing. The fractured surfaces and characterization of the dentin-cement interface of bonded specimens were investigated using a Scanning Electron Microscope. A significantly higher tensile strength of all-porcelain (12.5 ± 2.2 MPa) than that of cast metal (9.2 ± 3.5 MPa) restorations was revealed with cohesive failure in the cement and failure at the prosthesis-cement interface in Super-Bond C&B group. No significant difference in tensile strength was found among the types of restorations using the other three cements with adhesive failure on the dentin side and cohesive failure in the cured resin. SEM micrographs demonstrated the consistent hybridized dentin in Super-Bond C&B specimens that could resist degradation when immersed in hydrochloric acid followed by NaOCl solutions whereas a detached and degraded interfacial layer was found for the other cements. The results suggest that when complete hybridization of resin into dentin occurs tensile strength at the dentin-cement is higher than at the cement-prosthesis interfaces. The impermeable hybridized dentin can protect the underlying dentin and pulp from acid demineralization, even if detachment of the prosthesis has occurred.

  11. The effect of simplified adhesives on the bond strength to dentin of dual-cure resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shade, A M; Wajdowicz, M N; Bailey, C W; Vandewalle, K S

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strengths to dentin of two dual-cure resin cements, one with a unique initiator, NX3 (Kerr Corp), and the other with a traditional redox-initiator system, Calibra (Dentsply), when used in combination with simplified or nonsimplified adhesive agents. The two dual-cure resin cements, in either self- or dual-cure activation modes, were bonded to human dentin with four dental adhesives to create 16 subgroups of 10 specimens each. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37°C, the specimens were tested in shear in a universal testing machine. With both NX3 and Calibra, bond strengths significantly increased when the specimens were dual cured. In addition, with either cement in either mode, the nonsimplified adhesives performed significantly better than did the simplified adhesive bonding agents. When used specifically with simplified adhesives in either cure mode, NX3 did not produce significantly higher bond strengths than did Calibra. In general, lower dentin bond strengths were found with simplified adhesives or self-cure activation with either resin cement.

  12. Influence of post-cure time on the microhardness of self-adhesive resin cements inside the root canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena, E; Fuentes, M V; Garrido, M A; Rodríguez, J; Ceballos, L

    2012-01-01

    To compare the microhardness of several dual-cure, self-adhesive resin cements used to lute fiber posts at 24 hours and seven days after cementation. Bovine incisors were selected to lute 15 fiber posts that were 12 mm long (FRC Postec Plus size 3, Ivoclar-Vivadent). Five resin cements were tested: Multilink Automix (Ivoclar-Vivadent), without light-curing, and the self-adhesive resin cements Maxcem Elite (Kerr), RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE), G-Cem (GC), and Smartcem 2 (Dentsply), which were light-cured for 40 seconds (LED Bluephase, Ivoclar-Vivadent). Each root was embedded in chemically cured acrylic resin and stored at 37°C for 24 hours. The roots were transversally sectioned into nine specimens that were each 1 mm thick, with three specimens corresponding to each root third. Indentations (100g, 30 seconds) were performed on each section in the resin cement, at 24 hours and seven days after cementation, using a Vickers digital microdurometer (Buehler). Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance, Student-Newman-Keuls test, and paired t-test (pcement evaluated, the root third, and their interactions on microhardness values at 24 hours and seven days after post cementation. RelyX Unicem and G-Cem exhibited the highest microhardness values, whereas Multilink Automix presented the lowest. All resin cements suffered a decrease in microhardness according to root canal depth, with the exception of G-Cem and Multilink Automix at 24 hours and Smartcem 2 after seven days. After seven days, the evaluated resin cements showed a significant increase in microhardness values, with the exception of Maxcem Elite and Smartcem 2 at the coronal third. Microhardness of the self-adhesive resin cements when used to lute fiber posts was material-dependent and higher values were obtained in the coronal third, revealing their sensitivity to light irradiation. More information regarding the polymerization reaction of these cements is warranted. According to the current results

  13. BOND STRENGTH DURABILITY OF SELF-ETCHING ADHESIVES AND RESIN CEMENTS TO DENTIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima; de Melo, Renata Marques; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Camargo, Fernanda Pelógia; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Balducci, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply) and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco) self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond) or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar) within a short (24 h) and long period of evaluation (90 days). Material and Methods: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10). The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y), producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm2 cross-sectional area, which were subjected to μTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The μTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05). Results: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, p<0.001). All eight experimental means (MPa) were compared by the Tukey's test (p<0.05) and the following results were obtained: Tyrian-One Step Plus/C&B/24 h (22.4±7.3); Tyrian-One Step Plus/Variolink II/24 h (39.4±11.6); Xeno III/C&B/24 h (40.3±12.9); Xeno III/Variolink II/24 h (25.8±10.5); Tyrian-One Step Plus/C&B/90 d (22.1±12.8) Tyrian-One Step Plus/VariolinkII/90 d (24.2±14.2); Xeno III/C&B/90 d (27.0±13.5); Xeno III/Variolink II/ 90 d (33.0±8.9). Conclusions: Xeno III/Variolink II was the luting agent/adhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water. PMID:19466243

  14. Bond strength durability of self-etching adhesives and resin cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina de Andrade Lima Chaves

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar within a short (24 h and long period of evaluation (90 days. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10. The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y, producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm² cross-sectional area, which were subjected to µTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The µTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05. RESULTS: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, p<0.001. All eight experimental means (MPa were compared by the Tukey's test (p<0.05 and the following results were obtained: Tyrian-One Step Plus /C&B/24 h (22.4±7.3; Tyrian-One Step Plus /Variolink II/24 h (39.4±11.6; Xeno III/C&B/24 h (40.3±12.9; Xeno III/Variolink II/24 h (25.8±10.5; Tyrian-One Step Plus /C&B/90 d (22.1±12.8 Tyrian-One Step Plus/VariolinkII/90 d (24.2±14.2; Xeno III/C&B/90 d (27.0±13.5; Xeno III/Variolink II/90 d (33.0±8.9. CONCLUSIONS: Xeno III/Variolink II was the luting agent/adhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water.

  15. Impact of different adhesives on work of adhesion between CAD/CAM polymers and resin composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keul, Christine; Müller-Hahl, Manuel; Eichberger, Marlis; Liebermann, Anja; Roos, Malgorzata; Edelhoff, Daniel; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2014-09-01

    To determine the impact of pre-treatment of adhesive systems on the work of adhesion (WA) between CAD/CAM polymers and resin composite cements and compare with conventional tests of previous studies. Surface parameters were measured by contact angle measurement (2700 measurements) and WA was calculated. Five CAD/CAM polymers were used for fabrication of specimens (n=75/subgroup): artBloc Temp (A), Telio CAD (B), Nano Composite CFI-C (C), exp. CAD/CAM nanohybrid composite (D), and LAVA Ultimate (E). Then, air-abraded specimens were pre-treated (n=15 per group): Ambarino P60 (I), Monobond Plus/Heliobond (II), visio.link (III), VP connect (IV), and no pre-treatment (V). Resin composite cement specimens (n=75) were smoothed out homogeneously on a glass plate (n=15/group): RelyX ARC (RXA), Variolink II (VAR), Panavia F2.0 (PAN), RelyX Unicem (RXU), and Clearfil SA Cement (CSA). Contact angles were determined with 3 drops of distilled water and diiodomethane each. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis-H test and Spearman-Rho correlation (p<0.05). CAD/CAM materials (B), (A), and (C) showed higher WA compared to (D) and (E). (II) and (IV) resulted in higher WA than (I), (III) and (V). VAR had the significantly lowest WA, followed by RXU, RXA, CSA and PAN. No correlation occurred between WA and TBS/SBS whereas polar component of surface free energy of CAD/CAM resin and spreading coefficient showed significant positive correlation with TBS/SBS. Determination of WA is not a proper method to draw conclusions about the bond between resin materials. Destructive test methods are not dispensable. The successful outcome of fixed dental restorations depends, among others, on the quality of bonding between the tooth and the restoration. Additional pre-treatment of the dental CAD/CAM resin restoration by bonding systems can be recommended for clinical use. Pre-treatment showed a significant impact on the surface properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Polymerization Mode of Self-Adhesive, Dual-Cured Dental Resin Cements Light Cured Through Various Restorative Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Ji Suk; Kang, Jeong Kyung; Jha, Nayansi; Ryu, Jae Jun

    2017-05-06

    The aim of this study was to investigate the polymerization mode of self-adhesive, dual-cured resin cements light-cured through overlying materials with different degree of translucency by measuring the degree of conversion (DC). Three kinds of self-adhesive, dual-cured resin cements (G-CEM LinkAceTM , Maxcem EliteTM , and BisCem® ) were light-cured through three different restorative materials that included porcelain-fused metal (PFM), zirconia, and lithium disilicate. Polymerization kinetics were continuously evaluated using infrared spectroscopy after 0, 5, 10, and 30 min and 2 weeks of mixing. Data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), one-way ANOVA, and Tukey's multiple-comparison test (α = 0.05). Regardless of the kind of resin cement, the light-cured groups showed higher DC than did the autopolymerization group under PFM at any point of time (p cements to achieve statistically similar DC between the zirconia and lithium disilicate groups increased in the following order: G-CEM LinkAceTM , BisCem® , and Maxcem EliteTM (p adhesive, dual-cured resin cements. The resin cements light-cured through lithium disilicate and zirconia showed higher DC than that shown by cements cured under PFM at any measurement time. The lithium disilicate and zirconia groups showed differences in the early stage of polymerization for G-CEM LinkAceTM and BisCem® ; however, the differences diminished at 2 weeks. Chemical polymerization is not sufficient to cause the resin cement to achieve the highest polymerization not only in early stage, but also in late stage of polymerization. The sensitivity to the intensity of the light was different for each resin cement. Special clinical steps to compensate for the attenuated light intensity seem to be necessary for the resin cements which are susceptible to light intensity. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29:209-214, 2017). © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effect of various intracanal medicaments on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to root canal dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Arslan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It has been shown that the irrigating solutions and medicament used during root canal treatment may affect the bonding strength. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of triple antibiotic paste (TAP, double antibiotic paste (DAP and calcium hydroxide (CH on the bond strength to root dentin of self-adhesive resin cement. Materials and methods: Forty-eight single-rooted human teeth were prepared and randomly divided into one control and three experimental groups (dressing with TAP, DAP or CH. After removal of intracanal dressing, post-spaces were created and fiber posts cemented to the root canal using a self-adhesive resin cement. A push-out test was performed. The data obtained from the push-out test were analyzed using analysis of variance and Bonferroni post hoc tests (p = 0.05. Results: TAP decreased the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement bond strength to root dentin compared to the control group (p = 0.012, while CH and DAP did not influence this (p > 0.05. The majority of specimens exhibited adhesive failures. Conclusions: TAP decreased the bond strength of self-adhesive to the root dentin compared to the control group.

  18. Influence of fluoride- or triclosan-based desensitizing agents on adhesion of resin cements to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dündar, Mine; Cal, Ebru; Gökçe, Bülent; Türkün, Murat; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2010-10-01

    Effect of desensitizers on the bond strength of resin cements to dentin was evaluated. Intact premolars (N = 90) were embedded in polymethyl methacrylate; dentin surfaces were exposed, and they were randomly divided into two main groups of cements (Duolink (D), Variolink II (V); n = 45 per group) and then into three desensitizer subgroups (n = 15 per subgroup). Teeth in controls (C) were treated according to cements' adhesion protocols; the other two groups received either fluoride- [Aqua-Prep F (F)] or triclosan-based [Seal&Protect (T)] desensitizers. Ceramic disks (Empress 2) were adhered; specimens were thermocycled (×5,000 cycles, 5-55 ± 1°C, dwell time 30 s) and subjected to shear bond strength test (MPa ± SD) in a universal testing machine (crosshead speed 1 mm/min). Failure types were classified using scanning electron microscope. For V, application of both desensitizers (29.6 ± 7.8 and 22.8 ± 2.8 for F and T, respectively) did not present significantly different results than that of the VC (21.2 ± 2.3; p > 0.05, one-way ANOVA). In D, F (20.6 ± 2.4) showed significantly higher results (p types.

  19. Effect of adhesive cements on reduction of microleakage at the amalgam/composite-resin interface

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    Khoroushi M

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Patients always complain about metallic color of amalgam restorations. Covering amalgam by composite can solve this problem. Since polymerization shrinkage is a serious shortcoming in composites, application of the combined amalgam and composite restoration is one of the methods to reduce leakage in the cervical margins of posterior restorations. The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate the microleakage of amalgam/composite interface when Rely-X ARC adhesive resin cement was used in the joint. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four sound extracted premolars were chosen. Mesial and distal class II conventional cavities were prepared and the samples were divided into 4 groups of 12. In all groups, the bases of the cavities were restored with amalgam and then the remaining part was filled by composite resin. Specimens in groups 1 and 2 were restored with composite-resin, immediately after condensing amalgam without or with application of Rely-X ARC (3M, ESPE respectively. In groups 3 and 4, composite resin were applied 24 hours after condensation of amalgam, without or with application of Rely-X ARC respectively. After polishing and thermocycling, all specimens were prepared for dye penetration and the degree of leakage was scored and analyzed using Kruskall Wallis test with p<0.05 as the level of significance. Results: The frequency of dye penetration in different groups was obtained. The most and the least scores were observed in groups 3 and 4 respectively. No statistically significant difference was observed in different methods. Conclusion: None of the methods in this study could seal the amalgam/composite-resin interface.

  20. Microleakage of IPS empress 2 inlay restorations luted with self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal, E; Celik, E U; Turkun, M

    2012-01-01

    To assess the microleakage of three self-adhesive and one etch-and-rinse resin cements when luting IPS Empress 2 (Ivoclar Vivadent, Liechtenstein) all-ceramic inlay restorations to the prepared cavities in extracted human molars. The cylindrical Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 40 extracted human third molars using diamond burs. The IPS Empress 2 ceramic inlays were placed with Multilink Sprint (Ivoclar Vivadent), RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE, USA), G-Cem (GC, Japan), or Variolink II (Ivoclar Vivadent) as the control group. After storage in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, samples were subjected to 1000 thermal cycles between baths of 5°C and 55°C, with a dwell time of 30 seconds. The microleakage scores were examined on the occlusal and gingival margins at 30× magnification after each sample was stained with 0.5% basic fuchsin and sectioned into three parts using a thin diamond blade (Isomet, Buehler, USA) (n=40). The extent of microleakage on both occlusal and gingival margins of the restorations was scored and recorded. The microleakage data were analyzed using Kruskall-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. Statistically significant differences were observed between the groups in both margins according to the Kruskall-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (pVariolink II Variolink II = RelyX Unicem adhesive resin cements displayed higher microleakage scores on the occlusal margins, whereas on the gingival margins RelyX Unicem showed comparable microleakage results with the control samples.

  1. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dry and moist dentin

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    Carolina Bosso Andre

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effects of humidity conditions and evaluation times on the dentin bond strength (DBS of two self-adhesive resin cements (RC. The RC used were: RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE and Clearfil SA Cement (Kuraray Med.. One hundred and twenty coronal portions of bovine incisors (n = 10 were used. Buccal surfaces were abraded in order to expose a flat dentinal surface (180-grit SiC and to standardize the smear layer formation (600-grit SiC. The humidity conditions tested were: dry (air-dried for 10 s, slightly moist (water application with disposable applicator on dried dentin and water excess removed with absorbent paper, and moist (same application without water removal. The RC were used according to the manufacturers' recommendations and were applied to prepolymerized resin discs (2 mm thick; Sinfony, 3M ESPE, which were subsequently bonded to the dentin surfaces. After 24 h, half of the teeth were prepared for the microtensile bond strength test, while the other half were stored in water for 6 months and tested in tension (0.5 mm/min until failure. A 3-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test were performed (preset alpha of 0.05. No RC showed any reduction of DBS after 6 months, and no significant difference was observed between them. The moist dentin increased the bond strength of Clearfil SA Cement for both periods of time. Humidity conditions can change the DBS; however, the study's results were product-dependent.

  2. The adhesive system and root canal region do not influence the degree of conversion of dual resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    PEREIRA, Priscilla Cristoforides; de MELO, Renata Marques; CHAVES, Carolina; GALHANO, Graziela A. P.; BOTTINO, Marco Antonio; BALDUCCI, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of two adhesive systems and the post space region on the degree of conversion of dual resin cement and its bond strength to root dentin. Material and Methods One three-step etch-andrinse (All-bond 2, Bisco) and another one-step self-etch (Xeno III, Dentsply) adhesive systems were applied on 20 (n=10) crownless bovine incisors, at 12-mm-deep post space preparation, and a fiber post (DT Light Post, Bisco) was cemented using a dual cure resin cement (Duo-Link, Bisco). Three transverse sections (3 mm) were obtained, being one from each study region (cervical, middle and apical). The degree of conversion of the dual cure resin cement was determined by a micro-Raman spectrometer. The data (%) were submitted to repeated-measures analysis of variance and Tukey's test (p<0.05). Results For both groups, the degree of conversion means (%) (All bond 2cervical = 69.3; All bond 2middle = 55.1; All bond 2apical= 56; Xeno IIIcervical = 68.7; Xeno IIImiddle = 68.8; Xeno IIIapical = 54.3) were not significantly different along the post space regions (p<0.05). Conclusion Neither the adhesive nor the post space region influenced the degree of conversion of the cement layer. PMID:21085803

  3. The adhesive system and root canal region do not influence the degree of conversion of dual resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Cristoforides Pereira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of two adhesive systems and the post space region on the degree of conversion of dual resin cement and its bond strength to root dentin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One three-step etch-and-rinse (All-bond 2, Bisco and another one-step self-etch (Xeno III, Dentsply adhesive systems were applied on 20 (n=10 crownless bovine incisors, at 12-mm-deep post space preparation, and a fiber post (FRC Postec, Ivoclar was cemented using a dual cure resin cement (Duo-Link, Bisco. Three transverse sections (3 mm were obtained, being one from each study region (cervical, middle and apical. The degree of conversion of the dual cure resin cement was determined by a micro-Raman spectrometer. The data (% were submitted to repeated-measures analysis of variance and Tukey's test (p<0.05. RESULTS: For both groups, the degree of conversion means (% (All bond 2cervical = 69.3; All bond 2middle = 55.1; All bond 2apical= 56; Xeno III cervical = 68.7; Xeno IIImiddle = 68.8; Xeno III apical = 54.3 were not significantly different along the post space regions (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Neither the adhesive nor the post space region influenced the degree of conversion of the cement layer.

  4. 24 hours and 3-months bond strength between dual-cured resin cements and simplified adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Thaiane R; Cavalcanti, Andrea N; Fontes, Céres M; Marchi, Giselle M; Muniz, Leonardo; Mathias, Paula

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the bonding compatibility between dual-cured resin cements and simplified adhesive systems (one-step self-etch and two-step etch & rinse), measured after 24 hours and 3 months. The occlusal dentin surfaces of 24 human third molars were exposed and flattened. Teeth were randomly assigned to 3 groups and treated with different combinations of adhesive system and resin cement [G1-Single Bond/Rely X ARC (SB/RX); G2-Excite DSC/Variolink II (EX/VR); G3-Adper Prompt/Rely X ARC (AD/RX)]. Indirect composite restorations were cemented on flattened surfaces, and sectioned to obtain multiple bonded beams for the microtensile bond strength test. The beams from each tooth were tested under tension after 24 hours and 3 months (ANOVA/ Tukey's test, alpha=5%). Failure patterns were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy. After 24h, AD/RX presented the lowest bond strength mean values. AD/RX specimens did not withstand three months storage. SB/RX and EX/VR presented similar bond strengths in both periods tested. The association AD/RX resulted in low bond strength mean values, especially after storage. Cementing indirect restorations using one-step self-etch adhesive systems and dual-cured resin cements would be clinically unreliable.

  5. Si-based thin film coating on Y-TZP: Influence of deposition parameters on adhesion of resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, José Renato Cavalcanti; Nogueira Junior, Lafayette; Massi, Marcos; Silva, Alecssandro de Moura; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Sobrinho, Argemiro Soares da Silva; Özcan, Mutlu

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated the influence of deposition parameters for Si-based thin films using magnetron sputtering for coating zirconia and subsequent adhesion of resin cement. Zirconia ceramic blocks were randomly divided into 8 groups and specimens were either ground finished and polished or conditioned using air-abrasion with alumina particles coated with silica. In the remaining groups, the polished specimens were coated with Si-based film coating with argon/oxygen magnetron discharge at 8:1 or 20:1 flux. In one group, Si-based film coating was performed on air-abraded surfaces. After application of bonding agent, resin cement was bonded. Profilometry, goniometry, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy analysis were performed on the conditioned zirconia surfaces. Adhesion of resin cement to zirconia was tested using shear bond test and debonded surfaces were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy. Si-based film coating applied on air-abraded rough zirconia surfaces increased the adhesion of the resin cement (22.78 ± 5.2 MPa) compared to those of other methods (0-14.62 MPa) (p = 0.05). Mixed type of failures were more frequent in Si film coated groups on either polished or air-abraded groups. Si-based thin films increased wettability compared to the control group but did not change the roughness, considering the parameters evaluated. Deposition parameters of Si-based thin film and after application of air-abrasion influenced the initial adhesion of resin cement to zirconia.

  6. Si-based thin film coating on Y-TZP: Influence of deposition parameters on adhesion of resin cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, José Renato Cavalcanti, E-mail: joserenatocq@hotmail.com [Potiguar University, Department of Biotechnology, Natal (Brazil); Nogueira Junior, Lafayette [São Paulo State University, Department of Prosthodontics and Dental Materials, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Massi, Marcos [Federal University of São Paulo, Institute of Science and Technology, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Silva, Alecssandro de Moura; Bottino, Marco Antonio [São Paulo State University, Department of Prosthodontics and Dental Materials, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Sobrinho, Argemiro Soares da Silva [Technological Institute of Aeronautics, Department of Physics, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Özcan, Mutlu [University of Zurich, Dental Materials Unit, Center for Dental and Oral Medicine, Clinic for Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics and Dental Materials Science, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated the influence of deposition parameters for Si-based thin films using magnetron sputtering for coating zirconia and subsequent adhesion of resin cement. Zirconia ceramic blocks were randomly divided into 8 groups and specimens were either ground finished and polished or conditioned using air-abrasion with alumina particles coated with silica. In the remaining groups, the polished specimens were coated with Si-based film coating with argon/oxygen magnetron discharge at 8:1 or 20:1 flux. In one group, Si-based film coating was performed on air-abraded surfaces. After application of bonding agent, resin cement was bonded. Profilometry, goniometry, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy analysis were performed on the conditioned zirconia surfaces. Adhesion of resin cement to zirconia was tested using shear bond test and debonded surfaces were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy. Si-based film coating applied on air-abraded rough zirconia surfaces increased the adhesion of the resin cement (22.78 ± 5.2 MPa) compared to those of other methods (0–14.62 MPa) (p = 0.05). Mixed type of failures were more frequent in Si film coated groups on either polished or air-abraded groups. Si-based thin films increased wettability compared to the control group but did not change the roughness, considering the parameters evaluated. Deposition parameters of Si-based thin film and after application of air-abrasion influenced the initial adhesion of resin cement to zirconia.

  7. Effects of aging on the bond strength of self-etching adhesives and resin luting cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Riza Cetin

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: PF luting cement and PLP dentin adhesive were less affected by aging than the other dentin adhesive systems studied. Additional in vivo data should be acquired to complement these findings and clarify the clinical efficacies of the tested adhesives.

  8. Evaluation of bond strength between leucite-based and lithium disilicate-based ceramics to dentin after cementation with conventional and self-adhesive resin agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigolin, Fernando J; Miranda, Milton E; Flório, Flávia M; Basting, Roberta T

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two heat-pressed ceramics (leucite-based--IPS Empress Esthetic/Ivoclar Vivadent, and lithium disilicate-based --IPS e.max Press/Ivoclar Vivadent) to dentin with the use of conventional and self-adhesive resin cements. The occlusal surface of 60 intact human molars was removed and the dentin was exposed. Ceramic blocks were cemented randomly with regard to the cementation systems (n = 10): conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II/Ivoclar Vivadent), conventional self-polymerizing resin cement (Multilink/Ivoclar Vivadent), and dual self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100/3M ESPE). The dual cementation systems were photoactivated with a LED light device (Radii Cal, SDI) for 40 seconds. The specimens were sectioned to obtain sticks of approximately 1 mm2 for microtensile tests on a universal testing machine (EMIC). The type of fracture was analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey test (alpha = 0.05) showed that there was no difference between types of ceramic. Average microtensile bond strength was higher for the conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II) and the self-adhesive dual resin cement (RelyX U100), despite greater prevalence of premature loss of the sticks with the latter. Average bond strength was lower when the conventional self-polymerizing resin cement (Multilink) was used. Leucite-based and lithium disilicate-based cements present similar bond strength to the dentin with conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II) and a dual self-adhesive cement (RelyX U100).

  9. Comparison of Hypersensitivity in Metal Ceramic Crowns cemented with Zinc Phosphate and Self-adhesive Resin: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Thatapudi; Garhnayak, Mirna; Garhnayak, Lokanath; Dhal, Angurbala; Kar, Aswini K

    2017-10-01

    Luting agents used to fix artificial prostheses, such as fixed partial denture (FPD) to tooth are basically viscous in nature and show chemical reaction for fixation. Postcementation hypersensitivity is a frequent complaint of patients. The present study was conducted to compare postcementation hypersensitivity with zinc phosphate and self-adhesive resin in complete coverage crown. This study included 30 patients in which 60 porcelein fused to metal crowns was placed. Two metal crowns were placed in each patient in nonantagonis-tic contralateral quadrants. First crown was cemented with zinc phosphate cement, while the other was cemented with self-adhesive resin. Hypersensitivity was evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS) score and by clinical test. For clinical evaluation of sensitivity, hot and cold water was applied to the cervical margin of restoration for 5 seconds and response was recorded. This study consisted of 30 patients in which 60 crowns were given. There was no statistical difference in VAS score of mastication in zinc phosphate cement recorded at baseline, 1 week, 4 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years (p > 0.05). Cold response also did not show a significant difference at six time points. Warm response showed slight decrease in subsequent time points but was nonsignificant (p > 0.05). Similarly, with self-adhesive resin cement, VAS score during mastication, hot and cold response was statistically nonsignificant (p > 0.05). Postcementation hypersensitivity is a frequent complaint that patient may experience. However, we found no statistically significant difference in both cements tested. Postcementation hypersensitivity is an unpleasant sensation experienced by patients. This may affect the success of any prosthesis. Thus, selection of luting agent for cementation plays an important role to eliminate this symptom.

  10. Immediate and delayed photoactivation of self-adhesive resin cements and retention of glass-fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria-e-Silva, André Luis; Peixoto, Aline Carvalho; Borges, Marcela Gonçalves; Menezes, Murilo de Sousa; Moraes, Rafael Ratto de

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of immediate and delayed photoactivation of self-adhesive resin cements (SARCs) on the retention of glass-fiber posts luted into root canals. Bovine incisors were endodontically treated, and post holes of 9 mm in depth were prepared. Fiber posts were luted using one of two SARCs, BisCem (Bisco Inc., Schaumburg, USA) or RelyX Unicem clicker (3M ESPE, Saint Paul, USA), or a regular (etch-and-rinse) resin cement (AllCem; FGM, Joinvile, Brazil). Photoactivation was performed immediately, or at 5 or 10 min after cementation. Root/post specimens were transversely sectioned 7 days after luting into 1-mm-thick slices, which were submitted to push-out testing in a mechanical testing machine. Bond strength data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' method (α = 0.05). Immediate photoactivation resulted in the highest bond strength for Unicem. BisCem demonstrated higher bond strength values when photoactivated after a 10-min delay. Immediate photoactivation yielded the lowest bond strengths for AllCem, although no differences in bond strength were observed between photoactivation delayed by 5 and 10 min. In conclusion, the moment of resin cement photoactivation may affect the intraradicular retention of fiber posts, depending upon the resin cement used for luting.

  11. Immediate and delayed photoactivation of self-adhesive resin cements and retention of glass-fiber posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Faria-e-Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of immediate and delayed photoactivation of self-adhesive resin cements (SARCs on the retention of glass-fiber posts luted into root canals. Bovine incisors were endodontically treated, and post holes of 9 mm in depth were prepared. Fiber posts were luted using one of two SARCs, BisCem(r (Bisco Inc., Schaumburg, USA or RelyX Unicem clicker (3M ESPE, Saint Paul, USA, or a regular (etch-and-rinse resin cement (AllCem; FGM, Joinvile, Brazil. Photoactivation was performed immediately, or at 5 or 10 min after cementation. Root/post specimens were transversely sectioned 7 days after luting into 1-mm-thick slices, which were submitted to push-out testing in a mechanical testing machine. Bond strength data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' method (α = 0.05. Immediate photoactivation resulted in the highest bond strength for Unicem. BisCem(r demonstrated higher bond strength values when photoactivated after a 10-min delay. Immediate photoactivation yielded the lowest bond strengths for AllCem, although no differences in bond strength were observed between photoactivation delayed by 5 and 10 min. In conclusion, the moment of resin cement photoactivation may affect the intraradicular retention of fiber posts, depending upon the resin cement used for luting.

  12. Lack of correlation between tubular dentine cement penetration, adhesiveness and leakage in roots filled with gutta percha and an endodontic cement based on epoxy amine resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Ricardo; Silva Neto, Ulisses Xavier da; Carneiro, Everdan; Fariniuk, Luiz Fernando; Westphalen, Vânia Portela Ditzel; Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches

    2014-01-01

    To analyze possible correlations among tubular dentine cement penetration, adhesiveness and apical leakage in fillings performed with gutta percha and an endodontic cement based on epoxy amine resin. Sixty similar, extracted human mandibular central incisors were irrigated, instrumented and filled following the same protocol. First, apical leakage was quantified by fluid filtration tests. Then, these same specimens were sectioned for analysis of tubular dentine cement penetration and the middle thirds were submitted to push-out tests to analyze the adhesiveness of the fillings. In brief, the means and standard deviations with a confidence interval of 95% were as follows: tubular dentine cement penetration (8.875±4.540), adhesiveness (4.441±2.683) and apical leakage (0.318±0.215). The data were confronted using the Pearson's test (P>0.05), and it was possible to prove that there was no correlation between (1) tubular dentine cement penetration and apical leakage (r2: 0.08276), (2) tubular dentine cement penetration and adhesiveness (r2: -0.2412) and (3) adhesiveness and apical leakage (r2: 0.1340). After analysis of these data, it could be observed that there exists no correlation among the variables analyzed in this study.

  13. Shear bond strength of calcium enriched mixture cement and mineral trioxide aggregate to composite resin with two different adhesive systems.

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    Siavash Savadi Oskoee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Immediate restoration after vital pulp therapy is essential in order to create and maintain effective coronal seal.The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of recently used pulp capping materials: white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA, and calcium enriched mixture cement (CEM to composite resin with the use of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems and compare them with the bond strength of commonly used resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI cement.Forty specimens from each test material were fabricated, measuring 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in depth. The specimens of each material were divided into 2 groups of 20 specimens according to the adhesive system (Single Bond vs. Clearfil SE Bond used for bonding of resin composite. The shear bond strength values were measured at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min and fractured surfaces were examined. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey's test (P<0.05.Analysis of data showed a significantly higher bond strength for RMGI compared to MTA and CEM (P<0.001; however, no significant differences were observed in the bond strength values of MTA and CEM (P=0.9. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in relation to the type of the adhesive system irrespective of the type of the material used (P=0.95 All the failures were of cohesive type in RMGI, MTA and CEM.Bond strength of RMGI cement to composite resin was higher than that of MTA or CEM cement irrespective of the type of the adhesive system.

  14. Comparison of bracket debonding force between two conventional resin adhesives and a resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shammaa, I; Ngan, P; Kim, H; Kao, E; Gladwin, M; Gunel, E; Brown, C

    1999-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the debonding force of orthodontic brackets bonded with two conventional resin adhesives (Resilience L3 and Light Bond) and a resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement (Fuji Ortho LC). For the in vitro part of the study, 80 extracted premolars were randomly divided into four groups. In groups A and B, brackets were bonded to unetched enamel using Fuji Ortho LC cement in wet and dry conditions, respectively. In groups C and D, brackets were bonded to etched enamel using Resilience L3 and Light Bond, respectively. Debonding force was determined using a servohydraulic testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data was analyzed using the ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison test at pconventional resins. There was no significant difference between the two conventional resins or between unetched resin-reinforced glass ionomer in the wet and dry conditions. For the in vivo part of the study, 30 patients were randomly assigned to one of the three bonding material groups. Bracket survival rates and distributions were obtained by following these patients for 1.2 years. Data was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit estimates of survivorship function. Bond failure interface was determined using a modified adhesive remnant index (ARI). These results showed no significant difference between survival rates and distributions among the three bonding materials with respect to the type of malocclusion, type of orthodontic treatment, or location of bracket. There were significant differences between survival distributions of males and females in the unetched Fuji Ortho LC group and among type of teeth in the conventional resin groups. The predominant mode of bracket failure for the unetched Fuji Ortho LC cement was at the enamel-adhesive interface, and for conventional resins, the enamel-adhesive interface and the bracket-adhesive interface. These results suggest that resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement can withstand

  15. Self-adhesive resin cements: pH-neutralization, hydrophilicity, and hygroscopic expansion stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roedel, Lena; Bednarzig, Vera; Belli, Renan; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Zorzin, José

    2017-06-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the relationship between pH-neutralization, hydrophilicity, and free hygroscopic expansion stress of self-adhesive resin cements (SARCs) after storage in artificial saliva. The SARCs RelyX Unicem Automix 2 (RX2, 3 M ESPE), iCEM (iCEM, Heraeus) and Maxcem Elite (MCE, Kerr) were under investigation in this study. Cylinders (height × diameter, 6 × 4mm) were prepared from each material and stored in artificial saliva (7d at 37 °C). Cylinder height was measured at baseline and after 7 days. After storage, the compression modulus was measured to calculate the free hygroscopic expansion stress. For pH-neutralization and hydrophilicity assessment, disks (height × diameter, 1 × 1.5 mm) were prepared, covered with electrolyte, and monitored over 24 h at 37 °C. Hydrophilicity was assessed using the static sessile drop technique at baseline and at different time intervals up to 24 h. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Student-Newman-Keuls test (S-N-K, α = 0.05). After 24 h, RX2 (pH24h 4.68) had a significantly higher (p hygroscopic expansion stress of iCEM (29.15 MPa) was significantly higher (p hygroscopic expansion stress after 7 days compared to those with high pH-neutralization. Remnant hydrophilicity due to low pH-neutralization of SARCs could lead to cement interface stress build-up and long-term failure of silicate ceramic restorations.

  16. [Effect of a chemical primer on the bond strength of a zirconia ceramic with self-adhesive resin cement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Jing, Ye; Nie, Rongrong; Meng, Xiangfeng

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the bond strength and durability of a self-adhesive resin cement with a zirconia ceramic pretreated by a zirconia primer. Zirconia ceramic (Vita Inceram YZ) plates with a thickness of 2.5 mm were fired, polished, and then cleaned. Half of the polished ceramic plates were sandblasted with 50 μm alumina particles at 0.3 MPa for 20 s. The surface compound weight ratios were measured via X-ray fluorescence microscopy. The polished and sandblasted ceramic plates were directly bonded with self-adhesive resin cement (Biscem) or were pretreated by a zirconia primer (Z Primer Plus) before bonding with Biscem. The specimens of each test group were divided into two subgroups (n=10) and subjected to the shear test after 0 and 10,000 thermal cycles. The data were analyzed via three-way ANOVA. After air abrasion, 8.27% weight ratio of alumina attached to the zirconia surface. Compared with air abrasion, primer treatment more significantly improved the primary resin bond strength of the zirconia ceramic. The primary resin bond strength of the zirconia ceramic with no primer treatment was not affected by thermocycling (P>0.05). However, the primary resin bond strength of the zirconia ceramic with primer treatment was significantly decreased by thermocycling (Pzirconia ceramics. However, the bond interface of the primer is not stable and rapidly degraded during thermocycling.

  17. [The effect of acid etching on bond strength of different self-adhesive resin cements to dentin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Gui-hong; Wang, Hai-hua

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the effect of acid etching on bond strength (μTBS) of self-adhesive resin cements (Unicem, G-Cem, Clearfil SA Cement, BisCem) to dentin. Thirty-two human third molars without caries were used for the study. One fourth of the crowns were cut off, perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth with (Isomet) a low-speed saw, in order to expose the dentin surfaces of the sectioned sides. The sectioned dentin surfaces of the experimental groups were etched for 15 s. Subsequently, resin blocks were bonded to the dentin surfaces, with one of the four cements (Unicem, G-Cem, Clearfil SA Cement, BisCem). After being stored in water for 24 hours, all specimens were perpendicularly sectioned through the dentin-resin interfaces, prepared into beams about 1 mm×1 mm×8 mm for μTBS tests with micro-tensile tester. The micro-morphologies of the cement-dentin interfaces were assessed using scanning electron microscope. The data was analyzed using SPSS16.0 software package. Without pre-treatment of acid etching, Unicem group (12.9±3.2) MPa, G-Cem group (11.7±2.6) MPa and Clearfil SA Cement group (10.9±2.3) MPa possessed a higher bond strength than BisCem group (6.8±2.4) MPa (Padhesive cements (G-Cem, Clearfil SA CementUnicem, Unicem), but there was no significant difference in bond strength in BisCem group with or without acid etching. With pretreatment of acid etching, the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin decreases in G-Cem, Clearfil SA Cement and Unicem group, while there is no significant effect on the bond strength of BisCem group. Supported by Public Technology Applied Research Project of Science and Technology Bureau of Shaoxing City of Zhejiang Province (2012B70079).

  18. The shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin and enamel: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Raphaela F; Ramos, Carla M; Francisconi, Paulo A S; Borges, Ana Flávia S

    2015-03-01

    Clinicians continue to search for ways to simplify bonding procedures without compromising clinical efficacy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear strength of self-adhesive cements RelyX U100 and RelyX U200, and conventional resin cement RelyX ARC to enamel and dentin after different surface treatments. The crowns of 120 bovine incisor teeth were separated from the roots and embedded in epoxy resin in polyvinyl chloride tubes. In each tooth, the area to be cemented was delimited with central holed adhesive tape. The teeth were distributed into 12 groups (n=10) according to the substrate; etched or not with 37% phosphoric acid; and cement type of enamel-U100, enamel-phosphoric acid-U100, enamel-U200, enamel-phosphoric acid-U200, enamel-ARC, enamel-phosphoric acid-ARC, dentin-U100, dentin-phosphoric acid-U100, dentin-U200, dentin-phosphoric acid-U200, dentin-ARC, and dentin-phosphoric acid-ARC. After 7 days of storage in artificial saliva, shear strength tests were performed by using a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min). The data were analyzed with 3-way ANOVA and the Tukey test (α=.05). Fracture analysis was performed with a light microscope. Two specimens from each group were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope. In enamel, ARC (9.96 MPa) had higher shear strength (P=.038) than U100 (5.14 MPa); however, after surface etching, U100 (17.81 MPa) and U200 (17.52 MPa) had higher shear strength (Padhesive type. U200 self-adhesive cement had similar bond strength to the ARC in enamel, but the combination with phosphoric acid had the best bond strength. For dentin, self-adhesive resin cements are equally effective alternatives to conventional resin cement. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Leucite-reinforced glass ceramic inlays luted with self-adhesive resin cement: a 2-year in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taschner, Michael; Krämer, Norbert; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Pelka, Matthias; Breschi, Lorenzo; Petschelt, Anselm; Frankenberger, Roland

    2012-05-01

    Aim of the present prospective controlled clinical study was to compare the clinical performances of two different cementation procedures to lute IPS Empress inlays and onlays. Eighty-three IPS Empress restorations (70 class-II inlays, 13 onlays/47 premolars, 36 molars) were placed in 30 patients (19 females/11 males, mean age=39 years). Two cementation procedures were tested: group 1: forty-three restorations were luted with a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem, RX, 3M ESPE); group 2: forty restorations were luted with an etch-and-rinse multistep adhesive (Syntac Classic, Ivoclar-Vivadent) and Variolink II low (SV, Ivoclar-Vivadent). All restorations were evaluated after 2 weeks (baseline=1st recall=R1, n=83), 6 months (R2, n=83), 1 year (R3, n=82), and 2 years (R4, n=82) by two independent blinded calibrated examiners using modified USPHS criteria. From R1 to R4, one failure occurred in the SV group (at R2) due to marginal enamel chipping. After 2 years of clinical service (R4), better marginal and tooth integrity (padhesive cement (RX, group 1), while no differences were found for all remaining investigated criteria (p>0.05). The absence of enamel in proximal boxes (10% with no enamel and 51% of the restorations with less than 0.5mm enamel width at the bottom of the proximal box) did not affect marginal performance (p>0.05). The self-adhesive resin cement RelyX Unicem showed clinical outcomes similar to a conventional multi-step cementation procedure after 2 years of clinical service for most of the tested criteria. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of different adhesives combined with two resin composite cements on shear bond strength to polymeric CAD/CAM materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bähr, Nora; Keul, Christine; Edelhoff, Daniel; Eichberger, Marlis; Roos, Malgorzata; Gernet, Wolfgang; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the impact of different adhesives and resin composite cements on shear bond strength (SBS) to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)- and composite-based CAD/CAM materials. SBS specimens were fabricated and divided into five main groups (n=30/group) subject to conditioning: 1. Monobond Plus/Heliobond (MH), 2. Visio.link (VL), 3. Ambarino P60 (AM), 4. exp. VP connect (VP), and 5. no conditioning-control group (CG). All cemented specimens using a. Clearfil SA Cement and b. Variolink II were stored in distilled water for 24 h at 37 °C. Additionally, one half of the specimens were thermocycled for 5,000 cycles (5 °C/55 °C, dwell time 20 s). SBS was measured; data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, four- and one-way ANOVA, unpaired two-sample t-test and Chi(2)-test. CAD/CAM materials without additional adhesives showed no bond to resin composite cements. Highest SBS showed VL with Variolink II on composite-based material, before and after thermocycling.

  1. Effect of antibacterial/adhesive approaches on bonding durability of fiber posts cemented with self-etch resin cement

    OpenAIRE

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Memarpour, Mahtab; Vafamand, Narges; Mohammadi, Mahsa

    2017-01-01

    Background Longevity of post-retained restoration is highly depended on bonding stability of fiber post (FP) to root dentin. This study evaluated the effect of different antibacterial/adhesive approaches on bonding durability of FPs luted into root canal with a self-etch cement. Material and Methods Seventy-two human maxillary central incisor roots were divided into six groups after endodontic treatment, based on the antibacterial/adhesive treatments as follows: 1)ED primer II (ED, control); ...

  2. Effect of Anatomical Customization of the Fiber Post on the Bond Strength of a Self-Adhesive Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adricyla Teixeira Rocha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of the study was to evaluate, by means of the push-out test, the effect of the anatomical customization of the fiber post on the bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement. Methods. Twelve endodontically treated, human, upper central incisors were randomly divided into two groups (n=6: control (glass fiber posts cemented with Relyx® U200 and customized (glass fiber posts anatomically customized with translucent composite resin cemented with Relyx U200. The roots were sectioned into three slices, cervical, middle, and apical, and photographed with a digital camera attached to a stereomicroscopic loupe. The images were analyzed by software, for evaluation of the cement line. The slices were subsequently submitted to the push-out test until the post had completely extruded, and the fracture mode was analyzed with a stereomicroscopic loupe. Results. The results showed significant differences between the groups in the different root thirds in relation to the area occupied by air bubbles (p<0.05. Bond strength, when all the thirds are considered, was 8.77 ± 4.89 MPa for the control group and 16.96 ± 4.85 MPa for the customized group. Conclusion. The customized group showed greater bond resistance than the control group and a more uniform cement layer.

  3. Effect of dentin-cleaning techniques on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin luting cement to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M J M C; Bapoo, H; Rizkalla, A S; Santos, G C

    2011-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the influence of different cleansing techniques on the bond strength of self-adhesive cement to dentin. A total of 33 noncarious human molars were sectioned mesiodistally and embedded in chemically cured resin with the buccal or lingual surfaces facing upward. Superficial dentin was exposed and resin disk provisional restorations were cemented to the dentin surfaces with noneugenol provisional cement and were stored in distilled water at 37°C. After seven days, the provisional restorations were removed and 13 specimens were randomly assigned to each of the five groups (n=13), according to the following cleansing treatments: G1-excavator (control); G2-0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate; G3-40% polyacrylic acid; G4-mixture of flour pumice and water; and G5-sandblasting with 50 μm aluminum oxide particles at a pressure of 87 psi. Resin composite disks (Filtek Supreme Plus, 3M ESPE Dental Products, St Paul, MN, USA) 4.7 (±0.1) mm in diameter and 3.0 (±0.5) mm in height were cemented with self-adhesive cement (RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE), photocured, and stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. Shear bond strength testing was conducted using a universal test machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey-B rank order test. Sandblasting with aluminum oxide (11.32 ± 1.70 MPa) produced significantly higher shear bond strength values compared with any other treatment groups (p<0.05). No significant differences were found between G1-control (7.74 ± 1.72 MPa), G2-chlorhexidine (6.37 ± 1.47 MPa), and G4-pumice (7.33 ± 2.85 MPa) (p<0.05).

  4. Influence of Curing Mode on the Surface Energy and Sorption/Solubility of Dental Self-Adhesive Resin Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Jin Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of curing mode (dual- or self-cure on the surface energy and sorption/solubility of four self-adhesive resin cements (SARCs and one conventional resin cement. The degree of conversion (DC and surface energy parameters including degree of hydrophilicity (DH were determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and contact angle measurements, respectively (n = 5. Sorption and solubility were assessed by mass gain or loss after storage in distilled water or lactic acid for 60 days (n = 5. A linear regression model was used to correlate between the results (%DC vs. DH and %DC/DH vs. sorption/solubility. For all materials, the dual-curing consistently produced significantly higher %DC values than the self-curing (p < 0.05. Significant negative linear regressions were established between the %DC and DH in both curing modes (p < 0.05. Overall, the SARCs showed higher sorption/solubility values, in particular when immersed in lactic acid, than the conventional resin cement. Linear regression revealed that %DC and DH were negatively and positively correlated with the sorption/solubility values, respectively. Dual-curing of SARCs seems to lower the sorption and/or solubility in comparison with self-curing by increased %DC and occasionally decreased hydrophilicity.

  5. Impact of plasma treatment of PMMA-based CAD/CAM blanks on surface properties as well as on adhesion to self-adhesive resin composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebermann, Anja; Keul, Christine; Bähr, Nora; Edelhoff, Daniel; Eichberger, Marlis; Roos, Malgorzata; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2013-09-01

    To test surface energy, roughness and tensile bond strength (TBS) to self-adhesive resin composite cements without/with plasma treatment combined with different conditioning methods of PMMA-based CAD/CAM blocks. PMMA specimens (10mm×10mm×2mm) were fabricated (N=260), polished and air-abraded (50μm Al2O3, 5s, 0.05MPa). Twenty specimens were selected for surface energy and roughness measurements (without/with plasma n=10 per group). The remaining specimens (n=240) were used for TBS testing without/with plasma treatment and following conditioning methods (n=20 per test group): (i) without conditioning, (ii) Visio.link, (iii) VP connect and luted with Clearfil SA Cement and RelyX Unicem Automix. Specimens were aged (24h 37°C water+5000 thermal cycles, 5°C/55°C), TBS was measured and failure types were assessed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Mann-Whitney-U and Kruskal-Wallis-H tests, unpaired t-test, Chi(2) and the Spearman correlation test. Plasma treatment of PMMA increased the surface energy significantly (pVisio.link. Both resin composite cements showed the highest TBS for groups conditioned with Visio.link. Also, among Clearfil SA Cement, conditioning with VP connect showed comparable TBS to Visio.link. Plasma treatment of PMMA did not increase the adhesion to self-adhesive resin composite cements. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A 12-month clinical comparison of resin-modified light-activated adhesives for the cementation of orthodontic molar bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricker, J P

    1997-09-01

    A clinical trial is reported on the retention rates of resin-modified light-activated adhesives for the cementation of orthodontic molar bands. Fifty consecutive cases were fully banded and monitored over 12 months. Fuji II LC (GC International) recorded a failure rate of 2.9%, Bandlok (Reliance Orthodontic Products) 8.1%, with Ketac Cem (Espe) chemical cure 3.5%. There were no statistically significant differences between these rates. Fuji II LC and Ketac Cem failed at the interface between the adhesive and the metal, while Bandlok failed at the interface between the enamel and the adhesive. It is suggested that Fuji II LC and Ketac Cem will afford greater protection to the enamel against microleakage and demineralization than Bandlok.

  7. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 2: Effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Asuka; Matsumoto, Mariko; Higashi, Mami; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning on resin cement bonding to CAD/CAM resin blocks. One of two resin cements, PANAVIA V5 (PV5) or PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX (PSA), were bonded to one of 24 CAD/CAM blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK). Each cement group was divided into four subgroups: no cleaning (Ctl), ultrasonic cleaning (Uc), acid cleaning (Ac) and Uc+Ac. Micro-tensile bond strengths (µTBSs) were measured immediately and 1, 3, and 6 months after water storage. Block surfaces after each treatment were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (p<0.001, F=40), 'resin cement' (p<0.001, F=696) and 'water aging' (p<0.001, F=71). The PV5 group exhibited higher µTBS values than the PSA group. Although cleaning after sandblasting was effective in removing residual alumina particles, it did not affect the long-term bonding durability with non-contaminated CAD/CAM resin blocks.

  8. Effect of post space treatment with adhesives on the push-out bond strength of fiber posts luted with self-adhesive resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufan Can Okay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength of fiber posts used in the restoration of endodontically-treated teeth with extreme material loss, luted with two different self-adhesive resin cements alone or with the combination of an adhesive. Materials and Method: The post spaces of 80 extracted mandibular first premolar roots were prepared and divided into 4 experimental groups according to fiber post (RelyX Fiber Post luting material. Group 1 was luted with RelyX Unicem, Group 2 was luted with RelyX Unicem + Adper Easy One, Group 3 was luted with Clearfil SA Cement, and Group 4 was luted with Clearfil SA Cement + S3 Bond. After 24 h and 1 month, horizontal sections of 1 mm thickness were made from the coronal, middle and apical root parts of the fiber posts, and push-out tests were performed. Groups were compared by using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD post hoc tests and storage periods were compared by using independent samples t-test (α=0.05. Results: For both evaluation time periods, RelyX Unicem + Adper Easy One showed the highest bond strength. Regarding the 24 h period, the lowest bond strength values were found for the apical sections followed by middle and coronal sections. One month results revealed similar bond strength values for the middle and apical sections (p>0.05 which were significantly lower than the values found for the coronal sections (p<0.05. RelyX Unicem + Adper Easy One exhibited greater push-out bonding strength compared to other groups in the middle and apical sections (p<0.05. Conclusion: According to the results of this in vitro study it can be concluded that, using an adhesive system in combination with a self-adhesive resin cement during post cementation may improve the bond strength.

  9. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 1: Effects of sandblasting and silanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Mami; Matsumoto, Mariko; Kawaguchi, Asuka; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of sandblasting and silanization on resin cement bond strengths to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Twenty four blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK) were divided into two resin cement groups (PANAVIA V5 [PV5] and PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX [PSA]), and further divided into four subgroups representing different surface treatment methods: no treatment (Ctl), silanization (Si), sandblasting (Sb), and Sb+Si. After resin application, microtensile bond strengths (μTBSs) were measured immediately, 1, 3 and 6 months after water storage. In addition, surfaces resulting from each of the treatment methods were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Three-way analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (p<0.001, F=370), 'resin cement' (p<0.001, F=103, PSA

  10. Effect of chemomechanical caries removal on bonding of resin-modified glass ionomer cement adhesives to caries-affected dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamama, Hhh; Yiu, Cky; Burrow, M F

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the effect of: (1) chemomechanical caries removal (CMCR); (2) dentine surface treatments and (3) dentine substrates on adhesion of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) adhesives. One hundred and twenty permanent molars exhibiting moderate cavitation on the occlusal surface into dentine were used. Seventy-five carious molars were used for bond strength testing; the remaining 45 for micromorphological evaluation of the bonded interface. Caries was excavated with NaOCl-based CMCR (Carisolv), enzyme-based CMCR (Papacarie), or conventional rotary caries removal methods. Dentine surface treatment was performed using 37% phosphoric acid, 25-30% PAA or 20% PAA + 3% AlCl3 . Three-way ANOVA revealed that all three factors 'caries removal methods', 'dentine surface treatments' and 'dentine substrates' did not significantly affect bond strength (p > 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy micrographs showed that the acid-base resistant layer was thicker in caries-affected dentine compared to sound dentine. NaOCl- and enzyme-based CMCR methods have no adverse effect on adhesion of RMGIC adhesives to sound and caries-affected dentine. Dentine surface treatment with 37% phosphoric acid for 5 s has no negative effect on bonding of RMGIC adhesives to dentine compared with using polyacrylic acid for 10 s. RMGIC adhesives bonded well to both sound and caries-affected dentine. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  11. Effect of contamination and decontamination on adhesion of a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement to bovine dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangpermtam, Pitsapaporn; Botelho, Michael G; Dyson, John E

    2011-10-01

    To determine the adhesion of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement to bovine dentin under contaminated and decontaminated conditions. Forty-five bovine mandibular incisors were used. The surfaces of bovine dentin specimens were subjected to Temp-bond, dental handpiece lubricant (contamination), Hibiscrub, chlorhexidine or pumice (decontamination), as well as contamination followed by decontamination. From these, 14 test groups were created to investigate the effects of these variables on the microtensile bond strength of a resin-modified glassionomer cement to dentin. In addition, scanning electron microscopy was performed to examine the effects of contamination and decontamination procedures on the dentin surfaces. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney tests. SEM examination showed visible differences between the control group and dentin contaminated with Temp-bond or handpiece lubricant. All the contamination and decontamination test agents when used alone - except Hibiscrub - showed significant reductions in bond strength when compared to the control (p bond strength (p bond, handpiece lubricant, chlorhexidine, and pumice may have an adverse effect on the bonding of resin-modified glass ionomer to dentin. Hibiscrub was effective in decontaminating handpiece lubricant but not Temp-bond.

  12. Effect of antibacterial/adhesive approaches on bonding durability of fiber posts cemented with self-etch resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Memarpour, Mahtab; Vafamand, Narges; Mohammadi, Mahsa

    2017-09-01

    Longevity of post-retained restoration is highly depended on bonding stability of fiber post (FP) to root dentin. This study evaluated the effect of different antibacterial/adhesive approaches on bonding durability of FPs luted into root canal with a self-etch cement. Seventy-two human maxillary central incisor roots were divided into six groups after endodontic treatment, based on the antibacterial/adhesive treatments as follows: 1)ED primer II (ED, control); 2) Clearfil Protect Bond (PB); 3) 2% chlorhexidine (CH) pretreatment + ED primer II (CH+ED); 4) CH-incorporated into ED primer II (CH in ED); 5) CH pretreatment + Clearfil SE Bond (CH+SE); and 6)CH-incorporated into SE primer (CH in SE). The FPs were then cemented using PanaviaF2.0. After micro-slicing the bonded root dentin, a push-out bond strength (PBS) test was performed immediately or after two years of water storage. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (α=0.05). The effects of antibacterial/adhesive approach, time and interaction between the main factors were significant (p=0.01). There was no significant difference between the immediate groups, except between the CH+ED group (the lowest PBS) and PB and CH in SE groups (the highest PBS) (p≤0.03). After aging, the same difference was observed (p≤0.02); the control group exhibited a significantly lower PBS compared to the other groups (p≤0.01), except for CH+ED. Aging significantly decreased PBS of all the groups (p≤0.01); the control group exhibited the highest reduction. CH incorporated into self-etch primers or in pretreatment step prior to two-step self-etch adhesive and antibacterial adhesive could improve bond stability of self-etch cemented fiber post. However, none of these was capable of inhibiting bond degradation over time. Key words:Push-out bond strength, Fiber post, Chlorhexidine.

  13. Effect of various surface conditioning methods on the adhesion of dual-cure resin cement with MDP functional monomer to zirconia after thermal aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Nijhuis, Henk; Felipe Valandro, Luiz

    This study evaluated the effect of chairside and laboratory types of surface conditioning methods on the adhesion of dual-cure resin cement with MDP functional monomer to zirconia ceramic after thermocycling. Disk-shaped (diameter: 10 mm, thickness: 2 mm) Y-TZP ceramics (Lava(TM), 3M ESPE) were used

  14. Effects of the application techniques of self-adhesive resin cements on the interfacial integrity and bond strength of fiber posts to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedreira, Ana Paula Ribeiro do Vale; D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; Pereira, Patrícia Nóbrega Rodrigues; Chaves, Sasha Braun; Wang, Linda; Hilgert, Leandro; Garcia, Fernanda Cristina Pimentel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the influence of an application technique of a glass-fiber post using self-adhesive resin cements on the push-out bond strength and the presence of bubbles in the root thirds. The cements were either applied according to the manufacturer's instruction or using a commercial delivering system (Centrix), at which the cement pastes were collected and applied after manipulation. Material and Methods: Self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX U200/3M ESPE-U200; Maxcem Elite/Kerr-MAX; Clearfil SA Cement/Kuraray-CSA) and a conventional cement (RelyX ARC/3M ESPE-ARC) were used to cement a post and applied either based on the manufacturer's instructions or using a Centrix syringe to deliver the cements directly onto the post of choice, or directly into canal. The roots were scanned with a micro-computed tomography (μCT) and then sectioned into nine 1-mm thick slices for a push-out bond strength test. The μCT images showed the percentage of bubbles in the root thirds (cervical, medium, and apical). Data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA/Tukey (α=0.05). Results: Triple interaction was not significant (p>0.05). The interaction “material” vs “root third” was not significant. A significant interaction was observed between “material” vs “application technique” (p0.05). Significantly higher bond strength was observed when the self-adhesive resin cements were applied using the Centrix delivery system, in comparison with the manufacturer's instructions (pmedium>apical (pfiber posts. The delivery system (Centrix) seems to produce better results when cementing fiber posts. PMID:27812613

  15. Effects of the application techniques of self-adhesive resin cements on the interfacial integrity and bond strength of fiber posts to dentin

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    Ana Paula Ribeiro do Vale Pedreira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the influence of an application technique of a glass-fiber post using self-adhesive resin cements on the push-out bond strength and the presence of bubbles in the root thirds. The cements were either applied according to the manufacturer's instruction or using a commercial delivering system (Centrix, at which the cement pastes were collected and applied after manipulation. Material and Methods: Self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX U200/3M ESPE-U200; Maxcem Elite/Kerr-MAX; Clearfil SA Cement/Kuraray-CSA and a conventional cement (RelyX ARC/3M ESPE-ARC were used to cement a post and applied either based on the manufacturer's instructions or using a Centrix syringe to deliver the cements directly onto the post of choice, or directly into canal. The roots were scanned with a micro-computed tomography (μCT and then sectioned into nine 1-mm thick slices for a push-out bond strength test. The μCT images showed the percentage of bubbles in the root thirds (cervical, medium, and apical. Data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA/Tukey (α=0.05. Results: Triple interaction was not significant (p>0.05. The interaction “material” vs “root third” was not significant. A significant interaction was observed between “material” vs “application technique” (p0.05. Significantly higher bond strength was observed when the self-adhesive resin cements were applied using the Centrix delivery system, in comparison with the manufacturer's instructions (pmedium>apical (p<0.05. No correlations were found between the bond strength and voids. Conclusions: Bond strength and voids are negatively influenced by the conventional application technique for luting fiber posts. The delivery system (Centrix seems to produce better results when cementing fiber posts.

  16. Long-term bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to intraradicular dentin pretreated with chlorhexidine and ethanol

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    Mariah Carvalho Guimarães dos SANTOS

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Self-adhesive resin cements do not require prior preparation of the tooth surface, therefore dentin pretreatments may influence long-term bond strength. Objective To evaluate the influence of 100% ethanol (ET and 2% chlorhexidine (CL treatment of intraradicular dentin on the long-term bond strength (BS of a self-adhesive resin cement (SRC. Material and method 80 bovine roots were restored with fiber posts and SRC (U200 3M/ESPE and distributed into 4 groups according to dentin treatment: Group 1 – without treatment; Group 2 – 2% CL for 1 minute; Group 3 – 100% ET for 1 minute; Group 4 – 2% CL, followed by 100% ET. The samples were cross-sectioned to obtain two sections (0.7 mm thick for each root third: coronal, middle and apical. The immediate push-out test was carried out after 48 hours, and the long-term push-out test, after 180 days. Result The three-way ANOVA test for randomized blocks showed no difference between the BS values at 48 hours and 80 days, irrespective of the treatment and the third (p>0.05. The interaction of the treatment/third pairing was significant (p = 0.041 since the treatment with CL promoted lower BS in the coronal third, while treatment with ET promoted better BS in the apical third. Conclusion Treatment with CL and ET, separately or combined, promoted no differences between the BS values of the SRC to root dentin over time.

  17. Effects of the application techniques of self-adhesive resin cements on the interfacial integrity and bond strength of fiber posts to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedreira, Ana Paula Ribeiro do Vale; D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; Pereira, Patrícia Nóbrega Rodrigues; Chaves, Sasha Braun; Wang, Linda; Hilgert, Leandro; Garcia, Fernanda Cristina Pimentel

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of an application technique of a glass-fiber post using self-adhesive resin cements on the push-out bond strength and the presence of bubbles in the root thirds. The cements were either applied according to the manufacturer's instruction or using a commercial delivering system (Centrix), at which the cement pastes were collected and applied after manipulation. Self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX U200/3M ESPE-U200; Maxcem Elite/Kerr-MAX; Clearfil SA Cement/Kuraray-CSA) and a conventional cement (RelyX ARC/3M ESPE-ARC) were used to cement a post and applied either based on the manufacturer's instructions or using a Centrix syringe to deliver the cements directly onto the post of choice, or directly into canal. The roots were scanned with a micro-computed tomography (μCT) and then sectioned into nine 1-mm thick slices for a push-out bond strength test. The μCT images showed the percentage of bubbles in the root thirds (cervical, medium, and apical). Data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA/Tukey (α=0.05). Triple interaction was not significant (p>0.05). The interaction "material" vs "root third" was not significant. A significant interaction was observed between "material" vs "application technique" (pcements. Equivalent percentages of voids were observed for CSA, irrespective of the application technique (p>0.05). Significantly higher bond strength was observed when the self-adhesive resin cements were applied using the Centrix delivery system, in comparison with the manufacturer's instructions (pmedium>apical (pcementing fiber posts.

  18. A study of self-adhesive resin cements for bonding to silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy -- effect of including primer components in cement base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraguchi, Koichi; Minami, Hiroyuki; Minesaki, Yoshito; Suzuki, Shiro; Tanaka, Takuo

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacies of adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA Luting, Maxcem, G-CEM, RelyX Unicem Clicker, Vitremer Paste) for bonding to Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy not surface-pretreated with metal primer. For control, Panavia F 2.0 -developed for use with a proprietary metal primer, Alloy Primer- was tested with and without metal primer application. Pairs of alloy disks (10.0 and 8.0 mm in diameters, 3.0 mm thickness) were air-abraded with alumina and bonded with one of the cements. Shear bond strengths (SBSs) were measured before and after 50,000 times of thermocycling. Among Maxcem, RelyX Unicem Clicker and the control, there were no statistical differences in SBS before and after thermocycling. After thermocycling, Clearfil SA Luting exhibited the highest SBS among all the cements. Results showed that Clearfil SA Luting, Maxcem, and RelyX Unicem Clicker were efficacious for bonding to Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy after air abrasion surface treatment for the latter.

  19. Microleakage after Thermocycling of Three Self-Etch Adhesives under Resin-Modified Glass-Ionomer Cement Restorations

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    Sabine O. Geerts

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate microleakage that appeared on Resin-Modified Glass-Ionomer Cement (RMGIC restorations. Sixty class V cavities (h×w×l=2mm×2mm×3mm were cut on thirty extracted third molars, which were randomly allocated to three experimental groups. All the buccal cavities were pretreated with polyacrylic acid, whereas the lingual cavities were treated with three one-step Self-Etch adhesives, respectively, Xeno III (Dentsply Detrey GmbH, Konstanz, Germany, iBond exp (Heraeus Kulzer gmbH & Co. KG, Hanau, Germany, and Adper Prompt-L-Pop (3M ESPE AG, Dental products Seefeld, Germany. All cavities were completely filled with RMGIC, teeth were thermocycled for 800 cycles, and leakage was evaluated. Results were expressed as means ± standard deviations (SDs. Microleakage scores were analysed by means of generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs assuming an ordinal logistic link function. All results were considered to be significant at the 5% critical level (<.05. The results showed that bonding RMGIC to dentin with a Self-Etch adhesive rather than using polyacrylic acid did not influence microleakage scores (=.091, except for one tested Self-Etch adhesive, namely, Xeno III (<.0001. Nevertheless, our results did not show any significant difference between the three tested Self-Etch adhesive systems. In conclusion, the pretreatment of dentin with Self-Etch adhesive system, before RMGIC filling, seems to be an alternative to the conventional Dentin Conditioner for the clinicians as suggested by our results (thermocycling and others (microtensile tests.

  20. Microleakage of porcelain veneer restorations bonded to enamel and dentin with a new self-adhesive resin-based dental cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Gabriela; Johnson, Glen H; Geurtsen, Werner; Vargas, Marcos A

    2007-02-01

    Cementation technique of bonded ceramic restorations is a time-consuming and technique-sensitive procedure critical to long-term success. Evaluate the performance of a self-adhesive, modified-resin dental cement (Rely-X UniCem, 3M-ESPE) for the cementation of ceramic veneer restorations without previous conditioning of the tooth surface, and in combination with a one-bottle adhesive and a self-etching adhesive. Thirty-six premolars received a veneer preparation that extended into dentin. Leucite-reinforced pressed glass ceramic (Empress 1) veneers were cemented following manufacturers' instructions, according to the following treatment groups (n=9): (1) Variolink-Excite Ivoclar-Vivadent (V+E control), (2) Unicem+Single Bond 3M-ESPE (U+SB), (3) Unicem+Adper Prompt L-Pop 3M-ESPE (U+AP), (4) Unicem 3M-ESPE (U). After 24h storage at 37 degrees C, teeth were thermocycled (2000 cycles) at 5 and 55 degrees C, immersed in ammoniacal silver nitrate for 24h, placed in a developer solution overnight and sectioned using a slow-speed saw. Three 1mm longitudinal sections were obtained from each tooth and evaluated for leakage with a microscope (1x to 4x). Imaging software was used to measure stain penetration along the dentin and enamel surfaces. ANOVA with SNK (alpha=0.05) revealed that on dentin, U had significantly less leakage than U+SB and U+AP, but no different than V+E; on enamel U had leakage values that were significantly greater than the groups with adhesives. The self-adhesive cement U gave low leakage on dentin that was comparable to the cement that employed an adhesive for sealing dentin, whereas this cement benefits from use of an adhesive when cementing to enamel.

  1. Effect of different post space irrigation procedures on the bond strength of a fiber post attached with a self-adhesive resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kul, Esra; Yeter, Kübra Yesildal; Aladag, Lütfü Ihsan; Ayrancı, Leyla Benan

    2016-05-01

    The effects of different post space irrigation procedures on the bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to the root canal dentin are still unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of alternative post space irrigation procedures on the cement strengths of posts attached with a self-adhesive resin cement. Forty single-rooted teeth were selected, and after root canal preparation and obturation, post spaces were prepared. The teeth were divided into 4 groups corresponding to the post space irrigation procedure and treated as follows: the distilled water (DW) group (control) received 15 mL of distilled water; the NaOCl+ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) group was treated with 5 mL of 5.25% NaOCl, 5 mL of 17% EDTA, and 5 mL of distilled water; the chlorhexidine (CHX) group was treated with 15 mL of 2% chlorhexidine solution; and the phosphoric acid (PA) group treatment consisted of etching the walls of the prepared post holes with 35% phosphoric acid. Fiber posts were attached with a self-adhesive resin cement, and specimens were cut horizontally for push-out testing. The statistical evaluation consisted of 1-way ANOVA with the post hoc Tukey honest significant differences test (α=.05). The NaOCl+EDTA treatment yielded a significantly higher bond strength than those used in the other 3 groups (P=.003). No statistically significant differences were found among any of the other groups, as different root regions showed similar bond strength values (P>.05). The results showed that EDTA in combination with NaOCl could be advantageous for post space irrigation when fiber posts are bonded with a self-adhesive resin cement. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of pH, ultimate tensile strength, and micro-shear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements

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    Luciana Artioli COSTA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the pH, ultimate tensile strength (UTS, and micro-shear bond strength (µSBS of two self-adhesive resin cements to enamel and dentin. Sound bovine incisors (n = 10 and two self-adhesive resin cements (i.e., RelyX U-100 and seT PP were used. The pH of the resin cements was measured using a pH-indicator paper (n = 3. Specimens for UTS were obtained from an hourglass-shaped mold. For µSBS, cylinders with internal diameter of 0.75 mm and height of 0.5 mm were bonded to the flat enamel and dentin surfaces. Bonded cylinders were tested in the shear mode using a loop wire. The fracture mode was also evaluated. The cement seT PP showed a low pH; U-100 showed significantly higher UTS (49.9 ± 2.0 than seT PP (40.0 ± 2.1 (p < 0.05 and high µSBS to enamel (10.7 ± 3.7. The lowest µSBS was found for seT PP to dentin (0.7 ± 0.6; seT PP to enamel (4.8 ± 1.7, and for U-100 to dentin (7.2 ± 1.9, showing an intermediate µSBS value (p < 0.05. Adhesive failure was the most frequently observed failure mode. The resin cement that presented the lowest pH and UTS also presented the lowest micro-shear bond strength to enamel and dentin.

  3. In vitro evaluation of wall-to-wall adaptation of a self-adhesive resin cement used for luting gold and ceramic inlays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabianelli, Andrea; Goracci, Cecilia; Bertelli, Egidio; Monticelli, Francesca; Grandini, Simone; Ferrari, Marco

    2005-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the wall-to-wall adaptation of a new self-adhesive resin-based cement (RelyX Unicem) in comparison with that of other cements when luting gold and porcelain inlays in standardized Class II cavities in extracted teeth. In each experimental group (n = 10), a different combination of inlay and luting material was tested. Group 1: Porcelain Empress II (Ell) and RelyX Unicem (U); group 2: Ell and resin-based cement Variolink II in combination with primer and bonding Excite DSC; group 3: gold inlays (G) and U; group 4: G and Harvard zinc-oxy-phosphate cement; group 4: G and glass-ionomer cement Fuji Cem. After storage and thermocycling, microleakage testing was carried out and dye penetration was examined at the occlusal and cervical margins of each inlay. The differences in microleakage score were tested for statistical significance first comparing all groups, then pooling the groups for inlay material (Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U test, p cement/restoration interfaces were also made in each group. Harvard cement had the highest microleakage. The sealing ability exhibited by RelyX Unicem was satisfactory with both gold and porcelain inlays, and comparable to that of Fuji Cem and Variolink II. RelyX Unicem achieved an adequate seal on both enamel and dentin when used to lute in vitro gold and porcelain inlays.

  4. Shear Bond Strength of MDP-Containing Self-Adhesive Resin Cement and Y-TZP Ceramics: Effect of Phosphate Monomer-Containing Primers

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    Jin-Soo Ahn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different phosphate monomer-containing primers on the shear bond strength between yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP ceramics and MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement. Materials and Methods. Y-TZP ceramic surfaces were ground flat with #600-grit SiC paper and divided into six groups (n=10. They were treated as follows: untreated (control, Metal/Zirconia Primer, Z-PRIME Plus, air abrasion, Metal/Zirconia Primer with air abrasion, and Z-PRIME Plus with air abrasion. MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement was applied to the surface-treated Y-TZP specimens. After thermocycling, a shear bond strength test was performed. The surfaces of the Y-TZP specimens were analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. The bond strength values were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and the Student–Newman–Keuls multiple comparison test (P<0.05. Results. The Z-PRIME Plus treatment combined with air abrasion produced the highest bond strength, followed by Z-PRIME Plus application, Metal/Zirconia Primer combined with air abrasion, air abrasion alone, and, lastly, Metal/Zirconia Primer application. The control group yielded the lowest results (P<0.05. Conclusion. The application of MDP-containing primer resulted in increased bond strength between Y-TZP ceramics and MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cements.

  5. Effect of surface conditioning with airborne-particle abrasion on the tensile strength of polymeric CAD/CAM crowns luted with self-adhesive and conventional resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Basler, Tobias; Ender, Andreas; Roos, Malgorzata; Ozcan, Mutlu; Hämmerle, Christoph

    2012-02-01

    Adhesively bonded, industrially polymerized resins have been suggested as definitive restorative materials. It is claimed that such resins present similar mechanical properties to glass ceramic. The purpose of this study was to assess the tensile strength of polymeric crowns after conditioning with 2 different protocols: luted with self-adhesive or with conventional resin cements to dental abutments. Human teeth were prepared for crowns and divided into 13 groups (N=312, n=24 per group). Polymeric crowns were CAD/CAM fabricated and divided into 3 groups depending on different surface conditioning methods: A) No treatment, B) airborne-particle abrasion with 50 μm alumina, and C) airborne-particle abrasion with 110 μm alumina. Thereafter, the crowns were luted on dentin abutments with the following cements: 1) RXU (RelyX Unicem, self-adhesive), 2) GCM (G-Cem, self-adhesive), 3) ACG (artCem GI, conventional), and 4) VAR (Variolink II, conventional). Glass ceramic crowns milled and cemented with dual-polymerized resin cement (Variolink II) served as the control group. The tensile strength was measured initially (n=12) and after aging by mechanical thermocycling loading (1 200 000 cycles, 49 N, 5°C to 50°C) (n=12). The tensile strength (MPa) of all crowns was determined by the pull-off test (Zwick/Roell Z010; Ulm, Germany, 1mm/min). Subsequently, the failure types were classified. Data were analyzed with 2-way and 1-way ANOVA followed by a post hoc Scheffé test and t test (α=.05). No adhesion of the tested cements was observed on unconditioned polymeric CAD/CAM crowns and those luted with VAR. Among the tested cements, GCM showed significantly higher values after airborne-particle abrasion with 110 μm (initial: 2.8 MPa; after aging: 1 MPa) than 50 μm alumina (initial: 1.4 MPa; after aging: 0 MPa). No significant effect was found between 50 and 110 μm particle size alumina in combination with the other 2 cements. After aging, the tensile strength of the crowns

  6. Comparison of resin cement adhesion to Y-TZP ceramic following manufacturers' instructions of the cements only

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Kerkdijk, Sandra; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate the bond strength of four resin materials with various chemical compositions following the manufacturers' instructions only and (2) to test their durability in dry and thermal aged conditions when they were bonded to zirconia ceramic. Four types of

  7. Differential cytotoxic effects on odontoblastic cells induced by self-adhesive resin cements as a function of the activation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; Moura, Gioconda Emanuella Diniz de Dantas; Barbosa, Silvana Coelho de Arruda; Marques, Lygia de Azevedo; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira; Nascimento, Fábio Dupart; Tersariol, Ivarne Luis Dos Santos

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the cytotoxic effects of exposing odontoblast cells to a variety of commercial self-adhesive cements polymerized using different activation modes. Five cements: MaxCem Elite (MAX), Bifix SE (BSE), G-Cem LinkAce (GCE), Clearfil SA Luting (CAS), and RelyX U200 (U200) were mixed, dispensed into molds, and distributed in groups, according to polymerization protocols: immediate photoactivation; delayed photoactivation (10min self-curing plus light-activation); and chemical activation (no light exposure). Immortalized rat odontoblast cells (MDPC-23) were cultured. Cell viability was assessed by Trypan Blue staining and total cell death was assessed by annexin V-APC/7-AAD double staining and flow cytometry. Volatilized compounds from polymerized specimens of cements were evaluated by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Data was analyzed with 2-way ANOVA/Tukey tests (α=0.05). Exposure to all of the cements tested significantly reduced the cell viability, irrespective of the activation protocol (pcements were CSA and U200. Total death of cells significantly increased when exposed to BSE, GCE, and MAX, especially when chemically activated (pcements, mainly for MAX, regardless of the activation mode. Chemical activation of MAX also induced necrosis. Moreover, GCE and MAX exhibited higher percentages of late apoptotic/dead cells. Chromatograms revealed 28 compounds released from the cements tested, some of them with known carcinogenic effects. Selection of self-adhesive cements and polymerization protocols affect the cytotoxicity and cell viability of odontoblastic cells. Despite the simplified cementation protocol, care is needed when cementing indirect restorations with self-adhesive cements, especially on recently exposed dentin. This category of material may cause differential cytotoxic effects and should be considered when selecting a cement. This is particularly true in clinical cases of light attenuation, where the polymerization depends on

  8. Effect of thermomechanical aging on bond strength and interface morphology of glass fiber and zirconia posts bonded with a self-etch adhesive and a self-adhesive resin cement to natural teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Batu Can; Ozer, Fusun; Takeichi, Takuro; Karabucak, Bekir; Koray, Fatma; Blatz, Markus B

    2014-09-01

    Information regarding the effect of thermomechanical aging (TMA) on the bond strength of luting cements to root canal dentin and endodontic posts is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of TMA on the bond strength of fiber and zirconia posts bonded to root canal dentin with 2 different resin cements with microtensile and scanning electron microscopic evaluation. Eighty extracted single-rooted human premolars were endodontically treated and restored with either a glass fiber post (FP) or a zirconia post (ZP) with 2 commercially available resin luting cements. The teeth were divided into 2 main groups. In the first group, posts (n=40) were bonded with a self-etch adhesive cement (SEAC). In the second group (n=40), posts were bonded using a self-adhesive cement (SAC). During the first aging phase, all specimens in each group were stored in distilled water for 30 days at 37°C. During the second phase, half of the specimens in each group were subjected to the TMA. The test groups were as follows: FP/SEAC, FP/SEAC+TMA, ZP/SEAC, ZP/SEAC+TMA, FP/SAC, FP/SAC+TMA, ZP/SAC, and ZP/SAC+TMA. The bond strength was measured with a microtensile test. Data were analyzed by 3-way analysis of variance and the Tukey honest significant different test (α=.05). FP/SEAC at 30 days was higher than in the other groups. However, bond strength values were significantly reduced in this group after TMA (Pposts and the resin cements as well as between the resin cements and the root canal dentin. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Analytical method to estimate resin cement diffusion into dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Ferraz, Larissa Cristina; Ubaldini, Adriana Lemos Mori; de Oliveira, Bruna Medeiros Bertol; Neto, Antonio Medina; Sato, Fracielle; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2016-05-01

    This study analyzed the diffusion of two resin luting agents (resin cements) into dentin, with the aim of presenting an analytical method for estimating the thickness of the diffusion zone. Class V cavities were prepared in the buccal and lingual surfaces of molars (n=9). Indirect composite inlays were luted into the cavities with either a self-adhesive or a self-etch resin cement. The teeth were sectioned bucco-lingually and the cement-dentin interface was analyzed by using micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) and scanning electron microscopy. Evolution of peak intensities of the Raman bands, collected from the functional groups corresponding to the resin monomer (C-O-C, 1113 cm-1) present in the cements, and the mineral content (P-O, 961 cm-1) in dentin were sigmoid shaped functions. A Boltzmann function (BF) was then fitted to the peaks encountered at 1113 cm-1 to estimate the resin cement diffusion into dentin. The BF identified a resin cement-dentin diffusion zone of 1.8±0.4 μm for the self-adhesive cement and 2.5±0.3 μm for the self-etch cement. This analysis allowed the authors to estimate the diffusion of the resin cements into the dentin. Fitting the MRS data to the BF contributed to and is relevant for future studies of the adhesive interface.

  10. Controlled, prospective, randomized, clinical split-mouth evaluation of partial ceramic crowns luted with a new, universal adhesive system/resin cement: results after 18 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Vanessa; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Federlin, Marianne; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2016-12-01

    A new universal adhesive with corresponding luting composite was recently marketed which can be used both, in a self-etch or in an etch-and-rinse mode. In this study, the clinical performance of partial ceramic crowns (PCCs) inserted with this adhesive and the corresponding luting material used in a self-etch or selective etch approach was compared with a self-adhesive universal luting material. Three PCCs were placed in a split-mouth design in 50 patients. Two PCCs were luted with a combination of a universal adhesive/resin cement (Scotchbond Universal/RelyX Ultimate, 3M ESPE) with (SB+E)/without (SB-E) selective enamel etching. Another PCC was luted with a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem 2, 3M ESPE). Forty-eight patients were evaluated clinically according to FDI criteria at baseline and 6, 12 and 18 months. For statistical analyses, the chi-square test (α = 0.05) and Kaplan-Meier analysis were applied. Clinically, no statistically significant differences between groups were detected over time. Within groups, clinically significant increase for criterion "marginal staining" was detected for SB-E over 18 months. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed significantly higher retention rates for SB+E (97.8 %) and SB-E (95.6 %) in comparison to RXU2 (75.6 %). The 18-month clinical performance of a new universal adhesive/composite combination showed no differences with respect to bonding strategy and may be recommended for luting PCCs. Longer-term evaluation is needed to confirm superiority of SB+E over SB-E. At 18 months, the new multi-mode adhesive, Scotchbond Universal, showed clinically reliable results when used for luting PCCs.

  11. Adhesion between glass fiber posts and resin cement: evaluation of bond strength after various pre-treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipahi, Cumhur; Piskin, Bulent; Akin, Gulsah E; Bektas, Ozden Ozel; Akin, Hakan

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate surface roughness and bond strength of glass fiber posts to a resin cement after various surface treatments. Sixty individually formed glass fiber posts with a diameter of 1.5 mm and a length of 20 mm were used for this study. They were randomly assigned to six groups of pre-treatment (n = 10/group): Group C, untreated (control); Group SB, sandblasted; Group SC, silica coated; Group HF, hydrofluoric acid-etched; Group N, Nd:YAG laser irradiated; Group E, Er:YAG laser irradiated. Surface roughness of the posts was measured before and after pre-treatment. The posts were then bonded to resin cement and tensile bond strengths were determined in a universal testing machine. For statistical analysis, two-way ANOVA and post-hoc comparison tests (α = 0.05) were performed. The highest bond strength value was observed in group HF, followed by group SC. There was a statistically significant difference in bond strength between group C and groups HF, SC and E (p Posts of group SB and group N showed the highest surface roughness. The findings of the present study reveal that hydrofluoric acid-etching, silica coating and Er:YAG laser irradiation provided a significant increase in bond strength between glass fiber posts and resin cement.

  12. Push-out bond strength and SEM analysis of two self-adhesive resin cements: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Baldea

    2013-09-01

    Materials and methods: RelyX Fiber Posts #3 (3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany were luted with RelyX U200 (3M ESPE (n = 10 and Maxcem Elite (Kerr Corporation, Orange, CA, USA (n = 10. Mean values of push-out bond strength for each group and root region (cervical, middle and apical were calculated. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P 60% adhesive failures at the resin cement-dentine interface were observed.

  13. The influence of ultrasound on removal of prefabricated metal post cemented with different resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atiyeh Feiz

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Ultrasonic energy did not decrease the retention of posts cemented with Panavia or Maxcem Elite cements. Furthermore, it seems that there is no significant difference between removal force of self-etch (Panavia and the self-etch self-adhesive (Maxcem Elite resin cements.

  14. The effect of tooth-preparation cleansing protocol on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to dentin contaminated with a hemostatic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyabutr, Y; Kois, J C

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of tooth-preparation cleansing protocols on the bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to dentin contaminated with two different types of hemostatic agents. The occlusal surface of extracted third molars was flattened to expose the dentin surface and prepared for a full crown. Acrylic temporary crowns were fabricated and placed using temporary cement. The specimens were stored at 100% relative humidity for seven days. Following removal of the temporary crowns, the specimens were surface debrided using aluminum oxide abrasion with a particle size of 27 μm at 40 psi. The specimens were randomly assigned to three groups, according to the hemostatic agents: Group I–an agent containing aluminum chloride was applied to the tooth surface; Group II–an agent containing ferric sulfate was applied to the tooth surface and Group III–uncontaminated (control). The contaminated specimens were then further subdivided into three subgroups (A–C; n=12): Group A–tooth surface cleansing with water spray; Group B–tooth surface cleansing with phosphoric acid etch and Group C–tooth surface cleansing with aluminum oxide abrasion with a particle size of 27 μm at 40 psi. Ceramic blocks were treated with a 9.5% hydrofluoric acid-etch and silanized prior to being cemented with self-adhesive resin luting agent (RelyX Unicem) to the prepared dentin. The shear bond strength was determined at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA, followed by the Duncan multiple range test, to determine any significant differences between the testing groups. The microstructure morphology of the tooth surface was evaluated using SEM analysis. The results revealed that there was a significant difference between the bond strength of the control and the contaminated testing groups (pdentin, while rinsing with water spray resulted in the lowest mean bond strength of the self-adhesive resin cement to dentin (p<0.05).

  15. Adhesion of resin-modified glass-ionomer cements may affect the integrity of tooth structure in the open sandwich technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Beata; Kruszelnicki, Anna; Kao, Anthony; Strykowska, Marta; Nicholson, John W

    2014-12-01

    To study the interfaces between model cavities prepared in teeth and four glass ionomer cements (two conventional and two resin-modified). Ten non-cavitated molars and premolars were used and, in each, two 3mm deep slot preparations were created on opposing sides of the tooth. The teeth were conditioned as appropriate, then restored using the open sandwich technique, using a conventional glass ionomer (Fuji IX, Ketac Molar) or resin modified glass ionomer (Fuji II LC or N100), followed by completion with composite resin. The teeth were then embedded in a transparent acrylic resin and cut parallel to the long axis through both restorations, using a low speed diamond wheel saw. Samples were evaluated using a metallographic light microscope (100×). Three areas were assessed: the axial wall, the axial gingival line angle and the cavo-surface line angle. Bonding was categorized as inadequate or adequate based on the appearance and inadequate bonding was further studied and classified. Data were analysed statistically using the McNamara analysis. The majority of materials failed to make adequate contact with the axial wall, and there were also flaws at the axial/gingival line angle in several samples. By contrast, the cavo-surface line angle was generally soundly filled and the materials showed intimate contact with the tooth surface in this region. The most serious inadequacy, though, was not lack of intimate contact and/or adhesive bond, but the presence of perpendicular cracks in 30% of the Fuji II LC samples which extended into the underlying dentin. The problems of placement and dentin cracking experienced with these materials demonstrate that adhesive bond strength alone cannot be used as the criterion of success for restorative materials. In fact good adhesion can, in certain cases, promote cracking of the dentin due to stresses within the material, an outcome which is undesirable. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  16. Effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement lining and composite layering technique on the adhesive interface of lateral wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Marinho AZEVEDO

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Interface integrity can be maintained by setting the composite in a layering technique and using liners. Objective The aim of this in vitro study was to verify the effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC lining and composite layering technique on the bond strength of the dentin/resin adhesive interface of lateral walls of occlusal restorations. Material and Methods Occlusal cavities were prepared in 52 extracted sound human molars, randomly assigned into 4 groups: Group 2H (control – no lining + two horizontal layers; Group 4O: no lining + four oblique layers; Group V-2H: RMGIC lining (Vitrebond + two horizontal layers; and Group V-4O: RMGIC lining (Vitrebond + four oblique layers. Resin composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE was placed after application of an adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE dyed with a fluorescent reagent (Rhodamine B to allow confocal microscopy analysis. The teeth were stored in deionized water at 37oC for 24 hours before being sectioned into 0.8 mm slices. One slice of each tooth was randomly selected for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM analysis. The other slices were sectioned into 0.8 mm x 0.8 mm sticks to microtensile bond strength test (MPa. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Fisher's test. Results There was no statistical difference on bond strength among groups (p>0.05. CLSM analysis showed no significant statistical difference regarding the presence of gap at the interface dentin/resin among groups. Conclusions RMGIC lining and composite layering techniques showed no effect on the microtensile bond strength and gap formation at the adhesive interface of lateral walls of high C-factor occlusal restorations.

  17. Pull-out bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to NaOCl-treated root dentin: effect of antioxidizing agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study evaluated the effect of three antioxidizing agents on pull-out bond strengths of dentin treated with sodium hypochlorite. Materials and Methods Root canals of 75 single-rooted human teeth were prepared. Fifteen teeth were irrigated with normal saline for a negative control group, and the remaining 60 teeth (groups 2 - 5 with 2.5% NaOCl. The teeth in group 2 served as a positive control. Prior to post cementation, the root canals in groups 3 - 5 were irrigated with three antioxidizing agents including 10% rosmarinic acid (RA, Baridge essence, 10% hesperidin (HPN, Sigma, and 10% sodium ascorbate hydrogel (SA, AppliChem. Seventy-five spreaders (#55, taper .02, Produits Dentaires S.A were coated with silica and silanized with the Rocatec system and ceramic bond. All the prepared spreaders were cemented with a self-adhesive resin cement (Bifix SE, Voco Gmbh in the prepared canals. After storage in distilled water (24 h/37℃, the spreaders were pulled out in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Pull-out strength values were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (α = 0.05. Results There were significant differences between study groups (p = 0.016. The highest pull-out strength was related to the SA group. The lowest strength was obtained in the positive control group. Conclusions Irrigation with NaOCl during canal preparation decreased bond strength of resin cement to root dentin. Amongst the antioxidants tested, SA had superior results in reversing the diminishing effect of NaOCl irrigation on the bond strength to root dentin.

  18. Damage of lithium-disilicate all-ceramic restorations by an experimental self-adhesive resin cement used as core build-ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterzenbach, G; Karajouli, G; Tunjan, R; Spintig, T; Bitter, K; Naumann, M

    2015-03-01

    This in vitro study aimed to predict the potential of fracture initiation after long-term incubation (LTI) of lithium-disilicate restorations due to a hygroscopic expansion of self-adhesive resin cement (SARC) used as core build-up material. Human maxillary central incisors were divided into four groups (n = 10). Teeth were endodontically treated and decoronated. Specimens were restored in a one-stage post-and-core procedure using experimental dual-curing SARC. Three application protocols to build up the core were compared as follows: I, auto-polymerisation; II, dual curing including 40 s light-initiated polymerisation; and III, an open matrix technique in a dual-curing mode. In group IV, a chemical-curing composite core build-up material served as control. For all specimens, a 2-mm ferrule design was ensured. Full anatomic lithium-disilicate crowns were adhesively luted. One-year LTI in 0.5 % chloramine solution at 37 °C was performed. Restorations were examined after 3, 6, 9 and 12 month of storage. Survival rates were calculated using log-rank statistics (p = 0.05). Fifty per cent of lithium-disilicate crowns of groups I and II showed visible crack propagation after 9 months of incubation, while one crown failed in group III. No failure was observed in group IV. The survival rates differed significantly (p = 0.017). SARC used to build up the core of severely damaged endodontically treated teeth does have the potential to cause fracture of lithium-disilicate crown restorations. Hygroscopic expansion of self-adhesive resin cements used as a core build-up material might have an adverse impact on longevity of glass-ceramic crowns.

  19. A Twofold Comparison between Dual Cure Resin Modified Cement and Glass Ionomer Cement for Orthodontic Band Cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Hanaa El; Elhiny, Omnia; Salem, Ghada; Abdelrahman, Ahmed; Attia, Mazen

    2016-12-15

    To test the solubility of dual cure resin modified resin cement in a food simulating solution and the shear bond strength compared to conventional Glass ionomer cement. The materials tested were self-adhesive dual cure resin modified cement and Glass Ionomer (GIC). Twenty Teflon moulds were divided into two groups of tens. The first group was injected and packed with the modified resin cement, the second group was packed with GIC. To test the solubility, each mould was weighed before and after being placed in an analytical reagent for 30 days. The solubility was measured as the difference between the initial and final drying mass. To measure the Shear bond strength, 20 freshly extracted wisdom teeth were equally divided into two groups and embedded in self-cure acrylic resin. Four mm sections of stainless steel bands were cemented to the exposed buccal surfaces of teeth under a constant load of 500 g. Shear bond strength was measured using a computer controlled materials testing machine and the load required to deband the samples was recorded in Newtons. GIC showed significantly higher mean weight loss and an insignificant lower Shear bond strength, compared to dual cure resin Cement. It was found that dual cure resin modified cement was less soluble than glass ionomer cement and of comparable bond strength rendering it more useful clinically for orthodontic band cementation.

  20. Influence of Bovine Dentin Site on the Bond Strength of Resin Cement

    OpenAIRE

    Tohru, HAYAKAWA; Hiroyuki, Mishima; Shuichi, YAMAKAWA; Mikiko, MASUDA; Masahiro, AIDA; Kimiya, NEMOTO; Yukishige, Kozawa; Department of Crown and Bridge Prosthodontics, Research Institute of Oral Science, Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo; Department of Dental Materials, Research Institute of Oral Science, Nihon Univerity School of Dentistry at Matsudo; Department of Anatomy, Research Institute of Oral Science, Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the influences of types of resin cements and dentin site(crown and root part)on the adhesion of resin cement to dentin. Three types of resin cements; Super-Bond C&B, Bistite II and Scotchbond Resin Cement were used. The tensile bond strength of each resin cement to crown and root dentin of bovine incisors was measured after 24 hours immersion in water at 37℃. Super-Bond C&B showed no significant difference in bond strength between crown and root den...

  1. Bond durability of different resin cements to caries-affected dentin under simulated intrapulpal pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, M F; El Deeb, H A; Gomaa, I E; Mobarak, E H

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the durability of the bond of different resin cement systems to normal dentin (ND) and caries-affected dentin (CAD) with and without simulated intrapulpal pressure (IPP). Molars with midcoronal caries were used. Occlusal enamel was cut to expose both dentin substrates (ND and CAD). Dentin substrates were differentiated using visual, tactile, caries-detecting dye, and dye-permeability methods. Prepared crown segments were equally divided according to the tested resin cement systems: etch-and-rinse resin cement, self-etch resin cement containing methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP), and self-adhesive resin cement. In addition to the dentin substrates and the resin cement types, the effect of application/storage conditions (with or without simulated IPP and with or without thermocycling) were tested. A microtensile bond strength test was done using a universal testing machine. Failure modes were determined using a scanning electron microscope. Etch-and-rinse resin cement strength values were significantly affected by the difference in the dentin substrates as well as the different application/storage conditions. Self-etch adhesive containing MDP bonded equally to ND and CAD and remained stable under all tested conditions. Self-adhesive resin cement revealed a similar bond to ND and CAD; however, its values were the lowest, especially when IPP and thermocycling were combined. Mixed failure was the predominant failure mode. Etch-and-rinse resin cement was sensitive to dentin substrate and application/storage conditions. Resin cement with self-etch adhesive containing MDP revealed more reliable bonding to ND/CAD even when IPP and thermocycling were combined. The bonding of the self-adhesive resin cement could not compete with other resin cements.

  2. Can application of universal primers alone be a substitute for airborne-particle abrasion to improve adhesion of resin cement to zirconia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Laudenice de Lucena; Campos, Fernanda; Dal Piva, Amanda Maria de Oliveira; Gondim, Laísa Daniel; Souza, Rodrigo Othávio de Assunção; Özcan, Mutlu

    2015-04-01

    To determine whether universal primers alone can deliver similar levels of adhesion of resin cement to zirconia ceramic when compared to their application in conjunction with airborne-particle abrasion. Sintered zirconia blocks (N = 160) (Lava, 3M ESPE), (5.25 × 5.25 × 3 mm3) were embedded in acrylic resin, polished, and randomly distributed into 16 groups (n = 10 per group), according to the factors "universal primer" (8 levels) and "air-particle abrasion" (2 levels): 1. ctr: control, without application of a universal primer; 2. AP: Alloy Primer; 3. MP: Monobond Plus; 4. MZP: Metal Zirconia Primer; 5. MZ: MZ Primer; 6. Sg: Signum Zirconia Bond; 7. SbU: Singlebond Universal; 8. ZP: Z Prime Plus. The universal primers were also used after air abrasion (A) of zirconia to form the following 8 groups: Ctr-A, AP-A, MP-A, MZP-A, MZ-A, Sg-A, SbU-A, and ZP-A. After ultrasonic cleaning, air abrasion was performed using Al2O3 particles (110 μm, 2.5 bar, 20 s at 10 mm) in a chairside air-abrasion device. After ultrasonic cleaning again, universal primers were applied according to each manufacturer's recommendation. The resin cement (RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE) was built up incrementally and photopolymerized on the zirconia surface using a silicone mold (Ø = 3.5, height = 3 mm). All specimens were stored in distilled water (60 days at 37°C) and then subjected to shear bond strength testing (SBS) in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). On a separate set of zirconia specimens, contact angle measurements were made using the sessile drop technique with a goniometer after the application of universal primers on control and air-abraded zirconia surfaces. Data (MPa) were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Tukey's test, and Student's t-test (α = 0.05). When universal primers were used alone, SbU presented significantly higher mean SBS (19.5 ± 5.8) that did the other primers (0 to 9.9 ± 6.6) (p = 0.001). When air abraded, the groups AP-A (14.1 ± 6.1), MP-A (15.9 ± 5.4), ZP-A (16.9

  3. Bonding of dual-curing resin cements to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmussen, Erik; Peutzfeldt, Anne

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of the study was three-fold: 1) to determine the strength of the bond between a number of dual-curing resin cements and dentin treated with corresponding adhesive systems, 2) to determine the effect on bond strength of not light curing the cements, and 3) to investigate whether application of a solution of sodium sulfinate or ascorbic acid would increase the bond strength in the cases where the manufacturer's version of an adhesive system resulted in low bond strength with chemically cured cement, ie, cement cured without light. The adhesive systems comprised 5 simplified systems (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT, ED Primer II, Excite DSC, OptiBond Solo Plus, and Prime and Bond NT), and as controls, two three-step etch and rinse systems (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus and Gluma Solid Bond). The corresponding dual-curing resin cements were RelyX ARC, Panavia F 2.0, Variolink II, Nexus 2, Calibra, RelyX ARC, and 2Bond2. The cements were either light and chemically cured or only chemically cured. The adhesive systems were used as recommended by the manufacturers, which for some systems involved inclusion of a so-called activator or catalyst when used with chemically cured cement. Sodium sulfinate and ascorbic acid were applied as a 1% ethanol solution. The bond strengths were measured in shear after storing specimens for 24 h in 37 degree C water. When the dual-curing resin cements had been both light and chemically cured, the bond strengths increased in this order: Gluma Solid Bond cements decreased the bond strengths with OptiBond Solo Plus and Prime and Bond NT. The use of activator in conjunction with OptiBond Solo Plus and Prime and Bond NT increased the bond strength to chemically cured cement, but not to the level obtained when the cement was both light and chemically cured. The use of the catalyst of Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus did not increase the bond strength with chemically cured cement. Pretreatment with a solution of sodium sulfinate or

  4. Deposition of SiOx thin films on Y-TZP by reactive magnetron sputtering: influence of plasma parameters on the adhesion properties between Y-TZP and resin cement for application in dental prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Renato Calvacanti de Queiroz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper SiOx thin films were deposited on Y-TZP ceramics by reactive magnetron sputtering technique in order to improve the adhesion properties between Y-TZP and resin cement for applications in dental prosthesis. For fixed cathode voltage, target current, working pressure and target-to-substrate distance, SiOx thin films were deposited at different oxygen concentrations in the Ar+O2 plasma forming gas. After deposition processes, SiOx thin films were characterized by profilometry, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Adhesion properties between Y-TZP and resin cement were evaluated by shear testing. Results indicate that films deposited at 20%O2 increased the bond strength to (32.8 ± 5.4 MPa. This value has not been achieved by traditional methods.

  5. Effect of selective enamel etching on clinical performance of CAD/CAM partial ceramic crowns luted with a self-adhesive resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federlin, Marianne; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2014-11-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate a self-adhesive resin luting cement [RelyX Unicem 3MESPE-RXU] for luting partial ceramic crowns (PCCs) with and without selective enamel etching in a prospective, randomized clinical trial. Thirty-four patients had received the intended treatment. Two PCCs (Vita Mark II; Cerec 3D; Sirona) had been placed in a split-mouth design: one with RXU without enamel etching (RXU), the other with RXU with selective enamel etching (RXU + E). Restorations were evaluated at baseline (BL) and after 12, 24, and 36 months (USPHS criteria). For statistical analysis, the Chi-square test was applied (α = 0.05). Clinical survival of all restorations (n = 68) after 3 years was determined using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Twenty three patients (12 male/11 female) were available for clinical evaluation after 3 years. 19 RXU-PCCs were placed in molars, four in premolars, 18 RXU + E-PCCs in molars, five in premolars. Concerning clinical changes, no significant differences were found between luting strategies RXU/RXU + E at all recalls. Statistically significant changes over time were observed for marginal adaptation and marginal discoloration between BL and 36 m for RXU and RXU + E. For RXU + E, postoperative hypersensitivities decreased significantly from BL (n = 6) to 36 m (n = 0). Of the 68 restorations originally included, eight RXU and four RXU + E restorations failed. At 3 years, Kaplan-Meier survival of RXU was 72.9 %, that of RXU + E 87.6 %. Survival rates were not statistically significant different. Although clinical survival of RXU + E is slightly better at 3 years, restorations of both groups perform similar with respect to clinical changes over time as evaluated by modified USPHS criteria. The self-adhesive resin cement RXU can be used in conjunction with selective enamel etching, because survival rates of PCCs in the RXU + E group were not lower but, as a trend, even better than without enamel

  6. The effect of dentin-cleaning agents on resin cement bond strength to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraç, Duygu; Bulucu, Bilinc; Saraç, Y Sinasi; Kulunk, Safak

    2008-06-01

    Provisional cement remnants on dentin affect the bond strength of resin cements to dentin. The authors investigated the effects of dentin-cleaning agents and etching systems on the bond strength of adhesive resin cement. The authors removed the provisional cement from the dentin surfaces of the specimens and then cleaned the surfaces with the dentin-cleaning agents Sikko Tim (VOCO GmbH, Cuxhaven, Germany), Cavity Cleanser (Bisco, Schaumburg, Ill.) or Consepsis Scrub (Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah). They used adhesive resin cement after applying the different etching adhesive systems. Then they examined the dentin surfaces by using scanning electron microscopy. The authors analyzed data by means of a two-way analysis of variance with Tukey honestly significant difference tests (alpha= .05). They found that specimens cleaned with Sikko Tim and Consepsis Scrub had higher shear bond strength values than did those in the no-treatment control group or the group cleaned with Cavity Cleanser. The specimens treated with the total-etching adhesive system had higher shear bond strength than did those treated with the self-etching adhesive systems. Sikko Tim and Consepsis Scrub were effective in removing provisional cement. Adhesive resin cement showed higher bond strength when used in conjunction with the total-etching adhesive system. The use of an effective dentin cleaner before cementation with resin cement can increase bond strength.

  7. Influence of the Curing Mode on Fluoride Ion Release of Self-adhesive Resin Luting Cements in Water or During pH-Cycling Regimen

    OpenAIRE

    Aguiar, T.R.; Pinto, C. F.; Cavalli, V; Santos, M. Nobre dos; AMBROSANO G.M.B.; Mathias, P; Giannini, M

    2012-01-01

    p. 63-70 This study evaluated the effects of curing modes and storage conditions on fluoride release of resin cements. In phase 1, the cumulative fluoride release rate from samples of the resin cements (Panavia F 2.0, RelyX Unicem, MaxCem, and BisCem) was quantified after 15 days storage in water (n=4). In phase 2, the fluoride release profiles from the same materials were analyzed during pH cycling (n=4). In this second phase, fluoride was measured at specific times (one, two, three, five...

  8. Microleakage and marginal gap of adhesive cements for noble alloy full cast crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, T; Mohajerfar, M; Keshvad, A; Motahhary, P

    2011-01-01

    Very limited comparative information about the microleakage in noble alloy full cast crowns luted with different types of adhesive resin cements is available. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microleakage and marginal gap of two self-adhesive resin cements with that of other types of adhesive luting cements for noble alloy full cast crowns. Fifty noncarious human premolars and molars were prepared in a standardized manner for full cast crown restorations. Crowns were made from a noble alloy using a standardized technique and randomly cemented with five cementing agents as follows: 1) GC Fuji Plus resin-modified glass ionomer cement, 2) Panavia F 2.0 resin cement, 3) Multilink Sprint self-adhesive resin cement, 4), Rely X Unicem self-adhesive resin cement with pretreatment, and 5) Rely X Unicem with no pretreatment. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for two weeks and then subjected to thermocycling. They were then placed in a silver nitrate solution, vertically cut in a mesiodistal direction and evaluated for microleakage and marginal gap using a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using a nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn multiple range test at a pcrown interfaces. The greatest amount of microleakage was found for Panavia F 2.0 resin cement followed by GC Fuji Plus at both interfaces. No statistically significant difference in the marginal gap values was found between the cementing agents evaluated (p>0.05). The self-adhesive resin cements provided a much better marginal seal for the noble alloy full cast crowns compared with the resin-modified glass ionomer or dual-cured resin-based cements.

  9. Evaluation of Adhesive and Compressive Strength of Glass Ionomer Cements

    OpenAIRE

    Ramashanker,; Raghuwar D Singh; Chand, Pooran; Jurel, Sunit Km.; Tripathi, Shuchi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess, compare and evaluate the adhesive strength and compressive strength of different brands of glass ionomer cements to a ceramometal alloy. (A) Glass ionomer cements: GC Fuji II (GC Corporation, Tokyo), Chem Flex (Dentsply DeTrey, Germany), Glass ionomer FX (Shofu-11, Japan), MR dental (MR dental suppliers Pvt Ltd, England). (B) Ceramometal alloy (Ni–Cr: Wiron 99; Bego, Bremen, Germany). (C) Cold cure acrylic resin. (E) Temperature cum humidity control chamber...

  10. Interfacial fracture toughness of different resin cements bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hooshmand, Tabassom; Rostami, Golriz; Behroozibakhsh, Marjan; Fatemi, Mostafa; Keshvad, Alireza; van Noort, Richard

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of HF acid etching and silane treatment on the interfacial fracture toughness of a self-adhesive and two conventional resin-based cements bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic...

  11. Microhardness of different resin cement shades inside the root canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignolo, Valeria; Fuentes, Maria-Victoria; Garrido, Miguel-Angel; Rodríguez, Jesús; Ceballos, Laura

    2012-09-01

    To compare microhardness along the root canal post space of two resin cements in different shades and a dual-cure resin core material. Root canals of 21 bovine incisors were prepared for post space. Translucent posts (X∘Post, Dentsply DeTrey) were luted using one the following resin luting agent: Calibra (Dentsply DeTrey) in Translucent, Medium and Opaque shades, RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE) in Translucent, A2 and A3 shades and the dual-cure resin core material Core∘X flow. All materials were applied according to manufacturers' instructions and were all photopolymerized (Bluephase LED unit, Ivoclar Vivadent, 40s). After 24 hours, roots were transversally cut into 9 slices 1 mm thick from the coronal to apical extremes, three corresponding to each root third. Then, VHNs were recorded (100gf, 30 s) on the resin luting materials along the adhesive interface in all sections. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and SNK tests (α=0.05). A significant influence on microhardness of resin luting material in their respective shades (pmicrohardness values and Calibra the lowest, regardless of the shade selected. All resin luting materials tested exhibited a significantly higher microhardness in the cervical third. Microhardness of resin luting agents tested inside the canal is dependent on material brand and resin cement shade seems to be a less relevant factor. Microhardness decreased along the root canal, regardless of the shade selected.

  12. Nanoleakage of fiber posts luted with different adhesive strategies and the effect of chlorhexidine on the interface of dentin and self-adhesive cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Danielson Guedes; Araujo, Cintia Tereza Pimenta; Prieto, Lucia Trazzi; de Oliveira, Dayane Carvalho Ramos Salles; Coppini, Erick Kamiya; Dias, Carlos Tadeu Santos; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the nanoleakage of fiber posts luted using different adhesive strategies and to investigate the effect of 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) on nanoleakage at the resin-dentin interfaces of self-adhesive cements. The self-adhesive and etch-and-rinse adhesive groups tested demonstrated similar results with regard to nanoleakage. Pretreatment with CHX promoted an adequate seal at the resin-dentin interface for self-adhesive cements.

  13. Investigation of the fatigue behavior of adhesive bonding of the lithium disilicate glass ceramic with three resin cements using rotating fatigue method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassini, E; Mirzaei, M; Alimi, A; Rahaeifard, M

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the fatigue behavior of bonding interface of lithium disilicate ceramic with three different dual cure resin cements. Forty five bar shaped ceramic-resin-ceramic specimens were prepared and divided into 3 groups (n=15) according to the resin cement used (group1: Panavia F2.0, group 2: RelyX Ultimate, group 3: Duo-Link Universal). Three specimens of each group were tested using three point bending test and the fracture strength of the resin-ceramic bond was measured. Other specimens of each group were placed in the rotating fatigue testing machine at stresses equal to 30%, 40%, 50% and 60% of the fracture strength. The cyclic loading was continued until fracture or a maximum of 10,000 cycles. For the specimens which did not fail until 10,000 cycles, the cyclic loading was stopped and the remained fracture strength of the specimens was measured. None of the specimens with cyclic loads of 30% and 40% of the fracture strength, have failed until 10,000 cycles. After 10,000 load cycles, the fracture strength of these specimens was significantly lower than their initial fracture strength. On the other hand, all specimens with cyclic stresses equal to 50% and 60% of the fracture strength have failed before 10,000 cycles so that the numbers of load cycles of RelyX specimens were significantly higher than those of Panavia ones and the numbers of cycles of Panavia specimens were significantly higher than those of Duo-Link specimens. The fatigue resistance of the ceramic-resin interface is significantly lower than its bond strength. Furthermore, RelyX Ultimate showed the highest fatigue resistance and Duo-Link Universal exhibited the weakest fatigue resistance. Since dental restorations are under cyclic loading caused by mastication forces, the results of this research can be used to select fatigue resistant resin cements for bonding of ceramic restorations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Effect of Different Storage Media on Color Stability of Self-Adhesive Composite Resin Cements for up to One Year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Liebermann

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the long-term color stability of eight self-adhesive composite resin cements (SACRCs after storage in diverse media for up to one year. 480 discs (diameter: 12 mm/thickness: 1.0 ± 0.05 mm were fabricated (n = 60/SACRC: (1 BeautyCem (BEA; (2 Bifix SE (BIF; (3 Clearfil SA Cement Automix (CLE; (4 RelyX Unicem 2 Automix (RXU; (5 SeT (SET; (6 SmartCem 2 (SMC; (7 SoloCem (SOC; and (8 SpeedCEM (SPC. After polishing, specimens were immersed in (a red wine (RW; (b curry-solution (CU; (c cress-solution (CR; and (d distilled water (DW at 37 °C and measured after 7, 28, 90, 180, and 365 days for color differences (ΔE and water absorption (WA. Non-aged specimens were used as baselines. After 365 days, all of the discs were polished and their ΔE was measured. Data were analyzed using Kolmogorov-Smirnov, partial-eta-squared/ηP2, 3-/1-way ANOVA with Tukey-HSD post-hoc test (α = 0.05. Significant differences occurred between all SACRCs for WA (p ≤ 0.003, except in RXU and in SET and in ΔE (p ≤ 0.002, except in SET and SPC. The significantly highest WA presented in SOC; the lowest showed in BEA. Significant ΔE differences and a decrease after polishing between all storage media were found (p < 0.001 with highest values for RW, followed by CU, CR, and DW. The lowest ΔE was measured for CLE, followed by SOC, BIF, RXU, BEA, SPC, SET, and SMC (p < 0.001 and increased significantly during aging. The highest ΔE decrease presented in BEA. SACRCs showed an increase in WA/ΔE within total aging time. Discoloration could not be removed completely by polishing. SACRCs need to be carefully selected for restorations in the esthetical zone with visible restoration margins. Polishing can significantly reduce the marginal discoloration.

  15. In vitro performance of self-adhesive resin cements for post-and-core build-ups: influence of chewing simulation or 1-year storage in 0.5% chloramine solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, M; Sterzenbach, G; Rosentritt, M; Beuer, F; Frankenberger, R

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this investigation was to test the in vitro performance of a self-adhesive resin composite core build-up in comparison with two typical conventional etch-and-rinse composite core build-up materials, before and after 1year of storage in 0.5% chloramine solution (LTS). Sixty human maxillary central incisors were divided into three groups. Teeth were root filled and decoronated. Specimens were restored using glass fiber posts cemented with a self-adhesive resin cement. Core build-ups were made with a self-adhesive (U) and two core build-up materials (C and L) applied with their corresponding bonding systems. All specimens received adhesively luted lithium disilicate crowns. Ten specimens of each group were exposed to LTS and examined monthly for cracks or other alterations. All specimens were thermocycled, mechanically loaded (TCML) and finally loaded until failure occurred. There was no statistical significant difference in regard to the number of failures during TCML without and with LTS (log rank: p = 0.225 and 0.609, respectively). The median fracture load values after static loading without LTS and with LTS did not differ significantly (Kruskal-Wallis test: p = 0.057 and 0.106, respectively), though the fracture patterns between the groups without (p = 0.024) and with LTS (p = 0.027) did. Self-adhesive cements used for core build-up have no significantly higher risk of failure compared to conventional core build-up materials in both LTS and TCML test scenarios. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The influence of temporary cements on dental adhesive systems for luting cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, José C V; Coelho, Paulo G; Janal, Malvin N; Silva, Nelson R F A; Monteiro, André J; Fernandes, Carlos A O

    2011-03-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that bond strength of total- and self-etching adhesive systems to dentine is not affected by the presence of remnants from either eugenol-containing (EC) or eugenol-free (EF) temporary cements after standardized cleaning procedures. Thirty non-carious human third molars were polished flat to expose dentine surfaces. Provisional acrylic plates were fabricated and cemented either with EC, EF or no temporary cements. All specimens were incubated for 7 days in water at 37°C. The restorations were then taken out and the remnants of temporary cements were mechanically removed with a dental instrument. The dentine surfaces were cleaned with pumice and treated with either total-etching (TE) or self-etching (SE) dental adhesive systems. Atomic force microscopy was used to examine the presence of remnants of temporary cements before and after dentine cleaning procedures. Composite resin build-ups were fabricated and cemented to the bonded dentine surfaces with a resin luting cement. The specimens were then sectioned to obtain 0.9mm(2) beams for microtensile bond strength testing. Fractographic analysis was performed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. ANOVA showed lower mean microtensile bond strength in groups of specimens treated with EC temporary cement than in groups treated with either no cement or an EF cement (p<0.05). Mean microtensile bond strength was lower in groups employing the SE rather than the TE adhesive system (p<0.001). SE samples were also more likely to fail during initial processing of the samples. There was no evidence of interaction between cement and adhesive system effects on tensile strength. Fractographic analysis indicated different primary failure modes for SE and TE bonding systems, at the dentine-adhesive interface and at the resin cement-resin composite interface, respectively. The use of eugenol-containing temporary cements prior to indirect bonding restorations reduce, to a statistically similar

  17. Microtensile Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Luting Cements to Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Tomoko Abo; Shigeru Uno; Masahiro Yoshiyama; Toshimoto Yamada; Nobuhiro Hanada

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to compare the bond strengths of the self-adhesive luting cements between ceramics and resin cores and examine their relation to the cement thickness. Three self-adhesive luting cements (Smartcem, Maxcem, and G-CEM) and a resin cement (Panavia F 2.0) for control were used in the paper. The thickness of the cements was controlled in approximately 25, 50, 100, or 200  μ m. Each 10 specimens were made according to the manufacturers' instructions and stored in water ...

  18. Evaluation of adhesive and compressive strength of glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramashanker; Singh, Raghuwar D; Chand, Pooran; Jurel, Sunit Km; Tripathi, Shuchi

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess, compare and evaluate the adhesive strength and compressive strength of different brands of glass ionomer cements to a ceramometal alloy. (A) Glass ionomer cements: GC Fuji II (GC Corporation, Tokyo), Chem Flex (Dentsply DeTrey, Germany), Glass ionomer FX (Shofu-11, Japan), MR dental (MR dental suppliers Pvt Ltd, England). (B) Ceramometal alloy (Ni-Cr: Wiron 99; Bego, Bremen, Germany). (C) Cold cure acrylic resin. (E) Temperature cum humidity control chamber. (F) Instron Universal Testing Machine. Four different types of Glass ionomer cements were used in the study. From each type of the Glass ionomer cements, 15 specimens for each were made to evaluate the compressive strength and adhesive strength, respectively. The 15 specimens were further divided into three subgroups of five specimens. For compressive strength, specimens were tested at 2, 4 and 12 h by using Instron Universal Testing Machine. To evaluate the adhesive strength, specimens were surface treated with diamond bur, silicone carbide bur and sandblasting and tested under Instron Universal Testing Machine. It was concluded from the study that the compressive strength as well as the adhesive bond strength of MR dental glass ionomer cement with a ceramometal alloy was found to be maximum compare to other glass ionomer cements. Sandblasting surface treatment of ceramometal alloy was found to be comparatively more effective for adhesive bond strength between alloy and glass ionomer cement.

  19. The effect of endodontic chemicals on the retention of fiber posts luted using a self-adhesive cement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jardim, Patrícia dos Santos; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Badin, Crissie Felicetti; Ferreira, Ana Cláudia de Araújo; Jacinto, Rogério Castilho

    2014-01-01

    ...% sodium hypochlorite; 5.25% Sodium hypochlorite + 17% EDTA; 2% chlorhexidine gel; 2% chlorhexidine gel + 17% EDTA. After chemo-mechanical preparation, fiber post cementation was performed with self-adhesive resin cement...

  20. Bond strength and cement-tooth interfacial characterization of self-adhesive composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, U Burak; Van Ende, Annelies; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Ermis, R Banu

    2017-08-01

    (1) To determine the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of self-adhesive (SA) composite cements to unetched/etched enamel and dentin, and (2) to characterize the cements' interaction with tooth tissue. 51 composite blocks were bonded to smear layer-covered enamel and dentin (three teeth per group). Four SA composite cements (Clearfil SA, G-CEM, RelyX Unicem, SmartCem2), and three multi-step composite cements, two used following an etch-and-rinse (E&R) approach (RelyX ARC, Variolink II 'E&R') and one used following a self-etch (SE) approach (Variolink II ' SE') were investigated. The cement-tooth specimens were perpendicularly sectioned into micro-specimens (1.0 × 1.0 mm) in order to measure the µTBS. The data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD (Pcomposite cements were applied to dentin free of a smear layer, regular and long resin tags were formed. No significant differences in bonding effectiveness were recorded for the self-adhesive composite cements when bonded to unetched/etched enamel and to dentin. Multi-step etch-and-rinse composite cements showed a better bonding effectiveness to enamel, although this could be approximated by the self-adhesive composite cements when enamel was acid-etched beforehand. On dentin, however, the bond strength of the etch-and-rinse composite cement RelyX ARC was superior.

  1. Microshear bond strength between restorative composites and resin cements

    OpenAIRE

    Rubens Nazareno GARCIA; Góes,Mário Fernando de; Giannini,Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    Introduction and objective: The techniques of adhesive cementationhave been widely used in dental restoration. The purpose of this studywas to evaluate the microshear bond strength between restorativecomposites and resin cements. Material and methods: Twenty composites blocks were prepared in order to obtain a flat surface, using 600-grid sandpaper. The samples were randomly divided in four groups(n=15) according to the experimental groups: [1] Z250 block + Single Bond + cylinder of RelyX ARC...

  2. Nonlinear visco-elastic finite element analysis of porcelain veneers: a submodelling approach to strain and stress distributions in adhesive and resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perillo, Letizia; Sorrentino, Roberto; Apicella, Davide; Quaranta, Alessandro; Gherlone, Enrico; Zarone, Fernando; Ferrari, Marco; Aversa, Raffaella; Apicella, Antonio

    2010-10-01

    To assess under load the biomechanical behavior of the cementing system of feldspathic vs alumina porcelain veneers. A 3D model of a maxillary central incisor, the periodontal ligament (PDL) and the alveolar bone was generated. Incisors restored with alumina and feldspathic porcelain veneers were compared to a natural sound tooth. Enamel, cementum, cancellous and cortical bone were considered isotropic elastic materials; conversely, dentin was designated as orthotropic. The nonlinear visco-elatic behavior of the PDL was considered. The adhesive layers were modelled using spring elements. A 50-N load at a 60-degree angle to the tooth's longitudinal axis was applied and validated. Stress concentration in the interfacial volumes of the main models was identified and submodelled in a new environment. Regarding tooth structure, strain concentrations were observed in the root dentin below the CEJ. As to the cement layer, tensile stresses concentrated in the palatal margin of the adhesive complex. Despite the effects on tooth deformation, the rigidity of the veneer did not affect the stress distributions in the cement layer or in the adhesive layers. In both cases, the palatal and cervical margins seemed to be the most stressed areas.

  3. Relined fiberglass post: an ex vivo study of the resin cement thickness and dentin-resin interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niélli Caetano de SOUZA

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the thickness of resin cements in the root thirds when using conventional fiberglass posts (CP and relined fiberglass posts (RP in weakened roots and to evaluate the morphological characteristics of the dentin-resin interface. Forty human maxillary anterior teeth had the crown sectioned below the cemento-enamel junction. The canals were endodontically treated and weakened with diamond burs. Teeth were divided into four groups (n = 10: Group 1 – CP + RelyX ARC; Group 2 – CP + RelyX U200; Group 3 – RP + RelyX ARC; and Group 4 – RP + RelyX U200. Prior to luting, 0.1% Fluorescein and 0.1% Rhodamine B dyes were added to an adhesive and resin cement, respectively. Slices were obtained from the apical, middle, and cervical thirds of the root. Confocal laser scanning microscopy images were recorded in four areas (buccal, lingual, mesial, distal of each third. In each area, four equidistant measures of the resin cement were made and the mean value was calculated. The interface morphology was observed. The data were submitted to three-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α = 0.05. The interaction between fiberglass posts, resin cement, and root thirds was significant (p < 0.0001. The resin cement thicknesses were significantly lower for RP in comparison with CP, except in the apical third. There was no significant difference between the resin cements for RP. There was formation of resin cement tags and adhesive tags along the root for RP. RP favored the formation of thin and uniform resin cement films and resin tags in weakened roots.

  4. Impairment of resin cement application on the bond strength of indirect composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovito Adiel SKUPIEN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of immediate and delayed resin cement application on the microtensile bond strength of indirect composite resin restorations and, to evaluate adhesive strategies (for regular resin cement or humidity parameters for self-adhesive resin cement. Forty-five enamel/dentin discs (0.5 mm height and 10 mm of diameter obtained from bovine teeth were divided into nine groups (n = 5. For regular cement, the variation factors were cementation technique at three levels (immediate cementation, 5 or 30 min after adhesive system application; and type of adhesive system at two levels (three- or two-step. For self-adhesive cement, the dentin moisture was the source of variation at three levels (normal, dry, or wet cementation. The specimens were submitted to microtensile bond strength (μTBS testing using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey’s test, and linear regression. Regular cement and three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system showed the highest values of bond strength (25.21 MPa–30 min of delay. Only for this condition, three-step adhesive showed higher bond strength than the two-step adhesive. Nevertheless, the linear regression showed that irrespective of the strategy, the use of the two-step approach when compared with three-step adhesive system decreased μTBS (p < 0.001. The failure analysis showed predominant adhesive failures for all tested groups. All groups had comparable values of bond strength to bovine dentin when the same materials were used, even in suboptimal clinical conditions.

  5. Does Adhesive Resin Application Contribute to Resin Bond Durability on Etched and Silanized Feldspathic Ceramic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Ozcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Kimpara, Estevao Tomomitsu

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the effect of adhesive application and aging on the bond durability of resin cement to etched and silanized feldspathic ceramic. Materials and Methods: Twenty blocks (6.4 x 6.4 x 4.8 mm) of feldspathic ceramic (Vita VM7) were produced. The ceramic surfaces were conditioned with

  6. Effects of Dental Adhesive Cement and Surface Treatment on Bond Strength and Leakage of Zirconium Oxide Ceramics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    TSUKAKOSHI, Makoto; SHINYA, Akikazu; GOMI, Harunori; LASSILA, Lippo V.J; VALLITTU, Pekka K; SHINYA, Akiyoshi

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the interactive influence of adhesive materials and surface treatments on bond strength of zirconium oxide ceramics, six types of adhesive resin cements (RelyX ARC (RA), Super-Bond C & B (SB), Linkmax (LM...

  7. Post-cementation colorimetric evaluation of the interaction between the thickness of ceramic veneers and the shade of resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calgaro, Patricia Angélica Milani; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Correr, Gisele Maria; Ornaghi, Bárbara Pick; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the color parameters (CIELab*) after the cementation of ceramic disks of different thicknesses onto a resin substrate using four different shades of resin cements, and determine the color difference (ΔE) between the adhesively cemented disks and a 10 mm-thick A1 shade ceramic control (target color). Ceramic disks, simulating laminate veneers, with thicknesses of 0.5, 0.7 and 1.0 mm (shade A1, IPS Classic) were fabricated (n = 40) and cemented with a dual-cured resin cement (Variolink II, shades A1, bleach, opaque and transparent) onto 120 2 mm-thick resin composite substrates (shade A3.5, Adoro). Each ceramic disk was photocured for 80 seconds. The determination of the CIELab* parameters of each ceramic-cement-substrate set was performed with a spectrophotometer. A 10 mm-thick A1 ceramic disk was used as a control. The results for the color difference (ΔE) obtained from L*, a* and b* parameters were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The ΔE values ranged from 2.46 (1.0 mm, opaque cement) to 12.11 (0.5 mm, A1 cement). The opaque cement showed the lower ΔE values, followed by the bleach, transparent and A1 cements. With respect to the thickness of the ceramic, color differences between the target color and the group with 1.0 mm ceramic disks were smaller for all cement shades tested. Only the combination of 1.0 mm ceramic disks cemented with the opaque cement was able to mask the background color (ΔE resin cement were smaller in comparison with the bleach, transparent and A1 cements.

  8. Effect of sulfuric acid etching of polyetheretherketone on the shear bond strength to resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproesser, Oliver; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Uhrenbacher, Julia; Roos, Malgorzata; Gernet, Wolfgang; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2014-10-01

    To examine the influence of etching duration on the bond strength of PEEK substrate in combination with different resin composite cements. In total, 448 PEEK specimens were fabricated, etched with sulfuric acid for 5, 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 300 s and then luted with two conventional resin cements (RelyX ARC and Variolink II) and one self-adhesive resin cement (Clearfil SA Cement) (n = 18/subgroup). Non-etched specimens served as the control group. Specimens were stored in distilled water for 28 days at 37°C and shear bond strengths were measured. Data were analyzed nonparametrically using Kruskal-Wallis-H (p cements. The optimal etching duration varied with the type of resin composite: 60 s for RelyX ARC (15.3 ± 7.2 MPa), 90 s for Variolink II (15.2 ± 7.2 MPa), and 120 s for Clearfil SA Cement (6.4 ± 5.9 MPa). Regardless of etching duration, however, the self-etching resin composite cement showed significantly lower shear bond strength values when compared to groups luted with the conventional resin composites. Although sulfuric acid seems to be suitable and effective for PEEK surface pre-treatment, further investigations are required to examine the effect of other adhesive systems and cements.

  9. Treatment of a Vertical Root Fracture Using Dual-Curing Resin Cement: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Moradi Majd

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Vertical root fracture (VRF is one of the most frustrating complications of root canal treatment. The prognosis of the root with VRF is poor therefore tooth extraction and root amputation are usually the only treatment options. However, bonding of the fracture line with adhesive resin cement during the intentional replantation procedure was recently suggested as an alternative to tooth extraction. Methods. A vertically fractured left maxillary incisor was carefully extracted, fracture line was treated with adhesive resin cement, a retrograde cavity was produced and filled with calcium-enriched mixture (CEM cement, and tooth was replanted. Results. After 12 months the tooth was asymptomatic. The size of periapical radiolucency was noticeably reduced and there was no clinical sign of ankylosis. Conclusion. Using adhesive resin cement to bond the fracture lines extraorally in roots with VRF and intentional replantation of the reconstructed teeth could be considered as an alternative to tooth extraction, especially for anterior teeth.

  10. Effect of activation modes on the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength and microhardness of dual-cured self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ah-Rang; Jeon, Yong-Chan; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Yun, Mi-Jung; Choi, Jae Won; Kwon, Yong Hoon; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength and microhardnss of several selfadhesive resin cements (Rely-X U200, Clearfill SA Luting, G-CEM LinkAce, Maxcem Elite, PermaCem 2.0, and Zirconite) using different activation modes (self-cured, light-cured) and testing time (immediately, 24 h, thermocycling). Specimens were prepared for the compressive strength (Ø 4×6 mm) and diametral tensile strength and microhardness (Ø 6×3 mm) according to ISO standards. The strength after 24 h was higher than immediately after. In addition, G-CEM showed the highest values. In terms of the activation modes, Rely-X U200, PermaCem 2.0 had higher values in the light-curing than the self-curing. In conclusion, all cements demonstrated clinically available strength values and revealed differences in strength according to their composition, testing time and activation mode. Furthermore, correlation was found between the microhardness (degree of conversion) and mechanical strengths of the cements tested.

  11. Influence of temporary cement contamination on the surface free energy and dentine bond strength of self-adhesive cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takimoto, Masayuki; Ishii, Ryo; Iino, Masayoshi; Shimizu, Yusuke; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Ando, Susumu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2012-02-01

    The surface free energy and dentine bond strength of self-adhesive cements were examined after the removal of temporary cements. The labial dentine surfaces of bovine mandibular incisors were wet ground with #600-grit SiC paper. Acrylic resin blocks were luted to the prepared dentine surfaces using HY Bond Temporary Cement Hard (HY), IP Temp Cement (IP), Fuji TEMP (FT) or Freegenol Temporary Cement (TC), and stored for 1 week. After removal of the temporary cements with an ultrasonic tip, the contact angle values of five specimens per test group were determined for the three test liquids, and the surface-energy parameters of the dentine surfaces were calculated. The dentine bond strengths of the self-adhesive cements were measured after removal of the temporary cements in a shear mode at a crosshead speed of 1.0mm/min. The data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's HSD test. For all surfaces, the value of the estimated surface tension component γ(S)(d) (dispersion) was relatively constant at 41.7-43.3 mJm(-2). After removal of the temporary cements, the value of the γ(S)(h) (hydrogen-bonding) component decreased, particularly with FT and TC. The dentine bond strength of the self-adhesive cements was significantly higher for those without temporary cement contamination (8.2-10.6 MPa) than for those with temporary cement contamination (4.3-7.1 MPa). The γ(S) values decreased due to the decrease of γ(S)(h) values for the temporary cement-contaminated dentine. Contamination with temporary cements led to lower dentine bond strength. The presence of temporary cement interferes with the bonding performance of self-adhesive cements to dentine. Care should be taken in the methods of removal of temporary cement when using self-adhesive cements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of polymerization mode of adhesive and cement on shear bond strength to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latta, Mark A; Kelsey, William P; Kelsey, William P

    2006-04-01

    To investigate the shear bond strength to dentin when two resin adhesive systems in light-cure, dual-cure, and auto-cure modes were used with three resin cements. This was done to determine the degree of compatibility that exists when resin products with different polymerization mechanisms are used together. Three hundred non-carious human molars were divided into 30 test groups in which Prime & Bond NT and ScotchBond Multi-Purpose were used as adhesives with Calibra, Nexxus and Variolink cements to attach Rexillium III posts to flattened dentin surfaces. Debonding was achieved with an Instron testing machine and mean shear bond strengths were determined for each test group. The data were subjected to three-way ANOVA and post-hoc LSD testing to determine whether significant differences existed between the test groups. Bond strengths achieved were affected by the adhesive, the cement, and the cement curing mode. In general, the auto-cure application of the three cements demonstrated reduced shear bond strengths, both with respect to the different adhesives and their curing modes as well as compared to the dual-cure technique of the same cement. Additionally, Prime & Bond NT demonstrated considerably more variability than ScotchBond Multi-Purpose when used with both dual-cure and auto-cure varieties of the three cements. The bond strengths of resin cements depend on the curing mode of the cement and the adhesive. Unlike with direct light-cured resin composites, combining adhesive systems and dual-cured resin cements from different manufacturers may be contraindicated.

  13. Microtensile bond strength of two self-adhesive cements to enamel and dentin: bonding efficiency and thermocycling effect

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes Jr, Virgílio Vilas Boas; Faculdade de Odontologia de São José dos Campos; Rodrigues, José Roberto; Faculdade de Odontologia de São José dos Campos; Silva, João Maurício Ferraz da; Faculdade de Odontologia de São José dos Campos; Pagani, Clóvis; Faculdade de Odontologia de São José dos Campos; Malaquias, Henderson; Faculdade de Odontologia de São José dos Campos; Balducci, Ivan; Faculdade de Odontologia de São José dos Campos

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bonding efficiency between two self-adhesive cements to enamel and dentine, with and without previous dental surface conditioning, before and after thermocycling. Thirty-six molars were divided into 3 experimental groups and 01 control group. The self-adhesive resin cements selected for the experimental groups were: RelyX Unicem (subgroups RE and RD) and Bifix SE (subgroups BE and BD). For control groups, a conventional resin cement, Variolin...

  14. Luting glass ceramic restorations using a selfadhesive resin cement under different dentin conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    GUARDA, Guilherme B.; GONÇALVES, Luciano S.; CORRER, Américo B.; MORAES, Rafael R.; SINHORETI, Mário A.C.; CORRER-SOBRINHO, Lourenço

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the bond strength of ceramic restorations luted using a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE) under different dentin conditions. Material and Methods In the experimental groups, ceramic restorations were luted to bovine incisors with RelyX Unicem under the following conditions: [Dry dentin]: surface was dried using air stream for 15 s; [Moist dentin]: excess dentin moisture was removed with absorbent paper; [Bonding agent]: Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray) self-etching adhesive system was previously applied to dentin. In the Control group, cementation was done using an etch-and-rinse adhesive (Excite DSC) and Variolink II resin cement (Ivoclar Vivadent). Photoactivation of the resin cements was performed with UltraLume LED 5 unit (Ultradent). The restorations (n=5 per group) were sectioned into beams and microtensile testing was carried out. Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's test (padhesive failures was observed for the "bonding agent" and "dry dentin" groups. The "moist dentin" group presented predominantly cohesive failures within the luting material. The previous application of a self-etching adhesive showed no significant effect. Conclusions Only excess dentin moisture should be removed for the cementation of ceramic restorations with self-adhesive resin cements. PMID:20857001

  15. Microtensile Bond Strength of CAD/CAM Resin Blocks to Dual-Cure Adhesive Cement: The Effect of Different Sandblasting Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekçe, Neslihan; Tuncer, Safa; Demirci, Mustafa; Kara, Dilan; Baydemir, Canan

    2018-02-11

    To investigate the effect of sandblasting powder particles on microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of dual-cure adhesive cement to CAD/CAM blocks. CAD/CAM blocks (Cerasmart, VITA, and LAVA) were cut in slabs and divided into groups: group 1, no sandblasting; group 2, sandblasted with 27-μm Al 2 O 3 ; group 3, sandblasted with 30-μm CoJet; group 4, sandblasted with 50-μm Al 2 O 3 . After sandblasting, all specimens were silanized and luted using dual-cure adhesive cement (G-CEM LinkForce). After 24 hours, bonded specimens were cut into 1 ± 0.2 mm 2 sticks, and μTBS values were obtained (N = 30). Additionally, 132 CAD/CAM block sections were prepared for surface roughness testing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluations. Results were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis One-way ANOVA and Dunn's Post Hoc Test (p 0.05). For LAVA, μTBS values of specimens that were sandblasted with 50-μm Al 2 O 3 powder were significantly higher than 30-μm-SiO 2 and 27-μm Al 2 O 3 (p CAD/CAM blocks for Cerasmart and VITA, although the results changed significantly for LAVA. The ideal bond protocol for CAD/CAM blocks is specific to the material used. © 2018 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  16. Evaluation of the flexural strength of dual-cure composite resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duymus, Zeynep Yesil; Yanikoğlu, Nuran Dinckal; Alkurt, Murat

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate of flexural strength of some adhesive resin cements. Three dual-cure composite resin cements (Nexus 3; Variolink II, Panavia F) were prepared. The manufacturer's mixing directions for the cements were followed. Adhesive resin cement was mixed, placed in the rectangular portion of the mold. Fifteen specimens were prepared for each cements. The cements were light-activated with light lamp for 40 s on both and top and bottom surfaces. The each cement specimens were divided into three groups according to time of storage and stored in distilled water for 24 h, 15, and 30 days. Total 45 specimens were stored at 37°C (98.6 0F) in distilled water for 24 h, 15, and 30 days prior to tests. The flexural strength was tested wıth a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min (0.02 in.) The maximum load was recorded as MPa. The results were analyzed by Analysis of Variance and Duncan test. The Panavia F resin cements content Bisphenol A was showed the highest flexural strength (80.80 MPa) (11.71 ksi) for 24 h. The lowest flexural strength was observed in Nexus 3 (51.00 MPa) (7.39 ksi). It was found significant interaction of material and time (p cement and time of storage was statistically significant on the flexural strengths (p < 0.001). Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Seating load parameters impact on dental ceramic reinforcement conferred by cementation with resin-cements.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2010-09-01

    Cementation of all-ceramic restorations with resin-cements has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of fracture in service. The aim was to investigate the influence of loading force and loading duration applied during cementation on the reinforcement conferred by a resin-cement on a leucite reinforced glass-ceramic.

  18. Comparison of the push-out strength of two fiber post systems dependent on different types of resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrouli, Maria; Geurtsen, Werner; Lührs, Anne-Katrin

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the push-out strength of glass fiber posts dependent on the resin cement. One hundred human teeth were divided into five groups (n = 20). Two glass fiber post systems (DT Light SL (DTSL) and RelyX Fiber Post (RF)) were used. DTSL posts were cemented with one "etch & rinse" system (ER) or one of three self-adhesive resin cements (SA). The RF posts were cemented with RelyX Unicem. Afterwards, half of the specimens were thermocycled (TC; 5°C/55°C, 5,000 cycles). All specimens were cut into disks (thickness, 2 mm). The push-out test was performed (crosshead speed, 1 mm/min), fracture types were determined (×25 and ×40 magnification), and statistical analysis was performed (one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Scheffe test, p glass fiber posts before thermocycling (p post and cement for ER or mixed fractures for SA. The bond strength of adhesively cemented glass fiber posts is not dependent on the type of resin cement after TC. The use of SA can lead to bond strength values comparable to ER. Self-adhesive resin cements could be used just as well as resin cements with "etch & rinse" adhesive systems for the cementation of glass fiber posts.

  19. Effect of cyclic loading on fracture strength and microleakage of a quartz fiber dowel with different adhesive, cement and resin core material combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldissara, P; Ozcan, M; Melilli, D; Valandro, L F

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the performance of different adhesive-cement-core combinations coupled with quartz fiber dowels after cyclic loading and fracture strength tests and assessed the microleakage using dye penetration method. Forty maxillary canines (N=10 per group) were restored with fiber dowels (Quartz fiber DT Light Post) and four adhesive-cement-core material combinations (Group 1: All-Bond 2+C&B [root]/All-Bond 2+Biscore [core]; Group 2: All-Bond 2+Bisfil 2B [root]/All-Bond 2+Bisfil 2B [core]; Group 3: Scotchbond 1+RelyX ARC [root]/Scotchbond 1+Supreme [core]; Group 4: RelyX Unicem [root]/Scotchbond 1+Filtek Supreme [core]). The specimens were initially cyclic loaded (x2,000,000, 8 Hz, 3 to 100 N at 45 °C under 37±3 °C water irrigation) and then immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsine at 37 °C for 24 hours for dye penetration and interface failure detection. The failure surfaces were observed under the stereomicroscope (x100 magnification). Circumferential and centripetal dye penetration was scored at the buccal and lingual sites. Only three specimens failed macroscopically during cyclic loading. No significant difference was found among the groups for the number of resisted cycles (P=0.9). Mean fracture strength between the groups were also not statistically significant (213±63-245±71 N) (P=0.740) (ANOVA). All four groups showed high values of dye penetration along the restoration interfaces being not significant from each other (P=0.224) (Kruskal-Wallis). The lingual sides of the teeth where the load applied, showed significantly higher incidence of detachment between the core and the dentin (100%, 90%, 100%, 90% for groups 1, 2, 3, 4, respectively) compared to the buccal side (30%, 30%, 60%, 40%) (P=0.032, c2 test). In 13 specimens (32.5%) crack lines at the coronal area were observed. Fracture strength was not significantly correlated with dye penetration (P=0.1803, r=-0.2162, Linear Regression and Correlation test). Different combinations of adhesive-cement

  20. Evaluation of tensile retention of Y-TZP crowns cemented on resin composite cores: effect of the cement and Y-TZP surface conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippe, M P; Amaral, R; Oliveira, F S; Cesar, P F; Scotti, R; Valandro, L F; Bottino, M A

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of the cement type (adhesive resin, self-adhesive, glass ionomer, and zinc phosphate) on the retention of crowns made of yttria-stabilized polycrystalline tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP). Therefore, 108 freshly extracted molars were embedded in acrylic resin, perpendicular to their long axis, and prepared for full crowns: the crown preparations were removed and reconstructed using composite resin plus fiber posts with dimensions identical to the prepared dentin. The preparations were impressed using addition silicone, and Y-TZP copings were produced, which presented a special setup for the tensile testing. Cementation was performed with two adhesive resin cements (Multilink Automix, Ivoclar-Vivadent; RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA), one self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100, 3M ESPE), one glass ionomer based cement (RelyX Luting, 3M ESPE), and one zinc phosphate cement (Cimento de Zinco, SS White, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). For the resin cement groups, the inner surfaces of the crowns were subjected to three surface treatments: cleaning with isopropyl alcohol, tribochemical silica coating, or application of a thin low-fusing glass porcelain layer plus silanization. After 24 hours, all groups were subjected to thermocycling (6000 cycles) and included in a special device for tensile testing in a universal testing machine to test the retention of the infrastructure. After testing, the failure modes of all samples were analyzed under a stereomicroscope. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed that the surface treatment and cement type (α=0.05) affected the tensile retention results. The Multilink cement presented the highest tensile retention values, but that result was not statistically different from RelyX ARC. The surface treatment was statistically relevant only for the Multilink cement. The cement choice was shown to be more important than the crown surface treatment for cementation of a Y-TZP crown to a composite resin substrate.

  1. Tooth surface treatment strategies for adhesive cementation

    OpenAIRE

    Rohr, Nadja; Fischer, Jens

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth surface pre-treatment steps on shear bond strength, which is essential for understanding the adhesive cementation process. MATERIALS AND METHODS Shear bond strengths of different cements with various tooth surface treatments (none, etching, priming, or etching and priming) on enamel and dentin of human teeth were measured using the Swiss shear test design. Three adhesives (Permaflo DC, Panavia F 2.0, and Panavia V5) and one sel...

  2. Influence of adhesive cementation systems on the bond strength of relined fiber posts to root dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Raquel Viana; Sampaio, Camila Sobral; Pacheco, Rafael Rocha; Pascon, Fernanda Miori; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria; Giannini, Marcelo

    2017-10-01

    Glass fiber post cementation procedures have undergone significant development. Relining the post with composite resin is a technique that aims to reduce resin cement thickness and consequently problems inherent to polymerization. Evidence is sparse regarding the efficacy of bonding procedures at increasing depths (from cervical to apical) using different adhesive cementation techniques. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength (PBS) of composite resin relined glass fiber posts cemented to bovine root dentin using different adhesive cementation protocols. Eighteen bovine teeth (n=6) were embedded in polystyrene resin blocks, and the crowns were sectioned leaving a root portion of 20 mm in length. Root canals were prepared using rotary instruments provided by the post manufacturer (Whitepost DC #1), resulting in a uniform root canal preparation. The root canals were lubricated with a water-soluble glycerin gel. Silane (Prosil) was applied and the posts relined with a microhybrid composite resin (Filtek Z100) to conform to the root canal anatomy. Three adhesive cementation protocols were evaluated: a 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi Purpose) in combination with a dual polymerizing resin cement (RelyX ARC); a universal adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal) associated with a dual polymerizing resin cement (RelyX Ultimate); and a self-adhesive dual polymerizing resin cement (RelyX Unicem 2). The roots were sectioned, resulting in four 2-mm segments at 4 different depths (cervical to apical) and evaluated by the PBS test, using a universal testing machine (Instron 4411) at 0.5 mm/min, until failure. Interfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, and failures were classified as cohesive failure in composite resin, cohesive failure in cement, cohesive failure in root dentin, adhesive failure, or mixed. Data were analyzed by 2-way split-plot ANOVA and the Tukey post hoc test (α=.05). No

  3. Influence of storage times on bond strength of resin cements to root canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Coêlho Bandéca

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The resin cements are responsible to retention of the indirect materials decreasing marginal leakage, increasing failure resistance compared with conventional cementation. The cementation within root canal is very hard due unfavorable conditions regarding the application of adhesive techniques caused by inadequate access. Therefore, considering the possibility to decrease steps of cementation, this study was performed to evaluate the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX TM U100, 3M ESPE and resin cement combined with self-ecthing adhesive system (Panavia® F 2.0, Kuraray light-cured with Quartz Tungsten Halogen (QTH following storage at 37 °C immediately after light-curing, 24 and 48 hours and 7 days. The root canals were prepared to receive the glass fiber post in the depth of 10 mm, irrigated with 17% EDTA and NaOCl, rinsed with distilled water and dried using paper points. The roots were perpendicularly sectioned into approximately 1 mm thick sections, obtaining ninety-six slices (n = 12. The slices were trimmed using a cylindrical diamond bur in the proximal surfaces until it touched the post and attached into a device, which were mounted on a strength tester (Bisco and loaded in tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure occurred at specimens. The analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests showed significant statistical differences (P .05. The resin cements 24 and 48 hours after light-curing were statistically similar among themselves (P > .05. The both resin cement showed similar bond strength into root canal on different storage times. The highest bond strength values of the resin cements were showed 7 days after curing.

  4. The effect of transmitted Er:YAG laser energy through a dental ceramic on different types of resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Onjen; Sari, Tugrul; Arslan Malkoç, Meral; Altintas, Subutayhan; Usumez, Aslihan; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2015-07-06

    The laser debonding procedure of adhesively luted all-ceramic restorations is based on the ablation of resin cement due to the transmitted laser energy through the ceramic. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation transmitted through a dental ceramic on five different resin cements. Five different resin cements were evaluated in this study: G-Cem LinkAce, Multilink Automix, Variolink II, Panavia F, and Rely X Unicem U100. Disc shaped resin cement specimens (n = 10) were fabricated for each group. A ceramic disc was placed between the resin cement discs and the tip of the handpiece of Er:YAG laser device. The resin cement discs were irradiated through the ceramic and the volume of the resin cement discs were measured using a micro-CT system before and after Er:YAG laser irradiation. The volume loss of the resin cement discs was calculated and analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey-HSD tests. The highest volume loss was determined in G-Cem (1.1 ± 0.6 mm(3) ) and Multilink (1.3 ± 0.1 mm(3) ) (P Variolink (0.4 ± 0.2 mm(3) ), and Panavia (0.6 ± 0.2 mm(3) ) groups (P cements were affected by the laser irradiation resulting in the volume loss of the cement; however, there are significant differences among different resin cements. All the resin cements tested in this study were effected by the Er:YAG laser irradiation and there were significant differences among the resin cements with regard to ablation volume. Lasers Surg. Med. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The role of resin cement on bond strength of glass-fiber posts luted into root canals: a systematic review and meta-analysis of in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkis-Onofre, R; Skupien, J A; Cenci, M S; Moraes, R R; Pereira-Cenci, T

    2014-01-01

    Because there are several ways to cement glass-fiber posts (GFPs) into root canals, there is no consensus on the best strategy to achieve high bond strengths. A systematic review was conducted to determine if there is difference in bond strength to dentin between regular and self-adhesive resin cements and to verify the influence of several variables on the retention of GFPs. This report followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. In vitro studies that investigated the bond strength of GFPs luted with self-adhesive and regular resin cements were selected. Searches were carried out in the PubMed and Scopus databases. No publication year or language limit was used, and the last search was done in October 2012. A global comparison was performed between self-adhesive and regular resin cements. Two subgroup analyses were performed: 1) Self-adhesive × Regular resin cement + Etch-and-rinse adhesive and 2) Self-adhesive × Regular resin cement + Self-etch adhesive. The analyses were carried out using fixed-effect and random-effects models. The results showed heterogeneity in all comparisons, and higher bond strength to dentin was identified for self-adhesive cements. Although the articles included in this meta-analysis showed high heterogeneity and high risk of bias, the in vitro literature seems to suggest that use of self-adhesive resin cement could improve the retention of GFPs into root canals.

  6. Resin adhesion to carious dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiyama, Masahiro; Tay, Franklin R; Torii, Yasuhiro; Nishitani, Yoshihiro; Doi, Junichi; Itou, Kousuke; Ciucchi, Bernard; Pashley, David H

    2003-02-01

    To investigate the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of a self-etching priming adhesive system to normal, caries-affected and caries-infected dentin, and to observe the ultrastructure of the resin-dentin interface by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Twelve extracted human molar teeth with deep occlusal caries were stained with caries detector solution and ground flat occlusally. The red-stained soft dentin was classified as caries-infected. The surrounding discolored dentin was classified as caries-affected dentin. The surrounding normal dentin served as a control. The entire flat surface was bonded with Clearfil Liner Bond 2V (CV) and covered with resin composite to form a composite crown 5 mm high. One day later the specimens were serially sectioned vertically into multiple slabs 0.8 mm thick. Under microscopic observation, the specimens were divided into normal or caries-infected or caries-affected dentin. These regions were isolated by cutting away the remaining dentin to form hour-glass shapes with the smallest surface area at the test site. After measuring the areas, the specimens were fixed to a microtensile tester and pulled under tension to failure. Additional slabs that were not used for bond strength tests were processed for TEM. Bond strength data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons. The microTBS of CV to normal, caries-affected and caries-infected dentin were 45 +/- 10 MPa, 30 +/- 10 MPa, 10 +/- 5 MPa, respectively. TEM images showed that CV formed thin hybrid layers that were less than 1 microm thick in normal dentin, but that were between 6-8 microm thick in caries-affected dentin. Bacteria were only sparsely observed in the dentin tubules of bonded caries-affected dentin. However, in caries-infected dentin, an unusual interface was seen in which carious bacteria within disorganized non-banded collagen fibrils could be seen embedded by the adhesive. The hybrid layer in caries

  7. Microtensile Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Luting Cements to Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Abo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to compare the bond strengths of the self-adhesive luting cements between ceramics and resin cores and examine their relation to the cement thickness. Three self-adhesive luting cements (Smartcem, Maxcem, and G-CEM and a resin cement (Panavia F 2.0 for control were used in the paper. The thickness of the cements was controlled in approximately 25, 50, 100, or 200 μm. Each 10 specimens were made according to the manufacturers’ instructions and stored in water at 37°C. After 24 hours, microtensile bond strength (μTBS was measured. There were significant differences in cements. Three self-adhesive cements showed significantly lower μTBSs than control that required both etching and priming before cementation (Tukey, <0.05. The cement thickness of 50 or 100 μm tended to induce the highest μTBSs for each self-adhesive luting cements though no difference was found.

  8. Bacterial colonization of resin composite cements: influence of material composition and surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glauser, Stephanie; Astasov-Frauenhoffer, Monika; Müller, Johannes A; Fischer, Jens; Waltimo, Tuomas; Rohr, Nadja

    2017-08-01

    So-called secondary caries may develop in the cement gap between the tooth and the bonded restoration. Cement materials with a low susceptibility to biofilm formation are therefore desirable. In the present study, the adhesion of Strepococcus mutans onto three adhesive (Multilink Automix, RelyX Ultimate, and Panavia V5) and three self-adhesive (Multilink Speed Cem, RelyX Unicem 2 Automix, and Panavia SA plus) resin composite cements was evaluated. Previous studies have failed to evaluate concomitantly the effect of both the composition of the cements and their surface roughness on biofilm formation. The presence of S. mutans on cement surfaces with differing degrees of roughness was therefore recorded using fluorescence microscopy and crystal violet staining, and the composition of the cements was analyzed using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping. Biofilm formation on resin composite cements was found to be higher on rougher surfaces, implying that adequate polishing of the cement gap is essential. The use of copper-containing cements (Multilink Automix, Panavia V5, and Panavia SA plus) significantly reduced biofilm formation. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  9. Tooth surface treatment strategies for adhesive cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Nadja; Fischer, Jens

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth surface pre-treatment steps on shear bond strength, which is essential for understanding the adhesive cementation process. Shear bond strengths of different cements with various tooth surface treatments (none, etching, priming, or etching and priming) on enamel and dentin of human teeth were measured using the Swiss shear test design. Three adhesives (Permaflo DC, Panavia F 2.0, and Panavia V5) and one self-adhesive cement (Panavia SA plus) were included in this study. The interface of the cement and the tooth surface with the different pre-treatments was analyzed using SEM. pH values of the cements and primers were measured. The highest bond strength values for all cements were achieved with etching and primer on enamel (25.6 ± 5.3 - 32.3 ± 10.4 MPa). On dentin, etching and priming produced the highest bond strength values for all cements (8.6 ± 2.9 - 11.7 ± 3.5 MPa) except for Panavia V5, which achieved significantly higher bond strengths when pre-treated with primer only (15.3 ± 4.1 MPa). Shear bond strength values were correlated with the micro-retentive surface topography of enamel and the tag length on dentin except for Panavia V5, which revealed the highest bond strength with primer application only without etching, resulting in short but sturdy tags. The highest bond strength can be achieved for Panavia F 2.0, Permaflo DC, and Panavia SA plus when the tooth substrate is previously etched and the respective primer is applied. The new cement Panavia V5 displayed low technique-sensitivity and attained significantly higher adhesion of all tested cements to dentin when only primer was applied.

  10. Bonding All-Ceramic Restorations with Two Resins Cement Techniques: A Clinical Report of Three-Year Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; de Almeida, Erika Oliveira; Junior, Amilcar Chagas Freitas; Martini, Ana Paula

    2011-01-01

    Ceramics have been widely used for esthetic and functional improvements. The resin cement is the material of choice for bonding ceramics to dental substrate and it can also dictate the final esthetic appearance and strength of the restoration. The correct use of the wide spectrum of resin luting agents available depends on the dental tooth substrate. This article presents three-year clinical results of a 41 years old female patient B.H.C complaining about her unattractive smile. Two all-ceramic crowns and two laminates veneers were placed in the maxillary incisors and cemented with a self-adhesive resin luting cement and conventional resin luting cement, respectively. After a three-year follow-up, the restorations and cement/teeth interface were clinically perfect with no chipping, fractures or discoloration. Proper use of different resin luting cements shows clinical appropriate behavior after a three-year follow-up. Self-adhesive resin luting cement may be used for cementing all-ceramic crowns with high predictability of success, mainly if there is a large dentin surface available for bonding and no enamel at the finish line. Otherwise, conventional resin luting agent should be used for achieving an adequate bonding strength to enamel. PMID:21912505

  11. Effect of Rebonding on the Bond Strength of Orthodontic Tubes: A Comparison of Light Cure Adhesive and Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Aleksiejunaite

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of different enamel preparation procedures and compare light cure composite (LCC and resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI on the bond strength of orthodontic metal tubes rebonded to the enamel. Twenty human molars were divided into two groups (n=10. Tubes were bonded using LCC (Transbond XT in group 1 and RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC in group 2. The tubes in each group were bonded following manufacturers’ instructions (experiment I and then debonded using testing machine. Then, the same brackets were sandblasted and rebonded twice. Before the first rebonding, the enamel was cleaned using carbide bur (experiment II and before second rebonding, it was cleaned using carbide bur and soda blasted (experiment III. Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests showed no significant difference between RMGI and LCC bond strengths in case of normal bonding and rebonding, when enamel was cleaned using carbide bur before rebonding. Enamel soda blasting before rebonding significantly increased RMGI tensile bond strength value compared to LLC (p<0.05. LCC and RMGI (especially RMGI provide sufficient bond strengths for rebonding of molar tubes, when residual adhesive from previous bonding is removed and enamel soda blasted.

  12. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE SOUZA, Grace; BRAGA, Roberto Ruggiero; CESAR, Paulo Francisco; LOPES, Guilherme Carpena

    2015-01-01

    Resin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC) under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used. PMID:26398507

  13. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace DE SOUZA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractResin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used.

  14. Comparison of alternative adhesive cementation concepts for zirconia ceramic: glaze layer vs zirconia primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cura, Cenk; Özcan, Mutlu; Isik, Gül; Saracoglu, Ahmet

    2012-02-01

    Zirconia-based ceramics offer strong restorations in dentistry, but the adhesive bond strength of resin cements to such ceramics is not optimal. This study evaluated the bond strength of silane/adhesive/resin cement and zirconia primer/resin cement combinations on non-glazed and glazed zirconia surfaces before and after aging. Disk-shaped zirconia ceramic specimens (diameter: 8 mm; thickness: 2 mm) (N = 80, n = 10 per group) were randomly divided into 2 groups. While half of the specimens received one coat of glaze and were later finished by grinding, the other half was only ground using 1200-grit silicone carbide abrasives under water. The glazed specimens were then conditioned with 9.5% HF acid gel for 60 s, rinsed with water for 90 s, and neutralized. The glazed and non-glazed specimens were further divided into two groups. Two resin cements, namely, Variolink II and Multilink Automix were adhered onto the zirconia surfaces with their corresponding adhesive systems. In the Variolink II group, zirconia surfaces were silanized (Monobond-S), and adhesive resin (Heliobond) was applied and photopolymerized. In the Multilink Automix group, one coat of Metal/Zirconia Primer was applied with a microbrush, left to react for 180 s, and dried using oil-free air. Half of the specimens in each cement group were subjected to 5000 thermocycles (5°C to 55°C) and the other half was kept in the dark for 24 h at 37°C prior to testing. Specimens were mounted in the jig of the universal testing machine, and force was applied to the ceramic/cement interface until failure occurred (1 mm/min). After evaluating all debonded specimens under SEM, the failure types were defined as either "adhesive" with no cement left on the zirconia (score 0) or "mixed" with less than half of the cement left on the surface with no cohesive failure of the substrate (score 1). Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Dunnett-T3 post-hoc tests. Application of a glaze layer significantly improved the

  15. Shear bond strength of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic and nano resin ceramics blocks cemented with three different generations of resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab-Ghani, Zuryati; Jaafar, Wahyuni; Foo, Siew Fon; Ariffin, Zaihan; Mohamad, Dasmawati

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the shear bond strength between the dentin substrate and computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic ceramic and nano resin ceramics blocks cemented with resin cement. Materials and Methods: Sixty cuboidal blocks (5 mm × 5 mm × 5 mm) were fabricated in equal numbers from feldspathic ceramic CEREC® Blocs PC and nano resin ceramic Lava™ Ultimate, and randomly divided into six groups (n = 10). Each block was cemented to the dentin of 60 extracted human premolar using Variolink® II/Syntac Classic (multi-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding), NX3 Nexus® (two-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding) and RelyX™ U200 self-adhesive cement. All specimens were thermocycled, and shear bond strength testing was done using the universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA. Results: Combination of CEREC® Blocs PC and Variolink® II showed the highest mean shear bond strength (8.71 Mpa), while the lowest of 2.06 Mpa were observed in Lava™ Ultimate and RelyX™ U200. There was no significant difference in the mean shear bond strength between different blocks. Conclusion: Variolink® II cement using multi-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding provided a higher shear bond strength than the self-adhesive cement RelyX U200. The shear bond strength was not affected by the type of blocks used. PMID:26430296

  16. Evaluation of bond strength of self-adhesive cements to dentin with or without application of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellos, Daphne Câmara; Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Silva, Melissa Aline; Rangel, Patrícia Maria; Torres, Carlos Rocha; Fava, Marcelo

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the bond strength of indirect restorations to dentin using self-adhesive cements with and without the application of adhesive systems. Seventy-two bovine incisors were used, in which the buccal surfaces were ground down to expose an area of dentin measuring a minimum of 4 x 4 mm. The indirect resin composite Resilab was used to make 72 blocks, which were cemented onto the dentin surface of the teeth and divided into 4 groups (n = 18): group 1: self-adhesive resin cement BiFix SE, applied according to manufacturer's recommendations; group 2: self-adhesive resin cement RelyX Unicem, used according to manufacturer's recommendations; group 3: etch-and-rinse Solobond M adhesive system + BiFix SE; group 4: etch-and-rinse Single Bond 2 adhesive system + RelyX Unicem. The specimens were sectioned into sticks and subjected to microtensile testing in a universal testing machine (EMIC DL- 200 MF). Data were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 5%). The mean values (± standard deviation) obtained for the groups were: group 1: 15.28 (± 8.17)a, group 2: 14.60 (± 5.21)a, group 3: 39.20 (± 9.98)c, group 4: 27.59 (± 6.57)b. Different letters indicate significant differences (ANOVA; p = 0.0000). The application of adhesive systems before self-adhesive cements significantly increased the bond strength to dentin. In group 2, RelyX Unicem associated with the adhesive system Single Bond 2 showed significantly lower mean tensile bond strengths than group 3 (BiFix SE associated with the etch-and-rinse Solobond M adhesive system).

  17. Shear bond strength of a self‑etched resin cement to an indirect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-15

    Nov 15, 2014 ... using a silicon mold (14 mm diameter, 20 mm height). Shear bond strength test. Shear bond ... inhibited superficial layer of composite monomers and increased the exposure of fillers.[18]. Surface ... self‑adhesive resin cements include monomers that are capable of etching and bonding to the dental surface ...

  18. Influence of endodontic sealer composition and time of fiber post cementation on sealer adhesiveness to bovine root dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ricardo Abreu da; Barreto, Mirela Sangoi; Moraes, Rafael do Amaral; Broch, Juliana; Bier, Carlos Alexandre Souza; Só, Marcus Vinícius Reis; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the influence of the type of endodontic sealer (salicylate resin-based sealer vs. two endodontic sealers) and the time of fiber post cementation after root filling on the post adhesion to bovine root dentin. Sixty bovine roots were assigned to six groups (n=10), considering an experimental design with two factors (factorial 3x2): endodontic sealer factor in three levels [epoxy resin-based sealer (AH Plus), eugenol-based sealer (Endofill), and salicylate resin-based sealer plus mineral trioxide aggregate - MTA (MTA Fillapex)] and time for post cementation factor in two levels (immediate post cementation or 15 days after root canal filling). After post cementation, 2-mm-thick slices were produced and submitted to push-out test. The failure modes were analyzed under a 40× stereomicroscope and scored as: adhesive at cement/dentin interface; adhesive at cement/post interface; cement cohesive; post cohesive; dentin cohesive; or mixed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests (α=0.05). When the fiber posts were cemented immediately after the root canal filling, the bond strengths were similar, independent of the endodontic sealer type. However, after 15 days, the epoxy resin-based sealer presented higher bond strength than the other sealers (ppost cementation has no influence on post/root dentin adhesion. On the contrary, the type of endodontic sealer can influence the adhesion between fiber posts and root dentin.

  19. Bonding between CAD/CAM resin and resin composite cements dependent on bonding agents: three different in vitro test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Simona; Keul, Christine; Roos, Malgorzata; Edelhoff, Daniel; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the bonding properties between CAD/CAM resin and three resin composite cements combined with different bonding agents using three test methods. Four hundred twenty CAD/CAM resin substrates were fabricated and divided into three test methods (shear bond strength (SBS, n = 180), tensile bond strength (TBS, n = 180) and work of adhesion (WA, n = 60)), further into four pretreatment methods (VP connect (VP), visio.link (VL), Clearfil Ceramic Primer (CP) and no pretreatment (CG)) and three cements (RelyX ARC, Variolink II and Clearfil SA Cement). Each subgroup contained 15 specimens. SBS and TBS were measured after 24 h H2O/37 °C + 5000 thermal-cycles (5/55 °C) and failure types were assessed. WA was determined for pretreated CAD/CAM resin and non-polymerized resin composite cements. Data were analysed with Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis H, Chi(2) and Spearman's Rho tests. Within SBS and TBS tests, CGs and groups pretreated with CP (regardless of resin composite cements), and VP pretreated with Clearfil SA Cement showed no bond. However, CG combined with RelyX ARC showed a TBS of 5.6 ± 1.3 MPa. In general, highest bond strength was observed for groups treated with VL. CG and groups pretreated using VL showed lower WA than the groups treated with VP or CP. Measured TBS values were higher than SBS ones. In general, SBS and TBS showed similar trends for the ranges of the values for the groups. WA results were not comparable with SBS/TBS results and admitted, therefore, no conclusions on it. For a clinical use of XHIP-CAD/CAM resin, the bond surface should be additionally pretreated with visio.link as bonding agent.

  20. Tensile bond strength of ceramic crowns to dentin using resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, James F; de Rijk, Waldemar G; Hill, Jennifer; Hill, Nathaniel

    2011-01-01

    This study measured the bond strength of the self-adhesive resin cements and a bonded resin cement for crowns bonded to extracted teeth with preparations having a total taper greater than 30 degrees. A crown pull-off test was used with direction of pull along the path of insertion. The CAD/CAM system Cerec was used to create crowns with the pull-off loop as an integral part of the crown structure. One hundred extracted human molars were prepared for all-ceramic crowns with a 1.5-mm shoulder, greater than 30-degree axial wall convergence, a flat occlusal surface and 3 to 5 mm occlusal/ gingival height. All-ceramic crowns were cemented with five different self-adhesive cements (Rely X Unicem, Maxcem Elite, BisCem, SmartCem 2, and G-Cem) and one bonded resin cement (Multilink). Forfour cements (excluding GCem and Multilink) there were 2 groups, one with HF etching and one without ceramic surface treatment. The crowns were then subject to tensile stress until either the crown fractured or the crown was lifted off from the tooth. For several cements, the bond strength exceeded the tensile strength of the all-ceramic crown; thus, the crown fractured, leaving the cemented part of the crown on the tooth. The effect of ceramic surface etching was not statistically significant at p = 0.05; however, for each cement, the treated crowns showed a lower coefficient of variance (COV). For this study, the COV ranged from 24.9 % to 97.9 %. Loads ranged from 41.3 to 190.3 N. Some of the new self-etching resin cements can create bonds to non-retentive crown preparations that are stronger than the strength of a ceramic crown; however, these high bond strengths may not be able to be achieved consistently.

  1. Resin cement color stability and its influence on the final shade of all-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinc, Evren; Antonson, Sibel A; Hardigan, Patrick C; Kesercioglu, Atilla

    2011-07-01

    Adhesive resin cements may go through internal discoloration, which may show-through and affect the appearance of translucent all-ceramic restorations. This in vitro study evaluated the amount of resin cement color change and its effect on the final shade of the all-ceramics. Three different resin cements in both light and dual-cure forms were included in the study (Nexus-2/Kerr; Appeal/Ivoclar Vivadent; Calibra/Dentsply). All resin cements contained veneered (IPS Empress Esthetic, ETC1 shade, 20 mm × 1 mm ingot discs) and uncovered groups (n=10/group), all luted on white backgrounds (acetalpolyoxymethylene/Delrin(®)). Curing was performed according to ISO standards with a calibrated LED curing-light (Flashlite 1401). Samples were stored in 37°C distilled water at dark. Spectrophotometric baseline color measurements (Color Eye 7000A) were performed from the samples' top surfaces at 24h (D65 illuminator). Samples were subjected to 65 h of accelerated ageing (Atlas Ci4000). Further color measurements from the same areas were recorded in CIEL*a*b* coordinates where a ΔE data above 3 was accepted as visible discoloration (OptiviewLite-1.9software). Statistical analysis was performed using a nested random effects model and Tukey's post hoc analysis. Light-cure groups showed better color stability in all three resins but only in Appeal resin cement, the dual-cure group discolored significantly more (pcolor change (ΔE>3) through the ceramic surface on any veneered group. All resin cements showed varying degrees of discoloration after accelerated ageing however their actual color change was partially masked by the ceramic. Dual-cure resin cements may affect aesthetics on restoration margins if directly exposed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Retention of gold alloy crowns cemented with traditional and resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzón, Lilliam M; Frey, Gary N; Winkler, Mark M; Tate, William H; Burgess, John O; Powers, John M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure in vitro retention of cast gold crowns cemented with traditional and resin cements. Forty-eight human molars were prepared on a lathe to produce complete crown preparations with a consistent taper and split into six groups, eight crowns in each group. Crowns were cast in a high-gold alloy and then cemented. After 24 hours, the retention force (N) was recorded and mean values were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and the Fisher post-hoc least significant difference (PLSD) multiple comparisons test (a = .05). Failure sites were examined under 3100 magnification and recorded. Mean values (SD) for each group in increasing order of retention force were: Harvard Cement: 43 N (27), TempoCem: 59 N (16), PermaCem Dual: 130 N (42), RelyX Luting Cement: 279 N (26), Contax and PermaCem Dual: 286 N (38), and TempoCem with Contax and PermaCem Dual: 340 N (14). The Fisher PLSD interval (P = .05) for comparing cements was 29 N. Zinc-phosphate cement and provisional resin cements had the lowest retention forces. Resin cement with a bonding agent and the hybrid-ionomer cement had similar retention forces. Resin cement with a bonding agent applied after use of a provisional resin cement had a significantly higher retention force than the other cements tested.

  3. Effects of Photodynamic Therapy on the Adhesive Interface of Fiber Posts Cementation Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Anna Thereza Peroba Rezende; Garcia Belizário, Lauriê; Venção, Ana Carolina; Fagundes Jordão-Basso, Keren Cristina; de Souza Rastelli, Alessandra Nara; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi; Kuga, Milton Carlos

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) on the bond strength and dentinal penetrability of cementation protocols using conventional resin cement (Relyx ARC; 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN) or self-adhesive (Relyx U200, 3M ESPE) after the glass fiber post cementation. Forty human canine roots were endodontically treated and prepared for a fiber post. The roots were divided into 4 groups according to the cementation protocol and PDT use: conventional cement (CC), Relyx ARC; self-adhesive cement (SAC), Relyx U200 cement; PDT/CC, PDT + Relyx ARC; and PDT/SAC, PDT + Relyx U200. After cementation of the fiber posts, the roots were cross sectioned, and then specimens from the cervical, middle, and apical thirds of the prosthetic space were obtained. The specimens were submitted to the pushout test and dentinal penetration evaluation of the cementation protocol using laser confocal microscopy. PDT/CC presented the lowest bond strength to root dentin in the cervical third (P  .05). PDT/CC presented the lowest dentinal penetration of the adhesive system in the cervical and apical thirds (P negative effects on the bond strength to dentin in the cervical third after cementation using Relyx ARC and on the dentinal penetrability of the etch-and-rinse adhesive system in the cervical and apical thirds of the prosthetic space. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Bond strength of different resin cement and ceramic shades bonded to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; Kimpara, Estevão Tomomitsu; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Júnior, Gildo Coelho; Rizkalla, Amin S

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of ceramic cemented to dentin varying the resin cement and ceramic shades. Two VITA VM7 ceramic shades (Base Dentine 0M1 and Base Dentine 5M3) were used. A spectrophotometer was used to determine the percentage translucency of ceramic (thickness: 2.5 mm). For the MTBS test, 80 molar dentin surfaces were etched and an adhesive was applied. Forty blocks (7.2 x 7.2 x 2.5 mm) of each ceramic shade were produced and the ceramic surface was etched (10% hydrofluoric acid) for 60 s, followed by the application of silane and resin cement (A3 yellow and transparent). The blocks were cemented to dentin using either A3 or transparent cement. Specimens were photoactivated for 20 s or 40 s, stored in distilled water (37°C/24 h), and sectioned. Eight experimental groups were obtained (n = 10). Specimens were tested for MTSB using a universal testing machine. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests (α cement that was photocured for 20 s exhibited the lowest MTBS, while the transparent cement that was photocured for 40 s presented the highest MTBS. For the 2.5-mm-thick 5M3 ceramic restorations, the MTBS of ceramic cemented to dentin significantly increased. The dual-curing cement Variolink II photocured for 40 s is not recommended for cementing the Base Dentine 5M3 feldspathic ceramic to dentin.

  5. A new adhesive bonding material for the cementation of implantable devices in otologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniglia, A J; Nakabayashi, N; Paparella, M M; Werning, J W

    1997-05-01

    Presently, there are no U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved adhesive bone cements for the surgical fixation of prosthetic materials in the middle ear. A promising new cement, 4-META/MMA-TBB opaque resin, has shown remarkable adhesive properties as a bone cement in vivo. The cement is composed of 4-methacryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META) and methyl methacrylate (MMA) as monomers and tri-n-butyl borane (TBB) as an initiator. An electromagnetic semiimplantable hearing device presently under development was implanted into the middle ear of six cats using 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to cement a titanium-encased magnet to the incus. The animals were subsequently killed (at a mean of 9.6 months) to assess the (temporal bones and specifically the magnet-incus complex in each animal. The titanium-encapsulated magnet was firmly adherent to all incuses without any failure of the cement-bone interface. Histopathologic examination of the implanted temporal bones demonstrated lack of middle ear inflammation. Transmission electron microscopy of the incuses demonstrated a unique "hybrid layer" in the bone-side subsurface of the bone-cement interface that elucidates the mechanism of interfacial adhesion. Our investigation highlights the special biomechanical properties as well as the biocompatibility of 4-META/ MMA-TBB resin that make it an attractive bone-bonding agent for use in otologic surgery, including its potential usefulness during ossicular reconstruction.

  6. Orthodontic bracket bonding with a plasma-arc light and resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, H; Komori, A; Kojima, I; Ando, F

    2001-07-01

    Developments in light-curing technology have led to the introduction of a plasma-arc light-curing unit that delivers high-intensity output for faster curing. The purposes of this study were to determine the shear bond strengths of light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement cured with a plasma-arc light-curing unit and to evaluate the durability of the resultant bond strength with thermal cycling. Comparisons were made between light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement and light-cured composite resin. Two light-curing units were used in this study: a plasma-arc light-curing unit and a conventional light-curing unit. The mean shear bond strengths of light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement with the plasma-arc and the conventional light-curing units were 20.3 MPa and 26.0 MPa, respectively. An analysis of variance showed no statistically significant differences between the plasma-arc and the conventional light-curing units. Light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement and light-cured composite resin demonstrated similar bond strengths and exhibited no statistical differences. There was no statistical difference in bond strength between the teeth that were thermal cycled and those that were not. Failure sites for the brackets bonded with light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement appeared to be predominantly at the bracket-adhesive interface. The SDs of light-cured composite resin were high for both light-curing units. Whereas the coefficients of variation for light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement ranged from 20% to 30%, those of light-cured composite resin ranged from 40% to 60%. The bond strength of light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement cured with either a conventional light-curing unit or a plasma-arc light-curing unit surpassed the clinically required threshold. The plasma-arc light-curing unit may be an advantageous alternative to the conventional light-curing unit for orthodontic bracket bonding with both

  7. Effects of oxalate desensitizer with different resin cement-retained indirect composite inlays on fracture resistance of teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Alavi, Ali Asghar; Karimi, Fatemeh; Ansarifard, Elham

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated whether the tubular occluding effect of oxalate desensitizer (OX) during adhesive cementation (three resin cements) influenced fracture resistance of teeth restored with adhesive inlays. Ninety intact maxillary premolars were randomly divided into 9 groups of 10 each. The two control groups were Gr 1, intact teeth and Gr 2, mesio-occlusodistal preparation only. In six experimental groups, the composite inlays were cemented with ED Primer II/Panavia F 2.0, Excite DSC/Variolink II, and One-Step Plus/Duolink according to manufacturers' instructions (Groups 3, 5, and 7, respectively) or with OX during cementation (Groups 4, 6, and 8, respectively). In Group 9, inlays were cemented with a resin cement without adhesive system. After thermocycling, fracture strength was tested. The data were analyzed using two-way and one-way ANOVA and LSD post hoc tests (α = 0.05). Fracture resistance of the six groups were significantly affected by OX (p = 0.002) but not by the resin cement type (p > 0.05). The interaction of the two factors was statistically significant (p = 0.052). A statistically significant difference between all groups was found (p cements had a significant negative effect on the fracture resistance of premolars restored with composite inlay cemented with Panavia F2.0 and Variolink II, but it had no significant effect when cemented with Duolink. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  8. Microtensile bond strength and scanning electron microscopic evaluation of zirconia bonded to dentin using two self-adhesive resin cements; effect of airborne abrasion and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Gamal

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Airborne abrasion-surface treatment of zirconia significantly enhanced the μTBS of both cements adhered to dentin while aging had an adverse effect. MS showed higher insignificant μTBS.

  9. Evaluation of polymerization shrinkage of resin cements through in vitro and in situ experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, A. P. G. O.; Karam, L. Z.; Pulido, C. A.; Gomes, O. M. M.; Kalinowski, H. J.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavior of two types of resin cements , conventional dual and dual self adhesive, through in vitro and in situ experiments. For the in vitro assay were selected two resin cements that were handled and dispensed over a mylar strip supported by a glass plate. The Bragg grating sensors were positioned and another portion of cement. was placed, covered by another mylar strip. For the in situ experiment 16 single-rooted teeth were selected who were divided into 2 groups: group 1 - conventional dual resin cement Relyx ARC and group 2 - dual self adhesive resin cement Relyx U200 ( 3M/ESPE ). The teeth were treated and prepared to receive the intracanal posts. Two Bragg grating sensors were recorded and introduced into the root canal at different apical and coronal positions. The results showed that the in vitro experiment presented similar values of polymerization shrinkage that the in situ experiment made in cervical position; whereas Relyx ARC resulted lower values compared to Relyx U200; and cervical position showed higher shrinkage than the apical.

  10. Water durability of resin bond to precious metal alloys using adhesive resins containing adhesion promoting monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoma, Yoshinori; Kojima, Katsunori

    2005-12-01

    Adhesive resins for precious metals were prepared by adding an adhesion promoting monomer to MMA-PMMA/TBBO resin. Precious metal alloys bonded by the adhesive resin were thermocycled 0, 1,000, 2,000, or 4,000 times in water between 4 and 60 degrees C, and tensile bond strengths were measured. Debonded metal surfaces after the tensile test were analyzed based on an area of cohesive failure. Three-way ANOVA revealed that all the three parameters--adherend, adhesive monomer, and number of thermal cycles--exhibited a significant influence on bond strength. Bond strength significantly decreased with increasing number of thermal cycles except for resin with 9,10-epithiodecyl 4-vinylbenzoate (EP8VB) to Au alloy. Mean bond strength of adhesive resin with 9,10-epithiodecyl methacrylate (EP8MA), EP8VB, or 3,4-epithiobutyl 2,2-bis(methacryloyloxymethyl)propionate (EP2BMA) exceeded 22 MPa after 4,000 thermal cycles. Analysis of debonded surfaces revealed the applicability of EP8MA, EP8VB, and EP2BMA as an adhesive monomer component of adhesive resin formulations.

  11. Biomechanical assessment of a new adhesive bone cement for otologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werning, J W; Maniglia, A J; Anderson, J M

    1995-05-01

    The adhesion of metallic prostheses to bone is a major problem in otologic surgery. Conventional bone cements lack significant adhesive strength, which predisposes the cemented prosthesis to loosening. The advent of surgically implantable hearing devices is one example where an adhesive cement to secure metal to bone would be useful. The biomechanical properties of a new cement, 4-META/MMA-TBB opaque resin, were evaluated in an animal model. The cement is composed of 4-methacryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META) and methyl methacrylate (MMA) as monomers and tri-n-butyl borane (TBB) as an initiator. Titanium disks were cemented to the tibias of rabbits, which were sacrificed at 0 and 90 days. Tensile and shear bond strengths between bone and metal were tested at both times. The mean baseline tensile and shear bond strengths were 8.92 MPa and 11.96 MPa, respectively. Adhesive failure occurred at the bone-cement interface. The decrease in bond strength at 90 days was minimal. Thus, 4-META/MMA-TBB cement is a promising new metal-to-bone adhesive that may be useful for the surgical fixation of metallic prostheses in otologic surgery.

  12. Interfacial fracture toughness of different resin cements bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, Tabassom; Rostami, Golriz; Behroozibakhsh, Marjan; Fatemi, Mostafa; Keshvad, Alireza; van Noort, Richard

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of HF acid etching and silane treatment on the interfacial fracture toughness of a self-adhesive and two conventional resin-based cements bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Lithium disilicate glass ceramic discs were prepared with two different surface preparations consisting of gritblasted with aluminium oxide, and gritblasted and etched with hydrofluoric acid. Ceramic surfaces with a chevron shaped circular hole were treated by an optimized silane treatment followed by an unfilled resin and then three different resin cements (Variolink II, Panavia F2, and Multilink Sprint). Specimens were kept in distilled water at 37°C for 24h and then subjected to thermocycling. The interfacial fracture toughness was measured and mode of failures was also examined. Data were analysed using analysis of variance followed by T-test analysis. No statistically significant difference in the mean fracture toughness values between the gritblasted and gritblasted and etched surfaces for Variolink II resin cement was found (P>0.05). For the gritblasted ceramic surfaces, no significant difference in the mean fracture toughness values between Panavia F2 and Variolink II was observed (P>0.05). For the gritblasted and etched ceramic surfaces, a significantly higher fracture toughness for Panavia F2 than the other cements was found (Pcements demonstrated a better bonding efficacy to the lithium disilicate glass ceramic compared to the self-adhesive resin cement. The lithium disilicate glass ceramic surfaces should be gritblasted and etched to get the best bond when used with Panavia F2 and Multilink Sprint resin cements, whereas for the Variolink II only gritblasting is required. The best bond overall is achieved with Panavia F2. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of Surface Treatments on the Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Monolithic Zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    To assess the influence of surface treatment on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of resin cements to monolithic zirconia materials. Two types of monolithic zirconia (Zenostar T [ZT] and Prettau Anterior [PA]) were evaluated. The specimens were assigned to three groups based on the surface treatment applied: group 1: control, assintered; group 2: sandblasted with 50-μm Al₂O₃; group 3: tribochemically silica sandblasted. Two types of resin cements (Multilink Speed [MS] and Multilink N [MN]) were applied to each group for evaluating the bond strength using the μTBS test. The fractured specimens were observed with a stereomicroscope and SEM. Surface roughness and topography of monolithic zirconia were examined after treatment. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. A Weibull analysis was performed on the bond strength data. The bond strength was significantly affected by the surface treatment and the type of resin cement (p zirconia (p = 0.387). Surface treatment with tribochemical silica sandblasting revealed significantly higher bond strength (p zirconia was changed due to surface treatments. The surface treatment of monolithic zirconia with tribochemical silica sandblasting enhanced the bond strength between zirconia and resin cements. Resins cements containing adhesive phosphate monomer (APM, MS) provided higher bond strength to monolithic zirconia than non-APM (MN).

  14. Effect of surface treatment of FRC-Post on bonding strength to resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Hyun Park,

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface treatment of FRC-Post on bonding strength to resin cements. Materials and Methods Pre-surface treated LuxaPost (DMG, Rely-X Fiber Post (3M ESPE and self adhesive resin cement Rely-X Unicem (3M ESPE, conventional resin cement Rely-X ARC (3M ESPE, and Rely-X Ceramic Primer (3M ESPE were used. After completing the surface treatments of the posts, posts and resin cement were placed in clear molds and photo-activation was performed. The specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the FRC-Post into 2 mm-thick segments, and push-out strength were measured. The results of bond strength value were statistically analyzed using independent samples t-test and one-way ANOVA with multiple comparisons using Scheffe's test. Results Silanization of posts affect to the bond strength in LuxaPost, and did not affect in Rely-X Fiber Post. Rely-X ARC showed higher value than Rely-X Unicem. Conclusions Silanization is needed to enhance the bond strength between LuxaPost and resin cements.

  15. Correlation between the cytotoxicity of self-etching resin cements and the degree of conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís FSA Morgan

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: These results indicate that photopolymerization of dual cure self-etching resin cements decrease toxic effects on cell culture. Adequate photopolymerization should be considered during cementation when using dual polymerization self-etching resin cements.

  16. Fracture Resistance of Lithium Disilicate Ceramics Bonded to Enamel or Dentin Using Different Resin Cement Types and Film Thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojpaibool, Thitithorn; Leevailoj, Chalermpol

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the influence of cement film thickness, cement type, and substrate (enamel or dentin) on ceramic fracture resistance. One hundred extracted human third molars were polished to obtain 50 enamel and 50 dentin specimens. The specimens were cemented to 1-mm-thick lithium disilicate ceramic plates with different cement film thicknesses (100 and 300 μm) using metal strips as spacers. The cements used were etch-and-rinse (RelyX Ultimate) and self-adhesive (RelyX U200) resin cements. Compressive load was applied on the ceramic plates using a universal testing machine, and fracture loads were recorded in Newtons (N). Statistical analysis was performed by multiple regression (p dentin resulted in lower MFL than with enamel (p dentin resulted in lower fracture loads than bonding to enamel. Reduced resin film thickness could reduce lithium disilicate restoration fracture. Etch-and-rinse resin cements are recommended for cementing on either enamel or dentin, compared with self-adhesive resin cement, for improved fracture resistance. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  17. Effect of resin cement, aging process and root level on the bond strength of the resin-fiber posts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuhim, Khalid Salman

    Background. Little is known about the long-term clinical bonding effectiveness of the Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts cemented with self-etch adhesive systems. Bond stability and longevity of the cemented post are adversely affected by physical and chemical factors over time, such as expansion and contraction stresses caused by thermal changes and occlusal load. This clinical condition can be simulated in vitro by thermocyclic loading; and bonding effectiveness can be evaluated by applying the micropush out test. Therefore, more in vitro studies are needed to evaluate the bond strength of the fiber posts cemented with different resin cement systems after simulating the artificial aging induced by thermocycling. The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two different resin cement systems (total etch, and self-etch resin cement system) used for cementation of fiber reinforced composite posts in three different aging periods using thermocycling. Methods. Following IRB approval, sixty freshly extracted bicuspid single rooted natural teeth were endodontically treated, and the post-spaces were prepared to receive a fiber-post cemented with either a total etch resin cement (Rely-X Ultimate) or with a self-etch resin cement (Rely-X Unicem). No thermocycling, 20,000 and 40,000 cycles was used to age the specimens. Teeth were randomly allocated into six different groups: G1 - Control: Rely-X Ultimate cement with no thermocycling. G2: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 20,000 thermocycling. G3: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 40,000 thermocycling. G4: Rely-X Unicem cement. G5: Rely-X Unicem cement. G6: Rely-X Unicem cement. Microtensile bond strength determined using a micropush out test on a universal testing machine (MTS). Additionally, the failure mode of each specimen was observed under a stereomicroscope (Olympus) at 40x magnification. Finally, one representative sample was randomly selected from each of the five failure modes for scanning

  18. Microleakage of adhesive and nonadhesive luting cements for stainless steel crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarpour, Mahtab; Mesbahi, Maryam; Rezvani, Gita; Rahimi, Mehran

    2011-01-01

    This study's purpose was to compare the ability of 5 luting cements to reduce microleakage at stainless steel crown (SSC) margins on primary molar teeth. Standard preparations were performed on 100 extracted primary molar teeth for SSC restoration. After fitting SSCs, samples were randomly divided into 5 groups of 20 teeth each, which were cemented with nonadhesive cement consisting of polycarboxylate (PC) or zinc phosphate (ZP), or with adhesive cement consisting of glass ionomer (GIC), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), or RMGIC with a bonding agent (RMGIC+DBA). After aging and thermocycling, the specimens were placed in 1% methylene blue, sectioned, and evaluated under a digital microscope. The data were compared between groups with the t test, analysis of variance, and the least significant difference test. Microleakage with adhesive cements was significantly lower than with nonadhesive cements (Pstainless steel crowns than nonadhesive cements. Use of a bonding agent with a resin-modified glass ionomer cement yielded better results than using the latter alone.

  19. Effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of zirconia to three resin cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadjoo, Nisa

    Statement of problem: There are no standard guidelines for material selection to obtain acceptable bonding to high-strength zirconium oxide ceramic. Studies suggest resin cements in combination with MDP-containing primer is a reasonable choice, however, the other cements cannot be rejected and need further investigation. Objective: The purpose of this in vitro study was the evaluation of the shear bond strength of three composite resin cements to zirconia ceramic after using different surface conditioning methods. Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty sintered Y-TZP ceramic (IPS e.max ZirCAD) squares (8 x 8 x 4 mm) were embedded in acrylic molds, then divided into three groups (n=40) based on the type of cement used. Within each group, the specimens were divided into four subgroups (n=10) and treated as follows: (1) Air abrasion with 50microm aluminum oxide (Al2O 3) particles (ALO); (2) Air abrasion + Scotchbond Universal adhesive (SBU); (3) Air abrasion + Monobond Plus (MBP); (4) Air abrasion + Z-Prime Plus (ZPP). Composite cylinders were used as carriers to bond to conditioned ceramic using (1) RelyX Ultimate adhesive resin cement (RX); (2) Panavia SA self-adhesive resin cement (PSA); (3) Calibra esthetic cement (CAL). The bonded specimens were submerged in distilled water and subjected to 24-hour incubation period at 37°C. All specimens were stressed in shear at a constant crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA. The bond strength values (MPa), means and standard deviations were calculated and data were analyzed using analysis of variance with Fisher's PLSD multiple comparison test at the 0.05 level of significance. The nature of failure was recorded. Results: The two-way ANOVA showed Panavia SA to have the highest strength at 44.3 +/- 16.9 MPa (pcement showed statistically higher bond strength (p=0.0054). The highest bond strengths for all three cements were observed with Scotchbond Universal surface

  20. An evaluation of retention and marginal seating of Ni-Cr alloy cast restorations using three different luting cements: An in vitro study

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    Bikash K Pattanaik

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Marginal seating of adhesive resin cement was significantly greater than that of zinc phosphate and resin-modified GIC. Retentive strength of adhesive resin cement and resin-modified GIC was significantly greater than that of zinc phosphate There was no significant difference of retentive strength between adhesive resin cement and resin-modified GIC.

  1. Immediate shear bond strength of resin cements to sodium hypochlorite-treated dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Clinton D

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the immediate shear bond strength of different categories of resin cements on sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl)-treated dentin and to evaluate if the bond was improved by a subsequent treatment with 10% sodium ascorbate before adhesive procedures. This study tested immediate shear bond strengths to human dentin of 5 resin cements: Variolink II (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein), Multilink (Ivoclar Vivadent), Clearfil Esthetic Cement EX (Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan), SpeedCEM (Ivoclar Vivadent), and Clearfil SA Cement (Kuraray). All cements were tested with no NaOCl pretreatment of the dentin (negative control) and with a 20-minute exposure of the dentin to 6% NaOCl before bonding procedures. The cements found to have decreased bond strengths to NaOCl-treated dentin were tested with the dentin exposed to 10% sodium ascorbate after NaOCl exposure. The sodium ascorbate exposure times tested were 5 seconds and 1 minute. The mean and standard deviation values for immediate shear bond strength (MPa) for the negative control group were as follows: Variolink II, 18.8 ± 4.2; Multilink, 29.1 ± 7.1; Clearfil Esthetic Cement EX, 20.7 ± 4.9; SpeedCEM, 17.8 ± 4.2; and Clearfil SA Cement, 7.2 ± 2.8. The results for the NaOCl exposure group were as follows: Variolink II, 24.0 ± 6.7; Multilink, 34.1 ± 6.1; Clearfil Esthetic Cement EX, 20.7 ± 6.8; SpeedCEM, 0.0 ± 0.0; and Clearfil SA Cement, 0.1 ± 0.1. The results for the 5-second sodium ascorbate group were the following: SpeedCEM, 8.5 ± 2.6, and Clearfil SA Cement, 4.3 ± 2.0. The following results were found for the 1-minute sodium ascorbate group: SpeedCEM, 12.2 ± 3.2, and Clearfil SA Cement, 4.8 ± 1.0. The resin cements tested varied in their capacity to adhere to NaOCl-treated dentin. Some resin cements exhibited equal or improved bond strengths (P cements, a rinse of 10% sodium ascorbate provided an immediate restoration of at least 50% of the original bond strength

  2. Push-out strength of fiber posts depending on the type of root canal filling and resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrouli, Maria; Günay, Hüsamettin; Geurtsen, Werner; Lührs, Anne-Katrin

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the push-out strength of two fiber post systems/resin cements (RelyX Unicem/RelyX Fiber Post (RLX) and Variolink II/DT Light SL (VL)) depending on the root canal filling (RF). One hundred sixty extracted human teeth were divided into four groups: gutta-percha/AH Plus (GP), gutta-percha/Guttaflow (GF), pre-existing root canal filling (PRF), and without root canal filling (WRF). After root canal treatment, fiber posts were inserted using either RelyX® or Variolink II®/Excite DSC®. Half of the specimens were thermocycled (TC, 5,000 cycles, 5-55°C). All specimens were subjected to the push-out test (crosshead speed 1 mm/min). Three-way ANOVA showed a significant influence of either the RF or the resin cement/post system (p adhesive fractures between post and cement. For RLX, mixed fractures between post and tooth and between tooth and cement were predominantly determined. The adhesion of resin cements/post systems could be dependent on the type of RF. Higher bond strength values were found for the conventional ("etch and rinse") adhesive than for the "self-adhesive resin cement."

  3. Epoxy-resin adhesive and method for bonding using such an epoxy resin adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhowmik, S.; Poulis, J.A.; Benedictus, R.

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to an epoxy resin adhesive comprising a dotation of nano-substances, wherein the nano- substances are selected from the group comprising carbon-fibre nanotubes, carbon nano-fibres, silicate nano powders, and wherein the nano-substances are dispersed in the adhesive with a

  4. Effect of adhesive resin type for bonding to zirconia using two surface pretreatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samimi, P.; Hasankhani, A.; Matinlinna, J.P.; Mirmohammadi, H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This laboratory study evaluated the short-term adhesive properties of one 10-MDP-containing and two MDP-free resin composite cements, using two types of zirconia surface pretreatments. Materials and Methods: Eighteen sintered zirconia disks (Procera, Nobel Biocare) were randomly divided

  5. Comparison of the microshear bond strength of two resin cements to Cercon and Zirkonzahn ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Nokar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Nowadays, the application of all ceramic restorations are being raised, because of their physical characteristics, such as translucency and good appearance. Numerous researchers investigated the impact of surface treatments on the bond strength of zirconia ceramic with resin cements. The aim of this study was to compare the microshear bond strength of Cercon and Zirkonzahn (two kind of zirconia ceramics, to two types of resin cements after thermocycling.   Materials and Methods: In this study, 24 rectangular specimens were made from each group of Cercon and Zirkonzahn ceramics. After sandblasting, these specimens were connected to 3×1 mm2 composite cylinders by two resin cements (Panavia F2 and Rely X Unicem2. After performing a thermocycling regime for 5000 cycles (5-55 ◦ C, the microshear bond strengths were measured by a universal testing machine. The mode of failures were determined by a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA.   Results: Type of ceramics had no significant impact on the microshear bond strength (P=0.317. The highest bond strengths in both ceramics were obtained with Reply X Unicem (P=0.035. The predominant failure mode was adhesive between the cement and ceramic.   Conclusion: Type of resin cement had a significant effect on their bond strengths to zirconia ceramics.

  6. Effect of Silanization on Microtensile Bond Strength of Different Resin Cements to a Lithium Disilicate Glass Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gré, Cristina Parise; de Ré Silveira, Renan C; Shibata, Shizuma; Lago, Carlo Tr; Vieira, Luiz Cc

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the influence of a silane-coupling agent on the bond strength of a self-adhesive cement and a conventional resin cement to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic. A total of eight ceramic blocks were fabricated and divided into four groups (n = 2). In groups 1 and 3, ceramic surfaces were etched with hydrofluoric acid 10% for 20 seconds, rinsed for 30 seconds, and air-dried. One layer of a silane agent was applied onto all ceramic specimens and air-dried for 30 seconds. In groups 2 and 4, ceramic surfaces were etched with hydrofluoric acid, rinsed, and air-dried without application of the silane-coupling agent. The ceramic blocks were bonded to a block of composite with a self-adhesive resin cement or with a conventional resin cement, according to the manufacturer's instructions. After 24 hours in distilled water at 37°C, the specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonding interface area to obtain beams with a bonding area of 0.8 mm(2) and submitted to a microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance and the Games-Howell post hoc test (p = 0.05). Fractured specimens were examined under optical microscopy at 40x magnification. Silanization resulted in higher microtensile bond strength compared to groups without silane. No significant differences were found between the conventional resin cement and the self-adhesive resin cement with silane agent (p = 0.983), and without silane agent (p = 0.877). Silanization appears to be crucial for resin bonding to a lithium disilicate-based ceramic, regardless of the resin cement used. The self-adhesive resin cement performed as well as the conventional resin cement. Applying one layer of a silane-coupling agent after etching the ceramic surface with hydrofluoric acid 10% enhanced the bond strength between resin cements and a glass ceramic.

  7. Bonding of adhesive resin luting agents to metal and amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Saad A; McCabe, John F; Walls, Angus W G

    2008-12-01

    The shear bond strength of three adhesives, Panavia 21, Superbond, All Bond C&B Cement, and a dual cure resin (Variolink), to Ni-Cr-Be (Rexillium III), Midigold (Type III gold) and Amalgam (Sybraloy) were determined. Fifteen samples were prepared using 800 grit abrasive papers for Ni-Cr and Midi-Gold, and 100 grit papers for amalgam. Ni-Cr-Be and Midi-Gold samples were sandblasted for 30 s and steam cleaned for 10 s. The adhesives were bonded to the samples using gelatine capsules and were matured for 24 h in water at 37 degrees C. The samples were debonded in shear using an Instron at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. The data was analysed using ANOVA and a Tukey test. The bond strength of Superbond to both metal alloys was significantly higher (Pcement had shown to be not significant difference from those of Panavia 21 and Variolink, when bonded to Rexillium and Midi-Gold, respectively. The bond strength of All Bond C&B Cement to amalgam was significantly greater (Padhesives when compared with Rexillium (PPanavia 21>All Bond C&B>Variolink. The nature of substrate to be used for bonding and the adhesive material itself are important factors in bonding which can be achieved between cast metals and prepared teeth with amalgam filling. Superbond should be successful as an adhesive for the attachment of all substrates tested, with the possible exception of amalgam, for which All Bond C&B Cement gives the best result.

  8. The effect of sodium hypochlorite and resin cement systems on push-out bond strength of cemented fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhudhairy, Fahad I; Bin-Shuwaish, Mohammed S

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of different endodontic irrigant solutions and resin cement systems on the bond strength of cemented fiber posts. Sixty human single-rooted anterior teeth were sectioned transversely at 2 mm incisal to the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). The roots were treated endodontically, and teeth were distributed into six groups: group A, includes 5.25%NaOCl irrigant with MultiCore Flow Core Build-Up material; group B, includes 5.25%NaOCl irrigant with RelyX-Unicem Self-Adhesive Universal Resin Cement; group C, includes 2.5% NaOCl irrigant with MultiCore Flow; group D, includes 2.5%NaOCl irrigant with RelyX-Unicem; group E, includes NaCl, irrigant with MultiCore Flow; and group F, includes NaCl irrigant with RelyX-Unicem. Universal tapered fiber posts (No. 3 RelyX Fiber Post) were cemented, and roots were sectioned into cervical and apical segments. Samples were then subjected to a push-out bond strength test and failure modes were examined. The mean push-out bond strength for group D showed the highest mean value (20.07 MPa), while the lowest value was found in group A. There was a significant difference between groups with regard to the irrigants used (p0.05). The total mean push-out bond strength of the cervical segments was found to be significantly higher than the apical segments (pbond strength of the fiber posts regardless of the cement used. Both adhesive resin systems showed similar bonding strength.

  9. Effect of Laser Etching on Glass Fiber Posts Cemented with Different Adhesive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlar Oz, Ozge; Secilmis, Asli; Aydin, Cemal

    2017-10-19

    Glass fiber-reinforced posts have been preferred frequently because of some physical properties similar to the dentin, chemically bonding to dentin, biocompatibility, and esthetics. This study aimed to evaluate the microleakage and bond strength of glass fiber posts cemented with various adhesive systems on laser-etched root canal walls. Roots of 120 human mandibular premolars were divided into two groups for push-out bond strength test and the microleakage test (n = 60). Erbium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser etching of the root canal walls was carried out on half of the specimens in both test groups. The laser-treated and laser-nontreated groups were divided again into three subgroups (n = 10). Glass fiber posts (everStick Post) were luted using three different resin cements: total-etch (Variolink N), self-etch (Panavia F 2.0), and self-adhesive (Rely X Unicem). Three dentin discs were obtained from each root, and the bond strength of the glass fiber posts was measured by push-out tests. The dye penetration method was used to investigate coronal microleakage. In addition, surface treatments and the bonding interfaces were observed using scanning electron microscope. The highest bond strengths were observed for the total-etch and self-adhesive resin cement groups with laser etching (p  0.05), except for the self-adhesive resin cement group (p fiber posts. In addition, laser etching can reduce microleakage of self-adhesive resin cement.

  10. Cements and adhesives for all-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Adriana P; Silva, Nelson R F A; Bonfante, Estevam A; Pegoraro, Thiago A; Dias, Renata A; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2011-04-01

    Dental cements are designed to retain restorations, prefabricated or cast posts and cores, and appliances in a stable, and long-lasting position in the oral environment. Resin-based cements were developed to overcome drawbacks of nonresinous materials, including low strength, high solubility, and opacity. Successful cementation of esthetic restorations depends on appropriate treatment to the tooth substrate and intaglio surface of the restoration, which in turn, depends on the ceramic characteristics. A reliable resin cementation procedure can only be achieved if the operator is aware of the mechanisms involved to perform the cementation and material properties. This article addresses current knowledge of resin cementation concepts, exploring the bonding mechanisms that influence long-term clinical success of all-ceramic systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Surface Hardness of Resin Cement Polymerized under Different Ceramic Materials

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    Pimmada Kesrak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the surface hardness of two light-cured resin cements polymerized under different ceramic discs. Methods. 40 experimental groups of 2 light-cured resin cement specimens (Variolink Veneer and NX3 were prepared and polymerized under 5 different ceramic discs (IPS e.max Press HT, LT, MO, HO, and Cercon of 4 thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mm, Those directly activated of both resin cements were used as control. After light activation and 37∘C storage in an incubator, Knoop hardness measurements were obtained at the bottom. The data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA, t-test, and one-way ANOVA. Results. The KHN of NX3 was of significantly higher than that of Variolink Veneer (<0.05. The KHN of resin cement polymerized under different ceramic types and thicknesses was significant difference (<0.05. Conclusion. Resin cements polymerized under different ceramic materials and thicknesses showed statistically significant differences in KHN.

  12. [Influence of time on shear strength using resin cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Wei-min; Zhang, Xiu-yin; Zhang, Fu-qiang

    2007-10-01

    To compare the shear bond strength of different composite resin cement systems at different time intervals. 48 healthy non-carious human molars were selected in the study. The samples were divided into two groups, 24 in each group. (1) RelyX unicem was used on bonding, (2) Variolink 2 was used on bonding. All specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 2 hours, 24 hours and 1 week. 8 specimens in each group were stressed in shear until failure. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS11.0 software package. Debonged surface was examined under light microscope. Shear bond strengths of two resin cements showed a significant increase as time went (Padhesive/dentin interfaces. Time can influence the shear bond strength using different composite resin cement systems. Supported by Shanghai Leading Academic Discipline Project (Grant No.T0202).

  13. Effect of various surface treatments of tooth – colored posts on bonding strength of resin cement

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    Mirzaei M.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Various studies have shown that reliable bond at the root - post - core interfaces are critical for the clinical success of post - retained restorations. Severe stress concentration at post - cement interface increases post debonding from the root. To form a bonded unit that reduces the risk of fracture, it is important to optimize the adhesion. Therefore, some post surface treatments have been proposed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of various surface treatments of tooth - colored posts on the bonding of resin cement. "nMaterials and Methods: In this interventional study, 144 tooth colored posts were used in 18 groups (8 samples in each group. The posts included quartz fiber (Matchpost, glass fiber (Glassix, and zirconia ceramic (Cosmopost and the resin cement was Panavia F 2.0. The posts received the following surface treatments: 1- No surface treatment (control group, 2- Etching with HF and silane, 3- Sandblasting with Cojet sand, 4- Sandblasting with Cojet sand and application of silane, 5- Sandblasting with alumina particles, 6- Sandblasting with alumina particles and application of silane. Then, posts were cemented into acrylic molds with Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The specimens were placed in water for 2 days and debonded in pull - out test. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA followed by Tamhane and Tukey HSD. Failure modes were observed under a stereomicroscope (10 . P<0.05 was considered as the significant level. "nResults: Surface treatments (sandblasting with Cojet and alumina particles ,with or without silane resulted in improved bond strength of resin cement to glass fiber post (Glassix and zirconia ceramic (Cosmopost [p<0/05], but not to the quartz fiber post (Matchpost. In general, higher bond strengths resulted in a to higher percentage of cohesive failures within the cement. "nConclusion: Based on the results of this study, sandblasting with cojet and alumina

  14. Desensitizing bioactive agents improves bond strength of indirect resin-cemented restorations: preliminary results

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    Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri Pires-de-Souza

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of indirect composite restorations cemented with a resin-based cement associated with etch-and-rinse and self-etching primer adhesive systems to dentin treated or not with a bioactive material. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Twenty bovine incisor crowns had the buccal enamel removed and the dentin ground flat. The teeth were assigned to 4 groups (n=5: Group I: acid etching + Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply; Group II: application of a bioactive glass (Biosilicato®+ acid etching + Prime & Bond NT; Group III: One-up Bond F (J Morita; Group IV: Biosilicato® + One-up Bond F. Indirect composite resin (Artglass, Kulzer cylinders (6x10mm were fabricated and cemented to the teeth with a dual-cure resin-based cement (Enforce, Dentsply. After cementation, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37ºC for 30 days and thereafter tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine (EMIC with 50 kgf load cell at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Failure modes were assessed under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (95% level of confidence. RESULTS: Groups I, II and III had statistically similar results (p>0.05. Group IV had statistically significant higher bond strength means (p<0.05 than the other groups. The analysis of the debonded surfaces showed a predominance of adhesive failure mode for Group III and mixed failure mode for the other groups. CONCLUSION: The use of desensitizing agent did not affect negatively the bonding of the indirect composite restorations to dentin, independently of the tested adhesive systems.

  15. Measuring the resistance of different substructure materials by sticking them to dentine with two different resin cements in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eratilla, V; Yildiz, A D; Guven, S; Eratilla, E A; Karaman, T; Aguloglu, S; Sumer, E

    2016-01-01

    The resistance of three different substructure materials - metal (Cr-Co), zirconium (Zr), and ceramics (IPS Empress II) - was measured by sticking them to dentine with two different resin cements, a dual-cure resin cement (Panavia F 2.0 Light) and a self-adhesive resin cement (BisCem). In an in vitro study, 72 central upper front teeth were selected with no decay or apparent breakage and with complete development, removed for periodontal reasons. Labial and incisal surfaces of all teeth were prepared. Molds were obtained to prepare metal (Co-Cr), Zr, and ceramic (IPS Empress II) blocks for use in the study. The compressive strengths of the obtained material infrastructures were examined after thermal cycle processing by performing cementation to the teeth with two different cements. The data obtained were analyzed statistically. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used for comparisons of the groups with two options, and Kruskal-Wallis variance analysis was used to compare more than two groups. Presistance groups were found to be, in order, Panavia-ceramics >Panavia-metal >Panavia-Zr >self-adhesive-ceramics >self-adhesive-Zr >and self-adhesive-metal.

  16. Influence of the Resin Cement Thickness on the Push-Out Bond Strength of Glass Fiber Posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Regina Maria Helen-Cot; Kinder, Gustavo Ross; Alfredo, Edson; Quaranta, Tarcisio; Correr, Gisele Maria; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes da; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of resin cement thickness on the bond strength of prefabricated and customized glass fiber posts after storage in distilled water. Thirty human uniradicular roots were treated endodontically. The roots were divided into 3 groups: THIN (thin cement layer) - post space preparation with #0.5 drill and cementation of #0.5 post; THICK (thick cement layer) - post space preparation with #1 drill and cementation of #0.5 post; and CUSTOM (customized cement layer) - post space preparation with #1 drill and cementation of a customized post (#0.5 glass fiber posts customized with resin composite). All posts were luted with self-adhesive resin cement. The push-out test was carried out after storage for 24 h and 90 days in distilled water at 37 °C. The data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=0.05). Bond strengths were significantly higher for CUSTOM (9.37 MPa), than for THIN (7.85 MPa) and THICK (7.07 MPa), which were statistically similar. Considering the thirds, the bond strength varied in the sequence: apical (7.13 MPa) fiber posts. The customized posts presented higher bond strength. Storage in water for 90 days affected negatively the values of bond strength, especially for thick cement layers in the apical third.

  17. Adhesive strength of self-adhesive resins to lithium disilicate ceramic and dentin: effect of dentin chelating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saker, Samah; Alnazzawi, Ahmad; Özcan, Mutlu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effect of different chelating agents on microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin. The occlusal surfaces of extracted human mandibular molars (N = 80) were cut horizontally to expose sound dentin. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups (n = 20 per group) and dentin surfaces were conditioned according to one of the following methods: group C: no treatment (control group); group CH: 0.2 % chitosan; group E: 17 % ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) and group P: 25 % polyacrylic acid (PAA). Lithium disilicate glass ceramic (e.max CAD) blocks were cemented to conditioned dentin surfaces with self-adhesive cements (RelyX Unicem or Clearfil SA) and photo-polymerized. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h and thermocycled for 6,000 times. The beams were obtained from bonded ceramic-cement-tooth assemblies and were subjected to the MTBS test (1 mm/min). Failure types were analyzed and selected beams were examined under scanning electron microscope. Data (MPa) were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P type significantly affected the MTBS results (P dentin chelating agents (P = 0.785). Interaction terms were not significant (P = 0.114). Control group with no dentin conditioning presented significantly lower results with both cements (RelyX Unicem: 8.1 ± 1.9(a), Clearfil SA: 8 ± 1.6(a)) than those of conditioned groups (19.3 ± 4.2(b)-24.5 ± 5.2(b)) (P types were predominantly adhesive in all groups. Chitosan (2 %), EDTA (17 %) or PAA (25 %) could all be used as dentin chelating agents in conjunction with self-adhesive resin cements tested.

  18. Bond strength of resin cement to CO2 and Er:YAG laser-treated zirconia ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Kasraei

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives It is difficult to achieve adhesion between resin cement and zirconia ceramics using routine surface preparation methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of CO2 and Er:YAG laser treatment on the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics. Materials and Methods In this in-vitro study 45 zirconia disks (6 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness were assigned to 3 groups (n = 15. In control group (CNT no laser treatment was used. In groups COL and EYL, CO2 and Er:YAG lasers were used for pretreatment of zirconia surface, respectively. Composite resin disks were cemented on zirconia disk using dual-curing resin cement. Shear bond strength tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min after 24 hr distilled water storage. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's HSD tests. Results The means and standard deviations of shear bond strength values in the EYL, COL and CNT groups were 8.65 ± 1.75, 12.12 ± 3.02, and 5.97 ± 1.14 MPa, respectively. Data showed that application of CO2 and Er:YAG lasers resulted in a significant higher shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics (p < 0.0001. The highest bond strength was recorded in the COL group (p < 0.0001. In the CNT group all the failures were adhesive. However, in the laser groups, 80% of the failures were of the adhesive type. Conclusions Pretreatment of zirconia ceramic via CO2 and Er:YAG laser improves the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic, with higher bond strength values in the CO2 laser treated samples.

  19. Different Strategies to Bond Bis-GMA-based Resin Cement to Zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Guilherme Carpena; Spohr, Ana Maria; De Souza, Grace M

    To evaluate the effect of different bonding strategies on short- and long-term bis-GMA-based resin cement bond strengths to zirconia. One hundred twenty samples of fully-sintered zirconia (Prettau Zirconia) were sandblasted and randomly distributed into 5 groups (n = 24): UA: Scotchbond Universal Adhesive; SZP: Signum Zirconia Bond I + II; ZPP: Z-Prime Plus; EXP: MZ experimental primer; CO: no primer application (control). After performing these surface treatments, translucent tubes (0.8 mm diameter and 1.0 mm height) were placed on the zirconia specimens, and bis-GMA-based cement (Duo-Link) was injected into them and light cured. Specimens were tested for microshear bond strength either 24 h or 6 months (m) after water storage (37°C) and surfaces were characterized by SEM and EDX. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (p zirconia surface. In these groups, EDX demonstrated the presence of phosphorus. Group ZPP resulted in a nonhomogeneous layer, exposing the zirconia substrate underneath. EXP application resulted in an undetectable layer. Water storage did not affect resin cement bond strengths to zirconia irrespective of the surface treatment. Bis-GMA-based resin cement bond strengths to zirconia are affected by specific bonding strategies.

  20. Shear bond strength of a self‑etched resin cement to an indirect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... however there were not statistical difference among the tested surface treatment methods. Conclusion: In Shear bond strength of resin, cement was independent of the surface conditioning methods applied on tested indirect resin composite. Key words: Composite resins, dental bonding, resin cements, surface properties ...

  1. The Translucency Effect of Different Colored Resin Cements used ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the different color of resin cements and zirconia cores on the translucency parameter (TP) of the restoration that simulates the implant‑supported fixed prosthesis using titanium base on the bottom. Materials and Methods: Zirconia core plates (Zr‑Zahn) were ...

  2. The Translucency Effect of Different Colored Resin Cements used ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the different color of resin cements and zirconia cores on the translucency parameter (TP) of the restoration that simulates the implant‑supported fixed prosthesis using titanium base on the bottom. Materials and Methods: Zirconia core plates ...

  3. Coating glass-ionomer cements with a nanofilled resin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonifacio, C.C.; Werner, A.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a nanofilled resin coat on the flexural strength (FS) and the early wear (after 50 000 and 200 000 cycles) of the glass-ionomer cements Fuji IX GP Extra (FIXE) and Ketac Molar Aplicap (KM). Materials and methods. Specimens were

  4. Shear bond strength of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic and nano resin ceramics blocks cemented with three different generations of resin cement

    OpenAIRE

    Zuryati Ab-Ghani; Wahyuni Jaafar; Siew Fon Foo; Zaihan Ariffin; Dasmawati Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the shear bond strength between the dentin substrate and computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic ceramic and nano resin ceramics blocks cemented with resin cement. Materials and Methods: Sixty cuboidal blocks (5 mm × 5 mm × 5 mm) were fabricated in equal numbers from feldspathic ceramic CEREC ® Blocs PC and nano resin ceramic Lava™ Ultimate, and randomly divided into six groups (n = 10). Each block was cemented to the dentin of 60 extracted huma...

  5. Cariogenic Bacteria Degrade Dental Resin Composites and Adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Bourbia, M.; Ma, D; Cvitkovitch, D G; Santerre, J.P.; Finer, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A major reason for dental resin composite restoration replacement is related to secondary caries promoted by acid production from bacteria including Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). We hypothesized that S. mutans has esterase activities that degrade dental resin composites and adhesives. Standardized specimens of resin composite (Z250), total-etch (Scotchbond Multipurpose, SB), and self-etch (Easybond, EB) adhesives were incubated with S. mutans UA159 or uninoculated culture medium (control)...

  6. Bond strength of selected composite resin-cements to zirconium-oxide ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fons-Font, Antonio; Amigó-Borrás, Vicente; Granell-Ruiz, María; Busquets-Mataix, David; Panadero, Rubén A.; Solá-Ruiz, Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strengths of zirconium-oxide (zirconia) ceramic and a selection of different composite resin cements. Study Design: 130 Lava TM cylinders were fabricated. The cylinders were sandblasted with 80 µm aluminium oxide or silica coated with CoJet Sand. Silane, and bonding agent and/or Clearfil Ceramic Primer were applied. One hundred thirty composite cement cylinders, comprising two dual-polymerizing (Variolink II and Panavia F) and two autopolymerizing (Rely X and Multilink) resins were bonded to the ceramic samples. A shear test was conducted, followed by an optical microscopy study to identify the location and type of failure, an electron microscopy study (SEM and TEM) and statistical analysis using the Kruskal-Wallis test for more than two independent samples and Mann-Whitney for two independent samples. Given the large number of combinations, Bonferroni correction was applied (α=0.001). Results: Dual-polymerizing cements provided better adhesion values (11.7 MPa) than the autopolymerizing (7.47 MPa) (p-value M-WAdhesive failure (separation of cement and ceramic) was produced at a lesser force than cohesive failure (fracture of cement) (p-value M-Wcement and the ceramic. Key words:Shear bond strength, silica coating, surface treatment, zirconia ceramics, phosphate monomer. PMID:22926485

  7. Evaluation of resin adhesion to zirconia ceramic using some organosilanes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matinlinna, Jukka P.; Heikkinen, Mo; Ozcan, Mutlu; Lassila, Lippo V. J.; Vallittu, Pekka K.

    Objectives. This study evaluated and compared the effect of three trialkoxysilane coupling agents on the bond strength of a Bis-GMA-based unfilled resin and a dimethacrylate-based resin composite luting cement to a zirconia ceramics (Procera(R) AllZircon, Nobel Biocare, Goteborg, Sweden). Methods.

  8. Bond strength of resin cements to noble and base metal alloys with different surface treatments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkhondeh Raeisosadat

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The bond strength of resin cements to metal alloys depends on the type of the metal, conditioning methods and the adhesive resins used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of resin cements to base and noble metal alloys after sand blasting or application of silano-pen.Cylinders of light cured Z 250 composite were cemented to "Degubond 4" (Au Pd and "Verabond" (Ni Cr alloys by either RelyX Unicem or Panavia F2, after sandblasting or treating the alloys with Silano-Pen. The shear bond strengths were evaluated. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and t tests at a significance level of P<0.05.When the alloys were treated by Silano-Pen, RelyX Unicem showed a higher bond strength for Degubond 4 (P=0.021 and Verabond (P< 0.001. No significant difference was observed in the bond strength of Panavia F2 to the alloys after either of surface treatments, Degubond 4 (P=0.291 and Verabond (P=0.899. Panavia F2 showed a higher bond strength to sandblasted Verabond compared to RelyX Unicem (P=0.003. The bond strength of RelyX Unicem was significantly higher to Silano-Pen treated Verabond (P=0.011. The bond strength of the cements to sandblasted Degubond 4 showed no significant difference (P=0.59. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated Degubond 4 (P=0.035.The bond strength of resin cements to Verabond alloy was significantly higher than Degubond 4. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated alloys. Surface treatments of the alloys did not affect the bond strength of Panavia F2.

  9. Effects of post surface conditioning before silanization on bond strength between fiber post and resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbarian, Parisa

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Post surface conditioning is necessary to expose the glass fibers to enable bonding between fiber post and resin cement. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning on tensile bond strength (TBS) of a glass fiber reinforced post to resin cement. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this in vitro study, 40 extracted single canal central incisors were endodontically treated and post spaces were prepared. The teeth were divided into four groups according to the methods of post surface treatment (n=10): 1) Silanization after etching with 20% H2O2, 2) Silanization after airborne-particle abrasion, 3) Silanization, and 4) No conditioning (Control). Adhesive resin cement (Panavia F 2.0) was used for cementation of the fiber posts to the root canal dentin. Three slices of 3 mm thick were obtained from each root. A universal testing machine was used with a cross-head speed of 1 mm/minute for performing the push-out tests. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests were used for analyzing data (α=0.05). RESULTS It is revealed that different surface treatments and root dentin regions had significant effects on TBS, but the interaction between surface treatments and root canal regions had no significant effect on TBS. There was significant difference among H2O2 + Silane Group and other three groups. CONCLUSION There were significant differences among the mean TBS values of different surface treatments. Application of hydrogen peroxide before silanization increased the bond strength between resin cements and fiber posts. The mean TBS mean values was significantly greater in the coronal region of root canal than the middle and apical thirds. PMID:23755337

  10. Effect of mode of polymerization of bonding agent on shear bond strength of autocured resin composite luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Cecilia C S; McComb, Dorothy; Anderson, James D; Tam, Laura E

    2003-04-01

    There have been anecdotal reports of low bond strength with autocured resin composite materials, particularly when light-cured bonding agents that combine primer and adhesive in a 1-bottle preparation are used. The objective of this study was to determine if the mode of polymerization of the bonding agent influences the strength of the attachment of autocured resin composite luting cements to dentin. The shear bond strength of 2 resin luting cements, Calibra and RelyX ARC, polymerized by autocuring, in combination with 4 different bonding agents, Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus, Prime & Bond NT, IntegraBond and Single Bond, polymerized to bovine dentin by light-curing, autocuring or dual-curing, was determined. The pH of each bonding agent and its components was measured. Two-way analysis of variance was used to test the effect of cement and adhesive on shear bond strength. For each bonding agent, the adhesive variable combined the factors product brand and mode of polymerization. With significant interaction among the above variables, the least square means of the 16 combinations of resin cement and adhesive were compared. There was no consistent relationship between shear bond strength and mode of polymerization of the bonding agent. Significant differences in bond strength were specific to the proprietary brand of bonding agent. The pH of the bonding agent depends on the manufacturer's formulation, and low pH may contribute to low bond strength. The low in vitro bond strength occurring with some combinations of bonding agent and resin cement could be clinically significant.

  11. Bonding Effectiveness of Two Adhesive Luting Cements to Glass Fiber Posts: Pull-Out Evaluation of Three Different Post Surface Conditioning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength at the post/resin-cement interface with 3 different surface treatments of glass fiber posts and with 2 different luting resin cements. Sixty glass fiber posts (RelyX Fiber Post) were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 20) and were luted with a dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement (RelyX Unicem) and with a dual-polymerizing resin cement (RelyX ARC). This was carried out in association with a dual-polymerizing adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus) in simulated plexiglass root canals after receiving three different pretreatment procedures. A pull-out test was performed on each sample to measure bond strengths. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Two samples from each group were processed for SEM observations in order to investigate the morphologic aspect of the post/cement interface. Both resin cements demonstrated significant different bond strength values (P post surface after pretreatment with methyl methacrylate. The dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement achieved higher MPa bond strength values. The use of methyl methacrylate as a surface treatment of glass fiber posts provided a significant increase in bond strengths between the posts and both luting materials. PMID:24987418

  12. Bonding Effectiveness of Two Adhesive Luting Cements to Glass Fiber Posts: Pull-Out Evaluation of Three Different Post Surface Conditioning Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Graiff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength at the post/resin-cement interface with 3 different surface treatments of glass fiber posts and with 2 different luting resin cements. Sixty glass fiber posts (RelyX Fiber Post were randomly divided into 3 groups (n=20 and were luted with a dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement (RelyX Unicem and with a dual-polymerizing resin cement (RelyX ARC. This was carried out in association with a dual-polymerizing adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus in simulated plexiglass root canals after receiving three different pretreatment procedures. A pull-out test was performed on each sample to measure bond strengths. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Two samples from each group were processed for SEM observations in order to investigate the morphologic aspect of the post/cement interface. Both resin cements demonstrated significant different bond strength values (P<0.0001. The surface treatment result was also statistically significant (P=0.0465. SEM examination showed a modification of the post surface after pretreatment with methyl methacrylate. The dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement achieved higher MPa bond strength values. The use of methyl methacrylate as a surface treatment of glass fiber posts provided a significant increase in bond strengths between the posts and both luting materials.

  13. Bonding effectiveness of two adhesive luting cements to glass fiber posts: pull-out evaluation of three different post surface conditioning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graiff, Lorenzo; Rasera, Laura; Calabrese, Marco; Vigolo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength at the post/resin-cement interface with 3 different surface treatments of glass fiber posts and with 2 different luting resin cements. Sixty glass fiber posts (RelyX Fiber Post) were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 20) and were luted with a dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement (RelyX Unicem) and with a dual-polymerizing resin cement (RelyX ARC). This was carried out in association with a dual-polymerizing adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus) in simulated plexiglass root canals after receiving three different pretreatment procedures. A pull-out test was performed on each sample to measure bond strengths. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Two samples from each group were processed for SEM observations in order to investigate the morphologic aspect of the post/cement interface. Both resin cements demonstrated significant different bond strength values (P post surface after pretreatment with methyl methacrylate. The dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement achieved higher MPa bond strength values. The use of methyl methacrylate as a surface treatment of glass fiber posts provided a significant increase in bond strengths between the posts and both luting materials.

  14. Extent of cement polymerization along dowel space as a function of the interaction between adhesive and cement in fiber post cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichi, Alessandro; Carrabba, Michele; Goracci, Cecilia; Ferrari, Marco

    2012-02-01

    To assess whether the polymerization extent of cement is influenced by curing mode of the adhesive and/or by photoactivation of the cement. One hundred five root segments were prepared from endodontically treated teeth. After post space preparation, the root segments were randomly divided into 7 groups, based on the cementation procedure to lute RelyX Fiber Posts (3M ESPE): 1. Variolink II (V, Ivoclar Vivadent); 2. V light-cured (LC); 3. Excite LC (ELC, Ivoclar Vivadent)/V; 4. ELC/V LC; 5. ELC-V LC (One Shot); 6. Excite DSC (EDSC)/V; 7. EDSC-V LC (One Shot). Each root segment was submitted to the acetone shake test to remove the unpolymerized resin and then cut longitudinally. On each half, the extent of cure of the cement was measured with image analysis software. The deepest and basically complete polymerization was obtained with EDSC (groups 6 and 7), regardless of whether light curing was performed. The extent of polymerization was most limited when adhesive was not applied (groups 1 and 2), or when ELC was only light cured, while V was allowed to auto-cure (group 3). With the one-shot polymerization of ELC and V (group 5), the extent of polymerization was similar to the procedure involving separate irradiation of adhesive and cement (group 4). The one-shot technique was significantly more effective if EDSC was used (group 6). The use of a self-activating dual-curing adhesive system in combination with a dual-curing cement enables effective luting of FRC posts regardless of the amount of light transmitted through the post.

  15. ADHESIVE SYSTEM AFFECTS REPAIR BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN COMPOSITE

    OpenAIRE

    IRMAK, Özgür; Özge ÇELIKSÖZ; Begüm YILMAZ; Batu Can YAMAN

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the effects of different adhesive systems on repair bond strength of aged resin composites. Materials and Methods: Ninety composite discs were built and half of them were subjected to thermal aging. Aged and non-aged specimens were repaired with resin composite using three different adhesive systems; a two-step self-etch adhesive, a two-step total-etch adhesive and a one-step self-etch adhesive; then they were subjected to shear forces. Data were analyzed stat...

  16. Clinical approach to anterior adhesive restorations using resin composite veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangani, Francesco; Cerutti, Antonio; Putignano, Angelo; Bollero, Raffaele; Madini, Lorenzo

    2007-01-01

    Scientific progress in adhesive dentistry has led to more conservative techniques, both direct and indirect, to solve esthetic problems in anterior teeth. This article will discuss only indirect techniques, which are clearly superior in complex cases in which it will be difficult to recreate harmonious tooth shape and color. After reviewing the literature and highlighting the properties of this technique, the indications and benefits compared to the direct technique will be assessed. This is followed by a step-by-step description of operative procedures, from treatment planning to relining and polishing of the cemented adhesive restoration. The long-term success of veneers depends mainly on the tooth preparation, which should be confined to enamel, involve proximal contact areas, maintain the cervical enamel margin, and incorporate the incisal edge to increase veneer resistance and enable correct placement. Although no clinical follow-up similar to that of ceramic materials is available, the latest-generation resin composites offer interesting features. They can withstand mechanical stress, have excellent esthetic properties, and, most importantly, can be repaired intraorally without impairing their physicochemical and mechanical properties.

  17. Caries inhibition around gallium alloy by fluoride releasing resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasman Nur'alim

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride-releasing materials inhibit secondary caries. Gallium alloy has been developed to replace mercury-based amalgam. The purpose of this study was to test a new F releasing resin-ionomer cement for inhibition of 24 extracted human premolars. The experimental cavity (ARG were filled using etching, priming, and F releasing resin-ionomer cement (All-bond 2 & Presinomer, Bisco followed by condensation of gallium alloy (G Tokuriki Honten, Japan. Three different controls were used: gallium alloy only (G, no etching, Presinomer, gallium alloy (RG, etching, priming, non-F cement (All-bond C&B, Bisco and gallium alloy (ACG The teeth were thermocycled 500x, stored in humidor 28 days, then exposed to artificial caries for 21 days using a strep. mutans culture. Next, they were sectioned and examined by microradiography. The microradiographs were examined for the presence of a caries inhibition zone near the restoration and classified as strongly inhibited (SI, moderately inhibited (MI or not inhibited (N at the enamel and dentin wall. A Chi-square analysis showed that G is different from ARG, ACG is different from ARG, and RG is different from ACG (p<0.05. The results show that the fluoride-releasing resin-ionomer cement provided caries inhibition with or without etching and bonding and that etching and bonding alone is not as effective as fluoride release.

  18. Comparative study to evaluate shear bond strength of RMGIC to composite resin using different adhesive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandak, Manoj G.; Pattanaik, Navdheeraj; Das, Ayan

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study is to compare and evaluate the role of new dental adhesives to bond composite to the resinmodified glass inomer cement (RMGIC). Materials and Methods: Thirty specimens were prepared on acrylic blocks, with wells prepared in it by drilling holes, to retain the RMGIC. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups of ten specimens each. In Group a thin layer of selfetch adhesive (3M ESPE) was applied between the RMGIC and the composite resin FILTEK P60 (3M SPE). In Group II, total etch adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2, 3M ESPE) was applied, and in Group III, there was no application of any adhesive between RMGIC and the composite resin. After curing all the specimens, the shear bond strength was measured using an Instron universal testing machine. Results: The results were drawn and tabulated using ANOVA-fishers and Dunnet D statistical tests.The maximum shear bond strength values were recorded in Group I specimens with self-etch adhesive showing a mean value of 2.74 when compared to the Group II adhesive (Total etch) showing a mean shear strength of value 1.89, where no adhesive was used, showed a minimum mean shear bond strength of 1.42. There was a great and significant difference between Group I and Group II (P value 0.05) whereas, both Group I and Group II showed a vast and significant difference from Group III (P value = 0–001). Conclusion: Hence, this present study concludes that application of self-etch adhesive (3M ESPE, U.S.A) in between RMGIC and composite resin increases the shear bond strength between RMGIC and the resin composites, as compared to the total-etch type adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2,3M ESPE, U.S.A) as well as without application of the adhesive agent. PMID:23293476

  19. Comparative study to evaluate shear bond strength of RMGIC to composite resin using different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj G Chandak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study is to compare and evaluate the role of new dental adhesives to bond composite to the resinmodified glass inomer cement (RMGIC. Materials and Methods: Thirty specimens were prepared on acrylic blocks, with wells prepared in it by drilling holes, to retain the RMGIC. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups of ten specimens each. In Group a thin layer of selfetch adhesive (3M ESPE was applied between the RMGIC and the composite resin FILTEK P60 (3M SPE. In Group II, total etch adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2, 3M ESPE was applied, and in Group III, there was no application of any adhesive between RMGIC and the composite resin. After curing all the specimens, the shear bond strength was measured using an Instron universal testing machine. Results: The results were drawn and tabulated using ANOVA-fishers and Dunnet D statistical tests.The maximum shear bond strength values were recorded in Group I specimens with self-etch adhesive showing a mean value of 2.74 when compared to the Group II adhesive (Total etch showing a mean shear strength of value 1.89, where no adhesive was used, showed a minimum mean shear bond strength of 1.42. There was a great and significant difference between Group I and Group II (P value 0.05 whereas, both Group I and Group II showed a vast and significant difference from Group III (P value = 0-001. Conclusion: Hence, this present study concludes that application of self-etch adhesive (3M ESPE, U.S.A in between RMGIC and composite resin increases the shear bond strength between RMGIC and the resin composites, as compared to the total-etch type adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2,3M ESPE, U.S.A as well as without application of the adhesive agent.

  20. Intentional re-plantation of a vertically fractured tooth repaired with an adhesive resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unver, S; Onay, E O; Ungor, M

    2011-11-01

    To present the successful treatment of a vertically fractured tooth by intentional re-plantation after root canal treatment and repair with an adhesive resin. Vertical root fracture is a challenging problem in respect of diagnosis and management options. In this case, a vertically fractured maxillary premolar was treated by intentional re-plantation after repairing it with 4-Methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhyride/methacrylate-tri-n-butyl borane (4-META/MMA-TBB) resin cement. At the 36-month follow-up, the tooth was asymptomatic, radiographically sound with reduced deep periodontal pockets and vertical bone loss. • Intentional replantation after repairing fractured fragments with an adhesive resin extraorally is a treatment option. • Long-term follow-up is necessary to evaluate the outcome of this technique. © 2011 International Endodontic Journal.

  1. Comparison of the amount of fluoride release from nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer, conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Sumitha; Rao, Arathi; Shenoy, Ramya

    2013-03-01

    To investigate and compare the amount of fluoride release of conventional, resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cements. Tablets of glass-ionomer cements were immersed in deionized water and incubated at 37°C. After 1, 2, 7, 15 and 30 days, fluoride ion was measured under normal atmospheric conditions by fluoride ion selective electrode. Buffer (TISAB II) was used to decomplex the fluoride ion and to provide a constant background ionic strength and to maintain the pH of water between 5.0 and 5.5 as the fluoride electrode is sensitive to changes in pH. Statistical evaluation was carried out by one way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) using SPSS 11.0. The significance level was set at pglass-ionomer cement was highest compared to the other two glass-ionomer cements, but the amount drastically reduced over the period. Although the amount of fluoride release was less than both the resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass-ionomer cement, the release was sustained consistently for 30 days. The cumulative fluoride release of nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement was very less compared to the conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements and Nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement released less but steady fluoride as compared to other resin modified glass ionomer cements.

  2. Adhesives Based on Furan Resin for Structural Laminated Timber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavia ZELENIUC

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In wood laminated products manufacturing thephenol-based adhesives are especially used. Recentlyother adhesives such as polyurethanes were promotedon the market for structural applications withremarkable properties. Structural adhesives have tofulfil the requirements according to their uses, underwet or dry conditions as adhesive type I and type IIrespectively. Criteria for evaluating structuraladhesives, includes delamination resistance, shearstrength of bond and percent of wood failure. Thisstudy has the objective to evaluate the bondingperformance of furan based resin and its suitability forstructural purposes. There are some investigationsabout the possibility of incorporating the furan resin intowood adhesive formulations but their industrialexploitation is still modest. Three experimentaladhesive compositions based on furan and ureaformaldehyderesins, were used to cold-glue beechand spruce lamellas to form a structural timber likeglued laminated timber. Adhesive formulations includedmixed furan resin with furfuryl alcohol (FC2 and twomodified furan resins with urea-formaldehyde resin(UR/FC2 and UR/FC3 at 50% UR. Bond shearstrength by longitudinal tensile and resistance todelamination were performed according to SR EN302:2004. The best performance was obtained withadhesive FC2 which showed shear strength above thevalues indicated for structural adhesives in EN301:2004. FC2 adhesive performed significantly betterin delamination tests too, both in dry and wetconditions, compared to the other two adhesives,showing promise for its use in load-bearing timberstructures.

  3. Effect of CO2 and Nd:YAG Lasers on Shear Bond Strength of Resin Cement to Zirconia Ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Kasraei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Because of poor bond between resin cement and zirconia ceramics, laser surface treatments have been suggested to improve adhesion. The present study evaluated the effect of CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers on the shear bond strength (SBS of resin cement to zirconia ceramic.Materials and Methods: Ninety zirconia disks (6×2 mm were randomly divided into six groups of 15. In the control group, no surface treatment was used. In the test groups, laser surface treatment was accomplished using CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers, respectively (groups two and three. Composite resin disks (3×2 mm were fabricated and cemented to zirconia disks with self-etch resin cement and stored in distilled water for 24 hours. In the test groups four-six, the samples were prepared as in groups one-three and then thermocycled and stored in distilled water for six months. The SBS tests were performed (strain rate of 0.5 mm/min. The fracture modes were observed via stereomicroscopy. Data were analyzed with one and two-way ANOVA, independent t and Tukey’s tests.Results: The SBS values of Nd:YAG group (18.95±3.46MPa was significantly higher than that of the CO2 group (14.00±1.96MPa, but lower than that of controls (23.35±3.12MPa. After thermocycling and six months of water storage, the SBS of the untreated group (1.80±1.23 MPa was significantly lower than that of the laser groups. In groups stored for 24 hours, 60% of the failures were adhesive; however, after thermocycling and six months of water storage, 100% of failures were adhesive.Conclusion: Bonding durability of resin cement to zirconia improved with CO2 and Nd:YAG laser surface treatment of zirconia ceramic.

  4. Effects of Mechanical and Chemical Pretreatments of Zirconia or Fiber Posts on Resin Cement Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Zhou, Hui; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chen; Sun, Ying Chun; Gao, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The bonding strength between resin cement and posts is important for post and core restorations. An important method of improving the bonding strength is the use of various surface pretreatments of the post. In this study, the surfaces of zirconia (fiber) posts were treated by mechanical and/or chemical methods such as sandblasting and silanization. The bonding strength between the zirconia (fiber) post and the resin cement was measured by a push-out method after thermocycling based on the adhesion to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The zirconia and fiber posts exhibited different bonding strengths after sandblasting and/or silanization because of the different strengths and chemical structures. The zirconia post showed a high bonding strength of up to 17.1 MPa after a combined treatment of sandblasting and silanization because of the rough surface and covalent bonds at the interface. This effect was also enhanced by using 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane for the formation of a flexible layer at the interface. In contrast, a high bonding strength of 13.9 MPa was obtained for the fiber post treated by silane agents because the sandblasting treatment resulted in damage to the fiber post, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the improvement in the bonding strength between the post and the resin cement could be controlled by different chemical and/or mechanical treatments. Enhanced bonding strength depended on covalent bonding and the surface roughness. A zirconia post with high bonding strength could potentially be used for the restoration of teeth in the future. PMID:26066349

  5. Effects of Mechanical and Chemical Pretreatments of Zirconia or Fiber Posts on Resin Cement Bonding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Li

    Full Text Available The bonding strength between resin cement and posts is important for post and core restorations. An important method of improving the bonding strength is the use of various surface pretreatments of the post. In this study, the surfaces of zirconia (fiber posts were treated by mechanical and/or chemical methods such as sandblasting and silanization. The bonding strength between the zirconia (fiber post and the resin cement was measured by a push-out method after thermocycling based on the adhesion to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The zirconia and fiber posts exhibited different bonding strengths after sandblasting and/or silanization because of the different strengths and chemical structures. The zirconia post showed a high bonding strength of up to 17.1 MPa after a combined treatment of sandblasting and silanization because of the rough surface and covalent bonds at the interface. This effect was also enhanced by using 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilylethane for the formation of a flexible layer at the interface. In contrast, a high bonding strength of 13.9 MPa was obtained for the fiber post treated by silane agents because the sandblasting treatment resulted in damage to the fiber post, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the improvement in the bonding strength between the post and the resin cement could be controlled by different chemical and/or mechanical treatments. Enhanced bonding strength depended on covalent bonding and the surface roughness. A zirconia post with high bonding strength could potentially be used for the restoration of teeth in the future.

  6. Effects of Mechanical and Chemical Pretreatments of Zirconia or Fiber Posts on Resin Cement Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Zhou, Hui; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chen; Sun, Ying Chun; Gao, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The bonding strength between resin cement and posts is important for post and core restorations. An important method of improving the bonding strength is the use of various surface pretreatments of the post. In this study, the surfaces of zirconia (fiber) posts were treated by mechanical and/or chemical methods such as sandblasting and silanization. The bonding strength between the zirconia (fiber) post and the resin cement was measured by a push-out method after thermocycling based on the adhesion to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The zirconia and fiber posts exhibited different bonding strengths after sandblasting and/or silanization because of the different strengths and chemical structures. The zirconia post showed a high bonding strength of up to 17.1 MPa after a combined treatment of sandblasting and silanization because of the rough surface and covalent bonds at the interface. This effect was also enhanced by using 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane for the formation of a flexible layer at the interface. In contrast, a high bonding strength of 13.9 MPa was obtained for the fiber post treated by silane agents because the sandblasting treatment resulted in damage to the fiber post, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the improvement in the bonding strength between the post and the resin cement could be controlled by different chemical and/or mechanical treatments. Enhanced bonding strength depended on covalent bonding and the surface roughness. A zirconia post with high bonding strength could potentially be used for the restoration of teeth in the future.

  7. Efficacy of a Universal Adhesive in the Bond Strength of Composite Cements to Polymer-infiltrated Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Nadja; Flury, Alba; Fischer, Jens

    2017-11-17

    To investigate the effect of a universal adhesive on the bond strength of composite cements to a polymer- infiltrated ceramic network. Shear bond strength to a polymer-infiltrated ceramic network (Vita Enamic) and to its polymer and ceramic components was assessed on polished surfaces using either a conventional dual-curing resin (RelyX Ultimate) or self-adhesive composite cement (RelyX Unicem 2 Automix). Substrate surfaces were either not pretreated or a silane coupling agent (Vitasil), a universal adhesive (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive), or both were applied. Further, the shear bond strength to polymer-infiltrated ceramic network was evaluated after etching with 5% hydrofluoric acid (Vita Ceramics Etch) of 0, 15, 30, 60 or 120 s without or with application of silane, universal adhesive, or both (n = 10). Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis test (p cement. Application of silane resulted in low mean bond strengths (4 to 5 MPa) to the ceramic. The universal adhesive bonded mainly to the polymer part of the polymer-infiltrated ceramic network. The best bonding performance for both cements was achieved when silane and universal adhesive were applied on the polymer-infiltrated ceramic network. Etching for 30 s or 60 s resulted in the highest mean shear bond strengths for all pretreatment groups (p adhesive dual-curing composite cement RelyX Unicem 2 Automix was found on the HF-etched polymer-infiltrated ceramic network. The conventional dual-curing composite cement RelyX Ultimate with Scotchbond Universal Adhesive may bond chemically to the polymer part of the polymer-infiltrated ceramic network. To achieve the highest bond strengths for both cements, the polymer-infiltrated ceramic network should be etched for 30 to 60 s, followed by the application of silane and universal adhesive.

  8. Effect of airborne-particle abrasion on dentin with experimental niobophosphate bioactive glass on the microtensile bond strength of resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Edilausson Moreno; Lima, Darlon Martins; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Martinelli, José Roberto; Bauer, José

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of two resin cements bonded to dentin pre-treated with experimental niobophosphate bioactive glass (NBG). The experimental bioactive glass was prepared by mixing different amounts of NbO5; (NH4)2HP4; CaO; Na2CO3. The particle size distribution and composition of the bioactive glass powder were determined. Twenty flat dentin surfaces from sound extracted human molars were polished with 600-grit SiC paper and air-abraded using experimental bioactive glass niobium powder. The bonding procedures were accomplished by the application of two resin cements: self-etching Panavia F or self-adhesive RelyX U-100. The resin-bonded specimens were cut and the μTBS test was performed after 24h. The failure mode was determined with a stereomicroscope at 40× magnification. The results were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (α=0.05). The two-way ANOVA did not detect interactions between factors, but only a difference between the self-etching and self-adhesive cement (p=0.001). The self-etching resin cement Panavia F obtained a higher μTBS than the self-adhesive cement Relyx U-100. The predominant failure mode of the cements was adhesive/mixed between the resin cement and dentin. A new bioactive glass containing niobium did not interfere with the immediate bonding performance of self-etching and self-adhesive cements. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of different luting protocols on shear bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing resin nanoceramic material to dentin

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    Claudio Poggio

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, conventional resin cements (coupled with etch and rinse or self-etch adhesives showed better shear strength values compared to self-adhesive resin cements. Furthermore, conventional resin cements used together with a self-etch adhesive reported the highest values of adhesion.

  10. Assessment of Tensile Bond Strength of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Resin to Enamel Using Two Types of Resin Cements and Three Surface Treatment Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Ghaffari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resin-bonded bridgework with a metal framework is one of the most conservative ways to replace a tooth with intact abutments. Visibility of metal substructure and debonding are the complications of these bridgeworks. Today, with the introduction of fiber-reinforced composite resins, it is possible to overcome these complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite resin materials (FRC to enamel. Methods: Seventy-two labial cross-sections were prepared from intact extracted teeth. Seventy-two rectangular samples of cured Vectris were prepared and their thickness was increased by adding Targis. The samples were divided into 3 groups for three different surface treatments: sandblasting, etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid, and roughening with a round tapered diamond bur. Each group was then divided into two subgroups for bonding to etched enamel by Enforce and Variolink II resin cements. Instron universal testing machine was used to apply a tensile force. The fracture force was recorded and the mode of failure was identified under a reflective microscope. Results: There were no significant differences in bond strength between the three surface treatment groups (P=0.53. The mean bond strength of Variolink II cement was greater than that of Enforce (P=0.04. There was no relationship between the failure modes (cohesive and adhesive and the two cement types. There was some association between surface treatment and failure mode. There were adhesive failures in sandblasted and diamond-roughened groups and the cohesive failure was dominant in the etched group. Conclusion: It is recommended that restorations made of fiber-reinforced composite resin be cemented with VariolinkII and surface-treated by hydrofluoric acid.   Keywords: Tensile bond strength; surface treatment methods; fiber-reinforced composite resin

  11. Effect of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of two resin cements to aged simulated composite core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Behnaz; Alaghehmand, Homayoon; Shakerian, Mohadese

    2015-01-01

    Roughening of the aged composite resin core (CRC) surface seems essential for durable adhesion. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of various surface treatments and different resin cements on microtensile bond strength (µ TBS) between two aged core build-up composites (CBCs) and feldspathic ceramic. A total of 16 composite blocks made of two CBCs, Core.it and Build-it were randomly assigned to four surface treatment groups after water storage and thermocycling (2 weeks and 500 cycles). Experimental groups included surface roughening with air abrasion (AA), hydrofluoric acid, pumice, and laser and then were bonded to computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic ceramic blocks using two resin cements, Panavia F2 (PF), and Duo-link (DL). The µ TBS was tested, and the fracture mode was assessed. The data were analyzed with multiple analysis of variance to estimate the contribution of different surface treatments, resin cements, and two aged CRCs on µ TBS. Statistical significance level was set at α strength (P strength was in AA group cemented with PF (31.83 MPa). The most common failure mode was cohesive fracture in the cement. Different surface treatments had different effects on µ TBS of aged CRCs to feldspathic ceramics. PF was significantly better than DL.

  12. In vitro evaluation of the Long-term bond strength of two resin cements to enamel and dentin

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    Zahra Jaberi Ansari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims : In this in vitro study, the long-term bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement and conventional resin cements to human enamel and dentin was compared .   Materials and Methods: 80 sections of intact human third molars were randomly assigned into eight groups according to the cement type [Rely X Unicem (RXU, Rely X ARC (RXA], bond substrate (enamel, dentin and the duration of water storage (24 h or 1 year. Rods of cements (0.75×1 mm were prepared on the top surface of specimens using Tygon tubes. The micro-shear bond strengths of specimens were measured by a micro-tensile tester. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed ranks and Mann Whitney tests ( α =0.05.   Results: The bond strengths of RXA and RXU cements to enamel after 24h were 18.56±4.08 MPa and 14.99±4.17 MPa, and after 1 year were 19.41±6.24 MPa and 15.51±6.17 MPa, respectively. The bond strengths of RXA and RXU cements to dentin were 13.36±4.02 MPa and 14.16±4.69 MPa after 24h , and 14.63±5.96 MPa and 14.08±6.72 MPa after 1 year, respectively. Tooth substrate had significant effect only on the shear bond strength of RXA cement after 24h (P=0.01, while no other significant differences were found in this study (P>0.05.   Conclusion: According to the results of this study, one-step self-adhesive and multi-step conventional resin cements were similarly effective in bonding to enamel and dentin after 1 year water storage.

  13. The Effect of Lithium Disilicate Ceramic Thickness and Translucency on Shear Bond Strength of Light-cured Resin Cement

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    Mohammad Javad Moghaddas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To achieve acceptable clinical performance, a ceramic veneer must be bonded to enamel by well-polymerized resin cement. Among different factors, thickness and translucency of the ceramic may affect the resin cement polymerization. Thus, the current study evaluated the effect of the thickness and translucency of lithium disilicate ceramic on light-cured resin cement bond strength to enamel. Methods: In this laboratory study, 208 sound bovine incisors were equally divided into 16 groups (n = 13. The lithium disilicate ceramic cubes in four thicknesses (0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1 mm with four translucencies (high and medium opaque, high and low translucent were fabricated and bonded to prepared enamel surfaces using a light-cured translucent resin cement according to manufacturer recommendations. After 5000 cycles of thermocycling, the bonded specimens were placed in a universal testing machine and loaded to the point of fracture. To determine the mode of failure, each sample was observed under a stereomicroscope. Data were recorded and analyzed by Shapiro-Wilk test and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: The ceramic thickness and translucency could not significantly affect shear bond strength (SBS of resin cement to enamel (p = 0.17 and p = 0.097, respectively.  The Adhesive and ceramic cohesive failures were reported as the maximum and minimum mode of failure, respectively. Conclusion: The SBS of the light-cured resin cement bonding to enamel and lithium disilicate ceramic was not affected by the translucency of ceramics having a thickness of less than 1 mm.

  14. Evaluation of the esthetic effect of resin cements and try-in pastes on ceromer veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wenzhong; Jiang, Tao; Ma, Xiao; Liang, Shanshan; Wang, Zhejun; Sa, Yue; Wang, Yining

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of various shades of resin cements on the final color of ceromer veneers and analyse the agreement of resin cements and corresponding try-in pastes. Ceromer disks (Ceramage, 1.0mm×10mm diameter) were bonded to resin background disks (3.0mm×10mm diameter) using five shades of resin cements (RelyX Veneer), whilst butylphthalate was placed between ceromer and resin background as the control group (n=5). The corresponding try-in pastes were placed between ceromer and resin background disks using the specimens of the control group. After colorimetric evaluations, the thickness of ceromer disks was reduced to 0.8 and 0.5mm. Color measurements were repeated at each thickness. To analyse masking ability of the cement, resin background disks with 0.1mm thick cement layer were fabricated using five shades of resin cements (n=5). Two-way ANOVA of ΔE values of cement shades and control group revealed significant differences in cement shade and thickness, and their interaction (presin cements created perceptible color differences (ΔE>2.0) in 0.5mm thick specimens and WO shade in 0.8mm thick specimens. There were no perceptible color differences between resin cements and corresponding try-in pastes. The effect of resin cements on the final color of ceromer veneers depended on cement shades and thickness of ceromer. The color of resin cements and corresponding try-in pastes achieved high agreement. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of different surface treatments on bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kömürcüoğlu, Meltem Bektaş; Sağırkaya, Elçin; Tulga, Ayça

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of different surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement by four point bending test. The CAD/CAM materials under investigation were e.max CAD, Mark II, Lava Ultimate, and Enamic. A total of 400 bar specimens (4×1.2×12 mm) (n=10) milled from the CAD/CAM blocks underwent various pretreatments (no pretreatment (C), hydrofluoric acid (A), hydrofluoric acid + universal adhesive (Scotchbond) (AS), sandblasting (Sb), and sandblasting + universal adhesive (SbS)). The bars were luted end-to-end on the prepared surfaces with a dual curing adhesive resin cement (Variolink N, Ivoclar Vivadent) on the custom-made stainless steel mold. Ten test specimens for each treatment and material combination were performed with four point bending test method. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. The surface treatment and type of CAD/CAM restorative material showed a significant effect on the four point bending strength (FPBS) ( P CAD/CAM restorative materials was modified after treatments. The surface treatment of sandblasting or HF acid etching in combination with a universal adhesive containing MDP can be suggested for the adhesive cementation of the novel CAD/CAM restorative materials.

  16. Shear bond strength of a self‑etched resin cement to an indirect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-15

    Nov 15, 2014 ... Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice • May-Jun 2015• Vol 18 • Issue 3. Abstract ... Key words: Composite resins, dental bonding, resin cements, surface properties ... etching effect of Er, Cr: YSGG laser on indirect composite.

  17. ADHESIVE SYSTEM AFFECTS REPAIR BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür IRMAK

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study evaluated the effects of different adhesive systems on repair bond strength of aged resin composites. Materials and Methods: Ninety composite discs were built and half of them were subjected to thermal aging. Aged and non-aged specimens were repaired with resin composite using three different adhesive systems; a two-step self-etch adhesive, a two-step total-etch adhesive and a one-step self-etch adhesive; then they were subjected to shear forces. Data were analyzed statistically. Results: Adhesive type and aging significantly affected the repair bond strengths (p<0.0001. No statistical difference was found in aged composite groups repaired with two-step self- etch or two-step total-etch adhesive. One-step self-etch adhesive showed lower bond strength values in aged composite repair (p<0.0001. Conclusion: In the repair of aged resin composite, two-step self-etch and two-step total-etch adhesives exhibited higher shear bond strength values than that of one-step self-etch adhesive.

  18. Bond durability of self-adhesive composite cements to dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Yuji; de Munck, Jan; Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; Yamada, Toshimoto; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2013-10-01

    Clinically, the most easy-to-use composite cements are the so-called self-adhesive composite cements (SAC's). Hardly any data is however today available on the long-term bonding effectiveness of such luting composites. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond durability of different composite cements used to lute feldspathic ceramic blocks onto dentine. Four SAC's (Clearfil SA Cement, Kuraray; G-CEM, GC; SmartCem2, Dentsply; Unicem 3M ESPE), one 'self-etch' (Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Kuraray) and one 'etch-and-rinse' (Variolink ll, Ivoclar-Vivadent) multi-step composite cement were used to lute feldspathic ceramic blocks (Vita Mark II, Vita) onto dentine surfaces. Teeth were distributed randomly in 24 experimental groups according to two different surface-preparation techniques ('SMEAR-COVERED' versus 'SMEAR-FREE') and storage conditions ('IMMEDIATE' versus 'AGED'). Failure patterns were evaluated with a stereomicroscope, and afterwards imaged using Feg-SEM. Two additional specimens were processed for cement-dentine interfacial analysis using TEM. A linear mixed effects statistical model revealed significant differences for the variables 'composite cement', 'surface preparation' and 'ageing'. All self-adhesive composite cements, except Unicem (3M ESPE), did bond less favourably to fractured dentine. TEM revealed an ultra-structurally different interaction of the composite cements with 'SMEAR-COVERED' and 'SMEAR-FREE' dentine. All SAC's suffered most when luted to 'SMEAR-FREE' (fractured) dentine, fortunately of no clinical relevance and most likely due to enhanced water sorption through the open tubules. When luted to 'SMEAR-COVERED' dentine, all SACs appeared equally effective and durable as the 'etch-and-rinse' and 'self-etch' multi-step composite cements. Solely the SAC SmartCem2 (Dentsply) appeared clearly less favourable and consistent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Bond strength of fiber post adhesion inside the root canal after using different irrigation protocols and adhesive luting cements in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Aschendorff, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to investigate the effects of three different irrigation protocols as a final rinse of the root canal on push-out bond strengths and durability of adhesion of fiber posts. The posts were inserted and luted pursuing two different adhesive strategies. Materials and methods: 120 human maxillary anterior teeth were endodontically treated. The teeth were divided into two groups: 1) self-adhesive resin cement (RX; n = 60) and 2) dual curing luting agent with an etch-and-r...

  20. Effect of different laser surface treatment on microshear bond strength between zirconia ceramic and resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan Zanjani, Vagharaldin; Ahmadi, Hadi; Nateghifard, Afshin; Ghasemi, Amir; Torabzadeh, Hassan; Abdoh Tabrizi, Maryam; Alikhani, Farnaz; Razi, Reza; Nateghifard, Ardalan

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of sandblasting, carbon dioxide (CO₂), and erbium,chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) lasers on the microshear bond strength of zirconia to resin cement. Sixty-one sintered yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia blocks (10 × 5 × 2 mm) were prepared and divided into four experimental groups (n = 15); one sample was retained as a control. The samples were treated by aluminium oxide air abrasion, CO₂4W, Er,Cr:YSGG 3W, and Er,Cr:YSGG 2W, respectively. One sample from each group and the control sample were analyzed by scanning electron microscope. Panavia F2.0 resin microcylinders were prepared and placed on treated surfaces, light cured, and incubated for 48 h. Microshear bond strength testing was done by a microtensile tester machine, and the type of bond failures were determined by stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by one-way anova and Tukey's test at a significance level of P laser showed significantly higher bond strength than Er,Cr:YSGG 2W (P laser-treated surfaces, the roughness was much less than the air abrasion-treated surfaces, and the mode of failure was almost pure adhesive. Air abrasion has a greater effect than CO₂and Er,Cr:YSGG lasers in the treatment of zirconia ceramic surfaces to enhance the bonding strength of resin cement to zirconia. CO₂laser at 4W and Er,Cr:YSGG laser at only 3-W output power can be regarded as surface treatment options for roughening the zirconia surface to establish better bond strength with resin cements. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. The effects of non-thermal plasma and conventional treatments on the bond strength of fiber posts to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Prado, Maíra; da Silva, Eduardo Moreira; Marques, Juliana das Neves; Gonzalez, Caroline Brum; Simão, Renata Antoun

    2017-05-01

    This study compared the effect of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and ammonia (NH3) plasmas on the bond strength of resin cement to fiber posts with conventional treatments. Sixty-five fiber posts were divided into 5 groups: Control (no surface treatment); H2O2 (24% hydrogen peroxide for 1 min); Blasting (blasting with aluminum oxide for 30 sec); NH3 (NH3 plasma treatment for 3 min); HMDSO (HMDSO plasma treatment for 15 min). After the treatments, the Ambar adhesive (FGM Dental Products) was applied to the post surface (n = 10). The fiber post was inserted into a silicon matrix that was filled with the conventional resin cement Allcem Core (FGM). Afterwards, the post/cement specimens were cut into discs and subjected to a push-out bond strength (POBS) test. Additionally, 3 posts in each group were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The POBS data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and the Tukey's honest significant difference post hoc test (α = 0.05). The Blasting and NH3 groups showed the highest POBS values. The HMDSO group showed intermediate POBS values, whereas the Control and H2O2 groups showed the lowest POBS values. Blasting and NH3 plasma treatments were associated with stronger bonding of the conventional resin cement Allcem to fiber posts, in a procedure in which the Ambar adhesive was used.

  2. Restoration of Strip Crown with a Resin-Bonded Composite Cement in Early Childhood Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Mi-ae; Kim, Ah-hyeon; Shim, Youn-soo; An, So-youn

    2013-01-01

    Background. Early childhood caries is a widely prevalent disease throughout the world. It is necessary to treat this condition in early childhood; however, child behavior management may be particularly challenging during treatment. To overcome this challenge, we used Carigel to remove caries and RelyX Unicem resin cement for strip crown restoration. It not only has the desired aesthetic effect but is also more effective for primary teeth, which are used for a shorter period than permanent teeth are. Case Presentation. We report a case of three pediatric patients with early childhood caries, in whom caries was removed by using Carigel to avoid the risk of pulpal exposure associated with high-speed handpieces. Subsequently, aesthetic restoration was performed using strip crown with RelyX Unicem self-adhesive resin cement. Conclusion. RelyX Unicem has the following advantages: (1) not requiring have any special skills for the dentist for performing the procedure, (2) decreased occurrence of bubbles during injection of the cement, and (3) overall short duration of the procedure. Thus, it is appropriate for the treatment of pediatric patients whose behavior is difficult to manage. However, further studies are required in order to establish the use of RelyX Unicem as a stable restorative material in early childhood caries. PMID:24490090

  3. Favorable residual stress induction by resin-cementation on dental porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Garry J P; Cao, Xu; Romanyk, Dan L; Addison, Owen

    2017-11-01

    Despite developments in polycrystalline ceramics, glassy dental-ceramic materials provide the optimum cosmetic option in most clinical situations to mimic the natural dentition. The clinical success of glassy dental-ceramic materials is often attributed to resin-adhesive bonding techniques. In this study we explore whether shrinkage stresses generated on photo-polymerisation of the resin-cement are sufficient to induce ceramic surface defect stabilization, and we quantify the transient nature of the induced stresses. Stress-induced changes in a feldspathic ceramic over a range of thicknesses (0.5-2.0mm: n=20 per thickness) were measured using a profilometric technique at baseline for each disc-shaped specimen (mean of the maximum deflection (δbaseline)) and again following polymerisation of a controlled resin-cement thickness on the contra-lateral surface. Measurements were repeated at 30, 60, 90 and 1440min following photo-polymerization (δ30, δ60, δ90 and δ1440, respectively) before bi-axial flexure strength (BFS) determination at 24h. A repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc Bonferroni tests determined that δ1440 was significantly different from δbaseline (p=0.02), δ30 (pporcelain has clearly been established. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Restoration of non-carious cervical lesions with ceramic inlays: A possible model for clinical testing of adhesive cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Staninec

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are many luting cements coming to market which claim to be adhesive, but there is no clinical protocol currently for testing these claims. There is a standardized protocol for testing direct restorations bonded to dentin and it is used extensively. Case Report: We describe a clinical procedure for restoring a non-carious cervical lesion (NCCL with a ceramic inlay using Computer-Aided Design and Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAD-CAM technology and an adhesive resin cement.The procedure was straightforward and the result was good at one month. Discussion: NCCL′s can be restored with CAD-CAM technology in one appointment. This technique can be used to clinically test adhesion of luting cements to dentin, similarly to the current standard for direct restorations.

  5. Effect of Self-etching Adhesives on the Bond Strength of Glass-Ionomer Cements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jaberi Ansari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Adequate bond strength between glass ionomer cements and composite resin is necessary for the success of the sandwich technique.This study assessed the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin to glass-ionomer cements (GIC using self-etch adhesives with different pH values.One hundred specimens (6×4×2 mm were made using Fuji II and Fuji II LC GICs and treated with different adhesives as follows: Group 1:Fuji II+ Adper Prompt L-Pop, Group-2: Fuji II+SE bond, Group-3: Fuji II + AdheSE, Group-4:Fuji II+ Protect bond, Group-5: Fuji II + Single bond, Group-6:Fuji II LC+ Adper Prompt LPop, Group-7: Fuji II LC+SE bond, Group-8:Fuji II LC+ AdheSE, Group-9: Fuji II LC+ Protect bond, and Group-10: Fuji II LC+ Single bond. Each group consisted of 10 specimens. A cylinder of Z100 composite resin was placed on each sample and light cured. After 24 hours of water storage (37°C, the specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength tests (0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test.The mean micro-shear bond strength of groups 1-10 was 11.66±1.79, 16.50±1.85, 18.47±1.77, 13.95±1.77, 15.27±1.49, 15.14±0.90, 20.03±1.19, 17.48±3.00, 16.24±1.98 and 16.03±1.49 MPa, respectively. There were significant differences between groups 1 and 7 (P0.05. Fuji II LC showed higher bond strength than Fuji II (P<0.05.Type of self-etch adhesive had no significant effect on micro-shear bond strength of glass-ionomer to composite resin. Resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC exhibited higher bond strength than the conventional GIC.

  6. Bond strength between zirconium ceramic and dual resinous cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Galan Junior

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the influence of different surface treatments on the bond strength between the resinous cement Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan and the structure of In-Ceram YZ (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany. Methods: Fifteen ceramic blocks were assessed: Group 1, finishing with abrasive paper; Group 2, finishing, airborne Al2O3 particle abrasion and silanization; Group 3, finishing, airborne particle abrasion, silicatization and silanization. After treatment, the blocks received cementation of resin composite cylinders with Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan and were submitted to the shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine. Results: The results were statistically analyzed (ANOVA and multiple comparison Student-Newman-Keuls test: Group 1 (9.66 ± 1.67 MPa < Group 2 (16.61 ± 3.38 MPa = Group 3 (19.23 ± 5.69 MPa, with p = 0.007. Conclusion: The structures of the In-Ceram YZ system (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany associated with Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan require previous etching to achieve greater bond strength between the ceramic and cement, and this treatment may be performed with airborne particle abrasion I or traditional silicatization, both followed by silanization.

  7. Influence of atmospheric pressure low-temperature plasma treatment on the shear bond strength between zirconia and resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuki; Okawa, Takahisa; Fukumoto, Takahiro; Tsurumi, Akiko; Tatsuta, Mitsuhiro; Fujii, Takamasa; Tanaka, Junko; Tanaka, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    Zirconia exhibits excellent strength and high biocompatibility in technological applications and it is has therefore been investigated for clinical applications and research. Before setting prostheses, a crown prosthesis inner surface is sandblasted with alumina to remove contaminants and form small cavities. This alumina sandblasting causes stress-induced phase transition of zirconia. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma has been applied in the dental industry, particularly for adhesives, as a surface treatment to activate the surface energy and remove contaminants. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment on the shear bond strength between zirconia and adhesive resin cement. The surface treatment method was classified into three groups: untreated (Cont group), alumina sandblast treatment (Sb group), and atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment (Ps group). Adhesive resin cement was applied to stainless steel and bonded to zirconia. Shear adhesion tests were performed after complete hardening of the cement. Multiple comparisons were performed using a one-way analysis of variance and the Bonferroni method. X-ray diffractometry was used to examine the change in zirconia crystal structure. Statistically significant differences were noted between the control and Sb groups and between the control and Ps groups. In contrast, no statistically significant differences were noted for the Ps and Sb bond strength. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment did not affect the zirconia crystal structure. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment improves the bonding strength of adhesive resin cement as effectively as alumina sandblasting, and does not alter the zirconia crystal structure. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of antioxidants on push-out bond strength of hydrogen peroxide treated glass fiber posts bonded with two types of resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Mazaheri, Hamid; Tarighi, Pardis; Samimi, Pouran; Khalighinejad, Navid

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) surface treatment of fiber posts has been reported to increase bond strength of fiber posts to resin cements. However, residual oxygen radicals might jeopardize the bonding procedure. This study examined the effect of three antioxidant agents on the bond strength of fiber posts to conventional and self-adhesive resin cements. Post spaces were prepared in forty human maxillary second premolars. Posts were divided into five groups of 8 each: G1 (control), no pre-treatment; G2, 10% H2O2 pre-treatment; G3, G4 and G5. After H2O2 application, Hesperidin (HES), Sodium Ascorbate (SA) or Rosmarinic acid (RA) was applied on each group respectively. In each group four posts were cemented with Duo-Link conventional resin cement and the others with self-adhesive BisCem cement. Push-out test was performed and data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05). There was a statistically significant interaction between the cement type and post surface treatment on push-out bond strength of fiber posts (p posts' surface treatments significantly affect the push-out bond strength of fiber posts (p = 0.001). H2O2 treated posts (G2) and control posts (G1) cemented with Duo-link showed the highest (15.96 ± 5.07MPa) and lowest bond strengths (6.79 ± 3.94) respectively. It was concluded that H2O2 surface treatment might enhance the bond strength of fiber posts cemented with conventional resin cements. The effect of antioxidants as post's surface treatment agents depends on the characteristics of resin cements used for bonding procedure.

  9. Effect of antioxidants on push-out bond strength of hydrogen peroxide treated glass fiber posts bonded with two types of resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 surface treatment of fiber posts has been reported to increase bond strength of fiber posts to resin cements. However, residual oxygen radicals might jeopardize the bonding procedure. This study examined the effect of three antioxidant agents on the bond strength of fiber posts to conventional and self-adhesive resin cements. Materials and Methods Post spaces were prepared in forty human maxillary second premolars. Posts were divided into five groups of 8 each: G1 (control, no pre-treatment; G2, 10% H2O2 pre-treatment; G3, G4 and G5. After H2O2 application, Hesperidin (HES, Sodium Ascorbate (SA or Rosmarinic acid (RA was applied on each group respectively. In each group four posts were cemented with Duo-Link conventional resin cement and the others with self-adhesive BisCem cement. Push-out test was performed and data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05. Results There was a statistically significant interaction between the cement type and post surface treatment on push-out bond strength of fiber posts (p < 0.001, F = 16. Also it was shown that different posts' surface treatments significantly affect the push-out bond strength of fiber posts (p = 0.001. H2O2 treated posts (G2 and control posts (G1 cemented with Duo-link showed the highest (15.96 ± 5.07MPa and lowest bond strengths (6.79 ± 3.94 respectively. Conclusions It was concluded that H2O2 surface treatment might enhance the bond strength of fiber posts cemented with conventional resin cements. The effect of antioxidants as post's surface treatment agents depends on the characteristics of resin cements used for bonding procedure.

  10. Deformation of a dental ceramic following adhesive cementation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2010-01-01

    Stress-induced changes imparted in a \\'dentin-bonded-crown\\' material during sintering, annealing, pre-cementation surface modification, and resin coating have been visualized by profilometry. The hypothesis tested was that operative techniques modify the stressing pattern throughout the material thickness. We polished the upper surfaces of 10 ceramic discs to remove surface imperfections before using a contact profilometer (40-nm resolution) to measure the \\'flatness\\'. Discs were re-profiled after annealing and after alumina particle air-abrasion and resin-coating of the \\'fit\\' surface. Polished surfaces were convex, with a mean deflection of 8.4 + or - 1.5 microm. Mean deflection was significantly reduced (P = 0.029) following alumina particle air-abrasion and increased (P < 0.001) on resin-coating. Polishing induced a tensile stress state, resulting in surface convexity. Alumina particle air-abrasion reduced the relative tensile stress state of the contralateral polished surface. Resin-polymerization generated compression within the resin-ceramic \\'hybrid layer\\' and tension in the polished surface and is likely to contribute to the strengthening of ceramics by resin-based cements.

  11. Evaluation of the bond strength of resin cements used to lute ceramics on laser-etched dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giray, Figen Eren; Duzdar, Lale; Oksuz, Mustafa; Tanboga, Ilknur

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of two different adhesive resin cements used to lute ceramics on laser-etched dentin. Erbium, chromium: yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser irradiation has been claimed to improve the adhesive properties of dentin, but results to date have been controversial, and its compatibility with existing adhesive resin cements has not been conclusively determined. Two adhesive cements, one "etch-and-rinse" [Variolink II (V)] and one "self-etch" [Clearfil Esthetic Cement (C)] luting cement, were used to lute ceramic blocks (Vita Celay Blanks, Vita) onto dentin surfaces. In total, 80 dentin specimens were distributed randomly into eight experimental groups according to the dentin surface-etching technique used Er,Cr:YSGG laser and Er:YAG laser: (1) 37% orthophosphoric acid+V (control group), (2) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+V, (3) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+acid+V, (4) Er:YAG laser+V, (5) Er:YAG laser+acid+V, (6) C, (7) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+C, and (8) Er:YAG laser+C. Following these applications, the ceramic discs were bonded to prepared surfaces and were shear loaded in a universal testing machine until fracture. SBS was recorded for each group in MPa. Shear test values were evaluated statistically using the Mann-Whitney U test. No statistically significant differences were evident between the control group and the other groups (p>0.05). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser+A+V group demonstrated significantly higher SBS than did the Er,Cr:YSGG laser+V group (p=0.034). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser+C and Er:YAG laser+C groups demonstrated significantly lower SBS than did the C group (padhesive cement used.

  12. Adhesive properties and kinetic polymerization behavior of resins containing adhesion promoting monomers for precious metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoma, Yoshinori

    2005-09-01

    Adhesion promoting monomers -5-(4-vinylbenzyl)-2-thiobarbituric acid (5VS), 9,10-epithiodecyl methacrylate (EP8MA), 9,10-epithiodecyl 4-vinylbenzoate (EP8VB), and 3,4-epithiobutyl 2,2-bis(methacryloyloxymethyl)propionate (EP2BMA)--were added to the MMA liquid of a MMA-PMMA/TBBO resin. Three dental precious metal alloys were butt-jointed together with the MMA-PMMA/TBBO adhesive resin, and tensile bond strength was measured after 2,000 thermocycles in water. Polymerization kinetics of MMA by 2,2'-azobis (isobutyronitrile) at 70 degrees C in the presence of 5VS, EP8MA, EP8VB, or EP2BMA were examined quantitatively using a DSC to clarify the relationship between the adhesive properties of MMA-PMMA/TBBO adhesive resin and the kinetic polymerization behavior thereof. Obtained kinetic parameters indicated that 5VS was not suitable as an adhesive monomer for adhesive resin formulations and that EP2BMA possessed the latent potential as an adhesive monomer. Further, tensile test results revealed the applicability of EP8MA, EP8VB, and EP2BMA as an adhesive monomer component of adhesive resin formulations.

  13. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Roots Restored with Fiber Posts Using Different Resin Cements- An In-vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Swetha; Irodi, Sujatha; Mehta, Deepak; Subramanya, Shankar; Govindaraju, Vinay Kumar

    2017-02-01

    The influence of the remaining coronal tooth structure along with intra-radicular esthetic posts increases fracture resistance of fractured teeth especially in the anterior region. The advent of resin based luting cements improves the adhesion of fiber posts. To evaluate the fracture resistance of endodontically treated roots restored with fiber posts using different resin cements - Calibra (etch and rinse), PermaFlo® DC (self-etch primer) and SmartCem2 (self-adhesive). Extracted human maxillary central incisors having similar dimensions were decoronated at the Cemento-Enamel Junction (CEJ) to create 16mm long specimens and endodontically treated. A total of 45 teeth were divided into three groups with 15 teeth each for cementation of easy fiber posts (size1, 0.8mm diameter). Post spaces were prepared to a depth of 10mm. Group 1 - Caulk 34% phosphoric acid gel, dual cure adhesive Prime and Bond NT followed by luting of post with Calibra cement. Group 2 - Ultra - etch then Primer A and Primer B, and PermaFlo® DC was used to cement the post. Group 3 - SmartCem2 [1:1 ratio] was used to cement the post. The excess lengths of posts were seared and teeth were mounted on acrylic blocks and loaded under compressive force to the long axis of the tooth which increased in periodic pattern of 1mm/min. The value of the force at which each root section gets fractured was noted. The data were statistically analysed using ANOVA and Tukey's Test. The mean fracture load (and SD) were as follows Group 1 - 762.400 (251.490); Group 2 - 662.933 (206.709); Group 3 - 657.800 (57.372). No statistically significant differences were seen among all three Groups, p-value (0.228). Posts cemented using self -adhesive resin cement SmartCem2 have highest fracture resistance and bonding efficacy of self-adhesive technique showed reliably better results but was comparable to total-etch and self-etch techniques.

  14. Surface roughness and wear of resin cements after toothbrush abrasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Kiyoshi ISHIKIRIAMA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased surface roughness and wear of resin cements may cause failure of indirect restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the surface roughness change and the vertical wear of four resin cements subjected to mechanical toothbrushing abrasion. Ten rectangular specimens (15 × 5 × 4 mm were fabricated according to manufacturer instructions for each group (n = 10: Nexus 3, Kerr (NX3; RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE (ARC; RelyX U100, 3M ESPE (U100; and Variolink II, Ivoclar/Vivadent (VL2. Initial roughness (Ra, µm was obtained through 5 readings with a roughness meter. Specimens were then subjected to toothbrushing abrasion (100,000 cycles, and further evaluation was conducted for final roughness. Vertical wear (µm was quantified by 3 readings of the real profile between control and brushed surfaces. Data were subjected to analysis of variance, followed by Tukey’s test (p < 0.05. The Pearson correlation test was performed between the surface roughness change and wear (p < 0.05. The mean values of initial/final roughness (Ra, µm/wear (µm were as follows: NX3 (0.078/0.127/23.175; ARC (0.086/0.246/20.263; U100 (0.296/0.589/16.952; and VL2 (0.313/0.512/22.876. Toothbrushing abrasion increased surface roughness and wear of all resin cements tested, although no correlation was found between those variables. Vertical wear was similar among groups; however, it was considered high and may lead to gap formation in indirect restorations.

  15. Comparison of two test designs for evaluating the shear bond strength of resin composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, M; Weiger, R; Fischer, J

    2016-02-01

    To compare a shear bond strength test for resin composite cements developed in order to better consider the shrinkage stress (here termed "Swiss shear test") with the shear test design according to ISO 29022. Four restorative materials (VITA Enamic (VE), VITA Suprinity (VS), Vitablocs Mark II (VM) and VITA YZ T (YZ)) served as substrate. VE, VS and VM were polished or etched. YZ was polished, sandblasted or etched. Specimens were either bonded according to the Swiss or the ISO shear test. RelyX Unicem 2 Automix, Maxcem Elite and PermaFlo DC were used as cements. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured. Failure modes (adhesive, cohesive or mixed) were evaluated by means of SEM. Mean SBS values obtained with the Swiss shear test were significantly lower than those obtained with the ISO shear test. VE and VM exhibited similar SBS, values of VS were significantly higher. On etched surfaces VM and VE exhibited primarily cohesive failures, VS primarily adhesive failures. On polished substrates significantly lower bond strength values and exclusively adhesive failures were observed. YZ exhibited solely adhesive failures. Compared to polished YZ, SBS significantly increased after sandblasting and even more after etching. Only for adhesively failed specimens mean SBS values of Swiss and ISO shear test were strongly correlated. Both test designs showed the same ranking of test results. When adhesive failure occurred test results were strongly correlated. When cohesive failure was involved, both test designs did not provide reliable results. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tensile bond strength between different glass ionomer cement and composite resin using three adhesive systems Avaliação da resistência de união interfacial entre diferentes cimentos de ionômero de vidro e resina composta, usando três sistemas adesivos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Dias

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tensile bond strength (TBS among a Composite Resin (Filtek Z250 and six conventional Glass Ionomer Cements, three used for lining (Bioglass F, Vidrion F and Glass Ionomer L.C. and three for restorations (Ketac Fil, Vidrion R and Glass Ionomer type II etched and non etched, using three adhesive systems (Single Bond, Bond 1 and Stae. Thirty-six groups were made, ten samples for each group, totalizing 360 specimens. There were significant differences on TBS among groups. Group 31 (Glass Ionomer Cement type II showed the highest TBS (9.65 MPa in comparison to other tested groups. Group 16 (Glass Ionomer L.C presented the lowest TBS (2.72 MPa in comparison to all the other groups. Therefore, it can be concluded that the acid etching of the Glass Ionomer Cement is not necessary. Foi avaliada, ">in vitro, a resistência de união, por tração, entre uma Resina Composta micro-híbrida (Filtek Z-250 e seis Cimentos de Ionômero de Vidro (CIV convencionais: três utilizados para base/forramento (Bioglass F, Vidrion F e Glass Ionomer Lining Cement e três para restauração (Ketac Fil, Vidrion R e Glass Ionomer Cement type II, sem e com condicionamento ácido ortofosfórico a 37%, usando três sistemas adesivos (Single Bond, Bond 1 e Stae. Foram confeccionados 36 grupos de 10 corpos-de-prova cada, totalizando 360 espécimes. Para análise estatística, foi utilizado o teste de Tukey-Kramer. Dentre os três CIV de base/forramento, os grupos 2 e 5 (Bioglass F apresentaram valores mais altos de adesividade à resina (7,24 e 6,03 MPa respectivamente. Quanto aos três CIV de restauração, todos apresentaram maior resistência de união, superior aos de base/forramento, sendo que o Glass Ionomer Cement type II (Grupo 31 e Vidrion R apresentaram maior força de adesão (9,65 e 7,47 MPa à resina composta. O grupo 16 (Glass Ionomer L.C. mostrou menor adesividade à resina (2,72 MPa. Houve diferenças significantes

  17. Comparison of the Amount of Fluoride Release from Nanofilled Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Conventional and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumitha Upadhyay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate and compare the amount of fluoride release of conventional, resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cements.Materials and Methods: Tablets of glass-ionomer cements were immersed in deionized water and incubated at 37◦C. After 1, 2, 7, 15 and 30 days, fluoride ion was measured under normal atmospheric conditions by fluoride ion selective electrode. Buffer (TISAB II was used to decomplex the fluoride ion and to provide a constant background ionic strength and to maintain the pH of water between 5.0 and 5.5 as the fluoride electrode is sensitive to changes in pH. Statistical evaluation was carried out by one way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance using SPSS 11.0. The significance level was set at p< 0.05.Results: The release of fluoride was highest on day 1 and there was a sudden fall on day 2 in all three groups. Initially fluoride release from conven-tional glass-ionomer cement was highest compared to the other two glass-ionomer cements, but the amount drastically reduced over the period. Although the amount of fluoride release was less than both the resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass-ionomer cement, the release was sustained consistently for 30 daysConclusion: The cumulative fluoride release of nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement was very less compared to the conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements and Nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement released less but steady fluoride as compared to other resin modified glass ionomer cements.

  18. Effect of Self-etching Adhesives on the Bond Strength of Glass-Ionomer Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaberi Ansari, Zahra; Panahandeh, Narges; Tabatabaei Shafiei, Zahra Sadat; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza

    2014-11-01

    Adequate bond strength between glass ionomer cements and composite resin is necessary for the success of the sandwich technique. This study assessed the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin to glass-ionomer cements (GIC) using self-etch adhesives with different pH values. One hundred specimens (6×4×2 mm) were made using Fuji II and Fuji II LC GICs and treated with different adhesives as follows: Group 1:Fuji II+ Adper Prompt L-Pop, Group-2: Fuji II+SE bond, Group-3: Fuji II + AdheSE, Group-4:Fuji II+ Protect bond, Group-5: Fuji II + Single bond, Group-6:Fuji II LC+ Adper Prompt LPop, Group-7: Fuji II LC+SE bond, Group-8:Fuji II LC+ AdheSE, Group-9: Fuji II LC+ Protect bond, and Group-10: Fuji II LC+ Single bond. Each group consisted of 10 specimens. A cylinder of Z100 composite resin was placed on each sample and light cured. After 24 hours of water storage (37°C), the specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength tests (0.5 mm/min). Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. The mean micro-shear bond strength of groups 1-10 was 11.66±1.79, 16.50±1.85, 18.47±1.77, 13.95±1.77, 15.27±1.49, 15.14±0.90, 20.03±1.19, 17.48±3.00, 16.24±1.98 and 16.03±1.49 MPa, respectively. There were significant differences between groups 1 and 7 (P0.05). Fuji II LC showed higher bond strength than Fuji II (Padhesive had no significant effect on micro-shear bond strength of glass-ionomer to composite resin. Resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) exhibited higher bond strength than the conventional GIC.

  19. Microtensile bond strength between adhesive cements and root canal dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Bouillaguet, Serge; Troesch, Sabra; Wataha, John C.; Krejci, Ivo; Meyer, Jean Marc; Pashley, David H

    2003-01-01

    The hypotheses tested were that the bond strength of adhesive cements to root canal dentin (1) would be reduced as a function of configuration factor, polymerization process and type of luting material and (2) would be lowered near the apex of the tooth.

  20. The effects of dentin and intaglio indirect ceramic optimized polymer restoration surface treatment on the shear bond strength of resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitarini, A.; Suprastiwi, E.; Usman, M.

    2017-08-01

    Ceramic optimized polymer (ceromer) bonds to the tooth substrate through resin cements. The bond strength between dentin, resin cement, and ceromer depends on the applied surface treatment. To analyze the effects of dentin and intaglio ceromer surface treatment on the shear bond strength self-adhesive resin cement. Forty-five dentin premolar and ceromer specimens were bonded with resin cement and divided into three groups as follows: in group 1, no treatment was applied; in group 2, dentin surface treatment was carried out with acid etching and a bonding agent; and in group 3, dentin surface treatment was carried out with acid etching, a bonding agent, and intaglio ceromer surface treatment with etching and silane. All specimens were incubated at 37 °C for 24 hours, and the shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. Group 3 showed the highest shear bond strength, followed by group 2. The surface treatment of dentin and intaglio ceromer showed significantly improved shear bond strength in the group comparison. Dentin and intaglio ceromer surface treatment can improved the shear bond strength self-adhesive resin cement.

  1. Effect of intraoral aging on the setting status of resin composite and glass ionomer orthodontic adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliadi, Anna; Baumgartner, Stefan; Athanasiou, Athanasios E; Eliades, Theodore; Eliades, George

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of intraoral aging on the setting status of a resin composite and a glass ionomer adhesive, relative to control specimens stored in water. Metallic brackets were bonded with resin composite orthodontic adhesive (Transbond XT; 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) or a glass ionomer cement (Fuji I; GC, Tokyo, Japan) to recently extracted premolars and kept in water for 6 months. The same materials were also bonded to the premolars of orthodontic patients. After 6 months, the teeth were carefully extracted, with the brackets intact on their buccal surfaces. All teeth were embedded in epoxy resin and sectioned buccolingually. Fourier transform infrared microscopy and Raman microscopy were used for the estimation of the degree of cure in the composite and the salt yield in the glass ionomer adhesives. The control samples of the composite showed significantly lower degrees of cure than did the retrieved specimens (52.40% ± 3.21% vs 57.62% ± 1.32% by Fourier transform infrared microscopy, and 61.40% ± 2.61% vs 67.40% ± 3.44% by Raman microscopy). Raman microscopy significantly overestimated the degree of cure and failed to provide reliable information for the salt yield in the glass ionomer cement. Fourier transform infrared microscopy showed increased, but no statistically significant difference in, aluminum-carboxylate salts in the retrieved specimens. Enhanced oxidation of residual carbon-carbon bonds in the composite and slightly increased dissolution of the weaker calcium-salt phase in the glass ionomer cement were the main differences in the intraorally aged specimens in comparison with the specimens stored in water. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Affordable Resins and Adhesives From Optimized Soybean Varieties (ARA Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Richard WOol; Dr. X. Susan Sun; Rich Chapas

    2004-04-21

    The Mission of the ARA Program was to develop the Corporate Infrastructure to mass-produce new bio-based materials from Soybeans. The resins were integrated with the bio-fuels program. (1) to research, develop, and commercialize low cost adhesives and resins from soy oil and protein, the co-products of the soy bio-diesel process. (2) to study structure-functionality of soy oil and proteins at molecular and genomic levels

  3. Use of dental adhesives as modeler liquid of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münchow, Eliseu Aldrighi; Sedrez-Porto, José Augusto; Piva, Evandro; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Cenci, Maximiliano Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Resin adhesives (RA) have been applied between resin composite (RC) increments, but there is no consensus on the impact of this technique on the properties of the final restoration. This study evaluated the effect of the presence of RA between RC layers on physical properties, translucency and long-term color stability of the restorative material. Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose (bond, 3M ESPE) and Adper™ Single Bond 2 (3M ESPE) were used as RA, and Filtek™ Z350 (3M ESPE) as RC. Specimens containing RA were prepared by applying 3 layers of the adhesive between 4 increments of RC; adhesive-free specimens were also used (control). Tests of water sorption and solubility, mechanical performance (microtensile cohesive strength, flexural strength, and flexural modulus, after immediate and long-term water storage), and translucency and color stability (after immediate and 1, 7, 90, and 180 days of water or wine storage) were performed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images were also taken from the fractured specimens (flexural strength test). Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey test (padhesive resin (SBMP). This study is the first to show positive results from the use of resin adhesives as modeler liquid of resin composite, which is common in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Do conventional glass ionomer cements release more fluoride than resin-modified glass ionomer cements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Maria Fernanda Costa; Martinho, Roberto Luiz de Menezes; Guedes-Neto, Manoel Valcácio; Rebelo, Maria Augusta Bessa; Pontes, Danielson Guedes

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of conventional glass ionomer cements (GICs) and resin-modified GICs. Materials and Methods The cements were grouped as follows: G1 (Vidrion R, SS White), G2 (Vitro Fil, DFL), G3 (Vitro Molar, DFL), G4 (Bioglass R, Biodinâmica), and G5 (Ketac Fil, 3M ESPE), as conventional GICs, and G6 (Vitremer, 3M ESPE), G7 (Vitro Fil LC, DFL), and G8 (Resiglass, Biodinâmica) as resin-modified GICs. Six specimens (8.60 mm in diameter; 1.65 mm in thickness) of each material were prepared using a stainless steel mold. The specimens were immersed in a demineralizing solution (pH 4.3) for 6 hr and a remineralizing solution (pH 7.0) for 18 hr a day. The fluoride ions were measured for 15 days. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test with 5% significance were applied. Results The highest amounts of fluoride release were found during the first 24 hr for all cements, decreasing abruptly on day 2, and reaching gradually decreasing levels on day 7. Based on these results, the decreasing scale of fluoride release was as follows: G2 > G3 > G8 = G4 = G7 > G6 = G1 > G5 (p < 0.05). Conclusions There were wide variations among the materials in terms of the cumulative amount of fluoride ion released, and the amount of fluoride release could not be attributed to the category of cement, that is, conventional GICs or resin-modified GICs. PMID:26295024

  5. Do conventional glass ionomer cements release more fluoride than resin-modified glass ionomer cements?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Costa Cabral

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of conventional glass ionomer cements (GICs and resin-modified GICs. Materials and Methods The cements were grouped as follows: G1 (Vidrion R, SS White, G2 (Vitro Fil, DFL, G3 (Vitro Molar, DFL, G4 (Bioglass R, Biodinâmica, and G5 (Ketac Fil, 3M ESPE, as conventional GICs, and G6 (Vitremer, 3M ESPE, G7 (Vitro Fil LC, DFL, and G8 (Resiglass, Biodinâmica as resin-modified GICs. Six specimens (8.60 mm in diameter; 1.65 mm in thickness of each material were prepared using a stainless steel mold. The specimens were immersed in a demineralizing solution (pH 4.3 for 6 hr and a remineralizing solution (pH 7.0 for 18 hr a day. The fluoride ions were measured for 15 days. Analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey's test with 5% significance were applied. Results The highest amounts of fluoride release were found during the first 24 hr for all cements, decreasing abruptly on day 2, and reaching gradually decreasing levels on day 7. Based on these results, the decreasing scale of fluoride release was as follows: G2 > G3 > G8 = G4 = G7 > G6 = G1 > G5 (p < 0.05. Conclusions There were wide variations among the materials in terms of the cumulative amount of fluoride ion released, and the amount of fluoride release could not be attributed to the category of cement, that is, conventional GICs or resin-modified GICs.

  6. Effect of resin cement type on the microtensile bond strength to lithium disilicate ceramic and dentin using different test assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marocho, Susana María; Ozcan, Mutlu; Amaral, Regina; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluated the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of 3 different resin cements to lithium-disilicate ceramic using two assemblies: ceramic-cement-ceramic (CCC) and ceramic-cement-dentin (CCD). The bonding surfaces of lithium disilicate ceramic blocks (5 × 5 × 4 mm) (Nblock = 90) were etched with 4% hydrofluoric acid for 20 s and silanized. Flat dentin surfaces of human third molars were conditioned according to the respective manufacturer's specifications for three types of resin cements (ML: Multilink, Ivoclar-Vivadent; PF: Panavia F, Kuraray; SB: Super Bond C&B, Sun Medical). While one set of ceramic blocks (n = 30) was cemented to another equal set (CCC assembly), another set of ceramic blocks (n = 30) was cemented on flat dentin (CCD assembly). The bonded specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h, and then sectioned along the x- and y-axes to obtain nontrimmed beam specimens. The beam specimens were randomly divided into two conditions: dry condition (DC - immediate testing); and aging condition (AC - thermocycling 12,000 times + water storage for 150 days). The µTBS bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). After debonding, the substrate and adherent surfaces were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope to categorize the failure types. The data were statistically evaluated using 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). While the mean µTBS of CCC assemblies were significantly influenced by the cement type (p 0.05). Without aging (DC), the mean µTBS (MPa) of SB (26.9) and PF (26.9) were significantly higher than ML (18.5) (p 0.05). In both CCC and CCD assemblies, pre-test failures were the least with SB cement. Regardless of the resin cement type employed and storage conditions, adhesive failures ranged between 35.3% and 88.9%, cohesive failures in cement between 2.3% and 35.3%, and cohesive failures in ceramic between 3.3% and 6.8%. SB resin cement demonstrated the highest bond strength to a

  7. Chemical adhesion rather than mechanical retention enhances resin bond durability of a dental glass-ceramic with leucite crystallites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, X F [Department of Prosthodontics, The Stomatological Hospital Affiliated Medical School, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yoshida, K [Division of Applied Prosthodontics, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8588 (Japan); Gu, N, E-mail: mengsoar@nju.edu.c [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Biomaterials and Devices, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2010-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of chemical adhesion by a silane coupler and mechanical retention by hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching on the bond durability of resin to a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystallites. Half of the ceramic plates were etched with 4.8% HFA (HFA group) for 60 s, and the other half were not treated (NoHFA group). The scale of their surface roughness and rough area was measured by a 3D laser scanning microscope. These plates then received one of the following two bond procedures to form four bond test groups: HFA/cement, NoHFA/cement, HFA/silane/cement and NoHFA/silane/cement. The associated micro-shear bond strength and bond failure modes were tested after 0 and 30 000 thermal water bath cycles. Four different silane/cement systems (Monobond S/Variolink II, GC Ceramic Primer/Linkmax HV, Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Porcelain Liner M/SuperBond C and B) were used. The data for each silane/cement system were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. HFA treatment significantly increased the surface R{sub a} and R{sub y} values and the rough area of the ceramic plates compared with NoHFA treatment. After 30 000 thermal water bath cycles, the bond strength of all the test groups except the HFA/Linkmax HV group was significantly reduced, while the HFA/Linkmax HV group showed only adhesive interface failure. The other HFA/cement groups and all NoHFA/cement groups lost bond strength completely, and all NoHFA/silane/cement groups with chemical adhesion had significantly higher bond strength and more ceramic cohesive failures than the respective HFA/cement groups with mechanical retention. The result of the HFA/silane/cement groups with both chemical adhesion and mechanical retention revealed that HFA treatment could enhance the bond durability of resin/silanized glass ceramics, which might result from the increase of the chemical adhesion area on the ceramic rough surface and subsequently reduced degradation speed of the silane

  8. Shear bond strength between alumina substrate and prosthodontic resin composites with various adhesive resin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJehani, Yousef A; Baskaradoss, Jagan K; Geevarghese, Amrita; AlShehry, Marey A; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2015-05-02

    With the increase in demand for cosmetics and esthetics, resin composite restorations and all-ceramic restorations have become an important treatment alternative. Taking into consideration the large number of prosthodontic and adhesive resins currently available, the strength and durability of these materials needs to be evaluated. This laboratory study presents the shear bond strengths of a range of veneering resin composites bonded to all-ceramic core material using different adhesive resins. Alumina ceramic specimens (Techceram Ltd, Shipley, UK) were assigned to three groups. Three types of commercially available prosthodontic resin composites [BelleGlass®, (BG, Kerr, CA, USA), Sinfony® (SF, 3 M ESPE, Dental Products, Germany), and GC Gradia® (GCG, GC Corp, Tokyo, Japan)] were bonded to the alumina substrate using four different adhesive resins. Half the specimens per group (N = 40) were stored dry for 24 hours, the remaining were stored for 30 days in water. The bonding strength, so-called shear bond strengths between composite resin and alumina substrate were measured. Data were analysed statistically and variations in bond strength within each group were additionally evaluated by calculating the Weibull modulus. Bond strengths were influenced by the brand of prosthodontic resin composites. Shear bond strengths of material combinations varied from 24.17 ± 3.72-10.15 ± 3.69 MPa and 21.20 ± 4.64-7.50 ± 4.22 at 24 h and 30 days, respectively. BG resin composite compared with the other resin composites provided the strongest bond with alumina substrate (p < 0.01). SF resin composite was found to have a lower bond strength than the other composites. The Weibull moduli were highest for BG, which was bonded by using Optibond Solo Plus adhesive resin at 24 h and 30 days. There was no effect of storage time and adhesive brand on bond strength. Within the limitations of this study, the shear bond strengths of composite resins to alumina substrate are related to

  9. Effect of two self-adhesive cements on marginal adaptation and strength of esthetic ceramic CAD/CAM molar crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörmann, Werner; Wolf, Daniel; Ender, Andreas; Bindl, Andreas; Göhring, Till; Attin, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    This study evaluated the effects of adhesive cements on marginal adaptation and fracture resistance of ceramic molar crowns. Seventy-five extracted maxillary molars were selected. The occlusal morphology of 15 molars (control) was scanned and transferred to the crowns in the test groups by CAD/CAM. Sixty molars received full-coverage crown preparations with 6-degree axial taper, 1.0-mm shoulder, and 2.0-mm occlusal reduction. They were assigned to four groups, and pulpal pressure was simulated. The 15 crowns in each test group were seated with resin-based self-adhesive cements, Rely-X (RX) and Multilink (MS), one multistep bonded adhesive luting composite resin, Variolink (VL), and glass-ionomer cement, Ketac Cem (KC). Test and control molars were subjected to thermal and mechanical fatigue stress (TMS: 12,000 x 5 degrees C to 50 degrees C; 2.4 million x 49 N) for 18 days in a masticator. Marginal adaptation ["continuous margin%" (CM%)] of the crowns was determined by scanning electron microscopy (200x). Finally, molars were occlusally loaded until fracture in a testing machine, and fracture load (N) was recorded. Marginal adaptation and strength data were statistically analyzed. TMS significantly (p molars was significantly (p < 0.001) higher than that of experimental crowns. Fracture resistance of RX cemented crowns was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than that of other crowns. Occlusal morphology significantly influenced fracture resistance (p < 0.05). Self-adhesive cement RX offers a valid alternative to multistep resin-based luting composite with respect to marginal adaptation to dentin and fracture resistance. The latter is also influenced by occlusal morphology, necessitating careful monitoring of occlusal contacts.

  10. Role of Chlorhexidine on Long-term Bond Strength of Self-adhesive Composite Cements to Intraradicular Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeloni, Valeria; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Marchesi, Giulio; Cadenaro, Milena; Comba, Allegra; Maravi, Tatjana; Scotti, Nicola; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    To examine the effect of CHX pre-treatment on long-term bond strength of fiber posts luted with self-adhesive resin cements. Seventy-two single-rooted teeth were selected for root canal treatment and post space preparation. The tested self-adhesive cement/post combinations were (N = 36): 1. RelyX Fiber-Posts luted with RelyX Unicem; 2. Rebilda Posts luted with Bifix SE Cement. For both self-adhesive cements, half of the specimens (experimental groups) were luted after the application of a solution of 2% CHX, while no CHX application was performed for the remaining specimens (control groups). Luted specimens were cut and used for push-out bond strength evaluation immediately, and after storage in artificial saliva for 6 months or 1 year. Additional specimens were processed for quantitative interfacial nanoleakage analysis. ANOVA showed that the variable times of storage had a significant influence on the results (p 0.05) was found. Tukey's pairwise post-hoc test showed that the radicular bond strength decreased with time of storage. In particular, a significant difference was found between T0 and T1y, but not between T0 and T6m. In contrast, in terms of pretreatment, no significant reduction in push-out bond strength was observed, irrespective of the aging time. CHX pretreatment did not prevent bond strength degradation of fiber posts luted with self-adhesive cements.

  11. Bond strength and fracture analysis between resin cements and root canal dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Guilherme Carpena; Ballarin, Andressa; Baratieri, Luiz N

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this research is to evaluate bond strength between translucent fibre posts (White Post DC, FGM or FRC Postec Plus, Ivoclar/Vivadent) and intraradicular dentin at three different levels (cervical, middle and apical) using a dual-cure (AllCem, FGM) or self-curing (Multilink, Ivoclar/Vivadent) resin cement. Also, the fracture type after push-out test was analysed under SEM. Thirty-two extracted single-root teeth were selected. After undergoing endodontic therapy, they were randomly divided into four groups according to their post type and resin cement. Root canals were etched using 37% phosphoric acid, and Excite DSC adhesive (Ivoclar/Vivadent) was applied in all groups. The root was sectioned to obtain nine 1-mm-thick slices (three per third: coronal, middle, apical). All slices were subjected to push-out tests. Data were analysed using two-way anova. The mean bond strengths vary from 6.6 (4.6) MPa [apical] to 11.9 (5.9) MPa [cervical]. There were no significant differences between groups. Pearson χ(2)-test revealed significant differences in fracture types for all groups (P < 0.0001). The apical third had the lowest bond strengths and it was also shown to be the most critical region for luting fibre posts. © 2010 The Authors. Australian Endodontic Journal © 2010 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  12. Effect of sandblasting, silica coating, and laser treatment on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Nasrin; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Heidari, Solmaz; Khoshro, Kimia

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of laser irradiation as well as other surface treatment methods on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to the two types of resin cements. Zirconia ceramic blocks (ICE Zirkon) were sintered according to the manufacturer's instructions and duplicated in resin composites. The ceramic specimens were divided into four groups according to the following surface treatments: no surface treatment (control), sandblasting with alumina, silica coating plus silanization, and Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The specimens were divided equally and then bonded with Panavia F2.0 (self-etching resin cement) and Clearfil SA Luting (self-adhesive resin cement) to the composite blocks. The bonded ceramic-composite blocks were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 72 h, cut to prepare bar-shaped specimens with a bonding area of approximately 1 mm(2), and thermocycled for 3000 cycles between 5 and 55 °C, and the microtensile bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test. The results showed that the self-adhesive resin cement used in this study did not improve the microtensile bond strength when the zirconia surface was sandblasted by alumina. The use of the Nd:YAG laser did not enhance the bond strength between the zirconia and both types of resin cements. In addition, silica coating of the zirconia surfaces plus silane application significantly improved the bond strength regardless of the type of resin cement utilized.

  13. 21 CFR 872.3750 - Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3750 Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner. (a) Identification. A bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner is a device...

  14. Effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on bond durability of fiber posts cemented with etch-and-rinse adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Memarpour, Mahtab; Sarafraz, Zahra

    2016-08-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate whether use of an adhesive penetration enhancer, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), improves bond stability of fiber posts to root dentin using two two-step etch-and-rinse resin cements. Forty human maxillary central incisor roots were randomly divided into 4 groups after endodontic treatment and post space preparation, based on the fiber post/cement used with and without DMSO pretreatment. Acid-etched root dentin was treated with 5% DMSO aqueous solution for 60 seconds or with distilled water (control) prior to the application of Excite DSC/Variolink II or One-Step Plus/Duo-link for post cementation. After micro-slicing the bonded root dentin, push-out bond strength (P-OBS) test was performed immediately or after 1-year of water storage in each group. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Student's t-test (α=.05). A significant effect of time, DMSO treatment, and treatment × time interaction were observed (P.05). DMSO-wet bonding might be a beneficial method in preserving the stability of resin-dentin bond strength over time when fiber post is cemented with the tested etch-and-rinse adhesive cements.

  15. Effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on bond durability of fiber posts cemented with etch-and-rinse adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Sarafraz, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was undertaken to investigate whether use of an adhesive penetration enhancer, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), improves bond stability of fiber posts to root dentin using two two-step etch-and-rinse resin cements. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty human maxillary central incisor roots were randomly divided into 4 groups after endodontic treatment and post space preparation, based on the fiber post/cement used with and without DMSO pretreatment. Acid-etched root dentin was treated with 5% DMSO aqueous solution for 60 seconds or with distilled water (control) prior to the application of Excite DSC/Variolink II or One-Step Plus/Duo-link for post cementation. After micro-slicing the bonded root dentin, push-out bond strength (P-OBS) test was performed immediately or after 1-year of water storage in each group. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Student's t-test (α=.05). RESULTS A significant effect of time, DMSO treatment, and treatment × time interaction were observed (Pcements. Aging significantly reduced P-OBS in control groups (P.05). CONCLUSION DMSO-wet bonding might be a beneficial method in preserving the stability of resin-dentin bond strength over time when fiber post is cemented with the tested etch-and-rinse adhesive cements. PMID:27555893

  16. Effect of curing protocol on the polymerization of dual-cured resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sónia G; Fulgêncio, Rogério; Nunes, Teresa G; Toledano, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate how curing protocol affects the extent of polymerization of dual-cured resin cements. Four commercial resin cements were used (DuoLink, Panavia F 2.0, Variolink II and Enforce). The extent of polymerization of the resin cements cured under different conditions was measured using a (1)H Stray-Field MRI method, which also enabled to probe molecular mobility in the kHz frequency range. Resin cements show well distinct behaviours concerning chemical cure. Immediate photo-activation appears to be the best choice for higher filler loaded resin cements (Panavia F 2.0 and Variolink). A photo-activation delay (5 min) did not induce any significant difference in the extent of polymerization of all cements. The extent of polymerization of dual-cured resin cements considerably changed among products under various curing protocols. Clinicians should optimize the materials choice taking into account the curing characteristics of the cements. Copyright 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of Pre-Sintered Zirconia Surface Conditioning on Shear Bond Strength to Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomofumi Sawada

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite on zirconia surface to which a specific conditioner was applied before sintering. After sintering of either conditioner-coated or uncoated specimens, both groups were divided into three subgroups by their respective surface modifications (n = 10 per group: no further treatment; etched with hydrofluoric acid; and sandblasted with 50 µm Al2O3 particles. Surfaces were characterized by measuring different surface roughness parameters (e.g., Ra and Rmax and water contact angles. Half of the specimens underwent thermocycling (10,000 cycles, 5–55 °C after self-adhesive resin cement build-up. The SBSs were measured using a universal testing machine, and the failure modes were analyzed by microscopy. Data were analyzed by nonparametric and parametric tests followed by post-hoc comparisons (α = 0.05. Conditioner-coated specimens increased both surface roughness and hydrophilicity (p < 0.01. In the non-thermocycled condition, sandblasted surfaces showed higher SBSs than other modifications, irrespective of conditioner application (p < 0.05. Adhesive fractures were commonly observed in the specimens. Thermocycling favored debonding and decreased SBSs. However, conditioner-coated specimens upon sandblasting showed the highest SBS (p < 0.05 and mixed fractures were partially observed. The combination of conditioner application before sintering and sandblasting after sintering showed the highest shear bond strength and indicated improvements concerning the failure mode.

  18. Bond durability of resin cements to Au-Pd-Ag alloy under cyclic impact load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, Masahiro; Yokota, Hiroaki; Yoshihiko, Hayashi

    2004-06-01

    The bond durability of resin cements to a 12% Au-Pd-Ag alloy was studied through cyclic impact tests with different loads. A piece of casting alloy was bonded to a cast block with two types of resin cements, Super Bond C&B and Bistite II. A shear load was applied onto a small piece of alloy until debonding of the specimen, using different weights of plungers, 130 g, 230 g, 330 g and 430 g. The specimen bonded with Super Bond exhibited a higher resistance than that with Bistite II. The fracture modes of the debonded cements were completely different from each other. That is, Bistite II showed a bulk fracture of cement by the crack penetrating through the cement layer. On the other hand, Super Bond showed damages limited to the surface and no bulk fracture. The mode of fracture was dependent not on the loading weight but the types of resin cements used.

  19. The influence of resin cements on the final color of ceramic veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Dong; Hong, Guang; Xing, Wen-Zhong; Wang, Yi-Ning

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of three brands of resin cement on the final color of ceramic veneers. 50 disk-shaped ceramic specimens (IPS e.Max, 0.6mm×8.0mm diameter) and disk-shaped composite resin background specimens (4.0mm×8.0mm diameter) were prepared and divided into 10 groups (n=5). These paired specimens were bonded using ten shades of resin cement (Variolink Veneer, shades LV-3, LV-2, MV, HV+2, HV+3; Panavia F, shades light and brown; and RelyX™ Veneer, shades WO, TR, A3). A spectrophotometer (VITA Easyshade) was used to measure the color parameters (CIE L*a*b* values) of the paired disks before and after cementation. The color differences (ΔE values) after cementation were calculated and statistically analyzed by the One-way ANOVA (at the significant level presin cement. The ΔE values of ceramic disks after cementation ranged from 1.38 to 7.16. The ΔE values were more than 3.3 when the ceramic disks were cemented with resin cements in shade HV+3 (4.90) and shade WO (7.16). One-way ANOVA of ΔE values revealed significant differences in the resin cement shades. Resin cements can affect the final color of ceramic veneer restorations, and the extent of this effect varies according to the resin cement shades. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Adhesive luting of all-ceramic restorations--the impact of cementation variables and short-term water storage on the strength of a feldspathic dental ceramic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the impact of resin cement luting variables and short-term water storage on the strength of an adhesively luted all-ceramic restorative material. An understanding of the strengthening mechanisms will result in optimisation of operative techniques and materials selection criteria.

  1. Effect of Resin Cement Porosity on Retention of Glass-Fiber Posts to Root Dentin: An Experimental and Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Natércia Rezende; Aguiar, Grazielle Crystine Rodrigues; Rodrigues, Monise de Paula; Bicalho, Aline Aredes; Soares, Priscilla Barbosa Ferreira; Veríssimo, Crisnicaw; Soares, Carlos José

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of porosity of self-adhesive resin on the stress distribution, post retention and failure mode of fiber post cemented to human root dentin. Ten human central upper incisors with circular root canal were selected. They were sectioned with 15 mm and were endodontically filled. The roots were scanned using micro-CT after post space preparation for root filling remaining evaluation. Fiber posts were cemented using self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X U200, 3M-ESPE). Two 1-mm-thick slices from the cervical, medium and apical thirds were scanned for resin cement bubbles volume measurements and submitted to a push-out test (PBS). Three operators using stereomicroscopy and confocal laser microscopy classified the failure mode. Stress distributions during the push-out test were analyzed using 3D finite element analysis. PBS values (MPa) were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests and the failure modes using the Kappa coefficient to assess inter-operator agreement. Chi-square test was used to determine significant differences between the methods ( = 0.05). Push-out bond strength was significantly affected by the bubbles presence in all root depth (p<0.05). The stress concentration was higher when the bubbles were present. Adhesive dentin/resin cement interface failure was the most frequent type of failure. Confocal microscopy was better than stereomicroscopy for failure analysis. Bubbles generated during resin cement insertion into the root canal negatively affect the stress distribution and the bond strength. The use of confocal microscopy is recommended for failure analysis.

  2. Comparison of the resin cement bond strength to an indirect composites treated by Er;YAG laser and sandblast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansure Mirzaee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Indirect composites are designed to overcome the shortcomings of direct composites such as polymerization shrinkage and low degree of conversion. But, good adhesion of resin cements to indirect composites is still difficult. This research was designed to assess the effect of different powers of Er;YAG laser compared with sandblasting. On the micro tensil bond strength of resin cement to indirect composites.   Materials and Methods: Specimens were prepred using dental resin composite (Gradia GC and metallic mold (15×5×5 mm and were cured according to the manufacturer’s instructions. 24 blocks were prepared and randomly divided into 12 groups. G1:no treatment (as control, G 2-6: Er; YAG laser irradiation (2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Watt, G7: sandblast. Two composite blocks were bonded to each other with Panavia F.2. resin cement. The cylindrical sections with dimensions of 1 mm were tested in a microtensile bond strength tester device using 0.5 mm/min speed until fracture points. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and T-test.   Results: Interaction between lasers irradiation and sandblast treatments were significant (P0.05 whether samples were sandblasted or not. Samples which received 300 mJ of laser showed lower bond strength compared with no laser treatment. Other groups showed no significant difference (P>0.05.   Conclusion: It seems that application of sandblast with proper variables, is a good way to improve bond strength.Laser application had no influence in improving the bond strength between the indirect composite and resin cement.

  3. Effects of multipurpose, universal adhesives on resin bonding to zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-H; Chae, S-Y; Lee, Y; Han, G-J; Cho, B-H

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of single-bottle, multipurpose, universal adhesives on the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic. Polished zirconia ceramic (Cercon base) discs were randomly divided into four groups (n=40) according to the applied surface-conditioning agent: Single Bond 2, Single Bond Universal, All-Bond Universal, and Alloy Primer. Cured composite cylinders (Ø 0.8 mm × 1 mm) were cemented to the conditioned zirconia specimens with resin cement (RelyX ARC). The bonded specimens were subjected to a microshear bond-strength test after 24 hours of water storage and after 10,000 cycles of thermocycling. The surface-conditioning agent significantly influenced the bond strength (pUniversal showed the highest initial bond strength (37.7 ± 5.1 MPa), followed by All-Bond Universal (31.3 ± 5.6 MPa), Alloy Primer (26.9 ± 5.1 MPa), and Single Bond 2 (8.5 ± 4.6 MPa). Artificial aging significantly reduced the bond strengths of all the test groups (pUniversal showed the highest bond-strength value (26.9 ± 6.4 MPa). Regardless of artificial aging, Single Bond Universal and All-Bond Universal showed significantly higher bond strengths than Alloy Primer, a conventional metal primer.

  4. Push-out bond strength of a fiber post system with two resin cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosharraf, Ramin; Haerian, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Debonding is a common cause of failure encountered with fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts, and usually occurs along the post space-dentin adhesive interface. The aim of this in vitro study is to evaluate the regional push-out bond strength of a fiber-reinforced post system, using two resin cements. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study 20 maxillary central incisors were decoronated and the roots were endodontically treated. Following post space preparation, the roots were divided into two groups of 10 specimens each. Fiber-reinforced composite posts were cemented with two resin cement systems: (a) Self-etch system (Panavia F2.0/ED-primer II) and (b) conventional system (Variolink II/Excite DSC). Three slices of each root, with a thickness of 3 mm, were prepared. The push-out test was performed with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute, and bond strength values were calculated. The data were analyzed with a two-way Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe tests (α=.05). Results: There were no significant differences between the mean push-out bond strengths of two experimental groups (Panavia F: 12.59±5.44, Variolink II: 12.49±4.52 MPa) (P=0.920), but there were significant differences between the mean push out bond strengths of the root dentin regions (Pcement systems. The coronal region of the root dentin showed a significantly higher bond strength than the apical region. PMID:23372603

  5. Hardening of a dual-cure resin cement using QTH and LED curing units

    Science.gov (United States)

    SANTOS, Maria Jacinta Moraes Coelho; PASSOS, Sheila Pestana; da ENCARNAÇÃO, Monalisa Olga Lessa; SANTOS, Gildo Coelho; BOTTINO, Marco Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the surface hardness of a resin cement (RelyX ARC) photoactivated through indirect composite resin (Cristobal) disks of different thicknesses using either a light-emitting diode (LED) or quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) light source. Material and Methods Eighteen resin cement specimens were prepared and divided into 6 groups according to the type of curing unit and the thickness of resin disks interposed between the cement surface and light source. Three indentations (50 g for 15 s) were performed on the top and bottom surface of each specimen and a mean Vickers hardness number (VHN) was calculated for each specimen. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer test was used for post-hoc pairwise comparisons. Results Increased indirect resin disk thickness resulted in decreased mean VHN values. Mean VHN values for the top surfaces of the resin cement specimens ranged from 23.2 to 46.1 (QTH) and 32.3 to 41.7 (LED). The LED curing light source produced higher hardness values compared to the QTH light source for 2- and 3-mm-thick indirect resin disks. The differences were clinically, but not statistically significant. Increased indirect resin disk thickness also resulted in decreased mean VHN values for the bottom surfaces of the resin cement: 5.8 to 19.1 (QTH) and 7.5 to 32.0 (LED). For the bottom surfaces, a statistically significant interaction was also found between the type of curing light source and the indirect resin disk thickness. Conclusions Mean surface hardness values of resin cement specimens decreased with the increase of indirect resin disk thickness. The LED curing light source generally produced higher surface hardness values. PMID:20485920

  6. Hardening of a dual-cure resin cement using QTH and LED curing units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jacinta Moraes Coelho Santos

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the surface hardness of a resin cement (RelyX ARC photoactivated through indirect composite resin (Cristobal disks of different thicknesses using either a light-emitting diode (LED or quartz tungsten halogen (QTH light source. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighteen resin cement specimens were prepared and divided into 6 groups according to the type of curing unit and the thickness of resin disks interposed between the cement surface and light source. Three indentations (50 g for 15 s were performed on the top and bottom surface of each specimen and a mean Vickers hardness number (VHN was calculated for each specimen. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer test was used for post-hoc pairwise comparisons. RESULTS: Increased indirect resin disk thickness resulted in decreased mean VHN values. Mean VHN values for the top surfaces of the resin cement specimens ranged from 23.2 to 46.1 (QTH and 32.3 to 41.7 (LED. The LED curing light source produced higher hardness values compared to the QTH light source for 2- and 3-mm-thick indirect resin disks. The differences were clinically, but not statistically significant. Increased indirect resin disk thickness also resulted in decreased mean VHN values for the bottom surfaces of the resin cement: 5.8 to 19.1 (QTH and 7.5 to 32.0 (LED. For the bottom surfaces, a statistically significant interaction was also found between the type of curing light source and the indirect resin disk thickness. CONCLUSION: Mean surface hardness values of resin cement specimens decreased with the increase of indirect resin disk thickness. The LED curing light source generally produced higher surface hardness values.

  7. Analysis of residual stress in the resin of metal-resin adhesion structures by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hiroki; Endo, Kazuhiko; Nagano-Takebe, Futami; Ida, Yusuke; Kakino, Ken; Narita, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    The residual stress caused by polymerization shrinkage and thermal contraction of a heat-curing resin containing 4-META on a metal-resin structure was measured by a scanning acoustic microscope. The tensile residual stress in the resin occurred within 70 µm of the adhesion interface with a flat plate specimen. The maximum tensile stress was about 58 MPa at the interface. On a metal plate specimen with retention holes, ring-like cracks in the resin occurred around the retention holes with the adhesive specimen and many linear cracks occurred in the resin vertical to the longitudinal direction of the metal frame with the non-adhesive specimens. There was tensile residual stress on the resin surface at the center of the retention holes of the adhesion specimen, indicating that the stress in the specimen with surface treatment for adhesion was higher than in that without surface treatment.

  8. Cariogenic bacteria degrade dental resin composites and adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbia, M; Ma, D; Cvitkovitch, D G; Santerre, J P; Finer, Y

    2013-11-01

    A major reason for dental resin composite restoration replacement is related to secondary caries promoted by acid production from bacteria including Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). We hypothesized that S. mutans has esterase activities that degrade dental resin composites and adhesives. Standardized specimens of resin composite (Z250), total-etch (Scotchbond Multipurpose, SB), and self-etch (Easybond, EB) adhesives were incubated with S. mutans UA159 or uninoculated culture medium (control) for up to 30 days. Quantification of the BisGMA-derived biodegradation by-product, bishydroxy-propoxy-phenyl-propane (BisHPPP), was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Surface analysis of the specimens was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). S. mutans was shown to have esterase activities in levels comparable with those found in human saliva. A trend of increasing BisHPPP release throughout the incubation period was observed for all materials and was more elevated in the presence of bacteria vs. control medium for EB and Z250, but not for SB (p adhesives; degree of degradation was dependent on the material's chemical formulation. This finding suggests that the resin-dentin interface could be compromised by oral bacteria that contribute to the progression of secondary caries.

  9. Adhesive primers for bonding cobalt-chromium alloy to resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, K; Kamada, K; Atsuta, M

    1999-06-01

    This study evaluated the effect of five adhesive primers on the shear bond strength of a self-curing resin to cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy. The adhesive primers Acryl Bond (AB, Shofu), Cesead Opaque Primer (COP, Kuraray), Metacolor Opaque Bonding Liner (MOBL, Sun-Medical), Metal PrimerII (MPII, GC) and MR. Bond (MRB, Tokuyama) were used. A brass ring which was placed over the casting alloy disk surface non-primed or primed with each primer was filled with the self-curing MMA-PMMA resin. The specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 h and then immersed alternately in water baths at 4 C and 60 degrees C for 1 min each for up to 50000 thermal cycles before shear mode testing at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. All of the primers examined, except MOBL, improved the shear bond strength between the resin and Co-Cr alloy compared with nonprimed specimens prior to thermal cycling. Regardless of which primer was used, the shear bond strength significantly differed between thermal cycles 0 and 50000. However, after 50000 thermal cycles, the bond strengths of resin to Co-Cr alloy primed with COP or MPII were significantly greater than those of specimens primed with AB, MOBL or MRB and non-primed controls. This study indicated that COP and MPII are effective primers to obtain higher bond strength between resin and Co-Cr alloy.

  10. Shear bond strength of cement to zirconia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosentritt, M.; Behr, M.; van der Zel, J.M.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the shear bond strength (SBS) of various cements to zirconia ceramic. CoCr-cylinders were bonded to zirconia plates (20 mm × 10 mm × 2 mm; n = 8 per group) using four self-adhesive resin cements (one capsule, three hand-mixed) and four resin cements, partly in combination

  11. The effect of polymerization mode on monomer conversion, free radical entrapment, and interaction with hydroxyapatite of commercial self-adhesive cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; Silva, Marília Santos; Vismara, Marcus Vinícius Gonçalves; Di Hipólito, Vinicius; Miranda González, Alejandra Hortencia; de Oliveira Graeff, Carlos Frederico

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the degree of conversion, the free radical entrapment, and the chemical interaction of self-adhesive resin cements mixed with pure hydroxyapatite, as a function of the polymerization activation mode among a variety of commercial self-adhesive cements. Four cements (Embrace WetBond, MaxCem Elite, Bifix SE, and RelyX U200) were mixed, combined with hydroxyapatite, dispensed into molds, and distributed into three groups, according to polymerization protocols: IP (photoactivation for 40s); DP (delayed photoactivation, 10 min self-curing plus 40s light-activated); and CA (chemical activation, no light exposure). Infrared (IR) spectra were obtained and monomer conversion (%) was calculated by comparing the aliphatic-to-aromatic IR absorption peak ratio before and after polymerization (n=10). The free radical entrapment values of the resin cements were characterized using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and the concentration of spins (number of spins/mass) calculated (n=3). Values were compared using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (α=5%). X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterized the crystallinity of hydroxyapatite as a function of the chemical interactions with the resin cements. The tested parameters varied as a function of resin cement and polymerization protocol. Embrace WetBond and RelyX U200 demonstrated dependence on photoactivation (immediate or delayed), whereas MaxCem Elite exhibited dependence on the chemical activation mode. Bifix SE presented the best balance based on the parameters analyzed, irrespective of the activation protocol. Choice of polymerization protocol affects the degree of conversion, free radical entrapment, and the chemical interaction between hydroxyapatite and self-adhesive resin cement mixtures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Curing Mode on Shear Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Cement to Composite Blocks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jin-Young Kim; Ga-Young Cho; Byoung-Duck Roh; Yooseok Shin

    2016-01-01

    .... The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength and fracture pattern of indirect CAD/CAM composite blocks cemented with two self-etch adhesive cements with different curing modes...

  13. Persistence of endodontic methacrylate-based cement residues on dentin adhesive surface treated with different chemical removal protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuga, Milton Carlos; Só, Marcus Vinicius Reis; De Campos, Edson Alves; Faria, Gisele; Keine, Kátia Cristina; Dantas, Andrea Abi Rached; Faria, Norberto Batista

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the persistence of methacrylate-based cement residues on the dentin, after dentin surface cleaning with ethanol or acetone, with or without previous application of a dentin adhesive. Forty bovine crown fragments were obtained and the dentin surface was washed with 1.0 mL of 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), followed by 0.1 mL of 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid application for 3 min, and final irrigation with 2.5% NaOCl. The specimens were air dried and resin-based cement was rubbed onto the dentine surface with a microbrush applicator. In 20 specimens, previously to cement, a dentin adhesive was applied in all surfaces. After 15 min, the surface was scrubbed with a cotton pellet and moistened with ethanol or acetone, compounding the following groups: G1-99.5% ethanol and G2-acetone, without previous use of dentin adhesive; G3-99.5% ethanol and G4-acetone, with previous use of dentin adhesive. The dentin surface was scrubbed until the cement residues could not be visually detected. Sections were then processed for scanning electron microscopy and evaluated at 500× magnification and scores were attributed to each image according to the area covered by residual sealer, and data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis at 5% significance. The lower residue presence was observed in G3 (P = 0.005). All surface presented cement residues when acetone was used as cleaning solution (P = 0.0005). The cleaning solutions were unable to completely remove the cement residues from both surfaces. The ethanol used after previous application of the dentin adhesive promoted the lower presence of residues. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Evaluation of stainless steel crowns cemented with glass-ionomer and resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Yucel; Simsek, Sera; Dalmis, Anya; Gurbuz, Taskin; Kocogullari, M Elcin

    2006-04-01

    To evaluate in vitro and in vivo conditions of stainless steel crowns (SSC) cemented using one luting glass-ionomer cement (Aqua Meron) and one luting resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (Vitremer). In the in vitro part of this study, retentive properties of SSCs cemented using Aqua Meron and Vitremer on extracted primary first molars were tested. In addition, two specimens of each group were used to evaluate the tooth hard tissue-cement, within the cement itself, cement-SSC, and tooth hard tissue-cement-SSC under scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the in vivo part of this study, 152 SSCs were placed on the first or second primary molars of 86 children, and cemented using either Aqua Meron or Vitremer. The crowns were examined for retention. In addition, the clinical views of the crowns were recorded with an intraoral camera. No significant difference was found between the mean retentive forces of Aqua Meron and Vitremer (P> 0.05). SSCs cemented with Aqua Meron and Vitremer had an average lifespan of 26.44 and 24.07 months respectively. Only one (0.66%) of 152 SSCs was lost from the Aqua Meron group during post-cementation periods. Nineteen of the 152 SSCs (12.5%) had dents or perforations.

  15. Effect of different resin luting cements on the marginal fit of lithium disilicate pressed crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounajjed, Radek; Salinas, Thomas J; Ingr, Tomas; Azar, Basel

    2017-11-15

    The vertical marginal discrepancy of restorations can increase upon cementation, and poor marginal fit can lead to cement dissolution, marginal discoloration, microleakage, and secondary caries. The amount of increase is related to the type of luting cement used, but how lithium disilicate pressed crowns are affected by different resin cements is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effect of using different resin luting cements on the vertical marginal discrepancy of lithium disilicate pressed crowns. A total of 18 intact extracted mandibular third molars were disinfected in a solution of 10% formalin for 7 days and were then prepared to receive a ceramic crown. Impressions were made with polyvinyl siloxane and lithium disilicate pressed crowns made and cemented with 1 of 3 resin luting cements. The marginal discrepancy was measured at 4 points on the finishing line of each tooth, with optical microscopy at ×200 magnification before and after cementation. Statistical analysis was done with the Kruskal-Wallis test to compare the median marginal increase among the 3 groups. The least amount of marginal increase after cementation was with Harvard PremiumFlow cement, with an average marginal increase of 42 ±11 μm. RelyX Ultimate cement increased the margins by an average 45 ±29 μm. The highest marginal increase was found in the Enamel Plus HRi preheated composite resin group (116 ±47 μm). The marginal increase of pressed crowns cemented with preheated composite resin (Enamel Plus HRi) exceeded the clinically acceptable range of marginal discrepancy. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Study of deformation of resin cements used in fixing of root posts through fiber Bragg grating sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, C. A.; Franco, A. P. G. O.; Karam, L. Z.; Kalinowski, H. J.; Gomes, O. M. M.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the polymerization shrinkage "in situ" in resin cements inside the root canal during the fixation of glass fiber posts. For cementation teeth were randomly divided into 2 groups according to the resin cement used: Group1 - resin cement dual Relyx ARC (3M/ESPE), and Group 2 - resin cement dual Relyx U200 (3M/ESPE). Before inserting the resin cement into the root canal, two Bragg grating sensors were recorded and pasted in the region without contact with the canal, one at the apical and other at the coronal thirds of the post. The sensors measured the deformation of the resin cements in coronal and apical root thirds to obtain the values in micro-strain (μɛ).

  17. Long-term dentin retention of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement in non-carious cervical lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dijken, J.W.V. van; Pallesen, U.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical long-term retention to dentin of seven adhesive systems.......The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical long-term retention to dentin of seven adhesive systems....

  18. The influence of silane evaporation procedures on microtensile bond strength between a dental ceramic and a resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Carolina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the influence of silane evaporation procedures on bond strength between a dental ceramic and a chemically activated resin cement. Materials and Methods: Eighteen blocks (6 mm Χ 14 mm Χ 14 mm of ceramic IPS Empress 2 were cemented (C and B to composite resin (InTen-S blocks using a chemical adhesive system (Lok. Six groups were analyzed, each with three blocks divided according to ceramic surface treatment: two control groups (no treatment, NT; 10% hydrofluoric acid plus silane Monobond-S dried at room temperature, HFS; the other four groups comprised different evaporation patterns (silane rinsed and dried at room temperature, SRT; silane rinsed in boiling water and dried as before, SBRT; silane rinsed with boiling water and heat dried at 50°C, SBH; silane dried at 50 ± 5°C, rinsed in boiling water and dried at room temperature, SHBRT. The cemented blocks were sectioned to obtain specimens for microtensile test 7 days after cementation and were stored in water for 30 days prior to testing. Fracture patterns were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Statistics and Results: All blocks of NT debonded during sectioning. One way ANOVA tests showed higher bond strengths for HFS than for the other groups. SBRT and SBH were statistically similar, with higher bond strengths than SRT and SHBRT. Failures were 100% adhesive in SRT and SHBRT. Cohesive failures within the "adhesive zone" were detected in HFS (30%, SBRT (24% and SBH (40%. Conclusion: Silane treatment enhanced bond strength in all conditions evaluated, showing best results with HF etching.

  19. Bond strength of orthodontic light-cured resin-modified glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsiang Yu; Chen, Chien Hsiu; Li, Chuan Li; Tsai, Hung Huey; Chou, Ta Hsiung; Wang, Wei Nan

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the bond strengths and debonded interfaces achieved with light-cured resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) and conventional light-cured composite resin. In addition, the effects of acid etching and water contamination were examined. One hundred human premolars were randomly divided into five equal groups. The mini Dyna-lock upper premolar bracket was selected for testing. The first four groups were treated with light-cured RMGIC with or without 15 per cent phosphoric acid-etching treatment and with or without water contamination preceding bracket bonding. The control samples were treated with the conventional light-cured Transbond composite resin under acid etching and without water contamination. Subsequently, the brackets were debonded by tensile force using an Instron machine. The modified adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were assigned to the bracket base of the debonded interfaces using a scanning electron microscope. The bond strength and modified ARI scores were determined and analysed statistically by one-way analysis of variance and chi-square test. Under all four conditions, the bond strength of the light-cure RMGIC was equal to or higher than that of the conventional composite resin. The highest bond strength was achieved when using RMGIC with acid etching but without water contamination. The modified ARI scores were 2 for Fuji Ortho LC and 3 for Transbond. No enamel detachment was found in any group. Fifteen per cent phosphoric acid etching without moistening the enamel of Fuji Ortho LC provided the more favourable bond strength. Enamel surfaces, with or without water contamination and with or without acid etching, had the same or a greater bond strength than Transbond.

  20. Adhesive Bonding of Aluminium Alloy A5754 by Epoxy Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Michalec

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Joining thin sheets of aluminium and its alloys is a promising area in the field of joining materials. Nowadays, joining methods that do not melt the material itself are increasingly being utilised. This paper deals with adhesive bonding of aluminium alloy A5754 by two-component epoxy resins. Theresults show that joints bonded by Hysol 9466 have appropriate mechanical properties, but that joints bonded by Hysol 9492 have better thermal stability.

  1. Comparison the Effects of Different Root Canal Irrigants on the Retention of Quarts Fiber Posts Cemented by Resin Cement

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdi Shirinzad; Zahed Mohammadi; Loghman Rezaei-Soufi; Mehdi Rasekh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Root canal irrigants could change the structure of root dentin and affect the posts retention the purpose of this study was to compare the effects of three different endodontic irrigants on the retention of quarts fiber posts cemented by different resin cements. Materials & Methods: In this in-vitro study, 10 mm long post spaces were prepared in root canals of 120 premolars after endodontic therapy and cutting the crowns at the cementoenamel junction. The teeth were randomly div...

  2. [Application of 4-META on adhesive opaque resin. (Part 1) Adhesive strength and the stability (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, T; Nagata, K; Nakabayashi, N; Masuhara, E

    1979-04-01

    Mechanical devices, which has been conventionally used for retaining thermo-setting acrylic resin veneers possesses disadvantage of poor marginal sealing and requires rather complicated procedure applying on the metal casting. An application of adhesive resins to overcome these disadvantages was studied. Adhesive opaque resin consisted of MMA, epoxy acrylate, TiO2 and adhesive monomer 4-META was prepared and the adhesive bonding strength between the opaque resin and Ni-Cr alloy which is for crown and bridge works, was measured. As the results, the opaque resin applied on the metal casting with proper surface treatment showed an excellent adhesive bonding strength of 260 kg/cm2. This value did not decreased even after subjected to 300 time thermal cyclings (4 degrees C and 60 degrees C). After a three months immersion in water at 37 degrees C, adhesive bonding strength decreased slightly to 190 kg/cm2.

  3. Influence of dentin contamination by temporary cements on the bond strength of adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josimeri Hebling

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin contaminated by temporary cements with or without eugenol. Method: Flat dentin surfaces were obtained from twenty-four human third molars. With exception of the control group (n=8, the surfaces were covered with Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA or Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA and kept in an oven at 37oC for seven days. After removing the cements, the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA or Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan were applied in accordance with the manufacturers’ recommendations, and then the crowns were constructed in of resin composite. The teeth were sectioned into specimens with a cross-sectional bond area of 0.81mm2, which were sub mitted to microtensile testing in a mechanical test machine at an actuator speed of 0.5mm/min. The data were analyzed by t- and ANOVA tests, complemented by Tukey tests (α=0.05. Results: For Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA, bond strength did not differ statistically (p>0.05 for all the experimental conditions. For Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan, only the Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA Group showed significantly lower bond strength (30.1±13.8 MPa in comparison with the other groups; control (38.9±13.5 MPa and Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA (42.1±11.0 MPa, which showed no significant difference between them.Conclusion: It was concluded that the previous covering of dentin with temporary cement containing eugenol had a deleterious effect on the adhesive performance of the self-etching system only.

  4. The behavior of implant-supported dentures and abutments using the cemented cylinder technique with different resinous cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivete Aparecida de Mathias Sartori

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the behavior of implant-supported dentures and their components, made by cemented cylinder technique, using threetypes of resin cements. Methods: Fifty three patients, of whom 26 were women and 27 men, aged between 25 and 82 years. Results: With partial (54.43% and total (45.57% implant-supported dentures, of the Cone Morse, external and internal hexagon types (Neodent®, Curitiba, Brazil, totaling 237 fixations, were analyzed. The resin cements used were Panavia® (21.94%, EnForce® (58.23% and Rely X® (19.83% and the components were used in accordance with the Laboratory Immediate Loading - Neodent® sequence. The period of time of denture use ranged between 1 and 5 years. The results reported that 5(2.1% cylinders were loosened from metal structure (both belonging to Rely X group, 2(0.48% implants were lost after the first year of use, 16(6.75% denture retention screws wereloosened and 31(13.08% abutment screws were unloosened.Conclusion: The reasons for these failures probably are: metal structure internal retention failure, occlusal pattern, cementation technique and loading conditions. The cemented cylinder technique was effective when used in partial and total implant-supported rehabilitations, keeping prosthetic components stable, despite the resin cement utilized. However, further clinical studies must be conducted.

  5. Comparison of shear bond strength of calcium-enriched mixture cement and mineral trioxide aggregate to composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskoee, Siavash Savadi; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Bahari, Mahmoud; Motahari, Paria; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Asgary, Saeed

    2011-11-01

    Adhesion of composite resin and pulp capping biomaterials remarkably influences treatment outcomes. This in vitro study aimed to compare the shear bond strength of composite resin to calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) with or without acid etching. A total of 90 cylindrical acrylic blocks containing a central hole, measuring 4 mm diameter and 2 mm height were prepared. The blocks were randomly divided into three experimental groups based on being filled with CEM, MTA or RMGI. Samples in each group were then randomly divided into two subgroups, i.e. with or without phosphoric acid etching. Placing composite resin cylinders on the samples, shear bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. Failure modes of the samples were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests. Shear bond strengths in the etched and nonetched samples were not significantly different (p = 0.60). There was a significant difference in shear bond strength values of the three experimental materials (p strength values (p material and surface etching was statistically significant (p shear bond strength of these materials to composite resin. Besides, shear bond strength values of MTA and CEM to composite resin, are favorable due to their cohesive mode of failure. When MTA and CEM biomaterials are used in vital pulp therapy, it is advisable to cover these materials with RMGI. In addition, if it is not possible to use RMGI, the surface etching of MTA and CEM biomaterials is not necessary prior to composite restoration using total-etch adhesive resin.

  6. Leaching of Co and Cs from spent ion exchange resins in cement ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2003-08-22

    Aug 22, 2003 ... Abstract. The leaching rate of 60Co and 137Cs from the spent cation exchange resins in cement–bentonite matrix has been studied. The solidification matrix was a standard Portland cement mixed with 290–350 (kg/m3) spent cation exchange resins, with or without 2–5% of bentonite clay. The leaching ...

  7. Innovations in bonding to zirconia based ceramics: part III. Phosphate monomer resin cements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirmohammadi, H.; Aboushelib, M.N.M.; Salameh, Z.; Feilzer, A.J.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare the bond strength values and the ranking order of three phosphate monomer containing resin cements using microtensile (μTBS) and microshear (μSBS) bond strength tests. Materials and methods Zirconia discs (Procera Zirconia) were bonded to resin composite discs (Filtek Z250) using

  8. Bonding of resin-based luting cements to zirconia with and without the use of ceramic priming agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Nakayama, Daisuke; Komine, Futoshi; Blatz, Markus B; Matsumura, Hideo

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated and compared bonding characteristics of resin-based luting agents and special ceramic primers to zirconia. Disk specimens (n = 242) were fabricated from zirconium dioxide ceramics (Katana) and bonded with four resin-based luting agents without priming. In addition, zirconia was bonded with 7 bondingsystem combinations of three priming agents and three resin-based luting agents. Two of the resin-based luting agents and two ceramic priming agents contain an identical adhesive monomer, 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP), either in the material itself or in the priming agent. Shear bond strength was determined after 20,000 cycles of thermocycling. The Kruskal-Wallis test was performed for both pre- and post-thermocycling groups to evaluate the difference among primer and luting agent variations. On the basis of the Kruskal-Wallis test, Steel-Dwass multiple comparisons were further performed to compare the difference among four luting agents and seven conbinations of three primers and three luting agents for both pre- and post-thermocycling conditions. Within the four unprimed groups, Clearfil SA Cement (5.8 MPa) and Panavia F 2.0 (6.7 MPa) showed statistically higher post-thermocycling bond strength than the other materials (0.1 MPa) (p primed with Monobond Plus (4.0-4.6 MPa) (p priming agents containing the adhesive monomer MDP provide better bond strength to zirconia than do other systems.

  9. Adhesive restorations: comparative evaluation between the adhesion of the glass-ceramics to the composite cement and the adhesion of the ceromer to the composite cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceruti, P; Erovigni, F; Casella, F; Lombardo, S

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this work is to compare the adhesion of the glass-ceramic (empress II) to the composite cement and the adhesion of the ceromer to the composite cement. From each of the above materials, 10 little blocks, of 8 x 6 x 2 mm size, have been prepared. All the surface treatments suggested by the manufacturing industry have been performed: sandblasting and acid-etching of the ceramic, ceromer surface roughening with diamond bur and silanization and bonding application on both materials. A homogeneous layer of cement has been placed between couples of blocks of the same material and photopolymerised. Every sample, consisting of 2 bonded blocks, has been submitted to a traction force on a universal test machine connected with a computerized measure system (SINTEC D/10). Samples have been anchored to the machine binding devices by a bicomponent epoxy glue. Data on the breaking charge have been recorded and an analysis of the broken surfaces has been performed in order to classify the breaking modalities. The results ontained showed that the composite-glass-ceramic adhesion force (mean value 64 Mpa) was remarkably higher than the composite-ceromer adhesion (mean value 37.21 Mpa). The analysis of the broken surfaces by SEM showed that a mixed fracture occurred in all samples (both partly adhesive and cohesive).

  10. Influence of curing protocol and ceramic composition on the degree of conversion of resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Daniel Septimio Lanza

    Full Text Available Abstract Due to increasing of aesthetic demand, ceramic crowns are widely used in different situations. However, to obtain long-term prognosis of restorations, a good conversion of resin cement is necessary. Objective: To evaluate the degree of conversion (DC of one light-cure and two dual-cure resin cements under a simulated clinical cementation of ceramic crowns. Material and Methods: Prepared teeth were randomly split according to the ceramic's material, resin cement and curing protocol. The crowns were cemented as per manufacturer's directions and photoactivated either from occlusal suface only for 60 s; or from the buccal, occlusal and lingual surfaces, with an exposure time of 20 s on each aspect. After cementation, the specimens were stored in deionized water at 37°C for 7 days. Specimens were transversally sectioned from occlusal to cervical surfaces and the DC was determined along the cement line with three measurements taken and averaged from the buccal, lingual and approximal aspects using micro-Raman spectroscopy (Alpha 300R/WITec®. Data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA and Tukey test at =5%. Results: Statistical analysis showed significant differences among cements, curing protocols and ceramic type (p<0.001. The curing protocol 3x20 resulted in higher DC for all tested conditions; lower DC was observed for Zr ceramic crowns; Duolink resin cement culminated in higher DC regardless ceramic composition and curing protocol. Conclusion: The DC of resin cement layers was dependent on the curing protocol and type of ceramic.

  11. Shear bond strengths of self-adhesive luting resins fixing dentine to different restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Congxiao; Degrange, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the bond strengths of three self-adhesive resin cements (Rely X Unicem, Maxcem and Multilink Sprint) fixing dentine to four different restorative substrates (Ni-Cr alloy, E-Max glass-ceramic, Y-TZP Zirconia and Adoro micro-filled composite) and to compare their performances with those of two conventional dual-cured luting cements (Variolink II + Total-etch Excite DSC and Multilink Automix + Self-etching Primer A + B). Cylindric specimens (5 x 5 mm) were prepared with the four restorative materials for bonding to human dentine. Three surface treatments were performed depending on the restorative material: (i) Al2O3 50 microm sandblasting (Ni-Cr, Adoro), (ii) #800 SiC polishing (Zirconia, E-Max), (iii) hydrofluoric acid (HF)-etching (E-Max). Twenty-five groups (n = 10) were designed according to luting cements, restorative materials and surface pre-treatments. In some experimental groups, Variolink II and Multilink Automix were coupled with, respectively, a silane primer (Monobond S) and an alloy/zirconia primer (Multilink A/Z primer). Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 h and then loaded in shear until failure. Variolink II and Multilink Automix showed the highest bond strengths, regardless of the restorative substrate, when used with dentine bonding systems and primers, while the weakest bonds were with Maxcem. The bond strength recorded with the two other self-adhesive cements depended on the nature of the restorative substrate. Increasing retention at the interfaces (i.e., HF ceramic etching) and using specific primers significantly improves the bond strength of luted restorative materials to dentine.

  12. Cement waste-form development for ion-exchange resins at the Rocky Flats Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veazey, G.W. [Los Alamos National Labs., NM (United States); Ames, R.L. [Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, CO (United States)

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the development of a cement waste form to stabilize ion-exchange resins at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). These resins have an elevated potential for ignition due to inadequate wetness and contact with nitrates. The work focused on the preparation and performance evaluation of several Portland cement/resin formulations. The performance standards were chosen to address Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and Environmental Protection Agency Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements, compatibility with Rocky Flats equipment, and throughput efficiency. The work was performed with surrogate gel-type Dowex cation- and anion-exchange resins chosen to be representative of the resin inventory at RFETS. Work was initiated with nonactinide resins to establish formulation ranges that would meet performance standards. Results were then verified and refined with actinide-containing resins. The final recommended formulation that passed all performance standards was determined to be a cement/water/resin (C/W/R) wt % ratio of 63/27/10 at a pH of 9 to 12. The recommendations include the acceptable compositional ranges for each component of the C/W/R ratio. Also included in this report are a recommended procedure, an equipment list, and observations/suggestions for implementation at RFETS. In addition, information is included that explains why denitration of the resin is unnecessary for stabilizing its ignitability potential.

  13. Modification of resin modified glass ionomer cement by addition of bioactive glass nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valanezhad, Alireza; Odatsu, Tetsuro; Udoh, Koichi; Shiraishi, Takanobu; Sawase, Takashi; Watanabe, Ikuya

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, sol-gel derived nanoparticle calcium silicate bioactive glass was added to the resin-modified light cure glass-ionomer cement to assess the influence of additional bioactive glass nanoparticles on the mechanical and biological properties of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. The fabricated bioactive glass nanoparticles added resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (GICs) were immersed in the phosphate buffer solution for 28 days to mimic real condition for the mechanical properties. Resin-modified GICs containing 3, 5 and 10 % bioactive glass nanoparticles improved the flexural strength compared to the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement and the samples containing 15 and 20 % bioactive glass nanoparticles before and after immersing in the phosphate buffer solution. Characterization of the samples successfully expressed the cause of the critical condition for mechanical properties. Cell study clarified that resin-modified glass-ionomer cement with high concentrations of bioactive glass nanoparticles has higher cell viability and better cell morphology compare to control groups. The results for mechanical properties and toxicity approved that the considering in selection of an optimum condition would have been a more satisfying conclusion for this study.

  14. Comparison of shear bond strength of self-etch and self-adhesive cements bonded to lithium disilicate, enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Jennifer; Ali, Mohsin; Belles, Donald

    2015-11-01

    Comparison of shear bond strength of self-etch and self-adhesive cements bonded to lithium disilicate, enamel and dentin. With several self-adhesive resin cements currently available, there is confusion about which product and technique is optimal for bonding ceramic restorations to teeth. The objective of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of lithium disilicate cemented to enamel and dentin using 5 adhesive cements. 100 lithium disilicate rods were pretreated with 5% hydrofluoric acid, silane, and cemented to 50 enamel and 50 dentin surfaces using five test cements: Variolink II (etch-and-rinse) control group, Clearfil Esthetic (two step self-etch), RelyX Unicem, SpeedCEM, and BifixSE (self-adhesive). All specimens were stored (37 degrees C, 100% humidity) for 24 hours before testing their shear bond strength using a universal testing machine (Instron). Debonded surfaces were observed under a low-power microscope to assess the location and type of failure. The highest bond strength for both enamel and dentin were recorded for Variolink II, 15.1MPa and 20.4MPa respectively, and the lowest were recorded for BifixSE, 0.6MPa and 0.9MPa respectively. Generally, higher bond strengths were found for dentin (7.4MPa) than enamel (5.3MPa). Tukey's post hoc test showed no significant difference between Clearfil Esthetic and SpeedCem (p = 0.059), Unicem and SpeedCem (p = 0.88), and Unicem and BifixSE (p = 0.092). All cements bonded better to lithium disilicate than to enamel or dentin, as all bond failures occurred at the tooth/adhesive interface except for Variolink II. Bond strengths recorded for self-adhesive cements were very low compared to the control "etch and rinse" and self-etch systems. Further improvements are apparently needed in self-adhesive cements for them to replace multistep adhesive systems. The use of conventional etch and rinse cements such as Veriolink II should be preferred for cementing all ceramic restorations over self-adhesive cements

  15. Color management of porcelain veneers: influence of dentin and resin cement colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozic, Alma; Tsagkari, Maria; Khashayar, Ghazal; Aboushelib, Moustafa

    2010-01-01

    Porcelain veneers have become an interesting treatment option to correct the shape and color of anterior teeth. Because of their limited thickness and high translucency, achieving a good color match is influenced by several variables. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of natural dentin and resin cement colors on final color match of porcelain veneers. A preselected shade tab (A1) was chosen as the target color for a maxillary central incisor, and its color parameters (L*a*b*) were measured using a digital spectrophotometer (SpectroShade, MHT). Nine natural dentin colors (Natural Die Material, Ivoclar Vivadent) representing a wide range of tooth colors were used to prepare resin replicas of the maxillary central incisor with a standard preparation for porcelain veneers. The prepared porcelain veneers (IPS Empress Esthetic, A1, 0.6 mm thick, Ivoclar Vivadent) were cemented on the resin dies (nine groups of natural dentin colors) using seven shades of resin cement (Variolink Veneers, Ivoclar Vivadent). The L*a*b* values of the cemented veneers were measured, and DE values were calculated against the preselected target color (A1). DE greater than 3.3 was considered as a significant color mismatch detectable by the human eye. The seven shades of resin cement had no significant influence on the final color of the veneers, as the measured DE values were almost identical for every test group. On the other hand, the color of natural dentin was a significant factor that influenced final color match. None of the 63 tested combinations (nine natural dentin colors and seven resin cement colors) produced an acceptable color match. Thin porcelain veneers cannot mask underlying tooth color even when different shades of resin cement are used. Incorporation of opaque porcelain (high chroma) may improve final color match.

  16. [Color stability of ceromer veneers/resin cements after accelerated ageing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Likai; Liu, Yanan; Zheng, Yan; Li, Pingping; Shi, Lianshui

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the color stability of ceromer veneers/resin cements after accelerated ageing, and to provide the reference for clinical application and choice. Fifteen groups of ceromer veneers/resin cements samples, five samples in each group, were prepared as experimental groups.In the fifteen groups, ceromer veneers in three thickness (1.00, 0.75, 0.50 mm) and resin cements of five shades(A1,A3, B 0.5, WO, TR), were matched through permutation and combination. Three groups of ceromer veneers with different thickness (1.00, 0.75, 0.50 mm) were used as control groups. All samples were put into xenon lamp ageing instrument to accelerate ageing.Spectrophotometer were used to measure the lightness(L(*)), red green color(a(*)) and blue yellow color(b(*)) of samples before and after accelerated ageing process, and the change of lightness (ΔL) , red green color (Δa) , blue yellow color (Δb) and color variation(ΔE) were calculated.We investigated the effect of thickness of ceromer veneer and color of resin cement on color variation by using analysis of variance. The thickness factor and color factor showed significant effect on ΔE values, and they have interaction (P veneer and the color of resin cement could both affect the color stability of ceromer veneers/resin cements. The changes of lightness and color in ceromer veneers/resin cements were considered clinically acceptable after accelerated ageing.

  17. Relationship Between Simulated Gap Wear and Generalized Wear of Resin Luting Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, A; Barkmeier, W W; Takamizawa, T; Latta, M A; Miayazaki, M

    The relationship between the simulated gap wear and generalized wear of resin luting cements was investigated. Five resin luting cements, G-Cem LinkForce (GL), Multilink Automix (MA), NX3 Nexus, Panavia V5 (PV), and RelyX Ultimate were evaluated and subsequently subjected to a wear challenge in a Leinfelder-Suzuki (Alabama) wear simulation device. Half of the specimens from each resin luting cement were photo-cured for 40 seconds and the other half were not photo-cured. The simulated gap and generalized wear were generated using a flat-ended stainless steel antagonist. Wear testing was performed in a water slurry of polymethyl methacrylate beads, and the simulated gap and generalized wear were determined using a noncontact profilometer (Proscan 2100) in conjunction with the Proscan and AnSur 3D software. A strong relationship was found between the gap wear and generalized wear simulation models. The simulated gap wear and generalized wear of the resin luting cements followed similar trends in terms of both volume loss and mean depth of wear facets with each curing method. Unlike the simulated gap wear and generalized wear of GL and PV, those of MA, NX, and RU were influenced by the curing method. The results of this study indicate that simulated gap wear of resin luting cements is very similar to simulated generalized wear. In most cases, dual curing appears to ensure greater wear resistance of resin luting cements than chemical curing alone. The wear resistance of some resin luting cements appears to be material dependent and is not influenced by the curing method.

  18. Review of methyl methacrylate (MMA)/tributylborane (TBB)-initiated resin adhesive to dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Taira, Yohsuke; Imai, Yohji

    2014-01-01

    This review, focusing mainly on research related to methyl methacrylate/tributylborane (MMA/TBB) resin, presents the early history of dentin bonding and MMA/TBB adhesive resin, followed by characteristics of resin bonding to dentin. Bond strengths of MMA/TBB adhesive resin to different adherends were discussed and compared with other bonding systems. Factors affecting bond strength (such as conditioners, primers, and medicaments used for dental treatment), bonding mechanism, and polymerizatio...

  19. Evaluation of shear bond strength of silorane resin to conventional, resin-modified glass ionomers and nano-ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babannavar, Roopa; Shenoy, Arvind

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the shear bond strength of silorane composite resin to conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements. Shear bond strengths of Vitrebond (Group I), Ketac N100 (Group II) and Ketac Bond (Group III) glass ionomer cements to the composite Filtek P90 were evaluated. The bond strength was tested using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Comparison between the groups was carried out using an analysis of variance test and pairwise comparison using Tukey's post-hoc test with a significance level of P ≤ 0.05. The measured bond strengths were 17.14 ± 3.39 MPA for Group I (Vitrebond), 15.34 ± 3.39 MPa for Group II (Ketac N100) and 14.12 ± 2.79 MPa for Group III (Ketac Bond). Group I achieved higher bond strength than Groups II and III. Resin-modified glass ionomer cement (i.e. Vitrebond) appears to be preferable to nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement (i.e. Ketac N100) and conventional glass ionomer cement (i.e. Ketac Bond) as a base under low-shrink posterior composite (i.e. Filtek P90). © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Regional bond strength to lateral walls in class I and II ceramic inlays luted with four resin cements and glass-ionomer luting agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Ana G; González-Lopez, Santiago; Bolaños-Carmona, Victoria; Maurício, Paulo J; Félix, Sergio A; Carvalho, Patricia A

    2011-10-01

    To investigate regional shear bond strength to lateral walls of ceramic inlays in occlusal and occlusoproximal cavities using etch-and-rinse and self-adhesive resin cements and a glass-ionomer luting agent. IPS e.max Press ceramic inlays were made in 50 Class I and 50 Class II standardized cavities in intact extracted human molars and divided into 5 luting agent subgroups (n = 10): Variolink II (VL); Multilink Sprint (MLS); Multilink Automix (MLA); RelyX Unicem (RLX), and Ketac Cem Aplicap (KC). Inlays were pre-etched with IPS Ceramic etching gel for 60s. After 48 h, two disks of ca 1.0 mm thickness, one of superficial and the other of deep dentin, were push-out tested in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The mode of failure was determined under a stereomicroscope at 20X. Data were analyzed with one way ANOVA, and Scheffé's test was used for post-hoc comparisons (α = 0.05). There were no significant differences in shear bond strength between Class I and Class II cavities for the dual-curing system in light-curing mode (VL=MLS=RLX), except that RLX demonstrated greater bond strength to deep dentin in Class II cavities. Bond strength values were significantly higher on deep than on superficial dentin. KC showed the worst result. Failures were mixed (adhesive/cohesive) for the resin luting cements and solely adhesive (cement/ceramic) for the glass-ionomer luting agent. Dual-curing etch-and-rinse or self-etching self-adhesive resin luting cements achieved greater bond strength when light curing was applied, with no differences between Class I and Class II cavities but higher values for deep vs superficial dentin. The weakest adhesion was obtained with glass-ionomer luting agent in both cavity types.

  1. Ultrasonic measurement of the effects of adhesive application and power density on the polymerization behavior of core build-up resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunada, Noriatsu; Ishii, Ryo; Shiratsuchi, Koji; Shimizu, Yusuke; Tsubota, Keishi; Kurokawa, Hiroyasu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2013-01-01

    To use ultrasonic measurements to monitor the effects of adhesive application and power density on the polymerization behavior of dual-cured core build-up resins. Ultrasonic measurements were carried out using a pulser-receiver, transducers and an oscilloscope. The core build-up resins were mixed, inserted into a transparent mold and then placed onto a sample stage with or without self-etch adhesive. Power densities of 0 (no light irradiation), 200 and 600 mW/cm(2) were used for curing. The transit time through the core build-up resin disk was divided by the specimen thickness to obtain the longitudinal sound velocity (V). Light irradiation of the core build-up resins at a power density of 600 mW/cm(2) caused V values to rise to an initial plateau of 1550-1650 m/s, then to rise rapidly to a second plateau of 2800-3200 m/s. The rate of V increase was slower when the resin cements were light-irradiated and became faster when irradiated at a higher power density. There were no significant differences between the groups with or without adhesive. The polymerization behavior of the core build-up resins was affected by the power density of the curing unit. The influence of adhesive application differed among the core build-up resins tested.

  2. Evaluation of the Effect of Sodium Hypochlorite Irrigant on Pull-out Bond Strength of FRC Posts Using Different Resin Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Boruziniat

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To evaluate the effects of using sodium hypochlorite irrigant on pull-out bond strength of self-etch and self-adhesive resin cements to dentin. Methods: Sixty intact premolars were decoronated and the root canals were prepared by step-back technique. The teeth were divided into two groups according to the irrigant used during root canal treatment: 5.25% sodium hypochlorite and normal saline. The canals were obturated and after 48 hours storage, 8mm depth post space was prepared with application of normal saline as irrigant. Then, each group was divided into two subgroups depending on the type of the cements used for cementation of fiber reinforced composite (FRC posts (Panavia F2or Embrace. The pull-out bond strength test was evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed by Two-way AONVA. Results: The type of cement had no statistically significant effect on the bond strength; however, the type of irrigant was statistically effective. There was no interaction between two independent variables. The application of sodium hypochlorite significantly decreased the pull-out bond strength in Embrace cement in comparison with the use of normal saline. Conclusion: The type of irrigants used in endodontic treatment may affect on bond strength of FRC posts cemented by self-adhesive cements

  3. An evaluation of commercial and experimental resin-modified glass-ionomer cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchanavasita, Widchaya

    Glass-ionomer cement (GIG) has become widely accepted as a restorative material due to its bonding ability and sustained release of fluoride. The cement is, however, sensitive to moisture imbalance and lacks toughness. Recently, resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RMGIC) have been introduced. These materials contain monomeric species, such as 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) in addition to the components of the conventional glass-ionomer cements. Disadvantages of RMGICs include a relatively high contraction and exotherm on polymerisation. HEMA is known to be cytotoxic, leading to problems of biocompatibility, and polyHEMA swells on exposure to water, leading to dimensional instability of the cements. Addressing these problems is important in the development of the RMGICs. Using alternative monomers to replace or reduce the amount of HEMA used in the current RMGIC formulations would be appropriate. This study was divided into two parts. Initially certain properties such as water sorption, micro-hardness, flexural strength and polymerisation exotherm of commercially available RMGICs were evaluated. Long-term storage of RMGICs in aqueous solutions resulted in their high water uptakes and solubilities and large volumetric expansions. However, the surface hardness and strengths of the restorative grade RMGICs were not affected on storage in distilled water. When the materials were immersed in artificial saliva, significantly higher water uptake were obtained; the equilibrium water uptake were not reached after 20 months. As a consequence, plastic behaviour and reduced surface hardness were observed. The RMGICs also produced high exotherm during polymerisation. The second part of the study investigated the use of an experimental resin as an alternative to HEMA. The experimental resin has the advantage of low toxicity to the pulp and relatively low polymerisation shrinkage. This study compared the polymerisations of the resin and HEMA, and of mixtures of these two

  4. Interfacial adhesion of dental ceramic-resin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, Alvaro

    The clinical success of resin bonding procedures for indirect ceramic restorations and ceramic repairs depends on the quality and durability of the bond between the ceramic and the resin. The quality of this bond will depend upon the bonding mechanisms that are controlled in part by the surface treatment that promotes micromechanical and/or chemical bonding to the substrate. The objective of this study is to correlate interfacial toughness (K A) with fracture surface morphological parameters of the dental ceramic-resin systems as a function of ceramic surface treatment. The analytical procedures focused on characterizing the microstructure and fracture properties of EmpressRTM ceramics (a leucite-based core ceramic, two lithia disilicate-based core ceramics, and a glass veneer) and determining the ceramic-resin adhesion zone bond strength characteristics. Microstructure and composition are controlling factors in the development of micromechanical retention produced by etching. Silane treated ceramics negated the effect of surface roughening produced by etching, inducing lower surface energy of the ceramic and, reduced bonding effectiveness. There was a positive correlation between WA, tensile bond strength (a), and KA, i.e., higher mean WA value, and higher mean sigma and KA values. This study suggests that (1) the sigma and KA values for ceramic bonded to resin are affected by the ceramic microstructure and the ceramic surface treatments; (2) the definition of the adhesion zone is essential to classify the modes of failure, which should be an integral component of all failure analyses; (3) the microtensile test may be preferable to conventional shear or flexural tests as an indicator of composite-ceramic bond quality; and (4) careful microscopic analysis of fracture surfaces and an x-ray dot map can produce a more consistent and complete description of the fracture process and interpretation of the modes of failure. The mode of failure and fractographic analyses

  5. Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laili, Zalina, E-mail: liena@nm.gov.my [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, 43600, Selangor Malaysia (Malaysia); Waste and Environmental Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Yasir, Muhamad Samudi [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, 43600, Selangor Malaysia (Malaysia); Wahab, Mohd Abdul [Waste and Environmental Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material i.e. biochar is described in this paper. Different percentage of biochar (0%, 5%, 8%, 11%, 14% and 18%) was investigated in this study. The characteristics such as compressive strength and leaching behavior were examined in order to evaluate the performance of solidified radioactive waste resins. The results showed that the amount of biochar affect the compressive strength of the solidified resins. Based on the data obtained for the leaching experiments performed, only one formulation showed the leached of Cs-134 from the solidified radioactive waste resins.

  6. Effects of some chemical surface modifications on resin zirconia adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Wong, Hai Ming

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of various chemical surface modifications on adhesion between zirconia and resin adhesive. Pre-sintered zirconia discs were sectioned from commercial cylindrical blocks and polished with abrasive papers under running tap water. All the discs were randomly divided into five study groups according to the methods of surface treatment, including: the control group (fully sintered, without any modification), group S (fully sintered and sandblasted with silica coated alumina particles), group HN (fully sintered and etched with a blend of mineral acid solution at 100 °C for 25 min), group HF (fully sintered and etched with 48% hydrofluoric acid solution at 100 °C for 25 min), and group Si (coated with silica particles and then fully sintered). The mean value of surface roughness was evaluated before further treatment. Resin stubs (3.6mm in diameter and 3mm in height) were adhered and light cured on each zirconia disc after the application of a silane coupling agent. In each group, all the samples were further divided into three subgroups with each n=12, one for the measurement of initial adhesion strength (shear bond) value and the other two were tested after thermal cycling for 10,000 and 20,000 cycles, respectively. The results were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Turkey HSD (pzirconia surface crystallinity. The morphological appearance of zirconia surface after surface treatment was observed with SEM. The control group showed the lowest initial shear bond strength (SBS) value (16.8 ± 2.4 MPa) and did not survive the aging treatments. All the investigated surface treatments improved resin zirconia bond strength significantly, the group S displaying the highest initial value of 25.1 ± 2.7 MPa. However, the highest resistance to the aging effects of thermal cycling was found in group Si. It was further shown in the XRD examination that only the grit-blasting caused the crystalline transformation from tetragonal phase to monoclinic phase (T

  7. Influence of Eugenol-based Sealers on Push-out Bond Strength of Fiber Post Luted with Resin Cement: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Aline Segatto Pires; Leitune, Vicente Castelo Branco; Collares, Fabrício Mezzomo

    2015-09-01

    It is unclear in the literature if the presence of eugenol in root dentin impairs the retention of a fiber post luted with resin cements. The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature and perform meta-analysis on the influence of eugenol on the bond strength of posts luted to root canals. A systematic electronic search was performed in PubMed, Scopus, Lilacs, and Web of Science databases. No language or publication date restrictions were applied. Eligible studies were those that assessed the immediate push-out bond strength of posts cemented to root dentin after the removal of eugenol-based sealer and compared it with a eugenol-free group. Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria although 2 were excluded after full-text reading and 1 study was identified by cross-reference. Nine studies were included in the meta-analysis. Global analysis showed a significant influence of eugenol, which lowered the bond strength of fiber posts cemented to root canals (P negative effect of eugenol on bond strength in all subgroups assessed (P posts luted to root canal with resin cement, regardless of the type of adhesive system or resin cement used. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Aspects of bonding between resin luting cements and glass ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Burrow, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    The bonding interface of glass ceramics and resin luting cements plays an important role in the long-term durability of ceramic restorations. The purpose of this systematic review is to discuss the various factors involved with the bond between glass ceramics and resin luting cements. An electronic Pubmed, Medline and Embase search was conducted to obtain laboratory studies on resin-ceramic bonding published in English and Chinese between 1972 and 2012. Eighty-three articles were included in this review. Various factors that have a possible impact on the bond between glass ceramics and resin cements were discussed, including ceramic type, ceramic crystal structure, resin luting cements, light curing, surface treatments, and laboratory test methodology. Resin-ceramic bonding has been improved substantially in the past few years. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching followed by silanizaiton has become the most widely accepted surface treatment for glass ceramics. However, further studies need to be undertaken to improve surface preparations without HF because of its toxicity. Laboratory test methods are also required to better simulate the actual oral environment for more clinically compatible testing. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of accelerated aging on the color and opacity of resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavam, Maryam; Amani-Tehran, Mohammad; Saffarpour, Mahshid

    2010-01-01

    The color stability of resin cements plays a major role in the esthetic performance of porcelain laminate veneers. Some dual-polymerizable resin cements used to bond porcelain laminates were shown to undergo color changes during service. Some recently produced cements are described as being color stable, but scientific data are not available. The current study evaluated the effect of accelerated aging on the color and opacity of resin cements. The hypothesis was that the auto-polymerizing cements would show less color and opacity stability. Forty (0.7 x 18 mm) feldspathic porcelain disks were prepared and divided into four equal groups. The resin cements were bonded to the disks by application of an identical load of 2.5 kilograms, and they were polymerized according to the manufacturer's instructions. The groups were: Variolink Veneer (light-polymerizing), Variolink II (light-polymerizing), Variolink II (dual-polymerizing) and Multilink (auto-polymerizing). A spectrophotometer was used to measure the following color parameters in the CIE L*a*b* color space on a black and white background: deltaa*, deltab*, deltaL*, deltaC, deltaH, deltaE and deltaCR (contrast ratio). The measurements were performed before and after aging. Paired t- and one-way ANOVA tests were used to analyze the data (alpha = .05). None of the groups showed significant differences in deltaE before and after aging (p > .05); deltaE remained in the range of clinical acceptance (deltaE aging. The studied cements can ensure color stability when used to cement porcelain laminate veneers, but the change in opacity can affect clinical results. Auto polymerizing cements become more opaque with aging; therefore, porcelain restorations may lose their match with other teeth.

  10. Current clinical concepts for adhesive cementation of tooth-colored posterior restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietschi, D; Spreafico, R

    1998-01-01

    The adhesive luting of tooth-colored posterior restorations has long been considered an unreliable clinical procedure. The physical and clinical properties of former base lining materials, the absence of an effective peripheral biological seal during provisionalization, and the use of less than optimal adhesive systems and luting cements have prevented the achievement of satisfactory clinical results. This article describes effective procedures for adhesive cementation based on the application of distinctive layers and the use of densely filled, viscous luting materials.

  11. [Evaluation of the esthetic effect of resin cements on the final color of ceramic veneer restorations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zhang, Shaopu; Xing, Wenzhong; Zhan, Kangru; Wang, Yining

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the influence of various shades of resin cements on the final color of an improved lithium-disilicate pressed glass ceramic veneers and analyze the agreement of resin cements and corresponding try-in pastes. Forty-eight artificial maxillary central incisor teeth were sequenced according to the measured color parameters and divided at random into 8 groups (n = 6). These artificial teeth were prepared following veneer preparation protocol. An improved lithium- disilicate pressed glass ceramic materials (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) were selected as the veneer material. The shape and curvature of each veneer wax pattern were duplicated with the same impression to guarantee the similarity. The ceramic veneer specimens were delivered on the artificial teeth using the corresponding try-in pastes of 8 shades (Variolink Veneer, shades of LV-3, LV-2, MV, HV+2, HV+3; and 3M RelyXTM Veneer, shades of WO, TR, A3) and bonded with the resin cements. A clinical spectrophotometer was used to measure the color parameters of the ceramic veneers before the try-in, during the try-in procedure, and after cementation. ΔE values and C*ab values were calculated. The result of one-way ANOVA indicated that the color changes of ceramic veneer cementation with resin cements were statistically significantly different in the shades of resin cements (P veneer after cementation ranged from 0.93 to 6.79. The color changes of ceramic veneer specimens using the shades of LV-3, HV+3, WO were 3.31, 4.90 and 6.79, respectively (ΔE>3.3). The ΔE values of the ceramic veneer specimens between the resin cements and corresponding try-in pastes were from 0.72 to 1.79 (except the shade of HV+3). The LV-3, HV+3, WO shades were able to change the final color of a ceramic veneer. The color of resin cements and corresponding try-in pastes achieved high agreement (except the shade of HV+3).

  12. Significant shear bond strength improvements of a resin-modified glass ionomer cement with a resin coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, Michael T; Stoeckel, Daniel C; Rawson, Kenneth G; Welch, Dan B

    2017-01-01

    Previous evidence has suggested that resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs) may be sensitive to temperature and moisture changes for the first 24 hours after photopolymerization. To test the hypothesis that a resin coating placed over the surface of an RMGIC restoration would decrease the susceptibility to moisture and temperature conditions, 44 RMGIC samples were prepared in inverted-cone recesses drilled in epoxy resin plates. After abrasion of all samples with 800-grit silicon carbide paper to simulate a diamond bur finish on the surface, a coat of highly filled resin was applied to the experimental group (n = 22) and cured according to the manufacturer's instructions. The plates were thermocycled 500 times between 5°C and 55°C and then maintained at 37°C with 95% humidity. The thermocycled samples were bonded to a second epoxy resin plate filled with RMGIC and subjected to shear bond strength testing. The resin-coated group had a significantly greater mean shear bond strength than the control group (P < 0.05). The resin coating also appeared to affect the mode of failure by significantly increasing the number of mixed failures (P < 0.05). The results suggest that a resin coating protects RMGIC from moisture- and temperature-induced damage and increases shear bond strength.

  13. Influence of resin cement polymerization shrinkage on stresses in porcelain crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Liliana G; Kelly, J Robert

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of polymerization shrinkage of the cement layer on stresses within feldspathic ceramic crowns, using experimentally validated FEA models for (1) increasing occlusal cement thickness; and, (2) bonded versus non-bonded ceramic-cement interfaces. 2-D axial symmetric models simulated stylized feldspathic crowns (1.5mm occlusal thickness) cemented with resin-cement layers of 50-500μm on dentin preparations, being loaded (500N) or not. Ceramic-cement interface was either bonded or not. Cement was bonded to the dentin in all models. Maximum axial shrinkage of 0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 4.65% were simulated. The first principal stresses developing in the cementation surface at the center and at the occluso-axial line-angle of the crown were registered. Polymerization shrinkage of the cement increased tensile stresses in the ceramic, especially in loaded non-bonded crowns for thicker cement layers. Stresses in loaded non-bonded crowns increased as much as 87% when cement shrinkage increased from 0% to 4.65% (100-187MPa), for a 500μm-thick cement. Increasing polymerization shrinkage strain raised the tensile stresses, especially at the internal occlusal-axial line-angle, for bonded crowns. Changes in the polymerization shrinkage strain (from 0% to 4.65%) have little effect on the tensile stresses generated at the cementation surface of the ceramic crowns, when the occlusal cement thickness is thin (approx. 50μm for bonded crowns). However, as the cement becomes thicker stresses within the ceramic become significant. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated posts on bonding of resin cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeld, Anne; Asmussen, Erik

    2004-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of various surface treatments of prefabricated posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White) and zirconia (Cerapost) on the bonding of two resin cements: ParaPost Cement and Panavia F by a diametral tensile strength (DTS) test...... of resin cement to titanium alloy posts was increased by several surface treatments of the post. However, coating with primers as sole treatment had no effect on bonding. With the DTS method applied, none of the surface treatments had an effect on the bonding to glass fiber posts. The bonding of both resin....... The posts received surface treatments in three categories: 1) roughening by sandblasting and hydrofluoric acid etching; 2) application of primer by coating with Alloy Primer, Metalprimer II and Silane and 3) a combination treatment in the form of roughening (sandblasting or etching) supplemented...

  15. Ten-year observation of dentin bonding durability of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin cement--a SEM and TEM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Kanako; Kitasako, Yuichi; Ichinose, Shizuko; Burrow, Michael F; Ariyoshi, Meu; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to assess dentin bond durability of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin cement over ten years, by evaluating the tensile bond strength, and SEM and TEM observations. Tensile bond strength of Super Bond C&B (SB) to bovine dentin was evaluated at 1 day and after 10 years. The mode of failure after debonding was observed by SEM. Interfacial ultrastructure and nanoleakage was observed by TEM at the baseline and after 10 y. The tensile bond strength significantly dropped after 10 y. The failure pattern shifted from cohesive failure in resin towards adhesive failure or cohesive failure in dentin. TEM observation revealed degradation of both resin and collagen networks within the hybrid layer and nanoleakage at the base of the hybrid layer after 10 y. The bond strength of SB to dentin significantly decreased, and the hybrid layer degraded, while the overlying hydrophobic resin layer showed little disintegration over 10 y.

  16. Effect of Different Silane-Containing Solutions on Glass-Ceramic/ Cement Bonding Interacting with Dual-Cure Resin Cements

    OpenAIRE

    Murillo Gómez DDS, MSc, Fabián; De Góes DDS, MSc, PhD, Mário Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of different silane-containing solutions on ceramic-cement bonding and their interaction with different dual-cure resin cements. Forty five glass- ceramic plaques (IPS e.max CAD®) were sandblasted with aluminum oxide for 5s, etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid gel (HF) for 20s and then divided in three groups of 15 each to be treated with different silane-containing solutions: RelyX Ceramic Primer® (AS), Scotchbond Universal® (SU), Clearfil Ceram...

  17. Effect of ultraviolet aging on translucency of resin-cemented ceramic veneers: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Sedanur; Bagis, Bora; Turkaslan, Suha S; Bagis, Yildirim Hakan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the translucency of ceramic veneers cemented with light- or dual-cured resin cements after accelerated aging. A total of 392 specimens were made of shade A1 with 0.5- and 1.0-mm thickness. Light-cured RelyX Veneer and dual-cured Maxcem Elite and Variolink II resin cements were applied on the porcelain discs with a thickness of 0.1 mm. Translucency parameter (TP) values of the ceramic veneers after cementation and UV aging test were evaluated. Statistical analyses were done with ANOVA and Tukey's tests and paired sample t-test (p Veneer Tr (TP = 11.15; p = 0.608), Variolink II Tr (TP = 10.98; p = 0.55), and Maxcem Clear (TP = 11.81; p = 0.702) did not affect the translucency of 1-mm-thick ceramics (TP = 11.38). The aging process affected TP values of both ceramics and cemented ceramics, as the TP values decreased after aging. Among the TP values of opaque shade resin cements, there were significant differences between the "ceramic," "ceramic + RelyX Veneer WO," "ceramic + Variolink II WO," and "ceramic + Maxcem WO" variables for both 0.5 and 1 mm thicknesses (p Veneer Tr," "ceramic + Variolink II Tr," and "ceramic + Maxcem Clear" variables at 0.5 mm thickness, and there were no significant differences between "ceramic," "ceramic + RelyX Veneer Tr," and "ceramic + Variolink II Tr" variables after aging (p > 0.05). The TP of the same color of resin cements varied related to the type or brand. Aging caused both the ceramics and cemented ceramics to become more opaque. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  18. Effect of brand and shade of resin cements on the final color of lithium disilicate ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Doğu Ömür; Ceylan, Gözlem; Yilmaz, Burak

    2017-04-01

    Resin cements are available in various shades from different manufacturers. However, there is no standard for the optical properties of these cements, which may result in differences in the color of translucent ceramic restorations. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of different shades and brands of resin cements on the color of a lithium disilicate ceramic. Ten ceramic disks (11×1.5 mm, shade A2) were fabricated from lithium disilicate high-translucency blocks. Eighty cement disks (11×0.2 mm) were fabricated from 4 brands (Maxcem; Variolink; Clearfil; and RelyX) of resin cements in translucent and universal (shade A2) shades. Color measurements of ceramic specimens were made without (control) and with each brand/shade of resin cement material (test) with a spectrophotometer, and International Commission on Illumination Lab (CIELab) color coordinates were recorded. Color differences (ΔE00) between the control and test groups were calculated. ΔE00 results were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and subsequent pairwise testing. Comparisons were performed using the Student t test, and then all P values were corrected with the step-down Bonferroni procedure (α=.05). The effect on the ΔE00 values (Ptranslucent cement group had significantly higher ΔE00 results than other brands (Ptranslucent and RelyX_universal were significantly different from each other for comparisons within brands (Pceramic was not visually perceptible (ΔE00≤1.30). Clinically unacceptable results (ΔE00>2.25) were observed only for Variolink_translucent cement (2.36). Same-shade resin cements from different manufacturers had different effects on the color of lithium disilicate ceramic. The effects of different shades of resin cements from the same manufacturer on the color of lithium disilicate ceramic were statistically different for only RelyX, which may also be considered clinically different based on clinical acceptability thresholds for color difference values (

  19. Review of methyl methacrylate (MMA)/tributylborane (TBB)-initiated resin adhesive to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Yohsuke; Imai, Yohji

    2014-01-01

    This review, focusing mainly on research related to methyl methacrylate/tributylborane (MMA/TBB) resin, presents the early history of dentin bonding and MMA/TBB adhesive resin, followed by characteristics of resin bonding to dentin. Bond strengths of MMA/TBB adhesive resin to different adherends were discussed and compared with other bonding systems. Factors affecting bond strength (such as conditioners, primers, and medicaments used for dental treatment), bonding mechanism, and polymerization characteristics of MMA/TBB resin were also discussed. This review further reveals the unique adhesion features between MMA/TBB resin and dentin: in addition to monomer diffusion into the demineralized dentin surface, graft polymerization of MMA onto dentin collagen and interfacial initiation of polymerization at the resin-dentin interface provide the key bonding mechanisms.

  20. Influence of glass particle size of resin cements on bonding to glass ceramic: SEM and bond strength evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Fernanda; Moraes, Rafael R; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Boscato, Noéli

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of the filler particle size (micron or submicron) of experimental resin cements on the microtensile bond strength to a glass-ceramic pretreated with hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching or alumina airborne-particle abrasion (AA). Cements were obtained from a Bis-GMA/TEGDMA mixture filled with 60 mass% micron-sized (1 ± 0.2 µm) or submicron-sized (180 ± 30 µm) Ba-Si-Al glass particles. Ceramic blocks (PM9; VITA) were treated with 10% HFA for 60 s or AA for 15 s. Silane and adhesive were applied. Ceramic blocks were bonded to resin composite blocks (Z250; 3M ESPE) using one of the cements. Bonded specimens were sectioned into beams (n = 20/group) and subjected to microtensile bond strength tests. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' tests (5%). Failure modes were classified under magnification. Morphologies of the treated ceramic surfaces and bonded interfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The HFA-submicron group had lower bond strengths than the other groups. All AA-submicron specimens debonded prematurely. Mixed failures were predominant for HFA groups, whereas interfacial failures predominated for AA groups. SEM revealed a honeycomb-like aspect in the HFA-treated ceramic, whereas the AA-treated groups showed an irregular retentive pattern. Continuity of cement infiltration along the bonded interface was more uniform for HFA-treated compared to AA-treated specimens. Cracks toward the bulk of the ceramic were observed in AA-treated specimens. Particle size significantly influenced the ceramic bond strength, whereas surface treatment had a minor effect. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. [Effect of ceramic thickness and resin cement shades on final color of heat-pressed ceramic veneers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, D F; Zhan, K R; Chen, X D; Xing, W Z

    2017-02-09

    Objective: To analyze the effect of ceramic materials thickness and resin cement shades on the final color of ceramic veneers in the discolored teeth, and to investigate the color agreement of try-in pastes to the corresponding resin cements. Methods: Sixty artificial maxillary central incisor teeth (C2 shade) were used to simulate the natural discolored teeth and prepared according to veneer tooth preparation protocol. Veneers of different thickness in the body region (0.50 and 0.75 mm) were fabricated using ceramic materials (LT A2 shade, IPS e.max Press). The ceramic veneer specimens were bonded to the artificial teeth using the 6 shades of resin cements (Variolink Veneer: shades of LV-3, LV-2, HV+3; RelyX™ Veneer: shades of TR, A3, WO) ( n= 5). A clinical spectrophotometer was used to measure the color parameters of ceramic veneers at the cervical, body and incisal regions. Color changes of veneers before and after cementation were calculated and registered as ΔE1, and the changes between try-in paste and the corresponding resin cements were registered as ΔE2. Results: Three-way ANOVA indicated that ΔE1 and ΔE2 values were significantly affected by the ceramic thickness, resin cement shades and measuring regions ( Pveneers were cemented with resin cements in shades of HV+3 and WO. The ΔE2 values of six shades ranged from 0.60-2.56. The shades of HV+3, WO and A3 resin cements were more than 1.60. Conclusions: Different thickness of ceramic materials, resin cement shades and measuring regions could affect the final color of ceramic veneers. The color differences of some resin cements and corresponding try-in pastes might be observed in clinical practice.

  2. Effect of dentine conditioning on adhesion of resin-modified glass ionomer adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamama, H H; Burrow, M F; Yiu, C

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of phosphoric acid as a surface treatment compared to traditional conditioning agents to dentine bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGIC) adhesives. Forty human molars were utilized in microtensile bond strength testing, while another 16 were used for evaluation of the bonded interface with scanning electron microscopy. Three RMGIC adhesives were evaluated: Fuji Bond LC (GC Corp); Riva Bond LC (SDI Ltd); and Ketac N100 (3M-ESPE). Surface treatments were 37% phosphoric acid (5 s) or 25-30% polyacrylic acid (PAA) (10 s), or the manufacturer's method - Fuji Bond LC: Cavity Conditioner (20% PAA + 3% AlCl3 10 s) or Ketac N100 primer: Ketac Nano priming agent (15 s). Teeth were finished with 600-grit SiC paper, surfaces treated and bonded with RMGIC adhesive and stored in distilled water for 24 h then subjected to microtensile bond strength testing. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed adhesion was affected by the 'type of RMGIC adhesive' and 'method of dentine surface treatment' (p < 0.05). The microtensile bond strength of Ketac N100 primer groups was lower than Fuji Bond LC and Riva Bond LC (p < 0.05). For RMGIC adhesives a brief etch with phosphoric acid does not adversely effect short-term bond strengths, but is no better than traditional conditioning with PAA. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  3. An in situ evaluation of the polymerization shrinkage, degree of conversion, and bond strength of resin cements used for luting fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Camilo Andrés; de Oliveira Franco, Ana Paula Gebert; Gomes, Giovana Mongruel; Bittencourt, Bruna Fortes; Kalinowski, Hypolito José; Gomes, João Carlos; Gomes, Osnara Maria Mongruel

    2016-10-01

    The behavior and magnitude of the deformations that occur during polymerization and the behavior of the luting agents of glass fiber posts inside the root canal require quantification. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the in situ polymerization shrinkage, degree of conversion, and bond strength inside the root canal of resin cements used to lute fiber posts. Thirty maxillary canines were prepared to lute fiber posts. The teeth were randomly divided into 2 groups (n=15) according to the cementation system used, which included ARC, the conventional dual-polymerized resin cement RelyX ARC, and the U200 system, a self-adhesive resin cement, RelyX U200. Two fiber optic sensors with recorded Bragg gratings (FBG) were attached to each post before inserting the resin cement inside the root canal to measure the polymerization shrinkage (PS) of the cements in the cervical and apical root regions (με). Specimens were sectioned (into cervical and apical regions) to evaluate bond strength (BS) with a push-out test and degree of conversion (DC) with micro-Raman spectroscopy. Data were statistically analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey honestly significant difference post hoc test (α=.05). The ARC and U200 system showed similar PS values (-276.4 ±129.2 με and -252.1 ±119.2 με, respectively). DC values from ARC were higher (87.5 ±2.7%) than those of U200 (55.9 ±9.7%). The cervical region showed higher DC values (74.8 ±15.2%) and PS values (-381.6 ±53.0 με) than those of the apical region (68.5 ±20.1% and -146.9 ±43.5 με, respectively) for both of the resin cements. BS was only statistically different between the cervical and apical regions for ARC (P<.05). The ARC system showed the highest PS and DC values compared with U200; and for both of the resin cements, the PS and DC values were higher at the cervical region than at the apical region of the canal root. BS was higher in the cervical region only for ARC. Copyright © 2016

  4. Effects of proximal grooves and abutment height on the resistance of resin-cemented crowns in teeth with inadequate resistance: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Chen; Lin, Chun-Li; Ko, Ellen Wen-Ching

    2015-01-01

    The resistance form is a key factor for a successful crown fabrication. This in vitro study evaluates the effects of proximal grooves and abutment height on the resistance of single cast crowns in molars with inadequate resistance. Sixty extracted human molars were prepared to possess 20° of total occlusal convergence for single crown fabrication. All of the prepared teeth were divided into six groups and prepared according to three axial heights (2, 3, and 4 mm) with or without preparing a pair of proximal grooves. Alloy metal copings of 5% titanium were casted and cemented. A self-adhesive modified-resin cement was used for cementation. A lateral dislodgement test was performed with an increasing external force applied at a 45° angulation on a universal testing machine. The force required to dislodge the crown from the tooth or to break the core was recorded. Proximal grooves increased the dislodgement resistance in groups with an abutment height of 4 mm, whereas adding grooves made no significant differences in resistance in groups with abutment heights of 2 and 3 mm. The 2 mm groups exhibited worse performance than the other groups, whether they had proximal grooves or not. An abutment height of 3 mm provided adequate resistance for single cast crowns when self-adhesive modified-resin cement was used. Preparing a pair of proximal grooves on abutments shorter than 4 mm had no significant influence on the resistance.

  5. Shear Bond Strength between Fiber-Reinforced Composite and Veneering Resin Composites with Various Adhesive Resin Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJehani, Yousef A; Baskaradoss, Jagan K; Geevarghese, Amrita; AlShehry, Marey A; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the shear bond strength of different laboratory resin composites bonded to a fiber-reinforced composite substrate with some intermediate adhesive resins. Mounted test specimens of a bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate (StickNet) were randomly assigned to three equal groups. Three types of commercially available veneering resin composites - BelleGlass®, Sinfony®, and GC Gradia® were bonded to these specimens using four different adhesive resins. Half the specimens per group were stored for 24 hours; the remaining were stored for 30 days. There were 10 specimens in the test group (n). The shear bond strengths were calculated and expressed in MPa. Data were analyzed statistically, and variations in bond strength within each group were additionally evaluated by calculating the Weibull modulus. Shear bond values of those composites are influenced by the different bonding resins and different indirect composites. There was a significant difference in the shear bond strengths using different types of adhesive resins (p = 0.02) and using different veneering composites (p veneering composite to bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate is influenced by the brand of the adhesive resin and veneering composite. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  6. Effect of exposure time on the polymerization of resin cement through ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShaafi, Maan M; AlQahtani, Mohammed Q; Price, Richard B

    2014-04-01

    This study measured the effects of using three different exposure times to cure one resin cement through two types of ceramic. One light-curing resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar Vivadent) was exposed for 20 s, 40 s, or 60 s with a BluePhase G2 light (Ivoclar Vivadent) on the high power setting through 1.0 mm of either ZirPress (ZR) or Empress Esthetic (EST) ceramic (Ivoclar Vivadent). The degree of conversion (DC) of the resin was measured 100 s after light exposure. The Knoop microhardness (KHN) was measured 5 min after light exposure and again after 24 h. The DC and KHN results were analyzed with ANOVA followed by Scheffe's post-hoc multiple comparison tests at α = 0.05. Increasing exposure time had a significant effect on the KHN and DC values for the resins exposed through both ceramics. As exposure times increased, the influence of the ceramic was reduced; however, the microhardness values were greater for the cement exposed through EST ceramic. When the exposure time was increased from 20 s to 40 s, microhardness values for the resin increased by 39.6% through the EST ceramic. When exposed for 60 s, there were no differences between the 100-s DC values or 5-min KHN values using either ceramic (p > 0.05). There was an excellent correlation between the DC at 100 s and the microhardness values measured at 5 min. Resin polymerization was greater through EST than ZR ceramic. At least 40 s to 60 s from the Blue- Phase G2 on high power mode is required to cure this resin cement through 1.0 mm of ceramic.

  7. Effect of Different Thicknesses of Pressable Ceramic Veneers on Polymerization of Light-cured and Dual-cured Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seok-Hwan; Lopez, Arnaldo; Berzins, David W; Prasad, Soni; Ahn, Kwang Woo

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the effects of ceramic veneer thicknesses on the polymerization of two different resin cements. A total of 80 ceramic veneer disks were fabricated by using a pressable ceramic material (e.max Press; Ivoclar Vivadent) from a Low Translucency (LT) ingot (A1 shade). These disks were divided into light-cured (LC; NX3 Nexus LC; Kerr) and dual-cured (DC; NX3 Nexus DC; Kerr) and each group was further divided into four subgroups, based on ceramic disk thickness (0.3, 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2 mm). The values of Vickers microhardness (MH) and degree of conversion (DOC) were obtained for each specimen after a 24-hour storage period. Association between ceramic thickness, resin cement type, and light intensity readings (mW/cm(2)) with respect to microhardness and degree of conversion was statistically evaluated by using analysis of variance (ANOVA). For the DOC values, there was no significant difference observed among the LC resin cement subgroups, except in the 1.2 mm subgroup; only the DOC value (14.0 ± 7.4%) of 1.2 mm DC resin cement had significantly difference from that value (28.9 ± 7.5%) of 1.2 mm LC resin cement (p resin cement groups, there was statistically significant difference (p resin cement groups demonstrated higher values than DC resin cement groups. On the other hands, among the DC resin cement subgroups, the MH values of 1.2 mm DC subgroup was significantly lower than the 0.3 mm and 0.6 mm subgroups (p 0.05). The degree of conversion and hardness of the resin cement was unaffected with veneering thicknesses between 0.3 and 0.9 mm. However, the DC resin cement group resulted in a significantly lower DOC and MH values for the 1.2 mm subgroup. While clinically adequate polymerization of LC resin cement can be achieved with a maximum 1.2 mm of porcelain veneer restoration, the increase of curing time or light intensity is clinically needed for DC resin cements at the thickness of more than 0.9 mm.

  8. The effect of glass ionomer and adhesive cements on substance P expression in human dental pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviedes-Bucheli, Javier; Ariza-Garcia, German; Camelo, Patricia; Mejia, Monica; Ojeda, Karyn; Azuero-Holguin, Maria-Mercedes; Abad-Coronel, Dunia; Munoz, Hugo-Roberto

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of glass ionomer and adhesive cements on SP expression in healthy human dental pulp. Forty pulp samples were obtained from healthy premolars where extraction was indicated for orthodontic reasons. In thirty of these premolars a Class V cavity preparation was performed and teeth were equally divided in three groups: Experimental Group I: Glass Ionomer cement was placed in the cavity. Experimental Group II: Adhesive Cement was placed in the cavity. Positive control group: Class V cavities only. The remaining ten healthy premolars where extracted without treatment and served as a negative control group. All pulp samples were processed and SP was measured by radioimmunoassay. Greater SP expression was found in the adhesive cement group, followed by the glass ionomer and the positive control groups. The lower SP values were for the negative control group. ANOVA showed statistically significant differences between groups (padhesive cements provoke a greater SP expression when compared with glass ionomer.

  9. Effect of Ultrasonic Versus Manual Cementation on the Fracture Strength of Resin Composite Laminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M.; Mese, A.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of conventional versus ultrasonic cementation techniques on the fracture strength of resin composite laminates. In addition, the failure modes were assessed. Window-type preparations I mm above the cemento-enamel junction were made on intact human maxillary central

  10. [H(2)O(2) treatment improves the bond strength between glass fiber posts and resin cement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhong, Bo; Tan, Jian guo; Zhou, Jian feng; Chen, Li

    2011-02-18

    To evaluate the effect of etching with H2O2 on the bond strength between epoxy-based glass fiber posts and resin cement. Sixteen epoxy-based glass fiber posts were randomly divided into 4 groups (4 posts in each group) for different surface treatments. Group 1, no surface treatment (Control group); Group 2, treated with silane coupling agent for 60 s; Group 3, immersed in 10% H2O2 for 10 min then treated with silane coupling agent for 60 s; Group 4, immersed in 30% H2O2 for 10 min then treated with silane coupling agent for 60 s. Resin cement was used for the post cementation to form resin slabs which were then sectioned and trimmed into dumbbell shape to obtain microtensile specimens. Microtensile bond strengths were tested and the failure modes were examined with a stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis of microtensile bond strengths was performed with Kruskal-Wallis test. The microtensile bond strengths (standard deviation) were 18.81 (4.04) MPa for Group 1, 26.70 (9.63) MPa for Group 2, 39.07 (6.47) MPa for Group 3, 46.05 (5.97) MPa for Group 4. Etching with H2O2 followed by silanization could significantly improve the bond strength between epoxy-based glass fiber posts and resin cement.

  11. Push-out bond strength of a fiber post system with two resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Mosharraf

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Under the conditions of this study, there was no significant difference between the mean push out bond strength of self-etching and the conventional resin cement systems. The coronal region of the root dentin showed a significantly higher bond strength than the apical region.

  12. The influence of adhesive luting systems on bond strength and failure mode of an indirect micro ceramic resin-based composite veneer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabi, Nasrin; Ghavamnasiri, Marjaneh; Forooghbakhsh, Azadeh

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the bond strength and failure mode of enamel/resin-based composite veneers bonded with three different dual cured resin adhesive systems. Standard preparations for laminate veneer restorations were made on 30 human central incisors using depth cutting burs (0.5 mm depth at the incisal area and 0.3 mm at the gingival area). Thirty indirect laminates were prepared using a highly filled polymeric material (GC Gradia) according to the manufacturer's instructions. After sandblasting the fitting surfaces, the specimens were randomly divided into three groups (ten per group) based on the type of resin cement luting systems; Excite/Variolink II, Single Bond/Rely X Veneer Cement, and Clearfil New Bond/Panavia F. The specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 48 hours. Fracture testing was performed using a universal testing machine where the load was applied from the incisal direction at 135 degrees to the long axis of the tooth (0.5 mm/min). The one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Chi-Square tests were used for statistical analysis at a significance level of p > 0.05. The ANOVA showed no significant difference was found among the groups (P > 0.05). Indirect veneers showed mean enamel bond strength of 114.4 +/- 48 N, 159.7 +/- 83.4 N, and 126.1 +/- 51.7 N with Variolink II, Rely X veneer cement, and Panavia F, respectively. The Chi-Square tests showed no significant difference regarding the failure mode frequencies in different types of failure in the three groups (p>0.05). The failure mode analysis showed mainly adhesive failure in the resin cement/laminate interface in all groups. There was no significant difference in bond strength of veneers with the three different resin cements tested. In addition, there was no significant difference in the frequency of the failure mode in each type of failure among the three test groups. The failure analysis revealed mainly an adhesive failure at the resin cement/veneer interface. The results of this

  13. Effect of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer liner on dentin adhesive interface of Class I cavity walls after thermocycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, P C P; de Almeida Júnior, A A; Francisconi, L F; Casas-Apayco, L C; Pereira, J C; Wang, L; Atta, M T

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze the effect of glass-ionomer cement as a liner on the dentin/resin adhesive interface of lateral walls of occlusal restorations after thermocycling. Occlusal cavities were prepared in 60 human molars, divided into six groups: no liner (1 and 4); glass-ionomer cement (GIC, Ketac Molar Easymix, 3M ESPE) (2 and 5); and resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC, Vitrebond, 3M ESPE) (3 and 6). Resin composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE) was placed after application of an adhesive system (Adper Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE) that was mixed with a fluorescent reagent (Rhodamine B) to allow confocal microscopy analysis. Specimens of groups 4, 5 and 6 were thermocycled (5°C-55°C) with a dwell time of 30 seconds for 5000 cycles. After this period, teeth were sectioned in approximately 0.8-mm slices. One slice of each tooth was randomly selected for confocal microscopy analysis. The other slices were sectioned into 0.8 mm × 0.8 mm beams, which were submitted to microtensile testing (MPa). Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (p<0.05). There was no detectedstatistical difference on bond strength among groups (α<0.05). Confocal microscopy analysis showed a higher mean gap size in group 4 (12.5 μm) and a higher percentage of marginal gaps in the thermocycled groups. The RMGIC liner groups showed the lowest percentage of marginal gaps. Lining with RMGIC resulted in less gap formation at the dentin/resin adhesive interface after artificial aging. RMGIC or GIC liners did not alter the microtensile bond strength of adhesive system/resin composite to dentin on the lateral walls of Class I restorations.

  14. Can a soda-lime glass be used to demonstrate how patterns of strength dependence are influenced by pre-cementation and resin-cementation variables?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hooi, Paul

    2013-01-01

    To determine how the variability in biaxial flexure strength of a soda-lime glass analogue for a PLV and DBC material was influenced by precementation operative variables and following resin-cement coating.

  15. The impact of endodontic irrigating solutions on the push-out shear bond strength of glass fiber posts luted with resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Pelegrine, Rina Andrea; Silveira, Cláudia Fernandes de Magalhães; Bueno, Vanessa Castro Pestana da Silveira; Alves, Vanessa de Oliveira; Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches; Pereira, Gisele Damiana da Silveira; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2016-01-01

    Resin-based restorative materials, widely used to cement posts, may be influenced by irrigants used during endodontic chemical-mechanical preparation. This study evaluated the impact of endodontic irrigating solutions and adhesive cement systems on the push-out shear bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin. Ninety-six bovine incisors were divided into 12 groups (4 irrigants × 3 resin cements; n = 8). Prepared canals were irrigated with saline solution, 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 5.25% NaOCl, or 2% chlorhexidine gel, and posts were cemented with RelyX ARC, Panavia F, or RelyX U100. The bond strength was evaluated by means of the push-out test, and results were subjected to analysis of variance. The mean bond strength observed for the combination of 5.25% NaOCl irrigant and RelyX U100 cement was significantly lower (8.82 MPa) than the values found for the other groups (P fiber posts to dentin.

  16. The efficiency of different light sources to polymerize resin cement beneath porcelain laminate veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usumez, A; Ozturk, A N; Usumez, S; Ozturk, B

    2004-02-01

    Plasma arc light units for curing resin composites have been introduced with the claim of relatively short curing times. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of two different light sources to polymerize dual curing resin cement beneath porcelain laminate veneers. Twenty extracted healthy human maxillary centrals were used. Teeth were sectioned 2 mm below the cemento-enamel junction and crown parts were embedded into self-cure acrylic resin, labial surface facing up. Cavity preparation was carried out on labial surfaces. These teeth were divided into two groups of 10 each. The resin cement/veneer combination was exposed to two different photo polymerization units. A conventional halogen light (Hilux 350, Express Dental Products) and a plasma arc light (Power PAC, ADT) were used to polymerize resin cement. Ten specimens were polymerized conventionally (40 s) and the other specimens by plasma arc curing (PAC) (6 s). Two samples from each tooth measuring 1.2 x 1.2 x 5 mm were prepared. These sections were subjected to microshear testing and failure values were recorded. Statistically significant differences were found between the bond strength of veneers exposed to conventional light and PAC unit (P < 0.001). Samples polymerized with halogen light showed better bond strength. The results of this study suggest that the curing efficiency of PAC through ceramic was lower compared with conventional polymerization for the exposure durations tested in this study.

  17. The Effect of Glass Ionomer and Adhesive Cements on Substance P Expression in Human Dental Pulp

    OpenAIRE

    Caviedes Bucheli, Javier; Ariza García, Germán; Camelo, Patricia; Mejía, Mónica; Ojeda, Karyn; Azuero Holguin, María Mercedes; Abad Coronel, Dunia; Munoz, Hugo-Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of glass ionomer and adhesive cements on SP expression in healthy human dental pulp. Study Design: Forty pulp samples were obtained from healthy premolars where extraction was indicated for orthodontic reasons. In thirty of these premolars a Class V cavity preparation was performed and teeth were equally divided in three groups: Experimental Group I: Glass Ionomer cement was placed in the cavity. Experimental Group II: Adhesive ...

  18. Effect of resin coating on adhesion and microleakage of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing fabricated all-ceramic crowns after occlusal loading: a laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitayama, Shuzo; Pilecki, Peter; Nasser, Nasser A; Bravis, Theodora; Wilson, Ron F; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji; Watson, Timothy F; Foxton, Richard M

    2009-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of resin coating and occlusal loading on adhesion and microleakage of all-ceramic crowns. Molars were prepared for an all-ceramic crown and were divided into two groups: non-coated (control) and resin-coated with Clearfil Tri-S Bond. Crowns were fabricated using CEREC 3 and cemented using Clearfil Esthetic Cement. After 24 h of storage in water, the restored teeth in each group were divided into two subgroups: unloaded, or loaded while stored in water. Mechanical loading was achieved with an axial force of 80 N at 2.5 cycles s(-1) for 250,000 cycles. After immersion in Rhodamine B, the specimens were sectioned and processed for microleakage evaluation by confocal microscopy, which was followed by further sectioning for microtensile bond testing. Loading had no significant effect on microleakage in either the resin-coated or non-resin-coated groups. Resin coating did not reduce the microleakage at the dentine interface but increased the microleakage at the enamel interface. All the beams fractured during slicing when non-coated and loaded. The bond strengths of non-coated and unloaded, resin-coated and unloaded, and resin-coated and loaded groups were 15.82 +/- 4.22, 15.17 +/- 5.24, and 12.97 +/- 5.82 MPa, respectively. Resin coating with Clearfil Tri-S Bond improved the bonding of resin cement to dentine for loaded specimens. However, it was not effective in reducing the microleakage, regardless of whether it was loaded or unloaded.

  19. Shear bond strength of Biodentine, ProRoot MTA, glass ionomer cement and composite resin on human dentine ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaup, Markus; Dammann, Christoph Heinrich; Schäfer, Edgar; Dammaschke, Till

    2015-04-19

    The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of Biodentine, ProRoot