WorldWideScience

Sample records for adhesive dynamics part

  1. Urethane/Silicone Adhesives for Bonding Flexing Metal Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Paul D.

    2004-01-01

    Adhesives that are blends of commercially available urethane and silicone adhesives have been found to be useful for bonding metal parts that flex somewhat during use. These urethane/silicone adhesives are formulated for the specific metal parts to be bonded. The bonds formed by these adhesives have peel and shear strengths greater than those of bonds formed by double-sided tapes and by other adhesives, including epoxies and neat silicones. In addition, unlike the bonds formed by epoxies, the bonds formed by these adhesives retain flexibility. In the initial application for which the urethane/silicone adhesives were devised, there was a need to bond spring rings, which provide longitudinal rigidity for inflatable satellite booms, with the blades that provide the booms axial strength. The problem was to make the bonds withstand the stresses, associated with differences in curvature between the bonded parts, that arose when the booms were deflated and the springs were compressed. In experiments using single adhesives (that is, not the urethane/ silicone blends), the bonds were broken and, in each experiment, it was found that the adhesive bonded well with either the ring or with the blade, but not both. After numerous experiments, the adhesive that bonded best with the rings and the adhesive that bonded best with the blades were identified. These adhesives were then blended and, as expected, the blend bonded well with both the rings and the blades. The two adhesives are Kalex (or equivalent) high-shear-strength urethane and Dow Corning 732 (or equivalent) silicone. The nominal mixture ratio is 5 volume parts of the urethane per 1 volume part of the silicone. Increasing the proportion of silicone makes the bond weaker but more flexible, and decreasing the proportion of silicone makes the bond stronger but more brittle. The urethane/silicone blend must be prepared and used quickly because of the limited working time of the urethane: The precursor of the urethane

  2. Sliding Adhesion Dynamics of Isolated Gecko Setal Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponberg, Simon; Autumn, Kellar

    2003-03-01

    The tokay gecko (Gekko gecko) can adhere to nearly any surface through van der Waals interactions of the specialized setae (b-keratin "hairs") of its toe pads. Our recent research has suggested that a gecko is substantially overbuilt for static adhesion requiring as little as 0.03of its theoretical adhesive capacity. We performed the first sliding adhesion experiments on this novel biological adhesive to determine its response to dynamic loading. We isolated arrays of setae and constructed a precision controlled Robo-toe to study sliding effects. Our results indicate that, unlike many typical adhesives, gecko setal arrays exhibit an increased frictional force upon sliding (mk > ms) which further increases with velocity, suggesting that perturbation rejection may be an evolutionary design principle underlying the evolution of the gecko adhesive. We compare these dynamic properties with those of other adhesives and explore the impacts of these results on the design of artificial adhesives.

  3. Role of flexural stiffness of leukocyte microvilli in adhesion dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tai-Hsien; Qi, Dewei

    2018-03-01

    Previous work reported that microvillus deformation has an important influence on dynamics of cell adhesion. However, the existing studies were limited to the extensional deformation of microvilli and did not consider the effects of their bending deformation on cell adhesion. This Rapid Communication investigates the effects of flexural stiffness of microvilli on the rolling process related to adhesion of leukocytes by using a lattice-Boltzmann lattice-spring method (LLM) combined with adhesive dynamics (AD) simulations. The simulation results reveal that the flexural stiffness of microvilli and their bending deformation have a profound effect on rolling velocity and adhesive forces. As the flexural stiffness of the microvilli decreases, their bending angles increase, resulting in an increase in the number of receptor-ligand bonds and adhesive bonding force and a decrease in the rolling velocity of leukocytes. The effects of flexural stiffness on deformation and adhesion represent crucial factors involved in cell adhesion.

  4. Strong dynamical effects during stick-slip adhesive peeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbe, Marie-Julie; Santucci, Stéphane; Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Vanel, Loïc

    2014-01-07

    We consider the classical problem of the stick-slip dynamics observed when peeling a roller adhesive tape at a constant velocity. From fast imaging recordings, we extract the dependence of the stick and slip phase durations on the imposed peeling velocity and peeled ribbon length. Predictions of Maugis and Barquins [in Adhesion 12, edited by K. W. Allen, Elsevier ASP, London, 1988, pp. 205-222] based on a quasistatic assumption succeed to describe quantitatively our measurements of the stick phase duration. Such a model however fails to predict the full stick-slip cycle duration, revealing strong dynamical effects during the slip phase.

  5. Adhesion dynamics and durotaxis in migrating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harland, Ben; Walcott, Sam; Sun, Sean X.

    2011-02-01

    When tissue cells are plated on a flexible substrate, durotaxis, the directed migration of cells toward mechanically stiff regions, has been observed. Environmental mechanical signals are not only important in cell migration but also seem to influence all aspects of cell differentiation and development, including the metastatic process in cancer cells. Based on a theoretical model suggesting that this mechanosensation has a mechanical basis, we introduce a simple model of a cell by considering the contraction of F-actin bundles containing myosin motors (stress fibers) mediated by the movement of adhesions. We show that, when presented with a linear stiffness gradient, this simple model exhibits durotaxis. Interestingly, since stress fibers do not form on soft surfaces and since adhesion sliding occurs very slowly on hard surfaces, the model predicts that the expected cell velocity reaches a maximum at an intermediate stiffness. This prediction can be experimentally tested. We therefore argue that stiffness-dependent cellular adaptations (mechanosensation) and durotaxis are intimately related and may share a mechanical basis. We therefore identify the essential physical ingredients, which combined with additional biochemical mechanisms can explain durotaxis and mechanosensation in cells.

  6. Adhesive capsulitis and dynamic splinting: a controlled, cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Paul D; Willis, F Buck

    2009-01-01

    Background Adhesive Capsulitis (AC) affects patient of all ages, and stretching protocols are commonly prescribed for this condition. Dynamic splinting has been shown effective in contracture reduction from pathologies including Trismus to plantar fasciitis. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of dynamic splinting on patients with AC. Methods This controlled, cohort study, was conducted at four physical therapy, sports medicine clinics in Texas and California. Sixty-two patients diagnosed with Stage II Adhesive Capsulitis were grouped by intervention. The intervention categories were as follows: Group I (Control); Group II (Physical Therapy exclusively with standardized protocols); Group III; (Shoulder Dynasplint system exclusively); Group IV (Combined treatment with Shoulder Dynasplint and standardized Physical Therapy). The duration of this study was 90 days for all groups, and the main outcome measures were change in active, external rotation. Results Significant difference was found for all treatment groups (p adhesive Capsulitis. Trial Registration Trial Number: NCT00873158 PMID:19735563

  7. Adhesion induced by mobile binders: Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochard-Wyart, F.; de Gennes, P. G.

    We consider a vesicle bilayer loaded with molecules that can bind (upon contact) with a solid surface, following the classical model of Bell, Dembo, and Bongrand. We are interested in situations where the contact area varies with time: we assume that binders can then migrate via diffusion. The resulting dissipation and lag create a retarded force on the contact line, which could be significant squeezing or rolling experiments. However, there are two cases where we expect the lag force to be ineffective: (i) separation shrinking of an adhesive patch (where the Evans "tear out" process turns out to be less costly) and (ii) spontaneous growth of a patch from a point contact. In this last case, the lag force is weak, and we give detailed predictions for the growth laws.

  8. On the role of adhesion in single-file dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Ahmed M.; Noel, John A.

    2017-08-01

    For a one-dimensional interacting system of Brownian particles with hard-core interactions (a single-file model), we study the effect of adhesion on both the collective diffusion (diffusion of the entire system with respect to its center of mass) and the tracer diffusion (diffusion of the individual tagged particles). For the case with no adhesion, all properties of these particle systems that are independent of particle labeling (symmetric in all particle coordinates and velocities) are identical to those of non-interacting particles (Lebowitz and Percus, 1967). We clarify this last fact twice. First, we derive our analytical predictions that show that the probability-density functions of single-file (ρsf) and ordinary (ρord) diffusion are identical, ρsf =ρord, predicting a nonanomalous (ordinary) behavior for the collective single-file diffusion, where the average second moment with respect to the center of mass, , is calculated from ρ for both diffusion processes. Second, for single-file diffusion, we show, both analytically and through large-scale simulations, that grows linearly with time, confirming the nonanomalous behavior. This nonanomalous collective behavior comes in contrast to the well-known anomalous sub-diffusion behavior of the individual tagged particles (Harris, 1965). We introduce adhesion to single-file dynamics as a second inter-particle interaction rule and, interestingly, we show that adding adhesion does reduce the magnitudes of both and the mean square displacement per particle Δx2; but the diffusion behavior remains intact independent of adhesion in both cases. Moreover, we study the dependence of both the collective diffusion constant D and the tracer diffusion constant DT on the adhesion coefficient α.

  9. Adhesive capsulitis and dynamic splinting: a controlled, cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willis F Buck

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adhesive Capsulitis (AC affects patient of all ages, and stretching protocols are commonly prescribed for this condition. Dynamic splinting has been shown effective in contracture reduction from pathologies including Trismus to plantar fasciitis. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of dynamic splinting on patients with AC. Methods This controlled, cohort study, was conducted at four physical therapy, sports medicine clinics in Texas and California. Sixty-two patients diagnosed with Stage II Adhesive Capsulitis were grouped by intervention. The intervention categories were as follows: Group I (Control; Group II (Physical Therapy exclusively with standardized protocols; Group III; (Shoulder Dynasplint system exclusively; Group IV (Combined treatment with Shoulder Dynasplint and standardized Physical Therapy. The duration of this study was 90 days for all groups, and the main outcome measures were change in active, external rotation. Results Significant difference was found for all treatment groups (p Conclusion The difference for the combined treatment group was attributed to patients' receiving the best PT combined with structured "home therapy" that contributed an additional 90 hours of end-range stretching. This adjunct should be included in the standard of care for adhesive Capsulitis. Trial Registration Trial Number: NCT00873158

  10. Dynamic loading of galvanized parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Černý

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is divided into two parts: the theoretical part includes actual knowledge and points of view about degradation processes in construction materials, anticorrosion protection, zinc coat composition and high frequency fatigue. The laboratory part follow-up existing regulations contents Czech standards and formulate specifications for acquisition of objective information from acceleration la­bo­ra­to­ry tests in condensation chests, mechanical high frequency fatigue tests on pulsator machine and possibilities of evaluation of fatigue tests. Laboratory findings declare to fundamental types of damage of constructions with anticorrosion protection in real loading conditions with dynamic high frequency character. Laboratory tests were made in sulphide and chloride environments.

  11. Understanding dynamic changes in live cell adhesion with neutron reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghans, Ann

    Understanding the structure and functionality of biological systems on a nanometer-resolution and short temporal scales is important for solving complex biological problems, developing innovative treatment, and advancing the design of highly functionalized biomimetic materials. For example, adhesion of cells to an underlying substrate plays a crucial role in physiology and disease development, and has been investigated with great interest for several decades. In the talk, we would like to highlight recent advances in utilizing neutron scattering to study bio-related structures in dynamic conditions (e . g . under the shear flow) including in-situ investigations of the interfacial properties of living cells. The strength of neutron reflectometry is its non-pertubative nature, the ability to probe buried interfaces with nanometer resolution and its sensitivity to light elements like hydrogen and carbon. That allows us to study details of cell - substrate interfaces that are not accessible with any other standard techniques. We studied the adhesion of human brain tumor cells (U251) to quartz substrates and their responses to the external mechanical forces. Such cells are isolated within the central nervous system which makes them difficult to reach with conventional therapies and therefore making them highly invasive. Our results reveal changes in the thickness and composition of the adhesion layer (a layer between the cell lipid membrane and the quartz substrate), largely composed of hyaluronic acid and associated proteoglycans, when the cells were subjected to shear stress. Further studies will allow us to determine more conditions triggering changes in the composition of the bio-material in the adhesion layer. This, in turn, can help to identify changes that correlate with tumor invasiveness, which can have significant medical impact for the development of targeted anti-invasive therapies.

  12. Adhesiveness of cold rolled steels for car body parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleiner Marques Marra

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the adhesiveness of uncoated and zinc-electrogalvanized steel sheets used in the automotive industry. Three types of adhesives, one acrylic and two epoxy resins, were employed to join low carbon cold rolled steels, one uncoated and another electrogalvanized, both previously degreased or chemically pickled. Mechanical strength of the joints was evaluated by the T-peel and tensile strength tests. Steel grade, surface condition and heating below the cure temperatures did not influence the joints' mechanical strength. However, their shear strength decreased drastically as the test temperature increased. The exposure of the joints to an atmosphere with 90% relative humidity at 40 °C caused reduction of their shear strength. Epoxy adhesives showed higher mechanical strength, but exhibited higher degradation by humidity.

  13. Adhesion of solid particles to gas bubbles. Part 2: Experimental

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omota, Florin; Dimian, Alexandre C.; Bliek, A.

    2006-01-01

    In slurry bubble columns, the adhesion of solid catalyst particles to bubbles may significantly affect the G–L mass transfer and bubble size distribution. This feature may be exploited in design by modifying the hydrophilic or hydrophobic nature of the particles used. Previously we have proposed a

  14. Disorders of adhesions or adhesion-related disorder: monolithic entities or part of something bigger--CAPPS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, David M

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to review progress in the field of abdominopelvic adhesions and the validity of its two underlying assumptions: (1) The formation of adhesions results in infertility, bowel obstruction, or other complications. Reducing or avoiding adhesions will curb these sequelae. (2) "Adhesions" is a monolithic entity to be tackled without regard to any other condition. Evidence is discussed to validate the first assumption. We reviewed progress in the field by examining hospital data. We found a growing trend in the number and cost of discharges for just two adhesion-related diagnoses, and the low usage of adhesion barriers appears in at most 5% of appropriate procedures. Data from an Internet-based survey suggested that the problem may be partly due to ignorance among patients and physicians about adhesions and their prevention. Two other surveys of patients visiting the adhesions.org Web site defined more fully adhesion-related disorder (ARD). The first survey ( N = 466) described a patient with chronic pain, gastrointestinal disturbances, an average of nine bowel obstructions, and an inability to work or maintain family or social relationships. The second survey (687 U.S. women) found a high (co-) prevalence of abdominal or pelvic adhesions (85%), chronic abdominal or pelvic pain (69%), irritable bowel syndrome (55%), recurrent bowel obstruction (44%), endometriosis (40%), and interstitial cystitis (29%). This pattern suggests that although "adhesions" may start out as a monolithic entity, an adhesions patient may develop related conditions (ARD) until they merge into an independent entity where they are practically indistinguishable from patients with multiple symptoms originating from other abdominopelvic conditions such as pelvic or bladder pain. Rather than use terms that constrain the required multidisciplinary, biopsychosocial approach to these patients by the paradigms of the specialty related to the patient's initial symptom set, the

  15. The role of adhesive molecules in endometrial cancer: part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Malinowski

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The carcinogenesis is a result of both functional and structural disorders in the tissue. It initiates as a mutationin a gene encoding protein that is essential for cellular function. The subsequent cascade of eventsleads to accumulation of mutations and loss of cellular function. The cell loses its tissue-specific morphology,disconnects from other cells and extracellular matrix and migrates – the invasion begins. It is now clear thatadhesive molecules are a key player in this cascade. These proteins of the cell membrane surface are responsiblefor attachment of the cells to each other and to the extracellular matrix. These interactions are crucial forboth structural and functional tissue organization. Lack of this homeostasis destroys the tissue architectureand impairs its function and results in invasion. Abnormal expression of adhesive molecules was reported in allexamined cancers, including endometrial cancer.Endometrial cancer is the most common gynaecological cancer in developed countries. Although in many casesdiagnosed and treated in early stages, and thus with good results, some patients cannot be cured. Completeknowledge of the pathogenesis of the disease will be helpful in identifying the patients with negative prognosticfactors, increased risk of recurrence and, perhaps, to find other therapeutic options. In the paper we are trying tosum up the up-to-date knowledge of the role of adhesive molecules in pathogenesis of endometrial cancer.

  16. Dynamic interplay between adhesive and lateral E-cadherin dimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Laur, Oscar Y; Troyanovsky, Regina B

    2002-01-01

    E-cadherin, an adhesive transmembrane protein of epithelial adherens junctions, forms two types of detergent-resistant dimers: adhesive dimers consisting of cadherin molecules derived from two neighboring cells and lateral dimers incorporating cadherins of the same cell. Both dimers depend...... on the integrity of the same residue, Trp156. While the relative amounts of these complexes are not certain, we show here that in epithelial A-431 cells, adhesive dimers may be a prevalent form. Inactivation of the calcium-binding sites, located between successive cadherin ectodomains, drastically reduced...... the amount of adhesive dimers and concomitantly increased the amount of lateral dimers. A similar interdependence of adhesive and lateral dimers was observed in digitonin-permeabilized cells. In these cells, adhesive dimers immediately disassembled after lowering the Ca2+ concentration below 0.1 m...

  17. Conformational Dynamics of the Focal Adhesion Targeting Domain Control Specific Functions of Focal Adhesion Kinase in Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kadaré, Gress

    2015-01-02

    Focal adhesion (FA) kinase (FAK) regulates cell survival and motility by transducing signals from membrane receptors. The C-terminal FA targeting (FAT) domain of FAK fulfils multiple functions, including recruitment to FAs through paxillin binding. Phosphorylation of FAT on Tyr925 facilitates FA disassembly and connects to the MAPK pathway through Grb2 association, but requires dissociation of the first helix (H1) of the four-helix bundle of FAT. We investigated the importance of H1 opening in cells by comparing the properties of FAK molecules containing wild-type or mutated FAT with impaired or facilitated H1 openings. These mutations did not alter the activation of FAK, but selectively affected its cellular functions, including self-association, Tyr925 phosphorylation, paxillin binding, and FA targeting and turnover. Phosphorylation of Tyr861, located between the kinase and FAT domains, was also enhanced by the mutation that opened the FAT bundle. Similarly phosphorylation of Ser910 by ERK in response to bombesin was increased by FAT opening. Although FAK molecules with the mutation favoring FAT opening were poorly recruited at FAs, they efficiently restored FA turnover and cell shape in FAK-deficient cells. In contrast, the mutation preventing H1 opening markedly impaired FAK function. Our data support the biological importance of conformational dynamics of the FAT domain and its functional interactions with other parts of the molecule.

  18. Intra-abdominal adhesions in ultrasound. Part II: The morphology of changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Smereczyński

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite their frequent appearance, intra-abdominal adhesions are rarely the subject of clinical studies and academic discussions. For many years the operators have been trying to reduce such unfavourable consequences of interventions in the abdominal structures. The aim of this article is to present the possibilities of intra-abdominal adhesion diagnostics by means of ultrasound imaging based on authors’ own experience and information included in pertinent literature. The anatomy and examination technique of the abdominal wall were discussed in Part I of the article. In order to evaluate intraperitoneal adhesions, one should use a convex transducer with the frequency of 3.5–6 MHz. The article provides numerous examples of US images presenting intra-abdominal adhesions, particularly those which appeared after surgical procedures. The significance of determining their localisation and extensiveness prior to a planned surgical treatment is emphasized. Four types of morphological changes in the ultrasound caused by intra-abdominal adhesions are distinguished and described: visceroperitoneal adhesions, intraperitoneal adhesions, adhesive obstructions as well as adhesions between the liver and abdominal wall with a special form of such changes, i.e. hepatic pseudotumour. Its ultrasound features are as follows: 1. The lesion is localised below the scar in the abdominal wall after their incision. 2. The lesion is localised in the abdominal part of the liver segments III, IV and V. 3. With the US beam focus precisely set, the lack of fascia – peritoneum complex may be noticed. An uneven liver outline or its ventral displacement appears. 4. A hepatic adhesion-related pseudotumour usually has indistinct margins, especially the posterior one, and, gradually, from top to bottom, loses its hypoechogenic nature. 5. In a respiration test, this liver fragment does not present the sliding movement – a neoplastic tumour rarely shows such an effect

  19. Strength and durability of one-part polyurethane adhesive bonds to wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. B. Vick; E. A. Okkonen

    1998-01-01

    One-part polyurethane wood adhesives comprise a new class of general purpose consumer products. Manufacturersa claims of waterproof bonds brought many inquiries to the Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) from users constructing aircraft, boats, lawn furniture, and other laminated materials for outdoor use. Although FPL has technical information on several types of...

  20. ADAMTS9-Regulated Pericellular Matrix Dynamics Governs Focal Adhesion-Dependent Smooth Muscle Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Mead

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Focal adhesions anchor cells to extracellular matrix (ECM and direct assembly of a pre-stressed actin cytoskeleton. They act as a cellular sensor and regulator, linking ECM to the nucleus. Here, we identify proteolytic turnover of the anti-adhesive proteoglycan versican as a requirement for maintenance of smooth muscle cell (SMC focal adhesions. Using conditional deletion in mice, we show that ADAMTS9, a secreted metalloprotease, is required for myometrial activation during late gestation and for parturition. Through knockdown of ADAMTS9 in uterine SMC, and manipulation of pericellular versican via knockdown or proteolysis, we demonstrate that regulated pericellular matrix dynamics is essential for focal adhesion maintenance. By influencing focal adhesion formation, pericellular versican acts upstream of cytoskeletal assembly and SMC differentiation. Thus, pericellular versican proteolysis by ADAMTS9 balances pro- and anti-adhesive forces to maintain an SMC phenotype, providing a concrete example of the dynamic reciprocity of cells and their ECM. : Mead et al. identify a proteolytic mechanism that actively maintains a pericellular microenvironment conducive to uterine smooth muscle activation prior to parturition. They show that pericellular matrix proteolysis by the secreted metalloprotease ADAMTS9 is crucial for maintenance of focal adhesions in uterine smooth muscle cells, and its absence impairs parturition. Keywords: metalloprotease, extracellular matrix, smooth muscle, proteoglycan, myometrium, parturition, uterus, focal adhesion, proteolysis, interference reflection microscopy

  1. Dynamic Control of Synaptic Adhesion and Organizing Molecules in Synaptic Plasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudenko, Gabby (Texas-MED)

    2017-01-01

    Synapses play a critical role in establishing and maintaining neural circuits, permitting targeted information transfer throughout the brain. A large portfolio of synaptic adhesion/organizing molecules (SAMs) exists in the mammalian brain involved in synapse development and maintenance. SAMs bind protein partners, formingtrans-complexes spanning the synaptic cleft orcis-complexes attached to the same synaptic membrane. SAMs play key roles in cell adhesion and in organizing protein interaction networks; they can also provide mechanisms of recognition, generate scaffolds onto which partners can dock, and likely take part in signaling processes as well. SAMs are regulated through a portfolio of different mechanisms that affect their protein levels, precise localization, stability, and the availability of their partners at synapses. Interaction of SAMs with their partners can further be strengthened or weakened through alternative splicing, competing protein partners, ectodomain shedding, or astrocytically secreted factors. Given that numerous SAMs appear altered by synaptic activity, in vivo, these molecules may be used to dynamically scale up or scale down synaptic communication. Many SAMs, including neurexins, neuroligins, cadherins, and contactins, are now implicated in neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental diseases, such as autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder and studying their molecular mechanisms holds promise for developing novel therapeutics.

  2. The Effect of Water on the Work of Adhesion at Epoxy Interfaces by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkley, J.A.; Frankland, S.J.V.; Clancy, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation can be used to explore the detailed effects of chemistry on properties of materials. In this paper, two different epoxies found in aerospace resins are modeled using molecular dynamics. The first material, an amine-cured tetrafunctional epoxy, represents a composite matrix resin, while the second represents a 177 C-cured adhesive. Surface energies are derived for both epoxies and the work of adhesion values calculated for the epoxy/epoxy interfaces agree with experiment. Adding water -- to simulate the effect of moisture exposure -- reduced the work of adhesion in one case, and increased it in the other. To explore the difference, the various energy terms that make up the net work of adhesion were compared and the location of the added water was examined.

  3. Differentiation of the drying time of adhesives on plywoods through the dynamic speckle technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, S.; Nirala, A. K.

    2018-02-01

    The drying time of adhesives such as Fevicol SH, Fevicol MR, Dendrite white and Bulbond after coating separately on the three plywoods, namely Archidply, Centuryply and Greenply, has been studied non-destructively using the dynamic speckle technique. The time history of the speckle pattern, the co-occurrence matrix, 3D graphs and line profiles of images from the time history of the speckle pattern along with 3D trajectory plots have been used for qualitative analysis whereas the inertia moment, absolute value difference, SM index and autocovariance have been used for quantitative analysis. The gray-level co-occurrence matrix has been used for the first time to study the textual parameters of adhesive coated on plywoods during drying. The average drying time of adhesive is a maximum for Bulbond on Archidply (357.25  ±  1.49 min) and a minimum for Dendrite white on Greenply (90.75  ±  2.36 min). Comparative studies among the results obtained for all the four adhesives on the three plywoods reveal that Dendrite white adhesive is the best among the adhesives because it takes the shortest time to dry on all the plywoods, and Greenply is the best among all the plywoods because drying is fastest on it for all the adhesives. Furthermore, it is also concluded that the best plywood and the best adhesive may be decided by knowing the remnant activity.

  4. The Molecular Architecture of Cell Adhesion: Dynamic Remodeling Revealed by Videonanoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnauld eSergé

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The plasma membrane delimits the cell, which is the basic unit of living organisms, and is also a privileged site for cell communication with the environment. Cell adhesion can occur through cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts. Adhesion proteins such as integrins and cadherins also constitute receptors for inside-out and outside-in signaling within proteolipidic platforms. Adhesion molecule targeting and stabilization relies on specific features such as preferential segregation by the sub-membrane cytoskeleton meshwork and within membrane proteolipidic microdomains. This review presents an overview of the recent insights brought by the latest developments in microscopy, to unravel the molecular remodeling occurring at cell contacts. The dynamic aspect of cell adhesion was recently highlighted by super-resolution videomicroscopy, also named videonanoscopy. By circumventing the diffraction limit of light, nanoscopy has allowed the monitoring of molecular localization and behavior at the single-molecule level, on fixed and living cells. Accessing molecular-resolution details such as quantitatively monitoring components entering and leaving cell contacts by lateral diffusion and reversible association has revealed an unexpected plasticity. Adhesion structures can be highly specialized, such as focal adhesion in motile cells, as well as immune and neuronal synapses. Spatiotemporal reorganization of adhesion molecules, receptors and adaptors directly relates to structure/function modulation. Assembly of these supramolecular complexes is continuously balanced by dynamic events, remodeling adhesions on various timescales, notably by molecular conformation switches, lateral diffusion within the membrane and endo/exocytosis. Pathological alterations in cell adhesion are involved in cancer evolution, through cancer stem cell interaction with stromal niches, growth, extravasation and metastasis.

  5. Probing cellular mechanoadaptation using cell-substrate de-adhesion dynamics: experiments and model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S S, Soumya; Sthanam, Lakshmi Kavitha; Padinhateeri, Ranjith; Inamdar, Mandar M; Sen, Shamik

    2014-01-01

    Physical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are known to regulate cellular processes ranging from spreading to differentiation, with alterations in cell phenotype closely associated with changes in physical properties of cells themselves. When plated on substrates of varying stiffness, fibroblasts have been shown to exhibit stiffness matching property, wherein cell cortical stiffness increases in proportion to substrate stiffness up to 5 kPa, and subsequently saturates. Similar mechanoadaptation responses have also been observed in other cell types. Trypsin de-adhesion represents a simple experimental framework for probing the contractile mechanics of adherent cells, with de-adhesion timescales shown to scale inversely with cortical stiffness values. In this study, we combine experiments and computation in deciphering the influence of substrate properties in regulating de-adhesion dynamics of adherent cells. We first show that NIH 3T3 fibroblasts cultured on collagen-coated polyacrylamide hydrogels de-adhere faster on stiffer substrates. Using a simple computational model, we qualitatively show how substrate stiffness and cell-substrate bond breakage rate collectively influence de-adhesion timescales, and also obtain analytical expressions of de-adhesion timescales in certain regimes of the parameter space. Finally, by comparing stiffness-dependent experimental and computational de-adhesion responses, we show that faster de-adhesion on stiffer substrates arises due to force-dependent breakage of cell-matrix adhesions. In addition to illustrating the utility of employing trypsin de-adhesion as a biophysical tool for probing mechanoadaptation, our computational results highlight the collective interplay of substrate properties and bond breakage rate in setting de-adhesion timescales.

  6. Aspects of silicone rubber as encapsulant for neurological prostheses. Part 2: Adhesion to binary oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, P E; Aylett, B J

    1995-05-01

    The paper presents some measurements of the hydrothermal stability of experimental adhesive joints in water at 100 degrees C. The joints are between one adhesive silicone rubber and ten metal or metal-oxide adherends, all combinations of interest to the neurological prosthesis maker. The probable adhesion mechanism is then considered, in the search for some parameter by which the experimental results could have been predicted. Evidence is produced that physical adsorption plays little or no part in the adhesion, but that hydrothermal stability seems to be a function of the adherend ionic charge. In pursuit of this idea, the valency, the Slater potential and the iso-electric point for the surface (IEPS) of the adherend are examined as possible prediction parameters. It is concluded that, at least in neutral and acidified water, the IEPS is a promising predictor, with the benefit that it is experimentally determinable for adherends of unknown composition. The most stable joints seem to occur when the charge density on the adherend has an optimum negative value.

  7. Modeling cytoskeletal flow over adhesion sites: competition between stochastic bond dynamics and intracellular relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabass, Benedikt; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2010-01-01

    In migrating cells, retrograde flow of the actin cytoskeleton is related to traction at adhesion sites located at the base of the lamellipodium. The coupling between the moving cytoskeleton and the stationary adhesions is mediated by the continuous association and dissociation of molecular bonds. We introduce a simple model for the competition between the stochastic dynamics of elastic bonds at the moving interface and relaxation within the moving actin cytoskeleton represented by an internal viscous friction coefficient. Using exact stochastic simulations and an analytical mean field theory, we show that the stochastic bond dynamics lead to biphasic friction laws as observed experimentally. At low internal dissipation, stochastic bond dynamics lead to a regime of irregular stick-and-slip motion. High internal dissipation effectively suppresses cooperative effects among bonds and hence stabilizes the adhesion.

  8. Effect of Self-Adhesive and Separate Etch Adhesive Dual Cure Resin Cements on the Bond Strength of Fiber Post to Dentin at Different Parts of the Root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Mohamadian Amiri

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Bonding of fiber posts to intracanal dentin is challenging in the clinical setting. This study aimed to compare the effect of self-adhesive and separate etch adhesive dual cure resin cements on the bond strength of fiber post to dentin at different parts of the root.Materials and Methods: This in-vitro experimental study was conducted on 20 single-rooted premolars. The teeth were decoronated at 1mm coronal to the cementoenamel junction (CEJ, and the roots underwent root canal treatment. Post space was prepared in the roots. Afterwards, the samples were randomly divided into two groups. In group 1, the fiber posts were cemented using Rely X Unicem cement, while in group 2, the fiber posts were cemented using Duo-Link cement, according to the manufacturer's instructions. The intracanal post in each root was sectioned into three segments of coronal, middle, and apical, and each cross-section was subjected to push-out bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 1mm/minute until failure. Push-out bond strength data were analyzed using independent t-test and repeated measures ANOVA.Results: The bond strength at the middle and coronal segments in separate etch adhesive cement group was higher than that in self-adhesive cement group. However, the bond strength at the apical segment was higher in self-adhesive cement group compared to that in the other group. Overall, the bond strength in separate etch adhesive cement group was significantly higher than that in self-adhesive cement group (P<0.001.Conclusions: Bond strength of fiber post to intracanal dentin is higher after the use of separate etch adhesive cement compared to self-adhesive cement.

  9. Quantitative analysis of dynamic adhesion properties in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells with fullerenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Zuobin; Wang, Xinyue; Huang, Yanhong

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the effect of fullerenol (C60(OH)24) on the cellular dynamic biomechanical behaviors of living human hepatocellular carcinoma (SMCC-7721) cancer cells were investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM) nanoindentation. As an important biomarker of cellular information, the cell adhesion is essential to maintain proper functioning as well as links with the pathogenesis and canceration. Nonetheless, it is challenging to properly evaluate the complex adhesion properties as all the biomechanical parameters interfere with each other. To investigate the dynamic adhesion changes, especially in the case of the fullerenol treatment, the detachment force and work, adhesion events, and membrane tether properties were measured and analyzed systematically with the proposed quantitative method. The statistical analyses suggest that, under the same operating parameters of AFM, the dependence of adhesion energy on the tip-cell contact area is weakened after the fullerenol treatment and the probability of adhesion decreases significantly from 30.6% to 4.2%. In addition, the disruption of the cytoskeleton resulted in a 34% decrease of the average membrane tether force and a 21% increase of the average tether length. Benefiting from the quantitative method, this work contributes to revealing the effects of fullerenol on the cellular biomechanical properties of the living SMCC-7721 cells in a precise and rigorous way and additionally is further instructive to interpret the interaction mechanism of other potential nanomedicines with living cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Substrate adhesion regulates sealing zone architecture and dynamics in cultured osteoclasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Anderegg

    Full Text Available The bone-degrading activity of osteoclasts depends on the formation of a cytoskeletal-adhesive super-structure known as the sealing zone (SZ. The SZ is a dynamic structure, consisting of a condensed array of podosomes, the elementary adhesion-mediating structures of osteoclasts, interconnected by F-actin filaments. The molecular composition and structure of the SZ were extensively investigated, yet despite its major importance for bone formation and remodelling, the mechanisms underlying its assembly and dynamics are still poorly understood. Here we determine the relations between matrix adhesiveness and the formation, stability and expansion of the SZ. By growing differentiated osteoclasts on micro-patterned glass substrates, where adhesive areas are separated by non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG barriers, we show that SZ growth and fusion strictly depend on the continuity of substrate adhesiveness, at the micrometer scale. We present a possible model for the role of mechanical forces in SZ formation and reorganization, inspired by the current data.

  11. Dynamic testing of adhesive joints using a shock testing machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanhold, J.E. van; Weersink, A.F.J.; Ludolphy, J.W.L.

    1998-01-01

    A light-weight shock testing machine, designed for type approval testing of naval equipment up to 300 kg mass, has been modified into a dynamic tensile test rig. This enables to test structural details for high rate dynamic tensile loadings such as occur during underwater shock. The maximum capacity

  12. On the solvability of dynamic elastic-visco-plastic contact problems with adhesion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jarušek, Jiří; Sofonea, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2009), s. 191-214 ISSN 2066-6594 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100750802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : elastic-visco-plastic material * dynamic process * frictionless contact * normal compliance * Signorini condition * adhesion * variational formulation * weak solution * a priori estimates Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  13. Continuum mechanics at the atomic scale : Insights into non-adhesive contacts using molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solhjoo, Soheil; Vakis, Antonis I.

    2016-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to study non-adhesive contact at the atomic scale. Starting from the case of Hertzian contact, it was found that the reduced Young’s modulus E* for shallow indentations scales as a function of, both, the indentation depth and the contact

  14. Shape and Dynamics of Adhesive Cells: Mechanical Response of Open Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuehua; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2017-05-01

    Cell adhesion is an essential biological process. However, previous theoretical and experimental studies ignore a key variable, the changes of cellular volume and pressure, during the dynamic adhesion process. Here, we treat cells as open systems and propose a theoretical framework to investigate how the exchange of water and ions with the environment affects the shape and dynamics of cells adhered between two adhesive surfaces. We show that adherent cells can be either stable (convex or concave) or unstable (spontaneous rupture or collapse) depending on the adhesion energy density, the cell size, the separation of two adhesive surfaces, and the stiffness of the flexible surface. Strikingly, we find that the unstable states vanish when cellular volume and pressure are constant. We further show that the detachments of convex and concave cells are very different. The mechanical response of adherent cells is mainly determined by the competition between the loading rate and the regulation of the cellular volume and pressure. Finally, we show that as an open system the detachment of adherent cells is also significantly influenced by the loading history. Thus, our findings reveal a major difference between living cells and nonliving materials.

  15. Molecular dynamics for lateral surface adhesion and peeling behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes on gold surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Pei-Hsing

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Adhesion and peeling behaviors of SWCNTs are investigated by detailed, fully atomistic MD simulations. ► Adhesion energy of SWCNTs are discussed. ► Dynamical behaviors of SWCNTs in low temperature adhesion are analyzed. ► Adhesion strengths of SWCNTs obtained from MD simulations are compared with the predictions of Hamaker theory and JKR model. - Abstract: Functional gecko-inspired adhesives have attracted a lot of research attention in the last decade. In this work, the lateral surface adhesion and normal peeling-off behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on gold substrates are investigated by performing detailed, fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effects of the diameter and adhered length of CNTs on the adhesive properties were systematically examined. The simulation results indicate that adhesion energies between the SWCNTs and the Au surface varied from 220 to 320 mJ m −2 over the reported chirality range. The adhesion forces on the lateral surface and the tip of the nanotubes obtained from MD simulations agree very well with the predictions of Hamaker theory and Johnson–Kendall–Roberts (JKR) model. The analyses of covalent bonds indicate that the SWCNTs exhibited excellent flexibility and extensibility when adhering at low temperatures (∼100 K). This mechanism substantially increases adhesion time compared to that obtained at higher temperatures (300–700 K), which makes SWCNTs promising for biomimetic adhesives in ultra-low temperature surroundings.

  16. Assessment of Fevicol (adhesive Drying Process through Dynamic Speckle Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Z. Ansari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic laser speckle (or biospeckle analysis is a useful measurement tool to analyze micro-motion on a sample surface via temporal statistics based on a sequence of speckle images. The aim of this work was to evaluate the use of dynamic speckles as an alternative tool to monitoring Fevicol drying process. Experimental demonstration of intensity-based algorithm to monitor Fevicol drying process is reported. The experiment was explored with the technique called Inertia Moment of co-occurrence matrix. The results allowed verifying the drying process and it was possible to observe different activity stages during the drying process. Statistical Tukey test at 5% significance level allowed differentiating different stages of drying. In conclusion, speckle activity, measured by the Inertia Moment, can be used to monitor drying processes of the Fevicol.

  17. Intermittent stick-slip dynamics during the peeling of an adhesive tape from a roller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Dalbe, Marie-Julie; Guerra, Claudia; Cohen, Caroline; Ciccotti, Matteo; Santucci, Stéphane; Vanel, Loïc

    2013-02-01

    We study experimentally the fracture dynamics during the peeling at a constant velocity of a roller adhesive tape mounted on a freely rotating pulley. Thanks to a high speed camera, we measure, in an intermediate range of peeling velocities, high frequency oscillations between phases of slow and rapid propagation of the peeling fracture. This so-called stick-slip regime is well known as the consequence of a decreasing fracture energy of the adhesive in a certain range of peeling velocity coupled to the elasticity of the peeled tape. Simultaneously with stick slip, we observe low frequency oscillations of the adhesive roller angular velocity which are the consequence of a pendular instability of the roller submitted to the peeling force. The stick-slip dynamics is shown to become intermittent due to these slow pendular oscillations which produce a quasistatic oscillation of the peeling angle while keeping constant the peeling fracture velocity (averaged over each stick-slip cycle). The observed correlation between the mean peeling angle and the stick-slip amplitude questions the validity of the usually admitted independence with the peeling angle of the fracture energy of adhesives.

  18. Dynamic contact problem with adhesion and damage between thermo-electro-elasto-viscoplastic bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadj ammar, Tedjani; Saïdi, Abdelkader; Azeb Ahmed, Abdelaziz

    2017-05-01

    We study of a dynamic contact problem between two thermo-electro-elasto-viscoplastic bodies with damage and adhesion. The contact is frictionless and is modeled with normal compliance condition. We derive variational formulation for the model and prove an existence and uniqueness result of the weak solution. The proof is based on arguments of evolutionary variational inequalities, parabolic inequalities, differential equations, and fixed point theorem.

  19. ZnO nanostructure-modified QCM for dynamic monitoring of cell adhesion and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Pavel Ivanoff; Duan, Ziqing; Lu, Yicheng; Khavulya, Dmitry; Boustany, Nada

    2013-03-15

    Noninvasive examination of live cell function in real-time is essential in advancing the understanding of the dynamic progression of cell's biological processes. We present a dynamic and noninvasive method of monitoring the adhesion and proliferation of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) using a ZnO nanostructure-modified quartz crystal microbalance (ZnOnano-QCM) biosensor. The ZnOnano-QCM biosensor consists of a conventional QCM with ZnO nanostructures directly grown on its sensing electrode deployed in-situ of a standard cell culture environment. Cell adhesion to the ZnO surfaces with various morphologies is studied and the optimal morphology is chosen for the BAEC adhesion. The ZnOnano-QCM biosensor displays enhanced sensitivity compared to the standard QCM sensor with ~10 times higher frequency shift and motional inductance, and ~4 times higher measured motional resistance at full confluency. The dynamic motional resistance and inductance relating to the cells' viscoelastic properties during growth are extracted from the measured time-evolving acoustic spectra. The Butterworth-Van-Dyck (BVD) model is adapted for the ZnOnano-QCM biosensor system and is used to correlate the measured time-evolving acoustic spectra with the motional characteristics of cell attachment and proliferation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Tissue organization by cadherin adhesion molecules: dynamic molecular and cellular mechanisms of morphogenetic regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Carien M.; Leckband, Deborah; Yap, Alpha S.

    2013-01-01

    This review addresses the cellular and molecular mechanisms of cadherin-based tissue morphogenesis. Tissue physiology is profoundly influenced by the distinctive organizations of cells in organs and tissues. In metazoa, adhesion receptors of the classical cadherin family play important roles in establishing and maintaining such tissue organization. Indeed, it is apparent that cadherins participate in a range of morphogenetic events that range from support of tissue integrity to dynamic cellular rearrangements. A comprehensive understanding of cadherin-based morphogenesis must then define the molecular and cellular mechanisms that support these distinct cadherin biologies. Here we focus on four key mechanistic elements: the molecular basis for adhesion through cadherin ectodomains; the regulation of cadherin expression at the cell surface; cooperation between cadherins and the actin cytoskeleton; and regulation by cell signaling. We discuss current progress and outline issues for further research in these fields. PMID:21527735

  1. Angiogenin enhances cell migration by regulating stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saisai Wei

    Full Text Available Angiogenin (ANG acts on both vascular endothelial cells and cancer cells, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we carried out a co-immunoprecipitation assay in HeLa cells and identified 14 potential ANG-interacting proteins. Among these proteins, β-actin, α-actinin 4, and non-muscle myosin heavy chain 9 are stress fiber components and involved in cytoskeleton organization and movement, which prompted us to investigate the mechanism of action of ANG in cell migration. Upon confirmation of the interactions between ANG and the three proteins, further studies revealed that ANG co-localized with β-actin and α-actinin 4 at the leading edge of migrating cells. Down-regulation of ANG resulted in fewer but thicker stress fibers with less dynamics, which was associated with the enlargements of focal adhesions. The focal adhesion kinase activity and cell migration capacity were significantly decreased in ANG-deficient cells. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the existence of ANG in the cytoplasm optimizes stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion formation to accommodate cell migration. The finding that ANG promoted cancer cell migration might provide new clues for tumor metastasis research.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Roller Nanoimprint Process: Adhesion and Other Mechanical Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Te-Hua

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molecular dynamics simulations using tight-binding many body potential are carried out to study the roller imprint process of a gold single crystal. The effect of the roller tooth’s taper angle, imprint depth, imprint temperature, and imprint direction on the imprint force, adhesion, stress distribution, and strain are investigated. A two-stage roller imprint process was obtained from an imprint force curve. The two-stage imprint process included the imprint forming with a rapid increase of imprint force and the unloading stage combined with the adhesion stage. The results show that the imprint force and adhesion rapidly increase with decreasing taper angle and increasing imprint depth. The magnitude of the maximum imprint force and the time at which this maximum occurs are proportional to the imprint depth, but independent of the taper angle. In a comparison of the imprint mechanisms with a vertical imprint case, while high stress and strain regions are concentrated below the mold for vertical imprint, they also occur around the mold in the case of roller imprint. The regions were only concentrated on the substrate atoms underneath the mold in vertical imprint. Plastic flow increased with increasing imprint temperature.

  3. DYNAMIC ADHESIVE WETTABILITY OF POPLAR VENEER WITH COLD OXYGEN PLASMA TREATMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Lijuan Tang,; Rong Zhang,; Xiaoyan Zhou,; Mingzhu Pan,; Minzhi Chen,; Xuehui Yang,; Ping Zhou,; Zhao Chen

    2012-01-01

    Effects of cold oxygen plasma treatment on activating the surface of poplar veneers and improving its wettability were investigated. The veneers were treated with cold oxygen plasma for 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 min, and aged in air for 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. The dynamic adhesive wettability of veneers was assessed using the contact angle, K-value analysis, and surface free energy. The shear strength of three-layer panels produced from untreated and cold oxygen plasma treated veneers was exami...

  4. Wavelet Imaging on Multiple Scales (WIMS) reveals focal adhesion distributions, dynamics and coupling between actomyosin bundle stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toplak, Tim; Palmieri, Benoit; Juanes-García, Alba; Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Grant, Martin; Wiseman, Paul W.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce and use Wavelet Imaging on Multiple Scales (WIMS) as an improvement to fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to measure physical processes and features that occur across multiple length scales. In this study, wavelet transforms of cell images are used to characterize molecular dynamics at the cellular and subcellular levels (i.e. focal adhesions). We show the usefulness of the technique by applying WIMS to an image time series of a migrating osteosarcoma cell expressing fluorescently labelled adhesion proteins, which allows us to characterize different components of the cell ranging from optical resolution scale through to focal adhesion and whole cell size scales. Using WIMS we measured focal adhesion numbers, orientation and cell boundary velocities for retraction and protrusion. We also determine the internal dynamics of individual focal adhesions undergoing assembly, disassembly or elongation. Thus confirming as previously shown, WIMS reveals that the number of adhesions and the area of the protruding region of the cell are strongly correlated, establishing a correlation between protrusion size and adhesion dynamics. We also apply this technique to characterize the behavior of adhesions, actin and myosin in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing a mutant form of myosin IIB (1935D) that displays decreased filament stability and impairs front-back cell polarity. We find separate populations of actin and myosin at each adhesion pole for both the mutant and wild type form. However, we find these populations move rapidly inwards toward one another in the mutant case in contrast to the cells that express wild type myosin IIB where those populations remain stationary. Results obtained with these two systems demonstrate how WIMS has the potential to reveal novel correlations between chosen parameters that belong to different scales. PMID:29049414

  5. In vitro adhesion of staphylococci to diamond-like carbon polymer hybrids under dynamic flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soininen, Antti; Levon, Jaakko; Katsikogianni, Maria; Myllymaa, Katja; Lappalainen, Reijo; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Kinnari, Teemu J; Tiainen, Veli-Matti; Missirlis, Yannis

    2011-03-01

    This study compares the ability of selected materials to inhibit adhesion of two bacterial strains commonly implicated in implant-related infections. These two strains are Staphylococcus aureus (S-15981) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 35984). In experiments we tested six different materials, three conventional implant metals: titanium, tantalum and chromium, and three diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings: DLC, DLC-polydimethylsiloxane hybrid (DLC-PDMS-h) and DLC-polytetrafluoroethylene hybrid (DLC-PTFE-h) coatings. DLC coating represents extremely hard material whereas DLC hybrids represent novel nanocomposite coatings. The two DLC polymer hybrid films were chosen for testing due to their hardness, corrosion resistance and extremely good non-stick (hydrophobic and oleophobic) properties. Bacterial adhesion assay tests were performed under dynamic flow conditions by using parallel plate flow chambers (PPFC). The results show that adhesion of S. aureus to DLC-PTFE-h and to tantalum was significantly (P DLC-PDMS-h (0.671 ± 0.001 × 10(7)/cm(2) and 0.751 ± 0.002 × 10(7)/cm(2) vs. 1.055 ± 0.002 × 10(7)/cm(2), respectively). No significant differences were detected between other tested materials. Hence DLC-PTFE-h coating showed as low susceptibility to S. aureus adhesion as all the tested conventional implant metals. The adherence of S. epidermidis to biomaterials was not significantly (P DLC-PTFE-h films could be used as a biomaterial coating without increasing the risk of implant-related infections.

  6. Cellular adhesome screen identifies critical modulators of focal adhesion dynamics, cellular traction forces and cell migration behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkelman, Michiel; Balcıoğlu, Hayri E.; Klip, Janna E.; Yan, Kuan; Verbeek, Fons J.; Danen, Erik H. J.; van de Water, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells migrate from the primary tumour into surrounding tissue in order to form metastasis. Cell migration is a highly complex process, which requires continuous remodelling and re-organization of the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions. Here, we aimed to identify genes controlling aspects of tumour cell migration, including the dynamic organization of cell-matrix adhesions and cellular traction forces. In a siRNA screen targeting most cell adhesion-related genes we identified 200+ genes that regulate size and/or dynamics of cell-matrix adhesions in MCF7 breast cancer cells. In a subsequent secondary screen, the 64 most effective genes were evaluated for growth factor-induced cell migration and validated by tertiary RNAi pool deconvolution experiments. Four validated hits showed significantly enlarged adhesions accompanied by reduced cell migration upon siRNA-mediated knockdown. Furthermore, loss of PPP1R12B, HIPK3 or RAC2 caused cells to exert higher traction forces, as determined by traction force microscopy with elastomeric micropillar post arrays, and led to considerably reduced force turnover. Altogether, we identified genes that co-regulate cell-matrix adhesion dynamics and traction force turnover, thereby modulating overall motility behaviour. PMID:27531518

  7. Dynamical arrest, percolation, gelation, and glass formation in model nanoparticle dispersions with thermoreversible adhesive interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Aaron P R; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón; Kim, Jung M; Wagner, Norman J

    2012-01-24

    We report an experimental study of the dynamical arrest transition for a model system consisting of octadecyl coated silica suspended in n-tetradecane from dilute to concentrated conditions spanning the state diagram. The dispersion's interparticle potential is tuned by temperature affecting the brush conformation leading to a thermoreversible model system. The critical temperature for dynamical arrest, T*, is determined as a function of dispersion volume fraction by small-amplitude dynamic oscillatory shear rheology. We corroborate this transition temperature by measuring a power-law decay of the autocorrelation function and a loss of ergodicity via fiber-optic quasi-elastic light scattering. The structure at T* is measured using small-angle neutron scattering. The scattering intensity is fit to extract the interparticle pair-potential using the Ornstein-Zernike equation with the Percus-Yevick closure approximation, assuming a square-well interaction potential with a short-range interaction (1% of particle diameter). (1) The strength of attraction is characterized using the Baxter temperature (2) and mapped onto the adhesive hard sphere state diagram. The experiments show a continuous dynamical arrest transition line that follows the predicted dynamical percolation line until ϕ ≈ 0.41 where it subtends the predictions toward the mode coupling theory attractive-driven glass line. An alternative analysis of the phase transition through the reduced second virial coefficient B(2)* shows a change in the functional dependence of B(2)* on particle concentration around ϕ ≈ 0.36. We propose this signifies the location of a gel-to-glass transition. The results presented herein differ from those observed for depletion flocculated dispersion of micrometer-sized particles in polymer solutions, where dynamical arrest is a consequence of multicomponent phase separation, suggesting dynamical arrest is sensitive to the physical mechanism of attraction.

  8. ADHESION EFFECTS WITHIN THE HARD MATTER – SOFT MATTER INTERFACE: MOLECULAR DYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Tsukanov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study three soft matter – hard matter systems consisting of different nanomaterials and organic molecules were studied using the steered molecular dynamics approach in order to reveal regularities in the formation of organic-inorganic hybrids and the stability of multimolecular complexes, as well as to analyze the energy aspects of adhesion between bio-molecules and layered ceramics. The combined process free energy estimation (COPFEE procedure was used for quantitative and qualitative assessment of the considered heterogeneous systems. Interaction of anionic and cationic amino acids with the surface of a [Mg4Al2(OH122+ 2Cl–] layered double hydroxide (LDH nanosheet was considered. In both cases, strong adhesion was observed despite the opposite signs of electric charge. The free energy of the aspartic amino acid anion, which has two deprotonated carboxylic groups, was determined to be –45 kJ/mol for adsorption on the LDH surface. For the cationic arginine, with only one carboxylic group and a positive net charge, the energy of adsorption was –26 kJ/mol, which is twice higher than that of chloride anion adsorption on the same cationic nanosheet. This fact clearly demonstrates the capability of “soft matter” species to adjust themselves and fit into the surface, minimizing energy of the system. The adsorption of protonated histamine, having no carboxylic groups, on a boehmite nanosheet is also energetically favorable, but the depth of free energy well is quite small at 3.6 kJ/mol. In the adsorbed state the protonated amino-group of histamine plays the role of proton donor, while the hydroxyl oxygens of the layered hydroxide have the role of proton acceptor, which is unusual. The obtained results represent a small step towards further understanding of the adhesion effects within the hard matter – soft matter contact zone.

  9. Parietal pleural invasion/adhesion of subpleural lung cancer: Quantitative 4-dimensional CT analysis using dynamic-ventilatory scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, Kotaro, E-mail: ksakuma@ohara-hp.or.jp [Department of Radiology, Ohara General Hospital, 6-11 Omachi, Fukushima City, Fukushima 960-8611 (Japan); Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Fukushima Medical University, 1 Hikariga-oka, Fukushima City, Fukushima 960-1295 (Japan); Yamashiro, Tsuneo, E-mail: clatsune@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215 (Japan); Moriya, Hiroshi, E-mail: hrshmoriya@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ohara General Hospital, 6-11 Omachi, Fukushima City, Fukushima 960-8611 (Japan); Murayama, Sadayuki, E-mail: sadayuki@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215 (Japan); Ito, Hiroshi, E-mail: h-ito@fmu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Fukushima Medical University, 1 Hikariga-oka, Fukushima City, Fukushima 960-1295 (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • 4DCT can be used for assessment of pleural invasion/adhesion by lung cancer. • Quantitative 4DCT indices of lung cancer and adjacent structures are described. • An automatic analysis of pleural invasion/adhesion would be developed in the future. - Abstract: Purpose: Using 4-dimensional dynamic-ventilatory scanning by a 320-row computed tomography (CT) scanner, we performed a quantitative assessment of parietal pleural invasion and adhesion by peripheral (subpleural) lung cancers. Methods: Sixteen patients with subpleural lung cancer underwent dynamic-ventilation CT during free breathing. Neither parietal pleural invasion nor adhesion was subsequently confirmed by surgery in 10 patients, whereas the other 6 patients were judged to have parietal pleural invasion or adhesion. Using research software, we tracked the movements of the cancer and of an adjacent structure such as the rib or aorta, and converted the data to 3-dimensional loci. The following quantitative indices were compared by the Mann-Whitney test: cross-correlation coefficient between time curves for the distances moved from the inspiratory frame by the cancer and the adjacent structure, the ratio of the total movement distances (cancer/adjacent structure), and the cosine similarities between the inspiratory and expiratory vectors (from the cancer to the adjacent structure) and between vectors of the cancer and of the adjacent structure (from inspiratory to expiratory frames). Results: Generally, the movements of the loci of the lung cancer and the adjacent structure were similar in patients with parietal pleural invasion/adhesion, while they were independent in patients without. There were significant differences in all the parameters between the two patient groups (cross-correlation coefficient and the movement distance ratio, P < 0.01; cosine similarities, P < 0.05). Conclusion: These observations suggest that quantitative indices by dynamic-ventilation CT can be utilized as a

  10. The detection and role of molecular tension in focal adhesion dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Brenton D

    2014-01-01

    Cells are exquisitely sensitive to the mechanical nature of their environment, including applied force and the stiffness of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Recent evidence has shown that these variables are critical regulators of diverse processes mediating embryonic development, adult tissue physiology, and many disease states, including cancer, atherosclerosis, and myopathies. Often, detection of mechanical stimuli is mediated by the structures that link cells that surround ECM, the focal adhesions (FAs). FAs are intrinsically force sensitive and display altered dynamics, structure, and composition in response to applied load. While much progress has been made in determining the proteins that localize to and regulate the formation of these structures, less is known about the role of tension across specific proteins in this process. A recently developed class of force-sensitive biosensors is enabling a greater understanding of the molecular bases of cellular mechanosensitivity and cell migration. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Loading and fracture response of CFRP-to-steel adhesively bonded joints with thick adherents – Part II: Numerical simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anyfantis, Konstantinos; Tsouvalis, Nicholas G.

    2013-01-01

    This work is focused on the numerical simulation of experimentally tested single lap joints, based on cohesive zone modeling techniques. Seven cases have been considered for analysis. The models were built in a 3-dimensional finite element space. The adherents were modeled with continuum elements....... The traction increase part of the cohesive laws is given by an exponential function, which describes the elastoplastic adhesive response, and the traction decrease part is given by a linear function, which describes damage initiation and propagation. By using this model, it was achieved to calculate...

  12. A-Part Gel, an adhesion prophylaxis for abdominal surgery: a randomized controlled phase I-II safety study [NCT00646412].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Reinhold; Baumann, Petra; Schmoor, Claudia; Odermatt, Erich K; Wente, Moritz N; Jauch, Karl-Walter

    2015-01-01

    Intra-abdominal surgical intervention can cause the development of intra-peritoneal adhesions. To reduce this problem, different agents have been tested to minimize abdominal adhesions; however, the optimal adhesion prophylaxis has not been found so far. Therefore, the A-Part(®) Gel was developed as a barrier to diminish postsurgical adhesions; the aim of this randomized controlled study was a first evaluation of its safety and efficacy. In this prospective, controlled, randomized, patient-blinded, monocenter phase I-II study, 62 patients received either the hydrogel A-Part-Gel(®) as an anti-adhesive barrier or were untreated after primary elective median laparotomy. Primary endpoint was the occurrence of peritonitis and/or wound healing impairment 28 ± 10 days postoperatively. As secondary endpoints anastomotic leakage until 28 days after surgery, adverse events and adhesions were assessed until 3 months postoperatively. A lower rate of wound healing impairment and/or peritonitis was observed in the A-Part Gel(®) group compared to the control group: (6.5 vs. 13.8 %). The difference between the two groups was -7.3%, 90 % confidence interval [-20.1, 5.4 %]. Both treatment groups showed similar frequency of anastomotic leakage but incidence of adverse events and serious adverse events were slightly lower in the A-Part Gel(®) group compared to the control. Adhesion rates were comparable in both groups. A-Part Gel(®) is safe as an adhesion prophylaxis after abdominal wall surgery but no reduction of postoperative peritoneal adhesion could be found in comparison to the control group. This may at least in part be due to the small sample size as well as to the incomplete coverage of the incision due to the used application. NCT00646412.

  13. Effect of Carbon Nanofiber-Matrix Adhesion on Polymeric Nanocomposite Properties—Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Lafdi

    2008-01-01

    carbon nanocomposite. Carbon nanofibers were subjected to electrochemical oxidation in 0.1 M nitric acid for varying times. The strength of adhesion between the nanofiber and an epoxy matrix was characterized by flexural strength and modulus. The surface functional groups formed and their concentration of nanofibers showed a dependence on the degree of oxidation. The addition of chemical functional groups on the nanofiber surface allows them to physically and chemically adhere to the continuous resin matrix. The chemical interaction with the continuous epoxy matrix results in the creation of an interphase region. The ability to chemically and physically interact with the epoxy region is beneficial to the mechanical properties of a carbon nanocomposite. A tailored degree of surface functionalization was found to increase adhesion to the matrix and increase flexural modulus.

  14. Advanced adhesives in electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, C

    2011-01-01

    Adhesives are widely used in the manufacture of electronic devices to act as passive and active components. Recently there has been considerable interest in the use of conductive adhesives. This book reviews key types of conductive adhesives, processing methods, properties and the way they can be modelled as well as potential applications.$bAdhesives for electronic applications serve important functional and structural purposes in electronic components and packaging, and have developed significantly over the last few decades. Advanced adhesives in electronics reviews recent developments in adhesive joining technology, processing and properties. The book opens with an introduction to adhesive joining technology for electronics. Part one goes on to cover different types of adhesive used in electronic systems, including thermally conductive adhesives, isotropic and anisotropic conductive adhesives and underfill adhesives for flip-chip applications. Part two focuses on the properties and processing of electronic ...

  15. Targeted Molecular Dynamics to determine Focal Adhesion Targeting Domain Folding Intermediates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Mohanty

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Focal adhesion kinase (FAT domain of Focal Adhesion Kinase is a four helical bundle known for conformational plasticity. FAT adopts two distinctly different conformations i.e., close (cFAT and arm-exchanged (aeFAT states under native conditions [1]. The slow transition from cFAT to aeFAT is likely to proceed through an open intermediate state that allows YENV motif to attain β-turn conformation and phosphorylation of Y925 by Src kinases [2]. The two end states of FAT are known to interact with Paxillin and are responsible for maintaining steady state in Heart while intermediate conformation interacts with Grb2-SH2 leading to Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy (PAH [2]. 10ns Targeted Molecular Dynamics (TMD was done between c- and aeFAT in order to explore the conformational transition and to capture pathologically relevant oFAT. Cluster and dynamic cross correlation analysis (DCCA of TMD generated trajectory was done and the selected FAT intermediate was docked with Grb2-SH2 using HADDOCK v2.2 docking followed by molecular dynamics. Conservation analysis of FAT-Grb2 binding site was done using CONSURF [3]. A Pharmacophore FAT-Grb2 complex was generated using SPARKv1.2 and submitted for Virtual screening using BLAZE v4. Drug likeliness and ADMET properties were calculated using MOLINSPIRATION tool. TMD reveals six clusters and DCCA showed positively and negatively correlated region along the transition pathway. Intermediates with competence for Grb2 interaction were docked with Grb2 and best binding complex was further refined. MMPBSA binding energy calculations revealed the best binding pose where the phosphorylated YENV motif of Human FAT interacted with a charged and hydrophobic pocket of Grb2. The conservation analysis showed that the charged pocket was more conserved in comparison with the hydrophobic pocket, hence providing useful insights on binding and specificity determining residues in Grb2. Virtual screening using the pharmacophore

  16. Stroma regulates increased epithelial lateral cell adhesion in 3D culture: a role for actin/cadherin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Karen F; Pearson, Joanna F; Aziz, Naveed; O'Toole, Peter; Garrod, David; Lang, Shona H

    2011-04-18

    Cell shape and tissue architecture are controlled by changes to junctional proteins and the cytoskeleton. How tissues control the dynamics of adhesion and cytoskeletal tension is unclear. We have studied epithelial tissue architecture using 3D culture models and found that adult primary prostate epithelial cells grow into hollow acinus-like spheroids. Importantly, when co-cultured with stroma the epithelia show increased lateral cell adhesions. To investigate this mechanism further we aimed to: identify a cell line model to allow repeatable and robust experiments; determine whether or not epithelial adhesion molecules were affected by stromal culture; and determine which stromal signalling molecules may influence cell adhesion in 3D epithelial cell cultures. The prostate cell line, BPH-1, showed increased lateral cell adhesion in response to stroma, when grown as 3D spheroids. Electron microscopy showed that 9.4% of lateral membranes were within 20 nm of each other and that this increased to 54% in the presence of stroma, after 7 days in culture. Stromal signalling did not influence E-cadherin or desmosome RNA or protein expression, but increased E-cadherin/actin co-localisation on the basolateral membranes, and decreased paracellular permeability. Microarray analysis identified several growth factors and pathways that were differentially expressed in stroma in response to 3D epithelial culture. The upregulated growth factors TGFβ2, CXCL12 and FGF10 were selected for further analysis because of previous associations with morphology. Small molecule inhibition of TGFβ2 signalling but not of CXCL12 and FGF10 signalling led to a decrease in actin and E-cadherin co-localisation and increased paracellular permeability. In 3D culture models, paracrine stromal signals increase epithelial cell adhesion via adhesion/cytoskeleton interactions and TGFβ2-dependent mechanisms may play a key role. These findings indicate a role for stroma in maintaining adult epithelial tissue

  17. Stroma regulates increased epithelial lateral cell adhesion in 3D culture: a role for actin/cadherin dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen F Chambers

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell shape and tissue architecture are controlled by changes to junctional proteins and the cytoskeleton. How tissues control the dynamics of adhesion and cytoskeletal tension is unclear. We have studied epithelial tissue architecture using 3D culture models and found that adult primary prostate epithelial cells grow into hollow acinus-like spheroids. Importantly, when co-cultured with stroma the epithelia show increased lateral cell adhesions. To investigate this mechanism further we aimed to: identify a cell line model to allow repeatable and robust experiments; determine whether or not epithelial adhesion molecules were affected by stromal culture; and determine which stromal signalling molecules may influence cell adhesion in 3D epithelial cell cultures.The prostate cell line, BPH-1, showed increased lateral cell adhesion in response to stroma, when grown as 3D spheroids. Electron microscopy showed that 9.4% of lateral membranes were within 20 nm of each other and that this increased to 54% in the presence of stroma, after 7 days in culture. Stromal signalling did not influence E-cadherin or desmosome RNA or protein expression, but increased E-cadherin/actin co-localisation on the basolateral membranes, and decreased paracellular permeability. Microarray analysis identified several growth factors and pathways that were differentially expressed in stroma in response to 3D epithelial culture. The upregulated growth factors TGFβ2, CXCL12 and FGF10 were selected for further analysis because of previous associations with morphology. Small molecule inhibition of TGFβ2 signalling but not of CXCL12 and FGF10 signalling led to a decrease in actin and E-cadherin co-localisation and increased paracellular permeability.In 3D culture models, paracrine stromal signals increase epithelial cell adhesion via adhesion/cytoskeleton interactions and TGFβ2-dependent mechanisms may play a key role. These findings indicate a role for stroma in maintaining adult

  18. Calcium Phosphate Bone Cements Including Sugar Surfactants: Part Two-Injectability, Adhesive Properties and Biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercier, Ariane; Gonçalves, Stéphane; Autefage, Helène; Briand-Mesange, Fabienne; Lignon, Olivier; Fitremann, Juliette

    2010-12-02

    Addition of sugar surfactants, sucrose fatty acid esters and alkylpolyglucosides to a calcium phosphate cement, designed for bone reconstruction, is described. Thanks to their adsorption at the surface of the calcium phosphate particles, the sugar surfactants allowed a full injectability and brought a very good workability. Injectability was measured by monitoring force-distance curves. With some of the selected sugar surfactants adhesive properties of the cement pastes were also observed, which were measured by tack tests. Finally, some properties related to biological applications are described, including gentamicine release and osteoblast viability experiments. The whole study demonstrates that addition of these mild surfactants improved several properties of the calcium phosphate cement, without impairing function.

  19. Calcium Phosphate Bone Cements Including Sugar Surfactants: Part Two—Injectability, Adhesive Properties and Biocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne Briand-Mesange

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Addition of sugar surfactants, sucrose fatty acid esters and alkylpolyglucosides to a calcium phosphate cement, designed for bone reconstruction, is described. Thanks to their adsorption at the surface of the calcium phosphate particles, the sugar surfactants allowed a full injectability and brought a very good workability. Injectability was measured by monitoring force-distance curves. With some of the selected sugar surfactants adhesive properties of the cement pastes were also observed, which were measured by tack tests. Finally, some properties related to biological applications are described, including gentamicine release and osteoblast viability experiments. The whole study demonstrates that addition of these mild surfactants improved several properties of the calcium phosphate cement, without impairing function.

  20. Molecular dynamics study on the effects of stamp shape, adhesive energy, and temperature on the nanoimprint lithography process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Kwang-Seop; Kim, Kyung-Woong

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of nanoimprint lithography (NIL) were performed to investigate the effects of three critical process parameters in NIL: stamp shape, adhesive energy between the stamp and polymer film, and imprint temperature. The proposed simulation model of the NIL process consists of an amorphous SiO 2 stamp with a line pattern, an amorphous poly(methylmethacrylate) film, and a Si substrate under the periodic boundary condition in the horizontal direction to simulate a real NIL process imprinting periodical line patterns. The behavior of polymer deformation and the effects of adhesion on pattern transfer were investigated by observing the deformation process, calculating the imprint and separation forces, and analyzing the density and stress distribution inside the polymer film. In addition, their dependency on the process parameters is also discussed with reference to the changes in pattern shape, adhesive energy between the stamp and polymer atoms, and imprint temperature of the polymer film. During the imprint process, the rectangular pattern shows inferior cavity filling and higher stress concentration compared to trapezoidal and triangular patterns because it requires much larger flow and deformation of the polymer film. Low imprint temperature also produces high stress concentration and large imprint force due to the lower fluidity of polymer film. In the separation process, the rectangular pattern generates the largest separation force and causes the most serious defects of the transferred pattern and even the polymer film, while the triangular pattern shows the most satisfactory pattern transfer. In addition, the adhesive energy between the stamp and the polymer film also strongly influences the adhesion between the stamp and the polymer film. Low adhesive energy reduces the separation force of the stamp and transferred pattern defects, and therefore enhances the quality of pattern transfer.

  1. The physical characteristics of resin composite-calcium silicate interface as part of a layered/laminate adhesive restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Danya F; Foxton, Richard; Manoharan, Andiappan; Watson, Timothy F; Banerjee, Avijit

    2014-03-01

    To compare in-vitro micro-shear bond strengths (μSBS) of resin composite to calcium silicate cement (Biodentine™) vs. glass ionomer cement vs. resin modified glass ionomer cement (RM-GIC) using an adhesive in self-etch (SE)/total etch (TE) mode after aging three substrates and bond and characterizing their failure modes. Resin composite was SE/TE bonded to 920 standardized disks of Biodentine™, GIC & RM-GIC. Dividing samples into two groups, the first underwent early (t=0min, 5min, 20min, 24h) or delayed (t=2wk, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months) substrate aging before bonding and μSBS (t=24h) testing. In the second, adhesive was applied after either early (t=5min) or delayed (t=2wk) substrate aging and then tested after bond aging (t=2wk, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months). The failure modes were identified using stereomicroscope. SEM images of selected samples were analyzed. No significant differences were observed between (SE)/(TE) bonding modes (P=0.42). With substrate aging, a significant reduction in μSBS occurred between early and delayed time intervals for Biodentine™ (P=0.001), but none for the GIC/RM-GIC (P=0.465, P=0.512 respectively). With bond aging, there was no significant difference between time intervals for all groups, except at 6 months for the GIC (PBiodentine™ is a weak restorative material in its early setting phase. Placing the overlying resin composite as part of the laminate/layered definitive restoration is best delayed for >2wk to allow sufficient intrinsic maturation to withstand contraction forces from the resin composite. A total-etch or self-etch adhesive may be used. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. How overdrying wood reduces its bonding to phenol-formaldehyde adhesives : a critical review of the literature. Part II, Chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfred W. Christiansen

    1991-01-01

    Literature dealing with the effect of excessive drying (overdrying) on wood surface inactivation to bonding is reviewed in two parts and critically evaluated, primarily for phenolic adhesives. Part 1 of the review, published earlier, covers physical mechanisms that could contribute to surface inactivation. The principal physical mechanism is the migration to the...

  3. Multiscale approaches to protein-mediated interactions between membranes—relating microscopic and macroscopic dynamics in radially growing adhesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bihr, Timo; Smith, Ana-Suncana; Seifert, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Macromolecular complexation leading to coupling of two or more cellular membranes is a crucial step in a number of biological functions of the cell. While other mechanisms may also play a role, adhesion always involves the fluctuations of deformable membranes, the diffusion of proteins and the molecular binding and unbinding. Because these stochastic processes couple over a multitude of time and length scales, theoretical modeling of membrane adhesion has been a major challenge. Here we present an effective Monte Carlo scheme within which the effects of the membrane are integrated into local rates for molecular recognition. The latter step in the Monte Carlo approach enables us to simulate the nucleation and growth of adhesion domains within a system of the size of a cell for tens of seconds without loss of accuracy, as shown by comparison to 10 6 times more expensive Langevin simulations. To perform this validation, the Langevin approach was augmented to simulate diffusion of proteins explicitly, together with reaction kinetics and membrane dynamics. We use the Monte Carlo scheme to gain deeper insight to the experimentally observed radial growth of micron sized adhesion domains, and connect the effective rate with which the domain is growing to the underlying microscopic events. We thus demonstrate that our technique yields detailed information about protein transport and complexation in membranes, which is a fundamental step toward understanding even more complex membrane interactions in the cellular context. (paper)

  4. Multiscale approaches to protein-mediated interactions between membranes—relating microscopic and macroscopic dynamics in radially growing adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihr, Timo; Seifert, Udo; Smith, Ana-Sunčana

    2015-08-01

    Macromolecular complexation leading to coupling of two or more cellular membranes is a crucial step in a number of biological functions of the cell. While other mechanisms may also play a role, adhesion always involves the fluctuations of deformable membranes, the diffusion of proteins and the molecular binding and unbinding. Because these stochastic processes couple over a multitude of time and length scales, theoretical modeling of membrane adhesion has been a major challenge. Here we present an effective Monte Carlo scheme within which the effects of the membrane are integrated into local rates for molecular recognition. The latter step in the Monte Carlo approach enables us to simulate the nucleation and growth of adhesion domains within a system of the size of a cell for tens of seconds without loss of accuracy, as shown by comparison to 106 times more expensive Langevin simulations. To perform this validation, the Langevin approach was augmented to simulate diffusion of proteins explicitly, together with reaction kinetics and membrane dynamics. We use the Monte Carlo scheme to gain deeper insight to the experimentally observed radial growth of micron sized adhesion domains, and connect the effective rate with which the domain is growing to the underlying microscopic events. We thus demonstrate that our technique yields detailed information about protein transport and complexation in membranes, which is a fundamental step toward understanding even more complex membrane interactions in the cellular context.

  5. Atomic force microscope adhesion measurements and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations at different humidities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppä, Jeremias; Sairanen, Hannu; Korpelainen, Virpi; Husu, Hannu; Heinonen, Martti; Lassila, Antti; Reischl, Bernhard; Raiteri, Paolo; Rohl, Andrew L; Nordlund, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Due to their operation principle atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are sensitive to all factors affecting the detected force between the probe and the sample. Relative humidity is an important and often neglected—both in experiments and simulations—factor in the interaction force between AFM probe and sample in air. This paper describes the humidity control system designed and built for the interferometrically traceable metrology AFM (IT-MAFM) at VTT MIKES. The humidity control is based on circulating the air of the AFM enclosure via dryer and humidifier paths with adjustable flow and mixing ratio of dry and humid air. The design humidity range of the system is 20–60 %rh. Force–distance adhesion studies at humidity levels between 25 %rh and 53 %rh are presented and compared to an atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The uncertainty level of the thermal noise method implementation used for force constant calibration of the AFM cantilevers is 10 %, being the dominant component of the interaction force measurement uncertainty. Comparing the simulation and the experiment, the primary uncertainties are related to the nominally 7 nm radius and shape of measurement probe apex, possible wear and contamination, and the atomistic simulation technique details. The interaction forces are of the same order of magnitude in simulation and measurement (5 nN). An elongation of a few nanometres of the water meniscus between probe tip and sample, before its rupture, is seen in simulation upon retraction of the tip in higher humidity. This behaviour is also supported by the presented experimental measurement data but the data is insufficient to conclusively verify the quantitative meniscus elongation. (paper)

  6. A short-time scale colloidal system reveals early bacterial adhesion dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Beloin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of bacteria on abiotic surfaces has important public health and sanitary consequences. However, despite several decades of study of bacterial adhesion to inert surfaces, the biophysical mechanisms governing this process remain poorly understood, due, in particular, to the lack of methodologies covering the appropriate time scale. Using micrometric colloidal surface particles and flow cytometry analysis, we developed a rapid multiparametric approach to studying early events in adhesion of the bacterium Escherichia coli. This approach simultaneously describes the kinetics and amplitude of early steps in adhesion, changes in physicochemical surface properties within the first few seconds of adhesion, and the self-association state of attached and free-floating cells. Examination of the role of three well-characterized E. coli surface adhesion factors upon attachment to colloidal surfaces--curli fimbriae, F-conjugative pilus, and Ag43 adhesin--showed clear-cut differences in the very initial phases of surface colonization for cell-bearing surface structures, all known to promote biofilm development. Our multiparametric analysis revealed a correlation in the adhesion phase with cell-to-cell aggregation properties and demonstrated that this phenomenon amplified surface colonization once initial cell-surface attachment was achieved. Monitoring of real-time physico-chemical particle surface properties showed that surface-active molecules of bacterial origin quickly modified surface properties, providing new insight into the intricate relations connecting abiotic surface physicochemical properties and bacterial adhesion. Hence, the biophysical analytical method described here provides a new and relevant approach to quantitatively and kinetically investigating bacterial adhesion and biofilm development.

  7. A model of the effects of cancer cell motility and cellular adhesion properties on tumour-immune dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frascoli, Federico; Flood, Emelie; Kim, Peter S

    2017-06-01

    We present a three-dimensional model simulating the dynamics of an anti-cancer T-cell response against a small, avascular, early-stage tumour. Interactions at the tumour site are accounted for using an agent-based model (ABM), while immune cell dynamics in the lymph node are modelled as a system of delay differential equations (DDEs). We combine these separate approaches into a two-compartment hybrid ABM-DDE system to capture the T-cell response against the tumour. In the ABM at the tumour site, movement of tumour cells is modelled using effective physical forces with a specific focus on cell-to-cell adhesion properties and varying levels of tumour cell motility, thus taking into account the ability of cancer cells to spread and form clusters. We consider the effectiveness of the immune response over a range of parameters pertaining to tumour cell motility, cell-to-cell adhesion strength and growth rate. We also investigate the dependence of outcomes on the distribution of tumour cells. Low tumour cell motility is generally a good indicator for successful tumour eradication before relapse, while high motility leads, almost invariably, to relapse and tumour escape. In general, the effect of cell-to-cell adhesion on prognosis is dependent on the level of tumour cell motility, with an often unpredictable cross influence between adhesion and motility, which can lead to counterintuitive effects. In terms of overall tumour shape and structure, the spatial distribution of cancer cells in clusters of various sizes has shown to be strongly related to the likelihood of extinction. © The authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved.

  8. Tris(trimethylsilyl)silane as a co-initiator for dental adhesive: Photo-polymerization kinetics and dynamic mechanical property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Linyong; Ye, Qiang; Ge, Xueping; Misra, Anil; Spencer, Paulette

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the polymerization behavior of a model dentin adhesive with tris(trimethylsilyl)silane (TTMSS) as a co-initiator, and to investigate the polymerization kinetics and mechanical properties of copolymers in dry and wet conditions. A co-monomer mixture based on HEMA/BisGMA (45/55, w/w) was used as a model dentin adhesive. The photoinitiator system included camphorquinone (CQ) as the photosensitizer and the co-initiator was ethyl-4-(dimethylamino) benzoate (EDMAB) or TTMSS. Iodonium salt, diphenyliodonium hexafluorophosphate (DPIHP) serving as a catalyst, was selectively added into the adhesive formulations. The control and the experimental formulations were characterized with regard to the degree of conversion (DC) and dynamic mechanical properties under dry and wet conditions. In two-component photoinitiator system (CQ/TTMSS), with an increase of TTMSS concentration, the polymerization rate and DC of CC double bond increased, and showed a dependence on the irradiation time and curing light intensity. The copolymers that contained the three-component photoinitiator system (CQ/TTMSS/DPIHP) showed similar dynamic mechanical properties, under both dry and wet conditions, to the EDMAB-containing system. The DC of formulations using TTMSS as co-initiator showed a strong dependence on irradiation time. With the addition of TTMSS, the maximum polymerization rate can be adjusted and the network structure became more homogenous. The results indicated that the TTMSS could be used as a substitute for amine-type co-initiator in visible-light induced free radical polymerization of methacrylate-based dentin adhesives. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dynamic bio-adhesion of polymer nanoparticles on MDCK epithelial cells and its impact on bio-membranes, endocytosis and paracytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bing; Yuan, Lan; Dai, Wenbing; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Fang, Weigang; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-03-21

    Nowadays, concern about the use of nanotechnology for biomedical application is unprecedentedly increasing. In fact, nanosystems applied for various potential clinical uses always have to cross the primary biological barrier consisting of epithelial cells. However, little is really known currently in terms of the influence of the dynamic bio-adhesion of nanosystems on bio-membranes as well as on endocytosis and transcytosis. This was investigated here using polymer nanoparticles (PNs) and MDCK epithelial cells as the models. Firstly, the adhesion of PNs on cell membranes was found to be time-dependent with a shift of both location and dispersion pattern, from the lateral adhesion of mainly mono-dispersed PNs initially to the apical coverage of the PN aggregate later. Then, it was interesting to observe in this study that the dynamic bio-adhesion of PNs only affected their endocytosis but not their transcytosis. It was important to find that the endocytosis of PNs was not a constant process. A GM1 dependent CDE (caveolae dependent endocytosis) pathway was dominant in the preliminary stage, followed by the co-existence of a CME (clathrin-mediated endocytosis) pathway for the PN aggregate at a later stage, in accordance with the adhesion features of PNs, suggesting the modification of PN adhesion patterns on the endocytosis pathways. Next, the PN adhesion was noticed to affect the structure of cell junctions, via altering the extra- and intra-cellular calcium levels, leading to the enhanced paracellular transport of small molecules, but not favorably enough for the obviously increased passing of PNs themselves. Finally, FRAP and other techniques all demonstrated the obvious impact of PN adhesion on the membrane confirmation, independent of the adhesion location and time, which might lower the threshold for the internalization of PNs, even their aggregates. Generally, these findings confirm that the transport pathway mechanism of PNs through epithelial cells is rather

  10. Dynamic bio-adhesion of polymer nanoparticles on MDCK epithelial cells and its impact on bio-membranes, endocytosis and paracytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bing; Yuan, Lan; Dai, Wenbing; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Fang, Weigang; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays, concern about the use of nanotechnology for biomedical application is unprecedentedly increasing. In fact, nanosystems applied for various potential clinical uses always have to cross the primary biological barrier consisting of epithelial cells. However, little is really known currently in terms of the influence of the dynamic bio-adhesion of nanosystems on bio-membranes as well as on endocytosis and transcytosis. This was investigated here using polymer nanoparticles (PNs) and MDCK epithelial cells as the models. Firstly, the adhesion of PNs on cell membranes was found to be time-dependent with a shift of both location and dispersion pattern, from the lateral adhesion of mainly mono-dispersed PNs initially to the apical coverage of the PN aggregate later. Then, it was interesting to observe in this study that the dynamic bio-adhesion of PNs only affected their endocytosis but not their transcytosis. It was important to find that the endocytosis of PNs was not a constant process. A GM1 dependent CDE (caveolae dependent endocytosis) pathway was dominant in the preliminary stage, followed by the co-existence of a CME (clathrin-mediated endocytosis) pathway for the PN aggregate at a later stage, in accordance with the adhesion features of PNs, suggesting the modification of PN adhesion patterns on the endocytosis pathways. Next, the PN adhesion was noticed to affect the structure of cell junctions, via altering the extra- and intra-cellular calcium levels, leading to the enhanced paracellular transport of small molecules, but not favorably enough for the obviously increased passing of PNs themselves. Finally, FRAP and other techniques all demonstrated the obvious impact of PN adhesion on the membrane confirmation, independent of the adhesion location and time, which might lower the threshold for the internalization of PNs, even their aggregates. Generally, these findings confirm that the transport pathway mechanism of PNs through epithelial cells is rather

  11. The dynamic sublayers for improving the adhesion of CVD diamond films on copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaydaychuk, A. V.; Linnik, S. A.; Okhotnikov, V. V.

    2017-05-01

    Polycrystalline diamond films were fabricated on copper substrates by a multi-step process comprised of physical vapor deposition of Al-based composite interlayer on Cu substrate and depositing continuous diamond film on composite interlayer by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD). The interface characteristics and adhesion strength were investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy, Raman analysis, calotest and indentation test. The results show that the continuous film without cracks is successfully obtained. The improved adhesion between diamond film and substrate results from the low residual stress in the film due to their compensation by Al interlayer in the sample cooling process.

  12. Integration of actin dynamics and cell adhesion by a three-dimensional, mechanosensitive molecular clutch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Lindsay B; Waterman, Clare M

    2015-08-01

    During cell migration, the forces generated in the actin cytoskeleton are transmitted across transmembrane receptors to the extracellular matrix or other cells through a series of mechanosensitive, regulable protein-protein interactions termed the molecular clutch. In integrin-based focal adhesions, the proteins forming this linkage are organized into a conserved three-dimensional nano-architecture. Here we discuss how the physical interactions between the actin cytoskeleton and focal-adhesion-associated molecules mediate force transmission from the molecular clutch to the extracellular matrix.

  13. Inside-out signaling promotes dynamic changes in the carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) oligomeric state to control its cell adhesion properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Prerna C; Lee, Hannah S W; Ming, Aaron Y K; Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M; Yip, Christopher M; Rocheleau, Jonathan V; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2013-10-11

    Cell-cell contacts are fundamental to multicellular organisms and are subject to exquisite levels of control. The carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) can engage in both cis-homophilic (parallel) oligomerization and trans-homophilic (anti-parallel) binding. In this study, we establish that the CEACAM1 transmembrane domain has a propensity to form cis-dimers via the transmembrane-embedded (432)GXXXG(436) motif and that this basal state is overcome when activated calmodulin binds to the CEACAM1 cytoplasmic domain. Although mutation of the (432)GXXXG(436) motif reduced CEACAM1 oligomerization, it did not affect surface localization of the receptor or influence CEACAM1-dependent cellular invasion by the pathogenic Neisseria. The mutation did, however, have a striking effect on CEACAM1-dependent cellular aggregation, increasing both the kinetics of cell-cell association and the size of cellular aggregates formed. CEACAM1 association with tyrosine kinase c-Src and tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 was not affected by the (432)GXXXG(436) mutation, consistent with their association with the monomeric form of wild type CEACAM1. Collectively, our results establish that a dynamic oligomer-to-monomer shift in surface-expressed CEACAM1 facilitates trans-homophilic binding and downstream effector signaling.

  14. Dynamic fracture of adhesively bonded composite structures using cohesive zone models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhecha, Dhaval P.

    Using experimental data obtained from standard fracture test configurations, theoretical and numerical tools are developed to mathematically describe non-self-similar progression of cracks without specifying an initial crack. A cohesive-decohesive zone model, similar to the cohesive zone model known in the fracture mechanics literature as the Dugdale-Barenblatt model, is adopted to represent the degradation of the material ahead of the crack tip. This model unifies strength-based crack initiation and fracture-mechanics-based crack progression. The cohesive-decohesive zone model is implemented with an interfacial surface material that consists of an upper and a lower surface that are connected by a continuous distribution of normal and tangential nonlinear elastic springs that act to resist either Mode I opening, Mode II sliding, Mode III sliding, or a mixed anode. The initiation of fracture is determined by the interfacial strength and the progression of the crack is determined by the critical energy release rate. The adhesive is idealized with an interfacial surface material to predict interfacial fracture. The interfacial surface material is positioned within the bulk material to predict discrete cohesive cracks. The interfacial surface material is implemented through an interface element, which is incorporated in ABAQUS using the user defined element (UEL) option. A procedure is established to formulate a rate dependent model based on experiments carried out on compact tension test specimens. The rate dependent model is incorporated into the interface element approach to capture the unstable crack growth observed in experiments under quasi-static loading conditions. The compact tension test gives the variation of the fracture toughness with the rate of loading, this information is processed and a relationship between the fracture toughness and the rate of the opening displacement is established. The cohesive-decohesive zone model is implemented through a

  15. Topography on a subcellular scale modulates cellular adhesions and actin stress fiber dynamics in tumor associated fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azatov, Mikheil; Sun, Xiaoyu; Suberi, Alexandra; Fourkas, John T.; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2017-12-01

    Cells can sense and adapt to mechanical properties of their environment. The local geometry of the extracellular matrix, such as its topography, has been shown to modulate cell morphology, migration, and proliferation. Here we investigate the effect of micro/nanotopography on the morphology and cytoskeletal dynamics of human pancreatic tumor-associated fibroblast cells (TAFs). We use arrays of parallel nanoridges with variable spacings on a subcellular scale to investigate the response of TAFs to the topography of their environment. We find that cell shape and stress fiber organization both align along the direction of the nanoridges. Our analysis reveals a strong bimodal relationship between the degree of alignment and the spacing of the nanoridges. Furthermore, focal adhesions align along ridges and form preferentially on top of the ridges. Tracking actin stress fiber movement reveals enhanced dynamics of stress fibers on topographically patterned surfaces. We find that components of the actin cytoskeleton move preferentially along the ridges with a significantly higher velocity along the ridges than on a flat surface. Our results suggest that a complex interplay between the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions coordinates the cellular response to micro/nanotopography.

  16. N-alkyl-N-(phosphonoethyl substituted (methacrylamides – new adhesive monomers for self-etching self-priming one part dental adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim E. Klee

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Novel N-alkyl-N-(phosphonoethyl substituted mono-, bis- and tris(methacrylamides 3 were synthesized by two different three-step reactions and characterized by IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy as well as refractive index and viscosity. The phosphonoethyl substituted (methacrylamide monomers show improved hydrolytic stability compared to carboxylic esters. The highest stability was found for the phosphonoethyl substituted acrylamide monomers. Acrylamides have a larger polymerization enthalpy ranging from −50 to −70 kJ·mol−1 per double bond compared to methacrylamides which show −8.57 to −25.1 kJ·mol−1 per double bond. Depending on their structure (methacrylamides 3 exhibit an adhesion to enamel and dentin up to 19.5 MPa. The monomer 3c shows the highest adhesion values to both substrates, namely 15.3 ± 3.4 MPa to enamel and 18.5 ± 2.3 MPa to dentin.

  17. Adhesion kinetics of human primary monocytes, dendritic cells, and macrophages: Dynamic cell adhesion measurements with a label-free optical biosensor and their comparison with end-point assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgovan, Norbert; Ungai-Salánki, Rita; Lukácsi, Szilvia; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Szabó, Bálint; Horvath, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), and macrophages (MFs) are closely related immune cells that differ in their main functions. These specific functions are, to a considerable degree, determined by the differences in the adhesion behavior of the cells. To study the inherently and essentially dynamic aspects of the adhesion of monocytes, DCs, and MFs, dynamic cell adhesion assays were performed with a high-throughput label-free optical biosensor [Epic BenchTop (BT)] on surfaces coated with either fibrinogen (Fgn) or the biomimetic copolymer PLL-g-PEG-RGD. Cell adhesion profiles typically reached their maximum at ∼60 min after cell seeding, which was followed by a monotonic signal decrease, indicating gradually weakening cell adhesion. According to the biosensor response, cell types could be ordered by increasing adherence as monocytes, MFs, and DCs. Notably, all three cell types induced a larger biosensor signal on Fgn than on PLL-g-PEG-RGD. To interpret this result, the molecular layers were characterized by further exploiting the potentials of the biosensor: by measuring the adsorption signal induced during the surface coating procedure, the authors could estimate the surface density of adsorbed molecules and, thus, the number of binding sites potentially presented for the adhesion receptors. Surfaces coated with PLL-g-PEG-RGD presented less RGD sites, but was less efficient in promoting cell spreading than those coated with Fgn; hence, other binding sites in Fgn played a more decisive role in determining cell adherence. To support the cell adhesion data obtained with the biosensor, cell adherence on Fgn-coated surfaces 30-60 min after cell seeding was measured with three complementary techniques, i.e., with (1) a fluorescence-based classical adherence assay, (2) a shear flow chamber applying hydrodynamic shear stress to wash cells away, and (3) an automated micropipette using vacuum-generated fluid flow to lift cells up. These techniques confirmed the results

  18. Characterization of cohesion, adhesion and creep-properties of dynamically loaded coatings through the impact tester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzakis, K.D.; Michailidis, N.; Lontos, A.; Siganos, A.; Hadjiyiannis, S.; Giannopoulos, G.; Maliaris, G. [Aristoteles Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece). Lab. for Machine Tools and Mfg. Engineering; Erkens, G. [CemeCon GmbH, Wuerselen (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    The coating impact test, in combination with finite elements method (FEM) simulation, is successfully used to characterize the fatigue performance of coatings. Critical values for stress components, responsible for distinctive fatigue failure modes of the coating, are obtained and the fatigue limits of various coatings are illustrated in form of generally applicable Smith and Woehler diagrams, determined through a developed evaluation software. This software takes into account the impact test experimental data, as well as coating and substrate constitutive laws. Herewith coating adhesive and cohesive failure modes are elucidated and a cutting performance prediction of coated tools can be carried out. On the other hand, creep phenomena of plasma sprayed coatings are quantitatively interpreted. (orig.)

  19. Loading and fracture response of CFRP-to-steel adhesively bonded joints with thick adherents – Part I: Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anyfantis, Konstantinos; Tsouvalis, Nicholas G.

    2013-01-01

    There is a gap in the existing standardized testing procedures (ASTM and ISO) for evaluating the stiffness and strength of composite-to-metal adhesively bonded joints. Thus, there is much effort made in this field towards understanding the impact of the geometric parameters to the loading...... and fracture response of such joints, but limited to joints with thin adherents. On this basis, the present work provides an experimental parametric study of adhesively bonded Single Lap Joint geometries between thick dissimilar adherents. For this purpose, mild steel and CFRP laminates have been considered...

  20. MVL-PLA2, a snake venom phospholipase A2, inhibits angiogenesis through an increase in microtubule dynamics and disorganization of focal adhesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Bazaa

    Full Text Available Integrins are essential protagonists of the complex multi-step process of angiogenesis that has now become a major target for the development of anticancer therapies. We recently reported and characterized that MVL-PLA2, a novel phospholipase A2 from Macrovipera lebetina venom, exhibited anti-integrin activity. In this study, we show that MVL-PLA2 also displays potent anti-angiogenic properties. This phospholipase A2 inhibited adhesion and migration of human microvascular-endothelial cells (HMEC-1 in a dose-dependent manner without being cytotoxic. Using Matrigel and chick chorioallantoic membrane assays, we demonstrated that MVL-PLA2, as well as its catalytically inactivated form, significantly inhibited angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. We have also found that the actin cytoskeleton and the distribution of alphav beta3 integrin, a critical regulator of angiogenesis and a major component of focal adhesions, were disturbed after MVL-PLA2 treatment. In order to further investigate the mechanism of action of this protein on endothelial cells, we analyzed the dynamic instability behavior of microtubules in living endothelial cells. Interestingly, we showed that MVL-PLA2 significantly increased microtubule dynamicity in HMEC-1 cells by 40%. We propose that the enhancement of microtubule dynamics may explain the alterations in the formation of focal adhesions, leading to inhibition of cell adhesion and migration.

  1. Dynamic strain distribution measurement and crack detection of an adhesive-bonded single-lap joint under cyclic loading using embedded FBG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, Xiaoguang; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Wada, Daichi; Kanai, Makoto; Ohsawa, Isamu; Igawa, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the dynamic strain distribution measurement of an adhesive-bonded single-lap joint was carried out in a cyclic load test using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor embedded into the adhesive/adherend interface along the overlap length direction. Unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) substrates were bonded by epoxy resin to form the joint, and the FBG sensor was embedded into the surface of one substrate during its curing. The measurement was carried out with a sampling rate of 5 Hz by the sensing system, based on the optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) throughout the test. A finite element analysis (FEA) was performed for the measurement evaluation using a three-dimensional model, which included the embedded FBG sensor. The crack detection method, based on the longitudinal strain distribution measurement, was introduced and performed to estimate the cracks that occurred at the adhesive/adherend interface in the test. (paper)

  2. Full-mouth adhesive rehabilitation of a severely eroded dentition: the three-step technique. Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vailati, Francesca; Belser, Urs Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, a full-mouth rehabilitation based on full-crown coverage has been recommended treatment for patients affected by severe dental erosion. Nowadays, thanks to improved adhesive techniques, the indications for crowns have decreased and a more conservative approach may be proposed. Even though adhesive treatments simplify both the clinical and laboratory procedures, restoring such patients still remains a challenge due to the great amount of tooth destruction. To facilitate the clinician's task during the planning and execution of a full-mouth adhesive rehabilitation, an innovative concept has been developed: the three-step technique. Three laboratory steps are alternated with three clinical steps, allowing the clinician and the laboratory technician to constantly interact to achieve the most predictable esthetic and functional outcome. During the first step, an esthetic evaluation is performed to establish the position of the plane of occlusion. In the second step, the patient's posterior quadrants are restored at an increased vertical dimension. Finally, the third step reestablishes the anterior guidance. Using the three-step technique, the clinician can transform a full-mouth rehabilitation into a rehabilitation for individual quadrants. The present article focuses on the second step, explaining all the laboratory and clinical steps necessary to restore the posterior quadrants with a defined occlusal scheme at an increased vertical dimension. A brief summary of the first step is also included.

  3. Full-mouth adhesive rehabilitation of a severely eroded dentition: the three-step technique. Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vailati, Francesca; Belser, Urs Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, a full-mouth rehabilitation based on full-crown coverage has been the recommended treatment for patients affected by severe dental erosion. Nowadays, thanks to improved adhesive techniques, the indications for crowns have decreased and a more conservative approach may be proposed. Even though adhesive treatments simplify both the clinical and laboratory procedures, restoring such patients still remains a challenge due to the great amount of tooth destruction. To facilitate the clinician's task during the planning and execution of a full-mouth adhesive rehabilitation, an innovative concept has been developed: the three-step technique. Three laboratory steps are alternated with three clinical steps, allowing the clinician and the laboratory technician to constantly interact to achieve the most predictable esthetic and functional outcome. During the first step, an esthetic evaluation is performed to establish the position of the plane of occlusion. In the second step, the patient's posterior quadrants are restored at an increased vertical dimension. Finally, the third step reestablishes the anterior guidance. Using the three-step technique, the clinician can transform a full-mouth rehabilitation into a rehabilitation for individual quadrants. This article illustrates only the first step in detail, explaining all the clinical parameters that should be analyzed before initiating treatment.

  4. Complex dynamics in diatomic molecules. Part II: Quantum trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.-D.; Weng, H.-J.

    2008-01-01

    The second part of this paper deals with quantum trajectories in diatomic molecules, which has not been considered before in the literature. Morse potential serves as a more accurate function than a simple harmonic oscillator for illustrating a realistic picture about the vibration of diatomic molecules. However, if we determine molecular dynamics by integrating the classical force equations derived from a Morse potential, we will find that the resulting trajectories do not consist with the probabilistic prediction of quantum mechanics. On the other hand, the quantum trajectory determined by Bohmian mechanics [Bohm D. A suggested interpretation of the quantum theory in terms of hidden variable. Phys. Rev. 1952;85:166-179] leads to the conclusion that a diatomic molecule is motionless in all its vibrational eigen-states, which also contradicts probabilistic prediction of quantum mechanics. In this paper, we point out that the quantum trajectory of a diatomic molecule completely consistent with quantum mechanics does exist and can be solved from the quantum Hamilton equations of motion derived in Part I, which is based on a complex-space formulation of fractal spacetime [El Naschie MS. A review of E-Infinity theory and the mass spectrum of high energy particle physics. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 2004;19:209-36; El Naschie MS. E-Infinity theory - some recent results and new interpretations. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 2006;29:845-853; El Naschie MS. The concepts of E-infinity. An elementary introduction to the cantorian-fractal theory of quantum physics. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 2004;22:495-511; El Naschie MS. SU(5) grand unification in a transfinite form. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 2007;32:370-374; Nottale L. Fractal space-time and microphysics: towards a theory of scale relativity. Singapore: World Scientific; 1993; Ord G. Fractal space time and the statistical mechanics of random works. Chaos, Soiltons and Fractals 1996;7:821-843] approach to quantum

  5. Dynamic Response of Metal-Polymer Bilayers - Viscoelasticity, Adhesion and Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    the characteristic high speed radial expansion of the sample (note that the coil is firmly embedded in epoxy and is therefore immobile ). The...the load cell and crosshead displacement sensor of the device. The engineering stress in the specimen was obtained from the load and original cross...dynamic failure behavior of ceramics used as transparent armor (see, for example [3,4, 5]). Glass, laminated with alternating layers of polymers of

  6. Intra­‑abdominal adhesions in ultrasound. Part I: The visceroperitoneal bordeline, anatomy and the method of examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Smereczyński

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It needs to be emphasized that ultrasonography is a primary test performed in order to evaluate the abdominal wall and structures located in their vicinity. It allows for the determination of the anatomy and lesions in this localization. Thorough knowledge con‑ cerning the ultrasound anatomy of the tested structures constitutes a basis of all diagnos‑ tic successes. Therefore, this part of the article is devoted to this subject matter. The pos‑ sibility to diagnose intra-abdominal adhesions with ultrasound is underestimated and rarely used. The aim of this paper is to discuss and document the ultrasound anatomy of the posterior surface of the abdominal wall as well as to present techniques directed at the detection of adhesions, in particular the visceroperitoneal ones. The posterior surface of the abdominal wall constitutes an extensive tissue area of complex structure, with folds and ligaments surrounded by various amounts of the epiperitoneal fat. In some places, this tissue separates the components of the fascia and peritoneum complex. The ultra‑ sound manifestation of this complex is two hyperechogenic lines placed parallelly to each other in the places where they are not separated by the accumulated adipose tissue. Another factor which separates the peritoneum from the viscera is of dynamic character. It is a so-called visceral slide induced by easy or deep breathing. Its size should not be lower than 1 cm and the deflections gradually and symmetrically diminish from the epi‑ gastric to hypogastric region. Last but not least, the evaluation of the reciprocal relation of the abdominal wall with viscera may be aided by rhythmical manual compressions on the abdominal wall (ballottement sign performed below the applied ultrasound trans‑ ducer. During this test, the size of the visceral slide in relation to the abdominal wall is observed. The maneuver is usually performed in uncooperative patients or those with shallow breath. The

  7. Novel 2-(ω-phosphonooxy-2-oxaalkylacrylate monomers for self-etching self-priming one part adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim E. Klee

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Novel hydrolysis stable 2-(ω-phosphonooxy-2-oxaalkylacrylate monomers 3 with phosphoric acid moieties were synthesized by a three step synthesis via Baylis–Hillman reaction of ethyl acrylate and formaldehyde, and subsequent etherification of the obtained product with diols and phosphorylation using POCl3. The polymerization enthalpy of 2-(ω-phosphonooxy-2-oxaalkylacrylates 3 as measured by DSC ranges from −29 to −53 kJ·mol−1. The shear bond strength of adhesive compositions 4, comprising of polymerizable acids 3, ranges from 5.8 to 19.3 MPa on enamel and from 8.7 to 16.9 MPa on dentin.

  8. Microfilament-coordinated adhesion dynamics drives single cell migration and shapes whole tissues [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Aguilar-Cuenca

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion to the substratum and/or other cells is a crucial step of cell migration. While essential in the case of solitary migrating cells (for example, immune cells, it becomes particularly important in collective cell migration, in which cells maintain contact with their neighbors while moving directionally. Adhesive coordination is paramount in physiological contexts (for example, during organogenesis but also in pathology (for example, tumor metastasis. In this review, we address the need for a coordinated regulation of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions during collective cell migration. We emphasize the role of the actin cytoskeleton as an intracellular integrator of cadherin- and integrin-based adhesions and the emerging role of mechanics in the maintenance, reinforcement, and turnover of adhesive contacts. Recent advances in understanding the mechanical regulation of several components of cadherin and integrin adhesions allow us to revisit the adhesive clutch hypothesis that controls the degree of adhesive engagement during protrusion. Finally, we provide a brief overview of the major impact of these discoveries when using more physiological three-dimensional models of single and collective cell migration.

  9. Population dynamics of minimally cognitive individuals. Part 2: Dynamics of time-dependent knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmieder, R.W.

    1995-07-01

    The dynamical principle for a population of interacting individuals with mutual pairwise knowledge, presented by the author in a previous paper for the case of constant knowledge, is extended to include the possibility that the knowledge is time-dependent. Several mechanisms are presented by which the mutual knowledge, represented by a matrix K, can be altered, leading to dynamical equations for K(t). The author presents various examples of the transient and long time asymptotic behavior of K(t) for populations of relatively isolated individuals interacting infrequently in local binary collisions. Among the effects observed in the numerical experiments are knowledge diffusion, learning transients, and fluctuating equilibria. This approach will be most appropriate to small populations of complex individuals such as simple animals, robots, computer networks, agent-mediated traffic, simple ecosystems, and games. Evidence of metastable states and intermittent switching leads them to envision a spectroscopy associated with such transitions that is independent of the specific physical individuals and the population. Such spectra may serve as good lumped descriptors of the collective emergent behavior of large classes of populations in which mutual knowledge is an important part of the dynamics.

  10. Dynamics of Bio-Polymeric Brushes Growing from a Cellular Membrane: Tentative Modelling of the Actin Turnover within an Adhesion Unit; the Podosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biben, Thierry; Géminard, Jean-Christophe; Melo, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    Podosomes are involved in the adhesion process of various cells to a solid substrate. They have been proven to consist of a dense actin core surrounded by an actin cloud. The podosomes, which nucleate when the cell comes in the vicinity of a substrate, contribute to link the membrane to the solid surface, but rather than frozen links, collective dynamical behaviors are experimentally observed. Depending on the differentiation stage, podosomes assemble and form clusters, rings or belts. Considering the dynamics of a polymeric brush, we design a simple model aiming at the description of a single podosome, the basic unit of these complex adhesion-structures and compare our theoretical conclusions to recent experimental results. Particularly, we explain, by solving the diffusion problem around the podosome, why the structure is likely to have a finite life-span.

  11. Assessing the Impact of Germination and Sporulation Conditions on the Adhesion of Bacillus Spores to Glass and Stainless Steel by Fluid Dynamic Gauging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu Zhou, Ke; Li, Nan; Christie, Graham; Wilson, D Ian

    2017-11-01

    The adhesion of spores of 3 Bacillus species with distinctive morphologies to stainless steel and borosilicate glass was studied using the fluid dynamic gauging technique. Marked differences were observed between different species of spores, and also between spores of the same species prepared under different sporulation conditions. Spores of the food-borne pathogen B. cereus were demonstrated to be capable of withstanding shear stresses greater than 1500 Pa when adhered to stainless steel, in contrast to spores of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus megaterium, which detached in response to lower shear stress. An extended DLVO model was shown to be capable of predicting the relative differences in spore adhesion between spores of different species and different culture conditions, but did not predict absolute values of force of adhesion well. Applying the model to germinating spores showed a significant reduction in adhesion force shortly after triggering germination, indicating a potential strategy to achieve enhanced removal of spores from surfaces in response to shear stress, such as during cleaning-in-place procedures. Spore-forming bacteria are a concern to the food industry because they have the potential to cause food-borne illness and product spoilage, while being strongly adhesive to processing surfaces and resistant to cleaning-in-place procedures. This work is of significance to the food processors and manufacturers because it offers insight to the properties of spore adhesion and identifies a potential strategy to facilitate the removal of spores during cleaning procedures. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Food Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Institute of Food Technologists.

  12. Adhesive Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2003-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well...... to rewriting on arbitrary adhesive categories....

  13. Protein adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda F. Lorenz

    2018-01-01

    Nature uses a wide variety of chemicals for providing adhesion internally (e.g., cell to cell) and externally (e.g., mussels to ships and piers). This adhesive bonding is chemically and mechanically complex, involving a variety of proteins, carbohydrates, and other compounds.Consequently,the effect of protein structures on adhesive properties is only partially...

  14. A prospective, randomised, controlled, double-blind phase I-II clinical trial on the safety of A-Part® Gel as adhesion prophylaxis after major abdominal surgery versus non-treated group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weis Christine

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postoperative adhesions occur when fibrous strands of internal scar tissue bind anatomical structures to one another. The most common cause of intra-abdominal adhesions is previous intra-abdominal surgical intervention. Up to 74% of intestinal obstructions are caused by post surgical adhesions. Although a variety of methods and agents have been investigated to prevent post surgical adhesions, the problem of peritoneal adhesions remains largely unsolved. Materials serving as an adhesion barrier are much needed. Methods/Design This is a prospective, randomised, controlled, patient blinded and observer blinded, single centre phase I-II trial, which evaluates the safety of A-Part® Gel as an adhesion prophylaxis after major abdominal wall surgery, in comparison to an untreated control group. 60 patients undergoing an elective median laparotomy without prior abdominal surgery are randomly allocated into two groups of a 1:1- ratio. Safety parameter and primary endpoint of the study is the occurrence of wound healing impairment or peritonitis within 28 (+10 days after surgery. The frequency of anastomotic leakage within 28 days after operation, occurrence of adverse and serious adverse events during hospital stay up to 3 months and the rate of adhesions along the scar within 3 months are defined as secondary endpoints. After hospital discharge the investigator will examine the enrolled patients at 28 (+10 days and 3 months (±14 days after surgery. Discussion This trial aims to assess, whether the intra-peritoneal application of A-Part® Gel is safe and efficacious in the prevention of post-surgical adhesions after median laparotomy, in comparison to untreated controls. Trial registration NCT00646412

  15. Cellular prion protein is required for neuritogenesis: fine-tuning of multiple signaling pathways involved in focal adhesions and actin cytoskeleton dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alleaume-Butaux A

    2013-07-01

    PC-dependent neurite sprouting is a process in which PrPC governs the dynamics of FAs and the actin cytoskeleton via ß1 integrin signaling. The presence of PrPC is necessary to render neuronal stem cells competent to respond to neuronal inducers and to develop neurites. In differentiating neurons, PrPC exerts a facilitator role towards neurite elongation. This function relies on the interaction of PrPC with a set of diverse partners such as elements of the extracellular matrix, plasma membrane receptors, adhesion molecules, and soluble factors that control actin cytoskeleton turnover through Rho-GTPase signaling. Once neurons have reached their terminal stage of differentiation and acquired their polarized morphology, PrPC also takes part in the maintenance of neurites. By acting on tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, or matrix metalloproteinase type 9, PrPC stabilizes interactions between neurites and the extracellular matrix. Keywords: prion, neuronal differentiation, neurite sprouting, neurite outgrowth, signaling, multiprotein complexes

  16. Groundwater chemistry, storage and dynamics in parts of Jigawa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Sedimentary (Chad formation) and Basement complex rocks in parts of Jigawa State were investigated for groundwater suitability for drinking, efficiency in water transmission and storage using aquifer properties derived from pumping test data using the Cooper and Jacob straight line method for single well tests.

  17. Part I: Spin wave dynamics in YIG spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental study is made of the interactions between spin wave modes excited in a sphere of yttrium iron garnet by pumping the Suhl subsidiary absorption with microwaves. The dynamical behavior of the magnetization is observed under high resolution by varying the dc field and microwave pump power. Varied behavior is found: (1) onset of the Suhl instability by excitation of a single spin wave mode; (2) when two or more modes are excited, interactions lead to auto-oscillations displaying period-doubling to chaos; (3) quasiperiodicity, locking, and chaos occur when three or more modes are excited; (4) abrupt transition to wide band power spectra (i.e., turbulence), with hysteresis; (5) irregular relaxation oscillations and aperiodic spiking behavior. A theoretical model is developed using the plane wave approximation obtaining the lowest order nonlinear interaction terms between the excited modes. Extension of this analysis to the true spherical spin-modes is discussed. Bifurcation behavior is examined, and dynamical behavior is numerically computed and compared to the experimental data. A theory is developed regarding the nature of the experimentally observed relaxation oscillations and spiking behavior based on the interaction of ''weak'' and ''strong'' modes, and this is demonstrated in the numerical simulations for two modes. Quasiperiodicity is shown to occur in the numerical study when at least 3 modes are excited with appropriate parameter values. A possible mechanism for generating microwave subharmonics at half of the pumping frequency is discussed. 57 refs., 25 figs., 5 tabs

  18. Dynamic of taking out molding parts at injection molding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ragan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Most plastic parts used in automobile production are manufactured by injection molding. Their quality depends also on taking out molding and on the manipulators for it. Task of this contribution is to theoretically describe a transport of molding at taking out after injection molding in relation on its regulation. The following quantities are derived at it: the transition characteristic of the taking out system, the blocking diagram of taking out molding regulation, the amplitude and phase characteristic and the transition characteristic of action quantity at taking out molding regulation.

  19. Dynamic Regulation of a Cell Adhesion Protein Complex Including CADM1 by Combinatorial Analysis of FRAP with Exponential Curve-Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai-Yageta, Mika; Maruyama, Tomoko; Suzuki, Takashi; Ichikawa, Kazuhisa; Murakami, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Protein components of cell adhesion machinery show continuous renewal even in the static state of epithelial cells and participate in the formation and maintenance of normal epithelial architecture and tumor suppression. CADM1 is a tumor suppressor belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecule and forms a cell adhesion complex with an actin-binding protein, 4.1B, and a scaffold protein, MPP3, in the cytoplasm. Here, we investigate dynamic regulation of the CADM1-4.1B-MPP3 complex in mature cell adhesion by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis. Traditional FRAP analysis were performed for relatively short period of around 10min. Here, thanks to recent advances in the sensitive laser detector systems, we examine FRAP of CADM1 complex for longer period of 60 min and analyze the recovery with exponential curve-fitting to distinguish the fractions with different diffusion constants. This approach reveals that the fluorescence recovery of CADM1 is fitted to a single exponential function with a time constant (τ) of approximately 16 min, whereas 4.1B and MPP3 are fitted to a double exponential function with two τs of approximately 40-60 sec and 16 min. The longer τ is similar to that of CADM1, suggesting that 4.1B and MPP3 have two distinct fractions, one forming a complex with CADM1 and the other present as a free pool. Fluorescence loss in photobleaching analysis supports the presence of a free pool of these proteins near the plasma membrane. Furthermore, double exponential fitting makes it possible to estimate the ratio of 4.1B and MPP3 present as a free pool and as a complex with CADM1 as approximately 3:2 and 3:1, respectively. Our analyses reveal a central role of CADM1 in stabilizing the complex with 4.1B and MPP3 and provide insight in the dynamics of adhesion complex formation. PMID:25780926

  20. Dynamic regulation of a cell adhesion protein complex including CADM1 by combinatorial analysis of FRAP with exponential curve-fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai-Yageta, Mika; Maruyama, Tomoko; Suzuki, Takashi; Ichikawa, Kazuhisa; Murakami, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Protein components of cell adhesion machinery show continuous renewal even in the static state of epithelial cells and participate in the formation and maintenance of normal epithelial architecture and tumor suppression. CADM1 is a tumor suppressor belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecule and forms a cell adhesion complex with an actin-binding protein, 4.1B, and a scaffold protein, MPP3, in the cytoplasm. Here, we investigate dynamic regulation of the CADM1-4.1B-MPP3 complex in mature cell adhesion by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis. Traditional FRAP analysis were performed for relatively short period of around 10 min. Here, thanks to recent advances in the sensitive laser detector systems, we examine FRAP of CADM1 complex for longer period of 60 min and analyze the recovery with exponential curve-fitting to distinguish the fractions with different diffusion constants. This approach reveals that the fluorescence recovery of CADM1 is fitted to a single exponential function with a time constant (τ) of approximately 16 min, whereas 4.1B and MPP3 are fitted to a double exponential function with two τs of approximately 40-60 sec and 16 min. The longer τ is similar to that of CADM1, suggesting that 4.1B and MPP3 have two distinct fractions, one forming a complex with CADM1 and the other present as a free pool. Fluorescence loss in photobleaching analysis supports the presence of a free pool of these proteins near the plasma membrane. Furthermore, double exponential fitting makes it possible to estimate the ratio of 4.1B and MPP3 present as a free pool and as a complex with CADM1 as approximately 3:2 and 3:1, respectively. Our analyses reveal a central role of CADM1 in stabilizing the complex with 4.1B and MPP3 and provide insight in the dynamics of adhesion complex formation.

  1. Real-time monitoring of mechanical changes during dynamic adhesion of erythrocytes to endothelial cells by QCM-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaolian; Bai, Haihua; Yang, Peihui

    2015-07-21

    A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring is used to measure changes in mechanical properties of diabetic red blood cells (RBCs) and normal RBCs. Moreover, the adhesion interaction between these two kinds of RBCs and endothelial cells (ECs) is further investigated using a proposed QCM-D biosensor for the first time.

  2. Adhesion of nitrile rubber (NBR) to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fabric. Part 1: PET surface modification by methylenediphenyl di-isocyanate (MDI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razavizadeh, Mahmoud; Jamshidi, Masoud, E-mail: mjamshidi@iust.ac.ir

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Glutaric anhydride peroxide (GAP) was grafted on PET surface by UV irradiation method. Then MDI was attached to GAP on PET surface. • The fabric was vulcanized by nitrile rubber. • Peet test was performed after each stage of surface modification. • Curing temperature was increased and the tests were repeated. • Effect of MDI coating on PET without carboxylation was evaluated. Effect of vulcanizing temperature on this product was also studied. - Abstract: Fiber to rubber adhesion is an important subject in rubber composite industry. It is well known that surface physical, mechanical and chemical treatments are effective methods to improve interfacial bonding. Ultra violet (UV) light irradiation is an efficient method which is used to increase interfacial interactions. In this research UV assisted chemical modification of PET fabric was used to increase its bonding to nitrile rubber (NBR). NBR is perfect selection to produce fuel and oil resistant rubber parts but it has weak bonding to fabrics. For this purpose at first, the PET fabric was carboxylated under UV irradiation and then methylenediphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) was reacted and grafted to carboxylated PET. T-peel test was used to evaluate PET fabric to NBR bonding strength. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-AT) was used to assess surface modifications of the PET fabrics. The chemical composition of the PET surfaces before and after carboxylation and MDI grafting was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that at vulcanizing temperature of 150 °C, carboxylation in contrary to MDI grafting, improved considerably PET to NBR adhesion. Finally effect of curing temperature on PET to NBR bonding strength was determined. It was found that increasing vulcanizing temperature to 170 °C caused considerable improvement (about 134%) in bonding strength.

  3. Cellular Adhesion and Adhesion Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    SELLER, Zerrin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, cell adhesion and cell adhesion molecules have been shown to be important for many normal biological processes, including embryonic cell migration, immune system functions and wound healing. It has also been shown that they contribute to the pathogenesis of a large number of common human disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and tumor cell metastasis in cancer. In this review, the basic mechanisms of cellular adhesion and the structural and functional features of adhes...

  4. Bacterial adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loosdrecht, van M.C.M.

    1988-01-01

    As mentioned in the introduction of this thesis bacterial adhesion has been studied from a variety of (mostly practice oriented) starting points. This has resulted in a range of widely divergent approaches. In order to elucidate general principles in bacterial adhesion phenomena, we felt it

  5. Adhesive Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2004-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well...

  6. On the Interplay Between Adhesion Strength and Tensile Properties of Thermal Spray Coated Laminates—Part I: High Velocity Thermal Spray Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaotao; Smith, Gregory M.; Sampath, Sanjay

    2018-02-01

    Adhesion of thermal spray (TS) coatings is an important system level property in coating design and application. Adhesive-based pull testing (ASTM C633) has long been used to evaluate coating/substrate bonding. However, this approach is not always suitable for high velocity spray coatings, for example, where adhesion strengths are routinely greater than the strength of the adhesive bonding agent used in the testing. In this work, a new approach has been proposed to evaluate the adhesion of TS coatings. A systematic investigation of the effects of substrate roughness on both the uniaxial tensile yield strength and traditional bond pull adhesive strength of HVOF Ni and Ni-5wt.%Al, as well as cold-sprayed Ni-coated laminates revealed a strong correlation between these two test methodologies for the respective materials and processes. This approach allows measurement of the adhesion response even where the adhesive method is not applicable, overcoming many of the issues in the traditional ASTM C633. Analysis of cracking patterns of the coatings after 10.5% strain was used to assess the adhesion and cohesion properties. The mechanisms which determine the load transfer between the substrate and the coating are also briefly discussed.

  7. Jovian Dynamics. Part 1: Vortex Stability, Structure, and Genesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, G. P.

    1996-09-01

    The vertical of Jupiter's atmosphere is probed and isolated by evaluating the stability characteristics of planetary vortices over a wide parameter range. The resulting structures lead to simulating the genesis of single and multiple vortex states in Part I of this paper and the genesis of an equatorial superrotation and midlatitudinal multiple jets in Part II.The stability and genesis of baroclinic Rossby vortices, the vortices associated with long solitary Rossby waves in a stratified fluid, are studied numerically using a primitive equation model with Jovian and oceanic parameters and hypo-thermal structures. Vortex stability, that is, coherence and persistence, depends primarily upon latitude location and vertical structure and is used to deduce possible stratifications for Jupiter's atmosphere. The solutions suggest that Jupiter's large-scale motions are confined to a layer of depth h and are bounded by an abyss with an impermeable interface at a depth H, such that h/H1/20. Consequently, they also extend earlier results derived with the reduced-gravity, shallow-water model, particularly the explanation for the origin, uniqueness, and longevity of the Great Red Spot (GRS).Beginning at the equator, stable anticyclones are seen to exist only when they have the Hermitian latitudinal form, the Korteweg-deVries longitudinal form, the confined exponential vertical structure exp(Nz/H), and the amplitude range as prescribed by the analytical theory of Marshall and Boyd for N=8. Soliton interactions occur between equatorial vortices of similar horizontal and vertical form.In middle and low latitudes, shallow anticyclones with an exponential structure of N=20 exist quasi-stably for a variety of sizes. Such vortices remain coherent but tend to migrate equatorward (where they disperse) at rates that depend upon their size, location, and vertical structure: large and medium anticyclones propagate primarily westward while migrating slowly, whereas small storms just migrate

  8. Denture Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevent overuse if zinc is an ingredient. (Some companies include graphics of the amount of adhesive to ... and adequate directions for use or a clear definition of an unsafe dosage or methods or duration ...

  9. TRIM15 is a focal adhesion protein that regulates focal adhesion disassembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchil, Pradeep D.; Pawliczek, Tobias; Reynolds, Tracy D.; Ding, Siyuan; Hinz, Angelika; Munro, James B.; Huang, Fang; Floyd, Robert W.; Yang, Haitao; Hamilton, William L.; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Xiong, Yong; Calderwood, David A.; Mothes, Walther

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Focal adhesions are macromolecular complexes that connect the actin cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. Dynamic turnover of focal adhesions is crucial for cell migration. Paxillin is a multi-adaptor protein that plays an important role in regulating focal adhesion dynamics. Here, we identify TRIM15, a member of the tripartite motif protein family, as a paxillin-interacting factor and a component of focal adhesions. TRIM15 localizes to focal contacts in a myosin-II-independent manner by an interaction between its coiled-coil domain and the LD2 motif of paxillin. Unlike other focal adhesion proteins, TRIM15 is a stable focal adhesion component with restricted mobility due to its ability to form oligomers. TRIM15-depleted cells display impaired cell migration and reduced focal adhesion disassembly rates, in addition to enlarged focal adhesions. Thus, our studies demonstrate a cellular function for TRIM15 as a regulatory component of focal adhesion turnover and cell migration. PMID:25015296

  10. Effects of raw materials on the properties of wood fiber-polyethylene composites--part 3: effect of a compatibilizer and wood adhesive on the interfacial adhesion of wood/plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin-yin Hwang; Chung-yun Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of maleated polypropylene compatabilizer on the interfacial properties of wood and polyolefins. Birch wood dowels containing an adhesive applied on the surface were embedded in molten plastic matrices using specially designed jigs. The three plastics investigated included low density polyethylene (LFPE), linear low...

  11. Population dynamics of minimally cognitive individuals. Part I: Introducing knowledge into the dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmieder, R.W.

    1995-07-01

    The author presents a new approach for modeling the dynamics of collections of objects with internal structure. Based on the fact that the behavior of an individual in a population is modified by its knowledge of other individuals, a procedure for accounting for knowledge in a population of interacting objects is presented. It is assumed that each object has partial (or complete) knowledge of some (or all) other objects in the population. The dynamical equations for the objects are then modified to include the effects of this pairwise knowledge. This procedure has the effect of projecting out what the population will do from the much larger space of what it could do, i.e., filtering or smoothing the dynamics by replacing the complex detailed physical model with an effective model that produces the behavior of interest. The procedure therefore provides a minimalist approach for obtaining emergent collective behavior. The use of knowledge as a dynamical quantity, and its relationship to statistical mechanics, thermodynamics, information theory, and cognition microstructure are discussed.

  12. Effects of Structural Damage on Dynamic Behavior at Sandwich Composite Beams - Part I-Theoretical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufoi Marius

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper series presents an analysis regarding the dynamics of sandwich composite beams, embedded at one end, in order to highlight the effect of geometrical and material discontinuities upon the natural frequencies. In first part (Part I, analysis was performed with EulerBernoulli analytical method for determining the vibration modes and in second part (Part II, analysis was performed with numerical simulation in SolidWorks software for a five-layer composite. In the last section of the paper, an example is shown regarding how to interpret the obtained results.

  13. PI(3,4)P2plays critical roles in the regulation of focal adhesion dynamics of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Miki; Ijuin, Takeshi; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2017-05-01

    Phosphoinositides play pivotal roles in the regulation of cancer cell phenotypes. Among them, phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate (PI(3,4)P 2 ) localizes to the invadopodia, and positively regulates tumor cell invasion. In this study, we examined the effect of PI(3,4)P 2 on focal adhesion dynamics in MDA-MB-231 basal breast cancer cells. Knockdown of SHIP2, a phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphatase (PIP 3 ) 5-phosphatase that generates PI(3,4)P 2 , in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, induced the development of focal adhesions and cell spreading, leading to the suppression of invasion. In contrast, knockdown of PTEN, a 3-phosphatase that de-phosphorylates PIP 3 and PI(3,4)P 2 , induced cell shrinkage and increased cell invasion. Interestingly, additional knockdown of SHIP2 rescued these phenotypes. Overexpression of the TAPP1 PH domain, which binds to PI(3,4)P 2 , and knockdown of Lpd, a downstream effector of PI(3,4)P 2 , resulted in similar phenotypes to those induced by SHIP2 knockdown. Taken together, our results suggest that inhibition of PI(3,4)P 2 generation and/or downstream signaling could be useful for inhibiting breast cancer metastasis. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  14. Stretchable, Adhesion-Tunable Dry Adhesive by Surface Wrinkling

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Hoon Eui

    2010-02-16

    We introduce a simple yet robust method of fabricating a stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by combining replica molding and surface wrinkling. By utilizing a thin, wrinkled polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sheet with a thickness of 1 mm with built-in micropillars, active, dynamic control of normal and shear adhesion was achieved. Relatively strong normal (∼10.8 N/cm2) and shear adhesion (∼14.7 N/cm2) forces could be obtained for a fully extended (strained) PDMS sheet (prestrain of∼3%), whereas the forces could be rapidly reduced to nearly zero once the prestrain was released (prestrain of ∼0.5%). Moreover, durability tests demonstrated that the adhesion strength in both the normal and shear directions was maintained over more than 100 cycles of attachment and detachment. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  15. An improved layer-by-layer self-assembly technique to generate biointerfaces for platelet adhesion studies: Dynamic LbL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Juan Manuel

    sequentially at selected surface locations to generate a composite overlap of presumed platelet adhesion as a function of fibrinogen distribution. The method was unable to distinguish the surface from the adhered cells. The surface inhomogeneity and porosity retained a large amount of acridine orange stain, even in the absence of platelets, and components in the platelet-rich plasma (PRP) were found to fix acridine orange in a mode that fluoresced in the FITC imaging FM. Both of these problems obfuscated the platelet adhesion FM results when using s-LbL surfaces and acridine orange staining of platelets. A dynamic process (d-LbL) was developed in which a solution of the molecule to be layered was constantly washed over the surface, and was constantly mixed to maintain a more homogeneous distribution of solute relative to the surface during the layering process. The d-LbL surfaces were tested as described above, and found to reduce the size and number of regions of anomalous acridine orange pooling trapped by the surface, providing a greater consistency and reliability in identifying platelets. The improved surface was then used in a series of platelet adhesion experiments under static and dynamic flow conditions, and with and without the chemical additive L-arginine. The complex microcharmel system used in prior studies was replaced with a simpler system involving fewer nuisance variables for these tests. The tests were performed on both collagen and fibrinogen surfaces. Collagen has been used as a thrombogenic surface in multiple studies in the literature, but produces additional variables in thrombogenesis control that are avoided when fibrinogen is used. In these tests, fibrinogen was found to be as thrombogenic as collagen, and platelet coverage of both biointerfaces was reduced by L-arginine in a manner similar to previously reported work. The simpler system differed from the previous microchannel system in important factors: (1) It exposed the platelets to much lower

  16. Adhesion molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Preedy, Victor R

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the structure and classification of adhesion molecules in relation to signaling pathways and gene expression. It discusses immunohistochemical localization, neutrophil migration, and junctional, functional, and inflammatory adhesion molecules in pathologies such as leukocyte decompression sickness and ischemia reperfusion injury. Highlighting the medical applications of current research, chapters cover diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome; hypoxia; kidney disease; smoking, atrial fibrillation, and heart disease, the brain and dementia; and tumor proliferation. Finally, it looks at molecular imaging and bioinformatics, high-throughput technologies, and chemotherapy.

  17. Dynamic Pressure Distribution due to Horizontal Acceleration in Spherical LNG Tank with Cylindrical Central Part

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Dae-Eun; Shin, Sang-Hoon

    2017-11-01

    Spherical LNG tanks having many advantages such as structural safety are used as a cargo containment system of LNG carriers. However, it is practically difficult to fabricate perfectly spherical tanks of different sizes in the yard. The most effective method of manufacturing LNG tanks of various capacities is to insert a cylindrical part at the center of existing spherical tanks. While a simplified high-precision analysis method for the initial design of the spherical tanks has been developed for both static and dynamic loads, in the case of spherical tanks with a cylindrical central part, the analysis method available only considers static loads. The purpose of the present study is to derive the dynamic pressure distribution due to horizontal acceleration, which is essential for developing an analysis method that considers dynamic loads as well.

  18. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    reduce or delay bacterial biofilm formation of a range of urinary tract infectious E.coli and Klebsiella isolates. Several other proteinaceous coatings were also found to display anti-adhesive properties, possibly providing a measure for controlling the colonization of implant materials. Several other...... components. These substances may both mediate and stabilize the bacterial biofilm. Finally, several adhesive structures were examined, and a novel physiological biofilm phenotype in E.coli biofilms was characterized, namely cell chain formation. The autotransporter protein, antigen 43, was implicated...

  19. THE FOOTWEAR DESIGNING SESSION USING CRISPIN DYNAMICS ENGINEER. PART II: Creating the parts, Estimating the material consumption, Grading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IOVAN-DRAGOMIR Alina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The diversification and customization of products are important characteristic of the modern economy and especially of the fashion industry. Because of this, the lifetime of the footwear product is very short and result the necessity to cut the design and production time. By classic methodology, designing footwear is a very complex and laborious activity. That is because classic methodology requires many graphic executions using manual means, which consume a lot of the producer’s time. With CRISPIN Dynamics, one can visualize a range of designs on-screen; work out the costs of a new style and even cut out sample shoe components. Reliance on manual skills is largely eliminated, so the staff can work creatively, but with increased accuracy and productivity. One can even send designs to a distant office or manufacturing centre in a matter of minutes. This paper presents the basic function of CRISPIN Dynamics CAD Suite Engineer for footwear design. The process of new product development has six stapes: digitized form of the medium copy, last flatting, model drawing, creation and management of individual parts, estimation of material consumption, multiplying the designed footwear product’s pattern. This product has been developed for shoemakers who wish to ensure that their business remains competitive by increasing the efficiency, speed and accuracy of pattern development and grading.

  20. A data-driven framework for identifying nonlinear dynamic models of genetic parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnanathan, Kirubhakaran; Anderson, Sean R; Billings, Stephen A; Kadirkamanathan, Visakan

    2012-08-17

    A key challenge in synthetic biology is the development of effective methodologies for characterization of component genetic parts in a form suitable for dynamic analysis and design. In this investigation we propose the use of a nonlinear dynamic modeling framework that is popular in the field of control engineering but is novel to the field of synthetic biology: Nonlinear AutoRegressive Moving Average model with eXogenous inputs (NARMAX). The framework is applied to the identification of a genetic part BBa_T9002 as a case study. A concise model is developed that exhibits accurate representation of the system dynamics and a structure that is compact and consistent across cell populations. A comparison is made with a biochemical model, derived from a simple enzymatic reaction scheme. The NARMAX model is shown to be comparably simple but exhibits much greater prediction accuracy on the experimental data. These results indicate that the data-driven NARMAX framework is an attractive technique for dynamic modeling of genetic parts.

  1. Polymer adhesion predictions for oral dosage forms to enhance drug administration safety. Part 3: Review of in vitro and in vivo methods used to predict esophageal adhesion and transit time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumond, Nélio; Stegemann, Sven

    2018-05-01

    The oral cavity is frequently used to administer pharmaceutical drug products. This route of administration is seen as the most accessible for the majority of patients and supports an independent therapy management. For current oral dosage forms under development, the prediction of their unintended mucoadhesive properties and esophageal transit profiles would contribute for future administration safety, as concerns regarding unintended adhesion of solid oral dosage forms (SODF) during oro-esophageal transit still remain. Different in vitro methods that access mucoadhesion of polymers and pharmaceutical preparations have been proposed over the years. The same methods might be used to test non-adhesive systems and contribute for developing safe-to-swallow technologies. Previous works have already investigated the suitability of non-animal derived in vitro methods to assess such properties. The aim of this work was to review the in vitro methodology available in the scientific literature that used animal esophageal tissue to evaluate mucoadhesion and esophageal transit of pharmaceutical preparations. Furthermore, in vivo methodology is also discussed. Since none of the in vitro methods developed are able to mimic the complex swallowing process and oro-esophageal transit, in vivo studies in humans remain as the gold standard. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Dynamic change of active component content in different parts of Prunella vulgaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuxia; Yin, Jinbao; Guo, Qiaosheng; Xiao, Yunhua

    2011-03-01

    Through determination of the dynamic change of the active component in different parts of Prunella vulgaris at different growth stages, to find the optimal harvest time. Total flavonoids content was determined by using the spectrophotometric method, and the content of ursolic acid and oleanolic acid was determined by HPLC. The contents of ash and extract were determined according to the methods in Chinese Pharmacopeia (2005 edition). There existed the active components in all parts of P. vulgaris, but the active component contents in different parts of P. vulgaris of at different growth stages, changed very obviously. In Yangtze-Huaihai region, the optimal harvest time of Prunella spike best harvest is at the end of June, and Prunellastem at the end of May. All parts of P. vulgaris have medicinal value.

  3. Adhesive plasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  4. Light detection and ranging measurements of wake dynamics. Part II: two-dimensional scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trujillo, Juan-José; Bingöl, Ferhat; Larsen, Gunner Chr.

    2011-01-01

    the instantaneous transversal wake position which is quantitatively compared with the prediction of the Dynamic Wake Meandering model. The results, shown for two 10-min time series, suggest that the conjecture of the wake behaving as a passive tracer is a fair approximation; this corroborates and expands...... the results of one-dimensional measurements already presented in the first part of this paper. Consequently, it is now possible to separate the deterministic and turbulent parts of the wake wind field, thus enabling capturing the wake in the meandering frame of reference. The results correspond, qualitatively...

  5. The role of fires in the Holocene landscape dynamics of the southeastern part of Meshchera Lowlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyakonov, K. N.; Novenko, E. Yu.; Mironenko, I. V.; Kuprijanov, D. A.; Bobrovsky, M. V.

    2017-11-01

    The reconstructions of landscape dynamics and fire regimes in the southeastern part of Meshchera Lowlands in the Holocene are presented. Based on study of the fire layers in peat deposits of bogs, as well as botanical and palynological analyses of peat and morphological analysis of soils, it was established that the long-period dynamics for landscapes of the territory during the Middle and Late Holocene was determined primarily by shifts in fire regimes. Since 8000 cal. yr. BP, periods with high fire frequency (from 15-20 to 120 years) alternated with intervals when the fire frequency varied from 500-600 to 1800 years. The paleoecological reconstructions showed that increased fire activity was also recorded prior to human settlement in the southeastern part of the Meshchera Lowlands, when the action of the anthropogenic factor was the lowest.

  6. Dynamic stresses in a Francis model turbine at deep part load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Wilhelm; von Locquenghien, Florian; Conrad, Philipp; Koutnik, Jiri

    2017-04-01

    A comparison between numerically obtained dynamic stresses in a Francis model turbine at deep part load with experimental ones is presented. Due to the change in the electrical power mix to more content of new renewable energy sources, Francis turbines are forced to operate at deep part load in order to compensate stochastic nature of wind and solar power and to ensure grid stability. For the extension of the operating range towards deep part load improved understanding of the harsh flow conditions and their impact on material fatigue of hydraulic components is required in order to ensure long life time of the power unit. In this paper pressure loads on a model turbine runner from unsteady two-phase computational fluid dynamics simulation at deep part load are used for calculation of mechanical stresses by finite element analysis. Therewith, stress distribution over time is determined. Since only few runner rotations are simulated due to enormous numerical cost, more effort has to be spent to evaluation procedure in order to obtain objective results. By comparing the numerical results with measured strains accuracy of the whole simulation procedure is verified.

  7. Accelerated growth of oxide film on aluminium alloys under steam: Part II: Effects of alloy chemistry and steam vapour pressure on corrosion and adhesion performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Bordo, Kirill; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2015-01-01

    The steam treatment of aluminium alloys with varying vapour pressure of steamresulted in the growth of aluminium oxyhydroxide films of thickness range between 450 - 825nm. The surface composition, corrosion resistance, and adhesion of the produced films was characterised by XPS, potentiodynamic...... polarization, acetic acid salt spray, filiform corrosion test, and tape test. The oxide films formed by steam treatment showed good corrosion resistance in NaCl solution by significantly reducing anodic and cathodic activities. The pitting potential of the surface treated with steam was a function...... of the vapour pressure of the steam. The accelerated corrosion and adhesion tests on steam generated oxide films with commercial powder coating verified that the performance of the oxide coating is highly dependent on the vapour pressure of the steam....

  8. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Lebesgue

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc versus the non-adhesive part (the stem, and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue. This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article “Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach” (Lebesgue et al., 2016 [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold, likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives.

  9. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    2016-06-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article "Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach" (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives.

  10. Adhesion and Cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Anthony von Fraunhofer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed.

  11. Dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance field sensing with part-per-trillion resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Simon; Barmet, Christoph; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Brunner, David O; Schmid, Thomas; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2016-12-02

    High-field magnets of up to tens of teslas in strength advance applications in physics, chemistry and the life sciences. However, progress in generating such high fields has not been matched by corresponding advances in magnetic field measurement. Based mostly on nuclear magnetic resonance, dynamic high-field magnetometry is currently limited to resolutions in the nanotesla range. Here we report a concerted approach involving tailored materials, magnetostatics and detection electronics to enhance the resolution of nuclear magnetic resonance sensing by three orders of magnitude. The relative sensitivity thus achieved amounts to 1 part per trillion (10 -12 ). To exemplify this capability we demonstrate the direct detection and relaxometry of nuclear polarization and real-time recording of dynamic susceptibility effects related to human heart function. Enhanced high-field magnetometry will generally permit a fresh look at magnetic phenomena that scale with field strength. It also promises to facilitate the development and operation of high-field magnets.

  12. Exhaust Gas Temperature Measurements in Diagnostics of Turbocharged Marine Internal Combustion Engines Part II Dynamic Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korczewski Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The second part of the article describes the technology of marine engine diagnostics making use of dynamic measurements of the exhaust gas temperature. Little-known achievements of Prof. S. Rutkowski of the Naval College in Gdynia (now: Polish Naval Academy in this area are presented. A novel approach is proposed which consists in the use of the measured exhaust gas temperature dynamics for qualitative and quantitative assessment of the enthalpy flux of successive pressure pulses of the exhaust gas supplying the marine engine turbocompressor. General design assumptions are presented for the measuring and diagnostic system which makes use of a sheathed thermocouple installed in the engine exhaust gas manifold. The corrected thermal inertia of the thermocouple enables to reproduce a real time-history of exhaust gas temperature changes.

  13. Adhesive organ regeneration in Macrostomum lignano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengerer, Birgit; Hennebert, Elise; Flammang, Patrick; Salvenmoser, Willi; Ladurner, Peter

    2016-06-02

    Flatworms possess pluripotent stem cells that can give rise to all cell types, which allows them to restore lost body parts after injury or amputation. This makes flatworms excellent model systems for studying regeneration. In this study, we present the adhesive organs of a marine flatworm as a simple model system for organ regeneration. Macrostomum lignano has approximately 130 adhesive organs at the ventral side of its tail plate. One adhesive organ consists of three interacting cells: one adhesive gland cell, one releasing gland cell, and one modified epidermal cell, called an anchor cell. However, no specific markers for these cell types were available to study the regeneration of adhesive organs. We tested 15 commercially available lectins for their ability to label adhesive organs and found one lectin (peanut agglutinin) to be specific to adhesive gland cells. We visualized the morphology of regenerating adhesive organs using lectin- and antibody staining as well as transmission electron microscopy. Our findings indicate that the two gland cells differentiate earlier than the connected anchor cells. Using EdU/lectin staining of partially amputated adhesive organs, we showed that their regeneration can proceed in two ways. First, adhesive gland cell bodies are able to survive partial amputation and reconnect with newly formed anchor cells. Second, adhesive gland cell bodies are cleared away, and the entire adhesive organ is build anew. Our results provide the first insights into adhesive organ regeneration and describe ten new markers for differentiated cells and tissues in M. lignano. The position of adhesive organ cells within the blastema and their chronological differentiation have been shown for the first time. M. lignano can regenerate adhesive organs de novo but also replace individual anchor cells in an injured organ. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of organogenesis in flatworms and enable further molecular investigations of cell

  14. Time Analysis of Building Dynamic Response Under Seismic Action. Part 1: Theoretical Propositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufimtcev, E. M.

    2017-11-01

    The first part of the article presents the main provisions of the analytical approach – the time analysis method (TAM) developed for the calculation of the elastic dynamic response of rod structures as discrete dissipative systems (DDS) and based on the investigation of the characteristic matrix quadratic equation. The assumptions adopted in the construction of the mathematical model of structural oscillations as well as the features of seismic forces’ calculating and recording based on the data of earthquake accelerograms are given. A system to resolve equations is given to determine the nodal (kinematic and force) response parameters as well as the stress-strain state (SSS) parameters of the system’s rods.

  15. Polymer adhesion predictions for oral dosage forms to enhance drug administration safety. Part 2: In vitro approach using mechanical force methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumond, Nélio; Stegemann, Sven

    2018-03-05

    Predicting the potential for unintended adhesion of solid oral dosage forms (SODF) to mucosal tissue is an important aspect that should be considered during drug product development. Previous investigations into low strength mucoadhesion based on particle interactions methods provided evidence that rheological measurements could be used to obtain valid predictions for the development of SODF coatings that can be safely swallowed. The aim of this second work was to estimate the low mucoadhesive strength properties of different polymers using in vitro methods based on mechanical forces and to identify which methods are more precise when measuring reduced mucoadhesion. Another aim was to compare the obtained results to the ones achieved with in vitro particle interaction methods in order to evaluate which methodology can provide stronger predictions. The combined results correlate between particle interaction methods and mechanical force measurements. The polyethylene glycol grades (PEG) and carnauba wax showed the lowest adhesive potential and are predicted to support safe swallowing. Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) along with high molecular grades of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) exhibited strong in vitro mucoadhesive strength. The combination of rheological and force tensiometer measurements should be considered when assessing the reduced mucoadhesion of polymer coatings to support safe swallowing of SODF. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanisms of adhesion in geckos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autumn, Kellar; Peattie, Anne M

    2002-12-01

    The extraordinary adhesive capabilities of geckos have challenged explanation for millennia, since Aristotle first recorded his observations. We have discovered many of the secrets of gecko adhesion, yet the millions of dry, adhesive setae on the toes of geckos continue to generate puzzling new questions and valuable answers. Each epidermally-derived, keratinous seta ends in hundreds of 200 nm spatular tips, permitting intimate contact with rough and smooth surfaces alike. Prior studies suggested that adhesive force in gecko setae was directly proportional to the water droplet contact angle (θ) , an indicator of the free surface energy of a substrate. In contrast, new theory suggests that adhesion energy between a gecko seta and a surface (W(GS)) is in fact proportional to (1 + cosθ), and only for θ > 60°. A reanalysis of prior data, in combination with our recent study, support the van der Waals hypothesis of gecko adhesion, and contradict surface hydrophobicity as a predictor of adhesion force. Previously, we and our collaborators measured the force production of a single seta. Initial efforts to attach a seta failed because of improper 3D orientation. However, by simulating the dynamics of gecko limbs during climbing (based on force plate data) we discovered that, in single setae, a small normal preload, combined with a 5 μm displacement yielded a very large adhesive force of 200 microNewton (μN), 10 times that predicted by whole-animal measurements. 6.5 million setae of a single tokay gecko attached maximally could generate 130 kg force. This raises the question of how geckos manage to detach their feet in just 15 ms. We discovered that simply increasing the angle that the setal shaft makes with the substrate to 30° causes detachment. Understanding how simultaneous attachment and release of millions of setae are controlled will require an approach that integrates levels ranging from molecules to lizards.

  17. On the Processing of Spalling Experiments. Part II: Identification of Concrete Fracture Energy in Dynamic Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukić, Bratislav B.; Saletti, Dominique; Forquin, Pascal

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a second part of the study aimed at investigating the fracture behavior of concrete under high strain rate tensile loading. The experimental method together with the identified stress-strain response of three tests conducted on ordinary concrete have been presented in the paper entitled Part I (Forquin and Lukić in Journal of Dynamic Behavior of Materials, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40870-017-0135-1). In the present paper, Part II, the investigation is extended towards directly determining the specific fracture energy of each observed fracture zone by visualizing the dynamic cracking process with a temporal resolution of 1 µs. Having access to temporal displacement fields of the sample surface, it is possible to identify the fracture opening displacement (FOD) and the fracture opening velocity of any principle (open) and secondary (closed) fracture at each measurement instance, that may or may not lead to complete physical failure of the sample. Finally, the local Stress-FOD curves were obtained for each observed fracture zone, opposed to previous works where indirect measurements were used. The obtained results indicated a much lower specific fracture energy compared to the results often found in the literature. Furthermore, numerical simulations were performed with a damage law to evaluate the validity of the proposed experimental data processing and compare it to the most often used one in the previous works. The results showed that the present method can reliably predict the specific fracture energy needed to open one macro-fracture and suggested that indirect measurement techniques can lead to an overestimate of specific fracture energy due to the stringent assumption of linear elasticity up-to the peak and the inability of having access to the real post-peak change of axial stress.

  18. Adhesion of nitrile rubber to UV-assisted surface chemical modified PET fabric, part II: Interfacial characterization of MDI grafted PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razavizadeh, Mahmoud; Jamshidi, Masoud, E-mail: mjamshidi@iust.ac.ir

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • In this research UV-irradiated PET fabric was chemically modified. • The fabric at first carboxylated under UV irradiation using glutaric anhydride, then it was grafted using isocyanate (i.e. MDI). • The surface of the fabric was characterized before and after each treating satge. • The composite samples were prepared and tested for T-Peel test. The surfaces of the fabrics were surface characterized to understand. - Abstract: Fiber to rubber adhesion is an important subject in rubber industry. It is well known that surface treatment (i.e. physical, mechanical and chemical) is an effective method to improve interfacial bonding of fibers and/or fabrics to rubbers. UV irradiation is an effective method which has been used to increase fabric-rubber interfacial interactions. In this research UV assisted chemical modification of PET fabrics was used to increase PET to nitrile rubber (NBR) adhesion. Nitrile rubber is a perfect selection as fuel and oil resistant rubber. However it has weak bonding to PET fabric. For this purpose PET fabric was carboxylated under UV irradiation and then methylenediphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) was grafted on carboxylated PET. The chemical composition of the fabric before and after surface treatment was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The sectional morphology of the experimental PET fibers and the interface between rubber compound and PET fabric was studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The morphology and structure of the product were analyzed by an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX). FTIR-ATR and H NMR analysis were used to assess surface modifications on the PET irradiated fabrics.

  19. Adhesion in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2014-01-01

    This comprehensive book will provide both fundamental and applied aspects of adhesion pertaining to microelectronics in a single and easily accessible source. Among the topics to be covered include; Various theories or mechanisms of adhesionSurface (physical or chemical) characterization of materials as it pertains to adhesionSurface cleaning as it pertains to adhesionWays to improve adhesionUnraveling of interfacial interactions using an array of pertinent techniquesCharacterization of interfaces / interphasesPolymer-polymer adhesionMetal-polymer adhesion  (metallized polymers)Polymer adhesi

  20. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION AND DYNAMIC SIMULATION FOR SINGULARIZING UNIT IN PART FEEDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. SURESH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the automotive sector, the act of feeding and orienting the asymmetric components in desired orientation was considered as major problem. Brake pad was considered in this work and a singularizing unit (hopper was developed for separating them. The objective of this work was to identify the suitable parameters for feeding the irregular part one by one in the specified orientations. Experiments were conducted for various frequency levels at various levels of inclination of the hopper using base plates. The experimental outcome provides the suitable parameters of base plate thickness and frequency of vibration. The hopper model was developed and the vibration analysis was carried out using dynamic simulation software. The results of the physical experiments and simulated design experiment were compared. The comparison shows an appreciable relationship to each other.

  1. Grid interaction of offshore wind farms. Part 1. Models for dynamic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morren, Johan; Pierik, Jan T. G.; de Haan, Sjoerd W. H.; Bozelie, Jan

    2005-07-01

    In this contribution, dynamic wind farm models suitable for fast simulation of power systems are presented. While deriving the models, special attention has been paid to increasing the computational speed of the simulation program. An important increase in speed is realized by the use of the well-known dq0 transformation (Park transformation) not only for the generator but also for all other electrical components. The use of the Park transformation is common practice in electrical machine models, but not in the modelling of other electrical components. For single turbines, simulations in the dq0 reference frame are 100 times faster than simulations in the abc reference frame. After a discussion of the Park transformation and its most important properties, it is explained how models in the dq0 reference frame can be obtained. The dq0 models of the most important electrical components are presented. The mechanical and aerodynamic models that are needed for dynamic simulation of wind turbines are discussed briefly. The models are applied in Part 2. Copyright

  2. THE FOOTWEAR DESIGNING SESSIONS USING CRISPIN DYNAMICS ENGINEER. PART I: Develop into a full shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IOVAN-DRAGOMIR Alina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The diversification and customization of products are important characteristic of the modern economy and especially of the fashion industry. Because of this, the lifetime of the footwear product is very short and result the necessity to cut the design and production time. By classic methodology, designing footwear is a very complex and laborious activity. That is because classic methodology requires many graphic executions using manual means, which consume a lot of the producer’s time. With CRISPIN Dynamics, one can visualize a range of designs on-screen; work out the costs of a new style and even cut out sample shoe components. Reliance on manual skills is largely eliminated, so the staff can work creatively, but with increased accuracy and productivity. One can even send designs to a distant office or manufacturing center in a matter of minutes. This paper presents the basic function of CRISPIN Dynamics CAD Suite Engineer for footwear design. The process of new product development has six steps: digitized form of the medium copy, last flatting, model drawing, creation and management of individual parts, estimation of material consumption, multiplying the designed footwear product’s pattern. This product has been developed for shoemakers who wish to ensure that their business remains competitive by increasing the efficiency, speed and accuracy of pattern development and grading.

  3. Seismic triggering of landslides. Part B: Simulation of dynamic failure processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-B. Havenith

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available From field observations it is possible to establish correlations between geological conditions and landslide occurrence. However, in general, it is difficult to assess the affect of individual factors on slope instability because of their mutual interaction. In addition, the dynamic effect of propagating seismic waves significantly increases the complexity of the slope stability problem. Wave diffraction, reflection and focusing effects are dependent on local geological conditions and make it difficult to analyse dynamic sliding mechanisms using field observations alone. As a consequence, in order to examine the influence of various geological and seismic factors on slope movements, it is often necessary to produce numerical models. This paper describes the results of such models as applied to two case studies in Kyrgyzstan: the Ananevo rockslide, located in granite, and the Suusamyr debris slump-flow, situated within soft sediments (see Part A: Havenith et al., 2003. Discrete element modelling (UDEC, adapted both to the discontinuous character of fractured rock and to the heterogeneity of layered mediums, was used. This permitted simulation of deformation mechanisms, including seismically induced bending, block tilting, and slip. Particular attention was paid to the interaction between deformation mechanisms, site-specific amplification effects, and subsurface structure.

  4. Design and fabrication of polymer based dry adhesives inspired by the gecko adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kejia

    There has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties: the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this thesis, easy, scalable methods, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques are presented to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provide anisotropic adhesion properties. In the first part of the study, the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function are measured. Consistent with the Peel Zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. Contact mechanics of the synthetic array were highly anisotropic, consistent with the frictional adhesion model and gecko-like. Based on the original design, a new design of gecko-like dry adhesives was developed which showed superior tribological properties and furthermore showed anisotropic adhesive properties without the need for tilt in the structures. These adhesives can be used to reversibly suspend weights from vertical surfaces (e.g., walls) and, for the first time to our knowledge, horizontal surfaces (e.g., ceilings) by simultaneously and judiciously activating anisotropic friction and adhesion forces. Furthermore, adhesion properties between artificial gecko-inspired dry adhesives and rough substrates with varying roughness are studied. The results suggest that both adhesion and friction forces on a rough substrate depends significantly on the

  5. Accuracy of preoperative real-time dynamic transvaginal ultrasound sliding sign in prediction of pelvic adhesions in women with previous abdominopelvic surgery: prospective, multicenter, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayachi, A; Bouchahda, R; Derouich, S; Mkaouer, L; Kehila, M; Abouda, H; Channoufi, B; Bouyahia, M; Braham, M; Zhioua, F; Bouchahda, H; Mourali, M

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the role of the transvaginal sonographic (TVS) sliding sign in predicting pelvic adhesions in women with previous abdominopelvic surgery. This was a multicenter, prospective, interventional, double-blind study of patients with a history of abdominopelvic surgery who were undergoing laparoscopy or laparotomy during the 6-month period from March to August 2016 in one of three academic obstetrics and gynecology departments. Prior to surgery, patients were examined by TVS to assess the vesicouterine pouch, uterus, ovaries and pouch of Douglas, using the TVS pelvic sliding sign. Ultrasound findings and medical and surgical data were recorded. We assessed the accuracy of the preoperative TVS sliding sign in the prediction of pelvic adhesions overall and in each compartment separately. During the study period, complete TVS sliding sign and laparoscopic or laparotomic data were available for 107 women. Their mean age was 44.0 (95% CI, 41.6-46.4; range, 20-79) years. Their mean parity was 2.0 (95% CI, 1.7-2.3; range, 0-9) and the mean number of previous abdominal surgical procedures per patient was 1.3 (95% CI, 1.2-1.5; range, 1-4). Adhesions were noted in 27/107 (25.2%) patients. The TVS sliding sign had a sensitivity of 96.3% and specificity of 92.6% in predicting pelvic adhesions. There was a significant relationship between adhesions in each compartment and the TVS sliding sign (P sign is an effective means to detect preoperatively pelvic adhesions in patients with previous abdominopelvic surgery. Use of such a non-invasive and well-tolerated technique could help in the planning of laparoscopy or laparotomy and counseling of these patients. Copyright © 2017 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2017 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Adhesion property of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR-based adhesives containing calcium carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The adhesion property (i.e. viscosity, loop tack and peel strength of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR 25 and ENR 50 grade-based pressure-sensitive adhesive was studied in the presence of calcium carbonate. The range of calcium carbonate loaded was from 10 to 50 parts per hundred parts of rubber (phr. Coumarone-indene resin was used as the tackifier and its concentration was fixed at 80 phr. Toluene was chosen as the solvent throughout the investigation. The substrates (PET film/paper were coated with the adhesive using a SHEEN hand coater at a coating thickness of 60 µm. Viscosity of the adhesive was measured by a HAAKE Rotary Viscometer whereas loop tack and peel strength were determined by a Llyod Adhesion Tester operating at 30 cm/min. Results show that viscosity of ENR-based adhesives increases gradually with increase in calcium carbonate loading due to the concentration effect of the filler. However, for loop tack and peel strength, it passes through a maximum at 30 phr calcium carbonate, an observation which is attributed to the optimum wettability of adhesive on the substrate at this adhesive composition. ENR 25-based adhesive consistently exhibits higher adhesion property than ENR 50 for all calcium carbonate loadings studied.

  7. Fracture mechanics characterisation of medium-size adhesive joint specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Jacobsen, T.K.

    2004-01-01

    Medium-size specimens (adhesive layer were tested in four point bending to determine their load carrying capacity. Specimens having different thickness were tested. Except for onespecimen, the cracking occurred as cracking...... along the adhesive layer; initially cracking occurred along the adhesive/laminate interface, but after some crack extension the cracking took place inside the laminate (for one specimen the later part of thecracking occurred unstably along the adhesive/ laminate interface). Crack bridging by fibres...

  8. Nucleation and growth of cadherin adhesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, Mireille; Thoumine, Olivier; Brevier, Julien; Choquet, Daniel; Riveline, Daniel; Mege, Rene-Marc

    2007-01-01

    Cell-cell contact formation relies on the recruitment of cadherin molecules and their anchoring to actin. However, the precise chronology of events from initial cadherin trans-interactions to adhesion strengthening is unclear, in part due to the lack of access to the distribution of cadherins within adhesion zones. Using N-cadherin expressing cells interacting with N-cadherin coated surfaces, we characterized the formation of cadherin adhesions at the ventral cell surface. TIRF and RIC microscopies revealed streak-like accumulations of cadherin along actin fibers. FRAP analysis indicated that engaged cadherins display a slow turnover at equilibrium, compatible with a continuous addition and removal of cadherin molecules within the adhesive contact. Association of cadherin cytoplasmic tail to actin as well as actin cables and myosin II activity are required for the formation and maintenance of cadherin adhesions. Using time lapse microscopy we deciphered how cadherin adhesions form and grow. As lamellipodia protrude, cadherin foci stochastically formed a few microns away from the cell margin. Neo-formed foci coalesced aligned and coalesced with preformed foci either by rearward sliding or gap filling to form cadherin adhesions. Foci experienced collapse at the rear of cadherin adhesions. Based on these results, we present a model for the nucleation, directional growth and shrinkage of cadherin adhesions

  9. Adhesive wafer bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklaus, F.; Stemme, G.; Lu, J.-Q.; Gutmann, R. J.

    2006-02-01

    Wafer bonding with intermediate polymer adhesives is an important fabrication technique for advanced microelectronic and microelectromechanical systems, such as three-dimensional integrated circuits, advanced packaging, and microfluidics. In adhesive wafer bonding, the polymer adhesive bears the forces involved to hold the surfaces together. The main advantages of adhesive wafer bonding include the insensitivity to surface topography, the low bonding temperatures, the compatibility with standard integrated circuit wafer processing, and the ability to join different types of wafers. Compared to alternative wafer bonding techniques, adhesive wafer bonding is simple, robust, and low cost. This article reviews the state-of-the-art polymer adhesive wafer bonding technologies, materials, and applications.

  10. System dynamics comparison of three inventory management models in an automotive parts supply chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andries Botha

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The automotive parts supply chain measures its success in terms of parts availability and stock required to achieve the availability target, measured as allocation fill rate (AFR. The supply chain strives to achieve an AFR target of 95.5% while maintaining low levels of stock. Objective: The first objective of this study is to evaluate the current inventory management approach, namely the maximum inventory position (MIP method, to understand the difference between the theoretical derivation and the actual implementation. The second objective is to develop and compare the performance of a new stock target setting (STS method relative to the MIP methods. Method: The theoretical and actual equations behind the MIP and STS methods are derived for steady state as well as stochastic conditions. A system dynamics simulation model (SDSM was developed to describe both the local and imported supply chains. The SDSM was used to simulate and confirm the parameters for the STS method. It was also used to compare the three inventory management methods against a theoretical environment and actual data sets. Results: The STS method requires a damping factor (DF to ensure it does not cause the bullwhip effect. The SDSM was used to determine that a value equal to the lead time ensures effective damping. In the theoretical environment, the MIPTheory method requires the lowest stock, but also has the lowest AFR. MIPActual achieves the highest AFR, but with significantly higher stock holding. The STS method improves on the AFR achieved by the MIPTheory method, with lower stock holding than the MIPActual method. With the actual demand data sets, the results vary by parts movement type. With fast moving parts, all methods achieve the AFR target, the MIPActual method has a higher stock holding for all cases, and the STS method results in reduced stock holding for 7 of 12 cases. With medium moving parts, the MIPActual method improves on the AFR in all 15

  11. Adhesion rings surround invadopodia and promote maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Branch

    2012-06-01

    Invasion and metastasis are aggressive cancer phenotypes that are highly related to the ability of cancer cells to degrade extracellular matrix (ECM. At the cellular level, specialized actin-rich structures called invadopodia mediate focal matrix degradation by serving as exocytic sites for ECM-degrading proteinases. Adhesion signaling is likely to be a critical regulatory input to invadopodia, but the mechanism and location of such adhesion signaling events are poorly understood. Here, we report that adhesion rings surround invadopodia shortly after formation and correlate strongly with invadopodium activity on a cell-by-cell basis. By contrast, there was little correlation of focal adhesion number or size with cellular invadopodium activity. Prevention of adhesion ring formation by inhibition of RGD-binding integrins or knockdown (KD of integrin-linked kinase (ILK reduced the number of ECM-degrading invadopodia and reduced recruitment of IQGAP to invadopodium actin puncta. Furthermore, live cell imaging revealed that the rate of extracellular MT1-MMP accumulation at invadopodia was greatly reduced in both integrin-inhibited and ILK-KD cells. Conversely, KD of MT1-MMP reduced invadopodium activity and dynamics but not the number of adhesion-ringed invadopodia. These results suggest a model in which adhesion rings are recruited to invadopodia shortly after formation and promote invadopodium maturation by enhancing proteinase secretion. Since adhesion rings are a defining characteristic of podosomes, similar structures formed by normal cells, our data also suggest further similarities between invadopodia and podosomes.

  12. Adhesive Elastomeric Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Mansour, Haefa; Liu, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Sutures and staples commonly used to close surgical wounds tend to be much stiffer than the surrounding tissue, often resulting in external tissue damage. Surgical adhesives provide a promising alternative to these sutures and staples. Ideal surgical adhesives are biocompatible, able to set well and remain sticky in moist conditions, possess strong adhesive and cohesive properties, and exhibit mechanical properties that mimic those of the surrounding tissue. Unfortunately, the adhesives avail...

  13. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  14. On the Interplay Between Adhesion Strength and Tensile Properties of Thermal Spray Coated Laminates—Part II: Low-Velocity Thermal Spray Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaotao; Smith, Gregory M.; Sampath, Sanjay

    2018-02-01

    In this two-part study, uniaxial tensile testing was used to evaluate coating/substrate bonding and compared with traditional ASTM C633 bond pull test results for thermal spray (TS) coated steel laminates. In Part I, the rationale, methodology, and applicability of the test to high-velocity TS coatings were demonstrated. In this Part II, the method was investigated for low-velocity TS processes (air plasma spray and arc spray) on equivalent materials. Ni and Ni-5wt.%Al coatings were deposited on steel substrates with three different roughness levels and tested using both uniaxial tensile and ASTM C633 methods. The results indicate the uniaxial tensile approach provides useful information about the nature of the coating/substrate bonding and goes beyond the traditional bond pull test in providing insightful information on the load sharing processes across the interface. Additionally, this proposed methodology alleviates some of the longstanding shortcomings and potentially reduces error associated with the traditional ASTM C633 test. The mechanisms governing the load transfer between the substrate and the coating were investigated, and the influence of Al in the coating material evaluated.

  15. Corrosion protection properties and interfacial adhesion mechanism of an epoxy/polyamide coating applied on the steel surface decorated with cerium oxide nanofilm: Complementary experimental, molecular dynamics (MD) and first principle quantum mechanics (QM) simulation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlakeh, Ghasem; Ramezanzadeh, Bahram; Saeb, Mohammad Reza; Terryn, Herman; Ghaffari, Mehdi

    2017-10-01

    The effect of cerium oxide treatment on the corrosion protection properties and interfacial interaction of steel/epoxy was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, (EIS) classical molecular dynamics (MD) and first principle quantum mechanics (QM) simulation methods X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to verify the chemical composition of the Ce film deposited on the steel. To probe the role of the curing agent in epoxy adsorption, computations were compared for an epoxy, aminoamide and aminoamide modified epoxy. Moreover, to study the influence of water on interfacial interactions the MD simulations were executed for poly (aminoamide)-cured epoxy resin in contact with the different crystallographic cerium dioxide (ceria, CeO2) surfaces including (100), (110), and (111) in the presence of water molecules. It was found that aminoamide-cured epoxy material was strongly adhered to all types of CeO2 substrates, so that binding to ceria surfaces followed the decreasing order CeO2 (111) > CeO2 (100) > CeO2 (110) in both dry and wet environments. Calculation of interaction energies noticed an enhanced adhesion to metal surface due to aminoamide curing of epoxy resin; where facets (100) and (111) revealed electrostatic and Lewis acid-base interactions, while an additional hydrogen bonding interaction was identified for CeO2 (110). Overall, MD simulations suggested decrement of adhesion to CeO2 in wet environment compared to dry conditions. Additionally, contact angle, pull-off test, cathodic delamination and salt spray analyses were used to confirm the simulation results. The experimental results in line with modeling results revealed that Ce layer deposited on steel enhanced substrate surface free energy, work of adhesion, and interfacial adhesion strength of the epoxy coating. Furthermore, decrement of adhesion of epoxy to CeO2 in presence of water was affirmed by experimental results. EIS results revealed remarkable enhancement of the corrosion

  16. Analysis of a Swashplate Mechanism of the Hingeless Rotor Hub with the Flybar in a Model Helicopter, Part II: Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaapour, Mohammad Reza; Zohoor, Hassan

    Swashplate mechanism is the steering control mechanism, used in most helicopters. It is a complex multi-loop closed kinematic chain which controls the angles of attack of the main rotor blades. In most new model helicopters, this mechanism is also equipped with the bell-hiller stabilizer bar (flybar), to improve the stability. The main purpose of this paper is the dynamic analysis of a swashplate mechanism, one of the latest architectures, used for hingeless rotor with the flybar. The underlying kinematics has been discussed in Part I. Thus, the detailed dynamic analysis of the whole mechanism and each part are presented here. The analyses are based on the parallel manipulators concept and the virtual work principle. Also an ADAMS rigid body dynamic model was developed to verify the results of the analytical model. In many simulated cases, the results matched.

  17. Element Partition Trees For H-Refined Meshes to Optimize Direct Solver Performance. Part I: Dynamic Programming

    KAUST Repository

    AbouEisha, Hassan M.

    2017-07-13

    We consider a class of two-and three-dimensional h-refined meshes generated by an adaptive finite element method. We introduce an element partition tree, which controls the execution of the multi-frontal solver algorithm over these refined grids. We propose and study algorithms with polynomial computational cost for the optimization of these element partition trees. The trees provide an ordering for the elimination of unknowns. The algorithms automatically optimize the element partition trees using extensions of dynamic programming. The construction of the trees by the dynamic programming approach is expensive. These generated trees cannot be used in practice, but rather utilized as a learning tool to propose fast heuristic algorithms. In this first part of our paper we focus on the dynamic programming approach, and draw a sketch of the heuristic algorithm. The second part will be devoted to a more detailed analysis of the heuristic algorithm extended for the case of hp-adaptive

  18. Particle adhesion and removal

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive and easily accessible reference source covering all important aspects of particle adhesion and removal.  The core objective is to cover both fundamental and applied aspects of particle adhesion and removal with emphasis on recent developments.  Among the topics to be covered include: 1. Fundamentals of surface forces in particle adhesion and removal.2. Mechanisms of particle adhesion and removal.3. Experimental methods (e.g. AFM, SFA,SFM,IFM, etc.) to understand  particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions.4. Mechanics of adhesion of micro- and  n

  19. Dynamic simulation of a circulating fluidized bed boiler system part I: Description of the dynamic system and transient behavior of sub-models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Il; Choi, Sang Min; Yang, Jong In

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic performance simulation of a CFB boiler in a commercial-scale power plant is reported. The boiler system was modeled by a finite number of heat exchanger units, which are sub-grouped into the gas-solid circulation loop, the water-steam circulation loop, and the inter-connected heat exchangers blocks of the boiler. This dynamic model is an extension from the previously reported performance simulation model, which was designed to simulate static performance of the same power plant, where heat and mass for each of the heat exchanger units were balanced for the inter-connected heat exchanger network among the fuel combustion system and the water-steam system. Dynamic performance simulation was achieved by calculating the incremental difference from the previous time step, and progressing for the next time step. Additional discretization of the heat exchanger blocks was necessary to accommodate the dynamic response of the water evaporation and natural circulation as well as the transient response of the metal temperature of the heat exchanger elements. Presentation of the simulation modeling is organized into two parts; system configuration of the model plant and the general approach of the simulation are presented along with the transient behavior of the sub-models in Part I. Dynamic sub-models were integrated in terms of the mass flow and the heat transfer for simulating the CFB boiler system. Dynamic simulation for the open loop response was performed to check the integrated system of the water-steam loop and the solid-gas loop of the total boiler system. Simulation of the total boiler system which includes the closed-loop control system blocks is presented in the following Part II

  20. Molybdenum protective coatings adhesion to steel substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesman, A. I.; Postnikov, D. V.; Polonyankin, D. A.; Teplouhov, A. A.; Tyukin, A. V.; Tkachenko, E. A.

    2017-06-01

    Protection of the critical parts, components and assemblies from corrosion is an urgent engineering problem and many other industries. Protective coatings’ forming on surface of metal products is a promising way of corrosionprevention. The adhesion force is one of the main characteristics of coatings’ durability. The paper presents theoretical and experimental adhesion force assessment for coatings formed by molybdenum magnetron sputtering ontoa steel substrate. Validity and reliability of results obtained by simulation and sclerometry method allow applying the developed model for adhesion force evaluation in binary «steel-coating» systems.

  1. DIABETES AND SHOULDER ADHESIVE CAPSULITIS

    OpenAIRE

    J. Mohanakrishnan; Bhanumathy Mohanakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adhesive capsulitis (AC) of shoulder is a common condition encountered by physical therapists in their routine outpatient care services; AC of shoulder is as by itself being a self limiting disorder lasts from months to years causing pain and discomfort to the patients. The condition is commonly associated with Diabetes mellitus or other co morbidities. The incidence of AC is high among diabetic individuals and it becomes mandatory on the part of physical therapists and other heal...

  2. Integrin LFA-1 regulates cell adhesion via transient clutch formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Munenori; Miyanaga, Yukihiro; Matsuoka, Satomi; Kozuka, Jun; Togashi, Yuichi; Kinashi, Tatsuo; Ueda, Masahiro

    2015-08-21

    Integrin LFA-1 regulates immune cell adhesion and trafficking by binding to ICAM-1 upon chemokine stimulation. Integrin-mediated clutch formation between extracellular ICAM-1 and the intracellular actin cytoskeleton is important for cell adhesion. We applied single-molecule tracking analysis to LFA-1 and ICAM-1 in living cells to examine the ligand-binding kinetics and mobility of the molecular clutch under chemokine-induced physiological adhesion and Mn(2+)-induced tight adhesion. Our results show a transient LFA-1-mediated clutch formation that lasts a few seconds and leads to a transient lower-mobility is sufficient to promote cell adhesion. Stable clutch formation was observed for Mn(2+)-induced high affinity LFA-1, but was not required for physiological adhesion. We propose that fast cycling of the clutch formation by intermediate-affinity integrin enables dynamic cell adhesion and migration. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Haptic control of a pneumatic muscle actuator to provide resistance for simulated isokinetic exercise: Part I--dynamic test station and human quadriceps dynamic simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kara L; Phillips, Chandler A; Reynolds, David B; Mohler, Stanley R; Rogers, Dana B; Neidhard-Doll, Amy T

    2014-01-01

    Pneumatic muscle actuators (PMAs) have a high power to weight ratio and possess unique characteristics which make them ideal actuators for applications involving human interaction. PMAs are difficult to control due to nonlinear dynamics, presenting challenges in system implementation. Despite these challenges, PMAs have great potential as a source of resistance for strength training and rehabilitation. The objective of this work was to control a PMA for use in isokinetic exercise, potentially benefiting anyone in need of optimal strength training through a joint's range of motion. A human quadriceps dynamic simulator (HQDS) was developed so that control effectiveness and accommodation could be tested prior to human implementation. The experimental set-up and HQDS are discussed in Part I of this work. The development of a PMA haptic controller and its interaction with the HQDS are discussed in Part II.

  4. An Explicit Formulation of Singularity-Free Dynamic Equations of Mechanical Systems in Lagrangian Form---Part Two: Multibody Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pål Johan From

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the explicit dynamic equations of multibody mechanical systems. This is the second paper on this topic. In the first paper the dynamics of a single rigid body from the Boltzmann--Hamel equations were derived. In this paper these results are extended to also include multibody systems. We show that when quasi-velocities are used, the part of the dynamic equations that appear from the partial derivatives of the system kinematics are identical to the single rigid body case, but in addition we get terms that come from the partial derivatives of the inertia matrix, which are not present in the single rigid body case. We present for the first time the complete and correct derivation of multibody systems based on the Boltzmann--Hamel formulation of the dynamics in Lagrangian form where local position and velocity variables are used in the derivation to obtain the singularity-free dynamic equations. The final equations are written in global variables for both position and velocity. The main motivation of these papers is to allow practitioners not familiar with differential geometry to implement the dynamic equations of rigid bodies without the presence of singularities. Presenting the explicit dynamic equations also allows for more insight into the dynamic structure of the system. Another motivation is to correct some errors commonly found in the literature. Unfortunately, the formulation of the Boltzmann-Hamel equations used here are presented incorrectly. This has been corrected by the authors, but we present here, for the first time, the detailed mathematical details on how to arrive at the correct equations. We also show through examples that using the equations presented here, the dynamics of a single rigid body is reduced to the standard equations on a Lagrangian form, for example Euler's equations for rotational motion and Euler--Lagrange equations for free motion.

  5. Modelling the WWER-type reactor dynamics using a hybrid computer. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpeta, C.

    Results of simulation studies into reactor and steam generator dynamics of a WWER type power plant are presented. Spatial kinetics of the reactor core is described by a nodal approximation to diffusion equations, xenon poisoning equations and heat transfer equations. The simulation of the reactor model dynamics was performed on a hybrid computer. Models of both a horizontal and a vertical steam generator were developed. The dynamics was investigated over a large range of power by computing the transients on a digital computer. (author)

  6. The adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-Min; Hong, Guang; Dilinuer, Maimaitishawuti; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Wang, Xin-Zhi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    To examine the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of modern denture adhesives in vitro. Three cream-type denture adhesives (Poligrip S, Corect Cream, Liodent Cream; PGS, CRC, LDC) and three powder-type denture adhesives (Poligrip Powder, New Faston, Zanfton; PGP, FSN, ZFN) were used in this study. The initial viscosity was measured using a controlled-stress rheometer. The adhesive strength was measured according to ISO-10873 recommended procedures. All data were analyzed independently by one-way analysis of variance combined with a Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test at a 5% level of significance. The initial viscosity of all the cream-type denture adhesives was lower than the powder-type adhesives. Before immersion in water, all the powder-type adhesives exhibited higher adhesive strength than the cream-type adhesives. However, the adhesive strength of cream-type denture adhesives increased significantly and exceeded the powder-type denture adhesives after immersion in water. For powder-type adhesives, the adhesive strength significantly decreased after immersion in water for 60 min, while the adhesive strength of the cream-type adhesives significantly decreased after immersion in water for 180 min. Cream-type denture adhesives have lower initial viscosity and higher adhesive strength than powder type adhesives, which may offer better manipulation properties and greater efficacy during application.

  7. Synaptic Cell Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Missler, Markus; Südhof, Thomas C.; Biederer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Chemical synapses are asymmetric intercellular junctions that mediate synaptic transmission. Synaptic junctions are organized by trans-synaptic cell adhesion molecules bridging the synaptic cleft. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules not only connect pre- and postsynaptic compartments, but also mediate trans-synaptic recognition and signaling processes that are essential for the establishment, specification, and plasticity of synapses. A growing number of synaptic cell adhesion molecules that inc...

  8. On protection of freedom's solar dynamic radiator from the orbital debris environment. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhatigan, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, recent progress to better understand the environmental threat of micrometeoroid and space debris to the solar dynamic radiator for the Space Station Freedom power system is reported. The objective was to define a design which would perform to survivability requirements over the expected lifetime of the radiator. A previous paper described the approach developed to assess on-orbit survivability of the solar dynamic radiator due to micrometeoroid and space debris impacts. Preliminary analyses were presented to quantify the solar dynamic radiator survivability. These included the type of particle and particle population expected to defeat the radiator bumpering. Results of preliminary hypervelocity impact (HVI) testing performed on radiator panel samples were also presented. This paper presents results of a more extensive test program undertaken to further define the response of the solar dynamic radiator to HVI. Tests were conducted on representative radiator panels (under ambient, nonoperating conditions) over a range of particle size, particle density, impact angle, and impact velocity. Target parameters were also varied. Data indicate that analytical penetration predictions are conservative (i.e., pessimistic) for the specific configuration of the solar dynamic radiator. Test results are used to define more rigorously the solar dynamic radiator reliability with respect to HVI. Test data, analyses, and survivability results are presented

  9. A dynamic model of the marriage market-Part 2: simulation of marital states and application to empirical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, A P; Garenne, M L

    2013-09-01

    A dynamic, two-sex, age-structured marriage model is presented. Part 1 focused on first marriage only and described a marriage market matching algorithm. In Part 2 the model is extended to include divorce, widowing, and remarriage. The model produces a self-consistent set of marital states distributed by age and sex in a stable population by means of a gender-symmetric numerical method. The model is compared with empirical data for the case of Zambia. Furthermore, a dynamic marriage function for a changing population is demonstrated in simulations of three hypothetical scenarios of elevated mortality in young to middle adulthood. The marriage model has its primary application to simulation of HIV-AIDS epidemics in African countries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A hybrid total internal reflection fluorescence and optical tweezers microscope to study cell adhesion and membrane protein dynamics of single living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder-van As, M.I.; Rieger, B.; Joosten, B.; Subramaniam, Vinod; Figdor, Carl; Kanger, Johannes S.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins plays an important role in cell–cell interactions. The onset of the interaction is typically not precisely controlled by current techniques, making especially difficult the visualization of early-stage dynamics. We have developed a novel method where

  11. Dynamic Characteristics of a New Machine for Fatigue Testing of Railway Axles – Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel FRYDRÝŠEK

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There were done some proposal calculations for a new testing machine. This new testing machine is determined for a dynamic fatigue testing of railway axles. The railway axles are subjected to bending and rotation (centrifugal effects. For the right proposition of a new machine is very important to know the basic dynamic characteristics of whole system. These dynamic characteristics are solved via FEM (MSC.Marc/Mentat software in combination with SBRA (Simulation-Based Reliability Assessment Method (probabilistic Monte Carlo approach, Anthill and Python software. The proposed dimensions and springs of a new machine for fatigue testing of railway axles were used for manufacturing. Application of the SBRA method connected with FEM in these areas is a new and innovative trend in mechanics. This paper is continuation of former work (i.e. easier deterministic approach already presented in this journal in 2007.

  12. An investigation of adhesive/adherend and fiber/matrix interactions. Part A: Surface characterization of titanium dioxide, titantium and titanium 6% Al to 4% V powders: Interaction with water, hydrogen chloride and polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, R. V.; Wightman, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The titanium dioxide surface is discussed. Polymer adhesive are also discussed. Titanium powders are considered. Characterization techniques are also considered. Interactions with polymers, water vapor, and HCl are reported. Adsorbents are characterized.

  13. Soy protein adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2010-01-01

    In the quest to manufacture and use building materials that are more environmentally friendly, soy adhesives can be an important component. Trees fix and store carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. After the trees are harvested, machinery converts the wood into strands, which are then bonded together with adhesives to form strandboard, used in constructing long-lasting...

  14. Adhesive compositions and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Scott D.; Sendijarevic, Vahid; O' Connor, James

    2017-12-05

    The present invention encompasses polyurethane adhesive compositions comprising aliphatic polycarbonate chains. In one aspect, the present invention encompasses polyurethane adhesives derived from aliphatic polycarbonate polyols and polyisocyanates wherein the polyol chains contain a primary repeating unit having a structure:. In another aspect, the invention provides articles comprising the inventive polyurethane compositions as well as methods of making such compositions.

  15. adhesive intestinal obstruction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-06-01

    Jun 1, 2006 ... ABSTRACT. Background: Adhesions after abdominal and pelvic surgery are a major cause of intestinal obstruction in the western world and the pathology is steadily gaining prominence in our practice. Objective: To determine the magnitude of adhesive intestinal obstruction; to determine the types.

  16. Instant acting adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. R.; Haines, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Adhesive developes 80 percent of minimum bond strength of 250 psi less than 30 sec after activation is required. Adhesive is stable, handles easily, is a low toxic hazard, and is useful in industrial and domestic prototype bonding and clamping operations.

  17. Expansion to abandoned agricultural land forms an integral part of silver fir dynamics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Volařík, D.; Hédl, Radim

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 292, March 2013 (2013), s. 39-48 ISSN 0378-1127 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600050812 Grant - others:ERC - European Union(XE) FP7/2007-2013 ERC no. 278065 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : silver fir * dynamics * landscape Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.667, year: 2013

  18. Metal speciation dynamics in colloidal ligand dispersions. Part 3: Lability features of steady-state systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinheiro, J.P.; Domingos, R.; Minor, M.; Leeuwen, van H.P.

    2006-01-01

    A lability criterion is developed for dynamic metal binding by colloidal ligands with convective diffusion as the dominant mode of mass transport. Scanned stripping chronopotentiometric measurements of Pb(II) and Cd(II) binding by carboxylated latex core-shell particles were in good agreement with

  19. Critical Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification Models. Part II: Kinetic and Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Żogała

    2014-01-01

    Originality/value: This paper presents state of art in the field of coal gasification modeling using kinetic and computational fluid dynamics approach. The paper also presents own comparative analysis (concerned with mathematical formulation, input data and parameters, basic assumptions, obtained results etc. of the most important models of underground coal gasification.

  20. Cantilever-beam dynamic modulus for wood composite products. Part 1, apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Turk; John F. Hunt; David J. Marr

    2008-01-01

    A cantilever-beam vibration-testing apparatus has been developed to provide a means of dynamic and non-destructive evaluation of modulus of elasticity for small samples of wood or wood-composite material. The apparatus applies a known displacement to a cantilever beam and then releases the beam into its natural first-mode vibration and records displacement as a...

  1. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach...... that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  2. Regional forecasting system of marine state and variability of dynamical processes in the easternmost part of the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordzadze, Avtandil; Demetrashvili, Demuri

    2014-05-01

    The regional forecasting system for the easternmost part of the Black Sea developed at M. Nodia Institute of Geophysics of I. Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University under the EU framework projects ARENA and ECOOP is a part of the Black Sea basin-scale Nowcasting/Forecasting System. A core of the regional forecasting system is a baroclinic regional model of Black Sea dynamics with 1 km spacing based on hydrostatic primitive equations of ocean hydrothermodynamics, which are written in z-coordinates for deviations of thermodynamic values from their standard vertical distributions. To solve the problem the two-cycle method of splitting the model equation system with respect to both physical processes and coordinate planes and lines is used. The regional model of M. Nodia Institute of Geophysics is nested in the basin-scale model of Black Sea dynamics of Marine Hydrophysical Institute (Sevastopol/Ukraine). The regional forecasting system provides 3 days' forecasts of current, temperature and salinity for the easternmost part of the Black Sea, which is limited to the Caucasian and Turkish coastal lines and the western liquid boundary coinciding with the meridian 39.080E. Data needed on liquid and upper boundaries, also the 3-D initial hydrophysical fields for the easternmost regional area are provided in near operative mode from Marine hydrophysical Institute via Internet. These data on the liquid boundary are values of velocity components, temperature and salinity predicted by the basin-scale model of Black Sea dynamics of Marine Hydrophysical Institute and on the sea surface 2-D meteorological boundary fields - wind stress, heat fluxes, evaporation and precipitation rates predicted by the regional atmospheric model ALADIN are used. The analysis of the results of modeling and forecast of dynamic processes developed for 2010-2014 showed that the easternmost water area of the Black Sea is a dynamically very active zone, where continuously there are processes of generation

  3. Shuttle active thermal control system development testing. Volume 7: Improved radiator coating adhesive tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, M. W.

    1973-01-01

    Silver/Teflon thermal control coatings have been tested on a modular radiator system projected for use on the space shuttle. Seven candidate adhesives have been evaluated in a thermal vacuum test on radiator panels similar to the anticipated flight hardware configuration. Several classes of adhesives based on polyester, silicone, and urethane resin systems were tested. These included contact adhesives, heat cured adhesives, heat and pressure cured adhesives, pressure sensitive adhesives, and two part paint on or spray on adhesives. The coatings attached with four of the adhesives, two silicones and two urethanes, had no changes develop during the thermal vacuum test. The two silicone adhesives, both of which were applied to the silver/Teflon as transfer laminates to form a tape, offered the most promise based on application process and thermal performance. Each of the successful silicone adhesives required a heat and pressure cure to adhere during the cryogenic temperature excursion of the thermal-vacuum test.

  4. Comparison of five organic wastes regarding their behaviour during composting : Part 2, nitrogen dynamic

    OpenAIRE

    De Guardia , A.; Mallard , P.; Téglia , C.; Marin , A.; Le Pape , C.; Launay , M.; Benoist , J.C.; Petiot , C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper aimed to compare household waste, separated pig solids, food waste, pig slaughterhouse sludge and green algae regarding processes ruling nitrogen dynamic during composting. For each waste, three composting simulations were performed in parallel in three similar reactors (300L), each one under a constant aeration rate. The aeration flows applied were comprised between 100 and 1100 L/h. The initial waste and the compost were characterized through the measurements of their contents in...

  5. Hybrid infrared scene projector (HIRSP): a high dynamic range infrared scene projector, part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantey, Thomas M.; Bowden, Mark; Cosby, David; Ballard, Gary

    2008-04-01

    This paper is a continuation of the merging of two dynamic infrared scene projector technologies to provide a unique and innovative solution for the simulation of high dynamic temperature ranges for testing infrared imaging sensors. This paper will present some of the challenges and performance issues encountered in implementing this unique projector system into a Hardware-in-the-Loop (HWIL) simulation facility. The projection system combines the technologies of a Honeywell BRITE II extended voltage range emissive resistor array device and an optically scanned laser diode array projector (LDAP). The high apparent temperature simulations are produced from the luminescent infrared radiation emitted by the high power laser diodes. The hybrid infrared projector system is being integrated into an existing HWIL simulation facility and is used to provide real-world high radiance imagery to an imaging infrared unit under test. The performance and operation of the projector is presented demonstrating the merit and success of the hybrid approach. The high dynamic range capability simulates a 250 Kelvin apparent background temperature to 850 Kelvin maximum apparent temperature signatures. This is a large increase in radiance projection over current infrared scene projection capabilities.

  6. Effect of Piers Shape on the Dynamic Structural Responses of Prestressed Concrete Bridge: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Fadhil Naser

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pier of bridge is usually used as a general term for any type of substructure located between horizontal spans and foundations. Piers give vertical supports for spans at intermediate points and perform two main functions. The objective of this study is to inspect the effect of piers shape on the dynamic structural performance by adopting theoretical dynamic analysis. The results of dynamic analysis of 25 bridges models show that the maximum value of natural frequency is equal to 5.64Hz in two circles piers bridge model. Therefore, this type of model has good stiffness and bearing capacity. The two square piers model, the one circle pier model, and the two circles piers model appear good stiffness because of the natural frequencies (5.30Hz, 5.52Hz, and 5.64Hz are more than the maximum forced frequencies (4.52Hz, 5.45Hz, and 4.52Hz respectively. According to the comparison between all models results, the two circles piers model has the higher stiffness because of this model has the maximum value of natural frequency (5.64Hz and it is more than all forced vibration frequencies of all others models. Therefore, this study recommends that using the bridge model of two circles piers in the bridges construction that consists of three spans (30m+40m+30m with section of box girder.

  7. Effect of Piers Shape on the Dynamic Structural Responses of Prestressed Concrete Bridge: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Fadhil Naser

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pier of bridge is usually used as a general term for any type of substructure located between horizontal spans and foundations. Piers give vertical supports for spans at intermediate points and perform two main functions. The objective of this study is to inspect the effect of piers shape on the dynamic structural performance by adopting theoretical dynamic analysis. The results of dynamic analysis of 25 bridges models show that the maximum value of natural frequency is equal to 5.64Hz in two circles piers bridge model. Therefore, this type of model has good stiffness and bearing capacity. The two square piers model, the one circle pier model, and the two circles piers model appear good stiffness because of the natural frequencies (5.30Hz, 5.52Hz, and 5.64Hz are more than the maximum forced frequencies (4.52Hz, 5.45Hz, and 4.52Hz respectively. According to the comparison between all models results, the two circles piers model has the higher stiffness because of this model has the maximum value of natural frequency (5.64Hz and it is more than all forced vibration frequencies of all others models. Therefore, this study recommends that using the bridge model of two circles piers in the bridges construction that consists of three spans (30m+40m+30m with section of box girder.

  8. Controllable biomimetic adhesion using embedded phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahn, J; Sameoto, D; Menon, C

    2011-01-01

    In many cases, such as in the instance of climbing robots or temporary adhesives, there is the need to be able to dynamically control the level of adhesion a biomimetic dry adhesive can provide. In this study, the effect of changing the backing layer stiffness of a dry adhesive is examined. Embedding a phase change material within the backing of a synthetic dry adhesive sheet allows the stiffness to be tailored at different points of a preload and adhesion cycle. Larger contact areas and more equal load sharing between adhesive fibres can be achieved by increasing the backing layer stiffness after initial deformation when the adhesive backing is loaded in its softened state. Adhesion behaviour is examined when the backing layer is maintained in solid and softened phases during complete load cycles and for load cycles under the condition of contact with the softened phase backing followed by pull-off during the solid phase. Absolute adhesion force is increased for trials in which a soft backing layer hardens prior to pull-off. This effect is due to the increased contact area made between the rounded probe and the softened material during preloading and the more equal load sharing condition during pull-off when the backing layer becomes stiff again

  9. Effect of static and dynamic muscle stretching as part of warm up procedures on knee joint proprioception and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Gregory S

    2017-10-01

    The importance of warm up procedures prior to athletic performance is well established. A common component of such procedures is muscle stretching. There is conflicting evidence regarding the effect of static stretching (SS) as part of warm up procedures on knee joint position sense (KJPS) and the effect of dynamic stretching (DS) on KJPS is currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of dynamic and static stretching as part warm up procedures on KJPS and knee extension and flexion strength. This study had a randomised cross-over design and ten healthy adults (20±1years) attended 3 visits during which baseline KJPS, at target angles of 20° and 45°, and knee extension and flexion strength tests were followed by 15min of cycling and either a rest period (CON), SS, or DS and repeat KJPS and strength tests. All participants performed all conditions, one condition per visit. There were warm up×stretching type interactions for KJPS at 20° (p=0.024) and 45° (p=0.018), and knee flexion (p=0.002) and extension (pwarm up procedures. However, the negative impact of SS on muscle strength limits the utility of SS before athletic performance. If stretching is to be performed as part of a warm up, DS should be favoured over SS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Fundamental study on repairing technique for cracked or damaged parts of structures by cold gas dynamic spray technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Kazuhiro; Amao, Satoshi; Ichikawa, Yuji; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2008-01-01

    This study proposes an innovative technique for repairing of cracked or damaged parts of structures, such as nuclear or thermal power plants, by means of cold gas dynamic spray (CS) technique. In the case of generation of cracks etc. in the structure, the cracks can be repaired by welding. However, the welding spends considerable time on repair, and also needs special skills. The CS technique is known as a new technique not only for coatings but also for thick depositions. It has many advantages, i.e. dense deposition, high deposition rate and low oxidation. Therefore, it has a possibility to apply the CS technique instead of welding to repair the cracks etc. In this study, the cold gas dynamic spray technique as a new repairing technique for some structures is introduced. (author)

  11. TecDEM: A MATLAB based toolbox for tectonic geomorphology, Part 2: Surface dynamics and basin analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Faisal; Gloaguen, Richard

    2011-02-01

    We present the analytical capability of TecDEM, a MATLAB toolbox used in conjunction with Global DEMs for the extraction of tectonic geomorphologic information. TecDEM includes a suite of algorithms to analyze topography, extracted drainage networks and sub-basins. The aim of part 2 of this paper series is the generation of morphometric maps for surface dynamics and basin analysis. TecDEM therefore allows the extraction of parameters such as isobase, incision, drainage density and surface roughness maps. We also provide tools for basin asymmetry and hypsometric analysis. These are efficient graphical user interfaces (GUIs) for mapping drainage deviation from basin mid-line and basin hypsometry. A morphotectonic interpretation of the Kaghan Valley (Northern Pakistan) is performed with TecDEM and the findings indicate a high correlation between surface dynamics and basin analysis parameters with neotectonic features in the study area.

  12. Friction and adhesion of hierarchical carbon nanotube structures for biomimetic dry adhesives: multiscale modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shihao; Jiang, Haodan; Xia, Zhenhai; Gao, Xiaosheng

    2010-09-01

    With unique hierarchical fibrillar structures on their feet, gecko lizards can walk on vertical walls or even ceilings. Recent experiments have shown that strong binding along the shear direction and easy lifting in the normal direction can be achieved by forming unidirectional carbon nanotube array with laterally distributed tips similar to gecko's feet. In this study, a multiscale modeling approach was developed to analyze friction and adhesion behaviors of this hierarchical fibrillar system. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube array with laterally distributed segments at the end was simulated by coarse grained molecular dynamics. The effects of the laterally distributed segments on friction and adhesion strengths were analyzed, and further adopted as cohesive laws used in finite element analysis at device scale. The results show that the laterally distributed segments play an essential role in achieving high force anisotropy between normal and shear directions in the adhesives. Finite element analysis reveals a new friction-enhanced adhesion mechanism of the carbon nanotube array, which also exists in gecko adhesive system. The multiscale modeling provides an approach to bridge the microlevel structures of the carbon nanotube array with its macrolevel adhesive behaviors, and the predictions from this modeling give an insight into the mechanisms of gecko-mimicking dry adhesives.

  13. EB curable laminating adhesives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Asao; Kobayashi, Masahide; Gotoh, Sakiko

    1992-01-01

    New developed solvent free EB curable laminating adhesives have two liquid components, A with hydroxy and acryloyl group, B with isocyanate and acryloyl group in a molecule. These EB laminating adhesives do not need any aging process, which is a big advantage, and are very suitable for environment, safety, and health because of no heating process and solvent free formulas. And we have made basic research about the relation of peel strength or heat seal strength versus Tg of cured film, elongation at break, elastic modulus, and so on. Basic specifications of the new developed adhesives are shown. (author)

  14. Dynamics of Practical Premixed Flames, Part I: Model Structure and Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Huber

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available For the analysis of thermoacoustic instabilities it is most important to determine the dynamic flame response to acoustic disturbances. Premixed flames are often modelled as single-input single-output system, where the “output” (the overall rate of heat release responds to a single “input” variable (often the velocity at the exit of the burner nozzle. However, for practical premixed flames, where perturbations of pressure or velocity at the fuel injector will modulate the fuel equivalence ratio, the heat release rate will respond to fluctuations of equivalence ratio as well as nozzle mass flow rate. In this case, a multiple-input, single-output (MISO model structure for the flame is appropriate. Such a model structure is developed in the present paper. Staged fuel injection as well as fuel line impedances can be taken into account, the integration with low-order or finite-element based models for stability analysis is straightforward. In order to determine unit impulse and frequency response functions for such a model structure, an identification scheme based on unsteady CFD calculation with broadband excitation followed by correlation analysis is proposed and validated successfully. Identification of MISO model coefficients is a challenging task, especially in the presence of noise. Therefore criteria are introduced which allow to ascertain a posteriori how well the identified model represents the true system dynamics. Using these criteria, it is investigated how excitation signal type, time series length and signal-to-noise ratio influence the results of the identification process. Consequences for passive design strategies based on multi-stage fuel injection and experimental work on practical premixed flame dynamics are discussed.

  15. Numerical Modeling of Dynamic Propagation in Finite Bodies, by Moving Singular Elements. Part I. Formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    let new tractions Ti act at S02. The principle of virtual work applied at t2 can be written as: 0 (G 2 -.2 62 F2 Su2 _ T26u 0 2 (ij Sej + pui i) -vf...are considered in the statement of virtual work at time tj (prior to the creation of new crack faces AE); this statement can be written as: *It is...normal to E1 . Adding Eqs. (1.18) and (1.19), the virtual work principle governing dynamic crack propagation between times t1 and t2 can be written as

  16. Model of moisture absorption by adhesive joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla Mora, Veronica; Mieloszyk, Magdalena; Ostachowicz, Wieslaw

    2018-01-01

    Adhesive joints offer many advantages over traditional mechanical joining systems. Nonetheless, their use is limited since they can be adversely affected by extreme temperatures and humidity conditions. Moisture contamination (even 1-3% of the sample weight) in an adhesive can alter its tensile strength and compromise the structural integrity of the joint. Moisture absorption processes can be monitored using methods based on fibre Bragg grating sensors embedded in the adhesive material. In the present paper, a finite element model of an adhesive joint between composite elements was analysed using the commercial code Abaqus™. The investigation contains two main parts: a thermal analysis and a hygro-mechanical analysis. The achieved results were verified using experimental investigation results for a sample with embedded fibre Bragg grating sensors that were applied to monitor the moisture-induced strains in the adhesive joint. The achieved numerical results show good agreement with the experimental ones for all considered analyses. The presented models can also be used for the determination of moisture content in an adhesive layer especially in a range of 1.5-2.5% of the water content.

  17. Coatings for rubber bonding and paint adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulos, M. S.; Petschel, M.

    1997-08-01

    Conversion coatings form an important base for the adhesion of paint to metal substrates and for the bonding of rubber to metal parts. Four types of conversion coatings were assessed as base treatments for the bonding of rubber to steel and for the corrosion protection of metal substrates under paint: amorphous iron phosphate, heavy zinc phosphate, and three types of modified zinc phosphates that utilized one or more metal cations in addition to zinc. When applied, these conversion coatings formed a thin film over the metal substrate that was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and chemical methods. The performance of the coatings was assessed using physical methods such as dry adhesion, conical mandrel, impact, and stress adhesion for the rubber-bonded parts, and by corrosion resistance methods such as humidity, salt spray, and cyclic corrosion. Coating characterization and performance were correlated.

  18. Dynamical implications of prescribing part of a coupled system: Results from a low-order model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Wittenberg

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a common procedure in climate modelling to specify dynamical system components from an external source; a prominent example is the forcing of an atmospheric model with observed sea surface temperatures. In this paper, we examine the dynamics of such forced models using a simple prototype climate system. A particular fully coupled run of the model is designated the "true" solution, and an ensemble of perturbed initial states is generated by adding small errors to the "true" initial state. The perturbed ensemble is then integrated for the same period as the true solution, using both the fully-coupled model and a model in which the ocean is prescribed exactly from the true solution at every time step. Although the prescribed forcing is error-free, the forced-atmosphere ensemble is shown to converge to spurious solutions. Statistical tests show that neither the time-mean state nor the variability of the forced ensemble is consistent with the fully-coupled system. A stability analysis reveals the source of the inconsistency, and suggests that such behaviour may be a more general feature of models with prescribed subsystems. Possible implications for model validation and predictability are discussed.

  19. Till stress do us part: On the interplay between perceived stress and communication network dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalish, Yuval; Luria, Gil; Toker, Sharon; Westman, Mina

    2015-11-01

    This study of perceived stress and communication networks fills 2 theoretical gaps in the literature: First, drawing predominantly on conservation of resource theory and faultline theory, we demonstrate the role of stress as an "engine of action" in network evolution. Second, we extend the stress literature to the interpersonal domain by arguing that others' levels of stress influence the individual's communication network, and this, in turn, changes his or her stress level. At 3 time points, we evaluated the communication ties and perceived stress in a unique field setting comprising 115 male participants (in 6 groups) performing group-based tasks. We introduce stochastic actor-based models for the coevolution of network ties and actor attributes, statistical models that enable causal inferences to be drawn regarding the interplay between dynamic networks and individual attributes. Using these models, we find that over time, individuals experiencing higher levels of perceived stress were less likely to create new communication ties and were more likely to maintain existing ties to others. Participants also tended to communicate with similarly stressed others. Such communication network dynamics further increased individuals' levels of perceived stress over time, leading to stress-related vicious cycles. We discuss organizational implications that relate to stress and network-related interventions. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Bioinspired pressure actuated adhesive system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paretkar, D.R.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Schneider, A.S.; Martina, D.; Creton, C.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a dry synthetic adhesive system inspired by gecko feet adhesion that can switch reversibly from adhesion to non-adhesion with applied pressure as external stimulus. Micropatterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with pillars of 30 µm length and 10 µm diameter were fabricated using

  1. Cohesion and Adhesion with Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2016-01-01

    With increasing interest in bio-based adhesives, research on proteins has expanded because historically they have been used by both nature and humans as adhesives. A wide variety of proteins have been used as wood adhesives. Ancient Egyptians most likely used collagens tobond veneer to wood furniture, then came casein (milk), blood, fish scales, and soy adhesives, with...

  2. Characterization of sugar cane bagasse: part II: fluid dynamic characteristics; Caracterizacion del bagazo de la cana de azucar: parte II: caracteristicas fluidodinamicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, Guillermo A. Roca [Universidad de Oriente (CEEFE/UO), Santiago de Cuba (Cuba). Centro de Estudios de Eficiencia Energetica], Emails: roca@ceefe.uo.edu.cu, grocabayamon@hotmail.com; Sanchez, Caio Glauco [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FEM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Mecanica], Email: caio@fem.unicamp.br; Gomez, Edgardo Olivares [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (NIPE/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Nucleo Interdisciplinar de Planejamento Energetico], Emails: gomez@bioware.com.br, egomez@energiabr.org.br; Cortez, Luis Augusto Barbosa [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (NIPE/FEAGRI/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Agricola. Nucleo Interdisciplinar de Planejamento Energetico], Email: cortez@reitoria.unicamp.br

    2006-07-01

    This paper is the second part of a general study about physic-geometrical and fluid-dynamics characteristic of the sugarcane bagasse particles. These properties has relevant importance on the dimensions and operation of the equipment for transport and treatment of solid particles. Was used the transport column method for the determination of the drag velocity and later on the drag coefficient of the sugarcane bagasse particles was calculated. Both, the installation and experimental technique used for materials of these characteristics are simple and innovations tools, but rigorous conceptually, thus the results obtained are reliable. Were used several sugarcane bagasse fractions of particles of known mean diameter. The properties determined were expressed as a function of Reynolds and Archimedes a dimensional criteria. The best considered model from statistical analysis (model from equation 8) was statistically validated for determined ranges of Reynolds and Archimedes. These empirical equations can be used to determine these properties in the range and conditions specified and also for modeling some processes where these fractions are employed. (author)

  3. Effect of the adhesive antibiotic TA on adhesion and initial growth of E. coli on silicone rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simhi, E; van der Mei, H C; Ron, E Z; Rosenberg, E; Busscher, H J

    2000-11-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection is the most common nosocomial infection, and contributes to patient morbidity and mortality. We investigated the effect that the TA adhesive antibiotic had on adhesion and initial growth in urine of Escherichia coli on silicone rubber. The TA antibiotic had reduced adhesion, and inhibited initial growth of the bacteria on the surface. Since adhesion and initial growth on the surface are an essential part of biofilm formation and subsequent infection, we speculate that the TA antibiotic coating might decrease the infection rate associated with indwelling urinary catheter.

  4. ACOUSTIC TRAVEL TIME collected as part of the Sub-Antarctic Flux and Dynamics Experiment (SAFDE) from March 1995 to March 1997 (NCEI Accession 0157074)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Inverted echo sounder (IES) data were collected as part of the Sub-Antarctic Flux and Dynamics Experiment (SAFDE) during March 1995 -- March 1997 conducted south of...

  5. Dynamics of glaciation in the Kazakh part of Altai during 60 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Vilesov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rates of degradation of glacierization шт the Kazakh part of Altai are considered in this paper. Analysis was performed on the basis of the degradation state (condition in two reference years - 1950 and 2011. For year 1950, materials of aerial surveys were used while for 2011 we took the satellite LandSat pictures with resolution of 15 m. The pictures were processed by GIS-technologies (software packages МарInfo, АгсGIS, and others. At the beginning of second half of 19th century (1950-1955 241 glaciers were counted on the territory under investigation. Area of bare ice (without moraines in the fernau stage with total area of 14.3 km2 was equal to 60.3 km2, and the ice volume – to 2.2524 km3. By 2011, quantity of small glaciers with areas less 0.1 km2 reduced, especially on extreme west sides of the ranges. Since second half of 19th century the Altai glaciers are at a stage of reducing, and the total quantity of glaciers decreased by 207 ones or by 64%. Area of the glaciers reduced from 71.4 down to 38.19 km2, i.e. by 33.2 km2.Thus, for the last 60 years the total melting of many small glaciers and disintegration of large ones, reduction of areas of open parts of the glaciers, lowering of their surfaces, and, as the consequences, a contraction of ice volumes and resources were noticed in all glacier basins in the Kazakh part of Altai. And this took place due to the changes of climate conditions. As a whole for the Kazakh Altai, since middle of 1950s till the present time quantity of glaciers reduced by 64%, total area of glacierization - by 52%. If the present-day rates of degradation remain the glacierization here may disappear by end of 21st – beginning of 22nd centuries. At the same time, even if the current tendencies will retain there is no reasons to believe that degradation of the glacierization can result in significant reduction of river run-off as well as water resources of the Irtysh River.

  6. Distinct Photopolymerization Efficacy on Dentin of Self-etch Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of application mode on polymerization effectiveness of self-etch adhesives with different pHs has rarely been studied. We applied 2 self-etch adhesives—Adper Prompt L-Pop (APLP, pH ~ 0.8) and Adper Easy-Bond (AEB, pH ~ 2.5)—to dentin with or without agitation (dynamic or static application), to investigate photopolymerization efficacy on dentin, and to understand the role of chemical interaction/reaction between adhesives and dentin. Micro-Raman spectra and imaging were acquired across the dentin/adhesive (D/A) interface. The degree of conversion (DC) of each adhesive as a function of position was calculated. SEM-EDS was used to obtain the elemental distribution along the interface. Photopolymerization efficacies of the two self-etch adhesives on dentin were apparently different. APLP exhibited decreasing DCs as the distance from the D/A interface became greater for both application modes, while the DCs for the dynamic mode were much higher than those for the static mode. As for AEB, the DCs remained almost constant across the adhesive layer and showed no significant difference between two modes. Raman spectral analysis disclosed that the chemical interaction between dentin and adhesives was responsible for the observations. We also verified this by tracking the distribution of the elements Ca and P in the adhesive layers. PMID:22736445

  7. Geophysical monitoring of active hydrologic processes as part of the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newmark, R.L.

    1992-05-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in collaboration with University of California at Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is conducting the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project (DUSP), an integrated project demonstrating the use of active thermal techniques to remove subsurface organic contamination. Complementary techniques address a number of environmental restoration problems: (1) steam flood strips organic contaminants from permeable zones, (2) electrical heating drives contaminants from less permeable zones into the more permeable zones from which they can be extracted, and (3) geophysical monitoring tracks and images the progress of the thermal fronts, providing feedback and control of the active processes. The first DUSP phase involved combined steam injection and vapor extraction in a ''clean'' site in the Livermore Valley consisting of unconsolidated alluvial interbeds of clays, sands and gravels. Steam passed rapidly through a high-permeability gravel unit, where in situ temperatures reached 117 degree C. An integrated program of geophysical monitoring was carried out at the Clean Site. We performed electrical resistance tomography (ERT), seismic tomography (crossborehole), induction tomography, passive seismic monitoring, a variety of different temperature measurement techniques and conventional geophysical well logging

  8. DYNAMICS OF POVERTY, DEFORESTATION AND BEEKEEPING IN NORTHERN NIGERIA: CONCERNS FOR POLICYMAKERS – Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rabi’u JA'AFAR-FURO

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The study examines the role of beekeeping amidst condition of abject poverty among the majority of the populationin northern Nigeria, and the much popularised Afforestation Programmes of the public sector. Data were collectedboth from primary and secondary sources. The findings indicated that while the activities/livelihood of the peoplehad devastating effects on the environment (felling of trees of which massive adoption of low-technologybeekeeping would play immense role in reviving the situation, the attitude of the government towards promoting treeplanting campaign in the area has not been encouraging. Its concluded that the livelihoods of the poor majority ofthe people of northern Nigeria had devastating effects on the Afforestation efforts in the area, and beekeepingenterprise could be used as a bridge between the two (poverty and afforestation. It is therefore, stronglyrecommended that policymakers should address the dynamics between poverty, deforestation and beekeeping withthe hope of stabilising the economic situation of the people of northern Nigeria and by extension improves theirincomes and livelihoods

  9. Intelligent vision-based part feeding on dynamic pursuit of moving objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kok-Meng; Qian, Yifei

    1995-11-01

    The paper addresses the problem of grasping moving objects from a vibratory feeder with robotic hand-eye coordination. Since the dynamics of moving targets on the vibratory feeder are highly nonlinear and impractical to model accurately, the problem has been formulated in the context of Prey Capture with the robot as a `pursuer' and a moving object as a passive `prey.' A hierarchical vision-based intelligent controller has been developed and implemented in the Factory-of-the Future Kitting Cell at Georgia Tech. The first and second levels are based on the principle of fuzzy logic to help the robot search for an object of interest and then pursue it. The third level is based on a backpropagation neural network to predict its position at which the robot gripper grasps it. The feasibility of the concept and the control strategies was verified by two experiments. The first experiment showed that the fuzzy logic controller could command the robot to successfully follow the highly nonlinear motion of a moving object and approach its vicinity. The second experiment demonstrated that the neural network could estimate its position fairly accurately in a finite period of time after the command of grasp operations was issued.

  10. Principles of physics in surgery: the laws of flow dynamics physics for surgeons - Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anurag; Sood, Akshay; Joy, S Parijat; Woodcock, John

    2009-08-01

    In the field of medicine and surgery many principles of physics find numerous applications. In this article we have summarized some prominent applications of the laws of fluid mechanics and hydrodynamics in surgery. Poiseuille's law sets the limits of isovolaemic haemodilution, enumerates limiting factors during fluid resuscitation and is a guiding principle in surgery for vascular stenoses. The equation of continuity finds use in non-invasive measurement of blood flow. Bernoulli's theorem explains the formation of post-stenotic dilatation. Reynolds number explains the origin of murmurs, haemolysis and airflow disturbances. Various forms of oxygen therapy are a direct application of the gas laws. Doppler effect is used in ultrasonography to find the direction and velocity of blood flow. In this first part of a series of articles we describe some applications of the laws of hydrodynamics governing the flow of blood and other body fluids.

  11. Dry adhesives with sensing features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahn, J; Menon, C

    2013-01-01

    Geckos are capable of detecting detachment of their feet. Inspired by this basic observation, a novel functional dry adhesive is proposed, which can be used to measure the instantaneous forces and torques acting on an adhesive pad. Such a novel sensing dry adhesive could potentially be used by climbing robots to quickly realize and respond appropriately to catastrophic detachment conditions. The proposed torque and force sensing dry adhesive was fabricated by mixing Carbon Black (CB) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to form a functionalized adhesive with mushroom caps. The addition of CB to PDMS resulted in conductive PDMS which, when under compression, tension or torque, resulted in a change in the resistance across the adhesive patch terminals. The proposed design of the functionalized dry adhesive enables distinguishing an applied torque from a compressive force in a single adhesive pad. A model based on beam theory was used to predict the change in resistance across the terminals as either a torque or compressive force was applied to the adhesive patch. Under a compressive force, the sensing dry adhesive was capable of measuring compression stresses from 0.11 Pa to 20.9 kPa. The torque measured by the adhesive patch ranged from 2.6 to 10 mN m, at which point the dry adhesives became detached. The adhesive strength was 1.75 kPa under an applied preload of 1.65 kPa for an adhesive patch with an adhesive contact area of 7.07 cm 2 . (paper)

  12. Dry adhesives with sensing features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, J.; Menon, C.

    2013-08-01

    Geckos are capable of detecting detachment of their feet. Inspired by this basic observation, a novel functional dry adhesive is proposed, which can be used to measure the instantaneous forces and torques acting on an adhesive pad. Such a novel sensing dry adhesive could potentially be used by climbing robots to quickly realize and respond appropriately to catastrophic detachment conditions. The proposed torque and force sensing dry adhesive was fabricated by mixing Carbon Black (CB) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to form a functionalized adhesive with mushroom caps. The addition of CB to PDMS resulted in conductive PDMS which, when under compression, tension or torque, resulted in a change in the resistance across the adhesive patch terminals. The proposed design of the functionalized dry adhesive enables distinguishing an applied torque from a compressive force in a single adhesive pad. A model based on beam theory was used to predict the change in resistance across the terminals as either a torque or compressive force was applied to the adhesive patch. Under a compressive force, the sensing dry adhesive was capable of measuring compression stresses from 0.11 Pa to 20.9 kPa. The torque measured by the adhesive patch ranged from 2.6 to 10 mN m, at which point the dry adhesives became detached. The adhesive strength was 1.75 kPa under an applied preload of 1.65 kPa for an adhesive patch with an adhesive contact area of 7.07 cm2.

  13. Leukocyte adhesion and polarization: Role of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Dion D; Fernandez-Borja, Mar

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte traffic out of the blood stream is crucial for an adequate immune response. Leukocyte extravasation is critically dependent on the binding of leukocyte integrins to their endothelial counterreceptors. This interaction enables the firm adhesion of leukocytes to the luminal side of the vascular wall and allows for leukocyte polarization, crawling and diapedesis. Leukocyte adhesion, polarization and migration requires the orchestrated regulation of integrin adhesion/de-adhesion dynamics and actin cytoskeleton rearrangements. Adhesion strength depends on conformational changes of integrin molecules (affinity) as well as the number of integrin molecules engaged at adhesion sites (valency). These two processes can be independently regulated and several molecules modulate either one or both processes. Cholesterol-rich membrane domains (lipid rafts) participate in integrin regulation and play an important role in leukocyte adhesion, polarization and motility. In particular, lipid raft-resident glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) have been reported to regulate leukocyte adhesion, polarization and motility in both integrin-dependent and independent manners. Here, we present our recent discovery concerning the novel role of the GPI-AP prion protein (PrP) in the regulation of β1 integrin-mediated monocyte adhesion, migration and shape polarization in the context of existing literature on GPI-AP-dependent regulation of integrins.

  14. LPJmL4 - a dynamic global vegetation model with managed land - Part 1: Model description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaphoff, Sibyll; von Bloh, Werner; Rammig, Anja; Thonicke, Kirsten; Biemans, Hester; Forkel, Matthias; Gerten, Dieter; Heinke, Jens; Jägermeyr, Jonas; Knauer, Jürgen; Langerwisch, Fanny; Lucht, Wolfgang; Müller, Christoph; Rolinski, Susanne; Waha, Katharina

    2018-04-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive description of the newest version of the Dynamic Global Vegetation Model with managed Land, LPJmL4. This model simulates - internally consistently - the growth and productivity of both natural and agricultural vegetation as coherently linked through their water, carbon, and energy fluxes. These features render LPJmL4 suitable for assessing a broad range of feedbacks within and impacts upon the terrestrial biosphere as increasingly shaped by human activities such as climate change and land use change. Here we describe the core model structure, including recently developed modules now unified in LPJmL4. Thereby, we also review LPJmL model developments and evaluations in the field of permafrost, human and ecological water demand, and improved representation of crop types. We summarize and discuss LPJmL model applications dealing with the impacts of historical and future environmental change on the terrestrial biosphere at regional and global scale and provide a comprehensive overview of LPJmL publications since the first model description in 2007. To demonstrate the main features of the LPJmL4 model, we display reference simulation results for key processes such as the current global distribution of natural and managed ecosystems, their productivities, and associated water fluxes. A thorough evaluation of the model is provided in a companion paper. By making the model source code freely available at https://gitlab.pik-potsdam.de/lpjml/LPJmL, we hope to stimulate the application and further development of LPJmL4 across scientific communities in support of major activities such as the IPCC and SDG process.

  15. Eruptions at Lone Star Geyser, Yellowstone National Park, USA, part 1: energetics and eruption dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlstrom, Leif; Hurwitz, Shaul; Sohn, Robert; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Murphy, Fred; Rudolph, Maxwell L.; Johnston, Malcolm J.S.; Manga, Michael; McCleskey, R. Blaine

    2013-01-01

    Geysers provide a natural laboratory to study multiphase eruptive processes. We present results from a four–day experiment at Lone Star Geyser in Yellowstone National Park, USA. We simultaneously measured water discharge, acoustic emissions, infraredintensity, and visible and infrared video to quantify the energetics and dynamics of eruptions, occurring approximately every three hours. We define four phases in the eruption cycle: 1) a 28 ± 3 minute phase with liquid and steam fountaining, with maximum jet velocities of 16–28 m s− 1, steam mass fraction of less than ∼ 0.01. Intermittently choked flow and flow oscillations with periods increasing from 20 to 40 s are coincident with a decrease in jet velocity and an increase of steam fraction; 2) a 26 ± 8 minute post–eruption relaxation phase with no discharge from the vent, infrared (IR) and acoustic power oscillations gliding between 30 and 40 s; 3) a 59 ± 13 minute recharge period during which the geyser is quiescent and progressively refills, and 4) a 69 ± 14 minute pre–play period characterized by a series of 5–10 minute–long pulses of steam, small volumes of liquid water discharge and 50–70 s flow oscillations. The erupted waters ascend froma 160 − 170° C reservoir and the volume discharged during the entire eruptive cycle is 20.8 ± 4.1 m3. Assuming isentropic expansion, we calculate a heat output from the geyser of 1.4–1.5 MW, which is < 0.1% of the total heat output from Yellowstone Caldera.

  16. Entropy Stable Summation-by-Parts Formulations for Compressible Computational Fluid Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Carpenter, M.H.

    2016-11-09

    A systematic approach based on a diagonal-norm summation-by-parts (SBP) framework is presented for implementing entropy stable (SS) formulations of any order for the compressible Navier–Stokes equations (NSE). These SS formulations discretely conserve mass, momentum, energy and satisfy a mathematical entropy equality for smooth problems. They are also valid for discontinuous flows provided sufficient dissipation is added at shocks and discontinuities to satisfy an entropy inequality. Admissible SBP operators include all centred diagonal-norm finite-difference (FD) operators and Legendre spectral collocation-finite element methods (LSC-FEM). Entropy stable multiblock FD and FEM operators follows immediately via nonlinear coupling operators that ensure conservation, accuracy and preserve the interior entropy estimates. Nonlinearly stable solid wall boundary conditions are also available. Existing SBP operators that lack a stability proof (e.g. weighted essentially nonoscillatory) may be combined with an entropy stable operator using a comparison technique to guarantee nonlinear stability of the pair. All capabilities extend naturally to a curvilinear form of the NSE provided that the coordinate mappings satisfy a geometric conservation law constraint. Examples are presented that demonstrate the robustness of current state-of-the-art entropy stable SBP formulations.

  17. Comparison of five organic wastes regarding their behaviour during composting: part 2, nitrogen dynamic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guardia, A; Mallard, P; Teglia, C; Marin, A; Le Pape, C; Launay, M; Benoist, J C; Petiot, C

    2010-03-01

    This paper aimed to compare household waste, separated pig solids, food waste, pig slaughterhouse sludge and green algae regarding processes ruling nitrogen dynamic during composting. For each waste, three composting simulations were performed in parallel in three similar reactors (300 L), each one under a constant aeration rate. The aeration flows applied were comprised between 100 and 1100 L/h. The initial waste and the compost were characterized through the measurements of their contents in dry matter, total carbon, Kjeldahl and total ammoniacal nitrogen, nitrite and nitrate. Kjeldahl and total ammoniacal nitrogen and nitrite and nitrate were measured in leachates and in condensates too. Ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions were monitored in continue. The cumulated emissions in ammonia and in nitrous oxide were given for each waste and at each aeration rate. The paper focused on process of ammonification and on transformations and transfer of total ammoniacal nitrogen. The parameters of nitrous oxide emissions were not investigated. The removal rate of total Kjeldahl nitrogen was shown being closely tied to the ammonification rate. Ammonification was modelled thanks to the calculation of the ratio of biodegradable carbon to organic nitrogen content of the biodegradable fraction. The wastes were shown to differ significantly regarding their ammonification ability. Nitrogen balances were calculated by subtracting nitrogen losses from nitrogen removed from material. Defaults in nitrogen balances were assumed to correspond to conversion of nitrate even nitrite into molecular nitrogen and then to the previous conversion by nitrification of total ammoniacal nitrogen. The pool of total ammoniacal nitrogen, i.e. total ammoniacal nitrogen initially contained in waste plus total ammoniacal nitrogen released by ammonification, was calculated for each experiment. Then, this pool was used as the referring amount in the calculation of the rates of accumulation, stripping and

  18. Comparison of five organic wastes regarding their behaviour during composting: Part 2, nitrogen dynamic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guardia, A. de; Mallard, P.; Teglia, C.; Marin, A.; Le Pape, C.; Launay, M.; Benoist, J.C.; Petiot, C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper aimed to compare household waste, separated pig solids, food waste, pig slaughterhouse sludge and green algae regarding processes ruling nitrogen dynamic during composting. For each waste, three composting simulations were performed in parallel in three similar reactors (300 L), each one under a constant aeration rate. The aeration flows applied were comprised between 100 and 1100 L/h. The initial waste and the compost were characterized through the measurements of their contents in dry matter, total carbon, Kjeldahl and total ammoniacal nitrogen, nitrite and nitrate. Kjeldahl and total ammoniacal nitrogen and nitrite and nitrate were measured in leachates and in condensates too. Ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions were monitored in continue. The cumulated emissions in ammonia and in nitrous oxide were given for each waste and at each aeration rate. The paper focused on process of ammonification and on transformations and transfer of total ammoniacal nitrogen. The parameters of nitrous oxide emissions were not investigated. The removal rate of total Kjeldahl nitrogen was shown being closely tied to the ammonification rate. Ammonification was modelled thanks to the calculation of the ratio of biodegradable carbon to organic nitrogen content of the biodegradable fraction. The wastes were shown to differ significantly regarding their ammonification ability. Nitrogen balances were calculated by subtracting nitrogen losses from nitrogen removed from material. Defaults in nitrogen balances were assumed to correspond to conversion of nitrate even nitrite into molecular nitrogen and then to the previous conversion by nitrification of total ammoniacal nitrogen. The pool of total ammoniacal nitrogen, i.e. total ammoniacal nitrogen initially contained in waste plus total ammoniacal nitrogen released by ammonification, was calculated for each experiment. Then, this pool was used as the referring amount in the calculation of the rates of accumulation, stripping and

  19. Temperature Effects on Adhesive Bond Strengths and Modulus for Commonly Used Spacecraft Structural Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Cassandra E.; Oakes, Eric J.; Hill, Jennifer R.; Aldi, Dominic; Forsberg, Gustaf A.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to observe how changes in temperature and substrate material affected the strength and modulus of an adhesive bondline. Seven different adhesives commonly used in aerospace bonded structures were tested. Aluminum, titanium and Invar adherends were cleaned and primed, then bonded using the manufacturer's recommendations. Following surface preparation, the coupons were bonded with the adhesives. The single lap shear coupons were then pull tested per ASTM D 1002 Standard Test Method for Apparent Shear Strength of Single- Lap-Joint over a temperature range from -150 deg C up to +150 deg C. The ultimate strength was calculated and the resulting data were converted into B-basis design allowables. Average and Bbasis results were compared. Results obtained using aluminum adherends are reported. The effects of using different adherend materials and temperature were also studied and will be reported in a subsequent paper. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to study variations in adhesive modulus with temperature. This work resulted in a highly useful database for comparing adhesive performance over a wide range of temperatures, and has facilitated selection of the appropriate adhesive for spacecraft structure applications.

  20. In vitro phosphorylation of the focal adhesion targeting domain of focal adhesion kinase by Src kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Jennifer; Prutzman, Kirk; Gunawardena, Harsha P; Schaller, Michael D; Chen, Xian; Campbell, Sharon L

    2012-03-20

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a key regulator of cell adhesion and migration, is overexpressed in many types of cancer. The C-terminal focal adhesion targeting (FAT) domain of FAK is necessary for proper localization of FAK to focal adhesions and subsequent activation. Phosphorylation of Y926 in the FAT domain by the tyrosine kinase Src has been shown to promote metastasis and invasion in vivo by linking the FAT domain to the MAPK pathway via its interaction with growth factor receptor-bound protein 2. Several groups have reported that inherent conformational dynamics in the FAT domain likely regulate phosphorylation of Y926; however, what regulates these dynamics is unknown. In this paper, we demonstrate that there are two sites of in vitro Src-mediated phosphorylation in the FAT domain: Y926, which has been shown to affect FAK function in vivo, and Y1008, which has no known biological role. The phosphorylation of these two tyrosine residues is pH-dependent, but this does not reflect the pH dependence of Src kinase activity. Circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance data indicate that the stability and conformational dynamics of the FAT domain are sensitive to changes in pH over a physiological pH range. In particular, regions of the FAT domain previously shown to regulate phosphorylation of Y926 as well as regions near Y1008 show pH-dependent dynamics on the microsecond to millisecond time scale.

  1. Patient positioning and immobilization in static and dynamic adaptive radiotherapy: an integral part of IGRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oinam, Arun S.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy treatment deals with different varieties of treatment procedures depending on type and stages of tumors. These treatments are grossly classified into palliative curative treatment. Immobilizations used in this treatment are designed with respect to this classification as well as the techniques. With the improvements in imaging technology used in Radiotherapy, patient position set up margin can be reduced as compared to the conventional radiotherapy. Still immobilization in patient position setup has been an integral part of Image Guided Radiotherapy (lGRT) and Stereotactic Radio Surgery (SRS) and Radiotherapy (SRT). Immobilization used in this technique should produce a minimum attenuation of radiation beam as well as positioning comfort and this will enhance the reproducibility for the daily position setup and immobilize the patient during the treatment. Advanced dose delivery technique like Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy (VMAT) can do differential dose sculpting around and inside the irregular shape different target volumes while minimizing the dose to the surrounding organs at risk. A small positional error may produce the mistreatment of target and exposure of organs at risk beyond the acceptable dose limits. Such a potential positional error can be reduced if different varieties of good immobilizing devices are properly utilized. The immobilization used in the treatment of Head and Neck and Cranial tumor can produce better immobilization as compared to abdominal and pelvic tumors which are forced to move by the inability to control movements of lung and heart as well as the very large flabby tissues which are attached skeleton bones

  2. Surface Modification of Titanium and Polyimide Sheet for Adhesive Bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akram, M.

    2015-01-01

    Major industrial sectors like automotive, aerospace and others are increasingly using polymer composites in their structural parts. Polyimide sheet and adhesives, are high performance polymers. They are widely used in various engineering applications due to their excellent thermal, mechanical and

  3. Implementation of Malaria Dynamic Models in Municipality Level Early Warning Systems in Colombia. Part I: Description of Study Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Daniel; Cerón, Viviana; Molina, Adriana M.; Quiñónes, Martha L.; Jiménez, Mónica M.; Ahumada, Martha; Gutiérrez, Patricia; Osorio, Salua; Mantilla, Gilma; Connor, Stephen J.; Thomson, Madeleine C.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Integrated National Adaptation Pilot project and the Integrated Surveillance and Control System, the Colombian National Institute of Health is working on the design and implementation of a Malaria Early Warning System framework, supported by seasonal climate forecasting capabilities, weather and environmental monitoring, and malaria statistical and dynamic models. In this report, we provide an overview of the local ecoepidemiologic settings where four malaria process-based mathematical models are currently being implemented at a municipal level. The description includes general characteristics, malaria situation (predominant type of infection, malaria-positive cases data, malaria incidence, and seasonality), entomologic conditions (primary and secondary vectors, mosquito densities, and feeding frequencies), climatic conditions (climatology and long-term trends), key drivers of epidemic outbreaks, and non-climatic factors (populations at risk, control campaigns, and socioeconomic conditions). Selected pilot sites exhibit different ecoepidemiologic settings that must be taken into account in the development of the integrated surveillance and control system. PMID:24891460

  4. Adhesive particle shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott [Dublin, CA; Rader, Daniel John [Albuquerque, NM; Walton, Christopher [Berkeley, CA; Folta, James [Livermore, CA

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  5. Localized Modeling of Biochemical and Flow Interactions during Cancer Cell Adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Behr

    Full Text Available This work focuses on one component of a larger research effort to develop a simulation tool to model populations of flowing cells. Specifically, in this study a local model of the biochemical interactions between circulating melanoma tumor cells (TC and substrate adherent polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN is developed. This model provides realistic three-dimensional distributions of bond formation and attendant attraction and repulsion forces that are consistent with the time dependent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD framework of the full system model which accounts local pressure, shear and repulsion forces. The resulting full dynamics model enables exploration of TC adhesion to adherent PMNs, which is a known participating mechanism in melanoma cell metastasis. The model defines the adhesion molecules present on the TC and PMN cell surfaces, and calculates their interactions as the melanoma cell flows past the PMN. Biochemical rates of reactions between individual molecules are determined based on their local properties. The melanoma cell in the model expresses ICAM-1 molecules on its surface, and the PMN expresses the β-2 integrins LFA-1 and Mac-1. In this work the PMN is fixed to the substrate and is assumed fully rigid and of a prescribed shear-rate dependent shape obtained from micro-PIV experiments. The melanoma cell is transported with full six-degrees-of-freedom dynamics. Adhesion models, which represent the ability of molecules to bond and adhere the cells to each other, and repulsion models, which represent the various physical mechanisms of cellular repulsion, are incorporated with the CFD solver. All models are general enough to allow for future extensions, including arbitrary adhesion molecule types, and the ability to redefine the values of parameters to represent various cell types. The model presented in this study will be part of a clinical tool for development of personalized medical treatment programs.

  6. Localized Modeling of Biochemical and Flow Interactions during Cancer Cell Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Julie; Gaskin, Byron; Fu, Changliang; Dong, Cheng; Kunz, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on one component of a larger research effort to develop a simulation tool to model populations of flowing cells. Specifically, in this study a local model of the biochemical interactions between circulating melanoma tumor cells (TC) and substrate adherent polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) is developed. This model provides realistic three-dimensional distributions of bond formation and attendant attraction and repulsion forces that are consistent with the time dependent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) framework of the full system model which accounts local pressure, shear and repulsion forces. The resulting full dynamics model enables exploration of TC adhesion to adherent PMNs, which is a known participating mechanism in melanoma cell metastasis. The model defines the adhesion molecules present on the TC and PMN cell surfaces, and calculates their interactions as the melanoma cell flows past the PMN. Biochemical rates of reactions between individual molecules are determined based on their local properties. The melanoma cell in the model expresses ICAM-1 molecules on its surface, and the PMN expresses the β-2 integrins LFA-1 and Mac-1. In this work the PMN is fixed to the substrate and is assumed fully rigid and of a prescribed shear-rate dependent shape obtained from micro-PIV experiments. The melanoma cell is transported with full six-degrees-of-freedom dynamics. Adhesion models, which represent the ability of molecules to bond and adhere the cells to each other, and repulsion models, which represent the various physical mechanisms of cellular repulsion, are incorporated with the CFD solver. All models are general enough to allow for future extensions, including arbitrary adhesion molecule types, and the ability to redefine the values of parameters to represent various cell types. The model presented in this study will be part of a clinical tool for development of personalized medical treatment programs.

  7. Electrically Conductive Epoxy Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Bai

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Conductive adhesives are widely used in electronic packaging applications such as die attachment and solderless interconnections, component repair, display interconnections, and heat dissipation. The effects of film thickness as functions of filler volume fraction, conductive filler size, shape, as well as uncured adhesive matrix viscosity on the electrical conduction behavior of epoxy-based adhesives are presented in this work. For this purpose, epoxy-based adhesives were prepared using conductive fillers of different size, shape, and types, including Ni powder, flakes, and filaments, Ag powder, and Cu powder. The filaments were 20 μm in diameter, and 160 or 260 μm in length. HCl and H3PO4 acid solutions were used to etch and remove the surface oxide layers from the fillers. The plane resistance of filled adhesive films was measured using the four-point method. In all cases of conductive filler addition, the planar resistivity levels for the composite adhesive films increased when the film thickness was reduced. The shape of resistivity-thickness curves was negative exponential decaying type and was modeled using a mathematical relation. The relationships between the conductive film resistivities and the filler volume fractions were also derived mathematically based on the experimental data. Thus, the effects of surface treatment of filler particles, the type, size, shape of fillers, and the uncured epoxy viscosity could be included empirically by using these mathematical relations based on the experimental data. By utilizing the relations we proposed to model thickness-dependent and volume fraction-dependent conduction behaviors separately, we were able to describe the combined and coupled volume fraction-film thickness relationship mathematically based on our experimental data.

  8. Analysis of Dynamic Fracture Compliance Based on Poroelastic Theory - Part II: Results of Numerical and Experimental Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ding; Ding, Pin-bo; Ba, Jing

    2018-03-01

    In Part I, a dynamic fracture compliance model (DFCM) was derived based on the poroelastic theory. The normal compliance of fractures is frequency-dependent and closely associated with the connectivity of porous media. In this paper, we first compare the DFCM with previous fractured media theories in the literature in a full frequency range. Furthermore, experimental tests are performed on synthetic rock specimens, and the DFCM is compared with the experimental data in the ultrasonic frequency band. Synthetic rock specimens saturated with water have more realistic mineral compositions and pore structures relative to previous works in comparison with natural reservoir rocks. The fracture/pore geometrical and physical parameters can be controlled to replicate approximately those of natural rocks. P- and S-wave anisotropy characteristics with different fracture and pore properties are calculated and numerical results are compared with experimental data. Although the measurement frequency is relatively high, the results of DFCM are appropriate for explaining the experimental data. The characteristic frequency of fluid pressure equilibration calculated based on the specimen parameters is not substantially less than the measurement frequency. In the dynamic fracture model, the wave-induced fluid flow behavior is an important factor for the fracture-wave interaction process, which differs from the models at the high-frequency limits, for instance, Hudson's un-relaxed model.

  9. Benefits to decomposition rates when using digestate as compost co-feedstock: Part II - Focus on microbial community dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab, Golnaz; Razaviarani, Vahid; Sheng, Zhiya; Liu, Yang; McCartney, Daryl

    2017-10-01

    Linkage between composting reactor performance and microbial community dynamics was investigated during co-composting of digestate and fresh feedstock (organic fraction of municipal solid waste) using 25L reactors. Previously, the relationship between composting performance and various physicochemical parameters were reported in Part I of the study (Arab and McCartney, 2017). Three digestate to fresh feedstock ratios (0, 40, and 100%; wet weight basis) were selected for analysis of microbial community dynamics. The 40% ratio was selected because it was found to perform the best (Arab and McCartney, 2017). Illumina sequencing results revealed that the reactor with a greater composting performance (higher organic matter degradation and higher heat generation; 40% ratio) was associated with higher microbial diversity. Two specific bacterial orders that might result in higher performance were Thermoactinomycetaceae and Actinomycetales with a higher sequence abundance during thermophilic composting phase and during the maturing composting phase, respectively. Galactomyces, Pichia, Chaetomium, and Acremonium were the four fungal genera that are probably also involved in higher organic matter degradation in the reactor with better performance. The redundancy analysis (RDA) biplot indicated that among the studied environmental variables, temperature, total ammonia nitrogen and nitrate concentration accounted for much of the major shifts in microbial sequence abundance during the co-composting process. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Natural and bio-inspired underwater adhesives: Current progress and new perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Mengkui; Ren, Susu; Wei, Shicao; Sun, Chengjun; Zhong, Chao

    2017-11-01

    Many marine organisms harness diverse protein molecules as underwater adhesives to achieve strong and robust interfacial adhesion under dynamic and turbulent environments. Natural underwater adhesion phenomena thus provide inspiration for engineering adhesive materials that can perform in water or high-moisture settings for biomedical and industrial applications. Here we review examples of biological adhesives to show the molecular features of natural adhesives and discuss how such knowledge serves as a heuristic guideline for the rational design of biologically inspired underwater adhesives. In view of future bio-inspired research, we propose several potential opportunities, either in improving upon current L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine-based and coacervates-enabled adhesives with new features or engineering conceptually new types of adhesives that recapitulate important characteristics of biological adhesives. We underline the importance of viewing natural adhesives as dynamic materials, which owe their outstanding performance to the cellular coordination of protein expression, delivery, deposition, assembly, and curing of corresponding components with spatiotemporal control. We envision that the emerging synthetic biology techniques will provide great opportunities for advancing both fundamental and application aspects of underwater adhesives.

  11. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  12. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-04

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects.

  13. DIABETES AND SHOULDER ADHESIVE CAPSULITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mohanakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adhesive capsulitis (AC of shoulder is a common condition encountered by physical therapists in their routine outpatient care services; AC of shoulder is as by itself being a self limiting disorder lasts from months to years causing pain and discomfort to the patients. The condition is commonly associated with Diabetes mellitus or other co morbidities. The incidence of AC is high among diabetic individuals and it becomes mandatory on the part of physical therapists and other health professionals to approach this issue on a holistic manner. This paper deals with the importance of a physiotherapist role in prevention and dealing with the causative factors of AC and not merely its symptom. Methods: Extensive literature review was done from the electronic data bases, Systematic reviews and critical reviews from Pub med indexed journals and other peer reviewed publications across the globe. Results: It was not the type of diabetes but the duration of the disease and the glycemic index, marking the causative factor for adhesive capsulitis of shoulder. Conclusion: It may be concluded that physiotherapist play a vital role in identifying the pre-diabetic or a diabetic state of an individual reporting in a multi disciplinary set up with a AC of shoulder, and also has a role in the prevention of AC by helping the individual to maintain a good glycemic control with a holistic approach which includes aerobic exercises, General Flexibility exercises, Weight management and Yoga therapy.

  14. an Adhesive Patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mojtaba Taghizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-in-adhesive transdermal drug delivery systems  TDDSs containing stimulants, termed as energetic substances, such as caffeine and pantothenic acid, were studied. Caffeine is a white crystalline substance and a stimulant to central nervous system. In humans, caffeine acts as a central nervous system stimulant, temporarily warding off drowsiness and restoring alertness. Pantothenic acid, also recognized as vitamin B5, is a water-soluble vitamin. For many animals, pantothenic acid is an essential nutrient. Animals require pantothenic acid to synthesize and metabolize proteins, carbohydrates and fats. For this purpose caffeine and pantothenic acid were  used  as  drug  components with  6.32%  and  1.12%  loadings,  in  different functional and non-functional acrylic pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs of 52.89%, respectively. Ethylene glycol as a chemical enhancer was used in all TDDSs with 39.67%. The effect of PSAs  type on  in vitro  release and adhesion properties  (peel strength and tack values from drug delivery devices were evaluated. It was found that TDDS containing -COOH functional PSA showed  the  lowest steady state fux. The adhesion properties of the samples were improved by addition of functional acrylic PSA in formulations.

  15. Adhesion energy, surface traction and surface tension in liquid xenon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We calculated the adhesion energy, the surface traction and the surface energy of liquid xenon using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The value of the adhesion energy for liquid xenon at a reduced density of 0.630 was found to be 0.591 J/m2 and the surface traction has a peak at z = 3.32 Å. It was observed ...

  16. Adhesion energy, surface traction and surface tension in liquid xenon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We calculated the adhesion energy, the surface traction and the surface energy of liquid xenon using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The value of the adhesion energy for liquid xenon at a reduced density of 0.630 was found to be 0.591 J/m2 and the surface traction has a peak at = 3.32 Å. It was observed that the ...

  17. Adhesive bonding of wood materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles B. Vick

    1999-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of wood components has played an essential role in the development and growth of the forest products industry and has been a key factor in the efficient utilization of our timber resource. The largest use of adhesives is in the construction industry. By far, the largest amounts of adhesives are used to manufacture building materials, such as plywood,...

  18. New adhesives and bonding techniques. Why and when?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Nicola; Cavalli, Giovanni; Gagliani, Massimo; Breschi, Lorenzo

    Nowadays, adhesive dentistry is a fundamental part of daily clinical work. The evolution of adhesive materials and techniques has been based on the need for simplicity in the step-by-step procedures to obtain long-lasting direct and indirect restorations. For this reason, recently introduced universal multimode adhesives represent a simple option for creating a hybrid layer, with or without the use of phosphoric acid application. However, it is important to understand the limitations of this latest generation of adhesive systems as well as how to use them on coronal and radicular dentin. Based on the findings in the literature, universal multimode adhesives have shown promising results, even if the problem of hybrid layer degradation due to the hydrolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) still exists. Studies are therefore required to help us understand how to reduce this degradation.

  19. Management of adhesive capsulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stupay KL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kristen L Stupay,1 Andrew S Neviaser2 1Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is a condition of capsular contracture that reduces both active and passive glenohumeral motion. The cause of adhesive capsulitis is not known but it is strongly associated with endocrine abnormalities such as diabetes. Diverse terminology and the absence of definitive criteria for diagnosis make evaluating treatment modalities difficult. Many treatment methods have been reported, most with some success, but few have been proved to alter the natural course of this disease. Most afflicted patients will achieve acceptable shoulder function without surgery. Those who remain debilitated after 8–12 months are reasonable candidates for invasive treatments. Here, the various treatment methods and the data to support their use are reviewed. Keywords: frozen shoulder, stiff shoulder, periarthritis, painful shoulder 

  20. Cancer systems biology in the genome sequencing era: part 2, evolutionary dynamics of tumor clonal networks and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Edwin; Zou, Jinfeng; Zaman, Naif; Beitel, Lenore K; Trifiro, Mark; Paliouras, Miltiadis

    2013-08-01

    A tumor often consists of multiple cell subpopulations (clones). Current chemo-treatments often target one clone of a tumor. Although the drug kills that clone, other clones overtake it and the tumor recurs. Genome sequencing and computational analysis allows to computational dissection of clones from tumors, while singe-cell genome sequencing including RNA-Seq allows profiling of these clones. This opens a new window for treating a tumor as a system in which clones are evolving. Future cancer systems biology studies should consider a tumor as an evolving system with multiple clones. Therefore, topics discussed in Part 2 of this review include evolutionary dynamics of clonal networks, early-warning signals (e.g., genome duplication events) for formation of fast-growing clones, dissecting tumor heterogeneity, and modeling of clone-clone-stroma interactions for drug resistance. The ultimate goal of the future systems biology analysis is to obtain a 'whole-system' understanding of a tumor and therefore provides a more efficient and personalized management strategies for cancer patients. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An improved parameterization of the allocation of assimilated carbon to plant parts in vegetation dynamics for Noah-MP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gim, Hyeon-Ju; Park, Seon Ki; Kang, Minseok; Thakuri, Bindu Malla; Kim, Joon; Ho, Chang-Hoi

    2017-08-01

    In the land surface models predicting vegetation growth and decay, representation of the seasonality of land surface energy and mass fluxes largely depends on how to describe the vegetation dynamics. In this study, we developed a new parameterization scheme to characterize allocation of the assimilated carbon to plant parts, including leaves and fine roots. The amount of carbon allocation in this scheme depends on the climatological net primary production (NPP) of the plants. The newly developed scheme is implemented in the augmented Noah land surface model with multiple parameterization options (Noah-MP) along with other biophysical processes related to variations in photosynthetic capacity. The scheme and the augmented biophysical processes are evaluated against tower measurements of vegetation from four forest sites in various regions—two for the deciduous broadleaf and two for the needleleaf evergreen forest. Results from the augmented Noah-MP showed good agreement with the observations and demonstrated improvements in representing the seasonality of leaf area index (LAI), gross primary production (GPP), ecosystem respiration (ER), and latent heat flux. In particular, significant improvements are found in simulating amplitudes and phase shift timing in the LAI seasonal cycle, and the amount of GPP and ER in the growing season. Furthermore, the augmented Noah-MP performed reasonably well in simulating the spatial distributions of LAI, GPP, and NPP in East Asia, consistent with the satellite observations.

  2. Syndecans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Chen, L; Woods, A

    2001-01-01

    Now that transmembrane signaling through primary cell-matrix receptors, integrins, is being elucidated, attention is turning to how integrin-ligand interactions can be modulated. Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans implicated as coreceptors in a variety of physiological processes, including...... cell adhesion, migration, response to growth factors, development, and tumorigenesis. This review will describe this family of proteoglycans in terms of their structures and functions and their signaling in conjunction with integrins, and indicate areas for future research....

  3. Tackifier Mobility in Model Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Adriana; Li, Xiaoqing

    1997-03-01

    A systematic study of the molecular mobility of tackifier in a pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) has been done for the first time. The objective is to relate changes in adhesive performance with tackifier loading to tackifier mobility. Study focused first on a model PSA consisting of anionically polymerized polyisoprene (PI) (Mw=300,000 Mw/Mn 1.05) and a single simple tackifier, n-butyl ester of abietic acid. This model system is fully miscible at room temperature, and its tack performance has been studied. Tackifier mobility was measured using Pulsed-Gradient Spin-Echo NMR as a function of tackifier concentration and temperature. The concentration dependence observed for this adhesive with modestly enhanced performance was weak, indicating the tackifier neither acts to plasticize or antiplasticize appreciably. Diffusion in a two-phase system of hydrogenated PI with the same tackifier is similar, though the tack of that adhesive varies much more markedly with composition. In contrast, tackifier mobility varies strongly with composition in a PSA composed of PI with a commercial tackifier chemically similar to the model tackifier, but having a higher molecular weight and glass transition temperature. * Supported in part by US DOD: ARO(DAAH04-93-G-0410)

  4. A novel c-Src recruitment pathway from the cytosol to focal adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiyama, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Watanabe, Tomonobu M; Fujita, Hideaki

    2017-07-01

    The role of myristoylation in the localization and catalytic activity of Src at focal adhesions was investigated by live-cell imaging and site-directed mutagenesis. Although the majority of activated Src molecules are localized at focal adhesions, it is unclear how activated Src molecules are recruited to focal adhesions. Because Src is activated at the cell membrane, translocation of Src to cell membranes is considered to be essential for its recruitment to focal adhesions. Membrane-targeting-deficient Src mutant SrcG2A localizes at focal adhesions, indicating direct recruitment of Src from cytosol to focal adhesions. Furthermore, directly recruited Src molecules are shown to enhance paxillin dynamics at focal adhesions. These results reveal that the regulation of Src activation and translocation is more complex than previously suggested. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  5. Engineering emergent multicellular behavior through synthetic adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David; Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar

    In over a decade, synthetic biology has developed increasingly robust gene networks within single cells, but constructed very few systems that demonstrate multicellular spatio-temporal dynamics. We are filling this gap in synthetic biology's toolbox by developing an E. coli self-assembly platform based on modular cell-cell adhesion. We developed a system in which adhesive selectivity is provided by a library of outer membrane-displayed peptides with intra-library specificities, while affinity is provided by consistent expression across the entire library. We further provide a biophysical model to help understand the parameter regimes in which this tool can be used to self-assemble into cellular clusters, filaments, or meshes. The combined platform will enable future development of synthetic multicellular systems for use in consortia-based metabolic engineering, in living materials, and in controlled study of minimal multicellular systems. Stanford Bio-X Bowes Fellowship.

  6. Complex hydro- and sediment dynamics survey of two critical reaches on the Hungarian part of river Danube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranya, Sandor; Jozsa, Janos; Goda, Laszlo; Rakoczi, Laszlo

    2008-01-01

    Detailed hydrodynamic survey of two critical river reaches has been performed from hydro- and sediment dynamics points of view, in order to explore the main features, moreover, provide calibration and verification data to related 3D flow and sediment transport modelling. Special attention has been paid to compare moving and fix boat measurement modes for estimating various flow and large-scale bed form features, resulting in recommendations e.g. on the time period needed in stationary mode operation to obtain sufficiently stabilized average velocity profiles and related parameter estimations. As to the study reaches, the first comprises a 5 km long sandy-gravel bed reach of river Danube located in Central-Hungary, presenting problems for navigation. As a conventional remedy, groyne fields have been implemented to make and maintain the reach sufficiently deep, navigable even in low flow periods. As is usually the case, these works resulted in rather complex flow characteristics and related bed topography at places. The second site is another 5 km long reach of river Danube, close to the southern border to Serbia. There the river presents navigational problems similar to the previously mentioned reach, however, having entirely sand bed conditions, abundant in a variety of dunes, especially in the shallower parts. In both study reaches ADCP measurements were done with around 2.5 Hz sampling frequency both in moving boat operation mode providing overall, though locally moderately representative picture, and in fixed boat mode at a considerable number of selected verticals with 10 minutes long measuring time.

  7. Polymer Claw: Instant Underwater Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    glycerol is a well-known hygroscopic liquid and lubricant. In the Polymer Claw Progress Report -4- 9/24/12 The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics...the Polymer Claw adhesive partially solidified, while commercial adhesives were completely liquid after one hour. However, the curing rate was...is not valid for partial liquid adhesives, we will only test at later times, noting the minimum time for which the glass slides break. The time to

  8. Polyurethane adhesive ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Polyurethane adhesives are found in a large number of household products in the United States and are used for a variety of purposes. Several brands of these expanding wood glues (those containing diphenylmethane diisocyanate [MDI]) have the potential to form gastrointestinal (GI) foreign bodies if ingested. The ingested adhesive forms an expanding ball of glue in the esophagus and gastric lumen. This expansion is caused by a polymerization reaction using the heat, water, and gastric acids of the stomach. A firm mass is created that can be 4-8 times its original volume. As little as 2 oz of glue have been reported to develop gastric foreign bodies. The obstructive mass is reported to form within minutes of ingestion of the adhesive. The foreign body can lead to esophageal impaction and obstruction, airway obstruction, gastric outflow obstruction, mucosal hemorrhage, ulceration, laceration, perforation of the esophageal and gastric linings, and death. Clinical signs following ingestion include anorexia, lethargy, vomiting, tachypnea, and abdominal distention and pain, and typically develop within 12 hours. Clinical signs may depend upon the size of the mass. If left untreated, perforation and rupture of the esophagus or stomach can occur. The glue mass does not stick to the GI mucosa and is not always detectable on abdominal palpation. Radiographs are recommended to confirm the presence of the "glue-ball" foreign body, and radiographic evidence of the obstruction may be seen as early as 4-6 hours following ingestion. Emesis is contraindicated owing to the risk of aspiration of the glue into the respiratory tree or the subsequent lodging of the expanding glue mass in the esophagus. Likewise, efforts to dilute the glue and prevent the formation of the foreign body through administration of liquids, activated charcoal, or bulk-forming products to push the foreign body through the GI tract have proven ineffective. Even endoscopy performed to remove the foreign body has

  9. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  10. Passively stuck: death does not affect gecko adhesion strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, William J; Higham, Timothy E

    2014-12-01

    Many geckos use adhesive toe pads on the bottom of their digits to attach to surfaces with remarkable strength. Although gecko adhesion has been studied for hundreds of years, gaps exist in our understanding at the whole-animal level. It remains unclear whether the strength and maintenance of adhesion are determined by the animal or are passively intrinsic to the system. Here we show, for the first time, that strong adhesion is produced passively at the whole-animal level. Experiments on both live and recently euthanized tokay geckos (Gekko gecko) revealed that death does not affect the dynamic adhesive force or motion of a gecko foot when pulled along a vertical surface. Using a novel device that applied repeatable and steady-increasing pulling forces to the foot in shear, we found that the adhesive force was similarly high and variable when the animal was alive (mean ± s.d. = 5.4 ± 1.7 N) and within 30 min after death (5.4 ± 2.1 N). However, kinematic analyses showed that live geckos are able to control the degree of toe pad engagement and can rapidly stop strong adhesion by hyperextending the toes. This study offers the first assessment of whole-animal adhesive force under extremely controlled conditions. Our findings reveal that dead geckos maintain the ability to adhere with the same force as living animals, disproving that strong adhesion requires active control. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Moving alcohol prevention research forward-Part II: new directions grounded in community-based system dynamics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Lemke, Michael K; Barry, Adam E; Lich, Kristen Hassmiller

    2018-02-01

    Given the complexity of factors contributing to alcohol misuse, appropriate epistemologies and methodologies are needed to understand and intervene meaningfully. We aimed to (1) provide an overview of computational modeling methodologies, with an emphasis on system dynamics modeling; (2) explain how community-based system dynamics modeling can forge new directions in alcohol prevention research; and (3) present a primer on how to build alcohol misuse simulation models using system dynamics modeling, with an emphasis on stakeholder involvement, data sources and model validation. Throughout, we use alcohol misuse among college students in the United States as a heuristic example for demonstrating these methodologies. System dynamics modeling employs a top-down aggregate approach to understanding dynamically complex problems. Its three foundational properties-stocks, flows and feedbacks-capture non-linearity, time-delayed effects and other system characteristics. As a methodological choice, system dynamics modeling is amenable to participatory approaches; in particular, community-based system dynamics modeling has been used to build impactful models for addressing dynamically complex problems. The process of community-based system dynamics modeling consists of numerous stages: (1) creating model boundary charts, behavior-over-time-graphs and preliminary system dynamics models using group model-building techniques; (2) model formulation; (3) model calibration; (4) model testing and validation; and (5) model simulation using learning-laboratory techniques. Community-based system dynamics modeling can provide powerful tools for policy and intervention decisions that can result ultimately in sustainable changes in research and action in alcohol misuse prevention. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  12. Analysis of the Dynamic Response in the Railway Vehicles to the Track Vertical Irregularities. Part I: The Theoretical Model and the Vehicle Response Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dumitriu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper herein focuses on the dynamic response of a two-bogie vehicle to the excitations derived from the track vertical irregularities. The symmetrical and antisymmetrical modes due from the bounce and pitch motions of the axles’ planes in the two bogies are being considered. The analysis of the dynamic response in the vehicle relies on the response functions in three reference points of the carbody, composed by means of these response functions to the symmetrical and antisymmetrical excitation modes. Similarly, the dynamic response of the vehicle to the track stochastic irregularities is examined and expressed as a power spectral density of the carbody vertical acceleration and the root mean square of the acceleration and the index of the partial comfort to the vertical vibrations is calculated. The paper is structured into two parts. The Part I includes all the theoretical elements required for the analysis of the dynamic response in the vehicle, while Part II introduces the results of the numerical analysis.

  13. Studies on the Adhesive Property of Snail Adhesive Mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newar, Janu; Ghatak, Archana

    2015-11-10

    Many gastropod molluscs are known to secrete mucus which allow these animals to adhere to a substrate while foraging over it. While the mucus is known to provide strong adhesion to both dry and wet surfaces, including both horizontal and vertical ones, no systematic study has been carried out to understand the strength of such adhesion under different conditions. We report here results from preliminary studies on adhesion characteristics of the mucus of a snail found in eastern India, Macrochlamys indica. When perturbed, the snail was found to secrete its adhesive mucus, which was collected and subjected to regular adhesion tests. The hydrated mucus was used as such, and also as mixed with buffer of different pH. These experiments suggest that the mucus was slightly alkaline, and showed the maximum adhesion strength of 9 kPa when present in an alkaline buffer. Preliminary studies indicate that adhesive force is related to the ability of the mucus to incorporate water. In alkaline condition, the gel like mass that it forms, incorporate water from a wet surface and enable strong adhesion.

  14. Light-Curing Adhesive Repair Tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Ronald; Haight, Andrea Hoyt

    2009-01-01

    Adhesive tapes, the adhesive resins of which can be cured (and thereby rigidized) by exposure to ultraviolet and/or visible light, are being developed as repair patch materials. The tapes, including their resin components, consist entirely of solid, low-outgassing, nonhazardous or minimally hazardous materials. They can be used in air or in vacuum and can be cured rapidly, even at temperatures as low as -20 C. Although these tapes were originally intended for use in repairing structures in outer space, they can also be used on Earth for quickly repairing a wide variety of structures. They can be expected to be especially useful in situations in which it is necessary to rigidize tapes after wrapping them around or pressing them onto the parts to be repaired.

  15. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, A. R.; Afendi, Mohd; Majid, M. S. Abdul

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding.

  16. Growth dynamics of fine roots in a coniferous fern forest site close to Forsmark in the central part of Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Hans; Stadenberg, Ingela

    2007-12-01

    The seasonal growth dynamics of live and dead roots for trees and the field layer species (g/m 2 , varying diameter fractions) and live/dead ratios were analysed at a fresh/moist coniferous fern forest site close to the nuclear power plant at Forsmark in the central eastern parts of Sweden. The changes in depth distribution of fine roots were observed at depth intervals of the top humus horizon down to 40 cm in the mineral soil profile. The bulk of living fine roots of trees ( 2 . The total quantity of fine roots (live + dead) amounted to 543, 434, 314 and 546 g/m 2 . Considerable quantities of fine roots (< 1 mm in diameter) were attributed to field-layer species (about 18% of the total biomass during the whole period of investigation). The turnover rate (the rate of construction of new roots) for tree fine roots < 1 mm in diameter amounted to at least the size of the average fine-root biomass. Our methods of estimating fine-root production and mortality, involved periodic measurements of live and dead dry weight of the fine roots from sequential core samples of the forest soil. The collected data give a proper and instant measure of the spatial and temporal distribution of fine roots in the undisturbed soil-profile. Data from other fine-root investigations suggest turnover rates in agreement with our present findings. Differences between root growth and turnover should be expected between trees of different age, tree species and different forest sites, but also between different years. Substantial variations in fine-root biomass, necromass and live/dead ratios are found in different forest sites. Correct methods for estimating the amount of live and dead fine-roots in the soil at regular time intervals are essential for any calculation of fine-root turnover. Definition of root vitality differs in literature, making it difficult to compare results from different root investigators. Our investigation clarifies the importance of using distinct morphological criteria

  17. Cell Adhesions: Actin-Based Modules that Mediate Cell-Extracellular Matrix and Cell-Cell Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachir, Alexia; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Nelson, W. James; Bianchini, Julie M.

    2018-01-01

    Cell adhesions link cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and to each other, and depend on interactions with the actin cytoskeleton. Both cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesion sites contain discrete, yet overlapping functional modules. These modules establish physical association with the actin cytoskeleton, locally modulate actin organization and dynamics, and trigger intracellular signaling pathways. Interplay between these modules generates distinct actin architectures that underlie different stages, types, and functions of cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesions. Actomyosin contractility is required to generate mature, stable adhesions, as well as sense and translate the mechanical properties of the cellular environment to changes in cell organization and behavior. In this chapter we discuss the organization and function of different adhesion modules and how they interact with the actin cytoskeleton. We highlight the molecular mechanisms of mechanotransduction in adhesions, and how adhesion molecules mediate crosstalk between cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesion sites. PMID:28679638

  18. Measurement of thick film adhesion by an impact separation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snowden, W.E.; Aksay, I.A.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize a dynamic loading (impact separation) technique to determine absolute values for the force of adhesion required to separate a substrate/film interface into its two joining components. A principal advantage of the technique is that the force required for adhesive failure is applied directly at the interface by stress waves of relatively low amplitude, not by application of a force to the free surface of the film. Critical impact velocities required for separation of thick films from two types of substrates were measured. Values for force of adhesion were then calculated using a complex finite-difference computer code developed for analysis of a variety of dynamic problems

  19. Ultrastructural and Histochemical Characterization of the Zebra Mussel Adhesive Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsad, Nikrooz

    Since their accidental introduction into the Great Lakes in mid- to late-1980s, the freshwater zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, have colonized most lakes and waterways across eastern North America. Their rapid spread is partly attributed to their ability to tenaciously attach to hard substrates via an adhesive apparatus called the byssus, resulting in serious environmental and economic impacts. A detailed ultrastructural study of the byssus revealed a 10 nm adhesive layer at the attachment interface. Distributions of the main adhesive amino acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), and its oxidizing (cross-linking) enzyme, catechol oxidase, were determined histochemically. It was found that, upon aging, DOPA levels remained high in the portion of the byssus closest to the interface, consistent with an adhesive role. In contrast, reduced levels of DOPA corresponded well with high levels of catechol oxidase in the load-bearing component of the byssus, presumably forming cross-links and increasing the cohesive strength.

  20. On protection of Freedom's solar dynamic radiator from the orbital debris environment. Part 2: Further testing and analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer L.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Fleming, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    Presented here are results of a test program undertaken to further define the response of the solar dynamic radiator to hypervelocity impact (HVI). Tests were conducted on representative radiator panels (under ambient, nonoperating conditions) over a range of velocity. Target parameters are also varied. Data indicate that analytical penetration predictions are conservative (i.e., pessimistic) for the specific configuration of the solar dynamic radiator. Test results are used to define the solar dynamic radiator reliability with respect to HVI more rigorously than previous studies. Test data, reliability, and survivability results are presented.

  1. Humidity dependence of adhesion for silane coated microcantilevers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Boer, Maarten P.; Mayer, Thomas M.; Carpick, Robert W.; Michalske, Terry A.; Srinivasan, U.; Maboudian, R.

    1999-01-01

    This study examines adhesion between silane-coated micromachined surfaces that are exposed to humid conditions. Our quantitative values for interfacial adhesion energies are determined from an in-situ optical measurement of deformations in partly-adhered cantilever beams. We coated micromachined cantilevers with either ODTS (C(sub 18)H(sub 37)SiCl(sub 3)) or FDTS (C(sub 8)F(sub 17)C(sub 2)H(sub 4)SiCl(sub 3)) with the objective of creating hydrophobic surfaces whose adhesion would be independent of humidity. In both cases, the adhesion energy is significantly lower than for uncoated, hydrophilic surfaces. For relative humidities (RH) less than 95% (ODTS) and 80% (FDTS) the adhesion energy was extremely low and constant. In fact, ODTS-coated beams exposed to saturated humidity conditions and long (48 hour) exposures showed only a factor of two increase in adhesion energy. Surprisingly, FDTS coated beams, which initially have a higher contact angle (115(degree)) with water than do ODTS coated beams (112(degree)), proved to be much more sensitive to humidity. The FDTS coated surfaces showed a factor of one hundred increase in adhesion energy after a seven hour exposure to 90% RH. Atomic force microscopy revealed agglomerated coating material after exposed to high RH, suggesting a redistribution of the monolayer film. This agglomeration was more prominent for FDTS than ODTS. These findings suggest a new mechanism for uptake of moisture under high humidity conditions. At high humidities, the silane coatings can reconfigure from a surface to a bulk phase leaving behind locally hydrophilic sites which increase the average measured adhesion energy. In order for the adhesion increase to be observed, a significant fraction of the monolayer must be converted from the surface to the bulk phase

  2. The effect of water on the gecko adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Alyssa Yeager

    The gecko adhesive system is a dry, reversible adhesive that is virtually surface-insensitive due to the utilization of intermolecular van der Waals forces. Remarkably, although detailed models of the adhesive mechanism exist and hundreds of gecko-inspired synthetics have been fabricated, our ability to fully replicate the system still falls short. One reason for this is our limited understanding of how the system performs in natural environments. To begin to resolve this I focused on one particular environmental parameter, water. Although thin layers of water can disrupt van der Waals forces, I hypothesized that geckos are able to retain or regain adhesive function on wet surfaces. I was motivated to investigate this hypothesis because many species of gecko are native to the tropics, a climate where we expect surface water to be prevalent, thus it is likely geckos have some mechanism to overcome the challenges associated with surface water and wetting. Despite the challenge water should pose to adhesion, I found that when tested on hydrophobic substrates geckos cling equally well in air and water. Conversely, on wet hydrophilic substrates geckos cannot support their body weight. Investigating these results further, I found that the superhydrophobic nature of the adhesive toe pads allows geckos to form an air bubble around their foot, which when pressed into contact with a hydrophobic substrate likely removes water from the adhesive interface. When the toe pads are no longer superhydrophobic however, geckos cannot support their body weight and fall from substrates. In order to regain adhesion geckos only need to take about ten steps on a dry substrate to self-dry their toe pads. Finally, when measuring a dynamic component of adhesion, running, we found that geckos are able to maintain speed on misted hydrophobic and hydrophilic substrates, contrary to what we would predict based on static shear adhesion measurements. In conclusion, my research provides a detailed

  3. Factors influencing the polymer-polymer adhesion- strength during two shot moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Mohammad Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tang, Peter Torben

    At the present state of two shot moulding, the adhesion strength of the two different polymers is an important issue. Many fascinating applications of two component or multi component polymer parts are restricted due to the weak interfacial adhesion of the polymers. A thorough understanding...... of the factors that influence the adhesion strength of subsequently moulded polymers is necessary for multi component polymer processing. Even when a stronger adhesion is not required the tuning factors should be found out to control the bond strength of two polymers. This paper investigates the effects...... of the process and material parameters on the adhesion strength of two component polymer parts and sorts out the factors which can effectively control the adhesion between two different polymers. The results and discussion presented in this paper could be used as a guide for multi component polymer processing....

  4. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...

  5. Syndecans, signaling, and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1996-01-01

    structures within the heparan sulfate chains, leaving the roles of chondroitin sulfate chains and extracellular portion of the core proteins to be elucidated. Evidence that syndecans are a class of receptor involved in cell adhesion is mounting, and their small cytoplasmic domains may link...... transmembrane signaling from matrix to cytoskeleton, as proposed for other classes of adhesion receptors....

  6. Controlling adhesive behavior during recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl Houtman; Karen Scallon; Jihui Guo; XinPing Wang; Steve Severtson; Mark Kroll; Mike Nowak

    2004-01-01

    Adhesives can be formulated to facilitate their removal by typical paper recycling unit operations. The investigations described in this paper are focused on determining fundamental properties that control particle size during pulping. While pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) with high elastic moduli tend to survive pulping with larger particles, facestock and...

  7. Effect of fibril shape on adhesive properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Daniel; Hill, Ginel; Parness, Aaron; Esparza, Noé; Cutkosky, Mark; Kenny, Tom

    2010-08-01

    Research into the gecko's adhesive system revealed a unique architecture for adhesives using tiny hairs. By using a stiff material (β-keratin) to create a highly structured adhesive, the gecko's system demonstrates properties not seen in traditional pressure-sensitive adhesives which use a soft, unstructured planar layer. In contrast to pressure sensitive adhesives, the gecko adhesive displays frictional adhesion, in which increased shear force allows it to withstand higher normal loads. Synthetic fibrillar adhesives have been fabricated but not all demonstrate this frictional adhesion property. Here we report the dual-axis force testing of single silicone rubber pillars from synthetic adhesive arrays. We find that the shape of the adhesive pillar dictates whether frictional adhesion or pressure-sensitive behavior is observed. This work suggests that both types of behavior can be achieved with structures much larger than gecko terminal structures. It also indicates that subtle differences in the shape of these pillars can significantly influence their properties.

  8. Gecko-Inspired, Controlled Adhesion and Its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menguc, Yigit

    This thesis work is primarily concerned with taking inspiration from the principles of gecko-adhesion in order to control the attachment of synthetic structured adhesives. We present gecko-inspired angled elastomer micropillars with flat or round tip endings as compliant pick-and-place micromanipulators. The pillars are 35 mum in diameter, 90 mum tall, and angled at an inclination of 20°. By gently pressing the tip of a pillar to a part, the pillar adheres to it through intermolecular forces. Next, by retracting quickly, the part is picked from a given donor substrate. During transferring, the adhesion between the pillar and the part is high enough to withstand disturbances due to external forces or the weight of the part. During release of the part onto a receiver substrate, the contact area of the pillar to the part is drastically reduced by controlled vertical or shear displacement, which results in reduced adhesive forces. The maximum repeatable ratio of pick-to-release adhesive forces was measured as 39 to 1. We find that a flat tip shape and shear displacement control provide a higher pick-to-release adhesion ratio than a round tip and vertical displacement control, respectively. We present a model of forces to serve as a framework for the operation of this micromanipulator. Finally, demonstrations of pick-and-place manipulation of mum-scale silicon microplatelets and a cm-scale glass cover slip serve as proofs of concept. The compliant polymer micropillars are safe for use with fragile parts, and, due to exploiting intermolecular forces, could be effective on most materials and in air, vacuum, and liquid environments. We present a study of the self-cleaning and contamination resistance phenomena of synthetic gecko-inspired adhesives made from elastomeric polyurethane. The phenomenon of self-cleaning makes the adhesive foot of the gecko robust against dirt, and makes it effectively sticky throughout the lifetime of the material (within the molting cycles

  9. Regulative mechanisms of chondrocyte adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Fehrenbach, Miriam

    2006-01-01

    Interaction between chondrocytes and extracellular matrix is considered a key factor in the generation of grafts for matrix-associated chondrocyte transplantation. Therefore, our objective was to study the influence of differentiation status on cellular attachment. Adhesion of chondrocytes...... to collagen type II increased after removal from native cartilage up to the third day in monolayer in a dose-dependent manner. Following dedifferentiation after the second passage, adhesion to collagen types I (-84%) and II (-46%) decreased, whereas adhesion to fibrinogen (+59%) and fibronectin (+43......%) increased. A cartilage construct was developed based on a clinically established collagen type I scaffold. In this matrix, more than 80% of the cells could be immobilized by mechanisms of adhesion, filtration, and cell entrapment. Confocal laser microscopy revealed focal adhesion sites as points of cell...

  10. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neviaser, Andrew S; Neviaser, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is characterized by painful, gradual loss of active and passive shoulder motion resulting from fibrosis and contracture of the joint capsule. Other shoulder pathology can produce a similar clinical picture, however, and must be considered. Management is based on the underlying cause of pain and stiffness, and determination of the etiology is essential. Subtle clues in the history and physical examination can help differentiate adhesive capsulitis from other conditions that cause a stiff, painful shoulder. The natural history of adhesive capsulitis is a matter of controversy. Management of true capsular restriction of motion (ie, true adhesive capsulitis) begins with gentle, progressive stretching exercises. Most patients improve with nonsurgical treatment. Indications for surgery should be individualized. Failure to obtain symptomatic improvement and continued functional disability following ≥6 months of physical therapy is a general guideline for surgical intervention. Diligent postoperative therapy to maintain motion is required to minimize recurrence of adhesive capsulitis.

  11. Plasticizers increase adhesion of the deteriogenic fungus Aureobasidium pullulans to polyvinyl chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, J S; Van der Mei, H C; Nixon, M; Eastwood, I M; Greenhalgh, M; Read, S J; Robson, G D; Handley, P S

    1999-08-01

    Initial adhesion of fungi to plasticized polyvinyl chloride (pPVC) may determine subsequent colonization and biodeterioration processes. The deteriogenic fungus Aureobasidium pullulans was used to investigate the physicochemical nature of adhesion to both unplasticized PVC (uPVC) and pPVC containing the plasticizers dioctyl phthalate (DOP) and dioctyl adipate (DOA). A quantitative adhesion assay using image analysis identified fundamental differences in the mechanism of adhesion of A. pullulans blastospores to these substrata. Adhesion to pPVC was greater than that to uPVC by a maximum of 280% after a 4-h incubation with 10(8) blastospores ml(-1). That plasticizers enhance adhesion to PVC was confirmed by incorporating a dispersion of both DOA and DOP into the blastospore suspension. Adhesion to uPVC was increased by up to 308% in the presence of the dispersed plasticizers. Hydrophobic interactions were found to dominate adhesion to uPVC because (i) a strong positive correlation was observed between substratum hydrophobicity (measured by using a dynamic contact angle analyzer) and adhesion to a range of unplasticized polymers including uPVC, and (ii) neither the pH nor the electrolyte concentration of the suspension buffer, both of which influence electrostatic interactions, affected adhesion to uPVC. In contrast, adhesion to pPVC is principally controlled by electrostatic interactions. Enhanced adhesion to pPVC occurred despite a relative reduction of 13 degrees in the water contact angle of pPVC compared to that of uPVC. Furthermore, adhesion to pPVC was strongly dependent on both the pH and electrolyte concentration of the suspension medium, reaching maximum levels at pH 8 and with an electrolyte concentration of 10 mM NaCl. Plasticization with DOP and DOA therefore increases adhesion of A. pullulans blastospores to pPVC through an interaction mediated by electrostatic forces.

  12. Adhesive tape exfoliation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Single-crystal graphite can be cleaved by the use of an adhesive tape. This was also the initial route for obtaining graphene, a one-layer thick graphite slab. In this letter a few simple and fun considerations are presented in an attempt to shed some light on why this procedure is successful....... In particular on the nature of the surprisingly small number of repetitive steps that are needed in order to obtain a single-layer slab. Two frameworks for exfoliation are investigated: parallel exfoliation involving repetitive simultaneous cleaving, the other, serial exfoliation, which involves the repetitive...... cleaving of a single chunk of graphite. For both cases, parallel and serial exfoliation, it is investigated how many generations of cleavages are needed. An approximate model with the probability distribution expressed as a simple closed form is presented and compared with the simulations....

  13. RAGE controls leukocyte adhesion in preterm and term infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Kirsten; Tschada, Raphaela; Metzger, Marie-Sophie; Braach, Natascha; Kuss, Navina; Hudalla, Hannes; Poeschl, Johannes; Frommhold, David

    2014-11-27

    Insufficient leukocyte recruitment may be one reason for the high incidence of life-threatening infections in preterm infants. Since the receptor of advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a known leukocyte adhesion molecule and highly expressed during early development, we asked whether RAGE plays a role for leukocyte recruitment in preterm and term infants. Leukocyte adhesion was analyzed in dynamic flow chamber experiments using isolated leukocytes of cord blood from extremely premature (35 weeks of gestation) and compared to the results of adults. For fluorescent microscopy leukocytes were labeled with rhodamine 6G. In the respective age groups we also measured the plasma concentration of soluble RAGE (sRAGE) by ELISA and Mac-1 and LFA-1 expression on neutrophils by flow cytometry. The adhesive functions of fetal leukocytes significantly increase with gestational age. In all age groups, leukocyte adhesion was crucially dependent on RAGE. In particular, RAGE was equally effective to mediate leukocyte adhesion when compared to ICAM-1. The plasma levels of sRAGE were high in extremely premature infants and decreased with increasing gestational age. In contrast, expression of β2-Integrins Mac-1 and LFA-1 which are known ligands for RAGE and ICAM-1 did not change during fetal development. We conclude that RAGE is a crucial leukocyte adhesion molecule in both preterm and term infants.

  14. Numerical investigation of adhesion effects on solid particles filtration efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffee, Amira; Luckham, Paul; Matar, Omar K.

    2017-11-01

    Our work investigate the effectiveness of particle filtration process, in particular using a fully-coupled Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Discrete Element Method (DEM) approach involving poly-dispersed, adhesive solid particles. We found that an increase in particle adhesion reduces solid production through the opening of a wire-wrap type filter. Over time, as particle agglomerates continuously deposit on top of the filter, layer upon layer of particles is built on top of the filter, forming a particle pack. It is observed that with increasing particle adhesion, the pack height build up also increases and hence decreases the average particle volume fraction of the pack. This trend suggests higher porosity and looser packing of solid particles within the pack with increased adhesion. Furthermore, we found that the pressure drop for adhesive case is lower compared to non-adhesive case. Our results suggest agglomerating solid particles has beneficial effects on particle filtration. One important application of these findings is towards designing and optimizing sand control process for a hydrocarbon well with excessive sand production which is major challenge in oil and gas industry. Funding from PETRONAS and RAEng UK for Research Chair (OKM) gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Shearing Nanometer-Thick Confined Hydrocarbon Films: Friction and Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, I. M.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2016-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics (MD) friction and adhesion calculations for nanometer-thick confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths 20, 100 and 1400 carbon atoms. We study the dependency of the frictional shear stress on the confining pressure and sliding speed. We present results...

  16. Dynamic testing of young children with (severe) disabilities : Presentation as part of symposium: Dynamic testing in children – language and speech problems or developmental disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Linda

    2015-01-01

    A main disadvantage of static tests is that they do not take into account differences between children in chances they have had to learn and develop. Dynamic assessment is a way to take into account these differences and assess which skills a child can learn in which speed and which support it needs

  17. Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Lawrence E

    2001-01-01

    Beginning text presents complete theoretical treatment of mechanical model systems and deals with technological applications. Topics include introduction to calculus of vectors, particle motion, dynamics of particle systems and plane rigid bodies, technical applications in plane motions, theory of mechanical vibrations, and more. Exercises and answers appear in each chapter.

  18. Selecting a dynamic simulation modeling method for health care delivery research-part 2: report of the ISPOR Dynamic Simulation Modeling Emerging Good Practices Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Deborah A; Burgos-Liz, Lina; IJzerman, Maarten J; Crown, William; Padula, William V; Wong, Peter K; Pasupathy, Kalyan S; Higashi, Mitchell K; Osgood, Nathaniel D

    2015-03-01

    In a previous report, the ISPOR Task Force on Dynamic Simulation Modeling Applications in Health Care Delivery Research Emerging Good Practices introduced the fundamentals of dynamic simulation modeling and identified the types of health care delivery problems for which dynamic simulation modeling can be used more effectively than other modeling methods. The hierarchical relationship between the health care delivery system, providers, patients, and other stakeholders exhibits a level of complexity that ought to be captured using dynamic simulation modeling methods. As a tool to help researchers decide whether dynamic simulation modeling is an appropriate method for modeling the effects of an intervention on a health care system, we presented the System, Interactions, Multilevel, Understanding, Loops, Agents, Time, Emergence (SIMULATE) checklist consisting of eight elements. This report builds on the previous work, systematically comparing each of the three most commonly used dynamic simulation modeling methods-system dynamics, discrete-event simulation, and agent-based modeling. We review criteria for selecting the most suitable method depending on 1) the purpose-type of problem and research questions being investigated, 2) the object-scope of the model, and 3) the method to model the object to achieve the purpose. Finally, we provide guidance for emerging good practices for dynamic simulation modeling in the health sector, covering all aspects, from the engagement of decision makers in the model design through model maintenance and upkeep. We conclude by providing some recommendations about the application of these methods to add value to informed decision making, with an emphasis on stakeholder engagement, starting with the problem definition. Finally, we identify areas in which further methodological development will likely occur given the growing "volume, velocity and variety" and availability of "big data" to provide empirical evidence and techniques

  19. Growth dynamics of fine roots in a coniferous fern forest site close to Forsmark in the central part of Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Hans; Stadenberg, Ingela (SLU, Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Research, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2007-12-15

    The seasonal growth dynamics of live and dead roots for trees and the field layer species (g/m2, varying diameter fractions) and live/dead ratios were analysed at a fresh/moist coniferous fern forest site close to the nuclear power plant at Forsmark in the central eastern parts of Sweden. The changes in depth distribution of fine roots were observed at depth intervals of the top humus horizon down to 40 cm in the mineral soil profile. The bulk of living fine roots of trees (< 1 mm in diameter) were found in the mineral soil horizon the total profile down to 40 cm of the mineral soil, where 89, 82, 83 and 89% of the total amount in the whole profile were found. The upper 2.5 cm part of the humus layer contained 83, 81, 100 and 100% of all roots of the humus layer on the four different sampling occasions. High amounts of living fine roots were found in the upper 10 cm of the mineral soil horizon viz. 84, 76, 91 and 69% of the total mineral soil layer. Consequently, both the top soil horizons of the humus and the mineral soil layers were heavily penetrated by living fine roots. The highest proportion of living fine roots was found in the top 2.5 cm of the humus layer. Accordingly, the live/dead ratio of fine roots (< 1 mm in diameter) decreased from the top of the humus layer to the lower part of mineral soil horizon from 8.0-0.3, 0.8-0.2, 4.4-0.4 and 3.3-0.7 (g g-1) for the four sampling occasions, respectively. We concluded that the decrease in the live/ dead ratio was related to decreased vitality with depth of the fine roots in the soil profile. The highest live/dead ratio was found in the upper 2.5 cm of the humus layer for both the tree and field-layer species. This distribution pattern was most evident for tree fine roots < 1 mm in diameter. The mean fine-root biomass (live tissue < 1 mm in diameter) of tree species for the total profile varied on the four sampling occasions between 317, 113, 139 and 248 g m-2. The related fine root necromass (dead tissue

  20. Dynamic simulation of a circulating fluidized bed boiler system part II: Simulation of a boiler system operating in a power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Il; Choi, Sang Min; Yang, Jong In

    2016-01-01

    A case of dynamic performance simulation model of a CFB boiler is presented in this study. The dynamic system of a CFB boiler in an operating power plant and the transient behavior of sub-models is described in the accompanying paper, Part I. The current paper, Part II, describes the model extension for the CFB boiler system in a power plant. The open loop model in Paper I was expanded by applying a set of PID (Proportional-integral-differential) control loops. In the control loop, pressure, temperature, mass flow rate of the main steam, the drum water level and the oxygen level at the stack were controlled. Dynamic performance was simulated to check the response of the closed control loop. Finally, performance of the total boiler system for a range of operation load of the power plant was simulated, where the parameters were calculated and control variables were maintained at the set values by PID control. Dynamic performance of a boiler at a selected load variation case was simulated and compared with actual measurements and their transient response characteristics were discussed. The simulation can also directly produce useful operation parameters, which are not measurable, but could be used for engineering evaluation

  1. Effect on adhesion of a nanocapsules-loaded adhesive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Genari

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to evaluate the in situ degree of conversion, contact angle, and immediate and long-term bond strengths of a commercial primer and an experimental adhesive containing indomethacin- and triclosan-loaded nanocapsules (NCs. The indomethacin- and triclosan-loaded NCs, which promote anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects through controlled release, were incorporated into the primer at a concentration of 2% and in the adhesive at concentrations of 1, 2, 5, and 10%. The in situ degree of conversion (DC, n=3 was evaluated by micro-Raman spectroscopy. The contact angle of the primer and adhesive on the dentin surface (n = 3 was determined by an optical tensiometer. For the microtensile bond strength µTBS test (12 teeth per group, stick-shaped specimens were tested under tensile stress immediately after preparation and after storage in water for 1 year. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA, three-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc tests with α=0.05. The use of the NC-loaded adhesive resulted in a higher in situ degree of conversion. The DC values varied from 75.07 ± 8.83% to 96.18 ± 0.87%. The use of NCs in only the adhesive up to a concentration of 5% had no influence on the bond strength. The contact angle of the primer remained the same with and without NCs. The use of both the primer and adhesive with NCs (for all concentrations resulted in a higher contact angle of the adhesive. The longitudinal μTBS was inversely proportional to the concentration of NCs in the adhesive system, exhibiting decreasing values for the groups with primer containing NCs and adhesives with increasing concentrations of NCs. Adhesives containing up to 5% of nanocapsules and primer with no NCs maintained the in situ degree of conversion, contact angle, and immediate and long-term bond strengths. Therefore, the NC-loaded adhesive can be an alternative method for combining the bond performance and therapeutic effects. The use of an

  2. Competition between adhesion and inertia during stick-slip peeling of Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbe, M.-J.; Villey, R.; Ciccotti, M.; Cortet, P.-P.; Santucci, S.; Vanel, L.

    2015-03-01

    We consider the classical problem of the instable stick-slip dynamics often observed when peeling a pressure sensitive adhesive, quantifying for the first time experimentally the influence of the peeling angle. This instability is known to be the consequence of a decreasing fracture energy of the adhesive-substrate joint over a certain range of driving velocity: we focus here on the important case where the instability develops at large driving velocity. We show that the shape of the peeling front velocity fluctuations progressively changes from typical stick-slip relaxation oscillations to nearly sinusoidal oscillations as the peeling angle and/or the driving velocity is increased. This transition is accompanied with a change in the dependencies of the limit cycles' period on the control parameters. We show that it results from the competition, in the dynamical equation, between the standard fracture energy and a term -considered here for the first time- associated to the freestanding tape elasticity and inertia. We manage to predict quantitatively the transition of the instability amplitude and period from the classical Barquins-Maugis quasistatic regime to a purely inertial regime in which the adhesion energy is no more at play in setting the instability limit cycles.

  3. Wet adhesion and adhesive locomotion of snails on anti-adhesive non-wetting surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil J Shirtcliffe

    Full Text Available Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted, texture (smooth, rough or granular or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces.

  4. Wet adhesion and adhesive locomotion of snails on anti-adhesive non-wetting surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces.

  5. An Explicit Formulation of Singularity-Free Dynamic Equations of Mechanical Systems in Lagrangian Form---Part one: Single Rigid Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pål Johan From

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the explicit dynamic equations of a mechanical system. The equations are presented so that they can easily be implemented in a simulation software or controller environment and are also well suited for system and controller analysis. The dynamics of a general mechanical system consisting of one or more rigid bodies can be derived from the Lagrangian. We can then use several well known properties of Lie groups to guarantee that these equations are well defined. This will, however, often lead to rather abstract formulation of the dynamic equations that cannot be implemented in a simulation software directly. In this paper we close this gap and show what the explicit dynamic equations look like. These equations can then be implemented directly in a simulation software and no background knowledge on Lie theory and differential geometry on the practitioner's side is required. This is the first of two papers on this topic. In this paper we derive the dynamics for single rigid bodies, while in the second part we study multibody systems. In addition to making the equations more accessible to practitioners, a motivation behind the papers is to correct a few errors commonly found in literature. For the first time, we show the detailed derivations and how to arrive at the correct set of equations. We also show through some simple examples that these correspond with the classical formulations found from Lagrange's equations. The dynamics is derived from the Boltzmann--Hamel equations of motion in terms of local position and velocity variables and the mapping to the corresponding quasi-velocities. Finally we present a new theorem which states that the Boltzmann--Hamel formulation of the dynamics is valid for all transformations with a Lie group topology. This has previously only been indicated through examples, but here we also present the formal proof. The main motivation of these papers is to allow practitioners not familiar with

  6. Organosolv Lignin-Based Wood Adhesive. Influence of the Lignin Extraction Conditions on the Adhesive Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issam Dababi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol organosolv alfa grass lignins were extracted in the presence of sulfuric acid or Lewis acids (Sc(OTf3, FeCl3 as catalysts and subjected to a comprehensive structural characterization by solid state 13C NMR, GPC, MALDI-TOF, and ASAP-MS/MS. The impact of the severity of the treatment and of the nature of the acid catalyst on the recovered lignin structure was investigated. The lignins isolated at high severity were highly recondensed and partly composed of regular structures composed of furan-like rings. The alfa (Stipa tenacissima L. organosolv lignins were used for the preparation of formaldehyde-free adhesives which were characterized by TMA and used for the preparation of particleboard without any addition of synthetic resin. It has been demonstrated for the first time that: (1 the addition of 10% to 30% of organosolv alfa lignin in a tannin-based adhesive improved the adhesive performance; and (2 the conditions of the lignin extraction strongly impact the lignin-based adhesive performances. The highly recondensed lignin extracted with sulfuric acid as a catalyst allowed the production of resins with improved performances. Formulations composed of 50% glyoxalated alfa lignin and 50% of Aleppo Pine tannins yielded good internal bond strength results for the panels (IB = 0.45 MPa and satisfied relevant international standard specifications for interior-grade panels.

  7. Zebra mussel adhesion: structure of the byssal adhesive apparatus in the freshwater mussel, Dreissena polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsad, Nikrooz; Sone, Eli D

    2012-03-01

    The freshwater zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) owes a large part of its success as an invasive species to its ability to attach to a wide variety of substrates. As in marine mussels, this attachment is achieved by a proteinaceous byssus, a series of threads joined at a stem that connect the mussel to adhesive plaques secreted onto the substrate. Although the zebra mussel byssus is superficially similar to marine mussels, significant structural and compositional differences suggest that further investigation of the adhesion mechanisms in this freshwater species is warranted. Here we present an ultrastructural examination of the zebra mussel byssus, with emphasis on interfaces that are critical to its adhesive function. By examining the attached plaques, we show that adhesion is mediated by a uniform electron dense layer on the underside of the plaque. This layer is only 10-20 nm thick and makes direct and continuous contact with the substrate. The plaque itself is fibrous, and curiously can exhibit either a dense or porous morphology. In zebra mussels, a graded interface between the animal and the substrate mussels is achieved by interdigitation of uniform threads with the stem, in contrast to marine mussels, where the threads themselves are non-uniform. Our observations of several novel aspects of zebra mussel byssal ultrastructure may have important implications not only for preventing biofouling by the zebra mussel, but for the development of new bioadhesives as well. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Low Impedance Carbon Adhesive Electrodes with Long Shelf Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posada-Quintero, Hugo F; Reyes, Bersaín A; Burnham, Ken; Pennace, John; Chon, Ki H

    2015-10-01

    A novel electrocardiogram (ECG) electrode film is developed by mixing carbon black powder and a quaternary salt with a visco-elastic polymeric adhesive. Unlike traditional wet gel-based electrodes, carbon/salt/adhesive (CSA) electrodes should theoretically have an infinite shelf life as they do not dehydrate even after a prolonged period of storage. The CSA electrodes are electrically activated for use through the process of electrophoresis. Specifically, the activation procedure involves sending a high voltage and current through the electrode, which results in significant reduction of impedance so that high fidelity ECG signals can be obtained. Using the activation procedure, the ideal concentration of carbon black powder in the mixture with the adhesive was examined. It was determined that the optimum concentration of carbon black which minimized post-activation impedance was 10%. Once the optimal carbon black powder concentration was determined, extensive signal analysis was performed to compare the performance of the CSA electrodes to the standard silver-silver chloride (Ag/AgCl) electrodes. As a part of data analysis, electrode-skin contact impedance of the CSA was measured and compared to the standard Ag/AgCl electrodes; we found consistently lower impedance for CSA electrodes. For quantitative data analysis, we simultaneously collected ECG data with CSA and Ag/AgCl electrodes from 17 healthy subjects. Heart rate variability (HRV) indices and ECG morphological waveforms were calculated to compare CSA and Ag/AgCl electrodes. Non-significant differences for most of the HRV indices between CSA and Ag/AgCl electrodes were found. Of the morphological waveform metrics consisting of R-wave peak amplitude, ST-segment elevation and QT interval, only the first index was found to be significantly different between the two media. The response of CSA electrodes to motion artifacts was also tested, and we found in general no difference in the quality of the ECG signal

  9. Cell adhesion pattern created by OSTE polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjia; Li, Yiyang; Ding, Xianting

    2017-04-24

    Engineering surfaces with functional polymers is a crucial issue in the field of micro/nanofabrication and cell-material interface studies. For many applications of surface patterning, it does not need cells to attach on the whole surface. Herein, we introduce a novel polymer fabrication protocol of off-stoichiometry thiol-ene (OSTE) polymers to create heterogeneity on the surface by utilizing 3D printing and soft-lithography. By choosing two OSTE polymers with different functional groups, we create a pattern where only parts of the surface can facilitate cell adhesion. We also study the hydrophilic property of OSTE polymers by mixing poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) directly with pre-polymers and plasma treatments afterwards. Moreover, we investigate the effect of functional groups' excess ratio and hydrophilic property on the cell adhesion ability of OSTE polymers. The results show that the cell adhesion ability of OSTE materials can be tuned within a wide range by the coupling effect of functional groups' excess ratio and hydrophilic property. Meanwhile, by mixing PEG with pre-polymers and undergoing oxygen plasma treatment afterward can significantly improve the hydrophilic property of OSTE polymers.

  10. Application of system identification to analytic rotor modeling from simulated and wind tunnel dynamic test data, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenemser, K. H.; Banerjee, D.

    1977-01-01

    An introduction to aircraft state and parameter identification methods is presented. A simplified form of the maximum likelihood method is selected to extract analytical aeroelastic rotor models from simulated and dynamic wind tunnel test results for accelerated cyclic pitch stirring excitation. The dynamic inflow characteristics for forward flight conditions from the blade flapping responses without direct inflow measurements were examined. The rotor blades are essentially rigid for inplane bending and for torsion within the frequency range of study, but flexible in out-of-plane bending. Reverse flow effects are considered for high rotor advance ratios. Two inflow models are studied; the first is based on an equivalent blade Lock number, the second is based on a time delayed momentum inflow. In addition to the inflow parameters, basic rotor parameters like the blade natural frequency and the actual blade Lock number are identified together with measurement bias values. The effect of the theoretical dynamic inflow on the rotor eigenvalues is evaluated.

  11. Marine Bioinspired Underwater Contact Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Sean K; Sodano, Antonio; Cunningham, Dylan J; Huang, Sharon S; Zalicki, Piotr J; Shin, Seunghan; Ahn, B Kollbe

    2016-05-09

    Marine mussels and barnacles are sessile biofouling organisms that adhere to a number of surfaces in wet environments and maintain remarkably strong bonds. Previous synthetic approaches to mimic biological wet adhesive properties have focused mainly on the catechol moiety, present in mussel foot proteins (mfps), and especially rich in the interfacial mfps, for example, mfp-3 and -5, found at the interface between the mussel plaque and substrate. Barnacles, however, do not use Dopa for their wet adhesion, but are instead rich in noncatecholic aromatic residues. Due to this anomaly, we were intrigued to study the initial contact adhesion properties of copolymerized acrylate films containing the key functionalities of barnacle cement proteins and interfacial mfps, for example, aromatic (catecholic or noncatecholic), cationic, anionic, and nonpolar residues. The initial wet contact adhesion of the copolymers was measured using a probe tack testing apparatus with a flat-punch contact geometry. The wet contact adhesion of an optimized, bioinspired copolymer film was ∼15.0 N/cm(2) in deionized water and ∼9.0 N/cm(2) in artificial seawater, up to 150 times greater than commercial pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tapes (∼0.1 N/cm(2)). Furthermore, maximum wet contact adhesion was obtained at ∼pH 7, suggesting viability for biomedical applications.

  12. Finite element for rotor/stator interactive forces in general engine dynamic simulation. Part 1: Development of bearing damper element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. L.; Padovan, J.; Fertis, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    A general purpose squeeze-film damper interactive force element was developed, coded into a software package (module) and debugged. This software package was applied to nonliner dynamic analyses of some simple rotor systems. Results for pressure distributions show that the long bearing (end sealed) is a stronger bearing as compared to the short bearing as expected. Results of the nonlinear dynamic analysis, using a four degree of freedom simulation model, showed that the orbit of the rotating shaft increases nonlinearity to fill the bearing clearance as the unbalanced weight increases.

  13. Modeling the motion of non-adhesive and adhesive capsules through channels with posts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangdong; Alexeev, Alexander; Balazs, Anna

    2007-03-01

    We study numerically the motion of compliant microcapsules in microchannels. These microchannels have two adhesive posts on the walls that form an orifice with a separation distance roughly comparable in size to the diameter of the capsules. Each microcapsule consists of an elastic shell that is filled with a viscous fluid. The capsules model synthetic polymeric microcapsules or biological cells, such as leukocytes. The microcapsules are driven to move through the channels by an imposed pressure gradient. To model this multi-component system, we combine the lattice Boltzmann model for fluid dynamics and the lattice spring model for the micromechanics of elastic solids. We probe the effect of capsule stiffness and adhesion between the posts and capsule on the motion of capsules within the channel.

  14. TANNIN ADHESIVES AS AN ALTENATIVE TO THE SYNTHETIC PHENOLIC ADHESIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Çolak

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, increasing attention has been paid industrially to the use of tannin formaldehyde adhesives in production of wood based panel products such as particleboard, fiber board and plywood. The researches on the use of tannin extracts as a wood adhesive started in 1950, however, they proceeded very slowly since the problems associated with the application of them. The idea which tannin extract can be used replace the oil-based phenolic adhesive was the base of several studies after the oil crisis of the 1970s. In the past, the economical aspects were important in the researches on the tannin-based adhesives. Nowadays, however, both economical and ecological factors should have taken into consideration in wood bonding.

  15. Structural adhesives directory and databook

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Jo

    1996-01-01

    A worldwide directory of commercially available adhesive products for use in a wide range of engineering disciplines. Along with product names and suppliers, basic property data are tabulated and cross-referenced. The book is subdivided according to class of adhesive, with introductions to each class followed by comparison tables and datasheets for each adhesive. The datasheets contain detailed information, from product codes to environmental properties and are therefore of interest across a broad readership. Standardized data will aid the user in cross-comparison between different manufacturers and in easily identifying the required information.

  16. Photovoltaic module with adhesion promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Grace

    2013-10-08

    Photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters and methods for fabricating photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters are described. A photovoltaic module includes a solar cell including a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a plurality of interspaced back-side contacts. A first glass layer is coupled to the first surface by a first encapsulating layer. A second glass layer is coupled to the second surface by a second encapsulating layer. At least a portion of the second encapsulating layer is bonded directly to the plurality of interspaced back-side contacts by an adhesion promoter.

  17. Adhesion of laser deposited films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhovannik, E.V.; Nikolaev, I.N.; Utochkin, Yu.A.; Stavkin, D.G.

    1996-01-01

    The method of thin solid films (Ni, Cu, Al, Pd, Si, InSb, Ta 2 O 5 ) formation on different substrates (Cu, Fe, Si, SiO 2 , Ta 2 O 5 , carbon, glass, mica, teflon) with higher adhesion strength (∼ 10 7 Pa) without preliminary treatment of substrate surface was discribed. The method is based on laser evaporation of solid in vacuum. Adhesion was measured by means of a direct pull technique using a pin soldered to buffer film evaporated by laser on the investigated film. Possible reasons for higher adhesion of films fabricated by laser deposition were discussed. 10 refs.; 3 figs

  18. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Susan [Manhattan, KS; Wang, Donghai [Manhattan, KS; Zhong, Zhikai [Manhattan, KS; Yang, Guang [Shanghai, CN

    2008-08-26

    The present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  19. Comparing Soy Flour Wood Adhesives to Purified Soy Protein Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda F. Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    While economics dictate that soy-based wood adhesives be made with soy flour, much of the recent literature on soy-based wood adhesives has involved using soy protein isolate. The obvious assumption is that the additional carbohydrates in the flour but not in the isolate only serve as inert diluents. Our studies have shown that the isolate can provide 10 times the wet...

  20. Examining Potential Active Tempering of Adhesive Curing by Marine Mussels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie A. Hamada

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mussels generate adhesives for staying in place when faced with waves and turbulence of the intertidal zone. Their byssal attachment assembly consists of adhesive plaques connected to the animal by threads. We have noticed that, every now and then, the animals tug on their plaque and threads. This observation had us wondering if the mussels temper or otherwise control catechol chemistry within the byssus in order to manage mechanical properties of the materials. Here, we carried out a study in which the adhesion properties of mussel plaques were compared when left attached to the animals versus detached and exposed only to an aquarium environment. For the most part, detachment from the animal had almost no influence on the mechanical properties on low-energy surfaces. There was a slight, yet significant difference observed with attached versus detached adhesive properties on high energy surfaces. There were significant differences in the area of adhesive deposited by the mussels on a low- versus a high-energy surface. Mussel adhesive plaques appear to be unlike, for example, spider silk, for which pulling on the material is needed for assembly of proteinaceous fibers to manage properties.

  1. Mathematical modeling of bone marrow--peripheral blood dynamics in the disease state based on current emerging paradigms, part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afenya, Evans K; Ouifki, Rachid; Camara, Baba I; Mundle, Suneel D

    2016-04-01

    Stemming from current emerging paradigms related to the cancer stem cell hypothesis, an existing mathematical model is expanded and used to study cell interaction dynamics in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. The proposed mathematical model is described by a system of nonlinear differential equations with delay, to quantify the dynamics in abnormal hematopoiesis. The steady states of the model are analytically and numerically obtained. Some conditions for the local asymptotic stability of such states are investigated. Model analyses suggest that malignancy may be irreversible once it evolves from a nonmalignant state into a malignant one and no intervention takes place. This leads to the proposition that a great deal of emphasis be placed on cancer prevention. Nevertheless, should malignancy arise, treatment programs for its containment or curtailment may have to include a maximum and extensive level of effort to protect normal cells from eventual destruction. Further model analyses and simulations predict that in the untreated disease state, there is an evolution towards a situation in which malignant cells dominate the entire bone marrow - peripheral blood system. Arguments are then advanced regarding requirements for quantitatively understanding cancer stem cell behavior. Among the suggested requirements are, mathematical frameworks for describing the dynamics of cancer initiation and progression, the response to treatment, the evolution of resistance, and malignancy prevention dynamics within the bone marrow - peripheral blood architecture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Air classifier technology (ACT) in dry powder inhalation. Part 1 : Introduction of a novel force distribution concept (FDC) explaining the performance of a basic air classifier on adhesive mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, A H; Hagedoorn, P; Gjaltema, D; Goede, J; Frijlink, H W

    2003-01-01

    Air classifier technology (ACT) is introduced as part of formulation integrated dry powder inhaler development (FIDPI) to optimise the de-agglomeration of inhalation powders. Carrier retention and de-agglomeration results obtained with a basic classifier concept are discussed. The theoretical

  3. Bacterial endotoxin adhesion to different types of orthodontic adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Coutinho ROMUALDO

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacterial endotoxin (LPS adhesion to orthodontic brackets is a known contributing factor to inflammation of the adjacent gingival tissues. Objective The aim of this study was to assess whether LPS adheres to orthodontic adhesive systems, comparing two commercial brands. Material and Methods Forty specimens were fabricated from Transbond XT and Light Bond composite and bonding agent components (n=10/component, then contaminated by immersion in a bacterial endotoxin solution. Contaminated and non-contaminated acrylic resin samples were used as positive and negative control groups, respectively. LPS quantification was performed by the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate QCL-1000™ test. Data obtained were scored and subjected to the Chi-square test using a significance level of 5%. Results There was endotoxin adhesion to all materials (p0.05. There was no significant difference (p>0.05 among commercial brands. Affinity of endotoxin was significantly greater for the bonding agents (p=0.0025. Conclusions LPS adhered to both orthodontic adhesive systems. Regardless of the brand, the endotoxin had higher affinity for the bonding agents than for the composites. There is no previous study assessing the affinity of LPS for orthodontic adhesive systems. This study revealed that LPS adheres to orthodontic adhesive systems. Therefore, additional care is recommended to orthodontic applications of these materials.

  4. Laser-based microbonding using hot melt adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemken, G.; Böhm, S.

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents an alternative adhesive bonding system which is able to join very small parts as well as relatively large parts with high accuracy requirements. The main advantages are the possibility to apply small volumes, to preapply the adhesive with a temporarily delayed joining procedure and extremely short set cycles. The center of micro joining develops suitable joining techniques on the basis of non-viscous adhesive systems (hot melts). The process development focuses on the suitability for automation, process times and the applicability of batch processes. The article discusses certain hot melt application techniques that are suitable for batch production e. g. the laser-sintering of hot melt powder, presents an adapted assembly system and shows an example of an automated assembly process for hot melt coated micro components. Therefore, using hot melts can be a technologically and economically interesting alternative for the assembly and packaging of MEMS.

  5. The association of metabolic syndrome markers with adhesive capsulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Daniel C; Gans, Itai; Park, Min Jung; Carey, James L; Kelly, John D

    2014-07-01

    Research has associated adhesive capsulitis with diabetes mellitus but suggests that glucose-mediated injury may begin before diabetes is diagnosed. The period preceding diabetes is often marked by metabolic syndrome. We investigated the relationship between metabolic syndrome components (insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and obesity) and the development of adhesive capsulitis using a case-control study. We retrospectively reviewed 150 consecutive adhesive capsulitis patient charts to determine the prevalence of obesity and of medications used for treating metabolic syndrome elements and compared these with previously reported nationwide values. The prevalence of anti-hyperglycemia medications in the adhesive capsulitis cohort was 18.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 12.9%-25.7%), twice the national rate of diagnosed diabetes of 7.6% (95% CI, 6.7%-8.5%). In the 20- to 39-year-old group, the prevalence of anti-hyperglycemic medications, 26.3% (95% CI, 11.8%-48.8%), was over 10 times the nationwide rate. The overall prevalence of hypertensive medication use in the adhesive capsulitis group, 33.1% (95% CI, 25.9%-41.2%), was notably higher than the nationwide rate, 21.6% (95% CI, 19.8%-23.4%). In the 40- to 64-year-old group, the prevalence of hypertensive medication use, 36.8% (95% CI, 28.6%-46.0%), was notably higher than the nationwide rate of 24.5% (95% CI, 22.2%-27.0%). The prevalence of anti-lipid medications and obesity was similar between the groups. The relationship between adhesive capsulitis and metabolic syndrome remains unclear. Our results confirm previous work associating hyperglycemia with adhesive capsulitis. We have also shown a possible association of hypertension, part of metabolic syndrome and a proinflammatory condition, with adhesive capsulitis, which has not been previously described. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Bacterial adhesion and growth on a polymer brush-coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejadnik, M Reza; van der Mei, Henny C; Norde, Willem; Busscher, Henk J

    2008-10-01

    Biomaterials-related infections pose serious problems in implant surgery, despite the development of non-adhesive coatings. Non-adhesive coatings, like polymer brush-coatings, have so far only been investigated with respect to preventing initial bacterial adhesion, but never with respect to effects on kinetics of bacterial growth. Here, we compare adhesion and 20 h growth of three bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) on pristine and brush-coated silicone rubber in a parallel plate flow chamber. Brush-coatings were made using a tri-block copolymer of polyethylene oxide (PEO) and polypropylene oxide (PPO). Brush-coatings prevented adhesion of staphylococci to below 5 x 10(5)cm(-2) after 30 min, which is a 10-fold reduction compared to pristine silicone rubber. Biofilms grew on both brush-coated and pristine silicone rubber, while the viability of biofilms on brush-coatings was higher than on pristine silicone rubber. However, biofilms on brush-coatings developed more slowly and detached almost fully by high fluid shear. Brush-coating remained non-adhesive after S. epidermidis biofilm formation and subsequent removal whereas a part of its functionality was lost after removal of S. aureus biofilms. Adhesion, growth and detachment of P. aeruginosa were not significantly different on brush-coatings as compared with pristine silicone rubber, although here too the viability of biofilms on brush-coatings was higher. We conclude that polymer brush-coatings strongly reduce initial adhesion of staphylococci and delay their biofilm growth. In addition, biofilms on brush-coatings are more viable and easily removed by the application of fluid shear.

  7. The morphology and adhesion mechanism of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Tramacere

    Full Text Available The octopus sucker represents a fascinating natural system performing adhesion on different terrains and substrates. Octopuses use suckers to anchor the body to the substrate or to grasp, investigate and manipulate objects, just to mention a few of their functions. Our study focuses on the morphology and adhesion mechanism of suckers in Octopus vulgaris. We use three different techniques (MRI, ultrasonography, and histology and a 3D reconstruction approach to contribute knowledge on both morphology and functionality of the sucker structure in O. vulgaris. The results of our investigation are two-fold. First, we observe some morphological differences with respect to the octopus species previously studied (i.e., Octopus joubini, Octopus maya, Octopus bimaculoides/bimaculatus and Eledone cirrosa. In particular, in O. vulgaris the acetabular chamber, that is a hollow spherical cavity in other octopuses, shows an ellipsoidal cavity which roof has an important protuberance with surface roughness. Second, based on our findings, we propose a hypothesis on the sucker adhesion mechanism in O. vulgaris. We hypothesize that the process of continuous adhesion is achieved by sealing the orifice between acetabulum and infundibulum portions via the acetabular protuberance. We suggest this to take place while the infundibular part achieves a completely flat shape; and, by sustaining adhesion through preservation of sucker configuration. In vivo ultrasonographic recordings support our proposed adhesion model by showing the sucker in action. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers innovative potential cues for developing bioinspired artificial adhesion systems. Furthermore, we think that it could possibly represent a useful approach in order to investigate any potential difference in the ecology and in the performance of adhesion by different species.

  8. The morphology and adhesion mechanism of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramacere, Francesca; Beccai, Lucia; Kuba, Michael; Gozzi, Alessandro; Bifone, Angelo; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The octopus sucker represents a fascinating natural system performing adhesion on different terrains and substrates. Octopuses use suckers to anchor the body to the substrate or to grasp, investigate and manipulate objects, just to mention a few of their functions. Our study focuses on the morphology and adhesion mechanism of suckers in Octopus vulgaris. We use three different techniques (MRI, ultrasonography, and histology) and a 3D reconstruction approach to contribute knowledge on both morphology and functionality of the sucker structure in O. vulgaris. The results of our investigation are two-fold. First, we observe some morphological differences with respect to the octopus species previously studied (i.e., Octopus joubini, Octopus maya, Octopus bimaculoides/bimaculatus and Eledone cirrosa). In particular, in O. vulgaris the acetabular chamber, that is a hollow spherical cavity in other octopuses, shows an ellipsoidal cavity which roof has an important protuberance with surface roughness. Second, based on our findings, we propose a hypothesis on the sucker adhesion mechanism in O. vulgaris. We hypothesize that the process of continuous adhesion is achieved by sealing the orifice between acetabulum and infundibulum portions via the acetabular protuberance. We suggest this to take place while the infundibular part achieves a completely flat shape; and, by sustaining adhesion through preservation of sucker configuration. In vivo ultrasonographic recordings support our proposed adhesion model by showing the sucker in action. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers innovative potential cues for developing bioinspired artificial adhesion systems. Furthermore, we think that it could possibly represent a useful approach in order to investigate any potential difference in the ecology and in the performance of adhesion by different species.

  9. Laser surface treatment for enhanced titanium to carbon fiber-reinforced polymer adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palavra, Armin; Coelho, Bruno N.; de Hosson, Jeff Th. M.; Lima, Milton S. F.; Carvalho, Sheila M.; Costa, Adilson R.

    The adhesion between carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) and titanium parts can be improved by laser surface texturing before gluing them together. Here, a pulsed Nd:YAG laser was employed before bonding of the textured surfaces using an epoxy paste adhesive. To investigate the influence of the

  10. Shear Adhesive Connections for Glass Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machalická, K.; Horčičková, I.; Eliášová, M.

    2015-11-01

    Unique aesthetical properties of glass - not only transparency but also smooth, glossy and primarily reflective surface - give this material special importance in the contemporary architecture. In every structural application of glass it is necessary to solve the problem associated with connections between glass pane and other part from a different material or between two glass elements. Moreover, there are many types of hybrid structures that combine glass and different materials to achieve safe failure behaviour and high degree of transparency at the same time. Connection of brittle glass and reinforcing material is an essential part of these structures, where composite action between two parts is beneficially ensured by a glued joint. The current paper deals with the experimental analysis focused on the determination of mechanical characteristics of adhesives applied in planar connections under shear loading.

  11. Adhesive capsulitis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, Anthony

    2011-02-15

    Adhesive capsulitis is a common, yet poorly understood, condition causing pain and loss of range of motion in the shoulder. It can occur in isolation or concomitantly with other shoulder conditions (e.g., rotator cuff tendinopathy, bursitis) or diabetes mellitus. It is often self-limited, but can persist for years and may never fully resolve. The diagnosis is usually clinical, although imaging can help rule out other conditions. The differential diagnosis includes acromioclavicular arthropathy, autoimmune disease (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis), biceps tendinopathy, glenohumeral osteoarthritis, neoplasm, rotator cuff tendinopathy or tear (with or without impingement), and subacromial and subdeltoid bursitis. Several treatment options are commonly used, but few have high-level evidence to support them. Because the condition is often self-limited, observation and reassurance may be considered; however, this may not be acceptable to many patients because of the painful and debilitating nature of the condition. Nonsurgical treatments include analgesics (e.g., acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), oral prednisone, and intra-articular corticosteroid injections. Home exercise regimens and physical therapy are often prescribed. Surgical treatments include manipulation of the joint under anesthesia and capsular release.

  12. Foreign material in postoperative adhesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Luijendijk; D.C.D. de Lange (Diederik); C.C. Wauters; W.C.J. Hop (Wim); J.J. Duron; J.L. Pailler; B.R. Camprodon; L. Holmdahl; H.J. van Geldorp; J. Jeekel (Hans)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: The authors determined the prevalence of foreign body granulomas in intra-abdominal adhesions in patients with a history of abdominal surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In a cross-sectional, multicenter, multinational study, adult patients with a

  13. Underwater adhesion: The barnacle way

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.

    silicone substrata. For both materials, significant variation among maternal families in the proportion of barnacles producing a thick adhesive plaque was observed, which suggests the presence of genetic variation, or maternal environmental effects...

  14. A SIMULINK environment for flight dynamics and control analysis: Application to the DHC-2 Beaver. Part 1: Implementation of a model library in SIMULINK. Part 2: Nonlinear analysis of the Beaver autopilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauw, Marc O.

    1993-01-01

    The design of advanced Automatic Aircraft Control Systems (AACS's) can be improved upon considerably if the designer can access all models and tools required for control system design and analysis through a graphical user interface, from within one software environment. This MSc-thesis presents the first step in the development of such an environment, which is currently being done at the Section for Stability and Control of Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering. The environment is implemented within the commercially available software package MATLAB/SIMULINK. The report consists of two parts. Part 1 gives a detailed description of the AACS design environment. The heart of this environment is formed by the SIMULINK implementation of a nonlinear aircraft model in block-diagram format. The model has been worked out for the old laboratory aircraft of the Faculty, the DeHavilland DHC-2 'Beaver', but due to its modular structure, it can easily be adapted for other aircraft. Part 1 also describes MATLAB programs which can be applied for finding steady-state trimmed-flight conditions and for linearization of the aircraft model, and it shows how the built-in simulation routines of SIMULINK have been used for open-loop analysis of the aircraft dynamics. Apart from the implementation of the models and tools, a thorough treatment of the theoretical backgrounds is presented. Part 2 of this report presents a part of an autopilot design process for the 'Beaver' aircraft, which clearly demonstrates the power and flexibility of the AACS design environment from part 1. Evaluations of all longitudinal and lateral control laws by means of nonlinear simulations are treated in detail. A floppy disk containing all relevant MATLAB programs and SIMULINK models is provided as a supplement.

  15. 21 CFR 878.4010 - Tissue adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tissue adhesive. 878.4010 Section 878.4010 Food... DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4010 Tissue adhesive. (a) Tissue adhesive for the topical approximation of skin—(1) Identification. A tissue adhesive for the topical...

  16. Adhesion properties of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR/Standard Malaysian Rubber (SMR L-based adhesives in the presence of phenol formaldehyde resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The adhesion properties, i. e. viscosity, tack and peel strength of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR/Standard Malaysian Rubber (SMR L-based pressure-sensitive adhesive was studied using phenol formaldehyde resin as the tackifying resin. Toluene was used as the solvent throughout the experiment. SBR composition in SBR/SMR L blend used was 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100%. Three different resin loadings, i. e. 40, 80 and 120 parts per hundred parts of rubber (phr were used in the adhesive formulation. The viscosity of adhesive was determined by a HAAKE Rotary Viscometer whereas loop tack and peel strength of paper/polyethylene terephthalate (PET film were measured using a Lloyd Adhesion Tester operating at 30 cm/min. Results indicate that the viscosity of adhesive decreases with increasing % SBR whereas loop tack passes through a maximum value at 20% SBR for all resin loadings. Except for the control sample (without resin, the peel strength shows a maximum value at 60% SBR for the three modes of peel tests. For a fixed % SBR, adhesive sample containing 40 phr phenol formaldehyde resin always exhibits the highest loop tack and peel strength, an observation which is associated to the optimum wettability of adhesive on the substrate.

  17. Studies of molecular dynamics with neutron scattering techniques. Part of a coordinated programme on neutron scattering techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinhas, L.A.

    1980-05-01

    Molecular dynamics was studied in samples of tert-butanol, cyclohexanol and methanol, using neutron inelastic and quasi-elastic techniques. The frequency spectra of cyclohexanol in crystalline phase were interpreted by assigning individual energy peaks to hindered rotation of molecules, lattice vibration, hydrogen bond stretching and ring bending modes. Neutron quasi-elastic scattering measurements permitted the testing of models for molecular diffusion as a function of temperature. The interpretation of neutron incoherent inelastic scattering on methanol indicated the different modes of molecular dynamics in this material; individual inelastic peaks in the spectra could be assigned to vibrations of crystalline lattice, stretching of hydrogen bond and vibrational and torsional modes of CH 3 OH molecule. The results of the experimental work on tertbutanol indicate two distinct modes of motion in this material: individual molecular librations are superposed to a cooperative rotation diffusion which occurs both in solid and in liquid state

  18. Fuel cell systems and traditional technologies. Part II: Experimental study on dynamic behavior of PEMFC in stationary power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturelli, Lucia; Santangelo, Paolo E.; Tartarini, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    The present work is focused on electric generation for stationary applications. The dynamic behavior of a PEMFC-based system has been investigated at both constant and variable load conditions from an experimental point of view. An analysis of efficiency as a function of time has been proposed to summarize the dynamic performance; moreover, current intensity and voltage have been considered as main parameters of interest from the electric point of view. In addition, other energetic and thermodynamic parameters have been studied in this work. The experimental campaign has been carried out over four test typologies: constant load; increasing and decreasing load; random load. These tests have been planned to challenge the system with a variety of load-based cycles, in the frame of a thorough simulation of real-load conditions.

  19. High-density polyethylene/cycloolefin copolymer blends. Part 1: Phase structure, dynamic mechanical, tensile and impact properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolařík, Jan; Kruliš, Zdeněk; Šlouf, Miroslav; Fambri, L.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 6 (2005), s. 817-826 ISSN 0032-3888 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/04/1051; GA ČR GP106/02/P029 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : copolymer blends * phase structure * dynamic mechanical Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.076, year: 2005

  20. The Shock and Vibration Bulletin. Part 4. Dynamic Properties of Materials, Applications of Materials, Shock and Blast, Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    ELEMENTS WITH MATERIAL DAMPING M. M. Wallace and C. W. Bert. The University of Oklahoma, Noman, OK CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OP MAGLEV ...Fourier transform in the desired frequency regions of interest or other spectra shapes as desired. These force pulse trains generate high output...band vibration testing. There are a number of papers concerning the techniques used to optimize a pulse train to provide a particular spectral

  1. The Shock and Vibration Bulletin. Part 2. Measurement Techniques and Data Analysis, Dynamic Measurements, Vibration and Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    DAMPING M. M. Wallace and C. W. Bert, The University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF MAGLEV VEHICLES ON ELEVATED GUIDEWAYS...state transmitted and/oT reflected sound pressure for a coated, submerged flat plate, subject to a train of normally incident harmonic waves...simply make the length of the train of waves as long as you please. It is in 3i07 Main, I, G , Vibrations and Waves in the low frequency problems

  2. Three-pattern decomposition of global atmospheric circulation: part II—dynamical equations of horizontal, meridional and zonal circulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shujuan; Cheng, Jianbo; Xu, Ming; Chou, Jifan

    2018-04-01

    The three-pattern decomposition of global atmospheric circulation (TPDGAC) partitions three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric circulation into horizontal, meridional and zonal components to study the 3D structures of global atmospheric circulation. This paper incorporates the three-pattern decomposition model (TPDM) into primitive equations of atmospheric dynamics and establishes a new set of dynamical equations of the horizontal, meridional and zonal circulations in which the operator properties are studied and energy conservation laws are preserved, as in the primitive equations. The physical significance of the newly established equations is demonstrated. Our findings reveal that the new equations are essentially the 3D vorticity equations of atmosphere and that the time evolution rules of the horizontal, meridional and zonal circulations can be described from the perspective of 3D vorticity evolution. The new set of dynamical equations includes decomposed expressions that can be used to explore the source terms of large-scale atmospheric circulation variations. A simplified model is presented to demonstrate the potential applications of the new equations for studying the dynamics of the Rossby, Hadley and Walker circulations. The model shows that the horizontal air temperature anomaly gradient (ATAG) induces changes in meridional and zonal circulations and promotes the baroclinic evolution of the horizontal circulation. The simplified model also indicates that the absolute vorticity of the horizontal circulation is not conserved, and its changes can be described by changes in the vertical vorticities of the meridional and zonal circulations. Moreover, the thermodynamic equation shows that the induced meridional and zonal circulations and advection transport by the horizontal circulation in turn cause a redistribution of the air temperature. The simplified model reveals the fundamental rules between the evolution of the air temperature and the horizontal, meridional

  3. Composition and Humidity Response of the Black Widow Spider's Gumfoot Silk and its Implications on Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Dharamdeep; Zhang, Ci; Cool, Lydia Rose; Blackledge, Todd. A.; Wesdemiotis, Chrys; Miyoshi, Toshikazu; Dhinojwala, Ali

    Humidity plays an important part in the performance of biomaterials such as pollen, gecko toe, wheat awns, bird feathers and dragline silk. Capture silk produced by web building spiders form an interesting class of humidity responsive biological glues. The adhesive properties of the widely studied `viscid silk' produced by orbweb-weaving spiders is highly humidity sensitive. On the other hand, relatively less is known about the dependence of composition and humidity response towards adhesion for `gumfoot' silk produced by cobweb-weaving spiders. In the present study, we investigate the gumfoot silk produced by Black Widow using adhesion mechanics, microscopy and spectroscopic methods. The results show the presence of hygroscopic salts, glycoproteins and previously known spider coating peptides in silk and their importance in the humidity response and adhesion. The current study elucidates the role of constituents of capture silk in its adhesion mechanism and offers insights to novel ways for fabricating bio-inspired adhesives.

  4. Cell Adhesion Molecules of the Immunoglobulin Superfamily in the Nervous System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmod, Peter Schledermann; Pedersen, Martin Volmer; Berezin, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    CAMs belonging to IgSF, that exclusively or in part, are expressed in the nervous system. The chapter includes descriptions of myelin protein zero (P0), integrin-associated protein (CD47), neuroplastin, activated leukocyte-cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM), melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM......Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are proteins mediating cell-cell or cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. CAMs are traditionally divided into four groups, the cadherins, the selectins, the integrins and CAMs belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF). The present chapter describes......), myelinassociated glycoprotein (MAG), the neural cell adhesion molecules 1 and 2 (NCAM, NCAM2), Down Syndrome cell adhesion molecule (DSCAM) and Down Syndrome cell adhesion molecule-like-1 (DSCAML1), sidekick 1 and 2 (SDK1, SDK2), signal-regulatory proteins (SIRPs), nectins, nectin-like proteins (necls...

  5. Large deformation contact mechanics of a pressurized long rectangular membrane. II. Adhesive contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Abhishek; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2013-01-01

    In part I of this work, we presented a theory for adhesionless contact of a pressurized neo-Hookean plane-strain membrane to a rigid substrate. Here, we extend our theory to include adhesion using a fracture mechanics approach. This theory is used to study contact hysteresis commonly observed in experiments. Detailed analysis is carried out to highlight the differences between frictionless and no-slip contact. Membrane detachment is found to be strongly dependent on adhesion: for low adhesion, the membrane ‘pinches-off’, whereas for large adhesions, it detaches unstably at finite contact (‘pull-off’). Expressions are derived for the critical adhesion needed for pinch-off to pull-off transition. Above a threshold adhesion, the membrane exhibits bistability, two stable states at zero applied pressure. The condition for bistability for both frictionless and no-slip boundary conditions is obtained explicitly. PMID:24353472

  6. Experimental Determination of the Dynamic Hydraulic Transfer Function for the J-2X Oxidizer Turbopump. Part One; Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Tom; Patel, Sandeep; Lee, Erik; Karon, Dave

    2011-01-01

    An advanced methodology for extracting the hydraulic dynamic pump transfer matrix (Yp) for a cavitating liquid rocket engine turbopump inducer+impeller has been developed. The transfer function is required for integrated vehicle pogo stability analysis as well as optimization of local inducer pumping stability. Laboratory pulsed subscale waterflow test of the J-2X oxygen turbo pump is introduced and our new extraction method applied to the data collected. From accurate measures of pump inlet and discharge perturbational mass flows and pressures, and one-dimensional flow models that represents complete waterflow loop physics, we are able to derive Yp and hence extract the characteristic pump parameters: compliance, pump gain, impedance, mass flow gain. Detailed modeling is necessary to accurately translate instrument plane measurements to the pump inlet and discharge and extract Yp. We present the MSFC Dynamic Lump Parameter Fluid Model Framework and describe critical dynamic component details. We report on fit minimization techniques, cost (fitness) function derivation, and resulting model fits to our experimental data are presented. Comparisons are made to alternate techniques for spatially translating measurement stations to actual pump inlet and discharge.

  7. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  8. Adhesive restorations: comparative evaluation between the adhesion of the glass-ceramics to the composite cement and the adhesion of the ceromer to the composite cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceruti, P; Erovigni, F; Casella, F; Lombardo, S

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this work is to compare the adhesion of the glass-ceramic (empress II) to the composite cement and the adhesion of the ceromer to the composite cement. From each of the above materials, 10 little blocks, of 8 x 6 x 2 mm size, have been prepared. All the surface treatments suggested by the manufacturing industry have been performed: sandblasting and acid-etching of the ceramic, ceromer surface roughening with diamond bur and silanization and bonding application on both materials. A homogeneous layer of cement has been placed between couples of blocks of the same material and photopolymerised. Every sample, consisting of 2 bonded blocks, has been submitted to a traction force on a universal test machine connected with a computerized measure system (SINTEC D/10). Samples have been anchored to the machine binding devices by a bicomponent epoxy glue. Data on the breaking charge have been recorded and an analysis of the broken surfaces has been performed in order to classify the breaking modalities. The results ontained showed that the composite-glass-ceramic adhesion force (mean value 64 Mpa) was remarkably higher than the composite-ceromer adhesion (mean value 37.21 Mpa). The analysis of the broken surfaces by SEM showed that a mixed fracture occurred in all samples (both partly adhesive and cohesive).

  9. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the

  10. Motion of Elastic Microcapsules on Compliant Surfaces with Adhesive Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresov, Egor; Kolmakov, German; Balazs, Anna

    2011-03-01

    By integrating mesoscale models for hydrodynamics, micromechanics and adhesion, we examine the fluid driven motion of elastic microcapsules on compliant surfaces. The capsules, modeled as three-dimensional fluid-filled elastic shells, represent polymeric microcapsules or biological cells. Our combined integrated Lattice Boltzmann model/Lattice spring model (LBM/LSM) approach allows for a dynamic interaction between the elastic capsule's wall and surrounding fluid. To capture the interaction between the shell and the surface, we adopt the Bell model, used previously to describe the interaction of biological cell like leukocytes rolling on surfaces under the influence of an imposed shear. The surface of the microcapsule contains receptors with an affinity to adhesive ligands of the substrate. We examine how the parameters of adhesion and rigidity of the capsules and the substrate affect movement of the capsules. The findings provide guidelines for creating smart surfaces that could regulate the microcapsules' motion.

  11. Analytical Modelling and Optimization of the Temperature-Dependent Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Fused Deposition Fabricated Parts Made of PC-ABS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Omar Ahmed; Masood, Syed Hasan; Bhowmik, Jahar Lal

    2016-11-04

    Fused deposition modeling (FDM) additive manufacturing has been intensively used for many industrial applications due to its attractive advantages over traditional manufacturing processes. The process parameters used in FDM have significant influence on the part quality and its properties. This process produces the plastic part through complex mechanisms and it involves complex relationships between the manufacturing conditions and the quality of the processed part. In the present study, the influence of multi-level manufacturing parameters on the temperature-dependent dynamic mechanical properties of FDM processed parts was investigated using IV-optimality response surface methodology (RSM) and multilayer feed-forward neural networks (MFNNs). The process parameters considered for optimization and investigation are slice thickness, raster to raster air gap, deposition angle, part print direction, bead width, and number of perimeters. Storage compliance and loss compliance were considered as response variables. The effect of each process parameter was investigated using developed regression models and multiple regression analysis. The surface characteristics are studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Furthermore, performance of optimum conditions was determined and validated by conducting confirmation experiment. The comparison between the experimental values and the predicted values by IV-Optimal RSM and MFNN was conducted for each experimental run and results indicate that the MFNN provides better predictions than IV-Optimal RSM.

  12. Analytical Modelling and Optimization of the Temperature-Dependent Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Fused Deposition Fabricated Parts Made of PC-ABS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Ahmed Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fused deposition modeling (FDM additive manufacturing has been intensively used for many industrial applications due to its attractive advantages over traditional manufacturing processes. The process parameters used in FDM have significant influence on the part quality and its properties. This process produces the plastic part through complex mechanisms and it involves complex relationships between the manufacturing conditions and the quality of the processed part. In the present study, the influence of multi-level manufacturing parameters on the temperature-dependent dynamic mechanical properties of FDM processed parts was investigated using IV-optimality response surface methodology (RSM and multilayer feed-forward neural networks (MFNNs. The process parameters considered for optimization and investigation are slice thickness, raster to raster air gap, deposition angle, part print direction, bead width, and number of perimeters. Storage compliance and loss compliance were considered as response variables. The effect of each process parameter was investigated using developed regression models and multiple regression analysis. The surface characteristics are studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM. Furthermore, performance of optimum conditions was determined and validated by conducting confirmation experiment. The comparison between the experimental values and the predicted values by IV-Optimal RSM and MFNN was conducted for each experimental run and results indicate that the MFNN provides better predictions than IV-Optimal RSM.

  13. A new technique for dynamic load distribution when two manipulators mutually lift a rigid object. Part 2, Derivation of entire system model and control architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unseren, M.A.

    1994-04-01

    A rigid body model for the entire system which accounts for the load distribution scheme proposed in Part 1 as well as for the dynamics of the manipulators and the kinematic constraints is derived in the joint space. A technique is presented for expressing the object dynamics in terms of the joint variables of both manipulators which leads to a positive definite and symmetric inertia matrix. The model is then transformed to obtain reduced order equations of motion and a separate set of equations which govern the behavior of the internal contact forces. The control architecture is applied to the model which results in the explicit decoupling of the position and internal contact force-controlled degrees of freedom (DOF).

  14. Optimizing Adhesive Design by Understanding Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Daniel R; Crosby, Alfred J

    2015-12-23

    Adhesives have long been designed around a trade-off between adhesive strength and releasability. Geckos are of interest because they are the largest organisms which are able to climb utilizing adhesive toepads, yet can controllably release from surfaces and perform this action over and over again. Attempting to replicate the hierarchical, nanoscopic features which cover their toepads has been the primary focus of the adhesives field until recently. A new approach based on a scaling relation which states that reversible adhesive force capacity scales with (A/C)(1/2), where A is the area of contact and C is the compliance of the adhesive, has enabled the creation of high strength, reversible adhesives without requiring high aspect ratio, fibrillar features. Here we introduce an equation to calculate the compliance of adhesives, and utilize this equation to predict the shear adhesive force capacity of the adhesive based on the material components and geometric properties. Using this equation, we have investigated important geometric parameters which control force capacity and have shown that by controlling adhesive shape, adhesive force capacity can be increased by over 50% without varying pad size. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that compliance of the adhesive far from the interface still influences shear adhesive force capacity. Utilizing this equation will allow for the production of adhesives which are optimized for specific applications in commercial and industrial settings.

  15. Structural and dynamic characterization of the upper part of the HIV-1 cTAR DNA hairpin

    OpenAIRE

    Zargarian, Loussin?; Kanevsky, Igor; Bazzi, Ali; Boynard, Jonathan; Chaminade, Fran?oise; Foss?, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    First strand transfer is essential for HIV-1 reverse transcription. During this step, the TAR RNA hairpin anneals to the cTAR DNA hairpin; this annealing reaction is promoted by the nucleocapsid protein and involves an initial loop?loop interaction between the apical loops of TAR and cTAR. Using NMR and probing methods, we investigated the structural and dynamic properties of the top half of the cTAR DNA (mini-cTAR). We show that the upper stem located between the apical and the internal loop...

  16. On protection of Freedom's solar dynamic radiator from the orbital debris environment. Part 1: Preliminary analyses and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer L.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Fleming, Michael L.

    1990-01-01

    A great deal of experimentation and analysis was performed to quantify penetration thresholds of components which will experience orbital debris impacts. Penetration was found to depend upon mission specific parameters such as orbital altitude, inclination, and orientation of the component; and upon component specific parameters such as material, density and the geometry particular to its shielding. Experimental results are highly dependent upon shield configuration and cannot be extrapolated with confidence to alternate shield configurations. Also, current experimental capabilities are limited to velocities which only approach the lower limit of predicted orbital debris velocities. Therefore, prediction of the penetrating particle size for a particular component having a complex geometry remains highly uncertain. An approach is described which was developed to assess on-orbit survivability of the solar dynamic radiator due to micrometeoroid and space debris impacts. Preliminary analyses are presented to quantify the solar dynamic radiator survivability, and include the type of particle and particle population expected to defeat the radiator bumpering (i.e., penetrate a fluid flow tube). Results of preliminary hypervelocity impact testing performed on radiator panel samples (in the 6 to 7 km/sec velocity range) are also presented. Plans for further analyses and testing are discussed. These efforts are expected to lead to a radiator design which will perform to requirements over the expected lifetime.

  17. Dynamics of stress as a predictor of health consequences in Polish drilling platform workers. Longitudinal study: part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczyńska, Irena; Jeżewska, Maria; Grubman-Nowak, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The subject of presented article is the evaluation of the relationship between the way of adaptation to work-related stress and chosen health indicators among drilling platform workers in Poland. The study procedure is a longitudinal research, including data analysis from 1993 to 2013. 167 Polish platform male workers with an average age of 42 years have been examined. The studies include, according to the triangulation method, data from 3 sources: data concerning the so-called 'objective' and 'subjective' stress, personality and temperamental examinations and data concerning health state. Stress affects health negatively, the higher subjective and objective stress, the worse health indicators: higher body mass index, more declared health ailments and worse evaluation of personal health (r = -0.23). Stress also affects health via 2 indirect tracts: through the kind of stress adaptation (stress dynamics) (r = -0.43) and through coping - depositional stress coping style (r = 0.41). Stress adaptation (stress dynamics) and coping style included in the study in longer perspective show that those drilling platform workers, who declare the decrease of stress over the years, present worse health indicators than those, who declare variability in the ways of adaptation to stress.

  18. QuSpin: a Python package for dynamics and exact diagonalisation of quantum many body systems part I: spin chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Weinberg, Marin Bukov

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a new open-source Python package for exact diagonalization and quantum dynamics of spin(-photon chains, called QuSpin, supporting the use of various symmetries in 1-dimension and (imaginary time evolution for chains up to 32 sites in length. The package is well-suited to study, among others, quantum quenches at finite and infinite times, the Eigenstate Thermalisation hypothesis, many-body localisation and other dynamical phase transitions, periodically-driven (Floquet systems, adiabatic and counter-diabatic ramps, and spin-photon interactions. Moreover, QuSpin's user-friendly interface can easily be used in combination with other Python packages which makes it amenable to a high-level customisation. We explain how to use QuSpin using four detailed examples: (i Standard exact diagonalisation of XXZ chain (ii adiabatic ramping of parameters in the many-body localised XXZ model, (iii heating in the periodically-driven transverse-field Ising model in a parallel field, and (iv quantised light-atom interactions: recovering the periodically-driven atom in the semi-classical limit of a static Hamiltonian.

  19. Dynamic impact characteristics of KN-18 SNF transport cask - Part 1: An advanced numerical simulation and validation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kap-Sun; Kim, Jong-Soo; Choi, Kyu-Sup; Shin, Tae-Myung; Yun, Hyun-Do

    2010-01-01

    Domestic and international regulations for the transportation of radioactive materials strictly prescribe the design requirements for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) transport casks. According to the applicable codes, a transport cask must withstand a free-drop impact of 9 m onto an unyielding surface and a free-drop impact of 1 m onto a mild steel bar. However, the structural performance of a transport cask is not easy to evaluate precisely because the dynamic impact characteristics of the cask, which includes impact limiters to absorb the impact energy, are so complex. In this study, a more advanced and applicable numerical simulation method using the finite element (FE) method via the commercial FE code LS-DYNA is proposed and verified against the experimental results for a 1/3-scale model of the KN-18 SNF transport cask, recently developed in Korea. In addition, the detailed dynamic impact characteristics of the transport cask under free-drop conditions are investigated via the proposed numerical simulation method and actual drop tests to improve the accuracy and optimization of the SNF transport cask design.

  20. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Williams, Scott; McCoy, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA gripper pad surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and

  1. On-ground testing of the role of adhesion in the LISA-Pathfinder test mass injection phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoluzzi, D.; Zanoni, C.; Conklin, J. W.

    2017-05-01

    Many space missions share the need to fly a free-falling body inside the spacecraft, as a reference for navigation and/or as a probe for the local gravitational field. When a mechanism is required to cage such an object during the launch phase, the need arises to release it to free-fall once the operational phase must be initiated in orbit. The criticality of this phase increases when the mechanical interfaces between the body and the mechanism are affected by adhesion and the actuation authority of the control system on the free-falling body is limited. Both conditions are realized in the LISA Pathfinder mission, which aims at injecting a gold-coated 2 kg cubic test mass into a nearly perfect geodesic trajectory to demonstrate the readiness of the developed technology for in-space gravity wave detection. The criticality of adhesion is widely recognized in space technology, because it can affect and jeopardize the functionality of mechanisms, when arising between moving parts. In the LISA Pathfinder case, metallic adhesion potentially plays a relevant role, mainly for two reasons. First, thanks to its properties (ductility, high surface energy) the gold coating on the proof mass easily produces cold weldings, especially in vacuum conditions. Second, the detachment of the proof mass from the releasing device occurs abruptly and a relevant influence of the separation velocity is expected on the strength of the welding. This can produce an excessive velocity of the proof mass at the retraction of the releasing device for the following capture and centring phase on behalf of the control system. A testing activity is performed to characterize the dynamic behaviour of the adhesive bonds between the proof mass and the releasing device, which can be used to predict their contribution on the residual velocity of the proof mass after in-flight release. The study of such a dynamic phenomenon sets some challenging requirements on the measurement technique, both on the

  2. Aphids (Homoptera, Aphidodea inhabiting the trees Crataegus x media Bechst. in the urban green area. Part I. The population dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożena Jaśkiwicz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The studies were conducted in the years 1999-2001 in the green areas of Lublin, on the trees of Crataegus x media Bechst. The purpose of the studies was to establish the species composition and the population dynamics of aphids inhabiting hawthorn in the street and park sites. The studies found out the presence of four aphid species on the examined trees, namely Aphis pomi De Geer, aphids from the genus Dysaphis Börn., Ovatus crataegarius (Walk. and Rhopalosiphum insertum (Walk.. More aphid species and bigger populations were found in the street site (A as compa red with the park site (B.The weather conditions (air temperatures of over 30°C and stormy rainfalls limited the population of all aphid species. On the other hand, a mild winter and a warm spring with the rainfalls within the norm caused that the number of aphids decreased considerably.

  3. A new technique for dynamic load distribution when two manipulators mutually lift a rigid object. Part 1, The proposed technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unseren, M.A.

    1994-04-01

    A general framework for solving the dynamic load distribution when two manipulators hold a rigid object is proposed. The underspecified problem of solving for the contact forces and torques based on the object`s equations of motion is transformed into a well specified problem. This is accomplished by augmenting the object`s equations of motion with additional equations which relate a new vector variable quantifying the internal contact force and torque degrees of freedom (DOF) as a linear function of the contact forces and torques. The resulting augmented system yields a well specified solution for the contact forces and torques in which they are separated into their motion inducing and internal components. A particular solution is suggested which enables the designer to conveniently specify what portion of the payload`s mass each manipulator is to bear. It is also shown that the results of the previous work are just a special case of the general load distribution framework described here.

  4. Polyurethane adhesives in flat roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogárová Markéta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to stabilize individual layers of flat roofs, mainly because of wind suction. Apart from anchoring and surcharge, these layers can be secured by bonding. At present gluing is an indispensable and widely used stabilization method. On our market we can found many types of adhesives, most widely used are based on polyurethane. This paper focuses on problematic about stabilization thermal insulation from expanded polystyrene to vapor barrier from bitumen. One of the main issues is to calculate the exact amount of adhesive, which is required to guarantee the resistance against wind suction. In this problematic we can not find help neither in technical data sheets provided by the manufactures. Some of these data sheets contain at least information about amount of adhesive depending on location in roof plane and building height, but they do not specify the strength of such connection. It was therefore resorted to select several representatives polyurethane adhesives and their subsequent testing on specimens simulating the flat roof segment. The paper described the test methodology and results for two types of polyurethane adhesives.

  5. Effects of alcohol on pericardial adhesion formation in hypercholesterolemic swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassaletta, Antonio D; Chu, Louis M; Sellke, Frank W

    2012-04-01

    Reoperative cardiac surgery is complicated in part because of extensive adhesions encountered during the second operation. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of alcohol with and without resveratrol (red wine vs vodka) on postoperative pericardial adhesion formation in a porcine model of hypercholesterolemia and chronic myocardial ischemia. Male Yorkshire swine were fed a high-cholesterol diet to simulate conditions of coronary artery disease followed by surgical placement of an ameroid constrictor to induce chronic ischemia. Postoperatively, control pigs continued their high-cholesterol diet alone, whereas the 2 experimental groups had diets supplemented with red wine or vodka. Seven weeks after ameroid placement, all animals underwent reoperative sternotomy. Compared with controls, pericardial adhesion grade was markedly reduced in the vodka group, whereas there was no difference in the wine group. Intramyocardial fibrosis was significantly reduced in the vodka group compared with controls. There was no difference in expression of proteins involved in focal adhesion formation between any groups (focal adhesion kinase, integrin alpha-5, integrin beta-1, paxillin, vinculin, protein tyrosine kinase 2, protein kinase C ε, and phosphorylated protein kinase C ε). The wine group exhibited elevated C-reactive protein levels versus the control and vodka groups. Postoperative vodka consumption markedly reduced the formation of pericardial adhesions and intramyocardial fibrosis, whereas red wine had no effect. Analysis of protein expression did not reveal any obvious explanation for this phenomenon, suggesting a post-translational effect of alcohol on fibrous tissue deposition. The difference in adhesion formation in the vodka versus wine groups may be due to increased inflammation in the wine group. Copyright © 2012 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Focal adhesion kinase-dependent focal adhesion recruitment of SH2 domains directs SRC into focal adhesions to regulate cell adhesion and migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jui-Chung; Chen, Yu-Chen; Kuo, Chih-Ting; Wenshin Yu, Helen; Chen, Yin-Quan; Chiou, Arthur; Kuo, Jean-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Directed cell migration requires dynamical control of the protein complex within focal adhesions (FAs) and this control is regulated by signaling events involving tyrosine phosphorylation. We screened the SH2 domains present in tyrosine-specific kinases and phosphatases found within FAs, including SRC, SHP1 and SHP2, and examined whether these enzymes transiently target FAs via their SH2 domains. We found that the SRC_SH2 domain and the SHP2_N-SH2 domain are associated with FAs, but only the SRC_SH2 domain is able to be regulated by focal adhesion kinase (FAK). The FAK-dependent association of the SRC_SH2 domain is necessary and sufficient for SRC FA targeting. When the targeting of SRC into FAs is inhibited, there is significant suppression of SRC-mediated phosphorylation of paxillin and FAK; this results in an inhibition of FA formation and maturation and a reduction in cell migration. This study reveals an association between FAs and the SRC_SH2 domain as well as between FAs and the SHP2_N-SH2 domains. This supports the hypothesis that the FAK-regulated SRC_SH2 domain plays an important role in directing SRC into FAs and that this SRC-mediated FA signaling drives cell migration. PMID:26681405

  7. The dynamic balance of the children with cerebral palsy and typical developing during gait Part II: Instantaneous velocity and acceleration of COM and COP and their relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsue, Bih-Jen; Miller, Freeman; Su, Fong-Chin

    2009-04-01

    As a companion research subsequent to analyzing displacement of center of mass (COM) and center of pressure (COP) in Part I, the purposes of this study were to quantify dynamic stability using magnitudes and patterns of instantaneous velocity and acceleration of COM and COP of the children with cerebral palsy (CP) during walking, and compare the data with those of the typically developing (TD) children. The instantaneous velocity and acceleration of COM and COP were acquired by calculating the first and second derivatives of displacement data presented in Part I. Velocity and acceleration of COM and COP were normalized by each participant's leg length to eliminate the influence of individual's stature. The results indicate that the preferred walking speed is significantly higher in TD groups than hemiplegic group (Hemi) and diplegic group (Di). The peak values of instantaneous velocity and acceleration of COM in vertical, medio-lateral (ML) and antero-posterior (AP) directions and velocity and acceleration of COP in ML direction were significantly higher in Di group than TD group. Both CP groups showed great variability in COM and COP parameters. Therefore, although Di group demonstrated higher peak values than Hemi group, the only significant difference between two groups was instantaneous COP velocity in ML direction. The findings of this study suggest that this assessment may be of value for research or clinical evaluation of dynamic balance dysfunction during walking and provide comparisons and insights for specific treatments or surgical interventions for the children with CP.

  8. Shear and Thermal Testing of Adhesives for VELO Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    De Capua, Stefano; Klaver, Suzanne; Parkes, Chris; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Stelmasiak, Guy James

    2016-01-01

    As part of the R&D process of the LHCb VELO Upgrade, a study has been performed on the thermal and mechanical performance of the adhesives Stycast 2850FT, 3M 9461P, and Araldite 2011. One or more of these adhesives could be used to attach the ASICs and hybrids to the microchannel cooling substrate. Samples were irradiated at up to the maximum dose expected at the upgrade. Shear tests of the samples were made and a suitable performance obtained from all glues. Some failures were encountered with Stycast 2850FT glued samples and this is attributed to the sample preparation. The relative thermal conductivities of the adhesives were also determined by measuring the relative temperature difference across a glued joint while one side is heated.

  9. Using cell-substrate impedance and live cell imaging to measure real-time changes in cellular adhesion and de-adhesion induced by matrix modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Martin D; Thomas, Shane R

    2015-02-19

    Cell-matrix adhesion plays a key role in controlling cell morphology and signaling. Stimuli that disrupt cell-matrix adhesion (e.g., myeloperoxidase and other matrix-modifying oxidants/enzymes released during inflammation) are implicated in triggering pathological changes in cellular function, phenotype and viability in a number of diseases. Here, we describe how cell-substrate impedance and live cell imaging approaches can be readily employed to accurately quantify real-time changes in cell adhesion and de-adhesion induced by matrix modification (using endothelial cells and myeloperoxidase as a pathophysiological matrix-modifying stimulus) with high temporal resolution and in a non-invasive manner. The xCELLigence cell-substrate impedance system continuously quantifies the area of cell-matrix adhesion by measuring the electrical impedance at the cell-substrate interface in cells grown on gold microelectrode arrays. Image analysis of time-lapse differential interference contrast movies quantifies changes in the projected area of individual cells over time, representing changes in the area of cell-matrix contact. Both techniques accurately quantify rapid changes to cellular adhesion and de-adhesion processes. Cell-substrate impedance on microelectrode biosensor arrays provides a platform for robust, high-throughput measurements. Live cell imaging analyses provide additional detail regarding the nature and dynamics of the morphological changes quantified by cell-substrate impedance measurements. These complementary approaches provide valuable new insights into how myeloperoxidase-catalyzed oxidative modification of subcellular extracellular matrix components triggers rapid changes in cell adhesion, morphology and signaling in endothelial cells. These approaches are also applicable for studying cellular adhesion dynamics in response to other matrix-modifying stimuli and in related adherent cells (e.g., epithelial cells).

  10. Lignin-Furfural Based Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajakta Dongre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lignin recovered from the hot-water extract of sugar maple (Acer saccharum is used in this study to synthesize adhesive blends to replace phenol-formaldehyde (PF resin. Untreated lignin is characterized by lignin content and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis. The molecular weight distribution of the lignin and the blends are characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC. The effect of pH (0.3, 0.65 and 1, ex situ furfural, and curing conditions on the tensile properties of adhesive reinforced glass fibers is determined and compared to the reinforcement level of commercially available PF resin. The adhesive blend prepared at pH = 0.65 with no added furfural exhibits the highest tensile properties and meets 90% of the PF tensile strength.

  11. Lap shear strength and healing capability of self-healing adhesive containing epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazali, Habibah; Ye, Lin; Zhang, Ming-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a self-healing polymeric adhesive formulation with epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules. Epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules were dispersed into a commercialize two-part epoxy adhesive for developing self-healing epoxy adhesive. The influence of different content of microcapsules on the shear strength and healing capability of epoxy adhesive were investigated using single-lap-joints with average thickness of adhesive layer of about 180 µm. This self-healing adhesive was used in bonding of 5000 series aluminum alloys adherents after mechanical and alkaline cleaning surface treatment. The adhesion strength was measured and presented as function of microcapsules loading. The results indicated that the virgin lap shear strength was increased by about 26% with addition of 3 wt% of self-healing microcapsules. 12% to 28% recovery of the shear strength is achieved after self-healing depending on the microcapsules content. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study fracture surface of the joints. The self-healing adhesives exhibit recovery of both cohesion and adhesion properties with room temperature healing.

  12. Lap shear strength and healing capability of self-healing adhesive containing epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghazali, Habibah; Ye, Lin [Centre for Advanced Materials Technology (CAMT), School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Zhang, Ming-Qiu [Key Laboratory of Polymeric Composite and Functional Materials of Ministry of Education, Zhongshan University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2016-03-09

    The aim of this work is to develop a self-healing polymeric adhesive formulation with epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules. Epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules were dispersed into a commercialize two-part epoxy adhesive for developing self-healing epoxy adhesive. The influence of different content of microcapsules on the shear strength and healing capability of epoxy adhesive were investigated using single-lap-joints with average thickness of adhesive layer of about 180 µm. This self-healing adhesive was used in bonding of 5000 series aluminum alloys adherents after mechanical and alkaline cleaning surface treatment. The adhesion strength was measured and presented as function of microcapsules loading. The results indicated that the virgin lap shear strength was increased by about 26% with addition of 3 wt% of self-healing microcapsules. 12% to 28% recovery of the shear strength is achieved after self-healing depending on the microcapsules content. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study fracture surface of the joints. The self-healing adhesives exhibit recovery of both cohesion and adhesion properties with room temperature healing.

  13. Is DRM lipid composition relevant in cell-extracellular matrix adhesion structures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, María Gabriela; Sterin-Speziale, Norma Beatriz

    2008-01-01

    Focal adhesions mediate cell-extracellular matrix adhesion. They are inserted in detergent-resistant membrane microdomains enriched in phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate. In spite of the relevance that membrane lipids appear to have on cell adhesion structures, to our knowledge, there are no previous reports on the membrane lipid composition where focal adhesions are located in vivo or on how changes in local membrane composition contribute to focal adhesion maintenance. This may be due to the fact that the explosion of information in the fields of genomics and proteomics has not been matched by a corresponding advancement of knowledge in the field of lipids. The physiological importance of lipids is illustrated by the numerous diseases to which lipid abnormalities contribute. To gain insight into the role of membrane lipid composition in the preservation of epithelial cell adhesion to the substratum, how specific changes in the membrane lipid composition in vivo affect the maintenance of focal adhesions in renal papillae collecting duct cells has been previously studied. It is currently considered that phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate plays a crucial role in the maintenance of assembled focal adhesion. However, such pool of polyphosphoinositides has to be part of a domain of a specific lipid composition to serve as a membrane lipid stabilizing the focal adhesion plaque.

  14. Modified silyl-terminated polyether polymer blends with bisphenol A diglycidyl ether epoxy for adhesive applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitenieks, J; Meri, R Merijs; Zicans, J; Berzins, R; Umbraško, J; Rekners, U

    2016-01-01

    Modified silyl-terminated polyether polymer (MS Polymer) was blended with bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (DGEBPA) epoxy at MS Polymer/epoxy ratio from 30/70 to 70/30. MS Polymer/epoxy systems were examined for two-component adhesive formulation with additional fillers. Applicability of the MS Polymer/epoxy system at the ratio of the components 60/40 is demonstrated for the development of adhesive formulation. Rheological analysis of the components A and B shows suitable viscosity values for development of two- component adhesives formulation. Curing dynamics as well as tensile stress-strain properties and Shore A hardness of the chosen adhesive formulation are reasonable for the development of MS Polymer/epoxy type adhesive. (paper)

  15. Integrative systems and synthetic biology of cell-matrix adhesion sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamir, Eli

    2016-09-02

    The complexity of cell-matrix adhesion convolves its roles in the development and functioning of multicellular organisms and their evolutionary tinkering. Cell-matrix adhesion is mediated by sites along the plasma membrane that anchor the actin cytoskeleton to the matrix via a large number of proteins, collectively called the integrin adhesome. Fundamental challenges for understanding how cell-matrix adhesion sites assemble and function arise from their multi-functionality, rapid dynamics, large number of components and molecular diversity. Systems biology faces these challenges in its strive to understand how the integrin adhesome gives rise to functional adhesion sites. Synthetic biology enables engineering intracellular modules and circuits with properties of interest. In this review I discuss some of the fundamental questions in systems biology of cell-matrix adhesion and how synthetic biology can help addressing them.

  16. Membrane tension controls adhesion positioning at the leading edge of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Bruno; Gole, Laurent; Kosmalska, Anita Joanna; Tam, Zhi Yang; Luo, Weiwei; Kan, Sophie; Viasnoff, Virgile; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Tucker-Kellogg, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Cell migration is dependent on adhesion dynamics and actin cytoskeleton remodeling at the leading edge. These events may be physically constrained by the plasma membrane. Here, we show that the mechanical signal produced by an increase in plasma membrane tension triggers the positioning of new rows of adhesions at the leading edge. During protrusion, as membrane tension increases, velocity slows, and the lamellipodium buckles upward in a myosin II–independent manner. The buckling occurs between the front of the lamellipodium, where nascent adhesions are positioned in rows, and the base of the lamellipodium, where a vinculin-dependent clutch couples actin to previously positioned adhesions. As membrane tension decreases, protrusion resumes and buckling disappears, until the next cycle. We propose that the mechanical signal of membrane tension exerts upstream control in mechanotransduction by periodically compressing and relaxing the lamellipodium, leading to the positioning of adhesions at the leading edge of cells. PMID:28687667

  17. The Effect of Contrast Material on Radiation Dose at CT: Part I. Incorporation of Contrast Material Dynamics in Anthropomorphic Phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahbaee, Pooyan; Segars, W Paul; Marin, Daniele; Nelson, Rendon C; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-06-01

    Purpose To develop a method to incorporate the propagation of contrast material into computational anthropomorphic phantoms for estimation of organ dose at computed tomography (CT). Materials and Methods A patient-specific physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of the human cardiovascular system was incorporated into 58 extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) patient phantoms. The PBPK model comprised compartmental models of vessels and organs unique to each XCAT model. For typical injection protocols, the dynamics of the contrast material in the body were described according to a series of patient-specific iodine mass-balance differential equations, the solutions to which provided the contrast material concentration time curves for each compartment. Each organ was assigned to a corresponding time-varying iodinated contrast agent to create the contrast material-enhanced five-dimensional XCAT models, in which the fifth dimension represents the dynamics of contrast material. To validate the accuracy of the models, simulated aortic and hepatic contrast-enhancement results throughout the models were compared with previously published clinical data by using the percentage of discrepancy in the mean, time to 90% peak, peak value, and slope of enhancement in a paired t test at the 95% significance level. Results The PBPK model allowed effective prediction of the time-varying concentration curves of various contrast material administrations in each organ for different patient models. The contrast-enhancement results were in agreement with results of previously published clinical data, with mean percentage, time to 90% peak, peak value, and slope of less than 10% (P > .74), 4%, 7%, and 14% for uniphasic and 12% (P > .56), 4%, 12%, and 14% for biphasic injection protocols, respectively. The exception was hepatic enhancement results calculated for a uniphasic injection protocol for which the discrepancy was less than 25%. Conclusion A technique to model the propagation of

  18. Cleavage and Cell Adhesion Properties of Human Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (HEPCAM)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaktanis, Thanos; Kremling, Heidi; Pavšič, Miha; von Stackelberg, Ricarda; Mack, Brigitte; Fukumori, Akio; Steiner, Harald; Vielmuth, Franziska; Spindler, Volker; Huang, Zhe; Jakubowski, Jasmine; Stoecklein, Nikolas H.; Luxenburger, Elke; Lauber, Kirsten; Lenarčič, Brigita; Gires, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Human epithelial cell adhesion molecule (HEPCAM) is a tumor-associated antigen frequently expressed in carcinomas, which promotes proliferation after regulated intramembrane proteolysis. Here, we describe extracellular shedding of HEPCAM at two α-sites through a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) and at one β-site through BACE1. Transmembrane cleavage by γ-secretase occurs at three γ-sites to generate extracellular Aβ-like fragments and at two ϵ-sites to release human EPCAM intracellular domain HEPICD, which is efficiently degraded by the proteasome. Mapping of cleavage sites onto three-dimensional structures of HEPEX cis-dimer predicted conditional availability of α- and β-sites. Endocytosis of HEPCAM warrants acidification in cytoplasmic vesicles to dissociate protein cis-dimers required for cleavage by BACE1 at low pH values. Intramembrane cleavage sites are accessible and not part of the structurally important transmembrane helix dimer crossing region. Surprisingly, neither chemical inhibition of cleavage nor cellular knock-out of HEPCAM using CRISPR-Cas9 technology impacted the adhesion of carcinoma cell lines. Hence, a direct function of HEPCAM as an adhesion molecule in carcinoma cells is not supported and appears to be questionable. PMID:26292218

  19. The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES, model description – Part 2: Carbon fluxes and vegetation dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Clark

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES is a process-based model that simulates the fluxes of carbon, water, energy and momentum between the land surface and the atmosphere. Many studies have demonstrated the important role of the land surface in the functioning of the Earth System. Different versions of JULES have been employed to quantify the effects on the land carbon sink of climate change, increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, changing atmospheric aerosols and tropospheric ozone, and the response of methane emissions from wetlands to climate change.

    This paper describes the consolidation of these advances in the modelling of carbon fluxes and stores, in both the vegetation and soil, in version 2.2 of JULES. Features include a multi-layer canopy scheme for light interception, including a sunfleck penetration scheme, a coupled scheme of leaf photosynthesis and stomatal conductance, representation of the effects of ozone on leaf physiology, and a description of methane emissions from wetlands. JULES represents the carbon allocation, growth and population dynamics of five plant functional types. The turnover of carbon from living plant tissues is fed into a 4-pool soil carbon model.

    The process-based descriptions of key ecological processes and trace gas fluxes in JULES mean that this community model is well-suited for use in carbon cycle, climate change and impacts studies, either in standalone mode or as the land component of a coupled Earth system model.

  20. Structural and dynamic characterization of the upper part of the HIV-1 cTAR DNA hairpin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargarian, Loussiné; Kanevsky, Igor; Bazzi, Ali; Boynard, Jonathan; Chaminade, Françoise; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    First strand transfer is essential for HIV-1 reverse transcription. During this step, the TAR RNA hairpin anneals to the cTAR DNA hairpin; this annealing reaction is promoted by the nucleocapsid protein and involves an initial loop–loop interaction between the apical loops of TAR and cTAR. Using NMR and probing methods, we investigated the structural and dynamic properties of the top half of the cTAR DNA (mini-cTAR). We show that the upper stem located between the apical and the internal loops is stable, but that the lower stem of mini-cTAR is unstable. The residues of the internal loop undergo slow motions at the NMR time-scale that are consistent with conformational exchange phenomena. In contrast, residues of the apical loop undergo fast motions. The lower stem is destabilized by the slow interconversion processes in the internal loop, and thus the internal loop is responsible for asymmetric destabilization of mini-cTAR. These findings are consistent with the functions of cTAR in first strand transfer: its apical loop is suitably exposed to interact with the apical loop of TAR RNA and its lower stem is significantly destabilized to facilitate the subsequent action of the nucleocapsid protein which promotes the annealing reaction. PMID:19417069

  1. Organic matter dynamics in a savanna transition riparian zone: Input of plant reproductive parts increases leaf breakdown process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan S. Rezende

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of coarse particulate organic matter (CPOM drives the functioning of most low order freshwater ecosystems. We evaluated plant litter input, litterfall, leaf litter breakdown rates, and the aquatic invertebrate community over the course of one year in a stream situation in a transition zone between savannah and Atlantic forest. Total organic matter input (litter fall was 335 g m-2 yr-1, which was mainly composed of leaves (50%. Higher values are found in the transition from dry to rainy season (September and October, probably in response to water stress. The remaining leaf mass (65% on average was lowest in May (49% and highest in August (79%. CPOM productivity in this transition riparian zone is higher than in other savannah systems, but lower than in Atlantic forest. The higher leaf litter breakdown in May was likely accompanied by environmental enrichment due to increase in fruits and flowers (high energy resources. The coefficient of decomposition was classified as fast (k= -0.016 and showed a positive relationship with water flow (increase in physical abrasion. Collected invertebrates were classified as 6% shredders and 12% scrapers. The remaining leaf mass showed a negative relationship with scraper abundance, highlighting the importance of these trophic groups in tropical streams. We can conclude that climate factors (e.g., rainfall directly affect the input and quality of CPOM and, consequently, leaf decomposition in savanna/Atlantic forest transition zones. 

  2. A dynamic model of the marriage market-part 1: matching algorithm based on age preference and availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, A P; Garenne, M L

    2013-09-01

    The matching algorithm in a dynamic marriage market model is described in this first of two companion papers. Iterative Proportional Fitting is used to find a marriage function (an age distribution of new marriages for both sexes), in a stable reference population, that is consistent with the one-sex age distributions of new marriages, and includes age preference. The one-sex age distributions (which are the marginals of the two-sex distribution) are based on the Picrate model, and age preference on a normal distribution, both of which may be adjusted by choice of parameter values. For a population that is perturbed from the reference state, the total number of new marriages is found as the harmonic mean of target totals for men and women obtained by applying reference population marriage rates to the perturbed population. The marriage function uses the age preference function, assumed to be the same for the reference and the perturbed populations, to distribute the total number of new marriages. The marriage function also has an availability factor that varies as the population changes with time, where availability depends on the supply of unmarried men and women. To simplify exposition, only first marriage is treated, and the algorithm is illustrated by application to Zambia. In the second paper, remarriage and dissolution are included. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Foaming morphology control of microcellular injection molded parts with gas counter pressure and dynamic mold temperature control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiu, Tai-Yi; Huang, Chao-Tsai; Chang, Rong-Yu; Hwang, Shyh-Shin

    2014-05-01

    Microcellular injection molding process is a promising solution for products with special requirements such as weight reduction, extra thin wall, high dimensional stability, clamping force reduction, etc. Despite microcellular foaming application used in reciprocating screw injection molding machine was built more than a decade, some limitations, such as poor surface quality or poor foaming control, confine the usage of this technology. Earlier CAE simulation tool for microcellular injection molding was not successful due to insufficient physical and computational considerations, limited by complicated bubble growth mechanism; so that, an economic and efficient tool for examining foaming quality of injection foaming product was lack. In this study, a recent developed three-dimensional simulation tool is used to predict injection foaming process. Predictions are carried out with commodity polypropylene and polystyrene with nitrogen and carbon dioxide supercritical fluids (SCFs). Comparisons of simulations between microcellular injection molding with and without counter pressure are discussed to provide insights into the correlation of surface quality and cell size distribution near the surface of product. Furthermore, comparisons between simulation predictions and experimental results of molding process, which is featured with dynamic mold temperature and gas counter pressure, are given for understanding quality improvement by controlling foaming morphology, and benefit of industrial application.

  4. Dynamic impact characteristics of KN-18 SNF transport cask - Part 2: Sensitivity analysis of modeling and design parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kap-Sun; Kim, Jong-Soo; Choi, Kyu-Sup; Shin, Tae-Myung; Yun, Hyun-Do

    2010-01-01

    In Part 1 of this study, an advanced numerical simulation method was proposed to investigate the impact characteristics of the KN-18 spent nuclear fuel (SNF) transport cask recently developed in Korea and verified against the experimental results. In this study, sensitivity analyses are carried out using the proposed numerical simulation method to investigate the effects of the various modeling and design parameters, such as material model assumption, modeling methodology, analytical assumptions, and design variables that can affect the impact characteristics of a cask and the accuracy of the numerical results. These parametric analyses were also performed to provide a basis for correlations with test results that is closer to reality than merely conservative as a means of benchmarking the numerical models. In addition, the parametric analysis results are compared against the experimental results, and the sensitivities of each parameter are summarized to provide references for the future design and analysis of SNF transport casks.

  5. Seasonal and interannual dynamics of soil microbial biomass and available nitrogen in an alpine meadow in the eastern part of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bo; Wang, Jinniu; Wu, Ning; Wu, Yan; Shi, Fusun

    2018-01-01

    Soil microbial activity varies seasonally in frozen alpine soils during cold seasons and plays a crucial role in available N pool accumulation in soil. The intra- and interannual patterns of microbial and nutrient dynamics reflect the influences of changing weather factors, and thus provide important insights into the biogeochemical cycles and ecological functions of ecosystems. We documented the seasonal and interannual dynamics of soil microbial and available N in an alpine meadow in the eastern part of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China, between April 2011 and October 2013. Soil was collected in the middle of each month and analyzed for water content, microbial biomass C (MBC) and N (MBN), dissolved organic C and N, and inorganic N. Soil microbial community composition was measured by the dilution-plate method. Fungi and actinomycetes dominated the microbial community during the nongrowing seasons, and the proportion of bacteria increased considerably during the early growing seasons. Trends of consistently increasing MBC and available N pools were observed during the nongrowing seasons. MBC sharply declined during soil thaw and was accompanied by a peak in available N pool. Induced by changes in soil temperatures, significant shifts in the structures and functions of microbial communities were observed during the winter-spring transition and largely contributed to microbial reduction. The divergent seasonal dynamics of different N forms showed a complementary nutrient supply pattern during the growing season. Similarities between the interannual dynamics of microbial biomass and available N pools were observed, and soil temperature and water conditions were the primary environmental factors driving interannual fluctuations. Owing to the changes in climate, seasonal soil microbial activities and nutrient supply patterns are expected to change further, and these changes may have crucial implications for the productivity and biodiversity of alpine ecosystems.

  6. Seasonal and interannual dynamics of soil microbial biomass and available nitrogen in an alpine meadow in the eastern part of Qinghai–Tibet Plateau, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Xu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil microbial activity varies seasonally in frozen alpine soils during cold seasons and plays a crucial role in available N pool accumulation in soil. The intra- and interannual patterns of microbial and nutrient dynamics reflect the influences of changing weather factors, and thus provide important insights into the biogeochemical cycles and ecological functions of ecosystems. We documented the seasonal and interannual dynamics of soil microbial and available N in an alpine meadow in the eastern part of Qinghai–Tibet Plateau, China, between April 2011 and October 2013. Soil was collected in the middle of each month and analyzed for water content, microbial biomass C (MBC and N (MBN, dissolved organic C and N, and inorganic N. Soil microbial community composition was measured by the dilution-plate method. Fungi and actinomycetes dominated the microbial community during the nongrowing seasons, and the proportion of bacteria increased considerably during the early growing seasons. Trends of consistently increasing MBC and available N pools were observed during the nongrowing seasons. MBC sharply declined during soil thaw and was accompanied by a peak in available N pool. Induced by changes in soil temperatures, significant shifts in the structures and functions of microbial communities were observed during the winter–spring transition and largely contributed to microbial reduction. The divergent seasonal dynamics of different N forms showed a complementary nutrient supply pattern during the growing season. Similarities between the interannual dynamics of microbial biomass and available N pools were observed, and soil temperature and water conditions were the primary environmental factors driving interannual fluctuations. Owing to the changes in climate, seasonal soil microbial activities and nutrient supply patterns are expected to change further, and these changes may have crucial implications for the productivity and biodiversity of

  7. Combining research in physical chemistry and chemical education: Part A. The femtosecond molecular dynamics of small gas-phase anion clusters. Part B. Surveying student beliefs about chemistry and the development of physical chemistry learning tutorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbera, Jack

    2007-12-01

    This dissertation combines work in the areas of experimental physical chemistry and chemical education. In the area of physical chemistry, femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy is used to interrogate the time-dependence for energy redistribution, solvent reorientation, and dissociation dynamics in small gas-phase anion clusters. The chemical education research addressed in this manuscript include the development and validation of a survey to measure students' beliefs about chemistry and the learning of chemistry and the development and testing of learning tutorials for use in undergraduate physical chemistry courses in thermodynamics and kinetics. In the first part of this dissertation, the Cu(CD3OD) dynamics are investigated using a combination of femtosecond pump-probe experiments and ab initio calculations. Dissociation of this complex into Cu and CD3OD occurs on two distinct time scales: 3 and 30 ps, which arise, respectively, from the coupling of intermolecular solvent rotations and excited methyl rotor rotation into the Cu-O dissociation component upon electron photodetachment of the precursor anion. In the second part of this dissertation, the time-resolved recombination of photodissociated IBr-(CO2)n (n = 5 - 10) cluster anions is investigated. Upon excitation to the A' 2pi 1/2 state of the chromophore, the bare anion results in I- and Br products, upon solvation with CO2, the IBr- chromophore regains near-IR absorption after recombination and vibrational relaxation on the ground electronic state. The recombination times vary with the number of solvent molecules from 12 ps for n = 5 to 900 ps for n = 10. Extensive electronic structure and non-adiabatic molecular dynamic simulations provide a framework to understand this behavior. In the third part of this dissertation, the modification and validation of the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS) for use in chemistry is presented in detail. The CLASS survey is designed to measure student

  8. Activation and extinction models for platelet adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, T; Walker, P G

    2002-01-01

    Adherent platelets are an important part of both thrombus formation and in certain stages of atherogenesis. Platelets can be activated by potent chemicals released from adherent platelets and adhere far more readily than unactivated ones. An analytical and numerical model is presented utilising high Peclet number for the activation and adhesion of platelets in shear flows. The model uses a similarity transformation, which characterises the relationship between convective, diffusive transport and the bulk platelet activating reaction mechanism. A first order surface reaction mechanism is used to model platelet adhesion at the wall (cell) surface. The reduced Damköhler number, M, characterises the importance of the bulk reaction and includes both convective and diffusive terms. For a high rate of blood flow (M-->0) the activation of platelets can effectively be terminated. In contrast, for (M-->infinity) an inner layer of activated platelets exists with an infinitesimally thin reaction sheet separating activated and non-activated platelets. This characterisation by the Damköhler number highlights results found clinically, in that thrombus forms in areas of low shear (high M) and in some cases an increased blood flow (low M) can inhibit the activation of platelets completely. The model shows the critical balance that exists between convection, diffusion and reaction.

  9. Adhesion of Antireflective Coatings in Multijunction Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, Ryan; Miller, David C.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.

    2016-11-21

    The development of a new composite dual cantilever beam (cDCB) thin-film adhesion testing method is reported, which allows the measurement of adhesion on the fragile thin substrates used in multijunction photovoltaics. We address the adhesion of several antireflective coating systems on multijunction cells. By varying interface chemistry and morphology, we demonstrate the ensuing effects on adhesion and help to develop an understanding of how high adhesion can be achieved, as adhesion values ranging from 0.5 J/m2 to 10 J/m2 were measured. Damp Heat (85 degrees C/85% RH) was used to invoke degradation of interfacial adhesion. We show that even with germanium substrates that fracture easily, quantitative measurements of adhesion can still be made at high test yield. The cDCB test is discussed as an important new methodology, which can be broadly applied to any system that makes use of thin, brittle, or otherwise fragile substrates.

  10. Focal adhesions and cell-matrix interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1988-01-01

    Focal adhesions are areas of cell surfaces where specializations of cytoskeletal, membrane and extracellular components combine to produce stable cell-matrix interactions. The morphology of these adhesions and the components identified in them are discussed together with possible mechanisms...

  11. Bidirectional remodeling of β1-integrin adhesions during chemotropic regulation of nerve growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlstrom Lucas P

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemotropic factors in the extracellular microenvironment guide nerve growth by acting on the growth cone located at the tip of extending axons. Growth cone extension requires the coordination of cytoskeleton-dependent membrane protrusion and dynamic adhesion to the extracellular matrix, yet how chemotropic factors regulate these events remains an outstanding question. We demonstrated previously that the inhibitory factor myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG triggers endocytic removal of the adhesion receptor β1-integrin from the growth cone surface membrane to negatively remodel substrate adhesions during chemorepulsion. Here, we tested how a neurotrophin might affect integrin adhesions. Results We report that brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF positively regulates the formation of substrate adhesions in axonal growth cones during stimulated outgrowth and prevents removal of β1-integrin adhesions by MAG. Treatment of Xenopus spinal neurons with BDNF rapidly triggered β1-integrin clustering and induced the dynamic formation of nascent vinculin-containing adhesion complexes in the growth cone periphery. Both the formation of nascent β1-integrin adhesions and the stimulation of axon extension by BDNF required cytoplasmic calcium ion signaling and integrin activation at the cell surface. Exposure to MAG decreased the number of β1-integrin adhesions in the growth cone during inhibition of axon extension. In contrast, the BDNF-induced adhesions were resistant to negative remodeling by MAG, correlating with the ability of BDNF pretreatment to counteract MAG-inhibition of axon extension. Pre-exposure to MAG prevented the BDNF-induced formation of β1-integrin adhesions and blocked the stimulation of axon extension by BDNF. Conclusions Altogether, these findings demonstrate the neurotrophin-dependent formation of integrin-based adhesions in the growth cone and reveal how a positive regulator of substrate adhesions can block

  12. Creep behaviour of flexible adhesives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straalen, IJ.J. van; Botter, E.; Berg, A. van den; Beers, P. van

    2004-01-01

    Since flexible adhesives are used more and more in structural applications, designers should have a better understanding of its behaviour under various conditions as ultimate load, fatigue load, long-term load and environmental conditions. This paper focuses on long-term load conditions and its

  13. Syndecan proteoglycans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Oh, E S; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that a family of transmembrane proteoglycans, the syndecans, have important roles in cell adhesion. They participate through binding of matrix ligand to their glycosaminoglycan chains, clustering, and the induction of signaling cascades to modify the internal microfilament...

  14. Foreign material in postoperative adhesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Luijendijk; D.C.D. de Lange (Diederik C.); C.C.A.P. Wauters (C. C A P); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); J.J. Duron; J.L. Pailler; B.R. Camprodon; L. Holmdahl; H.J. van Geldorp (H.); J. Jeekel (Hans)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractObjective: The authors determined the prevalence of foreign body granulomas in intra-abdominal adhesions in patients with a history of abdominal surgery. Patients and Methods: In a cross sectional, multicenter, multinational study, adult patients with a history of one or more previous

  15. Ovalbumin as a Wood Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Holly Satori; Zhu Rongxian; Michael J. Birkeland

    2014-01-01

    Use of proteins to bond wood dominated industrial production until the middle of the 20th century (1). The ensuing creation of the plywood and glulam beam industries allowed for more efficient use of wood resources than is possible with solid wood products. Many protein sources have been used as adhesives, including plant (soybean) and animal (blood, fish scales,...

  16. Modeling cell adhesion and proliferation: a cellular-automata based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, J; Garzón-Alvarado, D; Cerrolaza, M

    Cell adhesion is a process that involves the interaction between the cell membrane and another surface, either a cell or a substrate. Unlike experimental tests, computer models can simulate processes and study the result of experiments in a shorter time and lower costs. One of the tools used to simulate biological processes is the cellular automata, which is a dynamic system that is discrete both in space and time. This work describes a computer model based on cellular automata for the adhesion process and cell proliferation to predict the behavior of a cell population in suspension and adhered to a substrate. The values of the simulated system were obtained through experimental tests on fibroblast monolayer cultures. The results allow us to estimate the cells settling time in culture as well as the adhesion and proliferation time. The change in the cells morphology as the adhesion over the contact surface progress was also observed. The formation of the initial link between cell and the substrate of the adhesion was observed after 100 min where the cell on the substrate retains its spherical morphology during the simulation. The cellular automata model developed is, however, a simplified representation of the steps in the adhesion process and the subsequent proliferation. A combined framework of experimental and computational simulation based on cellular automata was proposed to represent the fibroblast adhesion on substrates and changes in a macro-scale observed in the cell during the adhesion process. The approach showed to be simple and efficient.

  17. Elastic coupling of nascent apCAM adhesions to flowing actin networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejean, Cecile O; Schaefer, Andrew W; Buck, Kenneth B; Kress, Holger; Shundrovsky, Alla; Merrill, Jason W; Dufresne, Eric R; Forscher, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Adhesions are multi-molecular complexes that transmit forces generated by a cell's acto-myosin networks to external substrates. While the physical properties of some of the individual components of adhesions have been carefully characterized, the mechanics of the coupling between the cytoskeleton and the adhesion site as a whole are just beginning to be revealed. We characterized the mechanics of nascent adhesions mediated by the immunoglobulin-family cell adhesion molecule apCAM, which is known to interact with actin filaments. Using simultaneous visualization of actin flow and quantification of forces transmitted to apCAM-coated beads restrained with an optical trap, we found that adhesions are dynamic structures capable of transmitting a wide range of forces. For forces in the picoNewton scale, the nascent adhesions' mechanical properties are dominated by an elastic structure which can be reversibly deformed by up to 1 µm. Large reversible deformations rule out an interface between substrate and cytoskeleton that is dominated by a number of stiff molecular springs in parallel, and favor a compliant cross-linked network. Such a compliant structure may increase the lifetime of a nascent adhesion, facilitating signaling and reinforcement.

  18. Elastic coupling of nascent apCAM adhesions to flowing actin networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecile O Mejean

    Full Text Available Adhesions are multi-molecular complexes that transmit forces generated by a cell's acto-myosin networks to external substrates. While the physical properties of some of the individual components of adhesions have been carefully characterized, the mechanics of the coupling between the cytoskeleton and the adhesion site as a whole are just beginning to be revealed. We characterized the mechanics of nascent adhesions mediated by the immunoglobulin-family cell adhesion molecule apCAM, which is known to interact with actin filaments. Using simultaneous visualization of actin flow and quantification of forces transmitted to apCAM-coated beads restrained with an optical trap, we found that adhesions are dynamic structures capable of transmitting a wide range of forces. For forces in the picoNewton scale, the nascent adhesions' mechanical properties are dominated by an elastic structure which can be reversibly deformed by up to 1 µm. Large reversible deformations rule out an interface between substrate and cytoskeleton that is dominated by a number of stiff molecular springs in parallel, and favor a compliant cross-linked network. Such a compliant structure may increase the lifetime of a nascent adhesion, facilitating signaling and reinforcement.

  19. Functional cine MR imaging for the detection and mapping of intraabdominal adhesions: method and surgical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhmann-Kirchhoff, Sonja; Reiser, Maximilian; Lienemann, Andreas [University Hospital Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Lang, Reinhold; Steitz, Heinrich O.; Jauch, Karl W. [University Hospital Munich-Grosshadern, Department of Surgery, Munich (Germany); Kirchhoff, Chlodwig [University Hospital Munich-Innenstadt, Department of Surgery, Munich (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence and localization of intraabdominal adhesions using functional cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to correlate the MR findings with intraoperative results. In a retrospective study, patients who had undergone previous abdominal surgery with suspected intraabdominal adhesions were examined. A true fast imaging with steady state precession sequence in transverse/sagittal orientation was used for a section-by-section dynamic depiction of visceral slide on a 1.5-Tesla system. After MRI, all patients underwent anew surgery. A nine-segment abdominal map was used to document the location and type of the adhesions. The intraoperative results were taken as standard of reference. Ninety patients were enrolled. During surgery 71 adhesions were detected, MRI depicted 68 intraabdominal adhesions. The most common type of adhesion in MRI was found between the anterior abdominal wall and small bowel loops (n = 22, 32.5%) and between small bowel loops and pelvic organs (n = 14, 20.6%). Comparing MRI with the intraoperative findings, sensitivity varied between 31 and 75% with a varying specificity between 65 and 92% in the different segments leading to an overall MRI accuracy of 89%. Functional cine MRI proved to be a useful examination technique for the identification of intraabdominal adhesions in patients with acute or chronic pain and corresponding clinical findings providing accurate results. However, no differentiation for symptomatic versus asymptomatic adhesions is possible. (orig.)

  20. Crosstalk between focal adhesions and material mechanical properties governs cell mechanics and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Sabato; Panzetta, Valeria; Embrione, Valerio; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical properties of materials strongly influence cell fate and functions. Focal adhesions are involved in the extremely important processes of mechanosensing and mechanotransduction. To address the relationship between the mechanical properties of cell substrates, focal adhesion/cytoskeleton assembly and cell functions, we investigated the behavior of NIH/3T3 cells over a wide range of stiffness (3-1000kPa) using two of the most common synthetic polymers for cell cultures: polyacrylamide and polydimethylsiloxane. An overlapping stiffness region was created between them to compare focal adhesion characteristics and cell functions, taking into account their different time-dependent behavior. Indeed, from a rheological point of view, polyacrylamide behaves like a strong gel (elastically), whereas polydimethylsiloxane like a viscoelastic solid. First, focal adhesion characteristics and dynamics were addressed in terms of material stiffness, then cell spreading area, migration rate and cell mechanical properties were correlated with focal adhesion size and assembly. Focal adhesion size was found to increase in the whole range of stiffness and to be in agreement in the overlapping rigidity region for the investigated materials. Cell mechanics directly correlated with focal adhesion lengths, whereas migration rate followed an inverse correlation. Cell spreading correlated with the substrate stiffness on polyacrylamide hydrogel, while no specific trend was found on polydimethylsiloxane. Substrate mechanics can be considered as a key physical cue that regulates focal adhesion assembly, which in turn governs important cellular properties and functions. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Correction of the disease phenotype in canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency using ex vivo hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Thomas R.; Hai, Mehreen; Tuschong, Laura M.; Burkholder, Tanya H.; Gu, Yu-chen; Sokolic, Robert A.; Ferguson, Cole; Dunbar, Cynthia E.; Hickstein, Dennis D.

    2006-01-01

    Canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (CLAD) represents the canine counter-part of the human disease leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD). Defects in the leukocyte integrin CD18 adhesion molecule in both CLAD and LAD lead to recurrent, life-threatening bacterial infections. We evaluated ex vivo retroviral-mediated gene therapy in CLAD using 2 nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens—200 cGy total body irradiation (TBI) or 10 mg/kg busulfan—with or without posttransplantation immunosuppression. In...

  2. Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces polyurethane adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseland, L. M.

    1967-01-01

    Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces the adhesive properties of a polyurethane adhesive that fastens hardware to exterior surfaces of aluminum tanks. The mat is embedded in the uncured adhesive. It ensures good control of the bond line and increases the peel strength.

  3. Potential for Biobased Adhesives in Wood Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2016-01-01

    There has been a resurgence of interest and research on using bio-based materials as wood adhesives; however, they have achieved only limited market acceptance. To better understand this low level of replacement, it is important to understand why adhesives work or fail in moisture durability tests. A holistic model for wood adhesives has been developed that clarifies...

  4. Current dental adhesives systems. A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, Egle; Cumbo, Enzo; Cardoso, Rielson Jose A; Gallina, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry is based on the development of materials which establish an effective bond with the tooth tissues. In this context, adhesive systems have attracted considerable research interest in recent years. Successful adhesive bonding depends on the chemistry of the adhesive, on appropriate clinical handling of the material as well as on the knowledge of the morphological changes caused on dental tissue by different bonding procedures. This paper outlines the status of contemporary adhesive systems, with particular emphasis on chemical characteristics and mode of interaction of the adhesives with enamel and dentinal tissues. Dental adhesives are used for several clinical applications and they can be classified based on the clinical regimen in "etch-and-rinse adhesives" and "self-etch adhesives". Other important considerations concern the different anatomical characteristics of enamel and dentine which are involved in the bonding procedures that have also implications for the technique used as well as for the quality of the bond. Etch-and-rinse adhesive systems generally perform better on enamel than self-etching systems which may be more suitable for bonding to dentine. In order to avoid a possible loss of the restoration, secondary caries or pulp damage due to bacteria penetration or due to cytotoxicity effects of eluted adhesive components, careful consideration of several factors is essential in selecting the suitable bonding procedure and adhesive system for the individual patient situation.

  5. Recharging "Hot-Melt" Adhesive Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Progar, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    Technique for recharging surface with "hot-melt" film makes use of one sided, high-temperature, pressure-sensitive adhesive tape. Purpose of the one-sided tape is to hold hot-melt charge in place until fused to surface. After adhesive has fused to surface and cooled, tape is removed, leaving adhesive on surface.

  6. Influence of substrate modulus on gecko adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klittich, Mena R.; Wilson, Michael C.; Bernard, Craig; Rodrigo, Rochelle M.; Keith, Austin J.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-03-01

    The gecko adhesion system fascinates biologists and materials scientists alike for its strong, reversible, glue-free, dry adhesion. Understanding the adhesion system’s performance on various surfaces can give clues as to gecko behaviour, as well as towards designing synthetic adhesive mimics. Geckos encounter a variety of surfaces in their natural habitats; tropical geckos, such as Gekko gecko, encounter hard, rough tree trunks as well as soft, flexible leaves. While gecko adhesion on hard surfaces has been extensively studied, little work has been done on soft surfaces. Here, we investigate for the first time the influence of macroscale and nanoscale substrate modulus on whole animal adhesion on two different substrates (cellulose acetate and polydimethylsiloxane) in air and find that across 5 orders of magnitude in macroscale modulus, there is no change in adhesion. On the nanoscale, however, gecko adhesion is shown to depend on substrate modulus. This suggests that low surface-layer modulus may inhibit the gecko adhesion system, independent of other influencing factors such as macroscale composite modulus and surface energy. Understanding the limits of gecko adhesion is vital for clarifying adhesive mechanisms and in the design of synthetic adhesives for soft substrates (including for biomedical applications and wearable electronics).

  7. Aspirin augments hyaluronidase induced adhesion inhibition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postoperative adhesions occur after virtually all abdomino-pelvic surgery and are the leading cause of intestinal obstruction and other gynaecologic problems. We used an animal model to test the efficacy of combined administration of aspirin and hyaluronidase on adhesion formation. Adhesions were induced using ...

  8. 21 CFR 878.4380 - Drape adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drape adhesive. 878.4380 Section 878.4380 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4380 Drape adhesive. (a) Identification. A drape adhesive is a device intended to be placed on the skin to attach a surgical drape. (b...

  9. Initial Homotypic Cell Pair Adhesion in Regenerating Hydra Facilitates Subsequent Adhesion of Homotypic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, Y.; Hariyama, T.; Tsukahara, Y.

    In Hydra vulgaris at the level of dissociated single cells endodermal cells adhere to each other more readily than to ectodermal cells at the initial adhesion. The time required for adhesion to occur between two adjacent cells is shorter for both endodermal and ectodermal homotypic cell adhesions once the initial adhesion of the first pair of cells has been established. It is confirmed that contact of an aggregated pair with additional homotypic cells facilitates the occurrence of homotypic adhesions; heterotypic adhesions are discouraged. This suggests that adhesion of homotypic cells contributes to an increased readiness for subsequent homotypic cells to adhere.

  10. Effect of rate on adhesion and static friction of a film-terminated fibrillar interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajpayee, Shilpi; Long, Rong; Shen, Lulin; Jagota, Anand; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2009-03-03

    A film-terminated fibrillar interface has been shown to result in significant enhancement of adhesion and static friction compared to a flat control. This enhancement increases with interfibril spacing. In this, the first of a two-part study, by studying the effect of rate on adhesion and static friction, we show that both adhesion and static friction enhancement are due to a crack-trapping mechanism. For adhesion, as measured by an indentation experiment, an analytical model is used to relate the applied indenter displacement rate and measured forces to contact line velocity and energy release rate, respectively. The two mechanisms for adhesion enhancement--varying rate and crack-trapping--are found to be coupled multiplicatively.

  11. Extreme events in total ozone over Arosa – Part 2: Fingerprints of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry and effects on mean values and long-term changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Rieder

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study the frequency of days with extreme low (termed ELOs and extreme high (termed EHOs total ozone values and their influence on mean values and trends are analyzed for the world's longest total ozone record (Arosa, Switzerland. The results show (i an increase in ELOs and (ii a decrease in EHOs during the last decades and (iii that the overall trend during the 1970s and 1980s in total ozone is strongly dominated by changes in these extreme events. After removing the extremes, the time series shows a strongly reduced trend (reduction by a factor of 2.5 for trend in annual mean. Excursions in the frequency of extreme events reveal "fingerprints" of dynamical factors such as ENSO or NAO, and chemical factors, such as cold Arctic vortex ozone losses, as well as major volcanic eruptions of the 20th century (Gunung Agung, El Chichón, Mt. Pinatubo. Furthermore, atmospheric loading of ozone depleting substances leads to a continuous modification of column ozone in the Northern Hemisphere also with respect to extreme values (partly again in connection with polar vortex contributions. Application of extreme value theory allows the identification of many more such "fingerprints" than conventional time series analysis of annual and seasonal mean values. The analysis shows in particular the strong influence of dynamics, revealing that even moderate ENSO and NAO events have a discernible effect on total ozone. Overall the approach to extremal modelling provides new information on time series properties, variability, trends and the influence of dynamics and chemistry, complementing earlier analyses focusing only on monthly (or annual mean values.

  12. A Dynamic Analysis of the Role of the Planetary- and Synoptic-Scale in the Summer of 2010 Blocking Episodes over the European Part of Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R. Lupo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During the summer of 2010, an unusually persistent blocking episode resulted in anomalously warm dry weather over the European part of Russia. The excessive heat resulted in forest and peat fires, impacted terrestrial ecosystems, greatly increased pollution in urban areas, and increased mortality rates in the region. Using the National Centers for Atmospheric Research (NCAR, National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP reanalysis datasets, the climatological and dynamic character of blocking events for summer 2010 and a precursor May blocking event were examined. We found that these events were stronger and longer lived than typical warm season events. Using dynamic methods, we demonstrate that the July 2010 event was a synoptic-scale dominant blocking event; unusual in the summer season. An analysis of phase diagrams demonstrated that the planetary-scale did not become stable until almost one week after block onset. For all other blocking events studied here and previously, the planetary-scale became stable around onset. Analysis using area integrated regional enstrophy (IRE demonstrated that for the July 2010 event, synoptic-scale IRE increased at block onset. This was similar for the May 2010 event, but different from case studies examined previously that demonstrated the planetary-scale IRE was prominent at block onset.

  13. PREFACE: Dynamics of wetting Dynamics of wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grest, Gary S.; Oshanin, Gleb; Webb, Edmund B., III

    2009-11-01

    Capillary phenomena associated with fluids wetting other condensed matter phases have drawn great scientific interest for hundreds of years; consider the recent bicentennial celebration of Thomas Young's paper on equilibrium contact angles, describing the geometric shape assumed near a three phase contact line in terms of the relevant surface energies of the constituent phases [1]. Indeed, nearly a century has passed since the seminal papers of Lucas and Washburn, describing dynamics of capillary imbibition [2, 3]. While it is generally appreciated that dynamics of fluid wetting processes are determined by the degree to which a system is out of capillary equilibrium, myriad complications exist that challenge the fundamental understanding of dynamic capillary phenomena. The topic has gathered much interest from recent Nobel laureate Pierre-Gilles de Gennes, who provided a seminal review of relevant dissipation mechanisms for fluid droplets spreading on solid surfaces [4] Although much about the dynamics of wetting has been revealed, much remains to be learned and intrinsic technological and fundamental interest in the topic drives continuing high levels of research activity. This is enabled partly by improved experimental capabilities for resolving wetting processes at increasingly finer temporal, spatial, and chemical resolution. Additionally, dynamic wetting research advances via higher fidelity computational modeling capabilities, which drive more highly refined theory development. The significance of this topic both fundamentally and technologically has resulted in a number of reviews of research activity in wetting dynamics. One recent example addresses the evaluation of existing wetting dynamics theories from an experimentalist's perspective [5]. A Current Opinion issue was recently dedicated to high temperature capillarity, including dynamics of high temperature spreading [6]. New educational tools have recently emerged for providing instruction in wetting

  14. Hyaluronan modulates cell proliferation and mRNA expression of adhesion-related procollagens and cytokines in glenohumeral synovial/capsular fibroblasts in adhesive capsulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nago, Masaru; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Gotoh, Masafumi; Nakama, Kenjirou; Shirachi, Isao; Higuchi, Fujio; Nagata, Kensei

    2010-06-01

    There is a growing body of evidence supporting the use of hyaluronan (HA) in patients with adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder, although the mechanisms of the effect have not yet been clarified. This in vitro study examined the effects of HA on glenohumeral synovial/capsular fibroblasts (GSCFs) from patients with adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder. The study subjects were seven patients with primary or secondary adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder (average age: 55 years; range: 42-65). Synovial/capsular specimens were obtained from the rotator interval of each patient during arthroscopy. Part of the tissue specimen was used for histological analysis. The remainder of the tissue was prepared for cell culture. Various concentrations of HA (0.0-4.0 mg/mL) were added to the monolayer-cultured GSCFs from these patients. Histological analysis consistently demonstrated chronic nonspecific inflammation with synovial hyperplasia, proliferation of vessels and fibroblasts, and increased amount of extracellular matrix. Treatment with HA at various concentrations significantly and dose-dependently inhibited cell proliferation and decreased the expression levels of mRNA for adhesion-related procollagens and cytokines. Pretreatment with OS/37 did not reverse the inhibitory effect of HA. These results suggest that HA modulates cell proliferation and expression of the mRNA of adhesion-related procollagens and cytokines in GSCFs, preventing the progression of adhesion formation in patients with adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder. (c) 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Effects of photopolymerisation on genotoxicity of composite adhesives in the comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dačić Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Certain in vivo studies have shown that the application of adhesives directly onto the open pulp or on a thin layer of dentin causes inflammation and pulpal abscesses. This reaction is related to toxic effects of monomers from adhesives. It has been confirmed that after proper illumination the adhesives become less toxic. The aim of the study was to examine genotoxicity of non-polymerised, partly polymerised and polymerised adhesives on isolated human lymphocytes using the alkaline Comet assay. Adper Single bond2 and Adper Easy One/3M ESPE adhesive photopolymerisation was performed by Elipar Highlight 3M ESPE halogen lamp for 0, 10 and 40 sec, at final concentrations of 100, 200, 500 and 1000 μg/mL. With both adhesives, photopolymerisation at 0 and 10 seconds showed statistically significant increase in DNA damage in comparision to the negative control (solvent. On the other hand, after 40 seconds of photopolymerisation of both adhesives in all tested concentrations, the degree of DNA damage in Comet assay had no significant difference (P>0.05, χ2 test compared to the negative control. Therefore, only the 40 seconds of photopolymerisation prevented genotoxic effects of both adhesives in the Comet assay. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III46002 i br. OI173012

  16. Adhesive Force of a Spider Mite, Tetranychus urticae, to a Flat Smooth Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Katsumi; Egashira, Kai; Toukai, Tadashi; Ogushi, Jun

    The adhesion of a spider mite to a surface of a flat smooth plate is investigated as a model for micromachine parts to adhere to and move on such surfaces. The measurement of adhesive force is carried out under various conditions in which plate material, surface roughness of a plate and environmental humidity are differed. The adhesion mechanism is also discussed. Of the forces acting between a spider mite and a surface, one from dispersion interaction is the most dominant because (1) there is a high correlation between the adhesive force and the dispersion force component of surface energy with adhesive forces of 8.2µN for glass, 9.7µN for mica, 9.9µN for silicon and 12.1µN for gold, and because (2) high humidity and high surface roughness reduce the adhesive force. For strong adhesion based on work of adhesion, spider mites have tenent hairs with a bell-shaped end.

  17. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesika, Noshir S.; Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Zhao, Boxin; Tian, Yu; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2009-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  18. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesika, Noshir S [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Zeng Hongbo [Chemical and Materials Engineering Department, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2V4 (Canada); Kristiansen, Kai; Israelachvili, Jacob [Chemical Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Zhao, Boxin [Chemical Engineering Department and Waterloo Institute of Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Tian Yu [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Department of Precision Instruments, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Autumn, Kellar, E-mail: npesika@tulane.ed [Department of Biology, Lewis and Clark College, Portland, OR 97219 (United States)

    2009-11-18

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  19. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesika, Noshir S; Zeng Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Israelachvili, Jacob; Zhao, Boxin; Tian Yu; Autumn, Kellar

    2009-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  20. Photochemical tissue bonding with chitosan adhesive films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piller Sabine C

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photochemical tissue bonding (PTB is a promising sutureless technique for tissue repair. PTB is often achieved by applying a solution of rose bengal (RB between two tissue edges, which are irradiated by a green laser to crosslink collagen fibers with minimal heat production. In this study, RB has been incorporated in chitosan films to create a novel tissue adhesive that is laser-activated. Methods Adhesive films, based on chitosan and containing ~0.1 wt% RB were manufactured and bonded to calf intestine by a solid state laser (λ = 532 nm, Fluence~110 J/cm2, spot size~0.5 cm. A single-column tensiometer, interfaced with a personal computer, tested the bonding strength. K-type thermocouples recorded the temperature (T at the adhesive-tissue interface during laser irradiation. Human fibroblasts were also seeded on the adhesive and cultured for 48 hours to assess cell growth. Results The RB-chitosan adhesive bonded firmly to the intestine with adhesion strength of 15 ± 2 kPa, (n = 31. The adhesion strength dropped to 0.5 ± 0.1 (n = 8 kPa when the laser was not applied to the adhesive. The average temperature of the adhesive increased from 26°C to 32°C during laser exposure. Fibroblasts grew confluent on the adhesive without morphological changes. Conclusion A new biocompatible chitosan adhesive has been developed that bonds photochemically to tissue with minimal temperature increase.

  1. Platelet adhesion onto artificial red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, N; Kondo, T

    1980-05-01

    Several kinds of polyamide microcapsules containing mammalian hemolysate were prepared by making use of the interfacial polycondensation reaction between diamines and terephthaloyl dichloride and their blood compatibility in terms of platelet adhesion was examined aiming at their ultimate clinical use as artificial red blood cells. It was found that rabbit platelets adhere onto the hemolysate-loaded microcapsules in the presence of the plasma, while no platelet adhesion takes place in the absence of the plasma. This was interpreted as indicating an important role of plasma components in platelet adhesion. Moreover, platelet adhesion was observed to be facilitated by negative charges on the surface of the hemolysate-loaded microcapsules; the more negatively the surface was charge, the more easily the platelets adhered onto the surface. Finally, the present method of assessing platelet adhesion suggested the possibility of its use for kinetic study of platelet adhesion since it allowedus to make numerical evaluation of platelet adhesion as a function of time.

  2. Surface energy and viscoelasticity influence caramel adhesiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Ty B; Foegeding, Edward Allen

    2017-08-26

    Adhesion is an important textural attribute that directs consumer eating patterns and behaviors and can be a negative attribute during food processing. The objectives of this study were to modify caramel formulation and compare adhesion to different materials to quantify the influence of surface energetics and viscoelasticity on caramel adhesiveness. Mechanical adhesion was viewed in the context of pressure sensitive tack theory, where adhesion is controlled by viscoelasticity of the adhesive material and the surface energy relationship of material and probe. Caramel samples varied in total amount of fat and protein, and mechanical adhesion was measured using a series of materials with total surface energies of 39.7-53.2 mJ/m 2 . Adhesiveness decreased as fat and protein content increased, with a significant effect of total surface energy. Viscoelasticity was modeled using creep recovery data fit to a four-element Burger mechanistic model. Burger model parameters representing retarded elasticity correlated strongly with adhesiveness. The results suggest two zones of adhesion based on formulation, one driven by both surface energy relationships-most notably dispersive and total surface energy-and viscoelasticity, and the other driven solely by viscoelasticity. Relationships between mechanical properties and adhesion have been explored but are still not well understood, and could aid in the design of food products with a controlled level of adhesion. The results of this study indicate the importance of considering material surface energy when measuring mechanical adhesion or texture profile analysis. Understanding the relationships between viscoelastic behavior and adhesion can be used to make inferences on perceived texture. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandall, N A; Millett, D T; Mattick, C R; Hickman, J; Macfarlane, T V; Worthington, H V

    2003-01-01

    Bonding of orthodontic brackets to teeth is important to enable effective and efficient treatment with fixed appliances. The problem is bracket failure during treatment which increases operator chairside time and lengthens treatment time. A prolonged treatment is likely to increase the oral health risks of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances one of which is irreversible enamel decalcification. To evaluate the effectiveness of different orthodontic adhesives for bonding. Electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE. Date of most recent searches: August 2002 (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2002). Trials were selected if they met the following criteria: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing two different adhesive groups. Participants were patients with fixed orthodontic appliances. The interventions were adhesives that bonded stainless steel brackets to all teeth except the molars. The primary outcome was debond or bracket failure. Data were recorded on decalcification as a secondary outcome, if present. Information regarding methods, participants, interventions, outcome measures and results were extracted in duplicate by pairs of reviewers (Nicky Mandall (NM) and Rye Mattick (CRM); Declan Millett (DTM) and Joy Hickman (JH2)). Since the data were not presented in a form that was amenable to meta-analysis, the results of the review are presented in narrative form only. Three trials satisfied the inclusion criteria. A chemical cured composite was compared with a light cure composite (one trial), a conventional glass ionomer cement (one trial) and a polyacid-modified resin composite (compomer) (one trial). The quality of the trial reports was generally poor. It is difficult to draw any conclusions from this review, however, suggestions are made for methods of improving future research involving

  4. Polymer nanocarriers for dentin adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, R; Osorio, E; Medina-Castillo, A L; Toledano, M

    2014-12-01

    To obtain more durable adhesion to dentin, and to protect collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix from degradation, calcium- and phosphate-releasing particles have been incorporated into the dental adhesive procedure. The aim of the present study was to incorporate zinc-loaded polymeric nanocarriers into a dental adhesive system to facilitate inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-mediated collagen degradation and to provide calcium ions for mineral deposition within the resin-dentin bonded interface. PolymP- N : Active nanoparticles (nanoMyP) were zinc-loaded through 30-minute ZnCl2 immersion and tested for bioactivity by means of 7 days' immersion in simulated body fluid solution (the Kokubo test). Zinc-loading and calcium phosphate depositions were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Nanoparticles in ethanol solution infiltrated into phosphoric-acid-etched human dentin and Single Bond (3M/ESPE) were applied to determine whether the nanoparticles interfered with bonding. Debonded sticks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A metalloproteinase collagen degradation assay was also performed in resin-infiltrated dentin with and without nanoparticles, measuring C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) concentration in supernatants, after 4 wk of immersion in artificial saliva. Numerical data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests (p degradation. Tested nanoparticles may be incorporated into dental adhesive systems to provide the appropriate environment in which dentin MMP collagen degradation is inhibited and mineral growth can occur. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  5. Culinary Medicine—Jalebi Adhesions

    OpenAIRE

    Kapoor, Vinay K

    2015-01-01

    Culinary terms have been used to describe anatomy (bean-shaped kidneys), pathology (strawberry gall bladder), clinical signs (café-au-lait spots), radiological images (sausage-shaped pancreas), etc. While Indian cuisine is popular all over the world, no Indian dish finds mention in medical terminology. In intra-abdominal adhesions, sometimes, the intestinal loops are so densely adherent that it is difficult to make out proximal from distal and it is impossible to separate them without injurin...

  6. Polyurethane adhesives in flat roofs

    OpenAIRE

    Bogárová Markéta; Stodůlka Jindřich; Šuhajda Karel

    2017-01-01

    It is necessary to stabilize individual layers of flat roofs, mainly because of wind suction. Apart from anchoring and surcharge, these layers can be secured by bonding. At present gluing is an indispensable and widely used stabilization method. On our market we can found many types of adhesives, most widely used are based on polyurethane. This paper focuses on problematic about stabilization thermal insulation from expanded polystyrene to vapor barrier from bitumen. One of the main issues is...

  7. A review of our development of dental adhesives--effects of radical polymerization initiators and adhesive monomers on adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemura, Kunio; Endo, Takeshi

    2010-03-01

    This paper reviews the development of dental adhesives by collating information of related studies from original scientific papers, reviews, and patent literatures. Through our development, novel radical polymerization initiators, adhesive monomers, and microcapsules were synthesized, and their effects on adhesion were investigated. It was found that 5-monosubstituted barbituric acid (5-MSBA)-containing ternary initiators in conjunction with adhesive monomers contributed to effective adhesion with good polymerization reactivity. Several kinds of novel adhesive monomers bearing carboxyl group, phosphonic acid group or sulfur-containing group were synthesized, and investigated their multi-purpose bonding functions. It was suggested that the flexible methylene chain in the structure of adhesive monomers played a pivotal role in their enhanced bonding durability. It was found that the combination of acidic monomers with sulfur-containing monomer markedly improved adhesion to enamel, dentin, porcelain, alumina, zirconia, non-precious metals and precious metals. A new poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-type adhesive resin comprising microencapsulated polymerization initiators was also found to exhibit both good formulation stability and excellent adhesive property.

  8. Culinary Medicine-Jalebi Adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Vinay K

    2016-02-01

    Culinary terms have been used to describe anatomy (bean-shaped kidneys), pathology (strawberry gall bladder), clinical signs (café-au-lait spots), radiological images (sausage-shaped pancreas), etc. While Indian cuisine is popular all over the world, no Indian dish finds mention in medical terminology. In intra-abdominal adhesions, sometimes, the intestinal loops are so densely adherent that it is difficult to make out proximal from distal and it is impossible to separate them without injuring the bowel resulting in spill of contents-resection is the only option (Fig. 1). Jalebi, an Indian dessert, has a single long tubular strip of fried batter filled with sugary syrup so intertwined that it is impossible to discern its ends; if broken, the syrup spills out-the best way to relish it is to chew the whole piece (Fig. 2). Because of these similarities between them, I propose to name dense intra-abdominal adhesions as 'jalebi adhesions.'

  9. Modeling of Sylgard Adhesive Strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Ralph Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-03

    Sylgard is the name of a silicone elastomeric potting material manufactured by Dow Corning Corporation.1 Although the manufacturer cites its low adhesive strength as a feature of this product, thin layers of Sylgard do in fact have a non-negligible strength, which has been measured in recent tensile and shear debonding tests. The adhesive strength of thin layers of Sylgard potting material can be important in applications in which components having signi cantly di erent thermal expansion properties are potted together, and the potted assembly is subjected to temperature changes. The tensile and shear tractions developed on the potted surfaces of the components can cause signi cant internal stresses, particularly for components made of low-strength materials with a high area-to-volume ratio. This report is organized as follows: recent Sylgard debonding tests are rst brie y summarized, with particular attention to the adhesion between Sylgard and PBX 9501, and also between Sylgard and aluminum. Next, the type of numerical model that will be used to simulate the debonding behavior exhibited in these tests is described. Then the calibration of the debonding model will be illustrated. Finally, the method by which the model parameters are adjusted (scaled) to be applicable to other, non- tested bond thicknesses is summarized, and all parameters of the model (scaled and unscaled) are presented so that other investigators can reproduce all of the simulations described in this report as well as simulations of the application of interest.

  10. An innovative wheel–rail contact model for railway vehicles under degraded adhesion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meli, E., E-mail: enrico.meli@unifi.it; Ridolfi, A., E-mail: a.ridolfi@unifi.it [University of Florence, Department of Industrial Engineering (Italy)

    2015-03-15

    The accurate modelling of the wheel–rail contact plays a fundamental role in the railway field since the contact forces heavily affect the vehicle dynamics, the wear of the contact surfaces and the vehicle safety. Concerning the wheel–rail contact, an important open problem is represented by the degraded adhesion. A realistic adhesion model is quite difficult to obtain because of the complex and highly non-linear behaviour of the adhesion coefficient and the presence of external unknown contaminants (the third body); this is especially true when degraded adhesion and large sliding between the wheel and rail contact surfaces occur.In this work the authors present an adhesion model particularly developed to describe degraded adhesion conditions. The new approach will have to be suitable to be employed within the wheel–rail contact models typical of the multibody applications. In other words, the contact model, comprising the new adhesion model, will have to guarantee a good accuracy and, at the same time, a high numerical efficiency to be implemented directly online inside the general multibody model of the vehicles (e.g. in Matlab-Simulink or Simpack environments) ( www.mathworks.com http://www.mathworks.com , 2012; www.simpack.com http://www.simpack.com , 2012).The model analysed in the paper is based on some of the main phenomena characterising the degraded adhesion, such as large sliding at the contact interface, high energy dissipation, the consequent cleaning effect on the contact surfaces and the final adhesion recovery due to the removal of external unknown contaminants.The adhesion model has been validated because of the experimental data provided by Trenitalia S.p.A. coming from on-track tests performed in Velim (Czech Republic). The tests have been carried out on a straight railway track under degraded adhesion conditions with the railway vehicle UIC-Z1 equipped with a fully-working Wheel Slide Protection (WSP) system.The validation highlighted the

  11. Functional Peptides from Laminin-1 Improve the Cell Adhesion Capacity of Recombinant Mussel Adhesive Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Ji, Lina; Hua, Zichun

    2017-01-01

    Since cell adhesion is important for cell processes such as migration and proliferation, it is a crucial consideration in biomaterial design and development. Based on the fusion of mussel adhesive protein fp151 with laminin-1-originated functional peptides we designed fusion proteins (fLA4, fLG6 and fAG73) and explored their cell adhesion properties. In our study, cell adhesion analysis showed that protein fLG6 and fLA4 had a significantly higher cell adhesion property for A549 than fp151. Moreover, protein fAG73 also displayed a strong adhesion capacity for Hela cells. In conclusion, the incorporation of functional peptides with integrin and heparin/heparan sulphate binding capacity into mussel adhesive protein will promote the application of mussel adhesive protein as cell adhesion biomaterial. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. The physical effects of an adhesive dressing top layer on burn wound dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queen, D; Evans, J H; Gaylor, J D; Courtney, J M; Reid, W H

    1986-06-01

    Three hydrogels were assessed in respect of water-vapour transmission and conformability. These materials were tested alone and as part of a bilaminate dressing which incorporates an adhesive top layer. The adhesive layer used in this study was a compliant adhesive bandage, marketed under the name Mefix. It was observed that this layer reduced the normally high water-vapour transmission rates of the hydrogels to much lower, clinically more acceptable, levels. Mechanically, the Mefix layer protects the underlying hydrogel, prevents tearing and puncturing but decreases conformability by elastic restraint.

  13. Implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin methods and interfacial gauge methods for high-order accurate interface dynamics, with applications to surface tension dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and free surface flow: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saye, Robert

    2017-09-01

    In this two-part paper, a high-order accurate implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin (dG) framework is developed for fluid interface dynamics, facilitating precise computation of interfacial fluid flow in evolving geometries. The framework uses implicitly defined meshes-wherein a reference quadtree or octree grid is combined with an implicit representation of evolving interfaces and moving domain boundaries-and allows physically prescribed interfacial jump conditions to be imposed or captured with high-order accuracy. Part one discusses the design of the framework, including: (i) high-order quadrature for implicitly defined elements and faces; (ii) high-order accurate discretisation of scalar and vector-valued elliptic partial differential equations with interfacial jumps in ellipticity coefficient, leading to optimal-order accuracy in the maximum norm and discrete linear systems that are symmetric positive (semi)definite; (iii) the design of incompressible fluid flow projection operators, which except for the influence of small penalty parameters, are discretely idempotent; and (iv) the design of geometric multigrid methods for elliptic interface problems on implicitly defined meshes and their use as preconditioners for the conjugate gradient method. Also discussed is a variety of aspects relating to moving interfaces, including: (v) dG discretisations of the level set method on implicitly defined meshes; (vi) transferring state between evolving implicit meshes; (vii) preserving mesh topology to accurately compute temporal derivatives; (viii) high-order accurate reinitialisation of level set functions; and (ix) the integration of adaptive mesh refinement. In part two, several applications of the implicit mesh dG framework in two and three dimensions are presented, including examples of single phase flow in nontrivial geometry, surface tension-driven two phase flow with phase-dependent fluid density and viscosity, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and free

  14. Implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin methods and interfacial gauge methods for high-order accurate interface dynamics, with applications to surface tension dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and free surface flow: Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saye, Robert

    2017-09-01

    In this two-part paper, a high-order accurate implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin (dG) framework is developed for fluid interface dynamics, facilitating precise computation of interfacial fluid flow in evolving geometries. The framework uses implicitly defined meshes-wherein a reference quadtree or octree grid is combined with an implicit representation of evolving interfaces and moving domain boundaries-and allows physically prescribed interfacial jump conditions to be imposed or captured with high-order accuracy. Part one discusses the design of the framework, including: (i) high-order quadrature for implicitly defined elements and faces; (ii) high-order accurate discretisation of scalar and vector-valued elliptic partial differential equations with interfacial jumps in ellipticity coefficient, leading to optimal-order accuracy in the maximum norm and discrete linear systems that are symmetric positive (semi)definite; (iii) the design of incompressible fluid flow projection operators, which except for the influence of small penalty parameters, are discretely idempotent; and (iv) the design of geometric multigrid methods for elliptic interface problems on implicitly defined meshes and their use as preconditioners for the conjugate gradient method. Also discussed is a variety of aspects relating to moving interfaces, including: (v) dG discretisations of the level set method on implicitly defined meshes; (vi) transferring state between evolving implicit meshes; (vii) preserving mesh topology to accurately compute temporal derivatives; (viii) high-order accurate reinitialisation of level set functions; and (ix) the integration of adaptive mesh refinement. In part two, several applications of the implicit mesh dG framework in two and three dimensions are presented, including examples of single phase flow in nontrivial geometry, surface tension-driven two phase flow with phase-dependent fluid density and viscosity, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and free

  15. Accelerated Comparative Fatigue Strength Testing of Belt Adhesive Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajda, Miroslaw; Blazej, Ryszard; Jurdziak, Leszek

    2017-12-01

    Belt joints are the weakest link in the serial structure that creates an endless loop of spliced belt segments. This affects not only the lower strength of adhesive joints of textile belts in comparison to vulcanized splices, but also the replacement of traditional glues to more ecological but with other strength parameters. This is reflected in the lowered durability of adhesive joints, which in underground coal mines is nearly twice shorter than the operating time of belts. Vulcanized splices require high precision in performance, they need long time to achieve cross-linking of the friction mixture and, above all, they require specialized equipment (vulcanization press) which is not readily available and often takes much time to be delivered down, which means reduced mining output or even downtime. All this reduces the reliability and durability of adhesive joints. In addition, due to the consolidation on the Polish coal market, mines are joined into large economic units serviced by a smaller number of processing plants. The consequence is to extend the transport routes downstream and increase reliability requirements. The greater number of conveyors in the chain reduces reliability of supply and increases production losses. With high fixed costs of underground mines, the reduction in mining output is reflected in the increase in unit costs, and this at low coal prices on the market can mean substantial losses for mines. The paper describes the comparative study of fatigue strength of shortened samples of adhesive joints conducted to compare many different variants of joints (various adhesives and materials). Shortened samples were exposed to accelerated fatigue in the usually long-lasting dynamic studies, allowing more variants to be tested at the same time. High correlation between the results obtained for shortened (100 mm) and traditional full-length (3×250 mm) samples renders accelerated tests possible.

  16. Handbook of Adhesion, 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packham, D. E.

    2005-06-01

    This second edition of the successful Handbook of Adhesion provides concise and authoritative articles covering many aspects of the science and technology associated with adhesion and adhesives. It is intended to fill a gap between the necessarily simplified treatment of the student textbook and the full and thorough treatment of the research monograph and review article. The articles are structured in such a way, with internal cross-referencing and external literature references, that the reader can build up a broader and deeper understanding, as their needs require. This second edition includes many new articles covering developments which have risen in prominence in the intervening years, such as scanning probe techniques, the surface forces apparatus and the relation between adhesion and fractal surfaces. Advances in understanding polymer - polymer interdiffusion are reflected in articles drawing out the implications for adhesive bonding. In addition, articles derived from the earlier edition have been revised and updated where needed. Throughout the book there is a renewed emphasis on environmental implications of the use of adhesives and sealants. The scope of the Handbook, which features nearly 250 articles from over 60 authors, includes the background science - physics, chemistry and material science - and engineering, and also aspects of adhesion relevant to the use of adhesives, including topics such as: Sealants and mastics Paints and coatings Printing and composite materials Welding and autohesion Engineering design The Handbook of Adhesion is intended for scientists and engineers in both academia and industry, requiring an understanding of the various facets of adhesion.

  17. Adhesive systems under fissure sealants: yes or no?: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherian, Ali; Sarraf Shirazi, Alireza; Sadeghi, Ramin

    2016-06-01

    The authors of this systematic review and meta-analysis had 2 aims: to evaluate fissure sealant retention with and without the use of an adhesive system and to compare fissure sealant retention using etch-and-rinse adhesive systems versus self-etching adhesive systems. The authors conducted a literature search (all articles published through November 1, 2015) to identify studies for inclusion in this systematic review. They assessed the quality of the evidence provided using the modified Jadad scale and performed meta-analyses using a random-effects model. The authors considered 12 studies that met the inclusion criteria for the systematic review. In addition, they used 5 of 9 studies related to the first part of the study and 3 of 4 studies related to the second part of the study that met the inclusion criteria for meta-analysis. In the analysis of the first part of the systematic review, the authors found that adhesive systems had a significant positive effect on fissure sealant (odds ratio, 3.294; 95% confidence interval, 1.292-8.401; P = .013). In the analysis of the second part of the systematic review, the authors found that etch-and-rinse adhesives were superior to self-etching adhesives in the fissure sealant procedure (odds ratio, 14.569; 95% confidence interval, 2.616-81.131; P = .002). The use of adhesive systems beneath fissure sealants can increase the retention of fissure sealants. Also, when adhesive systems are used with fissure sealants, etch-and-rinse systems are preferable. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Adhesion enhancement of biomimetic dry adhesives by nanoparticle in situ synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díaz Téllez, J P; Harirchian-Saei, S; Li, Y; Menon, C

    2013-01-01

    A novel method to increase the adhesion strength of a gecko-inspired dry adhesive is presented. Gold nanoparticles are synthesized on the tips of the microfibrils of a polymeric dry adhesive to increase its Hamaker constant. Formation of the gold nanoparticles is qualitatively studied through a colour change in the originally transparent substance and quantitatively analysed using ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometry. A pull-off force test is employed to quantify the adhesion enhancement. Specifically, adhesion forces of samples with and without embedded gold nanoparticles are measured and compared. The experimental results indicate that an adhesion improvement of 135% can be achieved. (paper)

  19. Atomic scale onset of Al adhesion on Mo2BC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolvardi, Hamid; Music, Denis; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2015-01-01

    We have explored interfacial interactions between a Mo–C terminated Mo 2 BC(040) surface and an Al cluster using ab initio molecular dynamics. The Al cluster is disrupted and wets the Mo 2 BC(040) surface. This can be understood based on the electronic structure. Across the Al–MoC interface C s–Al s hybridized states are formed. These bonds are stronger than the Al–Al intra-cluster bonds. Hence, the onset of Al adhesion is caused by bond formation across the Al–MoC interface. - Highlights: • Interfacial interactions between Mo 2 BC and an Al cluster were explored. • Al forms bonds to C constituting the onset of Al adhesion on Mo 2 BC. • These data are relevant for other carbide coatings

  20. Biomimetic Fluorocarbon Surfactant Polymers Reduce Platelet Adhesion on PTFE/ePTFE Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuwu; Gupta, Anirban Sen; Sagnella, Sharon; Barendt, Pamela M.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Marchant, Roger E.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a series of fluorocarbon surfactant polymers designed as surface-modifying agents for improving the thrombogenicity of ePTFE vascular graft materials by the reduction of platelet adhesion. The surfactant polymers consist of a poly(vinyl amine) backbone with pendent dextran and perfluoroundecanoyl branches. Surface modification is accomplished by a simple dip-coating process in which surfactant polymers undergo spontaneous surface-induced adsorption and assembly on PTFE/ePTFE surface. The adhesion stability of the surfactant polymer on PTFE was examined under dynamic shear conditions in PBS and human whole blood with a rotating disk system. Fluorocarbon surfactant polymer coatings with three different dextran to perfluorocarbon ratios (1:0.5, 1:1 and 1:2) were compared in the context of platelet adhesion on PTFE/ePTFE surface under dynamic flow conditions. Suppression of platelet adhesion was achieved for all three coated surfaces over the shear-stress range of 0–75 dyn/cm2 in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or human whole blood. The effectiveness depended on the surfactant polymer composition such that platelet adhesion on coated surfaces decreased significantly with increasing fluorocarbon branch density at 0 dyn/cm2. Our results suggest that fluorocarbon surfactant polymers can effectively suppress platelet adhesion and demonstrate the potential application of the fluorocarbon surfactant polymers as non-thrombogenic coatings for ePTFE vascular grafts. PMID:19323880

  1. Does active application of universal adhesives to enamel in self-etch mode improve their performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loguercio, Alessandro D; Muñoz, Miguel Angel; Luque-Martinez, Issis; Hass, Viviane; Reis, Alessandra; Perdigão, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of adhesion strategy on the enamel microshear bond strengths (μSBS), etching pattern, and in situ degree of conversion (DC) of seven universal adhesives. 84 extracted third molars were sectioned in four parts (buccal, lingual, proximal) and divided into 21 groups, according to the combination of the main factors adhesive (AdheSE Universal [ADU], All-Bond Universal [ABU], Clearfil Universal [CFU], Futurabond U [FBU], G-Bond Plus [GBP], Prime&Bond Elect (PBE), and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive [SBU]), and adhesion strategy (etch-and-rinse, active self-etch, and passive self-etch). Specimens were stored in water (37°C/24h) and tested at 1.0mm/min (μSBS). Enamel-resin interfaces were evaluated for DC using micro-Raman spectroscopy. The enamel-etching pattern was evaluated under a field-emission scanning electron microscope (direct and replica techniques). Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Active self-etch application increased μSBS and DC for five out of the seven universal adhesives when compared to passive application (pself-etch application compared to that of passive self-etch application. Replicas of GBP and PBE applied in active self-etch mode displayed morphological features compatible with water droplets. The DC of GBP and PBE were not affected by the application/strategy mode. In light of the improved performance of universal adhesives when applied actively in SE mode, selective enamel etching with phosphoric acid may not be crucial for their adhesion to enamel. The active application of universal adhesives in self-etch mode may be a practical alternative to enamel etching in specific clinical situations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Human climbing with efficiently scaled gecko-inspired dry adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkes, Elliot W.; Eason, Eric V.; Christensen, David L.; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the mechanism of adhesion in geckos, many synthetic dry adhesives have been developed with desirable gecko-like properties such as reusability, directionality, self-cleaning ability, rough surface adhesion and high adhesive stress. However, fully exploiting these adhesives in practical applications at different length scales requires efficient scaling (i.e. with little loss in adhesion as area grows). Just as natural gecko adhesives have been used as a benchmark for syn...

  3. The influence of adhesive thickness on the microtensile bond strength of three adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcangelo, Camillo; Vanini, Lorenzo; Prosperi, Gianni Domenico; Di Bussolo, Giulia; De Angelis, Francesco; D'Amario, Maurizio; Caputi, Sergio

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of multiple adhesive layers of three etch-and-rinse adhesives on both adhesive thickness and microtensile bond strength (microTBS). Midcoronal occlusal dentin of 36 extracted human molars was used. Teeth were randomly assigned to 3 groups (EB, XP, PQ) according to the adhesive system to be used: PQ1 (Ultradent) (PQ), EnaBond (Micerium) (EB), or XP Bond (Dentsply/DeTrey) (XP). Specimens from each group were further divided into three subgroups according to the number of adhesive coatings (1, 2, or 3). In all subgroups, each adhesive layer was light cured before application of each additional layer. After bonding procedures, composite crowns were incrementally built up. Specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the adhesive interface to produce multiple beams, approximately 1 mm2 in area. Beams were tested under tension at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Adhesive thicknesses and failure modes were evaluated with SEM. The microTBS data and mean adhesive thickness were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and multiple-comparison Tukey's test (alpha = 0.05). The mean bond strength (in MPa (SD)) of group EB gradually increased from 1 to 3 consecutive coatings (27.02 (9.38) to 44.32 (4.93), respectively) (p adhesive coatings. The mean thickness of the adhesive layer (in microm (SD)) significantly increased with the number of coatings (p adhesive failure between adhesive and dentin. The XP3 and PQ3 subgroups showed a greater number of total cohesive failure in adhesive. Multiple adhesive coats significantly affected bond strength to dentin. An excess of adhesive layer thickness can negatively influence the strength and the quality of adhesion.

  4. A Thermomechanical and Adhesion Analysis of Epoxy/Al2O3 Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Primo Basílio de Souza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermomechanial properties of polymeric nanocom‐ posites are related to the quality of the adhesion between matrix and nanoparticle. Since the adhesion is related to the nature of the materials and the surface available for chemical, electrostatic and mechanical interactions among these materials, weak bonding forces between alumina (inorganic and polymer matrices (organic were expected. Furthermore, using nanoparticles with greater diameters means that the specific surface area reduction will have an adverse impact on the adhesive process. For epoxy matrices reinforced with alumina nanoparticles, different volume fractions and sizes were observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC: a relation between the glass transition temperature (Tg and the nanoparticle size. This observa‐ tion was tested by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA and the cross-link density was calculated. In addition, the thermal stability enhanced by alumina addition to organic resins and the quality of the adhesion was observed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA.

  5. Numerical Tests of the Virtual Human Model Response Under Dynamic Load Conditions Defined in Federal Aviation Regulation Part 23.562 and 25.562 – Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindstedt Lukasz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the presented research was to check mechanical response of human body model under loads that can occur during airplane accidents and compare results of analysis with some results of experimental tests described in literature. In simulations, new multi-purpose human body model, the VIRTHUMAN, was used. The whole model, as well as its particular segments, was earlier validated based on experimental data, which proved its accuracy to simulate human body dynamic response under condition typical for car crashes, but it was not validated for loads with predominant vertical component (loads acting along spinal column, typical for airplane crashes. Due to limitation of available experimental data, the authors focused on conducting calculations for the case introduced in 14 CFR: Parts 23.562 and 25.562, paragraph (b(1, knowing as the 60° pitch test. The analysis consists in comparison of compression load measured in lumbar section of spine of the FAA HIII Dummy (experimental model and in the Virthuman (numerical model. The performed analyses show numerical stability of the model and satisfactory agreement between experimental data and simulated Virthuman responses. In that sense, the Virthuman model, although originally developed for automotive analyses, shows also great potential to become valuable tool for applications in aviation crashworthiness and safety analyses, as well.

  6. Classification of OPP adhesive tapes according to pyrogram of adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumooka, Y

    2011-03-20

    Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) of colorless and transparent oriented polypropylene (OPP) adhesive tapes were analyzed by pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py/GC/MS). The PSAs were acrylic and rubber-based PSAs and the tapes were classified according to total ion current (TIC) chromatograms of the PSAs. The main pyrolyzates of the acrylic PSAs were decomposition products of monomers, monomers, dimmers and trimers. Those of the rubber-based PSAs were the monomers of elastomers, and subtle peaks observed were the pyrolyzates of tackifiers and volatile additives in the TIC chromatograms. Small differences were observed among the classifications of the acrylic PSAs by Py/GC/MS, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) and Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI/MS). The classification of the rubber-based PSAs by Py/GC/MS and that by ATR FT-IR were the same, and a slight difference was observed between those by Py/GC/MS and MALDI MS. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Adhesive Strength of dry Adhesive Structures Depending on the Thickness of Metal Coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gyu Hye; Kwon, Da Som; Kim, Mi Jung; Kim, Su Hee; Yoon, Ji Won; An, Tea Chang; Hwang, Hui Yun

    2016-01-01

    Recently, engineering applications have started to adopt solutions inspired by nature. The peculiar adhesive properties of gecko skin are an example, as they allow the animal to move freely on vertical walls and even on ceilings. The high adhesive forces between gecko feet and walls are due to the hierarchical microscopical structure of the skin. In this study, the effect of metal coatings on the adhesive strength of synthetic, hierarchically structured, dry adhesives was investigated. Synthetic dry adhesives were fabricated using PDMS micro-molds prepared by photolithography. Metal coatings on synthetic dry adhesives were formed by plasma sputtering. Adhesive strength was measured by pure shear tests. The highest adhesion strengths were found with coatings composed of 4 nm thick layers of Indium, 8 nm thick layers of Zinc and 6 nm thick layers of Gold, respectively

  8. Influence of composition on the adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-min; Hong, Guang; Hayashida, Kentaro; Maeda, Takeshi; Murata, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of composition on the initial viscosity and adhesive strength between denture adhesives and the denture base. Two types of water-soluble polymers (methoxy ethylene maleic anhydride copolymer [PVM-MA] and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose [CMC]) were used. Samples were divided into three groups. Group 1 contained only PVM-MA; Group 2 contained only CMC; and Group 3 contained PVM-MA and CMC. The initial viscosity and adhesive strength were measured. For Group 1, the initial viscosity increased significantly as PVM-MA content increased. The adhesive strength of Group 1 lasted longer than Group 2. The adhesive strength of Group 3 varied greatly. The ratio of CMC and PVM-MA has a significant effect on the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of denture adhesives. Our results suggest that it is possible to improve the durability of a denture adhesive by combining different water-soluble polymers.

  9. Adhesion of rhodium films on metallic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marot, L.; Covarel, G.; Tuilier, M.-H.; Steiner, R.; Oelhafen, P.

    2008-01-01

    Rhodium coated metallic films were prepared by magnetron sputtering on metallic substrates. All films were elaborated in same conditions on copper, molybdenum and stainless steel. Adhesion strength tests were carried out by scratch test. The results reveal that the adhesion strength between the film and the substrate is influenced by the hardness of the substrate. Increase of deposition temperature improves the adhesion of the coating. In addition, pre-treatment of substrates by a filtered cathodic vacuum arc and the layer thickness have has some effects on the final adhesion strength

  10. Autologous fibrin adhesive in experimental tubal anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, S; Rusia, U; Agarwal, S; Agarwal, N

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate autologous fibrin in rabbit oviduct anastomosis versus 7-0 vikryl, a conventional suture material used in tubal anastomosis. Thrombin was added to the autologous fibrinogen at the site of anastomosis to obtain a tissue adhesive. The anastomotic time, pregnancy rate, and litter size were evaluated. Three months later, a relaparotomy was done to evaluate patency and degree of adhesions, and a tubal biopsy was taken from the site of anastomosis. Analysis of results showed a statistically significant (P < .001) shortened anastomotic time and superior histopathological union in the tissue adhesive group. Patency rate, pregnancy rate, and degree of adhesions were comparable in both groups.

  11. Wood adhesives from Eucalyptus tar and creosote

    OpenAIRE

    Pimenta, AS; Vital, BR; Fujiwara, FY

    1997-01-01

    This study has shown that Eucalyptus tar and creosote can be used in phenolic adhesive formulations (resols) for wood products bonding. Some adhesives were prepared substituting 0; 17.7; 35.0 and 67.0% of the phenol by anhydrous tar and 0; 15.0 e 28.5% by creosote. In gluing Brazilian pine veneers, eucalypt tar and creosote based adhesives required longer pressing times for curing than conventional phenol-formaldehyde adhesives. By using C-13 NMR, the number of carbons in side chains and hydr...

  12. Brain surface motion imaging to predict adhesions between meningiomas and the brain surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taoka, Toshiaki; Yamatani, Yuya; Akashi, Toshiaki; Miyasaka, Toshiteru; Emura, Tomoko; Kichikawa, Kimihiko [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology, Nara (Japan); Yamada, Syuichi; Nakase, Hiroyuki [Nara Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Nara (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    ''Brain surface motion imaging'' (BSMI) is the subtraction of pulse-gated, 3D, heavily T2-weighted image of two different phases of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsation, which enables the assessment of the dynamics of brain surface pulsatile motion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of this imaging method for providing presurgical information about adhesions between meningiomas and the brain surface. Eighteen cases with surgically resected meningioma in whom BSMI was presurgically obtained were studied. BSMI consisted of two sets of pulse-gated, 3D, heavily T2-weighted, fast spin echo scans. Images of the systolic phase and the diastolic phase were obtained, and subtraction was performed with 3D motion correction. We analyzed the presence of band-like texture surrounding the tumor and judged the degree of motion discrepancy as ''total,'' ''partial,'' or ''none.'' The correlation between BSMI and surgical findings was evaluated. For cases with partial adhesions, agreements in the locations of the adhesions were also evaluated. On presurgical BSMI, no motion discrepancy was seen in eight cases, partial in six cases, and total in four cases. These presurgical predictions about adhesions and surgical findings agreed in 13 cases (72.2%). The locations of adhesions agreed in five of six cases with partial adhesions. In the current study, BSMI could predict brain and meningioma adhesions correctly in 72.2% of cases, and adhesion location could also be predicted. This imaging method appears to provide presurgical information about brain/meningioma adhesions. (orig.)

  13. 78 FR 52429 - Indirect Food Additives: Adhesives and Components of Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 175 Indirect Food Additives: Adhesives and Components of Coatings CFR Correction In Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 170 to 199, revised as of April 1, 2013, on page 196, in Sec. 175.320, in paragraph (c), in...

  14. Differential effects of corticosteroids and theophylline on the adhesive interaction between eosinophils and endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Nagata

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Corticosteroids and theophylline have been used widely for the treatment of asthma. These two classes of drugs appear to reduce the tissue infiltration of eosinophils, predominant inflammatory cells in the airways of asthmatic patients. Corticosteroids inhibit the generation of both endothelial-activating Th2 cytokines (e.g. interleukin (IL-4/IL-13 and eosinophil growth factors (e.g. IL-5/granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor and also attenuate the effects of eosinophil growth factors on the differentiation and prolonged survival of eosinophils. However, corticosteroids modulate directly neither eosinophil adhesiveness nor the expression of adhesion proteins on endothelial cells in vitro. Therefore, it is likely that the inhibitory effect of corticosteroids on the tissue infiltration of eosinophils is the consequence of indirect mechanisms, mainly via the inhibition of cytokines. Interestingly, theophylline, which is generally accepted as a bronchodilator, attenuates eosinophil adhesion to endothelial cells in vitro at a clinically therapeutic concentration. Furthermore, theophylline inhibits the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 on endothelial cells that had been stimulated with IL-4 plus tumor necrosis factor-a. Thus, theophylline possibly exerts an inhibitory effect on both the adhesive property of eosinophils and the expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells. These findings possibly indicate that theophylline would be adequate to supplement the actions of corticosteroids in asthmatic airway inflammation, partly via its inhibitory effect on the interaction between blood eosinophils and endothelial cells.

  15. Old and sticky—adhesive mechanisms in the living fossil Nautilus pompilius (Mollusca, Cephalopoda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Byern, Janek; Wani, Ryoji; Schwaha, Thomas; Grunwald, Ingo; Cyran, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Nautiloidea is the oldest group within the cephalopoda, and modern Nautilus differs much in its outer morphology from all other recent species; its external shell and pinhole camera eye are the most prominent distinguishing characters. A further unique feature of Nautilus within the cephalopods is the lack of suckers or hooks on the tentacles. Instead, the animals use adhesive structures present on the digital tentacles. Earlier studies focused on the general tentacle morphology and put little attention on the adhesive gland system. Our results show that the epithelial parts on the oral adhesive ridge contain three secretory cell types (columnar, goblet, and cell type 1) that differ in shape and granule size. In the non-adhesive aboral epithelium, two glandular cell types (cell types 2 and 3) are present; these were not mentioned in any earlier study and differ from the cells in the adhesive area. The secretory material of all glandular cell types consists mainly of neutral mucopolysaccharide units, whereas one cell type in the non-adhesive epithelium also reacts positive for acidic mucopolysaccharides. The present data indicate that the glue in Nautilus consists mainly of neutral mucopolysaccharides. The glue seems to be a viscous carbohydrate gel, as known from another cephalopod species. De-attachment is apparently effectuated mechanically, i.e., by muscle contraction of the adhesive ridges and tentacle retraction. PMID:22221553

  16. Properties of pressure sensitive adhesives found in paper recycling operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan F. Verhulst; Steven J. Severtson; Jihui Guo; Carl J. Houtman

    2006-01-01

    Hot melt and water-based adhesives are very different materials with similar physical properties. Their ability to act as adhesives is due to physical bonds and mechanical interlocks which form as adhesive flows into topographical features on the substrate surface. Hot-melt adhesives are based on soft, rubbery polymers while water-based adhesives are usually acrylic...

  17. Effect of inorganic fillers in paper on the adhesion of pressure-sensitive adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weixu Chen; Xiaoyan Tang; John Considine; Kevin T. Turner

    2011-01-01

    Inorganic fillers are inexpensive materials used to increase the density, smoothness and other properties of paper that are important for printing. In the current study, the adhesion of pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs), a common type of adhesive used in labels and tapes, to papers containing varying amounts and types of fillers is investigated. Papers with three...

  18. Adhesive Bonding and Corrosion Performance Investigated as a Function of Aluminum Oxide Chemistry and Adhesives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrahami, S.T.; Hauffman, T.; de Kok, John M.M.; Terryn, H.A.; Mol, J.M.C.

    2017-01-01

    The long-term strength and durability of an adhesive bond is dependent on the stability of the oxide-adhesive interface. As such, changes in the chemistry of the oxide and/or the adhesive are expected to modify the interfacial properties and affect the joint performance in practice. The upcoming

  19. Characterization of macrophage adhesion molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remold-O'Donnell, E.; Savage, B.

    1988-01-01

    Macrophage adhesion molecule (MAM), an abundant surface molecule which functions in the adhesion and spreading of guinea pig macrophages on surfaces, is characterized as a heterodimer of the trypsin- and plasmin-sensitive glycopeptide gp160 (MAM-α) and the glycopeptide gp93 (MAM-β). The density of MAM molecules is estimated at 630,000 per macrophage on the basis of quantitative binding of 125 I-labeled monoclonal antibody. The glycopeptide subunits display microheterogeneity on isoelectrofocusing; the pI is 5.8-6.3 for gp160 (MAM-α) and 6.4-7.0 for gp93 (MAM-β). A neutrophil gp160, gp93 molecule was shown to be indistinguishable from macrophage MAM on the basis of electrophoresis, isoelectrofocusing, and reactivity with 10 monoclonal antibodies. A related heterodimer of gp93 associated with a larger, antigenically different glycopeptide (gp180, gp93)was identified on circulating lymphocytes. Cumulative properties indicate that MAM is the guinea pig analog of human Mo1 and mouse Mac-1

  20. Hardness and adhesion performances of nanocoating on carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnidawani, J. N.; Azlina, H. N.; Norita, H.; Bonnia, N. N.

    2018-01-01

    Nanocoatings industry has been aggressive in searching for cost-effective alternatives and environmental friendly approaches to manufacture products. Nanocoatings represent an engineering solution to prevent corrosion of the structural parts of ships, insulation and pipelines industries. The adhesion and hardness properties of coating affect material properties. This paper reviews ZnO-SiO2 as nanopowder in nano coating formulation as the agent for new and improved coating performances. Carbon steel on type S50C used as common substrate in nanocoating industry. 3wt% ZnO and 2wt% SiO2 addition of nanoparticles into nanocoating showed the best formulation since hardness and adhesion of nanocoating was good on carbon steel substrate. Incorporation of nanoparticles into coating increased the performances of coating.

  1. Aspects of silicone rubber as encapsulant for neurological prostheses. Part 4: Two-part rubbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, P E

    1997-05-01

    The durability of the adhesion, in the presence of water, of three two-part silicone rubbers to five adherends of practical interest is examined. The results are contrasted with those obtained, in previous work, from single-part material. It is concluded that two-part rubbers promise outstanding performance in particular circumstances.

  2. Signaling mechanisms of neurite outgrowth induced by the cell adhesion molecules NCAM and N-cadherin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S M; Berezin, V; Bock, E

    2008-01-01

    Formation of appropriate neural circuits depends on a complex interplay between extracellular guiding cues and intracellular signaling events that result in alterations of cytoskeletal dynamics and a neurite growth response. Surface-expressed cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) interact with the surro......Formation of appropriate neural circuits depends on a complex interplay between extracellular guiding cues and intracellular signaling events that result in alterations of cytoskeletal dynamics and a neurite growth response. Surface-expressed cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) interact...... extracellular guidance cues to intracellular events and thereby regulating neurite outgrowth. In this review, we focus on two CAMs, the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and N-cadherin, and their ability to mediate signaling associated with a neurite outgrowth response. In particular, we will focus on direct...

  3. Gelatinous zooplankton in the Belgian part of the North Sea and the adjacent Schelde estuary: Spatio-temporal distribution patterns and population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansteenbrugge, Lies; Van Regenmortel, Tina; De Troch, Marleen; Vincx, Magda; Hostens, Kris

    2015-03-01

    Many ocean ecosystems are thought to be heading towards a dominance of gelatinous organisms. However, gelatinous zooplankton has been largely understudied and the absence of quantitative long-term data for the studied area impedes drawing conclusions on potential increasing densities. This study gives a comprehensive overview of the spatio-temporal distribution patterns of gelatinous zooplankton in terms of diversity and density in the Belgian part of the North Sea and the adjacent Schelde estuary, based on monthly and seasonal samples between March 2011 and February 2012. Three Scyphozoa, three Ctenophora and 27 Hydrozoa taxa were identified, including three non-indigenous species: Mnemiopsis leidyi, Nemopsis bachei and Lovenella assimilis. In general, one gelatinous zooplankton assemblage was found across locations and seasons. Average gelatinous zooplankton densities reached up to 18 ind·m-3 near the coast, gradually declining towards the open sea. In the brackish Schelde estuary, average densities remained below 3 ind·m-3. Highest gelatinous zooplankton densities were recorded in summer and autumn. Overall, hydromedusae were the most important group both in terms of diversity and density. The ctenophore Pleurobrachia pileus and the hydromedusa Clytia sp. were present in every season and at every location. Gelatinous zooplankton densities never outnumbered the non-gelatinous zooplankton densities recorded from the WP3 samples. The spatial and temporal distribution patterns seemed to be mainly driven by temperature (season) and salinity (location). Other environmental parameters including (larger) non-gelatinous zooplankton densities (as an important food source) were not retained in the most parsimonious DistLM model.In terms of population dynamics, Beroe sp. seemed to follow the three reproductive cycles of its prey P. pileus and the presence of M. leidyi, which were abundant in a broad size spectrum in summer and autumn. In general, gelatinous zooplankton

  4. Clays causing adhesion with tool surfaces during mechanical tunnel driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnoli, G.; Fernández-Steeger, T.; Stanjek, H.; Feinendegen, M.; Post, C.; Azzam, R.

    2009-04-01

    During mechanical excavation with a tunnel boring machine (TBM) it is possible that clays stick to the cutting wheel and to other metal parts. The resulting delays in the progress of construction work, cause great economic damage and often disputes between the public awarding authorities and executing companies. One of the most important factors to reduce successfully the clay adhesion is the use of special polymers and foams. But why does the clay stick to the metal parts? A first step is to recognize which kind of clay mineralogy shows serious adhesion problems. The mechanical properties of clay and clay suspensions are primarily determined by surface chemistry and charge distribution at the interfaces, which in turn affect the arrangement of the clay structure. As we know, clay is a multi-phase material and its behaviour depends on numerous parameters such as: clay mineralogy, clay fraction, silt fraction, sand fraction, water content, water saturation, Atterberg limits, sticky limit, activity, cation exchange capacity, degree of consolidation and stress state. It is therefore likely that adhesion of clay on steel is also affected by these clay parameters. Samples of clay formations, which caused problems during tunnel driving, will be analyzed in laboratory. Mineralogical analyses (diffractometry, etc.) will be carried out to observe which minerals are responsible for adherence problems. To manipulate the physical properties, batch tests will be carried out in order to eliminate or reduce the adhesion on tool surfaces through variation of the zeta potential. Second step is the performance of vane shear tests on clay samples. Different pore fluid (distilled water, pure NaCl solution, ethanol and methanol) will be used to study the variation of the mechanical behaviour of clay depending on the dielectric constant of the fluids. This project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the DFG (German Research Foundation) in the

  5. A fast and quantitative evaluation of the Aspergillus fumigatus biofilm adhesion properties by means of digital pulsed force mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiorana, Alessandro; Papi, Massimiliano; Bugli, Francesca; Torelli, Riccardo; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Cacaci, Margherita; Posteraro, Brunella; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; De Spirito, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogenic mould Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) is an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised and in part immunocompetent patients. A. fumigatus can grow in multicellular communities by the formation of a hyphal network embedded in an extracellular matrix (ECM) meanly composed by polysaccharides, melanin, proteins. Because adhesion properties is one primary factor affecting the balance between growth, detachment and biofilm formation, its quantification is essential in understanding, predicting, and modelling biofilm development. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and force spectroscopy have recently opened a range of novel applications in microbiology including the imaging and manipulation of membrane proteins at the subnanometer level, the observation of the surface of living cells at high resolution, the mapping of local properties such as surface charges, the measurement of elastic properties of cell-surface constituents and the probing of cellular interactions using functionalized probes. Nevertheless, the principal disadvantage of this approach is the relatively slow acquisition rate that makes AFM is not able to detect fast dynamics. In this study we demonstrated that digital pulsed force mode (DPFM) atomic force microscopy can be used to obtain high-resolution topographical images and to quantify the adhesion properties of the A. fumigatus biofilm with an high acquisition rate. Here we show by means of DPFM-AFM that Alginate Lyase (AlgL), an enzyme known to reduce negatively charged alginate levels in microbial biofilm, is able to reduce the biofilm adhesion forces forming several nano-fractures in the ECM. These results suggest that the AlgL could used to enhance the antifungal drugs transit through the ECM.

  6. A fast and quantitative evaluation of the Aspergillus fumigatus biofilm adhesion properties by means of digital pulsed force mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiorana, Alessandro [Istituto di Fisica, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, L. go F. Vito 1, 00168 Roma (Italy); Papi, Massimiliano, E-mail: m.papi@rm.unicatt.it [Istituto di Fisica, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, L. go F. Vito 1, 00168 Roma (Italy); Bugli, Francesca; Torelli, Riccardo [Istituto di Microbiologia, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, L. go F. Vito 1, 00168 Roma (Italy); Maulucci, Giuseppe [Istituto di Fisica, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, L. go F. Vito 1, 00168 Roma (Italy); Cacaci, Margherita; Posteraro, Brunella; Sanguinetti, Maurizio [Istituto di Microbiologia, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, L. go F. Vito 1, 00168 Roma (Italy); De Spirito, Marco [Istituto di Fisica, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, L. go F. Vito 1, 00168 Roma (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    The opportunistic pathogenic mould Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) is an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised and in part immunocompetent patients. A. fumigatus can grow in multicellular communities by the formation of a hyphal network embedded in an extracellular matrix (ECM) meanly composed by polysaccharides, melanin, proteins. Because adhesion properties is one primary factor affecting the balance between growth, detachment and biofilm formation, its quantification is essential in understanding, predicting, and modelling biofilm development. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and force spectroscopy have recently opened a range of novel applications in microbiology including the imaging and manipulation of membrane proteins at the subnanometer level, the observation of the surface of living cells at high resolution, the mapping of local properties such as surface charges, the measurement of elastic properties of cell-surface constituents and the probing of cellular interactions using functionalized probes. Nevertheless, the principal disadvantage of this approach is the relatively slow acquisition rate that makes AFM is not able to detect fast dynamics. In this study we demonstrated that digital pulsed force mode (DPFM) atomic force microscopy can be used to obtain high-resolution topographical images and to quantify the adhesion properties of the A. fumigatus biofilm with an high acquisition rate. Here we show by means of DPFM-AFM that Alginate Lyase (AlgL), an enzyme known to reduce negatively charged alginate levels in microbial biofilm, is able to reduce the biofilm adhesion forces forming several nano-fractures in the ECM. These results suggest that the AlgL could used to enhance the antifungal drugs transit through the ECM.

  7. Dynamics of Soft Matter

    CERN Document Server

    García Sakai, Victoria; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    Dynamics of Soft Matter: Neutron Applications provides an overview of neutron scattering techniques that measure temporal and spatial correlations simultaneously, at the microscopic and/or mesoscopic scale. These techniques offer answers to new questions arising at the interface of physics, chemistry, and biology. Knowledge of the dynamics at these levels is crucial to understanding the soft matter field, which includes colloids, polymers, membranes, biological macromolecules, foams, emulsions towards biological & biomimetic systems, and phenomena involving wetting, friction, adhesion, or micr

  8. GEM/POPs: a global 3-D dynamic model for semi-volatile persistent organic pollutants ─ Part 2: Global transports and budgets of PCBs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Barrie

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Global transports and budgets of three PCBs were investigated with a 3-D dynamic model for semi-volatile persistent organic pollutants – GEM/POPs. Dominant pathways were identified for PCB transports in the atmosphere with a transport flux peaking below 8 km for gaseous and 14 km for particulate PCB28, and peaking below 4 km for gaseous and 6 km for particulate PCB180. The inter-continental transports of PCBs in the Northern Hemisphere (NH are dominated in the zonal direction with their route changes regulated seasonally by the variation of westerly jet. The transport pathways from Europe and North Atlantic contributed the most PCBs to the Arctic. Inter-hemispheric transports of PCBs originated from the regions of Europe, Asia and North America in three different flow-paths, accompanying with easterly jet, Asian monsoon winds and trade winds. PCBs from the Southern Hemisphere (SH could also be exported into the NH. According to the PCB emissions of year 2000, Europe, North America and Asia are the three largest sources of the three PCBs, contributing to the global background concentrations in the atmosphere, soil and water. Globally, PCB28 in soil and water has become a comparable source to the anthropogenic emissions while heavier PCBs such as PCB153 and 180 are still transporting into soil and water. For all three congeners, particulate PCBs are concentrated in the higher levels than gaseous PCBs. More than half of the particulate PCB28 could reach up to the stratosphere, while most of the heavier counter-parts (PCB153 and PCB180 are stored in the troposphere including boundary layer with more than 99% gaseous PCB180 below 6 km.

  9. Modelling of the dynamics of the vessel and circuits of recirculation of a BWR type nucleo electric as part of the SUN-RAH university simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez S, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    In the present project, the development of a model for the dynamics of the process of energy transport generated in the nuclear fuel until the main steam lines of a nucleo electric central with BWR type nuclear reactor, using mathematical models of reduced order is presented. These models present the main characteristics of the reactor vessel and of the recirculation system, defined by the main phenomena that intervene in those physical processes. Likewise, the objective of the general project of the one University student nucleo electric simulator with Boiling Water Reactor (SUN-RAH) for later on to establish the modeling equations for each part of the nuclear reactor as well as of the load pursuit system. Also, its were described the graphic interfaces implemented in an three layers architecture in which the different measuring variables are presented in the monitor. It fits signalize that the advantage presented by the University student nucleo electric simulator is the possibility to carry out changes in the magnitudes of those different variables that intervene in the physical processes made in the one reactor and in the recirculation system in execution time of the same one. Of same way, the creation of a graphic intuitive interface, friendly, and designed with the same technology with the one that the video games are programmed in the present time. Besides all the above mentioned, the pending goals inside of the project are exposed, as well as the developments in construction process or conceptualized to be included in future versions of the simulator. Finally its are thinking about possible scenarios of applications of SUN-RAH, as well as their reaches. (Author)

  10. Adhesion mechanism of a gecko-inspired oblique structure with an adhesive tip for asymmetric detachment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Yu; Sato, Chiaki; Takahashi, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    An adhesion model of an oblique structure with an adhesive tip is proposed by considering a limiting stress for adhesion to describe the detachment mechanism of gecko foot hairs. When a force is applied to the root of the oblique structure, normal and shear stresses are generated at contact and the adhesive tip is detached from the surface when reaching the limiting stress. An adhesion criterion that considers both the normal and shear stresses is introduced, and the asymmetric detachment of the oblique structure is theoretically investigated. In addition, oblique beam array structures are manufactured, and an inclination effect of the structure on the asymmetric detachment is experimentally verified. (paper)

  11. Prenatal diagnostic procedure for leukocyte adhesion deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weening, R. S.; Bredius, R. G.; Wolf, H.; van der Schoot, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder which leads to recurrent severe infections due to impaired leukocyte functions. The disorder is caused by an absence or deficiency of leukocyte cell adhesion molecules (LeuCAMs) on the leukocyte membranes. The diagnosis is

  12. Predicting Failure Initiation in Structural Adhesive Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Elastoplástico de Adhesivos – Modeling, characterization and simulation of the elastoplastic behavior of adhesives. Maestría en Ciencia de Materiales...adhesive and a 1018 steel”. Maestría en Ciencia de Materiales. Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados S.C. May 2012.  Abstract: In the

  13. Mechanisms of temporary adhesion in benthic animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dodou, D.; Breedveld, P.; Winter, J.C.F.; Dankelman, J.; Leeuwen, van J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Adhesive systems are ubiquitous in benthic animals and play a key role in diverse functions such as locomotion, food capture, mating, burrow building, and defence. For benthic animals that release adhesives, surface and material properties and external morphology have received little attention

  14. Switchable adhesion by chemical functionality and topography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamperman, M.M.G.; Synytska, A.

    2012-01-01

    Progress in adhesion technology over the last few decades has led to widespread replacement of mechanical fasteners with adhesive bonds. Despite the advances, it remains challenging to produce materials that are sticky on demand. In this feature article we highlight recent efforts to develop

  15. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    Abstract. A major issue encountered during fabrication of triple junction a-Si solar cells on polyimide sub- strates is the adhesion of the solar cell thin films to the substrates. Here, we present our study of film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and ...

  16. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A major issue encountered during fabrication of triple junction -Si solar cells on polyimide substrates is the adhesion of the solar cell thin films to the substrates. Here, we present our study of film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and Gouldflex), and the ...

  17. Age Increases Monocyte Adhesion on Collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaji, Samira; Zondler, Lisa; Kleinjan, Fenneke; Nolte, Ulla; Mulaw, Medhanie A.; Danzer, Karin M.; Weishaupt, Jochen H.; Gottschalk, Kay-E.

    2017-05-01

    Adhesion of monocytes to micro-injuries on arterial walls is an important early step in the occurrence and development of degenerative atherosclerotic lesions. At these injuries, collagen is exposed to the blood stream. We are interested whether age influences monocyte adhesion to collagen under flow, and hence influences the susceptibility to arteriosclerotic lesions. Therefore, we studied adhesion and rolling of human peripheral blood monocytes from old and young individuals on collagen type I coated surface under shear flow. We find that firm adhesion of monocytes to collagen type I is elevated in old individuals. Pre-stimulation by lipopolysaccharide increases the firm adhesion of monocytes homogeneously in older individuals, but heterogeneously in young individuals. Blocking integrin αx showed that adhesion of monocytes to collagen type I is specific to the main collagen binding integrin αxβ2. Surprisingly, we find no significant age-dependent difference in gene expression of integrin αx or integrin β2. However, if all integrins are activated from the outside, no differences exist between the age groups. Altered integrin activation therefore causes the increased adhesion. Our results show that the basal increase in integrin activation in monocytes from old individuals increases monocyte adhesion to collagen and therefore the risk for arteriosclerotic plaques.

  18. Influence of Blood Contamination During Multimode Adhesive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The present study evaluated the effects of blood contamination performed at different steps of bonding on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of multimode adhesives to dentin when using the self-etch approach. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five molars were randomly assigned to three adhesive groups ...

  19. Is nonoperative management of adhesive intestinal obstruction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nonoperative management of adhesive intestinal obstruction gives good results in adults but there are scant studies on its outcome in children. This study reports outcomes and experiences with nonoperative and operative management of adhesive intestinal obstruction in children in a resource-poor country.

  20. Hot-Melt Adhesive Attachment System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, R. L.; Frizzell, A. W.; Little, B. D.; Progar, D. J.; Coultrip, R. H.; Couch, R. H.; Stein, B. A.; Buckley, J. D.; St. Clair, T. L.; Gleason, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Adhesive system is as effective on Earth as in space. Fiberglass cloth mounted in head assembly. When adhesive reaches melt temperature head is attached to metals composites, ceramics, and other materials. Once attached, head cooled rapidly for quick stick. Used to tether tools or attach temporary scaffolding to walls, buildings, or beams.

  1. Adhesions and Adhesiolysis: The Role of Laparoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavic, Suzanne M.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Adhesions commonly result from abdominal and pelvic surgical procedures and may result in intestinal obstruction, infertility, chronic pain, or complicate subsequent operations. Laparoscopy produces less peritoneal trauma than does conventional laparotomy and may result in decreased adhesion formation. We present a review of the available data on laparoscopy and adhesion formation, as well as laparoscopic adhesiolysis. We also review current adjuvant techniques that may be used by practicing laparoscopists to prevent adhesion formation. Database: A Medline search using “adhesions,” “adhesiolysis,” and “laparoscopy” as key words was performed for English-language articles. Further references were obtained through cross-referencing the bibliography cited in each work. Discussion: The majority of studies indicate that laparoscopy may reduce postoperative adhesion formation relative to laparotomy. However, laparoscopy by itself does not appear to eliminate adhesions completely. A variety of adjuvant materials are available to surgeons, and the most recent investigation has demonstrated significant potential for intraperitoneal barriers. Newer technologies continue to evolve and should result in clinically relevant reductions in adhesion formation. PMID:12113430

  2. Biobased adhesives and non-conventional bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles Frihart

    2010-01-01

    Biobased adhesives fall into several major classes based upon their chemical structures. Starches are used in large volume, especially in the paper products industries, but cellulosics generally do not have the strength and water resistance needed for most wood products. Several authors have covered cellulosics adhesives (Baumann and Conner 2002, Pizzi 2006). However...

  3. Scaling Principles for Understanding and Exploiting Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Alfred

    A grand challenge in the science of adhesion is the development of a general design paradigm for adhesive materials that can sustain large forces across an interface yet be detached with minimal force upon command. Essential to this challenge is the generality of achieving this performance under a wide set of external conditions and across an extensive range of forces. Nature has provided some guidance through various examples, e.g. geckos, for how to meet this challenge; however, a single solution is not evident upon initial investigation. To help provide insight into nature's ability to scale reversible adhesion and adapt to different external constraints, we have developed a general scaling theory that describes the force capacity of an adhesive interface in the context of biological locomotion. We have demonstrated that this scaling theory can be used to understand the relative performance of a wide range of organisms, including numerous gecko species and insects, as well as an extensive library of synthetic adhesive materials. We will present the development and testing of this scaling theory, and how this understanding has helped guide the development of new composite materials for high capacity adhesives. We will also demonstrate how this scaling theory has led to the development of new strategies for transfer printing and adhesive applications in manufacturing processes. Overall, the developed scaling principles provide a framework for guiding the design of adhesives.

  4. Chapter 16: Soy Proteins as Wood Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Christopher G. Hunt; Michael J. Birkeland

    2014-01-01

    Protein adhesives allowed the development of bonded wood products such as plywood and glulam in the early 20th century. Petrochemical-based adhesives replaced proteins in most wood bonding applications because of lower cost, improved production efficiencies, and enhanced durability. However, several technological and environmental factors have led to a resurgence of...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 Printable PDF Open All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 is a disorder that ...

  6. Interpenetrating Polymer Network (IPN) Adhesives for Electron Beam Cure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sands, James

    2000-01-01

    Electron beam (e-beam)-processed polymer adhesives have historically performed poorly compared to traditional adhesive technologies due to a lack of toughness engineered into these new types of adhesive materials...

  7. Do uniform tangential interfacial stresses enhance adhesion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menga, Nicola; Carbone, Giuseppe; Dini, Daniele

    2018-03-01

    We present theoretical arguments, based on linear elasticity and thermodynamics, to show that interfacial tangential stresses in sliding adhesive soft contacts may lead to a significant increase of the effective energy of adhesion. A sizable expansion of the contact area is predicted in conditions corresponding to such scenario. These results are easily explained and are valid under the assumptions that: (i) sliding at the interface does not lead to any loss of adhesive interaction and (ii) spatial fluctuations of frictional stresses can be considered negligible. Our results are seemingly supported by existing experiments, and show that frictional stresses may lead to an increase of the effective energy of adhesion depending on which conditions are established at the interface of contacting bodies in the presence of adhesive forces.

  8. Adhesive Joints in Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jeppe Bjørn

    The industrial goal of this PhD project is to enable manufacturing of larger wind turbine blades by improving the existing design methods for adhesive joints. This should improve the present joint design such that more efficient wind turbine blades can be produced. The main scientific goal...... of the project is to develop new- and to improve the existing design rules for adhesive joints in wind turbine blades. The first scientific studies of adhesive joints were based on stress analysis, which requires that the bond-line is free of defects, but this is rarely the case for a wind turbine blade. Instead...... curing and test temperatures) on the formation of transverse cracks in the adhesive were tested experimentally. It was assumed that the transverse cracks evolved due to a combination of mechanical- and residual stresses in the adhesive. A new approach was developed that allows the residual stress...

  9. Preparation of Power Distribution System for High Penetration of Renewable Energy Part I. Dynamic Voltage Restorer for Voltage Regulation Pat II. Distribution Circuit Modeling and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshkbar Sadigh, Arash

    Part I: Dynamic Voltage Restorer In the present power grids, voltage sags are recognized as a serious threat and a frequently occurring power-quality problem and have costly consequence such as sensitive loads tripping and production loss. Consequently, the demand for high power quality and voltage stability becomes a pressing issue. Dynamic voltage restorer (DVR), as a custom power device, is more effective and direct solutions for "restoring" the quality of voltage at its load-side terminals when the quality of voltage at its source-side terminals is disturbed. In the first part of this thesis, a DVR configuration with no need of bulky dc link capacitor or energy storage is proposed. This fact causes to reduce the size of the DVR and increase the reliability of the circuit. In addition, the proposed DVR topology is based on high-frequency isolation transformer resulting in the size reduction of transformer. The proposed DVR circuit, which is suitable for both low- and medium-voltage applications, is based on dc-ac converters connected in series to split the main dc link between the inputs of dc-ac converters. This feature makes it possible to use modular dc-ac converters and utilize low-voltage components in these converters whenever it is required to use DVR in medium-voltage application. The proposed configuration is tested under different conditions of load power factor and grid voltage harmonic. It has been shown that proposed DVR can compensate the voltage sag effectively and protect the sensitive loads. Following the proposition of the DVR topology, a fundamental voltage amplitude detection method which is applicable in both single/three-phase systems for DVR applications is proposed. The advantages of proposed method include application in distorted power grid with no need of any low-pass filter, precise and reliable detection, simple computation and implementation without using a phased locked loop and lookup table. The proposed method has been verified

  10. Adhesives for orthodontic bracket bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déborah Daniella Diniz Fonseca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of acid etching, introduced by Buonocore in 1955, brought the possibility of bonding between the bracket base and enamel, contributing to more esthetic and conservative orthodontics. This direct bracket bonding technique has brought benefits such as reduced cost and time in performing the treatment, as well as making it easier to perform oral hygiene. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of published studies on orthodontic bracket bonding to dental enamel. It was verified that resin composites and glass ionomer are the most studied and researched materials for this purpose. Resin-modified glass ionomer, with its biocompatibility, capacity of releasing fluoride and no need for acid etching on the tooth structure, has become increasingly popular among dentists. However, due to the esthetic and mechanical properties of light polymerizable resin composite, it continues to be one of the adhesives of choice in the bracket bonding technique and its use is widely disseminated.

  11. Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-08-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

  12. Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-08-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

  13. Studying the Adhesion Force and Glass Transition of Thin Polystyrene Films by Atomic Force Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kang, Hua; Qian, Xiaoqin; Guan, Li

    2018-01-01

    microscopy (AFM)-based forcedistance curve to study the relaxation dynamics and the film thickness dependence of glass transition temperature (T-g) for normal thin polystyrene (PS) films supported on silicon substrate. The adhesion force (F-ad) between AFM tip and normal thin PS film surfaces...

  14. Adhesion protein protocols [Methods in molecular biology, v. 96

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dejana, Elisabetta; Corada, Monica

    1999-01-01

    "An international corps of expert investigators describe their optimized techniques for both the identification of new cell adhesion proteins and for the characterization of novel adhesive structures...

  15. Sundew adhesive: a naturally occurring hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Sun, Leming; Agrawal, Richa; Zhang, Mingjun

    2015-06-06

    Bioadhesives have drawn increasing interest in recent years, owing to their eco-friendly, biocompatible and biodegradable nature. As a typical bioadhesive, sticky exudate observed on the stalked glands of sundew plants aids in the capture of insects and this viscoelastic adhesive has triggered extensive interests in revealing the implied adhesion mechanisms. Despite the significant progress that has been made, the structural traits of the sundew adhesive, especially the morphological characteristics in nanoscale, which may give rise to the viscous and elastic properties of this mucilage, remain unclear. Here, we show that the sundew adhesive is a naturally occurring hydrogel, consisting of nano-network architectures assembled with polysaccharides. The assembly process of the polysaccharides in this hydrogel is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions mediated with divalent cations. Negatively charged nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 231.9 ± 14.8 nm, are also obtained from this hydrogel and these nanoparticles are presumed to exert vital roles in the assembly of the nano-networks. Further characterization via atomic force microscopy indicates that the stretching deformation of the sundew adhesive is associated with the flexibility of its fibrous architectures. It is also observed that the adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive is susceptible to low temperatures. Both elasticity and adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive reduce in response to lowering the ambient temperature. The feasibility of applying sundew adhesive for tissue engineering is subsequently explored in this study. Results show that the fibrous scaffolds obtained from sundew adhesive are capable of increasing the adhesion of multiple types of cells, including fibroblast cells and smooth muscle cells, a property that results from the enhanced adsorption of serum proteins. In addition, in light of the weak cytotoxic activity exhibited by these scaffolds towards a variety of

  16. The coffee diterpene kahweol inhibits tumor necrosis factor-α-induced expression of cell adhesion molecules in human endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung Gyun; Kim, Ji Young; Hwang, Yong Pil; Lee, Kyung Jin; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2006-01-01

    Endothelial cells produce adhesion molecules after being stimulated with various inflammatory cytokines. These adhesion molecules play an important role in the development of atherogenesis. Recent studies have highlighted the chemoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of kahweol, a coffee-specific diterpene. This study examined the effects of kahweol on the cytokine-induced monocyte/human endothelial cell interaction, which is a crucial early event in atherogenesis. Kahweol inhibited the adhesion of TNFα-induced monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNFα-induced protein and mRNA expression of the cell adhesion molecules, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. Furthermore, kahweol inhibited the TNFα-induced JAK2-PI3K/Akt-NF-κB activation pathway in these cells. Overall, kahweol has anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerotic activities, which occurs partly by down-regulating the pathway that affects the expression and interaction of the cell adhesion molecules on endothelial cells

  17. Encapsulant Adhesion to Surface Metallization on Photovoltaic Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tracy, Jared; Bosco, Nick; Dauskardt, Reinhold

    2017-11-01

    Delamination of encapsulant materials from PV cell surfaces often appears to originate at regions with metallization. Using a fracture mechanics based metrology, the adhesion of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulant to screen-printed silver metallization was evaluated. At room temperature, the fracture energy Gc [J/m2] of the EVA/silver interface (952 J/m2) was ~70% lower than that of the EVA/antireflective (AR) coating (>2900 J/m2) and ~60% lower than that of the EVA to the surface of cell (2265 J/m2). After only 300 h of damp heat aging, the adhesion energy of the silver interface dropped to and plateaued at ~50-60 J/m2 while that of the EVA/AR coating and EVA/cell remained mostly unchanged. Elemental surface analysis showed that the EVA separates from the silver in a purely adhesive manner, indicating that bonds at the interface were likely displaced in the presence of humidity and chemical byproducts at elevated temperature, which in part accounts for the propensity of metalized surfaces to delaminate in the field.

  18. Junctional adhesion molecule-A: functional diversity through molecular promiscuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbacher, Tim; Kummer, Daniel; Ebnet, Klaus

    2017-12-14

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) regulate important processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis. This activity is primarily due to their ability to initiate intracellular signaling cascades at cell-cell contact sites. Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is an IgSF-CAM with a short cytoplasmic tail that has no catalytic activity. Nevertheless, JAM-A is involved in a variety of biological processes. The functional diversity of JAM-A resides to a large part in a C-terminal PDZ domain binding motif which directly interacts with nine different PDZ domain-containing proteins. The molecular promiscuity of its PDZ domain motif allows JAM-A to recruit protein scaffolds to specific sites of cell-cell adhesion and to assemble signaling complexes at those sites. Here, we review the molecular characteristics of JAM-A, including its dimerization, its interaction with scaffolding proteins, and the phosphorylation of its cytoplasmic domain, and we describe how these characteristics translate into diverse biological activities.

  19. Role of Adhesion Molecules in Eosinophil Activation: A Comparative Study on the Effect of Adhesion Molecules on Eosinophil Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutoshi Yamaguchi

    2004-01-01

    Conclusions: The regulation of adhesion molecules, by not only preventing eosinophil adhesion but also eosinophil activation, may be a potential target in the treatment of allergic inflammatory disorders.

  20. Radiation curable adhesive compositions and composite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, W.

    1984-01-01

    This disclosure relates to novel adhesive compositions and composite structures utilizing the same, wherein said adhesive compositions contain an elastomer, a chemically compatible ethylenically unsaturated monomer, a tackifier, an adhesion promoter, and optionally, pigments, fillers, thickeners and flow control agents which are converted from the liquid to the solid state by exposure to high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam. A particularly useful application for such adhesive compositions comprises the assembly of certain composite structures or laminates consisting of, for example, a fiber flocked rubber sheet and a metal base with the adhesive fulfilling the multiple functions of adhering the flocked fiber to the rubber sheet as well as adhering the rubber sheet to the metal base. Optionally, the rubber sheet itself may also be cured at the same time as the adhesive composition with all operations being carried out at ambient temperatures and in the presence of air, with exposure of said assembly to selected dosages of high energy ionizing radiation. These adhesive compositions contain no solvents thereby almost eliminating air pollution or solvent toxicity problems, and offer substantial savings in energy and labor as they are capable of curing in very short time periods without the use of external heat which might damage the substrate

  1. Adhesion Control between Resist and Photomask Blank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Masaaki; Hatakeyama, Sho; Yoshida, Kouji; Abe, Makoto; Totsukawa, Daisuke; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hoga, Morihisa; Hayashi, Naoya; Ohtani, Hiroyuki; Fujihira, Masamichi

    2009-06-01

    Most problems in photomask fabrication such as pattern collapse, haze, and cleaning damage are related to the behavior of surfaces and interfaces of resists, opaque layers, and quartz substrates. Therefore, it is important to control the corresponding surface and interface energies in photomask fabrication processes. In particular, adhesion analysis in microscopic regions is strongly desirable to optimize material and process designs in photomask fabrication. We applied the direct peeling (DP) method with a scanning probe microscope (SPM) tip and measured the adhesion of resist patterns on Cr and quartz surfaces for photomask process optimization. We also studied the effect of tip shape on the reproducibility of adhesion measurements and the dependence of collapse behavior on the resist profile. We measured lateral forces between the resulting collapsed resist pillar and the Cr or the quartz surface before and after the sliding and related these observed lateral forces to the static and kinetic frictional forces, respectively. We also studied the effect of surface modification of the Cr and quartz surfaces with silanization reagents on adhesion measured with the DP method. Resist adhesion could be controlled by surface modification using silanes. We also discuss the relationship between the adhesion observed with the DP method and the properties of the modified surfaces including water contact angles and local adhesive forces measured from force-distance curves with an SPM.

  2. Dynamic performance assessment of a residential building-integrated cogeneration system under different boundary conditions. Part II: Environmental and economic analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosato, Antonio; Sibilio, Sergio; Scorpio, Michelangelo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A building-integrated micro-cogeneration system was dynamically simulated. • Simulation data were analyzed from both environmental and economic point of views. • The proposed system was compared with a conventional supply system. • The proposed system reduces the environmental impact under heat-led operation. • The proposed system reduces the operating costs whatever the control logic is. - Abstract: This work examines the performance of a residential building-integrated micro-cogeneration system during the winter by means of a whole building simulation software. The cogeneration unit was coupled with a multi-family house composed of three floors, compliant with the transmittance values of both walls and windows suggested by the Italian Law; a stratified combined tank for both heating purposes and domestic hot water production was also used for storing heat. Simulations were performed considering the transient nature of the building and occupant driven loads as well as the part-load characteristics of the cogeneration unit. This system was described in detail and analyzed from an energy point of view in the companion paper. In this paper the simulation results were evaluated in terms of both carbon dioxide equivalent emissions and operating costs; detailed analyses were performed in order to estimate the influence of the most significant boundary conditions on both environmental and economic performance of the proposed system: in particular, three volumes of the hot water storage, four climatic zones corresponding to four Italian cities, two electric demand profiles, as well as two control strategies micro-cogeneration unit were considered. The assessment of environmental impact was performed by using the standard emission factors approach, neglecting the effects of local pollutants. The operating costs due to both natural gas and electric energy consumption were evaluated in detail, whereas both the capital and maintenance costs were

  3. Comparison of Allevyn Adhesive and Biatain Adhesive in the management of pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amione, P; Ricci, E; Topo, F; Izzo, L; Pirovano, R; Rega, V; Cocci, C; Masina, M

    2005-09-01

    The primary objective was to assess dressing delamination and the ensuing potential consequences during wear and/or removal, as well as the effect of residue remaining in the ulcer following foam breakdown. In this prospective multicentre study, 32 patients with a grade II or III pressure ulcer were randomised to receive either Allevyn Adhesive or Biatain Adhesive dressing. The performance of the dressings was assessed over seven dressing changes or a maximum of six weeks. The primary efficacy variable was the proportion of patients with at least one delaminated dressing (delamination being defined as the falling apart of a dressing during wear or removal, or the presence of residue from the dressing in the ulcer). Allevyn Adhesive was significantly less likely to delaminate than Biatain Adhesive: 83% of patients given Biatain Adhesive had a dressing that delaminated compared with 14% for Allevyn Adhesive (p = 0.014). Furthermore, a greater proportion of the Biatain Adhesive dressings delaminated compared with the Allevyn Adhesive dressings: 50% versus 4% (p < 0.001). Allevyn Adhesive performed significantly better in the following parameters: handling exudate (p = 0.044), comfort (p = 0.007), ease of application (p = 0.004), conformability during application (p = 0.003) and removal (p < 0.0001), and adherence to the skin during application (p = 0.003) and prior to removal (p = 0.011). Three patients given Allevyn Adhesive (21%) reported three adverse events; six patients given Biatain Adhesive (33%) reported eight adverse events. Allevyn Adhesive is effective and well tolerated in the management of pressure ulcers and less likely to delaminate than Biatain Adhesive.

  4. Western blot analysis of adhesive interactions under fluid shear conditions: the blot rolling assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackstein, Robert; Fuhlbrigge, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Western blotting has proven to be an important technique in the analysis of receptor-ligand interactions (i.e., by ligand blotting) and for identifying molecules mediating cell attachment (i.e., by cell blotting). Conventional ligand blotting and cell blotting methods employ non-dynamic (static) incubation conditions, whereby molecules or cells of interest are placed in suspension and overlaid on membranes. However, many cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesive interactions occur under fluid shear conditions, and shear stress itself mediates and/or facilitates the engagement of these physiologically appropriate receptors and ligands. Notably, shear forces critically influence the adhesion of circulating cells and platelets to vessel walls in physiologic cell migration and hemostasis, as well as in inflammatory and thrombotic disorders, cancer metastasis, and atherosclerosis. Use of non-dynamic blotting conditions to analyze such interactions can introduce bias, overtly missing relevant effectors and/or exaggerating the relative role(s) of non-physiologic adhesion molecules. To address this shortfall, we have developed a new technique for identifying binding interactions under fluid shear conditions, the "blot rolling assay." Using this method, molecules in a complex mixture are resolved by gel electrophoresis, transferred to a membrane that is rendered semitransparent, and the membrane is then incorporated into a parallel-plate flow chamber apparatus. Under controlled flow conditions, cells or particles bearing adhesion proteins of interest are then introduced into the chamber and interactions with individual immobilized molecules (bands) can be visualized in real time. The substrate molecule(s) supporting adhesion under fluid shear can then be identified by staining with specific antibodies or by excising the relevant band(s) and performing mass spectrometry or microsequencing of the isolated material. This method thus allows for the identification, within a complex

  5. Adhesion Between Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    Different adhesion methods of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) layers were studied with respect to adhesional force and the resulting rheology of the two-layered PDMS films were investigated. The role of adhesion between PDMS layers on the performances of two-layer structures was studied with peel s...... strength test and by SEM pictures. The rheology of the double-layered compared to the monolayer films changed in some cases which indicates that the adhesion process needs to be carefully introduced in order not to alter the final properties....

  6. Embedded adhesive connection for laminated glass plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Zangenberg; Poulsen, S.H.; Bagger, A.

    2012-01-01

    The structural behavior of a new connection design, the embedded adhesive connection, used for laminated glass plates is investigated. The connection consists of an aluminum plate encapsulated in-between two adjacent triple layered laminated glass plates. Fastening between glass and aluminum...... is ensured using a structural adhesive. At first, the elastic and viscoelastic material properties of the adhesive are identified where the influence of load-rate and failure properties are also examined. Through an inverse analysis using the finite element method, the experimental observations...... usage in a design situation. The embedded connection shows promising potential as a future fastening system for load-carrying laminated glass plates....

  7. Effect of brushing on fluoride release from 3 bracket adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Robert N; Mack, Steven J; Wefel, James S; Vargas, Marcos A; Jakobsen, Jane R

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare fluoride ion release from 3 orthodontic bracket adhesives with and without brushing the bracketed teeth with a fluoridated dentifrice. The bracket adhesives included a light-cured composite resin (Transbond; 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif), a fluoride-releasing composite resin (Advance; L D Caulk Division, Dentsply International, Milford, Del), and a resin-modified glass ionomer (Fuji Ortho LC; GC America, Alsip, Ill). The teeth in the control group were not bonded with brackets. Sixty extracted human teeth were randomly assigned to 6 groups of 10 each: (1) Transbond, brushed; (2) Advance, brushed; (3) Advance, not brushed; (4) Fuji, brushed; (5) Fuji, not brushed; and (6) control, brushed. After bonding, each tooth was placed in a sealed plastic test tube containing 4 ml of deionized water. The toothpaste used in brushing contained 0.15% weight per volume sodium fluoride, 1500 parts per million parts fluoride (Winter-fresh gel; Colgate-Palmolive Co., New York, NY). Brushing began 24 hours after the teeth were bonded and placed in deionized water. After brushing, the teeth were thoroughly rinsed with deionized water and returned to a sealed test tube. Fluoride measurements were taken before brushing began, at intervals of 72 hours for 22 days, and 90 and 93 days after bonding. Findings included: (1) brushing significantly increased the release of fluoride ions from the teeth in the composite resin and control groups, (2) the enamel crowns of the unbonded control teeth absorbed and re-released a substantial amount of fluoride ions obtained from the toothpaste, (3) the brushed group of teeth bonded with the fluoride-releasing composite resin released significantly more fluoride on the last 4 days that measurements were taken after brushing than the nonbrushed group bonded with the same adhesive, (4) the brushed group of teeth bonded with the resin-modified glass ionomer released significantly more fluoride on the last 4

  8. Crack Propagation in a Toughened Epoxy Adhesive under Repeated Impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian A. Ashcroft

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adhesives are being increasingly used in structural applications, especially in aerospace, automotive and naval structures, making their structural integrity an important issue. In-service loading histories of such structures usually contain low-energy impacts, repetition of which can significantly affect their performance. This paper deals with the behaviour of the toughened epoxy adhesive FM73 under repeated impacts, known as impact fatigue. Izod impact fatigue tests were performed on FM73 specimens in order to study the evolution of damage and to characterise this via measurable parameters, such as the maximum force and the contact time. A finite element model was developed to simulate the impact tests and this was used to calculate the dynamic strain energy release rate, which was compared with that determined using a simple analytical method. A relationship between the maximum dynamic strain energy release rate and impact fatigue crack growth rate was established that was used as the basis of an impact fatigue crack growth law.

  9. Southern Hemisphere Application of the Systematic Approach to Tropical Cyclone Forecasting Part IV: Sources of Large Track Errors by Dynamical Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reader, Grahame

    2000-01-01

    Sources of 72-h track errors> 300 n mi by four dynamical model tropical cyclone predictions in the Southern Hemisphere during the 1997-98 and 1998-99 seasons are studied using conceptual models Carr and Elsberry have previously...

  10. Southern Hemisphere Application of the Systematic Approach to Tropical Cyclone Forecasting Part 4: Sources of Large Track Errors by Dynamical Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reader, Grahame

    2000-01-01

    Sources of 72-h track errors > 300 n mi by four dynamical model tropical cyclone predictions in the Southern Hemisphere during the 1997-98 and 1998-99 seasons are studied using conceptual models Carr and Elsberry have previously...

  11. Elastic–plastic adhesive impacts of tungsten dust with metal surfaces in plasma environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratynskaia, S.; Tolias, P.; Shalpegin, A.; Vignitchouk, L.; De Angeli, M.; Bykov, I.; Bystrov, K.; Bardin, S.; Brochard, F.; Ripamonti, D.; Harder, N. den; De Temmerman, G.

    2015-01-01

    Dust-surface collisions impose size selectivity on the ability of dust grains to migrate in scrape-off layer and divertor plasmas and to adhere to plasma-facing components. Here, we report first experimental evidence of dust impact phenomena in plasma environments concerning low-speed collisions of tungsten dust with tungsten surfaces: re-bouncing, adhesion, sliding and rolling. The results comply with the predictions of the model of elastic-perfectly plastic adhesive spheres employed in the dust dynamics code MIGRAINe for sub- to several meters per second impacts of micrometer-range metal dust

  12. Viscoelastic features of adhesive setae of the tokay gecko (Gekko gecko L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivlev, Yu F; Il'in, A I; Trofimov, O V

    2016-03-01

    Deformations of particular setae of adhesive toe pad of the tokay gecko were investigated by atomic-force microscopy. The effective elastic modulus of the investigated setae varying within 0.34-19 GPa, a pronounced hysteresis was observed during reversible bending of setae. The hysteresis-related energy losses may be as high as 98% of the total bending work. The pronounced viscous features of the setae contradict the hypothesis of dynamic self-cleaning of the gecko adhesive cover, according to which the setae are considered as absolutely elastic cantilever beams.

  13. Effects of different durations of acid hydrolysis on the properties of starch-based wood adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yajie; Xiong, Hanguo; Wang, Zhenjiong; Zia-Ud-Din; Chen, Lei

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the effect of different durations of acid hydrolysis on the improvement of the properties of starch-based wood adhesive was investigated through a variety of determination methods The improved properties were analyzed using the pasting properties, viscosity, shear performance in dry and wet states, fourier infrared spectrometer, dynamic time sweep, and low filed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Starch hydrolysis improved the viscosity stability, bonding performance, and water resistance of the starch-based wood adhesive. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Elastic–plastic adhesive impacts of tungsten dust with metal surfaces in plasma environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratynskaia, S., E-mail: svetlana.ratynskaia@ee.kth.se [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Association EUROfusion-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Tolias, P. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Association EUROfusion-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Shalpegin, A. [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Vignitchouk, L. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Association EUROfusion-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); De Angeli, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Bykov, I. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Association EUROfusion-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Bystrov, K.; Bardin, S. [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439MN Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Brochard, F. [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Ripamonti, D. [Istituto per l’Energetica e le Interfasi – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Harder, N. den; De Temmerman, G. [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439MN Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    Dust-surface collisions impose size selectivity on the ability of dust grains to migrate in scrape-off layer and divertor plasmas and to adhere to plasma-facing components. Here, we report first experimental evidence of dust impact phenomena in plasma environments concerning low-speed collisions of tungsten dust with tungsten surfaces: re-bouncing, adhesion, sliding and rolling. The results comply with the predictions of the model of elastic-perfectly plastic adhesive spheres employed in the dust dynamics code MIGRAINe for sub- to several meters per second impacts of micrometer-range metal dust.

  15. Vaginal epithelial cells regulate membrane adhesiveness to co-ordinate bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Jessica A; Klappe, Karin; Kok, Jan Willem; Busscher, Henk J; Reid, Gregor; van der Mei, Henny C

    2016-04-01

    Vaginal epithelium is colonized by different bacterial strains and species. The bacterial composition of vaginal biofilms controls the balance between health and disease. Little is known about the relative contribution of the epithelial and bacterial cell surfaces to bacterial adhesion and whether and how adhesion is regulated over cell membrane regions. Here, we show that bacterial adhesion forces with cell membrane regions not located above the nucleus are stronger than with regions above the nucleus both for vaginal pathogens and different commensal and probiotic lactobacillus strains involved in health. Importantly, adhesion force ratios over membrane regions away from and above the nucleus coincided with the ratios between numbers of adhering bacteria over both regions. Bacterial adhesion forces were dramatically decreased by depleting the epithelial cell membrane of cholesterol or sub-membrane cortical actin. Thus, epithelial cells can regulate membrane regions to which bacterial adhesion is discouraged, possibly to protect the nucleus. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Impact of double filtration plasmapheresis on adhesion molecules levels in patients with stable coronary heart disease after coronary stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishko, Valerii V; Sokolov, Alexey A; Belskih, Andrei N; Ivanov, Andrei M; Meshkova, Marina E; Skorinova, Tatyana S

    2017-11-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory reaction at the site of damage plays a key role in the formation of neointimal hyperplasia, and in the progression of atherosclerosis. The initiating role in these processes is assigned to adhesion molecules. We studied the dynamics of the level of adhesion molecules soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), soluble form of the molecule platelet adhesion and endothelial type-1 (sPECAM-1), sL-, sP-, sE-selectins during double filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP) with use of plasma fractionators (PF) Cascadeflo EC-50W and EC-40W (Asahi Kasei Medical Co., Japan) in patients with stable coronary heart disease and hyperlipidemia-(a) in the early post-implantation period after coronary stenting. DFPP reduces the level of plasma adhesion molecules. When using PF Cascadeflo EC-40W, a more pronounced decrease occurs. The rejection coefficient (RC) of adhesion molecules has been identified for these PF. These RCs reflect the immediate removal efficiency of adhesion molecules in the perfusion of plasma through PF. The removal effectiveness of adhesion molecules when using PF Cascadeflo EC-40W is higher than when using the PF Cascadeflo EC-50W (sICAM-1 - 2.5 times, sVCAM-1 - 2.2 times, sPECAM-1.6 times, sL-selectin - 5 times, sP-selectin - 2.8 times, sE - selectin - 3 times). Reducing adhesion molecule levels when using DFPP may play an important role in correcting of endothelial dysfunction in response to damage to the arterial wall in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) during the early post-implantation period after coronary stenting. DFPP is a promising approach to prevent in-stent restenosis (ISR). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Micromechanical and surface adhesive properties of single saccharomyces cerevisiae cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzi, Bahman; Cetinkaya, Cetin

    2017-09-01

    The adhesion and mechanical properties of a biological cell (e.g. cell membrane elasticity and adhesiveness) are often strong indicators for the state of its health. Many existing techniques for determining mechanical properties of cells require direct physical contact with a single cell or a group of cells. Physical contact with the cell can trigger complex mechanotransduction mechanisms, leading to cellular responses, and consequently interfering with measurement accuracy. In the current work, based on ultrasonic excitation and interferometric (optical) motion detection, a non-contact method for characterizing the adhesion and mechanical properties of single cells is presented. It is experimentally demonstrated that the rocking (rigid body) motion and internal vibrational resonance frequencies of a single saccharomyces cerevisiae (SC) (baker’s yeast) cell can be acquired with the current approach, and the Young’s modulus and surface tension of the cell membrane as well as surface adhesion energy can be extracted from the values of these acquired resonance frequencies. The detected resonance frequency ranges for single SC cells include a rocking (rigid body) frequency of 330  ±  70 kHz and two breathing resonance frequencies of 1.53  ±  0.12 and 2.02  ±  0.31 MHz. Based on these values, the average work-of-adhesion of SC cells on a silicon substrate in aqueous medium is extracted, for the first time, as WASC-Si=16.2+/- 3.8 mJ {{m}-2} . Similarly, the surface tension and the Young’s modulus of the SC cell wall are predicted as {{σ }SC}=0.16+/- 0.02 N {{m}-1} and {{E}SC}= 9.20  ±  2.80 MPa, respectively. These results are compared to those reported in the literature by utilizing various methods, and good agreements are found. The current approach eliminates the measurement inaccuracies associated with the physical contact. Exciting and detecting cell dynamics at micro-second time-scales is significantly faster than the

  18. Handbook of adhesive bonded structural repair

    CERN Document Server

    Wegman, Raymond F

    1992-01-01

    Provides repair methods for adhesive bonded and composite structures; identifies suitable materials and equipment for repairs; describes damage evaluation criteria and techniques, and methods of inspection before and after repair.

  19. Recent advances in nanostructured biomimetic dry adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras ePattantyus-Abraham

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The relatively large size of the gecko and its ability to climb a multitude of structures with ease has often been cited as the inspiration upon which the field of dry adhesives is based. Since 2010, there have been many advances in the field of dry adhesives with much of the new research focusing on developing nanoscale and hierarchical features in a concentrated effort to develop synthetic gecko-like dry adhesives which are strong, durable and self-cleaning. A brief overview of the geckos and the hairs which it uses to adhere to many different surfaces is provided before delving into the current methods and materials used to fabricate synthetic gecko hairs. A summary of the recently published literature on bio-inspired, nanostructured dry adhesives is presented with an emphasis being placed on fabrication techniques.

  20. Hierarchical capillary adhesion of microcantilevers or hairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianlin; Feng Xiqiao; Xia Re; Zhao Hongping

    2007-01-01

    As a result of capillary forces, animal hairs, carbon nanotubes or nanowires of a periodically or randomly distributed array often assemble into hierarchical structures. In this paper, the energy method is adopted to analyse the capillary adhesion of microsized hairs, which are modelled as clamped microcantilevers wetted by liquids. The critical conditions for capillary adhesion of two hairs, three hairs or two bundles of hairs are derived in terms of Young's contact angle, elastic modulus and geometric sizes of the beams. Then, the hierarchical capillary adhesion of hairs is addressed. It is found that for multiple hairs or microcantilevers, the system tends to take a hierarchical structure as a result of the minimization of the total potential energy of the system. The level number of structural hierarchy increases with the increase in the number of hairs if they are sufficiently long. Additionally, we performed experiments to verify our theoretical solutions for the adhesion of microbeams