WorldWideScience

Sample records for adhesive binding mechanism

  1. Neuron-glia cell adhesion molecule interacts with neurons and astroglia via different binding mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    The neuron-glia cell adhesion molecule (Ng-CAM) is present in the central nervous system on postmitotic neurons and in the periphery on neurons and Schwann cells. It has been implicated in binding between neurons and between neurons and glia. To understand the molecular mechanisms of Ng-CAM binding, we analyzed the aggregation of chick Ng- CAM either immobilized on 0.5-micron beads (Covaspheres) or reconstituted into liposomes. The results were correlated with the binding of these particles t...

  2. Adhesive mechanisms in cephalopods: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Byern, Janek; Klepal, Waltraud

    2006-01-01

    Several genera of cephalopods (Nautilus, Sepia, Euprymna and Idiosepius) produce adhesive secretions, which are used for attachment to the substratum, for mating and to capture prey. These adhesive structures are located in different parts of the body, viz. in the digital tentacles (Nautilus), in the ventral surface of the mantle and fourth arm pair (Sepia), in the dorsal epidermis (Euprymna), or in the dorsal mantle side and partly on the fins (Idiosepius). Adhesion in Sepia is induced by suction of dermal structures on the mantle, while for Nautilus, Euprymna and Idiosepius adhesion is probably achieved by chemical substances. Histochemical studies indicate that in Nautilus and Idiosepius secretory cells that appear to be involved in adhesion stain for carbohydrates and protein, whilst in Euprymna only carbohydrates are detectable. De-adhesion is either achieved by muscle contraction of the tentacles and mantle (Nautilus and Sepia) or by secretion of substances (Euprymna). The de-adhesive mechanism used by Idiosepius remains unknown. PMID:17110356

  3. Mechanisms of adhesion in geckos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autumn, Kellar; Peattie, Anne M

    2002-12-01

    The extraordinary adhesive capabilities of geckos have challenged explanation for millennia, since Aristotle first recorded his observations. We have discovered many of the secrets of gecko adhesion, yet the millions of dry, adhesive setae on the toes of geckos continue to generate puzzling new questions and valuable answers. Each epidermally-derived, keratinous seta ends in hundreds of 200 nm spatular tips, permitting intimate contact with rough and smooth surfaces alike. Prior studies suggested that adhesive force in gecko setae was directly proportional to the water droplet contact angle (θ) , an indicator of the free surface energy of a substrate. In contrast, new theory suggests that adhesion energy between a gecko seta and a surface (W(GS)) is in fact proportional to (1 + cosθ), and only for θ > 60°. A reanalysis of prior data, in combination with our recent study, support the van der Waals hypothesis of gecko adhesion, and contradict surface hydrophobicity as a predictor of adhesion force. Previously, we and our collaborators measured the force production of a single seta. Initial efforts to attach a seta failed because of improper 3D orientation. However, by simulating the dynamics of gecko limbs during climbing (based on force plate data) we discovered that, in single setae, a small normal preload, combined with a 5 μm displacement yielded a very large adhesive force of 200 microNewton (μN), 10 times that predicted by whole-animal measurements. 6.5 million setae of a single tokay gecko attached maximally could generate 130 kg force. This raises the question of how geckos manage to detach their feet in just 15 ms. We discovered that simply increasing the angle that the setal shaft makes with the substrate to 30° causes detachment. Understanding how simultaneous attachment and release of millions of setae are controlled will require an approach that integrates levels ranging from molecules to lizards.

  4. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H.; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-06-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients.

  5. Adhesivity and rigidity of erythrocyte membrane in relation to wheat germ agglutinin binding

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Binding of the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) to erythrocyte membranes causes membrane rigidification. One of our objectives has been to directly measure the effects of WGA binding on membrane rigidity and to relate rigidification to the kinetics and levels of WGA binding. Our other objective has been to measure the strength of adhesion and mechanics of cell separation for erythrocytes bound together by WGA. The erythrocyte membrane rigidity was measured on single cells by micropipe...

  6. Using engineered single-chain antibodies to correlate molecular binding properties and nanoparticle adhesion dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Jered B; Pepper, Lauren R; Boder, Eric T; Hammer, Daniel A

    2011-11-15

    Elucidation of the relationship between targeting molecule binding properties and the adhesive behavior of therapeutic or diagnostic nanocarriers would aid in the design of optimized vectors and lead to improved efficacy. We measured the adhesion of 200-nm-diameter particles under fluid flow that was mediated by a diverse array of molecular interactions, including recombinant single-chain antibodies (scFvs), full antibodies, and the avidin/biotin interaction. Within the panel of scFvs, we used a family of mutants that display a spectrum of binding kinetics, allowing us to compare nanoparticle adhesion to bond chemistry. In addition, we explored the effect of molecular size by inserting a protein linker into the scFv fusion construct and by employing scFvs that are specific for targets with vastly different sizes. Using computational models, we extracted multivalent kinetic rate constants for particle attachment and detachment from the adhesion data and correlated the results to molecular binding properties. Our results indicate that the factors that increase encounter probability, such as adhesion molecule valency and size, directly enhance the rate of nanoparticle attachment. Bond kinetics had no influence on scFv-mediated nanoparticle attachment within the kinetic range tested, however, but did appear to affect antibody/antigen and avidin/biotin mediated adhesion. We attribute this finding to a combination of multivalent binding and differences in bond mechanical strength between recombinant scFvs and the other adhesion molecules. Nanoparticle detachment probability correlated directly with adhesion molecule valency and size, as well as the logarithm of the affinity for all molecules tested. On the basis of this work, scFvs can serve as viable targeting receptors for nanoparticles, but improvements to their bond mechanical strength would likely be required to fully exploit their tunable kinetic properties and maximize the adhesion efficiency of nanoparticles that

  7. Molecular mechanics of mussel adhesion proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J.

    2014-01-01

    Mussel foot protein (mfp), a natural glue produced by marine mussel, is an intriguing material because of its superior ability for adhesion in various environments. For example, a very small amount of this material is sufficient to affix a mussel to a substrate in water, providing structural support under extreme forces caused by the dynamic effects of waves. Towards a more complete understanding of its strength and underwater workability, it is necessary to understand the microscropic mechanisms by which the protein structure interacts with various substrates. However, none of the mussel proteins' structure is known, preventing us from directly using atomistic modeling to probe their structural and mechanical properties. Here we use an advanced molecular sampling technique to identify the molecular structures of two mussel foot proteins (mfp-3 and mfp-5) and use those structures to study their mechanics of adhesion, which is then incorporated into a continuum model. We calculate the adhesion energy of the mussel foot protein on a silica substrate, compute the adhesion strength based on results obtained from molecular modeling, and compare with experimental data. Our results show good agreement with experimental measurements, which validates the multiscale model. We find that the molecular structure of the folded mussel foot protein (ultimately defined by its genetic sequence) favors strong adhesion to substrates, where L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (or DOPA) protein subunits work in a cooperative manner to enhance adhesion. Our experimental data suggests a peak attachment force of 0.4±0.1 N, which compares favorably with the prediction from the multiscale model of Fc=0.21-0.33 N. The principles learnt from those results could guide the fabrication of new interfacial materials (e.g. composites) to integrate organic with inorganic surfaces in an effective manner.

  8. RNA-binding IMPs promote cell adhesion and invadopodia formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikesaa, Jonas; Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars;

    2006-01-01

    Oncofetal RNA-binding IMPs have been implicated in mRNA localization, nuclear export, turnover and translational control. To depict the cellular actions of IMPs, we performed a loss-of-function analysis, which showed that IMPs are necessary for proper cell adhesion, cytoplasmic spreading...... and invadopodia formation. Loss of IMPs was associated with a coordinate downregulation of mRNAs encoding extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins. The transcripts were present in IMP RNP granules, implying that IMPs were directly involved in the post-transcriptional control of the transcripts. In particular......, we show that a 5.0 kb CD44 mRNA contained multiple IMP-binding sites in its 3'UTR, and following IMP depletion this species became unstable. Direct knockdown of the CD44 transcript mimicked the effect of IMPs on invadopodia, and we infer that CD44 mRNA stabilization may be involved in IMP...

  9. Novel Phosphotidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Binding Sites on Focal Adhesion Kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Feng

    Full Text Available Focal adhesion kinase (FAK is a protein tyrosine kinase that is ubiquitously expressed, recruited to focal adhesions, and engages in a variety of cellular signaling pathways. Diverse cellular responses, such as cell migration, proliferation, and survival, are regulated by FAK. Prior to activation, FAK adopts an autoinhibited conformation in which the FERM domain binds the kinase domain, blocking access to the activation loop and substrate binding site. Activation of FAK occurs through conformational change, and acidic phospholipids such as phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2 are known to facilitate this process. PIP2 binding alters the autoinhibited conformation of the FERM and kinase domains and subsequently exposes the activation loop to phosphorylation. However, the detailed molecular mechanism of PIP2 binding and its role in FAK activation remain unclear. In this study, we conducted coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the binding of FAK to PIP2. Our simulations identified novel areas of basic residues in the kinase domain of FAK that potentially undergo transient binding to PIP2 through electrostatic attractions. Our investigation provides a molecular picture of PIP2-initiated FAK activation and introduces promising new pathways for future studies of FAK regulation.

  10. Sulfated polymannuroguluronate inhibits Tat-induced SLK cell adhesion via a novel binding site, a KKR spatial triad

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-lin WU; Jing AI; Jing-ming ZHAO; Bing XIONG; Xiao-jie XIN; Mei-yu GENG; Xian-liang XIN; Han-dong JIANG

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Sulfated polymannuroguluronate (SPMG), a candidate anti-AIDS drug, inhibited HIV replication and interfered with HIV entry into host T lymphocytes. SPMG has high binding affinity for the transactivating factor of the HIV-1 virus (Tat) via its basic domain. However, deletion or substitution of the basic domain affected, but did not completely eliminated Tat-SPMG interactions. Here, we sought to identify other SPMG binding sites in addition to the basic domain.Methods: The potential SPMG binding sites were determined using molecular simulation and a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based competitive inhibition assay. The effect of SPMG on Tat induced adhesion was evaluated using a cell adhesion assay. Results: The KKR domain, a novel high-affinity heparin binding site, was identified, which consisted of a triad of Lys12, Lys41, and Arg78. The KKR domain, spatially enclosed SPMG binding site on Tat, functions as another binding domain for SPMG. Further func- tional evaluation demonstrated that SPMG inhibits Tat-mediated SLK cell adhesion by directly binding to the KKR region.Conclusion: The KKR domain is a novel high-affinity binding domain for SPMG. Our findings provide important new insights into the molecular mechanisms of SPMG and a potential therapeutic intervention for Tat-induced cell adhesion.

  11. Controllable and switchable capillary adhesion mechanism for bio-adhesive pads: Effect of micro patterns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG XiangJun; LIU Yuan; LIU YongHe; AHMED S.I.-U.

    2009-01-01

    Some insects and animals, such as bugs, grasshoppers and tree frogs, realize their efficient adhesion mechanism to glass surface, wall and ceiling by injecting a wetting liquid thin film into the pad-substrate contact area. Their ability to control adhesion (attaching or detaching from a surface) is in many cases connected to the contact geometry and surface patterns of their attachment pads. This paper focuses on the dependence of the capillary adhesion (wet adhesion) on the micro patterns of the bio-adhesive pads. The objective is to reveal the possible mechanism for a bio-adhesive pad to control capillary force through adjusting its micro-scale surface pattern and topography. A capillary adhesion force model is built up taking account of the combined role of micro-dimple geometry as well as the wetting behavior of the confined liquid thin film. Calculated results of the apparent contact angle on the regularly micro-dimpled surfaces are compared with and in good agreement with the experimental measurements. Simulation of the capillary adhesion force reveals that it is controllable in a large mag-nitude by adjusting a dimensionless surface pattern parameter k defined as a/(a+b), where a is the dia-meter of micro dimple, and (a+b) is the side length of one pattern cell. When adjusting the parameter k more than 0.75, the capillary adhesion force could be switchable from attractive to repulsive. This effect of micro patterns on the interfacial capillary force is proved to be dominant when the pad-substrate clearance decreases to the nano/micrometer scale. These results indicate that a controllable and switchable capillary adhesive mechanism might be utilized by a living insect or animal to realize its stable adhesion and quick releasing movement through adjusting the micro-pattern topography of its bio-adhesive pad.

  12. Mechanisms of temporary adhesion in benthic animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dodou, D.; Breedveld, P.; Winter, J.C.F.; Dankelman, J.; Leeuwen, van J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Adhesive systems are ubiquitous in benthic animals and play a key role in diverse functions such as locomotion, food capture, mating, burrow building, and defence. For benthic animals that release adhesives, surface and material properties and external morphology have received little attention compa

  13. Mechanics of Cellular Adhesion to Artificial Artery Templates

    OpenAIRE

    Knöner, Gregor; Rolfe, Barbara E.; Campbell, Julie H.; Parkin, Simon J.; Heckenberg, Norman R.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2006-01-01

    We are using polymer templates to grow artificial artery grafts in vivo for the replacement of diseased blood vessels. We have previously shown that adhesion of macrophages to the template starts the graft formation. We present a study of the mechanics of macrophage adhesion to these templates on a single cell and single bond level with optical tweezers. For whole cells, in vitro cell adhesion densities decreased significantly from polymer templates polyethylene to silicone to Tygon (167, 135...

  14. Contact mechanics, friction and adhesion with application to quasicrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Bo; Carbone, Giuseppe; Samoilov, Vladimir N.;

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the origin of friction and adhesion between hard solids such as quasicrystals. We emphasize the fundamental role of surface roughness in many contact mechanics problems, in particular for friction and adhesion between solid bodies. The most important property of rough surfaces is the s...

  15. Mechanical behaviour of adhesive anchors installed in concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Zavliaris, K.D.

    1990-01-01

    The thesis presents the main characteristics of the mechanical behaviour of adhesive anchors installed in concrete. They are the mechanisms of failure, the relationship between applied pull-out'loadand slip of the anchor and the stresses and strains in each of the three components (steel-resin'-concrete). The study is-primarily-experimental--but theoretical and finite element analyses are also included. These main characteristics are dependent on the'adhesion and wetting phenomena across the ...

  16. GIT1 Utilizes a Focal Adhesion Targeting-Homology Domain to Bind Paxillin

    OpenAIRE

    Schmalzigaug, Robert; Garron, Marie-Line; Tyler Roseman, J.; Xing, Yanghui; Davidson, Collin E.; Arold, Stefan T.; Premont, Richard T.

    2007-01-01

    The GIT proteins, GIT1 and GIT2, are GTPase-activating proteins for the ADP-ribosylation factor family of small GTP binding proteins, but also serve as adaptors to link signaling proteins to distinct cellular locations. One role for GIT proteins is to link the PIX family of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors and their binding partners, the p21-activated protein kinases, to remodeling focal adhesions by interacting with the focal adhesion adaptor protein paxillin. We here identified the C...

  17. Novel Phosphotidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Binding Sites on Focal Adhesion Kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Feng; Blake Mertz

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a protein tyrosine kinase that is ubiquitously expressed, recruited to focal adhesions, and engages in a variety of cellular signaling pathways. Diverse cellular responses, such as cell migration, proliferation, and survival, are regulated by FAK. Prior to activation, FAK adopts an autoinhibited conformation in which the FERM domain binds the kinase domain, blocking access to the activation loop and substrate binding site. Activation of FAK occurs through confor...

  18. Mechanisms of Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion to model biomaterial surfaces: Establising a link between thrombosis and infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Julie Miyo

    Infections involving Staphylococcus epidermidis remain a life threatening complication associated with the use of polymer based cardiovascular devices. One of the critical steps in infection pathogenesis is the adhesion of the bacteria to the device surface. Currently, mechanisms of S. epidermidis adhesion are incompletely understood, but are thought to involve interactions between bacteria, device surface, and host blood elements in the form of adsorbed plasma proteins and surface adherent platelets. Our central hypothesis is that elements participating in thrombosis also promote S. epidermidis adhesion by specifically binding to the bacterial surface. The adhesion kinetics of S. epidermidis RP62A to host modified model biomaterial surface octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) under hydrodynamic shear conditions were characterized. Steady state adhesion to adsorbed proteins and surface adherent platelets was achieved at 90-120 minutes and 60-90 minutes, respectively. A dose response curve of S. epidermidis adhesion in the concentration range of 10sp7{-}10sp9 bac/mL resembled a multilayer adsorption isotherm. Increasing shear stress was found to LTA, and other LTA blocking agents significantly decreased S. epidermidis adhesion to the fibrin-platelet clots, suggesting that this interaction between S. epidermidis and fibrin-platelet clots is specific. Studies evaluated the adhesion of S. epidermidis to polymer immobilized heparin report conflicting results. Paulsson et al., showed that coagulase negative staphylococci adhered in comparable numbers to both immobilized heparin and nonheparinized surfaces, while exhibiting significantly greater adhesion to both surfaces than S. aureus. Preadsorption of the surfaces with specific heparin binding plasma proteins vitronectin, fibronectin, laminin, and collagen significantly increased adhesion. It was postulated that immobilized heparin contained binding sites for the plasma proteins, exposing bacteria binding domains of the

  19. The morphology and adhesion mechanism of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramacere, Francesca; Beccai, Lucia; Kuba, Michael; Gozzi, Alessandro; Bifone, Angelo; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The octopus sucker represents a fascinating natural system performing adhesion on different terrains and substrates. Octopuses use suckers to anchor the body to the substrate or to grasp, investigate and manipulate objects, just to mention a few of their functions. Our study focuses on the morphology and adhesion mechanism of suckers in Octopus vulgaris. We use three different techniques (MRI, ultrasonography, and histology) and a 3D reconstruction approach to contribute knowledge on both morphology and functionality of the sucker structure in O. vulgaris. The results of our investigation are two-fold. First, we observe some morphological differences with respect to the octopus species previously studied (i.e., Octopus joubini, Octopus maya, Octopus bimaculoides/bimaculatus and Eledone cirrosa). In particular, in O. vulgaris the acetabular chamber, that is a hollow spherical cavity in other octopuses, shows an ellipsoidal cavity which roof has an important protuberance with surface roughness. Second, based on our findings, we propose a hypothesis on the sucker adhesion mechanism in O. vulgaris. We hypothesize that the process of continuous adhesion is achieved by sealing the orifice between acetabulum and infundibulum portions via the acetabular protuberance. We suggest this to take place while the infundibular part achieves a completely flat shape; and, by sustaining adhesion through preservation of sucker configuration. In vivo ultrasonographic recordings support our proposed adhesion model by showing the sucker in action. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers innovative potential cues for developing bioinspired artificial adhesion systems. Furthermore, we think that it could possibly represent a useful approach in order to investigate any potential difference in the ecology and in the performance of adhesion by different species.

  20. The morphology and adhesion mechanism of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Tramacere

    Full Text Available The octopus sucker represents a fascinating natural system performing adhesion on different terrains and substrates. Octopuses use suckers to anchor the body to the substrate or to grasp, investigate and manipulate objects, just to mention a few of their functions. Our study focuses on the morphology and adhesion mechanism of suckers in Octopus vulgaris. We use three different techniques (MRI, ultrasonography, and histology and a 3D reconstruction approach to contribute knowledge on both morphology and functionality of the sucker structure in O. vulgaris. The results of our investigation are two-fold. First, we observe some morphological differences with respect to the octopus species previously studied (i.e., Octopus joubini, Octopus maya, Octopus bimaculoides/bimaculatus and Eledone cirrosa. In particular, in O. vulgaris the acetabular chamber, that is a hollow spherical cavity in other octopuses, shows an ellipsoidal cavity which roof has an important protuberance with surface roughness. Second, based on our findings, we propose a hypothesis on the sucker adhesion mechanism in O. vulgaris. We hypothesize that the process of continuous adhesion is achieved by sealing the orifice between acetabulum and infundibulum portions via the acetabular protuberance. We suggest this to take place while the infundibular part achieves a completely flat shape; and, by sustaining adhesion through preservation of sucker configuration. In vivo ultrasonographic recordings support our proposed adhesion model by showing the sucker in action. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers innovative potential cues for developing bioinspired artificial adhesion systems. Furthermore, we think that it could possibly represent a useful approach in order to investigate any potential difference in the ecology and in the performance of adhesion by different species.

  1. The morphology and adhesion mechanism of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramacere, Francesca; Beccai, Lucia; Kuba, Michael; Gozzi, Alessandro; Bifone, Angelo; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The octopus sucker represents a fascinating natural system performing adhesion on different terrains and substrates. Octopuses use suckers to anchor the body to the substrate or to grasp, investigate and manipulate objects, just to mention a few of their functions. Our study focuses on the morphology and adhesion mechanism of suckers in Octopus vulgaris. We use three different techniques (MRI, ultrasonography, and histology) and a 3D reconstruction approach to contribute knowledge on both morphology and functionality of the sucker structure in O. vulgaris. The results of our investigation are two-fold. First, we observe some morphological differences with respect to the octopus species previously studied (i.e., Octopus joubini, Octopus maya, Octopus bimaculoides/bimaculatus and Eledone cirrosa). In particular, in O. vulgaris the acetabular chamber, that is a hollow spherical cavity in other octopuses, shows an ellipsoidal cavity which roof has an important protuberance with surface roughness. Second, based on our findings, we propose a hypothesis on the sucker adhesion mechanism in O. vulgaris. We hypothesize that the process of continuous adhesion is achieved by sealing the orifice between acetabulum and infundibulum portions via the acetabular protuberance. We suggest this to take place while the infundibular part achieves a completely flat shape; and, by sustaining adhesion through preservation of sucker configuration. In vivo ultrasonographic recordings support our proposed adhesion model by showing the sucker in action. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers innovative potential cues for developing bioinspired artificial adhesion systems. Furthermore, we think that it could possibly represent a useful approach in order to investigate any potential difference in the ecology and in the performance of adhesion by different species. PMID:23750233

  2. Syndecan-4 binding to the high affinity heparin-binding domain of fibronectin drives focal adhesion formation in fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Longley, R L; Tumova, S;

    2000-01-01

    fibroblasts attach and spread following integrin ligation, but do not form focal adhesions unless treated with a heparin-binding fragment of fibronectin (HepII), a peptide from this domain, or phorbol esters to activate protein kinase C. Syndecan-4 heparan sulfate proteoglycan is a transmembrane component...

  3. Rolling adhesion of alphaL I domain mutants decorrelated from binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Lauren R; Hammer, Daniel A; Boder, Eric T

    2006-06-30

    Activated lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1, alphaLbeta2 integrin) found on leukocytes facilitates firm adhesion to endothelial cell layers by binding to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), which is up-regulated on endothelial cells at sites of inflammation. Recent work has shown that LFA-1 in a pre-activation, low-affinity state may also be involved in the initial tethering and rolling phase of the adhesion cascade. The inserted (I) domain of LFA-1 contains the ligand-binding epitope of the molecule, and a conformational change in this region during activation increases ligand affinity. We have displayed wild-type I domain on the surface of yeast and validated expression using I domain specific antibodies and flow cytometry. Surface display of I domain supports yeast rolling on ICAM-1-coated surfaces under shear flow. Expression of a locked open, high-affinity I domain mutant supports firm adhesion of yeast, while yeast displaying intermediate-affinity I domain mutants exhibit a range of rolling phenotypes. We find that rolling behavior for these mutants fails to correlate with ligand binding affinity. These results indicate that unstressed binding affinity is not the only molecular property that determines adhesive behavior under shear flow.

  4. Distinct biophysical mechanisms of focal adhesion kinase mechanoactivation by different extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Jihye; Tajik, Arash; Sun, Jie; Guan, Jun-Lin; Humphries, Martin J; Craig, Susan E; Shekaran, Asha; García, Andrés J; Lu, Shaoying; Lin, Michael Z; Wang, Ning; Wang, Yingxiao

    2013-11-26

    Matrix mechanics controls cell fate by modulating the bonds between integrins and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. However, it remains unclear how fibronectin (FN), type 1 collagen, and their receptor integrin subtypes distinctly control force transmission to regulate focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity, a crucial molecular signal governing cell adhesion/migration. Here we showed, using a genetically encoded FAK biosensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer, that FN-mediated FAK activation is dependent on the mechanical tension, which may expose its otherwise hidden FN synergy site to integrin α5. In sharp contrast, the ligation between the constitutively exposed binding motif of type 1 collagen and its receptor integrin α2 was surprisingly tension-independent to induce sufficient FAK activation. Although integrin α subunit determines mechanosensitivity, the ligation between α subunit and the ECM proteins converges at the integrin β1 activation to induce FAK activation. We further discovered that the interaction of the N-terminal protein 4.1/ezrin/redixin/moesin basic patch with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate is crucial during cell adhesion to maintain the FAK activation from the inhibitory effect of nearby protein 4.1/ezrin/redixin/moesin acidic sites. Therefore, different ECM proteins either can transmit or can shield from mechanical forces to regulate cellular functions, with the accessibility of ECM binding motifs by their specific integrin α subunits determining the biophysical mechanisms of FAK activation during mechanotransduction.

  5. Glass Fiber Reinforced Polypropylene Mechanical Properties Enhancement by Adhesion Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Etcheverry

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Glass fibers (GF are the reinforcement agent most used in polypropylene (PP based composites, as they have good balance between properties and costs. However, their final properties are mainly determined by the strength and stability of the polymer-fiber interphase. Fibers do not act as an effective reinforcing material when the adhesion is weak. Also, the adhesion between phases can be easily degraded in aggressive environmental conditions such as high temperatures and/or elevated moisture, and by the stress fields to which the material may be exposed. Many efforts have been done to improve polymer-glass fiber adhesion by compatibility enhancement. The most used techniques include modifications in glass surface, polymer matrix and/or both. However, the results obtained do not show a good costs/properties improvement relationship. The aim of this work is to perform an accurate analysis regarding methods for GF/PP adhesion improvement and to propose a new route based on PP in-situ polymerization onto fibers. This route involves the modification of fibers with an aluminum alkyl and hydroxy-α-olefin and from there to enable the growth of the PP chains using direct metallocenic copolymerization. The adhesion improvements were further proved by fragmentation test, as well as by mechanical properties measurements. The strength and toughness increases three times and the interfacial strength duplicates in PP/GF composites prepared with in-situ polymerized fibers.

  6. The Adhesion and Formation Mechanism of Blast Furnace Gunning Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Basing on the study of the equilibrium relationship of interfacial tension among gunning particles, repaired surface and atmosphere, this test is in a position to draw a conclusion concerning the adhesion mechanism of the gunning refractory and the repaired surface, which illustrates the formation of the bottom gunning layer by moist fine gunning particles on the repaired surface. Also involved within the scope of discussion and probe are the patterns formed under this contacting effect and the formation mechanism of gunning layer. The analytic research regarding the behavior of gunning interface has ascribed the influence upon adhesion intensity to the quality of furnace gunning refractory, the state of the repaired surface and the gunning techniques.

  7. Adhesion properties of Lactobacillus rhamnosus mucus-binding factor to mucin and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Keita; Nakamata, Koichi; Ueno, Shintaro; Terao, Akari; Aryantini, Ni Putu Desy; Sujaya, I Nengah; Fukuda, Kenji; Urashima, Tadasu; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Takao

    2015-01-01

    We previously described potential probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains, isolated from fermented mare milk produced in Sumbawa Island, Indonesia, which showed high adhesion to porcine colonic mucin (PCM) and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Recently, mucus-binding factor (MBF) was found in the GG strain of L. rhamnosus as a mucin-binding protein. In this study, we assessed the ability of recombinant MBF protein from the FSMM22 strain, one of the isolates of L. rhamnosus from fermented Sumbawa mare milk, to adhere to PCM and ECM proteins by overlay dot blot and Biacore assays. MBF bound to PCM, laminin, collagen IV, and fibronectin with submicromolar dissociation constants. Adhesion of the FSMM22 mbf mutant strain to PCM and ECM proteins was significantly less than that of the wild-type strain. Collectively, these results suggested that MBF contribute to L. rhamnosus host colonization via mucin and ECM protein binding.

  8. The emerin-binding transcription factor Lmo7 is regulated by association with p130Cas at focal adhesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele A. Wozniak

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Loss of function mutations in the nuclear inner membrane protein, emerin, cause X-linked Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (X-EDMD. X-EDMD is characterized by contractures of major tendons, skeletal muscle weakening and wasting, and cardiac conduction system defects. The transcription factor Lmo7 regulates muscle- and heart-relevant genes and is inhibited by binding to emerin, suggesting Lmo7 misregulation contributes to EDMD disease. Lmo7 associates with cell adhesions and shuttles between the plasma membrane and nucleus, but the regulation and biological consequences of this dual localization were unknown. We report endogenous Lmo7 also associates with focal adhesions in cells, and both co-localizes and co-immunoprecipitates with p130Cas, a key signaling component of focal adhesions. Lmo7 nuclear localization and transcriptional activity increased significantly in p130Cas-null MEFs, suggesting Lmo7 is negatively regulated by p130Cas-dependent association with focal adhesions. These results support EDMD models in which Lmo7 is a downstream mediator of integrin-dependent signaling that allows tendon cells and muscles to adapt to and withstand mechanical stress.

  9. Effects of mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements on stress distribution in fiber-reinforced composite adhesive fixed partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Daiichiro; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Vallittu, Pekka K; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Using finite element analysis (FEA), this study investigated the effects of the mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements on stress distributions in fiber-reinforced resin composite (FRC) adhesive fixed partial dentures (AFPDs). Two adhesive resin cements were compared: Super-Bond C&B and Panavia Fluoro Cement. The AFPD consisted of a pontic to replace a maxillary right lateral incisor and retainers on a maxillary central incisor and canine. FRC framework was made of isotropic, continuous, unidirectional E-glass fibers. Maximum principal stresses were calculated using finite element method (FEM). Test results revealed that differences in the mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements led to different stress distributions at the cement interfaces between AFPD and abutment teeth. Clinical implication of these findings suggested that the safety and longevity of an AFPD depended on choosing an adhesive resin cement with the appropriate mechanical properties. PMID:22447051

  10. Failure mechanisms of fibrin-based surgical tissue adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, David Hugh

    A series of studies was performed to investigate the potential impact of heterogeneity in the matrix of multiple-component fibrin-based tissue adhesives upon their mechanical and biomechanical properties both in vivo and in vitro. Investigations into the failure mechanisms by stereological techniques demonstrated that heterogeneity could be measured quantitatively and that the variation in heterogeneity could be altered both by the means of component mixing and delivery and by the formulation of the sealant. Ex vivo tensile adhesive strength was found to be inversely proportional to the amount of heterogeneity. In contrast, in vivo tensile wound-closure strength was found to be relatively unaffected by the degree of heterogeneity, while in vivo parenchymal organ hemostasis in rabbits was found to be affected: greater heterogeneity appeared to correlate with an increase in hemostasis time and amount of sealant necessary to effect hemostasis. Tensile testing of the bulk sealant showed that mechanical parameters were proportional to fibrin concentration and that the physical characteristics of the failure supported a ductile mechanism. Strain hardening as a function of percentage of strain, and strain rate was observed for both concentrations, and syneresis was observed at low strain rates for the lower fibrin concentration. Blister testing demonstrated that burst pressure and failure energy were proportional to fibrin concentration and decreased with increasing flow rate. Higher fibrin concentration demonstrated predominately compact morphology debonds with cohesive failure loci, demonstrating shear or viscous failure in a viscoelastic rubbery adhesive. The lower fibrin concentration sealant exhibited predominately fractal morphology debonds with cohesive failure loci, supporting an elastoviscous material condition. The failure mechanism for these was hypothesized and shown to be flow-induced ductile fracture. Based on these findings, the failure mechanism was

  11. Dynamic mechanical and thermal properties of seven polyurethane adhesives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D.M.

    1981-03-01

    Seven polyurethane adhesives have been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These adhesives, designated Halthanes were synthesized because of OSHA restrictions on the use of the curing agent methylene bis(2-chloroaniline). Four of the Halthanes were made from LLNL-developed 4,4'-methylene bis(phenylisocyanate) terminated prepolymers cured with a blend of polyols; three were made from an LLNL-developed prepolymer terminated with Hylene W and cured with aromatic diamines. In this paper the dynamic mechanical and thermal behavior of these seven segmented polyurethanes are discussed. The chemical structure of the hard and soft segments, the concentrations of each block, and the presence of tetrafunctional crosslinker determined the dynamic mechanical and thermal properties of the three types of polyurethane adhesives, 73-, 87-, and 88-series Halthanes studied. Aromatic-aliphatic MDI- butanediol urethane hard segments produce lower modulus (10/sup 6/ Pa) materials in the rubbery region than cyclic unsaturated-aromatic urea hard segments. Incorporation of chemical crosslinks in the hard segments extended the rubbery plateau beyond the hard segment transitions up to temperatures where the polymer begins to degrade. Concentration of hard and soft segments can also be used to control the modulus between the glass transition temperatures of the two blocks.

  12. Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    As the body moves, tissues or organs inside are normally able to shift around each other. This is because these tissues have ... occur if the adhesions cause an organ or body part to: Twist Pull ... unable to move normally The risk of forming adhesions is high ...

  13. Temporal mechanisms of multimodal binding

    OpenAIRE

    Burr, D.; Silva, O; Cicchini, G. M.; Banks, M. S.; Morrone, M. C.

    2009-01-01

    The simultaneity of signals from different senses—such as vision and audition—is a useful cue for determining whether those signals arose from one environmental source or from more than one. To understand better the sensory mechanisms for assessing simultaneity, we measured the discrimination thresholds for time intervals marked by auditory, visual or auditory–visual stimuli, as a function of the base interval. For all conditions, both unimodal and cross-modal, the thresholds followed a chara...

  14. 25 Years of Tension over Actin Binding to the Cadherin Cell Adhesion Complex: The Devil is in the Details.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, W James; Weis, William I

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 25 years, there has been a conceptual (re)evolution in understanding how the cadherin cell adhesion complex, which contains F-actin-binding proteins, binds to the actin cytoskeleton. There is now good synergy between structural, biochemical, and cell biological results that the cadherin-catenin complex binds to F-actin under force. PMID:27166091

  15. Mechanical Strength and Inhibition of the Staphylococcus aureus Collagen-Binding Protein Cna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman-Bausier, Philippe; Valotteau, Claire; Pietrocola, Giampiero; Rindi, Simonetta; Alsteens, David; Foster, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus expresses a variety of cell surface adhesion proteins that bind to host extracellular matrix proteins. Among these, the collagen (Cn)-binding protein Cna plays important roles in bacterium-host adherence and in immune evasion. While it is well established that the A region of Cna mediates ligand binding, whether the repetitive B region has a dedicated function is not known. Here, we report the direct measurement of the mechanical strength of Cna-Cn bonds on living bacteria, and we quantify the antiadhesion activity of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) targeting this interaction. We demonstrate that the strength of Cna-Cn bonds in vivo is very strong (~1.2 nN), consistent with the high-affinity “collagen hug” mechanism. The B region is required for strong ligand binding and has been found to function as a spring capable of sustaining high forces. This previously undescribed mechanical response of the B region is of biological significance as it provides a means to project the A region away from the bacterial surface and to maintain bacterial adhesion under conditions of high forces. We further quantified the antiadhesion activity of MAbs raised against the A region of Cna directly on living bacteria without the need for labeling or purification. Some MAbs are more efficient in blocking single-cell adhesion, suggesting that they act as competitive inhibitors that bind Cna residues directly involved in ligand binding. This report highlights the role of protein mechanics in activating the function of staphylococcal adhesion proteins and emphasizes the potential of antibodies to prevent staphylococcal adhesion and biofilm formation. PMID:27795393

  16. Role of surface layer collagen binding protein from indigenous Lactobacillus plantarum 91 in adhesion and its anti-adhesion potential against gut pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Tyagi, Ashish; Kaushik, Jai Kumar; Saklani, Asha Chandola; Grover, Sunita; Batish, Virender Kumar

    2013-12-14

    Human feacal isolates were ascertain as genus Lactobacillus using specific primer LbLMA1/R16-1 and further identified as Lactobacillus plantarum with species specific primers Lpl-3/Lpl-2. 25 L. plantarum strains were further assessed for hydrophobicity following the microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) method and colonization potentials based on their adherence to immobilized human collagen type-1. Surface proteins were isolated from selected L. plantarum 91(Lp91) strain. The purified collagen binding protein (Cbp) protein was assessed for its anti-adhesion activity against enteric Escherichia coli 0157:H7 pathogen on immobilized collagen. Four L. plantarum strains displayed high degree of hydrophobicity and significant adhesion to collagen. A 72 kDa protein was purified which reduced 59.71% adhesion of E. coli 0157:H7 on immobilized collagen as compared to control well during adhesion assay. Cbp protein is the major influencing factor in inhibition of E. coli 0157:H7 adhesion with extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Hydrophobicity and adhesion potential are closely linked attributes precipitating in better colonization potential of the lactobacillus strains. Cbp is substantiated as a crucial surface protein contributing in adhesion of lactobacillus strains. The study can very well be the platform for commercialization of indigenous probiotic strain once their functional attributes are clinically explored.

  17. Adhesive Contact in Animal: Morphology, Mechanism and Bio-Inspired Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aihong Ji; Longbao Han; Zhendong Dai

    2011-01-01

    Many animals possess adhesive pads on their feet,which are able to attach to various substrates while controlling adhesive forces during locomotion.This review article studies the morphology of adhesive devices in animals,and the physical mechanisms of wet adhesion and dry adhesion.The adhesive pads are either ‘smooth' or densely covered with special adhesive setae.Smooth pads adhere by wet adhesion,which is facilitated by fluid secreted from the pads,whereas hairy pads can adhere by dry adhesion or wet adhesion.Contact area,distance between pad and substrate,viscosity and surface tension of the liquid filling the gap between pad and substrate are the most important factors which determine the wet adhesion.Dry adhesion was found only in hairy pads,which occurs in geckos and spiders.It was demonstrated that van der Waals interaction is the dominant adhesive force in geckos' adhesion.The bio-inspired applications derived from adhesive pads are also reviewed.

  18. Rapid and Localized Mechanical Stimulation and Adhesion Assay: TRPM7 Involvement in Calcium Signaling and Cell Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishitani, Wagner Shin; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Wang, Yingxiao

    2015-01-01

    A cell mechanical stimulation equipment, based on cell substrate deformation, and a more sensitive method for measuring adhesion of cells were developed. A probe, precisely positioned close to the cell, was capable of a vertical localized mechanical stimulation with a temporal frequency of 207 Hz, and strain magnitude of 50%. This setup was characterized and used to probe the response of Human Umbilical Endothelial Vein Cells (HUVECs) in terms of calcium signaling. The intracellular calcium ion concentration was measured by the genetically encoded Cameleon biosensor, with the Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7) expression inhibited. As TRPM7 expression also regulates adhesion, a relatively simple method for measuring adhesion of cells was also developed, tested and used to study the effect of adhesion alone. Three adhesion conditions of HUVECs on polyacrylamide gel dishes were compared. In the first condition, the substrate is fully treated with Sulfo-SANPAH crosslinking and fibronectin. The other two conditions had increasingly reduced adhesion: partially treated (only coated with fibronectin, with no use of Sulfo-SANPAH, at 5% of the normal amount) and non-treated polyacrylamide gels. The cells showed adhesion and calcium response to the mechanical stimulation correlated to the degree of gel treatment: highest for fully treated gels and lowest for non-treated ones. TRPM7 inhibition by siRNA on HUVECs caused an increase in adhesion relative to control (no siRNA treatment) and non-targeting siRNA, but a decrease to 80% of calcium response relative to non-targeting siRNA which confirms the important role of TRPM7 in mechanotransduction despite the increase in adhesion.

  19. Rapid and Localized Mechanical Stimulation and Adhesion Assay: TRPM7 Involvement in Calcium Signaling and Cell Adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Shin Nishitani

    Full Text Available A cell mechanical stimulation equipment, based on cell substrate deformation, and a more sensitive method for measuring adhesion of cells were developed. A probe, precisely positioned close to the cell, was capable of a vertical localized mechanical stimulation with a temporal frequency of 207 Hz, and strain magnitude of 50%. This setup was characterized and used to probe the response of Human Umbilical Endothelial Vein Cells (HUVECs in terms of calcium signaling. The intracellular calcium ion concentration was measured by the genetically encoded Cameleon biosensor, with the Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7 expression inhibited. As TRPM7 expression also regulates adhesion, a relatively simple method for measuring adhesion of cells was also developed, tested and used to study the effect of adhesion alone. Three adhesion conditions of HUVECs on polyacrylamide gel dishes were compared. In the first condition, the substrate is fully treated with Sulfo-SANPAH crosslinking and fibronectin. The other two conditions had increasingly reduced adhesion: partially treated (only coated with fibronectin, with no use of Sulfo-SANPAH, at 5% of the normal amount and non-treated polyacrylamide gels. The cells showed adhesion and calcium response to the mechanical stimulation correlated to the degree of gel treatment: highest for fully treated gels and lowest for non-treated ones. TRPM7 inhibition by siRNA on HUVECs caused an increase in adhesion relative to control (no siRNA treatment and non-targeting siRNA, but a decrease to 80% of calcium response relative to non-targeting siRNA which confirms the important role of TRPM7 in mechanotransduction despite the increase in adhesion.

  20. Mechanical Behaviour of Adhesive Joints in Cartonboard for Packaging

    OpenAIRE

    Korin, Christer

    2009-01-01

    A cartonboard package is often sealed and closed with an adhesive – either a hot-melt adhesive (adhesives that are applied in a molten state on the cartonboard) or a dispersion adhesive (adhesives that are applied as water-based dispersions). This thesis focuses on the process of hot-melt gluing, and how material properties and process conditions affect the performance of the adhesive joint. Requirements vary depending on how the package is to be used. A package that is only supposed to prote...

  1. Neutrophil adhesion and chemotaxis depend on substrate mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannat, Risat A; Hammer, Daniel A [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, 240 Skirkanich Hall, 210 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Robbins, Gregory P; Ricart, Brendon G [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, 311A Towne Building, 220 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Dembo, Micah, E-mail: hammer@seas.upenn.ed [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, 44 Cummington Street, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2010-05-19

    Neutrophil adhesion to the vasculature and chemotaxis within tissues play critical roles in the inflammatory response to injury and pathogens. Unregulated neutrophil activity has been implicated in the progression of numerous chronic and acute diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, asthma and sepsis. Cell migration of anchorage-dependent cells is known to depend on both chemical and mechanical interactions. Although neutrophil responses to chemical cues have been well characterized, little is known about the effect of underlying tissue mechanics on neutrophil adhesion and migration. To address this question, we quantified neutrophil migration and traction stresses on compliant hydrogel substrates with varying elasticity in a micromachined gradient chamber in which we could apply either a uniform concentration or a precise gradient of the bacterial chemoattractant fMLP. Neutrophils spread more extensively on substrates of greater stiffness. In addition, increasing the stiffness of the substrate leads to a significant increase in the chemotactic index for each fMLP gradient tested. As the substrate becomes stiffer, neutrophils generate higher traction forces without significant changes in cell speed. These forces are often displayed in pairs and focused in the uropod. Increases in the mean fMLP concentration beyond the K{sub D} of the receptor lead to a decrease in chemotactic index on all surfaces. Blocking with an antibody against {beta}{sub 2}-integrins leads to a significant reduction, but not an elimination, of directed motility on stiff materials, but no change in motility on soft materials, suggesting neutrophils can display both integrin-dependent and integrin-independent motility. These findings are critical for understanding how neutrophil migration may change in different mechanical environments in vivo and can be used to guide the design of migration inhibitors that more efficiently target inflammation.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus-Fibronectin Interactions with and without Fibronectin-Binding Proteins and Their Role in Adhesion and Desorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, C.P.; Boks, N.P.; Vries, de J.; Kaper, H.J.; Norde, W.; Busscher, H.J.; Mei, van der H.C.

    2008-01-01

    Adhesion and residence-time-dependent desorption of two Staphylococcus aureus strains with and without fibronectin (Fn) binding proteins (FnBPs) on Fn-coated glass were compared under flow conditions. To obtain a better understanding of the role of Fn-FnBP binding, the adsorption enthalpies of Fn wi

  3. Staphylococcus aureus-fibronectin interactions with and without fibronectin-binding proteins and their role in adhesion and desorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Chun; Boks, Niels P; de Vries, Jacob; Kaper, Harm; Norde, Willem; Busscher, Hendrik; van der Mei, Henderina

    2008-01-01

    Adhesion and residence-time-dependent desorption of two Staphylococcus aureus strains with and without fibronectin (Fn) binding proteins (FnBPs) on Fn-coated glass were compared under flow conditions. To obtain a better understanding of the role of Fn-FnBP binding, the adsorption enthalpies of Fn wi

  4. Compression Pressure Effect on Mechanical & Combustion Properties of Sawdust Briquette using Styrofoam adhesive as binder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrasheed A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, briquettes were produced from sawdust at different compression pressure using Styrofoam (Polystyrene foam adhesive as binding material. The effects of changing the compression pressure used in moulding of briquettes on its combustion and mechanical properties were investigated. In evaluating Combustion properties, 0.940kg of water was boiled using oven-dried sample of briquette in the combustion chamber with air flow velocity supplied to the combustion chamber at 10.2m/s. Combustion properties investigated were afterglow time, burning rate, specific fuel consumption, power output, percentage heat utilized, flame propagation rate and percentage ash content. The mechanical properties investigated included density, compressive strength, impact resistance, water resistance and abrasion resistance. The blends of sieved sawdust and binder were prepared in the ratio of 4:1 and compacted at pressures ranging from 40 – 90 kN/m2 at 10 kN/m2 interval in a hydraulic press machine with a dwell time of 5minutes. The pressures of moulding were varied to evaluate the range that gives the best quality in terms of combustion and mechanical properties of the briquette produced. The potential use of Polystyrene foam adhesive as a binder in production of briquettes was found promising.

  5. Adhesive and migratory effects of phosphophoryn are modulated by flanking peptides of the integrin binding motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeki Suzuki

    Full Text Available Phosphophoryn (PP is generated from the proteolytic cleavage of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP. Gene duplications in the ancestor dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1 genomic sequence created the DSPP gene in toothed animals. PP and DMP-1 are phosphorylated extracellular matrix proteins that belong to the family of small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins (SIBLINGs. Many SIBLING members have been shown to evoke various cell responses through the integrin-binding Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD domain; however, the RGD-dependent function of PP is not yet fully understood. We demonstrated that recombinant PP did not exhibit any obvious cell adhesion ability, whereas the simultaneously purified recombinant DMP-1 did. A cell adhesion inhibitory analysis was performed by pre-incubating human osteosarcoma MG63 cells with various PP peptides before seeding onto vitronectin. The results obtained revealed that the incorporation of more than one amino acid on both sides of the PP-RGD domain was unable to inhibit the adhesion of MG63 cells onto vitronectin. Furthermore, the inhibitory activity of a peptide containing the PP-RGD domain with an open carboxyl-terminal side (H-463SDESDTNSESANESGSRGDA482-OH was more potent than that of a peptide containing the RGD domain with an open amino-terminal side (H-478SRGDASYTSDESSDDDNDSDSH499-OH. This phenomenon was supported by the potent cell adhesion and migration abilities of the recombinant truncated PP, which terminated with Ala482. Furthermore, various point mutations in Ala482 and/or Ser483 converted recombinant PP into cell-adhesive proteins. Therefore, we concluded that the Ala482-Ser483 flanking sequence, which was detected in primates and mice, was the key peptide bond that allowed the PP-RGD domain to be sequestered. The differential abilities of PP and DMP-1 to act on integrin imply that DSPP was duplicated from DMP-1 to serve as a crucial extracellular protein for tooth development rather than as an integrin

  6. Role of Streptococcus gordonii Amylase-Binding Protein A in Adhesion to Hydroxyapatite, Starch Metabolism, and Biofilm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Jeffrey D.; Palmer, Robert J.; Kolenbrander, Paul E; Scannapieco, Frank A.

    2001-01-01

    Interactions between bacteria and salivary components are thought to be important in the establishment and ecology of the oral microflora. α-Amylase, the predominant salivary enzyme in humans, binds to Streptococcus gordonii, a primary colonizer of the tooth. Previous studies have implicated this interaction in adhesion of the bacteria to salivary pellicles, catabolism of dietary starches, and biofilm formation. Amylase binding is mediated at least in part by the amylase-binding protein A (Ab...

  7. Fracture mechanics characterisation of medium-size adhesive joint specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Jacobsen, T.K.

    2004-01-01

    Medium-size specimens (<2 m in length), consisting of two glass-fibre beams bonded together by an adhesive layer were tested in four point bending to determine their load carrying capacity. Specimens having different thickness were tested. Except for onespecimen, the cracking occurred as cracking...... along the adhesive layer; initially cracking occurred along the adhesive/laminate interface, but after some crack extension the cracking took place inside the laminate (for one specimen the later part of thecracking occurred unstably along the adhesive/ laminate interface). Crack bridging by fibres was...

  8. Hierarchical macroscopic fibrillar adhesives: in situ study of buckling and adhesion mechanisms on wavy substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Christina T; Kroner, Elmar; Fleck, Norman A; Arzt, Eduard

    2015-12-01

    Nature uses hierarchical fibrillar structures to mediate temporary adhesion to arbitrary substrates. Such structures provide high compliance such that the flat fibril tips can be better positioned with respect to asperities of a wavy rough substrate. We investigated the buckling and adhesion of hierarchically structured adhesives in contact with flat smooth, flat rough and wavy rough substrates. A macroscopic model for the structural adhesive was fabricated by molding polydimethylsiloxane into pillars of diameter in the range of 0.3-4.8 mm, with up to three different hierarchy levels. Both flat-ended and mushroom-shaped hierarchical samples buckled at preloads one quarter that of the single level structures. We explain this behavior by a change in the buckling mode; buckling leads to a loss of contact and diminishes adhesion. Our results indicate that hierarchical structures can have a strong influence on the degree of adhesion on both flat and wavy substrates. Strategies are discussed that achieve highly compliant substrates which adhere to rough substrates.

  9. Divergent evolution of vitamin B9 binding underlies Juno-mediated adhesion of mammalian gametes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ling; Nishimura, Kaoru; Sadat Al Hosseini, Hamed; Bianchi, Enrica; Wright, Gavin J; Jovine, Luca

    2016-02-01

    The interaction between egg and sperm is the first necessary step of fertilization in all sexually reproducing organisms. A decade-long search for a protein pair mediating this event in mammals culminated in the identification of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoprotein Juno as the egg plasma membrane receptor of sperm Izumo1 [1,2]. The Juno-Izumo1 interaction was shown to be essential for fertilization since mice lacking either gene exhibit sex-specific sterility, making these proteins promising non-hormonal contraceptive targets [1,3]. No structural information is available on how gamete membranes interact at fertilization, and it is unclear how Juno - which was previously named folate receptor (FR) 4, based on sequence similarity considerations - triggers membrane adhesion by binding Izumo1. Here, we report the crystal structure of Juno and find that the overall fold is similar to that of FRα and FRβ but with significant flexibility within the area that corresponds to the rigid ligand-binding site of these bona fide folate receptors. This explains both the inability of Juno to bind vitamin B9/folic acid [1], and why mutations within the flexible region can either abolish or change the species specificity of this interaction. Furthermore, structural similarity between Juno and the cholesterol-binding Niemann-Pick disease type C1 protein (NPC1) suggests how the modified binding surface of Juno may recognize the helical structure of the amino-terminal domain of Izumo1. As Juno appears to be a mammalian innovation, our study indicates that a key evolutionary event in mammalian reproduction originated from the neofunctionalization of the vitamin B9-binding pocket of an ancestral folate receptor molecule. PMID:26859261

  10. Designing a binding interface for control of cancer cell adhesion via 3D topography and metabolic oligosaccharide engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jian; Che, Pao-Lin; Wang, Zhi-Yun; Aich, Udayanath; Yarema, Kevin J

    2011-08-01

    This study combines metabolic oligosaccharide engineering (MOE), a technology where the glycocalyx of living cells is endowed with chemical features not normally found in sugars, with custom-designed three-dimensional biomaterial substrates to enhance the adhesion of cancer cells and control their morphology and gene expression. Specifically, Ac(5)ManNTGc, a thiol-bearing analog of N-acetyl-d-mannosamine (ManNAc) was used to introduce thiolated sialic acids into the glycocalyx of human Jurkat T-lymphoma derived cells. In parallel 2D films and 3D electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds were prepared from polyethersulfone (PES) and (as controls) left unmodified or aminated. Alternately, the materials were malemided or gold-coated to provide bio-orthogonal binding partners for the thiol groups newly expressed on the cell surface. Cell attachment was modulated by both the topography of the substrate surface and by the chemical compatibility of the binding interface between the cell and the substrate; a substantial increase in binding for normally non-adhesive Jurkat line for 3D scaffold compared to 2D surfaces with an added degree of adhesion resulting from chemoselective binding to malemidede-derivatived or gold-coated surfaces. In addition, the morphology of the cells attached to the 3D scaffolds via MOE-mediated adhesion was dramatically altered and the expression of genes involved in cell adhesion changed in a time-dependent manner. This study showed that cell adhesion could be enhanced, gene expression modulated, and cell fate controlled by introducing the 3D topograhical cues into the growth substrate and by creating a glycoengineered binding interface where the chemistry of both the cell surface and biomaterials scaffold was controlled to facilitate a new mode of carbohydrate-mediated adhesion. PMID:21549424

  11. Rapid and Localized Mechanical Stimulation and Adhesion Assay: TRPM7 Involvement in Calcium Signaling and Cell Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner Shin Nishitani; Adriano Mesquita Alencar; Yingxiao Wang

    2015-01-01

    A cell mechanical stimulation equipment, based on cell substrate deformation, and a more sensitive method for measuring adhesion of cells were developed. A probe, precisely positioned close to the cell, was capable of a vertical localized mechanical stimulation with a temporal frequency of 207 Hz, and strain magnitude of 50%. This setup was characterized and used to probe the response of Human Umbilical Endothelial Vein Cells (HUVECs) in terms of calcium signaling. The intracellular calcium i...

  12. The effect of adhesive layer elasticity on the fracture mechanics of a blister test specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updike, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical model of a blister type specimen for evaluating adhesive bond strength was developed. Plate theory with shear deformation was used to model the deformation of the plate, and elastic deformation of the adhesive layer is taken into account. It is shown that the inclusion of the elastic deformation of the adhesive layer can have a significant influence in the energy balance calculations of fracture mechanics.

  13. An adhesion-dependent switch between mechanisms that determine motile cell shape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin L Barnhart

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Keratocytes are fast-moving cells in which adhesion dynamics are tightly coupled to the actin polymerization motor that drives migration, resulting in highly coordinated cell movement. We have found that modifying the adhesive properties of the underlying substrate has a dramatic effect on keratocyte morphology. Cells crawling at intermediate adhesion strengths resembled stereotypical keratocytes, characterized by a broad, fan-shaped lamellipodium, clearly defined leading and trailing edges, and persistent rates of protrusion and retraction. Cells at low adhesion strength were small and round with highly variable protrusion and retraction rates, and cells at high adhesion strength were large and asymmetrical and, strikingly, exhibited traveling waves of protrusion. To elucidate the mechanisms by which adhesion strength determines cell behavior, we examined the organization of adhesions, myosin II, and the actin network in keratocytes migrating on substrates with different adhesion strengths. On the whole, our results are consistent with a quantitative physical model in which keratocyte shape and migratory behavior emerge from the self-organization of actin, adhesions, and myosin, and quantitative changes in either adhesion strength or myosin contraction can switch keratocytes among qualitatively distinct migration regimes.

  14. Lactobacillus Adhesion to Mucus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell L. Van Tassell

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mucus provides protective functions in the gastrointestinal tract and plays an important role in the adhesion of microorganisms to host surfaces. Mucin glycoproteins polymerize, forming a framework to which certain microbial populations can adhere, including probiotic Lactobacillus species. Numerous mechanisms for adhesion to mucus have been discovered in lactobacilli, including partially characterized mucus binding proteins. These mechanisms vary in importance with the in vitro models studied, which could significantly affect the perceived probiotic potential of the organisms. Understanding the nature of mucus-microbe interactions could be the key to elucidating the mechanisms of probiotic adhesion within the host.

  15. Nano-mechanics of Tunable Adhesion using Non Covalent Forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth Liechti

    2012-09-08

    The objective of this program was to examine, via experiment and atomistic and continuum analysis, coordinated noncovalent bonding over a range of length scales with a view to obtaining modulated, patterned and reversible bonding at the molecular level. The first step in this project was to develop processes for depositing self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) bearing carboxylic acid and amine moieties on Si (111) surfaces and probe tips of an interfacial force microscope (IFM). This allowed the adhesive portion of the interactions between functionalized surfaces to be fully captured in the force-displacement response (force profiles) that are measured by the IFM. The interactionswere extracted in the form of traction-separation laws using combined molecular and continuum stress analyses. In this approach, the results of molecular dynamics analyses of SAMs subjected to simple stress states are used to inform continuum models of their stress-strain behavior. Continuum analyses of the IFM experiment were then conducted, which incorporate the stress-strain behavior of the SAMs and traction-separation relations that represent the interactions between the tip and functionalized Si surface. Agreement between predicted and measured force profiles was taken to imply that the traction-separation relations have been properly extracted. Scale up to larger contact areas was considered by forming Si/SAM/Si sandwiches and then separating them via fracture experiments. The mode 1 traction-separation relations have been extracted using fracture mechanics concepts under mode 1 and mixed-mode conditions. Interesting differences were noted between the three sets of traction-separation relations.

  16. Mechanical pretreatment for improved adhesion of diamond coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond coatings are mainly used in cutting processes due to their tribological characteristics. They show a high hardness, low friction coefficient, high wear resistance and good chemical inertness. In relation to polycrystalline diamond (PCD)-tipped cutting inserts, especially the advantageous chemical stability of diamond coatings is superior as no binder phases between diamond grains are used. However, the deposition of adherent high-quality diamond coatings has been found difficult. Thus, substrate pretreatment is utilised to improve film adhesion. This investigation is based on water peening of the substrate material before coating. The investigation revealed best results for diamond film adhesion on pretreated substrates compared to conventional diamond coatings on cemented carbide tools applied with the CVD hot-filament process. In final cutting tests with increased film adhesion trough water peened cutting tools an improved wear behavior was detected. (orig.)

  17. Thermomechanical Mechanisms of Reducing Ice Adhesion on Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, N; Dotan, A; Dodiuk, H; Kenig, S

    2016-09-20

    Superhydrophobic (SH) coatings have been shown to reduce freezing and ice nucleation rates, by means of low surface energy chemistry tailored with nano/micro roughness. Durability enhancement of SH surfaces is a crucial issue. Consequently, the present research on reducing ice adhesion is based on radiation-induced radical reaction for covalently bonding SiO2 nanoparticles to polymer coatings to obtain durable roughness. Results indicated that the proposed approach resulted in SH surfaces having high contact angles (>155°) and low sliding angles (ice formed during exposure to air/supercooled water drops at -20 °C. The ice shear adhesion investigation (at -20 °C) demonstrated reduction of shear adhesion to a variety of SH treated substrates having low thermal expansion coefficient (copper and aluminum) and high thermal expansion coefficient (polycarbonate and poly(methyl methacrylate)). It was concluded that the thermal mismatch between the adhering ice and the various substrates and its resultant interfacial thermal stresses affect the adhesion strength of the ice to the respective substrate. PMID:27578298

  18. Biomimetic design of platelet adhesion inhibitors to block integrin α2β1-collagen interactions: I. Construction of an affinity binding model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Sun, Yan

    2014-04-29

    Platelet adhesion on a collagen surface through integrin α2β1 has been proven to be significant for the formation of arterial thrombus. However, the molecular determinants mediating the integrin-collagen complex remain unclear. In the present study, the dynamics of integrin-collagen binding and molecular interactions were investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) analysis. Hydrophobic interaction is identified as the major driving force for the formation of the integrin-collagen complex. On the basis of the MD simulation and MM-PBSA results, an affinity binding model (ABM) of integrin for collagen is constructed; it is composed of five residues, including Y157, N154, S155, R288, and L220. The ABM has been proven to capture the major binding motif contributing 84.8% of the total binding free energy. On the basis of the ABM, we expect to establish a biomimetic design strategy of platelet adhesion inhibitors, which would be beneficial for the development of potent peptide-based drugs for thrombotic diseases. PMID:24697616

  19. A synthetic peptide from the COOH-terminal heparin-binding domain of fibronectin promotes focal adhesion formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; McCarthy, J B; Furcht, L T;

    1993-01-01

    of focal adhesion and stress fiber formation requires additional interactions. Heparin-binding fragments of fibronectin can provide this signal. The COOH-terminal heparin-binding domain of fibronectin contains five separate heparin-binding amino acid sequences. We show here that all five sequences...... PRARI. The biological response to this peptide and to the COOH-terminal fragment may be mediated through cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans because treatment of cells with heparinase II and III, or competition with heparin, reduces the response. Treatment with chondroitinase ABC or competition...

  20. Mechanical Properties and Adhesion of a Micro Structured Polymer Blend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunero Cappella

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A 50:50 blend of polystyrene (PS and poly(n-butyl methacrylate (PnBMA has been characterized with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM in Tapping Mode and with force-distance curves. The polymer solution has been spin-coated on a glass slide. PnBMA builds a uniform film on the glass substrate with a thickness of @200 nm. On top of it, the PS builds an approximately 100 nm thick film. The PS-film undergoes dewetting, leading to the formation of holes surrounded by about 2 µm large rims. In those regions of the sample, where the distance between the holes is larger than about 4 µm, light depressions in the PS film can be observed. Topography, dissipated energy, adhesion, stiffness and elastic modulus have been measured on these three regions (PnBMA, PS in the rims and PS in the depressions. The two polymers can be distinguished in all images, since PnBMA has a higher adhesion and a smaller stiffness than PS, and hence a higher dissipated energy. Moreover, the polystyrene in the depressions shows a very high adhesion (approximately as high as PnBMA and its stiffness is intermediate between that of PnBMA and that of PS in the rims. This is attributed to higher mobility of the PS chains in the depressions, which are precursors of new holes.

  1. Experimental Investigation on the Morphology and Adhesion Mechanism of Leech Posterior Suckers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huashan Feng

    Full Text Available The posterior sucker of a leech represents a fascinating natural system that allows the leech to adhere to different terrains and substrates. However, the mechanism of adhesion and desorption has not yet to be elucidated. In order to better understand how the adhesion is performed, we analyzed the surface structure, adsorption movements, the muscles' distribution, physical characteristics, and the adsorption force of the leech posterior suckers by experimental investigation. Three conclusions can be drawn based on the obtained experimental results. First, the adhesion by the posterior sucker is wet adhesion, because the surface of the posterior sucker is smooth and the sealing can only be achieved on wet surfaces. Second, the deformation texture, consisting of soft collagen tissues and highly ductile epidermal tissues, plays a key role in adhering to rough surfaces. Finally, the adhesion and desorption is achieved by the synergetic operation of six muscle fibers working in different directions. Concrete saying, directional deformation of the collagen/epithermal interface driven by spatially-distributed muscle fibers facilitates the excretion of fluids in the sucker venter, thus allowing liquid sealing. Furthermore, we found that the adhesion strength is directly related to the size of the contact surface which is generated and affected by the sucker deformation. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers potential cues for developing innovative bio-inspired artificial adhesion systems.

  2. Cellular and molecular investigations of the adhesion and mechanics of Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskhan, Asma Omar

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to quantify the adherence and mechanical properties of an array of L. monocytogenes strains and their surface biopolymers. First, eight L. monocytogenes strains that represented the two major lineages of the species were compared for their adherence and mechanics at cellular and molecular levels. Our results indicated that strains of lineage' II were characterized by higher adhesion and Young's moduli, longer and more rigid surface biopolymers and lower specific and nonspecific forces when compared to lineage' I strains. Additionally, adherence and mechanical properties of eight L. monocytogenes epidemic and environmental strains were probed. Our results pointed to that environmental and epidemic strains representative of a given lineage were similar in their adherence and mechanical properties when investigated at a cellular level. However, when the molecular properties of the strains were considered, epidemic strains were characterized by higher specific and nonspecific forces, shorter, denser and more flexible biopolymers compared to environmental strains. Second, the role of environmental pH conditions of growth on the adhesion and mechanics of a pathogenic L. monocytogenes EGDe was investigated. Our results pointed to a transition in the adhesion energies for cells cultured at pH 7. In addition, when the types of molecular forces that govern the adhesion were quantified using Poisson statistical approach and using a new proposed method, specific hydrogen-bond energies dominated the bacterial adhesion process. Such a finding is instrumental to researchers designing methods to control bacterial adhesion. Similarly, bacterial cells underwent a transition in their mechanical properties. We have shown that cells cultured at pH 7 were the most rigid compared to those cultured in lower or higher pH conditions of growth. Due to transitions observed in adherence and mechanics when cells were cultured at pH 7, we hypothesized that

  3. P-Selectin Cross-Links PSGL-1 and Enhances Neutrophil Adhesion to Fibrinogen and ICAM-1 in a Src Kinase-Dependent, but GPCR-Independent Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Tao; Zhang, Lei; Geng, Zhen H; Wang, Hai-Bo; Wang, Jin-Tao; Chen, Ming; Geng, Jian-Guo

    2007-01-01

    Endothelial and platelet P-selectin (CD62P) and leukocyte integrin αMβ2 (CD11bCD18, Mac-1) are cell adhesion molecules essential for host defense and innate immunity. Upon inflammatory challenges, P-selectin binds to PSGL-1 (P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1, CD162) to mediate neutrophil rolling, during which integrins become activated by extracellular stimuli for their firm adhesion in a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-dependent mechanism. Here we show that cross-linking of PSGL-1 by dimeri...

  4. A New Self-Loading Locomotion Mechanism for Wall Climbing Robots Employing Biomimetic Adhesives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amirpasha Peyvandi; Parviz Soroushian; Jue Lu

    2013-01-01

    A versatile locomotion mechanism is introduced and experimentally verified.This mechanism comprises four rectangular wheels (legs) with rotational phase difference which enables the application of pressure to each contacting surface for securing it to the surface using bio-inspired or pressure-sensitive adhesives.In this mechanism,the adhesives are applied to two rigid plates attached to each wheel via hinges incorporating torsional springs.The springs force the plates back to their original position after the contact with the surface is lost in the course of locomotion.The wheels are made of low-modulus elastomers,and the pressure applied during contact is controlled by the elastic modulus,geometry and phase difference of wheels.This reliable adhesion system does not rely upon gravity for adhering to surfaces,and provides the locomotion mechanism with the ability to climb walls and transition from horizontal to vertical surfaces.

  5. Variation in one residue associated with the metal ion-dependent adhesion site regulates αIIbβ3 integrin ligand binding affinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Raborn

    Full Text Available The Asp of the RGD motif of the ligand coordinates with the β I domain metal ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS divalent cation, emphasizing the importance of the MIDAS in ligand binding. There appears to be two distinct groups of integrins that differ in their ligand binding affinity and adhesion ability. These differences may be due to a specific residue associated with the MIDAS, particularly the β3 residue Ala(252 and corresponding Ala in the β1 integrin compared to the analogous Asp residue in the β2 and β7 integrins. Interestingly, mutations in the adjacent to MIDAS (ADMIDAS of integrins α4β7 and αLβ2 increased the binding and adhesion abilities compared to the wild-type, while the same mutations in the α2β1, α5β1, αVβ3, and αIIbβ3 integrins demonstrated decreased ligand binding and adhesion. We introduced a mutation in the αIIbβ3 to convert this MIDAS associated Ala(252 to Asp. By combination of this mutant with mutations of one or two ADMIDAS residues, we studied the effects of this residue on ligand binding and adhesion. Then, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on the wild-type and mutant αIIbβ3 integrin β I domains, and investigated the dynamics of metal ion binding sites in different integrin-RGD complexes. We found that the tendency of calculated binding free energies was in excellent agreement with the experimental results, suggesting that the variation in this MIDAS associated residue accounts for the differences in ligand binding and adhesion among different integrins, and it accounts for the conflicting results of ADMIDAS mutations within different integrins. This study sheds more light on the role of the MIDAS associated residue pertaining to ligand binding and adhesion and suggests that this residue may play a pivotal role in integrin-mediated cell rolling and firm adhesion.

  6. Strain-specific diversity of mucus-binding proteins in the adhesion and aggregation properties of Lactobacillus reuteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Donald A; Jeffers, Faye; Parker, Mary L; Vibert-Vallet, Amandine; Bongaerts, Roy J; Roos, Stefan; Walter, Jens; Juge, Nathalie

    2010-11-01

    Mucus-binding proteins (MUBs) have been revealed as one of the effector molecules involved in mechanisms of the adherence of lactobacilli to the host; mub, or mub-like, genes are found in all of the six genomes of Lactobacillus reuteri that are available. We recently reported the crystal structure of a Mub repeat from L. reuteri ATCC 53608 (also designated strain 1063), revealing an unexpected recognition of immunoglobulins. In the current study, we explored the diversity of the ATCC 53608 mub gene, and MUB expression levels in a large collection of L. reuteri strains isolated from a range of vertebrate hosts. This analysis revealed that the MUB was only detectable on the cell surface of two highly related isolates when using antibodies that were raised against the protein. There was considerable variation in quantitative mucus adhesion in vitro among L. reuteri strains, and mucus binding showed excellent correlation with the presence of cell-surface ATCC 53608 MUB. ATCC 53608 MUB presence was further highly associated with the autoaggregation of L. reuteri strains in washed cell suspensions, suggesting a novel role of this surface protein in cell aggregation. We also characterized MUB expression in representative L. reuteri strains. This analysis revealed that one derivative of strain 1063 was a spontaneous mutant that expressed a C-terminally truncated version of MUB. This frameshift mutation was caused by the insertion of a duplicated 13 nt sequence at position 4867 nt in the mub gene, producing a truncated MUB also lacking the C-terminal LPxTG region, and thus unable to anchor to the cell wall. This mutant, designated 1063N (mub-4867(i)), displayed low mucus-binding and aggregation capacities, further providing evidence for the contribution of cell-wall-anchored MUB to such phenotypes. In conclusion, this study provided novel information on the functional attributes of MUB in L. reuteri, and further demonstrated that MUB and MUB-like proteins

  7. Effect of new adhesion promoter and mechanical interlocking on bonding strength in metal-polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuberth, A.; Göring, M.; Lindner, T.; Töberling, G.; Puschmann, M.; Riedel, F.; Scharf, I.; Schreiter, K.; Spange, S.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    There are various opportunities to improve the adhesion between polymer and metal in metal-plastic composites. The addition of a bonding agent which reacts with both joining components at the interfaces of the composite can enhance the bonding strength. An alternative method for the adjustment of interfaces in metal-plastic composites is the specific surface structuring of the joining partners in order to exploit the mechanical interlock effect. In this study the potential of using an adhesion promoter based on twin polymerization for metal-plastic composites in combination with different methods of mechanical surface treatment is evaluated by using the tensile shear test. It is shown that the new adhesion promoter has a major effect when applied on smooth metal surfaces. A combination of both mechanical and chemical surface treatment of the metal part is mostly just as effective as the application of only one of these surface treatment methods.

  8. Neural cell adhesion molecule-180-mediated homophilic binding induces epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) down-regulation and uncouples the inhibitory function of EGFR in neurite outgrowth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays important roles in neuronal development, regeneration, and synaptic plasticity. NCAM homophilic binding mediates cell adhesion and induces intracellular signals, in which the fibroblast growth factor receptor plays a prominent role. Recent studies on...... this NCAM-180-induced EGFR down-regulation involves increased EGFR ubiquitination and lysosomal EGFR degradation. Furthermore, NCAM-180-mediated EGFR down-regulation requires NCAM homophilic binding and interactions of the cytoplasmic domain of NCAM-180 with intracellular interaction partners, but does...

  9. A novel role for fibronectin type I domain in the regulation of human hematopoietic cell adhesiveness through binding to follistatin domains of FLRG and follistatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguer-Satta, Véronique; Forissier, Stéphanie; Bartholin, Laurent; Martel, Sylvie; Jeanpierre, Sandrine; Bachelard, Elodie; Rimokh, Ruth

    2006-02-15

    FLRG and follistatin belong to the family of follistatin proteins involved in the regulation of various biological effects, such as hematopoiesis, mediated by their binding to activin and BMP, both members of the TGFbeta family. To further characterize the function of FLRG, we searched for other possible functional partners using a yeast two-hybrid screen. We identified human fibronectin as a new partner for both FLRG and follistatin. We also demonstrated that their physical interaction is mediated by type I motifs of fibronectin and follistatin domains. We then analyzed the biological consequences of these protein interactions on the regulation of hematopoiesis. For the first time, we associated a biological effect with the regulation of human hematopoietic cell adhesiveness of both the type I motifs of fibronectin and the follistatin domains of FLRG and follistatin. Indeed, we observed a significant and specific dose-dependent increase of cell adhesion to fibronectin in the presence of FLRG or follistatin, using either a human hematopoietic cell line or primary cells. In particular, we observed a significantly increased adhesion of immature hematopoietic precursors (CFC, LTC-IC). Altogether these results highlight a new mechanism by which FLRG and follistatin regulate human hematopoiesis.

  10. Mechanical integrity and adhesion of thin films for applications in electronics packaging and cell biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan Jin; Wan Kaitak; Chian Kermsin

    2003-01-22

    A new theoretical model was developed for a pull-off adhesion test using an axisymmetric flat punch and a rectangular flat punch adhered to a thin polymer film interface. An elastic solution was derived to portray the mechanical integrity of the thin film. A mechanical energy release rate was calculated numerically. As the punch was pulled away from the adhered film, the film deformed under mixed bending and stretching. Both stiffness and thickness of the film were allowed to vary. The derived solid-film 'pull-off' events sharply contrast with the abrupt pull-off in solid-solid adhesion as predicted by the classical JKR theory.

  11. Substrate, focal adhesions, and actin filaments: a mechanical unit with a weak spot for mechanosensitive proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchenbüchler, David; Born, Simone; Kirchgeßner, Norbert; Houben, Sebastian; Hoffmann, Bernd; Merkel, Rudolf

    2010-05-01

    Mechanosensing is a vital prerequisite for dynamic remodeling of focal adhesions and cytoskeletal structures upon substrate deformation. For example, tissue formation, directed cell orientation or cell differentiation are regulated by such mechanosensing processes. Focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton are believed to be involved in these processes, but where mechanosensing molecules are located and how elastic substrate, focal adhesions and the cytoskeleton couple with each other upon substrate deformation still remains obscure. To approach these questions we have developed a sensitive method to apply defined spatially decaying deformation fields to cells cultivated on ultrasoft elastic substrates and to accurately quantify the resulting displacements of the actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesions, as well as the substrate. Displacement fields were recorded in live cell microscopy by tracking either signals from fluorescent proteins or marker particles in the substrate. As model cell type we used myofibroblasts. These cells are characterized by highly stable adhesion and force generating structures but are still able to detect mechanical signals with high sensitivity. We found a rigid connection between substrate and focal adhesions. Furthermore, stress fibers were found to be barely extendable almost over their whole lengths. Plastic deformation took place only at the very ends of actin filaments close to focal adhesions. As a result, this area became elongated without extension of existing actin filaments by polymerization. Both ends of the stress fibers were mechanically coupled with detectable plastic deformations on either site. Interestingly, traction force dependent substrate deformation fields remained mostly unaffected even when stress fiber elongations were released. These data argue for a location of mechanosensing proteins at the ends of actin stress fibers and describe, except for these domains, the whole system to be relatively rigid for tensile

  12. Engagement of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II molecules up-regulates intercellular adhesion of human B cells via a CD11/CD18-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcover, A; Juillard, V; Acuto, O

    1992-02-01

    We have studied the role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules in the regulation of intercellular adhesion of human B cells. We found that molecules able to bind to MHC class II molecules, such as monoclonal antibodies or staphylococcal enterotoxins, induced rapid and sustained homotypic adhesion of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B cell lines as well as peripheral blood B lymphocytes. Moreover, anti-MHC class I monoclonal antibodies also stimulated intercellular adherence. Adhesion induced upon MHC engagement was faster and stronger than that triggered by phorbol esters. It needed active metabolism, but divalent cations were not required. Monoclonal antibodies directed against LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18) or its ligand ICAM-1 (CD54) did not inhibit MHC class II-induced homotypic adhesion of various EBV-transformed B cell lines, nor of a variant of the B cell line Raji expressing very low LFA-1 surface levels. Moreover, EBV-transformed B cells from a severe lymphocyte adhesion deficiency patient, lacking surface CD11/CD18, also aggregated in response to anti-MHC class I or class II monoclonal antibodies. Together these data indicate that engagement of MHC molecules may transduce signals to B cells resulting in up-regulation of intercellular adhesion, via an LFA-1-independent mechanism. This may play a role in the stabilization of T cell/antigen-presenting cell conjugates at the moment of antigen recognition.

  13. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam) binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jones, Robert T

    2010-05-12

    Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C) and human (37°C) temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS)-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect through mediation of

  14. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Susan A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C and human (37°C temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect

  15. Mechanics of load-drag-unload contact cleaning of gecko-inspired fibrillar adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusomwan, Uyiosa A; Sitti, Metin

    2014-10-14

    Contact self-cleaning of gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives with mushroom-shaped tips has been demonstrated recently using load-drag-unload cleaning procedures similar to that of the natural animal. However, the underlying mechanics of contact cleaning has yet to be fully understood. In this work, we present a detailed experiment of contact self-cleaning that shows that rolling is the dominant mechanism of cleaning for spherical microparticle contaminants, during the load-drag-unload procedure. We also study the effect of dragging rate and normal load on the particle rolling friction. A model of spherical particle rolling on an elastomer fibrillar adhesive interface is developed and agrees well with the experimental results. This study takes us closer to determining design parameters for achieving self-cleaning fibrillar adhesives.

  16. Mutation of the Conserved Calcium-Binding Motif in Neisseria gonorrhoeae PilC1 Impacts Adhesion but Not Piliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan; Johnson, Michael D. L.; Burillo-Kirch, Christine; Mocny, Jeffrey C.; Anderson, James E.; Garrett, Christopher K.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae PilC1 is a member of the PilC family of type IV pilus-associated adhesins found in Neisseria species and other type IV pilus-producing genera. Previously, a calcium-binding domain was described in the C-terminal domains of PilY1 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and in PilC1 and PilC2 of Kingella kingae. Genetic analysis of N. gonorrhoeae revealed a similar calcium-binding motif in PilC1. To evaluate the potential significance of this calcium-binding region in N. gonorrhoeae, we produced recombinant full-length PilC1 and a PilC1 C-terminal domain fragment. We show that, while alterations of the calcium-binding motif disrupted the ability of PilC1 to bind calcium, they did not grossly affect the secondary structure of the protein. Furthermore, we demonstrate that both full-length wild-type PilC1 and full-length calcium-binding-deficient PilC1 inhibited gonococcal adherence to cultured human cervical epithelial cells, unlike the truncated PilC1 C-terminal domain. Similar to PilC1 in K. kingae, but in contrast to the calcium-binding mutant of P. aeruginosa PilY1, an equivalent mutation in N. gonorrhoeae PilC1 produced normal amounts of pili. However, the N. gonorrhoeae PilC1 calcium-binding mutant still had partial defects in gonococcal adhesion to ME180 cells and genetic transformation, which are both essential virulence factors in this human pathogen. Thus, we conclude that calcium binding to PilC1 plays a critical role in pilus function in N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:24002068

  17. Insights into the Alteration of Osteoblast Mechanical Properties upon Adhesion on Chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia G. Moutzouri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion on substrates is accompanied by significant changes in shape and cytoskeleton organization, which affect subsequent cellular and tissue responses, determining the long-term success of an implant. Alterations in osteoblast stiffness upon adhesion on orthopaedic implants with different surface chemical composition and topography are, thus, of central interest in the field of bone implant research. This work aimed to study the mechanical response of osteoblasts upon adhesion on chitosan-coated glass surfaces and to investigate possible correlations with the level of adhesion, spreading, and cytoskeleton reorganization. Using the micropipette aspiration technique, the osteoblast elastic modulus was found higher on chitosan-coated than on uncoated control substrates, and it was found to increase in the course of spreading for both substrates. The cell-surface contact area was measured throughout several time points of adhesion to quantify cell spreading kinetics. Significant differences were found between chitosan and control surfaces regarding the response of cell spreading, while both groups displayed a sigmoidal kinetical behavior with an initially elevated spreading rate which stabilizes in the second hour of attachment. Actin filament structural changes were confirmed after observation with confocal microscope. Biomaterial surface modification can enhance osteoblast mechanical response and induce favorable structural organization for the implant integration.

  18. The effect of interlayer adhesion on the mechanical behaviors of macroscopic graphene oxide papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yun; Liu, Lu-Qi; Zu, Sheng-Zhen; Peng, Ke; Zhou, Ding; Han, Bao-Hang; Zhang, Zhong

    2011-03-22

    High mechanical performances of macroscopic graphene oxide (GO) papers are attracting great interest owing to their merits of lightweight and multiple functionalities. However, the loading role of individual nanosheets and its effect on the mechanical properties of the macroscopic GO papers are not yet well understood. Herein, we effectively tailored the interlayer adhesions of the GO papers by introducing small molecules, that is, glutaraldehyde (GA) and water molecules, into the gallery regions. With the help of in situ Raman spectroscopy, we compared the varied load-reinforcing roles of nanosheets, and further predicted the Young's moduli of the GO papers. Systematic mechanical tests have proven that the enhancement of the tensile modulus and strength of the GA-treated GO paper arose from the improved load-bearing capability of the nanosheets. On the basis of Raman and macroscopic mechanical tests, the influences of interlayer adhesions on the fracture mechanisms of the strained GO papers were inferred.

  19. Diversity of Cyclic Di-GMP-Binding Proteins and Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shan-Ho; Galperin, Michael Y

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) synthetases and hydrolases (GGDEF, EAL, and HD-GYP domains) can be readily identified in bacterial genome sequences by using standard bioinformatic tools. In contrast, identification of c-di-GMP receptors remains a difficult task, and the current list of experimentally characterized c-di-GMP-binding proteins is likely incomplete. Several classes of c-di-GMP-binding proteins have been structurally characterized; for some others, the binding sites have been identified; and for several potential c-di-GMP receptors, the binding sites remain to be determined. We present here a comparative structural analysis of c-di-GMP-protein complexes that aims to discern the common themes in the binding mechanisms that allow c-di-GMP receptors to bind it with (sub)micromolar affinities despite the 1,000-fold excess of GTP. The available structures show that most receptors use their Arg and Asp/Glu residues to bind c-di-GMP monomers, dimers, or tetramers with stacked guanine bases. The only exception is the EAL domains that bind c-di-GMP monomers in an extended conformation. We show that in c-di-GMP-binding signature motifs, Arg residues bind to the O-6 and N-7 atoms at the Hoogsteen edge of the guanine base, while Asp/Glu residues bind the N-1 and N-2 atoms at its Watson-Crick edge. In addition, Arg residues participate in stacking interactions with the guanine bases of c-di-GMP and the aromatic rings of Tyr and Phe residues. This may account for the presence of Arg residues in the active sites of every receptor protein that binds stacked c-di-GMP. We also discuss the implications of these structural data for the improved understanding of the c-di-GMP signaling mechanisms.

  20. Adhesion mechanism of salmon to polymer-coated can walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommershuijzen, H.; Hviid, L.; Hartog, den H.; Vereijken, J.

    2005-01-01

    Minimization of the amount of salmon adhering to the can wall after emptying is one of the convenience requirements of consumers of canned salmon. In order to achieve this, the mechanism by which salmon adheres to cans needs to be understood. The aim of this study was to provide such knowledge for p

  1. Biophysical studies on calcium and carbohydrate binding to carbohydrate recognition domain of Gal/GalNAc lectin from Entamoeba histolytica: insights into host cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rupali; Verma, Kuldeep; Chandra, Mintu; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Datta, Sunando

    2016-09-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, an enteric parasite expresses a Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin that contributes to its virulence by establishing adhesion to host cell. In this study, carbohydrate recognition domain of Hgl (EhCRD) was purified and biophysical studies were conducted to understand the thermodynamic basis of its binding to carbohydrate and Ca(++) Here, we show that carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of the lectin binds to calcium through DPN motif. To decipher the role of calcium in carbohydrate binding and host cell adhesion, biophysical and cell-based studies were carried out. We demonstrated that the presence of the cation neither change the affinity of the lectin for carbohydrates nor alters its conformation. Mutation of the calcium-binding motif in EhCRD resulted in complete loss of ability to bind calcium but retained its affinity for carbohydrates. Purified EhCRD significantly diminished adhesion of the amebic trophozoites to Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells as well as triggered red blood cell agglutination. The calcium-binding defective mutant abrogated amebic adhesion to CHO cells similar to the wild-type protein, but it failed to agglutinate RBCs suggesting a differential role of the cation in these two processes. This study provides the first molecular description of the role of calcium in Gal/GalNAc mediated host cell adhesion.

  2. Biophysical studies on calcium and carbohydrate binding to carbohydrate recognition domain of Gal/GalNAc lectin from Entamoeba histolytica: insights into host cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rupali; Verma, Kuldeep; Chandra, Mintu; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Datta, Sunando

    2016-09-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, an enteric parasite expresses a Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin that contributes to its virulence by establishing adhesion to host cell. In this study, carbohydrate recognition domain of Hgl (EhCRD) was purified and biophysical studies were conducted to understand the thermodynamic basis of its binding to carbohydrate and Ca(++) Here, we show that carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of the lectin binds to calcium through DPN motif. To decipher the role of calcium in carbohydrate binding and host cell adhesion, biophysical and cell-based studies were carried out. We demonstrated that the presence of the cation neither change the affinity of the lectin for carbohydrates nor alters its conformation. Mutation of the calcium-binding motif in EhCRD resulted in complete loss of ability to bind calcium but retained its affinity for carbohydrates. Purified EhCRD significantly diminished adhesion of the amebic trophozoites to Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells as well as triggered red blood cell agglutination. The calcium-binding defective mutant abrogated amebic adhesion to CHO cells similar to the wild-type protein, but it failed to agglutinate RBCs suggesting a differential role of the cation in these two processes. This study provides the first molecular description of the role of calcium in Gal/GalNAc mediated host cell adhesion. PMID:27008865

  3. Transient adhesion and conductance phenomena in initial nanoscale mechanical contacts between dissimilar metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, William; Oliver, David; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grütter, Peter

    2013-11-29

    We report on transient adhesion and conductance phenomena associated with tip wetting in mechanical contacts produced by the indentation of a clean W(111) tip into a Au(111) surface. A combination of atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy was used to carry out indentation and to image residual impressions in ultra-high vacuum. The ∼7 nm radii tips used in these experiments were prepared and characterized by field ion microscopy in the same instrument. The very first indentations of the tungsten tips show larger conductance and pull-off adhesive forces than subsequent indentations. After ∼30 indentations to a depth of ∼1.7 nm, the maximum conductance and adhesion forces reach steady state values approximately 12 ×  and 6 ×  smaller than their initial value. Indentation of W(111) tips into Cu(100) was also performed to investigate the universality of tip wetting phenomena with a different substrate. We propose a model from contact mechanics considerations which quantitatively reproduces the observed decay rate of the conductance and adhesion drops with a 1/e decay constant of 9-14 indentation cycles. The results show that the surface composition of an indenting tip plays an important role in defining the mechanical and electrical properties of indentation contacts.

  4. Theory of the mechanical response of focal adhesions to shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biton, Y. Y.; Safran, S. A.

    2010-05-01

    The response of cells to shear flow is primarily determined by the asymmetry of the external forces and moments that are sensed by each member of a focal adhesion pair connected by a contractile stress fiber. In the theory presented here, we suggest a physical model in which each member of such a pair of focal adhesions is treated as an elastic body subject to both a myosin-activated contractile force and the shear stress induced by the external flow. The elastic response of a focal adhesion complex is much faster than the active cellular processes that determine the size of the associated focal adhesions and the direction of the complex relative to the imposed flow. Therefore, the complex attains its mechanical equilibrium configuration which may change because of the cellular activity. Our theory is based on the experimental observation that focal adhesions modulate their cross-sectional area in order to attain an optimal shear. Using this assumption, our elastic model shows that such a complex can passively change its orientation to align parallel to the direction of the flow.

  5. Fullerenes as adhesive layers for mechanical peeling of metallic, molecular and polymer thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Maria B; Slater, Anna G; Mangham, Barry; Champness, Neil R; Beton, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    We show that thin films of C60 with a thickness ranging from 10 to 100 nm can promote adhesion between a Au thin film deposited on mica and a solution-deposited layer of the elastomer polymethyldisolaxane (PDMS). This molecular adhesion facilitates the removal of the gold film from the mica support by peeling and provides a new approach to template stripping which avoids the use of conventional adhesive layers. The fullerene adhesion layers may also be used to remove organic monolayers and thin films as well as two-dimensional polymers which are pre-formed on the gold surface and have monolayer thickness. Following the removal from the mica support the monolayers may be isolated and transferred to a dielectric surface by etching of the gold thin film, mechanical transfer and removal of the fullerene layer by annealing/dissolution. The use of this molecular adhesive layer provides a new route to transfer polymeric films from metal substrates to other surfaces as we demonstrate for an assembly of covalently-coupled porphyrins.

  6. Theory of the mechanical response of focal adhesions to shear flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biton, Y Y; Safran, S A, E-mail: yoav.biton@weizmann.ac.i, E-mail: sam.safran@weizmann.ac.i [Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2010-05-19

    The response of cells to shear flow is primarily determined by the asymmetry of the external forces and moments that are sensed by each member of a focal adhesion pair connected by a contractile stress fiber. In the theory presented here, we suggest a physical model in which each member of such a pair of focal adhesions is treated as an elastic body subject to both a myosin-activated contractile force and the shear stress induced by the external flow. The elastic response of a focal adhesion complex is much faster than the active cellular processes that determine the size of the associated focal adhesions and the direction of the complex relative to the imposed flow. Therefore, the complex attains its mechanical equilibrium configuration which may change because of the cellular activity. Our theory is based on the experimental observation that focal adhesions modulate their cross-sectional area in order to attain an optimal shear. Using this assumption, our elastic model shows that such a complex can passively change its orientation to align parallel to the direction of the flow.

  7. Fullerenes as adhesive layers for mechanical peeling of metallic, molecular and polymer thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria B. Wieland

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We show that thin films of C60 with a thickness ranging from 10 to 100 nm can promote adhesion between a Au thin film deposited on mica and a solution-deposited layer of the elastomer polymethyldisolaxane (PDMS. This molecular adhesion facilitates the removal of the gold film from the mica support by peeling and provides a new approach to template stripping which avoids the use of conventional adhesive layers. The fullerene adhesion layers may also be used to remove organic monolayers and thin films as well as two-dimensional polymers which are pre-formed on the gold surface and have monolayer thickness. Following the removal from the mica support the monolayers may be isolated and transferred to a dielectric surface by etching of the gold thin film, mechanical transfer and removal of the fullerene layer by annealing/dissolution. The use of this molecular adhesive layer provides a new route to transfer polymeric films from metal substrates to other surfaces as we demonstrate for an assembly of covalently-coupled porphyrins.

  8. The fibronectin-binding integrins alpha5beta1 and alphavbeta3 differentially modulate RhoA-GTP loading, organization of cell matrix adhesions, and fibronectin fibrillogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danen, Erik H J; Sonneveld, Petra; Brakebusch, Cord;

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the formation of different types of cell matrix adhesions in cells that bind to fibronectin via either alpha5beta1 or alphavbeta3. In both cases, cell adhesion to fibronectin leads to a rapid decrease in RhoA activity. However, alpha5beta1 but not alphavbeta3 supports high levels...... of RhoA activity at later stages of cell spreading, which are associated with a translocation of focal contacts to peripheral cell protrusions, recruitment of tensin into fibrillar adhesions, and fibronectin fibrillogenesis. Expression of an activated mutant of RhoA stimulates alphavbeta3-mediated...... fibrillogenesis. Despite the fact that alpha5beta1-mediated adhesion to the central cell-binding domain of fibronectin supports activation of RhoA, other regions of fibronectin are required for the development of alpha5beta1-mediated but not alphavbeta3-mediated focal contacts. Using chimeras of beta1 and beta3...

  9. A room temperature cured low dielectric hyperbranched epoxy adhesive with high mechanical strength

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bibekananda De; Niranjan Karak

    2014-05-01

    A low dielectric constant hyperbranched epoxy thermoset with excellent adhesive and mechanical strength is the demand for advanced electronics and engineering applications. The present investigation provided a room temperature, curable hyperbranched epoxy, obtained by an A2 + B3 polycondensation reaction. The synthesized hyperbranched epoxy was cured by a combined hardener system consisting of a commercial poly(amido-amine) and a first generation aliphatic poly(amido-amine) dendrimer (PAD) prepared by Michael addition reaction of methyl acrylate and aliphatic amines. The thermoset exhibited high mechanical strength, excellent adhesive strength, low dielectric constant, good thermal stability and excellent weather resistance along with very good moisture resistance. The results showed the influence of the amount of PAD on the performance of the thermoset. Thus, the study revealed that the combined poly(amido-amine) cured hyperbranched epoxy has high potential in advanced electrical packaging and microelectronic devices.

  10. Tuning the mechanical properties of bioreducible multilayer films for improved cell adhesion and transfection activity

    OpenAIRE

    Blacklock, Jenifer; Vetter, Andreas; Lankenau, Andreas; Oupický, David; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2010-01-01

    A simple approach to the mechanical modulation of layer-by-layer (LbL) films is through manipulation of the film assembly. Here, we report results based on altering the salt concentration during film assembly and its effect on film rigidity. Based on changes in film rigidity, cell adhesion characteristics and transfection activity were investigated in vitro. LbL films consisting of reducible hyperbranched poly(amide amine) (RHB) have been implemented along with DNA for investigating fibroblas...

  11. Homophilic Adhesion Mechanism of Neurofascin, a Member of the L1 Family of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Heli; Focia, Pamela J.; He, Xiaolin (NWU, MED)

    2012-02-13

    The L1 family neural cell adhesion molecules play key roles in specifying the formation and remodeling of the neural network, but their homophilic interaction that mediates adhesion is not well understood. We report two crystal structures of a dimeric form of the headpiece of neurofascin, an L1 family member. The four N-terminal Ig-like domains of neurofascin form a horseshoe shape, akin to several other immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecules such as hemolin, axonin, and Dscam. The neurofascin dimer, captured in two crystal forms with independent packing patterns, reveals a pair of horseshoes in trans-synaptic adhesion mode. The adhesion interaction is mediated mostly by the second Ig-like domain, which features an intermolecular {beta}-sheet formed by the joining of two individual GFC {beta}-sheets and a large but loosely packed hydrophobic cluster. Mutagenesis combined with gel filtration assays suggested that the side chain hydrogen bonds at the intermolecular {beta}-sheet are essential for the homophilic interaction and that the residues at the hydrophobic cluster play supplementary roles. Our structures reveal a conserved homophilic adhesion mode for the L1 family and also shed light on how the pathological mutations of L1 affect its structure and function.

  12. Binding Mechanisms in Selective Laser Sintering and Selective Laser Melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruth, J.-P.; Mercelis, P.; Van Vaerenbergh, J.; Froyen, L.; Rombouts, M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose – This paper provides an overview of the different binding mechanisms in selective laser sintering (SLS) and selective laser melting (SLM), thus improving the understanding of these processes. Design/methodology/approach – A classification of SLS/SLM processes was developed, based on the bin

  13. Serum amyloid A binds specific extracellular matrix glycoproteins and induces the adhesion of resting CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preciado-Patt, L; Hershkoviz, R; Fridkin, M; Lider, O

    1996-02-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA), a prototypic acute phase protein reactant, exists naturally in the serum of healthy individuals. However, the levels of SAA in serum and its presence in sites of inflammation increase during certain chronic diseases associated with a local elevation of cytokine concentrations. Although the chemical structure of SAA is defined, its putative immunologic role(s) is still obscure. Nevertheless, it has been shown that 1) SAA acts as a chemoattractant and regulator of the migration of monocytes, polymorphonuclear cells, and T lymphocytes through endothelial cell monolayers; and 2) SAA and its proteolytically degraded N-terminal amyloid A fragment contain an extracellular matrix (ECM)-related cell adhesion epitopes. Herein, we examined whether SAA can associate with specific ECM moieties, and whether immobilized SAA-ECM complexes affect T lymphocyte adhesion. Radiolabeled human rSAA ([125I]rSAA) interacted avidly (Kd = 10(-9) M) and transiently with intact ECM, laminin, and vitronectin, but not with fibronectin or collagen type II. The binding of [125I]rSAA to ECM and laminin was inhibited by unlabeled rSAA and by the AA fragment, but not by the C-terminal portion of SAA (amino acid residues 2-82 and 77-104, respectively). Upon interactions with SAA or amyloid A, immobilized ECM, laminin, and vitronectin induced the adhesion of resting human CD4+ T cells in an apparently beta 1-integrin-mediated manner. Thus, the ECM appears to serve as a temporary anchorage site for SAA and amyloid A, and these ECM-complexed molecules seem to be involved in regulating the recruitment and accumulation of immunocytes in extravascular inflammatory compartments. PMID:8557997

  14. Effect of the regional variability of dentinal substrate and modes of application of adhesive systems on the mechanical properties of the adhesive layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmine Mendes Pupo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study assessed the effect of the dentin depth and the application mode on the hardness and elastic modulus of the adhesive layer. Materials and Methods: Occlusal surfaces of 48 caries-free human third molars were removed, at two levels: Superficial and deep dentin. For each type of surface, the test specimens were randomly divided into groups which underwent the application: A conventional two-step adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond [SB] and self-etch adhesives system (Adper™ SE Plus [SE] and AdheSE® [AD]. The adhesives applied were active or passive. Composite build-ups were constructed incrementally. The teeth were sectioned, embedded, and polished. The nanoindentation test was performed in the adhesive layer. The results were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey tests. Results: In the adhesive layer, the higher hardness (0.307 ± 0.006 GPa and elastic modulus (4.796 ± 0.165 GPa of SE were obtained in superficial dentin in passive application. The elastic modulus of SE (4.115 ± 0.098 GPa was lowest in active application in superficial dentin. The active application significantly increased the hardness of the SB in the deep dentin (0.011 ± 0.314 GPa compared the superficial dentin (0.280 ± 0.010 GPa. For the AD, only the mode of application was statistically significant (P=0.0041 for the hardness, active application (0.289 ± 0.015 GPa being higher than passive application (0.261 ± 0.013 GPa (P=0.0042 in deep dentin. Conclusion: The experimental results reveal that the mechanical properties were influenced for the application mode of adhesive systems and dentin depth.

  15. Binding Mechanisms of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Theory, Simulation, and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, Luca; Bessa, Luiza M.; Hanoulle, Xavier; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Blackledge, Martin; Schneider, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, protein science has been revolutionized by the discovery of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). In contrast to the classical paradigm that a given protein sequence corresponds to a defined structure and an associated function, we now know that proteins can be functional in the absence of a stable three-dimensional structure. In many cases, disordered proteins or protein regions become structured, at least locally, upon interacting with their physiological partners. Many, sometimes conflicting, hypotheses have been put forward regarding the interaction mechanisms of IDPs and the potential advantages of disorder for protein-protein interactions. Whether disorder may increase, as proposed, e.g., in the “fly-casting” hypothesis, or decrease binding rates, increase or decrease binding specificity, or what role pre-formed structure might play in interactions involving IDPs (conformational selection vs. induced fit), are subjects of intense debate. Experimentally, these questions remain difficult to address. Here, we review experimental studies of binding mechanisms of IDPs using NMR spectroscopy and transient kinetic techniques, as well as the underlying theoretical concepts and numerical methods that can be applied to describe these interactions at the atomic level. The available literature suggests that the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters characterizing interactions involving IDPs can vary widely and that there may be no single common mechanism that can explain the different binding modes observed experimentally. Rather, disordered proteins appear to make combined use of features such as pre-formed structure and flexibility, depending on the individual system and the functional context.

  16. Binding Mechanisms of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Theory, Simulation, and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, Luca; Bessa, Luiza M.; Hanoulle, Xavier; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Blackledge, Martin; Schneider, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, protein science has been revolutionized by the discovery of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). In contrast to the classical paradigm that a given protein sequence corresponds to a defined structure and an associated function, we now know that proteins can be functional in the absence of a stable three-dimensional structure. In many cases, disordered proteins or protein regions become structured, at least locally, upon interacting with their physiological partners. Many, sometimes conflicting, hypotheses have been put forward regarding the interaction mechanisms of IDPs and the potential advantages of disorder for protein-protein interactions. Whether disorder may increase, as proposed, e.g., in the “fly-casting” hypothesis, or decrease binding rates, increase or decrease binding specificity, or what role pre-formed structure might play in interactions involving IDPs (conformational selection vs. induced fit), are subjects of intense debate. Experimentally, these questions remain difficult to address. Here, we review experimental studies of binding mechanisms of IDPs using NMR spectroscopy and transient kinetic techniques, as well as the underlying theoretical concepts and numerical methods that can be applied to describe these interactions at the atomic level. The available literature suggests that the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters characterizing interactions involving IDPs can vary widely and that there may be no single common mechanism that can explain the different binding modes observed experimentally. Rather, disordered proteins appear to make combined use of features such as pre-formed structure and flexibility, depending on the individual system and the functional context. PMID:27668217

  17. THE MECHANISMS OF MODIFYING AGENTS INTERACTION WITH COMPONENTS OF ADHESIVE COMPOSITIONS OF PVA DISPERSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasyl SOLONYNKA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To modify polyvinylacetate dispersions, it was proposed to use the redox complex – Fenton reagent as a source of free radicals and oxidant for individual constituents, also it was proposed to use the acid-salt complex of nitric acid and aluminium nitrate as the mixture oxidant and the structure-forming agent (due to the formation of coordination bonds with functional groups of polymeric chains.The article presents the results of theoretical studies on possible mechanisms of chemical interaction between PVA dispersion-based adhesive composition (PVAD-51P trade mark and modifying agents; also given here are the results of experimental investigation by infrared spectroscopy in transmittance of polymeric films formed both by modified and non-modified polyvinylacetate adhesive compositions.

  18. Mechanical unfolding of ribose binding protein and its comparison with other periplasmic binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotamarthi, Hema Chandra; Narayan, Satya; Ainavarapu, Sri Rama Koti

    2014-10-01

    Folding and unfolding studies on large, multidomain proteins are still rare despite their high abundance in genomes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here, we investigate the unfolding properties of a 271 residue, two-domain ribose binding protein (RBP) from the bacterial periplasm using single-molecule force spectroscopy. We observe that RBP predominately unfolds via a two-state pathway with an unfolding force of ∼80 pN and an unfolding contour length of ∼95 nm. Only a small population (∼15%) of RBP follows three-state pathways. The ligand binding neither increases the mechanical stability nor influences the unfolding flux of RBP through different pathways. The kinetic partitioning between two-state and three-state pathways, which has been reported earlier for other periplasmic proteins, is also observed in RBP, albeit to a lesser extent. These results provide important insights into the mechanical stability and unfolding processes of large two-domain proteins and highlight the contrasting features upon ligand binding. Protein structural topology diagrams are used to explain the differences in the mechanical unfolding behavior of RBP with other periplasmic binding proteins.

  19. Staphylococcal SSL5 binding to human leukemia cells inhibits cell adhesion to endothelial cells and platelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walenkamp, Annemiek M. E.; Bestebroer, Jovanka; Boer, Ingrid G. J.; Kruizinga, Roeline; Verheul, Henk M.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.; de Haas, Carla J. C.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial proteins provide promising tools for novel anticancer therapies. Staphylococcal superantigen-like 5 (SSL5) was recently described to bind P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) on leukocytes and to inhibit neutrophil rolling on a P-selectin surface. As leukocytes and tumor cells share m

  20. Fibrinogen is a ligand for the Staphylococcus aureus Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules (MSCRAMM) Bone sialoprotein-binding protein (Bbp)

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED MSCRAMMs (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules) are bacterial surface proteins mediating adherence of the microbes to components of the extracellular matrix of the host. On Staphylococci the MSCRAMMs often have multiple ligands. Consequently we hypothesized that the S. aureus MSCRAMM Bbp (bone sialoprotein-binding protein) might recognize host molecules other than the identified bone protein. A ligand screen revealed that Bbp binds human fibrinogen (...

  1. Fibrinogen Is a Ligand for the Staphylococcus aureus Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules (MSCRAMM) Bone Sialoprotein-binding Protein (Bbp)

    OpenAIRE

    Vazquez, Vanessa; Liang, Xiaowen; Horndahl, Jenny K.; Ganesh, Vannakambadi K.; Smeds, Emanuel; Foster, Timothy J.; Hook, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) are bacterial surface proteins mediating adherence of the microbes to components of the extracellular matrix of the host. On Staphylococci, the MSCRAMMs often have multiple ligands. Consequently, we hypothesized that the Staphylococcus aureus MSCRAMM bone sialoprotein-binding protein (Bbp) might recognize host molecules other than the identified bone protein. A ligand screen revealed that Bbp binds human fibrinogen ...

  2. Adhesion and Cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Anthony von Fraunhofer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed.

  3. A unique bivalent binding and inhibition mechanism by the yatapoxvirus interleukin 18 binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Krumm

    Full Text Available Interleukin 18 (IL18 is a cytokine that plays an important role in inflammation as well as host defense against microbes. Mammals encode a soluble inhibitor of IL18 termed IL18 binding protein (IL18BP that modulates IL18 activity through a negative feedback mechanism. Many poxviruses encode homologous IL18BPs, which contribute to virulence. Previous structural and functional studies on IL18 and IL18BPs revealed an essential binding hot spot involving a lysine on IL18 and two aromatic residues on IL18BPs. The aromatic residues are conserved among the very diverse mammalian and poxviruses IL18BPs with the notable exception of yatapoxvirus IL18BPs, which lack a critical phenylalanine residue. To understand the mechanism by which yatapoxvirus IL18BPs neutralize IL18, we solved the crystal structure of the Yaba-Like Disease Virus (YLDV IL18BP and IL18 complex at 1.75 Å resolution. YLDV-IL18BP forms a disulfide bonded homo-dimer engaging IL18 in a 2∶2 stoichiometry, in contrast to the 1∶1 complex of ectromelia virus (ECTV IL18BP and IL18. Disruption of the dimer interface resulted in a functional monomer, however with a 3-fold decrease in binding affinity. The overall architecture of the YLDV-IL18BP:IL18 complex is similar to that observed in the ECTV-IL18BP:IL18 complex, despite lacking the critical lysine-phenylalanine interaction. Through structural and mutagenesis studies, contact residues that are unique to the YLDV-IL18BP:IL18 binding interface were identified, including Q67, P116 of YLDV-IL18BP and Y1, S105 and D110 of IL18. Overall, our studies show that YLDV-IL18BP is unique among the diverse family of mammalian and poxvirus IL-18BPs in that it uses a bivalent binding mode and a unique set of interacting residues for binding IL18. However, despite this extensive divergence, YLDV-IL18BP binds to the same surface of IL18 used by other IL18BPs, suggesting that all IL18BPs use a conserved inhibitory mechanism by blocking a putative receptor-binding

  4. Guanine Nucleotide-Binding Proteins of the G(12) Family Shape Immune Functions by Controlling CD4(+) T Cell Adhesiveness and Motility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Herroeder; P. Reichardt; A. Sassmann; B. Zimmermann; D. Jaeneke; J. Hoeckner; M.W. Hollmann; K.D. Fischer; S. Vogt; R. Grosse; N. Hogg; M. Gunzer; S. Offermanns; N. Wettschureck

    2009-01-01

    Integrin-mediated adhesion plays a central role in T cell trafficking and activation. Genetic inactivation of the guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein alpha-subunits G alpha(12) and G alpha(13) resulted in an increased activity of integrin leukocyte-function-antigen-1 in murine CD4(+) T cells. The

  5. Role of Lactobacillus reuteri cell and mucus-binding protein A (CmbA) in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells and mucus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Hanne; Roos, Stefan; Jonsson, Hans; Rud, Ida; Grimmer, Stine; van Pijkeren, Jan-Peter; Britton, Robert A; Axelsson, Lars

    2014-04-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri, a symbiotic inhabitant of the gastrointestinal tract in humans and animals, is marketed as a probiotic. The ability to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells and mucus is an interesting property with regard to probiotic features such as colonization of the gastrointestinal tract and interaction with the host. Here, we present a study performed to elucidate the role of sortase (SrtA), four putative sortase-dependent proteins (SDPs), and one C-terminal membrane-anchored cell surface protein of Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 in adhesion to Caco-2 cells and mucus in vitro. This included mutagenesis of the genes encoding these proteins and complementation of mutants. A null mutation in hmpref0536_10255 encoding srtA resulted in significantly reduced adhesion to Caco-2 cells and mucus, indicating involvement of SDPs in adhesion. Evaluation of the bacterial adhesion revealed that of the five putative surface protein mutants tested, only a null mutation in the hmpref0536_10633 gene, encoding a putative SDP with an LPxTG motif, resulted in a significant loss of adhesion to both Caco-2 cells and mucus. Complementation with the functional gene on a plasmid restored adhesion to Caco-2 cells. However, complete restoration of adhesion to mucus was not achieved. Overexpression of hmpref0536_10633 in strain ATCC PTA 6475 resulted in an increased adhesion to Caco-2 cells and mucus compared with the WT strain. We conclude from these results that, among the putative surface proteins tested, the protein encoded by hmpref0536_10633 plays a critical role in binding of Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 to Caco-2 cells and mucus. Based on this, we propose that this LPxTG motif containing protein should be referred to as cell and mucus binding protein A (CmbA). PMID:24473252

  6. Cell surface-expressed moesin-like receptor regulates T cell interactions with tissue components and binds an adhesion-modulating IL-2 peptide generated by elastase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, A; Hershkoviz, R; Altbaum-Weiss, I; Ganor, S; Lider, O

    2001-03-01

    The adhesion of leukocytes to the extracellular matrix (ECM) depends on their responses to variations in the chemotactic signals in their milieu, as well as on the functioning of cytoskeletal and context-specific receptors. Ezrin, radixin, and moesin constitute a family of proteins that link the plasma membrane to the actin cytoskeleton. The surface expression of moesin on T cells and its role in cell adhesion has not been fully elucidated. Recently, we found that IL-2 peptides generated by elastase modified the adhesion of activated T cells to ECM ligands. Here, we further examined the adhesion regulatory effects of EFLNRWIT, one of the IL-2 peptides, as well as the existence and putative function of its receptor on T cells. We found that when presented to T cells in the absence of another activator, the EFLNRWIT peptide induced cell adhesion to vessel wall and ECM components. Binding of a radiolabeled peptide to T cells, precipitation with the immobilized peptide, and amino acid sequencing of the precipitated protein revealed that EFLNRWIT exerts its function via a cell surface-expressed moesin-like moiety, whose constitutive expression on T cells was increased after activation. This notion was further supported by our findings that: 1) anti-moesin mAb inhibited the binding of T cells to the immobilized EFLNRWIT peptide, 2) immobilized recombinant moesin bound the IL-2 peptide, and 3) soluble moesin inhibited the EFLNRWIT-induced T cell adhesion to fibronectin. Interestingly, moesin appears to be generally involved in T cell responses to adhesion-regulating signals. Thus, the IL-2 peptide EFLNRWIT appears to exert its modulating capacities via an adhesion-regulating moesin-like receptor. PMID:11207255

  7. Staphylococcal SSL5 Binding to Human Leukemia Cells Inhibits Cell Adhesion to Endothelial Cells and Platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemiek M. E. Walenkamp

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial proteins provide promising tools for novel anticancer therapies. Staphylococcal superantigen-like 5 (SSL5 was recently described to bind P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 on leukocytes and to inhibit neutrophil rolling on a P-selectin surface. As leukocytes and tumor cells share many characteristics in migration and dissemination, we explored the potential of SSL5 as an antagonist of malignant cell behavior. Previously, it was demonstrated that rolling of human HL-60 leukemia cells on activated endothelial cells was mediated by P-selectin. In this study, we show that SSL5 targets HL-60 cells. Binding of SSL5 was rapid and without observed toxicity. Competition of SSL5 with the binding of three anti-PSGL-1 antibodies and P-selectin to HL-60 cells identified PSGL-1 as the ligand on HL-60 cells. Presence of sialyl Lewis x epitopes on PSGL-1 was crucial for its interaction with SSL5. Importantly, SSL5 not only inhibited the interaction of HL-60 cells with activated endothelial cells but also with platelets, which both play an important role in growth and metastasis of cancers. These data support the concept that SSL5 could be a lead in the search for novel strategies against hematological malignancies.

  8. Role of Polysaccharides on Mechanical and Adhesion Properties of Flax Fibres in Flax/PLA Biocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gijo Raj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of alkali and enzymatic treatments on flax fibre morphology, mechanical, and adhesion properties was investigated. The multilength scale analysis allows for the correlation of the fibre's morphological changes induced by the treatments with mechanical properties to better explain the adherence properties between flax and PLA. The atomic force microscopy (AFM images revealed the removal of primary layers, upon treatments, down to cellulose microfibrils present in the secondary layers. The variation in mechanical properties was found to be dependent, apart from the crystalline content, on interaction between cellulose microfibrils and encrusting polysaccharides, pectins and hemicelluloses, in the secondary layers. Finally, microbond tests between the modified fibres and PLA emphasize the important role of the outer fibre's surface on the overall composite properties. It was observed here that gentle treatments of the fibres, down to the oriented microfibrils, are favourable to a better adherence with a PLA drop. This paper highlights the important role of amorphous polymers, hemicellulose and pectin, in the optimisation of the adhesion and mechanical properties of flax fibres in the biocomposite.

  9. [Bonding strength of metal frameworks and adhesive agents in the resin-bonded bridge technic. 3. Comparative research on various retention mechanisms and adhesive systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirz, J; Besimo, C; Schmidli, F

    1989-01-01

    In fixed denture prosthetics, macro- and micromechanical as well as chemical adhesive mechanisms may be used between metal and bonding agent. The in vitro research presented here determines the adhesive strength of six different bonding agents and five different retention mechanisms on twelve precious and nonprecious metal alloys using shearing stress. The evaluation of the results should help to assess the suitability of the various combinations of materials and anchoring methods for the fixation of adhesive bridges. On the basis of the adhesive strengths and the examination of the various clinical advantages and disadvantages of the different methods that were analyzed, the electrolytic etching of nonprecious metal alloys appears to be particularly suitable for fixed denture prostheses. An efficient combination between alloy and bonding agent is of particular importance in this area. Macromechanical mesh and negative retentions can only be used to a limited clinical extent due to their high space requirements. Very good results were produced by the preconditioning of inner anchor surfaces with silanes. Sandblasting, however, provided unsatisfactory shear-stress results over a broad front independently of the type of alloy.

  10. Poly(AAc-co-MBA) hydrogel films: adhesive and mechanical properties in aqueous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunbabu, Dhamodaran; Shahsavan, Hamed; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Boxin

    2013-01-10

    Poly(acrylic acid-co-N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide) hydrogel films were synthesized by copolymerizing acrylic acid (AAc) with N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) as a cross-linker via photo polymerization in the spacing confined between two glass plates. NMR spectroscopy was utilized to determine the cross-linking density. We found that the cross-linking density determined by NMR is higher than that expected from the feed concentrations of cross-linkers, suggesting that MBA is more reactive than AAc and the heterogeneous nature of the cross-linking. In addition to the swelling tests, indentation tests were performed on the hydrogel films under water to investigate effects of the cross-linking density on the adhesion and mechanical properties of the hydrogel films in terms of adhesive pull-off force and Hertz-type elastic modulus. As the cross-linker concentration increased, the effective elastic modulus of the hydrogel films increased dramatically at low cross-linking densities and reached a high steady-state value at higher cross-linking densities. The pull-off force decreased with increasing cross-linker concentration and reached a lower force plateau at high cross-linking densities. An optimal "trade-off" cross-linking density was determined to be 0.02 mol fraction of MBA in the hydrogel, where balanced elastic modulus and adhesive pull-off force can be obtained.

  11. The binding mechanism of a peptidic cyclic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Longguang; Svane, Anna Sigrid P.; Sørensen, Hans Peter;

    2011-01-01

    , have attracted considerable attention. Here, we have investigated the mechanism of binding of peptidic inhibitors to serine protease targets. Our model is upain-1 (CSWRGLENHRMC), a disulfide-bond-constrained competitive inhibitor of human urokinase-type plasminogen activator with a noncanonical......Serine proteases are classical objects for studies of catalytic and inhibitory mechanisms as well as interesting as therapeutic targets. Since small-molecule serine protease inhibitors generally suffer from specificity problems, peptidic inhibitors, isolated from phage-displayed peptide libraries...... is stabilised by intrapeptide contacts between the N-terminal extension and the core peptide around Trp3. These results provide a uniquely detailed description of the binding of a peptidic protease inhibitor to its target and are of general importance in the development of peptidic inhibitors with high...

  12. CD4 binding to major histocompatibility complex class II antigens induces LFA-1-dependent and -independent homotypic adhesion of B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansas, G S; Cambier, J C; Tedder, T F

    1992-01-01

    T helper cells recognize processed antigen (Ag) in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens present on the surface of B cells and other Ag-presenting cells. This interaction is mediated through the T cell receptor complex with associate recognition of class II molecules by the CD4 molecule. In this study, the binding of a soluble recombinant CD4/Ig heavy chain fusion protein (CD4-gamma 3) or monoclonal antibody (mAb) to class II antigens on human B cells was shown to induce rapid and specific homotypic adhesion of B cells and most B lymphoblastoid cell lines. mAb reactive with CD4 inhibited CD4-gamma 3-induced adhesion and a mutant B lymphoblastoid cell line deficient in class II antigens failed to respond. Induction of homotypic adhesion was dependent on energy metabolism and a functional cytoskeleton, and class II+ pre-B cells did not exhibit adhesion in response to these stimuli, suggesting that cross-linking of class II molecules generated a transmembrane signal and did not simply aggregate cells. In addition, MHC class II-induced adhesion was Fc receptor independent, as 15 mAb of different Ig isotypes reactive with HLA-D or HLA-DQ gene products induced adhesion. Anti-class II mAb and CD4-gamma 3 were able to induce adhesion at concentrations as low as 10 ng/ml and 100 ng/ml, respectively. Suboptimal stimulation of B cell lines through HLA-D antigens induced homotypic adhesion that was dependent on the activation of LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18), and which could be blocked by specific mAb. However, at greater signal strengths, adhesion was not blocked by mAb against the known adhesion receptors, suggesting the induction of a novel adhesion pathway. Consistent with this, homotypic adhesion induced by engagement of MHC class II antigens was observed with LFA-1-deficient B cell lines, and was independent of CD49d or CD18 expression. Thus, the direct engagement of B cell class II antigens by CD4 is likely to generate transmembrane signals which

  13. Biophysically inspired model for functionalized nanocarrier adhesion to cell surface: roles of protein expression and mechanical factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, N.; Tourdot, Richard W.; Eckmann, David M.; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve selective targeting of affinity–ligand coated nanoparticles to the target tissue, it is essential to understand the key mechanisms that govern their capture by the target cell. Next-generation pharmacokinetic (PK) models that systematically account for proteomic and mechanical factors can accelerate the design, validation and translation of targeted nanocarriers (NCs) in the clinic. Towards this objective, we have developed a computational model to delineate the roles played by target protein expression and mechanical factors of the target cell membrane in determining the avidity of functionalized NCs to live cells. Model results show quantitative agreement with in vivo experiments when specific and non-specific contributions to NC binding are taken into account. The specific contributions are accounted for through extensive simulations of multivalent receptor–ligand interactions, membrane mechanics and entropic factors such as membrane undulations and receptor translation. The computed NC avidity is strongly dependent on ligand density, receptor expression, bending mechanics of the target cell membrane, as well as entropic factors associated with the membrane and the receptor motion. Our computational model can predict the in vivo targeting levels of the intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM1)-coated NCs targeted to the lung, heart, kidney, liver and spleen of mouse, when the contributions due to endothelial capture are accounted for. The effect of other cells (such as monocytes, etc.) do not improve the model predictions at steady state. We demonstrate the predictive utility of our model by predicting partitioning coefficients of functionalized NCs in mice and human tissues and report the statistical accuracy of our model predictions under different scenarios. PMID:27429783

  14. Biophysically inspired model for functionalized nanocarrier adhesion to cell surface: roles of protein expression and mechanical factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, N.; Tourdot, Richard W.; Eckmann, David M.; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2016-06-01

    In order to achieve selective targeting of affinity-ligand coated nanoparticles to the target tissue, it is essential to understand the key mechanisms that govern their capture by the target cell. Next-generation pharmacokinetic (PK) models that systematically account for proteomic and mechanical factors can accelerate the design, validation and translation of targeted nanocarriers (NCs) in the clinic. Towards this objective, we have developed a computational model to delineate the roles played by target protein expression and mechanical factors of the target cell membrane in determining the avidity of functionalized NCs to live cells. Model results show quantitative agreement with in vivo experiments when specific and non-specific contributions to NC binding are taken into account. The specific contributions are accounted for through extensive simulations of multivalent receptor-ligand interactions, membrane mechanics and entropic factors such as membrane undulations and receptor translation. The computed NC avidity is strongly dependent on ligand density, receptor expression, bending mechanics of the target cell membrane, as well as entropic factors associated with the membrane and the receptor motion. Our computational model can predict the in vivo targeting levels of the intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM1)-coated NCs targeted to the lung, heart, kidney, liver and spleen of mouse, when the contributions due to endothelial capture are accounted for. The effect of other cells (such as monocytes, etc.) do not improve the model predictions at steady state. We demonstrate the predictive utility of our model by predicting partitioning coefficients of functionalized NCs in mice and human tissues and report the statistical accuracy of our model predictions under different scenarios.

  15. Breast cancer cells compete with hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells for intercellular adhesion molecule 1-mediated binding to the bone marrow microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Abhishek; Friedrichs, Jens; Bonin, Malte von; Bejestani, Elham Peshali; Werner, Carsten; Wobus, Manja; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Bornhäuser, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Adhesion-based cellular interactions involved in breast cancer metastasis to the bone marrow remain elusive. We identified that breast cancer cells directly compete with hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) for retention in the bone marrow microenvironment. To this end, we established two models of competitive cell adhesion-simultaneous and sequential-to study a potential competition for homing to the niche and displacement of the endogenous HSPCs upon invasion by tumor cells. In both models, breast cancer cells but not non-tumorigenic cells competitively reduced adhesion of HSPCs to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in a tumor cell number-dependent manner. Higher adhesive force between breast cancer cells and MSCs, as compared with HSPCs, assessed by quantitative atomic force microscopy-based single-cell force spectroscopy could partially account for tumor cell mediated reduction in HSPC adhesion to MSCs. Genetic inactivation and blockade studies revealed that homophilic interactions between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expressed on tumor cells and MSCs, respectively, regulate the competition between tumor cells and HSPCs for binding to MSCs. Moreover, tumor cell-secreted soluble ICAM-1(sICAM-1) also impaired HSPC adhesion via blocking CD18-ICAM-1 binding between HSPCs and MSCs. Xenotransplantation studies in NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice revealed reduction of human HSPCs in the bone marrow via metastatic breast cancer cells. These findings point to a direct competitive interaction between disseminated breast cancer cells and HSPCs within the bone marrow micro environment. This interaction might also have implications on niche-based tumor support. Therefore, targeting this cross talk may represent a novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:27207667

  16. EFFECT OF INTERFACIAL ADHESION ON CRYSTALLIZATION AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF POLY (ETHYLENE TEREPHTHALATE)/GLASS BEAD COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OU Yuchun; YU Zhongzhen; ZHU Jin; LI Ge; ZHU Shanguang

    1996-01-01

    The interfacial adhesion between poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and glass bead was investigated by scanning electron microscope and parallel-plate rheometer. Effect of interfacial adhesion on the crystallization and mechanical properties of PET/glass bead composites was also studied by differential scanning calorimeter and mechanical testers.The results obtained indicate that the glass bead has a heterogeneous nucleation effect on the PET crystallization. Although better interfacial adhesion is advantageous to the increase of the tensile strength of the composite, yet it is unfavorable to the crystallization of PET. It should be pointed out that the crystallization rate of filled PET is always higher than that of pure PET, regardless of the state of interfacial adhesion.

  17. Coupling behavior between adhesive and abrasive wear mechanism of aero-hydraulic spool valves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yunxia; Gong Wenjun; Kang Rui

    2016-01-01

    Leakage due to wear is one of the main failure modes of aero-hydraulic spool valves. This paper established a practical coupling wear model for aero-hydraulic spool valves based on dynamic system modelling theory. Firstly, the experiment for wear mechanism verification proved that adhesive wear and abrasive wear did coexist during the working process of spool valves. Sec-ondly coupling behavior of each wear mechanism was characterized by analyzing actual time-variation of model parameters during wear evolution process. Meanwhile, Archard model and three-body abrasive wear model were utilized for adhesive wear and abrasive wear, respectively. Furthermore, their coupling wear model was established by calculating the actual wear volume. Finally, from the result of formal test, all the required parameters for our model were obtained. The relative error between model prediction and data of pre-test was also presented to verify the accuracy of model, which demonstrated that our model was useful for providing accurate prediction of spool valve’s wear life.

  18. Mechanical joining and adhesive bonding - basics, technology, applications; Fuegen durch Umformen und Kleben - Grundlagen, Technologie, Anwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meschut, G. [Volkswagen AG, Konzern-Forschung, Wolfsburg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    This contribution uses material combinations current in the automotive industry to demonstrate the mutual dependence of joining processes and their implications for the geometric shaping of fasteners in the combined shaping and adhesive bonding joining process. The mechanical properties of joints made using combined and elementary methods are compared taking into consideration quasi static, oscillating and impact-type loads, and ageing characteristics. The results demonstrate that the combination of mechanical and adhesive bonding methods produces joints of technologically high quality which can be implemented in optimised light-weight construction. General information is provided on the use of low-heat hybrid joining technology for project planning of this type of connections in industrial practice. (orig.) [German] Der Beitrag verdeutlicht anhand von aktuellen Werkstoffkombinationen aus dem Fahrzeugbau die gegenseitige Beeinflussung der Fuegeprozesse und die Folgen fuer die Fuegeelementausbildung bei der Verfahrenskombination Fuegen durch Umformen und Kleben. Die mechanischen Eigenschaften von kombiniert gefuegten und elementar gefuegten Verbindungen unter quasistatischer, schwingender und stossartiger Belastung sowie das Alterungsverhalten werden gegenuebergestellt. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass mittels der Kombination mechanischer Fuegeverfahren mit dem Kleben technologisch hochwertige Verbindungen fuer den eigenschaftsoptimierten Leichtbau realisierbar sind. Fuer die Projektierung derartiger Verbindungen in der industriellen Praxis werden allgemeingueltige Hinweise zum Einsatz der waermearmen Hybridfuegetechnik gegeben. (orig.)

  19. Epigenetic mechanisms of cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Jiro

    2016-09-01

    Multiple myeloma cells acquire the resistance to anti-cancer drugs through physical and functional interactions with the bone marrow microenvironment via two overlapping mechanisms. First, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) produce soluble factors, such as interleukin-6 and insulin-like growth factor-1, to activate signal transduction pathways leading to drug resistance (soluble factor-mediated drug resistance). Second, BMSCs up-regulate the expression of cell cycle inhibitors, anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family and ABC drug transporters in myeloma cells upon direct adhesion [cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR)]. Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying drug resistance may greatly contribute to the advancement of cancer therapies. Recent investigations, including ours, have revealed the involvement of epigenetic alterations in drug resistance especially CAM-DR. For example, we found that class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) determine the sensitivity of proteasome inhibitors and the histone methyltransferase EZH2 regulates the transcription of anti-apoptotic genes during the acquisition of CAM-DR by myeloma cells. In addition, another histone methyltransferase MMSET was shown to confer drug resistance to myeloma cells by facilitating DNA repair. These findings provide a rationale for the inclusion of epigenetic drugs, such as HDAC inhibitors and histone methylation modifiers, in combination chemotherapy for MM patients to increase the therapeutic index. PMID:27411688

  20. Flocculation protein structure and cell-cell adhesion mechanism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Katty; Willaert, Ronnie

    2010-11-01

    Cell-cell adhesion occurs in a broad spectrum of biological processes, of which yeast flocculation is an area of interest for evolutionary scientists to brewers and winemakers. The flocculation mechanism is based on a lectin-carbohydrate interaction but is not yet fully understood, although the first model dates back to the 1950s. This review will update the current understanding of the complex mechanism behind yeast flocculation. Moreover, modern technologies to measure the forces involved in single carbohydrate-lectin interactions, are discussed. The Flo1 protein has been extensively described as the protein responsible for strong flocculation. Recently, more research has been directed to the detailed analysis of this flocculin. Due to the advances in the field of bioinformatics, more information about Flo1p could be obtained via structurally or functionally related proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge of the Flo1 protein, with a strong emphasis towards its structure.

  1. A factor VIII-derived peptide enables von Willebrand factor (VWF)-binding of artificial platelet nanoconstructs without interfering with VWF-adhesion of natural platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji-Valizadeh, Hassan; Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2014-05-01

    There is substantial clinical interest in synthetic platelet analogs for potential application in transfusion medicine. To this end, our research is focused on self-assembled peptide-lipid nanoconstructs that can undergo injury site-selective adhesion and subsequently promote site-directed active platelet aggregation, thus mimicking platelet's primary hemostatic actions. For injury site-selective adhesion, we have utilized a coagulation factor FVIII-derived VWF-binding peptide (VBP). FVIII binds to VWF's D'-D3 domain while natural platelet GPIbα binds to VWF's A1 domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the VBP-decorated nanoconstructs will adhere to VWF without mutual competition with natural platelets. We further hypothesized that the adherent VBP-decorated constructs can enhance platelet aggregation when co-decorated with a fibrinogen-mimetic peptide (FMP). To test these hypotheses, we used glycocalicin to selectively block VWF's A1 domain and, using fluorescence microscopy, studied the binding of fluorescently labeled VBP-decorated nanoconstructs versus platelets to ristocetin-treated VWF. Subsequently, we co-decorated the nanoconstructs with VBP and FMP and incubated them with human platelets to study construct-mediated enhancement of platelet aggregation. Decoration with VBP resulted in substantial construct adhesion to ristocetin-treated VWF even if the A1-domain was blocked by glycocalicin. In comparison, such A1-blocking resulted in significant reduction of platelet adhesion. Without A1-blocking, the VBP-decorated constructs and natural platelets could adhere to VWF concomitantly. Furthermore, the constructs co-decorated with VBP and FMP enhanced active platelet aggregation. The results indicate significant promise in utilizing the FVIII-derived VBP in developing synthetic platelet analogs that do not interfere with VWF-binding of natural platelets but allow site-directed enhancement of platelet aggregation when combined with FMP.

  2. Multiscale mechanics and physics of nature’s dry adhesion systems

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Dry adhesion systems adhere via physical bonds without any significant contribution from a liquid medium. In nature, these systems are found among the footpads of spiders, lizards and many other small animals, with high adhesion force, low detachment force and elfcleaning properties. These features are highly interesting for biomimetic man-made adhesives. Heavy animals have an adhesion force much higher than its muscle force, and to enable detachment, they have evolved a functional surface wi...

  3. Dennexin peptides modeled after the homophilic binding sites of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) promote neuronal survival, modify cell adhesion and impair spatial learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler, Lene B; Christensen, Claus; Rossetti, Clara;

    2010-01-01

    , and the effect of dennexinA was independent of polysialic acid expression. Consistent with the effect of dennexinA on NCAM-mediated adhesion in vitro, the peptide impaired long-term memory retention in rats in the Morris water maze test. Thus, dennexins are novel site-specific pharmacological tools...

  4. Interaction between Endothelial Protein C Receptor and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 to Mediate Binding of Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Erythrocytes to Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avril, Marion; Bernabeu, Maria; Benjamin, Maxwell; Brazier, Andrew Jay

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) are candidate receptors for the deadly complication cerebral malaria. However, it remains unclear if Plasmodium falciparum parasites with dual binding specificity are involved in cytoadhesion or different parasite subpopulations bind in brain microvessels. Here, we investigated this issue by studying different subtypes of ICAM-1-binding parasite lines. We show that two parasite lines expressing domain cassette 13 (DC13) of the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family have dual binding specificity for EPCR and ICAM-1 and further mapped ICAM-1 binding to the first DBLβ domain following the PfEMP1 head structure in both proteins. As PfEMP1 head structures have diverged between group A (EPCR binders) and groups B and C (CD36 binders), we also investigated how ICAM-1-binding parasites with different coreceptor binding traits influence P. falciparum-infected erythrocyte binding to endothelial cells. Whereas levels of binding to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-stimulated endothelial cells from the lung and brain by all ICAM-1-binding parasite lines increased, group A (EPCR and ICAM-1) was less dependent than group B (CD36 and ICAM-1) on ICAM-1 upregulation. Furthermore, both group A DC13 parasite lines had higher binding levels to brain endothelial cells (a microvascular niche with limited CD36 expression). This study shows that ICAM-1 is a coreceptor for a subset of EPCR-binding parasites and provides the first evidence of how EPCR and ICAM-1 interact to mediate parasite binding to both resting and TNF-α-activated primary brain and lung endothelial cells. PMID:27406562

  5. The Ras suppressor Rsu-1 binds to the LIM 5 domain of the adaptor protein PINCH1 and participates in adhesion-related functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rsu-1 is a highly conserved leucine rich repeat (LRR) protein that is expressed ubiquitously in mammalian cells. Rsu-1 was identified based on its ability to inhibit transformation by Ras, and previous studies demonstrated that ectopic expression of Rsu-1 inhibited anchorage-independent growth of Ras-transformed cells and human tumor cell lines. Using GAL4-based yeast two-hybrid screening, the LIM domain protein, PINCH1, was identified as the binding partner of Rsu-1. PINCH1 is an adaptor protein that localizes to focal adhesions and it has been implicated in the regulation of adhesion functions. Subdomain mapping in yeast revealed that Rsu-1 binds to the LIM 5 domain of PINCH1, a region not previously identified as a specific binding domain for any other protein. Additional testing demonstrated that PINCH2, which is highly homologous to PINCH1, except in the LIM 5 domain, does not interact with Rsu-1. Glutathione transferase fusion protein binding studies determined that the LRR region of Rsu-1 interacts with PINCH1. Transient expression studies using epitope-tagged Rsu-1 and PINCH1 revealed that Rsu-1 co-immunoprecipitated with PINCH1 and colocalized with vinculin at sites of focal adhesions in mammalian cells. In addition, endogenous P33 Rsu-1 from 293T cells co-immunoprecipitated with transiently expressed myc-tagged PINCH1. Furthermore, RNAi-induced reduction in Rsu-1 RNA and protein inhibited cell attachment, and while previous studies demonstrated that ectopic expression of Rsu-1 inhibited Jun kinase activation, the depletion of Rsu-1 resulted in activation of Jun and p38 stress kinases. These studies demonstrate that Rsu-1 interacts with PINCH1 in mammalian cells and functions, in part, by altering cell adhesion

  6. New functions and signaling mechanisms for the class of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebscher, Ines; Ackley, Brian; Araç, Demet;

    2014-01-01

    The class of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs), with 33 human homologs, is the second largest family of GPCRs. In addition to a seven-transmembrane α-helix-a structural feature of all GPCRs-the class of aGPCRs is characterized by the presence of a large N-terminal extracellular region....... In addition, all aGPCRs but one (GPR123) contain a GPCR autoproteolysis-inducing (GAIN) domain that mediates autoproteolytic cleavage at the GPCR autoproteolysis site motif to generate N- and a C-terminal fragments (NTF and CTF, respectively) during protein maturation. Subsequently, the NTF and CTF...... recent advances in understanding the biological functions, signaling mechanisms, and disease associations of the aGPCRs....

  7. Study of the aging processes in polyurethane adhesives using thermal treatment and differential calorimetric, dielectric, and mechanical techniques ; 1, identifying the aging processes ; 2, quantifying the aging effect

    CERN Document Server

    Althouse, L P

    1979-01-01

    Study of the aging processes in polyurethane adhesives using thermal treatment and differential calorimetric, dielectric, and mechanical techniques ; 1, identifying the aging processes ; 2, quantifying the aging effect

  8. Effect of surface treatment of brackets and mechanical cycling on adhesion to enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrais, Fabiola Rossato; Degrazia, Felipe; Peres, Bernardo Urbanetto; Ferrazzo, Vilmar Antonio; Grehs, Renesio Armindo; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2014-01-01

    This in vitro study sought to evaluate how surface conditioning from bracket and mechanical cycling aging affected the bond strength between metallic brackets and bovine enamel, and to determine the adhesive remnant index. Eighty bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin using polyvinyl chloride rings and divided into 4 groups based on surface treatment (n = 20). Group 1 (control) received no surface treatment, Group 2 specimens were sandblasted with aluminum oxide particles, Group 3 specimens were sandblasted with silicon oxide and treated with a tribochemichemical silica coupling agent, and Group 4 specimens were primed with a multidomain protein-based agent. Half of the specimens were submitted to shear bond testing, while the others were subjected to mechanical cycling. ANOVA showed that mechanical cycling did not have a significant influence on bond strength (P = 0.9244), while surface conditioning of the brackets did (P = 0.0001). Tukey's test results were similar for mechanical cycling, and indicated that only Group 3 significantly improved the resin bond to the brackets; however, this group also demonstrated the highest percentage of enamel failure. PMID:24784526

  9. Dynamic force spectroscopy to probe adhesion strength of living cells

    OpenAIRE

    Prechtel, K.; Bausch, A. R.; Marchi-Artzner, V.; Kantlehner, M.; Kessler, H; Merkel, R

    2002-01-01

    We studied the mechanical strength of the adhesion of living cells to model membranes. The latter contained a RGD lipopeptide which is a high affinity binding site for a cell adhesion molecule (integrin alpha(V)beta(3)). Cells adhered specifically to the vesicles. We used micropipette aspiration for breaking this adhesion with well defined forces. Systematic variation of the rate of force application revealed pronounced kinetic effects. The dependence of the detachment forces on the loading r...

  10. Mono- and multiple TiN(/Ti) coating adhesion mechanism on a Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianzhong; Zheng, Hua; Sinkovits, Theo; Hee, Ay Ching; Zhao, Yue

    2015-11-01

    Mono- and multiple TiN(/Ti) coatings deposited on Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy substrates by the filtered arc deposition system were examined using scratch testing and depth-sensing indentation in terms of the relationship between the coating adhesion, deformation mechanism, and microstructure, and mechanical properties at the film/substrate interface. The results show that multilayer TiN/Ti coatings offer a greater resistance to cracking and delamination than monolithic TiN coatings under the same conditions on the Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloys substrates. And increasing the number of layers for TiN multilayer coating improves the coatings adhesion. In contrast, for the coatings on the Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloys substrates that were heat-treated to a higher hardness, the limited deformation in the substrates improved remarkably the coating adhesion indiscriminately. The substrate mechanical properties play the major roles in controlling the coating adhesion, and increasing thickness and layers of the TiN multilayer have a limited improvement to the adhesion of coating.

  11. Spectroscopic and Docking Studies on the Binding of Liquiritigenin with Hyaluronidase for Antiallergic Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Hua-jin Zeng; Ran Yang; Jing You; Ling-bo Qu; Yan-jun Sun

    2016-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of liquiritigenin on hyaluronidase and its binding mechanism were investigated systematically by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, and molecular modeling approaches. These results indicated that liquiritigenin could interact with hyaluronidase to form a liquiritigenin-hyaluronidase complex. The binding constant, number of binding sites, and thermodynamic parameters were calculated, which indicated that liquiritigenin could spontaneously bind with hyaluronidase mainly thro...

  12. AND-34, a novel p130Cas-binding thymic stromal cell protein regulated by adhesion and inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, D; Clayton, L K; Smolyar, A; Lerner, A

    1999-08-15

    We have characterized a novel cDNA whose steady state mRNA levels rise in the thymus 2 to 6 h following the induction of CD4+CD8+ thymocyte apoptosis by in vivo cross-linking of CD3 epsilon. This cDNA, AND-34-1, contains an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein with an amino-terminal Src homology 2 (SH2) domain and a carboxyl-terminal domain homologous to GDP-exchange factors (GEFs). Northern analysis demonstrates widespread expression of the AND-34 gene. Anti-CD3 epsilon treatment induces up-regulation of the AND-34 mRNA levels in total thymic RNA but not in RNA from purified thymocytes, suggesting that this transcript is derived from a thymic stromal cell population. IL-1 and TNF increase AND-34 transcript levels in thymic cortical reticular, thymic nurse, and fibroblast cell lines. In the thymic cortical reticular cell line, IL-1 and TNF induce a protein of the predicted 93-kDa size reactive with anti-AND-34 peptide antisera. Fifteen minutes of serum stimulation of vanadate-pretreated AND-34-1-transfected NIH3T3 fibroblasts induces tyrosine phosphorylation of AND-34 as well as coprecipitating 95-, 125-, and 130-kDa proteins. One of these tyrosine phosphorylated proteins is identified as p130Cas (Crk-associated substrate), a signaling molecule previously known to bind to a GDP-exchange factor (C3G) and inducibly associate with the focal adhesion complex. Consistent with such an association, AND-34 tyrosine phosphorylation is induced following adherence of trypsinized fibroblasts to fibronectin or poly-L -lysine-coated surfaces. PMID:10438950

  13. Characterization of the in vitro binding and inhibition kinetics of primary amine oxidase/vascular adhesion protein-1 by glucosamine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Olivieri, Aldo

    2012-04-01

    Primary-amine oxidase (PrAO) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of endogenous and exogenous primary amines and also functions, in some tissues, as an inflammation-inducible endothelial factor, known as vascular adhesion protein-1. VAP-1 mediates the slow rolling and adhesion of lymphocytes to endothelial cells in a number of inflammatory conditions, including inflammation of the synovium.

  14. Identification, purification, and characterization of a zyxin-related protein that binds the focal adhesion and microfilament protein VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, M; Jouvenal, K; Tripier, D; Walter, U

    1995-08-15

    VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein), an established substrate of cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases in vitro and in living cells, is associated with focal adhesions, microfilaments, and membrane regions of high dynamic activity. Here, the identification of an 83-kDa protein (p83) that specifically binds VASP in blot overlays of different cell homogenates is reported. With VASP overlays as a detection tool, p83 was purified from porcine platelets and used to generate monospecific polyclonal antibodies. VASP binding to purified p83 in solid-phase binding assays and the closely matching subcellular localization in double-label immunofluorescence analyses demonstrated that both proteins also directly interact as native proteins in vitro and possibly in living cells. The subcellular distribution, the biochemical properties, as well as microsequencing data revealed that porcine platelet p83 is related to chicken gizzard zyxin and most likely represents the mammalian equivalent of the chicken protein. The VASP-p83 interaction may contribute to the targeting of VASP to focal adhesions, microfilaments, and dynamic membrane regions. Together with our recent identification of VASP as a natural ligand of the profilin poly-(L-proline) binding site, our present results suggest that, by linking profilin to zyxin/p83, VASP may participate in spatially confined profilin-regulated F-actin formation.

  15. Neuritogenic and survival-promoting effects of the P2 peptide derived from a homophilic binding site in the neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin V; Køhler, Lene B; Ditlevsen, Dorte K;

    2004-01-01

    lowered by P2. Finally, treatment of neurons with P2 resulted in phosphorylation of the ser/thr kinase Akt. Thus, a small peptide mimicking homophilic NCAM interaction is capable of inducing differentiation as reflected by neurite outgrowth in several neuronal cell types and inhibiting apoptosis......The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays a pivotal role in neural development, regeneration, and plasticity. NCAM mediates adhesion and subsequent signal transduction through NCAM-NCAM binding. Recently, a peptide ligand termed P2 corresponding to a 12-amino-acid sequence in the FG loop......, it enhanced the survival rate of cerebellar neurons although not of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons. Moreover, our data indicate that the protective effect of P2 in cerebellar neurons was due to an inhibition of the apoptotic process, in that caspase-3 activity and the level of DNA fragmentation were...

  16. Hydrophobic recovery of UV/ozone treated poly(dimethylsiloxane): adhesion studies by contact mechanics and mechanism of surface modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicone elastomers (Sylgard 184 and 170), based on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), were surface treated by a combined exposure to UV and ozone. The effects of the treatments were analyzed as a function of time elapsed after stopping the treatments using different standard surface characterization techniques, such as water contact angle measurements, XPS and atomic force microscopy (AFM). However, the primary focus of this study was to apply the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics approach to investigate PDMS samples prior to and following UV/ozone surface treatment. A gradual formation of a hydrophilic, silica-like surface layer with increasing modulus was observed with increasing UV/ozone exposure. A subsequent hydrophobic recovery after UV/ozone exposure was observed, as indicated by increasing contact angles. This supports the hypothesis that the hydrophobic recovery is mainly caused by the gradual coverage of a permanent silica-like structure with free siloxanes and/or reorientation of polar groups. PDMS containing a homogenously dispersed filler (Sylgard 184), exhibited a decreasing surface roughness (by AFM) when the oxidized surface region 'collapsed' into a smooth SiOx layer (final surface roughness <2 nm). PDMS containing heterogeneously distributed, aggregated filler particles (Sylgard 170), exhibited an increasing surface roughness with treatment dose, which was attributed to the 'collapse' of the oxidized surface region thus exposing the contours of the underlying filler aggregates (final surface roughness ∼140 nm). A dedicated device was designed and built to study the contact mechanics behavior of PDMS prior to, and following surface treatment. The value of the combined elastic modulus obtained for PDMS lens and semi-infinite flat surface system showed an increase in full agreement with the formation of a silica-like layer exhibiting a high elastic modulus (compared with untreated PDMS). The work of adhesion observed in JKR experiments

  17. Hydrophobic recovery of UV/ozone treated poly(dimethylsiloxane): adhesion studies by contact mechanics and mechanism of surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oláh, Attila; Hillborg, Henrik; Vancso, G. Julius

    2005-01-01

    Silicone elastomers (Sylgard 184 and 170), based on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), were surface treated by a combined exposure to UV and ozone. The effects of the treatments were analyzed as a function of time elapsed after stopping the treatments using different standard surface characterization techniques, such as water contact angle measurements, XPS and atomic force microscopy (AFM). However, the primary focus of this study was to apply the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics approach to investigate PDMS samples prior to and following UV/ozone surface treatment. A gradual formation of a hydrophilic, silica-like surface layer with increasing modulus was observed with increasing UV/ozone exposure. A subsequent hydrophobic recovery after UV/ozone exposure was observed, as indicated by increasing contact angles. This supports the hypothesis that the hydrophobic recovery is mainly caused by the gradual coverage of a permanent silica-like structure with free siloxanes and/or reorientation of polar groups. PDMS containing a homogenously dispersed filler (Sylgard 184), exhibited a decreasing surface roughness (by AFM) when the oxidized surface region "collapsed" into a smooth SiO x layer (final surface roughness Sylgard 170), exhibited an increasing surface roughness with treatment dose, which was attributed to the "collapse" of the oxidized surface region thus exposing the contours of the underlying filler aggregates (final surface roughness ˜140 nm). A dedicated device was designed and built to study the contact mechanics behavior of PDMS prior to, and following surface treatment. The value of the combined elastic modulus obtained for PDMS lens and semi-infinite flat surface system showed an increase in full agreement with the formation of a silica-like layer exhibiting a high elastic modulus (compared with untreated PDMS). The work of adhesion observed in JKR experiments exhibited an increasing trend as a function of treatment done in agreement with

  18. Adhesion in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2014-01-01

    This comprehensive book will provide both fundamental and applied aspects of adhesion pertaining to microelectronics in a single and easily accessible source. Among the topics to be covered include; Various theories or mechanisms of adhesionSurface (physical or chemical) characterization of materials as it pertains to adhesionSurface cleaning as it pertains to adhesionWays to improve adhesionUnraveling of interfacial interactions using an array of pertinent techniquesCharacterization of interfaces / interphasesPolymer-polymer adhesionMetal-polymer adhesion  (metallized polymers)Polymer adhesi

  19. Personal electronics printing via tapping mode composite liquid metal ink delivery and adhesion mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; He, Zhi-Zhu; Yang, Jun; Liu, Jing

    2014-04-04

    Printed electronics is becoming increasingly important in a variety of newly emerging areas. However, restricted to the rather limited conductive inks and available printing strategies, the current electronics manufacture is usually confined to industry level. Here, we show a highly cost-effective and entirely automatic printing way towards personal electronics making, through introducing a tapping-mode composite fluid delivery system. Fundamental mechanisms regarding the reliable printing, transfer and adhesion of the liquid metal inks on the substrate were disclosed through systematic theoretical interpretation and experimental measurements. With this liquid metal printer, a series of representative electronic patterns spanning from single wires to desired complex configurations such as integrated circuit (IC), printed-circuits-on-board (PCB), electronic paintings, or more do-it-yourself (DIY) devices, were demonstrated to be printed out with high precision in a moment. And the total machine cost already reached personally affordable price. This is hard to achieve by a conventional PCB technology which generally takes long time and is material, water and energy consuming, while the existing printed electronics is still far away from the real direct printing goal. The present work opens the way for large scale personal electronics manufacture and is expected to generate important value for the coming society.

  20. Mechanical Strength of Particleboard Produced from Fonio Husk with Gum Arabic Resin Adhesive as Binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndububa E. E

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fonio (“Acha” husk passing through a maximum 4mm sieve aperture was blended with an adhesive liquid resin of gum Arabic to form Fonio Husk Particleboard (FHP samples. The resin binder was a product of crushed balls of gum Arabic that was mixed with water at ratio 4:3 by weight. The resin was introduced at percentage levels of 20%, 25%, 30%, 35%, 40% and 45% by weight. After pressing, heat treatments and curing, the particleboard samples were tested for mechanical strengths. The compressive strength ranged from 0.057N/mm2 at 20% level to 0.369N/mm2 at 45% level. Tensile strength increased steadily with increase in resin levels peaking at 0.792 N/mm2 for 45% level. The flexural strength followed the same trend peaking at 45% level with 3.697 N/mm2 . Some of the values met the minimum values prescribed by British, American and European Standards. The boards may not be used as load bearing materials but will be better suited as internal wall partitions and ceiling materials.

  1. Adhesion mechanisms of Vibrio fluvialis to skin mucus of Epinephelus awoara

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鄢庆枇; 赵敏慧; 王晓露; 邹文政; 陈昌生

    2010-01-01

    Vibrio fluvialis incubated in trypticase soy broth(TSB)showed stronger adhesion to the skin mucus of Epinephelus awoara than V.fluvialis grown on trypticase soy agar(TSA),and this bacterial adhesion was assessed in terms of saturation kinetics.Treating bacteria with antibody against O-antigens resulted in significantly reduced bacterial adhesion.In the early growth stage,the adhering bacteria numbers increased with incubation time,peaked at 24 h,and then dropped sharply.Prior heat treatment of the mucus at ...

  2. Motion of an Adhesive Gel in a Swelling Gradient a Mechanism for Cell Locomotion

    CERN Document Server

    Joanny, J F; Prost, J; Joanny, Jean-Francois; Julicher, Frank; Prost, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    Motivated by the motion of nematode sperm cells, we present a model for the motion of an adhesive gel on a solid substrate. The gel polymerizes at the leading edge and depolymerizes at the rear. The motion results from a competition between a self-generated swelling gradient and the adhesion on the substrate. The resulting stress provokes the rupture of the adhesion points and allows for the motion. The model predicts an unusual force-velocity relation which depends in significant ways on the point of application of the force.

  3. Mechanism and Prevention of Intestinal Adhesion%肠粘连的形成机制及其预防

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔令源

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal adhesion is a common complication of abdominal surgery. It makes troubles to patients and causes severe intestinal obstruction and chronic abdominal pain. So far the mechanism of intestinal adhesion is still not clear. It is generally believed that the overuse injury and inflammation lead to abnormal repair and healing of the tissue. There are many methods for clinical preventions of intestinal adhesion, which could be broadly divided into general surgical procedures, barriers and drugs. Here is to make a review on the definition epidemiology,consequences,mechanisms and preventions of intestinal adhesion.%肠粘连是腹部手术术后的常见并发症,不仅给患者带来不便,严重时还会导致肠梗阻、慢性腹痛等.目前,对肠粘连的形成机制尚无明确的认识,一般认为过度损伤和炎性反应导致组织的异常修复和愈合.临床上预防肠粘连的方法较多,可大致分为一般手术操作、屏障及药物治疗.该文就肠粘连的定义、流行病学与相关后果、肠粘连的机制及预防等方面进行综述.

  4. Mechanical switching and coupling between two dissociation pathways in a P-selectin adhesion bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Evan; Leung, Andrew; Heinrich, Volkmar; Zhu, Cheng

    2004-08-01

    Many biomolecular bonds exhibit a mechanical strength that increases in proportion to the logarithm of the rate of force application. Consistent with exponential decrease in bond lifetime under rising force, this kinetically limited failure reflects dissociation along a single thermodynamic pathway impeded by a sharp free energy barrier. Using a sensitive force probe to test the leukocyte adhesion bond P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1)-P-selectin, we observed a linear increase of bond strength with each 10-fold increase in the rate of force application from 300 to 30,000 pN/sec, implying a single pathway for failure. However, the strength and lifetime of PSGL-1-P-selectin bonds dropped anomalously when loaded below 300 pN/sec, demonstrating unexpectedly faster dissociation and a possible second pathway for failure. Remarkably, if first loaded by a "jump" in force to 20-30 pN, the bonds became strong when subjected to a force ramp as slow as 30 pN/sec and exhibited the same single-pathway kinetics under all force rates. Applied in this way, a new "jump/ramp" mode of force spectroscopy was used to show that the PSGL-1-P-selectin bond behaves as a mechanochemical switch where force history selects between two dissociation pathways with markedly different properties. Furthermore, replacing PSGL-1 by variants of its 19-aa N terminus and by the crucial tetrasaccharide sialyl LewisX produces dramatic changes in the failure kinetics, suggesting a structural basis for the two pathways. The two-pathway switch seems to provide a mechanism for the "catch bond" response observed recently with PSGL-1-P-selectin bonds subjected to small-constant forces.

  5. Comparison of the Folding Mechanism of Highly Homologous Proteins in the Lipid-binding Protein Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    The folding mechanism of two closely related proteins in the intracellular lipid binding protein family, human bile acid binding protein (hBABP) and rat bile acid binding protein (rBABP) were examined. These proteins are 77% identical (93% similar) in sequence Both of these singl...

  6. A Bio-Inspired Swellable Microneedle Adhesive for Mechanical Interlocking with Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Seung Yun; O'Cearbhaill, Eoin D.; Sisk, Geoffroy C; Park, Kyeng Min; Cho, Woo Kyung; Villiger, Martin; Bouma, Brett E; Pomahac, Bohdan; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Achieving significant adhesion to soft tissues while minimizing tissue damage poses a considerable clinical challenge. Chemical-based adhesives require tissue-specific reactive chemistry, typically inducing a significant inflammatory response. Staples are fraught with limitations including high-localized tissue stress and increased risk of infection, and nerve and blood vessel damage. Here, inspired by the endoparasite Pomphorhynchus laevis which swells its proboscis to attach to its host’s i...

  7. Cellular adhesion responses to the heparin-binding (HepII) domain of fibronectin require heparan sulfate with specific properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahalingam, Yashithra; Gallagher, John T; Couchman, John R

    2006-01-01

    Cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans are required in development and postnatal repair. Important classes of ligands for HS include growth factors and extracellular matrix macromolecules. For example, the focal adhesion component syndecan-4 interacts with the III(12-14) region of fibron......Cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans are required in development and postnatal repair. Important classes of ligands for HS include growth factors and extracellular matrix macromolecules. For example, the focal adhesion component syndecan-4 interacts with the III(12-14) region...

  8. Raman spectroscopy in investigations of mechanism of binding of human serum albumin to molecular probe fluorescein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of binding of molecular probe fluorescein to molecules of human serum albumin was studied by the Raman spectroscopy method. The position of binding Center on human serum albumin molecule for fluorescein is determined. The amino acid residues of albumin molecule, participating in binding of fluorescein at different pH values of solution, are established. The conformation rearrangements of globules of human serum albumin, taking place at binding of fluorescein at different pH values of solution, are registered

  9. Amino acid sequences mediating vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 binding to integrin alpha 4: homologous DSP sequence found for JC polyoma VP1 coat protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Andrew Meyer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The JC polyoma viral coat protein VP1 was analyzed for amino acid sequences homologies to the IDSP sequence which mediates binding of VLA-4 (integrin alpha 4 to vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. Although the full sequence was not found, a DSP sequence was located near the critical arginine residue linked to infectivity of the virus and binding to sialic acid containing molecules such as integrins (3. For the JC polyoma virus, a DSP sequence was found at residues 70, 71 and 72 with homology also noted for the mouse polyoma virus and SV40 virus. Three dimensional modeling of the VP1 molecule suggests that the DSP loop has an accessible site for interaction from the external side of the assembled viral capsid pentamer.

  10. A novel membrane-dependent on/off switch mechanism of talin FERM domain at sites of cell adhesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianqiang Song; Jun Qin; Jun Yang; Jamila Hirbawi; Sheng Ye; H Dhanuja Perera; Esen Goksoy; Pallavi Dwivedi; Edward F Plow; Rongguang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The activation of heterodimeric (α/β) integrin transmembrane receptors by cytosolic protein talin is crucial for regulating diverse cell-adhesion-dependent processes,including blood coagulation,tissue remodeling,and cancer metastasis.This process is triggered by the coincident binding of N-terminal FERM (four-point-one-protein/ezrin/radixin/moesin) domain of talin (talin-FERM) to the inner membrane surface and integrin β cytoplasmic tail,but how these binding events are spatiotemporally regulated remains obscure.Here we report the crystal structure of a dormant talin,revealing how a C-terminal talin rod segment (talin-RS) self-masks a key integrin-binding site on talin-FERM via a large interface.Unexpectedly,the structure also reveals a distinct negatively charged surface on talin-RS that electrostatically hinders the talin-FERM binding to the membrane.Such a dual inhibitory topology for talin is consistent with the biochemical and functional data,but differs significantly from a previous model.We show that upon enrichment with phosphotidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) - a known talin activator,membrane strongly attracts a positively charged surface on talin-FERM and simultaneously repels the negatively charged surface on talin-RS.Such an electrostatic "pull-push" process promotes the relief of the dual inhibition of talin-FERM,which differs from the classic "steric clash" model for conventional PIP2-induced FERM domain activation.These data therefore unravel a new type of membrane-dependent FERM domain regulation and illustrate how it mediates the talin on/off switches to regulate integrin transmembrane signaling and cell adhesion.

  11. CD36 binds oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) in a mechanism dependent upon fatty acid binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Anthony G; Chen, Alexander N; Paz, Miguel A; Hung, Justin P; Hamilton, James A

    2015-02-20

    The association of unesterified fatty acid (FA) with the scavenger receptor CD36 has been actively researched, with focuses on FA and oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake. CD36 has been shown to bind FA, but this interaction has been poorly characterized to date. To gain new insights into the physiological relevance of binding of FA to CD36, we characterized FA binding to the ectodomain of CD36 by the biophysical method surface plasmon resonance. Five structurally distinct FAs (saturated, monounsaturated (cis and trans), polyunsaturated, and oxidized) were pulsed across surface plasmon resonance channels, generating association and dissociation binding curves. Except for the oxidized FA HODE, all FAs bound to CD36, with rapid association and dissociation kinetics similar to HSA. Next, to elucidate the role that each FA might play in CD36-mediated oxLDL uptake, we used a fluorescent oxLDL (Dii-oxLDL) live cell assay with confocal microscopy imaging. CD36-mediated uptake in serum-free medium was very low but greatly increased when serum was present. The addition of exogenous FA in serum-free medium increased oxLDL binding and uptake to levels found with serum and affected CD36 plasma membrane distribution. Binding/uptake of oxLDL was dependent upon the FA dose, except for docosahexaenoic acid, which exhibited binding to CD36 but did not activate the uptake of oxLDL. HODE also did not affect oxLDL uptake. High affinity FA binding to CD36 and the effects of each FA on oxLDL uptake have important implications for protein conformation, binding of other ligands, functional properties of CD36, and high plasma FA levels in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  12. Effect of Fluoride-Releasing Adhesive Systems on the Mechanical Properties of Eroded Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Ana Paula Albuquerque; Moda, Mariana Dias; Suzuki, Thaís Yumi Umeda; Godas, André Gustavo de Lima; Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Santos, Paulo Henrique dos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of erosive pH cycling with solutions that simulate dental erosion on Martens hardness (HMV) and elastic modulus (Eit) of dentin restored with fluoride-releasing adhesive systems. Twenty-seven bovine dentin slabs were restored with three adhesive systems: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch adhesive system, One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect fluoride-containing self-etching adhesive systems. The restorations were made with Filtek Z250. The HMV and Eit values at distances of 10, 30, 50 and 70 µm from the interface were evaluated using a dynamic ultra microhardness tester before and after immersion in deionized water, citric acid and hydrochloric acid (n=9). Data were submitted to repeated-measures ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD tests (=0.05). After erosive cycling, HMV values of dentin decreased in all groups. For dentin restored with Adper Single Bond 2, the lowest values were found closer to the hybrid layer, while for One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect, the values remained unaltered at all distances. For dentin restored with fluoride-releasing adhesive systems, a decrease in Eit was found, but after 30 µm this difference was not significant. The acid substances were able to alter HMV and Eit of the underlying dentin. For fluoride-releasing adhesives, the greater the distance from bonded interface, the lower the Eit values. The fluoride in One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect was able to protect the underlying dentin closer to the materials. In this way, the fluoride from adhesive systems could have some positive effect in the early stages of erosive lesions. PMID:27058377

  13. Effect of Fluoride-Releasing Adhesive Systems on the Mechanical Properties of Eroded Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Ana Paula Albuquerque; Moda, Mariana Dias; Suzuki, Thaís Yumi Umeda; Godas, André Gustavo de Lima; Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Santos, Paulo Henrique dos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of erosive pH cycling with solutions that simulate dental erosion on Martens hardness (HMV) and elastic modulus (Eit) of dentin restored with fluoride-releasing adhesive systems. Twenty-seven bovine dentin slabs were restored with three adhesive systems: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch adhesive system, One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect fluoride-containing self-etching adhesive systems. The restorations were made with Filtek Z250. The HMV and Eit values at distances of 10, 30, 50 and 70 µm from the interface were evaluated using a dynamic ultra microhardness tester before and after immersion in deionized water, citric acid and hydrochloric acid (n=9). Data were submitted to repeated-measures ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD tests (=0.05). After erosive cycling, HMV values of dentin decreased in all groups. For dentin restored with Adper Single Bond 2, the lowest values were found closer to the hybrid layer, while for One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect, the values remained unaltered at all distances. For dentin restored with fluoride-releasing adhesive systems, a decrease in Eit was found, but after 30 µm this difference was not significant. The acid substances were able to alter HMV and Eit of the underlying dentin. For fluoride-releasing adhesives, the greater the distance from bonded interface, the lower the Eit values. The fluoride in One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect was able to protect the underlying dentin closer to the materials. In this way, the fluoride from adhesive systems could have some positive effect in the early stages of erosive lesions.

  14. Excellent Adhesion of Carbon Fibers to Polyurethane Matrix and Substantial Improvement of the Mechanical Properties of Polyurethane

    OpenAIRE

    Seydibeyoglu, M. Ozgur

    2011-01-01

    In this study, polyurethane-carbon fiber composites were prepared with excellent interface with perfect adhesion of carbon fibers with the polyurethane matrix. The polyurethane was thermoplastic polyurethane and the carbon fiber was polyacrylonitrile based with 7 micron meter thickness. The composites were prepared with solvent casting technique. The composite materials were characterized with tensile testing, dynamic mechanical analysis, scanning electron microscope, and thermogravimetric an...

  15. Y-box-binding protein-1 (YB-1) promotes cell proliferation, adhesion and drug resistance in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xiaobing; Wu, Yaxun; Wang, Yuchan; Zhu, Xinghua; Yin, Haibing; He, Yunhua; Li, Chunsun; Liu, Yushan; Lu, Xiaoyun; Chen, Yali; Shen, Rong; Xu, Xiaohong; He, Song

    2016-08-15

    YB-1 is a multifunctional protein, which has been shown to correlate with resistance to treatment of various tumor types. This study investigated the expression and biologic function of YB-1 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the expression statuses of YB-1 and pYB-1(S102) were reversely correlated with the clinical outcomes of DLBCL patients. In addition, we found that YB-1 could promote the proliferation of DLBCL cells by accelerating the G1/S transition. Ectopic expression of YB-1 could markedly increase the expression of cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and cyclin E. Furthermore, we found that adhesion of DLBCL cells to fibronectin (FN) could increase YB-1 phosphorylation at Ser102 and pYB-1(S102) nuclear translocation. In addition, overexpression of YB-1 could increase the adhesion of DLBCL cells to FN. Intriguingly, we found that YB-1 overexpression could confer drug resistance through cell-adhesion dependent and independent mechanisms in DLBCL. Silencing of YB-1 could sensitize DLBCL cells to mitoxantrone and overcome cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) phenotype in an AKT-dependent manner. PMID:27397581

  16. Stage-specific adhesion of Leishmania promastigotes to sand fly midguts assessed using an improved comparative binding assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Wilson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The binding of Leishmania promastigotes to the midgut epithelium is regarded as an essential part of the life-cycle in the sand fly vector, enabling the parasites to persist beyond the initial blood meal phase and establish the infection. However, the precise nature of the promastigote stage(s that mediate binding is not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address this issue we have developed an in vitro gut binding assay in which two promastigote populations are labelled with different fluorescent dyes and compete for binding to dissected sand fly midguts. Binding of procyclic, nectomonad, leptomonad and metacyclic promastigotes of Leishmania infantum and L. mexicana to the midguts of blood-fed, female Lutzomyia longipalpis was investigated. The results show that procyclic and metacyclic promastigotes do not bind to the midgut epithelium in significant numbers, whereas nectomonad and leptomonad promastigotes both bind strongly and in similar numbers. The assay was then used to compare the binding of a range of different parasite species (L. infantum, L. mexicana, L. braziliensis, L. major, L. tropica to guts dissected from various sand flies (Lu. longipalpis, Phlebotomus papatasi, P. sergenti. The results of these comparisons were in many cases in line with expectations, the natural parasite binding most effectively to its natural vector, and no examples were found where a parasite was unable to bind to its natural vector. However, there were interesting exceptions: L. major and L. tropica being able to bind to Lu. longipalpis better than L. infantum; L. braziliensis was able to bind to P. papatasi as well as L. major; and significant binding of L. major to P. sergenti and L. tropica to P. papatasi was observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results demonstrate that Leishmania gut binding is strictly stage-dependent, is a property of those forms found in the middle phase of development (nectomonad and leptomonad

  17. A triad of lys12, lys41, arg78 spatial domain, a novel identified heparin binding site on tat protein, facilitates tat-driven cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Ai

    Full Text Available Tat protein, released by HIV-infected cells, has a battery of important biological effects leading to distinct AIDS-associated pathologies. Cell surface heparan sulfate protoglycans (HSPGs have been accepted as endogenous Tat receptors, and the Tat basic domain has been identified as the heparin binding site. However, findings that deletion or substitution of the basic domain inhibits but does not completely eliminate Tat-heparin interactions suggest that the basic domain is not the sole Tat heparin binding site. In the current study, an approach integrating computational modeling, mutagenesis, biophysical and cell-based assays was used to elucidate a novel, high affinity heparin-binding site: a Lys12, Lys41, Arg78 (KKR spatial domain. This domain was also found to facilitate Tat-driven β1 integrin activation, producing subsequent SLK cell adhesion in an HSPG-dependent manner, but was not involved in Tat internalization. The identification of this new heparin binding site may foster further insight into the nature of Tat-heparin interactions and subsequent biological functions, facilitating the rational design of new therapeutics against Tat-mediated pathological events.

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmaceutical Drug Binding into Calsequestrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ChulHee Kang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Calsequestrin (CASQ is a major Ca2+-storage/buffer protein present in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of both skeletal (CASQ1 and cardiac (CASQ2 muscles. CASQ has significant affinity for a number of pharmaceutical drugs with known muscular toxicities. Our approach, with in silico molecular docking, single crystal X-ray diffraction, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, identified three distinct binding pockets on the surface of CASQ2, which overlap with 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD binding sites observed in the crystal structure. Those three receptor sites based on canine CASQ1 crystal structure gave a high correlation (R2 = 0.80 to our ITC data. Daunomycin, doxorubicin, thioridazine, and trifluoperazine showed strong affinity to the S1 site, which is a central cavity formed between three domains of CASQ2. Some of the moderate-affinity drugs and some high-affinity drugs like amlodipine and verapamil displayed their binding into S2 sites, which are the thioredoxin-like fold present in each CASQ domain. Docking predictions combined with dissociation constants imply that presence of large aromatic cores and less flexible functional groups determines the strength of binding affinity to CASQ. In addition, the predicted binding pockets for both caffeine and epigallocatechin overlapped with the S1 and S2 sites, suggesting competitive inhibition by these natural compounds as a plausible explanation for their antagonistic effects on cardiotoxic side effects.

  19. Peritoneal Adhesions as a Cause of Mechanical Small Bowel Obstruction Based on Own Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morawski Bartłomiej

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bowel obstruction is a condition which has been known for many years. As time goes by, the problem is still often encountered at surgical emergency rooms. More than 20% of emergency surgical interventions are performed because of symptoms of digestive tract obstruction with the disease mostly situated in the small bowel. Rates of causative factors of the disease have changed over recent years and there have been increasingly more cases of small bowel obstruction caused by peritoneal adhesions, i.e., adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO.

  20. A fundamental approach to adhesion: Synthesis, surface analysis, thermodynamics and mechanics. [titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Dwight, D. W.; Wightman, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Various surface preparations for titanium 6-4 alloy were studied. An anodizing method was investigated, and compared with the results of other chemical treatments, namely, phosphate/fluoride, Pasa-Jell and Turco. The relative durability of the different surface treatments was assessed by monitoring changes in surface chemistry and morphology occasioned by aging at 505 K (450 F). Basic electron spectroscopic data were collected for polyimide and polyphenylquinoxaline adhesives and synthetic precursors. Fractographic studies were completed for several combinations of adherend, adhesive, and testing conditions.

  1. Chemical adhesion rather than mechanical retention enhances resin bond durability of a dental glass-ceramic with leucite crystallites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, X F [Department of Prosthodontics, The Stomatological Hospital Affiliated Medical School, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yoshida, K [Division of Applied Prosthodontics, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8588 (Japan); Gu, N, E-mail: mengsoar@nju.edu.c [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Biomaterials and Devices, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2010-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of chemical adhesion by a silane coupler and mechanical retention by hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching on the bond durability of resin to a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystallites. Half of the ceramic plates were etched with 4.8% HFA (HFA group) for 60 s, and the other half were not treated (NoHFA group). The scale of their surface roughness and rough area was measured by a 3D laser scanning microscope. These plates then received one of the following two bond procedures to form four bond test groups: HFA/cement, NoHFA/cement, HFA/silane/cement and NoHFA/silane/cement. The associated micro-shear bond strength and bond failure modes were tested after 0 and 30 000 thermal water bath cycles. Four different silane/cement systems (Monobond S/Variolink II, GC Ceramic Primer/Linkmax HV, Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Porcelain Liner M/SuperBond C and B) were used. The data for each silane/cement system were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. HFA treatment significantly increased the surface R{sub a} and R{sub y} values and the rough area of the ceramic plates compared with NoHFA treatment. After 30 000 thermal water bath cycles, the bond strength of all the test groups except the HFA/Linkmax HV group was significantly reduced, while the HFA/Linkmax HV group showed only adhesive interface failure. The other HFA/cement groups and all NoHFA/cement groups lost bond strength completely, and all NoHFA/silane/cement groups with chemical adhesion had significantly higher bond strength and more ceramic cohesive failures than the respective HFA/cement groups with mechanical retention. The result of the HFA/silane/cement groups with both chemical adhesion and mechanical retention revealed that HFA treatment could enhance the bond durability of resin/silanized glass ceramics, which might result from the increase of the chemical adhesion area on the ceramic rough surface and subsequently reduced degradation speed of the silane

  2. Chemical adhesion rather than mechanical retention enhances resin bond durability of a dental glass-ceramic with leucite crystallites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of chemical adhesion by a silane coupler and mechanical retention by hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching on the bond durability of resin to a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystallites. Half of the ceramic plates were etched with 4.8% HFA (HFA group) for 60 s, and the other half were not treated (NoHFA group). The scale of their surface roughness and rough area was measured by a 3D laser scanning microscope. These plates then received one of the following two bond procedures to form four bond test groups: HFA/cement, NoHFA/cement, HFA/silane/cement and NoHFA/silane/cement. The associated micro-shear bond strength and bond failure modes were tested after 0 and 30 000 thermal water bath cycles. Four different silane/cement systems (Monobond S/Variolink II, GC Ceramic Primer/Linkmax HV, Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Porcelain Liner M/SuperBond C and B) were used. The data for each silane/cement system were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. HFA treatment significantly increased the surface Ra and Ry values and the rough area of the ceramic plates compared with NoHFA treatment. After 30 000 thermal water bath cycles, the bond strength of all the test groups except the HFA/Linkmax HV group was significantly reduced, while the HFA/Linkmax HV group showed only adhesive interface failure. The other HFA/cement groups and all NoHFA/cement groups lost bond strength completely, and all NoHFA/silane/cement groups with chemical adhesion had significantly higher bond strength and more ceramic cohesive failures than the respective HFA/cement groups with mechanical retention. The result of the HFA/silane/cement groups with both chemical adhesion and mechanical retention revealed that HFA treatment could enhance the bond durability of resin/silanized glass ceramics, which might result from the increase of the chemical adhesion area on the ceramic rough surface and subsequently reduced degradation speed of the silane coupler

  3. Mutation of the Conserved Calcium-Binding Motif in Neisseria gonorrhoeae PilC1 Impacts Adhesion but Not Piliation

    OpenAIRE

    CHENG, Yuan; Johnson, Michael D. L.; Burillo-Kirch, Christine; Mocny, Jeffrey C.; Anderson, James E.; Garrett, Christopher K.; Redinbo, Matthew R.; Thomas, Christopher E.

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae PilC1 is a member of the PilC family of type IV pilus-associated adhesins found in Neisseria species and other type IV pilus-producing genera. Previously, a calcium-binding domain was described in the C-terminal domains of PilY1 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and in PilC1 and PilC2 of Kingella kingae. Genetic analysis of N. gonorrhoeae revealed a similar calcium-binding motif in PilC1. To evaluate the potential significance of this calcium-binding region in N. gonorrhoeae, we...

  4. Bacillus subtilis TRAP binds to its RNA target by a 5' to 3' directional mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbolina, Maria V; Li, Xiufeng; Gollnick, Paul

    2005-01-28

    TRAP is an 11 subunit RNA-binding protein that regulates expression of the Bacillus subtilis trpEDCFBA operon by transcription attenuation and translation control mechanisms. Tryptophan-activated TRAP acts by binding to a site in the 5'-untranslated leader region of trp mRNA consisting of 11 (G/U)AG repeats. We used mung bean nuclease footprinting to analyze the interaction of TRAP with several artificial binding sites composed of 11 GAG repeats in nucleic acids that lack secondary structure. Affinities for individual repeats within a binding site did not vary significantly. In contrast, the association rate constants were highest for repeats at the 5' end and lowest for those at the 3' end of all binding sites tested. These results indicate that TRAP binds to its RNA targets by first associating with one or more repeat at the 5' end of its binding site followed by wrapping the remainder of binding site around the protein in a 5' to 3' direction. This directional binding is novel among RNA-binding proteins. We suggest that this mechanism of binding is important for TRAP-mediated transcription attenuation control of the trp operon. PMID:15588817

  5. Insights on Structural Characteristics and Ligand Binding Mechanisms of CDK2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2 is a crucial regulator of the eukaryotic cell cycle. However it is well established that monomeric CDK2 lacks regulatory activity, which needs to be aroused by its positive regulators, cyclins E and A, or be phosphorylated on the catalytic segment. Interestingly, these activation steps bring some dynamic changes on the 3D-structure of the kinase, especially the activation segment. Until now, in the monomeric CDK2 structure, three binding sites have been reported, including the adenosine triphosphate (ATP binding site (Site I and two non-competitive binding sites (Site II and III. In addition, when the kinase is subjected to the cyclin binding process, the resulting structural changes give rise to a variation of the ATP binding site, thus generating an allosteric binding site (Site IV. All the four sites are demonstrated as being targeted by corresponding inhibitors, as is illustrated by the allosteric binding one which is targeted by inhibitor ANS (fluorophore 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate. In the present work, the binding mechanisms and their fluctuations during the activation process attract our attention. Therefore, we carry out corresponding studies on the structural characterization of CDK2, which are expected to facilitate the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of kinase proteins. Besides, the binding mechanisms of CDK2 with its relevant inhibitors, as well as the changes of binding mechanisms following conformational variations of CDK2, are summarized and compared. The summary of the conformational characteristics and ligand binding mechanisms of CDK2 in the present work will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating the bioactivities of CDK2.

  6. Non-enzymatic glycation of type I collagen diminishes collagen-proteoglycan binding and weakens cell adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Reigle, Kristin L.; Di Lullo, Gloria; Turner, Kevin R.; Last, Jerold A; Chervoneva, Inna; Birk, David E.; Funderburgh, James L.; Elrod, Elizabeth; Markus W. Germann; Surber, Charles; Sanderson, Ralph D.; San Antonio, James D.

    2008-01-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of type I collagen occurs in aging and diabetes, and may affect collagen solubility, charge, polymerization, and intermolecular interactions. Proteoglycans1(PGs) bind type I collagen and are proposed to regulate fibril assembly, function, and cell-collagen interactions. Moreover, on the collagen fibril a keratan sulfate (KS) PG binding region overlaps with preferred collagen glycation sites. Thus, we examined the effect of collagen modified by simple glycation on PG-co...

  7. Particle adhesion and removal

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive and easily accessible reference source covering all important aspects of particle adhesion and removal.  The core objective is to cover both fundamental and applied aspects of particle adhesion and removal with emphasis on recent developments.  Among the topics to be covered include: 1. Fundamentals of surface forces in particle adhesion and removal.2. Mechanisms of particle adhesion and removal.3. Experimental methods (e.g. AFM, SFA,SFM,IFM, etc.) to understand  particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions.4. Mechanics of adhesion of micro- and  n

  8. Atomistic simulations to micro-mechanisms of adhesion in automotive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Fatih Gurcag

    This study aimed at depicting atomistic and microstructural aspects of adhesion and friction that appear in different automotive applications and manufacturing processes using atomistic simulations coupled with tribological tests and surface characterization experiments. Thin films that form at the contact interfaces due to chemical reactions and coatings that are developed to mitigate or enhance adhesion were studied in detail. The adhesion and friction experiments conducted on diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings against Al indicated that F incorporation into DLC decreased the coefficient of friction (COF) by 30% -with respect to H-DLC that is known to have low COF and anti-adhesion properties against Al- to 0.14 owing to formation of repulsive F-F interactions at the sliding interface as shown by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. F atoms transferred to the Al surface with an increase in the contact pressure, and this F transfer led to the formation of a stable AlF3 compound at the Al surface as confirmed by XPS and cross-sectional FIB-TEM. The incorporation of Si and O in a F-containing DLC resulted in humidity independent low COF of 0.08 due to the hydration effect of the Si-O-Si chains in the carbonaceous tribolayers that resulted in repulsive OH-OH interactions at the contact interface. At high temperatures, adhesion of Al was found to be enhanced as a result of superplastic oxide fibers on the Al surface. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of tensile deformation of Al nanowires in oxygen carried out with ReaxFF showed that native oxide of Al has an oxygen deficient, low density structure and in O2, the oxygen diffusion in amorphous oxide healed the broken Al-O bonds during applied strain and resulted in the superplasticity. The oxide shell also provided nucleation sites for dislocations in Al crystal. In fuel cell applications, where low Pt/carbon adhesion is causing durability problems, spin-polarized DFT showed that metals with unfilled d

  9. The Src Homology 3 Domain Is Required for Junctional Adhesion Molecule Binding to the Third PDZ Domain of the Scaffolding Protein ZO-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomme, Julian; Fanning, Alan S.; Caffrey, Michael; Lye, Ming F.; Anderson, James M.; Lavie, Arnon (NIH); (UNC); (UIC)

    2012-01-20

    Tight junctions are cell-cell contacts that regulate the paracellular flux of solutes and prevent pathogen entry across cell layers. The assembly and permeability of this barrier are dependent on the zonula occludens (ZO) membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) proteins ZO-1, -2, and -3. MAGUK proteins are characterized by a core motif of protein-binding domains that include a PDZ domain, a Src homology 3 (SH3) domain, and a region of homology to guanylate kinase (GUK); the structure of this core motif has never been determined for any MAGUK. To better understand how ZO proteins organize the assembly of protein complexes we have crystallized the entire PDZ3-SH3-GUK core motif of ZO-1. We have also crystallized this core motif in complex with the cytoplasmic tail of the ZO-1 PDZ3 ligand, junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) to determine how the activity of different domains is coordinated. Our study shows a new feature for PDZ class II ligand binding that implicates the two highly conserved Phe{sup -2} and Ser{sup -3} residues of JAM. Our x-ray structures and NMR experiments also show for the first time a role for adjacent domains in the binding of ligands to PDZ domains in the MAGUK proteins family.

  10. Therapeutic effects of tyroservatide on metastasis of lung cancer and its mechanism affecting integrin–focal adhesion kinase signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-ting; Zhao, Lan; Fu, Zheng; Zhao, Meng; Song, Xiao-meng; Jia, Jing; Wang, Song; Li, Jin-ping; Zhu, Zhi-feng; Lin, Gang; Lu, Rong; Yao, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Tyroservatide (YSV) can inhibit the growth and metastasis of mouse lung cancer significantly. This study investigated the therapeutic effects of tripeptide YSV on metastasis of human lung cancer cells and explored its possible mechanism that affects integrin–focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signal transduction in tumor cells. YSV significantly inhibited the adhesion and the invasion of highly metastatic human lung cancer cell lines 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299. In addition, YSV significantly inhibited phosphorylation of FAK Tyr397 and FAK Tyr576/577 in the 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299 human lung cancer cells in vitro. And the mRNA level and protein expression of FAK in these human lung cancer cells decreased at the same time. YSV also significantly inhibited mRNA and protein levels of integrin β1 and integrin β3 in the 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299 human lung cancer cells. Our research showed that YSV inhibited adhesion and invasion of human lung cancer cells and exhibited therapeutic effects on metastasis of lung cancer. PMID:27041993

  11. Crystal structures of Bbp from Staphylococcus aureus reveal the ligand binding mechanism with Fibrinogen α

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xinyue; Wu, Meng; Zhuo, Wei; Gu, Jinke; Zhang, Sensen; Ge, Jingpeng; Yang, Maojun

    2015-01-01

    Bone sialoprotein-binding protein (Bbp), a MSCRAMMs (Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules) family protein expressed on the surface of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), mediates adherence to fibrinogen α (Fg α), a component in the extracellular matrix of the host cell and is important for infection and pathogenesis. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of apo-Bbp273−598 and Bbp273−598-Fg α561−575 complex at a resolution of 2.03 Å and 1.45 Å, respective...

  12. Chemical functionalization of ceramic tile surfaces by silane coupling agents: polymer modified mortar adhesion mechanism implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Ancelmo Piscitelli Mansur

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion between tiles and mortars are crucial to the stability of ceramic tile systems. From the chemical point of view, weak forces such as van der Waals forces and hydrophilic interactions are expected to be developed preferably at the tiles and polymer modified Portland cement mortar interface. The main goal of this paper was to use organosilanes as primers to modify ceramic tile hydrophilic properties to improve adhesion between ceramic tiles and polymer modified mortars. Glass tile surfaces were treated with several silane derivatives bearing specific functionalities. Contact angle measurements and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR were used for evaluating the chemical changes on the tile surface. In addition, pull-off tests were conducted to assess the effect on adhesion properties between tile and poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate, EVA, modified mortar. The bond strength results have clearly shown the improvement of adherence at the tile-polymer modified mortar interface, reflecting the overall balance of silane, cement and polymer interactions.

  13. Multiscale treatment of theoretical mechanisms for the protection of hydrogel surfaces from adhesive forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoloff, J. B.

    2014-09-01

    One role of a lubricant is to prevent wear of two surfaces in contact, which is likely to be the result of adhesive forces that cause a pair of asperities belonging to two surfaces in contact to stick together. Such adhesive sticking of asperities can occur both for sliding surfaces and for surfaces which are pressed together and then pulled apart. The latter situation, for example, is important for contact lenses, as prevention of sticking reduces possible damage to the cornea as the lenses are inserted and removed from the eye. Contact lenses are made from both neutral and polyelectrolyte hydrogels. It is demonstrated here that sticking of neutral hydrogels can be prevented by repulsive forces between asperities in contact, resulting from polymers attached to the gel surface but not linked with each other. For polyelectrolyte hydrogels, it is shown that osmotic pressure due to counterions, held at the interface between asperities in contact by the electrostatic attraction between the ions and the fixed charges in the gel, can provide a sufficiently strong repulsive force to prevent adhesive sticking of small-length-scale asperities.

  14. Different mechanisms are involved in the antibody mediated inhibition of ligand binding to the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, K; Høyer-Hansen, G; Rønne, E;

    1999-01-01

    Certain monoclonal antibodies are capable of inhibiting the biological binding reactions of their target proteins. At the molecular level, this type of effect may be brought about by completely different mechanisms, such as competition for common binding determinants, steric hindrance or...

  15. Both common and specialty mushrooms inhibit adhesion molecule expression and in vitro binding of monocytes to human aortic endothelial cells in a pro-inflammatory environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Keith R

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD is a leading cause of mortality in the United States as well as globally. Epidemiological studies show that regular fruit and vegetable consumption reduces CVD risk, in part, due to antioxidant activity and immunomodulation since oxidative stress and inflammation are features of atherogenesis. Accumulating evidence also shows that dietary fungi, viz., mushrooms, can protect against chronic disease by altering inflammatory environments such as those associated with CVD although most research has focused on specialty mushrooms. In this study, we tested the ability of both common and specialty mushrooms to inhibit cellular processes associated with CVD. Methods Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC were incubated overnight with control media with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO vehicle (1% v/v or containing DMSO extracts of whole dehydrated mushrooms (0.1 mg/mL, which included Agaricus bisporus (white button and crimini, Lentinula edodes (shiitake, Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster, and Grifola frondosa (maitake. Monolayers were subsequently washed and incubated with medium alone or containing the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β (5 ng/mL for 6 h to upregulate pro-atherosclerotic adhesion molecules (AM. AM expression was assayed by ELISA and binding of U937 human monocytes pre-loaded with fluorescent dye was determined. Results White button mushrooms consistently reduced (p Conclusion These data provide evidence that dietary mushrooms can inhibit cellular processes such as adhesion molecule expression and ultimate binding of monocytes to the endothelium under pro-inflammatory conditions, which are associated with CVD. As a result, these findings support the notion that dietary mushrooms can be protective against CVD.

  16. PVD-Alumina Coatings on Cemented Carbide Cutting Tools: A Study About the Effect on Friction and Adhesion Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    S.E. Cordes

    2012-01-01

    Crystalline PVD γ-alumina coatings are interesting for machining operations due to their outstanding characteristics, such as high hot hardness, high thermal stability and low tendency to adhesion. In the present work (Ti,Al)N/γ-Al2O3-coatings are deposited on cemented carbide by means of MSIP. Objectives of this work are to study the effects of coating and cutting fluid regarding friction in tribological tests and to study the wear mechanisms and cutting performance of γ-Al2O3-based coated c...

  17. Effect of abdominal binding on respiratory mechanics during exercise in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    West, CR; Goosey-Tolfrey, VL; Campbell, IG; Romer, LM

    2014-01-01

    West CR, Goosey-Tolfrey VL, Campbell IG, Romer LM. Effect of abdominal binding on respiratory mechanics during exercise in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury. J Appl Physiol 117: 36–45, 2014. First published May 22, 2014; doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00218.2014.—We asked whether elastic binding of the abdomen influences respiratory mechanics during wheelchair propulsion in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Eight Paralympic wheelchair rugby players with m...

  18. Calculation of Host-Guest Binding Affinities Using a Quantum-Mechanical Energy Model

    OpenAIRE

    Muddana, Hari S.; Gilson, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    The prediction of protein-ligand binding affinities is of central interest in computer-aided drug discovery, but it is still difficult to achieve a high degree of accuracy. Recent studies suggesting that available force fields may be a key source of error motivate the present study, which reports the first mining minima (M2) binding affinity calculations based on a quantum mechanical energy model, rather than an empirical force field. We apply a semi-empirical quantum-mechanical energy functi...

  19. Cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes cell–substrate adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhe, Rahul P.; Gudzenko, Tetyana; Bachmann, Michael; Becker, Sarah F.; Gonnermann, Carina; Winter, Claudia; Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Alfandari, Dominique; Kratzer, Marie-Claire; Franz, Clemens M.; Kashef, Jubin

    2016-01-01

    Cadherin receptors have a well-established role in cell–cell adhesion, cell polarization and differentiation. However, some cadherins also promote cell and tissue movement during embryonic development and tumour progression. In particular, cadherin-11 is upregulated during tumour and inflammatory cell invasion, but the mechanisms underlying cadherin-11 stimulated cell migration are still incompletely understood. Here, we show that cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes adhesion to fibronectin in Xenopus neural crest, a highly migratory embryonic cell population. Transfected cadherin-11 also localizes to focal adhesions in different mammalian cell lines, while endogenous cadherin-11 shows focal adhesion localization in primary human fibroblasts. In focal adhesions, cadherin-11 co-localizes with β1-integrin and paxillin and physically interacts with the fibronectin-binding proteoglycan syndecan-4. Adhesion to fibronectin mediated by cadherin-11/syndecan-4 complexes requires both the extracellular domain of syndecan-4, and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of cadherin-11. These results reveal an unexpected role of a classical cadherin in cell–matrix adhesion during cell migration. PMID:26952325

  20. Spectroscopic and Docking Studies on the Binding of Liquiritigenin with Hyaluronidase for Antiallergic Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hua-jin; Yang, Ran; You, Jing; Qu, Ling-bo; Sun, Yan-jun

    2016-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of liquiritigenin on hyaluronidase and its binding mechanism were investigated systematically by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, and molecular modeling approaches. These results indicated that liquiritigenin could interact with hyaluronidase to form a liquiritigenin-hyaluronidase complex. The binding constant, number of binding sites, and thermodynamic parameters were calculated, which indicated that liquiritigenin could spontaneously bind with hyaluronidase mainly through electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions with one binding site. Synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence, and molecular docking results revealed that liquiritigenin bound directly to the enzyme cavity site and this binding influenced the microenvironment of the hyaluronidase activity site, resulting in reduced hyaluronidase activity. The present study provides useful information for clinical applications of liquiritigenin as a hyaluronidase inhibitor. PMID:27313960

  1. Monocytes mediate metastatic breast tumor cell adhesion to endothelium under flow

    OpenAIRE

    Evani, Shankar J.; Prabhu, Rajesh G.; Gnanaruban, V.; Finol, Ender A.; Anand K. Ramasubramanian

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial adhesion is necessary for the hematogenous dissemination of tumor cells. However, the metastatic breast tumor cell MDA-MB-231 does not bind to the endothelium under physiological flow conditions, suggesting alternate mechanisms of adhesion. Since monocytes are highly represented in the tumor microenvironment, and also bind to endothelium during inflammation, we hypothesized that the monocytes assist in the arrest of MDA-MB-231 on the endothelium. Using in vitro models of the dynam...

  2. Friction and adhesion of hierarchical carbon nanotube structures for biomimetic dry adhesives: multiscale modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shihao; Jiang, Haodan; Xia, Zhenhai; Gao, Xiaosheng

    2010-09-01

    With unique hierarchical fibrillar structures on their feet, gecko lizards can walk on vertical walls or even ceilings. Recent experiments have shown that strong binding along the shear direction and easy lifting in the normal direction can be achieved by forming unidirectional carbon nanotube array with laterally distributed tips similar to gecko's feet. In this study, a multiscale modeling approach was developed to analyze friction and adhesion behaviors of this hierarchical fibrillar system. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube array with laterally distributed segments at the end was simulated by coarse grained molecular dynamics. The effects of the laterally distributed segments on friction and adhesion strengths were analyzed, and further adopted as cohesive laws used in finite element analysis at device scale. The results show that the laterally distributed segments play an essential role in achieving high force anisotropy between normal and shear directions in the adhesives. Finite element analysis reveals a new friction-enhanced adhesion mechanism of the carbon nanotube array, which also exists in gecko adhesive system. The multiscale modeling provides an approach to bridge the microlevel structures of the carbon nanotube array with its macrolevel adhesive behaviors, and the predictions from this modeling give an insight into the mechanisms of gecko-mimicking dry adhesives.

  3. Full quantum mechanical study of binding of HIV-1 protease drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Da W.; Zhang, John Z. H.

    Fully quantum mechanical studies of detailed binding interactions between HIV-1 protease and six FDA (Food and Drug Administration)-approved drugs (saquinavir, indinavir, ritonavir, nelfinavir, amprenavir, and lopinavir) are carried out using a recently developed MFCC (molecular fractionation with conjugate caps) method. The MFCC calculation produces a quantum mechanical interaction spectrum for any protease drug binding complex. Detailed quantitative analysis on binding of lopinavir to specific residues of the protease is given from the current study. The present calculation shows that the dominant binding of lopinavir to the protease is through the formation of a strong hydrogen bond between the central hydroxyl group of the drug to the aspartate oxygen of Asp25 in one of the two chains of the protease (A chain). This is closely followed by hydrogen binding of the drug to Asp29 in the B chain and somewhat weak hydrogen bonding to Asp30, Gly27, Gly48, and Ile50 in both chains. By partitioning all six drugs into four building blocks besides the central component containing the hydroxyl group, MFCC calculation finds that block III has essentially no binding interaction with the protease and the major binding interactions of these drugs are from blocks II and IV, in addition to the dominant central hydroxyl group. This detailed quantitative information on drug binding to the protease is very useful in rational design of new and improved inhibitors of HIV-1 protease and its mutants.

  4. MicroRNA-155 modulates the pathogen binding ability of dendritic cells (DCs) by down-regulation of DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Nunez, Rocio T; Louafi, Fethi; Friedmann, Peter S; Sanchez-Elsner, Tilman

    2009-06-12

    MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) has been involved in the response to inflammation in macrophages and lymphocytes. Here we show how miR-155 participates in the maturation of human dendritic cells (DC) and modulates pathogen binding by down-regulating DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), after directly targeting the transcription factor PU.1. During the maturation of DCs, miR-155 increases up to 130-fold, whereas PU.1 protein levels decrease accordingly. We establish that human PU.1 is a direct target for miR-155 and localize the target sequence for miR-155 in the 3'-untranslated region of PU.1. Also, overexpression of miR-155 in the THP1 monocytic cell line decreases PU.1 protein levels and DC-SIGN at both the mRNA and protein levels. We prove a link between the down-regulation of PU.1 and reduced transcriptional activity of the DC-SIGN promoter, which is likely to be the basis for its reduced mRNA expression, after miR-155 overexpression. Finally, we show that, by reducing DC-SIGN in the cellular membrane, miR-155 is involved in regulating pathogen binding as dendritic cells exhibited the lower binding capacity for fungi and HIV protein gp-120 when the levels of miR-155 were higher. Thus, our results suggest a mechanism by which miR-155 regulates proteins involved in the cellular immune response against pathogens that could have clinical implications in the way pathogens enter the human organism. PMID:19386588

  5. Abdominal Adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adhesions? Abdominal adhesions can cause intestinal obstruction and female infertility—the inability to become pregnant after a year of trying. Abdominal adhesions can lead to female infertility by preventing fertilized eggs from reaching the uterus, ...

  6. TIM-1 glycoprotein binds the adhesion receptor P-selectin and mediates T cell trafficking during inflammation and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiari, Stefano; Donnarumma, Tiziano; Rossi, Barbara; Dusi, Silvia; Pietronigro, Enrica; Zenaro, Elena; Della Bianca, Vittorina; Toffali, Lara; Piacentino, Gennj; Budui, Simona; Rennert, Paul; Xiao, Sheng; Laudanna, Carlo; Casasnovas, Jose M; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Constantin, Gabriela

    2014-04-17

    Selectins play a central role in leukocyte trafficking by mediating tethering and rolling on vascular surfaces. Here we have reported that T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1) is a P-selectin ligand. We have shown that human and murine TIM-1 binds to P-selectin, and that TIM-1 mediates tethering and rolling of T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17, but not Th2 and regulatory T cells on P-selectin. Th1 and Th17 cells lacking the TIM-1 mucin domain showed reduced rolling in thrombin-activated mesenteric venules and inflamed brain microcirculation. Inhibition of TIM-1 had no effect on naive T cell homing, but it reduced T cell recruitment in a skin hypersensitivity model and blocked experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Uniquely, the TIM-1 immunoglobulin variable domain was also required for P-selectin binding. Our data demonstrate that TIM-1 is a major P-selectin ligand with a specialized role in T cell trafficking during inflammatory responses and the induction of autoimmune disease.

  7. Simulation of Cell Adhesion using a Particle Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer

    2005-11-01

    An efficient computational method for simulation of cell adhesion through protein binding forces is discussed. In this method, the cells are represented by deformable elastic particles, and the protein binding is represented by a rate equation. The method is first developed for collision and adhesion of two similar cells impacting on each other from opposite directions. The computational method is then applied in a particle-transport model for a cloud of interacting and colliding cells, each of which are represented by particles of finite size. One application might include red blood cells adhering together to form rouleaux, which are chains of red blood cells that are found in different parts of the circulatory system. Other potential applications include adhesion of platelets to a blood vessel wall or mechanical heart valve, which is a precursor of thrombosis formation, or adhesion of cancer cells to organ walls in the lymphatic, circulatory, digestive or pulmonary systems.

  8. INTERFACIAL ADHESION AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF PMMA-COATED CaCO3 NANOPARTICLE-REINFORCED PVC COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuehua Chen; Chunzhong Li; Shoufang Xu; Ling Zhang; Wei Shao; H. L. Du

    2006-01-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-coated nano-CaCO3 particles were prepared by in-situ emulsion polymerization. The mechanical properties of nano-CaCO3 particles-reinforced PVC were investigated using an AG-2000A universal testing machine and an XJU-2.75 izod impact tester; interfacial adhesion between CaCO3 nanoparticles and PVC matrix by SEM, and structure of PMMA coated on the surface of CaCO3 by FTIR and 1H-NMR. The results indicate that the PMMA coated on the nano CaCO3 particles consists mainly of syndiotactic structure, and their three tacticity contents were rr 52.8%, mm 7.3% and mr 39.9%, respectively. The interfacial adhesion between CaCO3 nanoparticles and PVC matrix was significantly improved when the CaCO3 nanoparticles were coated with PMMA, which led to increased Young's moduli and tensile strengths of the PMMA-coated CaCO3/PVC composites. The izod impact strengths of the composites were strongly affected by the PMMA coating thickness and increased significantly with increasing the volume fraction of CaCO3 filler in the composites.

  9. Physiochemical properties of Caulobacter crescentus holdfast: a localized bacterial adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, Cécile; Ma, Xiang; Licata, Nicholas A; Neves, Bernardo R A; Setayeshgar, Sima; Brun, Yves V; Dragnea, Bogdan

    2013-09-12

    To colonize surfaces, the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus employs a polar polysaccharide, the holdfast, located at the end of a thin, long stalk protruding from the cell body. Unlike many other bacteria which adhere through an extended extracellular polymeric network, the holdfast footprint area is tens of thousands times smaller than that of the total bacterium cross-sectional surface, making for some very demanding adhesion requirements. At present, the mechanism of holdfast adhesion remains poorly understood. We explore it here along three lines of investigation: (a) the impact of environmental conditions on holdfast binding affinity, (b) adhesion kinetics by dynamic force spectroscopy, and (c) kinetic modeling of the attachment process to interpret the observed time-dependence of the adhesion force at short and long time scales. A picture emerged in which discrete molecular units called adhesins are responsible for initial holdfast adhesion, by acting in a cooperative manner.

  10. Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein, Soluble-Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1, Procalcitonin, and Protein C Activity and Clinical Outcome in Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS or Sepsis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Muliaty

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biochemical markers may be used in diagnosis, prognostic and monitoring treatment and therapy for sepsis patients. In this study we used Lipopolysacharide Binding Protein (LBP, serum-Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1, Procalcitonin (PCT and protein C activity. LBP is related to lipopolysachharide or gram-negative bacterial endotoxin which bound to LBP and induced inflammatory response. ICAM-1 is associated with endothelial dysfunction in response to systemic inflammatory and septic condition. PCT increased in bacterial infection and in severe systemic inflammatory. Role of Protein C is protecting the intravascular system to systemic inflammation, sepsis and the concomitant intravascular coagulopathy. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between levels of serum LBP, sICAM-1, PCT, and protein C activity with the clinical outcome of SIRS or sepsis patients. METHODS: We included 19 post surgery patients with SIRS criteria from intensive care unit (ICU and evaluated the level of LBP serum with Chemiliuminescent Enzyme Immunoassay (Diagnostic Product Co., ICAM-1 with ELISA (R&D System, PCT with immunochromatography (BRAHMS, protein C activity with chromogenic method (Dade Behring. We performed the samples serially at the first admission of patients and after 72 hours. Data were analysed by non-parametric with Wilcoxon test and Mann-Whitney test. Correlation study between biomarkers calculated by Kendall’s tau and Spearman’s rho. RESULTS: Of 19 patients, 9 (47,4% died and 10 (52,6% surviving. The level of LBP serum decreased after 72 hours in surviving-sepsis patients, and increased in nonsurviving sepsis patients with significant different levels at 72 hours examination (p0.05. In all patients were found high level of PCT serum since the first admission examination, decreasing levels were occurred significantly in surviving patients after 72 hours (p0.05 both in surviving and non-surviving patients. CONCLUSIONS

  11. Spectroscopic and molecular modelling studies of binding mechanism of metformin with bovine serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepti; Ojha, Himanshu; Pathak, Mallika; Singh, Bhawna; Sharma, Navneet; Singh, Anju; Kakkar, Rita; Sharma, Rakesh K.

    2016-08-01

    Metformin is a biguanide class of drug used for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. It is well known that serum protein-ligand binding interaction significantly influence the biodistribution of a drug. Current study was performed to characterize the binding mechanism of metformin with serum albumin. The binding interaction of the metformin with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was examined using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence, circular dichroism, density functional theory and molecular docking studies. Absorption spectra and fluorescence emission spectra pointed out the weak binding of metformin with BSA as was apparent from the slight change in absorbance and fluorescence intensity of BSA in presence of metformin. Circular dichroism study implied the significant change in the conformation of BSA upon binding with metformin. Density functional theory calculations showed that metformin has non-planar geometry and has two energy states. The docking studies evidently signified that metformin could bind significantly to the three binding sites in BSA via hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions. The data suggested the existence of non-covalent specific binding interaction in the complexation of metformin with BSA. The present study will certainly contribute to the development of metformin as a therapeutic molecule.

  12. [Binding mechanism of traditional Chinese medicine active component 5-hydroxymethyl-furfural and HSA or BSA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ming; He, Ling; Lu, Xiao-Wang

    2012-03-01

    A combination of spectral experiment and molecular modeling techniques has been used to characterize the binding mechanism between an active component 5-hydroxymethyl-furfural (5-HMF) of traditional Chinese medicine and human serum albumin (HSA) or bovine serum albumin (BSA). The interaction mechanism of 5-HMF binding with HSA/BSA is analyzed. Although the drug can bind with HSA/BSA to form stable complexes, there are some differences in the bond strength. The values of binding distances (r) are different and low, which indicated the occurrence of energy transfer. The drug had conformational effect on HSA/BSA, which resulted in different changes of hydrophobic environment of the binding domain in HSA/BSA. The 'phase diagram' of fluorescence revealed that the changes on the conformational pattern of proteins have been affected by drug conformed to the "all-or-none" pattern. The interactions between drug and protein influenced by Co(II) were also discussed. Its effects acting on 5-HMF-HSA/BSA interactions are different. The computational modeling method was used to study the interaction between 5-HMF and HSA/BSA. The results of molecular model studies revealed that the binding modes for drug-serum albumin systems are mainly hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding. These results are in accordance with spectral results. The research results have given a better theoretical reference for the study of pharmacological mechanism of 5-hydroxymethyl-furfural.

  13. rRNA Binding Sites and the Molecular Mechanism of Action of the Tetracyclines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwudi, Chinwe U

    2016-08-01

    The tetracycline antibiotics are known to be effective in the treatment of both infectious and noninfectious disease conditions. The 16S rRNA binding mechanism currently held for the antibacterial action of the tetracyclines does not explain their activity against viruses, protozoa that lack mitochondria, and noninfectious conditions. Also, the mechanism by which the tetracyclines selectively inhibit microbial protein synthesis against host eukaryotic protein synthesis despite conservation of ribosome structure and functions is still questionable. Many studies have investigated the binding of the tetracyclines to the 16S rRNA using the small ribosomal subunit of different bacterial species, but there seems to be no agreement between various reports on the exact binding site on the 16S rRNA. The wide range of activity of the tetracyclines against a broad spectrum of bacterial pathogens, viruses, protozoa, and helminths, as well as noninfectious conditions, indicates a more generalized effect on RNA. In the light of recent evidence that the tetracyclines bind to various synthetic double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) of random base sequences, suggesting that the double-stranded structures may play a more important role in the binding of the tetracyclines to RNA than the specific base pairs, as earlier speculated, it is imperative to consider possible alternative binding modes or sites that could help explain the mechanisms of action of the tetracyclines against various pathogens and disease conditions. PMID:27246781

  14. Elucidation of binding mechanism and identification of binding site for an anti HIV drug, stavudine on human blood proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhya, B; Hegde, Ashwini H; Seetharamappa, J

    2013-05-01

    The binding of stavudine (STV) to two human blood proteins [human hemoglobin (HHb) and human serum albumin (HSA)] was studied in vitro under simulated physiological conditions by spectroscopic methods viz., fluorescence, UV absorption, resonance light scattering, synchronous fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and three-dimensional fluorescence. The binding parameters of STV-blood protein were determined from fluorescence quenching studies. Stern-Volmer plots indicated the presence of static quenching mechanism in the interaction of STV with blood proteins. The values of n close to unity indicated that one molecule of STV bound to one molecule of blood protein. The binding process was found to be spontaneous. Analysis of thermodynamic parameters revealed the presence of hydrogen bond and van der Waals forces between protein and STV. Displacement experiments indicated the binding of STV to Sudlow's site I on HSA. Secondary structures of blood proteins have undergone changes upon interaction with STV as evident from the reduction of α-helices (from 46.11% in free HHb to 38.34% in STV-HHb, and from 66.44% in free HSA to 52.26% in STV-HSA). Further, the alterations in secondary structures of proteins in the presence of STV were confirmed by synchronous and 3D-fluorescence spectral data. The distance between the blood protein (donor) and acceptor (STV) was found to be 5.211 and 5.402 nm for STV-HHb and STV-HSA, respectively based on Föster's non-radiative energy transfer theory. Effect of some metal ions was also investigated. The fraction of STV bound to HSA was found to be 87.8%.

  15. 贻贝的黏着机制%Adhesion Mechanism of Mussel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伯初; 周太刚; 陈双扣; 冯莹柱

    2007-01-01

    贻贝通过足丝(byssus)分泌的贻贝黏着蛋白质(mussel adhesive protein,MAP)能附着在海水中的任何有机物和无机物表面,目前认为贻贝黏着蛋白质中含高浓度特殊的氨基酸DOPA(3,4-二羟基苯丙氨酸)在贻贝黏附过程中扮演重要的角色.DOPA能直接与金属氧化物通过有机金属络合反应形成稳定的络合物,也能在氧化后与其同一多肽链上或不同多肽链上的其他残基形成稳定的交联结构,进而牢固黏附于物体表面.贻贝黏着蛋白质具有黏合范围广、速度快、耐腐蚀、强度高和生物亲和性良好等优点,被认为是极好的广谱生物胶黏剂而应用于医学和生物工程等领域.

  16. Deciphering the combinatorial roles of geometric, mechanical, and adhesion cues in regulation of cell spreading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg M Harris

    Full Text Available Significant effort has gone towards parsing out the effects of surrounding microenvironment on macroscopic behavior of stem cells. Many of the microenvironmental cues, however, are intertwined, and thus, further studies are warranted to identify the intricate interplay among the conflicting downstream signaling pathways that ultimately guide a cell response. In this contribution, by patterning adhesive PEG (polyethylene glycol hydrogels using Dip Pen Nanolithography (DPN, we demonstrate that substrate elasticity, subcellular elasticity, ligand density, and topography ultimately define mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs spreading and shape. Physical characteristics are parsed individually with 7 kilopascal (kPa hydrogel islands leading to smaller, spindle shaped cells and 105 kPa hydrogel islands leading to larger, polygonal cell shapes. In a parallel effort, a finite element model was constructed to characterize and confirm experimental findings and aid as a predictive tool in modeling cell microenvironments. Signaling pathway inhibition studies suggested that RhoA is a key regulator of cell response to the cooperative effect of the tunable substrate variables. These results are significant for the engineering of cell-extra cellular matrix interfaces and ultimately decoupling matrix bound cues presented to cells in a tissue microenvironment for regenerative medicine.

  17. Pressure sensitive adhesives from renewable resources

    OpenAIRE

    Maaßen, Wiebke

    2015-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) represent an important segment of the adhesives market. In this work, novel insights into the adhesive performance of bio-based pressure sensitive adhesives are presented. Three different homopolymers based on fatty acids derived from native vegetable oils as renewable feedstock were characterized in terms of their mechanical and adhesive properties.

  18. Mechanisms of DNA Binding and Regulation of Bacillus anthracis DNA Primase

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Subhasis B; Wydra, Eric; Biswas, Esther E.

    2009-01-01

    DNA primases are pivotal enzymes in chromosomal DNA replication in all organisms. In this article, we report unique mechanistic characteristics of recombinant DNA primase from Bacillus anthracis (B. anthracis). The mechanism of action of B. anthracis DNA primase (DnaGBA) may be described in several distinct steps as follows. Its mechanism of action is initiated when it binds to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in the form of a trimer. Although DnaGBA binds to different DNA sequences with moderate ...

  19. Expression of Lactobacillus reuteri Pg4 collagen-binding protein gene in Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 increases its adhesion ability to Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Hsiang-Yun; Yueh, Pei-Ying; Yu, Bi; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Je-Ruei

    2010-12-01

    The collagen-binding protein gene cnb was cloned from the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri strain Pg4. The DNA sequence of the cnb gene (792 bp) has an open reading frame encoding 263 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 28.5 kDa. The cnb gene was constructed so as to constitutively express under the control of the Lactococcus lactis lacA promoter and was transformed into Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393, a strain isolated from dairy products with poor ability to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopic and flow cytometric analysis of the transformed strain Lb. casei pNZ-cnb indicated that Cnb was displayed on its cell surface. Lb. casei pNZ-cnb not only showed a higher ability to adhere to Caco-2 cells but also exhibited a higher competition ability against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes adhesion to Caco-2 cells than Lb. casei ATCC 393. PMID:21070005

  20. Formation Mechanism and Binding Energy for Body-Centred Regular Octahedral Structure of Li7 Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The formation mechanism for the body-centred regular octahedral structure of Lh cluster is proposed. The curve of the total energy versus the separation R between the nucleus at tie centre and nuclei at the apexes for this structure of Lh has been calculated by using the method of Gou's modified arrangement channel quantum mechanics (MACQM). The result shows that the curve has a minimal energy of-52.169 73 a.u. at R= 5.06a0. When R approaches infinity, the totai energy of seven lithium atoms has the value of -51.996 21 a.u. So the binding energy of Lh with respect to seven lithium atoms is 0.173 52 a.u. Therefore the binding energy per atom for hit is 0.024 79 a.u. or 0.674 eV, which is greater than the binding energy per atom of 0.453 eV for Lii, the binding energy per atom of 0.494 eV for Liz and the binding energy per atom of 0.632 eV for Li& calculated previously by us. This means that the Lh cluster may be formed stably in a body-centred regular octahedral structure with a greater binding energy.

  1. Mechanism of Mcl-1 Conformational Regulation Upon Small Molecule Binding Revealed by Molecular Dynamic Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anhui; Song, Ting; Wang, Ziqian; Liu, Yubo; Fan, Yudan; Zhang, Yahui; Zhang, Zhichao

    2016-04-01

    Inhibition of interactions between Mcl-1 and proapoptotic proteins is considered to be a therapeutic strategy to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. Here, we adopted molecular dynamics simulation with molecular mechanics-Poisson Boltzmann/surface area method (MM-PB/SA) to study the inhibition mechanism of three Mcl-1 inhibitors, compounds 1, 2 and 3. Analysis of energy components shows that the better binding free energy of compound 3 than compounds 1 and 2 is attributable to the van der Waals energy (ΔEvdw ) and non-polar solvation energy (ΔGnp ) upon binding. In addition to the excellent agreement with previous experimentally determined affinities, our simulation results further show a bend of helix 4 on Mcl-1 upon compound 3 binding, which is driven by hydrophobic interaction with residue Val(253) , leading to a narrowed BH3-binding groove to impede Puma(BH) (3) binding. The computational result is consistent with our competitive isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) assays, which shows that the competitive ability of compound 3 toward Mcl-1/Puma(BH) (3) complex is improved beyond its direct binding affinity toward Mcl-1 itself, and compound 3 exhibits much more efficiency to compete with Puma(BH) (3) than compound 2. Our study provides a new strategy to improve inhibitory activity on Mcl-1 based on the conformational dynamic change. PMID:26518611

  2. Formation Mechanism and Binding Energy for Regular Tetrahedral Structure of Li4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GOU Qing-Quan; YANG Jian-Hui; LI Ping

    2006-01-01

    The formation mechanism for the regular tetrahedral structure of Li4 cluster is proposed. The curve of the total energy versus the separation R between the two nuclei has been calculated by using the method of Gou's modified arrangement channel quantum mechanics (MACQM). The result shows that the curve has a minimal energy of-29.8279 a.u. at R=14.50 a0. When R approaches infinity the total energy of four lithium atoms has the value of-29.7121 a.u. So the binding energy of Li4 with respect to four lithium atoms is the difference of 0.1158 a.u.for the above two energy values. Therefore the binding energy per atom for Li4 is 0.029 a.u., or 0.7878 eV, which is greater than the binding energy per atom of 0.453 eV for Li2, the binding energy pcr atom of 0.494 eV for Li3 and the binding energy per atom of 0.632 eV for Li5 calculated previously by us. This means that the Li4 cluster may be formed stably in a regular tetrahedral structure of side length R=14.50 a0 with a greater binding energy.

  3. Crystal structures of Bbp from Staphylococcus aureus reveal the ligand binding mechanism with Fibrinogen α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyue; Wu, Meng; Zhuo, Wei; Gu, Jinke; Zhang, Sensen; Ge, Jingpeng; Yang, Maojun

    2015-10-01

    Bone sialoprotein-binding protein (Bbp), a MSCRAMMs (Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules) family protein expressed on the surface of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), mediates adherence to fibrinogen α (Fg α), a component in the extracellular matrix of the host cell and is important for infection and pathogenesis. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of apo-Bbp(273-598) and Bbp(273-598)-Fg α(561-575) complex at a resolution of 2.03 Å and 1.45 Å, respectively. Apo-Bbp(273-598) contained the ligand binding region N2 and N3 domains, both of which followed a DE variant IgG fold characterized by an additional D1 strand in N2 domain and D1' and D2' strands in N3 domain. The peptide mapped to the Fg α(561-575) bond to Bbp(273-598) on the open groove between the N2 and N3 domains. Strikingly, the disordered C-terminus in the apo-form reorganized into a highly-ordered loop and a β-strand G'' covering the ligand upon ligand binding. Bbp(Ala298-Gly301) in the N2 domain of the Bbp(273-598)-Fg α(561-575) complex, which is a loop in the apo-form, formed a short α-helix to interact tightly with the peptide. In addition, Bbp(Ser547-Gln561) in the N3 domain moved toward the binding groove to make contact directly with the peptide, while Bbp(Asp338-Gly355) and Bbp(Thr365-Tyr387) in N2 domain shifted their configurations to stabilize the reorganized C-terminus mainly through strong hydrogen bonds. Altogether, our results revealed the molecular basis for Bbp-ligand interaction and advanced our understanding of S. aureus infection process. PMID:26349459

  4. Two-step mechanism involving active-site conformational changes regulates human telomerase DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Christopher G; Moye, Aaron L; Holien, Jessica K; Parker, Michael W; Cohen, Scott B; Bryan, Tracy M

    2015-01-15

    The ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase maintains telomeres and is essential for cellular immortality in most cancers. Insight into the telomerase mechanism can be gained from syndromes such as dyskeratosis congenita, in which mutation of telomerase components manifests in telomere dysfunction. We carried out detailed kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of wild-type telomerase and two disease-associated mutations in the reverse transcriptase domain. Differences in dissociation rates between primers with different 3' ends were independent of DNA affinities, revealing that initial binding of telomerase to telomeric DNA occurs through a previously undescribed two-step mechanism involving enzyme conformational changes. Both mutations affected DNA binding, but through different mechanisms: P704S specifically affected protein conformational changes during DNA binding, whereas R865H showed defects in binding to the 3' region of the DNA. To gain further insight at the structural level, we generated the first homology model of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase domain; the positions of P704S and R865H corroborate their observed mechanistic defects, providing validation for the structural model. Our data reveal the importance of protein interactions with the 3' end of telomeric DNA and the role of protein conformational change in telomerase DNA binding, and highlight naturally occurring disease mutations as a rich source of mechanistic insight. PMID:25365545

  5. Statistical-mechanical lattice models for protein-DNA binding in chromatin

    CERN Document Server

    Teif, Vladimir B

    2010-01-01

    Statistical-mechanical lattice models for protein-DNA binding are well established as a method to describe complex ligand binding equilibriums measured in vitro with purified DNA and protein components. Recently, a new field of applications has opened up for this approach since it has become possible to experimentally quantify genome-wide protein occupancies in relation to the DNA sequence. In particular, the organization of the eukaryotic genome by histone proteins into a nucleoprotein complex termed chromatin has been recognized as a key parameter that controls the access of transcription factors to the DNA sequence. New approaches have to be developed to derive statistical mechanical lattice descriptions of chromatin-associated protein-DNA interactions. Here, we present the theoretical framework for lattice models of histone-DNA interactions in chromatin and investigate the (competitive) DNA binding of other chromosomal proteins and transcription factors. The results have a number of applications for quant...

  6. Molecular mechanism of recombinant liver fatty acid binding protein's antioxidant activity

    OpenAIRE

    YAN, JING; Gong, Yuewen; She, Yi-Min; Wang, Guqi; Roberts, Michael S; Burczynski, Frank J.

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocytes expressing liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) are known to be more resistant to oxidative stress than those devoid of this protein. The mechanism for the observed antioxidant activity is not known. We examined the antioxidant mechanism of a recombinant rat L-FABP in the presence of a hydrophilic (AAPH) or lipophilic (AMVN) free radical generator. Recombinant L-FABP amino acid sequence and its amino acid oxidative products following oxidation were identified by MALDI quadrup...

  7. Prediction of Peptide Binding to Major Histocompatibility II Receptors with Molecular Mechanics and Semi-Empirical Quantum Mechanics Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Platts

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Methods for prediction of the binding of peptides to major histocompatibility complex (MHC II receptors are examined, using literature values of IC50 as a benchmark. Two sets of IC50 data for closely structurally related peptides based on hen egg lysozyme (HEL and myelin basic protein (MBP are reported first. This shows that methods based on both molecular mechanics and semi-empirical quantum mechanics can predict binding with good-to-reasonable accuracy, as long as a suitable method for estimation of solvation effects is included. A more diverse set of 22 peptides bound to HLA-DR1 provides a tougher test of such methods, especially since no crystal structure is available for these peptide-MHC complexes. We therefore use sequence based methods such as SYFPEITHI and SVMHC to generate possible binding poses, using a consensus approach to determine the most likely anchor residues, which are then mapped onto the crystal structure of an unrelated peptide bound to the same receptor. This analysis shows that the MM/GBVI method performs particularly well, as does the AMBER94 forcefield with Born solvation model. Indeed, MM/GBVI can be used as an alternative to sequence based methods in generating binding poses, leading to still better accuracy.

  8. Formation Mechanism and Binding Energy for Body-Centred Regular Tetrahedral Structure of Li5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ping; YANG Jian-Hui; GOU Qing-Quan

    2006-01-01

    The formation mechanism for the body-centred regular tetrahedral structure of Li5 cluster is proposed.The curve of the total energy versus the separation R between the nucleus at the centre and nuclei at the apexes for this structure of Li5 has been calculated by using the method of Gou's modified arrangement channel quantum mechanics(MACQM). The result shows that the curve has a minimal energy of-37.2562 a.u. at R = 14.5a0. When R approaches infinity the total energy of five lithium atoms has the value of-37.1401 a.u. So the binding energy of Li5 with respect to five lithium atoms is the difference of 0.1161 a.u. for the above two energy values. Therefore the binding energy per atom for Li5 is 0.023 22 a.u., or 0.632 eV, which is greater than the binding energy per atom of 0.453 eV for Li2 and the binding energy per atom of 0.494 eV for Li3 calculated previously by us. This means that the Li5 cluster may be formed stably in a body-centred regular tetrahedral structure with a greater binding energy.

  9. Two Escape Mechanisms of Influenza A Virus to a Broadly Neutralizing Stalk-Binding Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Ning; Swem, Lee R.; Reichelt, Mike; Chen-Harris, Haiyin; Luis, Elizabeth; Park, Summer; Fouts, Ashley; Lupardus, Patrick; Wu, Thomas D.; Li, Olga; McBride, Jacqueline; Lawrence, Michael; Xu, Min; Tan, Man-Wah

    2016-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting the stalk region of influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinin (HA) are effective in blocking virus infection both in vitro and in vivo. The highly conserved epitopes recognized by these antibodies are critical for the membrane fusion function of HA and therefore less likely to be permissive for virus mutational escape. Here we report three resistant viruses of the A/Perth/16/2009 strain that were selected in the presence of a broadly neutralizing stalk-binding antibody. The three resistant viruses harbor three different mutations in the HA stalk: (1) Gln387Lys; (2) Asp391Tyr; (3) Asp391Gly. The Gln387Lys mutation completely abolishes binding of the antibody to the HA stalk epitope. The other two mutations, Asp391Tyr and Asp391Gly, do not affect antibody binding at neutral pH and only slightly reduce binding at low pH. Interestingly, they enhance the fusion ability of the HA, representing a novel mechanism that allows productive membrane fusion even in the presence of antibody and hence virus escape from antibody neutralization. Therefore, these mutations illustrate two different resistance mechanisms used by IAV to escape broadly neutralizing stalk-binding antibodies. Compared to the wild type virus, the resistant viruses release fewer progeny viral particles during replication and are more sensitive to Tamiflu, suggesting reduced viral fitness. PMID:27351973

  10. Formation Mechanism and Binding Energy for Regular Octahedral Structure of Li6 Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yan-Ping; LI Ping; GOU Qing-Quan; LIU Wei-Na

    2008-01-01

    The formation mechanism for the regular octahedral structure of Li6cluster is proposed. The curve of the total energy versus the separation R between any two neighboring nuclei has been calculated by using the method of Gou's modified arrangement channel quantum mechanics (MACQM). The result shows that the curve has a minimal energy of-44.736 89 a.u. At R=5.07α0. When R approaches infinity, the total energy of six lithium atoms has the value of-44.568 17 a.u. So the binding energy of Li6 with respect to six lithium atoms is 0.1687 a.u. Therefore, the binding energy per atom for Li6 is 0.028 12 a.u., or 0.7637 eV, which is greater than the binding energy per atom of 0.453 eV for Li2 arid the binding energy per atom of 0.494 eV for Li3 calculated in our previous work. This means that the Li6 cluster may be formed in a regular octahedral structure with a greater binding energy.

  11. A novel COX-independent mechanism of sulindac sulfide involves cleavage of epithelial cell adhesion molecule protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggett, Jason L; Min, Kyung-Won; Smolensky, Dmitriy; Baek, Seung Joon

    2014-08-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are extensively used over the counter to treat headaches and inflammation as well as clinically to prevent cancer among high-risk groups. The inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) activity by NSAIDs plays a role in their anti-tumorigenic properties. NSAIDs also have COX-independent activity which is not fully understood. In this study, we report a novel COX-independent mechanism of sulindac sulfide (SS), which facilitates a previously uncharacterized cleavage of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) protein. EpCAM is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein that has been implemented as an over-expressed oncogene in many cancers including colon, breast, pancreas, and prostate. We found EpCAM to be down-regulated by SS in a manner that is independent of COX activity, transcription regulation, de novo protein synthesis, and proteasomal degradation pathway. Our findings clearly demonstrate that SS drives cleavage of the extracellular portion of EpCAM near the N-terminus. This SS driven cleavage is blocked by a deleting amino acids 55-81 as well as simply mutating arginine residues at positions 80 and 81 to alanine of EpCAM. Proteolysis of EpCAM by SS may provide a novel mechanism by which NSAIDs affect anti-tumorigenesis at the post-translational level. PMID:24859349

  12. Exploring the binding mechanisms of MIF to CXCR2 using theoretical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Li, Youyong; Li, Dan; Xu, Peng; Tian, Sheng; Sun, Huiyong; Liu, Hui; Hou, Tingjun

    2015-02-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a multi-functional protein that acts as a cytokine and as an enzyme. Recently, MIF was identified as a non-canonical ligand of G protein-coupled chemokine receptor CXCR2 with low nanomolar affinity in leukocyte arrest and chemotaxis, but the precise knowledge of the molecular determinants of the MIF-CXCR2 interface has remained unknown. Therefore, we employed homology modeling, protein-protein docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, Molecular Mechanics/Generalized Born Surface Area (MM/GBSA) binding free energy calculations and MM/GBSA binding free energy decomposition to obtain insights into the molecular recognition of MIF with CXCR2. The predicted binding pattern of MIF-CXCR2 is in good agreement with the experimental data and sheds light on the functional role of important MIF-CXCR2 interface residues in association with binding and signaling. According to our predictions, the R11A/D44A double mutations of MIF exhibit a pronounced defect in the binding affinity of MIF to CXCR2, resulting in large conformational changes. The potential two-site binding model for the MIF-CXCR2 recognition was proposed: initialized primarily by the non-polar interactions including the van der Waals and hydrophobic interactions, the N-terminal region of CXCR2 contacts the N-like loop and β-sheet of MIF (site 1), and then the ECL2 and ECL3 regions of CXCR2 form strong interactions with the pseudo-(E)LR motif and C-terminus of MIF, which induces the molecular thermodynamic motion of TMs for signal transduction (site 2). This study will extend our understanding to the binding mechanisms of MIF to CXCR2 and provide useful information for the rational design of potent inhibitors selectively targeting the MIF-CXCR2 interactions. PMID:25526079

  13. Marginal Micro-leakage of Self-etch and All-in One Adhesives to Primary Teeth, with Mechanical or Chemo-Mechanical Caries Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouzari A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Chemo-mechanical caries removal is an effective alternative to the traditional rotary drilling method. One of the factors that can influence micro-leakage is the method of caries removal. Objectives: To compare the micro-leakage of resin composite in primary dentition using self-etch and all-in one adhesives following conventional and chemo-mechanical caries removal. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human primary anterior teeth with class III carious lesions were collected. The selected teeth were divided randomly into two groups each consisting of 30 teeth. In group1 carious lesions were removed using Carisolv multi mix gel. In group 2, caries was removed using round steel burs in a slow–speed hand piece. Then, the specimens in each group were randomly divided into two subgroups (A and B of 15 and treated by either Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB or Scotch bond. All prepared cavities were filled with a resin composite (Estellite. All the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24 hours and then thermocycled in 5ºC and 55ºC water with a dwell time of 20 seconds for 1500 cycles. The specimens were immersed in 1% methylene blue solution for 24 hours, removed, washed and sectioned mesiodistally. The sectioned splits were examined under a stereomicroscope to determine the micro-leakage scores. The data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis Test in SPSS version 21. Results: There were no significant differences between micro-leakage scores among the four groups (p = 0.127. Score 0 of micro-leakage was detected for 60% of the specimens in group 1-A (Carisolv + CSEB, 73% of the group 2-A (hand piece + CSEB, 80% of the group 1-B (Carisolv + Scotch bond, and 93% of the group 2-B in which caries was removed using hand piece and bonded with Scotch bond . Conclusions: Although caries removal using hand piece bur along with using Scotch bond adhesive performed less micro-leakage, it would seems that the use of Carisolv

  14. Development of a shock wave adhesion test for composite bonds by laser pulsed and mechanical impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecault, Romain; Boustie, Michel; Touchard, Fabienne; Arrigoni, Michel; Berthe, Laurent; CNRS Collaboration

    2013-06-01

    Evaluating the bonding quality of composite material is becoming one of the main challenges faced by aeronautic industries. This work aims the development of a technique using shock wave, which would enable to quantify the bonding mechanical quality. Laser shock experiments were carried out. This technique enables high tensile stress generation in the thickness of composite bond without any mechanical contact. The resulting damage has been quantified using different method such as confocal microscopy, ultrasound and cross section observation. The discrimination between a correct bond and a weak bond was possible thanks to these experiments. Nevertheless, laser sources are not well adapted for optimization of such a test since it has often fixed parameters. That is why mechanical impacts bonded composites were also performed in this work. By changing the thickness of aluminum projectiles, the tensile stresses generated by the shock wave propagation were moved toward the composite/bond interface. The observations made prove that the optimization of the technique is possible. The key parameters for the development of a bonding test using shock wave have been identified.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of gastric epithelial cell adhesion and injection of CagA by Helicobacter pylori

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Backert, Steffen

    2011-11-01

    Abstract Helicobacter pylori is a highly successful pathogen uniquely adapted to colonize humans. Gastric infections with this bacterium can induce pathology ranging from chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers to gastric cancer. More virulent H. pylori isolates harbour numerous well-known adhesins (BabA\\/B, SabA, AlpA\\/B, OipA and HopZ) and the cag (cytotoxin-associated genes) pathogenicity island encoding a type IV secretion system (T4SS). The adhesins establish tight bacterial contact with host target cells and the T4SS represents a needle-like pilus device for the delivery of effector proteins into host target cells such as CagA. BabA and SabA bind to blood group antigen and sialylated proteins respectively, and a series of T4SS components including CagI, CagL, CagY and CagA have been shown to target the integrin β1 receptor followed by injection of CagA across the host cell membrane. The interaction of CagA with membrane-anchored phosphatidylserine may also play a role in the delivery process. While substantial progress has been made in our current understanding of many of the above factors, the host cell receptors for OipA, HopZ and AlpA\\/B during infection are still unknown. Here we review the recent progress in characterizing the interactions of the various adhesins and structural T4SS proteins with host cell factors. The contribution of these interactions to H. pylori colonization and pathogenesis is discussed.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of gastric epithelial cell adhesion and injection of CagA by Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Backert Steffen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Helicobacter pylori is a highly successful pathogen uniquely adapted to colonize humans. Gastric infections with this bacterium can induce pathology ranging from chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers to gastric cancer. More virulent H. pylori isolates harbour numerous well-known adhesins (BabA/B, SabA, AlpA/B, OipA and HopZ and the cag (cytotoxin-associated genes pathogenicity island encoding a type IV secretion system (T4SS. The adhesins establish tight bacterial contact with host target cells and the T4SS represents a needle-like pilus device for the delivery of effector proteins into host target cells such as CagA. BabA and SabA bind to blood group antigen and sialylated proteins respectively, and a series of T4SS components including CagI, CagL, CagY and CagA have been shown to target the integrin β1 receptor followed by injection of CagA across the host cell membrane. The interaction of CagA with membrane-anchored phosphatidylserine may also play a role in the delivery process. While substantial progress has been made in our current understanding of many of the above factors, the host cell receptors for OipA, HopZ and AlpA/B during infection are still unknown. Here we review the recent progress in characterizing the interactions of the various adhesins and structural T4SS proteins with host cell factors. The contribution of these interactions to H. pylori colonization and pathogenesis is discussed.

  17. Syndecan proteoglycans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Oh, E S; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that a family of transmembrane proteoglycans, the syndecans, have important roles in cell adhesion. They participate through binding of matrix ligand to their glycosaminoglycan chains, clustering, and the induction of signaling cascades to modify the internal microfilament...... organization. Syndecans can modulate the type of adhesive responses induced by other matrix ligand-receptor interactions, such as those involving the integrins, and so contribute to the control of cell morphology, adhesion and migration....

  18. Network Analysis Reveals the Recognition Mechanism for Mannose-binding Lectins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunjie; Jian, Yiren; Zeng, Chen; Computational Biophysics Lab Team

    The specific carbohydrate binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) protein in plants makes it a very useful molecular tool for cancer cell detection and other applications. The biological states of most MBL proteins are dimeric. Using dynamics network analysis on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the model protein of MBL, we elucidate the short- and long-range driving forces behind the dimer formation. The results are further supported by sequence coevolution analysis. We propose a general framework for deciphering the recognition mechanism underlying protein-protein interactions that may have potential applications in signaling pathways.

  19. RecO protein initiates DNA recombination and strand annealing through two alternative DNA binding mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhikov, Mikhail; Gupta, Richa; Glickman, Michael; Korolev, Sergey

    2014-10-17

    Recombination mediator proteins (RMPs) are important for genome stability in all organisms. Several RMPs support two alternative reactions: initiation of homologous recombination and DNA annealing. We examined mechanisms of RMPs in both reactions with Mycobacterium smegmatis RecO (MsRecO) and demonstrated that MsRecO interacts with ssDNA by two distinct mechanisms. Zinc stimulates MsRecO binding to ssDNA during annealing, whereas the recombination function is zinc-independent and is regulated by interaction with MsRecR. Thus, different structural motifs or conformations of MsRecO are responsible for interaction with ssDNA during annealing and recombination. Neither annealing nor recombinase loading depends on MsRecO interaction with the conserved C-terminal tail of single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding protein (SSB), which is known to bind Escherichia coli RecO. However, similarly to E. coli proteins, MsRecO and MsRecOR do not dismiss SSB from ssDNA, suggesting that RMPs form a complex with SSB-ssDNA even in the absence of binding to the major protein interaction motif. We propose that alternative conformations of such complexes define the mechanism by which RMPs initiate the repair of stalled replication and support two different functions during recombinational repair of DNA breaks. PMID:25170075

  20. Development of a shock wave adhesion test for composite bonds by pulsed laser and mechanical impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecault, R.; Boustie, M.; Touchard, F.; Arrigoni, M.; Berthe, L.

    2014-05-01

    Evaluating the bonding quality of composite material is becoming one of the main challenges faced by aeronautic industries. This work aims to the development of a technique using shock wave, which would enable to quantify the bonding mechanical quality. Laser shock experiments were carried out. This technique enables high tensile stress generation in the thickness of composite bonds. The resulting damage has been quantified using different methods such as confocal microscopy, ultrasound and cross section observation. The discrimination between a correct bond and a weak bond was possible thanks to these experiments. Nevertheless, laser sources are not well adapted for optimization of such a test because of often fixed settings. That is why mechanical impacts on bonded composites were also performed in this work. By changing the thickness of aluminum projectiles, the generated tensile stresses by the shock wave propagation were moved toward the composite/bond interface. The made observations prove that the technique optimization is possible. The key parameters for the development of a bonding test using shock waves have been identified.

  1. Insights into the selective binding and toxic mechanism of microcystin to catalase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuandong; Da, Liangjun

    2014-03-01

    Microcystin is a sort of cyclic nonribosomal peptides produced by cyanobacteria. It is cyanotoxin, which can be very toxic for plants and animals including humans. The present study evaluated the interaction of microcystin and catalase, under physiological conditions by means of fluorescence, three-dimensional (3D) fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), Fourier Transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and enzymatic reactionkinetic techniques. The fluorescence data showed that microcystin could bind to catalase to form a complex. The binding process was a spontaneous molecular interaction procedure, in which electrostatic interactions played a major role. Energy transfer and fluorescence studies proved the existence of a static binding process. Additionally, as shown by the three-dimensional fluorescence, CD and FT-IR results, microcystin could lead to conformational and microenvironmental changes of the protein, which may affect the physiological functions of catalase. The work provides important insights into the toxicity mechanism of microcystin in vivo.

  2. Adhesive Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2003-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well...... to rewriting on arbitrary adhesive categories....

  3. Adhesive Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2004-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well...... to rewriting on arbitrary adhesive categories....

  4. Exploring the binding mechanism of ondansetron hydrochloride to serum albumins: spectroscopic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    B, Sandhya; Hegde, Ashwini H; K C, Ramesh; J, Seetharamappa

    2012-02-01

    The mechanism of interaction of ondansetron hydrochloride (OND) to serum albumins [bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA)] was studied for the first time employing fluorimetric, circular dichroism, FTIR and UV-vis absorption techniques under the simulated physiological conditions. Fluorimetric results were utilized to investigate the binding and conformational characteristics of protein upon interaction with varying concentrations of the drug. Higher binding constant values revealed the strong interaction between the drug and protein while the number of binding sites close to unity indicated single class of binding site for OND in protein. Thermodynamic results revealed that both hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interactions played a major role in stabilizing drug-protein complex. Site marker competitive experiments indicated that the OND bound to albumins at subdomin II A (Sudlow's site I). Further, the binding distance between OND and serum albumin was calculated based on the Förster's theory of non-radioactive energy transfer and found to be 2.30 and 3.41 nm, respectively for OND-BSA and OND-HSA. The circular dichroism data revealed that the presence of OND decreased the α-helix content of serum albumins. 3D-fluorescence results also indicated the conformational changes in protein upon interaction with OND. Further, the effects of some cations have been investigated in the interaction of drug to protein.

  5. POF and HP1 bind expressed exons, suggesting a balancing mechanism for gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anna-Mia; Stenberg, Per; Pettersson, Fredrik; Larsson, Jan

    2007-11-01

    Two specific chromosome-targeting and gene regulatory systems are present in Drosophila melanogaster. The male X chromosome is targeted by the male-specific lethal complex believed to mediate the 2-fold up-regulation of the X-linked genes, and the highly heterochromatic fourth chromosome is specifically targeted by the Painting of Fourth (POF) protein, which, together with heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), modulates the expression level of genes on the fourth chromosome. Here we use chromatin immunoprecipitation and tiling microarray analysis to map POF and HP1 on the fourth chromosome in S2 cells and salivary glands at high resolution. The enrichment profiles were complemented by transcript profiles to examine the link between binding and transcripts. The results show that POF specifically binds to genes, with a strong preference for exons, and the HP1 binding profile is a mirror image of POF, although HP1 displays an additional "peak" in the promoter regions of bound genes. HP1 binding within genes is much higher than the basal HP1 enrichment on Chromosome 4. Our results suggest a balancing mechanism for the regulation of the fourth chromosome where POF and HP1 competitively bind at increasing levels with increased transcriptional activity. In addition, our results contradict transposable elements as a major nucleation site for HP1 on the fourth chromosome.

  6. POF and HP1 bind expressed exons, suggesting a balancing mechanism for gene regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Mia Johansson

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Two specific chromosome-targeting and gene regulatory systems are present in Drosophila melanogaster. The male X chromosome is targeted by the male-specific lethal complex believed to mediate the 2-fold up-regulation of the X-linked genes, and the highly heterochromatic fourth chromosome is specifically targeted by the Painting of Fourth (POF protein, which, together with heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1, modulates the expression level of genes on the fourth chromosome. Here we use chromatin immunoprecipitation and tiling microarray analysis to map POF and HP1 on the fourth chromosome in S2 cells and salivary glands at high resolution. The enrichment profiles were complemented by transcript profiles to examine the link between binding and transcripts. The results show that POF specifically binds to genes, with a strong preference for exons, and the HP1 binding profile is a mirror image of POF, although HP1 displays an additional "peak" in the promoter regions of bound genes. HP1 binding within genes is much higher than the basal HP1 enrichment on Chromosome 4. Our results suggest a balancing mechanism for the regulation of the fourth chromosome where POF and HP1 competitively bind at increasing levels with increased transcriptional activity. In addition, our results contradict transposable elements as a major nucleation site for HP1 on the fourth chromosome.

  7. Exploring the binding mechanism of ondansetron hydrochloride to serum albumins: Spectroscopic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhya, B.; Hegde, Ashwini H.; K. C., Ramesh; Seetharamappa, J.

    2012-02-01

    The mechanism of interaction of ondansetron hydrochloride (OND) to serum albumins [bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA)] was studied for the first time employing fluorimetric, circular dichroism, FTIR and UV-vis absorption techniques under the simulated physiological conditions. Fluorimetric results were utilized to investigate the binding and conformational characteristics of protein upon interaction with varying concentrations of the drug. Higher binding constant values revealed the strong interaction between the drug and protein while the number of binding sites close to unity indicated single class of binding site for OND in protein. Thermodynamic results revealed that both hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interactions played a major role in stabilizing drug-protein complex. Site marker competitive experiments indicated that the OND bound to albumins at subdomin II A (Sudlow's site I). Further, the binding distance between OND and serum albumin was calculated based on the Förster's theory of non-radioactive energy transfer and found to be 2.30 and 3.41 nm, respectively for OND-BSA and OND-HSA. The circular dichroism data revealed that the presence of OND decreased the α-helix content of serum albumins. 3D-fluorescence results also indicated the conformational changes in protein upon interaction with OND. Further, the effects of some cations have been investigated in the interaction of drug to protein.

  8. Molecular mechanism of ATP binding and ion channel activation in P2X receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattori, Motoyuki; Gouaux, Eric (Oregon HSU)

    2012-10-24

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-activated ion channels permeable to Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. The seven P2X receptor subtypes are implicated in physiological processes that include modulation of synaptic transmission, contraction of smooth muscle, secretion of chemical transmitters and regulation of immune responses. Despite the importance of P2X receptors in cellular physiology, the three-dimensional composition of the ATP-binding site, the structural mechanism of ATP-dependent ion channel gating and the architecture of the open ion channel pore are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4 receptor in complex with ATP and a new structure of the apo receptor. The agonist-bound structure reveals a previously unseen ATP-binding motif and an open ion channel pore. ATP binding induces cleft closure of the nucleotide-binding pocket, flexing of the lower body {beta}-sheet and a radial expansion of the extracellular vestibule. The structural widening of the extracellular vestibule is directly coupled to the opening of the ion channel pore by way of an iris-like expansion of the transmembrane helices. The structural delineation of the ATP-binding site and the ion channel pore, together with the conformational changes associated with ion channel gating, will stimulate development of new pharmacological agents.

  9. Mechanism of sequence-specific template binding by the DNA primase of bacteriophage T7

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Seung-Joo

    2010-03-28

    DNA primases catalyze the synthesis of the oligoribonucleotides required for the initiation of lagging strand DNA synthesis. Biochemical studies have elucidated the mechanism for the sequence-specific synthesis of primers. However, the physical interactions of the primase with the DNA template to explain the basis of specificity have not been demonstrated. Using a combination of surface plasmon resonance and biochemical assays, we show that T7 DNA primase has only a slightly higher affinity for DNA containing the primase recognition sequence (5\\'-TGGTC-3\\') than for DNA lacking the recognition site. However, this binding is drastically enhanced by the presence of the cognate Nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs), Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and Cytosine triphosphate (CTP) that are incorporated into the primer, pppACCA. Formation of the dimer, pppAC, the initial step of sequence-specific primer synthesis, is not sufficient for the stable binding. Preformed primers exhibit significantly less selective binding than that observed with ATP and CTP. Alterations in subdomains of the primase result in loss of selective DNA binding. We present a model in which conformational changes induced during primer synthesis facilitate contact between the zinc-binding domain and the polymerase domain. The Author(s) 2010. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Molecular Binding Mechanism of TtgR Repressor to Antibiotics and Antimicrobials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Fernandez-Escamilla

    Full Text Available A disturbing phenomenon in contemporary medicine is the prevalence of multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria. Efflux pumps contribute strongly to this antimicrobial drug resistance, which leads to the subsequent failure of clinical treatments. The TtgR protein of Pseudomonas putida is a HTH-type transcriptional repressor that controls expression of the TtgABC efflux pump, which is the main contributor to resistance against several antimicrobials and toxic compounds in this microbe. One of the main strategies to modulate the bacterial resistance is the rational modification of the ligand binding target site. We report the design and characterization of four mutants-TtgRS77A, TtgRE78A, TtgRN110A and TtgRH114A - at the active ligand binding site. The biophysical characterization of the mutants, in the presence and in the absence of different antimicrobials, revealed that TtgRN110A is the variant with highest thermal stability, under any of the experimental conditions tested. EMSA experiments also showed a different dissociation pattern from the operator for TtgRN110A, in the presence of several antimicrobials, making it a key residue in the TtgR protein repression mechanism of the TtgABC efflux pump. We found that TtgRE78A stability is the most affected upon effector binding. We also probe that one mutation at the C-terminal half of helix-α4, TtgRS77A, provokes a severe protein structure distortion, demonstrating the important role of this residue in the overall protein structure and on the ligand binding site. The data provide new information and deepen the understanding of the TtgR-effector binding mechanism and consequently the TtgABC efflux pump regulation mechanism in Pseudomonas putida.

  11. Formation Mechanism and Binding Energy for Body-Centred Regular Icosahedral Structure of Li13 Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei-Na; LI Ping; GOU Qing-Quan; ZHAO Yan-Ping

    2008-01-01

    The formation mechanism for the body-centred regular icosahedral structure of Li13 cluster is proposed. The curve of the total energy versus the separation R between the nucleus at the centre and nuclei at the apexes for this structure of Li13 has been calculated by using the method of Gou's modified arrangement channel quantum mechanics (MACQM). The result shows that the curve has a minimal energy of-96.951 39 a.u. at R = 5.46a0. When R approaches to infinity, the total energy of thirteen lithium atoms has the value of-96.564 38 a.u. So the binding energy of Li13 with respect to thirteen lithium atoms is 0.387 01 a.u. Therefore the binding energy per atom for Li13 is 0.029 77 a.u. or 0.810 eV, which is greater than the binding energy per atom of 0.453 eV for Li2, 0.494 eV for Lia, 0.7878 eV for Li4, 0.632 eV for Lis, and 0.674 eV for Lit calculated by us previously. This means that the Li13 cluster may be formed stably in a body-centred regular icosahedral structure with a greater binding energy.

  12. STARD6 on steroids: solution structure, multiple timescale backbone dynamics and ligand binding mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Létourneau, Danny; Bédard, Mikaël; Cabana, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Andrée; LeHoux, Jean-Guy; Lavigne, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    START domain proteins are conserved α/β helix-grip fold that play a role in the non-vesicular and intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The mechanism and conformational changes permitting the entry of the ligand into their buried binding sites is not well understood. Moreover, their functions and the identification of cognate ligands is still an active area of research. Here, we report the solution structure of STARD6 and the characterization of its backbone dynamics on multiple time-scales through 15N spin-relaxation and amide exchange studies. We reveal for the first time the presence of concerted fluctuations in the Ω1 loop and the C-terminal helix on the microsecond-millisecond time-scale that allows for the opening of the binding site and ligand entry. We also report that STARD6 binds specifically testosterone. Our work represents a milestone for the study of ligand binding mechanism by other START domains and the elucidation of the biological function of STARD6. PMID:27340016

  13. Formation Mechanism and Binding Energy for Equilateral Triangle Structure of Li3 Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The formation mechanism for the equilateral triangle structure of Li3 cluster is proposed. The curve of the total energy versus the interatomic distance for this structure has been calculated by using the method of Gou's Modified Arrangement Channel Quantum Mechanics. The result shows that the curve has a minimal energy of-22.338 60 a.u at R = 5.82 a0. The total energy of Li3 when R approaches ∞ has the value of-22.284 09 a.u. This is also the total energy of three lithium atoms dissociated from Li3. The difference value of 0.0545 08 a.u. for the above two energy values is the dissociation energy of Li3 cluster, which is also its binding energy. Therefore the binding energy per lithium atom for Li3 is 0.018 169 a.u. = 0.494 eV, which is greater than the binding energy of 0.453 eV per atom for Li2 calculated in a previous work. This means that the Li3 cluster may be formed in the equilateral triangle structure of side length R = 5.82a0 stably with a stronger binding from the symmetrical interaction among the three lithium atoms.

  14. 9-cis-Retinoic Acid Promotes Cell Adhesion Through Integrin Dependent and Independent Mechanisms Across Immune Lineages

    OpenAIRE

    Whelan, Jarrett T.; Chen, Jianming; Miller, Jabin; Morrow, Rebekah L.; Lingo, Joshuah D.; Merrell, Kaitlin; Shaikh, Saame Raza; Bridges, Lance C.

    2012-01-01

    Retinoids are essential in the proper establishment and maintenance of immunity. Although retinoids are implicated in immune related processes, their role in immune cell adhesion has not been well established. In this study, the effect of 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis-RA) on human hematopoietic cell adhesion was investigated. 9-cis-RA treatment specifically induced cell adhesion of the human immune cell lines HuT-78, NB4, RPMI 8866, and U937. Due to the prominent role of integrin receptors in me...

  15. The zebrafish galectins Drgal1-L2 and Drgal3-L1 bind in vitro to the infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) glycoprotein and reduce viral adhesion to fish epithelial cells

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nita-Lazar, M.; Mancini, J.; Feng, C.; Gonzalez-Montalban, N.; Ravindran, C.; Jackson, S.; Heras-Sanchez, A.D.L.; Giomarelli, B.; Ahmed, H.; Haslam, S.M.; Wu, G.; Dell, A.; Ammayappan, A.; Vakharia, V.N.; Vasta, G.R.

    enters the host through the skin at the base of the fins, the viral adhesion and entry mechanisms are not fully understood. In recent years, evidence has accumulated in support of the key roles played by protein-carbohydrate interactions between host...

  16. A Study on Efficient Mobile IPv6 Fast Handover Scheme Using Reverse Binding Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolentino, Randy S.; Lee, Kijeong; Kim, Sung-Gyu; Kim, Miso; Park, Byungjoo

    This paper proposes a solution for solving the packet handover issues of MIPv6. We propose an efficient scheme that can support fast handover effectively in standard Mobile IPv6 (MIPv6) by optimizing the associated data and the flow of signal during handover. A new signaling message Reverse Packet Binding Mechanism is defined and utilized to hasten the handover procedure by adding a buffer in access point (AP) and home agent (HA).

  17. Co元素对硬质合金基底金刚石涂层膜基界面结合强度的影响∗%The Influence of Co binding phase on adhesive strength of diamond coating with cemented carbide substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    简小刚; 陈军

    2015-01-01

    Diamond coating has many excellent properties as the same as those of the natural diamond, such as extreme hard-ness, high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion coefficient, high chemical stability, and good abrasive resistance, which is considered as the best tool coating material applied to the high-silicon aluminum alloy cutting. We can use the hot filament chemical vapor deposition method (HFCVD) to deposit a 2—20 µm diamond coating on the cemented carbide tool to improve the cutting performance and increase the tool life significantly. Many experiments have proved that the existence of cobalt phase can weaken the adhesive strength of diamond coating. However, we still lack a perfect theory to explain why the Co element can reduce the adhesive strength of diamond coating is still lacking. What we can do now is only to improve the adhesive strength of diamond coating by doing testing many times in experiments. Compared with these traditional experiments, the first principles simulation based on quantum mechanics can describe the microstructure property and electron density of materials. It is successfully used to investigate the surface, interface, electron component, and so on etc. We can also use this method to study the interface problem at an atomic level. So the first principles based upon density functional theory (DFT) is used to investigate the influence of cobalt binding phase in cemented carbide substrate on adhesive strength of diamond coating. In this article, we uses Material Studios software to build WC/diamond and WC-Co/diamond interface models to evaluate the influence of cobalt phase on the adhesive strength of diamond coating with CASTEP program which can calculate the most stablest structure of film-substrate interface. We use PBE functional form to obtain the exchange potential and relevant potential, and to solve the self-consistent Kohn-Sham equations. We calculate the interfacial bonding energy, analyse the electron density of

  18. Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines bind to platelets. Incubation with platelets induces CD15 and P-selectin dependent adhesion of the cell lines to Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial cells (HUVEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohana, Ofra Malka; Ozer, Janet; Prinsloo, Isebrand; Benharroch, Daniel; Gopas, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is believed to spread in an orderly fashion within the lymphatic compartment. In a minority of cases, after reaching the spleen, the neoplasm disseminates, reminiscent of metastasis. In the spleen, the Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg tumor cells come across platelets in the blood vessels and mainly in the splenic red pulp. Based on this knowledge, we investigated the possibility of platelets inducing cell adhesion in Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines. We showed that L428 and KMH-2 cells strongly adhere to thrombin-activated platelets. Cell adhesion to platelets is partially dependent on CD15 antigens (Lewis(X)), mainly sialyl-CD15, and P-selectin. KMH-2, as compared to L428 cells, showed increased binding due to its differential high expression of the sialyl-CD15. As a consequence of incubation with platelets, KMH-2 cells also produced increased amounts of tumor necrosis factors α (TNFα) followed by enhanced binding to human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). Incubation of both cell lines with activated platelets also induced activation of AP-1 transcription complex. Our findings are consistent with the concept that platelets play a critical role in the dissemination of HRS cells in HL, predominantly in the spleen, by increasing cell adhesion and thus promoting their proliferative and migratory properties beyond the lymphatic system.

  19. Amino acid analogues bind to carbon nanotube via π-π interactions: Comparison of molecular mechanical and quantum mechanical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zaixing; Wang, Zhigang; Tian, Xingling; Xiu, Peng; Zhou, Ruhong

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the interaction between carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and biomolecules is essential to the CNT-based nanotechnology and biotechnology. Some recent experiments have suggested that the π-π stacking interactions between protein's aromatic residues and CNTs might play a key role in their binding, which raises interest in large scale modeling of protein-CNT complexes and associated π-π interactions at atomic detail. However, there is concern on the accuracy of classical fixed-charge molecular force fields due to their classical treatments and lack of polarizability. Here, we study the binding of three aromatic residue analogues (mimicking phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan) and benzene to a single-walled CNT, and compare the molecular mechanical (MM) calculations using three popular fixed-charge force fields (OPLSAA, AMBER, and CHARMM), with quantum mechanical (QM) calculations using the density-functional tight-binding method with the inclusion of dispersion correction (DFTB-D). Two typical configurations commonly found in π-π interactions are used, one with the aromatic rings parallel to the CNT surface (flat), and the other perpendicular (edge). Our calculations reveal that compared to the QM results the MM approaches can appropriately reproduce the strength of π-π interactions for both configurations, and more importantly, the energy difference between them, indicating that the various contributions to π-π interactions have been implicitly included in the van der Waals parameters of the standard MM force fields. Meanwhile, these MM models are less accurate in predicting the exact structural binding patterns (matching surface), meaning there are still rooms to be improved. In addition, we have provided a comprehensive and reliable QM picture for the π-π interactions of aromatic molecules with CNTs in gas phase, which might be used as a benchmark for future force field developments.

  20. DNA-Binding Kinetics Determines the Mechanism of Noise-Induced Switching in Gene Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Margaret J; Chu, Brian K; Roy, Mahua; Read, Elizabeth L

    2015-10-20

    Gene regulatory networks are multistable dynamical systems in which attractor states represent cell phenotypes. Spontaneous, noise-induced transitions between these states are thought to underlie critical cellular processes, including cell developmental fate decisions, phenotypic plasticity in fluctuating environments, and carcinogenesis. As such, there is increasing interest in the development of theoretical and computational approaches that can shed light on the dynamics of these stochastic state transitions in multistable gene networks. We applied a numerical rare-event sampling algorithm to study transition paths of spontaneous noise-induced switching for a ubiquitous gene regulatory network motif, the bistable toggle switch, in which two mutually repressive genes compete for dominant expression. We find that the method can efficiently uncover detailed switching mechanisms that involve fluctuations both in occupancies of DNA regulatory sites and copy numbers of protein products. In addition, we show that the rate parameters governing binding and unbinding of regulatory proteins to DNA strongly influence the switching mechanism. In a regime of slow DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, spontaneous switching occurs relatively frequently and is driven primarily by fluctuations in DNA-site occupancies. In contrast, in a regime of fast DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, switching occurs rarely and is driven by fluctuations in levels of expressed protein. Our results demonstrate how spontaneous cell phenotype transitions involve collective behavior of both regulatory proteins and DNA. Computational approaches capable of simulating dynamics over many system variables are thus well suited to exploring dynamic mechanisms in gene networks.

  1. Behavioural evidence for separate mechanisms of audiovisual temporal binding as a function of leading sensory modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecere, Roberto; Gross, Joachim; Thut, Gregor

    2016-06-01

    The ability to integrate auditory and visual information is critical for effective perception and interaction with the environment, and is thought to be abnormal in some clinical populations. Several studies have investigated the time window over which audiovisual events are integrated, also called the temporal binding window, and revealed asymmetries depending on the order of audiovisual input (i.e. the leading sense). When judging audiovisual simultaneity, the binding window appears narrower and non-malleable for auditory-leading stimulus pairs and wider and trainable for visual-leading pairs. Here we specifically examined the level of independence of binding mechanisms when auditory-before-visual vs. visual-before-auditory input is bound. Three groups of healthy participants practiced audiovisual simultaneity detection with feedback, selectively training on auditory-leading stimulus pairs (group 1), visual-leading stimulus pairs (group 2) or both (group 3). Subsequently, we tested for learning transfer (crossover) from trained stimulus pairs to non-trained pairs with opposite audiovisual input. Our data confirmed the known asymmetry in size and trainability for auditory-visual vs. visual-auditory binding windows. More importantly, practicing one type of audiovisual integration (e.g. auditory-visual) did not affect the other type (e.g. visual-auditory), even if trainable by within-condition practice. Together, these results provide crucial evidence that audiovisual temporal binding for auditory-leading vs. visual-leading stimulus pairs are independent, possibly tapping into different circuits for audiovisual integration due to engagement of different multisensory sampling mechanisms depending on leading sense. Our results have implications for informing the study of multisensory interactions in healthy participants and clinical populations with dysfunctional multisensory integration. PMID:27003546

  2. Behavioural evidence for separate mechanisms of audiovisual temporal binding as a function of leading sensory modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecere, Roberto; Gross, Joachim; Thut, Gregor

    2016-06-01

    The ability to integrate auditory and visual information is critical for effective perception and interaction with the environment, and is thought to be abnormal in some clinical populations. Several studies have investigated the time window over which audiovisual events are integrated, also called the temporal binding window, and revealed asymmetries depending on the order of audiovisual input (i.e. the leading sense). When judging audiovisual simultaneity, the binding window appears narrower and non-malleable for auditory-leading stimulus pairs and wider and trainable for visual-leading pairs. Here we specifically examined the level of independence of binding mechanisms when auditory-before-visual vs. visual-before-auditory input is bound. Three groups of healthy participants practiced audiovisual simultaneity detection with feedback, selectively training on auditory-leading stimulus pairs (group 1), visual-leading stimulus pairs (group 2) or both (group 3). Subsequently, we tested for learning transfer (crossover) from trained stimulus pairs to non-trained pairs with opposite audiovisual input. Our data confirmed the known asymmetry in size and trainability for auditory-visual vs. visual-auditory binding windows. More importantly, practicing one type of audiovisual integration (e.g. auditory-visual) did not affect the other type (e.g. visual-auditory), even if trainable by within-condition practice. Together, these results provide crucial evidence that audiovisual temporal binding for auditory-leading vs. visual-leading stimulus pairs are independent, possibly tapping into different circuits for audiovisual integration due to engagement of different multisensory sampling mechanisms depending on leading sense. Our results have implications for informing the study of multisensory interactions in healthy participants and clinical populations with dysfunctional multisensory integration.

  3. Mechanical joining and adhesive bonding. Joining processes with new challenges to materials testing; Umformen und Kleben. Fuegeverfahren mit neuen Herausforderungen fuer die Materialpruefung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meschut, G. [Volkswagen AG, Wolfsburg (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    This contribution highlights new material combinations in the automotive industry to demonstrate the mutual dependence of joining processes and their implications for the geometric shaping of fasteners in the combined shaping and adhesive bonding joining process. The mechanical properties of joints produced by combined and elementary methods are compared taking into consideration quasi static, oscillating and impact-type loads, and ageing characteristics. The results demonstrate that the combination of mechanical and adhesive bonding methods produces joints of high technological quality which can be implemented in optimised light-weight construction. General information is provided on the use of low-heat hybrid joining technology for project planning of this type of connections in industrial practice. (orig.)

  4. Molecular docking characterizes substrate-binding sites and efflux modulation mechanisms within P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ricardo J; Ferreira, Maria-José U; dos Santos, Daniel J V A

    2013-07-22

    P-Glycoprotein (Pgp) is one of the best characterized ABC transporters, often involved in the multidrug-resistance phenotype overexpressed by several cancer cell lines. Experimental studies contributed to important knowledge concerning substrate polyspecificity, efflux mechanism, and drug-binding sites. This information is, however, scattered through different perspectives, not existing a unifying model for the knowledge available for this transporter. Using a previously refined structure of murine Pgp, three putative drug-binding sites were hereby characterized by means of molecular docking. The modulator site (M-site) is characterized by cross interactions between both Pgp halves herein defined for the first time, having an important role in impairing conformational changes leading to substrate efflux. Two other binding sites, located next to the inner leaflet of the lipid bilayer, were identified as the substrate-binding H and R sites by matching docking and experimental results. A new classification model with the ability to discriminate substrates from modulators is also proposed, integrating a vast number of theoretical and experimental data. PMID:23802684

  5. Sliding mechanics of coated composite wires and the development of an engineering model for binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zufall, S W; Kusy, R P

    2000-02-01

    A tribological (friction and wear) study, which was designed to simulate clinical sliding mechanics, was conducted as part of an effort to determine the suitability of poly(chloro-p-xylylene) coatings for composite orthodontic archwires. Prototype composite wires, having stiffnesses similar to those of current initial and intermediate alignment wires, were tested against stainless steel and ceramic brackets in the passive and active configurations (with and without angulation). Kinetic coefficient of friction values, which were determined to quantify sliding resistances as functions of the normal forces of ligation, had a mean that was 72% greater than uncoated wire couples at 0.43. To improve analysis of the active configuration, a mathematical model was developed that related bracket angulation, bracket width, interbracket distance, wire geometry, and wire elastic modulus to sliding resistance. From this model, kinetic coefficients of binding were determined to quantify sliding resistances as functions of the normal forces of binding. The mean binding coefficient was the same as that of uncoated wire couples at 0.42. Although penetrations through the coating were observed on many specimens, the glass-fiber reinforcement within the composite wires was undamaged for all conditions tested. This finding implies that the risk of glass fiber release during clinical use would be eliminated by the coating. In addition, the frictional and binding coefficients were still within the limits outlined by conventional orthodontic wire-bracket couples. Consequently, the coatings were regarded as an improvement to the clinical acceptability of composite orthodontic archwires.

  6. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  7. Theory on the mechanisms of combinatorial binding of transcription factors with DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Murugan, R

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theoretical framework on the mechanism of combinatorial binding of transcription factors (TFs) with their specific binding sites on DNA. We consider three possible mechanisms viz. monomer, hetero-oligomer and coordinated recruitment pathways. In the monomer pathway, combinatorial TFs search for their targets in an independent manner and the protein-protein interactions among them will be insignificant. The protein-protein interactions are very strong so that the hetero-oligomer complex of TFs as a whole searches for the cognate sites in case of hetero-oligomer pathway. The TF which arrived first will recruit the adjacent TFs in a sequential manner in the recruitment pathway. The free energy released from the protein-protein interactions among TFs will be in turn utilized to stabilize the TFs-DNA complex. Such coordinated binding of TFs in fact emerges as the cooperative effect. Monomer and hetero-oligomer pathways are efficient only when few TFs are involved in the combinatorial regulation. Detai...

  8. Attenuated total reflection fourier transform infrared spectroscopy towards disclosing mechanism of bacterial adhesion on thermally stabilized titanium nano-interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Judy; Chun, Sechul; Doble, Mukesh

    2016-08-01

    Titanium is widely used as medical implant material and as condenser material in the nuclear industry where its integrity is questioned due to its susceptibility to bacterial adhesion. A systematic investigation on the influence of thermally (50-800 °C) stabilized titanium (TS-Ti) nano oxide towards bacterial adhesion was carried out. The results showed that below 350 °C significant bacterio-phobicity was observed, while above 500 °C significant affinity towards bacterial cells was recorded. Conventional characterization tools such as HR-TEM and XRD did not provide much insight on the changes occurring on the oxide film with heat treatment, however, attenuated total reflection fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) of the surface showed significant changes in the spectral pattern as a function of increasing heat treatment. It was observed that elevated OH, N-H and C=O groups and rutile titania on the TS-Ti oxide films led to higher affinity for bacterial adhesion. On the other hand low temperature TS-Ti nanooxide films (film grown at 50 °C was observed to be the most efficient anti-bacterial adhesion interface, while the 800 °C interface was the one showing highest affinity towards bacterial adhesion. This study confirms the successful application of ATR-FTIR technique for nano-oxide film characterization and towards understanding the variations in bacterial interaction of such nano interfaces. PMID:27412653

  9. Simulative Calculation of Mechanical Property, Binding Energy and Detonation Property of TATB/Fluorine-polymer PBX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA, Xiu-Fang; XIAO, Ji-Jun; HUANG, Hui; JU, Xue-Hai; LI, Jin-Shan; XIAO, He-Ming

    2006-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) method was used to simulate 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) coated with fluorine containing polymers. The mechanical properties and binding energies of PBXs were obtained. It was found that when the number of chain monomers of fluorine containing polymers was the same, the elasticity of TATB/F2314 was increased more greatly than others and the binding energy of TATB/F2311 was the largest among four PBXs. Detonation heat and velocity of such four PBXs were calculated according to theoretical and empirical formulas. The results show that the order of detonation heat is TATB>TATB/PVDF>TATB/F2311 >TATB/F2314>TATB/PCTFE while the order of detonation velocity is TATB/PVDF<TATB/F2311 <TATB/F2314<TATB/PCTFE<TATB.

  10. Mechanism of RecO recruitment to DNA by single-stranded DNA binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhikov, Mikhail; Koroleva, Olga; Postnov, Dmitri; Tran, Andrew; Korolev, Sergey

    2011-08-01

    RecO is a recombination mediator protein (RMP) important for homologous recombination, replication repair and DNA annealing in bacteria. In all pathways, the single-stranded (ss) DNA binding protein, SSB, plays an inhibitory role by protecting ssDNA from annealing and recombinase binding. Conversely, SSB may stimulate each reaction through direct interaction with RecO. We present a crystal structure of Escherichia coli RecO bound to the conserved SSB C-terminus (SSB-Ct). SSB-Ct binds the hydrophobic pocket of RecO in a conformation similar to that observed in the ExoI/SSB-Ct complex. Hydrophobic interactions facilitate binding of SSB-Ct to RecO and RecO/RecR complex in both low and moderate ionic strength solutions. In contrast, RecO interaction with DNA is inhibited by an elevated salt concentration. The SSB mutant lacking SSB-Ct also inhibits RecO-mediated DNA annealing activity in a salt-dependent manner. Neither RecO nor RecOR dissociates SSB from ssDNA. Therefore, in E. coli, SSB recruits RMPs to ssDNA through SSB-Ct, and RMPs are likely to alter the conformation of SSB-bound ssDNA without SSB dissociation to initiate annealing or recombination. Intriguingly, Deinococcus radiodurans RecO does not bind SSB-Ct and weakly interacts with the peptide in the presence of RecR, suggesting the diverse mechanisms of DNA repair pathways mediated by RecO in different organisms. PMID:21504984

  11. Mechanism of RecO recruitment to DNA by single-stranded DNA binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryzhikov, Mikhail; Koroleva, Olga; Postnov, Dmitri; Tran, Andrew; Korolev, Sergey (St. Louis-MED)

    2011-08-25

    RecO is a recombination mediator protein (RMP) important for homologous recombination, replication repair and DNA annealing in bacteria. In all pathways, the single-stranded (ss) DNA binding protein, SSB, plays an inhibitory role by protecting ssDNA from annealing and recombinase binding. Conversely, SSB may stimulate each reaction through direct interaction with RecO. We present a crystal structure of Escherichia coli RecO bound to the conserved SSB C-terminus (SSB-Ct). SSB-Ct binds the hydrophobic pocket of RecO in a conformation similar to that observed in the ExoI/SSB-Ct complex. Hydrophobic interactions facilitate binding of SSB-Ct to RecO and RecO/RecR complex in both low and moderate ionic strength solutions. In contrast, RecO interaction with DNA is inhibited by an elevated salt concentration. The SSB mutant lacking SSB-Ct also inhibits RecO-mediated DNA annealing activity in a salt-dependent manner. Neither RecO nor RecOR dissociates SSB from ssDNA. Therefore, in E. coli, SSB recruits RMPs to ssDNA through SSB-Ct, and RMPs are likely to alter the conformation of SSB-bound ssDNA without SSB dissociation to initiate annealing or recombination. Intriguingly, Deinococcus radiodurans RecO does not bind SSB-Ct and weakly interacts with the peptide in the presence of RecR, suggesting the diverse mechanisms of DNA repair pathways mediated by RecO in different organisms.

  12. Mechanism of fluorescence and conformational changes of the sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein of the sand worm Nereis diversicolor upon Ca2+ or Mg2+ binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillen, Alain; Verheyden, Stefan; Delfosse, Lotte; Braem, Tania; Robben, Johan; Volckaert, Guido; Engelborghs, Yves

    2003-09-01

    The calcium-binding protein isolated from the sarcoplasm of the muscles of the sand worm Nereis diversicolor has four EF-hands and three active binding sites for Ca(2+) or Mg(2+). Nereis diversicolor sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein contains three tryptophan residues at positions 4, 57, and 170, respectively. The Wt protein shows a very limited fluorescence increase upon binding of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+). Single-tryptophan-containing mutants were produced and purified. The fluorescence titrations of these mutants show a limited decrease of the affinity for calcium, but no alterations of the cooperativity. Upon adding calcium, Trp170 shows a strong fluorescence increase, Trp57 an extensive fluorescence decrease, and Trp4 shows no fluorescence change. Therefore mutant W4F/W170F is ideally suited to analyze the fluorescence titrations and to study the binding mechanism. Mutations of the calcium ligands at the z-position in the three binding sites show no effect at site I and a total loss of cooperativity at sites III and IV. The quenching of Trp57 upon calcium binding is dependent on the presence of arginine R25, but this residue is not just a simple dynamic quencher. The role of the salt bridge R25-D58 is also investigated. PMID:12944301

  13. Tyrosine phosphorylation of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1, CD31) in mechanically stimulated vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, M; Masuda, M; Harada, N; Lopes, R B; Fujiwara, K

    1997-03-01

    Fluid flow triggers signal transducing events, modulates gene expression, and remodels cytoskeletal structures in vascular endothelial cells (ECs). However, the primary steps of mechanoreception are still unknown. We have recently reported that a glycoprotein is rapidly tyrosine-phosphorylated in bovine ECs exposed to fluid flow or osmotic shock. Here were cloned a 3.4 kb cDNA encoding this protein and found that this was bovine PECAM-1. The tyrosine-phosphorylation level of PECAM-1 immunoprecipitated from mechanically stimulated bovine or human ECs increased. The PECAM-1 phosphorylation was not induced by reagents that triggered Ca2+ mobilization in ECs. An autophosphorylatable band comigrating with c-Src was co-immunoprecipitated with anti-PECAM-1, and c-Src phosphorylated and bound to a GST fusion protein containing the PECAM-1 cytoplasmic domain. A spliced mRNA form lacking amino acid residues 703-721 in the cytoplasmic domain was also expressed in bovine ECs, c-Src neither phosphorylated nor bound to the fusion protein containing the spliced PECAM-1 cytoplasmic domain which lacked one (Tyr 713) of the six tyrosine residues in the PECAM-1 cytoplasmic domain. These results suggest that the YSEI motif containing Tyr 713 is the Src phosphorylation/binding site. Our study is the first demonstration of inducible tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1 and suggests involvement of PECAM-1 and Src family kinases in the sensing/signal transduction of mechanical stimuli in ECs. PMID:9084985

  14. MicroRNA-155 Modulates the Pathogen Binding Ability of Dendritic Cells (DCs) by Down-regulation of DC-specific Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-3 Grabbing Non-integrin (DC-SIGN)*

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Nunez, Rocio T.; Louafi, Fethi; Friedmann, Peter S.; Sanchez-Elsner, Tilman

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) has been involved in the response to inflammation in macrophages and lymphocytes. Here we show how miR-155 participates in the maturation of human dendritic cells (DC) and modulates pathogen binding by down-regulating DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), after directly targeting the transcription factor PU.1. During the maturation of DCs, miR-155 increases up to 130-fold, whereas PU.1 protein levels decrease accordingly. We esta...

  15. Effects of ligand binding on the mechanical stability of protein GB1 studied by steered molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ji-Guo; Zhao, Shu-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Li, Chun-Hua; Li, Jing-Yuan

    2016-08-01

    Regulation of the mechanical properties of proteins plays an important role in many biological processes, and sheds light on the design of biomaterials comprised of protein. At present, strategies to regulate protein mechanical stability focus mainly on direct modulation of the force-bearing region of the protein. Interestingly, the mechanical stability of GB1 can be significantly enhanced by the binding of Fc fragments of human IgG antibody, where the binding site is distant from the force-bearing region of the protein. The mechanism of this long-range allosteric control of protein mechanics is still elusive. In this work, the impact of ligand binding on the mechanical stability of GB1 was investigated using steered molecular dynamics simulation, and a mechanism underlying the enhanced protein mechanical stability is proposed. We found that the external force causes deformation of both force-bearing region and ligand binding site. In other words, there is a long-range coupling between these two regions. The binding of ligand restricts the distortion of the binding site and reduces the deformation of the force-bearing region through a long-range allosteric communication, which thus improves the overall mechanical stability of the protein. The simulation results are very consistent with previous experimental observations. Our studies thus provide atomic-level insights into the mechanical unfolding process of GB1, and explain the impact of ligand binding on the mechanical properties of the protein through long-range allosteric regulation, which should facilitate effective modulation of protein mechanical properties. PMID:27444879

  16. Effects of ligand binding on the mechanical stability of protein GB1 studied by steered molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ji-Guo; Zhao, Shu-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Li, Chun-Hua; Li, Jing-Yuan

    2016-08-01

    Regulation of the mechanical properties of proteins plays an important role in many biological processes, and sheds light on the design of biomaterials comprised of protein. At present, strategies to regulate protein mechanical stability focus mainly on direct modulation of the force-bearing region of the protein. Interestingly, the mechanical stability of GB1 can be significantly enhanced by the binding of Fc fragments of human IgG antibody, where the binding site is distant from the force-bearing region of the protein. The mechanism of this long-range allosteric control of protein mechanics is still elusive. In this work, the impact of ligand binding on the mechanical stability of GB1 was investigated using steered molecular dynamics simulation, and a mechanism underlying the enhanced protein mechanical stability is proposed. We found that the external force causes deformation of both force-bearing region and ligand binding site. In other words, there is a long-range coupling between these two regions. The binding of ligand restricts the distortion of the binding site and reduces the deformation of the force-bearing region through a long-range allosteric communication, which thus improves the overall mechanical stability of the protein. The simulation results are very consistent with previous experimental observations. Our studies thus provide atomic-level insights into the mechanical unfolding process of GB1, and explain the impact of ligand binding on the mechanical properties of the protein through long-range allosteric regulation, which should facilitate effective modulation of protein mechanical properties.

  17. 肾上皮细胞损伤使草酸钙晶体黏附增强的分子机制%Molecular Mechanism of Adhesion of Monohydrate and Dihydrate Calcium Oxalate Crystals on Injured Kidney Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甘琼枝; 孙新园; 姚秀琼; 欧阳健明

    2016-01-01

    研究了非洲绿猴肾上皮细胞( Vero)在损伤前后与一水合草酸钙( COM)和二水合草酸钙( COD)晶体的黏附作用及其引起的细胞反应,探讨了肾结石形成机理。 COM和COD晶体与损伤细胞的黏附加重了细胞的过氧化损伤程度,导致损伤细胞的活力进一步降低,乳酸脱氢酶( LDH)释放量和活性氧( ROS)进一步增加,坏死细胞数量进一步增多,细胞体积缩小,并出现凋亡小体。 COM晶体对细胞的损伤能力显著大于COD晶体。扫描电子显微镜( SEM)观测结果表明,损伤组Vero与COM微晶的黏附作用显著强于对照组,且能促进COM微晶的聚集。共聚焦显微镜观测结果表明, Vero损伤后,其表面表达的晶体黏附分子透明质酸( HA)显著增加, HA分子是促进微晶黏附的重要原因。细胞表面草酸钙的黏附量和晶体聚集程度与细胞的损伤程度成正相关。本文结果从分子和细胞水平上提示,细胞损伤是导致草酸钙肾结石形成的重要因素。%Effects of cell injury on calcium oxalate monohydrate( COM) and calcium oxalate dihydrate( COD) microcrystalline adhesion and cellular response of calcium oxalate microcrystalline on African green monkey renal epithelial( Vero) cells after adhesion were evaluated. COM amd COD crystal adhesion to injured Vero cells increased oxidative damage degree, the LDH release amount, reactive oxygen species( ROS) and dead cells and decreased cell viability. The cells shrinked and apoptotic bodies appeared. COM crystals caused more serious damage to injured Vero cells than COD crystals. The results of scanning electron microscopy ( SEM) showed that the adhesive capacity of injured Vero cells to COM was significantly stronger than the con-trol group, which enhanced crystals adhesion and aggregation. Laser scanning confocal microscope showed that Vero cell injury increased the expression of crystal binding hyaluronic acid ( HA ) molecules which were

  18. Nanoparticle adhesion in proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qianping; Joy, David C.; Keffer, David J.

    2013-11-01

    Carbon supported platinum (Pt/C) catalyst remains among the most preferable catalyst materials for Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells. However, platinum (Pt) particles suffer from poor durability and encounter electrochemical surface area (ESA) loss under operation with the accompany of Pt nanoparticle coarsening. Several proposed mechanisms have involved the Pt detachment from its carbonate support as an initial step for the deactivation of Pt nanoparticles. In this study, we investigated the detachment mechanism from the nano-adhesion point of view. Classic molecular dynamics simulations are performed on systems contain Pt nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes. A thin Nafion film (1 nm) at different hydration levels is also included in the system to study the environmental effect on nanoparticle adhesion. We found that the adhesion force strengthens as the Pt size goes up. Pt nanoparticles of tetrahedral shape exhibit relatively stronger connection with the carbon substrate due to its unique ‘anchor-like’ structure. Adhesion is enhanced with the introduction of a Nafion. The humidity level in the Nafion film has a rather complicated effect on the strength of nanoparticle adhesion. The binding energies and maximum adhesive forces are reported for all systems studied.

  19. Binding of single walled carbon nanotube to WT and mutant HIV-1 proteases: analysis of flap dynamics and binding mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, Biswa Ranjan; Wang, Yixuan

    2012-09-01

    Most of the currently treated HIV-1 protease (HIV-PR) inhibitors have been prone to suffer from the mutations associated drug resistance. Therefore, it is necessary to search for potent alternatives against the drug resistance. In the current study we have tested the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) as an inhibitor in wild type (WT) as well as in three primary mutants (I50V(PR), V82A(PR) and I84V(PR)) of the HIV-1-PR through docking the SWCNT in the active site region, and then performed all-atom MD simulations for the complexes. The conformational dynamics of HIV-PR with a 20 ns trajectory reveals that the SWCNT can effectively bind to the HIV-1-PR active site and regulate the flap dynamics such as maintaining the flap-flap closed. To gain an insight into the binding affinity, we also performed the MM-PBSA based binding free energy calculations for the four HIV-PR/SWCNT complexes. It was observed that, although the binding between the SWCNT and the HIV-PR decreases due to the mutations, the SWCNTs bind to the HIV-PRs 3-5 folds stronger than the most potent HIV-1-PR inhibitor, TMC114. Remarkably, the significant interactions with binding energy higher than 1kcal/mol focus on the flap and active regions, which favors closing flap-flap and deactivating the active residues of the HIV-PR. The flap dynamics and binding strength information for HIV-PR and SWCNTs can help design SWCNT-based HIV-1-PR inhibitors. PMID:23142620

  20. Cellulose as an adhesion agent for the synthesis of lignin aerogel with strong mechanical performance, Sound-absorption and thermal Insulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Xiong, Ye; Fan, Bitao; Yao, Qiufang; Wang, Hanwei; Jin, Chunde; Sun, Qingfeng

    2016-08-26

    The lignin aerogels that are both high porosity and compressibility would have promising implications for bioengineering field to sound-adsorption and damping materials; however, creating this aerogel had a challenge to adhesive lignin. Here we reported cellulose as green adhesion agent to synthesize the aerogels with strong mechanical performance. Our approach-straightforwardly dissolved in ionic liquids and simply regenerated in the deionized water-causes assembly of micro-and nanoscale and even molecule level of cellulose and lignin. The resulting lignin aerogels exhibit Young's modulus up to 25.1 MPa, high-efficiency sound-adsorption and excellent thermal insulativity. The successful synthesis of this aerogels developed a path for lignin to an advanced utilization.

  1. Cellulose as an adhesion agent for the synthesis of lignin aerogel with strong mechanical performance, Sound-absorption and thermal Insulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Xiong, Ye; Fan, Bitao; Yao, Qiufang; Wang, Hanwei; Jin, Chunde; Sun, Qingfeng

    2016-01-01

    The lignin aerogels that are both high porosity and compressibility would have promising implications for bioengineering field to sound-adsorption and damping materials; however, creating this aerogel had a challenge to adhesive lignin. Here we reported cellulose as green adhesion agent to synthesize the aerogels with strong mechanical performance. Our approach-straightforwardly dissolved in ionic liquids and simply regenerated in the deionized water-causes assembly of micro-and nanoscale and even molecule level of cellulose and lignin. The resulting lignin aerogels exhibit Young's modulus up to 25.1 MPa, high-efficiency sound-adsorption and excellent thermal insulativity. The successful synthesis of this aerogels developed a path for lignin to an advanced utilization. PMID:27562532

  2. Study on the Mechanism of Adhesion Improvement Using Dry-Ice Blasting for Plasma-Sprayed Al2O3 Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shujuan; Song, Bo; Hansz, Bernard; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2013-03-01

    The mechanisms of adhesion improvement of plasma-sprayed Al2O3 coatings using dry-ice blasting were investigated. In this study, the change of substrate surface characteristics in both the topography and the wettability due to the treatment of dry-ice blasting was mainly studied. The effect of dry-ice blasting on Al2O3 splat morphology with different treatment durations was also examined. The residual stress of plasma-sprayed Al2O3 coatings using dry-ice blasting was measured by curvature method and compared to that of coatings deposited with conventional air cooling. Based on these numerous assessment tests, it could be concluded that the adhesion improvement of Al2O3 coatings could be attributed to the cleaning effect of dry-ice blasting on different organic substances adsorbed on the substrates and the peening effect.

  3. Cellulose as an adhesion agent for the synthesis of lignin aerogel with strong mechanical performance, Sound-absorption and thermal Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Xiong, Ye; Fan, Bitao; Yao, Qiufang; Wang, Hanwei; Jin, Chunde; Sun, Qingfeng

    2016-08-01

    The lignin aerogels that are both high porosity and compressibility would have promising implications for bioengineering field to sound-adsorption and damping materials; however, creating this aerogel had a challenge to adhesive lignin. Here we reported cellulose as green adhesion agent to synthesize the aerogels with strong mechanical performance. Our approach—straightforwardly dissolved in ionic liquids and simply regenerated in the deionized water—causes assembly of micro-and nanoscale and even molecule level of cellulose and lignin. The resulting lignin aerogels exhibit Young’s modulus up to 25.1 MPa, high-efficiency sound-adsorption and excellent thermal insulativity. The successful synthesis of this aerogels developed a path for lignin to an advanced utilization.

  4. Kinetic mechanism of phenylalanine hydroxylase: intrinsic binding and rate constants from single-turnover experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Pavon, Jorge Alex; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2013-02-12

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH) catalyzes the key step in the catabolism of dietary phenylalanine, its hydroxylation to tyrosine using tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and O(2). A complete kinetic mechanism for PheH was determined by global analysis of single-turnover data in the reaction of PheHΔ117, a truncated form of the enzyme lacking the N-terminal regulatory domain. Formation of the productive PheHΔ117-BH(4)-phenylalanine complex begins with the rapid binding of BH(4) (K(d) = 65 μM). Subsequent addition of phenylalanine to the binary complex to form the productive ternary complex (K(d) = 130 μM) is approximately 10-fold slower. Both substrates can also bind to the free enzyme to form inhibitory binary complexes. O(2) rapidly binds to the productive ternary complex; this is followed by formation of an unidentified intermediate, which can be detected as a decrease in absorbance at 340 nm, with a rate constant of 140 s(-1). Formation of the 4a-hydroxypterin and Fe(IV)O intermediates is 10-fold slower and is followed by the rapid hydroxylation of the amino acid. Product release is the rate-determining step and largely determines k(cat). Similar reactions using 6-methyltetrahydropterin indicate a preference for the physiological pterin during hydroxylation.

  5. Charging effect in Au nanoparticle memory device with biomolecule binding mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sung Mok; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Bong-Jin; Yoon, Tae-Sik; Kim, Yong-Sang; Lee, Hyun Ho

    2011-07-01

    Organic memory device having gold nanoparticle (Au NPs) has been introduced in the structure of metal-pentacene-insulator-silicon (MPIS) capacitor device, where the Au NPs layer was formed by a new bonding method. Biomolecule binding mechanism between streptavidin and biotin was used as a strong binding method for the formation of monolayered Au NPs on polymeric dielectric of poly vinyl alcohol (PVA). The self-assembled Au NPs was functioned to show storages of charge in the MPIS device. The binding by streptavidin and biotin was confirmed by AFM and UV-VIS. The UV-VIS absorption of the Au NPs was varied at 515 nm and 525 nm depending on the coating of streptavidin. The AFM image showed no formation of multi-stacked layers of the streptavidin-capped Au NPs on biotin-NHS layer. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) performance of the memory device was measured to investigate the charging effect from Au NPs. In addition, charge retention by the Au NPs storage was tested to show 10,000 s in the C-V curve.

  6. Study of adhesion and friction properties on a nanoparticle gradient surface: transition from JKR to DMT contact mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N; Nalam, Prathima C; Clasohm, Lucy Y; Spencer, Nicholas D

    2013-01-01

    We have previously investigated the dependence of adhesion on nanometer-scale surface roughness by employing a roughness gradient. In this study, we correlate the obtained adhesion forces on nanometer-scale rough surfaces to their frictional properties. A roughness gradient with varying silica particle (diameter ≈ 12 nm) density was prepared, and adhesion and frictional forces were measured across the gradient surface in perfluorodecalin by means of atomic force microscopy with a polyethylene colloidal probe. Similarly to the pull-off measurements, the frictional forces initially showed a reduction with decreasing particle density and later an abrupt increase as the colloidal sphere began to touch the flat substrate beneath, at very low particle densities. The friction-load relation is found to depend on the real contact area (A(real)) between the colloid probe and the underlying particles. At high particle density, the colloidal sphere undergoes large deformations over several nanoparticles, and the contact adhesion (JKR type) dominates the frictional response. However, at low particle density (before the colloidal probe is in contact with the underlying surface), the colloidal sphere is suspended by a few particles only, resulting in local deformations of the colloid sphere, with the frictional response to the applied load being dominated by long-range, noncontact (DMT-type) interactions with the substrate beneath.

  7. Surface-modified nanoparticles as a new, versatile, and mechanically robust nonadhesive coating: Suppression of protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmes, P.F.; Currie, E.P.K.; Thies, J.C.; Mei, van der H.C.; Busscher, H.J.; Norde, W.

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of surface-modified silica nanoparticles, chemically grafted with acrylate and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) groups, and the ability of the resulting crosslinked coatings to inhibit protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion are explored. Water contact angles, nanoindentation, and atomic

  8. Surface-modified nanoparticles as a new, versatile, and mechanically robust nonadhesive coating : Suppression of protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmes, P. F.; Currie, E. P. K.; Thies, J. C.; van der Mei, H. C.; Busscher, H. J.; Norde, W.

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of surface-modified silica nanoparticles, chemically grafted with acrylate and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) groups, and the ability of the resulting crosslinked coatings to inhibit protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion are explored. Water contact angles, nanoindentation, and atomic

  9. Full-length recombinant Plasmodium falciparum VAR2CSA binds specifically to CSPG and induces potent parasite adhesion blocking antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khunrae, Pongsak; Dahlbäck, Madeleine; Nielsen, Morten A;

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains one of the world's leading causes of human suffering and poverty. Each year, the disease takes 1-3 million lives, mainly in sub-Saharan Africa. The adhesion of parasite-infected erythrocytes to the vascular endothelium or the placenta is the key event...

  10. Revealing the mechanisms of protein disorder and N-glycosylation in CD44-hyaluronan binding using molecular simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olgun eGuvench

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular N-terminal hyaluronan binding domain (HABD of CD44 is a small globular domain that confers hyaluronan (HA binding functionality to this large transmembrane glycoprotein. When recombinantly expressed by itself, HABD exists as a globular water-soluble protein that retains the capacity to bind HA. This has enabled atomic-resolution structural biology experiments that have revealed the structure of HABD and its binding mode with oligomeric HA. Such experiments have also pointed to an order-to-disorder transition in HABD that is associated with HA binding. However, it had remained unclear how this structural transition was involved in binding since it occurs in a region of HABD distant from the HA-binding site. Furthermore, HABD is known to be N-glycosylated, and such glycosylation can diminish HA binding when the associated N-glycans are capped with sialic acid residues. The intrinsic flexibility of disordered proteins and of N-glycans makes it difficult to apply experimental structural biology approaches to probe the molecular mechanisms of how the order-to-disorder transition and N-glycosylation can modulate HA binding by HABD. We review recent results from molecular dynamics simulations that provide atomic-resolution mechanistic understanding of such modulation to help bridge gaps between existing experimental binding and structural biology data. Findings from these simulations include: Tyr42 may function as a molecular switch that converts the HA binding site from a low affinity to a high affinity state; in the partially-disordered form of HABD, basic amino acids in the C-terminal region can gain sufficient mobility to form direct contacts with bound HA to further stabilize binding; and terminal sialic acids on covalently-attached N-glycans can form charge-paired hydrogen bonding interactions with basic amino acids that could otherwise bind to HA, thereby blocking HA binding to glycosylated CD44 HABD.

  11. Defining the domains of type I collagen involved in heparin- binding and endothelial tube formation

    OpenAIRE

    Sweeney, Shawn M.; Guy, Cynthia A.; Fields, Gregg B.; Antonio, James D. San

    1998-01-01

    Cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) interactions with type I collagen may be a ubiquitous cell adhesion mechanism. However, the HSPG binding sites on type I collagen are unknown. Previously we mapped heparin binding to the vicinity of the type I collagen N terminus by electron microscopy. The present study has identified type I collagen sequences used for heparin binding and endothelial cell–collagen interactions. Using affinity coelectrophoresis, we found heparin to bind as foll...

  12. DDB2 (damaged-DNA binding 2) protein: a new modulator of nanomechanical properties and cell adhesion of breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieux, Claire; Bacharouche, Jalal; Soussen, Charles; Hupont, Sébastien; Razafitianamaharavo, Angélina; Klotz, Rémi; Pannequin, Rémi; Brie, David; Bécuwe, Philippe; Francius, Grégory; Grandemange, Stéphanie

    2016-02-01

    DDB2, known for its role in DNA repair, was recently shown to reduce mammary tumor invasiveness by inducing the transcription of IκBα, an inhibitor of NF-κB activity. Since cellular adhesion is a key event during the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) leading to the invasive capacities of breast tumor cells, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of DDB2 in this process. Thus, using low and high DDB2-expressing MDA-MB231 and MCF7 cells, respectively, in which DDB2 expression was modulated experimentally, we showed that DDB2 overexpression was associated with a decrease of adhesion abilities on glass and plastic areas of breast cancer cells. Then, we investigated cell nanomechanical properties by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results revealed significant changes in the Young's Modulus value and the adhesion force in MDA-MB231 and MCF7 cells, whether DDB2 was expressed or not. The cell stiffness decrease observed in MDA-MB231 and MCF7 expressing DDB2 was correlated with a loss of the cortical actin-cytoskeleton staining. To understand how DDB2 regulates these processes, an adhesion-related gene PCR-Array was performed. Several adhesion-related genes were differentially expressed according to DDB2 expression, indicating that important changes are occurring at the molecular level. Thus, this work demonstrates that AFM technology is an important tool to follow cellular changes during tumorigenesis. Moreover, our data revealed that DDB2 is involved in early events occurring during metastatic progression of breast cancer cells and will contribute to define this protein as a new marker of metastatic progression in this type of cancer.

  13. The zebrafish galectins Drgal1-L2 and Drgal3-L1 bind in vitro to the infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) glycoprotein and reduce viral adhesion to fish epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nita-Lazar, Mihai; Mancini, Justin; Feng, Chiguang; González-Montalbán, Núria; Ravindran, Chinnarajan; Jackson, Shawn; de las Heras-Sánchez, Ana; Giomarelli, Barbara; Ahmed, Hafiz; Haslam, Stuart M; Wu, Gang; Dell, Anne; Ammayappan, Arun; Vakharia, Vikram N; Vasta, Gerardo R

    2016-02-01

    The infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV; Rhabdoviridae, Novirhabdovirus) infects teleost fish, such as salmon and trout, and is responsible for significant losses in the aquaculture industry and in wild fish populations. Although IHNV enters the host through the skin at the base of the fins, the viral adhesion and entry mechanisms are not fully understood. In recent years, evidence has accumulated in support of the key roles played by protein-carbohydrate interactions between host lectins secreted to the extracellular space and virion envelope glycoproteins in modulating viral adhesion and infectivity. In this study, we assessed in vitro the potential role(s) of zebrafish (Danio rerio) proto type galectin-1 (Drgal1-L2) and a chimera galectin-3 (Drgal3-L1) in IHNV adhesion to epithelial cells. Our results suggest that the extracellular Drgal1-L2 and Drgal3-L1 interact directly and in a carbohydrate-dependent manner with the IHNV glycosylated envelope and glycans on the epithelial cell surface, significantly reducing viral adhesion.

  14. Mechanical Control of ATP Synthase Function: Activation Energy Difference between Tight and Loose Binding Sites

    KAUST Repository

    Beke-Somfai, Tamás

    2010-01-26

    Despite exhaustive chemical and crystal structure studies, the mechanistic details of how FoF1-ATP synthase can convert mechanical energy to chemical, producing ATP, are still not fully understood. On the basis of quantum mechanical calculations using a recent highresolution X-ray structure, we conclude that formation of the P-O bond may be achieved through a transition state (TS) with a planar PO3 - ion. Surprisingly, there is a more than 40 kJ/mol difference between barrier heights of the loose and tight binding sites of the enzyme. This indicates that even a relatively small change in active site conformation, induced by the γ-subunit rotation, may effectively block the back reaction in βTP and, thus, promote ATP. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  15. Hormone- and DNA-binding mechanisms of the recombinant human estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obourn, J D; Koszewski, N J; Notides, A C

    1993-06-22

    We have investigated the hormone- and DNA-binding mechanisms of the wild-type human estrogen receptor (hER) overproduced in insect cells using a baculovirus expression system. The recombinant hER was indistinguishable in size (67 kDa) and immunogenically from the native human estrogen receptor in MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells. The recombinant hER was purified to 70-80% homogeneity with a two-step procedure that included ammonium sulfate precipitation and oligonucleotide affinity chromatography using a unique Teflon affinity matrix. The recombinant hER bound estradiol with a positively cooperative mechanism. At hER concentrations in excess of 13 nM the Hill coefficient reached a maximal value of 1.6, whereas, at lower hER concentrations, the Hill coefficient approached 1.0, suggesting that the hER was dissociated to the monomeric species and site-site interactions were diminished. The hER specifically bound an estrogen responsive element (ERE) from chicken vitellogenin II gene as measured by the gel mobility assay, ethylation, and thymine interference footprinting. Specific interference patterns suggest a two-fold symmetry of the hER binding to the ERE with each monomer of the hER bound in the major groove of the DNA. These data indicate that the recombinant hER is valuable to define the biochemical and structural properties of the native estrogen receptor. PMID:8512933

  16. Structure and Ligand-Binding Mechanism of a Cysteinyl Leukotriene-Binding Protein from a Blood-Feeding Disease Vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonka, Willy; Pham, Van; Nardone, Glenn; Gittis, Apostolos; Silva-Cardoso, Lívia; Atella, Georgia C; Ribeiro, José M C; Andersen, John F

    2016-07-15

    Blood-feeding disease vectors mitigate the negative effects of hemostasis and inflammation through the binding of small-molecule agonists of these processes by salivary proteins. In this study, a lipocalin protein family member (LTBP1) from the saliva of Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi, is shown to sequester cysteinyl leukotrienes during feeding to inhibit immediate inflammatory responses. Calorimetric binding experiments showed that LTBP1 binds leukotrienes C4 (LTC4), D4 (LTD4), and E4 (LTE4) but not biogenic amines, adenosine diphosphate, or other eicosanoid compounds. Crystal structures of ligand-free LTBP1 and its complexes with LTC4 and LTD4 reveal a conformational change during binding that brings Tyr114 into close contact with the ligand. LTC4 is cleaved in the complex, leaving free glutathione and a C20 fatty acid. Chromatographic analysis of bound ligands showed only intact LTC4, suggesting that cleavage could be radiation-mediated. PMID:27124118

  17. Adhesion improvement of graphene/copper interface using UV/ozone treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeongmin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graphene Research Center, KAIST, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Won Seok [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Taek-Soo, E-mail: tskim1@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graphene Research Center, KAIST, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    The weak adhesion between graphene and its substrate is a potentially significant problem for graphene-based electronic devices. However, quantitative studies on adhesion improvement between graphene and its substrate using simple surface treatments have not yet been reported. In this study, we report the adhesion improvement of the graphene/copper interface using a UV/ozone treatment. The adhesion energy is measured directly using double cantilever beam fracture mechanics testing. A significantly improved adhesion energy of 2.10 ± 0.27 J/m{sup 2} is achieved with 15 min of UV/ozone treatment; the improved adhesion energy is approximately 200% of that without treatment. The chemical modification of the graphene/copper interface is also characterized using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). - Highlights: • The adhesion energy of the graphene/copper interface improve by UV/ozone treatment. • A threshold amount of treatment time for adhesion improvement was found. • Copper oxide pellets provide additional bonds that improve the adhesion energy. • The binding between carbon and copper atoms is due to the bridges of oxygen atoms.

  18. Adhesion improvement of graphene/copper interface using UV/ozone treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The weak adhesion between graphene and its substrate is a potentially significant problem for graphene-based electronic devices. However, quantitative studies on adhesion improvement between graphene and its substrate using simple surface treatments have not yet been reported. In this study, we report the adhesion improvement of the graphene/copper interface using a UV/ozone treatment. The adhesion energy is measured directly using double cantilever beam fracture mechanics testing. A significantly improved adhesion energy of 2.10 ± 0.27 J/m2 is achieved with 15 min of UV/ozone treatment; the improved adhesion energy is approximately 200% of that without treatment. The chemical modification of the graphene/copper interface is also characterized using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). - Highlights: • The adhesion energy of the graphene/copper interface improve by UV/ozone treatment. • A threshold amount of treatment time for adhesion improvement was found. • Copper oxide pellets provide additional bonds that improve the adhesion energy. • The binding between carbon and copper atoms is due to the bridges of oxygen atoms

  19. Reactive calcium-phosphate-containing poly(ester-co-ether) methacrylate bone adhesives: chemical, mechanical and biological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Olsen, Irwin; Li, Haoying; Gellynck, Kris; Buxton, Paul G; Knowles, Jonathan C; Salih, Vehid; Young, Anne M

    2010-03-01

    A poly(propylene glycol-co-lactide) dimethacrylate adhesive with monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM)/beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) fillers in various levels has been investigated. Water sorption by the photo-polymerized materials catalyzed varying filler conversion to dicalcium phosphate (DCP). Polymer modulus was found to be enhanced upon raising total calcium phosphate content. With greater DCP levels, faster release of phosphate and calcium ions and improved buffering of polymer degradation products were observed. This could reduce the likelihood of pH-catalyzed bulk degradation and localized acid production and thereby may prevent adverse biological responses. Bone-like MG-63 cells were found to attach, spread and have normal morphology on both the polymer and composite surfaces. Moreover, composites implanted into chick embryo femurs became closely apposed to the host tissue and did not appear to induce adverse immunological reaction. The above results suggest that the new composite materials hold promise as clinical effective bone adhesives.

  20. The effect of lignin as a natural adhesive on the physico-mechanical properties of Vitis vinifera fiberboards

    OpenAIRE

    Camilo Mancera; Nour-Eddine El Mansouri; Fabiola Vilaseca; Francesc Ferrando; Joan Salvado

    2011-01-01

    Lignin was used as a natural adhesive to manufacture Vitis vinifera fiberboards. The fiberboards were produced at laboratory scale by adding powdered lignin to material that had previously been steam-exploded under optimized pretreatment and pressing conditions. The kraft lignin used was washed several times with an acidic solution to eliminate any contaminants and low molecular weight compounds. This research studied the effects of amounts of lignin ranging from 5% to 20% on the properties o...

  1. Enhancement of mechanical strength of particleboard using environmentally friendly pine (Pinus pinaster L.) tannin adhesives with cellulose nanofibers

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Juqing; Lu, Xiaoning; Zhou, Xiaojian; Chrusciel, Laurent; Deng, Yuhe; Zhou, Handong; Zhu, Shangwu; Brosse, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Context Condensed tannins have been successfully used as substitutes for phenol in the production of resins for wood products. However, the enhancement of the properties of tannin-based resins with nontoxic and cost effective additives is of great interest.• Methods In the present work, the performance enhancement of tannin-based particleboards with cellulose nanofibers was investigated.• Results In presence of 2 % of cellulose nanofibers, the viscosity of tannin-based adhesives and the inter...

  2. Glycated LDL increase VCAM-1 expression and secretion in endothelial cells and promote monocyte adhesion through mechanisms involving endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Laura; Sanda, Gabriela M; Deleanu, Mariana; Stancu, Camelia S; Sima, Anca V

    2016-06-01

    Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is a worldwide epidemic, and its atherosclerotic complications produce morbidity and mortality in affected patients. It is known that the vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) levels are increased in the sera of diabetic patients. Our aim was to investigate the impact of the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) in VCAM-1 expression and secretion in human endothelial cells (HEC) exposed to glycated low-density lipoproteins (gLDL). The results showed that 24 h incubation of HEC with gLDL induces (i) stimulation of VCAM-1 expression and secretion, determining increased monocyte adhesion to HEC; (ii) RAGE up-regulation and free cholesterol loading; (iii) ERS activation (increased eIF2α phosphorylation and CHOP mRNA levels, and decreased GRP78 protein expression); and (iv) oxidative stress [increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic unit gene expression]. Treatment of gLDL-exposed HEC with ERS inhibitors, salubrinal (Sal) and sodium phenylbutyrate (PBA), decreased intracellular ROS. Incubation of gLDL-exposed cells with the anti-oxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) reduced ERS, revealed by decreased eIF2α phosphorylation and CHOP gene expression and increased GRP78 expression, thus validating the interconnection between ERS and oxidative stress. Sal, PBA, NAC and inhibitors of p38 MAP kinase and NF-kB induced the decrease of VCAM-1 expression and of the ensuing monocyte adhesion induced by gLDL. In conclusion, in HEC, gLDL stimulate the expression of cellular VCAM-1, the secretion of soluble VCAM-1, and the adhesion of monocytes through mechanisms involving p38 MAP kinase and NF-kB signalling pathways activated by RAGE, ERS and oxidative stress, thus contributing to diabetic atherosclerosis. PMID:27206739

  3. Adhesion in hydrogel contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, J. R.; Jay, G. D.; Kim, K.-S.; Bothun, G. D.

    2016-05-01

    A generalized thermomechanical model for adhesion was developed to elucidate the mechanisms of dissipation within the viscoelastic bulk of a hyperelastic hydrogel. Results show that in addition to the expected energy release rate of interface formation, as well as the viscous flow dissipation, the bulk composition exhibits dissipation due to phase inhomogeneity morphological changes. The mixing thermodynamics of the matrix and solvent determines the dynamics of the phase inhomogeneities, which can enhance or disrupt adhesion. The model also accounts for the time-dependent behaviour. A parameter is proposed to discern the dominant dissipation mechanism in hydrogel contact detachment.

  4. Focal adhesions and cell-matrix interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1988-01-01

    Focal adhesions are areas of cell surfaces where specializations of cytoskeletal, membrane and extracellular components combine to produce stable cell-matrix interactions. The morphology of these adhesions and the components identified in them are discussed together with possible mechanisms...

  5. Evaluation of a sequential extraction process used for determining mercury binding mechanisms to coal combustion byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, James D; Biswas, Pratim; Giammar, Daniel E

    2007-07-01

    Leaching of mercury from coal combustion byproducts is a concern because of the toxicity of mercury. Leachability of mercury can be assessed by using sequential extraction procedures. Sequential extraction procedures are commonly used to determine the speciation and mobility of trace metals in solid samples and are designed to differentiate among metals bound by different mechanisms and to different solid phases. This study evaluated the selectivity and effectiveness of a sequential extraction process used to determine mercury binding mechanisms to various materials. A six-step sequential extraction process was applied to laboratory-synthesized materials with known mercury concentrations and binding mechanisms. These materials were calcite, hematite, goethite, and titanium dioxide. Fly ash from a full-scale power plant was also investigated. The concentrations of mercury were measured using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry, whereas the major elements were measured by ICP atomic emission spectrometry. The materials were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy. The sequential extraction procedure provided information about the solid phases with which mercury was associated in the solid sample. The procedure effectively extracted mercury from the target phases. The procedure was generally selective in extracting mercury. However, some steps in the procedure extracted mercury from nontarget phases, and others resulted in mercury redistribution. Iron from hematite and goethite was only leached in the reducible and residual extraction steps. Some mercury associated with goethite was extracted in the ion exchangeable step, whereas mercury associated with hematite was extracted almost entirely in the residual step. Calcium in calcite and mercury associated with calcite were primarily removed in the acid-soluble extraction step. Titanium in titanium dioxide and mercury adsorbed onto

  6. Role of dystrophins and utrophins in platelet adhesion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecedo, Doris; Mondragón, Ricardo; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Martínez-Pérez, Francisco; Martínez-Rojas, Dalila; Rendón, Alvaro

    2006-07-01

    Platelets are crucial at the site of vascular injury, adhering to the sub-endothelial matrix through receptors on their surface, leading to cell activation and aggregation to form a haemostatic plug. Platelets display focal adhesions as well as stress fibres to contract and facilitate expulsion of growth and pro-coagulant factors contained in the granules and to constrict the clot. The interaction of F-actin with different actin-binding proteins determines the properties and composition of the focal adhesions. Recently, we demonstrated the presence of dystrophin-associated protein complex corresponding to short dystrophin isoforms (Dp71d and Dp71) and the uthophin gene family (Up400 and Up71), which promote shape change, adhesion, aggregation, and granule centralisation. To elucidate participation of both complexes during the platelet adhesion process, their potential association with integrin beta-1 fraction and the focal adhesion system (alpha-actinin, vinculin and talin) was evaluated by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation assays. It was shown that the short dystrophin-associated protein complex participated in stress fibre assembly and in centralisation of cytoplasmic granules, while the utrophin-associated protein complex assembled and regulated focal adhesions. The simultaneous presence of dystrophin and utrophin complexes indicates complementary structural and signalling mechanisms to the actin network, improving the platelet haemostatic role.

  7. Probing ligand-binding modes and binding mechanisms of benzoxazole-based amide inhibitors with soluble epoxide hydrolase by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hang; Zhang, Ying; Li, Liang; Han, Ju-Guang

    2012-08-30

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) has become a new therapeutic target for treating a variety of human diseases. The inhibition of human sEH hydrolase activity was studied by molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation techniques. A set of six benzoxazole-based amide inhibitors binding to sEH has been studied through molecular docking, MD simulation, free energy calculations, and energy decomposition analysis. On the basis of molecular mechanics-generalized Born/surface area (MM-GB/SA) computation and normal-mode analysis (NMA), the obtained results indicate that the rank of calculated binding free energies (ΔΔGTOT) of these inhibitors is in excellent agreement with that of experimental bioactivity data (IC50). The correlation coefficient (r(2)) between the predicted ΔΔGTOT and IC50 is 0.88. van der Waals energies are the largest component of the total energies, and the entropy changes play an indispensable role in determining the ΔΔGTOT. Rational binding modes were discussed and determined by the docking results and binding free energies. The free energy decomposition of each residue reveals that the residue Trp334 dominates the most binding free energies among all residues and that the activities for these molecules to the sEH are not decided by hydrogen bonds or a certain residue but by the common effect of multiple side chains in the active site.

  8. Heparin-binding hemagglutinin adhesion of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and tuberculosis%结核分枝杆菌肝素结合血凝黏附素与结核病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂理会; 李传友

    2008-01-01

    结核分枝杆菌肝素结合血凝黏附素是一种表面蛋白,有3个功能结构域,其C末端在翻译后进行甲基化修饰,与其免疫特性相关.可结合硫酸化糖,可通过补体C3介导与巨噬细胞的结合,与上皮细胞结合在肺外结核发病中有重要作用.通过对其细胞免疫及体液免疫作用的研究发现,其在诊断中有较好的作用,在免疫预防及免疫治疗中有广阔的应用前景.%The heparin-binding hemagglutinin adhesion(HBHA) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)is a surface-expressed protein,which has three functional domains.It experiences post'translationally modification of lysine,proline and alanine residues at its carboxyl-terminal that is relative with its immune properties.HBHA can bind with sulfated glycoconj ugates such as heparin,and attach to mononuclear phagocytes by binding to human component C3. Its adhesion to epithelial cells is important to extrapulmonary tuberculosis.HBHA plays a provital role in diagnosis of tuberculosis by cellular immune combining humoral immune assay,and is a viable candidate for tuberculosis vaccine and immune therapy.

  9. Molecular Mechanism of Mot1, a TATA-binding Protein (TBP)-DNA Dissociating Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Ramya; True, Jason D; Auble, David T

    2016-07-22

    The essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATPase Mot1 globally regulates transcription by impacting the genomic distribution and activity of the TATA-binding protein (TBP). In vitro, Mot1 forms a ternary complex with TBP and DNA and can use ATP hydrolysis to dissociate the TBP-DNA complex. Prior work suggested an interaction between the ATPase domain and a functionally important segment of DNA flanking the TATA sequence. However, how ATP hydrolysis facilitates removal of TBP from DNA is not well understood, and several models have been proposed. To gain insight into the Mot1 mechanism, we dissected the role of the flanking DNA segment by biochemical analysis of complexes formed using DNAs with short single-stranded gaps. In parallel, we used a DNA tethered cleavage approach to map regions of Mot1 in proximity to the DNA under different conditions. Our results define non-equivalent roles for bases within a broad segment of flanking DNA required for Mot1 action. Moreover, we present biochemical evidence for two distinct conformations of the Mot1 ATPase, the detection of which can be modulated by ATP analogs as well as DNA sequence flanking the TATA sequence. We also show using purified complexes that Mot1 dissociation of a stable, high affinity TBP-DNA interaction is surprisingly inefficient, suggesting how other transcription factors that bind to TBP may compete with Mot1. Taken together, these results suggest that TBP-DNA affinity as well as other aspects of promoter sequence influence Mot1 function in vivo.

  10. Leveraging cross-species transcription factor binding site patterns: from diabetes risk loci to disease mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claussnitzer, Melina; Dankel, Simon N; Klocke, Bernward; Grallert, Harald; Glunk, Viktoria; Berulava, Tea; Lee, Heekyoung; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Fadista, Joao; Ehlers, Kerstin; Wahl, Simone; Hoffmann, Christoph; Qian, Kun; Rönn, Tina; Riess, Helene; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Bretschneider, Nancy; Schroeder, Timm; Skurk, Thomas; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Spieler, Derek; Klingenspor, Martin; Seifert, Martin; Kern, Michael J; Mejhert, Niklas; Dahlman, Ingrid; Hansson, Ola; Hauck, Stefanie M; Blüher, Matthias; Arner, Peter; Groop, Leif; Illig, Thomas; Suhre, Karsten; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Mellgren, Gunnar; Hauner, Hans; Laumen, Helmut

    2014-01-16

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed numerous risk loci associated with diverse diseases. However, identification of disease-causing variants within association loci remains a major challenge. Divergence in gene expression due to cis-regulatory variants in noncoding regions is central to disease susceptibility. We show that integrative computational analysis of phylogenetic conservation with a complexity assessment of co-occurring transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) can identify cis-regulatory variants and elucidate their mechanistic role in disease. Analysis of established type 2 diabetes risk loci revealed a striking clustering of distinct homeobox TFBS. We identified the PRRX1 homeobox factor as a repressor of PPARG2 expression in adipose cells and demonstrate its adverse effect on lipid metabolism and systemic insulin sensitivity, dependent on the rs4684847 risk allele that triggers PRRX1 binding. Thus, cross-species conservation analysis at the level of co-occurring TFBS provides a valuable contribution to the translation of genetic association signals to disease-related molecular mechanisms. PMID:24439387

  11. Binding mechanism of sulfur and dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile in sulfur/polymer composite cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, The Nam Long; Ghaznavi, Mahmoudreza; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Yongguang; Konarov, Aishuak; Sadhu, Mikhail; Tangirala, Ravichandra; Chen, P.

    2013-11-01

    A composite consisting of sulfur/dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile is one of the most promising cathode materials for use in rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries. However, the reported sulfur contents have been low, less than 50 wt%, which compromise the intrinsic high specific capacity and energy of elemental sulfur and hence decrease significantly the specific energy of the composite. To identify the potential to further increase the sulfur content, we elucidate the binding mechanism of sulfur and polyacrylonitrile in their composite. The heat treatment experiments at varying timespans with excess sulfur showed a constancy of sulfur content after a critical length of timespan, indicating the saturation of sulfur in the structure of dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile. Based on molecular structure and size consideration, it is proposed that the binding involves the formation of an 8 membered ring of sulfur embedded between 4 heterocyclic rings of dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile. From this model and experimental results, we show that there exists an upper limit of sulfur content in the sulfur/dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile composite at 56 wt%.

  12. Mechanical stimulation of C2C12 cells increases m-calpain expression, focal adhesion plaque protein degradation and cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossi, Alberto; Lawson, Moira Ann

    Abstract Mechanical stimulation of C2C12 cells increases m-calpain expression, focal adhesion plaque protein degradation and cell differentiation. A. Grossi, M. A. Lawson; Department of Food Science, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg C, Denmark The process of muscle...... development and growth is a complex sequence of events whereby muscle cells respond to a number of stimuli in order to form organised muscle tissue. Increase in muscle mass is greatly influenced by the rate of skeletal muscle protein synthesis and degradation, processes that can be altered by mechanical...... forces. Stretch- or load-induced signaling is now beginning to be understood as a factor which affects the mass and phenotype of muscles as well as the expression of a number of proteins within muscle cells. Use of magnetic field to produce mechanical forces to stimulate cell populations has been well...

  13. Talin-KANK1 interaction controls the recruitment of cortical microtubule stabilizing complexes to focal adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchet, Benjamin P; Gough, Rosemarie E; Ammon, York-Christoph; van de Willige, Dieudonnée; Post, Harm; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Altelaar, AF Maarten; Heck, Albert JR; Goult, Benjamin T; Akhmanova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The cross-talk between dynamic microtubules and integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix plays a crucial role in cell polarity and migration. Microtubules regulate the turnover of adhesion sites, and, in turn, focal adhesions promote the cortical microtubule capture and stabilization in their vicinity, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we show that cortical microtubule stabilization sites containing CLASPs, KIF21A, LL5β and liprins are recruited to focal adhesions by the adaptor protein KANK1, which directly interacts with the major adhesion component, talin. Structural studies showed that the conserved KN domain in KANK1 binds to the talin rod domain R7. Perturbation of this interaction, including a single point mutation in talin, which disrupts KANK1 binding but not the talin function in adhesion, abrogates the association of microtubule-stabilizing complexes with focal adhesions. We propose that the talin-KANK1 interaction links the two macromolecular assemblies that control cortical attachment of actin fibers and microtubules. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18124.001 PMID:27410476

  14. The effects on tensile, shear, and adhesive mechanical properties when recycled epoxy/fiberglass is used as an alternative for glass microballoons in fiberglass foam core sandwiches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dru Matthew

    The problem of this study was to determine whether fiberglass foam core sandwiches made with recycled epoxy/fiberglass have equal or better flatwise tension, shear, and peel (adhesion) mechanical properties when compared with composite sandwiches made with industry standard glass microballoons. Recycling epoxy/fiberglass could save money by: (1) reusing cured composite materials, (2) consuming less virgin composite materials, (3) spending less on transportation and disposing of unusable composites, and (4) possibly enabling companies to sell their recycled composite powder to other manufacturers. This study used three mechanical property tests, which included: flatwise tensile test, shear test, and peel (adhesion) test. Each test used 300 samples for a combined total of 900 sandwich test samples for this study. A factorial design with three independent variables was used. The first variable, filler type, had three levels: no filler, microballoon filler, and recycled epoxy/fiberglass filler. The second variable, foam density, had four levels: 3 lb/ft³, 4 lb/ft³, 5 lb/ft³, and 6 lb/ft³. The third variable, filler percentage ratio, had eight levels: 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, and 70%. The results of this study revealed two primary conclusions. The first conclusion was that sandwich test panels produced with recycled epoxy/fiberglass powder were equal or significantly better in tensile, shear, and peel (adhesion) strength than sandwiches produced with hollow glass microballoons. The second conclusion was that sandwich test panels produced with recycled epoxy/fiberglass powder were equal or significantly lighter in weight than sandwiches produced with hollow glass microballoons.

  15. Measurement of the mechanical adhesion between a single-walled carbon nanotube and a silicon dioxide substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Jed; Minot, Ethan; McEuen, Paul; Davis, Robert

    2003-10-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes were grown over a lithographically defined set of trenches, 60 nm deep and 300 nm wide on a pitch of 500 nm. After finding a nanotube that crossed three or more trenches, we used an atomic force microscope (AFM) to measure the amount of force required to make the carbon nanotube slip along the silicon dioxide trench tops. This was done by pushing down on the tube with the AFM probe until slip was observed in the force-distance curve. This measurement allowed us to determine the adhesion force per unit length between a nanotube and a silicon dioxide substrate.

  16. Cloning of a soluble isoform of the SgIGSF adhesion molecule that binds the extracellular domain of the membrane-bound isoform.

    OpenAIRE

    Koma, Yu-ichiro; Ito, Akihiko; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Watabe, Kenji; OKADA, Morihito; Tsubota, Noriaki; Iseki, Shoichi; Kitamura, Yukihiko

    2004-01-01

    SgIGSF (spermatogenic immunoglobulin superfamily) is a recently identified intercellular adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily. In a mast-cell cDNA library, we found a clone that resulted from the retention of intron 7 within the mature SgIGSF message. This clone was predicted to encode a soluble isoform of SgIGSF (sSgIGSF) with 336 amino-acid residues because its open reading frame ended just before the transmembrane domain. We constructed a plasmid expressing sSgIGSF fused to ...

  17. Mechanisms of in vivo binding site selection of the hematopoietic master transcription factor PU.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thu-Hang; Minderjahn, Julia; Schmidl, Christian; Hoffmeister, Helen; Schmidhofer, Sandra; Chen, Wei; Längst, Gernot; Benner, Christopher; Rehli, Michael

    2013-07-01

    The transcription factor PU.1 is crucial for the development of many hematopoietic lineages and its binding patterns significantly change during differentiation processes. However, the 'rules' for binding or not-binding of potential binding sites are only partially understood. To unveil basic characteristics of PU.1 binding site selection in different cell types, we studied the binding properties of PU.1 during human macrophage differentiation. Using in vivo and in vitro binding assays, as well as computational prediction, we show that PU.1 selects its binding sites primarily based on sequence affinity, which results in the frequent autonomous binding of high affinity sites in DNase I inaccessible regions (25-45% of all occupied sites). Increasing PU.1 concentrations and the availability of cooperative transcription factor interactions during lineage differentiation both decrease affinity thresholds for in vivo binding and fine-tune cell type-specific PU.1 binding, which seems to be largely independent of DNA methylation. Occupied sites were predominantly detected in active chromatin domains, which are characterized by higher densities of PU.1 recognition sites and neighboring motifs for cooperative transcription factors. Our study supports a model of PU.1 binding control that involves motif-binding affinity, PU.1 concentration, cooperativeness with neighboring transcription factor sites and chromatin domain accessibility, which likely applies to all PU.1 expressing cells.

  18. 变异链球菌黏附机制的研究进展%Research progress on Streptococcus mutans adhesion mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨隆强; 周乔

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans (S.mutans) is one of the most important pathogens in dental caries. In recent years, the studies on the mechanism of S. mutans adhesion focused on the molecular and genetic level, laying the foundation for the further study of dental caries prevention and treatment. The paper mainly reviews mechanism of adhesion and associated regulating factors of S. mutans.%变异链球菌对牙面的黏附,是形成牙菌斑的前提和致龋的重要条件.分子生物学技术的不断进步使针对变异链球菌黏附机制的研究进入了分子水平,旨在更好地诠释变异链球菌在致龋过程中的作用,为龋病的防治奠定基础.本文就黏附、变异链球菌表面成分与黏附的关系、影响变异链球菌黏附的环境因素、变异链球菌黏附研究的前景展望等作一综述.

  19. Protein-ligand binding affinities from large-scale quantum mechanical simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The accurate prediction of protein-drug binding affinities is a major aim of computational drug optimisation and development. A quantitative measure of binding affinity is provided by the free energy of binding, and such calculations typically require extensive configurational sampling of entities such as proteins with thousands of atoms. Current binding free energy methods use force fields to perform the configurational sampling and to compute interaction energies. Due to the empirical natur...

  20. Decipher the mechanisms of protein conformational changes induced by nucleotide binding through free-energy landscape analysis: ATP binding to Hsp70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Nicolaï

    Full Text Available ATP regulates the function of many proteins in the cell by transducing its binding and hydrolysis energies into protein conformational changes by mechanisms which are challenging to identify at the atomic scale. Based on molecular dynamics (MD simulations, a method is proposed to analyze the structural changes induced by ATP binding to a protein by computing the effective free-energy landscape (FEL of a subset of its coordinates along its amino-acid sequence. The method is applied to characterize the mechanism by which the binding of ATP to the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD of Hsp70 propagates a signal to its substrate-binding domain (SBD. Unbiased MD simulations were performed for Hsp70-DnaK chaperone in nucleotide-free, ADP-bound and ATP-bound states. The simulations revealed that the SBD does not interact with the NBD for DnaK in its nucleotide-free and ADP-bound states whereas the docking of the SBD was found in the ATP-bound state. The docked state induced by ATP binding found in MD is an intermediate state between the initial nucleotide-free and final ATP-bound states of Hsp70. The analysis of the FEL projected along the amino-acid sequence permitted to identify a subset of 27 protein internal coordinates corresponding to a network of 91 key residues involved in the conformational change induced by ATP binding. Among the 91 residues, 26 are identified for the first time, whereas the others were shown relevant for the allosteric communication of Hsp70 s in several experiments and bioinformatics analysis. The FEL analysis revealed also the origin of the ATP-induced structural modifications of the SBD recently measured by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. The pathway between the nucleotide-free and the intermediate state of DnaK was extracted by applying principal component analysis to the subset of internal coordinates describing the transition. The methodology proposed is general and could be applied to analyze allosteric communication in

  1. Molecular simulations of aromatase reveal new insights into the mechanism of ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jiho; Czapla, Luke; Amaro, Rommie E

    2013-08-26

    CYP19A1, also known as aromatase or estrogen synthetase, is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of estrogens from their corresponding androgens. Several clinically used breast cancer therapies target aromatase. In this work, explicitly solvated all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of aromatase with a model of the lipid bilayer and the transmembrane helix are performed. The dynamics of aromatase and the role of titration of an important amino acid residue involved in aromatization of androgens are investigated via two 250-ns long simulations. One simulation treats the protonated form of the catalytic aspartate 309, which appears more consistent with crystallographic data for the active site, while the simulation of the deprotonated form shows some notable conformational shifts. Ensemble-based computational solvent mapping experiments indicate possible novel druggable binding sites that could be utilized by next-generation inhibitors. In addition, the effects of protonation on the ligand positioning and channel dynamics are investigated using geometrical models that estimate the opening width of critical channels. Significant differences in channel dynamics between the protonated and deprotonated trajectories are exhibited, suggesting that the mechanism for substrate and product entry and the aromatization process may be coupled to a "locking" mechanism and channel opening. Our results may be particularly relevant in the design of novel drugs, which may be useful therapeutic treatments of cancers such as those of the breast and prostate. PMID:23927370

  2. Binding of Divalent Cations to Polygalacturonate: A Mechanism Driven by the Hydration Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Uyen T D; Lerbret, Adrien; Neiers, Fabrice; Chambin, Odile; Assifaoui, Ali

    2016-02-11

    We have investigated the interactions between polygalacturonate (polyGal) and four divalent cations (M(2+) = Ba(2+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+)) that differ in size and affinity for water. Our results evidence that M(2+)-polyGal interactions are intimately linked to the affinity of M(2+) for water. Mg(2+) interacts so strongly with water that it remains weakly bound to polyGal (polycondensation) by sharing water molecules from its first coordination shell with the carboxylate groups of polyGal. In contrast, the other cations form transient ionic pairs with polyGal by releasing preferentially one water molecule (for Zn(2+)) or two (for Ca(2+) and Ba(2+)), which corresponds to monodentate and bidentate binding modes with carboxylates, respectively. The mechanism for the binding of these three divalent cations to polyGal can be described by two steps: (i) monocomplexation and formation of point-like cross-links between polyGal chains (at low M(2+)/Gal molar ratios, R) and (ii) dimerization (at higher R). The threshold molar ratio, R*, between these two steps depends on the nature of divalent cations and is lower for calcium ions (R* barium ions (R* > 0.3). This difference may be explained by the intermediate affinity of Ca(2+) for water with respect to those of Zn(2+) and Ba(2+), which may induce the formation of cross-links of intermediate flexibility. By comparison, the lower and higher flexibilities of the cross-links formed by Zn(2+) and Ba(2+), respectively, may shift the formation of dimers to higher molar ratios (R*). PMID:26771109

  3. NMr studies of the AMP binding site and mechanism of adenylate kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuby, S.A.; Fry, D.C.; Mildvan, A.S.

    1986-05-01

    The authors recently located by NMR the MgATP binding site on adenylate kinase correcting the proposed location for this site based on X-ray studies of the binding of salicylate. To determine the conformation and location of the other substrate, they have determined distances from Cr/sup 3 +/ AMPPCP to 6 protons and to the phosphorus atom of AMP on adenylate kinase using the paramagnetic-probe-T/sub 1/ method. They have also used time-dependent NOEs to measure five interproton distances on AMP, permitting evaluation of the conformation of enzyme-bound AMP and its position with respect to metal-ATP. Enzyme-bound AMP exhibits a high-anti glycosyl torsional angle (X = 110/sup 0/), a 3'-endo sugar pucker (delta = 105/sup 0/), and a gauche-trans orientation about the C/sub 4/'-C/sub 5/' bond (..gamma.. = 180/sup 0/). The distance from Cr/sup 3 +/ to the phosphorus of AMP is 6.4 +/- 0.3 A, indicating a reaction coordinate distance of greater than or equal to A which is consistent with an associative SN2 mechanism for the phosphoryl transfer. Ten intermolecular NOEs, from protons of the enzyme to those of AMP were detected. These constraints, together with the conformation of AMP and the X-ray structure of the enzyme, suggest proximity (less than or equal to A) of AMP to leu 116, arg 171, val 173, gln 185, thr 188, and asp 191.

  4. Syndecan-4 and focal adhesion function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    2001-01-01

    Two groups have now reported the viability of mice that lack syndecan-4. These mice have wound healing/angiogenesis problems, and fibroblasts from these animals differ in adhesion and migration from normal. This is consistent with recent in vitro data indicating a need for signaling via syndecan-4...... for focal adhesion formation, and reports that overexpression of proteins that bind syndecan-4 can modify cell adhesion and migration....

  5. Computational Study of the Binding Mechanism of Actin-Depolymerizing Factor 1 with Actin in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Wang, Xue; Dong, Chun-Hai; Yang, Jian Ming; Yao, Xiao Jun

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a highly conserved protein. It plays important roles in cellular function and exists either in the monomeric (G-actin) or polymeric form (F-actin). Members of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family bind to both G-actin and F-actin and play vital roles in actin dynamics by manipulating the rates of filament polymerization and depolymerization. It has been reported that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants of actin-depolymerizing factor 1 (ADF1) in Arabidopsis thaliana decreased the binding affinity of ADF for the actin monomer. To investigate the binding mechanism and dynamic behavior of the ADF1-actin complex, we constructed a homology model of the AtADF1-actin complex based on the crystal structure of AtADF1 and the twinfilin C-terminal ADF-H domain in a complex with a mouse actin monomer. The model was then refined for subsequent molecular dynamics simulations. Increased binding energy of the mutated system was observed using the Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area and Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-GB/PBSA) methods. To determine the residues that make decisive contributions to the ADF1 actin-binding affinity, per-residue decomposition and computational alanine scanning analyses were performed, which provided more detailed information on the binding mechanism. Root-mean-square fluctuation and principal component analyses confirmed that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants induced an increased conformational flexibility. The comprehensive molecular insight gained from this study is of great importance for understanding the binding mechanism of ADF1 and G-actin. PMID:27414648

  6. The formation mechanism and the binding energy of the body-centred regular tetrahedral structure of He+5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李萍; 熊勇; 芶清泉; 张建平

    2002-01-01

    We propose the formation mechanism of the body-centred regular tetrahedral structure of the He+5 cluster. The total energy curve for this structure has been calculated by using a modified arrangement channel quantum mechanics method. The result shows that a minimal energy of -13.9106 a.u. occurs at a separation of 1.14a0 between the nucleus at the centre and nuclei at the apexes. Therefore we obtain the binding energy of 0.5202 a.u. for this structure. This means that the He+5 cluster may be stable with a high binding energy in a body-centred regular tetrahedral structure.

  7. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... is the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental parameters......, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to significantly...

  8. The mechanism of enterprise-university-esearch institute binding to promote higher education and protection measures --.For example Tianiin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Zheng

    2012-01-01

    The Mechanism of Enterprise-university-research institute (EUR.I) Binding is a market-oriented strategic alliance as the government and industry associations and intermediary organs for auxiliary forces complement, in which enterprises play the leading role and which combines the efforts of enterprises, universities and research institutes. It is the advanced development of enterprise- university-research institute binding cooperation. The development of technology and social economy continue to offer new challenges for higher education. Under this situation, many universities in Tianjin area actively develop their superiority and cooperate with enterprise and research department, trying their best to explore various enterprise- university-research institute binding ways to quicken the pace of technology innovation and transfer in order to make the school's track wider and wider. According to the situation of Tianjin area, this text introduces the cases of mechanism of enterprise-university- research binding about this area' s universities and comes up with safeguard measures on the base of analyzing other areas' mechanism of enterprise-university-~esearch institute binding, combining with educational economy and management theory.

  9. 壁虎粘附微观力学机制的仿生研究进展%PROGRESS IN THE BIONIC STUDY ON GECKO'S MICRO-ADHESION MECHANISM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈少华; 志龙

    2012-01-01

    A class of animals possesses special climbing abilities in nature, which attracts enormous academic interests. To investigate the macro- and micro-mechanisms of such animals' adhesion can not only develop relevant surface/interface mechanics, but also provide novel ideas for the design of advanced adhesive materials and appropriate adhesive system for a micro-climbing robot, and shed lights on solving methods for adhesive failure problems in MEMS/NEMS and AFM. Experiments have found that the adhesive system on gecko's foot is hierarchical, which will produce strong adhesion. There are millions of setae on a gecko's foot and each seta will branch into hundreds of spatulae. The spatula is the smallest adhesive structure in a gecko's foot, which is about 200nm in width and length, about 5nm in thickness. The adhesive behavior of a spatula on a surface looks like that of a finite-sized nano-film. The basic principle of the adhesion is due to Van Der Waals force between two surfaces. Plenty of spatulae will cause the adhesion force large enough to support the weight of a gecko. In the present paper, considering the real shape of the smallest adhesive structure, which is similar to a nano-film with a finite length, we present an overview of the main influence factors of the micro-adhesion mechanism of gecko's spatula, including the effects of adhesion length, thickness and peeling angles of a finite nano-film on the adhesion force, the effects of surface roughness and environmental humidity on surface/interface adhesion. Experimental investigations as well as theoretical and numerical studies are also reviewed. Finally, possible challenges and future development of the biomimetic adhesive mechanics are proposed and prospected.%本文针对壁虎粘附系统最小单元的真实形状, 类似于有限尺寸纳米薄膜的铲状纤维, 综述了对其微观粘附力学机制主要影响因素的多个研究, 主要考虑了有限尺寸纳米薄膜长度、厚度

  10. Evaluation of mechanism of non-thermal plasma effect on the surface of polypropylene films for enhancement of adhesive and hemo compatible properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navaneetha Pandiyaraj, K., E-mail: dr.knpr@gmail.com [Surface Engineering Laboratory, Department of Physics, Sri Shakthi Institute of Engineering and Technology, L& T by pass, Chinniyam Palayam (post), Coimbatore-641062 (India); Deshmukh, R.R. [Department of Physics, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai-400 019 (India); Arunkumar, A.; Ramkumar, M.C. [Surface Engineering Laboratory, Department of Physics, Sri Shakthi Institute of Engineering and Technology, L& T by pass, Chinniyam Palayam (post), Coimbatore-641062 (India); Ruzybayev, I.; Ismat Shah, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, 208 Dupont Hall, Newark (United States); Su, Pi-Guey [Department of Chemistry, Chinese Culture University, Taipei 111, Taiwan (China); Periayah, Mercy Halleluyah; Halim, A.S. [School of Medical Sciences, Health Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan (Malaysia)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Investigated the mechanism of effect of various gaseous plasma treatments on the surface properties of Polypropylene (PP) films. • The improvement in surface energy is basically due to the incorporation of polar functional groups onto the PP films. • The extent of surface modification and hydrophobic recovery depends upon the type of plasma forming gas. • Due to the significant morphological and chemical changes induced by the gaseous plasma treatment, improved the blood compatibility as well as adhesive strength of the PP films. - Abstract: The hydro-carbon based polymers have attracted attention of scientists for its use in bio-medical field as various implants due to inherent flexibility. However, they have poor surface properties; particularly they have low surface energy (SE). Hence, blood components (platelets, blood proteins, etc.)-polymer surface interaction is the major concern when it comes in contact with blood. Thus, surface modification is required to develop the perfect antithrombogenic property without affecting the materials bulk. The present study describes the improvement in adhesive and blood compatible properties of polypropylene (PP) by low temperature (non-thermal) plasma of various gases such as Ar, O{sub 2}, air and Ar + O{sub 2} for biomedical applications. The changes in surface morphological, chemical and hydrophilic modification induced by the gaseous plasma treatment were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and contact angle measurements, respectively. Moreover, the stability of plasma effect was also studied for the different storage conditions. Variation in adhesive strength of the plasma treated PP film was studied by T-Peel and Lap-Shear strength tests. The blood compatibility of the surface modified PP films was investigated by in vitro analysis. It was found that gaseous plasma treatment improved the blood compatibility

  11. Evaluation of mechanism of non-thermal plasma effect on the surface of polypropylene films for enhancement of adhesive and hemo compatible properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Investigated the mechanism of effect of various gaseous plasma treatments on the surface properties of Polypropylene (PP) films. • The improvement in surface energy is basically due to the incorporation of polar functional groups onto the PP films. • The extent of surface modification and hydrophobic recovery depends upon the type of plasma forming gas. • Due to the significant morphological and chemical changes induced by the gaseous plasma treatment, improved the blood compatibility as well as adhesive strength of the PP films. - Abstract: The hydro-carbon based polymers have attracted attention of scientists for its use in bio-medical field as various implants due to inherent flexibility. However, they have poor surface properties; particularly they have low surface energy (SE). Hence, blood components (platelets, blood proteins, etc.)-polymer surface interaction is the major concern when it comes in contact with blood. Thus, surface modification is required to develop the perfect antithrombogenic property without affecting the materials bulk. The present study describes the improvement in adhesive and blood compatible properties of polypropylene (PP) by low temperature (non-thermal) plasma of various gases such as Ar, O2, air and Ar + O2 for biomedical applications. The changes in surface morphological, chemical and hydrophilic modification induced by the gaseous plasma treatment were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and contact angle measurements, respectively. Moreover, the stability of plasma effect was also studied for the different storage conditions. Variation in adhesive strength of the plasma treated PP film was studied by T-Peel and Lap-Shear strength tests. The blood compatibility of the surface modified PP films was investigated by in vitro analysis. It was found that gaseous plasma treatment improved the blood compatibility as well as

  12. Glycan involvement in the adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautto, Liisa; Nguyen-Khuong, Terry; Everest-Dass, Arun; Leong, Andrea; Zhao, Zhenjun; Willcox, Mark D P; Packer, Nicolle H; Peterson, Robyn

    2016-04-01

    The human eye is constantly bathed by tears, which protect the ocular surface via a variety of mechanisms. The O-linked glycans of tear mucins have long been considered to play a role in binding to pathogens and facilitating their removal in the tear flow. Other conjugated glycans in tears could similarly contribute to pathogen binding and removal but have received less attention. In the work presented here we assessed the contribution of glycan moieties, in particular the protein attached N-glycans, presented by the broad complement of tear proteins to the adhesion of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a leading cause of microbial keratitis and ulceration of the cornea. Our adhesion assay involved immobilising the macromolecular components of tears into the wells of a polyvinyl difluoride (PVDF) microtitre filter plate and probing the binding of fluorescently labelled bacteria. Three P. aeruginosa strains were studied: a cytotoxic strain (6206) and an invasive strain (6294) from eye infections, and an invasive strain (320) from a urinary tract infection (UTI). The ocular isolates adhered two to three times more to human tears than to human saliva or porcine gastric mucin, suggesting ocular niche-specific adaptation. Support for the role of the N-glycans carried by human tear proteins in the binding and removal of P. aeruginosa from the eye was shown by: 1) pre-incubation of the bacteria with free component sugars, galactose, mannose, fucose and sialyl lactose (or combination thereof) inhibiting adhesion of all the P. aeruginosa strains to the immobilised tear proteins, with the greatest inhibition of binding of the ocular cytotoxic 6206 and least for the invasive 6294 strain; 2) pre-incubation of the bacteria with N-glycans released from the commercially available human milk lactoferrin, an abundant protein that carries N-linked glycans in tears, inhibiting the adhesion to tears of the ocular bacteria by up to 70%, which was significantly more

  13. Cell adhesion during bullet motion in capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishida, Shunichi; Omori, Toshihiro; Kamm, Roger D; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-08-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of cell adhesion in capillaries whose diameter is comparable to or smaller than that of the cell. In contrast to a large number of previous efforts on leukocyte and tumor cell rolling, much is still unknown about cell motion in capillaries. The solid and fluid mechanics of a cell in flow was coupled with a slip bond model of ligand-receptor interactions. When the size of a capillary was reduced, the cell always transitioned to "bullet-like" motion, with a consequent decrease in the velocity of the cell. A state diagram was obtained for various values of capillary diameter and receptor density. We found that bullet motion enables firm adhesion of a cell to the capillary wall even for a weak ligand-receptor binding. We also quantified effects of various parameters, including the dissociation rate constant, the spring constant, and the reactive compliance on the characteristics of cell motion. Our results suggest that even under the interaction between P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and P-selectin, which is mainly responsible for leukocyte rolling, a cell is able to show firm adhesion in a small capillary. These findings may help in understanding such phenomena as leukocyte plugging and cancer metastasis.

  14. Dominant Alcohol-Protein Interaction via Hydration-Enabled Enthalpy-Driven Binding Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yuan; Kleinhammes, Alfred; Tang, Pei; Xu, Yan; Wu, Yue

    2015-04-30

    Water plays an important role in weak associations of small drug molecules with proteins. Intense focus has been on binding-induced structural changes in the water network surrounding protein binding sites, especially their contributions to binding thermodynamics. However, water is also tightly coupled to protein conformations and dynamics, and so far little is known about the influence of water-protein interactions on ligand binding. Alcohols are a type of low-affinity drugs, and it remains unclear how water affects alcohol-protein interactions. Here, we present alcohol adsorption isotherms under controlled protein hydration using in situ NMR detection. As functions of hydration level, Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of binding were determined from the temperature dependence of isotherms. Two types of alcohol binding were found. The dominant type is low-affinity nonspecific binding, which is strongly dependent on temperature and the level of hydration. At low hydration levels, this nonspecific binding only occurs above a threshold of alcohol vapor pressure. An increased hydration level reduces this threshold, with it finally disappearing at a hydration level of h ≈ 0.2 (g water/g protein), gradually shifting alcohol binding from an entropy-driven to an enthalpy-driven process. Water at charged and polar groups on the protein surface was found to be particularly important in enabling this binding. Although further increase in hydration has smaller effects on the changes of binding enthalpy and entropy, it results in a significant negative change in Gibbs free energy due to unmatched enthalpy-entropy compensation. These results show the crucial role of water-protein interplay in alcohol binding.

  15. Unfolding mechanism of thrombin-binding aptamer revealed by molecular dynamics simulation and Markov State Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaojun; Zhang, Liyun; Xiao, Xiuchan; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Guo, Yanzhi; Yu, Xinyan; Pu, Xuemei; Li, Menglong

    2016-04-01

    Thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) with the sequence 5‧GGTTGGTGTGGTTGG3‧ could fold into G-quadruplex, which correlates with functionally important genomic regionsis. However, unfolding mechanism involved in the structural stability of G-quadruplex has not been satisfactorily elucidated on experiments so far. Herein, we studied the unfolding pathway of TBA by a combination of molecular dynamics simulation (MD) and Markov State Model (MSM). Our results revealed that the unfolding of TBA is not a simple two-state process but proceeds along multiple pathways with multistate intermediates. One high flux confirms some observations from NMR experiment. Another high flux exhibits a different and simpler unfolding pathway with less intermediates. Two important intermediate states were identified. One is similar to the G-triplex reported in the folding of G-quadruplex, but lack of H-bonding between guanines in the upper plane. More importantly, another intermediate state acting as a connector to link the folding region and the unfolding one, was the first time identified, which exhibits higher population and stability than the G-triplex-like intermediate. These results will provide valuable information for extending our understanding the folding landscape of G-quadruplex formation.

  16. NMR studies of the AMP-binding site and mechanism of adenylate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1987-03-24

    NMR has previously been used to determine the conformation of enzyme-bound MgATP and to locate the MgATP-binding site on adenylate kinase [Fry, D. C., Kuby, S. A., & Mildvan, A. S. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 4680-4694]. To determine the conformation and location of the other substrate, AMP, distances have been measured from Cr3+AMPPCP, a linear competitive inhibitor with respect to MgATP, to six protons and to the phosphorus atom of AMP on adenylate kinase, with the paramagnetic probe-T1 method. Time-dependent nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) have been used to measure five interproton distances on enzyme-bound AMP. These distances were used to determine the conformation of bound AMP in addition to its position with respect to metal-ATP. Enzyme-bound AMP exhibits a high anti-glycosyl torsional angle (chi = 110 +/- 10 degrees), a 3'-endo,2'-exo ribose pucker (delta = 105 +/- 10 degrees), and gauche-trans orientations about the C4'-C5' bond (gamma = 180 +/- 10 degrees) and the C5'-O5' bond (beta = 170 +/- 20 degrees). The distance from Cr3+ to the phosphorus of AMP is 5.9 +/- 0.3 A, indicating a reaction coordinate distance of approximately 3 A, which is consistent with an associative SN2 mechanism for the phosphoryl transfer. Ten intermolecular NOEs, from protons of the enzyme to those of AMP, were detected, indicating the proximity of at least three hydrophobic amino acids to bound AMP. These constraints, together with the conformation of AMP and the intersubstrate distances, were used to position AMP into the X-ray structure of adenylate kinase. The AMP binding site is found to be near (less than or equal to 4 A from) Leu-116, Arg-171, Val-173, Val-182, and Leu-190; all of these residues have been found to be invariant in muscle-type rabbit, calf, human, porcine [Kuby, S. A., Palmieri, R. H., Frischat, A., Fischer, A. H., Wu, L. H., Maland, L., & Manship, M. (1984) Biochemistry 23, 2393-2399], and chicken adenylate kinase [Kishi, F., Maruyama, M., Tanizawa, Y

  17. Molecular mechanisms involved in TFF3 peptide-mediated modulation of the E-cadherin/catenin cell adhesion complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer zum Büschenfelde, Dirk; Hoschützky, Heinz; Tauber, Rudolf; Huber, Otmar

    2004-05-01

    TFF3 is a member of the TFF-domain peptide family which is constitutively expressed in mucous epithelial tissues where it acts as a motogenic factor and plays an important role during epithelial restitution after wounding and during inflammation. In contrast to these beneficial functions, TFFs were also reported to be involved in cell scattering and tumor invasion. These changes in epithelial cell morphology and motility are associated with a modulation of cell contacts. In this respect, we here investigated the E-cadherin/catenin cell adhesion complex in FLAG-hTFF3-transfected HT29/B6 and MDCK cells. In hTFF3-transfected cells the amount of E-cadherin is reduced with a concomitant reduction of alpha- and beta-catenin levels. On one hand, E-cadherin expression is lowered at the transcriptional level as shown by multiplex RT-PCR analysis. This decrease does not depend on differences in the promoter methylation status as shown by methylation-specific PCR. On the other hand, pulse-chase experiments showed a reduction in the E-cadherin half-life in hTFF3-transfected cells reflecting increased E-cadherin degradation. In summary, hTFF3 induces transcriptional and posttranslational processes resulting in a modulation of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts that may play an important role in the paradoxical benefical and pathogenic function of TFF peptides.

  18. Adhesion and multi-materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhesion is a multidisciplinary science relevant to many practical fields. The main application of adhesion is bonding by adhesives. This technique is widely used in the industrial world and more specifically in the advanced technical domains. Adhesion is also involved in multi-component materials such as coatings, multilayer materials, polymer blends, composite materials... The multidisciplinary aspect of adhesion is well demonstrated by considering the wide variety of concepts, models and theories proposed for its description. An example of the adhesion between a fiber and a matrix in a composite material will lead to a general model relating the molecular properties of the interface to its capacity of stress transfer and hence to the macroscopic mechanical properties of the composite. This relationship is valid whatever the fiber (glass, carbon, polymeric) or the polymer matrix (thermoplastics, thermosetting). Any deviation from this model can be attributed to the existence of an interfacial zone or interphase exhibiting properties, mainly mechanical properties, different from the bulk matrix. Two examples are examined: the first one deals with the creation of a trans crystalline interphase in a semi-crystalline thermoplastic matrix and the second one is concerned with the formation of a pseudo glassy interphase in an elastomer matrix. These examples stress the need for complementary approaches in the understanding of adhesion phenomena at different levels of knowledge, from molecular to macroscopic. They also show how important it is to understand the mechanisms of formation of inter phases in order to be able to master the performance of multicomponent materials. (Author)

  19. Mechanical stimuli on C2C12 myoblasts affect myoblast differentiation, focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation and galectin-1 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossi, Alberto Blak; Lametsch, Rene; Karlsson, Anders H;

    2011-01-01

    to specific receptors on the cell surface. We showed that mechanical stimuli promote an increase of FAK phosphorylation. In order to further shed light in the process of myoblast induced differentiation by mechanical stimuli, we performed a proteomic analysis. Thirteen proteins were found to be affected...... by mechanical stimulation including Galectin-1, Annexin III, and RhoGDI. In this study we demonstrate how the combination of this method of mechanical stimuli and proteomic analysis can be a powerful tool to detect proteins that are potentially interacting in biochemical pathways or complex cellular mechanisms...... during the process of myoblast differentiation. We determined an increase in expression and changes in cellular localization of Galectin-1, in mechanically stimulated myoblasts. A potential involvement of Galectin-1 in myoblast differentiation is presented....

  20. Development of a Surface Plasmon Resonance Assay for the Characterization of Small-Molecule Binding Kinetics and Mechanism of Binding to Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poda, Suresh B; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Nachane, Ruta; Menon, Veena; Gandhi, Adarsh S; Budac, David P; Li, Guiying; Campbell, Brian M; Tagmose, Lena

    2015-10-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), a pivotal enzyme in the kynurenine pathway, was identified as a potential therapeutic target for treating neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In this article, we describe a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay that delivers both kinetics and the mechanism of binding (MoB) data, enabling a detailed characterization of KMO inhibitors for the enzyme in real time. SPR assay development included optimization of the protein construct and the buffer conditions. The stability and inhibitor binding activity of the immobilized KMO were significantly improved when the experiments were performed at 10°C using a buffer containing 0.05% n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside (DDM) as the detergent. The KD values of the known KMO inhibitors (UPF648 and RO61-8048) from the SPR assay were in good accordance with the biochemical LC/MS/MS assay. Also, the SPR assay was able to differentiate the binding kinetics (k(a) and k(d)) of the selected unknown KMO inhibitors. For example, the inhibitors that showed comparable IC50 values in the LC/MS/MS assay displayed differences in their residence time (τ = 1/k(d)) in the SPR assay. To better define the MoB of the inhibitors to KMO, an SPR-based competition assay was developed, which demonstrated that both UPF648 and RO61-8048 bound to the substrate-binding site. These results demonstrate the potential of the SPR assay for characterizing the affinity, the kinetics, and the MoB profiles of the KMO inhibitors.

  1. Multifunctionality and mechanism of ligand binding in a mosquito antiinflammatory protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, Eric; Mans, Ben J.; Ribeiro, José M.C.; Andersen, John F.; (NIH)

    2009-04-07

    The mosquito D7 salivary proteins are encoded by a multigene family related to the arthropod odorant-binding protein (OBP) superfamily. Forms having either one or two OBP domains are found in mosquito saliva. Four single-domain and one two-domain D7 proteins from Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti (AeD7), respectively, were shown to bind biogenic amines with high affinity and with a stoichiometry of one ligand per protein molecule. Sequence comparisons indicated that only the C-terminal domain of AeD7 is homologous to the single-domain proteins from A. gambiae, suggesting that the N-terminal domain may bind a different class of ligands. Here, we describe the 3D structure of AeD7 and examine the ligand-binding characteristics of the N- and C-terminal domains. Isothermal titration calorimetry and ligand complex crystal structures show that the N-terminal domain binds cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) with high affinities (50-60 nM) whereas the C-terminal domain binds biogenic amines. The lipid chain of the cysLT binds in a hydrophobic pocket of the N-terminal domain, whereas binding of norepinephrine leads to an ordering of the C-terminal portion of the C-terminal domain into an alpha-helix that, along with rotations of Arg-176 and Glu-268 side chains, acts to bury the bound ligand.

  2. Extracellular matrix-anchored serum amyloid A preferentially induces mast cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershkoviz, R; Preciado-Patt, L; Lider, O; Fridkin, M; Dastych, J; Metcalfe, D D; Mekori, Y A

    1997-07-01

    Mast cells are known to accumulate in various inflammatory processes, some of which are known to be associated with increased local and systemic levels of acute-phase reactants such as serum amyloid A (SAA) or with amyloid deposition. The mechanism(s) by which mast cells are recruited to these sites, however, has not been fully elucidated. It has recently been shown that SAA interacts with extracellular matrix (ECM) components and thereby acts as a chemoattractant and regulator of immune cell migration. On the basis of these observations, we examined the effect of SAA on mast cell adhesion to ECM, an essential step in cellular transmigration. We could first demonstrate strong specific binding of recombinant human SAA (rSAA) to murine mast cells using flow cytometry. Moreover, radiolabeled rSAA was found to bind, in a saturable manner, to mast cells, reaching a binding affinity of 10(-8) M. When immobilized by preincubation with ECM, SAA or its proteolytically degraded amyloid A fragment (amino acid residues 2-82), which contains RGD-related adhesion motif but not the COOH-terminal portion of SAA (amino acid residues 77-104), induced the adhesion of resting mast cells to ECM or laminin. SAA and AA, in soluble or immobilized forms, did not activate mast cells to release mediators. Mast cell adhesion to the immobilized ECM-SAA complex appeared to occur through an integrin recognition, inasmuch as adhesion was calcium dependent and could be blocked by an RGD-containing peptide or by anti-CD29 monoclonal antibody. Genistein also inhibited adhesion, indicating that tyrosine kinase activity was involved. These data suggest that SAA bound to ECM may serve as an important inducer of mast cell adhesion, thus regulating mast cell recruitment and accumulation at these sites, which in turn could potentiate further pathology. PMID:9252455

  3. Self-Healing Efficiency of Cementitious Materials Containing Microcapsules Filled with Healing Adhesive: Mechanical Restoration and Healing Process Monitored by Water Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenting; Jiang, Zhengwu; Yang, Zhenghong; Zhao, Nan; Yuan, Weizhong

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous crack healing of cementitious composite, a construction material that is susceptible to cracking, is of great significance to improve the serviceability and to prolong the longevity of concrete structures. In this study, the St-DVB microcapsules enclosing epoxy resins as the adhesive agent were embedded in cement paste to achieve self-healing capability. The self-healing efficiency was firstly assessed by mechanical restoration of the damaging specimens after being matured. The flexural and compressive configurations were both used to stimulate the localized and distributed cracks respectively. The effects of some factors, including the content of microcapsules, the curing conditions and the degree of damage on the healing efficiency were investigated. Water absorption was innovatively proposed to monitor and characterize the evolution of crack networks during the healing process. The healing cracks were observed by SEM-EDS following. The results demonstrated that the capsule-containing cement paste can achieve the various mechanical restorations depending on the curing condition and the degree of damage. But the voids generated by the surfactants compromised the strength. Though no noticeable improved stiffness obtained, the increasing fracture energy was seen particularly for the specimen acquiring 60% pre-damage. The sorptivity and amount of water decreased with cracks healing by the adhesive, which contributed to cut off and block ingress of water. The micrographs by SEM-EDS also validated that the cracks were bridged by the hardened epoxy as the dominated elements of C and O accounted for 95% by mass in the nearby cracks. PMID:24312328

  4. Self-healing efficiency of cementitious materials containing microcapsules filled with healing adhesive: mechanical restoration and healing process monitored by water absorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenting Li

    Full Text Available Autonomous crack healing of cementitious composite, a construction material that is susceptible to cracking, is of great significance to improve the serviceability and to prolong the longevity of concrete structures. In this study, the St-DVB microcapsules enclosing epoxy resins as the adhesive agent were embedded in cement paste to achieve self-healing capability. The self-healing efficiency was firstly assessed by mechanical restoration of the damaging specimens after being matured. The flexural and compressive configurations were both used to stimulate the localized and distributed cracks respectively. The effects of some factors, including the content of microcapsules, the curing conditions and the degree of damage on the healing efficiency were investigated. Water absorption was innovatively proposed to monitor and characterize the evolution of crack networks during the healing process. The healing cracks were observed by SEM-EDS following. The results demonstrated that the capsule-containing cement paste can achieve the various mechanical restorations depending on the curing condition and the degree of damage. But the voids generated by the surfactants compromised the strength. Though no noticeable improved stiffness obtained, the increasing fracture energy was seen particularly for the specimen acquiring 60% pre-damage. The sorptivity and amount of water decreased with cracks healing by the adhesive, which contributed to cut off and block ingress of water. The micrographs by SEM-EDS also validated that the cracks were bridged by the hardened epoxy as the dominated elements of C and O accounted for 95% by mass in the nearby cracks.

  5. Structure, mechanics, and binding mode heterogeneity of LEDGF/p75-DNA nucleoprotein complexes revealed by scanning force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlinden, Willem; Lipfert, Jan; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Debyser, Zeger; de Feyter, Steven

    2014-04-01

    LEDGF/p75 is a transcriptional coactivator implicated in the pathogenesis of AIDS and leukemia. In these contexts, LEDGF/p75 acts as a cofactor by tethering protein cargo to transcriptionally active regions in the human genome. Our study - based on scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging - is the first to provide structural information on the interaction of LEDGF/p75 with DNA. Two novel approaches that allow obtaining insights into the DNA conformation inside nucleoprotein complexes revealed (1) that LEDGF/p75 can bind at least in three different binding modes, (2) how DNA topology and protein dimerization affect these binding modes, and (3) geometrical and mechanical aspects of the nucleoprotein complexes. These structural and mechanical details will help us to better understand the cellular mechanisms of LEDGF/p75 as a transcriptional coactivator and as a cofactor in disease.LEDGF/p75 is a transcriptional coactivator implicated in the pathogenesis of AIDS and leukemia. In these contexts, LEDGF/p75 acts as a cofactor by tethering protein cargo to transcriptionally active regions in the human genome. Our study - based on scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging - is the first to provide structural information on the interaction of LEDGF/p75 with DNA. Two novel approaches that allow obtaining insights into the DNA conformation inside nucleoprotein complexes revealed (1) that LEDGF/p75 can bind at least in three different binding modes, (2) how DNA topology and protein dimerization affect these binding modes, and (3) geometrical and mechanical aspects of the nucleoprotein complexes. These structural and mechanical details will help us to better understand the cellular mechanisms of LEDGF/p75 as a transcriptional coactivator and as a cofactor in disease. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SFM topographs of phage lambda DNA in situ, in the absence and presence of LEDGF/p75; model-independent tests for DNA chain equilibration in 2D; SFM topographs of

  6. On the mechanism of targeting of phage fusion protein-modified nanocarriers: only the binding peptide sequence matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Kulkarni, Nikita; D’Souza, Gerard G.M.; Petrenko, Valery A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2011-01-01

    The integration of pharmaceutical nanocarriers with phage display techniques is emerging as a new paradigm for targeted cancer nanomedicines. We explored the direct use of landscape phage fusion proteins for the self-assembly of phage-derived binding peptides to liposomes for cancer cell targeting. The primary purpose of this study was to elucidate the targeting mechanism with a particular emphasis on the relative contributions of the two motifs that make up the landscape phage fusion protein (a binding peptide and the phage pVIII coat protein) to the targeting efficiency. Using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we confirmed the formation of phage-liposomes. Using FACS analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and fluorescence photospectrometry, we found that liposomes modified with MCF-7-specific phage fusion proteins (MCF-7 binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, fused to the phage PVIII coat protein) provided a strong and specific association with target MCF-7 cancer cells but not with co-cultured, non-target cells including C166-GFP and NIH3T3. The substitution for the binding peptide fused to phage pVIII coat protein abolished the targeting specificity. The addition of free binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, competitively inhibited the interaction of MCF-7-specific phage-liposomes with target MCF-7 cells but showed no reduction of MCF-7-associated plain liposomes. The proteolysis of the binding peptide reduced MCF-7 cell-associated phage-liposomes in a proteinase K (PK) concentration-dependent manner with no effect on the binding of plain liposomes to MCF-7 cells. Overall, only the binding peptide motif was involved in the targeting specificity of phage-liposomes. The presence of phage pVIII coat protein did not interfere with the targeting efficiency. PMID:21675738

  7. On the mechanism of targeting of phage fusion protein-modified nanocarriers: only the binding peptide sequence matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Kulkarni, Nikita; D'Souza, Gerard G M; Petrenko, Valery A; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2011-10-01

    The integration of pharmaceutical nanocarriers with phage display techniques is emerging as a new paradigm for targeted cancer nanomedicines. We explored the direct use of landscape phage fusion proteins for the self-assembly of phage-derived binding peptides to liposomes for cancer cell targeting. The primary purpose of this study was to elucidate the targeting mechanism with a particular emphasis on the relative contributions of the two motifs that make up the landscape phage fusion protein (a binding peptide and the phage pVIII coat protein) to the targeting efficiency. Using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we confirmed the formation of phage-liposomes. Using FACS analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and fluorescence photospectrometry, we found that liposomes modified with MCF-7-specific phage fusion proteins (MCF-7 binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, fused to the phage PVIII coat protein) provided a strong and specific association with target MCF-7 cancer cells but not with cocultured, nontarget cells including C166-GFP and NIH3T3. The substitution for the binding peptide fused to phage pVIII coat protein abolished the targeting specificity. The addition of free binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, competitively inhibited the interaction of MCF-7-specific phage-liposomes with target MCF-7 cells but showed no reduction of MCF-7-associated plain liposomes. The proteolysis of the binding peptide reduced MCF-7 cell-associated phage-liposomes in a proteinase K (PK) concentration-dependent manner with no effect on the binding of plain liposomes to MCF-7 cells. Overall, only the binding peptide motif was involved in the targeting specificity of phage-liposomes. The presence of phage pVIII coat protein did not interfere with the targeting efficiency. PMID:21675738

  8. Mac-2 binding protein is a cell-adhesive protein of the extracellular matrix which self-assembles into ring-like structures and binds beta1 integrins, collagens and fibronectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasaki, T; Brakebusch, C; Engel, J;

    1998-01-01

    Human Mac-2 binding protein (M2BP) was prepared in recombinant form from the culture medium of 293 kidney cells and consisted of a 92 kDa subunit. The protein was obtained in a native state as indicated by CD spectroscopy, demonstrating alpha-helical and beta-type structure, and by protease resis...

  9. Effects of interfacial adhesion on mechanical properties of filler reinforced composites%界面粘接对填充复合材料力学性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周兴平; 屈仁伟; 解孝林

    2001-01-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate(PMMA) coated talc was obtained by the in situ polymerization of MMA on the surface of talc.The composites containing PMMA adhesive layer was subsequently producted by filling the treated talc into PVC matrix.The polymer adhesive layer improves the mechanical proeperties of the composite for its interfacial adhesion similar to general adhesive agent.Since a mutual diffusion between adhesive layer and matrix and a innerstress on interfaces exist,there is a optimal thickness of adhesive layer in composites.%利用原位聚合的方法将聚甲基丙烯酸甲酯(PMMA)包覆在滑石粉的表面,制得了含PMMA粘接层的滑石粉/PVC复合材料。聚合物粘接层类似于粘接材料的粘接剂的作用,它很好地改善了复合材料的界面粘附性,提高了复合材料的机械强度。由于聚合物粘接层和基体聚合物的相互扩散以及界面内应力的存在,复合材料中存在一个最佳的聚合物粘接层。

  10. Sequential dimerization of human zipcode-binding protein IMP1 on RNA: a cooperative mechanism providing RNP stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.; Kristensen, M. A.; Willemoes, Martin;

    2004-01-01

    zipcode-binding protein IMP1 on targets in the 3'-UTR from Igf-II mRNA and in H19 RNA. In both cases, two molecules of IMP1 bound to RNA by a sequential, cooperative mechanism, characterized by an initial fast step, followed by a slow second step. The first step created an obligatory assembly intermediate...... of low stability, whereas the second step was the discriminatory event that converted a putative RNA target into a ‘locked' stable RNP. The ability to dimerize was also observed between members of the IMP family of zipcode-binding proteins, providing a multitude of further interaction possibilities...

  11. Myosin-binding protein C displaces tropomyosin to activate cardiac thin filaments and governs their speed by an independent mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Mun, Ji Young; Previs, Michael J.; Yu, Hope Y.; Gulick, James; Tobacman, Larry S.; Beck Previs, Samantha; Robbins, Jeffrey; Warshaw, David M.; Craig, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Myosin-binding protein C (MyBP-C) is a component of myosin filaments, one of the two sets of contractile elements whose relative sliding is the basis of muscle contraction. In the heart, MyBP-C modulates contractility in response to cardiac stimulation; mutations in MyBP-C lead to cardiac disease. The mechanism by which MyBP-C modulates cardiac contraction is not understood. Using electron microscopy and a light microscopic assay for filament sliding, we demonstrate that MyBP-C binds to the o...

  12. [FTIR spectroscopic studies of facial prosthetic adhesives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Biao; Yang, Qing-fang; Liang, Jian-feng; Zhao, Yi-min

    2008-10-01

    According to the composition of the traditional facial prosthetic adhesives, most of adhesives can be classified into two categories: acrylic polymer-based adhesive and silicone-based adhesive. In previous studies, measurements of various mechanical bond strengths were carried out, whereas the functional groups of the adhesives were evaluated seldom during the adhesion. In the present study the analysis of two facial prosthetic adhesives (Epithane and Secure Adhesive) was carried out by using infrared spectroscopy. Two adhesives in the form of fluid or semisolid were submitted to FTIR spectroscopy, respectively. The results showed that water and ammonia residue volatilized during the solidification of Epithane, and absorption peak reduction of carbonyl was due to the volatilization of acetate vinyl from Secure Adhesive. Similar silicone functional groups both in the silicone-based adhesive and in silicone elastomer could be the key to higher bond strength between silicone elastomer and skin with silicone-based adhesive. The position, shape of main absorption peaks of three adhesives didn't change, which showing that their main chemicals and basic structures didn't change during solidification. PMID:19123392

  13. Characterization of Heparin-binding Site of Tissue Transglutaminase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Collighan, Russell J.; Pytel, Kamila; Rathbone, Daniel L.; Li, Xiaoling; Griffin, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) is a multifunctional Ca2+-activated protein cross-linking enzyme secreted into the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it is involved in wound healing and scarring, tissue fibrosis, celiac disease, and metastatic cancer. Extracellular TG2 can also facilitate cell adhesion important in wound healing through a nontransamidating mechanism via its association with fibronectin, heparan sulfates (HS), and integrins. Regulating the mechanism how TG2 is translocated into the ECM therefore provides a strategy for modulating these physiological and pathological functions of the enzyme. Here, through molecular modeling and mutagenesis, we have identified the HS-binding site of TG2 202KFLKNAGRDCSRRSSPVYVGR222. We demonstrate the requirement of this binding site for translocation of TG2 into the ECM through a mechanism involving cell surface shedding of HS. By synthesizing a peptide NPKFLKNAGRDCSRRSS corresponding to the HS-binding site within TG2, we also demonstrate how this mimicking peptide can in isolation compensate for the RGD-induced loss of cell adhesion on fibronectin via binding to syndecan-4, leading to activation of PKCα, pFAK-397, and ERK1/2 and the subsequent formation of focal adhesions and actin cytoskeleton organization. A novel regulatory mechanism for TG2 translocation into the extracellular compartment that depends upon TG2 conformation and the binding of HS is proposed. PMID:22298777

  14. Identical phosphatase mechanisms achieved through distinct modes of binding phosphoprotein substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazy, Y.; Motaleb, M.A.; Guarnieri, M.T.; Charon, N.W.; Zhao, R.; Silversmith, R.E. (WVU); (UNC); (Colorado); (EC Uni.)

    2010-04-05

    Two-component signal transduction systems are widespread in prokaryotes and control numerous cellular processes. Extensive investigation of sensor kinase and response regulator proteins from many two-component systems has established conserved sequence, structural, and mechanistic features within each family. In contrast, the phosphatases which catalyze hydrolysis of the response regulator phosphoryl group to terminate signal transduction are poorly understood. Here we present structural and functional characterization of a representative of the CheC/CheX/FliY phosphatase family. The X-ray crystal structure of Borrelia burgdorferi CheX complexed with its CheY3 substrate and the phosphoryl analogue BeF{sub 3}{sup -} reveals a binding orientation between a response regulator and an auxiliary protein different from that shared by every previously characterized example. The surface of CheY3 containing the phosphoryl group interacts directly with a long helix of CheX which bears the conserved (E - X{sub 2} - N) motif. Conserved CheX residues Glu96 and Asn99, separated by a single helical turn, insert into the CheY3 active site. Structural and functional data indicate that CheX Asn99 and CheY3 Thr81 orient a water molecule for hydrolytic attack. The catalytic residues of the CheX-CheY3 complex are virtually superimposable on those of the Escherichia coli CheZ phosphatase complexed with CheY, even though the active site helices of CheX and CheZ are oriented nearly perpendicular to one other. Thus, evolution has found two structural solutions to achieve the same catalytic mechanism through different helical spacing and side chain lengths of the conserved acid/amide residues in CheX and CheZ.

  15. Mechanism of quinine-dependent monoclonal antibody binding to platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougie, Daniel W; Peterson, Julie; Rasmussen, Mark; Aster, Richard H

    2015-10-29

    Drug-dependent antibodies (DDAbs) that cause acute thrombocytopenia upon drug exposure are nonreactive in the absence of the drug but bind tightly to a platelet membrane glycoprotein, usually α(IIb)/β3 integrin (GPIIb/IIIa) when the drug is present. How a drug promotes binding of antibody to its target is unknown and is difficult to study with human DDAbs, which are poly-specific and in limited supply. We addressed this question using quinine-dependent murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which, in vitro and in vivo, closely mimic antibodies that cause thrombocytopenia in patients sensitive to quinine. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, we found that quinine binds with very high affinity (K(D) ≈ 10⁻⁹ mol/L) to these mAbs at a molar ratio of ≈ 2:1 but does not bind detectably to an irrelevant mAb. Also using SPR analysis, GPIIb/IIIa was found to bind monovalently to immobilized mAb with low affinity in the absence of quinine and with fivefold greater affinity (K(D) ≈ 2.2 × 10⁻⁶) when quinine was present. Measurements of quinine-dependent binding of intact mAb and fragment antigen-binding (Fab) fragments to platelets showed that affinity is increased 10 000- to 100 000-fold by bivalent interaction between antibody and its target. Together, the findings indicate that the first step in drug-dependent binding of a DDAb is the interaction of the drug with antibody, rather than with antigen, as has been widely thought, where it induces structural changes that enhance the affinity/specificity of antibody for its target epitope. Bivalent binding may be essential for a DDAb to cause thrombocytopenia.

  16. Synthesis, {sup 68}Ga labeling and preliminary evaluation of DOTA peptide binding vascular adhesion protein-1: a potential PET imaging agent for diagnosing osteomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ujula, Tiina [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Salomaeki, Satu [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Department of Chemistry, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Virsu, Pauliina [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Lankinen, Petteri; Maekinen, Tatu J. [Orthopedic Research Unit, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Autio, Anu [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Yegutkin, Gennady G. [MediCity Research Laboratory, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Knuuti, Juhani [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Jalkanen, Sirpa [MediCity Research Laboratory, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); National Public Health Institute, Turku (Finland); Roivainen, Anne [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Turku Center for Disease Modeling, University of Turku, Turku (Finland)], E-mail: anne.roivainen@utu.fi

    2009-08-15

    Introduction: Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is an infection/inflammation-inducible endothelial glycoprotein. Based on our previous studies, the most VAP-1-selective peptide (VAP-P1) was 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N',N'',N''',N,,,,-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-conjugated, {sup 68}gallium ({sup 68}Ga)-labeled (named [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1) and evaluated preliminarily. Methods: Targeting was evaluated by using VAP-1-transfected cells. Biodistribution of [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 was studied by positron emission tomography imaging of healthy rats and rats with bone inflammation caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection. Uptake of [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 in osteomyelitis was compared with negative control peptide and competition with an excess of unlabeled DOTAVAP-P1. Results: [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 bound more efficiently to VAP-1-transfected cells than to controls. In rats, [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 cleared rapidly from blood circulation, excreted quickly in urine and showed an in vivo half-life of 26{+-}2.3 min. Imaging of osteomyelitis demonstrated modest target-to-background ratio. Studies with the negative control peptide and competitors revealed a significantly lower uptake at the infection site compared to [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1. Conclusions: The results represent a proof-of-concept that infection-induced VAP-1 can be targeted by [{sup 68}Ga]DOTA peptide. [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 is just the first candidate peptide and an essential opening for developing VAP-1-specific imaging agents.

  17. DNA structure, binding mechanism and biology functions of polypyridyl complexes in biomedicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    There is considerable research interest and vigorous debate about the DNA binding of polypyridyl complexes including the electron transfer involving DNA. In this review, based on the fluorescence quenching experiments, it was proposed that DNA might serve as a conductor. From the time-interval CD spectra, the different binding rates of D- and L-enantiomer to calf thymus DNA were observed. The factors influencing the DNA-binding of polypyridyl complexes, and the potential bio-functions of the complexes are also discussed.

  18. Host Selection of Microbiota via Differential Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoughlin, Kirstie; Schluter, Jonas; Rakoff-Nahoum, Seth; Smith, Adrian L; Foster, Kevin R

    2016-04-13

    The host epithelium is the critical interface with microbial communities, but the mechanisms by which the host regulates these communities are poorly understood. Here we develop the hypothesis that hosts use differential adhesion to select for and against particular members of their microbiota. We use an established computational, individual-based model to study the impact of host factors that regulate adhesion at the epithelial surface. Our simulations predict that host-mediated adhesion can increase the competitive advantage of microbes and create ecological refugia for slow-growing species. We show how positive selection via adhesion can be transformed into negative selection if the host secretes large quantities of a matrix such as mucus. Our work predicts that adhesion is a powerful mechanism for both positive and negative selection within the microbiota. We discuss molecules-mucus glycans and IgA-that affect microbe adhesion and identify testable predictions of the adhesion-as-selection model. PMID:27053168

  19. Mechanism of the Association between Na+ Binding and Conformations at the Intracellular Gate in Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Quick, Matthias; Zhao, Chunfeng;

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) terminate neurotransmission by Na+-dependent reuptake of released neurotransmitters. Previous studies suggested that Na+-binding reconfigures dynamically coupled structural elements in an allosteric interaction network (AIN) responsible for function...... in both LeuT and human dopamine transporter (hDAT), we apply the novel method to identify the composition and the dynamic properties of their conserved AIN. In LeuT, two different perturbations disrupting Na+ binding and transport (i.e. replacing Na+ with Li+ or the Y268A mutation at the intracellular...... with global conformational changes that are critical for the transport mechanism. That the AIN between the Na+ binding sites and the intracellular gate in bacterial LeuT resembles that in eukaryotic hDAT highlights the conservation of allosteric pathways underlying NSS function....

  20. Molecular modeling study on the allosteric inhibition mechanism of HIV-1 integrase by LEDGF/p75 binding site inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Xue

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrase (IN is essential for the integration of viral DNA into the host genome and an attractive therapeutic target for developing antiretroviral inhibitors. LEDGINs are a class of allosteric inhibitors targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site of HIV-1 IN. Yet, the detailed binding mode and allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs to HIV-1 IN is only partially understood, which hinders the structure-based design of more potent anti-HIV agents. A molecular modeling study combining molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy calculation were performed to investigate the interaction details of HIV-1 IN catalytic core domain (CCD with two recently discovered LEDGINs BI-1001 and CX14442, as well as the LEDGF/p75 protein. Simulation results demonstrated the hydrophobic domain of BI-1001 and CX14442 engages one subunit of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer through hydrophobic interactions, and the hydrophilic group forms hydrogen bonds with HIV-1 IN CCD residues from other subunit. CX14442 has a larger tert-butyl group than the methyl of BI-1001, and forms better interactions with the highly hydrophobic binding pocket of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer interface, which can explain the stronger affinity of CX14442 than BI-1001. Analysis of the binding mode of LEDGF/p75 with HIV-1 IN CCD reveals that the LEDGF/p75 integrase binding domain residues Ile365, Asp366, Phe406 and Val408 have significant contributions to the binding of the LEDGF/p75 to HIV1-IN. Remarkably, we found that binding of BI-1001 and CX14442 to HIV-1 IN CCD induced the structural rearrangements of the 140 s loop and oration displacements of the side chains of the three conserved catalytic residues Asp64, Asp116, and Glu152 located at the active site. These results we obtained will be valuable not only for understanding the allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs but also for the rational design of allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 IN targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site.

  1. Operating mechanism and molecular dynamics of pheromone-binding protein ASP1 as influenced by pH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Han

    Full Text Available Odorant binding protein (OBP is a vital component of the olfactory sensation system. It performs the specific role of ferrying odorant molecules to odorant receptors. OBP helps insects and types of animal to sense and transport stimuli molecules. However, the molecular details about how OBPs bind or release its odorant ligands are unclear. For some OBPs, the systems' pH level is reported to impact on the ligands' binding or unbinding capability. In this work we investigated the operating mechanism and molecular dynamics in bee antennal pheromone-binding protein ASP1 under varying pH conditions. We found that conformational flexibility is the key factor for regulating the interaction of ASP1 and its ligands, and the odorant binds to ASP1 at low pH conditions. Dynamics, once triggered by pH changes, play the key roles in coupling the global conformational changes with the odorant release. In ASP1, the C-terminus, the N-terminus, helix α2 and the region ranging from helices α4 to α5 form a cavity with a novel 'entrance' of binding. These are the major regions that respond to pH change and regulate the ligand release. Clearly there are processes of dynamics and hydrogen bond network propagation in ASP1 in response to pH stimuli. These findings lead to an understanding of the mechanism and dynamics of odorant-OBP interaction in OBP, and will benefit chemsensory-related biotech and agriculture research and development.

  2. Mechanism of ABC transporters: A molecular dynamics simulation of a well characterized nucleotide-binding subunit

    OpenAIRE

    Peter M Jones; Anthony M George

    2002-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are membrane-bound molecular pumps that form one of the largest of all protein families. Several of them are central to phenomena of biomedical interest, including cystic fibrosis and resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. ABC transporters share a common architecture comprising two hydrophilic nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) and two hydrophobic transmembrane domains (TMDs) that form the substrate pathway across the membrane. The conformational changes ...

  3. Insights into the mechanism of DNA recognition by the methylated LINE binding protein EhMLBP of Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi, Tal; Siman-Tov, Rama; Ankri, Serge

    2009-08-01

    EhMLBP is an essential Entamoeba histolytica protein that binds preferentially to methylated long interspersed nuclear elements and rDNA. In an effort to identify more EhMLBP DNA substrates, we developed an affinity-based technique in which the C-terminal DNA binding domain of EhMLBP (GST-CterEhMLBP) was used as the ligand. Bioinformatic analysis of the DNA sequences that were isolated by this affinity method revealed the presence of a 29-nucleotide consensus motif that includes a stretch of ten adenines. Gel retardation analysis showed that EhMLBP binds to the consensus motif with a preference for its methylated form. Four DNA sequences, namely those that encoded either dihydrouridine synthetase, RAP GTPase activating protein, serine/threonine protein kinase or leucine-rich repeat containing protein (LRPP) were then selected for further analysis. In vivo binding of EhMLBP to these genes was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. The presence of methylated cytosines was detected in DNA encoding LRPP and to a lower extent in the other genes. EhMLBP binds preferentially to the methylated forms of these DNA targets. The ability of the consensus motif to compete with EhMLBP binding to its DNA substrates indicates that the adenine stretch is involved in the mechanism of DNA recognition. The results of this investigation extend our existing knowledge on the number of DNA sequences that are recognized by EhMLBP and reinforce the notion that this protein is an innate methylated DNA binding protein in E. histolytica.

  4. Direct binding of ledipasvir to HCV NS5A: mechanism of resistance to an HCV antiviral agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyock Joo Kwon

    Full Text Available Ledipasvir, a direct acting antiviral agent (DAA targeting the Hepatitis C Virus NS5A protein, exhibits picomolar activity in replicon cells. While its mechanism of action is unclear, mutations that confer resistance to ledipasvir in HCV replicon cells are located in NS5A, suggesting that NS5A is the direct target of ledipasvir. To date co-precipitation and cross-linking experiments in replicon or NS5A transfected cells have not conclusively shown a direct, specific interaction between NS5A and ledipasvir. Using recombinant, full length NS5A, we show that ledipasvir binds directly, with high affinity and specificity, to NS5A. Ledipasvir binding to recombinant NS5A is saturable with a dissociation constant in the low nanomolar range. A mutant form of NS5A (Y93H that confers resistance to ledipasvir shows diminished binding to ledipasvir. The current study shows that ledipasvir inhibits NS5A through direct binding and that resistance to ledipasvir is the result of a reduction in binding affinity to NS5A mutants.

  5. Identification and binding mechanism of phage displayed peptides with specific affinity to acid-alkali treated titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuhua; Tan, Jing; Wu, Baohua; Wang, Jianxin; Qu, Shuxin; Weng, Jie; Feng, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Acid-alkali treatment is one of means widely used for preparing bioactive titanium surfaces. Peptides with specific affinity to titanium surface modified by acid-alkali two-steps treatment were obtained via phage display technology. Out of the eight new unique peptides, titanium-binding peptide 54 displayed by monoclonal M13 phage at its pIII coat protein (TBP54-M13 phage) was proved to have higher binding affinity to the substrate. The binding interaction occurred at the domain from phenylalanine at position 1 to arginine at position 6 in the sequences of TBP54 (FAETHRGFHFSF) mainly via the reaction of these residues with the Ti surface. Together the coordination and electrostatic interactions controlled the specific binding of the phage to the substrate. The binding affinity was dependent on the surface basic hydroxyl group content. In addition, the phage showed a different interaction way with the Ti surface without acid-alkali treatment along with an impaired affinity. This study could provide more understanding of the interaction mechanism between the selected peptide and its specific substrate, and develop a promising method for the biofunctionalization of titanium. PMID:27371890

  6. Conformational Selection and Induced Fit Mechanisms in the Binding of an Anticancer Drug to the c-Src Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morando, Maria Agnese; Saladino, Giorgio; D’Amelio, Nicola; Pucheta-Martinez, Encarna; Lovera, Silvia; Lelli, Moreno; López-Méndez, Blanca; Marenchino, Marco; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the conformational changes associated with the binding of small ligands to their biological targets is a fascinating and meaningful question in chemistry, biology and drug discovery. One of the most studied and important is the so-called “DFG-flip” of tyrosine kinases. The conserved three amino-acid DFG motif undergoes an “in to out” movement resulting in a particular inactive conformation to which “type II” kinase inhibitors, such as the anti-cancer drug Imatinib, bind. Despite many studies, the details of this prototypical conformational change are still debated. Here we combine various NMR experiments and surface plasmon resonance with enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations to shed light into the conformational dynamics associated with the binding of Imatinib to the proto-oncogene c-Src. We find that both conformational selection and induced fit play a role in the binding mechanism, reconciling opposing views held in the literature. Moreover, an external binding pose and local unfolding (cracking) of the aG helix are observed.

  7. From flexibility to cooperativity: multiscale modeling of cadherin-mediated cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yinghao

    2013-03-01

    Cadherins constitute a large family of Ca2 +-dependent adhesion molecules in the Inter-cellular junctions that play a pivotal role in the assembly of cells into specific three-dimensional tissues. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying cadherin-mediated cell adhesion are still not fully understood, it seems likely that both cis dimers that are formed by binding of extracellular domains of two cadherins on the same cell surface, and trans-dimers formed between cadherins on opposing cell surfaces, are critical to trigger the junction formation. Here we present a new multiscale computational strategy to model the process of junction formation based on the knowledge of cadherin molecular structures and its 3D binding affinities. The cell interfacial region is defined by a simplified system where each of two interacting membrane surfaces is represented as a two-dimensional lattice with each cadherin molecule treated as a randomly diffusing unit. The binding energy for a pair of interacting cadherins in this two-dimensional discrete system is obtained from 3D binding affinities through a renormalization process derived from statistical thermodynamics. The properties of individual cadherins used in the lattice model are based on molecular level simulations. Our results show that within the range of experimentally-measured binding affinities, cadherins condense into junctions driven by the coupling of cis and trans interactions. The key factor appears to be a loss of molecular flexibility during trans dimerization that increases the magnitude of lateral cis interactions. We have also developed stochastic dynamics to study the adhesion of multiple cells. Each cell in the system is described as a mechanical entity and adhesive properties between two cells are derived from the lattice model. The cellular simulations are used to study the specific problems of tissue morphogenesis and tumor metastasis. The consequent question and upcoming challenge is to understand the

  8. Cell adhesion molecules: detection with univalent second antibody

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Identification of cell surface molecules that play a role in cell-cell adhesion (here called cell adhesion molecules) has been achieved by demonstrating the inhibitory effect of univalent antibodies that bind these molecules in an in vitro assay of cell-cell adhesion. A more convenient reagent, intact (divalent) antibody, has been avoided because it might agglutinate the cells rather than blocking cell-cell adhesion. In this report, we show that intact rabbit immunoglobulin directed against c...

  9. Theory on the mechanism of rapid binding of transcription factor proteins at specific-sites on DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Murugan, Rajamanickam

    2014-01-01

    We develop revised theoretical ideas on the mechanism by which the transcription factor proteins locate their specific binding sites on DNA faster than the three-dimensional (3D) diffusion controlled rate limit. We demonstrate that the 3D-diffusion controlled rate limit can be enhanced when the protein molecule reads several possible binding stretches of the template DNA via one-dimensional (1D) diffusion upon each 3D-diffusion mediated collision or nonspecific binding event. The overall enhancement of site-specific association rate is directly proportional to the maximum possible sliding length (LA, square root of (6Do/kr) where Do is the 1D-diffusion coefficient and kr is the dissociation rate constant associated with the nonspecific DNA-protein complex) associated with the 1D-diffusion of protein molecule along DNA. Upon considering several possible mechanisms we find that the DNA binding proteins can efficiently locate their cognate sites on DNA by switching across fast-moving, slow-moving and reading sta...

  10. Underwater adhesion: The barnacle way

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.

    rosa and demonstrated the stimulatory effect of dopamine and noradrenaline on such secretion. Their study indicated exocytosis to be the major mode of cement secretion and suggest that gradual, localized exocytotic secretion of cement triggered... by catecholaminergic neurons to be the key mechanism during permanent attachment by barnacle cyprids [51]. Properties of barnacle adhesive The resistance to chemical breakdown by barnacle adhesive caused a major problem in its characterization. However...

  11. Investigation of the interfacial adhesion of the transparent conductive oxide films to large-area flexible polymer substrates using laser-induced thermo-mechanical stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Woo; Lee, Seung-Ho; Yang, Chan-Woo

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the interfacial adhesion strength (σint) of transparent conductive oxide (TCO) coatings on polymer substrates using a nanosecond Nd:YAG pulsed laser. We compared our results with those achieved using conventional testing methods such as bending and fragmentation tests as well as theoretical calculations. In the fragmentation and bending tests, mechanical compressive stress is induced in the film due to mismatches in Poisson's ratio and Young's modulus between the substrate and film. But, the incident laser makes the film under compression due to the mismatch in thermal expansion between the TCO and the polymer substrate. With a pulse incident to the substrate, the TCO rapidly expands by laser-induced instant heating while the transparent polymer does little, which causes the TCO to buckle and delaminate over the critical pulse energy. The critical compressive stress that scales with σint was calculated using simple equations, which agreed well with the results from previous theoretical calculations. Because the films preferentially delaminate at the defects and grain boundaries, this technique also provided useful information regarding the interface microstructures. Moreover, because the laser can scan over large areas, this method is suitable for flexible substrates that are produced by a roll-to-roll process. Nevertheless, the mechanical stress introduced by the bending and fragmentation tests causes the TCO to buckle without interfacial delamination. Hence, the stresses at the buckling disagreed with the results obtained from the laser test and the theoretical calculations.

  12. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesika, Noshir S.; Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Zhao, Boxin; Tian, Yu; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2009-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  13. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesika, Noshir S [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Zeng Hongbo [Chemical and Materials Engineering Department, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2V4 (Canada); Kristiansen, Kai; Israelachvili, Jacob [Chemical Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Zhao, Boxin [Chemical Engineering Department and Waterloo Institute of Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Tian Yu [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Department of Precision Instruments, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Autumn, Kellar, E-mail: npesika@tulane.ed [Department of Biology, Lewis and Clark College, Portland, OR 97219 (United States)

    2009-11-18

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  14. Nanofracture mechanics : scanning force microscopy for the investigation of adhesion and corrosion at solid-solid interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kaufmann, André Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Fracture processes are crucially determined by structural features on the molecular/nanometer scale (cavities, occlusions, cracks, etc.) as well as on the atomic scale (e.g. interstitial, substitutional and vacancy defects). In this work, fracture mechanics experiments were performed with fabricated nanostructures, so-called nanopillars. Furthermore, material interfaces had been introduced into these nanopillars as weak links in order to act as well-defined breaking points. By exerting calibr...

  15. Raman, IR and DFT studies of mechanism of sodium binding to urea catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Partha P.; Kumari, Gayatri; Chittoory, Arjun K.; Rajaram, Sridhar; Narayana, Chandrabhas

    2015-12-01

    Bis-camphorsulfonyl urea, a newly developed hydrogen bonding catalyst, was evaluated in an enantioselective Friedel-Crafts reaction. We observed that complexation of the sulfonyl urea with a sodium cation enhanced the selectivity of reactions in comparison to reactions performed with urea alone. To understand the role of sodium cation, we performed Infrared and Raman spectroscopic studies. The detailed band assignment of the molecule was made by calculating spectra using Density Functional theory. Our studies suggest that the binding of the cation takes place through the oxygen atoms of carbonyl and sulfonyl groups. Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis shows the expected charge distribution after sodium binding. The changes in the geometrical parameter and charge distribution are in line with the experimentally observed spectral changes. Based on these studies, we conclude that binding of the sodium cation changes the conformation of the sulfonyl urea to bring the chiral camphor groups closer to the incipient chiral center.

  16. Elucidation of the binding mechanism of coumarin derivatives with human serum albumin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archit Garg

    Full Text Available Coumarin is a benzopyrone which is widely used as an anti-coagulant, anti-oxidant, anti-cancer and also to cure arthritis, herpes, asthma and inflammation. Here, we studied the binding of synthesized coumarin derivatives with human serum albumin (HSA at physiological pH 7.2 by using fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies. By addition of coumarin derivatives to HSA the maximum fluorescence intensity was reduced due to quenching of intrinsic fluorescence upon binding of coumarin derivatives to HSA. The binding constant and free energy were found to be 1.957±0.01×10(5 M(-1, -7.175 Kcal M(-1 for coumarin derivative (CD enamide; 0.837±0.01×10(5 M(-1, -6.685 Kcal M(-1 for coumarin derivative (CD enoate, and 0.606±0.01×10(5 M(-1, -6.49 Kcal M(-1 for coumarin derivative methylprop (CDM enamide. The CD spectroscopy showed that the protein secondary structure was partially unfolded upon binding of coumarin derivatives. Further, the molecular docking studies showed that coumarin derivatives were binding to HSA at sub-domain IB with the hydrophobic interactions and also with hydrogen bond interactions. Additionally, the molecular dynamics simulations studies contributed in understanding the stability of protein-drug complex system in the aqueous solution and the conformational changes in HSA upon binding of coumarin derivatives. This study will provide insights into designing of the new inspired coumarin derivatives as therapeutic agents against many life threatening diseases.

  17. EPSP synthase: binding studies using isothermal titration microcalorimetry and equilibrium dialysis and their implications for ligand recognition and kinetic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ream, J E; Yuen, H K; Frazier, R B; Sikorski, J A

    1992-06-23

    Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements are reported which give important new binding constant (Kd) information for various substrate and inhibitor complexes of Escherichia coli EPSP synthase (EPSPS). The validity of this technique was first verified by determining Kd's for the known binary complex with the substrate, shikimate 3-phosphate (S3P), as well as the herbicidal ternary complex with S3P and glyphosate (EPSPS.S3P.glyphosate). The observed Kd's agreed very well with those from previous independently determined kinetic and fluorescence binding measurements. Further applications unequivocally demonstrate for the first time a fairly tight interaction between phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and free enzyme (Kd = 390 microM) as well as a correspondingly weak affinity for glyphosate (Kd = 12 mM) alone with enzyme. The formation of the EPSPS.PEP binary complex was independently corroborated using equilibrium dialysis. These results strongly suggest that S3P synergizes glyphosate binding much more effectively than it does PEP binding. These observations add important new evidence to support the hypothesis that glyphosate acts as a transition-state analogue of PEP. However, the formation of a catalytically productive PEP binary complex is inconsistent with the previously reported compulsory binding order process required for catalysis and has led to new studies which completely revise the overall EPSPS kinetic mechanism. A previously postulated ternary complex between S3P and inorganic phosphate (EPSPS.S3P.Pi, Kd = 4 mM) was also detected for the first time. Quantitative binding enthalpies and entropies were also determined for each ligand complex from the microcalorimetry data. These values demonstrate a clear difference in thermodynamic parameters for recognition at the S3P site versus those observed for the PEP, Pi, and glyphosate sites.

  18. Isolation and Characterization of Adhesive Secretion from Cuvierian Tubules of Sea Cucumber Holothuria forskåli (Echinodermata: Holothuroidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Baranowska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The sea cucumber Holothuria forskåli possesses a specialized system called Cuvierian tubules. During mechanical stimulation white filaments (tubules are expelled and become sticky upon contact with any object. We isolated a protein with adhesive properties from protein extracts of Cuvierian tubules from H. forskåli. This protein was identified by antibodies against recombinant precollagen D which is located in the byssal threads of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. To find out the optimal procedure for extraction and purification, the identified protein was isolated by several methods, including electroelution, binding to glass beads, immunoprecipitation, and gel filtration. Antibodies raised against the isolated protein were used for localization of the adhesive protein in Cuvierian tubules. Immunostaining and immunogold electron microscopical studies revealed the strongest immunoreactivity in the mesothelium; this tissue layer is involved in adhesion. Adhesion of Cuvierian tubule extracts was measured on the surface of various materials. The extracted protein showed the strongest adhesion to Teflon surface. Increased adhesion was observed in the presence of potassium and EDTA, while cadmium caused a decrease in adhesion. Addition of antibodies and trypsin abolished the adhesive properties of the extract.

  19. 应用于爬壁机器人的静电吸附原理建模及关键因素分析%Principle modeling and key factors analysis of the electrostatic adhesion mechanism used in wall climbing robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王黎明; 胡青春

    2012-01-01

    This paper includes an illustration of the electrostatic adhesion mechanism which is applied in the parti cular area of wall climbing robots. The adhesion mechanism of electrostatic adhesion technology will be researched at the beginning, then, the theoretical attraction force model between the electrodes and wall is built. Through the principle of virtual work, the paper obtains a mathematical expression of electrostatic adhesion, and for more com plexity, makes a specific investigation of double electrodes type, which is the base of comb-shaped electrodes. Schwarz-Christoffel transform will be utilized in this part, and it is an effective method in dealing with non-uniform electric field. Next, Matlab software is used to analyze the key factors which affect the adsorption strength in the e lectrodes. To illustrate the problem further, a simulation of voltage between the electrodes is done. Finally, to veri fy this adhesive function, an experiment with comb-shaped electrodes is done, from which it can be concluded that electrostatic adhesion can be a large attraction power in wall-climbing robots application.%本文对应用于静电吸附式爬壁机器人这一特殊领域的静电吸附原理进行分析,对静电力进行数学解析建模,通过施瓦兹-克里斯托菲数学变换重点分析影响梳状电极吸附力的结构因素,并借助Ansoft软件求解出不同占空比下的电极电容矩阵,最后通对设计的柔性板梳状电极进行实际实验测试,验证静电吸附在爬壁机器人应用上的可靠性.

  20. Simulation investigations in the binding energy and mechanical properties of HMX-based polymer-bonded explosives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Jijun; FANG Guoyong; JI Guangfu; XIAO Heming

    2005-01-01

    The molecular simulations of the well-known high explosive β-HMX (cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine) and its fluorine containing polymer-bonded explosives (PBXs) were carried out with the combination method of quantum mechanics, molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics. The atomic cluster model, containing the β-HMX molecule and the polymer molecule whose chain dimension was about the same as β-HMX's, was fully optimized by AM1 and PM3 semi-empirical molecular orbital and molecular mechanical methods using COMPASS and PCFF force field. Then the calculated binding energy is found to be linearly correlated to each other. Molecular dynamics simulations using COMPASS force field were performed for β-HMX crystal and the PBXs involving β-HMX and a series of fluorine containing polymers. Their elastic coefficients, moduli and Poisson's ratios were calculated. It is found that the mechanical properties of β-HMX can be effectively improved by blending with fluorine containing polymers in small amounts.

  1. An intermolecular binding mechanism involving multiple LysM domains mediates carbohydrate recognition by an endopeptidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Jaslyn E M M; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Gysel, Kira;

    2015-01-01

    of multiple LysM domains in substrate binding has so far lacked support from high-resolution structures of ligand-bound complexes. Here, a structural study of the Thermus thermophilus NlpC/P60 endopeptidase containing two LysM domains is presented. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering...

  2. Does Emotion Help or Hinder Immediate Memory?: Arousal Versus Priority-Binding Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Christopher B.; MacKay, Donald G.

    2006-01-01

    People recall taboo words better than neutral words in many experimental contexts. The present rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) experiments demonstrated this taboo-superiority effect for immediate recall of mixed lists containing taboo and neutral words matched for familiarity, length, and category coherence. Under binding theory (MacKay et…

  3. Multidrug transport by ATP binding cassette transporters : a proposed two-cylinder engine mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, HW; Higgins, CF; Konings, WN

    2001-01-01

    The elevated expression of ATP binding cassette (ABC) multidrug transporters in multidrug-resistant cells interferes with the drug-based control of cancers and infectious pathogenic microorganisms. Multidrug transporters interact directly with the drug substrates. This review summarizes current insi

  4. Nucleobases bind to and stabilize aggregates of a prebiotic amphiphile, providing a viable mechanism for the emergence of protocells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Roy A; Blosser, Matthew C; Stottrup, Benjamin L; Tavakley, Ravi; Deamer, David W; Keller, Sarah L

    2013-08-13

    Primordial cells presumably combined RNAs, which functioned as catalysts and carriers of genetic information, with an encapsulating membrane of aggregated amphiphilic molecules. Major questions regarding this hypothesis include how the four bases and the sugar in RNA were selected from a mixture of prebiotic compounds and colocalized with such membranes, and how the membranes were stabilized against flocculation in salt water. To address these questions, we explored the possibility that aggregates of decanoic acid, a prebiotic amphiphile, interact with the bases and sugar found in RNA. We found that these bases, as well as some but not all related bases, bind to decanoic acid aggregates. Moreover, both the bases and ribose inhibit flocculation of decanoic acid by salt. The extent of inhibition by the bases correlates with the extent of their binding, and ribose inhibits to a greater extent than three similar sugars. Finally, the stabilizing effects of a base and ribose are additive. Thus, aggregates of a prebiotic amphiphile bind certain heterocyclic bases and sugars, including those found in RNA, and this binding stabilizes the aggregates against salt. These mutually reinforcing mechanisms might have driven the emergence of protocells. PMID:23901105

  5. Rapid binding of plasminogen to streptokinase in a catalytic complex reveals a three-step mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhamme, Ingrid M; Bock, Paul E

    2014-10-01

    Rapid kinetics demonstrate a three-step pathway of streptokinase (SK) binding to plasminogen (Pg), the zymogen of plasmin (Pm). Formation of a fluorescently silent encounter complex is followed by two conformational tightening steps reported by fluorescence quenches. Forward reactions were defined by time courses of biphasic quenching during complex formation between SK or its COOH-terminal Lys(414) deletion mutant (SKΔK414) and active site-labeled [Lys]Pg ([5-(acetamido)fluorescein]-D-Phe-Phe-Arg-[Lys]Pg ([5F]FFR-[Lys]Pg)) and by the SK dependences of the quench rates. Active site-blocked Pm rapidly displaced [5F]FFR-[Lys]Pg from the complex. The encounter and final SK ·[5F]FFR-[Lys]Pg complexes were weakened similarly by SK Lys(414) deletion and blocking of lysine-binding sites (LBSs) on Pg kringles with 6-aminohexanoic acid or benzamidine. Forward and reverse rates for both tightening steps were unaffected by 6-aminohexanoic acid, whereas benzamidine released constraints on the first conformational tightening. This indicated that binding of SK Lys(414) to Pg kringle 4 plays a role in recognition of Pg by SK. The substantially lower affinity of the final SK · Pg complex compared with SK · Pm is characterized by a ∼ 25-fold weaker encounter complex and ∼ 40-fold faster off-rates for the second conformational step. The results suggest that effective Pg encounter requires SK Lys(414) engagement and significant non-LBS interactions with the protease domain, whereas Pm binding additionally requires contributions of other lysines. This difference may be responsible for the lower affinity of the SK · Pg complex and the expression of a weaker "pro"-exosite for binding of a second Pg in the substrate mode compared with SK · Pm. PMID:25138220

  6. Rapid Binding of Plasminogen to Streptokinase in a Catalytic Complex Reveals a Three-step Mechanism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhamme, Ingrid M.; Bock, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid kinetics demonstrate a three-step pathway of streptokinase (SK) binding to plasminogen (Pg), the zymogen of plasmin (Pm). Formation of a fluorescently silent encounter complex is followed by two conformational tightening steps reported by fluorescence quenches. Forward reactions were defined by time courses of biphasic quenching during complex formation between SK or its COOH-terminal Lys414 deletion mutant (SKΔK414) and active site-labeled [Lys]Pg ([5-(acetamido)fluorescein]-d-Phe-Phe-Arg-[Lys]Pg ([5F]FFR-[Lys]Pg)) and by the SK dependences of the quench rates. Active site-blocked Pm rapidly displaced [5F]FFR-[Lys]Pg from the complex. The encounter and final SK·[5F]FFR-[Lys]Pg complexes were weakened similarly by SK Lys414 deletion and blocking of lysine-binding sites (LBSs) on Pg kringles with 6-aminohexanoic acid or benzamidine. Forward and reverse rates for both tightening steps were unaffected by 6-aminohexanoic acid, whereas benzamidine released constraints on the first conformational tightening. This indicated that binding of SK Lys414 to Pg kringle 4 plays a role in recognition of Pg by SK. The substantially lower affinity of the final SK·Pg complex compared with SK·Pm is characterized by a ∼25-fold weaker encounter complex and ∼40-fold faster off-rates for the second conformational step. The results suggest that effective Pg encounter requires SK Lys414 engagement and significant non-LBS interactions with the protease domain, whereas Pm binding additionally requires contributions of other lysines. This difference may be responsible for the lower affinity of the SK·Pg complex and the expression of a weaker “pro”-exosite for binding of a second Pg in the substrate mode compared with SK·Pm. PMID:25138220

  7. Substrate binding and catalytic mechanism in phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus. a molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Graça Thrige, D; Buur, J R; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    1997-01-01

    For the first time a consistent catalytic mechanism of phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus is reported based on molecular mechanics calculations. We have identified the position of the nucleophilic water molecule, which is directly involved in the hydrolysis of the natural substrate phosphatidyl...

  8. Advances in modeling and design of adhesively bonded systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, S

    2013-01-01

    The book comprehensively charts a way for industry to employ adhesively bonded joints to make systems more efficient and cost-effective Adhesively bonded systems have found applications in a wide spectrum of industries (e.g., aerospace, electronics, construction, ship building, biomedical, etc.) for a variety of purposes. Emerging adhesive materials with improved mechanical properties have allowed adhesion strength approaching that of the bonded materials themselves. Due to advances in adhesive materials and the many potential merits that adhesive bonding offers, adhesive bonding has replac

  9. Theory and simulations of adhesion receptor dimerization on membrane surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yinghao; Honig, Barry; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam

    2013-03-19

    The equilibrium constants of trans and cis dimerization of membrane bound (2D) and freely moving (3D) adhesion receptors are expressed and compared using elementary statistical-thermodynamics. Both processes are mediated by the binding of extracellular subdomains whose range of motion in the 2D environment is reduced upon dimerization, defining a thin reaction shell where dimer formation and dissociation take place. We show that the ratio between the 2D and 3D equilibrium constants can be expressed as a product of individual factors describing, respectively, the spatial ranges of motions of the adhesive domains, and their rotational freedom within the reaction shell. The results predicted by the theory are compared to those obtained from a novel, to our knowledge, dynamical simulations methodology, whereby pairs of receptors perform realistic translational, internal, and rotational motions in 2D and 3D. We use cadherins as our model system. The theory and simulations explain how the strength of cis and trans interactions of adhesive receptors are affected both by their presence in the constrained intermembrane space and by the 2D environment of membrane surfaces. Our work provides fundamental insights as to the mechanism of lateral clustering of adhesion receptors after cell-cell contact and, more generally, to the formation of lateral microclusters of proteins on cell surfaces. PMID:23528081

  10. Surface binding sites (SBSs), mechanism and regulation of enzymes degrading amylopectin and α-limit dextrins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Marie Sofie; Cockburn, Darrell; Nielsen, Jonas W.;

    2013-01-01

    Certain enzymes interact with polysaccharides at surface binding sites (SBSs) situated outside of their active sites. SBSs are not easily identified and their function has been discerned in relatively few cases. Starch degradation is a concerted action involving GH13 hydrolases. New insight...... into barley seed α-amylase 1 (AMY1) and limit dextrinase (LD) includes i. kinetics of bi-exponential amylopectin hydrolysis by AMY1, one reaction having low Km (8 μg/mL) and high kcat (57 s-1) and the other high Km (97 μg/mL) and low kcat (23 s-1). β-Cyclodextrin (β-CD) inhibits the first reaction by binding...

  11. Kinetic mechanism and order of substrate binding for sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase from squash (Cucurbita moschata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, Matthew W; Fawcett, Tony; Slabas, Antoni R

    2002-03-13

    sn-Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (G3PAT, EC 2.3.1.15), a component of glycerolipid biosynthesis, is an important enzyme in chilling sensitivity in plants. The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme from squash (Cucurbita moschata), without bound substrate, has been determined [Turnbull et al. (2001) Acta Crystallogr. D 57, 451-453; Turnbull et al. (2001) Structure 9, 347-353]. Here we report the kinetic mechanism of plastidial G3PAT from squash and the order of substrate binding using acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) substrates. The reaction proceeds via a compulsory-ordered ternary complex with acyl-ACP binding before glycerol-3-phosphate. We have also determined that the reaction will proceed with C(4:0)-CoA, C(6:0)-CoA and C(12:0)-ACP substrates, allowing a wider choice of acyl groups for future co-crystallisation studies.

  12. Ritonavir binds to and downregulates estrogen receptors: Molecular mechanism of promoting early atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Jin [Ministry of Education Laboratory of Combinatorial Biosynthesis and Drug Discovery, School of Pharmaceutical Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wang, Ying [Department of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Su, Ke [Department of Nephrology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060 (China); Liu, Min [Ministry of Education Laboratory of Combinatorial Biosynthesis and Drug Discovery, School of Pharmaceutical Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hu, Peng-Chao [Department of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Ma, Tian; Li, Jia-Xi [Ministry of Education Laboratory of Combinatorial Biosynthesis and Drug Discovery, School of Pharmaceutical Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wei, Lei [Department of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zheng, Zhongliang, E-mail: biochem@whu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yang, Fang, E-mail: fang-yang@whu.edu.cn [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2014-10-01

    Estrogenic actions are closely related to cardiovascular disease. Ritonavir (RTV), a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitor, induces atherosclerosis in an estrogen-related manner. However, how RTV induce pathological phenotypes through estrogen pathway remains unclear. In this study, we found that RTV increases thickness of coronary artery walls of Sprague Dawley rats and plasma free fatty acids (FFA) levels. In addition, RTV could induce foam cell formation, downregulate both estrogen receptor α (ERα) and ERβ expression, upregulate G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) expression, and all of them could be partially blocked by 17β-estradiol (E2), suggesting RTV acts as an antagonist for E2. Computational modeling shows a similar interaction with ERα between RTV and 2-aryl indoles, which are highly subtype-selective ligands for ERα. We also found that RTV directly bound to ERα and selectively inhibited the nuclear localization of ERα, and residue Leu536 in the hydrophobic core of ligand binding domain (LBD) was essential for the interaction with RTV. In addition, RTV did not change the secondary structure of ERα-LBD like E2, which explained how ERα lost the capacity of nuclear translocation under the treatment of RTV. All of the evidences suggest that ritonavir acts as an antagonist for 17β-estradiol in regulating α subtype estrogen receptor function and early events of atherosclerosis. - Graphical abstract: RTV directly binds to ERα and Leu536 in the hydrophobic core of ligand binding domain is essential for the interaction. - Highlights: • RTV increases the thickness of rat coronary artery wall and foam cell formation. • RTV downregulates the expression of ERα and ERβ. • RTV inhibits ERα promoter activity. • RTV directly binds to ERα and the key amino acid is Leu536. • RTV inhibits the nuclear translocation of ERα and GPER.

  13. Advanced adhesives in electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, C

    2011-01-01

    Adhesives are widely used in the manufacture of electronic devices to act as passive and active components. Recently there has been considerable interest in the use of conductive adhesives. This book reviews key types of conductive adhesives, processing methods, properties and the way they can be modelled as well as potential applications.$bAdhesives for electronic applications serve important functional and structural purposes in electronic components and packaging, and have developed significantly over the last few decades. Advanced adhesives in electronics reviews recent developments in adhesive joining technology, processing and properties. The book opens with an introduction to adhesive joining technology for electronics. Part one goes on to cover different types of adhesive used in electronic systems, including thermally conductive adhesives, isotropic and anisotropic conductive adhesives and underfill adhesives for flip-chip applications. Part two focuses on the properties and processing of electronic ...

  14. C-terminal substitution of MDM2 interacting peptides modulates binding affinity by distinctive mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Brown

    Full Text Available The complex between the proteins MDM2 and p53 is a promising drug target for cancer therapy. The residues 19-26 of p53 have been biochemically and structurally demonstrated to be a most critical region to maintain the association of MDM2 and p53. Variation of the amino acid sequence in this range obviously alters the binding affinity. Surprisingly, suitable substitutions contiguous to this region of the p53 peptides can yield tightly binding peptides. The peptide variants may differ by a single residue that vary little in their structural conformations and yet are characterized by large differences in their binding affinities. In this study a systematic analysis into the role of single C-terminal mutations of a 12 residue fragment of the p53 transactivation domain (TD and an equivalent phage optimized peptide (12/1 were undertaken to elucidate their mechanistic and thermodynamic differences in interacting with the N-terminal of MDM2. The experimental results together with atomistically detailed dynamics simulations provide insight into the principles that govern peptide design protocols with regard to protein-protein interactions and peptidomimetic design.

  15. Displacement of p130Cas from focal adhesions links actomyosin contraction to cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiyama, Hiroaki; Hirata, Hiroaki; Loh, Xia Kun; Kanchi, Madhu Mathi; Fujita, Hideaki; Tan, Song Hui; Kawauchi, Keiko; Sawada, Yasuhiro

    2014-08-15

    Cell adhesion complexes provide platforms where cell-generated forces are transmitted to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion proteins is crucial for cells to communicate with the extracellular environment. However, the mechanisms that transmit actin cytoskeletal motion to the extracellular environment to drive cell migration are poorly understood. We find that the movement of p130Cas (Cas, also known as BCAR1), a mechanosensor at focal adhesions, correlates with actin retrograde flow and depends upon actomyosin contraction and phosphorylation of the Cas substrate domain (CasSD). This indicates that CasSD phosphorylation underpins the physical link between Cas and the actin cytoskeleton. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments reveal that CasSD phosphorylation, as opposed to the association of Cas with Src, facilitates Cas displacement from adhesion complexes in migrating cells. Furthermore, the stabilization of Src-Cas binding and inhibition of myosin II, both of which sustain CasSD phosphorylation but mitigate Cas displacement from adhesion sites, retard cell migration. These results indicate that Cas promotes cell migration by linking actomyosin contractions to the adhesion complexes through a dynamic interaction with Src as well as through the phosphorylation-dependent association with the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:24928898

  16. Adhesive Wear Fractal Model for End Face of Mechanical Seals%机械密封端面黏着磨损分形模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    房桂芳; 滕文锐; 刘其和; 张鹏高; 魏龙

    2013-01-01

    According to archard wear theory, a adhesive wear fractal model of the end face of mechanical seals was established by introducing the fractal wear coefficient and solving the volume of plastic and elastic-plastic deformation asperities, on the basis of contact fractal model of the end face of mechanical seals. The relationship among the wear rate, the profile fractal parameter of the end face of the soft ring, the real contact area, the material performance parameters and the working parameters of mechanical seals were obtained. The wear rate of the end face of soft ring of B104a - 70 mechanical seal was calculated and analyzed. The results indicate that the wear rate of the end face increases with increase in the face pressure, the rotating speed and the characteristic length scale of the end face, and it decreases rapidly at first and then increases gradually with increase in the fractal dimension. There exists an optimum fractal dimension which make wear rate minimum.%在机械密封端面接触分形模型基础上,依据Archard磨损理论,通过引入分形磨损系数及求解塑性和弹塑性变形微凸体的体积,建立了机械密封端面黏着磨损分形模型.得到了机械密封软质环端面磨损率与端面轮廓分形参数、真实接触面积、材料性能参数以及工作参数之间的关系式.对B104a-70型机械密封软质环端面的磨损率进行了计算和分析.结果表明,端面磨损率随着端面比压、转速及端面特征尺度系数的增大而增大;随着端面分形维数的增大先迅速减小后逐渐增大,即存在一个使磨损率最小的最优分形维数.

  17. Targeting of nucleotide-binding proteins by HAMLET--a conserved tumor cell death mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J C S; Nadeem, A; Rydström, A; Puthia, M; Svanborg, C

    2016-02-18

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills tumor cells broadly suggesting that conserved survival pathways are perturbed. We now identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET binding partners, accounting for about 35% of all HAMLET targets in a protein microarray comprising 8000 human proteins. Target kinases were present in all branches of the Kinome tree, including 26 tyrosine kinases, 10 tyrosine kinase-like kinases, 13 homologs of yeast sterile kinases, 4 casein kinase 1 kinases, 15 containing PKA, PKG, PKC family kinases, 15 calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases and 13 kinases from CDK, MAPK, GSK3, CLK families. HAMLET acted as a broad kinase inhibitor in vitro, as defined in a screen of 347 wild-type, 93 mutant, 19 atypical and 17 lipid kinases. Inhibition of phosphorylation was also detected in extracts from HAMLET-treated lung carcinoma cells. In addition, HAMLET recognized 24 Ras family proteins and bound to Ras, RasL11B and Rap1B on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Direct cellular interactions between HAMLET and activated Ras family members including Braf were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. As a consequence, oncogenic Ras and Braf activity was inhibited and HAMLET and Braf inhibitors synergistically increased tumor cell death in response to HAMLET. Unlike most small molecule kinase inhibitors, HAMLET showed selectivity for tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The results identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET targets and suggest that dysregulation of the ATPase/kinase/GTPase machinery contributes to cell death, following the initial, selective recognition of HAMLET by tumor cells. The findings thus provide a molecular basis for the conserved tumoricidal effect of HAMLET, through dysregulation of kinases and oncogenic GTPases, to which tumor cells are addicted. PMID:26028028

  18. Targeting of nucleotide-binding proteins by HAMLET--a conserved tumor cell death mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J C S; Nadeem, A; Rydström, A; Puthia, M; Svanborg, C

    2016-02-18

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills tumor cells broadly suggesting that conserved survival pathways are perturbed. We now identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET binding partners, accounting for about 35% of all HAMLET targets in a protein microarray comprising 8000 human proteins. Target kinases were present in all branches of the Kinome tree, including 26 tyrosine kinases, 10 tyrosine kinase-like kinases, 13 homologs of yeast sterile kinases, 4 casein kinase 1 kinases, 15 containing PKA, PKG, PKC family kinases, 15 calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases and 13 kinases from CDK, MAPK, GSK3, CLK families. HAMLET acted as a broad kinase inhibitor in vitro, as defined in a screen of 347 wild-type, 93 mutant, 19 atypical and 17 lipid kinases. Inhibition of phosphorylation was also detected in extracts from HAMLET-treated lung carcinoma cells. In addition, HAMLET recognized 24 Ras family proteins and bound to Ras, RasL11B and Rap1B on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Direct cellular interactions between HAMLET and activated Ras family members including Braf were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. As a consequence, oncogenic Ras and Braf activity was inhibited and HAMLET and Braf inhibitors synergistically increased tumor cell death in response to HAMLET. Unlike most small molecule kinase inhibitors, HAMLET showed selectivity for tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The results identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET targets and suggest that dysregulation of the ATPase/kinase/GTPase machinery contributes to cell death, following the initial, selective recognition of HAMLET by tumor cells. The findings thus provide a molecular basis for the conserved tumoricidal effect of HAMLET, through dysregulation of kinases and oncogenic GTPases, to which tumor cells are addicted.

  19. Processivity, substrate binding, and mechanism of cellulose hydrolysis by Thermobifida fusca Cel9A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongchao; Irwin, Diana C; Wilson, David B

    2007-05-01

    Thermobifida fusca Cel9A-90 is a processive endoglucanase consisting of a family 9 catalytic domain (CD), a family 3c cellulose binding module (CBM3c), a fibronectin III-like domain, and a family 2 CBM. This enzyme has the highest activity of any individual T. fusca enzyme on crystalline substrates, particularly bacterial cellulose (BC). Mutations were introduced into the CD or the CBM3c of Cel9A-68 using site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli; purified; and tested for activity on four substrates, ligand binding, and processivity. The results show that H125 and Y206 play an important role in activity by forming a hydrogen bonding network with the catalytic base, D58; another important supporting residue, D55; and Glc(-1) O1. R378, a residue interacting with Glc(+1), plays an important role in processivity. Several enzymes with mutations in the subsites Glc(-2) to Glc(-4) had less than 15% activity on BC and markedly reduced processivity. Mutant enzymes with severalfold-higher activity on carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were found in the subsites from Glc(-2) to Glc(-4). The CBM3c mutant enzymes, Y520A, R557A/E559A, and R563A, had decreased activity on BC but had wild-type or improved processivity. Mutation of D513, a conserved residue at the end of the CBM, increased activity on crystalline cellulose. Previous work showed that deletion of the CBM3c abolished crystalline activity and processivity. This study shows that it is residues in the catalytic cleft that control processivity while the CBM3c is important for loose binding of the enzyme to the crystalline cellulose substrate. PMID:17369336

  20. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  1. A Novel DNA Binding Mechanism for maf Basic Region-Leucine Zipper Factors Inferred from a MafA-DNA Complex Structure and Binding Specificities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xun; Guanga, Gerald P; Wan, Cheng; Rose, Robert B [Z; (W Elec.); (NCSU)

    2012-11-13

    MafA is a proto-oncoprotein and is critical for insulin gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. Maf proteins belong to the AP1 superfamily of basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors. Residues in the basic helix and an ancillary N-terminal domain, the Extended Homology Region (EHR), endow maf proteins with unique DNA binding properties: binding a 13 bp consensus site consisting of a core AP1 site (TGACTCA) flanked by TGC sequences and binding DNA stably as monomers. To further characterize maf DNA binding, we determined the structure of a MafA–DNA complex. MafA forms base-specific hydrogen bonds with the flanking G–5C–4 and central C0/G0 bases, but not with the core-TGA bases. However, in vitro binding studies utilizing a pulse–chase electrophoretic mobility shift assay protocol revealed that mutating either the core-TGA or flanking-TGC bases dramatically increases the binding off rate. Comparing the known maf structures, we propose that DNA binding specificity results from positioning the basic helix through unique phosphate contacts. The EHR does not contact DNA directly but stabilizes DNA binding by contacting the basic helix. Collectively, these results suggest a novel multistep DNA binding process involving a conformational change from contacting the core-TGA to contacting the flanking-TGC bases.

  2. The role of the Zn(II binding domain in the mechanism of E. coli DNA topoisomerase I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tse-Dinh Yuk-Ching

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I binds three Zn(II with three tetracysteine motifs which, together with the 14 kDa C-terminal region, form a 30 kDa DNA binding domain (ZD domain. The 67 kDa N-terminal domain (Top67 has the active site tyrosine for DNA cleavage but cannot relax negatively supercoiled DNA. We analyzed the role of the ZD domain in the enzyme mechanism. Results Addition of purified ZD domain to Top67 partially restored the relaxation activity, demonstrating that covalent linkage between the two domains is not necessary for removal of negative supercoils from DNA. The two domains had similar affinities to ssDNA. However, only Top67 could bind dsDNA with high affinity. DNA cleavage assays showed that the Top67 had the same sequence and structure selectivity for DNA cleavage as the intact enzyme. DNA rejoining also did not require the presence of the ZD domain. Conclusions We propose that during relaxation of negatively supercoiled DNA, Top67 by itself can position the active site tyrosine near the junction of double-stranded and single-stranded DNA for cleavage. However, the interaction of the ZD domain with the passing single-strand of DNA, coupled with enzyme conformational change, is needed for removal of negative supercoils.

  3. NMR studies of the AMP-binding site and mechanism of adenylate kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, D.C.; Kuby, S.A.; Mildvan, A.S.

    1987-03-24

    NMR has previously been used to determine the conformation of enzyme-bound MgATP and to locate the MgATP-binding site on adenylate kinase. To determine the conformation and location of the other substrate, AMP, distances have been measured from Cr/sup 3 +/AMPPCP, a linear competitive inhibitor with respect to MgATP, to six protons and to the phosphorus atom of AMP on adenylate kinase, with the paramagnetic probe-T/sub 1/ method. Time-dependent nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) have been used to measure five interproton distances on enzyme-bound AMP. These distances were used to determine the conformation of bound AMP in addition to its position with respect to metal-ATP. Ten intermolecular NOEs, from protons of the enzyme to those of AMP, were detected, indicating the proximity of at least three hydrophobic amino acids to bound AMP. These constraints, together with the conformation of AMP and the intersubstrate distances, were used to position AMP into the X-ray structure of adenylate kinase. The AMP binding site is found to be near Leu-116, Arg-171, Val-173, Val-182, and Leu-190; all of these residues have been found to be invariant in muscle-type rabbit, calf, human, porcine.

  4. An intermolecular binding mechanism involving multiple LysM domains mediates carbohydrate recognition by an endopeptidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Jaslyn E. M. M. [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Midtgaard, Søren Roi [University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Gysel, Kira [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Thygesen, Mikkel B.; Sørensen, Kasper K.; Jensen, Knud J. [University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren; Blaise, Mickaël, E-mail: mickael.blaise@cpbs.cnrs.fr [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark)

    2015-03-01

    The crystal and solution structures of the T. thermophilus NlpC/P60 d, l-endopeptidase as well as the co-crystal structure of its N-terminal LysM domains bound to chitohexaose allow a proposal to be made regarding how the enzyme recognizes peptidoglycan. LysM domains, which are frequently present as repetitive entities in both bacterial and plant proteins, are known to interact with carbohydrates containing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, such as chitin and peptidoglycan. In bacteria, the functional significance of the involvement of multiple LysM domains in substrate binding has so far lacked support from high-resolution structures of ligand-bound complexes. Here, a structural study of the Thermus thermophilus NlpC/P60 endopeptidase containing two LysM domains is presented. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering solution studies of this endopeptidase revealed the presence of a homodimer. The structure of the two LysM domains co-crystallized with N-acetyl-chitohexaose revealed a new intermolecular binding mode that may explain the differential interaction between LysM domains and short or long chitin oligomers. By combining the structural information with the three-dimensional model of peptidoglycan, a model suggesting how protein dimerization enhances the recognition of peptidoglycan is proposed.

  5. Design and fabrication of polymer based dry adhesives inspired by the gecko adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kejia

    There has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties: the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this thesis, easy, scalable methods, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques are presented to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provide anisotropic adhesion properties. In the first part of the study, the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function are measured. Consistent with the Peel Zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. Contact mechanics of the synthetic array were highly anisotropic, consistent with the frictional adhesion model and gecko-like. Based on the original design, a new design of gecko-like dry adhesives was developed which showed superior tribological properties and furthermore showed anisotropic adhesive properties without the need for tilt in the structures. These adhesives can be used to reversibly suspend weights from vertical surfaces (e.g., walls) and, for the first time to our knowledge, horizontal surfaces (e.g., ceilings) by simultaneously and judiciously activating anisotropic friction and adhesion forces. Furthermore, adhesion properties between artificial gecko-inspired dry adhesives and rough substrates with varying roughness are studied. The results suggest that both adhesion and friction forces on a rough substrate depends significantly on the

  6. Detailed characterization of the cooperative mechanism of Ca(2+) binding and catalytic activation in the Ca(2+) transport (SERCA) ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Lewis, D; Strock, C; Inesi, G; Nakasako, M; Nomura, H; Toyoshima, C

    2000-08-01

    Expression of heterologous SERCA1a ATPase in Cos-1 cells was optimized to yield levels that account for 10-15% of the microsomal protein, as revealed by protein staining on electrophoretic gels. This high level of expression significantly improved our characterization of mutants, including direct measurements of Ca(2+) binding by the ATPase in the absence of ATP, and measurements of various enzyme functions in the presence of ATP or P(i). Mutational analysis distinguished two groups of amino acids within the transmembrane domain: The first group includes Glu771 (M5), Thr799 (M6), Asp800 (M6), and Glu908 (M8), whose individual mutations totally inhibit binding of the two Ca(2+) required for activation of one ATPase molecule. The second group includes Glu309 (M4) and Asn796 (M6), whose individual or combined mutations inhibit binding of only one and the same Ca(2+). The effects of mutations of these amino acids were interpreted in the light of recent information on the ATPase high-resolution structure, explaining the mechanism of Ca(2+) binding and catalytic activation in terms of two cooperative sites. The Glu771, Thr799, and Asp800 side chains contribute prominently to site 1, together with less prominent contributions by Asn768 and Glu908. The Glu309, Asn796, and Asp800 side chains, as well as the Ala305 (and possibly Val304 and Ile307) carbonyl oxygen, contribute to site 2. Sequential binding begins with Ca(2+) occupancy of site 1, followed by transition to a conformation (E') sensitive to Ca(2+) inhibition of enzyme phosphorylation by P(i), but still unable to utilize ATP. The E' conformation accepts the second Ca(2+) on site 2, producing then a conformation (E' ') which is able to utilize ATP. Mutations of residues (Asp813 and Asp818) in the M6/M7 loop reduce Ca(2+) affinity and catalytic turnover, suggesting a strong influence of this loop on the correct positioning of the M6 helix. Mutation of Asp351 (at the catalytic site within the cytosolic domain

  7. p38 signaling and receptor recycling events in a microfluidic endothelial cell adhesion assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwayne A L Vickers

    Full Text Available Adhesion-based microfluidic cell separation has proven to be very useful in applications ranging from cancer diagnostics to tissue engineering. This process involves functionalizing microchannel surfaces with a capture molecule. High specificity and purity capture can be achieved using this method. Despite these advances, little is known about the mechanisms that govern cell capture within these devices and their relationships to basic process parameters such as fluid shear stress and the presence of soluble factors. This work examines how the adhesion of human endothelial cells (ECs is influenced by a soluble tetrapeptide, Arg-Glu-Asp-Val (REDV and fluidic shear stress. The ability of these ECs to bind within microchannels coated with REDV is shown to be governed by shear- and soluble-factor mediated changes in p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase expression together with recycling of adhesion receptors from the endosome.

  8. Role of CD18-dependent and CD18-independent mechanisms in the increased leukocyte adhesiveness and in the variations of circulating white blood cell populations induced by anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnaert, P; Pradier, O; Bournonville, B; Habrant, C; Goldman, M; Van Geertruyden, N

    1996-01-01

    Anti-CD3 antibodies induce a quick and profound depletion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) that is not well understood. We studied the effect of OKT3, a mouse monoclonal antibody against the human CD3 complex, on the in vitro adhesion of human PBMCs to monolayers of fresh and fixed human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). OKT3 induced an increased adhesiveness of PBMCs. This phenomenon was blocked with anti-CD18 antibodies, indicating the participation of beta 2 integrins. As this increased adhesiveness could explain the lymphopenia by adhesion of PBMCs to endothelial cells and their sequestration in some peripheral vascular beds, we studied the effect of anti-CD18 antibodies in vivo on mice injected with 145/2C11, a hamster monoclonal antibody against murine CD3. Mice treated with 145/2C11 presented with a transient granulocytopenia and a sustained reduction in PBMCs. A monoclonal anti-CD18 antibody prevented the granulocytopenia but had no effect on the drop in PBMCs. Consequently, the in vivo depletion of PBMCs after administration of an anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody involves CD18-independent mechanisms, while the transient drop in polymorphonuclear cells appears to be CD18-dependent. PMID:8819275

  9. CXCR4 Chemokine Receptor Mediates Prostate Tumor Cell Adhesion through α5 and β3 Integrins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Engl

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms leading to prostate cancer metastasis are not understood completely. Although there is evidence that the CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR 4 and its ligand CXCL12 may regulate tumor dissemination, their role in prostate cancer is controversial. We examined CXCR4 expression and functionality, and explored CXCL12-triggered adhesion of prostate tumor cells to human endothelium or to extracellular matrix proteins laminin, collagen, and fibronectin. Although little CXCR4 was expressed on LNCaP and DU-145 prostate tumor cells, CXCR4 was still active, enabling the cells to migrate toward a CXCL12 gradient. CXCL12 induced elevated adhesion to the endothelial cell monolayer and to immobilized fibronectin, laminin, and collagen. Anti-CXCR4 antibodies or CXCR4 knock out significantly impaired CXCL 12-triggered tumor cell binding. The effects observed did not depend on CXCR4 surface expression level. Rather, CXCR4-mediated adhesion was established by α5 and β3 integrin subunits and took place in the presence of reduced p38 and p38 phosphorylation. These data show that chemoattractive mechanisms are involved in adhesion processes of prostate cancer cells, and that binding of CXCL12 to its receptor leads to enhanced expression of α5 and β3. The findings provide a link between chemokine receptor expression and integrin-triggered tumor dissemination.

  10. Tuneable adhesion through novel binder technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, M.E.L.; Burghoorn, M.M.A.; Ingenhut, B.; Timmer, K.; Rentrop, C.H.A.; Bots, T.L.; Oosterhuis, G.; Fischer, H.R.

    2011-01-01

    A reversible crosslinking mechanism enabling bonding and debonding of adhesives and coatings based on Diels-Alder chemistry is described. The Diels-Alder compounds form a covalently crosslinked network at low temperatures that break at elevated temperatures. As a result, the adhesive exhibits good s

  11. Switchable adhesion by chemical functionality and topography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamperman, M.M.G.; Synytska, A.

    2012-01-01

    Progress in adhesion technology over the last few decades has led to widespread replacement of mechanical fasteners with adhesive bonds. Despite the advances, it remains challenging to produce materials that are sticky on demand. In this feature article we highlight recent efforts to develop reversi

  12. Photoactivation mechanisms of flavin-binding photoreceptors revealed through ultrafast spectroscopy and global analysis methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathes, Tilo; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Kennis, John T M

    2014-01-01

    Flavin-binding photoreceptor proteins use the isoalloxazine moiety of flavin cofactors to absorb light in the blue/UV-A wavelength region and subsequently translate it into biological information. The underlying photochemical reactions and protein structural dynamics are delicately tuned by the protein environment and represent fundamental reactions in biology and chemistry. Due to their photo-switchable nature, these proteins can be studied efficiently with laser-flash induced transient absorption and emission spectroscopy with temporal precision down to the femtosecond time domain. Here, we describe the application of both visible and mid-IR ultrafast transient absorption and time-resolved fluorescence methods in combination with sophisticated global analysis procedures to elucidate the photochemistry and signal transduction of BLUF (Blue light receptors using FAD) and LOV (Light oxygen voltage) photoreceptor domains.

  13. Roles of isolectin B4-binding afferents in colorectal mechanical nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Jun-Ho; Feng, Bin; Kaji, Kaori; Schwartz, Erica S; Gebhart, G F

    2016-02-01

    Isolectin B4-binding (IB4+) dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are distinct from peptidergic DRG neurons in their terminal location in the spinal cord and respective contributions to various classes and modalities of nociception. In DRG neurons innervating the mouse colon (c-DRG neurons), the reported proportion of IB4+ population is inconsistent across studies, and little is known regarding their role in colorectal mechanonociception. To address these issues, in C57BL/6J mice, we quantified IB4+ binding after labeling c-DRG neurons with Fast Blue and examined functional consequences of ablating these neurons by IB4-conjugated saporin. Sixty-one percent of Fast Blue-labeled neurons in the L6 DRG were IB4+, and 95% of these IB4+ c-DRG neurons were peptidergic. Intrathecal administration of IB4-conjugated saporin reduced the proportion of IB4+ c-DRG neurons to 37%, which was due to the loss of c-DRG neurons showing strong to medium IB4+ intensity; c-DRG neurons with weak IB4+ intensity were spared. However, this loss altered neither nociceptive behaviors to colorectal distension nor the relative proportions of stretch-sensitive colorectal afferent classes characterized by single-fiber recordings. These findings demonstrate that more than 1 half of viscerosensory L6 c-DRG neurons in C57BL/6J mouse are IB4+ and suggest, in contrast to the reported roles of IB4+/nonpeptidergic neurons in cutaneous mechanonociception, c-DRG neurons with strong-to-medium IB4+ intensity do not play a significant role in colorectal mechanonociception. PMID:26447707

  14. Quantum mechanical treatment of binding energy between DNA nucleobases and carbon nanotube: A DFT analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chehel Amirani, Morteza; Tang, Tian; Cuervo, Javier

    2013-12-01

    The interactions between DNA and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely studied in recent years. The binding process of DNA with CNT as well as the electronic properties of DNA/CNT hybrids constitutes an interesting yet complicated problem. The binding energy (BE) of the hybridization is one of the most extensively studied parameters for the problem. In this work, density functional theory (DFT) was used to perform geometry optimization of neutral nucleobases including adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine absorbed on a zigzag (7,0) single-walled CNT and to evaluate the basis set superposition error corrected BE of the optimized configuration. All DFT calculations were performed using the M05-2X functional. The 6-31G(d) basis set was used for the optimization step and single point energy calculations were done using the 6-31G(d,p) basis set. For each nucleobase, we examined the influence of the initial configuration (IC) on the BE value. In particular, we considered 24 different ICs for each nucleobase, and each IC was subjected to an independent optimization and BE calculation. Our results showed that different ICs result in very different BE values and can even change the order of the BE corresponding to different nucleobases. The difference in the BE for a particular nucleobase caused by changes in its IC can be comparable to the difference in the BE between different nucleobases at the same initial position relative to the CNT. This provides an explanation for the discrepancies that exist in the literature on the nucleobase/CNT BE, and suggests that the potential energy surface between the nucleobases and the CNT can have many local minima and care should be exercised in the calculation and interpretation of the BE.

  15. Shear adhesion strength of aligned electrospun nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najem, Johnny F; Wong, Shing-Chung; Ji, Guang

    2014-09-01

    Inspiration from nature such as insects' foot hairs motivates scientists to fabricate nanoscale cylindrical solids that allow tens of millions of contact points per unit area with material substrates. In this paper, we present a simple yet robust method for fabricating directionally sensitive shear adhesive laminates. By using aligned electrospun nylon-6, we create dry adhesives, as a succession of our previous work on measuring adhesion energies between two single free-standing electrospun polymer fibers in cross-cylinder geometry, randomly oriented membranes and substrate, and peel forces between aligned fibers and substrate. The synthetic aligned cylindrical solids in this study are electrically insulating and show a maximal Mode II shear adhesion strength of 27 N/cm(2) on a glass slide. This measured value, for the purpose of comparison, is 270% of that reported from gecko feet. The Mode II shear adhesion strength, based on a commonly known "dead-weight" test, is 97-fold greater than the Mode I (normal) adhesion strength of the same. The data indicate a strong shear binding on and easy normal lifting off. Anisotropic adhesion (Mode II/Mode I) is pronounced. The size and surface boundary effects, crystallinity, and bending stiffness of fibers are used to understand these electrospun nanofibers, which vastly differ from otherwise known adhesive technologies. The anisotropic strength distribution is attributed to a decreasing fiber diameter and an optimized laminate thickness, which, in turn, influences the bending stiffness and solid-state "wettability" of points of contact between nanofibers and surface asperities.

  16. Converging ligand-binding free energies obtained with free-energy perturbations at the quantum mechanical level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Martin A; Söderhjelm, Pär; Ryde, Ulf

    2016-06-30

    In this article, the convergence of quantum mechanical (QM) free-energy simulations based on molecular dynamics simulations at the molecular mechanics (MM) level has been investigated. We have estimated relative free energies for the binding of nine cyclic carboxylate ligands to the octa-acid deep-cavity host, including the host, the ligand, and all water molecules within 4.5 Å of the ligand in the QM calculations (158-224 atoms). We use single-step exponential averaging (ssEA) and the non-Boltzmann Bennett acceptance ratio (NBB) methods to estimate QM/MM free energy with the semi-empirical PM6-DH2X method, both based on interaction energies. We show that ssEA with cumulant expansion gives a better convergence and uses half as many QM calculations as NBB, although the two methods give consistent results. With 720,000 QM calculations per transformation, QM/MM free-energy estimates with a precision of 1 kJ/mol can be obtained for all eight relative energies with ssEA, showing that this approach can be used to calculate converged QM/MM binding free energies for realistic systems and large QM partitions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27117350

  17. Quantum mechanics capacitance molecular mechanics modeling of core-electron binding energies of methanol and methyl nitrite on Ag(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löytynoja, T.; Li, X.; Jänkälä, K.; Rinkevicius, Z.; Ågren, H.

    2016-07-01

    We study a newly devised quantum mechanics capacitance molecular mechanics (QMCMM) method for the calculation of core-electron binding energies in the case of molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. This yet untested methodology is applied to systems with monolayer of methanol/methyl nitrite on an Ag(111) surface at 100 K temperature. It was found out that the studied C, N, and O 1s core-hole energies converge very slowly as a function of the radius of the metallic cluster, which was ascribed to build up of positive charge on the edge of the Ag slab. Further analysis revealed that an extrapolation process can be used to obtain binding energies that deviated less than 0.5 eV against experiments, except in the case of methanol O 1s where the difference was as large as 1.8 eV. Additional QM-cluster calculations suggest that the latter error can be connected to the lack of charge transfer over the QM-CMM boundary. Thus, the results indicate that the QMCMM and QM-cluster methods can complement each other in a holistic picture of molecule-adsorbate core-ionization studies, where all types of intermolecular interactions are considered.

  18. Quantum mechanics capacitance molecular mechanics modeling of core-electron binding energies of methanol and methyl nitrite on Ag(111) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löytynoja, T; Li, X; Jänkälä, K; Rinkevicius, Z; Ågren, H

    2016-07-14

    We study a newly devised quantum mechanics capacitance molecular mechanics (QMCMM) method for the calculation of core-electron binding energies in the case of molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. This yet untested methodology is applied to systems with monolayer of methanol/methyl nitrite on an Ag(111) surface at 100 K temperature. It was found out that the studied C, N, and O 1s core-hole energies converge very slowly as a function of the radius of the metallic cluster, which was ascribed to build up of positive charge on the edge of the Ag slab. Further analysis revealed that an extrapolation process can be used to obtain binding energies that deviated less than 0.5 eV against experiments, except in the case of methanol O 1s where the difference was as large as 1.8 eV. Additional QM-cluster calculations suggest that the latter error can be connected to the lack of charge transfer over the QM-CMM boundary. Thus, the results indicate that the QMCMM and QM-cluster methods can complement each other in a holistic picture of molecule-adsorbate core-ionization studies, where all types of intermolecular interactions are considered. PMID:27421423

  19. Quantal concept of T-cell activation: adhesion domains as immunological synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackmann, Erich

    2011-06-01

    Adhesion micro-domains (ADs) formed during encounters of lymphocytes with antigen-presenting cells (APC) mediate the genetic expression of quanta of cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2). The IL-2-induced activation of IL-2 receptors promotes the stepwise progression of the T-cells through the cell cycle, hence their name, immunological synapses. The ADs form short-lived reaction centres controlling the recruitment of activators of the biochemical pathway (the kinases Lck and ZAP) while preventing the access of inhibitors (phosphatase CD45) through steric repulsion forces. CD45 acts as the generator of adhesion domains and, through its role as a spacer protein, also as the promoter of the reaction. In a second phase of T-cell-APC encounters, long-lived global reaction spaces (called supramolecular activation complexes (SMAC)) form by talin-mediated binding of the T-cell integrin (LFA-1) to the counter-receptor ICAM-1, resulting in the formation of ring-like tight adhesion zones (peripheral SMAC). The ADs move to the centre of the intercellular adhesion zone forming the central SMAC, which serve in the recycling of the AD. We propose that cell stimulation is triggered by integrating the effect evoked by the short-lived adhesion domains. Similar global reaction platforms are formed by killer cells to destruct APC. We present a testable mechanical model showing that global reaction spaces (SMAC or dome-like contacts between cytotoxic cells and APC) form by self-organization through delayed activation of the integrin-binding affinity and stabilization of the adhesion zones by F-actin recruitment. The mechanical stability and the polarization of the adhering T-cells are mediated by microtubule-actin cross-talk.

  20. Quantal concept of T-cell activation: adhesion domains as immunological synapses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackmann, Erich, E-mail: sackmann@ph.tum.de [Physics Department E22, Technical University Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Adhesion micro-domains (ADs) formed during encounters of lymphocytes with antigen-presenting cells (APC) mediate the genetic expression of quanta of cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2). The IL-2-induced activation of IL-2 receptors promotes the stepwise progression of the T-cells through the cell cycle, hence their name, immunological synapses. The ADs form short-lived reaction centres controlling the recruitment of activators of the biochemical pathway (the kinases Lck and ZAP) while preventing the access of inhibitors (phosphatase CD45) through steric repulsion forces. CD45 acts as the generator of adhesion domains and, through its role as a spacer protein, also as the promoter of the reaction. In a second phase of T-cell-APC encounters, long-lived global reaction spaces (called supramolecular activation complexes (SMAC)) form by talin-mediated binding of the T-cell integrin (LFA-1) to the counter-receptor ICAM-1, resulting in the formation of ring-like tight adhesion zones (peripheral SMAC). The ADs move to the centre of the intercellular adhesion zone forming the central SMAC, which serve in the recycling of the AD. We propose that cell stimulation is triggered by integrating the effect evoked by the short-lived adhesion domains. Similar global reaction platforms are formed by killer cells to destruct APC. We present a testable mechanical model showing that global reaction spaces (SMAC or dome-like contacts between cytotoxic cells and APC) form by self-organization through delayed activation of the integrin-binding affinity and stabilization of the adhesion zones by F-actin recruitment. The mechanical stability and the polarization of the adhering T-cells are mediated by microtubule-actin cross-talk.

  1. Human climbing with efficiently scaled gecko-inspired dry adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Elliot W; Eason, Eric V; Christensen, David L; Cutkosky, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the mechanism of adhesion in geckos, many synthetic dry adhesives have been developed with desirable gecko-like properties such as reusability, directionality, self-cleaning ability, rough surface adhesion and high adhesive stress. However, fully exploiting these adhesives in practical applications at different length scales requires efficient scaling (i.e. with little loss in adhesion as area grows). Just as natural gecko adhesives have been used as a benchmark for synthetic materials, so can gecko adhesion systems provide a baseline for scaling efficiency. In the tokay gecko (Gekko gecko), a scaling power law has been reported relating the maximum shear stress σmax to the area A: σmax ∝ A(-1/4). We present a mechanical concept which improves upon the gecko's non-uniform load-sharing and results in a nearly even load distribution over multiple patches of gecko-inspired adhesive. We created a synthetic adhesion system incorporating this concept which shows efficient scaling across four orders of magnitude of area, yielding an improved scaling power law: σmax ∝ A(-1/50). Furthermore, we found that the synthetic adhesion system does not fail catastrophically when a simulated failure is induced on a portion of the adhesive. In a practical demonstration, the synthetic adhesion system enabled a 70 kg human to climb vertical glass with 140 cm(2) of adhesive per hand.

  2. Computational Chemistry of Adhesive Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation is intended to determine the electrical mechanical, and chemical properties of adhesive bonds at the molecular level. The initial determinations will be followed by investigations of the effects of environmental effects on the chemistry and properties of the bond layer.

  3. Exploring the drug resistance of V32I and M46L mutant HIV-1 protease to inhibitor TMC114: flap dynamics and binding mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, Biswa Ranjan; Wang, Yixuan

    2015-03-01

    Inhibitors of HIV-1 protease (HIV-1-pr) generally only bind to the active site of the protease. However, for some mutants such as V32I and M46L the TMC114 can bind not only to the active cavity but also to the groove of the flexible flaps. Although the second binding site suggests the higher efficiency of the drug against HIV-1-pr, the drug resistance in HIV-1-pr due to mutations cannot be ignored, which prompts us to investigate the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and behavior of double bound TMC114 (2T) to HIV-1-pr. The conformational dynamics of HIV-1-pr and the binding of TMC114 to the WT, V32I and M46L mutants were investigated with all-atom molecular dynamic (MD) simulation. The 20 ns MD simulation shows many fascinating effects of the inhibitor binding to the WT and mutant proteases. MM-PBSA calculations explain the binding free energies unfavorable for the M46L and V32I mutants as compared to the WT. For the single binding (1T) the less binding affinity can be attributed to the entropic loss for both V32I-1T and M46L-1T. Although the second binding of TMC114 with flap does increase binding energy for the mutants (V32I-2T and M46L-2T), the considerable entropy loss results in the lower binding Gibbs free energies. Thus, binding of TMC114 in the flap region does not help much in the total gain in binding affinity of the system, which was verified from this study and thereby validating experiments. PMID:25562662

  4. Adhesion of actinomyces isolates to experimental pellicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, D; Kopec, L K; Bowen, W H

    1993-06-01

    The ability of oral bacteria to adhere to surfaces is associated with their pathogenicity. Actinomyces can adhere to pellicle and cells through extracellular fimbriae. Research on adhesion of actinomyces has been conducted with use of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated with mammalian-derived salivary constituents, whereas the bacterial-derived components of the acquired pellicle have been largely ignored. The influence of the cell-free bacterial enzyme, glucosyltransferase (GTF), on adhesion of human and rodent isolates of Actinomyces viscosus was examined. Cell-free GTF was adsorbed onto parotid saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (sHA). Next, A. viscosus was exposed to the pellicle following the synthesis of glucan formed in situ by GTF. Glucans formed on the pellicle served as binding sites for adhesion of a rodent strain of A. viscosus. Conversely, the presence of in situ glucans on sHA reduced the adhesion of human isolates of A. viscosus compared with their adhesion to sHA. Adhesion of the rodent strains may be facilitated through a dextran-binding protein, since the rodent strains aggregated in the presence of dextrans and mutan. The human isolates were not aggregated by dextran or mutan. Pellicle harboring A. viscosus rodent strains interfered with the subsequent adhesion of Streptococcus mutans to the bacterial-coated pellicle. In contrast, the adhesion of S. mutans to pellicle was not decreased when the pellicle was pre-exposed to a human isolate of A. viscosus. The experimental data suggest that human and the rodent isolates of A. viscosus have distinct glucan adhesion properties.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8496474

  5. Elastocapilllarity in insect adhesion: the case of beetle adhesive hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernay, Sophie; Gilet, Tristan; Lambert, Pierre; Federle, Walter

    2014-11-01

    The feet of many insects are covered with dense arrays of hair-like structures called setae. Liquid capillary bridges at the tip of these micrometric structures are responsible for the controlled adhesion of the insect on a large variety of substrates. The resulting adhesion force can exceed several times the body weight of the insect. The high aspect-ratio of setae suggests that flexibility is a key ingredient in this capillary-based adhesion mechanism. There is indeed a strong coupling between their elastic deformation and the shape of the liquid meniscus. In this experimental work, we observe and quantify the local deflection of dock beetle seta tips under perpendicular loading using interference microscopy. Our results are then interpreted in the light of an analytic model of elastocapillarity. This research has been funded by the FRIA/FNRS and the Interuniversity Attraction Poles Programme (IAP 7/38 MicroMAST) initiated by the Belgian Science Policy Office.

  6. Relevance of DNA binding to the mechanism of anti-herpesvirus activity of benzhydrazone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palu, G; Tognon, M; Romanelli, M G; Rassu, M; Parolin, M C; Zagotto, G; Palumbo, M

    1993-04-01

    Benzhydrazone (1H-benz(f)indene-1,3(2H)-dione bis (amidino-hydrazone) (BH) is a synthetic compound with selective anti-herpesvirus activity. Its selectivity seems to stem from the inhibition of viral protein glycosylation and several hypotheses have been formulated to explain such an effect. Data presented here demonstrate that DNA binding is a prominent feature of BH. Interaction is taking place with a relatively high affinity constant and is more efficient for GC-rich viral sequences. Experiments with the cloned DNA fragments from a BH-resistant virus strain indicate that BH-DNA complex formation is drastically reduced as compared to BH-sensitive virus. The occurrence of the resistant phenotype in HEp-2 cells but not in Vero cells could be explained by differences in BH cytotoxicity. Changes in drug uptake and accumulation by cells following infection, in addition to GC preference, may also account for the degree of antiviral selectivity shown by BH. PMID:8387259

  7. Mechanical properties of phosphorene nanotubes: a density functional tight-binding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkin, V; Zhang, Y W

    2016-09-30

    Using the density functional tight-binding method, we studied the elastic properties, deformation and failure of armchair (AC) and zigzag (ZZ) phosphorene nanotubes (PNTs) under uniaxial tensile strain. We found that the deformation and failure of PNTs are very much anisotropic. For ZZ PNTs, three deformation phases are recognized: the primary linear elastic phase-which is associated with interactions between neighboring puckers, succeeded by the bond rotation phase-where the puckered configuration of phosphorene is smoothed via bond rotation, and lastly the bond elongation phase-where the P-P bonds are directly stretched up to the maximally allowed limit and failure is initiated by the rupture of the most stretched bonds. For AC PNTs, the applied strain stretches the bonds up to the maximally allowed limit, causing their ultimate failure. For both AC and ZZ PNTs, their failure strain and failure stress are sensitive- while the Young's modulus, flexural rigidity, radial Poisson's ratio and thickness Poisson's ratio are relatively insensitive-to the tube diameter. More specifically, for AC PNTs, the failure strain decreases from 0.40 to 0.25 and the failure stress increases from 13 GPa to 21 GPa when the tube diameter increases from 13.3 Å to 32.8 Å; while for ZZ PNTs, the failure strain decreases from 0.66 to 0.55 and the failure stress increases from 4 GPa to 9 GPa when the tube diameter increases from 13.2 Å to 31.1 Å. The Young's modulus, flexural rigidity, radial and thickness Poisson ratios are 114.2 GPa, 0.019 eV · nm(2), 0.47 and 0.11 for AC PNTs, and 49.2 GPa, 0.071 eV · nm(2), 0.07 and 0.21 for ZZ PNTs, respectively. The present findings provide valuable references for the design and application of PNTs as device elements. PMID:27535543

  8. Metal binding mediated conformational change of XPA protein:a potential cytotoxic mechanism of nickel in the nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianping; Hu, Ziheng; Zhang, Yan; Gou, Xiaojun; Mu, Ying; Wang, Lirong; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2016-07-01

    structural biology information. Thus, we derived a putative cytotoxic mechanism associated with the nickel ion, where the Ni(2+) disrupts the conformation of the XPA Zn-finger, directly weakening its interaction with RPA70N, and thus lowering the effectiveness of the NER process. In sum, this work not only provides a theoretical insight into the multi-protein interactions involved in the NER process and potential cytotoxic mechanism associated with Ni(2+) binding in XPA, but may also facilitate rational anti-cancer drug design based on the NER mechanism. PMID:27307058

  9. 肾小管上皮细胞与基底膜的粘附力学特性%The adhesive mechanical properties of renal tubular epithelial cells on matrigel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋关斌; 俞为群; 王东; 吴雄飞

    2000-01-01

    purpose: to investigate the adhesive properties of renal tubular epithelial cells on matrigel and compared with the following three cases: ischemia、hypoxia and ischemia & hypoxia(I/H).materials and methods: A micropipette aspiration technique was adopted to determine the adhesive mechanics of renal tubular epithelial cells on matrige. results: it showed that the adhesion of renal tubular epithelial cells on matrigel was higher than that of those three model, further more, a different factor was followed by different adhesive mechanic. conclusion: the adhesion of I/H is lower, the ischemia is higher, but all were lower compared with control. It suggested that effect of hypoxia on adhesive properties of renal tubular epithelial cells on matrigel is bigger than that of ichemia.%目的:研究模拟缺血、缺氧、缺血缺氧三种条件下肾小管上皮细胞与基底膜的粘附力学特性。材料与方法:利用微管吸吮技术测定肾小管上皮细胞与人工基底膜的粘附力。结果:模拟缺血、缺氧、缺血缺氧三种模型中肾小管上皮细胞与基底膜的粘附力均较正常情况明显降低。结论:不同模拟损伤因素对粘附力的影响不同,其中缺血缺氧组粘附力最小,单纯缺血组的影响较小。这些结果提示,在一定条件下,氧缺乏比缺血情况更能影响肾小管上皮细胞与基底膜的粘附作用。

  10. Bacterial deposition in a parallel plate and a stagnation point flow chamber : microbial adhesion mechanisms depend on the mass transport conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, DP; Busscher, HJ; van der Mei, HC

    2002-01-01

    Deposition onto glass in a parallel plate (PP) and in a stagnation point (SP) flow chamber of Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus, Psychrobacter sp. and Halomonas pacifica, suspended in artificial seawater, was compared in order to determine the influence of methodology on bacterial adhesion mechanis

  11. BIOLOGICAL ADHESIVES. Adaptive synergy between catechol and lysine promotes wet adhesion by surface salt displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Greg P; Rapp, Michael V; Waite, J Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Butler, Alison

    2015-08-01

    In physiological fluids and seawater, adhesion of synthetic polymers to solid surfaces is severely limited by high salt, pH, and hydration, yet these conditions have not deterred the evolution of effective adhesion by mussels. Mussel foot proteins provide insights about adhesive adaptations: Notably, the abundance and proximity of catecholic Dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) and lysine residues hint at a synergistic interplay in adhesion. Certain siderophores—bacterial iron chelators—consist of paired catechol and lysine functionalities, thereby providing a convenient experimental platform to explore molecular synergies in bioadhesion. These siderophores and synthetic analogs exhibit robust adhesion energies (E(ad) ≥-15 millijoules per square meter) to mica in saline pH 3.5 to 7.5 and resist oxidation. The adjacent catechol-lysine placement provides a "one-two punch," whereby lysine evicts hydrated cations from the mineral surface, allowing catechol binding to underlying oxides.

  12. Mechanical properties of phosphorene nanotubes: a density functional tight-binding study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkin, V.; Zhang, Y. W.

    2016-09-01

    Using the density functional tight-binding method, we studied the elastic properties, deformation and failure of armchair (AC) and zigzag (ZZ) phosphorene nanotubes (PNTs) under uniaxial tensile strain. We found that the deformation and failure of PNTs are very much anisotropic. For ZZ PNTs, three deformation phases are recognized: the primary linear elastic phase—which is associated with interactions between neighboring puckers, succeeded by the bond rotation phase—where the puckered configuration of phosphorene is smoothed via bond rotation, and lastly the bond elongation phase—where the P–P bonds are directly stretched up to the maximally allowed limit and failure is initiated by the rupture of the most stretched bonds. For AC PNTs, the applied strain stretches the bonds up to the maximally allowed limit, causing their ultimate failure. For both AC and ZZ PNTs, their failure strain and failure stress are sensitive— while the Young’s modulus, flexural rigidity, radial Poisson’s ratio and thickness Poisson’s ratio are relatively insensitive—to the tube diameter. More specifically, for AC PNTs, the failure strain decreases from 0.40 to 0.25 and the failure stress increases from 13 GPa to 21 GPa when the tube diameter increases from 13.3 Å to 32.8 Å while for ZZ PNTs, the failure strain decreases from 0.66 to 0.55 and the failure stress increases from 4 GPa to 9 GPa when the tube diameter increases from 13.2 Å to 31.1 Å. The Young’s modulus, flexural rigidity, radial and thickness Poisson ratios are 114.2 GPa, 0.019 eV · nm2, 0.47 and 0.11 for AC PNTs, and 49.2 GPa, 0.071 eV · nm2, 0.07 and 0.21 for ZZ PNTs, respectively. The present findings provide valuable references for the design and application of PNTs as device elements.

  13. Properties of Nano SiO2 Modified PVF Adhesive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN He-sheng; SUN Zhen-ya; XUE Li-hui

    2004-01-01

    Some properties of nano SiO2 modified PVF adhesive were studied. The experimental results show that nano SiO2 can improve the properties of PVF adhesive very well. Meanwhile the modification mechanism of nano SiO2 to PVF adhesive and the applications of this adhesive in paper-plastic composite, concrete and fireproof paint were discussed by using IR and XRD determination.

  14. The function of the RNA-binding protein TEL1 in moss reveals ancient regulatory mechanisms of shoot development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, Julien; Spinner, Lara; Mazubert, Christelle; Charlot, Florence; Paquet, Nicolas; Thareau, Vincent; Dron, Michel; Nogué, Fabien; Charon, Céline

    2012-03-01

    The shoot represents the basic body plan in land plants. It consists of a repeated structure composed of stems and leaves. Whereas vascular plants generate a shoot in their diploid phase, non-vascular plants such as mosses form a shoot (called the gametophore) in their haploid generation. The evolution of regulatory mechanisms or genetic networks used in the development of these two kinds of shoots is unclear. TERMINAL EAR1-like genes have been involved in diploid shoot development in vascular plants. Here, we show that disruption of PpTEL1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens, causes reduced protonema growth and gametophore initiation, as well as defects in gametophore development. Leafy shoots formed on ΔTEL1 mutants exhibit shorter stems with more leaves per shoot, suggesting an accelerated leaf initiation (shortened plastochron), a phenotype shared with the Poaceae vascular plants TE1 and PLA2/LHD2 mutants. Moreover, the positive correlation between plastochron length and leaf size observed in ΔTEL1 mutants suggests a conserved compensatory mechanism correlating leaf growth and leaf initiation rate that would minimize overall changes in plant biomass. The RNA-binding protein encoded by PpTEL1 contains two N-terminus RNA-recognition motifs, and a third C-terminus non-canonical RRM, specific to TEL proteins. Removal of the PpTEL1 C-terminus (including this third RRM) or only 16-18 amino acids within it seriously impairs PpTEL1 function, suggesting a critical role for this third RRM. These results show a conserved function of the RNA-binding PpTEL1 protein in the regulation of shoot development, from early ancestors to vascular plants, that depends on the third TEL-specific RRM.

  15. Adhesive loose packings of small dry particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenwei; Li, Shuiqing; Baule, Adrian; Makse, Hernán A.

    We explore adhesive loose packings of dry small spherical particles of micrometer size using 3D discrete-element simulations with adhesive contact mechanics. A dimensionless adhesion parameter ($Ad$) successfully combines the effects of particle velocities, sizes and the work of adhesion, identifying a universal regime of adhesive packings for $Ad>1$. The structural properties of the packings in this regime are well described by an ensemble approach based on a coarse-grained volume function that includes correlations between bulk and contact spheres. Our theoretical and numerical results predict: (i) An equation of state for adhesive loose packings that appears as a continuation from the frictionless random close packing (RCP) point in the jamming phase diagram; (ii) The existence of a maximal loose packing point at the coordination number $Z=2$ and packing fraction $\\phi=1/2^{3}$. Our results highlight that adhesion leads to a universal packing regime at packing fractions much smaller than the random loose packing, which can be described within a statistical mechanical framework. We present a general phase diagram of jammed matter comprising frictionless, frictional, adhesive as well as non-spherical particles, providing a classification of packings in terms of their continuation from the spherical frictionless RCP.

  16. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  17. Mechanism of human papillomavirus binding to human spermatozoa and fertilizing ability of infected spermatozoa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Foresta

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses (HPVs are agents of the most common sexually transmitted diseases in females and males. Precise data about the presence, mechanism of infection and clinical significance of HPV in the male reproductive tract and especially in sperm are not available. Here we show that HPV can infect human sperm, it localizes at the equatorial region of sperm head through interaction between the HPV capsid protein L1 and syndecan-1. Sperm transfected with HPV E6/E7 genes and sperm exposed to HPV L1 capsid protein are capable to penetrate the oocyte and transfer the virus into oocytes, in which viral genes are then activated and transcribed. These data show that sperm might function as vectors for HPV transfer into the oocytes, and open new perspectives on the role of HPV infection in males and are particularly intriguing in relation to assisted reproduction techniques.

  18. Exploring the drug resistance of V32I and M46L mutant HIV-1 protease to inhibitor TMC114: flap dynamics and binding mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Meher, Biswa Ranjan; Wang, Yixuan

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitors of HIV-1 protease (HIV-1-pr) generally only bind to the active site of the protease. However, for some mutants such as V32I and M46L the TMC114 can bind not only to the active cavity also to the groove of the flexible flaps. Although the second binding site suggests the higher efficiency of the drug against HIV-1-pr, the drug resistance in HIV-1-pr due to mutations cannot be ignored, which prompts us to investigate the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and behavior of double ...

  19. Short Peptides Enhance Single Cell Adhesion and Viability onMicroarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C.; Asphahani,Fareid; Zhang, Miqin

    2007-01-19

    Single cell patterning holds important implications forbiology, biochemistry, biotechnology, medicine, and bioinformatics. Thechallenge for single cell patterning is to produce small islands hostingonly single cells and retaining their viability for a prolonged period oftime. This study demonstrated a surface engineering approach that uses acovalently bound short peptide as a mediator to pattern cells withimproved single cell adhesion and prolonged cellular viabilityon goldpatterned SiO2 substrates. The underlying hypothesis is that celladhesion is regulated bythe type, availability, and stability ofeffective cell adhesion peptides, and thus covalently bound shortpeptides would promote cell spreading and, thus, single cell adhesion andviability. The effectiveness of this approach and the underlyingmechanism for the increased probability of single cell adhesion andprolonged cell viability by short peptides were studied by comparingcellular behavior of human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells on threemodelsurfaces whose gold electrodes were immobilized with fibronectin,physically adsorbed Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, and covalently boundLys-Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, respectively. The surface chemistry and bindingproperties were characterized by reflectance Fourier transform infraredspectroscopy. Both short peptides were superior to fibronectin inproducing adhesion of only single cells, whereas the covalently boundpeptide also reduced apoptosis and necrosisof adhered cells. Controllingcell spreading by peptide binding domains to regulate apoptosis andviability represents a fundamental mechanism in cell-materialsinteraction and provides an effective strategy in engineering arrays ofsingle cells.

  20. Adhesion of subsets of human blood mononuclear cells to porcine endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Cellular immune response is a major barrier to xenotransplantation, and cell adhesion is the first step in intercellular recognition. Flow-cytometric adhesion assay has been used to investigate the differential adhesions of monocyte (Mo), natural killer cell (NK) and T lymphocyte (T) present within human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAEC), and to demonstrate the effect of human interferon-γ(hIFN-γ) or/and tumor necrosis factor-α (hTNF-α) pretreatment of PAEC on their adhesiveness for different PBMC subsets. The preferential sequence for PBMC subset binding to resting PAEC is Mo, NK and T cells, among which T cells show the slightest adherence; hTNF-α can act across the species, and augment Mo, NK and T cell adhesion ratios by 40%, 110% and 3 times, respectively. These results confirm at the cell level that host Mo and NK cells are major participants in the cellular xenograft rejection, thereby, providing a prerequisite for further studying the human Mo/NK-PAEC interactive mechanisms.

  1. Mechanism of transport and intracellular binding of porfiromycin in HCT 116 human colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, S S; Johnson, R; Gonzalez, H; Thohan, V

    1989-09-15

    The mechanism of uptake and efflux of porfiromycin (PFM) by HCT 116 human colon carcinoma cells or freshly obtained human RBC was investigated. The time course of uptake of radioactivity upon exposure of HCT 116 cells to [14C]PFM showed one fast and one slow phase of linear increase. The initial phase of PFM uptake was not saturable with external drug concentrations from 2 to 100 microM. PFM accumulation was temperature dependent with a temperature coefficient (Q10 24-37 degrees C) of 2.3 +/- 0.3. PFM uptake was not affected either by individual inhibitors such as 1 mM 2,4-dinitrophenol, sodium azide, iodoacetic acid, ouabain, 0.02 mM oligomycin, p-hydroxylmercuribenzoate, 0.2 mM N-ethylmaleimide, or by combinations of inhibitors. PFM uptake did not demonstrate competitive inhibition by unlabeled PFM and mitomycin C. Efflux of cellular radioactivity was not affected by the above mentioned inhibitors or by verapamil, diltiazem, or trifluoperazine. Only aliphatic alcohols accelerated the initial influx rate. The RBC, however, only exhibited the initial fast accumulation of [14C]PFM, and all the 14C accumulated by RBC was exchangeable. These data demonstrate that the uptake and the efflux of PFM in HCT 116 cells and RBC comprise a passive diffusion process. PMID:2766276

  2. Binding, tuning and mechanical function of the 4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid chromophore in photoactive yellow protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, M.A. van der; Arents, J.C.; Kort, R.; Hellingwerf, K.J.

    2007-01-01

    The bacterial photoreceptor protein photoactive yellow protein (PYP) covalently binds the chromophore 4-hydroxy coumaric acid, tuning (spectral) characteristics of this cofactor. Here, we study this binding and tuning using a combination of pointmutations and chromophore analogs. In all photosensor

  3. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  4. Postoperative Complications Leading to Death after Coagulum Pyelolithotomy in a Tetraplegic Patient: Can We Prevent Prolonged Ileus, Recurrent Intestinal Obstruction due to Adhesions Requiring Laparotomies, Chest Infection Warranting Tracheostomy, and Mechanical Ventilation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Soni, Bakul; Singh, Gurpreet; Hughes, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A 22-year-old male sustained C-6 tetraplegia in 1992. In 1993, intravenous pyelography revealed normal kidneys. Suprapubic cystostomy was performed. He underwent open cystolithotomy in 2004 and 2008. In 2009, computed tomography revealed bilateral renal calculi. Coagulum pyelolithotomy of left kidney was performed. Pleura and peritoneum were opened. Peritoneum could not be closed. Following surgery, he developed pulmonary atelectasis; he required tracheostomy and mechanical ventilation. He did not tolerate nasogastric feeding. CT of abdomen revealed bilateral renal calculi and features of proximal small bowel obstruction. Laparotomy revealed small bowel obstruction due to dense inflammatory adhesions involving multiple small bowel loops which protruded through the defect in sigmoid mesocolon and fixed posteriorly over the area of previous intervention. All adhesions were divided. The wide defect in mesocolon was not closed. In 2010, this patient again developed vomiting and distension of abdomen. Laparotomy revealed multiple adhesions. He developed chest infection and required ventilatory support again. He developed pressure sores and depression. Later abdominal symptoms recurred. This patient's general condition deteriorated and he expired in 2011. Conclusion. Risk of postoperative complications could have been reduced if minimally invasive surgery had been performed instead of open surgery to remove stones from left kidney. Suprapubic cystostomy predisposed to repeated occurrence of stones in urinary bladder and kidneys. Spinal cord physicians should try to establish intermittent catheterisation regime in tetraplegic patients. PMID:23533931

  5. Postoperative Complications Leading to Death after Coagulum Pyelolithotomy in a Tetraplegic Patient: Can We Prevent Prolonged Ileus, Recurrent Intestinal Obstruction due to Adhesions Requiring Laparotomies, Chest Infection Warranting Tracheostomy, and Mechanical Ventilation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Vaidyanathan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 22-year-old male sustained C-6 tetraplegia in 1992. In 1993, intravenous pyelography revealed normal kidneys. Suprapubic cystostomy was performed. He underwent open cystolithotomy in 2004 and 2008. In 2009, computed tomography revealed bilateral renal calculi. Coagulum pyelolithotomy of left kidney was performed. Pleura and peritoneum were opened. Peritoneum could not be closed. Following surgery, he developed pulmonary atelectasis; he required tracheostomy and mechanical ventilation. He did not tolerate nasogastric feeding. CT of abdomen revealed bilateral renal calculi and features of proximal small bowel obstruction. Laparotomy revealed small bowel obstruction due to dense inflammatory adhesions involving multiple small bowel loops which protruded through the defect in sigmoid mesocolon and fixed posteriorly over the area of previous intervention. All adhesions were divided. The wide defect in mesocolon was not closed. In 2010, this patient again developed vomiting and distension of abdomen. Laparotomy revealed multiple adhesions. He developed chest infection and required ventilatory support again. He developed pressure sores and depression. Later abdominal symptoms recurred. This patient’s general condition deteriorated and he expired in 2011. Conclusion. Risk of postoperative complications could have been reduced if minimally invasive surgery had been performed instead of open surgery to remove stones from left kidney. Suprapubic cystostomy predisposed to repeated occurrence of stones in urinary bladder and kidneys. Spinal cord physicians should try to establish intermittent catheterisation regime in tetraplegic patients.

  6. The effects of low salt concentrations on the mechanism of adhesion between two pieces of pork semimembranosus muscle following tumbling and cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombrun, Laure; Gatellier, Philippe; Carlier, Martine; Kondjoyan, Alain

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to gain deeper insight into the effect of salt content on the adhesion between pieces of semimembranosus pork muscle bound by a tumbling exudate gel. Hydrophobic site number, free thiol and carbonyl content were measured in tumbling exudate and meat protein to evaluate the protein-protein interactions involved in the adhesion process. Proteins were far more oxidized in exudate than in meat, and under our experimental conditions, salt content increased protein bonding in the exudate but not in the meat. Breaking stress increased between non-salted meat and 0.8%-salted meat but did not depend on the protein physicochemical properties of the tumbling exudate. Modifying the meat surface by tumbling alone, tumbling and salting, or scarification had no effect on breaking stress. It is suggested that the break between the meat pieces occurred between the tumbling exudate and the meat surface due to weaker chemical bonds at this location. PMID:23896131

  7. Molecular mechanism of AMD3100 antagonism in the CXCR4 receptor: transfer of binding site to the CXCR3 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; Gerlach, Lars-Ole; Jakobsen, Janus S;

    2004-01-01

    , respectively. Metal ion binding in the cyclam rings of AMD3100 increased its dependence on Asp(262) and provided a tighter molecular map of the binding site, where borderline mutational hits became clear hits for the Zn(II)-loaded analog. The proposed binding site for AMD3100 was confirmed by a gradual build...

  8. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins Involved in a Posttranscriptional Iron Regulatory Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa E.; Calla-Choque, Jaeson S.; Mancilla-Olea, Maria Inocente; Arroyo, Rossana

    2015-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE) located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis. PMID:26703754

  9. Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Serum Retinol-Binding Protein Develop Progressive Retinal Degeneration through a Retinoid-Independent Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Mei; Otalora, Laura; Martin, Ashley A; Moiseyev, Gennadiy; Vanlandingham, Phillip; Wang, Qilong; Farjo, Rafal; Yeganeh, Alexander; Quiambao, Alexander; Farjo, Krysten M

    2015-08-01

    Serum retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) is the sole specific transport protein for retinol in the blood, but it is also an adipokine with retinol-independent, proinflammatory activity associated with obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Moreover, two separate studies reported that patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy have increased serum RBP4 levels compared to patients with mild or no retinopathy, yet the effect of increased levels of RBP4 on the retina has not been studied. Here we show that transgenic mice overexpressing RBP4 (RBP4-Tg mice) develop progressive retinal degeneration, characterized by photoreceptor ribbon synapse deficiency and subsequent bipolar cell loss. Ocular retinoid and bisretinoid levels are normal in RBP4-Tg mice, demonstrating that a retinoid-independent mechanism underlies retinal degeneration. Increased expression of pro-interleukin-18 (pro-IL-18) mRNA and activated IL-18 protein and early-onset microglia activation in the retina suggest that retinal degeneration is driven by a proinflammatory mechanism. Neither chronic systemic metabolic disease nor other retinal insults are required for RBP4 elevation to promote retinal neurodegeneration, since RBP4-Tg mice do not have coincident retinal vascular pathology, obesity, dyslipidemia, or hyperglycemia. These findings suggest that elevation of serum RBP4 levels could be a risk factor for retinal damage and vision loss in nondiabetic as well as diabetic patients. PMID:26055327

  10. Progress of the mechanisms of focal adhesion kinase induced angiogenesis%黏着斑激酶促进血管生成机制的进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李越; 林春龙

    2013-01-01

    黏着斑激酶(focal adhesion kinase,FAK)是一种胞质非受体蛋白酪氨酸激酶,在人、鸟、果蝇、鼠、非洲蟾蜍中均有表达并呈高度同源性.FAK在多器官和组织中均有表达,尤其是在肿瘤细胞中高水平表达.FAK介导的信号通路是细胞内各信号通路的交汇点,对正常细胞及肿瘤细胞黏附、迁移、增殖均起调控作用.在血管形成过程中,FAK可以通过FAK-Rho GTPases通路、FAK-PI3K通路等信号通路调节血管内皮细胞的黏附及迁移,调节细胞骨架重建.%Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a cytoplasmic non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase and has its expression in humans,birds,fruit flies,mice and xenopus with a high degree of homology.FAK has its expression as well in multiple organs and tissues,especially high expression in tumor cell.FAKmediated signal pathway is the intersection of all signal pathways,playing a regulatory role in the adhesion,migration and proliferation of both normal cells and the tumor cell.FAK can also through such signal pathways as FAK Rho GTPases pathway and FAK-PI3K pathway and etc.Regulate both the reconstruction of cytoskeleton and the adhesion and migration of vascular endothelial cells that is of great significance in that process.

  11. Surface contact and design of fibrillar ‘friction pads’ in stick insects (Carausius morosus): mechanisms for large friction coefficients and negligible adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Labonte, David; John A Williams; Federle, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Many stick insects and mantophasmids possess tarsal ‘heel pads’ (euplantulae) covered by arrays of conical, micrometre-sized hairs (acanthae). These pads are used mainly under compression; they respond to load with increasing shear resistance, and show negligible adhesion. Reflected-light microscopy in stick insects (Carausius morosus) revealed that the contact area of ‘heel pads’ changes with normal load on three hierarchical levels. First, loading brought larger areas of the convex pads int...

  12. Endotoxin/lipopolysaccharide activates NF-kappa B and enhances tumor cell adhesion and invasion through a beta 1 integrin-dependent mechanism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wang, Jiang Huai

    2012-02-03

    Beta(1) integrins play a crucial role in supporting tumor cell attachment to and invasion into the extracellular matrix. Endotoxin\\/LPS introduced by surgery has been shown to enhance tumor metastasis in a murine model. Here we show the direct effect of LPS on tumor cell adhesion and invasion in extracellular matrix proteins through a beta(1) integrin-dependent pathway. The human colorectal tumor cell lines SW480 and SW620 constitutively expressed high levels of the beta(1) subunit, whereas various low levels of alpha(1), alpha(2), alpha(4), and alpha(6) expression were detected. SW480 and SW620 did not express membrane-bound CD14; however, LPS in the presence of soluble CD14 (sCD14) significantly up-regulated beta(1) integrin expression; enhanced tumor cell attachment to fibronectin, collagen I, and laminin; and strongly promoted tumor cell invasion through the Matrigel. Anti-beta(1) blocking mAbs (4B4 and 6S6) abrogated LPS- plus sCD14-induced tumor cell adhesion and invasion. Furthermore, LPS, when combined with sCD14, resulted in NF-kappaB activation in both SW480 and SW620 cells. Inhibition of the NF-kappaB pathway significantly attenuated LPS-induced up-regulation of beta(1) integrin expression and prevented tumor cell adhesion and invasion. These results provide direct evidence that although SW480 and SW620 cells do not express membrane-bound CD14, LPS in the presence of sCD14 can activate NF-kappaB, up-regulate beta(1) integrin expression, and subsequently promote tumor cell adhesion and invasion. Moreover, LPS-induced tumor cell attachment to and invasion through extracellular matrix proteins is beta(1) subunit-dependent.

  13. Adhesion of Cercaria (Larva of Helminth Parasites to Host by Lectins- Carbohydrates Bonds as a Model for Evaluation of Schistosoma Entrance Mechanisms in Cercarial Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Farahnak

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cercariae (larva of helminth parasites are covered by a thick glycocalyx coat, which serves as an osmotic protection during their free existence, and contain carbohydrates conjugated as glycoproteins, glycolipids and mucopolysaccharides. Although, limited studies have been made on life cycle of cercariae from fresh water snails, however, carbohydrate studies on cercariae have not been done in Iran so far. This study was made to determine the cercariae specifications from Lymnaea gedrosiana and evaluation of surface carbohydrates as receptors for host lectins in a host-parasite relationship system as a model in human schistosomiasis including cercarial dermatitis in Khuzestan Province. Methods: For this purpose, snails were collected from Dezful region in Khuzestan Province and cercariae were obtained by shedding method and identified by valuable keys. Experimental infection was established in the Culex pipiens (Culicidae mosquitoes larvae for further identification and mode of adhesion. To detect the mode of adhesion, surface carbohydrates of cercariae were detected by lentil (Lens culinaris lectins. Results: Examined snails were infected with xiphidiocerceria of trematodes and metacercariae were obtained from Culex pipiens. Also, Mannose monosaccharides- CH2OH (CHOH 4CHO - were detected particularly on the glands of cercariae. Conclusion: Adhesion of cercariae to their host by lectins-carbohydrates bonds is the first stage of host-parasite relationship. This phenomenon could be happened for animal schistosome's cercaria in cercarial dermatitis.

  14. Effects of nitric oxide-releasing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NONO-NSAIDs) on melanoma cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Huiwen [Edison Biotechnology Institute, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Mollica, Molly Y.; Lee, Shin Hee [Edison Biotechnology Institute, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Wang, Lei [Edison Biotechnology Institute, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A., E-mail: velazque@ualberta.ca [Chemistry Section, Laboratory of Comparative Carcinogenesis and Basic Research Program, SAIC-Frederick Inc., National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton Alberta, Canada T6G 2N8 (Canada); Wu, Shiyong, E-mail: wus1@ohio.edu [Edison Biotechnology Institute, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    A new class of nitric oxide (NO•)-releasing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NONO-NSAIDs) were developed in recent years and have shown promising potential as NSAID substitutes due to their gentle nature on cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems. Since nitric oxide plays a role in regulation of cell adhesion, we assessed the potential use of NONO-NSAIDs as anti-metastasis drugs. In this regard, we compared the effects of NONO-aspirin and a novel NONO-naproxen to those exerted by their respective parent NSAIDs on avidities of human melanoma M624 cells. Both NONO-NSAIDs, but not the corresponding parent NSAIDs, reduced M624 adhesion on vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) by 20–30% and fibronectin by 25–44% under fluid flow conditions and static conditions, respectively. Only NONO-naproxen reduced (∼ 56%) the activity of β1 integrin, which binds to α4 integrin to form very late antigen-4 (VLA-4), the ligand of VCAM-1. These results indicate that the diazeniumdiolate (NO•)-donor moiety is critical for reducing the adhesion between VLA-4 and its ligands, while the NSAID moiety can impact the regulation mechanism of melanoma cell adhesion. -- Highlights: ► NONO-naproxen, a novel nitric oxide-releasing NSAID, was synthesized. ► NONO-NSAIDs, but not their parent NSAIDs, reduced melanoma adhesion. ► NONO-naproxen, but not NONO-aspirin and NSAIDs, reduced activity of β1 integrin.

  15. Mechanisms of recognition and binding of α-TTP to the plasma membrane by multi-scale molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos eLamprakis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We used multiple sets of simulations both at the atomistic and coarse-grained level of resolution, to investigate interaction and binding of α-tochoperol transfer protein (α-TTP to phosphatidylinositol phosphate lipids (PIPs. Our calculations indicate that enrichment of membranes with such lipids facilitate membrane anchoring. Atomistic models suggest that PIP can be incorporated into the binding cavity of α-TTP and therefore confirm that such protein can work as lipid exchanger between the endosome and the plasma membrane. Comparison of the atomistic models of the α-TTP / PIPs complex with membrane-bound α-TTP revealed different roles for the various basic residues composing the basic patch that is key for the protein / ligand interaction. Such residues are of critical importance as several point mutations at their position lead to severe forms of ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED phenotypes. Specifically, R221 is main residue responsible for the stabilisation of the complex. R68 and R192 exchange strong interactions in the protein or in the membrane complex only, suggesting that the two residues alternate contact formation, thus facilitating lipid flipping from the membrane into the protein cavity during the lipid exchange process. Finally, R59 shows weaker interactions with PIPs anyway with a clear preference for specific phosphorylation positions, hinting a role in early membrane selectivity for the protein. Altogether, our simulations reveal significant aspects at the atomistic scale of interactions of α-TTP with the plasma membrane and with PIP, providing clarifications on the mechanism of intracellular vitamin E trafficking and helping establishing the role of key residue for the functionality of α-TTP.

  16. Kinetics and mechanism of proteinase-binding of pregnancy zone protein (PZP). Appearance of sulfhydryl groups in reactions with proteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, U; Sottrup-Jensen, L; Simonsen, M

    1992-01-01

    Proteinase binding by pregnancy zone protein (PZP), an alpha-macroglobulin involves bait region cleavages, association of dimeric-PZP into tetrameric and reaction of internal gamma-glutamyl-beta-cysteinyl thiol esters of PZP with proteinase side chains. The product is an equimolar enzyme-PZP(tetramer) covalently linked complex with four free sulfhydryl groups. The kinetics of the appearances of sulfhydryl groups during the reaction of PZP with chymotrypsin has been investigated using stopped-flow and conventional mixing techniques over a broad concentration range. Thiol ester cleavages followed double exponential decays corresponding with two steps. The faster one resulted in the appearance of three sulfhydryl groups with an observed rate constant, k(obs) = k1.1 + k1.2 delta E, dependent on the excess concentration of chymotrypsin, delta E, and k1.1 = 0.03 s-1 and k1.2 = 4 x 10(4) M-1 s-1. The last sulfhydryl group appeared in a slower step, with similar concentration dependence and k2.1 approximately 0.003 s-1 and k2.2 approximately 5 x 10(3) M-1s-1. Covalent binding of the enzyme apparently was simultaneous with the faster thiol ester cleavage step. Based on these and previous results a model of the reaction mechanism of the proteinase binding reaction of PZP is proposed. It consists of four major steps: (i) Bait region cleavage of PZP-dimers by the enzyme, (ii) fast association of enzyme-PZP(dimer) species with native PZP or with another enzyme-PZP(dimer) compound resulting in release of one of the associated enzyme molecules (iii) reaction of an average of three thiol esters of the enzyme-PZP(tetramer) intermediate with the associated internal enzyme molecule or with an external one. In this step one enzyme molecule becomes covalently linked to the PZP-(tetramer), three sulfhydryl groups appear and the enzymic activity of the bound enzyme molecule decreases to the level of that of the final complex. (iv) Hydrolysis of the last thiol ester and in the presence of

  17. Adhesion beyond the interface: Molecular adaptations of the mussel byssus to the intertidal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    MIller, Dusty Rose

    The California mussel, Mytilus californianus, adheres robustly in the high-energy and oxidizing intertidal zone with a fibrous holdfast called the byssus using 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (Dopa)-containing adhesive mussel foot proteins (mfps). There are many supporting roles to mussel adhesion that are intimately linked and ultimately responsible for mussel byssus's durable and dynamic adhesion. This dissertation explores these supporting mechanisms, including delivery of materials underwater, iron binding, friction, and antioxidant activity. As the outermost covering of the byssus, the cuticle deserves particular attention for its supporting roles to adhesion including the high stiffness and extensibility of the M. californianus byssal cuticle, which make it one of the most energy tolerant materials known. The cuticle's matrix-granule composite structure contributes to its toughness by microcracking between its harder granules and softer matrix. We investigated delivery of cuticular material underwater, cohesion of cuticle proteins, and surface damage mitigation by cuticle protein-based coacervates. To investigate underwater material delivery, we made cuticle matrix mimics by coacervating a key cuticular protein, Mytilus californianus foot protein 1, mfp-1, with hyaluronic acid. These matrix mimics coacervated over a wide range of solution conditions, delivered concentrated material, settled on and coated surfaces underwater. Because the granules are composed of mfp-1 condensed with iron, we used the surface forces apparatus to investigate the effects of iron on the cohesion of mfp-1 from two different species of mussels and found that subtle sequence variations modulate cohesion. Using the coacervate matrix mimics and, modeling the granules as a hard surface (mica), we investigated the wear protection of coacervated mfp-1/HA to mica under frictional shear and found that preventing wear depends critically on the presence of Dopa groups. In addition to cuticle

  18. In silico analysis of molecular mechanisms of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectin-induced cancer cell death from carbohydrate-binding motif evolution hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qi-Jia; Li, Zi-Yue; Yao, Shun; Ming, Miao; Wang, Shu-Ya; Liu, Bo; Bao, Jin-Ku

    2011-10-01

    Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins, a superfamily of strictly mannose-binding-specific lectins widespread amongst monotyledonous plants, have drawn a rising attention for their remarkable anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing activities toward various types of cancer cells; however, the precise molecular mechanisms by which they induce tumor cell apoptosis are still only rudimentarily understood. Herein, we found that the three conserved motifs "QXDXNXVXY," the mannose-specific binding sites, could mutate at one or more amino acid sites, which might be a driving force for the sequential evolution and thus ultimately leading to the complete disappearance of the three conserved motifs. In addition, we found that the motif evolution could result in the diversification of sugar-binding types that G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectins could bind from specific mannose receptors to more types of sugar-containing receptors in cancer cells. Subsequently, we indicated that some sugar-containing receptors such as TNFR1, EGFR, Hsp90, and Hsp70 could block downstream anti-apoptotic or survival signaling pathways, which, in turn, resulted in tumor cell apoptosis. Taken together, our hypothesis that carbohydrate-binding motif evolution may impact the G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectin-induced survival or anti-apoptotic pathways would provide a new perspective for further elucidating the intricate relationships between the carbohydrate-binding specificities and complex molecular mechanisms by which G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectins induce cancer cell death.

  19. Investigation on the Mechanics of Adhesion to the Selective Extracellular Matrix Coated Surfaces of Lung Cancer Cells%肺癌细胞与胞外基质选择裱衬表面粘附力学的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张婷; 屈谦; 薛亚梅; 吴泽志; 宋关斌; 蔡绍皙

    2001-01-01

    The adhesion properties of tumor cells with extracellular matrix(ECM) are closely associated with their invasion and metastasis.Our work reported here was intended reveal the relevant biomechanical and biorheological manifestations of human lung cancer. Using micropipette aspiration technique, we investigated quantitatively the adhesive mechanics properties of high metastatic human giant cell carcinoma(PG) cells as well as low metastatic adenocarcinoma(PAa) cells of lung based on cell culture in vitro. The results showed that the adhesion forces of PAa and PG cells to collagen Ⅳ were significantly higher than those to glass surfaces, but at the lower concentrations(1.00μg/ml and 2.00μg/ml) of collagen Ⅳ, the amplitude for the increase of adhesion forces of PG cells were less than the amplitude for that of PAa cells, and most of the adhesion force values of PAa cells to the coated surfaces of incorporation of laminin along with 2 μg/ml collagen Ⅳ were significantly greater than those of PG cells. At the lower concentrations(0.625μg/ml for PAa cells,and 0.625 μg/ml, 1. 25 μg/ml for PG cells) of laminin tested,the adhesion force values of PAa and PG cells all decreased, but the amplitude and level for the decreased values of adhesion forces of PG cells were greater than those for the PAa cells. In conclusion, the adhesive and proteolytic behaviour of cancer cells to extracellular matrix might be mediated mainly by tumor cell membrane receptors such as integrin receptors and laminin receptors, it might affect the biological characteristics and the metastasis of the tumor cells. The results may benefit to explain some questions in biomechanical views about how the highly metastatic PG cells are prone to migration and invasion.%肿瘤细胞与细胞外基质的粘附特性与肿瘤的侵袭转移密切相关,作者力图揭示人肺癌细胞相应的生物力学和生物流变学特征。采用微管吸吮技术定量测定体外培

  20. A Novel Domain Cassette Identifies Plasmodium falciparum PfEMP1 Proteins Binding ICAM-1 and Is a Target of Cross-Reactive, Adhesion-Inhibitory Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Anja; Jørgensen, Louise; Rask, Thomas Salhøj;

    2013-01-01

    -exposed children. Our study challenges earlier conclusions that group A PfEMP1 proteins are not central to ICAM-1-specific IE adhesion and support the feasibility of developing a vaccine preventing cerebral malaria by inhibiting cerebral IE sequestration. The Journal of Immunology, 2013, 190: 240-249....

  1. X-ray Structure Analysis of Indazolium trans-[Tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (KP1019) Bound to Human Serum Albumin Reveals Two Ruthenium Binding Sites and Provides Insights into the Drug Binding Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Ruthenium(III) complexes are promising candidates for anticancer drugs, especially the clinically studied indazolium trans-[tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (KP1019) and its analogue sodium trans-[tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (NKP-1339). Several studies have emphasized the likely role of human serum proteins in the transportation and accumulation of ruthenium(III) complexes in tumors. Therefore, the interaction between KP1019 and human serum albumin was investigated by means of X-ray crystallography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The structural data unambiguously reveal the binding of two ruthenium atoms to histidine residues 146 and 242, which are both located within well-known hydrophobic binding pockets of albumin. The ruthenium centers are octahedrally coordinated by solvent molecules revealing the dissociation of both indazole ligands from the ruthenium-based drug. However, a binding mechanism is proposed indicating the importance of the indazole ligands for binding site recognition and thus their indispensable role for the binding of KP1019. PMID:27196130

  2. X-ray Structure Analysis of Indazolium trans-[Tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (KP1019) Bound to Human Serum Albumin Reveals Two Ruthenium Binding Sites and Provides Insights into the Drug Binding Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijelic, Aleksandar; Theiner, Sarah; Keppler, Bernhard K; Rompel, Annette

    2016-06-23

    Ruthenium(III) complexes are promising candidates for anticancer drugs, especially the clinically studied indazolium trans-[tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (KP1019) and its analogue sodium trans-[tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (NKP-1339). Several studies have emphasized the likely role of human serum proteins in the transportation and accumulation of ruthenium(III) complexes in tumors. Therefore, the interaction between KP1019 and human serum albumin was investigated by means of X-ray crystallography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The structural data unambiguously reveal the binding of two ruthenium atoms to histidine residues 146 and 242, which are both located within well-known hydrophobic binding pockets of albumin. The ruthenium centers are octahedrally coordinated by solvent molecules revealing the dissociation of both indazole ligands from the ruthenium-based drug. However, a binding mechanism is proposed indicating the importance of the indazole ligands for binding site recognition and thus their indispensable role for the binding of KP1019. PMID:27196130

  3. Prevention of peritoneal adhesions: A promising role for gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hussein M Atta

    2011-01-01

    Adhesions are the most frequent complication of abdominopelvic surgery, yet the extent of the problem, and its serious consequences, has not been adequately recognized. Adhesions evolved as a life-saving mechanism to limit the spread of intraperitoneal inflammatory conditions. Three different pathophysiological mechanisms can independently trigger adhesion formation. Mesothelial cell injury and loss during operations, tissue hypoxia and inflammation each promotes adhesion formation separately, and potentiate the effect of each other. Studies have repeatedly demonstrated that interruption of a single pathway does not completely prevent adhesion formation. This review summarizes the pathogenesis of adhesion formation and the results of single gene therapy interventions. It explores the promising role of combinatorial gene therapy and vector modifications for the prevention of adhesion formation in order to stimulate new ideas and encourage rapid advancements in this field.

  4. Quantitative models of the mechanisms that control genome-wide patterns of transcription factor binding during early Drosophila development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommy Kaplan

    Full Text Available Transcription factors that drive complex patterns of gene expression during animal development bind to thousands of genomic regions, with quantitative differences in binding across bound regions mediating their activity. While we now have tools to characterize the DNA affinities of these proteins and to precisely measure their genome-wide distribution in vivo, our understanding of the forces that determine where, when, and to what extent they bind remains primitive. Here we use a thermodynamic model of transcription factor binding to evaluate the contribution of different biophysical forces to the binding of five regulators of early embryonic anterior-posterior patterning in Drosophila melanogaster. Predictions based on DNA sequence and in vitro protein-DNA affinities alone achieve a correlation of ∼0.4 with experimental measurements of in vivo binding. Incorporating cooperativity and competition among the five factors, and accounting for spatial patterning by modeling binding in every nucleus independently, had little effect on prediction accuracy. A major source of error was the prediction of binding events that do not occur in vivo, which we hypothesized reflected reduced accessibility of chromatin. To test this, we incorporated experimental measurements of genome-wide DNA accessibility into our model, effectively restricting predicted binding to regions of open chromatin. This dramatically improved our predictions to a correlation of 0.6-0.9 for various factors across known target genes. Finally, we used our model to quantify the roles of DNA sequence, accessibility, and binding competition and cooperativity. Our results show that, in regions of open chromatin, binding can be predicted almost exclusively by the sequence specificity of individual factors, with a minimal role for protein interactions. We suggest that a combination of experimentally determined chromatin accessibility data and simple computational models of transcription

  5. Mechanisms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaltransduction pathway in depressive disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyan Wang; Yingquan Zhang; Mingqi Qiao

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway plays an important role in the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs and has dominated recent studies on the pathogenesis of depression. In the present review we summarize the known roles of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP response element-binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the pathogenesis of depression and in the mechanism of action of antidepressant medicines. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway has potential to be used as a biological index to help diagnose depression, and as such it is considered as an important new target in the treatment of depression.

  6. Tension-compression asymmetry in the binding affinity of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Liu, Zishun; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2016-03-01

    Cell adhesion plays a crucial role in many biological processes of cells, e.g., immune responses, tissue morphogenesis, and stem cell differentiation. An essential problem in the molecular mechanism of cell adhesion is to characterize the binding affinity of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands under different physiological conditions. In this paper, a theoretical model is presented to study the binding affinity between a large number of anchored receptors and ligands under both tensile and compressive stresses, and corroborated by demonstrating excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that the binding affinity becomes lower as the magnitude of the applied stress increases, and drops to zero at a critical tensile or compressive stress. Interestingly, the critical compressive stress is found to be substantially smaller than the critical tensile stress for relatively long and flexible receptor-ligand complexes. This counterintuitive finding is explained by using the Euler instability theory of slender columns under compression. The tension-compression asymmetry in the binding affinity of anchored receptors and ligands depends subtly on the competition between the breaking and instability of their complexes. This study helps in understanding the role of mechanical forces in cell adhesion mediated by specific binding molecules.

  7. Characterization of heparin-binding site of tissue transglutaminase: its importance in cell surface targeting, matrix deposition, and cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Collighan, Russell J; Pytel, Kamila; Rathbone, Daniel L; Li, Xiaoling; Griffin, Martin

    2012-04-13

    Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) is a multifunctional Ca(2+)-activated protein cross-linking enzyme secreted into the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it is involved in wound healing and scarring, tissue fibrosis, celiac disease, and metastatic cancer. Extracellular TG2 can also facilitate cell adhesion important in wound healing through a nontransamidating mechanism via its association with fibronectin, heparan sulfates (HS), and integrins. Regulating the mechanism how TG2 is translocated into the ECM therefore provides a strategy for modulating these physiological and pathological functions of the enzyme. Here, through molecular modeling and mutagenesis, we have identified the HS-binding site of TG2 (202)KFLKNAGRDCSRRSSPVYVGR(222). We demonstrate the requirement of this binding site for translocation of TG2 into the ECM through a mechanism involving cell surface shedding of HS. By synthesizing a peptide NPKFLKNAGRDCSRRSS corresponding to the HS-binding site within TG2, we also demonstrate how this mimicking peptide can in isolation compensate for the RGD-induced loss of cell adhesion on fibronectin via binding to syndecan-4, leading to activation of PKCα, pFAK-397, and ERK1/2 and the subsequent formation of focal adhesions and actin cytoskeleton organization. A novel regulatory mechanism for TG2 translocation into the extracellular compartment that depends upon TG2 conformation and the binding of HS is proposed.

  8. Atomistic Mechanisms of Chemical Mechanical Polishing of a Cu Surface in Aqueous H2O2: Tight-Binding Quantum Chemical Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Kentaro; Ito, Hiroshi; Kuwahara, Takuya; Higuchi, Yuji; Ozawa, Nobuki; Kubo, Momoji

    2016-05-11

    We applied our original chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) simulator based on the tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics (TB-QCMD) method to clarify the atomistic mechanism of CMP processes on a Cu(111) surface polished with a SiO2 abrasive grain in aqueous H2O2. We reveal that the oxidation of the Cu(111) surface mechanically induced at the friction interface is a key process in CMP. In aqueous H2O2, in the first step, OH groups and O atoms adsorbed on a nascent Cu surface are generated by the chemical reactions of H2O2 molecules. In the second step, at the friction interface between the Cu surface and the abrasive grain, the surface-adsorbed O atom intrudes into the Cu bulk and dissociates the Cu-Cu bonds. The dissociation of the Cu-Cu back-bonds raises a Cu atom from the surface that is mechanically sheared by the abrasive grain. In the third step, the raised Cu atom bound to the surface-adsorbed OH groups is removed from the surface by the generation and desorption of a Cu(OH)2 molecule. In contrast, in pure water, there are no geometrical changes in the Cu surface because the H2O molecules do not react with the Cu surface, and the abrasive grain slides smoothly on the planar Cu surface. The comparison between the CMP simulations in aqueous H2O2 and pure water indicates that the intrusion of a surface-adsorbed O atom into the Cu bulk is the most important process for the efficient polishing of the Cu surface because it induces the dissociation of the Cu-Cu bonds and generates raised Cu atoms that are sheared off by the abrasive grain. Furthermore, density functional theory calculations show that the intrusion of the surface-adsorbed O atoms into the Cu bulk has a high activation energy of 28.2 kcal/mol, which is difficult to overcome at 300 K. Thus, we suggest that the intrusion of surface-adsorbed O atoms into the Cu bulk induced by abrasive grains at the friction interface is a rate-determining step in the Cu CMP process. PMID:27092706

  9. Structural analysis reveals the substrate-binding mechanism for the expanded substrate specificity of mutant meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weidong; Guo, Rey-Ting; Chen, Xi; Li, Zhe; Gao, Xiuzhen; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Wu, Qiaqing; Feng, Jinhui; Zhu, Dunming

    2015-04-13

    A meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase (DAPDH) from Clostridium tetani E88 (CtDAPDH) was found to have low activity toward the D-amino acids other than its native substrate. Site-directed mutagenesis similar to that carried out on the residues mutated by Vedha-Peters et al. resulted in a mutant enzyme with highly improved catalytic ability for the synthesis of D-amino acids. The crystal structures of the CtDAPDH mutant in apo form and in complex with meso-diaminopimelate (meso-DAP), D-leucine (D-leu), and 4-methyl-2-oxopentanoic acid (MOPA) were solved. meso-DAP was found in an area outside the catalytic cavity; this suggested a possible two-step substrate-binding mechanism for meso-DAP. D-leu and MOPA each bound both to Leu154 and to Gly155 in the open form of CtDAPDH, and structural analysis revealed the molecular basis for the expanded substrate specificity of the mutant meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenases. PMID:25754803

  10. Hypoxia induces phosphorylation of the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein by a novel signaling mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitner-Johnson, D; Millhorn, D E

    1998-07-31

    To investigate signaling mechanisms by which hypoxia regulates gene expression, we examined the effect of hypoxia on the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in PC12 cells. Exposure to physiological levels of hypoxia (5% O2, approximately 50 mm Hg) rapidly induced a persistent phosphorylation of CREB on Ser133, an event that is required for CREB-mediated transcriptional activation. Hypoxia-induced phosphorylation of CREB was more robust than that induced by any other stimulus tested, including forskolin, depolarization, and osmotic stress. Furthermore, this effect was not mediated by any of the previously known signaling pathways that lead to phosphorylation of CREB, including protein kinase A, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, protein kinase C, ribosomal S6 kinase-2, and mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase-2. Hypoxic activation of a CRE-containing reporter (derived from the 5'-flanking region of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene) was attenuated markedly by mutation of the CRE. Thus, a physiological reduction in O2 levels induces a functional phosphorylation of CREB at Ser133 via a novel signaling pathway. PMID:9677418

  11. Regulation of cell–cell adhesion by the cadherin–catenin complex

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, W. James

    2008-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent cell–cell adhesion is regulated by the cadherin family of cell adhesion proteins. Cadherins form trans-interactions on opposing cell surfaces which result in weak cell–cell adhesion. Stronger cell–cell adhesion occurs by clustering of cadherins and through changes in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Although cadherins were thought to bind directly to the actin cytoskeleton through cytoplasmic proteins, termed α- and β-catenin, recent studies with purified proteins in...

  12. Markov State Models Reveal a Two-Step Mechanism of miRNA Loading into the Human Argonaute Protein: Selective Binding followed by Structural Re-arrangement

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Hanlun

    2015-07-16

    Argonaute (Ago) proteins and microRNAs (miRNAs) are central components in RNA interference, which is a key cellular mechanism for sequence-specific gene silencing. Despite intensive studies, molecular mechanisms of how Ago recognizes miRNA remain largely elusive. In this study, we propose a two-step mechanism for this molecular recognition: selective binding followed by structural re-arrangement. Our model is based on the results of a combination of Markov State Models (MSMs), large-scale protein-RNA docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Using MSMs, we identify an open state of apo human Ago-2 in fast equilibrium with partially open and closed states. Conformations in this open state are distinguished by their largely exposed binding grooves that can geometrically accommodate miRNA as indicated in our protein-RNA docking studies. miRNA may then selectively bind to these open conformations. Upon the initial binding, the complex may perform further structural re-arrangement as shown in our MD simulations and eventually reach the stable binary complex structure. Our results provide novel insights in Ago-miRNA recognition mechanisms and our methodology holds great potential to be widely applied in the studies of other important molecular recognition systems.

  13. The homodimeric ATP-binding cassette transporter LmrA mediates multidrug transport by an alternating two-site (two-cylinder engine) mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, HW; Margolles, A; Muller, M; Higgins, CF; Konings, WN

    2000-01-01

    The bacterial LmrA protein and the mammalian multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein are closely related ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that confer multidrug resistance on cells by mediating the extrusion of drugs at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. The mechanisms by which transport is mediated,

  14. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  15. Electro-dry-adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Menon, Carlo

    2012-03-27

    This work presents novel conductive bioinspired dry adhesives with mushroom caps that enable the use of a synergistic combination of electrostatic and van der Waals forces (electro-dry-adhesion). An increase in shear adhesion bond strength of up to 2046% on a wide range of materials is measured when a maximum electrical field of 36.4 V μm(-1) is applied. A suction effect, due to the shape of the dry adhesive fibers, on overall adhesion was not noted for electro-dry-adhesives when testing was performed at both atmospheric and reduced pressure. Utilization of electrostatics to apply a preloading force to dry adhesive fiber arrays allows increased adhesion even after electrostatic force generation has been halted by ensuring the close contact necessary for van der Waals forces to be effective. A comparison is made between self-preloading of the electro-dry-adhesives and the direct application of a normal preloading pressure resulting in nearly the same shear bond strength with an applied voltage of 3.33 kV on the same sample.

  16. Shear adhesion strength of aligned electrospun nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najem, Johnny F; Wong, Shing-Chung; Ji, Guang

    2014-09-01

    Inspiration from nature such as insects' foot hairs motivates scientists to fabricate nanoscale cylindrical solids that allow tens of millions of contact points per unit area with material substrates. In this paper, we present a simple yet robust method for fabricating directionally sensitive shear adhesive laminates. By using aligned electrospun nylon-6, we create dry adhesives, as a succession of our previous work on measuring adhesion energies between two single free-standing electrospun polymer fibers in cross-cylinder geometry, randomly oriented membranes and substrate, and peel forces between aligned fibers and substrate. The synthetic aligned cylindrical solids in this study are electrically insulating and show a maximal Mode II shear adhesion strength of 27 N/cm(2) on a glass slide. This measured value, for the purpose of comparison, is 270% of that reported from gecko feet. The Mode II shear adhesion strength, based on a commonly known "dead-weight" test, is 97-fold greater than the Mode I (normal) adhesion strength of the same. The data indicate a strong shear binding on and easy normal lifting off. Anisotropic adhesion (Mode II/Mode I) is pronounced. The size and surface boundary effects, crystallinity, and bending stiffness of fibers are used to understand these electrospun nanofibers, which vastly differ from otherwise known adhesive technologies. The anisotropic strength distribution is attributed to a decreasing fiber diameter and an optimized laminate thickness, which, in turn, influences the bending stiffness and solid-state "wettability" of points of contact between nanofibers and surface asperities. PMID:25105533

  17. Inhibitory Effect of Doxycycline on the Adhesion of Melanoma Cells and Its MolecularMechanisms%多西环素抑制黑色素瘤细胞黏附的分子机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董恒磊; 孙保存; 孙涛; 赵楠; 董学易; 车娜; 赵秀兰

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the inhibitory effect of Doxycycline on the adhesion of melanoma cells and its mechanism.Methods: Melanoma B16F110, WM351 and WM451 cell lines were treated with Doxycycline at different doses and through different administration methods.MMT, cell adhesion experiment and Western blot were used to observe the effect of different treatment.A total of 20 C57/BL mice were transplanted with melanoma through injection of B16F10 cells and were divided into two groups.One group was treated with Doxycycline, and the other NaCl solution.Carcinoma tissues were obtained and underwentWestern blot and gelatin zymography.Results: MTT analysis showed that the inhibition ratio was significantly higher in the group receiving treatment before cell adhesion than in the group receiving treatment after cell adhesion ( P < 0.05 ).Cell adhesion experiment showed that Doxycycline had an inhibitory effect on the adhesion of B16F110, WM351 and WM451 cells, with a statistical significance ( P < 0.05 ).Western blot revealed that FAK expression in the three cell lines was decreased at 12 h after Doxycycline treatment.Observations from the mice melanoma model suggested obvious changes in FAK expression and its phosphorylation level ( P < 0.05 ).Conclusion: Doxycycline can interfere the adhesion of melanoma cells, possibly through inhibiting FAK expression and its phosphorylation.%目的:研究多西环素对黑色素瘤细胞黏附的抑制作用及分子机制.方法:对黑色素瘤细胞系B16F10、WM351、WM451分别以不同给药方式和给药浓度进行处理,利用MTT实验、细胞黏附实验和Western blot技术检测比较其差异.C57/BL小鼠20只进行黑色素瘤动物实验,接种B16F10后随机分为2组,分别给予多西环素和NaCl溶液处理,取瘤组织进行Western blot和明胶酶谱检测.结果:MTT实验显示"贴壁前"给药组的细胞抑制率显著高于"贴壁后"给药组且差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05).细胞黏附实

  18. Fabrication and characterization of hierarchical nanostructured smart adhesion surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyungoo; Bhushan, Bharat

    2012-04-15

    The mechanics of fibrillar adhesive surfaces of biological systems such as a Lotus leaf and a gecko are widely studied due to their unique surface properties. The Lotus leaf is a model for superhydrophobic surfaces, self-cleaning properties, and low adhesion. Gecko feet have high adhesion due to the high micro/nanofibrillar hierarchical structures. A nanostructured surface may exhibit low adhesion or high adhesion depending upon fibrillar density, and it presents the possibility of realizing eco-friendly surface structures with desirable adhesion. The current research, for the first time uses a patterning technique to fabricate smart adhesion surfaces: single- and two-level hierarchical synthetic adhesive structure surfaces with various fibrillar densities and diameters that allows the observation of either the Lotus or gecko adhesion effects. Contact angles of the fabricated structured samples were measured to characterize their wettability, and contamination experiments were performed to study for self-cleaning ability. A conventional and a glass ball attached to an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip were used to obtain the adhesive forces via force-distance curves to study scale effect. A further increase of the adhesive forces on the samples was achieved by applying an adhesive to the surfaces.

  19. Does a nonclassical signaling mechanism underlie an increase of estradiol-mediated gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor binding in ovine pituitary cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tracy L; Whitesell, Jennifer D; Cantlon, Jeremy D; Clay, Colin M; Nett, Terry M

    2011-10-01

    Estradiol-17beta (E2) is the major regulator of GnRH receptor (GnRHR) gene expression and number during the periovulatory period; however, the mechanisms underlying E2 regulation of the GNRHR gene remain undefined. Herein, we find that E2 conjugated to BSA (E2-BSA) mimics the stimulatory effect of E2 on GnRH binding in primary cultures of ovine pituitary cells. The time course for maximal GnRH analog binding was similar for both E2 and E2-BSA. The ability of E2 and E2-BSA to increase GnRH analog binding was blocked by the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI 182,780. Also, increased GnRH analog binding in response to E2 and the selective ESR1 agonist propylpyrazole triol was blocked by expression of a dominant-negative form of ESR1 (L540Q). Thus, membrane-associated ESR1 is the likely candidate for mediating E2 activation of the GNRHR gene. As cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) is an established target for E2 activation in gonadotrophs, we next explored a potential role for this protein as an intracellular mediator of the E2 signal. Consistent with this possibility, adenoviral-mediated expression of a dominant-negative form of CREB (A-CREB) completely abolished the ability of E2 to increase GnRH analog binding in primary cultures of ovine pituitary cells. Finally, the presence of membrane-associated E2 binding sites on ovine pituitary cells was demonstrated using a fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugate of E2-BSA. We suggest that E2 regulation of GnRHR number during the preovulatory period reflects a membrane site of action and may proceed through a nonclassical signaling mechanism, specifically a CREB-dependent pathway.

  20. Optimization of adhesion mode atomic force microscopy resolves individual molecules in topography and adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, O.H.; Snel, M.M.E.; Noort, van S.J.T.; Werf, van der K.O.; Grooth, de B.G.; Figdor, C.G.; Greve, J.

    1999-01-01

    The force sensor of an atomic force microscope (AFM) is sensitive enough to measure single molecular binding strengths by means of a force–distance curve. In order to combine high-force sensitivity with the spatial resolution of an AFM in topography mode, adhesion mode has been developed. Since this

  1. Plating on Plastics Part Ⅱ: Pretreatment, Mechanism of Adhesion%塑料电镀Ⅱ--塑料电镀前处理,结合机理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hermann-Josef Middeke

    2005-01-01

    Depositing metal onto a polymer surface requires that the metal is able to be deposited there (and nowhere else) and that it adheres. Even the Greek philosopher Plato wrote about adhesion. Today, we know about the factors influencing adhesion although we mostly are not able to get quantitative data. From experiments we can see that electrostatic forces have the greatest influence. Depending on the nature of the polymers to be plated, special pretreatment is therefore necessary to make a plastic′s surface receptive for the first plating step and help to achieve sufficient adhesion between surface and metal. While sometimes quite aggressive methods like chromosulphuric acid are necessary to attack the polymer surface, looking for less dangerous and environmentally friendly systems has started long time ago.%为将金属沉积在聚合材料表面,这种金属必须是可以被沉积在某处(而非它处),而且金属是附着其上的.希腊哲学家柏拉图甚至也曾谈及这种结合问题.今天,我们已经对影响结合力的因素有所了解,虽然其中大部分还没有得到定量数据.从实验数据可以看出,静电力的影响最大.根据被镀聚合材料的性质,采取特殊的前处理使塑料容易接受电镀过程的第一步,而且使塑料表面与金属间形成有效的结合.虽然有时需要使用如硫酸、铬酸等强腐蚀性的方法处理聚合材料表面,但人们早就开始了探索危害小的环保体系.

  2. Tissue adhesives in otorhinolaryngology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider, Gerlind

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of medical tissue adhesives has a long history without finding an all-purpose tissue adhesive for clinical daily routine. This is caused by the specific demands which are made on a tissue adhesive, and the different areas of application. In otorhinolaryngology, on the one hand, this is the mucosal environment as well as the application on bones, cartilage and periphery nerves. On the other hand, there are stressed regions (skin, oral cavity, pharynx, oesophagus, trachea and unstressed regions (middle ear, nose and paranasal sinuses, cranial bones. But due to the facts that adhesives can have considerable advantages in assuring surgery results, prevention of complications and so reduction of medical costs/treatment expenses, the search for new adhesives for use in otorhinolaryngology will be continued intensively. In parallel, appropriate application systems have to be developed for microscopic and endoscopic use.

  3. Molecular Mechanism for Age-Related Memory Loss: The Histone-Binding Protein RbAp48

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlopoulos, Elias; Jones, Sidonie; Kosmidis, Stylianos; Close, Maggie; Kim, Carla; Kovalerchik, Olga; Small, Scott A.; Kandel, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    To distinguish age-related memory loss more explicitly from Alzheimer’s disease (AD), we have explored its molecular underpinning in the dentate gyrus (DG), a subregion of the hippocampal formation thought to be targeted by aging. We carried out a gene expression study in human postmortem tissue harvested from both DG and entorhinal cortex (EC), a neighboring subregion unaffected by aging and known to be the site of onset of AD. Using expression in the EC for normalization, we identified 17 genes that manifested reliable age-related changes in the DG. The most significant change was an age-related decline in RbAp48, a histone-binding protein that modifies histone acetylation. To test whether the RbAp48 decline could be responsible for age-related memory loss, we turned to mice and found that, consistent with humans, RbAp48 was less abundant in the DG of old than in young mice. We next generated a transgenic mouse that expressed a dominant-negative inhibitor of RbAp48 in the adult forebrain. Inhibition of RbAp48 in young mice caused hippocampus-dependent memory deficits similar to those associated with aging, as measured by novel object recognition and Morris water maze tests. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies showed that within the hippocampal formation, dysfunction was selectively observed in the DG, and this corresponded to a regionally selective decrease in histone acetylation. Up-regulation of RbAp48 in the DG of aged wild-type mice ameliorated age-related hippocampus-based memory loss and age-related abnormalities in histone acetylation. Together, these findings show that the DG is a hippocampal subregion targeted by aging, and identify molecular mechanisms of cognitive aging that could serve as valid targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23986399

  4. Tongue adhesion in the horned frog Ceratophrys sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-06-01

    Frogs are well-known to capture elusive prey with their protrusible and adhesive tongues. However, the adhesive performance of frog tongues and the mechanism of the contact formation with the prey item remain unknown. Here we measured for the first time adhesive forces and tongue contact areas in living individuals of a horned frog (Ceratophrys sp.) against glass. We found that Ceratophrys sp. generates adhesive forces well beyond its own body weight. Surprisingly, we found that the tongues adhered stronger in feeding trials in which the coverage of the tongue contact area with mucus was relatively low. Thus, besides the presence of mucus, other features of the frog tongue (surface profile, material properties) are important to generate sufficient adhesive forces. Overall, the experimental data shows that frog tongues can be best compared to pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) that are of common technical use as adhesive tapes or labels.

  5. Biomimetic Adhesive Materials Containing Cyanoacryl Group for Medical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sueng Hwan Jo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available For underwater adhesives with biocompatible and more flexible bonds using biomimetic adhesive groups, DOPA-like adhesive molecules were modified with cyanoacrylates to obtain different repeating units and chain length copolymers. The goal of this work is to copy the mechanisms of underwater bonding to create synthetic water-borne underwater medical adhesives through blending of the modified DOPA and a triblock copolymer (PEO-PPO-PEO for practical application to repair wet living tissues and bones, and in turn, to use the synthetic adhesives to test mechanistic hypotheses about the natural adhesive. The highest values in stress and modulus of the biomimetic adhesives prepared in wet state were 165 kPa and 33 MPa, respectively.

  6. Isolation and biochemical characterization of underwater adhesives from diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Nicole; Kröger, Nils; Harrington, Matthew J; Brunner, Eike; Paasch, Silvia; Buhmann, Matthias T

    2014-01-01

    Many aquatic organisms are able to colonize surfaces through the secretion of underwater adhesives. Diatoms are unicellular algae that have the capability to colonize any natural and man-made submerged surfaces. There is great technological interest in both mimicking and preventing diatom adhesion, yet the biomolecules responsible have so far remained unidentified. A new method for the isolation of diatom adhesive material is described and its amino acid and carbohydrate composition determined. The adhesive materials from two model diatoms show differences in their amino acid and carbohydrate compositions, but also share characteristic features including a high content of uronic acids, the predominance of hydrophilic amino acid residues, and the presence of 3,4-dihydroxyproline, an extremely rare amino acid. Proteins containing dihydroxyphenylalanine, which mediate underwater adhesion of mussels, are absent. The data on the composition of diatom adhesives are consistent with an adhesion mechanism based on complex coacervation of polyelectrolyte-like biomolecules.

  7. Fresh look at electron-transfer mechanisms via the donor/acceptor bindings in the critical encounter complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosokha, Sergiy V; Kochi, Jay K

    2008-05-01

    Seminal insights provided by the iconic R. S. Mulliken and his "charge-transfer" theory, H. Taube and his "outer/inner-sphere" mechanisms, R. A. Marcus and his "two-state non-adiabatic" theory, and N. S. Hush and his "intervalence" theory are each separately woven into the rich panoramic tapestry constituting chemical research into electron-transfer dynamics, and its mechanistic dominance for the past half century and more. In this Account, we illustrate how the simultaneous melding of all four key concepts allows sharp focus on the charge-transfer character of the critical encounter complex to evoke the latent facet of traditional electron-transfer mechanisms. To this end, we exploit the intervalence (electronic) transition that invariably accompanies the diffusive encounter of electron-rich organic donors (D) with electron-poor acceptors (A) as the experimental harbinger of the collision complex, which is then actually isolated and X-ray crystallographically established as loosely bound pi-stacked pairs of various aromatic and olefinic donor/acceptor dyads with uniform interplanar separations of r(DA) = 3.1 +/- 0.2 A. These X-ray structures, together with the spectral measurements of their intervalence transitions, lead to the pair of important electron-transfer parameters, H(DA) (electronic coupling element) versus lambdaT (reorganization energy), the ratio of which generally defines the odd-electron mobility within such an encounter complex in terms of the resonance stabilization of the donor/acceptor assembly [D, A] as opposed to the reorganization-energy penalty required for its interconversion to the electron-transfer state [D(+*), A(-*)]. We recognize the resonance-stabilization energy relative to the intrinsic activation barrier as the mechanistic binding factor, Q = 2H(DA)/lambdaT, to represent the quantitative measure of the highly variable continuum of inner-sphere/outer-sphere interactions that are possible within various types of precursor complexes

  8. Exploring the binding mechanism of 5-hydroxy-3‧,4‧,7-trimethoxyflavone with bovine serum albumin: Spectroscopic and computational approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudha, A.; Srinivasan, P.; Thamilarasan, V.; Sengottuvelan, N.

    2016-03-01

    The current study was carried out to investigate the binding mechanism of a potential flavonoid compound 5-hydroxy-3‧,4‧,7-trimethoxyflavone (HTMF) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) using ultraviolet-visible, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) spectral measurements along with molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. It was confirmed from fluorescence spectra that the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA was robustly quenched by HTMF through a static quenching mechanism. The number of binding sites (n) for HTMF binding on BSA was found to be about one. The thermodynamic parameters estimated from the van't Hoff plot specified that hydrophobic force was the predominant force in the HTMF-BSA complex and there also exist hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions. The effect of HTMF on the BSA conformation examined using CD studies revealed that there is a decrease in the helical content of BSA upon HTMF interaction. The results of molecular docking study shed light on the binding mode which exposed that HTMF bind within the hydrophobic pocket of the subdomain IIIA of BSA. The stability of HTMF-BSA complex with respect to free protein was analyzed from the molecular dynamic studies. The electronic structure analysis of HTMF was achieved by using density functional theory (DFT) calculations at B3LYP/6-31G** level to support its antioxidant role. The results of computational analysis are in good consistence with the experimental data and the present findings suggested that HTMF exhibits a good binding propensity to BSA protein which will be helpful for the drug design.

  9. The distribution of ligand-binding pockets around protein-protein interfaces suggests a general mechanism for pocket formation

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Mu; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions are ubiquitous in a biological cell. Here, we report a comprehensive study of the distribution of protein-ligand interaction sites, namely ligand-binding pockets, around protein-protein interfaces where protein-protein interactions occur. We inspected a representative set of 1,611 representative protein-protein complexes and identified pockets with a potential for binding small molecule ligands. The majority of these pockets are within a 6 Å dis...

  10. The role of hydration on the mechanism of allosteric regulation: in situ measurements of the oxygen-linked kinetics of water binding to hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvay, Andrés G; Grigera, J Raúl; Colombo, Marcio F

    2003-01-01

    We report here the first direct measurements of changes in protein hydration triggered by a functional binding. This task is achieved by weighing hemoglobin (Hb) and myoglobin films exposed to an atmosphere of 98% relative humidity during oxygenation. The binding of the first oxygen molecules to Hb tetramer triggers a change in protein conformation, which increases binding affinity to the remaining empty sites giving rise to the appearance of cooperative phenomena. Although crystallographic data have evidenced that this structural change increases the protein water-accessible surface area, isobaric osmotic stress experiments in aqueous cosolutions have shown that water binding is linked to Hb oxygenation. Now we show that the differential hydration between fully oxygenated and fully deoxygenated states of these proteins, determined by weighing protein films with a quartz crystal microbalance, agree with the ones determined by osmotic stress in aqueous cosolutions, from the linkage between protein oxygen affinity and water activity. The agreements prove that the changes in water activity brought about by adding osmolytes to the buffer solution shift biochemical equilibrium in proportion to the number of water molecules associated with the reaction. The concomitant kinetics of oxygen and of water binding to Hb have been also determined. The data show that the binding of water molecules to the extra protein surface exposed on the transition from the low-affinity T to the high-affinity R conformations of hemoglobin is the rate-limiting step of Hb cooperative reaction. This evidences that water binding is a crucial step on the allosteric mechanism regulating cooperative interactions, and suggests the possibility that environmental water activity might be engaged in the kinetic control of some important reactions in vivo. PMID:12524309

  11. FAK dimerization controls its kinase-dependent functions at focal adhesions

    KAUST Repository

    Brami-Cherrier, Karen

    2014-01-30

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) controls adhesion-dependent cell motility, survival, and proliferation. FAK has kinase-dependent and kinase-independent functions, both of which play major roles in embryogenesis and tumor invasiveness. The precise mechanisms of FAK activation are not known. Using x-ray crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, and biochemical and functional analyses, we show that the key step for activation of FAK\\'s kinase-dependent functions-autophosphorylation of tyrosine-397-requires site-specific dimerization of FAK. The dimers form via the association of the N-terminal FERM domain of FAK and are stabilized by an interaction between FERM and the C-terminal FAT domain. FAT binds to a basic motif on FERM that regulates co-activation and nuclear localization. FAK dimerization requires local enrichment, which occurs specifically at focal adhesions. Paxillin plays a dual role, by recruiting FAK to focal adhesions and by reinforcing the FAT:FERM interaction. Our results provide a structural and mechanistic framework to explain how FAK combines multiple stimuli into a site-specific function. The dimer interfaces we describe are promising targets for blocking FAK activation. © 2014 The Authors.

  12. Insights into resistance mechanism of the macrolide biosensor protein MphR(A) binding to macrolide antibiotic erythromycin by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tingting; Zhang, Yanjun; Ding, Jing-Na; Fan, Song; Han, Ju-Guang

    2015-12-01

    Macrolide biosensor protein MphR(A) has been known as a key regulatory protein in metabolite sensing and genetic expression regulating. MphR(A) protein binds to macrolide antibiotic erythromycin (Ery) and releases the gene operon, thus activates expression of the mphA gene and initiates Ery resistance. The two mutant amino acid residues (V66L and V126L) might potentially disrupt Ery binding to MphR(A). In these studies, the binding of macrolide antibiotic Ery to wild type (Wt) MphR(A) and double mutant (V66L/V126L) MphR(A) are explored by molecular dynamics simulations. Compared to the Apo-MphR(A) protein and Wt-MphR(A)-Ery complex, many interesting effects owing to the double mutant (V66L/V126L) are discovered. In the case of Ery, Helix I which plays an important role in transcription shows itself a right-hand α helix in Wt-MphR(A)-Ery, whereas the activated helix is broken down in double mutant-V66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery. The calculated results exhibit that the double mutant V66L/V126L reduces the binding affinity of the V66L/V126L-MphR(A) to Ery, resulting in the block of Ery resistance. The binding free energy decomposition analysis reveals that the decrease of the binding affinity for the variant V66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery is mainly attributed to the gas phase electrostatic energies. The residue Leu66, Thr154, and Arg122 enhance the binding affinity of V66L/V126L-MphR(A) to Ery. The residues Tyr103 and His147 contributes mainly to binding energies in the Wt-MphR(A)-Ery complex, whereas the two residues have no contribution to the binding free energy inV66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery complex. Our study gives useful insights into the nature of amino acids mutation effect, the mechanism of blocking drug resistance at the atomic level and the characteristics in binding affinity for Ery to double mutant (V66L/V126L) MphR(A), which will contribute to the design of more effective macrolide antibiotics.

  13. The potent opioid agonist, (+)-cis-3-methylfentanyl binds pseudoirreversibly to the opioid receptor complex in vitro and in vivo: Evidence for a novel mechanism of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Band, L.; Xu, Heng; Bykov, V.; Rothman, R.B.; Kim, Chongho; Newman, A.; Jacobson, A.E.; Rice, K.C. (NIDDK, Bethesda, MD (USA)); Greig, N. (NIA, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The present study demonstrates that pretreatment of rat brain membranes with (+)-cis-3-methylfentanyl ((+)-cis-MF), followed by extensive washing of the membranes, produces a wash-resistant decreasing in the binding of ({sup 3}H)-(D-ala{sup 2}, D-leu{sup 5})enkephalin to the d binding site of the opioid receptor complex ({delta}{sub cx} binding site). Intravenous administration of (+)-cis-MF (50 {mu}g/kg) to rats produced a pronounced catalepsy and also produced a wash-resistant masking of {delta}{sub cx} and {mu} binding sites in membranes prepared 120 min post-injection. Administration of 1 mg/kg i.v. of the opioid antagonist, 6-desoxy-6{beta}-fluoronaltrexone (cycloFOXY), 100 min after the injection of (+)-cis-MF (20 min prior to the preparation of membranes) completely reversed the catatonia and restored masked {delta}{sub cx} binding sites to control levels. This was not observed with (+)-cycloFOXY. The implications of these and other findings for the mechanism of action of (+)-cis-MF and models of the opioid receptors are discussed.

  14. Steric mechanism of auto-inhibitory regulation of specific and non-specific DNA binding by the ETS transcriptional repressor ETV6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Soumya; Chan, Anson C K; Coyne, H Jerome; Bhachech, Niraja; Hermsdorf, Ulrike; Okon, Mark; Murphy, Michael E P; Graves, Barbara J; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2014-04-01

    DNA binding by the ETS transcriptional repressor ETV6 (or TEL) is auto-inhibited ~50-fold due to an α-helix that sterically blocks its ETS domain binding interface. Using NMR spectroscopy, we demonstrate that this marginally stable helix is unfolded, and not displaced to a non-inhibitory position, when ETV6 is bound to DNA containing a consensus (5')GGAA(3') recognition site. Although significantly lower in affinity, binding to non-specific DNA is auto-inhibited ~5-fold and is also accompanied by helix unfolding. Based on NMR chemical shift perturbations, both specific and non-specific DNA are bound via the same canonical ETS domain interface. However, spectral perturbations are smaller for the non-specific complex, suggesting weaker and less well-defined interactions than in the specific complex. In parallel, the crystal structure of ETV6 bound to a specific DNA duplex was determined. The structure of this complex reveals that a non-conserved histidine residue in the ETS domain recognition helix helps establish the specificity of ETV6 for DNA-binding sites containing (5')GGAA(3')versus(5')GGAT(3'). These studies provide a unified steric mechanism for attenuating ETV6 binding to both specific and non-specific DNA and expand the repertoire of characterized auto-inhibitory strategies utilized to regulate ETS factors.

  15. Coarse-grained/molecular mechanics of the TAS2R38 bitter taste receptor: experimentally-validated detailed structural prediction of agonist binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Marchiori

    Full Text Available Bitter molecules in humans are detected by ∼25 G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. The lack of atomic resolution structure for any of them is complicating an in depth understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying bitter taste perception. Here, we investigate the molecular determinants of the interaction of the TAS2R38 bitter taste receptor with its agonists phenylthiocarbamide (PTC and propylthiouracil (PROP. We use the recently developed hybrid Molecular Mechanics/Coarse Grained (MM/CG method tailored specifically for GPCRs. The method, through an extensive exploration of the conformational space in the binding pocket, allows the identification of several residues important for agonist binding that would have been very difficult to capture from the standard bioinformatics/docking approach. Our calculations suggest that both agonists bind to Asn103, Phe197, Phe264 and Trp201, whilst they do not interact with the so-called extra cellular loop 2, involved in cis-retinal binding in the GPCR rhodopsin. These predictions are consistent with data sets based on more than 20 site-directed mutagenesis and functional calcium imaging experiments of TAS2R38. The method could be readily used for other GPCRs for which experimental information is currently lacking.

  16. Comparative study on the cellular activities of osteoblast-like cells and new bone formation of anorganic bone mineral coated with tetra-cell adhesion molecules and synthetic cell binding peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Hyeon-Seok; Noh, Woo-Chang; Park, Jin-Woo; Lee, Jae-Mok; Yang, Dong-Jun; Park, Kwang-Bum; Suh, Jo-Young

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We have previously reported that tetra-cell adhesion molecule (T-CAM) markedly enhanced the differentiation of osteoblast-like cells grown on anorganic bone mineral (ABM). T-CAM comprises recombinant peptides containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence in the tenth type III domain, Pro-His-Ser-Arg-Asn (PHSRN) sequence in the ninth type III domain of fibronectin (FN), and the Glu-Pro-Asp-Ilu-Met (EPDIM) and Tyr-His (YH) sequence in the fourth fas-1 domain of βig-h3. Therefore, the purpos...

  17. Sticking around: an up-close look at drop adhesion

    CERN Document Server

    Paxson, Adam T

    2013-01-01

    We present a fluid dynamics video showing the adhesion of a drop to a superhydrophobic surface. We use environmental scanning electron microscopy to observe depinning events at the microscale. As the drop moves along the surface, the advancing portion of the contact line simply lies down onto the upcoming roughness features, contributing negligibly to adhesion. After measuring the local receding contact angle of capillary bridges formed on a micropillar array, we find that these depinning events follow the Gibbs depinning criterion. We further extend this technique to two-scale hierarchical structures to reveal a self-similar depinning mechanism in which the adhesion of the entire drop depends only on the pinning at the very smallest level of roughness hierarchy. With this self-similar depinning mechanism we develop a model to predict the adhesion of drops to superhydrophobic surfaces that explains both the low adhesion on sparsely structured surfaces and the surprisingly high adhesion on surfaces whose featu...

  18. Handbook of adhesion

    CERN Document Server

    Packham, D E

    2006-01-01

    This second edition of the successful Handbook of Adhesion provides concise and authoritative articles covering many aspects of the science and technology associated with adhesion and adhesives. It is intended to fill a gap between the necessarily simplified treatment of the student textbook and the full and thorough treatment of the research monograph and review article. The articles are structured in such a way, with internal cross-referencing and external literature references, that the reader can build up a broader and deeper understanding, as their needs require.This second edition includ

  19. Intercellular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1, Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1, and Regulated on Activation Normal T Cell Expressed and Secreted Are Expressed by Human Breast Carcinoma Cells and Support Eosinophil Adhesion and Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Shahina; Kaur, Jaswinder; Patel, Kamala D.

    2000-01-01

    Eosinophils are usually associated with parasitic and allergic diseases; however, eosinophilia is also observed in several types of human tumors, including breast carcinomas. In this study we examined several human breast carcinoma cell lines for adhesion molecule expression and the ability to bind and activate eosinophils. MDA-MB-435S and MDA-MB-468 cells constitutively expressed both intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and this expressio...

  20. IL-1β enhances cell adhesion to degraded fibronectin

    OpenAIRE

    Rajshankar, Dhaarmini; Downey, Gregory P.; McCulloch, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    IL-1β is a prominent proinflammatory cytokine that mediates degradation of extracellular matrix proteins through increased expression of matrix metalloproteinases, which involves a signaling pathway in adherent cells that is restricted by focal adhesions. Currently, the mechanism by which IL-1β affects cell adhesion to matrix proteins is not defined, and it is not known whether degraded matrix proteins affect IL-1β signaling. We examined adhesion-related IL-1β signaling in fibroblasts attachi...

  1. Nanoscale Adhesion Forces of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type IV Pili

    OpenAIRE

    Beaussart, Audrey; Baker, Amy E.; Kuchma, Sherry L.; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; O’Toole, George A; Yves F Dufrêne

    2014-01-01

    A variety of bacterial pathogens use nanoscale protein fibers called type IV pili to mediate cell adhesion, a primary step leading to infection. Currently, how these nanofibers respond to mechanical stimuli and how this response is used to control adhesion is poorly understood. Here, we use atomic force microscopy techniques to quantify the forces guiding the adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa type IV pili to surfaces. Using chemical force microscopy and single-cell force spectroscopy, we sho...

  2. Venous levels of shear support neutrophil-platelet adhesion and neutrophil aggregation in blood via P-selectin and beta2-integrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantopoulos, K.; Neelamegham, S.; Burns, A. R.; Hentzen, E.; Kansas, G. S.; Snapp, K. R.; Berg, E. L.; Hellums, J. D.; Smith, C. W.; McIntire, L. V.; Simon, S. I.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After activation, platelets adhere to neutrophils via P-selectin and beta2-integrin. The molecular mechanisms and adhesion events in whole blood exposed to venous levels of hydrodynamic shear in the absence of exogenous activation remain unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: Whole blood was sheared at approximately 100 s(-1). The kinetics of neutrophil-platelet adhesion and neutrophil aggregation were measured in real time by flow cytometry. P-selectin was upregulated to the platelet surface in response to shear and was the primary factor mediating neutrophil-platelet adhesion. The extent of neutrophil aggregation increased linearly with platelet adhesion to neutrophils. Blocking either P-selectin, its glycoprotein ligand PSGL-1, or both simultaneously by preincubation with a monoclonal antibody resulted in equivalent inhibition of neutrophil-platelet adhesion (approximately 30%) and neutrophil aggregation (approximately 70%). The residual amount of neutrophil adhesion was blocked with anti-CD11b/CD18. Treatment of blood with prostacyclin analogue ZK36374, which raises cAMP levels in platelets, blocked P-selectin upregulation and neutrophil aggregation to baseline. Complete abrogation of platelet-neutrophil adhesion required both ZK36374 and anti-CD18. Electron microscopic observations of fixed blood specimens revealed that platelets augmented neutrophil aggregation both by forming bridges between neutrophils and through contact-mediated activation. CONCLUSIONS: The results are consistent with a model in which venous levels of shear support platelet adherence to neutrophils via P-selectin binding PSGL-1. This interaction alone is sufficient to mediate neutrophil aggregation. Abrogation of platelet adhesion and aggregation requires blocking Mac-1 in addition to PSGL-1 or P-selectin. The described mechanisms are likely of key importance in the pathogenesis and progression of thrombotic disorders that are exacerbated by leukocyte-platelet aggregation.

  3. Mechanism of sphingosine 1-phosphate- and lysophosphatidic Acid-induced up-regulation of adhesion molecules and eosinophil chemoattractant in nerve cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Costello, Richard W

    2011-05-01

    The lysophospholipids sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) act via G-protein coupled receptors S1P(1-5) and LPA(1-3) respectively, and are implicated in allergy. Eosinophils accumulate at innervating cholinergic nerves in asthma and adhere to nerve cells via intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells were used as an in vitro cholinergic nerve cell model. The G(i) coupled receptors S1P(1), S1P(3), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3) were expressed on IMR-32 cells. Both S1P and LPA induced ERK phosphorylation and ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of ICAM-1 expression, with differing time courses. LPA also induced ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of the eosinophil chemoattractant, CCL-26. The eosinophil granule protein eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) induced ERK-dependent up-regulation of transcription of S1P(1), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3), providing the situation whereby eosinophil granule proteins may enhance S1P- and\\/or LPA- induced eosinophil accumulation at nerve cells in allergic conditions.

  4. Mechanism of sphingosine 1-phosphate- and lysophosphatidic Acid-induced up-regulation of adhesion molecules and eosinophil chemoattractant in nerve cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Costello, Richard W

    2012-02-01

    The lysophospholipids sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) act via G-protein coupled receptors S1P(1-5) and LPA(1-3) respectively, and are implicated in allergy. Eosinophils accumulate at innervating cholinergic nerves in asthma and adhere to nerve cells via intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells were used as an in vitro cholinergic nerve cell model. The G(i) coupled receptors S1P(1), S1P(3), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3) were expressed on IMR-32 cells. Both S1P and LPA induced ERK phosphorylation and ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of ICAM-1 expression, with differing time courses. LPA also induced ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of the eosinophil chemoattractant, CCL-26. The eosinophil granule protein eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) induced ERK-dependent up-regulation of transcription of S1P(1), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3), providing the situation whereby eosinophil granule proteins may enhance S1P- and\\/or LPA- induced eosinophil accumulation at nerve cells in allergic conditions.

  5. The talin head domain reinforces integrin-mediated adhesion by promoting adhesion complex stability and clustering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J Ellis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Talin serves an essential function during integrin-mediated adhesion in linking integrins to actin via the intracellular adhesion complex. In addition, the N-terminal head domain of talin regulates the affinity of integrins for their ECM-ligands, a process known as inside-out activation. We previously showed that in Drosophila, mutating the integrin binding site in the talin head domain resulted in weakened adhesion to the ECM. Intriguingly, subsequent studies showed that canonical inside-out activation of integrin might not take place in flies. Consistent with this, a mutation in talin that specifically blocks its ability to activate mammalian integrins does not significantly impinge on talin function during fly development. Here, we describe results suggesting that the talin head domain reinforces and stabilizes the integrin adhesion complex by promoting integrin clustering distinct from its ability to support inside-out activation. Specifically, we show that an allele of talin containing a mutation that disrupts intramolecular interactions within the talin head attenuates the assembly and reinforcement of the integrin adhesion complex. Importantly, we provide evidence that this mutation blocks integrin clustering in vivo. We propose that the talin head domain is essential for regulating integrin avidity in Drosophila and that this is crucial for integrin-mediated adhesion during animal development.

  6. The crucial role of collagen-binding integrins in maintaining the mechanical properties of human scleral fibroblasts-seeded collagen matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Shoulong; Cui, Dongmei; Yang, Xiao; Hu, Jianmin; Wan, Wenjuan; Zeng, Junwen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to identify the presence of collagen-binding integrin subunits in human scleral fibroblasts (HSFs) and investigate their actual functions in maintaining the mechanical creep properties of the HSFs-seeded collagen matrix. Methods Primary HSFs were cultured in vitro. Reverse- transcription PCR was used to detect mRNA expression of integrin α1, α2, and β1 subunits in HSFs. In addition, western blot analysis and immunofluorescence were used to detect their protei...

  7. Oxidation of Са2+-Binding Domain of NADPH Oxidase 5 (NOX5): Toward Understanding the Mechanism of Inactivation of NOX5 by ROS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrushanko, Irina Yu; Lobachev, Vladimir M.; Kononikhin, Alexey S.; Makarov, Alexander A.; Devred, Francois; Kovacic, Hervé; Kubatiev, Aslan A.; Tsvetkov, Philipp O.

    2016-01-01

    NOX5 protein, one of the most active generators of reactive oxygen species (ROS), plays an important role in many processes, including regulation of cell growth, death and differentiation. Because of its central role in ROS generation, it needs to be tightly regulated to guarantee cellular homeostasis. Contrary to other members of NADPH-oxidases family, NOX5 has its own regulatory calcium-binding domain and thus could be activated directly by calcium ions. While several mechanisms of activation have been described, very little is known about the mechanisms that could prevent the overproduction of ROS by NOX5. In the present study using calorimetric methods and circular dichroism we found that oxidation of cysteine and methionine residues of NOX5 decreases binding of Ca2+ ions and perturbs both secondary and tertiary structure of protein. Our data strongly suggest that oxidation of calcium-binding domain of NOX5 could be implicated in its inactivation, serving as a possible defense mechanism against oxidative stress. PMID:27391469

  8. Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD) LAD is an immune deficiency in ... are slow to heal also may have LAD. Treatment and Research Doctors prescribe antibiotics to prevent and ...

  9. The adhesion of mussel foot protein-3 to TiO2 surfaces: the effect of pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Wei, Wei; Menyo, Matthew S.; Masic, Admir; Waite, J. Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2013-01-01

    The underwater adhesion of marine mussels relies on mussel foot proteins (mfps) rich in the catecholic amino acid 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa). As a side-chain, Dopa is capable of strong bidentate interactions with a variety of surfaces, including many minerals and metal oxides. Titanium is among the most widely used medical implant material and quickly forms a TiO2 passivation layer under physiological conditions. Understanding the binding mechanism of Dopa to TiO2 surfaces is therefore of considerable theoretical and practical interest. Using a surface forces apparatus, we explored the force-distance profiles and adhesion energies of mussel foot protein 3 (mfp-3) to TiO2 surfaces at three different pHs (pH3, 5.5 and 7.5). At pH3, mfp-3 showed the strongest adhesion force on TiO2, with an adhesion energy of ~ −7.0 mJ/m2. Increasing the pH gives rise to two opposing effects: (1) increased oxidation of Dopa, thus decreasing availability for the Dopa-mediated adhesion, and (2) increased bidentate Dopa-Ti coordination, leading to the further stabilization of the Dopa group and thus an increasing of adhesion force. Both effects were reflected in the resonance-enhanced Raman spectra obtained at the three deposition pHs. The two competing effects give rise to a higher adhesion force of mfp-3 on TiO2 surface at pH 7.5 than at pH 5.5. Our results suggest that Dopa-containing proteins and synthetic polymers have great potential as coating materials for medical implant materials, particularly if redox activity can be controlled. PMID:23452271

  10. Repeated origin and loss of adhesive toepads in geckos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Gamble

    Full Text Available Geckos are well known for their extraordinary clinging abilities and many species easily scale vertical or even inverted surfaces. This ability is enabled by a complex digital adhesive mechanism (adhesive toepads that employs van der Waals based adhesion, augmented by frictional forces. Numerous morphological traits and behaviors have evolved to facilitate deployment of the adhesive mechanism, maximize adhesive force and enable release from the substrate. The complex digital morphologies that result allow geckos to interact with their environment in a novel fashion quite differently from most other lizards. Details of toepad morphology suggest multiple gains and losses of the adhesive mechanism, but lack of a comprehensive phylogeny has hindered efforts to determine how frequently adhesive toepads have been gained and lost. Here we present a multigene phylogeny of geckos, including 107 of 118 recognized genera, and determine that adhesive toepads have been gained and lost multiple times, and remarkably, with approximately equal frequency. The most likely hypothesis suggests that adhesive toepads evolved 11 times and were lost nine times. The overall external morphology of the toepad is strikingly similar in many lineages in which it is independently derived, but lineage-specific differences are evident, particularly regarding internal anatomy, with unique morphological patterns defining each independent derivation.

  11. Dynamic Regulation of Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule–mediated Homotypic Cell Adhesion through the Actin CytoskeletonV⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Nelissen, Judith M. D. T.; Peters, Inge M.; de Grooth, Bart G.; Van Kooyk, Yvette; Figdor, Carl G.

    2000-01-01

    Restricted expression of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) by hematopoietic cells suggests an important role in the immune system and hematopoiesis. To get insight into the mechanisms that control ALCAM-mediated adhesion we have investigated homotypic ALCAM–ALCAM interactions. Here, we demonstrate that the cytoskeleton regulates ALCAM-mediated cell adhesion because inhibition of actin polymerization by cytochalasin D (CytD) strongly induces homotypic ALCAM–ALCAM interactions....

  12. Effects of a Temperature-Sensitive, Anti-Adhesive Agent on the Reduction of Adhesion in a Rabbit Laminectomy Model

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jeong Woo; Bak, Koang Hum; Cho, Tae Koo; Chun, Hyoung-Joon; Ryu, Je Il

    2016-01-01

    Objective A common cause of failure in laminectomy surgery is when epidural, peridural, or perineural adhesion occurs postoperatively. The purpose of this study is to examine the efficacy of a temperature-sensitive, anti-adhesive agent (TSAA agent), Guardix-SG®, as a mechanical barrier for the prevention or reduction of peridural scar adhesion in a rabbit laminectomy model. Methods Twenty-six mature rabbits were used for this study. Each rabbit underwent two separate laminectomies at lumbar v...

  13. Management of adhesive capsulitis

    OpenAIRE

    Neviaser, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Kristen L Stupay,1 Andrew S Neviaser2 1Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is a condition of capsular contracture that reduces both active and passive glenohumeral motion. The cause of adhesive capsulitis is not known but it is strongly associated with endocrine abnormalities such as diabetes. Diverse terminology and the absence of definitive cri...

  14. Computational Studies of a Mechanism for Binding and Drug Resistance in the Wild Type and Four Mutations of HIV-1 Protease with a GRL-0519 Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Hu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance of mutations in HIV-1 protease (PR is the most severe challenge to the long-term efficacy of HIV-1 PR inhibitor in highly active antiretroviral therapy. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of drug resistance associated with mutations (D30N, I50V, I54M, and V82A and inhibitor (GRL-0519 complexes, we have performed five molecular dynamics (MD simulations and calculated the binding free energies using the molecular mechanics Poisson–Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA method. The ranking of calculated binding free energies is in accordance with the experimental data. The free energy spectra of each residue and inhibitor interaction for all complexes show a similar binding model. Analysis based on the MD trajectories and contribution of each residues show that groups R2 and R3 mainly contribute van der Waals energies, while groups R1 and R4 contribute electrostatic interaction by hydrogen bonds. The drug resistance of D30N can be attributed to the decline in binding affinity of residues 28 and 29. The size of Val50 is smaller than Ile50 causes the residue to move, especially in chain A. The stable hydrophobic core, including the side chain of Ile54 in the wild type (WT complex, became unstable in I54M because the side chain of Met54 is flexible with two alternative conformations. The binding affinity of Ala82 in V82A decreases relative to Val82 in WT. The present study could provide important guidance for the design of a potent new drug resisting the mutation inhibitors.

  15. Computational Studies of a Mechanism for Binding and Drug Resistance in the Wild Type and Four Mutations of HIV-1 Protease with a GRL-0519 Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guodong; Ma, Aijing; Dou, Xianghua; Zhao, Liling; Wang, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance of mutations in HIV-1 protease (PR) is the most severe challenge to the long-term efficacy of HIV-1 PR inhibitor in highly active antiretroviral therapy. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of drug resistance associated with mutations (D30N, I50V, I54M, and V82A) and inhibitor (GRL-0519) complexes, we have performed five molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and calculated the binding free energies using the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method. The ranking of calculated binding free energies is in accordance with the experimental data. The free energy spectra of each residue and inhibitor interaction for all complexes show a similar binding model. Analysis based on the MD trajectories and contribution of each residues show that groups R2 and R3 mainly contribute van der Waals energies, while groups R1 and R4 contribute electrostatic interaction by hydrogen bonds. The drug resistance of D30N can be attributed to the decline in binding affinity of residues 28 and 29. The size of Val50 is smaller than Ile50 causes the residue to move, especially in chain A. The stable hydrophobic core, including the side chain of Ile54 in the wild type (WT) complex, became unstable in I54M because the side chain of Met54 is flexible with two alternative conformations. The binding affinity of Ala82 in V82A decreases relative to Val82 in WT. The present study could provide important guidance for the design of a potent new drug resisting the mutation inhibitors. PMID:27240358

  16. Investigation of binding mechanism of novel 8-substituted coumarin derivatives with human serum albumin and α-1-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeggoni, Daniel Pushpa Raju; Manidhar, Darla Mark; Suresh Reddy, Cirandur; Subramanyam, Rajagopal

    2016-09-01

    Coumarin molecules have biological activities possessing lipid-controlling activity, anti-hepatitis C activity, anti-diabetic, anti-Parkinson activity, and anti-cancer activity. Here, we have presented an inclusive study on the interaction of 8-substituted-7-hydroxy coumarin derivatives (Umb-1/Umb-2) with α-1-glycoprotein (AGP) and human serum albumin (HSA) which are the major carrier proteins in the human blood plasma. Binding constants obtained from fluorescence emission data were found to be KUmb-1=3.1 ± .01 × 10(4) M(-1), KUmb-2 = 7 ± .01 × 10(4) M(-1), which corresponds to -6.1 and -6.5 kcal/mol of free energy for Umb-1 and Umb-2, respectively, suggesting that these derivatives bind strongly to HSA. Also these molecules bind to AGP with binding constants of KUmb-1-AGP=3.1 ± .01 × 10(3) M(-1) and KUmb-2-AGP = 4.6 ± .01 × 10(3) M(-1). Further, the distance, r between the donor (HSA) and acceptor (Umb-1/Umb-2) was calculated based on the Forster's theory of non-radiation energy transfer and the values were observed to be 1.14 and 1.29 nm in Umb-1-HSA and Umb-2-HSA system, respectively. The protein secondary structure of HSA was partially unfolded upon binding of Umb-1 and Umb-2. Furthermore, site displacement experiments with lidocaine, phenylbutazone (IIA), and ibuprofen (IIIA) proves that Umb derivatives significantly bind to subdomain IIIA of HSA which is further supported by docking studies. Furthermore, Umb-1 binds to LYS402 with one hydrogen bond distance of 2.8 Å and Umb-2 binds to GLU354 with one hydrogen bond at a distance of 2.0 Å. Moreover, these molecules are stabilized by hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl groups of carbon-3 of coumarin derivatives.

  17. Controlled Adhesion of Silicone Elastomer Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Michael

    2000-03-01

    Opportunities exist for controllably enhancing the adhesion of silicone surfaces, ranging from modest enhancement of release force levels of pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) release liners by incorporation of adhesion promoters known as high release additives (HRA), to permanent bonding of silicone elastomers using surface modification techniques such as plasma or corona treatment. Although only a part of the complex interaction of factors contributing to adhesion, surface properties such as wettability are a critical component in the understanding and control of release and adhesion phenomena. Surface characterization studies of low-surface-energy silicones before and after various adhesion modification strategies are reviewed. The silicones include polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and fluorosiloxane elastomers and coatings. Techniques used include contact angle, the Johnson, Kendall and Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics approach, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Topics addressed are: use of HRA in PDMS release liners, the interaction of PDMS PSAs with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and the effect of plasma treatment on PDMS and fluorosiloxane surfaces.

  18. Bioinspired pressure actuated adhesive system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paretkar, D.R.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Schneider, A.S.; Martina, D.; Creton, C.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a dry synthetic adhesive system inspired by gecko feet adhesion that can switch reversibly from adhesion to non-adhesion with applied pressure as external stimulus. Micropatterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with pillars of 30 µm length and 10 µm diameter were fabricated using

  19. Short arm region of laminin-5 gamma2 chain: structure, mechanism of processing and binding to heparin and proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasaki, T; Göhring, W; Mann, K;

    2001-01-01

    which required in addition disulfide reshuffling by isomerases. The liberated segment bound through its L4 m module to heparin, nidogen-1, fibulin-1 and fibulin-2. A further heparin/sulfatide-binding site could be attributed to some arginine residues in module LE1. The gamma2LE4-6 segment remaining...

  20. Role of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)-neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) interactions in induction of neurite outgrowth and identification of a binding site for NCAM in the heel region of GDNF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Gotfryd, Kamil; Li, Shizhong;

    2009-01-01

    -derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), the interaction of which induce neurite outgrowth. In the present study the requirements for NCAM-mediated GDNF-induced neurite outgrowth were investigated in cultures of hippocampal neurons, which do not express Ret. We demonstrate...... that NCAM-mediated GDNF-induced signaling leading to neurite outgrowth is more complex than previously reported. It not only involves NCAM-140 and the Src family kinase Fyn but also uses NCAM-180 and the fibroblast growth factor receptor. We find that induction of neurite outgrowth by GDNF via NCAM...... or by trans-homophilic NCAM interactions are not mutually exclusive. However, whereas NCAM-induced neurite outgrowth primarily is mediated by NCAM-180, we demonstrate that GDNF-induced neurite outgrowth involves both NCAM-140 and NCAM-180. We also find that GDNF-induced neurite outgrowth via NCAM differs from...