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Sample records for adhesion modification protein

  1. Protein adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda F. Lorenz

    2018-01-01

    Nature uses a wide variety of chemicals for providing adhesion internally (e.g., cell to cell) and externally (e.g., mussels to ships and piers). This adhesive bonding is chemically and mechanically complex, involving a variety of proteins, carbohydrates, and other compounds.Consequently,the effect of protein structures on adhesive properties is only partially...

  2. In vivo modification of tyrosine residues in recombinant mussel adhesive protein by tyrosinase co-expression in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Yoo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In nature, mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs show remarkable adhesive properties, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Thus, they have been considered promising adhesive biomaterials for various biomedical and industrial applications. However, limited production of natural MAPs has hampered their practical applications. Recombinant production in bacterial cells could be one alternative to obtain useable amounts of MAPs, although additional post-translational modification of tyrosine residues into 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-alanine (Dopa and Dopaquinone is required. The superior properties of MAPs are mainly attributed to the introduction of quinone-derived intermolecular cross-links. To solve this problem, we utilized a co-expression strategy of recombinant MAP and tyrosinase in Escherichia coli to successfully modify tyrosine residues in vivo. Results A recombinant hybrid MAP, fp-151, was used as a target for in vivo modification, and a dual vector system of pET and pACYC-Duet provided co-expression of fp-151 and tyrosinase. As a result, fp-151 was over-expressed and mainly obtained from the soluble fraction in the co-expression system. Without tyrosinase co-expression, fp-151 was over-expressed in an insoluble form in inclusion bodies. The modification of tyrosine residues in the soluble-expressed fp-151 was clearly observed from nitroblue tetrazolium staining and liquid-chromatography-mass/mass spectrometry analyses. The purified, in vivo modified, fp-151 from the co-expression system showed approximately 4-fold higher bulk-scale adhesive strength compared to in vitro tyrosinase-treated fp-151. Conclusion Here, we reported a co-expression system to obtain in vivo modified MAP; additional in vitro tyrosinase modification was not needed to obtain adhesive properties and the in vivo modified MAP showed superior adhesive strength compared to in vitro modified protein. It is expected that this co-expression strategy will accelerate

  3. In vivo modification of tyrosine residues in recombinant mussel adhesive protein by tyrosinase co-expression in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background In nature, mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs) show remarkable adhesive properties, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Thus, they have been considered promising adhesive biomaterials for various biomedical and industrial applications. However, limited production of natural MAPs has hampered their practical applications. Recombinant production in bacterial cells could be one alternative to obtain useable amounts of MAPs, although additional post-translational modification of tyrosine residues into 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-alanine (Dopa) and Dopaquinone is required. The superior properties of MAPs are mainly attributed to the introduction of quinone-derived intermolecular cross-links. To solve this problem, we utilized a co-expression strategy of recombinant MAP and tyrosinase in Escherichia coli to successfully modify tyrosine residues in vivo. Results A recombinant hybrid MAP, fp-151, was used as a target for in vivo modification, and a dual vector system of pET and pACYC-Duet provided co-expression of fp-151 and tyrosinase. As a result, fp-151 was over-expressed and mainly obtained from the soluble fraction in the co-expression system. Without tyrosinase co-expression, fp-151 was over-expressed in an insoluble form in inclusion bodies. The modification of tyrosine residues in the soluble-expressed fp-151 was clearly observed from nitroblue tetrazolium staining and liquid-chromatography-mass/mass spectrometry analyses. The purified, in vivo modified, fp-151 from the co-expression system showed approximately 4-fold higher bulk-scale adhesive strength compared to in vitro tyrosinase-treated fp-151. Conclusion Here, we reported a co-expression system to obtain in vivo modified MAP; additional in vitro tyrosinase modification was not needed to obtain adhesive properties and the in vivo modified MAP showed superior adhesive strength compared to in vitro modified protein. It is expected that this co-expression strategy will accelerate the use of functional MAPs in

  4. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam) binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Robert T; Sanchez-Contreras, Maria; Vlisidou, Isabella; Amos, Matthew R; Yang, Guowei; Muñoz-Berbel, Xavier; Upadhyay, Abhishek; Potter, Ursula J; Joyce, Susan A; Ciche, Todd A; Jenkins, A Toby A; Bagby, Stefan; Ffrench-Constant, Richard H; Waterfield, Nicholas R

    2010-05-12

    Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28 degrees C) and human (37 degrees C) temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS)-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect through mediation of EPS properties. Despite

  5. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Susan A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C and human (37°C temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect

  6. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam) binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jones, Robert T

    2010-05-12

    Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C) and human (37°C) temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS)-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect through mediation of

  7. Cell adhesion and growth enabled by biomimetic oligopeptide modification of a polydopamine-poly(ethylene oxide) protein repulsive surface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Musílková, Jana; Kotelnikov, Ilya; Novotná, Katarína; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Rypáček, František; Bačáková, Lucie; Proks, Vladimír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 11 (2015), s. 253 ISSN 0957-4530 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1857; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1168; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0029; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : protein repulsive surface * cell adhesion * RGD * endothelial cells Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 2.272, year: 2015

  8. Cohesion and Adhesion with Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2016-01-01

    With increasing interest in bio-based adhesives, research on proteins has expanded because historically they have been used by both nature and humans as adhesives. A wide variety of proteins have been used as wood adhesives. Ancient Egyptians most likely used collagens tobond veneer to wood furniture, then came casein (milk), blood, fish scales, and soy adhesives, with...

  9. Surface Modifications in Adhesion and Wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longley, Jonathan

    Advances in surface modification are changing the world. Changing surface properties of bulk materials with nanometer scale coatings enables inventions ranging from the familiar non-stick frying pan to advanced composite aircraft. Nanometer or monolayer coatings used to modify a surface affect the macro-scale properties of a system; for example, composite adhesive joints between the fuselage and internal frame of Boeing's 787 Dreamliner play a vital role in the structural stability of the aircraft. This dissertation focuses on a collection of surface modification techniques that are used in the areas of adhesion and wetting. Adhesive joints are rapidly replacing the familiar bolt and rivet assemblies used by the aerospace and automotive industries. This transition is fueled by the incorporation of composite materials into aircraft and high performance road vehicles. Adhesive joints have several advantages over the traditional rivet, including, significant weight reduction and efficient stress transfer between bonded materials. As fuel costs continue to rise, the weight reduction is accelerating this transition. Traditional surface pretreatments designed to improve the adhesion of polymeric materials to metallic surfaces are extremely toxic. Replacement adhesive technologies must be compatible with the environment without sacrificing adhesive performance. Silane-coupling agents have emerged as ideal surface modifications for improving composite joint strength. As these coatings are generally applied as very thin layers (compression of a water drop between two gradient surfaces. This inchworm type motion is studied in detail and offers an alternative method to surface vibration for moving drops in microfluidic devices. The final surface modification considered is the application of a thin layer of rubber to a rigid surface. While this technique has many practical uses, such as easy release coatings in marine environments, it is applied herein to enable spontaneous

  10. Adhesive Elastomeric Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Mansour, Haefa; Liu, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Sutures and staples commonly used to close surgical wounds tend to be much stiffer than the surrounding tissue, often resulting in external tissue damage. Surgical adhesives provide a promising alternative to these sutures and staples. Ideal surgical adhesives are biocompatible, able to set well and remain sticky in moist conditions, possess strong adhesive and cohesive properties, and exhibit mechanical properties that mimic those of the surrounding tissue. Unfortunately, the adhesives avail...

  11. Soy protein adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2010-01-01

    In the quest to manufacture and use building materials that are more environmentally friendly, soy adhesives can be an important component. Trees fix and store carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. After the trees are harvested, machinery converts the wood into strands, which are then bonded together with adhesives to form strandboard, used in constructing long-lasting...

  12. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Susan [Manhattan, KS; Wang, Donghai [Manhattan, KS; Zhong, Zhikai [Manhattan, KS; Yang, Guang [Shanghai, CN

    2008-08-26

    The present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  13. Chemical Protein Modification through Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnoo, Smita B; Madder, Annemieke

    2016-04-01

    The modification of proteins with non-protein entities is important for a wealth of applications, and methods for chemically modifying proteins attract considerable attention. Generally, modification is desired at a single site to maintain homogeneity and to minimise loss of function. Though protein modification can be achieved by targeting some natural amino acid side chains, this often leads to ill-defined and randomly modified proteins. Amongst the natural amino acids, cysteine combines advantageous properties contributing to its suitability for site-selective modification, including a unique nucleophilicity, and a low natural abundance--both allowing chemo- and regioselectivity. Native cysteine residues can be targeted, or Cys can be introduced at a desired site in a protein by means of reliable genetic engineering techniques. This review on chemical protein modification through cysteine should appeal to those interested in modifying proteins for a range of applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Comparing Soy Flour Wood Adhesives to Purified Soy Protein Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda F. Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    While economics dictate that soy-based wood adhesives be made with soy flour, much of the recent literature on soy-based wood adhesives has involved using soy protein isolate. The obvious assumption is that the additional carbohydrates in the flour but not in the isolate only serve as inert diluents. Our studies have shown that the isolate can provide 10 times the wet...

  15. Chapter 16: Soy Proteins as Wood Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Christopher G. Hunt; Michael J. Birkeland

    2014-01-01

    Protein adhesives allowed the development of bonded wood products such as plywood and glulam in the early 20th century. Petrochemical-based adhesives replaced proteins in most wood bonding applications because of lower cost, improved production efficiencies, and enhanced durability. However, several technological and environmental factors have led to a resurgence of...

  16. Soy protein modification: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barać Miroljub B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Soy protein products such as flour, concentrates and isolates are used in food formulation because of their functionality, nutritional value and low cost. To obtain their optimal nutritive and functional properties as well as desirable flavor different treatments are used. Soybean proteins can be modified by physical, chemical and enzymatic treatments. Different thermal treatments are most commonly used, while the most appropriate way of modifying soy proteins from the standpoint of safety is their limited proteolysis. These treatments cause physical and chemical changes that affect their functional properties. This review discusses three principal methods used for modification of soy protein products, their effects on dominant soy protein properties and some biologically active compounds.

  17. Adhesion protein protocols [Methods in molecular biology, v. 96

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dejana, Elisabetta; Corada, Monica

    1999-01-01

    "An international corps of expert investigators describe their optimized techniques for both the identification of new cell adhesion proteins and for the characterization of novel adhesive structures...

  18. Wood adhesives containing proteins and carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years there has been resurgent interest in using biopolymers as sustainable and environmentally friendly ingredients in wood adhesive formulations. Among them, proteins and carbohydrates are the most commonly used. In this chapter, an overview is given of protein-based and carbohydrate-...

  19. Functional Peptides from Laminin-1 Improve the Cell Adhesion Capacity of Recombinant Mussel Adhesive Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Ji, Lina; Hua, Zichun

    2017-01-01

    Since cell adhesion is important for cell processes such as migration and proliferation, it is a crucial consideration in biomaterial design and development. Based on the fusion of mussel adhesive protein fp151 with laminin-1-originated functional peptides we designed fusion proteins (fLA4, fLG6 and fAG73) and explored their cell adhesion properties. In our study, cell adhesion analysis showed that protein fLG6 and fLA4 had a significantly higher cell adhesion property for A549 than fp151. Moreover, protein fAG73 also displayed a strong adhesion capacity for Hela cells. In conclusion, the incorporation of functional peptides with integrin and heparin/heparan sulphate binding capacity into mussel adhesive protein will promote the application of mussel adhesive protein as cell adhesion biomaterial. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Effects of some chemical surface modifications on resin zirconia adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Wong, Hai Ming

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of various chemical surface modifications on adhesion between zirconia and resin adhesive. Pre-sintered zirconia discs were sectioned from commercial cylindrical blocks and polished with abrasive papers under running tap water. All the discs were randomly divided into five study groups according to the methods of surface treatment, including: the control group (fully sintered, without any modification), group S (fully sintered and sandblasted with silica coated alumina particles), group HN (fully sintered and etched with a blend of mineral acid solution at 100 °C for 25 min), group HF (fully sintered and etched with 48% hydrofluoric acid solution at 100 °C for 25 min), and group Si (coated with silica particles and then fully sintered). The mean value of surface roughness was evaluated before further treatment. Resin stubs (3.6mm in diameter and 3mm in height) were adhered and light cured on each zirconia disc after the application of a silane coupling agent. In each group, all the samples were further divided into three subgroups with each n=12, one for the measurement of initial adhesion strength (shear bond) value and the other two were tested after thermal cycling for 10,000 and 20,000 cycles, respectively. The results were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Turkey HSD (pzirconia surface crystallinity. The morphological appearance of zirconia surface after surface treatment was observed with SEM. The control group showed the lowest initial shear bond strength (SBS) value (16.8 ± 2.4 MPa) and did not survive the aging treatments. All the investigated surface treatments improved resin zirconia bond strength significantly, the group S displaying the highest initial value of 25.1 ± 2.7 MPa. However, the highest resistance to the aging effects of thermal cycling was found in group Si. It was further shown in the XRD examination that only the grit-blasting caused the crystalline transformation from tetragonal phase to monoclinic phase (T

  1. TRIM15 is a focal adhesion protein that regulates focal adhesion disassembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchil, Pradeep D.; Pawliczek, Tobias; Reynolds, Tracy D.; Ding, Siyuan; Hinz, Angelika; Munro, James B.; Huang, Fang; Floyd, Robert W.; Yang, Haitao; Hamilton, William L.; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Xiong, Yong; Calderwood, David A.; Mothes, Walther

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Focal adhesions are macromolecular complexes that connect the actin cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. Dynamic turnover of focal adhesions is crucial for cell migration. Paxillin is a multi-adaptor protein that plays an important role in regulating focal adhesion dynamics. Here, we identify TRIM15, a member of the tripartite motif protein family, as a paxillin-interacting factor and a component of focal adhesions. TRIM15 localizes to focal contacts in a myosin-II-independent manner by an interaction between its coiled-coil domain and the LD2 motif of paxillin. Unlike other focal adhesion proteins, TRIM15 is a stable focal adhesion component with restricted mobility due to its ability to form oligomers. TRIM15-depleted cells display impaired cell migration and reduced focal adhesion disassembly rates, in addition to enlarged focal adhesions. Thus, our studies demonstrate a cellular function for TRIM15 as a regulatory component of focal adhesion turnover and cell migration. PMID:25015296

  2. Regulatory protein modification: techniques and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hemmings, Hugh C

    1997-01-01

    ... important roles in cellular regulation. The techniques used to analyze various forms of posttranslational protein modification are described, along with current protocols, discussion of the methodological limitations, and relevant examples from recent publications. This collection should be of use to investigators of protein modification who work i...

  3. Wood adhesive properties of cottonseed protein with denaturant additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most commercial wood adhesive use either formaldehyde-based resins or polyurethanes, both of which include potentially toxic chemicals in their formulations. As a result, proteins are being considered as greener and more sustainable wood adhesives. While most of the protein adhesive studies focus ...

  4. A bioinspired elastin-based protein for a cytocompatible underwater adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, M Jane; Kilbride, Bridget F; Wilker, Jonathan J; Liu, Julie C

    2017-04-01

    The development of adhesives that can be applied and create strong bonds underwater is a significant challenge for materials engineering. When the adhesive is intended for biomedical applications, further criteria, such as biocompatibility, must be met. Current biomedical adhesive technologies do not meet these needs. In response, we designed a bioinspired protein system that shows promise to achieve biocompatible underwater adhesion coupled with environmentally responsive behavior that is "smart" - that is, it can be tuned to suit a specific application. The material, ELY 16 , is constructed from an elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) that can be produced in high yields from Escherichia coli and can coacervate in response to environmental factors such as temperature, pH, and salinity. To confer wet adhesion, we utilized design principles from marine organisms such as mussels and sandcastle worms. When expressed, ELY 16 is rich in tyrosine. Upon modification with the tyrosinase enzyme to form mELY 16 , the tyrosine residues are converted to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). Both ELY 16 and mELY 16 exhibit cytocompatibility and significant dry adhesion strength (>2 MPa). Modification with DOPA increases protein adsorption to glass and provides moderate adhesion strength (∼240 kPa) in a highly humid environment. Furthermore, this ELP exhibits a tunable phase transition behavior that can be formulated to coacervate in physiological conditions and provides a convenient mechanism for application underwater. Finally, mELY 16 possesses significantly higher adhesion strength in dry, humid, and underwater environments compared with a commercially available fibrin sealant. To our knowledge, mELY 16 provides the strongest bonds of any rationally designed protein when used completely underwater, and its high yields make it more viable for commercial application compared to natural adhesive proteins. In conclusion, this ELP shows great potential to be a new "smart" underwater

  5. Experimental strategies for the identification and characterization of adhesive proteins in animals: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebert, Elise; Maldonado, Barbara; Ladurner, Peter; Flammang, Patrick; Santos, Romana

    2015-01-01

    Adhesive secretions occur in both aquatic and terrestrial animals, in which they perform diverse functions. Biological adhesives can therefore be remarkably complex and involve a large range of components with different functions and interactions. However, being mainly protein based, biological adhesives can be characterized by classical molecular methods. This review compiles experimental strategies that were successfully used to identify, characterize and obtain the full-length sequence of adhesive proteins from nine biological models: echinoderms, barnacles, tubeworms, mussels, sticklebacks, slugs, velvet worms, spiders and ticks. A brief description and practical examples are given for a variety of tools used to study adhesive molecules at different levels from genes to secreted proteins. In most studies, proteins, extracted from secreted materials or from adhesive organs, are analysed for the presence of post-translational modifications and submitted to peptide sequencing. The peptide sequences are then used directly for a BLAST search in genomic or transcriptomic databases, or to design degenerate primers to perform RT-PCR, both allowing the recovery of the sequence of the cDNA coding for the investigated protein. These sequences can then be used for functional validation and recombinant production. In recent years, the dual proteomic and transcriptomic approach has emerged as the best way leading to the identification of novel adhesive proteins and retrieval of their complete sequences. PMID:25657842

  6. Protein Recovery from Secondary Paper Sludge and Its Potential Use as Wood Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervaiz, Muhammad

    Secondary sludge is an essential part of biosolids produced through the waste treatment plant of paper mills. Globally paper mills generate around 3.0 million ton of biosolids and in the absence of beneficial applications, the handling and disposal of this residual biomass poses a serious environmental and economic proposition. Secondary paper sludges were investigated in this work for recovery of proteins and their use as wood adhesive. After identifying extracellular polymeric substances as adhesion pre-cursors through analytical techniques, studies were carried out to optimize protein recovery from SS and its comprehensive characterization. A modified physicochemical protocol was developed to recover protein from secondary sludge in substantial quantities. The combined effect of French press and sonication techniques followed by alkali treatment resulted in significant improvement of 44% in the yield of solubilized protein compared to chemical methods. The characterization studies confirmed the presence of common amino acids in recovered sludge protein in significant quantities and heavy metal concentration was reduced after recovery process. The sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis revealed the presence of both low and high molecular weight protein fractions in recovered sludge protein. After establishing the proof-of-concept in the use of recovered sludge protein as wood adhesive, the bonding mechanism of protein adhesives with cellulose substrate was further elucidated in a complementary protein-modification study involving soy protein isolate and its glycinin fractions. The results of this study validated the prevailing bonding theories by proving that surface wetting, protein structure, and type of wood play important role in determining final adhesive strength. Recovered sludge protein was also investigated for its compatibility to formulate hybrid adhesive blends with formaldehyde and bio-based polymers. Apart from chemical

  7. Studies on polyurethane adhesives and surface modification of hydrophobic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Jayaraman

    This thesis work deals with (a) Curing of reactive, hot-melt polyurethane adhesives and (b) Adsorption studies using different interactions. Research on polyurethanes involves characterization of polyurethane prepolymers and a novel mechanism to cure isocyanate-terminated polyurethane prepolymer by a "trigger" mechanism. Curing of isocyanate-terminated polyurethane prepolymers has been shown to be influenced by morphology and environmental conditions such as temperature and relative humidity. Although the initial composition, final morphology and curing kinetics are known, information regarding the intermediate prepolymer mixture is yet to be established. Polyurethane prepolymers prepared by the reaction of diisocyanates with the primary hydroxyls of polyester diol (PHMA) and secondary hydroxyls of polyether diol (PPG) were characterized. The morphology and crystallization kinetics of a polyurethane prepolymer was compared with a blend of PPG prepolymer (the product obtained by the reaction of PPG with diisocyanate) and a PHMA prepolymer (the product obtained by the reaction of PHMA with diisocyanate) to study the effect of copolymer formed in the polyurethane prepolymer on the above-mentioned properties. Although the morphology of the polyurethane prepolymer is determined in the first few minutes of application, the chemical curing of isocyanate-terminated prepolymer occurs over hours to days. In the literature, different techniques are described to follow the curing kinetics. But there is no established technique to control the curing of polyurethane prepolymer. To make the curing process independent of environmental factors, a novel approach using a trigger mechanism was designed and implemented by using ammonium salts as curing agents. Ammonium salts that are stable at room temperature but decompose on heating to yield active hydrogen-containing compounds, NH3 and H2O, were used as 'Trojan horses' to cure the prepolymer chemically. Research on adsorption

  8. Surface Modification of Titanium and Polyimide Sheet for Adhesive Bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akram, M.

    2015-01-01

    Major industrial sectors like automotive, aerospace and others are increasingly using polymer composites in their structural parts. Polyimide sheet and adhesives, are high performance polymers. They are widely used in various engineering applications due to their excellent thermal, mechanical and

  9. Modification of in natura starch for application in adhesives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Gisela K.; Andrade, Cristina T.

    2001-01-01

    Commercial modified starches used in adhesive formulations have been characterized by infrared, spectroscopy, 13 C-NMR and viscosimetry. Several reactions have been carried out with starch in natura in acid solutions and the resulting products have been compared with the commercial samples. The product obtained by acid hydrolysis at 60 deg C for 90 min was characterized as the most appropriate to be used in adhesive formulations. (author)

  10. Thin film adhesion modification by MeV ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugden, S.

    1991-08-01

    The adhesion of thin films, and in particular the way in which such adhesion may be improved by irradiation, is rather poorly understood. The radiation enhanced adhesion effect has been investigated through the use of Ultra High Vacuum sample preparation, analysis and irradiation techniques, in order to gain control over surface and interface composition. In the systems studied, Au on Ta, Au on Si and Ag on Si, films deposited on atomically clean surfaces show good adhesion, and no evidence of enhancement due to irradiation is observed in the case of such clean interfaces. The results are entirely consistent with radiation enhanced adhesion being due to radiolytic effects on contaminant containing layers at the film/substrate interface. In addition, on silicon substrates the observations highlight the superiority of thermal cleaning over low energy sputtering as a route for producing a clean surface. A model of the radiation enhanced adhesion observations for dirty interface systems is developed, which takes into account the two dimensional nature of the ion energy deposition process. All the observations on such systems are broadly consistent with an activation energy for the process of approximately 5 eV. This value is sufficiently large to bring about chemical bonding rearrangement at the critical film/substrate interface. (Author)

  11. Reduction of initial corrosion rate and improvement of cell adhesion through surface modification of biodegradable Mg alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyung-Seop; Lee, Sun Hee; Kim, Won-Joo; Jeon, Hojeong; Seok, Hyun-Kwang; Ahn, Jae-Pyung; Kim, Yu-Chan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the surface modification of biodegradable pure Magnesium and Mg-5wt%Ca-1wt%Zn alloy was performed through immersion in HBSS, inorganic salt solution and cell media to reduce initial hydrogen evolution and improve cell adhesion. The formation of different CaP-like coatings from immersion of pure Mg and Mg alloy were observed using Cryo FIB analysis and their performances were measured through cell adhesion, quantification of released Mg ions, and cell cytotoxicity assays. The coating layers displayed significant reduction of initial corrosion rate, and cell adhesion for both pure Mg and Mg alloy appeared to be influenced by the amino acids and proteins in the cell media. In general, Mg alloy showed a denser coating layer with higher Ca contents, resulting in greater reduction of initial corrosion rate and improved cell adhesion, when compared to pure Mg. This is due to saturation of Ca around the corrosion site that provided much favorable environmental condition to produce denser calcium phosphate coating mixture. The result from this study suggests that the surface modification of biodegradable Mg alloy by immersion in alkaline solutions can be utilized to obtain ideal biodegradable orthopedic implant material with reduced initial hydrogen evolution rate and improved cell adhesion.

  12. High-adhesion Cu patterns fabricated by nanosecond laser modification and electroless copper plating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Ming; Liu, Jianguo, E-mail: liujg@mail.hust.edu.cn; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Du, Qifeng; Ai, Jun

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • High-adhesion copper patterns on alumina ceramic were obtained conveniently. • Effects of processing parameters on adhesion were investigated. • The adhesion of copper–ceramic was higher than the tensile strength of tin-lead solder. • Failure mechanism was studied by the analysis of fracture surfaces. - Abstract: Adhesion strength is a crucial factor for the performance and reliability of metallic patterns on insulator substrates. In this study, we present an efficient technique for selective metallization of alumina ceramic with high adhesion strength by using nanosecond laser modification and electroless copper plating. Specifically, a 355 nm Nd:YVO{sub 4} ultraviolet (UV) laser was employed not only to decompose palladium chloride film locally for catalyzing the electroless reaction, but also to modify the ceramic surface directly using its high fluence. An orthogonal experiment was undertaken to study the effects of processing parameters including laser fluence, scanning speed and scanning line interval on adhesion strength. The adhesion strength was measured by pulling a metallic wire soldered into the copper coating perpendicular to the substrate using a pull tester. The results have shown that a strong adhesion between the copper coating and the alumina ceramic, higher than the tensile strength of tin-lead solder was obtained. Surface and interface characteristics were investigated to understand that, whose results have shown that the high-aspect-ratio microstructures formed by the laser modification is the major reason for the improvement of adhesion.

  13. Exploring the diversity of protein modifications: special bacterial phosphorylation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijakovic, Ivan; Grangeasse, Christophe; Turgay, Kürşad

    2016-01-01

    Protein modifications not only affect protein homeostasis but can also establish new cellular protein functions and are important components of complex cellular signal sensing and transduction networks. Among these post-translational modifications, protein phosphorylation represents the one that ...

  14. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH 2 ) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  15. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing, E-mail: shisq@nwu.edu.cn; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH{sub 2}) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  16. Diagonal chromatography to study plant protein modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Alan; Tsiatsiani, Liana; Jacques, Silke; Stes, Elisabeth; Messens, Joris; Van Breusegem, Frank; Goormachtig, Sofie; Gevaert, Kris

    2016-08-01

    An interesting asset of diagonal chromatography, which we have introduced for contemporary proteome research, is its high versatility concerning proteomic applications. Indeed, the peptide modification or sorting step that is required between consecutive peptide separations can easily be altered and thereby allows for the enrichment of specific, though different types of peptides. Here, we focus on the application of diagonal chromatography for the study of modifications of plant proteins. In particular, we show how diagonal chromatography allows for studying proteins processed by proteases, protein ubiquitination, and the oxidation of protein-bound methionines. We discuss the actual sorting steps needed for each of these applications and the obtained results. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics--a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Soy protein isolate molecular level contributions to bulk adhesive properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shera, Jeanne Norton

    Increasing environmental awareness and the recognized health hazards of formaldehyde-based resins has prompted a strong demand for environmentally-responsible adhesives for wood composites. Soy protein-based adhesives have been shown to be commercially viable with 90-day shelf stability and composite physical properties comparable to those of commercial formaldehyde-based particleboards. The main research focus is to isolate and characterize the molecular level features in soy protein isolate responsible for providing mechanical properties, storage stability, and water resistance during adhesive formulation, processing, and wood composite fabrication. Commercial composite board will be reviewed to enhance our understanding of the individual components and processes required for particleboard production. The levels of protein structure will be defined and an overview of current bio-based technology will be presented. In the process, the logic for utilizing soy protein as a sole binder in the adhesive will be reinforced. Variables such as adhesive components, pH, divalent ions, blend aging, protein molecular weight, formulation solids content, and soy protein functionalization will relate the bulk properties of soy protein adhesives to the molecular configuration of the soybean protein. This work has demonstrated that when intermolecular beta-sheet interactions and protein long-range order is disrupted, viscosity and mechanical properties decrease. Storage stability can be maintained through the stabilization of intermolecular beta-sheet interactions. When molecular weight is reduced through enzymatic digestion, long-range order is disrupted and viscosity and mechanical properties decrease accordingly. Processibility and physical properties must be balanced to increase solids while maintaining low viscosity, desirable mechanical properties, and adequate storage stability. The structure of the soybean protein must be related to the particleboard bulk mechanical

  18. Optimized Baxter model of protein solutions : Electrostatics versus adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinsen, P.; Odijk, T.

    2004-01-01

    A theory is set up of spherical proteins interacting by screened electrostatics and constant adhesion, in which the effective adhesion parameter is optimized by a variational principle for the free energy. An analytical approach to the second virial coefficient is first outlined by balancing the

  19. Leukocyte adhesion and polarization: Role of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Dion D; Fernandez-Borja, Mar

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte traffic out of the blood stream is crucial for an adequate immune response. Leukocyte extravasation is critically dependent on the binding of leukocyte integrins to their endothelial counterreceptors. This interaction enables the firm adhesion of leukocytes to the luminal side of the vascular wall and allows for leukocyte polarization, crawling and diapedesis. Leukocyte adhesion, polarization and migration requires the orchestrated regulation of integrin adhesion/de-adhesion dynamics and actin cytoskeleton rearrangements. Adhesion strength depends on conformational changes of integrin molecules (affinity) as well as the number of integrin molecules engaged at adhesion sites (valency). These two processes can be independently regulated and several molecules modulate either one or both processes. Cholesterol-rich membrane domains (lipid rafts) participate in integrin regulation and play an important role in leukocyte adhesion, polarization and motility. In particular, lipid raft-resident glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) have been reported to regulate leukocyte adhesion, polarization and motility in both integrin-dependent and independent manners. Here, we present our recent discovery concerning the novel role of the GPI-AP prion protein (PrP) in the regulation of β1 integrin-mediated monocyte adhesion, migration and shape polarization in the context of existing literature on GPI-AP-dependent regulation of integrins.

  20. Spatial distribution of proteins in the quagga mussel adhesive apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, David J; Hanifi, Arash; Manion, Joseph; Gantayet, Arpita; Sone, Eli D

    2016-01-01

    The invasive freshwater mollusc Dreissena bugensis (quagga mussel) sticks to underwater surfaces via a proteinacious 'anchor' (byssus), consisting of a series of threads linked to adhesive plaques. This adhesion results in the biofouling of crucial underwater industry infrastructure, yet little is known about the proteins responsible for the adhesion. Here the identification of byssal proteins extracted from freshly secreted byssal material is described. Several new byssal proteins were observed by gel electrophoresis. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to characterize proteins in different regions of the byssus, particularly those localized to the adhesive interface. Byssal plaques and threads contain in common a range of low molecular weight proteins, while several proteins with higher mass were observed only in the plaque. At the adhesive interface, a plaque-specific ~8.1 kDa protein had a relative increase in signal intensity compared to the bulk of the plaque, suggesting it may play a direct role in adhesion.

  1. Adhesion of MRC-5 and A549 cells on poly(dimethylsiloxane) surface modified by proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuchowska, Agnieszka; Kwiatkowski, Piotr; Jastrzebska, Elzbieta; Chudy, Michal; Dybko, Artur; Brzozka, Zbigniew

    2016-02-01

    PDMS is a very popular material used for fabrication of Lab-on-a-Chip systems for biological applications. Although PDMS has numerous advantages, it is a highly hydrophobic material, which inhibits adhesion and proliferation of the cells. PDMS surface modifications are used to enrich growth of the cells. However, due to the fact that each cell type has specific adhesion, it is necessary to optimize the parameters of these modifications. In this paper, we present an investigation of normal (MRC-5) and carcinoma (A549) human lung cell adhesion and proliferation on modified PDMS surfaces. We have chosen these cell types because often they are used as models for basic cancer research. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first presentation of this type of investigation. The combination of a gas-phase processing (oxygen plasma or ultraviolet irradiation) and wet chemical methods based on proteins' adsorption was used in our experiments. Different proteins such as poly-l-lysine, fibronectin, laminin, gelatin, and collagen were incubated with the activated PDMS samples. To compare with other works, here, we also examined how ratio of prepolymer to curing agent (5:1, 10:1, and 20:1) influences PDMS hydrophilicity during further modifications. The highest adhesion of the tested cells was observed for the usage of collagen, regardless of PDMS ratio. However, the MRC-5 cell line demonstrated better adhesion than A549 cells. This is probably due to the difference in their morphology and type (normal/cancer). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Nanoscale adhesion forces between enamel pellicle proteins and hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukosavljevic, D; Hutter, J L; Helmerhorst, E J; Xiao, Y; Custodio, W; Zaidan, F C; Oppenheim, F G; Siqueira, W L

    2014-05-01

    The acquired enamel pellicle (AEP) is important for minimizing the abrasion caused by parafunctional conditions as they occur, for instance, during bruxism. It is a remarkable feature of the AEP that a protein/peptide film can provide enough protection in normofunction to prevent teeth from abrasion and wear. Despite its obvious critical role in the protection of tooth surfaces, the essential adhesion features of AEP proteins on the enamel surface are poorly characterized. The objective of this study was to measure the adhesion force between histatin 5, a primary AEP component, and hydroxyapatite (HA) surfaces. Both biotinylated histatin 5 and biotinylated human serum albumin were allowed to adsorb to streptavidin-coated silica microspheres attached to atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers. A multimode AFM with a Nanoscope IIIa controller was used to measure the adhesion force between protein-functionalized silica microspheres attached to cantilever tips and the HA surface. The imaging was performed in tapping mode with a Si3N4 AFM cantilever, while the adhesion forces were measured in AFM contact mode. A collection of force-distance curves (~3,000/replicate) was obtained to generate histograms from which the adhesion forces between histatin 5 or albumin and the HA surface were measured. We found that histatin 5 exhibited stronger adhesion forces (90% >1.830 nN) to the HA surface than did albumin (90% > 0.282 nN). This study presents an objective approach to adhesion force measurements between histatin 5 and HA, and provides the experimental basis for measuring the same parameters for other AEP constituents. Such knowledge will help in the design of synthetic proteins and peptides with preventive and therapeutic benefits for tooth enamel.

  3. Cell Adhesion Selectivity of Stent Material to improve Bio-functionality by Ion Beam Modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jaesang; Park, JUngchan; Jung, Myunghwan; Kim, Yongki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Junkyu [Bio alpha., Co. Ltd., Gimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In this study, ion implantation into collagen coated Co-Cr alloy, which is a cheaper material of the artificial stent product comparing with Ti alloy, has been studied to develop small diameter artificial stent by the cell adhesion control. The size of stent was 1.6mm of the diameter and 18mm of the length. The life-time of artificial stent depends on adhesion property of endothelial-cells. We successfully controlled cell adhesion selectivity between endothelial cell and muscle cell by using collagen coated and He{sup +} ion beam irradiated Co-Cr-alloy to apply to artificial stent. But, we did not achieve the inhibition of platelet adhesion, yet by using collagen coating and He{sup +} ion beam irradiation. Based on this study, we have plan to research about separation between collagen coating effect and ion beam effect. Also, we will have more detail analysis of the mechanism of cell attachment. In recent years, ion implantation has been applied to the surface modification of prosthesis to improve blood compatibility and tissue compatibility in field of biomedical application. As well known, bio compatibility was concerned with the cell adhesion selectivity for bio-functionality. The biomedical application of ion beam technology would be used more widely in the future such as catheter and artificial graft.

  4. Effect of surface modification of siliconeon Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion and colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haiying; Cao, Ting; Wang, Anfeng; Liang, Xuemei; Salley, Steven O; McAllister, James P; Ng, K Y Simon

    2007-03-15

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunts for the treatment of hydrocephalus are generally made of silicone rubber. The growth of bacterial colonies on the silicone surface leads to frequent CSF shunt complications. A systematic study of the effect of the surface modification of silicone on Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion and colonization was performed for different incubation times by means of colony counting and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Silicone was modified with different biopolymers and silanes, including heparin, hyaluronan, octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS), and fluoroalkylsilane (FAS) to provide a stable and biocompatible surface with different surface functional groups and degrees of hydrophobicity. The modified silicone surfaces were studied by using contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). After 4 and 8 h of incubation, the FAS- and OTS-coated silicone and the hyaluronan coated OTS/silicone surfaces showed significantly reduced bacterial adhesion and colonization compared to blank silicone by both quantification methods. However, the heparin coated OTS/silicone showed significantly increased bacterial adhesion. These results indicate that the nature of the surface functional group and surface roughness determine the extent of bacterial adhesion and colonization. However, the degree of hydrophobicity of the surface did not appear to play a determining role in bacterial adhesion and colonization.

  5. New technique of manipulating a protein crystal using adhesive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitatani, Tomoya; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi

    2008-01-01

    We have developed Crystal Catcher, a new device for manipulating protein crystals. Crystal Catcher directly captures a crystal with an adhesive. The easy and stable removal of a protein crystal from a drop has been achieved using the Crystal Catcher. The crystal picked up on the Crystal Catcher is positioned in the cryostream on a goniometer and flash-cooled. Various protein crystals can be captured and mounted without causing significant damage. This new approach will replace nylon loops for picking up protein crystals. (author)

  6. Protein kinase C involvement in focal adhesion formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1992-01-01

    Matrix molecules such as fibronectin can promote cell attachment, spreading and focal adhesion formation. Although some interactions of fibronectin with cell surface receptors have now been identified, the consequent activation of intracellular messenger systems by cell/matrix interactions have...... still to be elucidated. We show here that the kinase inhibitors H7 and HA1004 reduce focal adhesion and stress fiber formation in response to fibronectin in a dose-dependent manner, and that activators of protein kinase C can promote their formation under conditions where they do not normally form....... Fibroblasts spread within 1h on substrata composed of fibronectin and formed focal adhesions by 3h, as monitored by interference reflection microscopy (IRM) and by labeling for talin, vinculin and integrin beta 1 subunits. In addition, stress fibers were visible. When cells were allowed to spread for 1h...

  7. Protein Adsorption and Subsequent Fibroblasts Adhesion on Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagaya, Motohiro; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Yoshioka, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Junzo; Takemura, Taro; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2011-01-01

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) technique was employed for protein adsorption and subsequent fibroblast adhesion on hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystals. The pre-adsorption of three proteins (albumin (BSA) or fibronectin (Fn) or collagen (Col)) and subsequent adsorption of fetal bovine serum (FBS), and the adhesion of fibroblasts on the surface were in situ monitored, and evaluated with the frequency shift (Δf) and dissipation energy shift (ΔD), and the viscoelastic change as ΔD-Δf plot. The Col adsorption showed larger Δf and ΔD values compared with BSA or Fn adsorption, and the subsequent FBS adsorption depended on the pre-adsorbed proteins. The ΔD-Δf plot of the cell adhesion also showed the different behaviour on the surfaces, indicating the process affected by cell-protein interactions. The confocal laser scanning microscope images of adherent cells showed the different morphology and pseudopod on the surfaces. The cells adhered on the surfaces modified with Fn and Col had the uniaxially expanded shape with fibrous pseudopods, while those modified with BSA had round shape. The different cell-protein interaction would cause the arrangement of extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton changes at the interfaces.

  8. Protein Adsorption and Subsequent Fibroblasts Adhesion on Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagaya, Motohiro; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Yoshioka, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Junzo [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Takemura, Taro; Hanagata, Nobutaka, E-mail: tagaya.m.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2011-10-29

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) technique was employed for protein adsorption and subsequent fibroblast adhesion on hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystals. The pre-adsorption of three proteins (albumin (BSA) or fibronectin (Fn) or collagen (Col)) and subsequent adsorption of fetal bovine serum (FBS), and the adhesion of fibroblasts on the surface were in situ monitored, and evaluated with the frequency shift ({Delta}f) and dissipation energy shift ({Delta}D), and the viscoelastic change as {Delta}D-{Delta}f plot. The Col adsorption showed larger {Delta}f and {Delta}D values compared with BSA or Fn adsorption, and the subsequent FBS adsorption depended on the pre-adsorbed proteins. The {Delta}D-{Delta}f plot of the cell adhesion also showed the different behaviour on the surfaces, indicating the process affected by cell-protein interactions. The confocal laser scanning microscope images of adherent cells showed the different morphology and pseudopod on the surfaces. The cells adhered on the surfaces modified with Fn and Col had the uniaxially expanded shape with fibrous pseudopods, while those modified with BSA had round shape. The different cell-protein interaction would cause the arrangement of extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton changes at the interfaces.

  9. Using cell-substrate impedance and live cell imaging to measure real-time changes in cellular adhesion and de-adhesion induced by matrix modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Martin D; Thomas, Shane R

    2015-02-19

    Cell-matrix adhesion plays a key role in controlling cell morphology and signaling. Stimuli that disrupt cell-matrix adhesion (e.g., myeloperoxidase and other matrix-modifying oxidants/enzymes released during inflammation) are implicated in triggering pathological changes in cellular function, phenotype and viability in a number of diseases. Here, we describe how cell-substrate impedance and live cell imaging approaches can be readily employed to accurately quantify real-time changes in cell adhesion and de-adhesion induced by matrix modification (using endothelial cells and myeloperoxidase as a pathophysiological matrix-modifying stimulus) with high temporal resolution and in a non-invasive manner. The xCELLigence cell-substrate impedance system continuously quantifies the area of cell-matrix adhesion by measuring the electrical impedance at the cell-substrate interface in cells grown on gold microelectrode arrays. Image analysis of time-lapse differential interference contrast movies quantifies changes in the projected area of individual cells over time, representing changes in the area of cell-matrix contact. Both techniques accurately quantify rapid changes to cellular adhesion and de-adhesion processes. Cell-substrate impedance on microelectrode biosensor arrays provides a platform for robust, high-throughput measurements. Live cell imaging analyses provide additional detail regarding the nature and dynamics of the morphological changes quantified by cell-substrate impedance measurements. These complementary approaches provide valuable new insights into how myeloperoxidase-catalyzed oxidative modification of subcellular extracellular matrix components triggers rapid changes in cell adhesion, morphology and signaling in endothelial cells. These approaches are also applicable for studying cellular adhesion dynamics in response to other matrix-modifying stimuli and in related adherent cells (e.g., epithelial cells).

  10. Modification of resolution in capillary electrophoresis for protein profiling in identification of genetic modification in foods

    OpenAIRE

    Latoszek, A.; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    The capillary electrophoresis with UV detection was employed for protein profiling in extracts from maize and soybeans. Modifications of back-ground electrolyte and coating the capillary wall with polybrene was employed in order to decrease the protein adsorption on the capillary walls. The obtained protein profiles were compared for transgenic and non-transgenic variants, showing in some cases significant changes that might be employed for identification of genetic modifications ...

  11. The influence of surface modification on bacterial adhesion to titanium-based substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzetti, Martina; Dogša, Iztok; Stošicki, Tjaša; Stopar, David; Kalin, Mitjan; Kobe, Spomenka; Novak, Saša

    2015-01-28

    This study examines bacterial adhesion on titanium-substrates used for bone implants. Adhesion is the most critical phase of bacterial colonization on medical devices. The surface of titanium was modified by hydrothermal treatment (HT) to synthesize nanostructured TiO2-anatase coatings, which were previously proven to improve corrosion resistance, affect the plasma protein adsorption, and enhance osteogenesis. The affinity of the anatase coatings toward bacterial attachment was studied by using a green fluorescent protein-expressing Escherichia coli (gfp-E. coli) strain in connection with surface photoactivation by UV irradiation. We also analyzed the effects of surface topography, roughness, charge, and wettability. The results suggested the dominant effects of the macroscopic surface topography, as well as microasperity at the surface roughness scale, which were produced during titanium machining, HT treatment, or both. Macroscopic grooves provided a preferential site for bacteria deposit within the valleys, while the microscopic roughness of the valleys determined the actual interaction surface between bacterium and substrate, resulting in an "interlocking" effect and undesired high bacterial adhesion on nontreated titanium. In the case of TiO2-coated samples, the nanocrystals reduced the width between the microasperities and thus added nanoroughness features. These factors decreased the contact area between the bacterium and the coating, with consequent lower bacterial adhesion (up to 50% less) in comparison to the nontreated titanium. On the other hand, the pronounced hydrophilicity of one of the HT-coated discs after pre-irradiation seemed to enhance the attachment of bacteria, although the increase was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). This observation may be explained by the acquired similar degree of wetting between gfp-E. coli and the coating. No correlation was found between the bacterial adhesion and the ζ-values of the samples in PBS, so the

  12. Effect of surface modification of fiber post using dopamine polymerization on interfacial adhesion with core resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Chen, Qian; Yi, Mi; Zhou, Xuegang; Wang, Xinzhi; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of surface modification of fiber posts using dopamine polymerization on their interfacial adhesion with core resins. The fiber posts were surface-coated with polydopamine via the oxidization polymerization of dopamine in aqueous solution. Two commercial composite resins (3M ESPE and paracore) were used to build up the cores around the post heads (modified and unmodified). Pull-out tests were conducted, and the maximum failure load (N) and the failure modes were recorded to compare the interfacial adhesion between fiber post and resin core. The results demonstrated that the tensile forces needed to damage the retention of fiber post increased from 228.6 ± 10.9 N to 276.3 ± 14.7 N in the 3M ESPE group, from 216.5 ± 17.4 N to 277.2 ± 14.3 N in the paracore group, when polydopamine-coated fiber posts were applied. No significant difference had been found between the different resin groups. The observation of the surface morphology of both fiber posts and cores after adhesive failure clearly confirmed that the presence of polydopamine interlayer had acted as a binder to bond fiber post and resin together. This study would be valuable for endodontically treatments to reduce the chances of detachment of resin core from the fiber post or dislodgement of fiber posts from the canal.

  13. Silk Fibroin Aqueous-Based Adhesives Inspired by Mussel Adhesive Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kelly A; Roberts, Dane C; Kaplan, David L

    2016-01-11

    Silk fibroin from the domesticated silkworm Bombyx mori is a naturally occurring biopolymer with charged hydrophilic terminal regions that end-cap a hydrophobic core consisting of repeating sequences of glycine, alanine, and serine residues. Taking inspiration from mussels that produce proteins rich in L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) to adhere to a variety of organic and inorganic surfaces, the silk fibroin was functionalized with catechol groups. Silk fibroin was selected for its high molecular weight, tunable mechanical and degradation properties, aqueous processability, and wide availability. The synthesis of catechol-functionalized silk fibroin polymers containing varying amounts of hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG, 5000 g/mol) side chains was carried out to balance silk hydrophobicity with PEG hydrophilicity. The efficiency of the catechol functionalization reaction did not vary with PEG conjugation over the range studied, although tuning the amount of PEG conjugated was essential for aqueous solubility. Adhesive bonding and cell compatibility of the resulting materials were investigated, where it was found that incorporating as little as 6 wt % PEG prior to catechol functionalization resulted in complete aqueous solubility of the catechol conjugates and increased adhesive strength compared with silk lacking catechol functionalization. Furthermore, PEG-silk fibroin conjugates maintained their ability to form β-sheet secondary structures, which can be exploited to reduce swelling. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) proliferated on the silks, regardless of PEG and catechol conjugation. These materials represent a protein-based approach to catechol-based adhesives, which we envision may find applicability as biodegradable adhesives and sealants.

  14. Diagonal chromatography to study plant protein modifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walton, Alan; Tsiatsiani, Liana; Jacques, Silke; Stes, Elisabeth; Messens, Joris; Van Breusegem, Frank; Goormachtig, Sofie; Gevaert, Kris

    An interesting asset of diagonal chromatography, which we have introduced for contemporary proteome research, is its high versatility concerning proteomic applications. Indeed, the peptide modification or sorting step that is required between consecutive peptide separations can easily be altered and

  15. Prokaryotic Ubiquitin-Like Protein Modification

    OpenAIRE

    Maupin-Furlow, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Prokaryotes form ubiquitin (Ub)-like isopeptide bonds on the lysine residues of proteins by at least two distinct pathways that are reversible and regulated. In mycobacteria, the C-terminal Gln of Pup (prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein) is deamidated and isopeptide linked to proteins by a mechanism distinct from ubiquitylation in enzymology yet analogous to ubiquitylation in targeting proteins for destruction by proteasomes. Ub-fold proteins of archaea (SAMPs, small archaeal modifier protein...

  16. Syntenin-1 and ezrin proteins link activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule to the actin cytoskeleton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tudor, Cicerone; te Riet, J.; Eich, C.; Harkes, R.; Smisdom, N.; Bouhuijzen Wenger, J.; Ameloot, M.; Holt, M.; Kanger, Johannes S.; Figdor, Carl; Cambi, A.; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) is a type I transmembrane protein member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules. Involved in important pathophysiological processes such as the immune response, cancer metastasis, and neuronal development, ALCAM undergoes both

  17. Covalent modification of platelet proteins by palmitate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muszbek, L.; Laposata, M.

    1989-01-01

    Covalent attachment of fatty acid to proteins plays an important role in association of certain proteins with hydrophobic membrane structures. In platelets, the structure of many membrane glycoproteins (GPs) has been examined in detail, but the question of fatty acid acylation of platelet proteins has not been addressed. In this study, we wished to determine (a) whether platelet proteins could be fatty acid acylated; and, if so, (b) whether these modified proteins were present in isolated platelet membranes and cytoskeletal fractions; and (c) if the pattern of fatty acid acylated proteins changed on stimulation of the platelets with the agonist thrombin. We observed that in platelets allowed to incorporate 3H-palmitate, a small percentage (1.37%) of radioactivity incorporated into the cells became covalently bound to protein. Selective cleavage of thioester, thioester plus O-ester, and amide-linked 3H-fatty acids from proteins, and their subsequent analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) indicated that the greatest part of 3H-fatty acid covalently bound to protein was thioester-linked 3H-palmitate. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and fluorography, at least ten major radiolabeled proteins were detected. Activation of platelets by thrombin greatly increased the quantity of 3H-palmitoylated proteins associated with the cytoskeleton. Nearly all radiolabeled proteins were recovered in the membrane fraction, indicating that these proteins are either integral or peripheral membrane proteins or proteins tightly associated to membrane constituents. Components of the GPIIb-IIIa complex were not palmitoylated. Thus, platelet proteins are significantly modified posttranslationally by 3H-palmitate, and incorporation of palmitoylated proteins into the cytoskeleton is a prominent component of the platelet response to thrombin stimulation

  18. Influence of silane surface modification of veneer on interfacial adhesion of wood-plastic plywood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Lu; Chang, Liang; Guo, Wen-jing; Chen, Yongping; Wang, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    In this study, wood-plastic plywood was fabricated with high density polyethylene (HDPE) film and poplar veneer by hot-pressing. To improve the interfacial adhesion between the wood veneer and HDPE film, silane A-171 (vinyltrimethoxysilane) was used to treat the surface of poplar veneer by spraying. The effects of silane agent on the veneer surface properties as well as the physical-mechanical performance of wood-plastic plywood were evaluated. The adsorption of several prehydrolyzed alkoxysilanes onto the veneer surface and the existence of a covalent bonding between the wood veneer and silane agent were confirmed using FTIR, XPS and contact angle. Silane surface treatment resulted in enhancement of shear strength and water resistance. When one layer HDPE film was used as adhesive, it caused 293.2% increase in shear strength, 34.6% and 40.8% reduction in water absorption and thickness swelling, respectively. In addition, the wood failure also increased from 5% to 100% due to the silane modification. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results showed that treated plywood have higher storage modulus, lower tan δ peak value and lagged temperature for tan δ peak value with respect to untreated plywood. Experimental results of interfacial morphology by SEM further revealed better interaction between silane A-171 treated veneer and HDPE film.

  19. Functional Modification of Thioether Groups in Peptides, Polypeptides, and Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Timothy J

    2017-03-15

    Recent developments in the modification of methionine and other thioether-containing residues in peptides, polypeptides, and proteins are reviewed. Properties and potential applications of the resulting functionalized products are also discussed. While much of this work is focused on natural Met residues, modifications at other side-chain residues have also emerged as new thioether-containing amino acids have been incorporated into peptidic materials. Functional modification of thioether-containing amino acids has many advantages and is a complementary methodology to the widely utilized methods for modification at cysteine residues.

  20. Protein modification by acrolein: Formation and stability of cysteine adducts

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Jian; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Pierce, William M.

    2009-01-01

    The toxicity of the ubiquitous pollutant and endogenous metabolite, acrolein, is due in part to covalent protein modifications. Acrolein reacts readily with protein nucleophiles via Michael addition and Schiff base formation. Potential acrolein targets in protein include the nucleophilic side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues as well as the free amino terminus of proteins. Although cysteine is the most acrolein-reactive residue, cysteine-acrolein adducts are difficult to iden...

  1. High efficient and continuous surface modification of carbon fibers with improved tensile strength and interfacial adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingfeng; Zhao, Feng; Yao, Yue; Jin, Zhen; Liu, Xu; Huang, Yudong

    2017-08-01

    Most of the surface modification technologies for carbon fibers, no matter in laboratory scale or for commercial manufacture, are accompanied by a simultaneous decrease in tensile strength. In this paper, a feasible and high efficient strategy for carbon fiber treatment which could obviously improve both tensile strength and interfacial adhesion was proposed. Continuously moving carbon fibers were treated with atmospheric helium plasma for 1 min, followed by a 5 min pyrolytic carbon deposition using ethanol as precursor at 800 °C. The effects of the new approach were characterized by SEM, AFM, nanoindentation, XPS, Raman, wettability analysis, single fiber tensile strength testing and single fiber pull-out testing. After modification, pyrolytic carbon coating was deposited on the fiber surface uniformly, and the roughness and surface energy increased significantly. The single fiber tensile testing results indicate that the resulting fiber strength increased 15.7%, rising from 3.13 to 3.62 GPa. Meanwhile, the interfacial shear strength of its epoxy composites increased from 65.3 to 83.5 MPa. The comparative studies of carbon fibers modified with commercial anodic oxidation and sizing were also carried out. The results demonstrate that the new method can be utilized in the carbon fiber manufacture process and is more efficient than the traditional approaches.

  2. Protein-crystal interface mediates cell adhesion and proangiogenic secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei; Chen, Weisi; Gillis, Brian; Fischbach, Claudia; Estroff, Lara A; Gourdon, Delphine

    2017-02-01

    The nanoscale materials properties of bone apatite crystals have been implicated in breast cancer bone metastasis and their interactions with extracellular matrix proteins are likely involved. In this study, we used geologic hydroxyapatite (HAP, Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 ), closely related to bone apatite, to investigate how HAP surface chemistry and nano/microscale topography individually influence the crystal-protein interface, and how the altered protein deposition impacts subsequent breast cancer cell activities. We first utilized Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to assess the molecular conformation of fibronectin (Fn), a major extracellular matrix protein upregulated in cancer, when it adsorbed onto HAP facets. Our analysis reveals that both low surface charge density and nanoscale roughness of HAP facets individually contributed to molecular unfolding of Fn. We next quantified cell adhesion and secretion on Fn-coated HAP facets using MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Our data show elevated proangiogenic and proinflammatory secretions associated with more unfolded Fn adsorbed onto nano-rough HAP facets with low surface charge density. These findings not only deconvolute the roles of crystal surface chemistry and topography in interfacial protein deposition but also enhance our knowledge of protein-mediated breast cancer cell interactions with apatite, which may be implicated in tumor growth and bone metastasis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Short-term adhesion and long-term biofouling testing of polydopamine and poly(ethylene glycol) surface modifications of membranes and feed spacers for biofouling control

    KAUST Repository

    Miller, Daniel J.

    2012-08-01

    Ultrafiltration, nanofiltration membranes and feed spacers were hydrophilized with polydopamine and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol) surface coatings. The fouling propensity of modified and unmodified membranes was evaluated by short-term batch protein and bacterial adhesion tests. The fouling propensity of modified and unmodified membranes and spacers was evaluated by continuous biofouling experiments in a membrane fouling simulator. The goals of the study were: 1) to determine the effectiveness of polydopamine and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol) membrane coatings for biofouling control and 2) to compare techniques commonly used in assessment of membrane biofouling propensity with biofouling experiments under practical conditions. Short-term adhesion tests were carried out under static, no-flow conditions for 1 h using bovine serum albumin, a common model globular protein, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common model Gram-negative bacterium. Biofouling tests were performed in a membrane fouling simulator (MFS) for several days under flow conditions similar to those encountered in industrial modules with the autochthonous drinking water population and acetate dosage as organic substrate. Polydopamine- and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol)-modified membranes showed significantly reduced adhesion of bovine serum albumin and P. aeruginosa in the short-term adhesion tests, but no reduction of biofouling was observed during longer biofouling experiments with modified membranes and spacers. These results demonstrate that short-term batch adhesion experiments using model proteins or bacteria under static conditions are not indicative of biofouling, while continuous biofouling experiments showed that membrane surface modification by polydopamine and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol) is not effective for biofouling control. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Protein modification: Standing out from the crowd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yichao; Liu, Lei

    2016-02-01

    The discovery of a tetrapeptide containing a reactive cysteine provides a method to site-selectively modify peptides and proteins, even if other cysteine residues are present in the polypeptide chain.

  5. Chemical biology: Protein modification in a trice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Heather

    2015-10-01

    Organometallic reagents have been developed that chemically modify proteins and peptides specifically at cysteine amino-acid residues -- potentially offering a general route to making therapeutically useful compounds. See Letter p.687

  6. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIV. Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Jörg; Aust, Gabriela; Araç, Demet

    2015-01-01

    The Adhesion family forms a large branch of the pharmacologically important superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). As Adhesion GPCRs increasingly receive attention from a wide spectrum of biomedical fields, the Adhesion GPCR Consortium, together with the International Union of Basic...

  7. Use of additives to enhance the properties of cottonseed protein as wood adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soy protein is currently being used commercially as a “green” wood adhesive. Previous work in this laboratory has shown that cottonseed protein isolate, tested on maple wood veneer, produced higher adhesive strength and hot water resistance relative to soy protein. In the present study, cottonseed...

  8. Focal adhesion protein abnormalities in myelodysplastic mesenchymal stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aanei, Carmen Mariana, E-mail: caanei@yahoo.com [Laboratoire Hematologie, CHU de Saint-Etienne, 42055, Saint-Etienne (France); Department of Immunology, Gr. T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 700115, Iasi (Romania); Eloae, Florin Zugun [Department of Immunology, Gr. T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 700115, Iasi (Romania); Flandrin-Gresta, Pascale [Laboratoire Hematologie, CHU de Saint-Etienne, 42055, Saint-Etienne (France); CNRS UMR 5239, Universite de Lyon, 42023, Saint-Etienne (France); Tavernier, Emmanuelle [Service Hematologie Clinique, Institut de Cancerologie de la Loire, 42270, Saint-Priest-en-Jarez (France); CNRS UMR 5239, Universite de Lyon, 42023, Saint-Etienne (France); Carasevici, Eugen [Department of Immunology, Gr. T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 700115, Iasi (Romania); Guyotat, Denis [Service Hematologie Clinique, Institut de Cancerologie de la Loire, 42270, Saint-Priest-en-Jarez (France); CNRS UMR 5239, Universite de Lyon, 42023, Saint-Etienne (France); Campos, Lydia [Laboratoire Hematologie, CHU de Saint-Etienne, 42055, Saint-Etienne (France); CNRS UMR 5239, Universite de Lyon, 42023, Saint-Etienne (France)

    2011-11-01

    Direct cell-cell contact between haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) and their cellular microenvironment is essential to maintain 'stemness'. In cancer biology, focal adhesion (FA) proteins are involved in survival signal transduction in a wide variety of human tumours. To define the role of FA proteins in the haematopoietic microenvironment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), CD73-positive mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were immunostained for paxillin, pFAK [Y{sup 397}], and HSP90{alpha}/{beta} and p130CAS, and analysed for reactivity, intensity and cellular localisation. Immunofluorescence microscopy allowed us to identify qualitative and quantitative differences, and subcellular localisation analysis revealed that in pathological MSCs, paxillin, pFAK [Y{sup 397}], and HSP90{alpha}/{beta} formed nuclear molecular complexes. Increased expression of paxillin, pFAK [Y{sup 397}], and HSP90{alpha}/{beta} and enhanced nuclear co-localisation of these proteins correlated with a consistent proliferative advantage in MSCs from patients with refractory anaemia with excess blasts (RAEB) and negatively impacted clonogenicity of HPCs. These results suggest that signalling via FA proteins could be implicated in HPC-MSC interactions. Further, because FAK is an HSP90{alpha}/{beta} client protein, these results suggest the utility of HSP90{alpha}/{beta} inhibition as a target for adjuvant therapy for myelodysplasia.

  9. Adhesive modular proteins occur in the extracellular mucilage of the motile, pennate diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, Tony M; Willis, Anusuya; Wetherbee, Richard

    2006-04-15

    This Letter reports on adhesive modular proteins recorded by atomic force microscopy on live cells from the extracellular mucilage secreted from, and deposited around, the motile form of the pennate diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum. This is the first report of modular proteins and their supramolecular assemblies, called adhesive nanofibers (ANFs), to be found on diatoms that use adhesives not only for substratum adhesion, but as a conduit for cell motility. The permanent adhesive pads secreted by Toxarium undulatum, a sessile centric diatom, were previously shown to possess ANFs with a modular protein backbone. Our results reported here suggest that modular proteins may be an important component of diatom adhesives in general, and that diatoms utilize the tensile strength, toughness, and flexibility of ANFs for multiple functions. Significantly, the genome of P. tricornutum has recently been sequenced; this will allow directed searches of the genome to be made for genes with modular protein homologs, and subsequent detailed studies of their molecular structure and function.

  10. Role of Carbonyl Modifications on Aging-Associated Protein Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanase, Maya; Urbanska, Aleksandra M.; Zolla, Valerio; Clement, Cristina C.; Huang, Liling; Morozova, Kateryna; Follo, Carlo; Goldberg, Michael; Roda, Barbara; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Santambrogio, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a common biological phenomenon, observed in different physiological and pathological conditions. Decreased protein solubility and a tendency to aggregate is also observed during physiological aging but the causes are currently unknown. Herein we performed a biophysical separation of aging-related high molecular weight aggregates, isolated from the bone marrow and splenic cells of aging mice and followed by biochemical and mass spectrometric analysis. The analysis indicated that compared to younger mice an increase in protein post-translational carbonylation was observed. The causative role of these modifications in inducing protein misfolding and aggregation was determined by inducing carbonyl stress in young mice, which recapitulated the increased protein aggregation observed in old mice. Altogether our analysis indicates that oxidative stress-related post-translational modifications accumulate in the aging proteome and are responsible for increased protein aggregation and altered cell proteostasis.

  11. Chromatin proteins and modifications as drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, Kristian; Dhanak, Dashyant

    2013-01-01

    is a frequent event in disease, and the first epigenetic-based therapies for cancer treatment have been approved. A generation of new classes of potent and specific inhibitors for several chromatin-associated proteins have shown promise in preclinical trials. Although the biology of epigenetic regulation...

  12. Olefin metathesis for site-selective protein modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuya A; Chalker, Justin M; Davis, Benjamin G

    2009-04-17

    For a reaction to be generally useful for protein modification, it must be site-selective and efficient under conditions compatible with proteins: aqueous media, low to ambient temperature, and at or near neutral pH. To engineer a reaction that satisfies these conditions is not a simple task. Olefin metathesis is one of most useful reactions for carbon-carbon bond formation, but does it fit these requirements? This minireview is an account of the development of olefin metathesis for protein modification. Highlighted below are examples of olefin metathesis in peptidic systems and in aqueous media that laid the groundwork for successful metathesis on protein substrates. Also discussed are the opportunities in protein engineering for the genetic introduction of amino acids suitable for metathesis and the related challenges in chemistry and biology.

  13. Protein kinase C, focal adhesions and the regulation of cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh, Betina S; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Couchman, John Robert

    2014-01-01

    in their intracellular compartment. Among these are tyrosine kinases, which have received a great deal of attention, whereas the serine/threonine kinase protein kinase C has received much less. Here the status of protein kinase C in focal adhesions and cell migration is reviewed, together with discussion of its roles...... and adhesion turnover. Focal adhesions, or focal contacts, are widespread organelles at the cell-matrix interface. They arise as a result of receptor interactions with matrix ligands, together with clustering. Recent analysis shows that focal adhesions contain a very large number of protein components...

  14. High-energy ion implantation of polymeric fibers for modification of reinforcement-matrix adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grummon, D. S.; Schalek, R.; Ozzello, A.; Kalantar, J.; Drzal, L. T.

    1991-07-01

    We have previously reported on the effect of high-energy ion irradiation of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE), and Kevlar-49 polyaramid fibers, on fiber-matrix adhesion and interfacial shear strength (ISS) in epoxy matrix composites. Irradiation of UHMW-PE fibers produced large improvements in interfacial shear strength, without degrading fiber tensile strength. ISS was not generally affected in irradiated Kevlar-49, and fiber tensile strength decreased. The divergence in response between polyaramid and polyethylene relates both to differences in the mesoscopic structure of the individual fibers, and to the different forms of beam induced structural modification favored by the individual polymer chemistries. Here we report results of surface energy measurements, infrared spectroscopy analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies on UHMW-PE and polyaramid fibers, irradiated to fluences between 2 × 10 12 and 5 × 10 15 cm -2 with N +, Ar +, Ti +, Na +, and He + at energies between 30 and 400 keV. UHMW-PE fibers showed a pronounced increase in the polar component of surface energy which could be associated with carbonyl, hydroxyl and hydroperoxide groups at the surface. Kevlar, on the other hand, tended toward carbonization and showed a decrease in nitrogen and oxygen concentrations and a sharp drop in polar surface energy.

  15. Cleavage of Type I Collagen by Fibroblast Activation Protein-α Enhances Class A Scavenger Receptor Mediated Macrophage Adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Mazur

    Full Text Available Pathophysiological conditions such as fibrosis, inflammation, and tumor progression are associated with modification of the extracellular matrix (ECM. These modifications create ligands that differentially interact with cells to promote responses that drive pathological processes. Within the tumor stroma, fibroblasts are activated and increase the expression of type I collagen. In addition, activated fibroblasts specifically express fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP, a post-prolyl peptidase. Although FAP reportedly cleaves type I collagen and contributes to tumor progression, the specific pathophysiologic role of FAP is not clear. In this study, the possibility that FAP-mediated cleavage of type I collagen modulates macrophage interaction with collagen was examined using macrophage adhesion assays. Our results demonstrate that FAP selectively cleaves type I collagen resulting in increased macrophage adhesion. Increased macrophage adhesion to FAP-cleaved collagen was not affected by inhibiting integrin-mediated interactions, but was abolished in macrophages lacking the class A scavenger receptor (SR-A/CD204. Further, SR-A expressing macrophages localize with activated fibroblasts in breast tumors of MMTV-PyMT mice. Together, these results demonstrate that FAP-cleaved collagen is a substrate for SR-A-dependent macrophage adhesion, and suggest that by modifying the ECM, FAP plays a novel role in mediating communication between activated fibroblasts and macrophages.

  16. Dissecting signaling and functions of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Araç, Demet; Aust, Gabriela; Calebiro, Davide; Engel, Felix B.; Formstone, Caroline; Goffinet, André; Hamann, Jörg; Kittel, Robert J.; Liebscher, Ines; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Monk, Kelly R.; Petrenko, Alexander; Piao, Xianhua; Prömel, Simone; Schiöth, Helgi B.; Schwartz, Thue W.; Stacey, Martin; Ushkaryov, Yuri A.; Wobus, Manja; Wolfrum, Uwe; Xu, Lei; Langenhan, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise an expanded superfamily of receptors in the human genome. Adhesion class G protein-coupled receptors (adhesion-GPCRs) form the second largest class of GPCRs. Despite the abundance, size, molecular structure, and functions in facilitating cell and matrix

  17. Dissecting signaling and functions of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araç, Demet; Aust, Gabriela; Calebiro, Davide

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise an expanded superfamily of receptors in the human genome. Adhesion class G protein-coupled receptors (adhesion-GPCRs) form the second largest class of GPCRs. Despite the abundance, size, molecular structure, and functions in facilitating cell and matrix...

  18. Enterococcus faecalis surface proteins determine its adhesion mechanism to bile drain materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waar, K; van der Mei, HC; Harmsen, HJM; Degener, JE; Busscher, HJ

    An important step in infections associated with biliary drains is adhesion of micro-organisms to the surface. In this study the role of three surface proteins of Enterococcus faecalis (enterococcal surface protein, aggregation substances 1 and 373) in the adhesion to silicone rubber,

  19. Proteins and their modifications in a medieval mummy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikšík, Ivan; Sedláková, Pavla; Pataridis, Statis; Bortolotti, F.; Gottardo, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 11 (2016), s. 2037-2044 ISSN 0961-8368 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01948S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mummy * collagen * protein modification * deamidation * carbamylation * carboxymethylation Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.523, year: 2016

  20. Posttranslational modifications of proteins : tools for functional proteomics [Methods in molecular biology, v. 194

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kannicht, Christoph

    2002-01-01

    ... single glycosylation sites in a protein. Additional powerful techniques facilitate the analysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositols, lipid modifications, protein phosphorylation and sulfation, protein methylation and acetylation, a-amidation...

  1. Cell signaling, post-translational protein modifications and NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theillet, Francois-Xavier [In-cell NMR Group, Department of NMR-Supported Structural Biology, Leibniz Institute of Molecular Pharmacology (FMP Berlin) (Germany); Smet-Nocca, Caroline [Universite Lille Nord de France, CNRS UMR 8576 (France); Liokatis, Stamatios; Thongwichian, Rossukon; Kosten, Jonas [In-cell NMR Group, Department of NMR-Supported Structural Biology, Leibniz Institute of Molecular Pharmacology (FMP Berlin) (Germany); Yoon, Mi-Kyung; Kriwacki, Richard W. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Structural Biology (United States); Landrieu, Isabelle; Lippens, Guy [Universite Lille Nord de France, CNRS UMR 8576 (France); Selenko, Philipp, E-mail: selenko@fmp-berlin.de [In-cell NMR Group, Department of NMR-Supported Structural Biology, Leibniz Institute of Molecular Pharmacology (FMP Berlin) (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Post-translationally modified proteins make up the majority of the proteome and establish, to a large part, the impressive level of functional diversity in higher, multi-cellular organisms. Most eukaryotic post-translational protein modifications (PTMs) denote reversible, covalent additions of small chemical entities such as phosphate-, acyl-, alkyl- and glycosyl-groups onto selected subsets of modifiable amino acids. In turn, these modifications induce highly specific changes in the chemical environments of individual protein residues, which are readily detected by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. In the following, we provide a concise compendium of NMR characteristics of the main types of eukaryotic PTMs: serine, threonine, tyrosine and histidine phosphorylation, lysine acetylation, lysine and arginine methylation, and serine, threonine O-glycosylation. We further delineate the previously uncharacterized NMR properties of lysine propionylation, butyrylation, succinylation, malonylation and crotonylation, which, altogether, define an initial reference frame for comprehensive PTM studies by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy.

  2. PLMD: An updated data resource of protein lysine modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haodong; Zhou, Jiaqi; Lin, Shaofeng; Deng, Wankun; Zhang, Ying; Xue, Yu

    2017-05-20

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) occurring at protein lysine residues, or protein lysine modifications (PLMs), play critical roles in regulating biological processes. Due to the explosive expansion of the amount of PLM substrates and the discovery of novel PLM types, here we greatly updated our previous studies, and presented a much more integrative resource of protein lysine modification database (PLMD). In PLMD, we totally collected and integrated 284,780 modification events in 53,501 proteins across 176 eukaryotes and prokaryotes for up to 20 types of PLMs, including ubiquitination, acetylation, sumoylation, methylation, succinylation, malonylation, glutarylation, glycation, formylation, hydroxylation, butyrylation, propionylation, crotonylation, pupylation, neddylation, 2-hydroxyisobutyrylation, phosphoglycerylation, carboxylation, lipoylation and biotinylation. Using the data set, a motif-based analysis was performed for each PLM type, and the results demonstrated that different PLM types preferentially recognize distinct sequence motifs for the modifications. Moreover, various PLMs synergistically orchestrate specific cellular biological processes by mutual crosstalks with each other, and we totally found 65,297 PLM events involved in 90 types of PLM co-occurrences on the same lysine residues. Finally, various options were provided for accessing the data, while original references and other annotations were also present for each PLM substrate. Taken together, we anticipated the PLMD database can serve as a useful resource for further researches of PLMs. PLMD 3.0 was implemented in PHP + MySQL and freely available at http://plmd.biocuckoo.org. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Artificial Metalloenzymes through Chemical Modification of Engineered Host Proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Zernickel, Anna

    2014-10-01

    With a few exceptions, all organisms are restricted to the 20 canonical amino acids for ribosomal protein biosynthesis. Addition of new amino acids to the genetic code can introduce novel functionalities to proteins, broadening the diversity of biochemical as well as chemical reactions and providing new tools to study protein structure, reactivity, dynamics and protein-protein-interactions. The site directed in vivo incorporation developed by P. G. SCHULTZ and coworkers, using an archeal orthogonal tRNA/aaRS (aminoacyl-tRNA synthase) pair, allows site-specifically insertion of a synthetic unnatural amino acid (UAA) by reprogramming the amber TAG stop codon. A variety of over 80 different UAAs can be introduced by this technique. However by now a very limited number can form kinetically stable bonds to late transition metals. This thesis aims to develop new catalytically active unnatural amino acids or strategies for a posttranslational modification of site-specific amino acids in order to achieve highly enantioselective metallorganic enzyme hybrids (MOEH). As a requirement a stable protein host has to be established, surviving the conditions for incorporation, posttranslational modification and the final catalytic reactions. mTFP* a fluorescent protein was genetically modified by excluding any exposed Cys, His and Met forming a variant mTFP*, which fulfills the required specifications. Posttranslational chemical modification of mTFP* allow the introduction of single site metal chelating moieties. For modification on exposed cysteines different maleiimid containing ligand structures were synthesized. In order to perform copper catalyzed click reactions, suitable unnatural amino acids (para-azido-(L)-phenylalanine, para-ethynyl-(L)-phenylalanine) were synthesized and a non-cytotoxic protocol was established. The triazole ring formed during this reaction may contribute as a moderate σ-donor/π-acceptor ligand to the metal binding site. Since the cell limits the

  4. Wet-chemical approach for the cell-adhesive modification of polytetrafluoroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, Matthias; Dahm, Manfred; Vahl, Christian-F

    2011-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), a frequently utilized polymer for the fabrication of synthetic vascular grafts, was surface-modified by means of a wet-chemical process. The inherently non-cell-adhesive polymer does not support cellular attachment, a prerequisite for the endothelialization of luminal surface grafts in small diameter applications. To impart the material with cell-adhesive properties a treatment with sodium-naphthalene provided a basis for the subsequent immobilization of the adhesion promoting RGD-peptide using a hydroxy- and amine-reactive crosslinker. Successful conjugation was shown with cell culture experiments which demonstrated excellent endothelial cell growth on the modified surfaces.

  5. Influence of nitriding atmosphere on the modification of surface titanium with focus on the behavior of blood platelets adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitoriano, J.O.; Alves, C.; Braz, D.C.; Camara, R.B.G.; Rocha, H.A.O.

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the influence of surface modification of titanium on the adhesion of blood platelets, through techniques of adhesion and morphological analyzes. Discs of titanium grade II received different surface treatments with plasma of Ar + N 2 + H 2 and Ar + H 2 , forming two experimental groups including only polished samples used as standard. Before and after treatment the samples were characterized according to topography, crystalline structure and wettability, using atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and testing of sessile drop, respectively. Platelet rich plasma (PRP) was applied on the modified surfaces in a culture plates. Images obtained by electron microscopy of adhered platelets were analyzed to verify the behavior of platelets in the different experimental conditions. (author)

  6. Specific Adhesion of Lipid Membranes Can Simultaneously Produce Two Types of Lipid and Protein Heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindell, Orrin; Micah, Natalie; Ritzer, Max; Gordon, Vernita

    2015-03-01

    Living cells adhere to one another and their environment. Adhesion is associated with re-organization of the lipid and protein components of the cell membrane. The resulting heterogeneities are functional structures involved in biological processes. We use artificial lipid membranes that contain a single type of binding protein. Before adhesion, the lipid, protein, and dye components in the membrane are well-mixed and constitute a single disordered-liquid phase (Ld) . After adhesion, two distinct types of heterogeneities coexist in the adhesion zone: a central domain of ordered lipid phase that excludes both binding proteins and membrane dye, and a peripheral domain of disordered lipid phase that is densely packed with adhesion proteins and enriched in membrane dye relative to the non-adhered portion of the vesicle. Thus, we show that adhesion that is mediated by only one type of protein can organize the lipid and protein components of the membranes into heterogeneities that resemble those found in biology, for example the immune synapse.

  7. Lysine Glutarylation Is a Protein Posttranslational Modification Regulated by SIRT5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Minjia; Peng, Chao; Anderson, Kristin A.

    2014-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of a five-carbon protein posttranslational modification (PTM) called lysine glutarylation (Kglu). This protein modification was detected by immunoblot and mass spectrometry (MS), and then comprehensively validated by chemical and biochemical metho...

  8. Adhesion protein protocols [Methods in molecular biology, v. 96

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dejana, Elisabetta; Corada, Monica

    1999-01-01

    .... By illuminating these adhesive molecules and the possibilities for manipulating them, the new experimental strategies collected here will have considerable clinical potential for the regulation of immunity, inflammation, tissue remodeling, and embryonic development" [publisher's web site].

  9. Dissecting signaling and functions of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araç, Demet; Aust, Gabriela; Calebiro, Davide; Engel, Felix B; Formstone, Caroline; Goffinet, André; Hamann, Jörg; Kittel, Robert J; Liebscher, Ines; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Monk, Kelly R; Petrenko, Alexander; Piao, Xianhua; Prömel, Simone; Schiöth, Helgi B; Schwartz, Thue W; Stacey, Martin; Ushkaryov, Yuri A; Wobus, Manja; Wolfrum, Uwe; Xu, Lei; Langenhan, Tobias

    2012-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise an expanded superfamily of receptors in the human genome. Adhesion class G protein-coupled receptors (adhesion-GPCRs) form the second largest class of GPCRs. Despite the abundance, size, molecular structure, and functions in facilitating cell and matrix contacts in a variety of organ systems, adhesion-GPCRs are by far the most poorly understood GPCR class. Adhesion-GPCRs possess a unique molecular structure, with extended N-termini containing various adhesion domains. In addition, many adhesion-GPCRs are autoproteolytically cleaved into an N-terminal fragment (NTF, NT, α-subunit) and C-terminal fragment (CTF, CT, β-subunit) at a conserved GPCR autoproteolysis-inducing (GAIN) domain that contains a GPCR proteolysis site (GPS). These two features distinguish adhesion-GPCRs from other GPCR classes. Though active research on adhesion-GPCRs in diverse areas, such as immunity, neuroscience, and development and tumor biology has been intensified in the recent years, the general biological and pharmacological properties of adhesion-GPCRs are not well known, and they have not yet been used for biomedical purposes. The "6th International Adhesion-GPCR Workshop," held at the Institute of Physiology of the University of Würzburg on September 6-8, 2012, assembled a majority of the investigators currently actively pursuing research on adhesion-GPCRs, including scientists from laboratories in Europe, the United States, and Asia. The meeting featured the nascent mechanistic understanding of the molecular events driving the signal transduction of adhesion-GPCRs, novel models to evaluate their functions, and evidence for their involvement in human disease. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  10. Universal method for protein bioconjugation with nanocellulose scaffolds for increased cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, Volodymyr; Sämfors, Sanna; Hägg, Daniel; Gatenholm, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) is an emerging biomaterial since it is biocompatible, integrates well with host tissue and can be biosynthesized in desired architecture. However, being a hydrogel, it exhibits low affinity for cell attachment, which is crucial for the cellular fate process. To increase cell attachment, the surface of BNC scaffolds was modified with two proteins, fibronectin and collagen type I, using an effective bioconjugation method applying 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium (CDAP) tetrafluoroborate as the intermediate catalytic agent. The effect of CDAP treatment on cell adhesion to the BNC surface is shown for human umbilical vein endothelial cells and the mouse mesenchymal stem cell line C3H10T1/2. In both cases, the surface modification increased the number of cells attached to the surfaces. In addition, the morphology of the cells indicated more healthy and viable cells. CDAP activation of bacterial nanocellulose is shown to be a convenient method to conjugate extracellular proteins to the scaffold surfaces. CDAP treatment can be performed in a short period of time in an aqueous environment under heterogeneous and mild conditions preserving the nanofibrillar network of cellulose. © 2013.

  11. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier [Laboratory of Cell Physiology, IoNS, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine [Pôle de Recherche Cardiovasculaire, IREC, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Morel, Nicole, E-mail: nicole.morel@uclouvain.be [Laboratory of Cell Physiology, IoNS, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium)

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  12. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier; Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine; Morel, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca 2+ signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate

  13. Enterococcus faecalis surface proteins determine its adhesion mechanism to bile drain materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waar, Karola; van der Mei, Henny C; Harmsen, Hermie J M; Degener, John E; Busscher, Henk J

    2002-06-01

    An important step in infections associated with biliary drains is adhesion of micro-organisms to the surface. In this study the role of three surface proteins of Enterococcus faecalis (enterococcal surface protein, aggregation substances 1 and 373) in the adhesion to silicone rubber, fluoro-ethylene-propylene and polyethylene was examined. Four isogenic E. faecalis strains with and without aggregation substances and one strain expressing enterococcal surface protein were used. The kinetics of enterococcal adhesion to the materials was measured in situ in a parallel plate flow chamber. Initial deposition rates were similar for all strains, whereas the presence of surface proteins increased the total number of adhering bacteria. Nearest neighbour analysis demonstrated that enterococci expressing the whole sex-pheromone plasmid encoding aggregation substances 1 or 373 adhered in higher numbers through mechanisms of positive cooperativity, which means that adhesion of bacteria enhances the probability of adhesion of other bacteria near these bacteria. Enterococci with the enterococcal surface protein did not adhere through this mechanism. These findings indicate that the surface proteins of E. faecalis play a key role in the adhesion to bile drains and bile drain associated infections.

  14. Role of surface layer collagen binding protein from indigenous Lactobacillus plantarum 91 in adhesion and its anti-adhesion potential against gut pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Tyagi, Ashish; Kaushik, Jai Kumar; Saklani, Asha Chandola; Grover, Sunita; Batish, Virender Kumar

    2013-12-14

    Human feacal isolates were ascertain as genus Lactobacillus using specific primer LbLMA1/R16-1 and further identified as Lactobacillus plantarum with species specific primers Lpl-3/Lpl-2. 25 L. plantarum strains were further assessed for hydrophobicity following the microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) method and colonization potentials based on their adherence to immobilized human collagen type-1. Surface proteins were isolated from selected L. plantarum 91(Lp91) strain. The purified collagen binding protein (Cbp) protein was assessed for its anti-adhesion activity against enteric Escherichia coli 0157:H7 pathogen on immobilized collagen. Four L. plantarum strains displayed high degree of hydrophobicity and significant adhesion to collagen. A 72 kDa protein was purified which reduced 59.71% adhesion of E. coli 0157:H7 on immobilized collagen as compared to control well during adhesion assay. Cbp protein is the major influencing factor in inhibition of E. coli 0157:H7 adhesion with extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Hydrophobicity and adhesion potential are closely linked attributes precipitating in better colonization potential of the lactobacillus strains. Cbp is substantiated as a crucial surface protein contributing in adhesion of lactobacillus strains. The study can very well be the platform for commercialization of indigenous probiotic strain once their functional attributes are clinically explored. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Laser surface modification of silicone rubber to reduce platelet adhesion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorasani, M T; Mirzadeh, H

    2004-01-01

    To improve the blood compatibility, the surface of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films were irradiated using a CO2-pulsed laser. Acrylamide (AAm) was grafted onto a pre-irradiated surface. The AAm-grafted and laser-treated films were characterized using different techniques. Platelet adhesion and activation onto the AAm-grafted PDMS, laser-treated (ungrafted) and unmodified PDMS film surfaces were compared. Data from in vitro assays indicated that the platelet adhesion was reduced on the AAm-grafted PDMS and laser treated PDMS films in comparison with the unmodified PDMS. The laser-irradiated sample showed the minimum platelet adhesion. It seems that laser irradiation onto a silicone rubber surface is a versatile technique to produce anti-thrombogenic surface for biomaterial applications.

  16. MODIFICATION OF ERYTHROCYTE MEMBRANE PROTEINS WITH POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL 1500

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Zemlianskykh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to study the effect of polyethylene glycol PEG-1500 on the Ca2+-ATPase activity and changes in CD44 surface marker expression in human erythrocyte membranes. Determination of the Ca2+-ATPase activity was carried out in sealed erythrocyte ghosts by the level of accumulation of inorganic phosphorus. Changes in the expression of CD44 and amount of CD44+-erythrocytes were evaluated by flow cytometry. The inhibition of Ca2+-ATPase activity and a reduction in the level of CD44 expression and also the decrease in the amount CD44+-cells were found, reflecting a fairly complex restructuring in the membrane-cytoskeleton complex of erythrocytes under the influence of PEG-1500. Effect of PEG-1500 on the surface CD44 marker could be mediated by modification of proteins of membrane-cytoskeleton complex, as indicated by accelerated loss of CD44 in erythrocyte membranes after application of protein cross-linking reagent diamide. Reduced activity of Ca2+-ATPase activity may contribute to the increase in intracellular Ca2+ level and thus leads to a modification of interactions of integral proteins with cytoskeletal components that eventually could result in membrane vesiculation and decreasing in expression of the CD44 marker, which is dynamically linked to the cytoskeleton.

  17. Effect of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Modification on Polyimide and Adhesive Joining with Titanium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akram, M.; Jansen, K.M.B.; Ernst, L.J.; Bhowmik, S.; Ajeesh, G.; Ahmed, S.; Chakraborty, D.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation highlights the effect of surface modification on polyimide by atmospheric pressure plasma treatment with different exposure time. Surface modification of polymer by plasma treatment essentially creates physical and chemical changes such as cross-linking and formation of free

  18. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiang Yao

    Full Text Available Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat, an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  19. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chunxiang; Behring, Jessica B; Shao, Di; Sverdlov, Aaron L; Whelan, Stephen A; Elezaby, Aly; Yin, Xiaoyan; Siwik, Deborah A; Seta, Francesca; Costello, Catherine E; Cohen, Richard A; Matsui, Reiko; Colucci, Wilson S; McComb, Mark E; Bachschmid, Markus M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat), an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT) labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg) mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  20. Surface modification of polyester fabrics by atmospheric-pressure air/He plasma for color strength and adhesion enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunming; Zhao, Meihua; Wang, Libing; Qu, Lijun; Men, Yajing

    2017-04-01

    Surface properties of water-based pigmented inks for ink-jet printed polyester fabrics were modified with atmospheric-pressure air/He plasma to improve the color strength and pigment adhesion of the treated surfaces. The influence of various parameters, including the surface morphology, chemical compositions, surface energy and dynamic contact angles of the control and plasma treated samples was studied. Color strength and edge definition were used to evaluate the ink-jet printing performance of fabrics. The change in pigment adhesion to polyester fibers was analyzed by SEM (scanning electron microscopy). AFM (Atomic force microscope) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) analyses indicated the increase in surface roughness and the oxygen-containing polar groups(Cdbnd O, Csbnd OH and COOH) reinforced the fixation of pigments on the fiber surface. The result from this study suggested that the improved pigment color yield was clearly affected by alteration of pigment adhesion enhanced by plasma surface modification. Polyester fabrics exhibited better surface property and ink-jet printing performance after the air/He mixture plasma treatment comparing with those after air plasma treatment.

  1. Adhesive proteins of stalked and acorn barnacles display homology with low sequence similarities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaimie-Leigh Jonker

    Full Text Available Barnacle adhesion underwater is an important phenomenon to understand for the prevention of biofouling and potential biotechnological innovations, yet so far, identifying what makes barnacle glue proteins 'sticky' has proved elusive. Examination of a broad range of species within the barnacles may be instructive to identify conserved adhesive domains. We add to extensive information from the acorn barnacles (order Sessilia by providing the first protein analysis of a stalked barnacle adhesive, Lepas anatifera (order Lepadiformes. It was possible to separate the L. anatifera adhesive into at least 10 protein bands using SDS-PAGE. Intense bands were present at approximately 30, 70, 90 and 110 kilodaltons (kDa. Mass spectrometry for protein identification was followed by de novo sequencing which detected 52 peptides of 7-16 amino acids in length. None of the peptides matched published or unpublished transcriptome sequences, but some amino acid sequence similarity was apparent between L. anatifera and closely-related Dosima fascicularis. Antibodies against two acorn barnacle proteins (ab-cp-52k and ab-cp-68k showed cross-reactivity in the adhesive glands of L. anatifera. We also analysed the similarity of adhesive proteins across several barnacle taxa, including Pollicipes pollicipes (a stalked barnacle in the order Scalpelliformes. Sequence alignment of published expressed sequence tags clearly indicated that P. pollicipes possesses homologues for the 19 kDa and 100 kDa proteins in acorn barnacles. Homology aside, sequence similarity in amino acid and gene sequences tended to decline as taxonomic distance increased, with minimum similarities of 18-26%, depending on the gene. The results indicate that some adhesive proteins (e.g. 100 kDa are more conserved within barnacles than others (20 kDa.

  2. Adhesive Proteins of Stalked and Acorn Barnacles Display Homology with Low Sequence Similarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, Jaimie-Leigh; Abram, Florence; Pires, Elisabete; Varela Coelho, Ana; Grunwald, Ingo; Power, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    Barnacle adhesion underwater is an important phenomenon to understand for the prevention of biofouling and potential biotechnological innovations, yet so far, identifying what makes barnacle glue proteins ‘sticky’ has proved elusive. Examination of a broad range of species within the barnacles may be instructive to identify conserved adhesive domains. We add to extensive information from the acorn barnacles (order Sessilia) by providing the first protein analysis of a stalked barnacle adhesive, Lepas anatifera (order Lepadiformes). It was possible to separate the L. anatifera adhesive into at least 10 protein bands using SDS-PAGE. Intense bands were present at approximately 30, 70, 90 and 110 kilodaltons (kDa). Mass spectrometry for protein identification was followed by de novo sequencing which detected 52 peptides of 7–16 amino acids in length. None of the peptides matched published or unpublished transcriptome sequences, but some amino acid sequence similarity was apparent between L. anatifera and closely-related Dosima fascicularis. Antibodies against two acorn barnacle proteins (ab-cp-52k and ab-cp-68k) showed cross-reactivity in the adhesive glands of L. anatifera. We also analysed the similarity of adhesive proteins across several barnacle taxa, including Pollicipes pollicipes (a stalked barnacle in the order Scalpelliformes). Sequence alignment of published expressed sequence tags clearly indicated that P. pollicipes possesses homologues for the 19 kDa and 100 kDa proteins in acorn barnacles. Homology aside, sequence similarity in amino acid and gene sequences tended to decline as taxonomic distance increased, with minimum similarities of 18–26%, depending on the gene. The results indicate that some adhesive proteins (e.g. 100 kDa) are more conserved within barnacles than others (20 kDa). PMID:25295513

  3. Site-selective protein immobilization by covalent modification of GST fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yiqing; Guo, Tianlin; Tang, Guanghui; Wu, Hui; Wong, Nai-Kei; Pan, Zhengying

    2014-11-19

    The immobilization of functional proteins onto solid supports using affinity tags is an attractive approach in recent development of protein microarray technologies. Among the commonly used fusion protein tags, glutathione S-transferase (GST) proteins have been indispensable tools for protein-protein interaction studies and have extensive applications in recombinant protein purification and reversible protein immobilization. Here, by utilizing pyrimidine-based small-molecule probes with a sulfonyl fluoride reactive group, we report a novel and general approach for site-selective immobilization of Schistosoma japonicum GST (sjGST) fusion proteins through irreversible and specific covalent modification of the tyrosine-111 residue of the sjGST tag. As demonstrated by sjGST-tagged eGFP and sjGST-tagged kinase activity assays, this immobilization approach offers the advantages of high immobilization efficiency and excellent retention of protein structure and activity.

  4. Construction of multifunctional proteins for tissue engineering: epidermal growth factor with collagen binding and cell adhesive activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannachi Imen, Elloumi; Nakamura, Makiko; Mie, Masayasu; Kobatake, Eiry

    2009-01-01

    The development of different techniques based on natural and polymeric scaffolds are useful for the design of different biomimetic materials. These approaches, however, require supplementary steps for the chemical or physical modification of the biomaterial. To avoid such steps, in the present study, we constructed a new multifunctional protein that can be easily immobilized onto hydrophobic surfaces, and at the same time helps enhance specific cell adhesion and proliferation onto collagen substrates. A collagen binding domain was fused to a previously constructed protein, which had an epidermal growth factor fused to a hydrophobic peptide that allows for cell adhesion. The new fusion protein, designated fnCBD-ERE-EGF is produced in Escherichia coli, and its abilities to bind to collagen and promote cell proliferation were investigated. fnCBD-ERE-EGF was shown to keep both collagen binding and cell growth-promoting activities comparable to those of the corresponding unfused proteins. The results obtained in this study also suggest the use of a fnCBD-ERE-EGF as an alternative for the design of multifunctional ECM-bound growth factor based materials.

  5. Atmospheric pressure plasma surface modification of titanium for high temperature adhesive bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akram, M.; Jansen, K.M.B.; Ernst, L.J.; Bhowmik, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation surface treatment of titanium is carried out by plasma ion implantation under atmospheric pressure plasma in order to increase the adhesive bond strength. Prior to the plasma treatment, titanium surfaces were mechanically treated by sand blasting. It is observed that the

  6. Tyrosine Sulfation as a Protein Post-Translational Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh-Shyong Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Integration of inorganic sulfate into biological molecules plays an important role in biological systems and is directly involved in the instigation of diseases. Protein tyrosine sulfation (PTS is a common post-translational modification that was first reported in the literature fifty years ago. However, the significance of PTS under physiological conditions and its link to diseases have just begun to be appreciated in recent years. PTS is catalyzed by tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST through transfer of an activated sulfate from 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate to tyrosine in a variety of proteins and peptides. Currently, only a small fraction of sulfated proteins is known and the understanding of the biological sulfation mechanisms is still in progress. In this review, we give an introductory and selective brief review of PTS and then summarize the basic biochemical information including the activity and the preparation of TPST, methods for the determination of PTS, and kinetics and reaction mechanism of TPST. This information is fundamental for the further exploration of the function of PTS that induces protein-protein interactions and the subsequent biochemical and physiological reactions.

  7. Surface modification of polyester fabrics by atmospheric-pressure air/He plasma for color strength and adhesion enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chunming, E-mail: zcm1229@126.com [College of Textiles and Clothing, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Sunvim Grp Co Ltd, Gaomi 261500 (China); Zhao, Meihua; Wang, Libing; Qu, Lijun [College of Textiles and Clothing, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Men, Yajing [Sunvim Grp Co Ltd, Gaomi 261500 (China)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Air/He plasma gave hydrophilicity on polyester surface and decreased contact angle to 18°. • The roughness of polyester increased and pit-like structures appeared on the surface after plasma treatment. • XPS confirmed the generation of new functional groups on polyester fabric. • The improved pigment color yield and anti-bleeding performance were contributed by the alteration of pigment adhesion. • The air/He plasma was more effective than air plasma at the same treatment time. - Abstract: Surface properties of water-based pigmented inks for ink-jet printed polyester fabrics were modified with atmospheric-pressure air/He plasma to improve the color strength and pigment adhesion of the treated surfaces. The influence of various parameters, including the surface morphology, chemical compositions, surface energy and dynamic contact angles of the control and plasma treated samples was studied. Color strength and edge definition were used to evaluate the ink-jet printing performance of fabrics. The change in pigment adhesion to polyester fibers was analyzed by SEM (scanning electron microscopy). AFM (Atomic force microscope) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) analyses indicated the increase in surface roughness and the oxygen-containing polar groups(C=O, C−OH and COOH) reinforced the fixation of pigments on the fiber surface. The result from this study suggested that the improved pigment color yield was clearly affected by alteration of pigment adhesion enhanced by plasma surface modification. Polyester fabrics exhibited better surface property and ink-jet printing performance after the air/He mixture plasma treatment comparing with those after air plasma treatment.

  8. Surface modification of polyester fabrics by atmospheric-pressure air/He plasma for color strength and adhesion enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Chunming; Zhao, Meihua; Wang, Libing; Qu, Lijun; Men, Yajing

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Air/He plasma gave hydrophilicity on polyester surface and decreased contact angle to 18°. • The roughness of polyester increased and pit-like structures appeared on the surface after plasma treatment. • XPS confirmed the generation of new functional groups on polyester fabric. • The improved pigment color yield and anti-bleeding performance were contributed by the alteration of pigment adhesion. • The air/He plasma was more effective than air plasma at the same treatment time. - Abstract: Surface properties of water-based pigmented inks for ink-jet printed polyester fabrics were modified with atmospheric-pressure air/He plasma to improve the color strength and pigment adhesion of the treated surfaces. The influence of various parameters, including the surface morphology, chemical compositions, surface energy and dynamic contact angles of the control and plasma treated samples was studied. Color strength and edge definition were used to evaluate the ink-jet printing performance of fabrics. The change in pigment adhesion to polyester fibers was analyzed by SEM (scanning electron microscopy). AFM (Atomic force microscope) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) analyses indicated the increase in surface roughness and the oxygen-containing polar groups(C=O, C−OH and COOH) reinforced the fixation of pigments on the fiber surface. The result from this study suggested that the improved pigment color yield was clearly affected by alteration of pigment adhesion enhanced by plasma surface modification. Polyester fabrics exhibited better surface property and ink-jet printing performance after the air/He mixture plasma treatment comparing with those after air plasma treatment.

  9. Photoactivatable Mussel-Based Underwater Adhesive Proteins by an Expanded Genetic Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauf, Matthias; Richter, Florian; Schneider, Tobias; Faidt, Thomas; Martins, Berta M; Baumann, Tobias; Durkin, Patrick; Dobbek, Holger; Jacobs, Karin; Möglich, Andreas; Budisa, Nediljko

    2017-09-19

    Marine mussels exhibit potent underwater adhesion abilities under hostile conditions by employing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA)-rich mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs). However, their recombinant production is a major biotechnological challenge. Herein, a novel strategy based on genetic code expansion has been developed by engineering efficient aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetases (aaRSs) for the photocaged noncanonical amino acid ortho-nitrobenzyl DOPA (ONB-DOPA). The engineered ONB-DOPARS enables in vivo production of MAP type 5 site-specifically equipped with multiple instances of ONB-DOPA to yield photocaged, spatiotemporally controlled underwater adhesives. Upon exposure to UV light, these proteins feature elevated wet adhesion properties. This concept offers new perspectives for the production of recombinant bioadhesives. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Synthesis and structure activity relationships of carbamimidoylcarbamate derivatives as novel vascular adhesion protein-1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaki, Susumu; Yamada, Hiroyoshi; Nagashima, Akira; Kondo, Mitsuhiro; Shimada, Yoshiaki; Kadono, Keitaro; Yoshihara, Kosei

    2017-11-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. Here, we conducted structural optimization of the glycine amide derivative 1, which we previously reported as a novel VAP-1 inhibitor, to improve stability in dog and monkey plasma, and aqueous solubility. By chemical modification of the right part in the glycine amide derivative, we identified the carbamimidoylcarbamate derivative 20c, which showed stability in dog and monkey plasma while maintaining VAP-1 inhibitory activity. We also found that conversion of the pyrimidine ring in 20c into saturated rings was effective for improving aqueous solubility. This led to the identification of 28a and 35 as moderate VAP-1 inhibitors with excellent aqueous solubility. Further optimization led to the identification of 2-fluoro-3-{3-[(6-methylpyridin-3-yl)oxy]azetidin-1-yl}benzyl carbamimidoylcarbamate (40b), which showed similar human VAP-1 inhibitory activity to 1 with improved aqueous solubility. 40b showed more potent ex vivo efficacy than 1, with rat plasma VAP-1 inhibitory activity of 92% at 1h after oral administration at 0.3mg/kg. In our pharmacokinetic study, 40b showed good oral bioavailability in rats, dogs, and monkeys, which may be due to its improved stability in dog and monkey plasma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Soy Flour Adhesive Strength Compared with That of Purified Soy Proteins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda Lorenz; Michael Birkeland; Chera Daurio; Charles R. Frihart

    2015-01-01

    Except for the substitution of soy flour in phenolic resins (Frihart et al. 2013) and the use of soy flour at high pHs (Lambuth 2003), the literature on soy protein properties for adhesives has mainly focused on soy protein isolate and specific protein fractions (Sun 2005b). The assumption is that proteins are the main portion of soy flour giving bond strength and the...

  12. Surface modification and adhesion improvement of PTFE film by ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.W.; Hong, J.W.; Wye, M.Y.; Kim, J.H.; Kang, H.J.; Lee, Y.S.

    2004-01-01

    The polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surfaces, modified by 1 kV Ar + or O 2 + ion beam irradiation, was investigated with in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron micrographs (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. The surface of PTFE films modified by Ar + ion irradiation was carbonized and the surface roughness increased with increasing ion doses. The surface of PTFE films modified by both Ar + ion in O 2 atmosphere and O 2 + ion irradiation formed the oxygen function group on PTFE surface, and the surface roughness change was relatively small. The adhesion improvement in Ar + ion irradiated PTFE surface is attributed to mechanical interlocking due to the surface roughness and -CF-radical, but that in Ar + ion irradiation in an O 2 atmosphere was contributed by the C-O complex and -CF-radical with mechanical interlocking. The C-O complex and -CF-radical in O 2 + ion irradiated surface contributed to the adhesion

  13. Biomolecular modification of carbon nanotubes for studies of cell adhesion and migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Wei; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2011-01-01

    We report a strategy for tailoring and patterning carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for biospecific cell studies. We synthesized a new electroactive hydroquinone terminated pyrene molecule to tailor CNTs. These modified CNTs can be oxidized and chemoselectively reacted with oxyamine tethered ligands to generate various ligand tethered CNTs. A cell adhesive Arg–Gly–Asp peptide (RGD) is immobilized to the CNTs and a new microfluidic patterning method is employed to generate multiplex patterned surfaces for biospecific cell adhesion and migration studies. This work demonstrates the integration of a new functionalization strategy to immobilize a variety of ligands to CNTs for a range of potential drug delivery, tissue imaging and cellular behavior studies and a microfluidic patterning strategy for generating complex high-throughput surfaces for biotechnological and cell based assay applications.

  14. Transience of plasma surface modification as an adhesion promoter for polychlorotrifluorethylene

    CERN Document Server

    Subramanian, S; Love, B J; Romand, M; Charbonnier, M

    2002-01-01

    Poly(chlorotrifluoroethylene) (PCTFE) and other fluoropolymers are increasingly used as inner layer dielectrics. However, these polymers have low surface energies and correspondingly poor adhesive properties. Results are presented on the use of a low-pressure ammonia plasma to enhance the surface bondability of PCTFE. The plasma modified PCTFE film surfaces were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. Surface modified films exhibited improved adhesion to electroless copper deposits (180 deg. peel test) compared to coated PCTFE controls and that underwent no plasma exposure. Annealing studies were conducted between 30 and 100 deg. C to examine the stability of the plasma-modified surfaces. For samples annealed below T sub g , contact angle measurements indicated that the plasma-introduced groups remained bound on the surface for four weeks. For specimens annealed above T sub g , the surface functionalities were absorbed within the bulk and surface rearrangement occurre...

  15. Diamond film growth with modification properties of adhesion between substrate and diamond film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setasuwon P.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Diamond film growth was studied using chemical vapor deposition (CVD. A special equipment was build in-house, employing a welding torch, and substrate holder with a water-cooling system. Acetylene and oxygen were used as combustion gases and the substrate was tungsten carbide cobalt. It was found that surface treatments, such as diamond powder scratching or acid etching, increase the adhesion and prevent the film peel-off. Diamond powder scratching and combined diamond powder scratching with acid etching gave the similar diamond film structure with small grain and slightly rough surface. The diamond film obtained with both treatments has high adhesion and can withstand internal stress better than ones obtained by untreated surface or acid etching alone. It was also found that higher substrate temperature produced smoother surface and more uniform diamond grain.

  16. Cell Adhesion Modification of Streptococcus viridians in the Presence of Xylitol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmacher, Jason; Vidakovich, Blair; Giangrande, Michael; Hoffmann, Peter

    2012-10-01

    There is scientific documentation that those who chew gum sweetened by the sugar alcohol xylitol report a dramatically lower incident of both dental caries and otitis media compared to those who chew conventional gum sweetened by sucrose. An explanation contends that xylitol interferes with the ability of Streptococcus viridian (SV) to form biofilms which is a necessary precursor to the bacteria's ability to damage human tissues. We have used atomic force microscopy to study the cell wall/fimbria properties at the nanonewton level in both the presence and absence of xylitol. The first set of measurements used varying concentrations of xylitol incorporated within the incubation medium. The second used non-xylitol grown bacteria, the xylitol was added externally at various concentrations. Our study suggests that growing SV with xylitol reduces their ability to adhere together. Additionally, externally added xylitol showed grouping of cell adhesion to a relatively narrow nanonewton spread that is concentration dependent. Measurement of the adhesion properties of the bacterial cell wall have found that there is a dramatic increase in the cell wall's firmness which simultaneously accompanied a decrease in its ability to support adhesion, even at very low concentrations of xylitol.

  17. Bacterial binding to extracellular proteins - in vitro adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, C.; Fiehn, N.-E.

    1999-01-01

    Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis......Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis...

  18. Functional Characteristics of Milk Protein Concentrates and Their Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluko, Hankie; Liu, Lu; Lv, Jia-Ping; Zhang, Shu-Wen

    2016-05-18

    A major deterrent to the usage of milk protein concentrate (MPC), a high-protein milk product with increasing demand as a food and sports drink ingredient, has been its poor functional characteristics when compared with other milk protein products such as whey protein concentrate and sodium caseinates. This review discusses the recent research on functional properties of MPC, focusing on factors that may contribute to the poor functional characteristics before, during, and after production. Current research, methods employed, and new understanding on the causes of poor solubility of MPC at mild temperatures (about 20°C) has been presented, including loss of solubility during storage as these areas have received unprecedented attention over the past decade, and also affects other useful functional properties of MPC, such as emulsifying properties, gelation, and foaming. Processing methods, which include heat treatment, high-pressure application, microwave heating, ultrasound application, and enzyme and salts modification, have been used or have potential to modify or improve the functional properties of MPCs. Future research on the effects of these processing methods on the functional properties, including effects of enzyme hydrolysis on bitterness and bioactivity, has also been discussed.

  19. Preliminary study on chicken feather protein-based wood adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehui Jiang; Daochun Qin; Chung-Yun Hse; Monlin Kuo; Zhaohui Luo; Ge Wang; Yan Yu

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to partially replace phenol in the synthesis of phenol-formaldehyde resin with feather protein. Feather protein–based resins, which contained one part feather protein and two parts phenol, were formulated under the conditions of two feather protein hydrolysis methods (with and without presence of phenol during...

  20. Unrestricted Mass Spectrometric Data Analysis for Identification, Localization, and Quantification of Oxidative Protein Modifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rykær, Martin; Svensson, Birte; Davies, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Oxidation generates multiple diverse post-translational modifications resulting in changes in protein structure and function associated with a wide range of diseases. Of these modifications, carbonylations have often been used as hallmarks of oxidative damage. However, accumulating evidence suppo...

  1. A hot water extract of Curcuma longa inhibits adhesion molecule protein expression and monocyte adhesion to TNF-α-stimulated human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Kengo; Muroyama, Koutarou; Yamamoto, Norio; Murosaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    The recruitment of arterial leukocytes to endothelial cells is an important step in the progression of various inflammatory diseases. Therefore, its modulation is thought to be a prospective target for the prevention or treatment of such diseases. Adhesion molecules on endothelial cells are induced by proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and contribute to the recruitment of leukocytes. In the present study, we investigated the effect of hot water extract of Curcuma longa (WEC) on the protein expression of adhesion molecules, monocyte adhesion induced by TNF-α in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). Treatment of HUVECs with WEC significantly suppressed both TNF-α-induced protein expression of adhesion molecules and monocyte adhesion. WEC also suppressed phosphorylation and degradation of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor, alpha (IκBα) induced by TNF-α in HUVECs, suggesting that WEC inhibits the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  2. Gamma irradiation effect on soy protein modification, protein - phenolic interaction and antioxidant activity in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumari, Sweta; Dahuja, Anil; Vinutha, T.; Singh, Bhupinder

    2014-01-01

    Soy protein is one of the most important sources of protein to feed the world population in the future. Consumption of soybean quality protein and their texture is dependent on the protein modification. In the present study, four soybean genotypes PL5039 (black), EC 472143 (black), Pusa 9814 (yellow) and SL525 (yellow), differing in their seed coat colour were gamma irradiated at 0.5,1.0, 2.0 and 5.0 kGy and the extent of protein modification and parameters affecting it viz. free phenolics, bound phenolics, lip oxygenase and antioxidant activity were analysed. Modifications of soybean proteins were investigated by chemical analysis and electrophoresis. The irradiation dose of 1.0 kGy showed decreased turbidity, protein oxidation, surface hydrophobicity but increased solubility and sulfhydryl and disulfide contents in all the genotypes. Further, SDS PAGE profile of treated soybean seeds revealed remarkable difference in electrophoretic bands as compared to the untreated seeds. Lipoxygense activity in all the genotypes decreased with increased exposure of gamma irradiation, which produced peroxide products that changes the structural characteristics of soy protein. Free phenolics, bound phenolics and total antioxidant activity measured in terms of FRAP in all the genotypes increased significantly at a dose of 2.0 kGy and it declined at a dose of 5.0 kGy. Antioxidant potential measured in terms of 1,1-diphenyl-2- picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity showed an increasing trend with dose, indicating that radiation processing as a method of food preservation has a positive nutritional implication. Hence, it is suggested that, mild gamma irradiation upto 2.0 kGy may reduce the protein oxidation, enhance the antioxidant activity and improve the soybean protein quality compared to higher dose 5.0 kGy, which reduced the protein quality. (author)

  3. Surface modification of fluorocarbon polymer films for improved adhesion using atmospheric-pressure nonthermal plasma graft-polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okubo, Masaaki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan)], E-mail: mokubo@me.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Tahara, Mitsuru [Environment and Chemistry Department, Technology Research Institute of Osaka Prefecture, 2-7-1 Ayumino, Izumi, Osaka 594-1157 (Japan); Saeki, Noboru [Laboratory of Technology Development, Pearl Kogyo Co., Ltd., 3-8-13 Minamikagaya, Suminoe-ku, Osaka 559-0015 (Japan); Yamamoto, Toshiaki [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Musashi Institute of Technology, 1-28-1 Tamazutsumi, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8557 (Japan)

    2008-08-01

    Flexible thin solid films made of fluorocarbon polymers such as PFA (perfluoroalkoxy fluoroplastics), PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene), and PCTFE (polychlorotrifluoroethylene) have excellent properties in terms of flexibility, gas and moisture barriers, etc. We develop a surface modification technique for improving the adhesion of the films using an atmospheric-pressure NTP (nonthermal plasma) method followed by graft-polymerization of the hydrophilic monomer. The results of the T-type peeling test show that the peeling strength of the film is thirty times larger than that of the untreated film. It is confirmed from XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer) and the SEM (Scanning electron microscope) analyses that a few F atoms exist on the surface and the hydrophilic layer with a thickness is of the order of 1 {mu}m is formed due to the grafting process.

  4. Post-translational protein modifications in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wägner, A M; Cloos, P; Bergholdt, R

    2007-01-01

    that recognises and repairs isomerised Asn and Asp residues in proteins. The aim of this study was to assess the role of PIMT in the development of type 1 diabetes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Immunohistochemical analysis of 59 normal human tissues was performed with a monoclonal PIMT antibody. CGP3466B, which induces......-translational modifications and PIMT in the development of type 1 diabetes in the diabetes-prone BB rat, and perhaps also in humans...... expression of Pcmt1, was tested on MIN6 and INS1 cells, to assess its effect on Pcmt1 mRNA and PIMT levels (RT-PCR and western blot) and apoptosis. Forty-five diabetes-prone BioBreeding (BB) Ottawa Karlsburg (OK) rats were randomised to receive 0, 14 or 500 microg/kg (denoted as the control, low...

  5. Photo-assisted generation of phospholipid polymer substrates for regiospecific protein conjugation and control of cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masako; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Novel photo-reactive phospholipid polymers were synthesized for use in the preparation of nonfouling surfaces with protein conjugation capacity. Poly[2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)-ran-N-methacryloyl-(l)-tyrosinemethylester (MAT)] (P(MPC/MAT)) was synthesized by conventional radical polymerization, with the MAT units capable of being oxidized by 254nm UV irradiation. Because of this photo-oxidation, active species such as catechol and quinone were alternately generated in the copolymer. A silicon wafer was subjected to surface modification through spin coating of P(MPC/MAT) from an aqueous solution for use as a model substrate. The surface was then irradiated several times with UV light. The thickness of the polymer layers formed on the Si wafers was influenced by various parameters such as polymer concentration, UV irradiation time, and composition of the MAT units in P(MPC/MAT). Oxidized MAT units were advantageous not only for polymer adhesion to a solid surface but also for protein conjugation with the adhered polymers. The amount of protein immobilized on UV-irradiated P(MPC/MAT) was dependent on the composition of the MAT units in the polymer. Furthermore, it was confirmed that protein immobilization on the polymer occurred through the oxidized MAT units because the protein adsorption was significantly reduced upon blocking these units through pretreatment with glycine. Conjugation of regiospecific protein could also be achieved through the use of a photomask. In addition, nonspecific protein adsorption was reduced on the non-irradiated regions whose surface was covered with physisorbed P(MPC/MAT). Therefore, P(MPC/MAT) can be used in the preparation of nonfouling substrates, which enable micrometer-sized manipulation of proteins through photo-irradiation. Function of proteins immobilized on MPC copolymers was also confirmed by cell adhesion test. As such, photo-reactive MPC copolymers are suitable for performing controlled protein conjugation

  6. A SIMPLE FLUORESCENT LABELING METHOD FOR STUDIES OF PROTEIN OXIDATION, PROTEIN MODIFICATION, AND PROTEOLYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Andrew. M.; Davies, Kelvin. J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Proteins are sensitive to oxidation, and oxidized proteins are excellent substrates for degradation by proteolytic enzymes such as the Proteasome and the mitochondrial Lon protease. Protein labeling is required for studies of protein turnover. Unfortunately, most labeling techniques involve 3H or 14C methylation which is expensive, exposes researchers to radioactivity, generates large amounts of radioactive waste, and allows only single-point assays because samples require acid-precipitation. Alternative labeling methods, have largely proven unsuitable, either because the probe itself is modified by the oxidant(s) being studied, or because the alternative labeling techniques are too complex or too costly for routine use. What is needed is a simple, quick, and cheap labeling technique that uses a non-radioactive marker, that binds strongly to proteins, is resistant to oxidative modification, and emits a strong signal. We have devised a new reductive method for labeling free carboxyl groups of proteins with the small fluorophore 7-amino-4-methycoumarin (AMC). When bound to target proteins, AMC fluoresces very weakly but when AMC is released by proteinases, proteases, or peptidases, it fluoresces strongly. Thus, without acid-precipitation, the proteolysis of any target protein can be studied continuously, in multiwell plates. In direct comparisons, 3H-labeled proteins and AMC-labeled proteins exhibited essentially identical degradation patterns during incubation with trypsin, cell extracts, and purified proteasome. AMC-labeled proteins are well-suited to study increased proteolytic susceptibility following protein modification, since the AMC-protein bond is resistant to oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide and peroxynitrite, and is stable over time and to extremes of pH, temperature (even boiling), freeze-thawing, mercaptoethanol, and methanol. PMID:21988844

  7. Protein N-myristoylation in Escherichia coli: Reconstitution of a eukaryotic protein modification in bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duronio, R.J.; Jackson-Machelski, E.; Heuckeroth, R.O.; Gordon, J.I.; Olins, P.O.; Devine, C.S.; Yonemoto, W.; Slice, L.W.; Taylor, S.S.

    1990-01-01

    Protein N-myristoylation refers to the covalent attachment of a myristoyl group (C14:0), via amide linkage, to the NH 2 -terminal glycine residue of certain cellular and viral proteins. Myristoyl-CoA:protein N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) catalyzes this cotranslational modification. The authors have developed a system for studying the substrate requirements and biological effects of protein N-myristoylation as well as NMT structure-activity relationships. Expression of the yeast NMT1 gene in Escherichia coli, a bacterium that has no endogenous NMT activity, results in production of the intact 53-kDa NMT polypeptide as well as a truncated polypeptide derived from proteolytic removal of its NH 2 -terminal 39 amino acids. By using a dual plasmid system, N-myristoylation of a mammalian protein was reconstituted in E. coli by simultaneous expression of the yeast NMT1 gene and a murine cDNA encoding the catalytic (C) subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PK-A). A major advantage of the bacterial system over eukaryotic systems is the absence of endogenous NMT and substrates, providing a more straightforward way of preparing myristoylated, analog-substituted, and nonmyristoylated forms of a given protein for comparison of their structural and functional properties. The experimental system may prove useful for recapitulating other eukaryotic protein modifications in E. coli so that structure-activity relationships of modifying enzymes and their substrates can be more readily assessed

  8. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase attenuates hepatocellular carcinoma cell adhesion stimulated by adipokine resistin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chen-Chieh; Chang, Shun-Fu; Chao, Jian-Kang; Lai, Yi-Liang; Chang, Wei-En; Hsu, Wen-Hsiu; Kuo, Wu-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    Resistin, adipocyte-secreting adipokine, may play critical role in modulating cancer pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistin on HCC adhesion to the endothelium, and the mechanism underlying these resistin effects. Human SK-Hep1 cells were used to study the effect of resistin on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expressions as well as NF-κB activation, and hence cell adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR), an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, was used to determine the regulatory role of AMPK on HCC adhesion to the endothelium in regard to the resistin effects. Treatment with resistin increased the adhesion of SK-Hep1 cells to HUVECs and concomitantly induced NF-κB activation, as well as ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expressions in SK-Hep1 cells. Using specific blocking antibodies and siRNAs, we found that resistin-induced SK-Hep1 cell adhesion to HUVECs was through NF-κB-regulated ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expressions. Moreover, treatment with AICAR demonstrated that AMPK activation in SK-Hep1 cells significantly attenuates the resistin effect on SK-Hep1 cell adhesion to HUVECs. These results clarify the role of resistin in inducing HCC adhesion to the endothelium and demonstrate the inhibitory effect of AMPK activation under the resistin stimulation. Our findings provide a notion that resistin play an important role to promote HCC metastasis and implicate AMPK may be a therapeutic target to against HCC metastasis

  9. Corneal cell adhesion to contact lens hydrogel materials enhanced via tear film protein deposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M Elkins

    Full Text Available Tear film protein deposition on contact lens hydrogels has been well characterized from the perspective of bacterial adhesion and viability. However, the effect of protein deposition on lens interactions with the corneal epithelium remains largely unexplored. The current study employs a live cell rheometer to quantify human corneal epithelial cell adhesion to soft contact lenses fouled with the tear film protein lysozyme. PureVision balafilcon A and AirOptix lotrafilcon B lenses were soaked for five days in either phosphate buffered saline (PBS, borate buffered saline (BBS, or Sensitive Eyes Plus Saline Solution (Sensitive Eyes, either pure or in the presence of lysozyme. Treated contact lenses were then contacted to a live monolayer of corneal epithelial cells for two hours, after which the contact lens was sheared laterally. The apparent cell monolayer relaxation modulus was then used to quantify the extent of cell adhesion to the contact lens surface. For both lens types, lysozyme increased corneal cell adhesion to the contact lens, with the apparent cell monolayer relaxation modulus increasing up to an order of magnitude in the presence of protein. The magnitude of this increase depended on the identity of the soaking solution: lenses soaked in borate-buffered solutions (BBS, Sensitive Eyes exhibited a much greater increase in cell attachment upon protein addition than those soaked in PBS. Significantly, all measurements were conducted while subjecting the cells to moderate surface pressures and shear rates, similar to those experienced by corneal cells in vivo.

  10. Synthetic Proteins and Peptides for the Direct Interrogation of α-Synuclein Posttranslational Modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Matthew R; Abeywardana, Tharindumala; Marotta, Nicholas P

    2015-06-25

    α-Synuclein is the aggregation-prone protein associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) and related neurodegenerative diseases. Complicating both its biological functions and toxic aggregation are a variety of posttranslational modifications. These modifications have the potential to either positively or negatively affect α-synuclein aggregation, raising the possibility that the enzymes that add or remove these modifications could be therapeutic targets in PD. Synthetic protein chemistry is uniquely positioned to generate site-specifically and homogeneously modified proteins for biochemical study. Here, we review the application of synthetic peptides and proteins towards understanding the effects of α-synuclein posttranslational modifications.

  11. Tailored Poly(2-oxazoline) Polymer Brushes to Control Protein Adsorption and Cell Adhesion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ning

    2012-05-18

    POx bottle-brush brushes (BBBs) are synthesized by SIPGP of 2-isopropenyl-2-oxazoline and consecutive LCROP of 2-oxazolines on 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane-modified silicon substrates. The side chain hydrophilicity and polarity are varied. The impact of the chemical composition and architecture of the BBB upon protein (fibronectin) adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion are investigated and prove extremely low protein adsorption and cell adhesion on BBBs with hydrophilic side chains such as poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline) and poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline). The influence of the POx side chain terminal function upon adsorption and adhesion is minor but the side chain length has a significant effect on bioadsorption. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. A cohort of new adhesive proteins identified from transcriptomic analysis of mussel foot glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMartini, Daniel G; Errico, John M; Sjoestroem, Sebastian; Fenster, April; Waite, J Herbert

    2017-06-01

    The adaptive attachment of marine mussels to a wide range of substrates in a high-energy, saline environment has been explored for decades and is a significant driver of bioinspired wet adhesion research. Mussel attachment relies on a fibrous holdfast known as the byssus, which is made by a specialized appendage called the foot. Multiple adhesive and structural proteins are rapidly synthesized, secreted and moulded by the foot into holdfast threads. About 10 well-characterized proteins, namely the mussel foot proteins (Mfps), the preCols and the thread matrix proteins, are reported as representing the bulk of these structures. To explore how robust this proposition is, we sequenced the transcriptome of the glandular tissues that produce and secrete the various holdfast components using next-generation sequencing methods. Surprisingly, we found around 15 highly expressed genes that have not previously been characterized, but bear key similarities to the previously defined mussel foot proteins, suggesting additional contribution to byssal function. We verified the validity of these transcripts by polymerase chain reaction, cloning and Sanger sequencing as well as confirming their presence as proteins in the byssus. These newly identified proteins greatly expand the palette of mussel holdfast biochemistry and provide new targets for investigation into bioinspired wet adhesion. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. Comparison of the adhesive performances of soy meal, water washed meal fractions, and protein isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhesive bonding of wood plays an increasing role in the forest products industry and is a key factor for efficiently utilizing timber and other lignocellulosic resources. In this work, we obtained five soy meal products through commercial sources or in-house preparations. The protein content was 49...

  14. Substrate, focal adhesions, and actin filaments: a mechanical unit with a weak spot for mechanosensitive proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchenbuechler, David; Born, Simone; Kirchgessner, Norbert; Houben, Sebastian; Hoffmann, Bernd; Merkel, Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    Mechanosensing is a vital prerequisite for dynamic remodeling of focal adhesions and cytoskeletal structures upon substrate deformation. For example, tissue formation, directed cell orientation or cell differentiation are regulated by such mechanosensing processes. Focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton are believed to be involved in these processes, but where mechanosensing molecules are located and how elastic substrate, focal adhesions and the cytoskeleton couple with each other upon substrate deformation still remains obscure. To approach these questions we have developed a sensitive method to apply defined spatially decaying deformation fields to cells cultivated on ultrasoft elastic substrates and to accurately quantify the resulting displacements of the actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesions, as well as the substrate. Displacement fields were recorded in live cell microscopy by tracking either signals from fluorescent proteins or marker particles in the substrate. As model cell type we used myofibroblasts. These cells are characterized by highly stable adhesion and force generating structures but are still able to detect mechanical signals with high sensitivity. We found a rigid connection between substrate and focal adhesions. Furthermore, stress fibers were found to be barely extendable almost over their whole lengths. Plastic deformation took place only at the very ends of actin filaments close to focal adhesions. As a result, this area became elongated without extension of existing actin filaments by polymerization. Both ends of the stress fibers were mechanically coupled with detectable plastic deformations on either site. Interestingly, traction force dependent substrate deformation fields remained mostly unaffected even when stress fiber elongations were released. These data argue for a location of mechanosensing proteins at the ends of actin stress fibers and describe, except for these domains, the whole system to be relatively rigid for tensile

  15. Adhesion, invasion and evasion: the many functions of the surface proteins of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Timothy J.; Geoghegan, Joan A.; Ganesh, Vannakambadi K.; Höök, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important opportunistic pathogen and persistently colonizes about 20% of the human population. Its surface is ‘decorated’ with proteins that are covalently anchored to the cell wall peptidoglycan. Structural and functional analysis has identified four distinct classes of surface proteins, of which microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) are the largest class. These surface proteins have numerous functions, including adhesion to and invasion of host cells and tissues, evasion of immune responses and biofilm formation. Thus, cell wall-anchored proteins are essential virulence factors for the survival of S. aureus in the commensal state and during invasive infections, and targeting them with vaccines could combat S. aureus infections. PMID:24336184

  16. Role of Cbl-associated protein/ponsin in receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and cell adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritva Tikkanen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Cbl-associated protein/ponsin (CAP is an adaptor protein that contains a so-called Sorbin homology (SoHo domain and three Src homology 3 (SH3 domains which are engaged in diverse protein-protein interactions. CAP has been shown to function in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and cell adhesion and to be involved in the differentiation of muscle cells and adipocytes. In addition, it participates in signaling pathways through several receptor tyrosine kinases such as insulin and neurotrophin receptors. In the last couple of years, several studies have shed light on the details of these processes and identified novel interaction partners of CAP. In this review, we summarize these recent findings and provide an overview on the function of CAP especially in cell adhesion and membrane receptor signaling.

  17. Cortactin is a scaffolding platform for the E-cadherin adhesion complex and is regulated by protein kinase D1 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Robert; Van Lint, Johan; Katz, Sarah-Fee; Schneider, Marlon R; Kleger, Alexander; Paschke, Stephan; Seufferlein, Thomas; Eiseler, Tim

    2016-06-15

    Dynamic regulation of cell-cell adhesion by the coordinated formation and dissolution of E-cadherin-based adherens junctions is crucial for tissue homeostasis. The actin-binding protein cortactin interacts with E-cadherin and enables F-actin accumulation at adherens junctions. Here, we were interested to study the broader functional interactions of cortactin in adhesion complexes. In line with literature, we demonstrate that cortactin binds to E-cadherin, and that a posttranslational modification of cortactin, RhoA-induced phosphorylation by protein kinase D1 (PKD1; also known as PRKD1) at S298, impairs adherens junction assembly and supports their dissolution. Two new S298-phosphorylation-dependent interactions were also identified, namely, that phosphorylation of cortactin decreases its interaction with β-catenin and the actin-binding protein vinculin. In addition, binding of vinculin to β-catenin, as well as linkage of vinculin to F-actin, are also significantly compromised upon phosphorylation of cortactin. Accordingly, we found that regulation of cell-cell adhesion by phosphorylation of cortactin downstream of RhoA and PKD1 is vitally dependent on vinculin-mediated protein interactions. Thus, cortactin, unexpectedly, is an important integration node for the dynamic regulation of protein complexes during breakdown and formation of adherens junctions. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Influence of coating properties on the adhesion of proteins to atmospheric plasma modified surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Stallard, Charlie P.; McDonnell, Kevin; Donegan, Mick; Dowling, Denis P.

    2010-01-01

    Protein adhesion is of key importance for the biocompatibility of medical devices. This study investigates the adsorption of protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), onto both uncoated silicon wafers and nanometre thick fluorosiloxane coated wafers. A plasma polymerised coating was deposited from a mixture of tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane (TC) and perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane (FS) (1:1 by vol. ratio). The liquid precursor mixture was nebulised into an atmospheric plasma jet formed...

  19. An integrated transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of sea star epidermal secretions identifies proteins involved in defense and adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebert, Elise; Leroy, Baptiste; Wattiez, Ruddy; Ladurner, Peter

    2015-10-14

    Sea stars rely on epidermal secretions to cope with their benthic life. Their integument produces a mucus, which represents the first barrier against invaders; and their tube feet produce adhesive secretions to pry open mussels and attach strongly but temporarily to rocks. In this study, we combined high-throughput sequencing of expressed mRNA and mass-spectrometry-based identification of proteins to establish the first proteome of mucous and adhesive secretions from the sea star Asterias rubens. We show that the two secretions differ significantly, the major adhesive proteins being only present in trace amounts in the mucus secretion. Except for 41 proteins which were present in both secretions, a total of 34 and 244 proteins were identified as specific of adhesive secretions and mucus, respectively. We discuss the role of some of these proteins in the adhesion of sea stars as well as in their protection against oxygen reactive species and microorganisms. In addition, 58% of the proteins identified in adhesive secretions did not present significant similarity to other known proteins, revealing a list of potential novel sea star adhesive proteins uncharacterized so far. The panel of proteins identified in this study offers unprecedented opportunities for the development of sea star-inspired biomimetic materials. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Blockade of Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 Inhibits Lymphocyte Infiltration in Rat Liver Allograft Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Martelius, Timi; Salaspuro, Ville; Salmi, Marko; Krogerus, Leena; Höckerstedt, Krister; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Lautenschlager, Irmeli

    2004-01-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) has been shown to mediate lymphocyte adhesion to endothelia at sites of inflammation, but its functional role in vivo has not been tested in any rodent model. Here we report the effects of VAP-1 blockade on rat liver allograft rejection. BN recipients of PVG liver allografts (known to develop acute rejection by day 7) were treated with 2 mg/kg anti-VAP-1 (a new anti-rat VAP-1 mAb 174–5) or isotype-matched irrelevant antibody (NS1) every other day (n = 6/gro...

  1. Use of soy proteins in polyketone-based wood adhesives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamarneh, A.; Heeres, H. J.; Broekhuis, A. A.; Sjollema, K. A.; Zhang, Y.; Picchioni, F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the preparation of aqueous emulsions consisting of soy proteins and chemically modified thermosetting aliphatic polyketones. Emulsions were prepared in a range of total solids contents and different addition protocols were tested. Room temperature stability and structure of the

  2. Taking Orders from Light: Photo-Switchable Working/Inactive Smart Surfaces for Protein and Cell Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junji; Ma, Wenjing; He, Xiao-Peng; Tian, He

    2017-03-15

    Photoresponsive smart surfaces are promising candidates for a variety of applications in optoelectronics and sensing devices. The use of light as an order signal provides advantages of remote and noninvasive control with high temporal and spatial resolutions. Modification of the photoswitches with target biomacromolecules, such as peptides, DNA, and small molecules including folic acid derivatives and sugars, has recently become a popular strategy to empower the smart surfaces with an improved detection efficiency and specificity. Herein, we report the construction of photoswitchable self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) based on sugar (galactose/mannose)-decorated azobenzene derivatives and determine their photoswitchable, selective protein/cell adhesion performances via electrochemistry. Under alternate UV/vis irradiation, interconvertible high/low recognition and binding affinity toward selective lectins (proteins that recognize sugars) and cells that highly express sugar receptors are achieved. Furthermore, the cis-SAMs with a low binding affinity toward selective proteins and cells also exhibit minimal response toward unselective protein and cell samples, which offers the possibility in avoiding unwanted contamination and consumption of probes prior to functioning for practical applications. Besides, the electrochemical technique used facilitates the development of portable devices based on the smart surfaces for on-demand disease diagnosis.

  3. Surface modification of an experimental silicone rubber aimed at reducing initial candidal adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, C; Waters, M G J; Williams, D W; Lewis, M A O; Stickler, D

    2002-01-01

    Silicone rubber, which is a widely used biomaterial, is often used to make soft liners for permanent denture. Colonization of denture soft lining materials by Candida albicans can result in clinical problems. The aim of this study was to chemically modify the surface of an experimental silicone rubber in order to produce a silicone that was less susceptible to candidal colonization. Surface modification was carried out with the use of argon-plasma bombardment followed by silane treatment, which caused the incorporation of either hydrophilic or hydrophobic functional groups onto the surface. Changes in water contact angles and chemical analysis of the materials with scanning ion mass spectroscopy confirmed surface changes. In vitro assays were carried out using C. albicans to measure levels of adherence to the surface-modified silicone after 1 h. C. albicans exhibited very low adherence to all silane-treated surfaces, whether hydrophobic or hydrophilic. This led to the conclusion that incorporated long-chain functional groups were inhibiting the adherence of the yeast, possibly by the formation of a barrier between the surface of the material and the yeast. In conclusion, silane surface treatment of an experimental silicone rubber has been successful in reducing candidal adherence. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res (Appl Biomater) 63: 122--128, 2002; DOI 10.1002/jbm.10094

  4. The molecular mechanism of mediation of adsorbed serum proteins to endothelial cells adhesion and growth on biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dayun; Lü, Xiaoying; Hong, Ying; Xi, Tingfei; Zhang, Deyuan

    2013-07-01

    To explore molecular mechanism of mediation of adsorbed proteins to cell adhesion and growth on biomaterials, this study examined endothelial cell adhesion, morphology and viability on bare and titanium nitride (TiN) coated nickel titanium (NiTi) alloys and chitosan film firstly, and then identified the type and amount of serum proteins adsorbed on the three surfaces by proteomic technology. Subsequently, the mediation role of the identified proteins to cell adhesion and growth was investigated with bioinformatics analyses, and further confirmed by a series of cellular and molecular biological experiments. Results showed that the type and amount of adsorbed serum proteins associated with cell adhesion and growth was obviously higher on the alloys than on the chitosan film, and these proteins mediated endothelial cell adhesion and growth on the alloys via four ways. First, proteins such as adiponectin in the adsorbed protein layer bound with cell surface receptors to generate signal transduction, which activated cell surface integrins through increasing intracellular calcium level. Another way, thrombospondin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer promoted TGF-β signaling pathway activation and enhanced integrins expression. The third, RGD sequence containing proteins such as fibronectin 1, vitronectin and thrombospondin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer bound with activated integrins to activate focal adhesion pathway, increased focal adhesion formation and actin cytoskeleton organization and mediated cell adhesion and spreading. In addition, the activated focal adhesion pathway promoted the expression of cell growth related genes and resulted in cell proliferation. The fourth route, coagulation factor II (F2) and fibronectin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer bound with cell surface F2 receptor and integrin, activated regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathway and regulated actin cytoskeleton organization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) color reporter gene visualizes parvovirus B19 non-structural segment 1 (NS1) transfected endothelial modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, Thomas; Pölzelbauer, Catharina; Schönberger, Tanja; Paul, Angela; Seizer, Peter; Stellos, Konstantinos; Schuster, Andreas; Botnar, Rene M; Gawaz, Meinrad; Bigalke, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Human Parvovirus B19 (PVB19) has been associated with myocarditis putative due to endothelial infection. Whether PVB19 infects endothelial cells and causes a modification of endothelial function and inflammation and, thus, disturbance of microcirculation has not been elucidated and could not be visualized so far. To examine the PVB19-induced endothelial modification, we used green fluorescent protein (GFP) color reporter gene in the non-structural segment 1 (NS1) of PVB19. NS1-GFP-PVB19 or GFP plasmid as control were transfected in an endothelial-like cell line (ECV304). The endothelial surface expression of intercellular-adhesion molecule-1 (CD54/ICAM-1) and extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN/CD147) were evaluated by flow cytometry after NS-1-GFP or control-GFP transfection. To evaluate platelet adhesion on NS-1 transfected ECs, we performed a dynamic adhesion assay (flow chamber). NS-1 transfection causes endothelial activation and enhanced expression of ICAM-1 (CD54: mean ± standard deviation: NS1-GFP vs. control-GFP: 85.3 ± 11.2 vs. 61.6 ± 8.1; PGFP vs. control-GFP: 114 ± 15.3 vs. 80 ± 0.91; PGFP transfected cells. Dynamic adhesion assays showed that adhesion of platelets is significantly enhanced on NS1 transfected ECs when compared to control-GFP (PGFP color reporter gene shows transfection of ECs and may help to visualize NS1-PVB19 induced endothelial activation and platelet adhesion as well as an enhanced monocyte adhesion directly, providing in vitro evidence of possible microcirculatory dysfunction in PVB19-induced myocarditis and, thus, myocardial tissue damage.

  6. The role of cytoskeleton and adhesion proteins in the resistance to photodynamic therapy. Possible therapeutic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Venosa, Gabriela; Perotti, Christian; Batlle, Alcira; Casas, Adriana

    2015-08-01

    It is known that Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) induces changes in the cytoskeleton, the cell shape, and the adhesion properties of tumour cells. In addition, these targets have also been demonstrated to be involved in the development of PDT resistance. The reversal of PDT resistance by manipulating the cell adhesion process to substrata has been out of reach. Even though the existence of cell adhesion-mediated PDT resistance has not been reported so far, it cannot be ruled out. In addition to its impact on the apoptotic response to photodamage, the cytoskeleton alterations are thought to be associated with the processes of metastasis and invasion after PDT. In this review, we will address the impact of photodamage on the microfilament and microtubule cytoskeleton components and its regulators on PDT-treated cells as well as on cell adhesion. We will also summarise the impact of PDT on the surviving and resistant cells and their metastatic potential. Possible strategies aimed at taking advantage of the changes induced by PDT on actin, tubulin and cell adhesion proteins by targeting these molecules will also be discussed.

  7. Spatial and Temporal Effects in Protein Post-translational Modification Distributions in the Developing Mouse Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Alistair V G; Edwards, Gregory J; Schwämmle, Veit

    2014-01-01

    Protein post-translational modification (PTM) is a powerful way to modify the behavior of cellular proteins and thereby cellular behavior. Multiple recent studies of evolutionary trends have shown that certain pairs of protein post-translational modifications tend to occur closer to each other than...... for observations of increasingly frequent and diverse protein modification in cell biology. In this study, we use mass spectrometry and proteomic strategies to present biological data showing spatiotemporal PTM co-localization across multiple PTM categories, which display changes over development of the brain...

  8. Bioactivity of immobilized hyaluronic acid derivatives regarding protein adsorption and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köwitsch, Alexander; Yang, Yuan; Ma, Ning

    2011-01-01

    with HA on physicochemical surface properties of these substrata and estimates of the quantities of immobilized HA were obtained by different physical methods such as contact angle measurements, ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy. The bioactivity of aHA and tHA toward their natural binding partner...... affects cell growth and differentiation. A lower number and spreading of cells were observed on HA-modified surfaces compared to amino- and vinyl-terminated glass and silicon surfaces. Immunofluorescence microscopy also revealed that adhesion of fibroblast plated on HA-modified surfaces was mediated...... primarily by HA receptor CD44, indicating that bioactivity of HA was not significantly reduced by chemical modification....

  9. Protein Redox Modification as a Cellular Defense Mechanism against Tissue Ischemic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Jun Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein oxidative or redox modifications induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS or reactive nitrogen species (RNS not only can impair protein function, but also can regulate and expand protein function under a variety of stressful conditions. Protein oxidative modifications can generally be classified into two categories: irreversible oxidation and reversible oxidation. While irreversible oxidation usually leads to protein aggregation and degradation, reversible oxidation that usually occurs on protein cysteine residues can often serve as an “on and off” switch that regulates protein function and redox signaling pathways upon stress challenges. In the context of ischemic tolerance, including preconditioning and postconditioning, increasing evidence has indicated that reversible cysteine redox modifications such as S-sulfonation, S-nitrosylation, S-glutathionylation, and disulfide bond formation can serve as a cellular defense mechanism against tissue ischemic injury. In this review, I highlight evidence of cysteine redox modifications as protective measures in ischemic injury, demonstrating that protein redox modifications can serve as a therapeutic target for attenuating tissue ischemic injury. Prospectively, more oxidatively modified proteins will need to be identified that can play protective roles in tissue ischemic injury, in particular, when the oxidative modifications of such identified proteins can be enhanced by pharmacological agents or drugs that are available or to be developed.

  10. Characterization of the in vitro binding and inhibition kinetics of primary amine oxidase/vascular adhesion protein-1 by glucosamine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Olivieri, Aldo

    2012-04-01

    Primary-amine oxidase (PrAO) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of endogenous and exogenous primary amines and also functions, in some tissues, as an inflammation-inducible endothelial factor, known as vascular adhesion protein-1. VAP-1 mediates the slow rolling and adhesion of lymphocytes to endothelial cells in a number of inflammatory conditions, including inflammation of the synovium.

  11. Structural basis of the tensile strength of protein complexes mediating cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayas, Marco Vinicio

    This study explores the behaviour of adhesive complexes of cell adhesion molecules undergoing forced detachment. Molecular-forces measurements combined with Steered Molecular Dynamic (SMD) simulations were used to investigate the mechanical response of the CD2 C58 and hemophilic C-cadherin bonds. The CD2-CD58 adhesive complex, important for the adaptive immune response, contains several salt-bridges in the adhesive interface. SMD simulations showed that these inter-protein salt bridges contribute independently to the tensile strength of the complex. Consistent with this, force measurements with the Surface Force Apparatus (SFA) demonstrated that the elimination of single salt bridges weakens the bond. The corresponding loss in adhesion energy of the CD2-CD58 complex correlates with the importance of the salt bridges observed in the simulations. These findings correlate closely with the effect of the elimination of single salt bridges observed in cell aggregation assays and binding measurements. On the other hand, the hemophilic C-cadherin interaction determines specific cell-cell adhesion during development in Xenopus laevis . Single molecule force spectroscopy was used to characterize the multiple bound states between C-cadherin ectodomains. The experiments showed two short-lived bound states associated with the two outermost ectodomains and two long-lived states associated with the full ectodomain. It is likely that the two short-lived states are involved in the specificity of the interaction since previous studies showed that the corresponding states in E-cadherin have different lifetimes. In addition, SMD simulations of the forced dissociation of the strand dieter of C-cadherin suggested a mechanism for the specificity of cadherin interactions.

  12. The functional properties, modification and utilization of whey proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. G. Venter

    1986-03-01

    Full Text Available Whey protein has an excellent nutritional value and exhibits a functional potential. In comparison with certain other food proteins, the whey protein content of essential amino acids is extremely favourable for human consumption. Depending on the heat-treatment history thereof, soluble whey proteins with utilizable functional properties, apart from high biological value, true digestibility, protein efficiency ratio and nett protein utilization, can be recovered. Various technological and chemical recovery processes have been designed. Chemically and enzymatically modified whey protein is manufactured to obtain technological and functional advantages. The important functional properties of whey proteins, namely hydration, gelation, emulsifying and foaming properties, are reviewed.

  13. BioJava-ModFinder: identification of protein modifications in 3D structures from the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianjiong; Prlic, Andreas; Bi, Chunxiao; Bluhm, Wolfgang F; Dimitropoulos, Dimitris; Xu, Dong; Bourne, Philip E; Rose, Peter W

    2017-07-01

    We developed a new software tool, BioJava-ModFinder, for identifying protein modifications observed in 3D structures archived in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Information on more than 400 types of protein modifications were collected and curated from annotations in PDB, RESID, and PSI-MOD. We divided these modifications into three categories: modified residues, attachment modifications, and cross-links. We have developed a systematic method to identify these modifications in 3D protein structures. We have integrated this package with the RCSB PDB web application and added protein modification annotations to the sequence diagram and structure display. By scanning all 3D structures in the PDB using BioJava-ModFinder, we identified more than 30 000 structures with protein modifications, which can be searched, browsed, and visualized on the RCSB PDB website. BioJava-ModFinder is available as open source (LGPL license) at ( https://github.com/biojava/biojava/tree/master/biojava-modfinder ). The RCSB PDB can be accessed at http://www.rcsb.org . pwrose@ucsd.edu. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. Insulin-Regulated Increase of Soluble Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 in Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Salmi, Marko; Stolen, Craig; Jousilahti, Pekka; Yegutkin, Gennady G.; Tapanainen, Päivi; Janatuinen, Tuula; Knip, Mikael; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Salomaa, Veikko

    2002-01-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is one of the molecules on the endothelial cell membrane, which may guide inflammatory cells into atherosclerotic lesions. This dual function molecule may also contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and other vasculopathies via its enzymatic activity that oxidizes primary amines to produce their corresponding aldehydes, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonium. Because VAP-1 also exists in a soluble form, we analyzed its potential usefulness as a biomarke...

  15. Pseudouridine andN6-methyladenosine modifications weaken PUF protein/RNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Pavanapuresan P; AlSadhan, Ishraq; Merriman, Dawn K; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M; Herschlag, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    RNA modifications are ubiquitous in biology, with over 100 distinct modifications. While the vast majority were identified and characterized on abundant noncoding RNA such as tRNA and rRNA, the advent of sensitive sequencing-based approaches has led to the discovery of extensive and regulated modification of eukaryotic messenger RNAs as well. The two most abundant mRNA modifications-pseudouridine (Ψ) and N 6 -methyladenosine (m 6 A)-affect diverse cellular processes including mRNA splicing, localization, translation, and decay and modulate RNA structure. Here, we test the hypothesis that RNA modifications directly affect interactions between RNA-binding proteins and target RNA. We show that Ψ and m 6 A weaken the binding of the human single-stranded RNA binding protein Pumilio 2 (hPUM2) to its consensus motif, with individual modifications having effects up to approximately threefold and multiple modifications giving larger effects. While there are likely to be some cases where RNA modifications essentially fully ablate protein binding, here we see modest responses that may be more common. Such modest effects could nevertheless profoundly alter the complex landscape of RNA:protein interactions, and the quantitative rather than qualitative nature of these effects underscores the need for quantitative, systems-level accounting of RNA:protein interactions to understand post-transcriptional regulation. © 2017 Vaidyanathan et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  16. Protein Adhesion and Ion Substitution (on/in)to Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlet, L.; Fernandez Martinez, A.; Chapron, Y.; Sahai, N.; Cuello, G.; Brendle, J.; Marichal, C.

    2008-12-01

    Arsenic and pathogenic prion protein-scrapie (PrPsc) are important contaminants which may soil and water for decades, unless they are removed by sorption. Two sorption mechanisms will be discussed, namely the organics (Prp and single aminoacid) adsorption on clay and the arsenic substitution in gypsum. The elucidation of these contrasted mechanisms will be shown to request complementary molecular-mechanical simulations with experimental spectroscopic investigations. As first example, structural studies performed at ILL/ESRF on As-doped gypsum (CaSO4 2H2O) using neutron and X-ray diffraction data and EXAFS were performed to determine how As fits into the bulk of gypsum structure. The combined Rietveld analysis of neutron and X-ray diffraction data shows an expansion of the unit cell volume proportional to the As concentration within the samples. to-sulfate substitution mechanisms were used as simulation starting hypotheses. DFT-based simulations (Mulliken analysis) were used to interpret charge distribution and to show that among the possible mechanisms, a sulphate substitution by either protonated, or fully deprotonated, arsenate ion, only the protonated arsenate substitution could best fit the EXAFS data. In the second example, we used Molecular Dynamics to understand the mechanism of strong binding of the pathogenic PrP peptide with clay mineral surfaces. We modeled only the infectious moiety, PrP92-138, of the whole PrPsc structure, with explicitly solvating water molecules in contact with the cleavage plane of pyrophillite, as a model for montmorillonite without any cationic substitution. Partial residual negative charges on the cleavage plane were balanced with K+ ions. The peptide anchored to the clay surface via up to 10 hydrogen bonds from lysine and histidine residues to oxygen atoms of the siloxane cavities, and a total adsorption energy of 3465 KJ.mol-1 was obtained. Our results were compared to the one obtained by chemical and thermal analysis, 23Na, 1H

  17. Protein-protein binding before and after photo-modification of albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozinek, Sarah C.; Glickman, Randolph D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2016-03-01

    Bioeffects of directed-optical-energy encompass a wide range of applications. One aspect of photochemical interactions involves irradiating a photosensitizer with visible light in order to induce protein unfolding and consequent changes in function. In the past, irradiation of several dye-protein combinations has revealed effects on protein structure. Beta lactoglobulin, human serum albumin (HSA) and tubulin have all been photo-modified with meso-tetrakis(4- sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (TSPP) bound, but only in the case of tubulin has binding caused a verified loss of biological function (loss of ability to form microtubules) as a result of this light-induced structural change. The current work questions if the photo-induced structural changes that occur to HSA, are sufficient to disable its biological function of binding to osteonectin. The albumin-binding protein, osteonectin, is about half the molecular weight of HSA, so the two proteins and their bound product can be separated and quantified by size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography. TSPP was first bound to HSA and irradiated, photo-modifying the structure of HSA. Then native HSA or photo-modified HSA (both with TSPP bound) were compared, to assess loss in HSA's innate binding ability as a result of light-induced structure modification.

  18. Down regulation of NO signaling in Trypanosoma cruzi upon parasite-extracellular matrix interaction: changes in protein modification by nitrosylation and nitration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Pereira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion of the Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes, the causative agent of Chagas' disease in humans, to components of the extracellular matrix (ECM is an important step in host cell invasion. The signaling events triggered in the parasite upon binding to ECM are less explored and, to our knowledge, there is no data available regarding •NO signaling.Trypomastigotes were incubated with ECM for different periods of time. Nitrated and S-nitrosylated proteins were analyzed by Western blotting using anti-nitrotyrosine and S-nitrosyl cysteine antibodies. At 2 h incubation time, a decrease in NO synthase activity, •NO, citrulline, arginine and cGMP concentrations, as well as the protein modifications levels have been observed in the parasite. The modified proteins were enriched by immunoprecipitation with anti-nitrotyrosine antibodies (nitrated proteins or by the biotin switch method (S-nitrosylated proteins and identified by MS/MS. The presence of both modifications was confirmed in proteins of interest by immunoblotting or immunoprecipitation.For the first time it was shown that T. cruzi proteins are amenable to modifications by S-nitrosylation and nitration. When T. cruzi trypomastigotes are incubated with the extracellular matrix there is a general down regulation of these reactions, including a decrease in both NOS activity and cGMP concentration. Notwithstanding, some specific proteins, such as enolase or histones had, at least, their nitration levels increased. This suggests that post-translational modifications of T. cruzi proteins are not only a reflex of NOS activity, implying other mechanisms that circumvent a relatively low synthesis of •NO. In conclusion, the extracellular matrix, a cell surrounding layer of macromolecules that have to be trespassed by the parasite in order to be internalized into host cells, contributes to the modification of •NO signaling in the parasite, probably an essential move for the ensuing invasion step.

  19. Function-blocking antibodies to human vascular adhesion protein-1: a potential anti-inflammatory therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirton, Christopher M; Laukkanen, Marja-Leena; Nieminen, Antti; Merinen, Marika; Stolen, Craig M; Armour, Kathryn; Smith, David J; Salmi, Marko; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Clark, Michael R

    2005-11-01

    Human vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is a homodimeric 170-kDa sialoglycoprotein that is expressed on the surface of endothelial cells and functions as a semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase and as an adhesion molecule. Blockade of VAP-1 has been shown to reduce leukocyte adhesion and transmigration in in vivo and in vitro models, suggesting that VAP-1 is a potential target for anti-inflammatory therapy. In this study we have constructed mouse-human chimeric antibodies by genetic engineering in order to circumvent the potential problems involved in using murine antibodies in man. Our chimeric anti-VAP-1 antibodies, which were designed to lack Fc-dependent effector functions, bound specifically to cell surface-expressed recombinant human VAP-1 and recognized VAP-1 in different cell types in tonsil. Furthermore, the chimeric antibodies prevented leukocyte adhesion and transmigration in vitro and in vivo. Hence, these chimeric antibodies have the potential to be used as a new anti-inflammatory therapy.

  20. New functions and signaling mechanisms for the class of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebscher, Ines; Ackley, Brian; Araç, Demet

    2014-01-01

    The class of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs), with 33 human homologs, is the second largest family of GPCRs. In addition to a seven-transmembrane α-helix-a structural feature of all GPCRs-the class of aGPCRs is characterized by the presence of a large N-terminal extracellular region....... In addition, all aGPCRs but one (GPR123) contain a GPCR autoproteolysis-inducing (GAIN) domain that mediates autoproteolytic cleavage at the GPCR autoproteolysis site motif to generate N- and a C-terminal fragments (NTF and CTF, respectively) during protein maturation. Subsequently, the NTF and CTF...

  1. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Pathway Regulates Branching by Remodeling Epithelial Cell Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihermann-Hella, Anneliis; Lume, Maria; Miinalainen, Ilkka J.; Pirttiniemi, Anniina; Gui, Yujuan; Peränen, Johan; Charron, Jean; Saarma, Mart; Costantini, Frank; Kuure, Satu

    2014-01-01

    Although the growth factor (GF) signaling guiding renal branching is well characterized, the intracellular cascades mediating GF functions are poorly understood. We studied mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway specifically in the branching epithelia of developing kidney by genetically abrogating the pathway activity in mice lacking simultaneously dual-specificity protein kinases Mek1 and Mek2. Our data show that MAPK pathway is heterogeneously activated in the subset of G1- and S-phase epithelial cells, and its tissue-specific deletion results in severe renal hypodysplasia. Consequently to the deletion of Mek1/2, the activation of ERK1/2 in the epithelium is lost and normal branching pattern in mutant kidneys is substituted with elongation-only phenotype, in which the epithelium is largely unable to form novel branches and complex three-dimensional patterns, but able to grow without primary defects in mitosis. Cellular characterization of double mutant epithelium showed increased E-cadherin at the cell surfaces with its particular accumulation at baso-lateral locations. This indicates changes in cellular adhesion, which were revealed by electron microscopic analysis demonstrating intercellular gaps and increased extracellular space in double mutant epithelium. When challenged to form monolayer cultures, the mutant epithelial cells were impaired in spreading and displayed strong focal adhesions in addition to spiky E-cadherin. Inhibition of MAPK activity reduced paxillin phosphorylation on serine 83 while remnants of phospho-paxillin, together with another focal adhesion (FA) protein vinculin, were augmented at cell surface contacts. We show that MAPK activity is required for branching morphogenesis, and propose that it promotes cell cycle progression and higher cellular motility through remodeling of cellular adhesions. PMID:24603431

  2. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway regulates branching by remodeling epithelial cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneliis Ihermann-Hella

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Although the growth factor (GF signaling guiding renal branching is well characterized, the intracellular cascades mediating GF functions are poorly understood. We studied mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway specifically in the branching epithelia of developing kidney by genetically abrogating the pathway activity in mice lacking simultaneously dual-specificity protein kinases Mek1 and Mek2. Our data show that MAPK pathway is heterogeneously activated in the subset of G1- and S-phase epithelial cells, and its tissue-specific deletion results in severe renal hypodysplasia. Consequently to the deletion of Mek1/2, the activation of ERK1/2 in the epithelium is lost and normal branching pattern in mutant kidneys is substituted with elongation-only phenotype, in which the epithelium is largely unable to form novel branches and complex three-dimensional patterns, but able to grow without primary defects in mitosis. Cellular characterization of double mutant epithelium showed increased E-cadherin at the cell surfaces with its particular accumulation at baso-lateral locations. This indicates changes in cellular adhesion, which were revealed by electron microscopic analysis demonstrating intercellular gaps and increased extracellular space in double mutant epithelium. When challenged to form monolayer cultures, the mutant epithelial cells were impaired in spreading and displayed strong focal adhesions in addition to spiky E-cadherin. Inhibition of MAPK activity reduced paxillin phosphorylation on serine 83 while remnants of phospho-paxillin, together with another focal adhesion (FA protein vinculin, were augmented at cell surface contacts. We show that MAPK activity is required for branching morphogenesis, and propose that it promotes cell cycle progression and higher cellular motility through remodeling of cellular adhesions.

  3. Protein Modification: A Proposed Mechanism for the Long-Term Pathogenesis of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-04

    no longer targeted by the damaged proteasome for breakdown, and may rather accumulate as misfolded aggregates (26; 56). While several of the proteins ...influx elicits the generation of damaging reactive oxygen species. Protein carbonylation and citrullination are pathological post-translational...modifications, which can reveal hydrophobic residues to aqueous environments and prompt misfolding (26). The relationship between carbonylation and protein

  4. Bacterial adhesion to protein-coated surfaces: An AFM and QCM-D study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Joshua; Liu, Yatao; Camesano, Terri A.

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial adhesion to biomaterials, mineral surfaces, or other industrial surfaces is strongly controlled by the way bacteria interact with protein layers or organic matter and other biomolecules that coat the materials. Despite this knowledge, many studies of bacterial adhesion are performed under clean conditions, instead of in the presence of proteins or organic molecules. We chose fetal bovine serum (FBS) as a model protein, and prepared FBS films on quartz crystals. The thickness of the FBS layer was characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging under liquid and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Next, we characterized how the model biomaterial surface would interact with the nocosomial pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis. An AFM probe was coated with S. epidermidis cells and used to probe a gold slide that had been coated with FBS or another protein, fibronectin (FN). These experiments show that AFM and QCM-D can be used in complementary ways to study the complex interactions between bacteria, proteins, and surfaces.

  5. Computational and statistical methods for high-throughput analysis of post-translational modifications of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwämmle, Veit; Braga, Thiago Verano; Roepstorff, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of post-translational modifications (PTMs) represents one of the main research focuses for the study of protein function and cell signaling. Mass spectrometry instrumentation with increasing sensitivity improved protocols for PTM enrichment and recently established pipelines for...

  6. Connection between markers of cholestasis and intensity of oxidative modification of proteins in patients with choledocholithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Damnjanović

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the connection between cholestatic markers and the oxidative protein modification intensity in patients with choledocholithiasis. All the participants were subjected to clinical, laboratory and ultrasonic check-up at the Internal Department of the Military Hospital in Niš, Serbia. The parameters of oxidative stress: carbonyl groups, a measure of oxidative protein modification, and biochemical markers of cholestasis were determined by standard biochemical methods. The concentration of total (r=0.41, p<0.05, direct (r=0.49, p<+0.01 and indirect (r=0.41, p<0.05 bilirubin was in statistically significant positive linear correlation with the intensity of oxidative modification of proteins, while the other biochemical markers of cholestasis did not show such correlation. Total, direct and indirect bilirubins showed a significant positive correlation with oxidative protein modification, assessed through the levels of carbonyl groups in patients with choledocholithiasis.

  7. A genome-wide screen identifies conserved protein hubs required for cadherin-mediated cell–cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toret, Christopher P.; D’Ambrosio, Michael V.; Vale, Ronald D.; Simon, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Cadherins and associated catenins provide an important structural interface between neighboring cells, the actin cytoskeleton, and intracellular signaling pathways in a variety of cell types throughout the Metazoa. However, the full inventory of the proteins and pathways required for cadherin-mediated adhesion has not been established. To this end, we completed a genome-wide (∼14,000 genes) ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) screen that targeted Ca2+-dependent adhesion in DE-cadherin–expressing Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells in suspension culture. This novel screen eliminated Ca2+-independent cell–cell adhesion, integrin-based adhesion, cell spreading, and cell migration. We identified 17 interconnected regulatory hubs, based on protein functions and protein–protein interactions that regulate the levels of the core cadherin–catenin complex and coordinate cadherin-mediated cell–cell adhesion. Representative proteins from these hubs were analyzed further in Drosophila oogenesis, using targeted germline RNAi, and adhesion was analyzed in Madin–Darby canine kidney mammalian epithelial cell–cell adhesion. These experiments reveal roles for a diversity of cellular pathways that are required for cadherin function in Metazoa, including cytoskeleton organization, cell–substrate interactions, and nuclear and cytoplasmic signaling. PMID:24446484

  8. Candida albicans Hom6 is a homoserine dehydrogenase involved in protein synthesis and cell adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Wen Tsai

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose: Candida albicans is a common fungal pathogen in humans. In healthy individuals, C. albicans represents a harmless commensal organism, but infections can be life threatening in immunocompromised patients. The complete genome sequence of C. albicans is extremely useful for identifying genes that may be potential drug targets and important for pathogenic virulence. However, there are still many uncharacterized genes in the Candida genome database. In this study, we investigated C. albicans Hom6, the functions of which remain undetermined experimentally. Methods: HOM6-deleted and HOM6-reintegrated mutant strains were constructed. The mutant strains were compared with wild-type in their growth in various media and enzyme activity. Effects of HOM6 deletion on translation were further investigated by cell susceptibility to hygromycin B or cycloheximide, as well as by polysome profiling, and cell adhesion to polystyrene was also determined. Results: C. albicans Hom6 exhibits homoserine dehydrogenase activity and is involved in the biosynthesis of methionine and threonine. HOM6 deletion caused translational arrest in cells grown under amino acid starvation conditions. Additionally, Hom6 protein was found in both cytosolic and cell-wall fractions of cultured cells. Furthermore, HOM6 deletion reduced C. albicans cell adhesion to polystyrene, which is a common plastic used in many medical devices. Conclusion: Given that there is no Hom6 homologue in mammalian cells, our results provided an important foundation for future development of new antifungal drugs. Keywords: Candida albicans, cell adhesion, Hom6, homoserine dehydrogenase, protein synthesis

  9. Helicobacter pylori outer membrane protein Q genotypes and their susceptibility to anti-adhesive phytotherapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoob, Javed; Abbas, Zaigham; Mehmood, Malik Hassan; Tariq, Kanwal; Saleem, Saima Azhar; Awan, Safia; Malik, Abdul; Hamid, Saeed; Khan, Rustam; Jafri, Wasim

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative organism. Its outer membrane protein Q (HopQ) mediates host-pathogen interactions; HopQ genotypes 1 and 2 are found associating with gastroduodenal pathologies. The authors measured the anti-adhesion effects of the extracts of Abelmoschus esculentus, Zingiber officinale, Trachyspermum ammi, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Curcuma longa and Capsicum annum against HopQ genotypes and H. pylori cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA). DNA was extracted by polymerase chain reaction of the HopQ genotypes (i.e., type 1, type 2 and CagA) from 115 H. pylori strains. The effect of the extracts from selected dietary ingredients was determined using a gastric adenocarcinoma cell line and a quantitative DNA fragmentation assay. The anti-adhesive effect of these extracts on H. pylori was tested using an anti-adhesion analysis. C. annum, C. longa and A. esculentus showed prominent anti-adhesion effects with resultant values of 17.3% ± 2.9%, 14.6% ± 3.7%, 13.8% ± 3.6%, respectively, against HopQ type 1 and 13.1% ± 1.7%, 12.1% ± 2%, 11.1% ± 1.6%, respectively, against HopQ type 2. C. longa (93%), C. annum (89%) and A. esculentus (75%) had better anti-adhesive activity against H. pylori with HopQ type 1 compared to HopQ type 2 with respective values of 70%, 64% and 51%. Extracts of C. annum (14.7% ± 4.1%), A. esculentus (12.3% ± 4.1%) and Z. officinale (8.4% ± 2.8%) had an anti-adhesion effect against CagA-positive H. pylori strains compared to CagA-negative strains. The anti-adhesion properties of the tested phytotherapeutic dietary ingredients were varied with HopQ genotypes. HopQ type 1 was found to be more sensitive to extracts of C. annum, C. longa and A. esculentus compared to the HopQ type 2 genotype.

  10. Aire knockdown in medullary thymic epithelial cells affects Aire protein, deregulates cell adhesion genes and decreases thymocyte interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzi, Nicole; Assis, Amanda Freire; Cotrim-Sousa, Larissa Cotrim; Lopes, Gabriel Sarti; Mosella, Maritza Salas; Lima, Djalma Sousa; Bombonato-Prado, Karina F; Passos, Geraldo Aleixo

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that even a partial reduction of Aire mRNA levels by siRNA-induced Aire knockdown (Aire KD) has important consequences to medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). Aire knockdown is sufficient to reduce Aire protein levels, impair its nuclear location, and cause an imbalance in large-scale gene expression, including genes that encode cell adhesion molecules. These genes drew our attention because adhesion molecules are implicated in the process of mTEC-thymocyte adhesion, which is critical for T cell development and the establishment of central self-tolerance. Accordingly, we consider the following: 1) mTECs contribute to the elimination of self-reactive thymocytes through adhesion; 2) Adhesion molecules play a crucial role during physical contact between these cells; and 3) Aire is an important transcriptional regulator in mTECs. However, its role in controlling mTEC-thymocyte adhesion remains unclear. Because Aire controls adhesion molecule genes, we hypothesized that the disruption of its expression could influence mTEC-thymocyte interaction. To test this hypothesis, we used a murine Aire(+) mTEC cell line as a model system to reproduce mTEC-thymocyte adhesion in vitro. Transcriptome analysis of the mTEC cell line revealed that Aire KD led to the down-modulation of more than 800 genes, including those encoding for proteins involved in cell adhesion, i.e., the extracellular matrix constituent Lama1, the CAM family adhesion molecules Vcam1 and Icam4, and those that encode peripheral tissue antigens. Thymocytes co-cultured with Aire KD mTECs had a significantly reduced capacity to adhere to these cells. This finding is the first direct evidence that Aire also plays a role in controlling mTEC-thymocyte adhesion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The adhesion G protein-coupled receptor G2 (ADGRG2/GPR64) constitutively activates SRE and NFκB and is involved in cell adhesion and migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelia Peeters, Miriam; Fokkelman, Michiel; Boogaard, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (ADGRs) are believed to be activated by auto-proteolytic cleavage of their very large extracellular N-terminal domains normally acting as a negative regulator of the intrinsically constitutively active seven transmembrane domain. ADGRG2 (or GPR64) which...... activity through the adhesion- and migration-related transcription factors serum response element (SRE) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) presumably via coupling to Gα12/13 and Gαq. However, activation of these two pathways appears to occur through distinct molecular...... intracellular signal transduction. Knockdown of ADGRG2 by siRNA in the highly motile breast cancer cell lines Hs578T and MDA-MB-231 resulted in a strong reduction in cell adhesion and subsequent cell migration which was associated with a selective reduction in RelB, an NFκB family member. It is concluded...

  12. Expression profile of the entire family of Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors in mouse and rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebendal Ted

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are membrane-bound receptors with long N termini. This family has 33 members in humans. Several Adhesion GPCRs are known to have important physiological functions in CNS development and immune system response mediated by large cell surface ligands. However, the majority of Adhesion GPCRs are still poorly studied orphans with unknown functions. Results In this study we performed the extensive tissue localization analysis of the entire Adhesion GPCR family in rat and mouse. By applying the quantitative real-time PCR technique we have produced comparable expression profile for each of the members in the Adhesion family. The results are compared with literature data and data from the Allen Brain Atlas project. Our results suggest that the majority of the Adhesion GPCRs are either expressed in the CNS or ubiquitously. In addition the Adhesion GPCRs from the same phylogenetic group have either predominant CNS or peripheral expression, although each of their expression profile is unique. Conclusion Our findings indicate that many of Adhesion GPCRs are expressed, and most probably, have function in CNS. The related Adhesion GPCRs are well conserved in their structure and interestingly have considerable overlap in their expression profiles, suggesting similarities among the physiological roles for members within many of the phylogenetically related clusters.

  13. Protein Modifications as Manifestations of Hyperglycemic Glucotoxicity in Diabetes and Its Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes and its complications are hyperglycemic toxicity diseases. Many metabolic pathways in this array of diseases become aberrant, which is accompanied with a variety of posttranslational protein modifications that in turn reflect diabetic glucotoxicity. In this review, we summarize some of the most widely studied protein modifications in diabetes and its complications. These modifications include glycation, carbonylation, nitration, cysteine S-nitrosylation, acetylation, sumoylation, ADP-ribosylation, O-GlcNAcylation, and succination. All these posttranslational modifications can be significantly attributed to oxidative stress and/or carbon stress induced by diabetic redox imbalance that is driven by activation of pathways, such as the polyol pathway and the ADP-ribosylation pathway. Exploring the nature of these modifications should facilitate our understanding of the pathological mechanisms of diabetes and its associated complications.

  14. Surface Proteins of Lactococcus lactis: Bacterial Resources for Muco-adhesion in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Mercier-Bonin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Food and probiotic bacteria, in particular lactic acid bacteria, are ingested in large amounts by humans and are part of the transient microbiota which is increasingly considered to be able to impact the resident microbiota and thus possibly the host health. The lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis is extensively used in starter cultures to produce dairy fermented food. Also because of a generally recognized as safe status, L. lactis has been considered as a possible vehicle to deliver in vivo therapeutic molecules with anti-inflammatory properties in the gastrointestinal tract. One of the key factors that may favor health effects of beneficial bacteria to the host is their capacity to colonize transiently the gut, notably through close interactions with mucus, which covers and protects the intestinal epithelium. Several L. lactis strains have been shown to exhibit mucus-binding properties and bacterial surface proteins have been identified as key determinants of such capacity. In this review, we describe the different types of surface proteins found in L. lactis, with a special focus on mucus-binding proteins and pili. We also review the different approaches used to investigate the adhesion of L. lactis to mucus, and particularly to mucins, one of its major components, and we present how these approaches allowed revealing the role of surface proteins in muco-adhesion.

  15. Targeted Diazotransfer Reagents Enable Selective Modification of Proteins with Azides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Jonas; Swier, Lotteke J Y M; Oudshoorn, Ruben C; Médard, Guillaume; Kuster, Bernhard; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan; Witte, Martin D

    2017-04-19

    In chemical biology, azides are used to chemically manipulate target structures in a bioorthogonal manner for a plethora of applications ranging from target identification to the synthesis of homogeneously modified protein conjugates. While a variety of methods have been established to introduce the azido group into recombinant proteins, a method that directly converts specific amino groups in endogenous proteins is lacking. Here, we report the first biotin-tethered diazotransfer reagent DtBio and demonstrate that it selectively modifies the model proteins streptavidin and avidin and the membrane protein BioY on cell surface. The reagent converts amines in the proximity of the binding pocket to azides and leaves the remaining amino groups in streptavidin untouched. Reagents of this novel class will find use in target identification as well as the selective functionalization and bioorthogonal protection of proteins.

  16. Biological Chemistry and Functionality of Protein Sulfenic Acids and Related Thiol Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarie-Baez, Nelmi O.; Silva Lopez, Elsa I.; Furdui, Cristina M.

    2016-01-01

    Selective modification of proteins at cysteine residues by reactive oxygen, nitrogen or sulfur species formed under physiological and pathological states is emerging as a critical regulator of protein activity impacting cellular function. This review focuses primarily on protein sulfenylation (-SOH), a metastable reversible modification connecting reduced cysteine thiols to many products of cysteine oxidation. An overview is first provided on the chemistry principles underlining synthesis, stability and reactivity of sulfenic acids in model compounds and proteins, followed by a brief description of analytical methods currently employed to characterize these oxidative species. The following chapters present a selection of redox-regulated proteins for which the -SOH formation was experimentally confirmed and linked to protein function. These chapters are organized based on the participation of these proteins in the regulation of signaling, metabolism and epigenetics. The last chapter discusses the therapeutic implications of altered redox microenvironment and protein oxidation in disease. PMID:26340608

  17. Modifications of proteins by polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Hanne; Tsai, Lin; Stadtman, Earl

    2000-01-01

    in the formation of protein carbonyls, These results are consistent with the proposition that metal-catalyzed oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids can contribute to the generation of protein carbonyls by direct interaction of lipid oxidation products (alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes) with lysine residues...... of BSA were significantly lower than that observed in the absence of BSA. Direct treatment of proteins with various lipid hydroperoxides led to a slight increase in the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives, whereas treatment with the hydroperoxides together with Fe(ll) led to a substantial increase...

  18. Analysis of posttranslational modifications of proteins by tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Røssel; Trelle, Morten B; Thingholm, Tine E

    2006-01-01

    -temporal distribution in cells and tissues. Most PTMs can be detected by protein and peptide analysis by mass spectrometry (MS), either as a mass increment or a mass deficit relative to the nascent unmodified protein. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) provides a series of analytical features that are highly useful...... for the characterization of modified proteins via amino acid sequencing and specific detection of posttranslationally modified amino acid residues. Large-scale, quantitative analysis of proteins by MS/MS is beginning to reveal novel patterns and functions of PTMs in cellular signaling networks and biomolecular structures....

  19. Influence of subtilisin on the adhesion of a marine bacterium which produces mainly proteins as extracellular polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, C; Delbarre, C; Ghillebaert, F; Compere, C; Combes, D

    2008-09-01

    The nature of exopolymers involved in the adhesion of a marine biofilm-forming bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. D41 was investigated to evaluate and understand the antifouling potential of subtilisin. The exopolymers of D41 produced by fermentation were analysed by FTIR and SDS-PAGE showing the presence of polysaccharides, glycoproteins and proteins. A high content of proteins was detected both in soluble and capsular fractions. The microscopic observations of fluorescamine and calcofluor stained adhered D41 indicated mainly the presence of proteins in exopolymers produced during adhesion. Subtilisin, the broad spectrum protease, tested in natural sea water and in polystyrene microplates showed that antifouling activity was higher in the prevention of bacterial adhesion than in the detachment of adhered D41 cells. Overall, these results demonstrate the involvement of proteins in Pseudoalteromonas sp. D41 adhesion and confirm the high antifouling potential of subtilisin. This study emphasizes the major role of proteins instead of polysaccharides, thus extending our knowledge regarding the nature of extracellular polymers involved in bacterial adhesion. Furthermore, the high antifouling potential of subtilisin evaluated in the very first stages of fouling, bacterial adhesion, could lead to less toxic compounds than organometallic compounds in antifouling paint.

  20. Biological Insights into Therapeutic Protein Modifications throughout Trafficking and Their Biopharmaceutical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotian Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the lifespan of therapeutic proteins, from the point of biosynthesis to the complete clearance from tested subjects, they undergo various biological modifications. Therapeutic influences and molecular mechanisms of these modifications have been well appreciated for some while remained less understood for many. This paper has classified these modifications into multiple categories, according to their processing locations and enzymatic involvement during the trafficking events. It also focuses on the underlying mechanisms and structural-functional relationship between modifications and therapeutic properties. In addition, recent advances in protein engineering, cell line engineering, and process engineering, by exploring these complex cellular processes, are discussed and summarized, for improving functional characteristics and attributes of protein-based biopharmaceutical products.

  1. Analysis of posttranslational modifications of proteins by tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Røssel; Trelle, Morten B; Thingholm, Tine E

    2006-01-01

    -temporal distribution in cells and tissues. Most PTMs can be detected by protein and peptide analysis by mass spectrometry (MS), either as a mass increment or a mass deficit relative to the nascent unmodified protein. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) provides a series of analytical features that are highly useful...

  2. Double-Layer Surface Modification of Polyamide Denture Base Material by Functionalized Sol-Gel Based Silica for Adhesion Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafezeqoran, Ali; Koodaryan, Roodabeh

    2017-09-21

    Limited surface treatments have been proposed to improve the bond strength between autopolymerizing resin and polyamide denture base materials. Still, the bond strength of autopolymerizing resins to nylon polymer is not strong enough to repair the fractured denture effectively. This study aimed to introduce a novel method to improve the adhesion of autopolymerizing resin to polyamide polymer by a double layer deposition of sol-gel silica and N-2-(aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (AE-APTMS). The silica sol was synthesized by acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as silica precursors. Polyamide specimens were dipped in TEOS-derived sol (TS group, n = 28), and exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light under O 2 flow for 30 minutes. UV-treated specimens were immersed in AE-APTMS solution and left for 24 hours at room temperature. The other specimens were either immersed in AE-APTMS solution (AP group, n = 28) or left untreated (NT group, n = 28). Surface characterization was investigated by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Two autopolymerizing resins (subgroups G and T, n = 14) were bonded to the specimens, thermocycled, and then tested for shear bond strength with a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's HSD (α = 0.05). FTIR spectra of treated surfaces confirmed the chemical modification and appearance of functional groups on the polymer. One-way ANOVA revealed significant differences in shear bond strength among the study groups. Tukey's HSD showed that TS T and TS G groups had significantly higher shear bond strength than control groups (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). Moreover, bond strength values of AP T were statistically significant compared to controls (p = 0.017). Amino functionalized TEOS-derived silica coating is a simple and cost-effective method for improving the bond strength between the autopolymerizing resin and polyamide

  3. Platelet adhesion and plasma protein adsorption control of collagen surfaces by He+ ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurotobi, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakajima, H.; Suzuki, H.; Iwaki, M.

    2003-01-01

    He + ion implanted collagen-coated tubes with a fluence of 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 were exhibited antithrombogenicity. To investigate the mechanisms of antithrombogenicity of these samples, plasma protein adsorption assay and platelet adhesion experiments were performed. The adsorption of fibrinogen (Fg) and von Willebrand factor (vWf) was minimum on the He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 . Platelet adhesion (using platelet rich plasma) was inhibited on the He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 and was accelerated on the untreated collagen and ion implanted collagen with fluences of 1 x 10 13 , 1 x 10 15 and 1 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 . Platelet activation with washed platelets was observed on untreated collagen and He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 and was inhibited with fluences of 1 x 10 13 , 1 x 10 15 and 1 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 . Generally, platelets can react with a specific ligand inside the collagen (GFOGER sequence). The results of platelets adhesion experiments using washed platelets indicated that there were no ligands such as GFOGER on the He + ion implanted collagen over a fluence of 1 x 10 13 ions/cm 2 . On the 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 implanted collagen, no platelet activation was observed due to the influence of plasma proteins. >From the above, it is concluded that the decrease of adsorbed Fg and vWf caused the antithrombogenicity of He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 and that plasma protein adsorption took an important role repairing the graft surface

  4. Nanometer polymer surface features: the influence on surface energy, protein adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Joseph; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    Current small diameter (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces elevated endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis when compared to nanosmooth surfaces. Nonetheless, these studies failed to address the importance of lateral and vertical surface feature dimensionality coupled with surface free energy; nor did such studies elicit an optimum specific surface feature size for promoting endothelial cell adhesion. In this study, a series of highly ordered nanometer to submicron structured PLGA surfaces of identical chemistry were created using a technique employing polystyrene nanobeads and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Results demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with vertical surface features of size less than 18.87 nm but greater than 0 nm due to increased surface energy and subsequently protein (fibronectin and collagen type IV) adsorption. Furthermore, this study provided evidence that the vertical dimension of nanometer surface features, rather than the lateral dimension, is largely responsible for these increases. In this manner, this study provides key design parameters that may promote vascular graft efficacy.

  5. Amigo adhesion protein regulates development of neural circuits in zebrafish brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiang; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Sundvik, Maria; Chen, Yu-Chia; Aho, Vilma; Peltola, Marjaana A; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Panula, Pertti; Rauvala, Heikki

    2014-07-18

    The Amigo protein family consists of three transmembrane proteins characterized by six leucine-rich repeat domains and one immunoglobulin-like domain in their extracellular moieties. Previous in vitro studies have suggested a role as homophilic adhesion molecules in brain neurons, but the in vivo functions remain unknown. Here we have cloned all three zebrafish amigos and show that amigo1 is the predominant family member expressed during nervous system development in zebrafish. Knockdown of amigo1 expression using morpholino oligonucleotides impairs the formation of fasciculated tracts in early fiber scaffolds of brain. A similar defect in fiber tract development is caused by mRNA-mediated expression of the Amigo1 ectodomain that inhibits adhesion mediated by the full-length protein. Analysis of differentiated neural circuits reveals defects in the catecholaminergic system. At the behavioral level, the disturbed formation of neural circuitry is reflected in enhanced locomotor activity and in the inability of the larvae to perform normal escape responses. We suggest that Amigo1 is essential for the development of neural circuits of zebrafish, where its mechanism involves homophilic interactions within the developing fiber tracts and regulation of the Kv2.1 potassium channel to form functional neural circuitry that controls locomotion. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Protein-RNA linkage and posttranslational modifications of feline calicivirus and murine norovirus VPg proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Olspert

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Members of the Caliciviridae family of positive sense RNA viruses cause a wide range of diseases in both humans and animals. The detailed characterization of the calicivirus life cycle had been hampered due to the lack of robust cell culture systems and experimental tools for many of the members of the family. However, a number of caliciviruses replicate efficiently in cell culture and have robust reverse genetics systems available, most notably feline calicivirus (FCV and murine norovirus (MNV. These are therefore widely used as representative members with which to examine the mechanistic details of calicivirus genome translation and replication. The replication of the calicivirus RNA genome occurs via a double-stranded RNA intermediate that is then used as a template for the production of new positive sense viral RNA, which is covalently linked to the virus-encoded protein VPg. The covalent linkage to VPg occurs during genome replication via the nucleotidylylation activity of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Using FCV and MNV, we used mass spectrometry-based approach to identify the specific amino acid linked to the 5′ end of the viral nucleic acid. We observed that both VPg proteins are covalently linked to guanosine diphosphate (GDP moieties via tyrosine positions 24 and 26 for FCV and MNV respectively. These data fit with previous observations indicating that mutations introduced into these specific amino acids are deleterious for viral replication and fail to produce infectious virus. In addition, we also detected serine phosphorylation sites within the FCV VPg protein with positions 80 and 107 found consistently phosphorylated on VPg-linked viral RNA isolated from infected cells. This work provides the first direct experimental characterization of the linkage of infectious calicivirus viral RNA to the VPg protein and highlights that post-translational modifications of VPg may also occur during the viral life cycle.

  7. [New derivatives of azobenzene for the directed modification of proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khien, Le Tkhi; Shirling, B; Riazanova, A Iu; Zatsepin, T S; Volkov, E M; Kubareva, E A; Velichko, T I; Pingoud, A; Oretskaia, T S

    2009-01-01

    Derivatives of azobenzene which contained a maleimide group in one of the benzene rings (for binding to a protein cysteine residue) and maleimide, hydroxyl, or carboxyl substitutes in another benzene ring were synthesized. The reactivity of these compounds towards a cysteine residue of a protein and their optical properties in a free state and after their attachment to the mutant forms of the SsoII restriction endonuclease were studied.

  8. Micro patterning of cell and protein non-adhesive plasma polymerized coatings for biochip applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouaidat, Salim; Berendsen, C.; Thomsen, P.

    2004-01-01

    Micro scale patterning of bioactive surfaces is desirable for numerous biochip applications. Polyethyleneoxide-like (PEO-like) coating with non-fouling functionality has been deposited using low frequency AC plasma polymerization. The non-fouling properties of the coating were tested with human...... conventional cleanroom photolithography and lift-off. Single cell arrays showed sharp contrast in cell adhesion between the untreated glass surface and the ppCrown layer. Similarly, proteins adsorbed selectively to untreated glass but not to ppCrown. The simplicity of the liftoff technique and the sturdiness...

  9. Stainless steel modified with poly(ethylene glycol) can prevent protein adsorption but not bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Jiang; Bagge, Dorthe; Gram, Lone

    2003-01-01

    The surface of AISI 316 grade stainless steel (SS) was modified with a layer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) (molecular weight 5000) with the aim of preventing protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion. Model SS substrates were first modified to introduce a very high density of reactive amine groups....... The chemical composition and uniformity of the surfaces were determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight static secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SSIMS) in the imaging mode. The effects of PEI concentration and different substrate pre-cleaning methods on the structure...

  10. Quantum dots as bio-labels for the localization of a small plant adhesion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Sathyajith; Kim, Sunran; Martin, Rebecca; Lord, Elizabeth M.; Ozkan, Cengiz S.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, semiconducting nanoparticles have been successfully applied in live mammalian cell cultures, as alternative biological labels for multicolour imaging, by verifying known physiological processes. Here, we report the application of semiconducting nanoparticles to live plant cells in culture. Utilizing this technique, we have uncovered new knowledge regarding the localization of a plant pollen tube adhesion protein, stigma/stylar cysteine-rich adhesin (SCA). The potential of these nanoparticles is evident when the results were compared with conventional immunolocalization methods using fluorescently labelled antibodies.

  11. Proteins isolated from regenerating sciatic nerves of rats form aggregates following posttranslational amino acid modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingoglia, N.A.; Chakroborty, G.; Yu, M.; Luo, D.; Sturman, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Soluble proteins of regenerating sciatic nerves of rats can be posttranslationally, covalently modified by a variety of radioactive amino acids. The present study shows that once modified by a mixture of 15 amino acids, many of those proteins form aggregates that are unable to pass through a 0.45-micron filter and pellet following 20,000g centrifugation (suggesting a size of greater than 2 x 10(6) Da). Aggregation of proteins also occurs following modification by Arg or Lys alone, but does not occur following protein modification in nonregenerating nerves or in brain. Aggregates are not disrupted by treatment with 100 mM beta mercaptoethanol or by exposure to 1.0 M NaCl, but aggregates are solubilized by treatment with urea and by boiling in 1.5% SDS. Amino acid analysis of proteins modified by a mixture of [3H]amino acids shows a similar proportion of posttranslationally incorporated Ser, Pro, Val, Ala, Leu, Phe, Lys, and Arg in the soluble and pelletable fractions. Two-dimensional PAGE profiles of soluble and pelletable modified proteins show that the modified proteins in both fractions are in similar pI and molecular weight ranges, except that the soluble modified proteins include a high-molecular-weight component that is absent in the pelleted modified proteins. Kinetic studies show that while half-maximal levels of protein modification occur within 30 seconds of incubation, the appearance of the pelletable modified protein fraction is delayed significantly. These results indicate that amino acid modification of soluble proteins in regenerating sciatic nerves of rats results in physical changes in those proteins so that they form high-molecular-weight aggregates

  12. Multienzyme Modification of Hemp Protein for Functional Peptides Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional foods and nutraceuticals are of special importance, particularly for their impact on human health and prevention of certain chronic diseases. Consequently, the production and properties of bioactive peptides have received an increasing scientific interest over past few years. Present work intends to compare the competence of metalloendopeptidases (“Protease N” and “Protease A” with papain for getting functional peptides from hemp seed meal, which is an obligatory waste of hemp fiber production industry. As a measure of the functional potential hemp protein hydrolysates were analyzed for their antiradical properties in DPPH system. “Protease N” modified protein hydrolysate exhibited comparatively superior radical scavenging activity in DPPH system. Overall findings represent the importance of “Protease N,” as endopeptidase in getting peptides of good antiradical properties from various protein sources.

  13. Protein Nanosheet Mechanics Controls Cell Adhesion and Expansion on Low-Viscosity Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dexu; Megone, William; Nguyen, Khai D Q; Di Cio, Stefania; Ramstedt, Madeleine; Gautrot, Julien E

    2018-02-13

    Adherent cell culture typically requires cell spreading at the surface of solid substrates to sustain the formation of stable focal adhesions and assembly of a contractile cytoskeleton. However, a few reports have demonstrated that cell culture is possible on liquid substrates such as silicone and fluorinated oils, even displaying very low viscosities (0.77 cSt). Such behavior is surprising as low viscosity liquids are thought to relax much too fast (adhesions (with lifetimes on the order of minutes to hours). Here we show that cell spreading and proliferation at the surface of low viscosity liquids are enabled by the self-assembly of mechanically strong protein nanosheets at these interfaces. We propose that this phenomenon results from the denaturation of globular proteins, such as albumin, in combination with the coupling of surfactant molecules to the resulting protein nanosheets. We use interfacial rheology and atomic force microscopy indentation to characterize the mechanical properties of protein nanosheets and associated liquid-liquid interfaces. We identify a direct relationship between interfacial mechanics and the association of surfactant molecules with proteins and polymers assembled at liquid-liquid interfaces. In addition, our data indicate that cells primarily sense in-plane mechanical properties of interfaces, rather than relying on surface tension to sustain spreading, as in the spreading of water striders. These findings demonstrate that bulk and nanoscale mechanical properties may be designed independently, to provide structure and regulate cell phenotype, therefore calling for a paradigm shift for the design of biomaterials in regenerative medicine.

  14. Altering protein surface charge with chemical modification modulates protein–gold nanoparticle aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamison, Jennifer A.; Bryant, Erika L.; Kadali, Shyam B.; Wong, Michael S.; Colvin, Vicki L.; Matthews, Kathleen S.; Calabretta, Michelle K.

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) can interact with a wide range of molecules including proteins. Whereas significant attention has focused on modifying the nanoparticle surface to regulate protein–AuNP assembly or influence the formation of the protein “corona,” modification of the protein surface as a mechanism to modulate protein–AuNP interaction has been less explored. Here, we examine this possibility utilizing three small globular proteins—lysozyme with high isoelectric point (pI) and established interactions with AuNP; α-lactalbumin with similar tertiary fold to lysozyme but low pI; and myoglobin with a different globular fold and an intermediate pI. We first chemically modified these proteins to alter their charged surface functionalities, and thereby shift protein pI, and then applied multiple methods to assess protein–AuNP assembly. At pH values lower than the anticipated pI of the modified protein, AuNP exposure elicits changes in the optical absorbance of the protein–NP solutions and other properties due to aggregate formation. Above the expected pI, however, protein–AuNP interaction is minimal, and both components remain isolated, presumably because both species are negatively charged. These data demonstrate that protein modification provides a powerful tool for modulating whether nanoparticle–protein interactions result in material aggregation. The results also underscore that naturally occurring protein modifications found in vivo may be critical in defining nanoparticle–protein corona compositions.

  15. Molecular architecture of a complex between an adhesion protein from the malaria parasite and intracellular adhesion molecule 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Alan; Turner, Louise; Christoffersen, Stig

    2013-01-01

    The adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to human tissues or endothelium is central to the pathology caused by the parasite during malaria. It contributes to the avoidance of parasite clearance by the spleen and to the specific pathologies of cerebral and placental malaria...

  16. Targeted Diazotransfer Reagents Enable Selective Modification of Proteins with Azides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohse, Jonas; Swier, Lotteke; Oudshoorn, Ruben; Médard, Guillaume; Kuster, Bernhard; Slotboom, Dirk Jan; Witte, Martin D

    In chemical biology, azides are used to chemically manipulate target structures in a bioorthogonal manner for a plethora of applications ranging from target identification to the synthesis of homogeneously modified protein conjugates. While a variety of methods have been established to introduce the

  17. Characterisation of cellulose-binding proteins that are involved in the adhesion mechanism of Fibrobacter intestinalis DR7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, J; Forsberg, C W

    1999-04-01

    Cellulose-binding proteins (CBP) isolated from cell envelopes of the cellulolytic bacterium Fibrobacter intestinalis strain DR7 were studied in order to investigate the adhesion mechanism. The proteins were examined for their reaction with antibodies that specifically block bacterial adhesion, response to glycosylation staining and monosaccharide composition. To this end, the effect of some monosaccharides (CBP components) on blocking of DR7 adhesion to cellulose was determined. Previous study had shown the occurrence of 16 CBP in the outer membrane and periplasm of DR7, of which 6 had endoglucanase activity (Miron and Forsberg 1998). Data from the present study show that most of the 16 CBP of DR7, except for the 38-, 90- and 180-kDa proteins, are glycosylated. Rabbit antibodies that specifically block DR7 adhesion were prepared by affinity preabsorption of antiserum against wild-type DR7 with bacterial cells of its adherence-defective mutant (DR7-M). The preabsorbed antibodies reacted positively in Western blotting with glycosylated CBP of 225, 200, 150, 70, 45 and block the adhesion of DR7 cells to cellulose. It is suggested that some glycosylated residues of CBP may have a predominant role in the adhesion of DR7 to cellulose.

  18. Adipocyte protein modification by Krebs cycle intermediates and fumarate ester-derived succination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Allison M; Frizzell, Norma

    2013-11-01

    Protein succination, the non-enzymatic modification of cysteine residues by fumarate, is distinguishable from succinylation, an enzymatic reaction forming an amide bond between lysine residues and succinyl-CoA. Treatment of adipocytes with 30 mM glucose significantly increases protein succination with only a small change in succinylation. Protein succination may be significantly increased intracellularly after treatment with fumaric acid esters, however, the ester must be removed by saponification to permit 2SC-antibody detection of the fumarate adduct.

  19. Protein surface topology-probing by selective chemical modification and mass spectrometric peptide mapping.

    OpenAIRE

    Suckau, D; Mak, M; Przybylski, M

    1992-01-01

    Aminoacetylation of lysine residues and the modification of arginine by 1,2-cyclohexanedione to N7,N8-(dihydroxy-1,2-cyclohexylidene)arginine were used for probing the surface topology of hen-eggwhite lysozyme as a model protein. The molecular identification of lysine and arginine modification sites was provided by molecular weight determinations of modified and unmodified tryptic peptide mixtures (peptide mapping) using 252Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry. At conditions of limited chem...

  20. Ice cream structure modification by ice-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleda, Aleksei; Tsanev, Robert; Klesment, Tiina; Vilu, Raivo; Laos, Katrin

    2018-04-25

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs), also known as antifreeze proteins, were added to ice cream to investigate their effect on structure and texture. Ice recrystallization inhibition was assessed in the ice cream mixes using a novel accelerated microscope assay and the ice cream microstructure was studied using an ice crystal dispersion method. It was found that adding recombinantly produced fish type III IBPs at a concentration 3 mg·L -1 made ice cream hard and crystalline with improved shape preservation during melting. Ice creams made with IBPs (both from winter rye, and type III IBP) had aggregates of ice crystals that entrapped pockets of the ice cream mixture in a rigid network. Larger individual ice crystals and no entrapment in control ice creams was observed. Based on these results a model of ice crystals aggregates formation in the presence of IBPs was proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nanospherical arabinogalactan proteins are a key component of the high-strength adhesive secreted by English ivy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Tan, Li; Sun, Leming; Petrosino, Jennifer; Cui, Mei-Zhen; Hao, Feng; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-06-01

    Over 130 y have passed since Charles Darwin first discovered that the adventitious roots of English ivy (Hedera helix) exude a yellowish mucilage that promotes the capacity of this plant to climb vertical surfaces. Unfortunately, little progress has been made in elucidating the adhesion mechanisms underlying this high-strength adhesive. In the previous studies, spherical nanoparticles were observed in the viscous exudate. Here we show that these nanoparticles are predominantly composed of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), a superfamily of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins present in the extracellular spaces of plant cells. The spheroidal shape of the AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles results in a low viscosity of the ivy adhesive, and thus a favorable wetting behavior on the surface of substrates. Meanwhile, calcium-driven electrostatic interactions among carboxyl groups of the AGPs and the pectic acids give rise to the cross-linking of the exuded adhesive substances, favor subsequent curing (hardening) via formation of an adhesive film, and eventually promote the generation of mechanical interlocking between the adventitious roots of English ivy and the surface of substrates. Inspired by these molecular events, a reconstructed ivy-mimetic adhesive composite was developed by integrating purified AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles with pectic polysaccharides and calcium ions. Information gained from the subsequent tensile tests, in turn, substantiated the proposed adhesion mechanisms underlying the ivy-derived adhesive. Given that AGPs and pectic polysaccharides are also observed in bioadhesives exuded by other climbing plants, the adhesion mechanisms revealed by English ivy may forward the progress toward understanding the general principles underlying diverse botanic adhesives.

  2. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor alpha-stimulated monocyte adhesion to human aortic endothelial cells by AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewart, Marie-Ann; Kohlhaas, Christine F; Salt, Ian P

    2008-12-01

    Proatherosclerotic adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelium is attenuated by NO. As AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates endothelial NO synthesis, we investigated the modulation of adhesion to cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) by AMPK. HAECs incubated with the AMPK activator, AICAR, or expressing constitutively active AMPK demonstrated reduced TNFalpha-stimulated adhesion of promonocytic U-937 cells. Rapid inhibition of TNFalpha-stimulated U-937 cell adhesion by AICAR was NO-dependent, associated with unaltered cell surface adhesion molecule expression, and reduced MCP-1 secretion by HAECs. In contrast, inhibition of TNFalpha-stimulated U-937 cell adhesion by prolonged AMPK activation was NO-independent and associated with reduced cell surface adhesion molecule expression. AMPK activation in HAECs inhibits TNFalpha-stimulated leukocyte adhesion by a rapid NO-dependent mechanism associated with reduced MCP-1 secretion and a late NO-independent mechanism whereby adhesion molecule expression, in particular E-selectin, is suppressed.

  3. Robust Chemical Synthesis of Membrane Proteins through a General Method of Removable Backbone Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ji-Shen; He, Yao; Zuo, Chao; Cai, Xiao-Ying; Tang, Shan; Wang, Zhipeng A; Zhang, Long-Hua; Tian, Chang-Lin; Liu, Lei

    2016-03-16

    Chemical protein synthesis can provide access to proteins with post-translational modifications or site-specific labelings. Although this technology is finding increasing applications in the studies of water-soluble globular proteins, chemical synthesis of membrane proteins remains elusive. In this report, a general and robust removable backbone modification (RBM) method is developed for the chemical synthesis of membrane proteins. This method uses an activated O-to-N acyl transfer auxiliary to install in the Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis process a RBM group with switchable reactivity toward trifluoroacetic acid. The method can be applied to versatile membrane proteins because the RBM group can be placed at any primary amino acid. With RBM, the membrane proteins and their segments behave almost as if they were water-soluble peptides and can be easily handled in the process of ligation, purification, and mass characterizations. After the full-length protein is assembled, the RBM group can be readily removed by trifluoroacetic acid. The efficiency and usefulness of the new method has been demonstrated by the successful synthesis of a two-transmembrane-domain protein (HCV p7 ion channel) with site-specific isotopic labeling and a four-transmembrane-domain protein (multidrug resistance transporter EmrE). This method enables practical synthesis of small- to medium-sized membrane proteins or membrane protein domains for biochemical and biophysical studies.

  4. Comparative proteomic profiling of myofibrillar proteins in dry-cured ham with different proteolysis indices and adhesiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pedrouso, M; Pérez-Santaescolástica, C; Franco, D; Fulladosa, E; Carballo, J; Zapata, C; Lorenzo, J M

    2018-04-01

    Excessive proteolysis during dry-cured ham processing may lead to high adhesiveness and consumer dissatisfaction. The aim of this research is to identify biomarkers for proteolysis and adhesiveness. Two hundred biceps femoris porcine muscle samples from Spanish dry-cured ham were firstly evaluated for various physicochemical parameters, including their proteolysis indices and instrumental adhesiveness. Proteins of samples with extreme proteolysis indices were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). We found that hams of higher proteolysis index had statistically significant increased adhesiveness. Proteomic analysis revealed statistically significant qualitative and quantitative differences between sample groups. Thus, protein fragments increased remarkably in samples with higher proteolysis index scores. In addition, higher proteolysis index hams showed increased degradation for a total of five non-redundant myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins. However, myosin-1, α-actin and myosin-4 proteins were the biomarkers that underwent the most intense response to proteolysis and adhesiveness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Platelet adhesion and protein adsorption on silicone rubber surface by ozone-induced grafted polymerization with carboxybetaine monomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Yuan, Jiang; Zang, Xiaopeng; Shen, Jian; Lin, Sicong

    2005-03-10

    Platelet adhesion and protein adsorption on the silicone rubber film grafted with N,N'-dimethyl-N-methacryloyloxyethyl-N-(2-carboxyethyl) ammonium (DMMCA) was studied. The grafting was carried out by means of ozone-induced method and was confirmed by ATR-FTIR and XPS investigations. The grafted films possessed relatively hydrophilic surface revealed by contact angle measurement. The blood compatibility of the grafted film was evaluated in vitro by platelet adhesion in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and protein absorption in bovine fibrinogen (BFG) using silicone film as the reference. No substantial platelet adhesion was observed for the grafted films incubated in PRP for 60 and 180 min. The protein absorption was also significantly reduced after incubated in bovine fibrinogen for 60 min. Both the results indicated that the blood compatibility of silicone rubber was greatly improved by ozone-induced grafting of carboxybetaine zwitterionic polymer onto its surface.

  6. Plasma treatment induces internal surface modifications of electrospun poly(L-lactic) acid scaffold to enhance protein coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Seo, Hyok; Hee Lee, Mi; Kwon, Byeong-Ju; Kim, Hye-Lee; Park, Jong-Chul; Jin Lee, Seung; Kim, Bong-Jin; Wang, Kang-Kyun; Kim, Yong-Rok

    2013-01-01

    Advanced biomaterials should also be bioactive with regard to desirable cellular responses, such as selective protein adsorption and cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. To enhance cell-material interactions, surface modifications have commonly been performed. Among the various surface modification approaches, atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma has been used to change a hydrophobic polymer surface to a hydrophilic surface. Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA)-derived scaffolds lack cell recognition signals and the hydrophobic nature of PLLA hinders cell seeding. To make PLLA surfaces more conducive to cell attachment and spreading, surface modifications may be used to create cell-biomaterial interfaces that elicit controlled cell adhesion and maintain differentiated phenotypes. In this study, (He) gaseous atmospheric plasma glow discharge was used to change the characteristics of a 3D-type polymeric scaffold from hydrophobic to hydrophilic on both the outer and inner surfaces of the scaffold and the penetration efficiency with fibronectin was investigated. Field-emission scanning electron microscope images showed that some grooves were formed on the PLLA fibers after plasma treatment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data also showed chemical changes in the PLLA structure. After plasma treatment, -CN (285.76 eV) was increased in C1s and -NH 2 (399.70 eV) was increased significantly and –N=CH (400.80 eV) and –NH 3 + (402.05 eV) were newly appeared in N1s. These changes allowed fibronectin to penetrate into the PLLA scaffold; this could be observed by confocal microscopy. In conclusion, helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment was effective in modifying the polymeric scaffold, making it hydrophilic, and this treatment can also be used in tissue engineering research as needed to make polymers hydrophilic

  7. Plasma treatment induces internal surface modifications of electrospun poly(L-lactic) acid scaffold to enhance protein coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Seo, Hyok; Hee Lee, Mi; Kwon, Byeong-Ju; Kim, Hye-Lee; Park, Jong-Chul [Cellbiocontrol Laboratory, Department of Medical Engineering, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Jin Lee, Seung [Department of Industrial Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bong-Jin; Wang, Kang-Kyun; Kim, Yong-Rok [Department of Chemistry, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-21

    Advanced biomaterials should also be bioactive with regard to desirable cellular responses, such as selective protein adsorption and cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. To enhance cell-material interactions, surface modifications have commonly been performed. Among the various surface modification approaches, atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma has been used to change a hydrophobic polymer surface to a hydrophilic surface. Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA)-derived scaffolds lack cell recognition signals and the hydrophobic nature of PLLA hinders cell seeding. To make PLLA surfaces more conducive to cell attachment and spreading, surface modifications may be used to create cell-biomaterial interfaces that elicit controlled cell adhesion and maintain differentiated phenotypes. In this study, (He) gaseous atmospheric plasma glow discharge was used to change the characteristics of a 3D-type polymeric scaffold from hydrophobic to hydrophilic on both the outer and inner surfaces of the scaffold and the penetration efficiency with fibronectin was investigated. Field-emission scanning electron microscope images showed that some grooves were formed on the PLLA fibers after plasma treatment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data also showed chemical changes in the PLLA structure. After plasma treatment, -CN (285.76 eV) was increased in C1s and -NH{sub 2} (399.70 eV) was increased significantly and –N=CH (400.80 eV) and –NH{sub 3}{sup +} (402.05 eV) were newly appeared in N1s. These changes allowed fibronectin to penetrate into the PLLA scaffold; this could be observed by confocal microscopy. In conclusion, helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment was effective in modifying the polymeric scaffold, making it hydrophilic, and this treatment can also be used in tissue engineering research as needed to make polymers hydrophilic.

  8. Surface modification of SU-8 for metal/SU-8 adhesion using RF plasma treatment for application in thermopile detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Shakeel; Mattsson, Claes G.; Fondell, Mattis; Lindblad, Andreas; Thungström, Göran

    2015-08-01

    This article reports on plasma treatment of SU-8 epoxy in order to enhance adhesive strength for metals. Its samples were fabricated on standard silicon wafers and treated with (O2 and Ar) RF plasma at a power of 25 W at a low pressure of (3 × 10-3 Torr) for different time spans (10-70 s). The sample surfaces were characterized in terms of contact angle, surface (roughness and chemistry) and using a tape test. During the contact angle measurement, it was observed that the contact angle was reduced from 73° to 5° (almost wet) and 23° for (O2 and Ar) treated samples, respectively. The root mean square surface roughness was significantly increased by 21.5% and 37.2% for (O2 and Ar) treatment, respectively. A pattern of metal squares was formed on the samples using photolithography for a tape test. An adhesive tape was applied to the samples and peeled off at 180°. The maximum adhesion results, more than 90%, were achieved for the O2-treated samples, whereas the Ar-treated samples showed no change. The XPS study shows the formation of new species in the O2-treated sample compared to the Ar-treated samples. The high adhesive results were due to the formation of hydrophilic groups and new O2 species in the O2-treated samples, which were absent in Ar-treated samples.

  9. Inhibition of the plasma SCUBE1, a novel platelet adhesive protein, protects mice against thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Ying; Lin, Yuh-Charn; Liao, Wei-Ju; Tu, Cheng-Fen; Chen, Ming-Huei; Roffler, Steve R; Yang, Ruey-Bing

    2014-07-01

    Signal peptide-CUB-EGF domain-containing protein 1 (SCUBE1), a secreted and surface-exposed glycoprotein on activated platelets, promotes platelet-platelet interaction and supports platelet-matrix adhesion. Its plasma level is a biomarker of platelet activation in acute thrombotic diseases. However, the exact roles of plasma SCUBE1 in vivo remain undefined. We generated new mutant (Δ) mice lacking the soluble but retaining the membrane-bound form of SCUBE1. Plasma SCUBE1-depleted Δ/Δ mice showed normal hematologic and coagulant features and expression of major platelet receptors, but Δ/Δ platelet-rich plasma showed impaired platelet aggregation in response to ADP and collagen treatment. The addition of purified recombinant SCUBE1 protein restored the aggregation of platelets in Δ/Δ platelet-rich plasma and further enhanced platelet aggregation in +/+ platelet-rich plasma. Plasma deficiency of SCUBE1 diminished arterial thrombosis in mice and protected against lethal thromboembolism induced by collagen-epinephrine treatment. Last, antibodies directed against the epidermal growth factor-like repeats of SCUBE1, which are involved in trans-homophilic protein-protein interactions, protected mice against fatal thromboembolism without causing bleeding in vivo. We conclude that plasma SCUBE1 participates in platelet aggregation by bridging adjacent activated platelets in thrombosis. Blockade of soluble SCUBE1 might represent a novel antithrombotic strategy. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Profiling of integral membrane proteins and their post translational modifications using high-resolution mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souda, Puneet; Ryan, Christopher M.; Cramer, William A.; Whitelegge, Julian

    2011-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins pose challenges to traditional proteomics approaches due to unique physicochemical properties including hydrophobic transmembrane domains that limit solubility in aqueous solvents. A well resolved intact protein molecular mass profile defines a protein’s native covalent state including post-translational modifications, and is thus a vital measurement toward full structure determination. Both soluble loop regions and transmembrane regions potentially contain post-translational modifications that must be characterized if the covalent primary structure of a membrane protein is to be defined. This goal has been achieved using electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) with low-resolution mass analyzers for intact protein profiling, and high-resolution instruments for top-down experiments, toward complete covalent primary structure information. In top-down, the intact protein profile is supplemented by gas-phase fragmentation of the intact protein, including its transmembrane regions, using collisionally activated and/or electroncapture dissociation (CAD/ECD) to yield sequence-dependent high-resolution MS information. Dedicated liquid chromatography systems with aqueous/organic solvent mixtures were developed allowing us to demonstrate that polytopic integral membrane proteins are amenable to ESI-MS analysis, including top-down measurements. Covalent post-translational modifications are localized regardless of their position in transmembrane domains. Top-down measurements provide a more detail oriented high-resolution description of post-transcriptional and post-translational diversity for enhanced understanding beyond genomic translation. PMID:21982782

  11. Photochemically immobilized polymer coatings: effects on protein adsorption, cell adhesion, and leukocyte activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defife, K M; Hagen, K M; Clapper, D L; Anderson, J M

    1999-01-01

    Amphiphilic chains of 4-benzoylbenzoic acid moieties and polymer were photochemically immobilized onto silicone rubber to ask whether the covalently coupled polymers would passivate the silicone rubber by inhibiting protein adsorption and subsequent cell adhesion and activation. Three groups of polymers were utilized: the hydrophilic synthetic polymers of polyacrylamide, polyethylene glycol, and polyvinylpyrrolidone; the glycosaminoglycan, hyaluronic acid; and poly(glycine-valine-glycine-valine-proline), a polypeptide derived from the sequence of elastin. Each coating variant decreased the adsorption of fibrinogen and immunoglobulin G compared to uncoated silicone rubber. All except the methoxy-polyethylene glycol coating nearly abolished fibroblast growth, but none of the coating variants inhibited monocyte or polymorphonuclear leukocyte adhesion. Interleukin-1beta, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion by leukocytes were not statistically different between any of the coating variants and uncoated silicone rubber. However, the methoxy-polyethylene glycol and elastin-based polypeptide coatings, which supported the highest numbers of adherent monocytes, also elicited the lowest levels of proinflammatory cytokine secretion. When these in vitro data were collectively evaluated, the coating that most effectively passivated silicone rubber was the polypeptide derived from elastin.

  12. Anterior gradient protein-2 is a regulator of cellular adhesion in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diptiman Chanda

    Full Text Available Anterior Gradient Protein (AGR-2 is reported to be over-expressed in many epithelial cancers and promotes metastasis. A clear-cut mechanism for its observed function(s has not been previously identified. We found significant upregulation of AGR-2 expression in a bone metastatic prostate cancer cell line, PC3, following culturing in bone marrow-conditioned medium. Substantial AGR-2 expression was also confirmed in prostate cancer tissue specimens in patients with bone lesions. By developing stable clones of PC3 cells with varying levels of AGR-2 expression, we identified that abrogation of AGR-2 significantly reduced cellular attachment to fibronectin, collagen I, collagen IV, laminin I and fibrinogen. Loss of cellular adhesion was associated with sharp decrease in the expression of α4, α5, αV, β3 and β4 integrins. Failure to undergo apoptosis following detachment is a hallmark of epithelial cancer metastasis. The AGR-2-silenced PC3 cells showed higher resistance to Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis- inducing ligand (TRAIL induced apoptosis in vitro. This observation was also supported by significantly reduced Caspase-3 expression in AGR-2-silenced PC3 cells, which is a key effector of both extrinsic and intrinsic death signaling pathways. These data suggest that AGR-2 influence prostate cancer metastasis by regulation of cellular adhesion and apoptosis.

  13. Blockade of vascular adhesion protein-1 inhibits lymphocyte infiltration in rat liver allograft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelius, Timi; Salaspuro, Ville; Salmi, Marko; Krogerus, Leena; Höckerstedt, Krister; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Lautenschlager, Irmeli

    2004-12-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) has been shown to mediate lymphocyte adhesion to endothelia at sites of inflammation, but its functional role in vivo has not been tested in any rodent model. Here we report the effects of VAP-1 blockade on rat liver allograft rejection. BN recipients of PVG liver allografts (known to develop acute rejection by day 7) were treated with 2 mg/kg anti-VAP-1 (a new anti-rat VAP-1 mAb 174-5) or isotype-matched irrelevant antibody (NS1) every other day (n = 6/group) and one group with anti-VAP-1 2 mg/kg daily (n = 7). On day 7, samples were collected for transplant aspiration cytology, histology, and immunohistochemistry. Lymphocyte infiltration to the graft was clearly affected by VAP-blockade. The total inflammation, mainly the number of active lymphoid cells, in transplant aspiration cytology was significantly decreased in animals treated with anti-VAP-1 (4.7 +/- 1.0 and 2.4 +/- 1.0 corrected increment units, respectively) compared to control (6.6 +/- 1.0) (P VAP-1 plays an important role in lymphocyte infiltration to sites of inflammation, and, in particular, liver allograft rejection.

  14. Prediction of human protein function from post-translational modifications and localization features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Juhl; Gupta, Ramneek; Blom, Nikolaj

    2002-01-01

    a number of functional attributes that are more directly related to the linear sequence of amino acids, and hence easier to predict, than protein structure. These attributes include features associated with post-translational modifications and protein sorting, but also much simpler aspects......We have developed an entirely sequence-based method that identifies and integrates relevant features that can be used to assign proteins of unknown function to functional classes, and enzyme categories for enzymes. We show that strategies for the elucidation of protein function may benefit from...

  15. Characterization of the protein fraction of the temporary adhesive secreted by the tube feet of the sea star Asterias rubens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebert, Elise; Wattiez, Ruddy; Waite, J Herbert; Flammang, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Sea stars are able to make firm but temporary attachments to various substrata by secretions released by their tube feet. After tube foot detachment, the adhesive secretions remain on the substratum as a footprint. Proteins presumably play a key role in sea star adhesion, as evidenced by the removal of footprints from surfaces after a treatment with trypsin. However, until now, characterisation was hampered by their high insolubility. In this study, a non-hydrolytic method was used to render most of the proteins constituting the adhesive footprints soluble. After analysis by SDS-PAGE, the proteins separated into about 25 bands, which ranged from 25 to 450 kDa in apparent molecular weight. Using mass spectrometry and a homology-database search, it was shown that several of the proteins are known intracellular proteins, presumably resulting from contamination of footprint material with tube foot epidermal cells. However, 11 protein bands, comprising the most abundant proteins, were not identified and might correspond to novel adhesive proteins. They were named 'Sea star footprint proteins' (Sfps). Tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the protein bands yielded 43 de novo-generated peptide sequences. Most of them were shared by several, if not all, Sfps. Polyclonal antibodies were raised against one of the peptides (HEASGEYYR from Sfp-115) and were used in immunoblotting. They specifically labelled Sfp-115 and other bands with lower apparent molecular weights. The different results suggest that all Sfps might belong to a single family of related proteins sharing similar motifs or, alternatively, they are the products of polymerization and/or degradation processes.

  16. Adhesion of nitrile rubber (NBR) to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fabric. Part 1: PET surface modification by methylenediphenyl di-isocyanate (MDI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razavizadeh, Mahmoud; Jamshidi, Masoud, E-mail: mjamshidi@iust.ac.ir

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Glutaric anhydride peroxide (GAP) was grafted on PET surface by UV irradiation method. Then MDI was attached to GAP on PET surface. • The fabric was vulcanized by nitrile rubber. • Peet test was performed after each stage of surface modification. • Curing temperature was increased and the tests were repeated. • Effect of MDI coating on PET without carboxylation was evaluated. Effect of vulcanizing temperature on this product was also studied. - Abstract: Fiber to rubber adhesion is an important subject in rubber composite industry. It is well known that surface physical, mechanical and chemical treatments are effective methods to improve interfacial bonding. Ultra violet (UV) light irradiation is an efficient method which is used to increase interfacial interactions. In this research UV assisted chemical modification of PET fabric was used to increase its bonding to nitrile rubber (NBR). NBR is perfect selection to produce fuel and oil resistant rubber parts but it has weak bonding to fabrics. For this purpose at first, the PET fabric was carboxylated under UV irradiation and then methylenediphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) was reacted and grafted to carboxylated PET. T-peel test was used to evaluate PET fabric to NBR bonding strength. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-AT) was used to assess surface modifications of the PET fabrics. The chemical composition of the PET surfaces before and after carboxylation and MDI grafting was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that at vulcanizing temperature of 150 °C, carboxylation in contrary to MDI grafting, improved considerably PET to NBR adhesion. Finally effect of curing temperature on PET to NBR bonding strength was determined. It was found that increasing vulcanizing temperature to 170 °C caused considerable improvement (about 134%) in bonding strength.

  17. Post-Translational Modifications of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Sulfate Reduction Pathway Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaucher, S.P.; Redding, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Keasling, J.D.; Singh, A.K.

    2008-03-01

    Recent developments in shotgun proteomics have enabled high-throughput studies of a variety of microorganisms at a proteome level and provide experimental validation for predicted open reading frames in the corresponding genome. More importantly, advances in mass spectrometric data analysis now allow mining of large proteomics data sets for the presence of post-translational modifications(PTMs). Although PTMs are a critical aspectof cellular activity, such information eludes cell-wide studies conducted at the transcript level. Here, we analyze several mass spectrometric data sets acquired using two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, 2D-LC/MS/MS, for the sulfate reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. Our searches of the raw spectra led us to discover several post-translationally modified peptides in D. vulgaris. Of these, several peptides containing a lysine with a +42 Da modification were found reproducibly across all data sets. Both acetylation and trimethylation have the same nominal +42 Da mass, and are therefore candidates for this modification. Several spectra were identified having markers for trimethylation, while one is consistent with an acetylation. Surprisingly, these modified peptides predominantly mapped to proteins involved in sulfate respiration. Other highly expressed proteins in D. vulgaris, such as enzymes involved in electron transport and other central metabolic processes, did not contain this modification. Decoy database searches were used to control for random spectrum/sequence matches. Additional validation for these modifications was provided by alternate workflows, for example, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry analysis of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gamma-subunit(DsrC) protein. MS data for DsrC in this alternate workflow also contained the +42 Da modification at the same loci. Furthermore, the DsrC homologue in another sulfate reducing bacterium

  18. Site‐Selective Disulfide Modification of Proteins: Expanding Diversity beyond the Proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Kuan, Seah Ling; Wang, Tao; Weil, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The synthetic transformation of polypeptides with molecular accuracy holds great promise for providing functional and structural diversity beyond the proteome. Consequently, the last decade has seen an exponential growth of site‐directed chemistry to install additional features into peptides and proteins even inside living cells. The disulfide rebridging strategy has emerged as a powerful tool for site‐selective modifications since most proteins contain disulfide bonds. In this Revie...

  19. Facile immobilization of heparin on bioabsorbable iron via mussel adhesive protein (MAPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuchen Xu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by adhesive proteins in mussels, strategies using dopamine to modified surface have become particularly attractive. In the present work, we developed a novel and convenient method to modify the biodegradable Fe plates with heparin. Iron was first treated by a facile one-step pH-induced polymerization of dopamine, and then a high density heparin was successfully grafted onto the surface via coupling with polydopamine (PDA active layer. Heparin immobilization contributed much longer blood clotting coagulation time than the pure Fe sample, and hence reduced the risk of thrombosis. Cell viability tests suggested that the heparin modified Fe plates were more favorable to the proliferation of ECV304 cells. In summary, the heparin modified Fe plates with good anti-thrombus properties and inhibiting the proliferation of VSMC cells provide great prospects for biodegradable iron.

  20. Functional roles of mannose-binding protein in the adhesion, cytotoxicity and phagocytosis of Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Matin, Abdul; Shin, Ho-Joon; Park, Hyun; Yoo, Kyung-Tae; Yuan, Xi-Zhe; Kim, Kwang Sik; Jung, Suk-Yul

    2012-10-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a single-celled protozoan that is widely distributed in the environment and is a well-known of causing human keratitis, a vision-threatening infection. In this study, an ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) and a selection of saccharide were applied to A. castellanii by chemical mutagenesis. To understand the functional roles of a mannose-binding protein (MBP). A. castellanii were treated with methyl-alpha-D-mannopyranoside abbreviated Man, with and without the EMS pre-treatment, and their adhesion and cytotoxicity were analyzed, using a human brain microvascular endothelial cell (HBMEC) as the target cell. Both EMS and Man mutants exhibited significantly decreased levels of MBP expression and cytotoxicity to HBMEC, but showed similar levels of binding to HBMEC, as compared with the wild type. Of interest was that the exogenous mannose inhibited amoebae (i.e., Man mutant) binding to the HBMEC by castellanii. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A comprehensive platform for the analysis of ubiquitin-like protein modifications using in vivo biotinylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirone, Lucia; Xolalpa, Wendy; Sigurdsson, Jón Otti

    2017-01-01

    L conjugates from interactors, and low quantities of modified substrates. Here we describe bioUbLs, a comprehensive set of tools for studying modifications in Drosophila and mammals, based on multicistronic expression and in vivo biotinylation using the E. coli biotin protein ligase BirA. While the bio...

  2. Modifications in interaction and structure of silica nanoparticle-BSA protein system in aqueous electrolyte solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Indresh; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2015-06-01

    SANS measurements have been carried out to examine the modifications in interaction and structure of anionic silica nanoparticle with anionic BSA protein in presence of an electrolyte. The phase behaviour of anionic silica nanoparticle and anionic BSA protein is governed by the protein induced depletion interaction between nanoparticles. Both nanoparticle and protein coexist individually at low protein concentrations as electrostatic repulsion dominates over the depletion interaction. However, depletion induced fractal aggregates of nanoparticles are formed at higher protein concentrations. These aggregates can be formed at much smaller protein concentration in presence of an electrolyte. We show that both the electrostatic (decrease) and depletion interaction (increase) are modified with an electrolyte. The range of the depletion interaction is found to be significantly larger than the electrostatic interaction.

  3. Effects of Heterologous tRNA Modifications on the Production of Proteins Containing Noncanonical Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crnković, Ana; Vargas-Rodriguez, Oscar; Merkuryev, Anna; Söll, Dieter

    2018-02-02

    Synthesis of proteins with noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) enables the creation of protein-based biomaterials with diverse new chemical properties that may be attractive for material science. Current methods for large-scale production of ncAA-containing proteins, frequently carried out in Escherichia coli , involve the use of orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (o-aaRSs) and tRNAs (o-tRNAs). Although o-tRNAs are designed to be orthogonal to endogenous aaRSs, their orthogonality to the components of the E. coli metabolism remains largely unexplored. We systematically investigated how the E. coli tRNA modification machinery affects the efficiency and orthogonality of o-tRNA Sep used for production of proteins with the ncAA O- phosphoserine (Sep). The incorporation of Sep into a green fluorescent protein (GFP) in 42 E. coli strains carrying deletions of single tRNA modification genes identified several genes that affect the o-tRNA activity. Deletion of cysteine desulfurase ( iscS ) increased the yield of Sep-containing GFP more than eightfold, while overexpression of dimethylallyltransferase MiaA and pseudouridine synthase TruB improved the specificity of Sep incorporation. These results highlight the importance of tRNA modifications for the biosynthesis of proteins containing ncAAs, and provide a novel framework for optimization of o-tRNAs.

  4. Effects of Heterologous tRNA Modifications on the Production of Proteins Containing Noncanonical Amino Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Crnković

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of proteins with noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs enables the creation of protein-based biomaterials with diverse new chemical properties that may be attractive for material science. Current methods for large-scale production of ncAA-containing proteins, frequently carried out in Escherichia coli, involve the use of orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (o-aaRSs and tRNAs (o-tRNAs. Although o-tRNAs are designed to be orthogonal to endogenous aaRSs, their orthogonality to the components of the E. coli metabolism remains largely unexplored. We systematically investigated how the E. coli tRNA modification machinery affects the efficiency and orthogonality of o-tRNASep used for production of proteins with the ncAA O-phosphoserine (Sep. The incorporation of Sep into a green fluorescent protein (GFP in 42 E. coli strains carrying deletions of single tRNA modification genes identified several genes that affect the o-tRNA activity. Deletion of cysteine desulfurase (iscS increased the yield of Sep-containing GFP more than eightfold, while overexpression of dimethylallyltransferase MiaA and pseudouridine synthase TruB improved the specificity of Sep incorporation. These results highlight the importance of tRNA modifications for the biosynthesis of proteins containing ncAAs, and provide a novel framework for optimization of o-tRNAs.

  5. E-selectin ligand-1 (ESL-1) is a novel adiponectin binding protein on cell adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Kuroda, Nana; Uekita, Hiromi; Kochi, Ikoi; Matsumoto, Akane; Niinaga, Ryu; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro; Kihara, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adiponectin (APN) is an adipocyte-derived bioactive molecule with anti-diabetic and anti-atherogenic properties. Although anti-diabetic effects are mostly mediated by the adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, the anti-atherogenic mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Methods and Results: In this study, we identified E-selectin ligand (ESL)-1 as a novel APN-binding protein by mass spectrometry analysis of HepG2 cell-derived immunoprecipitant with an anti-APN antibody. Cell adhesion assays using fluorescence-labelled monocyte cell line THP-1 cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) revealed that APN-pre-treated THP-1 cells had reduced binding ability to HUVECs. This APN-mediated suppressive effect on monocyte binding to endothelial cells was partially abrogated by targeting ESL-1 with shRNA in THP-1 cells. In addition, serial mutagenesis analysis disclosed that five extracellular amino acids close to the N-terminus of ESL-1 were essential for binding with APN. Conclusion: Our results highlight the fact that interaction between APN and ESL-1 could provide a fundamental mechanism underlying the anti-atherogenic properties of APN. - Highlights: • E-selectin ligand (ESL)-1 was identified as an adiponectin (APN)-binding protein. • ESL-1 bound to APN at its N-terminal 6th-10th amino acids. • shESL-1 reduced the suppressive effect of APN on adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. • Interaction with ESL may be involved in the anti-atherogenic effects of APN.

  6. E-selectin ligand-1 (ESL-1) is a novel adiponectin binding protein on cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Kuroda, Nana; Uekita, Hiromi; Kochi, Ikoi; Matsumoto, Akane; Niinaga, Ryu [Department of Biomedical Informatics, Division of Health Sciences, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Kihara, Shinji, E-mail: skihara@sahs.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Biomedical Informatics, Division of Health Sciences, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-02-05

    Background: Adiponectin (APN) is an adipocyte-derived bioactive molecule with anti-diabetic and anti-atherogenic properties. Although anti-diabetic effects are mostly mediated by the adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, the anti-atherogenic mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Methods and Results: In this study, we identified E-selectin ligand (ESL)-1 as a novel APN-binding protein by mass spectrometry analysis of HepG2 cell-derived immunoprecipitant with an anti-APN antibody. Cell adhesion assays using fluorescence-labelled monocyte cell line THP-1 cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) revealed that APN-pre-treated THP-1 cells had reduced binding ability to HUVECs. This APN-mediated suppressive effect on monocyte binding to endothelial cells was partially abrogated by targeting ESL-1 with shRNA in THP-1 cells. In addition, serial mutagenesis analysis disclosed that five extracellular amino acids close to the N-terminus of ESL-1 were essential for binding with APN. Conclusion: Our results highlight the fact that interaction between APN and ESL-1 could provide a fundamental mechanism underlying the anti-atherogenic properties of APN. - Highlights: • E-selectin ligand (ESL)-1 was identified as an adiponectin (APN)-binding protein. • ESL-1 bound to APN at its N-terminal 6th-10th amino acids. • shESL-1 reduced the suppressive effect of APN on adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. • Interaction with ESL may be involved in the anti-atherogenic effects of APN.

  7. Redistribution of microfilament-associated proteins during the formation of focal contacts and adhesions in chick fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Badley, R A; Rees, D A

    1983-01-01

    The roles of the microfilament-associated proteins vinculin, alpha-actinin, myosin and filamin have been studied by immunofluorescence and double fluorescence in conjunction with interference reflection microscopy (IRM), during the development of focal contacts and focal adhesions in a chick...... the associated microfilament bundles. Indeed the appearance of small bodies containing alpha-actinin and vinculin is shown to precede focal contact formation in our model system and such structures (not visible by IRM) are proposed to be the precursors of focal contacts and adhesions. Myosin and filamin...... are distributed generally with some reticular patterning in the early motile cells which lack the focal specializations, but as focal contacts and adhesions form these proteins become progressively recruited into the associated microfilament bundles. Only then do we see the marked depletion that has been reported...

  8. Involvement of Sib Proteins in the Regulation of Cellular Adhesion in Dictyostelium discoideum▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Cornillon, Sophie; Froquet, Romain; Cosson, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms ensuring cellular adhesion have been studied in detail in Dictyostelium amoebae, but little is known about the regulation of cellular adhesion in these cells. Here, we show that cellular adhesion is regulated in Dictyostelium, notably by the concentration of a cellular secreted factor accumulating in the medium. This constitutes a quorum-sensing mechanism allowing coordinated regulation of cellular adhesion in a Dictyostelium population. In order to understand the mechani...

  9. Protein Modifiers Generally Provide Limited Improvement in Wood Bond Strength of Soy Flour Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    Soy flour adhesives using a polyamidoamine-epichlorohydrin (PAE) polymeric coreactant are used increasingly as wood adhesives for interior products. Although these adhesives give good performance, higher bond strength under wet conditions is desirable. Wet strength is important for accelerated tests involving the internal forces generated by the swelling of wood and...

  10. The recognition of adsorbed and denatured proteins of different topographies by β2 integrins and effects on leukocyte adhesion and activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brevig, T.; Holst, B.; Ademovic, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Leukocyte beta(2) integrins Mac-1 and p150,95 are promiscuous cell-surface receptors that recognise and mediate cell adhesion to a variety of adsorbed and denatured proteins. We used albumin as a model protein to study whether leukocyte adhesion and activation depended on the nm-scale topography ...

  11. Lysine-Directed Post-translational Modifications of Tau Protein in Alzheimer's Disease and Related Tauopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiana Kontaxi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Tau is a microtubule-associated protein responsible mainly for stabilizing the neuronal microtubule network in the brain. Under normal conditions, tau is highly soluble and adopts an “unfolded” conformation. However, it undergoes conformational changes resulting in a less soluble form with weakened microtubule stabilizing properties. Altered tau forms characteristic pathogenic inclusions in Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. Although, tau hyperphosphorylation is widely considered to be the major trigger of tau malfunction, tau undergoes several post-translational modifications at lysine residues including acetylation, methylation, ubiquitylation, SUMOylation, and glycation. We are only beginning to define the site-specific impact of each type of lysine modification on tau biology as well as the possible interplay between them, but, like phosphorylation, these modifications are likely to play critical roles in tau's normal and pathobiology. This review summarizes the latest findings focusing on lysine post-translational modifications that occur at both endogenous tau protein and pathological tau forms in AD and other tauopathies. In addition, it highlights the significance of a site-dependent approach of studying tau post-translational modifications under normal and pathological conditions.

  12. Surface-modified nanoparticles as a new, versatile, and mechanically robust nonadhesive coating : Suppression of protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmes, P. F.; Currie, E. P. K.; Thies, J. C.; van der Mei, H. C.; Busscher, H. J.; Norde, W.

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of surface-modified silica nanoparticles, chemically grafted with acrylate and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) groups, and the ability of the resulting crosslinked coatings to inhibit protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion are explored. Water contact angles, nanoindentation, and atomic

  13. Ubiquitin/SUMO modification regulates VHL protein stability and nucleocytoplasmic localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiliang Cai

    Full Text Available Functional inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL tumor suppressor protein is linked to the development of several forms of cancer as well as oncogenic progression like sporadic renal clear-cell carcinomas (RCC. Despite the critical role played by VHL in destruction of hypoxia-inducible factor α (HIFα via ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, very little is known about the post-translational modification which regulates VHL activity. Our previous study showed that the SUMO E3 ligase PIASy interacts with VHL and induces VHL SUMOylation on lysine residue 171 (Cai et al, PLoS ONE, 2010, 5(3:e9720. Here we further report that VHL also undergoes ubiquitylation on both lysine residues 171 and 196, which is blocked by PIASy. Moreover, using a VHL-SUMO1 or ubiquitin fusion protein, we found that ubiquitylated VHL is localized predominantly in the cytoplasm, while SUMOylated VHL results in increased VHL protein stability and nuclear redistribution. Interestingly, substitution of lysine 171 and 196 to arginine of VHL abrogates its inhibitory function on the transcriptional activity of HIFα, and tube formation in vitro. This demonstrates that post-translational modifications like ubiquitylation and SUMOylation contributes to VHL protein stability and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, and that the overall function of VHL in tumor suppression may require a precise and dynamically regulated process which involves protein modification.

  14. N-terminal modifications of cellular proteins: The enzymes involved, their substrate specificities and biological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varland, Sylvia; Osberg, Camilla; Arnesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of eukaryotic proteins are N-terminally modified by one or more processing enzymes. Enzymes acting on the very first amino acid of a polypeptide include different peptidases, transferases, and ligases. Methionine aminopeptidases excise the initiator methionine leaving the nascent polypeptide with a newly exposed amino acid that may be further modified. N-terminal acetyl-, methyl-, myristoyl-, and palmitoyltransferases may attach an acetyl, methyl, myristoyl, or palmitoyl group, respectively, to the α-amino group of the target protein N-terminus. With the action of ubiquitin ligases, one or several ubiquitin molecules are transferred, and hence, constitute the N-terminal modification. Modifications at protein N-termini represent an important contribution to proteomic diversity and complexity, and are essential for protein regulation and cellular signaling. Consequently, dysregulation of the N-terminal modifying enzymes is implicated in human diseases. We here review the different protein N-terminal modifications occurring co- or post-translationally with emphasis on the responsible enzymes and their substrate specificities. PMID:25914051

  15. Removable Backbone Modification Method for the Chemical Synthesis of Membrane Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia-Bin; Tang, Shan; Zheng, Ji-Shen; Tian, Chang-Lin; Liu, Lei

    2017-05-16

    Chemical synthesis can produce water-soluble globular proteins bearing specifically designed modifications. These synthetic molecules have been used to study the biological functions of proteins and to improve the pharmacological properties of protein drugs. However, the above advances notwithstanding, membrane proteins (MPs), which comprise 20-30% of all proteins in the proteomes of most eukaryotic cells, remain elusive with regard to chemical synthesis. This difficulty stems from the strong hydrophobic character of MPs, which can cause considerable handling issues during ligation, purification, and characterization steps. Considerable efforts have been made to improve the solubility of transmembrane peptides for chemical ligation. These methods can be classified into two main categories: the manipulation of external factors and chemical modification of the peptide. This Account summarizes our research advances in the development of chemical modification especially the two generations of removable backbone modification (RBM) strategy for the chemical synthesis of MPs. In the first RBM generation, we install a removable modification group at the backbone amide of Gly within the transmembrane peptides. In the second RBM generation, the RBM group can be installed into all primary amino acid residues. The second RBM strategy combines the activated intramolecular O-to-N acyl transfer reaction, in which a phenyl group remains unprotected during the coupling process, which can play a catalytic role to generate the activated phenyl ester to assist in the formation of amide. The key feature of the RBM group is its switchable stability in trifluoroacetic acid. The stability of these backbone amide N-modifications toward TFA can be modified by regulating the electronic effects of phenol groups. The free phenol group is acylated to survive the TFA deprotection step, while the acyl phenyl ester will be quantitatively hydrolyzed in a neutral aqueous solution, and the free

  16. Pathogenic Naegleria fowleri and non-pathogenic Naegleria lovaniensis exhibit differential adhesion to, and invasion of, extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamerson, Melissa; da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Cabral, Guy A; Marciano-Cabral, Francine

    2012-03-01

    Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis are closely related free-living amoebae found in the environment. N. fowleri causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system, while N. lovaniensis is non-pathogenic. N. fowleri infection occurs when the amoebae access the nasal passages, attach to the nasal mucosa and its epithelial lining, and migrate to the brain. This process involves interaction with components of the host extracellular matrix (ECM). Since the ability to invade tissues can be a characteristic that distinguishes pathogenic from non-pathogenic amoebae, the objective of this study was to assess adhesion to, and invasion of, the ECM by these two related but distinct Naegleria species. N. fowleri exhibited a higher level of adhesion to the ECM components laminin-1, fibronectin and collagen I. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that N. fowleri attached on ECM substrata exhibited a spread-out appearance that included the presence of focal adhesion-like structures. Western immunoblotting revealed two integrin-like proteins for both species, but one of these, with a molecular mass of approximately 70 kDa, was detected at a higher level in N. fowleri. Confocal microscopy indicated that the integrin-like proteins co-localized to the focal adhesion-like structures. Furthermore, anti-integrin antibody decreased adhesion of N. fowleri to ECM components. Finally, N. fowleri disrupted 3D ECM scaffolds, while N. lovaniensis had a minimal effect. Collectively, these results indicate a distinction in adhesion to, and invasion of, ECM proteins between N. fowleri and N. lovaniensis.

  17. Multi-functional and redundant roles of Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface proteins in tissue adhesion, colonization, and complement evasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Caine

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of Lyme disease in the U.S., with at least 25,000 cases reported to the CDC each year. B. burgdorferi is thought to enter and exit the bloodstream to achieve rapid dissemination to distal tissue sites during infection. Travel through the bloodstream requires evasion of immune surveillance and pathogen clearance in the host, a process at which B. burgdorferi is adept. B. burgdorferi encodes greater than 19 adhesive outer surface proteins many of which have been found to bind to host cells or components of the extracellular matrix. Several others bind to host complement regulatory factors, in vitro. Production of many of these adhesive proteins is tightly regulated by environmental cues, and some have been shown to aid in vascular interactions and tissue colonization, as well as survival in the blood, in vivo. Recent work has described multifaceted and redundant roles of B. burgdorferi outer surface proteins in complement component interactions and tissue targeted adhesion and colonization, distinct from their previously identified in vitro binding capabilities. Recent insights into the multifunctional roles of previously well characterized outer surface proteins such as BBK32, DbpA, CspA, and OspC have changed the way we think about the surface proteome of these organisms during the tick-mammal lifecycle. With the combination of new and old in vivo models and in vitro techniques, the field has identified distinct ligand binding domains on BBK32 and DbpA that afford tissue colonization or blood survival to B. burgdorferi. In this review we describe the multifunctional and redundant roles of many adhesive outer surface proteins of B. burgdorferi in tissue adhesion, colonization, and bloodstream survival that, together, promote the survival of Borrelia spp. throughout maintenance in their multi-host lifestyle.

  18. Mining Proteomic Data to Expose Protein Modifications in Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah eLeon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Proteomic tools identify constituents of complex mixtures, often delivering long lists of identified proteins. The high-throughput methods excel at matching tandem mass spectrometry data to spectra predicted from sequence databases. Unassigned mass spectra are ignored, but could, in principle, provide valuable information on unanticipated modifications and improve protein annotations while consuming limited quantities of material. Strategies to mine information from these discards are presented, along with discussion of features that, when present, provide strong support for modifications. In this study we mined LC-MS/MS datasets of proteolytically-digested concanavalin A pull down fractions from Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 cell lysates. Analyses identified 154 proteins. Many of the observed proteins displayed post-translationally modified forms, including O-formylated and methyl-esterified segments that appear biologically relevant (i.e., not artifacts of sample handling. Interesting cleavages and modifications (e.g., S-cyanylation and trimethylation were observed near catalytic sites of methanogenesis enzymes. Of 31 Methanosarcina protein N-termini recovered by concanavalin A binding or from a previous study, only M. mazei S-layer protein MM1976 and its M. acetivorans C2A orthologue, MA0829, underwent signal peptide excision. Experimental results contrast with predictions from algorithms SignalP 3.0 and Exprot, which were found to over-predict the presence of signal peptides. Proteins MM0002, MM0716, MM1364, and MM1976 were found to be glycosylated, and employing chromatography tailored specifically for glycopeptides will likely reveal more.This study supplements limited, existing experimental datasets of mature archaeal N-termini, including presence or absence of signal peptides, translation initiation sites, and other processing. Methanosarcina surface and membrane proteins are richly modified.

  19. Surface Modification of Silicone Rubber for Adhesion Patterning of Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Water Cluster Ion Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommani, Piyanuch; Ichihashi, Gaku; Ryuto, Hiromichi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Takaoka, Gikan H.

    2011-01-01

    Biocompatibility of silicone rubber sheet (SR) was improved by the water cluster ion irradiation for adhesion patterning of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The water cluster ions were irradiated at acceleration voltage of 6 kV and doses of 1014-1016 ions/cm2. The effect of ion dose on changes in wettability and surface atomic bonding state was observed. Compared to the unirradiated SR, about four-time smoother surface on the irradiated one was observed. Water contact angle decreased with an increase in the ion dose up to 1×1015 ions/cm2. With an increase in ion dose, XPS showed decrease of atomic carbon due to lateral sputtering effect and increase of atomic oxygen due to surface oxidation. After 7 days in vitro culture, the complete adhesion pattern of the rat MSCs was obtained on the irradiated SR at dose of 1×1015 ions/cm2, corresponding to the low contact angle of 87°. At low dose, the partial pattern on the irradiated region was observed instead.

  20. Surface modification of polyethylene by radiation-induced grafting for adhesive bonding. IV. Improvement in wet peel strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, S.; Yamamoto, F.

    1980-01-01

    Adhesive joints of hydrolyzed methyl acrylate grafts, bonded with epoxy adhesives, yield extremely high peel strength (adherend failure) in dry conditions. However, when the joints are exposed to humid environments, the peel strength rapidly decreases with exposure time and then reaches a constant value (wet peel strength). Since the locus of failure changes from the adherend to the homopolymer layer with decreasing peel strength, the decrease is due to a decrease in mechanical strength of the homopolymer layer itself, which results from its swelling by water absorption. Many attempts to reduce the swelling of the homopolymer layer or to strengthen the swollen homopolymer layer were unsuccessful except (1) priming with epoxy solutions consisting of a base epoxy resin and organic solvents which can dissolve not only epoxy resins but also hydrolyzed poly(methyl acrylate) and (2) partial etching of the homopolymer layer by photo-oxidative degradation. All the results on the improvement in wet peel strength can be explained in terms of the penetration of epoxy resins into the homopolymer layer and subsequent curing of the penetrated epoxy resin. 15 figures, 1 table

  1. Redistribution of microfilament-associated proteins during the formation of focal contacts and adhesions in chick fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Badley, R A; Rees, D A

    1983-01-01

    the associated microfilament bundles. Indeed the appearance of small bodies containing alpha-actinin and vinculin is shown to precede focal contact formation in our model system and such structures (not visible by IRM) are proposed to be the precursors of focal contacts and adhesions. Myosin and filamin...... are distributed generally with some reticular patterning in the early motile cells which lack the focal specializations, but as focal contacts and adhesions form these proteins become progressively recruited into the associated microfilament bundles. Only then do we see the marked depletion that has been reported...

  2. Cloning and sequencing of adhesion protein gene of Trichomonas gallinae from pigeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, F; Li, G Q; Su, R Q; Liang, G; Chen, Z H; Hicham, W

    2010-02-26

    The adhesion protein (AP) gene of Trichomonas gallinae from pigeon was cloned and sequenced. The first-strand cDNA of the AP gene of T. gallinae from pigeon was amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with total RNA extracting kit and cloned in the vector pMD18-T. The recombinant plasmid was identified by PCR and restriction endonuclease, and the positive clone was sequenced and analysed by comparing the sequence similarity with other sequences in the GenBank. The AP gene of T. gallinae had a length of 1032bp, which contained a complete open reading frame (ORF) of 930bp long, coding for 309 amino acids. The sequence analysis revealed that the homology with three AP genes of Trichomonas vaginalis (i.e., TVU87096, TVU87097 and TVU87098) was 94.2%, 92.6% and 92.0%, respectively. It is concluded that the successfully cloned AP gene from T. gallinae will provide the basis for the expression of the AP gene in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and the preparation of its recombinant protein.

  3. Maillard-reaction-induced modification and aggregation of proteins and hardening of texture in protein bar model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peng; Guo, Mufan; Liu, Dasong; Liu, Xiaoming; Labuza, Teodore P

    2013-03-01

    The hardening of high-protein bars causes problems in their acceptability to consumers. The objective of this study was to determine the progress of the Maillard reaction in model systems of high-protein nutritional bars containing reducing sugars, and to illustrate the influences of the Maillard reaction on the modification and aggregation of proteins and the hardening of bar matrices during storage. The progress of the Maillard reaction, glycation, and aggregation of proteins, and textural changes in bar matrices were investigated during storage at 25, 35, and 45 °C. The initial development of the Maillard reaction caused little changes in hardness; however, further storage resulted in dramatic modification of protein with formation of high-molecular-weight polymers, resulting in the hardening in texture. The replacement of reducing sugars with nonreducing ingredients such as sugar alcohols in the formula minimized the changes in texture. The hardening of high-protein bars causes problems in their acceptability to consumers. Maillard reaction is one of the mechanisms contributing to the hardening of bar matrix, particularly for the late stage of storage. The replacement of reducing sugars with nonreducing ingredients such as sugar alcohols in the formula will minimize the changes in texture. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  4. Functional modification of the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein after desensitization of turkey erythrocytes by catecholamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, M M; Stadel, J M; Iyengar, R; Lefkowitz, R J

    1983-07-01

    Densensitization of turkey erythrocytes by exposure to the beta-adrenergic agonist (-)isoproterenol leads to decreased activation of adenylate cyclase by agonist, NaF, and guanyl-5'-yl imido diphosphate, with no reduction in the number of beta-adrenergic receptors. Interactions between the receptor and the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein (N protein) also seem to be impaired. These observations suggest that a component distal to the beta-adrenergic receptor may be a locus of modification. Accordingly we examined the N protein to determine whether it was altered by desensitization. The rate at which (-)isoproterenol stimulated the release of [3H]GDP from the N protein was substantially lower in membranes prepared from desensitized cells, providing further evidence for uncoupling of the receptor and the N protein. The amount of N protein in membranes from control and desensitized cells was compared by labeling the 42,000 Mr component of the N protein with [32P]NAD+ and cholera toxin; no significant difference was found. However, significantly more N protein (p less than .001) was solubilized by cholate extraction of desensitized membranes, suggesting an altered association of the N protein with the membrane after desensitization. The functional activity of the N protein was measured by reconstitution of cholate extracts of turkey erythrocyte membranes into S49 lymphoma cyc- membranes. Reconstitution of (-)isoproterenol stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity was reduced significantly (p less than .05) after desensitization. These observations suggest that desensitization of the turkey erythrocyte by (-)isoproterenol results in functional modifications of the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein, leading to impaired interactions with the beta-adrenergic receptor and reduced activation of adenylate cyclase.

  5. Multiscale approaches to protein-mediated interactions between membranes—relating microscopic and macroscopic dynamics in radially growing adhesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bihr, Timo; Smith, Ana-Suncana; Seifert, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Macromolecular complexation leading to coupling of two or more cellular membranes is a crucial step in a number of biological functions of the cell. While other mechanisms may also play a role, adhesion always involves the fluctuations of deformable membranes, the diffusion of proteins and the molecular binding and unbinding. Because these stochastic processes couple over a multitude of time and length scales, theoretical modeling of membrane adhesion has been a major challenge. Here we present an effective Monte Carlo scheme within which the effects of the membrane are integrated into local rates for molecular recognition. The latter step in the Monte Carlo approach enables us to simulate the nucleation and growth of adhesion domains within a system of the size of a cell for tens of seconds without loss of accuracy, as shown by comparison to 10 6 times more expensive Langevin simulations. To perform this validation, the Langevin approach was augmented to simulate diffusion of proteins explicitly, together with reaction kinetics and membrane dynamics. We use the Monte Carlo scheme to gain deeper insight to the experimentally observed radial growth of micron sized adhesion domains, and connect the effective rate with which the domain is growing to the underlying microscopic events. We thus demonstrate that our technique yields detailed information about protein transport and complexation in membranes, which is a fundamental step toward understanding even more complex membrane interactions in the cellular context. (paper)

  6. Multiscale approaches to protein-mediated interactions between membranes—relating microscopic and macroscopic dynamics in radially growing adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihr, Timo; Seifert, Udo; Smith, Ana-Sunčana

    2015-08-01

    Macromolecular complexation leading to coupling of two or more cellular membranes is a crucial step in a number of biological functions of the cell. While other mechanisms may also play a role, adhesion always involves the fluctuations of deformable membranes, the diffusion of proteins and the molecular binding and unbinding. Because these stochastic processes couple over a multitude of time and length scales, theoretical modeling of membrane adhesion has been a major challenge. Here we present an effective Monte Carlo scheme within which the effects of the membrane are integrated into local rates for molecular recognition. The latter step in the Monte Carlo approach enables us to simulate the nucleation and growth of adhesion domains within a system of the size of a cell for tens of seconds without loss of accuracy, as shown by comparison to 106 times more expensive Langevin simulations. To perform this validation, the Langevin approach was augmented to simulate diffusion of proteins explicitly, together with reaction kinetics and membrane dynamics. We use the Monte Carlo scheme to gain deeper insight to the experimentally observed radial growth of micron sized adhesion domains, and connect the effective rate with which the domain is growing to the underlying microscopic events. We thus demonstrate that our technique yields detailed information about protein transport and complexation in membranes, which is a fundamental step toward understanding even more complex membrane interactions in the cellular context.

  7. Cell adhesion and growth on ultrananocrystalline diamond and diamond-like carbon films after different surface modifications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikšovský, Jan; Voss, A.; Kozarova, R.; Kocourek, Tomáš; Písařík, Petr; Ceccone, G.; Kulisch, W.; Jelínek, Miroslav; Apostolova, M.D.; Reithmaier, J.P.; Popov, C.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 297, APR (2014), s. 95-102 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD12069 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ultrananocrystalline diamond films * diamond -like carbon films * surface modification * direct contact cell tests Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.711, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169433214001251

  8. Multiple conserved cell adhesion protein interactions mediate neural wiring of a sensory circuit inC. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byunghyuk; Emmons, Scott W

    2017-09-13

    Nervous system function relies on precise synaptic connections. A number of widely-conserved cell adhesion proteins are implicated in cell recognition between synaptic partners, but how these proteins act as a group to specify a complex neural network is poorly understood. Taking advantage of known connectivity in C. elegans , we identified and studied cell adhesion genes expressed in three interacting neurons in the mating circuits of the adult male. Two interacting pairs of cell surface proteins independently promote fasciculation between sensory neuron HOA and its postsynaptic target interneuron AVG: BAM-2/neurexin-related in HOA binds to CASY-1/calsyntenin in AVG; SAX-7/L1CAM in sensory neuron PHC binds to RIG-6/contactin in AVG. A third, basal pathway results in considerable HOA-AVG fasciculation and synapse formation in the absence of the other two. The features of this multiplexed mechanism help to explain how complex connectivity is encoded and robustly established during nervous system development.

  9. Chemical synthesis of membrane proteins by the removable backbone modification method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shan; Zuo, Chao; Huang, Dong-Liang; Cai, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Long-Hua; Tian, Chang-Lin; Zheng, Ji-Shen; Liu, Lei

    2017-12-01

    Chemical synthesis can produce membrane proteins bearing specifically designed modifications (e.g., phosphorylation, isotope labeling) that are difficult to obtain through recombinant protein expression approaches. The resulting homogeneously modified synthetic membrane proteins are valuable tools for many advanced biochemical and biophysical studies. This protocol describes the chemical synthesis of membrane proteins by condensation of transmembrane peptide segments through native chemical ligation. To avoid common problems encountered due to the poor solubility of transmembrane peptides in almost any solvent, we describe an effective procedure for the chemical synthesis of membrane proteins through the removable-backbone modification (RBM) strategy. Two key steps of this protocol are: (i) installation of solubilizing Arg4-tagged RBM groups into the transmembrane peptides at any primary amino acid through Fmoc (9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl) solid-phase peptide synthesis and (ii) native ligation of the full-length sequence, followed by removal of the RBM tags by TFA (trifluoroacetic acid) cocktails to afford the native protein. The installation of RBM groups is achieved by using 4-methoxy-5-nitrosalicyladehyde by reduction amination to incorporate an activated O-to-N acyl transfer auxiliary. The Arg4-tag-modified membrane-spanning peptide segments behave like water-soluble peptides to facilitate their purification, ligation and mass characterization.

  10. Modifications in nanoparticle-protein interactions by varying the protein conformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sugam; Yadav, I.; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2017-05-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering has been used to study the interaction of silica nanoparticle with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) protein without and with a protein denaturing agent urea. The measurements have been carried out at pH 7 where both the components (nanoparticle and protein) are similarly charged. We show that the interactions in nanoparticle-protein system can be modified by changing the conformation of protein through the presence of urea. In the absence of urea, the strong electrostatic repulsion between the nanoparticle and protein prevents protein adsorption on nanoparticle surface. This non-adsorption, in turn gives rise to depletion attraction between nanoparticles. However, with addition of urea the depletion attraction is completely suppressed. Urea driven denaturation of protein is utilized to expose the positively charged patched of the BSA molecules which eventually leads to adsorption of BSA on nanoparticles eliminating the depletion interaction.

  11. Effects of fiber density and plasma modification of nanofibrous membranes on the adhesion and growth of HaCaT keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacakova, Marketa; Lopot, Frantisek; Hadraba, Daniel; Varga, Marian; Zaloudkova, Margit; Stranska, Denisa; Suchy, Tomas; Bacakova, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    It may be possible to regulate the cell colonization of biodegradable polymer nanofibrous membranes by plasma treatment and by the density of the fibers. To test this hypothesis, nanofibrous membranes of different fiber densities were treated by oxygen plasma with a range of plasma power and exposure times. Scanning electron microscopy and mechanical tests showed significant modification of nanofibers after plasma treatment. The intensity of the fiber modification increased with plasma power and exposure time. The exposure time seemed to have a stronger effect on modifying the fiber. The mechanical behavior of the membranes was influenced by the plasma treatment, the fiber density, and their dry or wet state. Plasma treatment increased the membrane stiffness; however, the membranes became more brittle. Wet membranes displayed significantly lower stiffness than dry membranes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis showed a slight increase in oxygen-containing groups on the membrane surface after plasma treatment. Plasma treatment enhanced the adhesion and growth of HaCaT keratinocytes on nanofibrous membranes. The cells adhered and grew preferentially on membranes of lower fiber densities, probably due to the larger area of void spaces between the fibers. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  12. Adhesion of Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes to fibronectin or laminin modifies tubulin and paraflagellar rod protein phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliciane C Mattos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The unicellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagaś disease in humans. Adherence of the infective stage to elements of the extracellular matrix (ECM, as laminin and fibronectin, is an essential step in host cell invasion. Although members of the gp85/TS, as Tc85, were identified as laminin and fibronectin ligands, the signaling events triggered on the parasite upon binding to these molecules are largely unexplored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Viable infective parasites were incubated with laminin, fibronectin or bovine serum albumin for different periods of time and the proteins were separated by bidimensional gels. The phosphoproteins were envisaged by specific staining and the spots showing phosphorylation levels significantly different from the control were excised and identified by MS/MS. The results of interest were confirmed by immunoblotting or immunoprecipitation and the localization of proteins in the parasite was determined by immunofluorescence. Using a host cell-free system, our data indicate that the phosphorylation contents of T. cruzi proteins encompassing different cellular functions are modified upon incubation of the parasite with fibronectin or laminin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Herein it is shown, for the first time, that paraflagellar rod proteins and α-tubulin, major structural elements of the parasite cytoskeleton, are predominantly dephosphorylated during the process, probably involving the ERK1/2 pathway. It is well established that T. cruzi binds to ECM elements during the cell infection process. The fact that laminin and fibronectin induce predominantly dephosphorylation of the main cytoskeletal proteins of the parasite suggests a possible correlation between cytoskeletal modifications and the ability of the parasite to internalize into host cells.

  13. Quantitative proteomic characterization of redox-dependent post-translational modifications on protein cysteines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Jicheng; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Protein cysteine thiols play a crucial role in redox signaling, regulation of enzymatic activity and protein function, and maintaining redox homeostasis in living systems. The unique chemical reactivity of thiol groups makes cysteine susceptible to oxidative modifications by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species to form a broad array of reversible and irreversible protein post-translational modifications (PTMs). The reversible modifications in particular are one of the major components of redox signaling and are involved in regulation of various cellular processes under physiological and pathological conditions. The biological significance of these redox PTMs in health and diseases has been increasingly recognized. Herein, we review the recent advances of quantitative proteomic approaches for investigating redox PTMs in complex biological systems, including the general considerations of sample processing, various chemical or affinity enrichment strategies, and quantitative approaches. We also highlight a number of redox proteomic approaches that enable effective profiling of redox PTMs for addressing specific biological questions. Although some technological limitations remain, redox proteomics is paving the way towards a better understanding of redox signaling and regulation in human health and diseases.

  14. Beyond gene expression: the impact of protein post-translational modifications in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Joel A; Solis, Nestor; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2014-01-31

    The post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins plays a critical role in the regulation of a broad range of cellular processes in eukaryotes. Yet their role in governing similar systems in the conventionally presumed 'simpler' forms of life has been largely neglected and, until recently, was thought to occur only rarely, with some modifications assumed to be limited to higher organisms alone. Recent developments in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have provided an unparalleled power to enrich, identify and quantify peptides with PTMs. Additional modifications to biological molecules such as lipids and carbohydrates that are essential for bacterial pathophysiology have only recently been detected on proteins. Here we review bacterial protein PTMs, focusing on phosphorylation, acetylation, proteolytic degradation, methylation and lipidation and the roles they play in bacterial adaptation - thus highlighting the importance of proteomic techniques in a field that is only just in its infancy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Trends in Microbial Proteomics. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. MS/MS of synthetic peptide is not sufficient to confirm new types of protein modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangkyu; Tan, Minjia; Dai, Lunzhi; Kwon, Oh Kwang; Yang, Jeong Soo; Zhao, Yingming; Chen, Yue

    2013-02-01

    Protein post-translational modification (PTM) is one of the major regulatory mechanisms that fine-tune protein functions. Undescribed mass shifts, which may suggest novel types of PTMs, continue to be discovered because of the availabilities of more sensitive mass spectrometry technologies and more powerful sequence alignment algorithms. In this study, the histone extracted from HeLa cells was analyzed using an approach that takes advantages of in vitro propionylation, efficient peptide separation using isoelectric focusing fractionation, and the high sensitivity of the linear ion trap coupled with hybrid FT mass spectrometer. One modified peptide was identified with a new type of protein modification (+42 Da), which was assigned to acetylation of threonine 15 in histone2A. The modified peptide was verified by careful manual evaluation of the tandem mass spectrum and confirmed by high-resolution MS/MS analysis of the corresponding synthetic peptide. However, HPLC coelution and MS/MS/MS of key ions showed that the +42 Da mass shifts at threonine residue did not correspond to acetylation. The key fragment ion, y4, in the MS/MS/MS spectra (indicative of the modification site) differed between the in vivo and synthetic peptide. We showed that the misidentification was originated from sequence homologues and chemical derivitization during sample preparation. This result indicated that a more stringent procedure that includes MS/MS, MS/MS/MS, and HPLC coelution of synthetic peptides is required to identify a new PTM.

  16. Podocalyxin is a novel polysialylated neural adhesion protein with multiple roles in neural development and synapse formation.

    OpenAIRE

    Nathalia Vitureira; Rosa Andrés; Esther Pérez-Martínez; Albert Martínez; Ana Bribián; Juan Blasi; Shierley Chelliah; Guillermo López-Doménech; Fernando De Castro; Ferran Burgaya; Kelly McNagny; Eduardo Soriano

    2010-01-01

    Neural development and plasticity are regulated by neural adhesion proteins, including the polysialylated form of NCAM (PSA-NCAM). Podocalyxin (PC) is a renal PSA-containing protein that has been reported to function as an anti-adhesin in kidney podocytes. Here we show that PC is widely expressed in neurons during neural development. Neural PC interacts with the ERM protein family, and with NHERF1/2 and RhoA/G. Experiments in vitro and phenotypic analyses of podxl-deficient mice indicate that...

  17. Plasmodium vivax thrombospondin related adhesion protein: immunogenicity and protective efficacy in rodents and Aotus monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Castellanos

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The thrombospondin related adhesion protein (TRAP is a malaria pre-erythrocytic antigen currently pursued as malaria vaccine candidate to Plasmodium falciparum. In this study, a long synthetic peptide (LSP representing a P. vivax TRAP fragment involved in hepatocyte invasion was formulated in both Freund and Montanide ISA 720 adjutants and administered by IM and subcutaneous routes to BALB/c mice and Aotus monkeys. We measured specific humoral immune responses in both animal species and performed a sporozoite challenge in Aotus monkeys to assess the protective efficacy of the vaccine. After immunization both mice and Aotus seroconverted as shown by ELISA, and the specific anti-peptide antibodies cross reacted with the parasite in IFAT assays. Only two out of six immunized animals became infected after P. vivax sporozoite challenge as compared with four out of six animals from the control group. These results suggest that this TRAP fragment has protective potential against P. vivax malaria and deserves further studies as vaccine candidate.

  18. The Prion Protein Controls Polysialylation of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 during Cellular Morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohadeseh Mehrabian

    Full Text Available Despite its multi-faceted role in neurodegenerative diseases, the physiological function of the prion protein (PrP has remained elusive. On the basis of its evolutionary relationship to ZIP metal ion transporters, we considered that PrP may contribute to the morphogenetic reprogramming of cells underlying epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMT. Consistent with this hypothesis, PrP transcription increased more than tenfold during EMT, and stable PrP-deficient cells failed to complete EMT in a mammalian cell model. A global comparative proteomics analysis identified the neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1 as a candidate mediator of this impairment, which led to the observation that PrP-deficient cells fail to undergo NCAM1 polysialylation during EMT. Surprisingly, this defect was caused by a perturbed transcription of the polysialyltransferase ST8SIA2 gene. Proteomics data pointed toward β-catenin as a transcriptional regulator affected in PrP-deficient cells. Indeed, pharmacological blockade or siRNA-based knockdown of β-catenin mimicked PrP-deficiency in regards to NCAM1 polysialylation. Our data established the existence of a PrP-ST8SIA2-NCAM signaling loop, merged two mature fields of investigation and offer a simple model for explaining phenotypes linked to PrP.

  19. Mussel adhesive protein coating: A potential therapeutic method for self-healing of cracked teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bo-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, cracked tooth syndrome is the third main cause of tooth extraction, following caries and periodontal diseases, done in almost all the dental clinics. Nevertheless, the diagnosis and treatment of this condition remain controversial. All candidate therapeutics, such as occlusal adjustment, preventive filling, root canal therapy (RCT, and crown restoration, provide unpredictable outcomes. As such, methods to prevent further crack development and to induce crack self-healing must be developed. The Hypothesis: Mussels secreting adhesive foot protein (Mafp can attach to various surfaces under aqueous conditions. In nature, mussels adhere to stones and deposit layer by layer through mineralization, thereby forming mussel-stone composites with excellent mechanical property. Given the natural process of mussel-stone complex formation, we hypothesize that application of Mafp coating at the crack interface may mineralize the cracks by capturing calcium and phosphate ions from the saliva. This process consequently leads to crack self-healing and complete restoration of the tooth structure. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: To test our hypothesis, we need to develop a model in vivo. Cracked teeth disks are adhered together using Mafp solution. Then, the tooth disks are sutured on the interior side of the cheeks. After regular intervals, the disks are removed and characterized. Scanning electron microscopy is performed to evaluate the morphology of the crack interface. Microhardness and shear bond strength are used to evaluate the mechanical property of the healing cracked zone. Transmission electron microscopy is also conducted to evaluate the crystallinity of the crack interface.

  20. E-selectin ligand-1 (ESL-1) is a novel adiponectin binding protein on cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Kuroda, Nana; Uekita, Hiromi; Kochi, Ikoi; Matsumoto, Akane; Niinaga, Ryu; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro; Kihara, Shinji

    2016-02-05

    Adiponectin (APN) is an adipocyte-derived bioactive molecule with anti-diabetic and anti-atherogenic properties. Although anti-diabetic effects are mostly mediated by the adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, the anti-atherogenic mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we identified E-selectin ligand (ESL)-1 as a novel APN-binding protein by mass spectrometry analysis of HepG2 cell-derived immunoprecipitant with an anti-APN antibody. Cell adhesion assays using fluorescence-labelled monocyte cell line THP-1 cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) revealed that APN-pre-treated THP-1 cells had reduced binding ability to HUVECs. This APN-mediated suppressive effect on monocyte binding to endothelial cells was partially abrogated by targeting ESL-1 with shRNA in THP-1 cells. In addition, serial mutagenesis analysis disclosed that five extracellular amino acids close to the N-terminus of ESL-1 were essential for binding with APN. Our results highlight the fact that interaction between APN and ESL-1 could provide a fundamental mechanism underlying the anti-atherogenic properties of APN. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON THE MODIFICATIONS PRODUCED AT THE INTERFACE BETWEEN THE PERIODONTAL ADHESIVE SPLINTS AND THE DENTAL SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan VÂSCU

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As the market offer for bioadhesive materials is constantly increasing, while the dental surfaces on which they are applied show specific features, different from those commonly resulting from the preparation of carious processes, knowledge on their behavioral characteristics is absolutely necessary for their utilization under optimum conditions, through methods assuming prolongued clinical performances, assured by dimensional and colouristic stability and by a reduced cure contraction, for diminishing as much as possible the space of marginal percolation and fracture of the free enamel-free margins, as well as for delamination of immobilization from the afferent dental structure. Selection of the type of material for periodonthic teeth immobilization and of the technique to be applied is decided on the basis of a systematic, clinical and radiological analysis meant at establishing: the number of affected teeth, the type of occlusion and the possible parafunctions, oral hygiene, the aesthetic requirements of the patient, his/her age and motivation for a periodical monitorization. Numerous modern materials employed in the immobilization of periodonthic teeth are closely related not only to their physical properties and long-term stability, but also to the oral environment in which they are functioning. Modern adhesive materials are well-suited for dental recovery of the remaining healthy structures, due to their capacity of chemically and micromechanically adhering onto them.

  2. Modification of cysteine residues by cyclopentenone prostaglandins: interplay with redox regulation of protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeste, Clara L; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Cyclopentenone prostaglandins (cyPG) are endogenous lipid mediators involved in the resolution of inflammation and the regulation of cell proliferation and cellular redox status. Upon exogenous administration they have shown beneficial effects in models of inflammation and tissue injury, as well as potential antitumoral actions, which have raised a considerable interest in their study for the development of therapeutic tools. Due to their electrophilic nature, the best-known mechanism of action of these mediators is the covalent modification of proteins at cysteine residues through Michael addition. Identification of cyPG targets through proteomic approaches, including MS/MS analysis to pinpoint the modified residues, is proving critical to characterize their mechanisms of action. Among the targets of cyPG are proinflammatory transcription factors, proteins involved in cell defense, such as the regulator of the antioxidant response Keap1 and detoxifying enzymes like GST, and key signaling proteins like Ras proteins. Moreover, cyPG may interact with redox-active small molecules, such as glutathione and hydrogen sulfide. Much has been learned about cyPG in the past few years and this knowledge has also contributed to clarify both pharmacological actions and signaling mechanisms of these and other electrophilic lipids. Given the fact that many cyPG targets are involved in or are targets for redox regulation, there is a complex interplay with redox-induced modifications. Here we address the modification of protein cysteine residues by cyPG elucidated by proteomic studies, paying special attention to the interplay with redox signaling. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Structural analysis of DNA–protein complexes regulating the restriction–modification system Esp1396I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Richard N. A.; McGeehan, John E.; Ball, Neil J.; Streeter, Simon D.; Thresh, Sarah-Jane; Kneale, G. G.

    2013-01-01

    Comparison of bound and unbound DNA in protein–DNA co-crystal complexes reveals insights into controller-protein binding and DNA distortion in transcriptional regulation. The controller protein of the type II restriction–modification (RM) system Esp1396I binds to three distinct DNA operator sequences upstream of the methyltransferase and endonuclease genes in order to regulate their expression. Previous biophysical and crystallographic studies have shown molecular details of how the controller protein binds to the operator sites with very different affinities. Here, two protein–DNA co-crystal structures containing portions of unbound DNA from native operator sites are reported. The DNA in both complexes shows significant distortion in the region between the conserved symmetric sequences, similar to that of a DNA duplex when bound by the controller protein (C-protein), indicating that the naked DNA has an intrinsic tendency to bend when not bound to the C-protein. Moreover, the width of the major groove of the DNA adjacent to a bound C-protein dimer is observed to be significantly increased, supporting the idea that this DNA distortion contributes to the substantial cooperativity found when a second C-protein dimer binds to the operator to form the tetrameric repression complex

  4. Barley lipid transfer protein, LTP1, contains a new type of lipid-like post-translational modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Lerche, Mathilde H.; Poulsen, Flemming Martin

    2001-01-01

    the formation of cutin and involvement in stress and pathogen responses, but there is yet no direct demonstration of an in vivo function. We have found and characterized a novel post-translational modification of the barley nonspecific lipid transfer protein, LTP1. The protein-modification bond is of a new type...... in which an aspartic acid in LTP1 is bound to the modification through what most likely is an ester bond. The chemical structure of the modification has been characterized by means of two-dimensional homo- and heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as well as mass spectrometry and is found...... to be lipid-like in nature. The modification does not resemble any standard lipid post-translational modification but is similar to a compound with known antimicrobial activity....

  5. Getting from A to B-exploring the activation motifs of the class B adhesion G protein-coupled receptor subfamily G member 4/GPR112

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelia Peeters, Miriam; Mos, Iris; Lenselink, Eelke B

    2016-01-01

    The adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (ADGRs/class B2 G protein-coupled receptors) constitute an ancient family of G protein-coupled receptors that have recently been demonstrated to play important roles in cellular and developmental processes. Here, we describe a first insight...... important motifs resembling class A, class B, and combined elements, but also a unique highly conserved ADGR motif (H3.33). Given the high conservation of these motifs and residues across the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor family, it can be assumed that these are general elements of adhesion GPCR...... function.-Peeters, M. C., Mos, I., Lenselink, E. B., Lucchesi, M., IJzerman, A. P., Schwartz, T. W. Getting from A to B-Exploring the activation motifs of the class B adhesion G protein-coupled receptor subfamily G member 4/GPR112....

  6. Modification of the Sweetness and Stability of Sweet-Tasting Protein Monellin by Gene Mutation and Protein Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiulei; Li, Lei; Yang, Liu; Liu, Tianming; Cai, Chenggu; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Natural sweet protein monellin has a high sweetness and low calorie, suggesting its potential in food applications. However, due to its low heat and acid resistance, the application of monellin is limited. In this study, we show that the thermostability of monellin can be improved with no sweetness decrease by means of sequence, structure analysis, and site-directed mutagenesis. We analyzed residues located in the α-helix as well as an ionizable residue C41. Of the mutants investigated, the effects of E23A and C41A mutants were most remarkable. The former displayed significantly improved thermal stability, while its sweetness was not changed. The mutated protein was stable after 30 min incubation at 85°C. The latter showed increased sweetness and slight improvement of thermostability. Furthermore, we found that most mutants enhancing the thermostability of the protein were distributed at the two ends of α-helix. Molecular biophysics analysis revealed that the state of buried ionizable residues may account for the modulated properties of mutated proteins. Our results prove that the properties of sweet protein monellin can be modified by means of bioinformatics analysis, gene manipulation, and protein modification, highlighting the possibility of designing novel effective sweet proteins based on structure-function relationships.

  7. Microbial expression of proteins containing long repetitive Arg-Gly-Asp cell adhesive motifs created by overlap elongation PCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Hiroyuki; Shinkai, Masashige; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2004-01-01

    We developed a novel method for creating repetitive DNA libraries using overlap elongation PCR, and prepared a DNA library encoding repetitive Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) cell adhesive motifs. We obtained various length DNAs encoding repetitive RGD from a short monomer DNA (18 bp) after a thermal cyclic reaction without a DNA template for amplification, and isolated DNAs encoding 2, 21, and 43 repeats of the RGD motif. We cloned these DNAs into a protein expression vector and overexpressed them as thioredoxin fusion proteins: RGD2, RGD21, and RGD43, respectively. The solubility of RGD43 in water was low and it formed a fibrous precipitate in water. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that RGD43 formed a branched 3D-network structure in the solid state. To evaluate the function of the cell adhesive motifs in RGD43, mouse fibroblast cells were cultivated on the RGD43 scaffold. The fibroblast cells adhered to the RGD43 scaffold and extended long filopodia

  8. A Halotyrosine Antibody that Detects Increased Protein Modifications in Asthma Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hongjun; Hallstrand, Teal S.; Daly, Don S.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Nair, Parameswaran; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2014-01-31

    Background-Airway inflammation plays an important pathophysiological role in asthma. Eosinophils produce hypobromite and bromotyrosine while neutrophils produce hypochlorite and chlorotyrosine. Objective-To evaluate halotyrosine modifications of individual airway proteins as a marker of inflammation in asthma using an antibody-based assay. Methods-We developed a novel monoclonal antibody (BTK-94C) that binds halogenated tyrosine residues, and used this antibody in a custom enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray platform to examine halotyrosine levels in 23 proteins in three independent sets of sputum samples (52 samples total). Results-In 15 subjects with either no asthma, or with asthma characterized by high or low sputum eosinophil counts, we found associations between increased halotyrosine levels of at least three proteins and severity of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Treatment with mepolizumab in 17 patients with sputum eosinophilia markedly reduced the sputum eosinophilia and significantly reduced halotyrosine levels in one sputum protein. Further analysis of 10 subjects with neutrophilic asthma and 10 health controls demonstrated a broad increase in halotyrosine in the patients with airway neutrophilia. Conclusions-Significantly higher levels of halotyrosine are associated with asthma in the asthma phenotypes we examined. The halotyrosine levels correlated with indirect AHR in the form of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Clinical Implication-An antibody-based assay for tyrosine halogenation in specific proteins may prove useful for assessing airway inflammation in asthma. Capsule Summary-An antibody to measure protein monobrominated tyrosine and other halotyrosine modifications was developed and used to evaluate halogenation in specific proteins in the airways for the first time. Associations were found between levels of halotyrosine and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, and eosinophil and neutrophil inflammation in sputum from

  9. Resistance to protein adsorption and adhesion of fibroblasts on nanocrystalline diamond films: the role of topography and boron doping

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alcaide, M.; Papaioannou, S.; Taylor, Andrew; Fekete, Ladislav; Gurevich, L.; Zachar, V.; Pennisi, C.P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 5 (2016), s. 90-1-12 ISSN 0957-4530 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1409 Grant - others:FUNBIO(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21568 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : protein adsorption * fibroblasts adhesion * nanocrystalline diamond * boron doping * topography Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.325, year: 2016

  10. Posttranslational modification of bioaerosol protein by common gas pollutants: NO2 and O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi Mahmood, Marliyyah; Bloss, William; Pope, Francis

    2016-04-01

    Air pollution can exacerbate several medical conditions, for example, hay fever and asthma. The global incidence of hay fever has been rising for decades; however, the underlying reasons behind this rise remain unclear. It is hypothesized that the exposure of pollen to common gas phase pollutants, such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3), increases the allergenicity of the pollen and thus increases hay fever incidence (Reinmuth-Selzle et al., 2014, Franze, et al., 2005). Since atmospheric pollutants often have greater concentrations within urban areas (in particular NO2) the hypothesis suggests that greater allergenicity should occur in urban areas. Certainly, several studies do suggest higher hay fever incidence within urban areas compared to rural areas (Schröder et al., 2015). Previous published work suggests a link between increased allergies and changes in the chemical composition of pollen protein via posttranslational modification of the protein (Reinmuth-Selzle et al., 2014). This study investigates the posttranslational modification of two highly allergenic pollen species (Birch and Ragweed) that are common in Europe. Within the laboratory, we expose pollen grains to atmospherically relevant exposures of gas phase NO2, O3 and other common gas phase oxidants under a range of environmentally relevant conditions. The effects of the exposures on the biochemistry of the pollen grains were probed using a proteomic approach (liquid chromatography coupled ultra-high resolution spectrometer). Our findings indicate the interaction between gas phase pollutants and pollen cause protein specific modifications; in particular nitration that occurs upon tyrosine residues and nitrosylation on cysteine residues. These modifications may affect human immune response to the pollen protein, which may suggest a possible reason for increased allergies in reaction to such chemically altered protein. Quantification of the relative degree of PTMs, from a variety of

  11. Modification of DNA radiolysis by DNA-binding proteins: Structural aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidkova, M.; Stisova, V.; Goffinont, S.; Gillard, N.; Castaing, B.; Spotheim-Maurizot, M.

    2006-01-01

    Formation of specific complexes between proteins and their cognate DNA modulates the yields and the location of radiation damage on both partners of the complex. The radiolysis of DNA-protein complexes is studied for: (1) the Escherichia coli lactose operator-repressor complex, (2) the complex between DNA bearing an analogue of an abasic site and the repair protein Fpg of Lactococcus lactis. Experimental patterns of DNA damages are presented and compared to predicted damage distribution obtained using an improved version of the stochastic model RADACK. The same method is used for predicting the location of damages on the proteins. At doses lower than a threshold that depends on the system, proteins protect their specific binding site on DNA while at high doses, the studied complexes are disrupted mainly through protein damage. The loss of binding ability is the functional consequence of the amino-acids modification by OH . radicals. Many of the most probably damaged amino acids are essential for the DNA-protein interaction and within a complex are protected by DNA. (authors)

  12. Orthogonal dual-modification of proteins for the engineering of multivalent protein scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Mühlberg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To add new tools to the repertoire of protein-based multivalent scaffold design, we have developed a novel dual-labeling strategy for proteins that combines residue-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids with chemical oxidative aldehyde formation at the N-terminus of a protein. Our approach relies on the selective introduction of two different functional moieties in a protein by mutually orthogonal copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC and oxime ligation. This method was applied to the conjugation of biotin and β-linked galactose residues to yield an enzymatically active thermophilic lipase, which revealed specific binding to Erythrina cristagalli lectin by SPR binding studies.

  13. The role of protein disulfide isomerase in the post-ligation phase of β3 integrin-dependent cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leader, Avi; Mor-Cohen, Ronit; Ram, Ron; Sheptovitsky, Vera; Seligsohn, Uri; Rosenberg, Nurit; Lahav, Judith

    2015-12-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) catalyzes disulfide bond exchange. It is crucial for integrin-mediated platelet adhesion and aggregation and disulfide bond exchange is necessary for αIIbβ3 and αvβ3 activation. However, the role of disulfide bond exchange and PDI in the post-ligation phase of αIIbβ3 and αvβ3 mediated cell adhesion has yet to be determined. To investigate a possible such role, we expressed wild type (WT) human αIIb and either WT human β3, or β3 harboring single or double cysteine to serine substitutions disrupting Cys473-Cys503 or Cys523-Cys544 bonds, in baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells, leading to expression of both human αIIbβ3 and a chimeric hamster/human αvβ3. Adhesion to fibrinogen-coated wells was studied in the presence or absence of bacitracin, a PDI inhibitor, with and without an αvβ3 blocker. Flow cytometry showed WT and mutant αIIbβ3 expression in BHK cells and indicated that mutated αIIbβ3 receptors were constitutively active while WT αIIbβ3 was inactive. Both αIIbβ3 and αvβ3 integrins, WT and mutants, mediated adhesion to fibrinogen as shown by reduced but still substantial adhesion following treatment with the αvβ3 blocker. Mutated αIIbβ3 integrins disrupted in the Cys523-Cys544 bond still depended on PDI for adhesion as shown by the inhibitory effect of bacitracin in the presence of the αvβ3 blocker. Mutated integrins disrupted in the Cys473-Cys503 bond showed a similar trend. PDI-mediated disulfide bond exchange plays a pivotal role in the post-ligation phase of αIIbβ3-mediated adhesion to fibrinogen, while this step in αvβ3-mediated adhesion is independent of disulfide exchange. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein (ADAP is a central hub for phosphotyrosine-mediated interactions in T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Sylvester

    Full Text Available TCR stimulation leads to an increase in cellular adhesion among other outcomes. The adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein (ADAP is known to be rapidly phosphorylated after T cell stimulation and relays the TCR signal to adhesion molecules of the integrin family. While three tyrosine phosphorylation sites have been characterized biochemically, the binding capabilities and associated functions of several other potential phosphotyrosine motifs remain unclear. Here, we utilize in vitro phosphorylation and mass spectrometry to map novel phosphotyrosine sites in the C-terminal part of human ADAP (486-783. Individual tyrosines were then mutated to phenylalanine and their relevance for cellular adhesion and migration was tested experimentally. Functionally important tyrosine residues include two sites within the folded hSH3 domains of ADAP and two at the C-terminus. Furthermore, using a peptide pulldown approach in combination with stable isotope labeling in cell culture (SILAC we identified SLP-76, PLCgamma, PIK3R1, Nck, CRK, Gads, and RasGAP as phospho-dependent binding partners of a central YDDV motif of ADAP. The phosphorylation-dependent interaction between ADAP and Nck was confirmed by yeast two-hybrid analysis, immunoprecipitation and binary pulldown experiments, indicating that ADAP directly links integrins to modulators of the cytoskeleton independent of SLP-76.

  15. PTH-related protein enhances MCF-7 breast cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion via an intracrine pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoli; Qian, Lihui; Falzon, Miriam

    2004-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most common carcinoma that metastasizes to the bone. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), a known stimulator of osteoclastic bone resorption, is a major mediator of the osteolytic process in breast cancer. PTHrP overexpression increases mitogenesis and decreases apoptosis in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. In this study, MCF-7 cells were used as a model system to study the effects of PTHrP on breast cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Clones of MCF-7 cells were established that overexpress wild-type PTHrP or PTHrP mutated in the nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Wild-type PTHrP-overexpressing cells showed significantly higher laminin adhesion and migration, and Matrigel invasion than empty vector-transfectants or cells overexpressing NLS-mutated PTHrP. Wild-type PTHrP also increased the cell surface expression of the pro-invasive integrins alpha6 and beta4; deletion of the NLS negated these effects. Exogenous PTHrP (1-34), (67-86), (107-139), and (140-173) had no effect on integrin expression, or on cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. These results indicate that PTHrP exerts its effects on cell adhesion, migration, invasion, and integrin expression via an intracrine pathway. PTHrP may play a role in breast cancer metastasis by upregulating proinvasive integrin expression, and controlling PTHrP production in breast cancer may provide therapeutic benefit.

  16. Modifications to the translational apparatus which affect the regulation of protein synthesis in sea urchin embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scalise, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    Protein synthesis can be regulated at a number of cellular levels. I have examined how modifications to specific components of the protein synthetic machinery are involved in regulating the efficiency of initiation of translation during early sea urchin embryogenesis. It is demonstrated that Ca{sup 2+} concentrations exceeding 500 uM cause the inhibition of protein synthesis in cell-free translation lysates prepared from sea urchin embryos. Specific changes in the state of phosphorylation of at least 8 proteins occur during this Ca{sup 2+}-mediated repression of translation. Analysis of these proteins has indicated that, unlike mammalian systems, there is no detectable level of Ca{sup 2+}-dependent phosphorylation of the {alpha}subunit eIF-2. Two of the proteins which do become phosphorylated in response to Ca{sup 2+} are calmodulin and an isoelectric form of sea urchin eIF-4D. In addition, 2 proteins which share similarities with kinases involved in the regulation of protein synthesis in mammalian cells, also become phosphorylated. I have investigated the consequences of changes in eIF-4D during sea urchin embryogenesis because it has been proposed that a polyamine-mediated conversion of lysine to hypusine in this factor may enhance translational activity. It is demonstrated that ({sup 3}H) spermidine-derived radioactivity is incorporated into a number of proteins when sea urchin embryos are labeled in vivo, and that the pattern of individual proteins that become labeled changes over the course of the first 30 hr of development.

  17. Additive effect of recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis ESAT-6 protein and ESAT-6/CFP-10 fusion protein in adhesion of macrophages through fibronectin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Mina; Seghatoleslam, Atefeh; Rasti, Mozhgan; Ebadat, Saeedeh; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin; Mostafavi-Pour, Zohreh

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculous granulomas are the sites of interaction between the T cells, macrophages, and extracellular matrix (ECM) to control the infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). A predominant role of RD-1-encoded secretory proteins, early secreted antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6), and culture filtrate protein-10 (CFP-10) in the formation of granulomas has recently been emphasized. However, the precise molecular events that induce the formation of these granulomatous structures are yet to be elucidated. Macrophages use integrins to adhere to fibronectin (FN) as a major component of the ECM. The major goal of this study was to investigate whether recombinant M. tuberculosis antigens can modulate integrin-mediated macrophage adhesion. Differentiated THP-1 cell line was stimulated with recombinant ESAT-6, CFP-10, and ESAT-6/CFP-10 proteins and evaluated for alterations in the expression levels of α5β1 and α4β1 by semiquantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The role of these recombinant antigens in the cytoskeleton rearrangement was determined by adhesion assay and immunofluorescent microscopy. Our data showed that ESAT-6 and ESAT-6/CFP-10 fusion proteins could induce adhesion of macrophages to FN through α4β1 integrin. An increased expression level of α4β1 integrin in comparison with α5β1 integrin in differentiated THP-1 cells was also observed. Results of immunofluorescence studies showed that recombinant proteins-treated THP-1 cells form well-organized stress fibers and focal contacts containing vinculin compared with untreated THP-1 cells. Increased expression level of α4β1 in differentiated THP-1 cells could suggest the important role of α4β1 integrin in adhesion and focal contact formation of macrophages exposed to M. tuberculosis antigens. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Posttranslational Protein Modification in the Salivary Glands of Sjögren’s Syndrome Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Herrera-Esparza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated posttranslational reactions in the salivary glands of patients with Sjögren’s syndrome. We analysed the biopsies of primary Sjögren’s patients using immunohistochemistry and a tag-purified anticyclic citrullinated protein (CCP antibody to detect citrullinated peptides, and the presence of peptidylarginine deiminase 2 (PAD2 was assessed simultaneously. The present work demonstrated the weak presence of the PAD2 enzyme in some normal salivary glands, although PAD2 expression was increased considerably in Sjögren’s patients. The presence of citrullinated proteins was also detected in the salivary tissues of Sjögren’s patients, which strongly supports the in situ posttranslational modification of proteins in this setting. Furthermore, the mutual expression of CCP and PAD2 suggests that this posttranslational modification is enzyme dependent. In conclusion, patients with Sjögren’s syndrome expressed the catalytic machinery to produce posttranslational reactions that may result in autoantigen triggering.

  19. In Silico Analysis of Correlations between Protein Disorder and Post-Translational Modifications in Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Kurotani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent proteome analyses have reported that intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs of proteins play important roles in biological processes. In higher plants whose genomes have been sequenced, the correlation between IDRs and post-translational modifications (PTMs has been reported. The genomes of various eukaryotic algae as common ancestors of plants have also been sequenced. However, no analysis of the relationship to protein properties such as structure and PTMs in algae has been reported. Here, we describe correlations between IDR content and the number of PTM sites for phosphorylation, glycosylation, and ubiquitination, and between IDR content and regions rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine (PEST and transmembrane helices in the sequences of 20 algae proteomes. Phosphorylation, O-glycosylation, ubiquitination, and PEST preferentially occurred in disordered regions. In contrast, transmembrane helices were favored in ordered regions. N-glycosylation tended to occur in ordered regions in most of the studied algae; however, it correlated positively with disordered protein content in diatoms. Additionally, we observed that disordered protein content and the number of PTM sites were significantly increased in the species-specific protein clusters compared to common protein clusters among the algae. Moreover, there were specific relationships between IDRs and PTMs among the algae from different groups.

  20. Plant-derived phenolics inhibit the accrual of structurally characterised protein and lipid oxidative modifications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arantza Soler-Cantero

    Full Text Available Epidemiological data suggest that plant-derived phenolics beneficial effects include an inhibition of LDL oxidation. After applying a screening method based on 2,4-dinitrophenyl hydrazine-protein carbonyl reaction to 21 different plant-derived phenolic acids, we selected the most antioxidant ones. Their effect was assessed in 5 different oxidation systems, as well as in other model proteins. Mass-spectrometry was then used, evidencing a heterogeneous effect on the accumulation of the structurally characterized protein carbonyl glutamic and aminoadipic semialdehydes as well as for malondialdehyde-lysine in LDL apoprotein. After TOF based lipidomics, we identified the most abundant differential lipids in Cu(++-incubated LDL as 1-palmitoyllysophosphatidylcholine and 1-stearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. Most of selected phenolic compounds prevented the accumulation of those phospholipids and the cellular impairment induced by oxidized LDL. Finally, to validate these effects in vivo, we evaluated the effect of the intake of a phenolic-enriched extract in plasma protein and lipid modifications in a well-established model of atherosclerosis (diet-induced hypercholesterolemia in hamsters. This showed that a dietary supplement with a phenolic-enriched extract diminished plasma protein oxidative and lipid damage. Globally, these data show structural basis of antioxidant properties of plant-derived phenolic acids in protein oxidation that may be relevant for the health-promoting effects of its dietary intake.

  1. Molecular classification of fatty liver by high-throughput profiling of protein post-translational modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urasaki, Yasuyo; Fiscus, Ronald R; Le, Thuc T

    2016-04-01

    We describe an alternative approach to classifying fatty liver by profiling protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) with high-throughput capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF) immunoassays. Four strains of mice were studied, with fatty livers induced by different causes, such as ageing, genetic mutation, acute drug usage, and high-fat diet. Nutrient-sensitive PTMs of a panel of 12 liver metabolic and signalling proteins were simultaneously evaluated with cIEF immunoassays, using nanograms of total cellular protein per assay. Changes to liver protein acetylation, phosphorylation, and O-N-acetylglucosamine glycosylation were quantified and compared between normal and diseased states. Fatty liver tissues could be distinguished from one another by distinctive protein PTM profiles. Fatty liver is currently classified by morphological assessment of lipid droplets, without identifying the underlying molecular causes. In contrast, high-throughput profiling of protein PTMs has the potential to provide molecular classification of fatty liver. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. In Silico Analysis of Correlations between Protein Disorder and Post-Translational Modifications in Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurotani, Atsushi; Sakurai, Tetsuya

    2015-08-20

    Recent proteome analyses have reported that intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of proteins play important roles in biological processes. In higher plants whose genomes have been sequenced, the correlation between IDRs and post-translational modifications (PTMs) has been reported. The genomes of various eukaryotic algae as common ancestors of plants have also been sequenced. However, no analysis of the relationship to protein properties such as structure and PTMs in algae has been reported. Here, we describe correlations between IDR content and the number of PTM sites for phosphorylation, glycosylation, and ubiquitination, and between IDR content and regions rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine (PEST) and transmembrane helices in the sequences of 20 algae proteomes. Phosphorylation, O-glycosylation, ubiquitination, and PEST preferentially occurred in disordered regions. In contrast, transmembrane helices were favored in ordered regions. N-glycosylation tended to occur in ordered regions in most of the studied algae; however, it correlated positively with disordered protein content in diatoms. Additionally, we observed that disordered protein content and the number of PTM sites were significantly increased in the species-specific protein clusters compared to common protein clusters among the algae. Moreover, there were specific relationships between IDRs and PTMs among the algae from different groups.

  3. Modification of the Langmuir-Schaefer method for fabrication of ordered protein films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, M. V.; Boikova, A. S.; Dyakova, Yu. A.; Marchenkova, M. A.; Opolchentsev, A. M.; Pisarevsky, Yu. V.; Prosekov, P. A.; Seregin, A. Yu.

    2017-07-01

    A modification of the Langmuir-Schaefer method for the fabrication of high-quality protein films on a solid substrate was proposed and applied to lysozyme. The procedure relies on the use of a pre-prepared protein solution, the parameters of which correspond to crystallization conditions. A lysozyme Langmuir monolayer was shown to be formed with the involvement of complexes, namely, dimers and octamers of protein molecules that are present in such protein solutions. These complexes apparently retain the structure after spreading a protein solution onto an aqueous subphase in a Langmuir trough. The thickness of the film after the transfer of the monolayer, which was formed by the proposed procedure, onto a solid substrate corresponds to the diameter of the octamer and this film is dense, continuous, and uniform, as was demonstrated by several methods: X-ray reflectivity, total external reflection X-ray standing wave, and atomic force microscopy. A layer of chloride ions that formed under the Langmuir monolayer was found at the air-protein film interface. This fact confirms an important role of the precipitating agent (chloride ions) in all steps of the formation of lysozyme films.

  4. Divalent cations and the protein surface co-ordinate the intensity of human platelet adhesion and P-selectin surface expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiss, P A; Andersson, R G G

    2002-07-01

    At sites of blood vessel injury, platelets adhere to exposed vessel components, such as collagen, or immobilized fibrinogen derived from plasma or activated platelets. The divalent cations Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) are essential for platelet adhesion and activation, but Mg(2+) can also inhibit platelet activation. The present study evaluates, by an enzymatic method, the effects of various divalent cations on the adhesion of isolated human platelets to collagen, fibrinogen, albumin or plastic in vitro. By enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, platelet surface expression of P-selectin was measured to estimate the state of activation on adherence. Mg(2+) increased platelet adhesion exclusively to collagen and fibrinogen at physiologically relevant concentrations. At higher concentrations, the adhesion declined. Ca(2+) induced a weak adhesion only to fibrinogen at physiological doses and a peak of increased adhesion to all protein-coated surfaces at 10 mmol/l. Mn(2+) elicited dose-dependent adhesion only to collagen and fibrinogen. Zn(2+), Ni(2+) and Cu(2+) increased the adhesion of platelets independently of the surface. Ca(2+) dose-dependently inhibited adhesion elicited by Mg(2+) to collagen and fibrinogen. No other combination of divalent cations elicited such an effect. Mg(2+)-dependent platelet adhesion to collagen and Ca(2+)-dependent adhesion to fibrinogen increased P-selectin expression. Thus, the present study shows that the outcome of the platelet adhesion depends on the surface and the access of divalent cations, which co-ordinate the intensity of platelet adhesion and P-selectin surface expression.

  5. Aldehyde stress-mediated novel modification of proteins: epimerization of the N-terminal amino acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajita, Ryo; Goto, Takaaki; Lee, Seon Hwa; Oe, Tomoyuki

    2013-12-16

    Various kinds of aldehyde-mediated chemical modifications of proteins have been identified as being exclusively covalent. We report a unique noncovalent modification: the aldehyde-mediated epimerization of the N-terminal amino acid. Epimerization of amino acids is thought to cause conformational changes that alter their biological activity. However, few mechanistic studies have been performed, because epimerization of an amino acid is a miniscule change in a whole protein. Furthermore, it does not produce a mass shift, making mass spectrometric analysis difficult. Here, we have demonstrated epimerization mediated by endogenous aldehydes. A model peptide, with an N-terminal l- or d-FMRFamide, was incubated with an endogenous or synthetic aldehyde [acetaldehyde, methylglyoxal, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), 4-oxo-2(E)-nonenal, 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal, d-glucose (Glc), 4- or 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde] under physiological conditions. Each reaction mixture was analyzed by liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection and/or electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Considerable epimerization occurred after incubation with some endogenous aldehydes (PLP, 40.6% after 1 day; Glc with copper ions, 6.5% after 7 days). Moreover, the epimerization also occurred in whole proteins (human serum albumin and PLP, 26.3% after 1 day). Tandem mass spectrometric studies, including deuterium labeling and sodium borohydride reduction, suggested that the epimerization results from initial Schiff base formation followed by tautomerization to ketimine that causes the chirality to be lost. This suggests that the epimerization of the N-terminal amino acid can also occur in vivo as a post-translational modification under a high level of aldehyde stress.

  6. Comparative methods for analysis of protein covalent modification by electrophilic quinoids formed from xenobiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bolan; Qin, Zhihui; Wijewickrama, Gihani T.; Edirisinghe, Praneeth; Bolton, Judy L.; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Conjugation of biotin and fluorophore tags is useful for assaying covalent protein modification. Oxidative bioactivation of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) yields reactive quinoid electrophiles that covalently modify proteins; bioactivation is associated with carcinogenic and chemopreventive effects. Identification of the protein targets of electrophilic metabolites is of general important for xenobiotics. Four methodologies, using SERM derivatives and biotin/fluorophore tags, were compared for purification and quantification: (1) covert oxidatively activated tags (COATags; SERM conjugated to biotin); (2) dansylTags (SERM conjugated to fluorophore); and azidoTags (SERM azide derivatives) in a 2-step conjugation to biotin, either using (3) Staudinger ligation; or (4) click chemistry. All synthetic derivatives retained the estrogen receptor ligand characteristics of the parent SERMs. Model proteins with bioactivation by tyrosinase in buffer or cell lysates and liver proteins with in situ bioactivation in rat primary hepatocytes were studied by immunoassay and fluorescence. Comparison showed: the azidoTag/Staudinger method was sensitive but nonspecific; the azidoTag/click methodology had low sensitivity; and, the dansylTag methodology failed to detect modified proteins in hepatocytes. The COATag methodology was adjudged superior, detecting 5 ng of modified protein in vitro and identifying protein targets in hepatocytes. In metabolism studies in rat liver microsomes, the azide group was metabolically labile, one contributing factor in not selecting an azidoTag methodology in the highly oxidative environments required for bioactivation. For study of the protein targets of electrophilic metabolites formed by in situ oxidative bioactivation, the COATag is both sensitive and specific, and does not appear to suffer from poor cell permeability. PMID:19301905

  7. Specificity of Protein Covalent Modification by the Electrophilic Proteasome Inhibitor Carfilzomib in Human Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federspiel, Joel D.; Codreanu, Simona G.; Goyal, Sandeep; Albertolle, Matthew E.; Lowe, Eric; Teague, Juli; Wong, Hansen; Guengerich, F. Peter; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Carfilzomib (CFZ) is a second-generation proteasome inhibitor that is Food and Drug Administration and European Commission approved for the treatment of relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma. CFZ is an epoxomicin derivative with an epoxyketone electrophilic warhead that irreversibly adducts the catalytic threonine residue of the β5 subunit of the proteasome. Although CFZ produces a highly potent, sustained inactivation of the proteasome, the electrophilic nature of the drug could potentially produce off-target protein adduction. To address this possibility, we synthesized an alkynyl analog of CFZ and investigated protein adduction by this analog in HepG2 cells. Using click chemistry coupled with streptavidin based IP and shotgun tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), we identified two off-target proteins, cytochrome P450 27A1 (CYP27A1) and glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1), as targets of the alkynyl CFZ probe. We confirmed the adduction of CYP27A1 and GSTO1 by streptavidin capture and immunoblotting methodology and then site-specifically mapped the adducts with targeted MS/MS methods. Although CFZ adduction of CYP27A1 and GSTO1 in vitro decreased the activities of these enzymes, the small fraction of these proteins modified by CFZ in intact cells should limit the impact of these off-target modifications. The data support the high selectivity of CFZ for covalent modification of its therapeutic targets, despite the presence of a reactive electrophile. The approach we describe offers a generalizable method to evaluate the safety profile of covalent protein-modifying therapeutics. PMID:27503896

  8. Adhesive bonding of resin composite to various titanium surfaces using different metal conditioners and a surface modification system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hercules Jorge ALMILHATTI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the effect of three metal conditioners on the shear bond strength (SBS of a prosthetic composite material to cpTi grade I having three surface treatments. Material and Methods: One hundred sixty eight rivet-shaped specimens (8.0x2.0 mm were cast and subjected to polishing (P or sandblasting with either 50 mm (50SB or 250 mm (250SB Al2O3. The metal conditioners Metal Photo Primer (MPP, Cesead II Opaque Primer (OP, Targis Link (TL, and one surface modification system Siloc (S, were applied to the specimen surfaces, which were covered with four 1-mm thick layers of resin composite. The resin layers were exposed to curing light for 90 s separately. Seven specimens from each experimental group were stored in water at 37ºC for 24 h while the other 7 specimens were subjected to 5,000 thermal cycles consisting of water baths at 4ºC and 60ºC (n=7. All specimens were subjected to SBS test (0.5 mm/min until failure occurred, and further 28 specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. Data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Tukey's test (α=0.05. Results: On 50SB surfaces, OP groups showed higher SBS means than MPP (P<0.05, while no significant difference was found among OP, S, and TL groups. On 250SB surfaces, OP and TL groups exhibited higher SBS than MPP and S (P<0.05. No significant difference in SBS was found between OP and TL groups nor between MPP and S groups. The use of conditioners on 250SB surfaces resulted in higher SBS means than the use of the same products on 50SB surfaces (P<0.05. Conclusion: Sandblasting associated with the use of metal conditioners improves SBS of resin composites to cpTi.

  9. Modification of Turnip yellow mosaic virus coat protein and its effect on virion assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Il Shin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV is a positive strand RNAvirus. We have modified TYMV coat protein (CP by inserting ac-Myc epitope peptide at the N- or C-terminus of the CP, andhave examined its effect on assembly. We introduced therecombinant CP constructs into Nicotiana benthamiana leavesby agroinfiltration. Examination of the leaf extracts by agarosegel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis showed that theCP modified at the N-terminus produced a band co-migratingwith wild-type virions. With C-terminal modification, however,the detected bands moved faster than the wild-type virions. Tofurther examine the effect, TYMV constructs producing themodified CPs were prepared. With N-terminal modification,viral RNAs were protected from RNase A. In contrast, the viralRNAs were not protected with C-terminal modification.Overall, the results suggest that virion assembly and RNApackaging occur properly when the N-terminus of CP ismodified, but not when the C-terminus is modified. [BMBReports 2013; 46(10: 495-500

  10. Modification of the protein corona–nanoparticle complex by physiological factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, Nicholas J.; DeBrosse, Madeleine C.; Hussain, Saber M.; Comfort, Kristen K.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) effects in a biological system are driven through the formation and structure of the protein corona–NP complex, which is dynamic by nature and dependent upon factors from both the local environment and NP physicochemical parameters. To date, considerable data has been gathered regarding the structure and behavior of the protein corona in blood, plasma, and traditional cell culture medium. However, there exists a knowledge gap pertaining to the protein corona in additional biological fluids and following incubation in a dynamic environment. Using 13 nm gold NPs (AuNPs), functionalized with either polyethylene glycol or tannic acid, we demonstrated that both particle characteristics and the associated protein corona were altered when exposed to artificial physiological fluids and under dynamic flow. Furthermore, the magnitude of observed behavioral shifts were dependent upon AuNP surface chemistry. Lastly, we revealed that exposure to interstitial fluid produced protein corona modifications, reshaping of the nano-cellular interface, modified AuNP dosimetry, and induction of previously unseen cytotoxicity. This study highlights the need to elucidate both NP and protein corona behavior in biologically representative environments in an effort to increase accurate interpretation of data and transfer of this knowledge to efficacy, behavior, and safety of nano-based applications. - Highlights: • Dynamic flow increased the size of the gold nanoparticle protein corona. • Exposure to biological fluids altered protein corona size and composition. • Interstitial fluid modified the nano-cellular interface and deposition efficiency. • Tannic acid coated nanoparticles induced toxicity in an interstitial environment.

  11. Translational infidelity-induced protein stress results from a deficiency in Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Ashish; Chan, Clement T Y; Dyavaiah, Madhu; Rooney, John P; Dedon, Peter C; Begley, Thomas J

    2012-07-01

    Correct codon-anticodon pairing promotes translational fidelity, with these interactions greatly facilitated by modified nucleosides found in tRNA. We hypothesized that wobble uridine modifications catalyzed by tRNA methyltransferase 9 (Trm9) are essential for translational fidelity. In support, we have used phenotypic, reporter and protein-based assays to demonstrate increased translational infidelity in trm9Δ Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Codon reengineering studies suggest that Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications promote fidelity during the translation of specific genes, those rich in arginine and glutamic acid codons from mixed boxes. Using quantitative tRNA modification analysis, we determined that trm9Δ cells are only deficient in 2 of 23 tRNA modifications, with those 2, 5-methoxycarbonylmethyluridine (mcm ( 5) U) and 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm ( 5) s ( 2) U), classified as key determinants of translational fidelity. We also show that in the absence of mcm ( 5) U and mcm ( 5) s ( 2) U, the resulting translational infidelity promotes protein errors and activation of unfolded protein and heat shock responses. These data support a model in which Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications promote fidelity during the translation of specific transcripts, with decreased wobble base modification leading to translational infidelity, protein errors and activation of protein stress response pathways.

  12. Study on the Soy Protein-Based Wood Adhesive Modified by Hydroxymethyl Phenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Lei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available To explain the reason why using phenol-formaldehyde (PF resin improves the water resistance of soy-based adhesive, the performance of soy-based adhesive cross-linked with hydroxymethyl phenol (HPF and the reaction between HPF and a common dipeptide N-(2-l-alanyl-l-glutamine (AG being used as a model compound were studied in this paper. The DSC and DMA results indicated the reaction between HPF and soy-based adhesive. The soy-based adhesive cross-linked with HPF cured at a lower temperature than the adhesive without HPF. The former showed better mechanical performance and heat resistance than the latter. The ESI-MS, FT-IR and 13C-NMR results proved the reaction between HPF and AG. Because of the existence of branched ether groups in the 13C-NMR results of HPF/AG, the reaction between HPF and AG might mainly happened between hydroxymethyl groups and amino groups under a basic condition.

  13. A graph modification approach for finding core-periphery structures in protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, Sharon; Hüffner, Falk; Komusiewicz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The core-periphery model for protein interaction (PPI) networks assumes that protein complexes in these networks consist of a dense core and a possibly sparse periphery that is adjacent to vertices in the core of the complex. In this work, we aim at uncovering a global core-periphery structure for a given PPI network. We propose two exact graph-theoretic formulations for this task, which aim to fit the input network to a hypothetical ground truth network by a minimum number of edge modifications. In one model each cluster has its own periphery, and in the other the periphery is shared. We first analyze both models from a theoretical point of view, showing their NP-hardness. Then, we devise efficient exact and heuristic algorithms for both models and finally perform an evaluation on subnetworks of the S. cerevisiae PPI network.

  14. [The roles of epigenetics and protein post-translational modifications in bacterial antibiotic resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Long-xiang; Yu, Zhao-xiao; Guo, Si-yao; Li, Ping; Abdalla, Abualgasim Elgaili; Xie, Jian-ping

    2015-08-01

    The increasing antibiotic resistance is now threatening to take us back to a pre-antibiotic era. Bacteria have evolved diverse resistance mechanisms, on which in-depth research could help the development of new strategies to control antibiotic-resistant infections. Epigenetic alterations and protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) play important roles in multiple cellular processes such as metabolism, signal transduction, protein degradation, DNA replication regulation and stress response. Recent studies demonstrated that epigenetics and PTMs also play vital roles in bacterial antibiotic resistance. In this review, we summarize the regulatory roles of epigenetic factors including DNA methylation and regulatory RNAs as well as PTMs such as phosphorylation and succinylation in bacterial antibiotic resistance, which may provide innovative perspectives on selecting antibacterial targets and developing antibiotics.

  15. Do post-translational beta cell protein modifications trigger type 1 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Størling, Joachim; Overgaard, Anne Julie; Brorsson, Caroline Anna

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is considered an autoimmune disease characterised by specific T cell-mediated destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells. Yet, except for insulin, no beta cell-specific antigens have been discovered. This may imply that the autoantigens in type 1 diabetes exist in modified...... forms capable of specifically triggering beta cell destruction. In other immune-mediated diseases, autoantigens targeted by the immune system have undergone post-translational modification (PTM), thereby creating tissue-specific neo-epitopes. In a similar manner, PTM of beta cell proteins might create...... beta cell-specific neo-epitopes. We suggest that the current paradigm of type 1 diabetes as a classical autoimmune disease should be reconsidered since the immune response may not be directed against native beta cell proteins. A modified model for the pathogenetic events taking place in islets leading...

  16. [VLP vaccines and effects of HIV-1 Env protein modifications on their antigenic properties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vzorov, A N; Compans, R W

    2016-01-01

    An ideal protective HIV-1 vaccine can elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies, capable of preventing HIV transmission. The strategies of designing vaccines include generation of soluble recombinant proteins which mimic the native Env complex and are able to enhance the immunogenicity of gp120. Recent data indicate that the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein has multiple functions, which can affect the early steps of infection, as well as viral assembly and antigenic properties. Modifications in the CT can be used to induce conformational changes in functional regions of gp120 and to stabilize the trimeric structure, avoiding immune misdirection and induction of non-neutralizing antibody responses. Env-trimers with modified CTs in virus-like particles (VLPs) are able to induce antibodies with broad spectrum neutralizing activity and high avidity and have the potential for developing an effective vaccine against HIV.

  17. Differential role of eDNA, proteins, and polysaccharides in cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion by three Staphylococcus species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Rikke Louise; Okshevsky, Mira Ursula; Zeng, Guanghong

    valuable for designing new approaches to biofilm prevention. In this study, we combine microfluidic flow-cell studies with single-cell analyses to understand how polysaccharides, extracellular DNA (eDNA), and proteins contribute individually and in concert to mediate bacterial adhesion and aggregation...... on abiotic surfaces. We quantified initial adhesion, cell aggregation, and single-cell adhesion forces of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Staphylococcus xylosus in the presence and absence of DNase, dispersin, or subtilisin, which cleave extracellular DNA, polysaccharides and proteins...... affected by DNase and dispersin treatments, hence eDNA and polysaccharides were essential for cell-cell interactions. We showed that proteins, polysaccharides and eDNA contribute differently to the adhesion of three Staphylcococcus species, underlining the need to either tailor biofilm prevention...

  18. Adhesions of extracellular surface-layer associated proteins in Lactobacillus M5-L and Q8-L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingchun; Xiang, Xinling; Lu, Qianhui; Zhang, Lanwei; Ma, Fang; Wang, Linlin

    2016-02-01

    Surface-layer associated proteins (SLAP) that envelop Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei M5-L and Lactobacillus casei Q8-L cell surfaces are involved in the adherence of these strain to the human intestinal cell line HT-29. To further elucidate some of the properties of these proteins, we assessed the yields and expressions of SLAP under different incubation conditions. An efficient and selective extraction of SLAP was obtained when cells of Lactobacillus were treated with 5 M LiCl at 37°C in aerobic conditions. The SLAP of Lactobacillus M5-L and Q8-L in cell extracts were visualized by SDS-PAGE and identified by Western blotting with sulfo-N-hydroxysuccinimide-biotin-labeled HT-29 cells as adhesion proteins. Atomic force microscopy contact imaging revealed that Lactobacillus strains M5-L and Q8-L normally display a smooth, homogeneous surface, whereas the surfaces of M5-L and Q8-L treated with 5 M LiCl were rough and more heterogeneous. Analysis of adhesion forces revealed that the initial adhesion forces of 1.41 and 1.28 nN obtained for normal Lactobacillus M5-L and Q8-L strains, respectively, decreased to 0.70 and 0.48 nN, respectively, following 5 M LiCl treatment. Finally, the dominant 45-kDa protein bands of Lactobacillus Q8-L and Lactobacillus M5-L were identified as elongation factor Tu and surface antigen, respectively, by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A central role for ubiquitination within a circadian clock protein modification code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina eStojkovic

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms, endogenous cycles of about 24 h in physiology, are generated by a master clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus and other clocks located in the brain and peripheral tissues. Circadian disruption is known to increase the incidence of various illnesses, such as mental disorders, metabolic syndrome and cancer. At the molecular level, periodicity is established by a set of clock genes via autoregulatory translation-transcription feedback loops. This clock mechanism is regulated by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and ubiquitination, which set the pace of the clock. Ubiquitination in particular has been found to regulate the stability of core clock components, but also other clock protein functions. Mutation of genes encoding ubiquitin ligases can cause either elongation or shortening of the endogenous circadian period. Recent research has also started to uncover roles for deubiquitination in the molecular clockwork. Here we review the role of the ubiquitin pathway in regulating the circadian clock and we propose that ubiquitination is a key element in a clock protein modification code that orchestrates clock mechanisms and circadian behavior over the daily cycle.

  20. Chemical modification and structural analysis of protein isolates to produce hydrogel using Whitemouth croaker (Micropogonias furnieri) wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Vilásia Guimarães; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; Damodaran, Srinivasan; Prentice, Carlos

    2011-09-01

    Recovery and alteration of fish protein from wastes and its use has been regarded as a promising alternative to develop useful products once polymer gels have a high capacity of water uptake. This study aims to produce hydrogel, a super absorbent biopolymer from modified fish protein, in order to evaluate the protein structure. In the modified proteins, analyses of the extent of modification of the lysine residues, electrophoresis, and electrometric titration were performed. In the hydrogels were realized assays of swelling water. The proteins with more modifications were shown as 63.5% and 75.9% of lysine residues, from fish protein isolate obtained with alkaline and acid solubilization, respectively. The modified protein in that same rate presented 332.0 and 311.4 carboxyl groups. Accordingly, the hydrogel produced from alkaline and acid isolates reached a maximum water uptake in 24 h of 79.42 and 103.25 g(water)/g(dry gel), respectively.

  1. Protein modifications by electrophilic lipoxidation products: adduct formation, chemical strategies and tandem mass spectrometry for their detection and identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, Yury V; Tzeng, Shin-Chen; Huang, Lin; Maier, Claudia S

    2014-01-01

    The post-translational modification of proteins by electrophilic oxylipids is emerging as an important mechanism that contributes to the complexity of proteomes. Enzymatic and non-enzymatic oxidation of biological lipids results in the formation of chemically diverse electrophilic carbonyl compounds, such as 2-alkenals and 4-hydroxy alkenals, epoxides, and eicosanoids with reactive cyclopentenone structures. These lipoxidation products are capable of modifying proteins. Originally considered solely as markers of oxidative insult, more recently the modifications of proteins by lipid peroxidation products are being recognized as a new mechanism of cell signaling with relevance to redox homeostasis, adaptive response and inflammatory resolution. The growing interest in protein modifications by reactive oxylipid species necessitates the availability of methods that are capable of detecting, identifying and characterizing these protein adducts in biological samples with high complexity. However, the efficient analysis of these chemically diverse protein adducts presents a considerable analytical challenge. We first provide an introduction into the chemistry and biological relevance of protein adductions by electrophilic lipoxidation products. We then provide an overview of tandem mass spectrometry approaches that have been developed in recent years for the interrogation of protein modifications by electrophilic oxylipid species. 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Redox modification of caveolar proteins in the cardiovascular system- role in cellular signalling and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubb, Kristen J; Birgisdottir, Asa Birna; Tang, Owen; Hansen, Thomas; Figtree, Gemma A

    2017-08-01

    Rapid and coordinated release of a variety of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide (O 2 .- ), hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and peroxynitrite, in specific microdomains, play a crucial role in cell signalling in the cardiovascular system. These reactions are mediated by reversible and functional modifications of a wide variety of key proteins. Dysregulation of this oxidative signalling occurs in almost all forms of cardiovascular disease (CVD), including at the very early phases. Despite the heavily publicized failure of "antioxidants" to improve CVD progression, pharmacotherapies such as those targeting the renin-angiotensin system, or statins, exert at least part of their large clinical benefit via modulating cellular redox signalling. Over 250 proteins, including receptors, ion channels and pumps, and signalling proteins are found in the caveolae. An increasing proportion of these are being recognized as redox regulated-proteins, that reside in the immediate vicinity of the two major cellular sources of ROS, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox) and uncoupled endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). This review focuses on what is known about redox signalling within the caveolae, as well as endogenous protective mechanisms utilized by the cell, and new approaches to targeting dysregulated redox signalling in the caveolae as a therapeutic strategy in CVD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    reduce or delay bacterial biofilm formation of a range of urinary tract infectious E.coli and Klebsiella isolates. Several other proteinaceous coatings were also found to display anti-adhesive properties, possibly providing a measure for controlling the colonization of implant materials. Several other...... components. These substances may both mediate and stabilize the bacterial biofilm. Finally, several adhesive structures were examined, and a novel physiological biofilm phenotype in E.coli biofilms was characterized, namely cell chain formation. The autotransporter protein, antigen 43, was implicated...

  4. Quantitation of cell-matrix adhesion using confocal image analysis of focal contact associated proteins and interference reflection microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usson, Y; Guignandon, A; Laroche, N; Lafage-Proust, M H; Vico, L

    1997-08-01

    We have developed an approach for the quantitation of vinculin, a focal contact associated protein, based on a multimodal confocal microscopy and image analysis. Vinculin spot distribution was imaged in confocal fluorescence microscopy and the corresponding focal contacts were imaged in confocal interference reflection microscopy. These images were analyzed with a SAMBA image cytometer. The image analysis program provided 12 morphometric features describing cellular area, shape, and proportions of vinculin spots as well as six topographical features describing the distribution of vinculin and the relative overlap of vinculin and focal contacts. This approach was applied to the study of rat osteosarcoma cells submitted to mechanical stresses: successions of 2g and 0g accelerations during a series of parabolic flights. The measured features were assessed by means of correlation analysis and stepwise discriminant analysis. After correlation analysis, only ten parameters were retained. Quantitation of cell morphological parameters indicated that cell area was significantly affected by gravitational stresses as well as vinculin distribution. Cell area was reduced by 50% and vinculin spots were restricted to cell periphery. Cell adhesion measured by IRM decreased significantly in the first part of the flight and remained stable at the end of the flight. These results suggest that cell-matrix adhesion is affected by gravitational stresses. Image analysis provides useful tools to investigate focal adhesion re-organization under different physiological stimuli.

  5. Adhesion of endothelial cells and adsorption of serum proteins on gas-plasma treated polytetrafluoroethylene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, A.; Dekker, A.; Reitsma, K.; Beugeling, T.; Beugeling, T.; Bantjes, A.; Bantjes, A.; Feijen, Jan; van Aken, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    From in vitro experiments it is known that human endothelial cells show poor adhesion to hydrophobic polymers. The hydrophobicity of vascular prostheses manufactured from Teflon® or Dacron® may be the reason why endothelialization of these grafts does not occur after implantation in humans. We

  6. The intracellular domain of the Drosophila cholinesterase-like neural adhesion protein, gliotactin, is natively unfolded

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, T; Rydberg, EH; Solomon, A.; Toker, L; Auld, VJ; Silman, I.; Botti, S; Sussman, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Drosophila gliotactin (Gli) is a 109-kDa transmembrane, cholinesterase-like adhesion molecule (CLAM), expressed in peripheral glia, that is crucial for formation of the blood-nerve barrier. The intracellular portion (Gli-cyt) was cloned and expressed in the cytosolic fraction of Escherichia coli

  7. A role for the retinoblastoma protein as a regulator of mouse osteoblast cell adhesion: implications for osteogenesis and osteosarcoma formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadette Sosa-García

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The retinoblastoma protein (pRb is a cell cycle regulator inactivated in most human cancers. Loss of pRb function results from mutations in the gene coding for pRb or for any of its upstream regulators. Although pRb is predominantly known as a cell cycle repressor, our data point to additional pRb functions in cell adhesion. Our data show that pRb regulates the expression of a wide repertoire of cell adhesion genes and regulates the assembly of the adherens junctions required for cell adhesion. We conducted our studies in osteoblasts, which depend on both pRb and on cell-to-cell contacts for their differentiation and function. We generated knockout mice in which the RB gene was excised specifically in osteoblasts using the cre-lox P system and found that osteoblasts from pRb knockout mice did not assemble adherens junction at their membranes. pRb depletion in wild type osteoblasts using RNAi also disrupted adherens junctions. Microarrays comparing pRb-expressing and pRb-deficient osteoblasts showed that pRb controls the expression of a number of cell adhesion genes, including cadherins. Furthermore, pRb knockout mice showed bone abnormalities consistent with osteoblast adhesion defects. We also found that pRb controls the function of merlin, a well-known regulator of adherens junction assembly, by repressing Rac1 and its effector Pak1. Using qRT-PCR, immunoblots, co-immunoprecipitation assays, and immunofluorescent labeling, we observed that pRb loss resulted in Rac1 and Pak1 overexpression concomitant with merlin inactivation by Pak1, merlin detachment from the membrane, and adherens junction loss. Our data support a pRb function in cell adhesion while elucidating the mechanism for this function. Our work suggests that in some tumor types pRb inactivation results in both a loss of cell cycle control that promotes initial tumor growth as well as in a loss of cell-to-cell contacts, which contributes to later stages of metastasis.

  8. Extracellular Protein Interactions Mediated by the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule, NCAM: Heterophilic Interactions Between NCAM and Cell Adhesion Molecules, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, and Viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Kulahin, Nikolaj; Walmod, Peter

    2008-01-01

    interactions, thereby modulating a range of biological processes. This review summarizes interactions between NCAM and other CAMs and ECM proteins. Additionally, the role of NCAM as a receptor for rabies virus, and its implications in rabies infections is briefly described. Interactions between NCAM and its...

  9. Small Heat Shock Protein αB-Crystallin Controls Shape and Adhesion of Glioma and Myoblast Cells in the Absence of Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho Shimizu

    Full Text Available Cell shape and adhesion and their proper controls are fundamental for all biological systems. Mesenchymal cells migrate at an average rate of 6 to 60 μm/hr, depending on the extracellular matrix environment and cell signaling. Myotubes, fully differentiated muscle cells, are specialized for power-generation and therefore lose motility. Cell spreading and stabilities of focal adhesion are regulated by the critical protein vinculin from immature myoblast to mature costamere of differentiated myotubes where myofibril Z-band linked to sarcolemma. The Z-band is constituted from microtubules, intermediate filaments, cell adhesion molecules and other adapter proteins that communicate with the outer environment. Mesenchymal cells, including myoblast cells, convert actomyosin contraction forces to tension through mechano-responsive adhesion assembly complexes as Z-band equivalents. There is growing evidence that microtubule dynamics are involved in the generation of contractile forces; however, the roles of microtubules in cell adhesion dynamics are not well determined. Here, we show for the first time that αB-crystallin, a molecular chaperon for tubulin/microtubules, is involved in cell shape determination. Moreover, knockdown of this molecule caused myoblasts and glioma cells to lose their ability for adhesion as they tended to behave like migratory cells. Surprisingly, αB-crystallin knockdown in both C6 glial cells and L6 myoblast permitted cells to migrate more rapidly (2.7 times faster for C6 and 1.3 times faster for L6 cells than dermal fibroblast. On the other hand, overexpression of αB-crystallin in cells led to an immortal phenotype because of persistent adhesion. Position of matured focal adhesion as visualized by vinculin immuno-staining, stress fiber direction, length, and density were clearly αB-crystallin dependent. These results indicate that the small HSP αB-crystallin has important roles for cell adhesion, and thus microtubule

  10. Changes in cell shape, cytoskeletal proteins and adhesion sites of cultured cells after extracellular Ca2+ chelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Mermelstein

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Although much is known about the molecules involved in extracellular Ca2+ regulation, the relationship of the ion with overall cell morphology is not understood. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of the Ca2+ chelator EGTA on the major cytoskeleton components, at integrin-containing adhesion sites, and their consequences on cell shape. Control mouse cell line C2C12 has a well-spread morphology with long stress fibers running in many different directions, as detected by fluorescence microscopy using rhodamine-phalloidin. In contrast, cells treated with EGTA (1.75 mM in culture medium for 24 h became bipolar and showed less stress fibers running in one major direction. The adhesion plaque protein alpha5-integrin was detected by immunofluorescence microscopy at fibrillar adhesion sites in both control and treated cells, whereas a dense labeling was seen only inside treated cells. Microtubules shifted from a radial arrangement in control cells to a longitudinal distribution in EGTA-treated cells, as analyzed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Desmin intermediate filaments were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy in a fragmented network dispersed within the entire cytoplasm in EGTA-treated cells, whereas a dense network was seen in the whole cytoplasm of control cells. The present results suggest that the role of extracellular Ca2+ in the regulation of C2C12 cell shape can be mediated by actin-containing stress fibers and microtubules and by intermediate filament reorganization, which may involve integrin adhesion sites.

  11. Myosin 1g Contributes to CD44 Adhesion Protein and Lipid Rafts Recycling and Controls CD44 Capping and Cell Migration in B Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orestes López-Ortega

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration and adhesion are critical for immune system function and involve many proteins, which must be continuously transported and recycled in the cell. Recycling of adhesion molecules requires the participation of several proteins, including actin, tubulin, and GTPases, and of membrane components such as sphingolipids and cholesterol. However, roles of actin motor proteins in adhesion molecule recycling are poorly understood. In this study, we identified myosin 1g as one of the important motor proteins that drives recycling of the adhesion protein CD44 in B lymphocytes. We demonstrate that the lack of Myo1g decreases the cell-surface levels of CD44 and of the lipid raft surrogate GM1. In cells depleted of Myo1g, the recycling of CD44 was delayed, the delay seems to be caused at the level of formation of recycling complex and entry into recycling endosomes. Moreover, a defective lipid raft recycling in Myo1g-deficient cells had an impact both on the capping of CD44 and on cell migration. Both processes required the transportation of lipid rafts to the cell surface to deliver signaling components. Furthermore, the extramembrane was essential for cell expansion and remodeling of the plasma membrane topology. Therefore, Myo1g is important during the recycling of lipid rafts to the membrane and to the accompanied proteins that regulate plasma membrane plasticity. Thus, Myosin 1g contributes to cell adhesion and cell migration through CD44 recycling in B lymphocytes.

  12. Modification of Hypoxic Respiratory Response by Protein Tyrosine Kinase in Brainstem Ventral Respiratory Neuron Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Huai, Ruituo; Yang, Junqing; Li, Yanchun

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) mediated the tyrosine phosphorylation modification of neuronal receptors and ion channels. Whether such modification resulted in changes of physiological functions was not sufficiently studied. In this study we examined whether the hypoxic respiratory response-which is the enhancement of breathing in hypoxic environment could be affected by the inhibition of PTK at brainstem ventral respiratory neuron column (VRC). Experiments were performed on urethane anesthetized adult rabbits. Phrenic nerve discharge was recorded as the central respiratory motor output. Hypoxic respiratory response was produced by ventilating the rabbit with 10% O2-balance 90% N2 for 5 minutes. The responses of phrenic nerve discharge to hypoxia were observed before and after microinjecting PTK inhibitor genistein, AMPA receptor antagonist CNQX, or inactive PTK inhibitor analogue daidzein at the region of ambiguus nucleus (NA) at levels 0-2 mm rostral to obex where the inspiratory subgroup of VRC were recorded. Results were as follows: 1. the hypoxic respiratory response was significantly attenuated after microinjection of genistein and/or CNQX, and no additive effect (i.e., further attenuation of hypoxic respiratory response) was observed when genistein and CNQX were microinjected one after another at the same injection site. Microinjection of daidzein had no effect on hypoxic respiratory response. 2. Fluorescent immunostaining showed that hypoxia significantly increased the number of phosphotyrosine immunopositive neurons in areas surrounding NA and most of these neurons were also immunopositive to glutamate AMPA receptor subunit GluR1. These results suggested that PTK played an important role in regulating the hypoxic respiratory response, possibly through the tyrosine phosphorylation modification of glutamate AMPA receptors on the respiratory neurons of ventral respiratory neuron column.

  13. A cell-surface superoxide dismutase is a binding protein for peroxinectin, a cell-adhesive peroxidase in crayfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, M W; Holmblad, T; Thörnqvist, P O; Cammarata, M; Parrinello, N; Söderhäll, K

    1999-03-01

    Peroxinectin, a cell-adhesive peroxidase (homologous to human myeloperoxidase), from the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus, was shown by immuno-fluorescence to bind to the surface of crayfish blood cells (haemocytes). In order to identify a cell surface receptor for peroxinectin, labelled peroxinectin was incubated with a blot of haemocyte membrane proteins. It was found to specifically bind two bands of 230 and 90 kDa; this binding was decreased in the presence of unlabelled peroxinectin. Purified 230/90 kDa complex also bound peroxinectin in the same assay. In addition, the 230 kDa band binds the crayfish beta-1,3-glucan-binding protein. The 230 kDa band could be reduced to 90 kDa, thus showing that the 230 kDa is a multimer of 90 kDa units. The peroxinectin-binding protein was cloned from a haemocyte cDNA library, using immuno-screening or polymerase chain reaction based on partial amino acid sequence of the purified protein. It has a signal sequence, a domain homologous to CuZn-containing superoxide dismutases, and a basic, proline-rich, C-terminal tail, but no membrane-spanning segment. In accordance, the 90 and 230 kDa bands had superoxide dismutase activity. Immuno-fluorescence of non-permeabilized haemocytes with affinity-purified antibodies confirmed that the crayfish CuZn-superoxide dismutase is localized at the cell surface; it could be released from the membrane with high salt. It was thus concluded that the peroxinectin-binding protein is an extracellular SOD (EC-SOD) and a peripheral membrane protein, presumably kept at the cell surface via ionic interaction with its C-terminal region. This interaction with a peroxidase seems to be a novel function for an SOD. The binding of the cell surface SOD to the cell-adhesive/opsonic peroxinectin may mediate, or regulate, cell adhesion and phagocytosis; it may also be important for efficient localized production of microbicidal substances.

  14. Modification effects of physical activity and protein intake on heritability of body size and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Hasselbalch, Ann Louise; Lallukka, Tea; Bogl, Leonie; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Heitmann, Berit L; Schousboe, Karoline; Rissanen, Aila; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2009-10-01

    The development of obesity is still a poorly understood process that is dependent on both genetic and environmental factors. The objective was to examine how physical activity and the proportion of energy as protein in the diet modify the genetic variation of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and percentage body fat. Twins from Denmark (756 complete pairs) and Finland (278 complete pairs) aged 18-67 and 21-24 y, respectively, participated. The proportion of energy as protein in the diet was estimated by using food-frequency questionnaires. The participants reported the frequency and intensity of their leisure time physical activity. Waist circumference and BMI were measured. Percentage body fat was assessed in Denmark by using a bioelectrical impedance method. The data were analyzed by using gene-environment interaction models for twin data with the Mx statistical package (Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA). High physical activity was associated with lower mean values, and a high proportion of protein in the diet was associated with higher mean BMI, waist circumference, and percentage body fat and a reduction in genetic and environmental variances. Genetic modification by physical activity was statistically significant for BMI (-0.18; 95% CI: -0.31, -0.05) and waist circumference (-0.14; 95% CI: -0.22, -0.05) in the merged data. A high proportion of protein in the diet reduced genetic and environmental variances in BMI and waist circumference in Danish men but not in women or in Finnish men. Our results suggest that, in physically active individuals, the genetic variation in weight is reduced, which possibly suggests that physical activity is able to modify the action of the genes responsible for predisposition to obesity, whereas the protein content of the diet has no appreciable effect.

  15. Oxidative Modification of Blood Serum Proteins in Multiple Sclerosis after Interferon Beta and Melatonin Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Adamczyk-Sowa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a disease involving oxidative stress (OS. This study was aimed at examination of the effect of melatonin supplementation on OS parameters, especially oxidative protein modifications of blood serum proteins, in MS patients. The study included 11 control subjects, 14 de novo diagnosed MS patients with the relapsing-remitting form of MS (RRMS, 36 patients with RRMS receiving interferon beta-1b (250 μg every other day, and 25 RRMS patients receiving interferon beta-1b plus melatonin (5 mg daily. The levels of N′-formylkynurenine, kynurenine, dityrosine, carbonyl groups, advanced glycation products (AGEs, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP, and malondialdehyde were elevated in nontreated RRSM patients. N′-Formylkynurenine, kynurenine, AGEs, and carbonyl contents were decreased only in the group treated with interferon beta plus melatonin, while dityrosine and AOPP contents were decreased both in the group of patients treated with interferon beta and in the group treated with interferon beta-1b plus melatonin. These results demonstrate that melatonin ameliorates OS in MS patients supporting the view that combined administration of interferon beta-1b and melatonin can be more effective in reducing OS in MS patients than interferon beta-1b alone.

  16. Atypical ubiquitin chains: new molecular signals. 'Protein Modifications: Beyond the Usual Suspects' review series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Fumiyo; Dikic, Ivan

    2008-06-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) is a small protein modifier that regulates many biological processes, including gene transcription, cell-cycle progression, DNA repair, apoptosis, virus budding and receptor endocytosis. Ub can be conjugated to target proteins either as a monomer or as Ub chains that vary in length and linkage type. The various types of Ub modification are linked to distinct physiological functions in cells. MonoUb, for example, regulates DNA repair and receptor endocytosis, whereas lysine 48-linked Ub chains label proteins for proteasomal degradation. More recently, the importance of chains conjugated through the other six lysines in Ub, known as atypical Ub chains, has been revealed. Atypical chains can be homotypic, sequentially using the same lysine residue in Ub for conjugation; mixed-linkage, utilizing several distinct lysines to connect consecutive Ub moieties; or heterologous, connecting Ub with other Ub-like modifiers. Here, we describe recent progress in the understanding of atypical Ub chain assembly and their recognition by Ub-binding domains, and we discuss further their functional roles in vivo.

  17. Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) plays a key role in ovarian cancer cell adhesion and motility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Renquan [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Fudan University, Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Sun, Xinghui [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, MA 02115 (United States); Xiao, Ran; Zhou, Lei; Gao, Xiang [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Fudan University, Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032 (China); Guo, Lin, E-mail: guolin500@hotmail.com [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Fudan University, Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated stable transduced HE4 overexpression and knockdown cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HE4 was associated with EOC cell adhesion and motility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HE4 might have some effects on activation of EGFR-MAPK signaling pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HE4 play an important role in EOC tumorigenicity. -- Abstract: Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) is a novel and specific biomarker for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). We previously demonstrated that serum HE4 levels were significantly elevated in the majority of EOC patients but not in subjects with benign disease or healthy controls. However, the precise mechanism of HE4 protein function is unknown. In this study, we generated HE4-overexpressing SKOV3 cells and found that stably transduced cells promoted cell adhesion and migration. Knockdown of HE4 expression was achieved by stable transfection of SKOV3 cells with a construct encoding a short hairpin DNA directed against the HE4 gene. Correspondingly, the proliferation and spreading ability of HE4-expressed cells were inhibited by HE4 suppression. Mechanistically, impaired EGFR and Erk1/2 phosphorylation were observed in cells with HE4 knockdown. The phosphorylation was restored when the knockdown cells were cultured in conditioned medium containing HE4. Moreover, in vivo tumorigenicity showed that HE4 suppression markedly inhibited the growth of tumors. This suggests that expression of HE4 is associated with cancer cell adhesion, migration and tumor growth, which can be related to its effects on the EGFR-MAPK signaling pathway. Our results provide evidence of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that may underlie the motility-promoting role of HE4 in EOC progression. The role of HE4 as a target for gene-based therapy might be considered in future studies.

  18. Effects of photochemically immobilized polymer coatings on protein adsorption, cell adhesion, and the foreign body reaction to silicone rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFife, K M; Shive, M S; Hagen, K M; Clapper, D L; Anderson, J M

    1999-03-05

    Photochemical immobilization technology was utilized to covalently couple polymers to silicone rubber either at multiple points along a polymer backbone or at the endpoint of an amphiphilic chain. The coating variants then were tested in vitro and in vivo for improvement of desired responses compared to uncoated silicone rubber. All coating variants suppressed the adsorption of fibrinogen and immunoglobulin G, and most also inhibited fibroblast growth by 90-99%. None of the coating variants inhibited monocyte or neutrophil adhesion in vitro. However, the surfaces that supported the highest levels of monocyte adhesion also elicited the lowest secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. None of the materials elicited a strong inflammatory response or significantly (p< 0.05) reduced the thickness of the fibrous capsule when implanted subcutaneously in rats. Overall, the most passivating coating variant was an endpoint immobilized polypeptide that reduced protein adsorption, inhibited fibroblast growth by 90%, elicited low cytokine secretion from monocytes, and reduced fibrous encapsulation by 33%. In general, although some coating variants modified the adsorption of proteins and the behavior of leukocytes or fibroblasts in vitro, none abolished the development of a fibrous capsule in vivo. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Restoring E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion increases PTEN protein level and stability in human breast carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zengxia; Wang Liying; Zhang Wen; Fu Yi; Zhao Hongbo; Hu Yali; Prins, Bram Peter; Zha Xiliang

    2007-01-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a well-characterized tumor suppressor that negatively regulates cell growth and survival. Despite the critical role of PTEN in cell signaling, the mechanisms of its regulation are still under investigation. We reported here that PTEN expression could be controlled by overexpression or knock-down of E-cadherin in several mammary carcinoma cell lines. Furthermore, we showed that the accumulation of PTEN protein in E-cadherin overexpressing cells was due to increased PTEN protein stability rather than the regulation of its transcription. The proteasome-dependent PTEN degradation pathway was impaired after restoring E-cadherin expression. Moreover, maintenance of E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion was necessary for its regulating PTEN. Altogether, our results suggested that E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion was essential for preventing the proteasome degradation of PTEN, which might explain how breast carcinoma cells which lost cell-cell contact proliferate rapidly and are prone to metastasis

  20. The structure of the hypothetical protein smu.1377c from Streptococcus mutans suggests a role in tRNA modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Tian-Min; Liu, Xiang; Li, Lanfen; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of smu.1377c, a hypothetical protein from S. mutans, shows a similar fold to Sua5-YciO-YrdC-family proteins and indicates its functional role in tRNA modification. Members of the Sua5-YciO-YrdC protein family are found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes and possess a conserved α/β twisted open-sheet fold. The Escherichia coli protein YrdC has been shown to be involved in modification of tRNA. The crystal structure of smu.1377c, a hypothetical protein from Streptococcus mutans, has been determined to 2.25 Å resolution. From structure analysis and comparison, it is shown that smu.1377c is a member of the Sua5-YciO-YrdC family and that it may play the same role as E. coli YrdC

  1. The Isotope-Coded Affinity Tag Method for Quantitative Protein Profile Comparison and Relative Quantitation of Cysteine Redox Modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, James Chun Yip; Zhou, Lei; Chan, Eric Chun Yong

    2015-11-02

    The isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT) technique has been applied to measure pairwise changes in protein expression through differential stable isotopic labeling of proteins or peptides followed by identification and quantification using a mass spectrometer. Changes in protein expression are observed when the identical peptide from each of two biological conditions is identified and a difference is detected in the measurements comparing the peptide labeled with the heavy isotope to the one with a normal isotopic distribution. This approach allows the simultaneous comparison of the expression of many proteins between two different biological states (e.g., yeast grown on galactose versus glucose, or normal versus cancer cells). Due to the cysteine-specificity of the ICAT reagents, the ICAT technique has also been applied to perform relative quantitation of cysteine redox modifications such as oxidation and nitrosylation. This unit describes both protein quantitation and profiling of cysteine redox modifications using the ICAT technique. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. The Adhesion G Protein-Coupled Receptor GPR56/ADGRG1 Is an Inhibitory Receptor on Human NK Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gin-Wen Chang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells possess potent cytotoxic mechanisms that need to be tightly controlled. Here, we explored the regulation and function of GPR56/ADGRG1, an adhesion G protein-coupled receptor implicated in developmental processes and expressed distinctively in mature NK cells. Expression of GPR56 was triggered by Hobit (a homolog of Blimp-1 in T cells and declined upon cell activation. Through studying NK cells from polymicrogyria patients with disease-causing mutations in ADGRG1, encoding GPR56, and NK-92 cells ectopically expressing the receptor, we found that GPR56 negatively regulates immediate effector functions, including production of inflammatory cytokines and cytolytic proteins, degranulation, and target cell killing. GPR56 pursues this activity by associating with the tetraspanin CD81. We conclude that GPR56 inhibits natural cytotoxicity of human NK cells.

  3. Differential Expression of Adhesion-Related Proteins and MAPK Pathways Lead to Suitable Osteoblast Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva-Leyva, Margarita; López-Díaz, Annia; Barrera, Lourdes; Camacho-Morales, Alberto; Hernandez-Aguilar, Felipe; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Calderón-Pérez, Jaime; García-Álvarez, Jorge; Orozco-Hoyuela, Gabriel; Piña-Barba, Cristina; Rojas-Martínez, Augusto; Romero-Díaz, Víktor; Lara-Arias, Jorge; Rivera-Bolaños, Nancy; López-Camarillo, César; Moncada-Saucedo, Nidia; Galván-De los Santos, Alejandra; Meza-Urzúa, Fátima; Villarreal-Gómez, Luis; Fuentes-Mera, Lizeth

    2015-11-01

    Cellular adhesion enables communication between cells and their environment. Adhesion can be achieved throughout focal adhesions and its components influence osteoblast differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Because cell adhesion and osteoblast differentiation are closely related, this article aimed to analyze the expression profiles of adhesion-related proteins during osteoblastic differentiation of two hMSCs subpopulations (CD105(+) and CD105(-)) and propose a strategy for assembling bone grafts based on its adhesion ability. In vitro experiments of osteogenic differentiation in CD105(-) cells showed superior adhesion efficiency and 2-fold increase of α-actinin expression compared with CD105(+) cells at the maturation stage. Interestingly, levels of activated β1-integrin increased in CD105(-) cells during the process. Additionally, the CD105(-) subpopulation showed 3-fold increase of phosphorylated FAK(Y397) compared to CD105(+) cells. Results also indicate that ERK1/2 was activated during CD105(-) bone differentiation and participation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-p38 in CD105(+) differentiation through a focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-independent pathway. In vivo trial demonstrated that grafts containing CD105(-) showed osteocytes embedded in a mineralized matrix, promoted adequate graft integration, increased host vascular infiltration, and efficient intramembranous repairing. In contrast, grafts containing CD105(+) showed deficient endochondral ossification and fibrocartilaginous tissue. Based on the expression of α-actinin, FAKy,(397) and ERK1/2 activation, we define maturation stage as critical for bone graft assembling. By in vitro assays, CD105(-) subpopulation showed superior adhesion efficiency compared to CD105(+) cells. Considering in vitro and in vivo assays, this study suggests that integration of a scaffold with CD105(-) subpopulation at the maturation stage represents an attractive strategy for clinical use in

  4. Structural and functional insights into the interaction between the Cas family scaffolding protein p130Cas and the focal adhesion-associated protein paxillin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chi; Miller, Darcie J.; Guibao, Cristina D.; Donato, Dominique M.; Hanks, Steven K.; Zheng, Jie J.

    2017-08-31

    The Cas family scaffolding protein p130Cas is a Src substrate localized in focal adhesions (FAs) and functions in integrin signaling to promote cell motility, invasion, proliferation, and survival. p130Cas targeting to FAs is essential for its tyrosine phosphorylation and downstream signaling. Although the N-terminal SH3 domain is important for p130Cas localization, it has also been reported that the C-terminal region is involved in p130Cas FA targeting. The C-terminal region of p130Cas or Cas family homology domain (CCHD) has been reported to adopt a structure similar to that of the focal adhesion kinase C-terminal focal adhesion-targeting domain. The mechanism by which the CCHD promotes FA targeting of p130Cas, however, remains unclear. In this study, using a calorimetry approach, we identified the first LD motif (LD1) of the FA-associated protein paxillin as the binding partner of the p130Cas CCHD (in a 1:1 stoichiometry with a Kd ~4.2 μM) and elucidated the structure of the p130Cas CCHD in complex with the paxillin LD1 motif by X-ray crystallography. Of note, a comparison of the CCHD/LD1 complex with a previously solved structure of CCHD in complex with the SH2-containing protein NSP3 revealed that LD1 had almost identical positioning of key hydrophobic and acidic residues relative to NSP3. Because paxillin is one of the key scaffold molecules in FAs, we propose that the interaction between the p130Cas CCHD and the LD1 motif of paxillin plays an important role in p130Cas FA targeting.

  5. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ryan Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP, decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231 breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24 h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10 µM of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC protein levels, although other protein levels were

  6. Tripping up Trp: Modification of protein tryptophan residues by reactive oxygen species, modes of detection, and biological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Deterding, Leesa J; Mason, Ronald P

    2015-12-01

    Proteins comprise a majority of the dry weight of a cell, rendering them a major target for oxidative modification. Oxidation of proteins can result in significant alterations in protein molecular mass such as breakage of the polypeptide backbone and/or polymerization of monomers into dimers, multimers, and sometimes insoluble aggregates. Protein oxidation can also result in structural changes to amino acid residue side chains, conversions that have only a modest effect on protein size but can have widespread consequences for protein function. There are a wide range of rate constants for amino acid reactivity, with cysteine, methionine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan having the highest rate constants with commonly encountered biological oxidants. Free tryptophan and tryptophan protein residues react at a diffusion-limited rate with hydroxyl radical and also have high rate constants for reactions with singlet oxygen and ozone. Although oxidation of proteins in general and tryptophan residues specifically can have effects detrimental to the health of cells and organisms, some modifications are neutral, whereas others contribute to the function of the protein in question or may act as a signal that damaged proteins need to be replaced. This review provides a brief overview of the chemical mechanisms by which tryptophan residues become oxidized, presents both the strengths and the weaknesses of some of the techniques used to detect these oxidative interactions, and discusses selected examples of the biological consequences of tryptophan oxidation in proteins from animals, plants, and microbes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase A (MsrA) and Its Function in Ubiquitin-Like Protein Modification inArchaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xian; Adams, Zachary; Liu, Rui; Hepowit, Nathaniel L; Wu, Yifei; Bowmann, Connor F; Moskovitz, Jackob; Maupin-Furlow, Julie A

    2017-09-05

    Methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA) is an antioxidant enzyme found in all domains of life that catalyzes the reduction of methionine- S -sulfoxide (MSO) to methionine in proteins and free amino acids. We demonstrate that archaeal MsrA has a ubiquitin-like (Ubl) protein modification activity that is distinct from its stereospecific reduction of MSO residues. MsrA catalyzes this Ubl modification activity, with the Ubl-activating E1 UbaA, in the presence of the mild oxidant dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and in the absence of reductant. In contrast, the MSO reductase activity of MsrA is inhibited by DMSO and requires reductant. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis reveals that MsrA-dependent Ubl conjugates are associated with DNA replication, protein remodeling, and oxidative stress and include the Ubl-modified MsrA, Orc3 (Orc1/Cdc6), and Cdc48d (Cdc48/p97 AAA+ ATPase). Overall, we found archaeal MsrA to have opposing MSO reductase and Ubl modifying activities that are associated with oxidative stress responses and controlled by exposure to mild oxidant. IMPORTANCE Proteins that are damaged by oxidative stress are often targeted for proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). The mechanisms that control this response are poorly understood, especially under conditions of mild oxidative stress when protein damage is modest. Here, we discovered a novel function of archaeal MsrA in guiding the Ubl modification of target proteins in the presence of mild oxidant. This newly reported activity of MsrA is distinct from its stereospecific reduction of methionine- S -sulfoxide to methionine residues. Our results are significant steps forward, first, in elucidating a protein factor that guides Ubl modification in archaea, and second, in providing an insight into oxidative stress responses that can trigger Ubl modification in a cell. Copyright © 2017 Fu et al.

  8. Prediction of protein modification sites of pyrrolidone carboxylic acid using mRMR feature selection and analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-Lu Zheng

    Full Text Available Pyrrolidone carboxylic acid (PCA is formed during a common post-translational modification (PTM of extracellular and multi-pass membrane proteins. In this study, we developed a new predictor to predict the modification sites of PCA based on maximum relevance minimum redundancy (mRMR and incremental feature selection (IFS. We incorporated 727 features that belonged to 7 kinds of protein properties to predict the modification sites, including sequence conservation, residual disorder, amino acid factor, secondary structure and solvent accessibility, gain/loss of amino acid during evolution, propensity of amino acid to be conserved at protein-protein interface and protein surface, and deviation of side chain carbon atom number. Among these 727 features, 244 features were selected by mRMR and IFS as the optimized features for the prediction, with which the prediction model achieved a maximum of MCC of 0.7812. Feature analysis showed that all feature types contributed to the modification process. Further site-specific feature analysis showed that the features derived from PCA's surrounding sites contributed more to the determination of PCA sites than other sites. The detailed feature analysis in this paper might provide important clues for understanding the mechanism of the PCA formation and guide relevant experimental validations.

  9. O-GlcNAcylation, contractile protein modifications and calcium affinity in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eCieniewski-Bernard

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation is recognized as being one of the major post-translational modification involved in the fine modulation of all if not all cellular processes including skeletal muscle contractile activity. However, phosphorylation presents a dynamic and highly regulated interplay with an atypical glycosylation on intracellular proteins, the O-GlcNAcylation. Akin to phosphorylation, O-GlcNAcylation is also involved in the physiopathology of several acquired diseases, such as muscle insulin resistance in diabetes or muscle atrophy. Recent data underline that the interplay between phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation acts as a modulator of skeletal muscle contractile activity. In particular, the O-GlcNAcylation level of the phosphoprotein MLC2 seems to be crucial in the modulation of the calcium activation properties, and should be responsible of changes in calcium properties observed in atrophy. Moreover, since several key structural proteins are O-GlcNAc-modified, and because of the localization of the enzymes involved in the O-GlcNAcylation/de-O-GlcNAcylation process to the nodal Z disk, a role of O-GlcNAcylation in the modulation of the sarcomeric structure should be considered.

  10. Oxidative stress impairs function and increases redox protein modifications in human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morielli, Tania; O'Flaherty, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress, generated by excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) or decreased antioxidant defenses (and possibly both), is associated with male infertility. Oxidative stress results in redox-dependent protein modifications, such as tyrosine nitration and S-glutathionylation. Normozoospermic sperm samples from healthy individuals were included in this study. Samples were incubated with increasing concentrations (0-5 mM) of exogenous hydrogen peroxide, tert-butyl hydroperoxide, or diethylamine NONOate (DA-NONOate, a nitric oxide (NO∙) donor) added to the medium. Spermatozoa treated with or without ROS were incubated under capacitating conditions and then levels of tyrosine phosphorylation and percentage of acrosome reaction (AR) induced by lysophosphatidylcholine were determined. Modified sperm proteins from cytosolic, triton-soluble, and triton-insoluble fractions were analyzed by SDS-PAGE immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry with anti-glutathione and anti-nitrotyrosine antibodies. Levels of S-glutathionylation increased dose dependently after exposure to hydroperoxides (Psperm capacitation by oxidative stress. In conclusion, oxidative stress promotes a dose-dependent increase in tyrosine nitration and S-glutathionylation and alters motility and the ability of spermatozoa to undergo capacitation.Free Spanish abstractA Spanish translation of this abstract is freely available at http://www.reproduction-online.org/content/149/1/113/suppl/DC1. © 2015 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  11. Improved efficiency of nanoneedle insertion by modification with a cell-puncturing protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Seunghwan; Matsumoto, Yuta; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Ueno, Takafumi; Silberberg, Yaron R.; Nakamura, Chikashi

    2018-03-01

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) probe etched into an ultra-sharp cylindrical shape (a nanoneedle) can be inserted into a living cell and mechanical responses of the insertion process are represented as force–distance curves using AFM. A probe-molecule-functionalized nanoneedle can be used to detect intracellular molecules of interest in situ. The insertion efficiencies of nanoneedles vary among cell types due to the cortex structures of cells, and some cell types, such as mouse fibroblast Balb/3T3 cells, show extremely low efficacy of insertion. We addressed this issue by using a cell membrane puncturing protein from bacteriophage T4 (gp5), a needle-like protein that spontaneously penetrates through the cell membrane. Gp5 was immobilized onto a nanoneedle surface. The insertion efficiency of the functionalized nanoneedle increased by over 15% compared to the non-functionalized control. Gp5-modification is a versatile approach in cell manipulation techniques for the insertion of other types of nanostructures into cells.

  12. Proteomic Investigation of Protein Profile Changes and Amino Acid Residue Level Modification in Cooked Lamb Meat: The Effect of Boiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tzer-Yang; Morton, James D; Clerens, Stefan; Dyer, Jolon M

    2015-10-21

    Hydrothermal treatment (heating in water) is a common method of general food processing and preparation. For red-meat-based foods, boiling is common; however, how the molecular level effects of this treatment correlate to the overall food properties is not yet well-understood. The effects of differing boiling times on lamb meat and the resultant cooking water were here examined through proteomic evaluation. The longer boiling time was found to result in increased protein aggregation involving particularly proteins such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, as well as truncation in proteins such as in α-actinin-2. Heat-induced protein backbone cleavage was observed adjacent to aspartic acid and asparagine residues. Side-chain modifications of amino acid residues resulting from the heating, including oxidation of phenylalanine and formation of carboxyethyllysine, were characterized in the cooked samples. Actin and myoglobin bands from the cooked meat per se remained visible on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, even after significant cooking time. These proteins were also found to be the major source of observed heat-induced modifications. This study provides new insights into molecular-level modifications occurring in lamb meat proteins during boiling and a protein chemistry basis for better understanding the effect of this common treatment on the nutritional and functional properties of red-meat-based foods.

  13. Modification of beta-lactoglobulin by oligofructose: impact on protein adsorption at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimova, Daria; de Jongh, Harmen H J

    2004-06-22

    Maillard products of beta-lactoglobulin (betaLg) and fructose oligosaccharide (FOS) were obtained in different degrees of modification depending on incubation time and pH. By use of a variety of biochemical and spectroscopic tools, it was demonstrated that the modification at limited degrees does not significantly affect the secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure of betaLg. The consequence of the modification on the thermodynamics of the protein was studied using differential scanning calorimetry, circular dichroism, and by monitoring the fluorescence intensity of protein samples with different concentrations of guanidine-HCl. The modification leads to lowering of the denaturation temperature by 5 degrees C and a reduction of the free energy of stabilization of about 30%. Ellipsometry and drop tensiometry demonstrated that upon adsorption to air-water interfaces in equilibrium modified betaLg exerts a lower surface pressure than native betaLg (16 versus 22 mN/m). Moreover, the surface elastic modulus increased with increasing surface pressure but reached significantly smaller values in the case of FOS-betaLg. Compared to native betaLg, modification of the protein with oligofructose moieties results in higher surface loads and thicker surface layers. The consequences of these altered surface rheological properties are discussed in view of the functional behavior in technological applications.

  14. Mac-2 binding protein is a cell-adhesive protein of the extracellular matrix which self-assembles into ring-like structures and binds beta1 integrins, collagens and fibronectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasaki, T; Brakebusch, C; Engel, J

    1998-01-01

    Human Mac-2 binding protein (M2BP) was prepared in recombinant form from the culture medium of 293 kidney cells and consisted of a 92 kDa subunit. The protein was obtained in a native state as indicated by CD spectroscopy, demonstrating alpha-helical and beta-type structure, and by protease...... in solid-phase assays to collagens IV, V and VI, fibronectin and nidogen, but not to fibrillar collagens I and III or other basement membrane proteins. The protein also mediated adhesion of cell lines at comparable strength with laminin. Adhesion to M2BP was inhibited by antibodies to integrin beta1...

  15. Improvement of Interfacial Adhesion by Bio-Inspired Catechol-Functionalized Soy Protein with Versatile Reactivity: Preparation of Fully Utilizable Soy-Based Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of materials based on renewable resources with enhanced mechanical and physicochemical properties is hampered by the abundance of hydrophilic groups because of their structural instability. Bio-inspired from the strong adhesion ability of mussel proteins, renewable and robust soy-based composite films were fabricated from two soybean-derived industrial materials: soluble soybean polysaccharide (SSPS and catechol-functionalized soy protein isolate (SPI-CH. The conjugation of SPI with multiple catechol moieties as a versatile adhesive component for SSPS matrix efficiently improved the interfacial adhesion between each segment of biopolymer. The biomimetic adherent catechol moieties were successfully bonded in the polymeric network based on catechol crosslinking chemistry through simple oxidative coupling and/or coordinative interaction. A combination of H-bonding, strong adhesion between the SPI-CH conjugation and SSPS matrix resulted in remarkable enhancements for mechanical properties. It was found that the tensile strength and Young’s modulus was improved from 2.80 and 17.24 MPa of unmodified SP film to 4.04 and 97.22 MPa of modified one, respectively. More importantly, the resultant films exhibited favorable water resistance and gas (water vapor barrier performances. The results suggested that the promising way improved the phase adhesion of graft copolymers using catechol-functionalized polymers as versatile adhesive components.

  16. MPTM: A tool for mining protein post-translational modifications from literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dongdong; Wang, Minghui; Li, Ao

    2017-10-01

    Due to the importance of post-translational modifications (PTMs) in human health and diseases, PTMs are regularly reported in the biomedical literature. However, the continuing and rapid pace of expansion of this literature brings a huge challenge for researchers and database curators. Therefore, there is a pressing need to aid them in identifying relevant PTM information more efficiently by using a text mining system. So far, only a few web servers are available for mining information of a very limited number of PTMs, which are based on simple pattern matching or pre-defined rules. In our work, in order to help researchers and database curators easily find and retrieve PTM information from available text, we have developed a text mining tool called MPTM, which extracts and organizes valuable knowledge about 11 common PTMs from abstracts in PubMed by using relations extracted from dependency parse trees and a heuristic algorithm. It is the first web server that provides literature mining service for hydroxylation, myristoylation and GPI-anchor. The tool is also used to find new publications on PTMs from PubMed and uncovers potential PTM information by large-scale text analysis. MPTM analyzes text sentences to identify protein names including substrates and protein-interacting enzymes, and automatically associates them with the UniProtKB protein entry. To facilitate further investigation, it also retrieves PTM-related information, such as human diseases, Gene Ontology terms and organisms from the input text and related databases. In addition, an online database (MPTMDB) with extracted PTM information and a local MPTM Lite package are provided on the MPTM website. MPTM is freely available online at http://bioinformatics.ustc.edu.cn/mptm/ and the source codes are hosted on GitHub: https://github.com/USTC-HILAB/MPTM .

  17. Protein tyrosine nitration and thiol oxidation by peroxynitrite-strategies to prevent these oxidative modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiber, Andreas; Daub, Steffen; Bachschmid, Markus; Schildknecht, Stefan; Oelze, Matthias; Steven, Sebastian; Schmidt, Patrick; Megner, Alexandra; Wada, Masayuki; Tanabe, Tadashi; Münzel, Thomas; Bottari, Serge; Ullrich, Volker

    2013-04-08

    The reaction product of nitric oxide and superoxide, peroxynitrite, is a potent biological oxidant. The most important oxidative protein modifications described for peroxynitrite are cysteine-thiol oxidation and tyrosine nitration. We have previously demonstrated that intrinsic heme-thiolate (P450)-dependent enzymatic catalysis increases the nitration of tyrosine 430 in prostacyclin synthase and results in loss of activity which contributes to endothelial dysfunction. We here report the sensitive peroxynitrite-dependent nitration of an over-expressed and partially purified human prostacyclin synthase (3.3 μM) with an EC50 value of 5 μM. Microsomal thiols in these preparations effectively compete for peroxynitrite and block the nitration of other proteins up to 50 μM peroxynitrite. Purified, recombinant PGIS showed a half-maximal nitration by 10 μM 3-morpholino sydnonimine (Sin-1) which increased in the presence of bicarbonate, and was only marginally induced by freely diffusing NO2-radicals generated by a peroxidase/nitrite/hydrogen peroxide system. Based on these observations, we would like to emphasize that prostacyclin synthase is among the most efficiently and sensitively nitrated proteins investigated by us so far. In the second part of the study, we identified two classes of peroxynitrite scavengers, blocking either peroxynitrite anion-mediated thiol oxidations or phenol/tyrosine nitrations by free radical mechanisms. Dithiopurines and dithiopyrimidines were highly effective in inhibiting both reaction types which could make this class of compounds interesting therapeutic tools. In the present work, we highlighted the impact of experimental conditions on the outcome of peroxynitrite-mediated nitrations. The limitations identified in this work need to be considered in the assessment of experimental data involving peroxynitrite.

  18. Protein Tyrosine Nitration and Thiol Oxidation by Peroxynitrite—Strategies to Prevent These Oxidative Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiber, Andreas; Daub, Steffen; Bachschmid, Markus; Schildknecht, Stefan; Oelze, Matthias; Steven, Sebastian; Schmidt, Patrick; Megner, Alexandra; Wada, Masayuki; Tanabe, Tadashi; Münzel, Thomas; Bottari, Serge; Ullrich, Volker

    2013-01-01

    The reaction product of nitric oxide and superoxide, peroxynitrite, is a potent biological oxidant. The most important oxidative protein modifications described for peroxynitrite are cysteine-thiol oxidation and tyrosine nitration. We have previously demonstrated that intrinsic heme-thiolate (P450)-dependent enzymatic catalysis increases the nitration of tyrosine 430 in prostacyclin synthase and results in loss of activity which contributes to endothelial dysfunction. We here report the sensitive peroxynitrite-dependent nitration of an over-expressed and partially purified human prostacyclin synthase (3.3 μM) with an EC50 value of 5 μM. Microsomal thiols in these preparations effectively compete for peroxynitrite and block the nitration of other proteins up to 50 μM peroxynitrite. Purified, recombinant PGIS showed a half-maximal nitration by 10 μM 3-morpholino sydnonimine (Sin-1) which increased in the presence of bicarbonate, and was only marginally induced by freely diffusing NO2-radicals generated by a peroxidase/nitrite/hydrogen peroxide system. Based on these observations, we would like to emphasize that prostacyclin synthase is among the most efficiently and sensitively nitrated proteins investigated by us so far. In the second part of the study, we identified two classes of peroxynitrite scavengers, blocking either peroxynitrite anion-mediated thiol oxidations or phenol/tyrosine nitrations by free radical mechanisms. Dithiopurines and dithiopyrimidines were highly effective in inhibiting both reaction types which could make this class of compounds interesting therapeutic tools. In the present work, we highlighted the impact of experimental conditions on the outcome of peroxynitrite-mediated nitrations. The limitations identified in this work need to be considered in the assessment of experimental data involving peroxynitrite. PMID:23567270

  19. Protein modifications by electrophilic lipoxidation products: Adduct formation, chemical strategies and tandem mass spectrometry for their detection and identification

    OpenAIRE

    Vasil’ev, Yury V.; Tzeng, Shin-Chen; Huang, Lin; Maier, Claudia S.

    2014-01-01

    The post-translational modification of proteins by electrophilic oxylipids is emerging as an important mechanism that contributes to the complexity of proteomes. Enzymatic and nonenzymatic oxidation of biological lipids results in the formation of chemically diverse electrophilic carbonyl compounds, such as 2-alkenals and 4-hydroxy alkenals, epoxides and eicosanoids with reactive cyclopentenone structures. These lipoxidation products are capable of modifying proteins. Originally considered so...

  20. Glutamine synthetase and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase are adhesive moonlighting proteins of Lactobacillus crispatus released by epithelial cathelicidin LL-37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainulainen, Veera; Loimaranta, Vuokko; Pekkala, Anna; Edelman, Sanna; Antikainen, Jenni; Kylväjä, Riikka; Laaksonen, Maiju; Laakkonen, Liisa; Finne, Jukka; Korhonen, Timo K

    2012-05-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) were identified as novel adhesive moonlighting proteins of Lactobacillus crispatus ST1. Both proteins were bound onto the bacterial surface at acidic pHs, whereas a suspension of the cells to pH 8 caused their release into the buffer, a pattern previously observed with surface-bound enolase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) of L. crispatus. The pH shift was associated with a rapid and transient increase in cell wall permeability, as measured by cell staining with propidium iodide. A gradual increase in the release of the four moonlighting proteins was also observed after the treatment of L. crispatus ST1 cells with increasing concentrations of the antimicrobial cationic peptide LL-37, which kills bacteria by disturbing membrane integrity and was here observed to increase the cell wall permeability of L. crispatus ST1. At pH 4, the fusion proteins His(6)-GS, His(6)-GPI, His(6)-enolase, and His(6)-GAPDH showed localized binding to cell division septa and poles of L. crispatus ST1 cells, whereas no binding to Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG was detected. Strain ST1 showed a pH-dependent adherence to the basement membrane preparation Matrigel. Purified His(6)-GS and His(6)-GPI proteins bound to type I collagen, and His(6)-GS also bound to laminin, and their level of binding was higher at pH 5.5 than at pH 6.5. His(6)-GS also expressed a plasminogen receptor function. The results show the strain-dependent surface association of moonlighting proteins in lactobacilli and that these proteins are released from the L. crispatus surface after cell trauma, under conditions of alkaline stress, or in the presence of the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 produced by human cells.

  1. Influence of nitriding atmosphere on the modification of surface titanium with focus on the behavior of blood platelets adhesion; Influencia da atmosfera nitretante na modificacao de superficies de titanio com enfase no comportamento de adesao de plaquetas sanguineas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitoriano, J.O.; Alves, C. [Universidade Federal Rural do Semi-Arido (UFERSA), RN (Brazil); Braz, D.C.; Camara, R.B.G.; Rocha, H.A.O., E-mail: clodomiro.jr@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), RN (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the influence of surface modification of titanium on the adhesion of blood platelets, through techniques of adhesion and morphological analyzes. Discs of titanium grade II received different surface treatments with plasma of Ar + N{sub 2} + H{sub 2} and Ar + H{sub 2}, forming two experimental groups including only polished samples used as standard. Before and after treatment the samples were characterized according to topography, crystalline structure and wettability, using atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and testing of sessile drop, respectively. Platelet rich plasma (PRP) was applied on the modified surfaces in a culture plates. Images obtained by electron microscopy of adhered platelets were analyzed to verify the behavior of platelets in the different experimental conditions. (author)

  2. N-terminal Gly(224-Gly(411 domain in Listeria adhesion protein interacts with host receptor Hsp60.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balamurugan Jagadeesan

    Full Text Available Listeria adhesion protein (LAP is a housekeeping bifunctional enzyme consisting of N-terminal acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH and C-terminal alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH. It aids Listeria monocytogenes in crossing the epithelial barrier through a paracellular route by interacting with its host receptor, heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60. To gain insight into the binding interaction between LAP and Hsp60, LAP subdomain(s participating in the Hsp60 interaction were investigated.Using a ModBase structural model, LAP was divided into 4 putative subdomains: the ALDH region contains N1 (Met(1-Pro(223 and N2 (Gly(224-Gly(411, and the ADH region contains C1 (Gly(412-Val(648 and C2 (Pro(649-Val(866. Each subdomain was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Purified subdomains were used in ligand overlay, immunofluorescence, and bead-based epithelial cell adhesion assays to analyze each domain's affinity toward Hsp60 protein or human ileocecal epithelial HCT-8 cells.The N2 subdomain exhibited the greatest affinity for Hsp60 with a K(D of 9.50±2.6 nM. The K(D of full-length LAP (7.2±0.5 nM to Hsp60 was comparable to the N2 value. Microspheres (1 µm diameter coated with N2 subdomain showed significantly (P<0.05 higher binding to HCT-8 cells than beads coated with other subdomains and this binding was inhibited when HCT-8 cells were pretreated with anti-Hsp60 antibody to specifically block epithelial Hsp60. Furthermore, HCT-8 cells pretreated with purified N2 subdomain also reduced L. monocytogenes adhesion by about 4 log confirming its involvement in interaction with epithelial cells.These data indicate that the N2 subdomain in the LAP ALDH domain is critical in initiating interaction with mammalian cell receptor Hsp60 providing insight into the molecular mechanism of pathogenesis for the development of potential anti-listerial control strategies.

  3. The GPS Motif Is a Molecular Switch for Bimodal Activities of Adhesion Class G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Prömel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion class G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCR form the second largest group of seven-transmembrane-spanning (7TM receptors whose molecular layout and function differ from canonical 7TM receptors. Despite their essential roles in immunity, tumorigenesis, and development, the mechanisms of aGPCR activation and signal transduction have remained obscure to date. Here, we use a transgenic assay to define the protein domains required in vivo for the activity of the prototypical aGPCR LAT-1/Latrophilin in Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that the GPCR proteolytic site (GPS motif, the molecular hallmark feature of the entire aGPCR class, is essential for LAT-1 signaling serving in two different activity modes of the receptor. Surprisingly, neither mode requires cleavage but presence of the GPS, which relays interactions with at least two different partners. Our work thus uncovers the versatile nature of aGPCR activity in molecular detail and places the GPS motif in a central position for diverse protein-protein interactions.

  4. The GPS motif is a molecular switch for bimodal activities of adhesion class G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prömel, Simone; Frickenhaus, Marie; Hughes, Samantha; Mestek, Lamia; Staunton, David; Woollard, Alison; Vakonakis, Ioannis; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schnabel, Ralf; Russ, Andreas P; Langenhan, Tobias

    2012-08-30

    Adhesion class G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCR) form the second largest group of seven-transmembrane-spanning (7TM) receptors whose molecular layout and function differ from canonical 7TM receptors. Despite their essential roles in immunity, tumorigenesis, and development, the mechanisms of aGPCR activation and signal transduction have remained obscure to date. Here, we use a transgenic assay to define the protein domains required in vivo for the activity of the prototypical aGPCR LAT-1/Latrophilin in Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that the GPCR proteolytic site (GPS) motif, the molecular hallmark feature of the entire aGPCR class, is essential for LAT-1 signaling serving in two different activity modes of the receptor. Surprisingly, neither mode requires cleavage but presence of the GPS, which relays interactions with at least two different partners. Our work thus uncovers the versatile nature of aGPCR activity in molecular detail and places the GPS motif in a central position for diverse protein-protein interactions. Copyright © 2012 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of post-translational modifications on structure, function and pharmacology of class C G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2015-01-01

    taste receptors (T1R1-3), one calcium-sensing (CaS) receptor, one GPCR, class C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6) receptor, and seven orphan receptors. G protein-coupled receptors undergo a number of post-translational modifications, which regulate their structure, function and/or pharmacology. Here, we...

  6. Biotherapeutic protein formulation variables influence protein integrity and can promote post-translational modifications as shown using chicken egg white lysozyme as a model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourbatsi, Evdoxia; Povey, Jane; Uddin, Shahid; Smales, C Mark

    2016-04-01

    The effect of different formulations variables on protein integrity were investigated using lysozyme as a model protein for the development of biotherapeutic protein formulations for use in the clinic. Buffer composition/concentration was the key variable of formulation reagents investigated in determining lysozyme stability and authenticity independent of protein concentration whilst the storage temperature and time, not surprisingly, were also key variables. Tryptic peptide mapping of the protein showed that the modifications occurred when formulated under specific conditions but not others. A model peptide system was developed that reflected the same behavior under formulation conditions as intact lysozyme. Peptide models may mirror the stability of proteins, or regions of proteins, in the same formulations and be used to help develop a rapid screen of formulations for stabilisation of biotherapeutic proteins.

  7. Using Theoretical Protein Isotopic Distributions to Parse Small-Mass-Difference Post-Translational Modifications via Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Timothy W.; Williams, Jared R.; Lopez, Nathan I.; Morré, Jeffrey T.; Bradford, C. Samuel; Beckman, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    Small-mass-difference modifications to proteins are obscured in mass spectrometry by the natural abundance of stable isotopes such as 13C that broaden the isotopic distribution of an intact protein. Using a ZipTip (Millipore, Billerica, MA, USA) to remove salt from proteins in preparation for high-resolution mass spectrometry, the theoretical isotopic distribution intensities calculated from the protein's empirical formula could be fit to experimentally acquired data and used to differentiate between multiple low-mass modifications to proteins. We could readily distinguish copper from zinc bound to a single-metal superoxide dismutase (SOD1) species; copper and zinc only differ by an average mass of 1.8 Da and have overlapping stable isotope patterns. In addition, proteins could be directly modified while bound to the ZipTip. For example, washing 11 mM S-methyl methanethiosulfonate over the ZipTip allowed the number of free cysteines on proteins to be detected as S-methyl adducts. Alternatively, washing with the sulfhydryl oxidant diamide could quickly reestablish disulfide bridges. Using these methods, we could resolve the relative contributions of copper and zinc binding, as well as disulfide reduction to intact SOD1 protein present from binding and sulfhydryl reduction of SOD1 at the individual subunit level and is applicable to many other proteins.

  8. Interleukin-2 induces beta2-integrin-dependent signal transduction involving the focal adhesion kinase-related protein B (fakB)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockdorff, J; Kanner, S B; Nielsen, M

    1998-01-01

    beta2 integrin molecules are involved in a multitude of cellular events, including adhesion, migration, and cellular activation. Here, we studied the influence of beta2 integrins on interleukin-2 (IL-2)-mediated signal transduction in human CD4(+) T cell lines obtained from healthy donors...... and a leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) patient. We show that IL-2 induces tyrosine phosphorylation of a 125-kDa protein and homotypic adhesion in beta2 integrin (CD18)-positive but not in beta2-integrin-negative T cells. EDTA, an inhibitor of integrin adhesion, blocks IL-2-induced tyrosine phosphorylation...... experiments indicate that the IL-2-induced 125-kDa phosphotyrosine protein is the focal adhesion kinase-related protein B (fakB). Thus, IL-2 induces strong tyrosine phosphorylation of fakB in beta2-integrin-positive but not in beta2-integrin-negative T cells, and CD18 mAb selectively blocks IL-2-induced fak...

  9. [Taylorella equigenitalis: cell wall proteins, gene fingerprints, plasmids, adhesion and toxicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapan, G; Awad-Masalmeh, M; Hartig, A; Silber, R

    1991-10-01

    In this study 55 strains of Taylorella equigenitalis isolated from horses of four different studs in Austria, and a comparative strain from the Federal Republic of Germany were investigated by different methods. These investigations were carried out with the help of SDS-PAGE, immunoblotting, the analyses of genomes and by proof of plasmids. Furthermore, pathogenic mechanisms such as adhesion or the formation of toxins were investigated in vitro. On the basis of the results carried out by means of SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting all tested strains of Taylorella equigenitalis were alike, whereas by DNA analyses the strains could be divided into five groups. The comparative strain from the FRG, which clearly differed from the Austrian strains, formed one group all by itself. From three studs, which are related to each other because of an intensive exchange of horses, representatives (n = 53) of three DNA fingerprint groups were isolated. These three fingerprint patterns were very similar to each other, while the hybridisation patterns from the other two Austrian strains were very different. One of these strains, isolated from a diseased mare, could not be distinguished from the other strain isolated from a clinical healthy stallion from the same study by this method. Only 47.3% from the investigated strains showed attachment to HeLa cells, while cell extracts of all of them caused morphological changes of a varying degree of both Y1 and Vero cells. There were no connexions between these adhesion-cytotoxicity-properties and the DNA fingerprint groups as well as the studs, respectively. No plasmids were found in the Taylorella equigenitalis strains used in this study.

  10. Recycling of protein subunits during DNA translocation and cleavage by Type I restriction-modification enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Michelle; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    The Type I restriction-modification enzymes comprise three protein subunits; HsdS and HsdM that form a methyltransferase (MTase) and HsdR that associates with the MTase and catalyses Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent DNA translocation and cleavage. Here, we examine whether the MTase and HsdR components can 'turnover' in vitro, i.e. whether they can catalyse translocation and cleavage events on one DNA molecule, dissociate and then re-bind a second DNA molecule. Translocation termination by both EcoKI and EcoR124I leads to HsdR dissociation from linear DNA but not from circular DNA. Following DNA cleavage, the HsdR subunits appear unable to dissociate even though the DNA is linear, suggesting a tight interaction with the cleaved product. The MTases of EcoKI and EcoAI can dissociate from DNA following either translocation or cleavage and can initiate reactions on new DNA molecules as long as free HsdR molecules are available. In contrast, the MTase of EcoR124I does not turnover and additional cleavage of circular DNA is not observed by inclusion of RecBCD, a helicase-nuclease that degrades the linear DNA product resulting from Type I cleavage. Roles for Type I restriction endonuclease subunit dynamics in restriction alleviation in the cell are discussed.

  11. Peptidomics of Peptic Digest of Selected Potato Tuber Proteins: Post-Translational Modifications and Limited Cleavage Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    C K Rajendran, Subin R; Mason, Beth; Udenigwe, Chibuike C

    2016-03-23

    Bioinformatic tools are useful in predicting bioactive peptides from food proteins. This study was focused on using bioinformatics and peptidomics to evaluate the specificity of peptide release and post-translational modifications (PTMs) in a peptic digest of potato protein isolate. Peptides in the protein hydrolysate were identified by LC-MS/MS and subsequently aligned to their parent potato tuber proteins. Five major proteins were selected for further analysis, namely, lipoxygenase, α-1,4-glucan phosphorylase, annexin, patatin, and polyubiquitin, based on protein coverage, abundance, confidence levels, and function. Comparison of the in silico peptide profile generated with ExPASy PeptideCutter and experimental peptidomics data revealed several differences. The experimental peptic cleavage sites were found to vary in number and specificity from PeptideCutter predictions. Average peptide chain length was also found to be higher than predicted with hexapeptides as the smallest detected peptides. Moreover, PTMs, particularly Met oxidation and Glu/Asp deamidation, were observed in some peptides, and these were unaccounted for during in silico analysis. PTMs can be formed during aging of potato tubers, or as a result of processing conditions during protein isolation and hydrolysis. The findings provide insights on the limitations of current bioinformatics tools for predicting bioactive peptide release from proteins, and on the existence of structural modifications that can alter the peptide bioactivity and functionality.

  12. Surface-tethered polymers to influence protein adsorption and microbial adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norde, Willem

    2007-01-01

    In various applications it is desired that biological cells or protein molecules are immobilized at surfaces. Examples are enzymes or cells in bioreactors and biosensors, immuno-proteins in solid-state diagnostics and proteinaceous farmacons in drug delivery systems. In order to retain biological

  13. Molecular modification of Protein A to improve the elution pH and alkali resistance in affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hai-Feng; Liang, Zhen-Dong; Wang, Sha-Li; Wu, Pu-Qiang; Jin, Xiong-Hua

    2014-04-01

    Protein A of Staphylococcus aureus has been widely used as an affinity ligand for the purification of immunoglobulin. However, the low elution pH and the sensitivity to alkaline condition restricted the large-scale application of antibody purification. To overcome these disadvantages, the B domain was selected and mutated to Z domain and the recombinant Protein A was reconstructed by linking five Z domains. First, a section of six glycines was inserted into the second loop of Z domain, Z (6G). This increased the elution pH to 4.0-5.0. Then, the site-specific mutagenesis was conducted by replacing the 23rd asparagines to threonine and 30th phenylalanine to alanine, Z (N23T, F30A). These mutations made the recombinant Protein A shown a higher alkaline resistance than the nature Protein A. The work confirmed the modification of Protein A and exhibited the characteristics of recombinant Staphylococcal Protein A for antibody purification.

  14. Crystal structure of a PCP/Sfp complex reveals the structural basis for carrier protein posttranslational modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufar, Peter; Rahighi, Simin; Kraas, Femke I; Kirchner, Donata K; Löhr, Frank; Henrich, Erik; Köpke, Jürgen; Dikic, Ivan; Güntert, Peter; Marahiel, Mohamed A; Dötsch, Volker

    2014-04-24

    Phosphopantetheine transferases represent a class of enzymes found throughout all forms of life. From a structural point of view, they are subdivided into three groups, with transferases from group II being the most widespread. They are required for the posttranslational modification of carrier proteins involved in diverse metabolic pathways. We determined the crystal structure of the group II phosphopantetheine transferase Sfp from Bacillus in complex with a substrate carrier protein in the presence of coenzyme A and magnesium, and observed two protein-protein interaction sites. Mutational analysis showed that only the hydrophobic contacts between the carrier protein's second helix and the C-terminal domain of Sfp are essential for their productive interaction. Comparison with a similar structure of a complex of human proteins suggests that the mode of interaction is highly conserved in all domains of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular cloning and characterization of a surface-localized adhesion protein in Mycoplasma bovis Hubei-1 strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Zou

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis is an important pathogen that causes various bovine diseases, such as mastitis in cows and pneumonia in calves. The surface proteins are generally thought to play a central role in the pathogenesis of this organism. We screened the entire genome of M. bovis Hubei-1 and discovered a gene named vpmaX that encodes the 25 kDa variable surface lipoprotein A (VpmaX. Sequence analysis revealed that VpmaX contains several repetitive units and a typical bacterial lipoprotein signal sequence. The vpmaX gene was cloned and expressed in E. coli to obtain recombinant VpmaX (rVpmaX. Western blot analysis using a rabbit antibody against rVpmaX demonstrated that VpmaX is a membrane protein. Immunostaining visualized via confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that rVpmaX was able to adhere to embryonic bovine lung cells (EBL, and this was also confirmed by a sandwich ELISA. In summary, a surface-localized adhesion protein was identified in M. bovis Hubei-1.

  16. Standardization and quality control in quantifying non-enzymatic oxidative protein modifications in relation to ageing and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedić, Olgica; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins determine the activity, stability, specificity, transportability and lifespan of a protein. Some PTM are highly specific and regulated involving various enzymatic pathways, but there are other non-enzymatic PTM (nePTM), which occur stochastically...... being fully active to totally inactive molecules. Determination of the type and the amount (abundance) of nePTM is essential for establishing connection between specific protein structure and specific biological role. This article summarizes analytical demands for reliable quantification of ne......PTM, including requirements for the assay performance, standardization and quality control, and points to the difficulties, uncertainties and un-resolved issues....

  17. Protein phosphatase 2A plays a critical role in interleukin-2-induced beta 2-integrin dependent homotypic adhesion in human CD4+ T cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockdorff, J; Nielsen, M; Svejgaard, A

    1997-01-01

    A, blocks PP1/PP2A activity and IL-2 induced adhesion, whereas cyclosporin A, an inhibitor of protein serine/threonine phosphatase 2B (PP2B), does not, suggesting that PP1 and/or PP2A are involved in IL-2 induced adhesion. Endothall, which preferentially inhibits PP2A, strongly inhibited cytokine...... modulates enzymatic activity and/or subcellular distribution of serine/threonine phosphatases 1 and 2A (PP1/PP2A) in T cells, we examined the role of these phosphatases in IL-2 induced homotypic adhesion in antigen specific human CD4+ T cell lines. We show that calyculin A, a potent inhibitor of PP1 and PP2...... induced adhesion, whereas the structurally related compound 1,4-dimethylendothall had no effect on either phosphatase activity or the adhesion response. Okadaic acid, which preferentially inhibits PP2A, almost completely blocked IL-2-induced adhesion, whereas tautomycin, a potent inhibitor of PP1, had...

  18. AMS 4.0: consensus prediction of post-translational modifications in protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plewczynski, Dariusz; Basu, Subhadip; Saha, Indrajit

    2012-08-01

    We present here the 2011 update of the AutoMotif Service (AMS 4.0) that predicts the wide selection of 88 different types of the single amino acid post-translational modifications (PTM) in protein sequences. The selection of experimentally confirmed modifications is acquired from the latest UniProt and Phospho.ELM databases for training. The sequence vicinity of each modified residue is represented using amino acids physico-chemical features encoded using high quality indices (HQI) obtaining by automatic clustering of known indices extracted from AAindex database. For each type of the numerical representation, the method builds the ensemble of Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) pattern classifiers, each optimising different objectives during the training (for example the recall, precision or area under the ROC curve (AUC)). The consensus is built using brainstorming technology, which combines multi-objective instances of machine learning algorithm, and the data fusion of different training objects representations, in order to boost the overall prediction accuracy of conserved short sequence motifs. The performance of AMS 4.0 is compared with the accuracy of previous versions, which were constructed using single machine learning methods (artificial neural networks, support vector machine). Our software improves the average AUC score of the earlier version by close to 7 % as calculated on the test datasets of all 88 PTM types. Moreover, for the selected most-difficult sequence motifs types it is able to improve the prediction performance by almost 32 %, when compared with previously used single machine learning methods. Summarising, the brainstorming consensus meta-learning methodology on the average boosts the AUC score up to around 89 %, averaged over all 88 PTM types. Detailed results for single machine learning methods and the consensus methodology are also provided, together with the comparison to previously published methods and state-of-the-art software tools. The

  19. RACK1 Targets the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase/Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway To Link Integrin Engagement with Focal Adhesion Disassembly and Cell Motility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vomastek, Tomáš; Iwanicki, M. P.; Schaeffer, J.; J.; Tarcsafalvi, A.; Parsons, J. T.; Weber, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 23 (2007), s. 8296-8305 ISSN 0270-7306 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200716 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : protein kinase * adhesion * cell Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 6.420, year: 2007

  20. Comparison of adhesive properties of water- and phosphate-buffer-washed cottonseed meals with cottonseed protein isolate on maple and poplar veneers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water- and phosphate buffer (35 mM Na2HPO4/NaH2PO4, pH 7.5)-washed cottonseed meals (abbreviated as WCM and BCM, respectively) could be low-cost and environmentally friendly protein-based adhesives as their preparation does not involve corrosive alkali and acid solutions that are needed for cottonse...

  1. Lysine pyrrolation is a naturally-occurring covalent modification involved in the production of DNA mimic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Hiroaki; Chikazawa, Miho; Otaki, Natsuki; Hioki, Yusuke; Shimozu, Yuki; Nakashima, Fumie; Shibata, Takahiro; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Maruyama, Shoichi; Matsumi, Noriyoshi; Uchida, Koji

    2014-06-18

    Covalent modification of proteins exerts significant effects on their chemical properties and has important functional and regulatory consequences. We now report the identification and verification of an electrically-active form of modified proteins recognized by a group of small molecules commonly used to interact with DNA. This previously unreported property of proteins was initially discovered when the γ-ketoaldehydes were identified as a source of the proteins stained by the DNA intercalators. Using 1,4-butanedial, the simplest γ-ketoaldehyde, we characterized the structural and chemical criteria governing the recognition of the modified proteins by the DNA intercalators and identified N(ε)-pyrrolelysine as a key adduct. Unexpectedly, the pyrrolation conferred an electronegativity and electronic properties on the proteins that potentially constitute an electrical mimic to the DNA. In addition, we found that the pyrrolated proteins indeed triggered an autoimmune response and that the production of specific antibodies against the pyrrolated proteins was accelerated in human systemic lupus erythematosus. These findings and the apparent high abundance of N(ε)-pyrrolelysine in vivo suggest that protein pyrrolation could be an endogenous source of DNA mimic proteins, providing a possible link connecting protein turnover and immune disorders.

  2. Post-translational modifications modulate ligand recognition by the third PDZ domain of the MAGUK protein PSD-95.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Murciano-Calles

    Full Text Available The relative promiscuity of hub proteins such as postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95 can be achieved by alternative splicing, allosteric regulation, and post-translational modifications, the latter of which is the most efficient method of accelerating cellular responses to environmental changes in vivo. Here, a mutational approach was used to determine the impact of phosphorylation and succinimidation post-translational modifications on the binding affinity of the postsynaptic density protein-95/discs large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ3 domain of PSD-95. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the binding affinity of this domain is influenced by an interplay between salt-bridges linking the α3 helix, the β2-β3 loop and the positively charged Lys residues in its high-affinity hexapeptide ligand KKETAV. The α3 helix is an extra structural element that is not present in other PDZ domains, which links PDZ3 with the following SH3 domain in the PSD-95 protein. This regulatory mechanism was confirmed experimentally via thermodynamic and NMR chemical shift perturbation analyses, discarding intra-domain long-range effects. Taken together, the results presented here reveal the molecular basis of the regulatory role of the α3 extra-element and the effects of post-translational modifications of PDZ3 on its binding affinity, both energetically and dynamically.

  3. Posttranslational modification of Birch and Ragweed allergen proteins by common gas phase pollutants, NO2 and O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, M. A.; Pope, F.; Bloss, W.

    2015-12-01

    The global incidence of hay fever has been rising for decades, however, the underlying reasons behind this rise remain unclear. It is hypothesized that exposure of pollen to common gas phase pollutants, such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3), increases the allergenicity of the pollen and thus increases hay fever incidence. Since atmospheric pollutants tend to have greater concentrations within urban areas (in particular NO2) the hypothesis suggests that greater allergenicity should occur in urban areas. Indeed, several studies do suggest higher hay fever incidence within urban areas compared to rural areas. Previous published work suggests a link between increased allergies with changes in the chemical composition of the pollen protein via posttranslational modification of the protein. This study investigates the posttranslational modification of two highly allergenic pollen species (Birch and Ragweed) that are common in Europe. Within the laboratory, we expose pollen grains to atmospherically relevant exposures of gas phase NO2, O3 and other common gas phase oxidants under a range of environmentally relevant conditions. The effects of the environmentally relevant exposures on the biochemistry of the pollen grains were probed using a proteomic approach (liquid chromatography coupled ultra-high resolution spectrometer). Our findings indicate the interaction between gas phase pollutants and pollen cause protein specific modifications; in particular, nitration occurs upon tyrosine residues and nitrosylation on cysteine residues. Possibly, these modifications may affect the immune response of the pollen protein, which may suggest a possible reason for increased allergies in reaction to such biologically altered protein. The laboratory-derived results will be supported with a time series analysis of asthma incidence rates for the London area, which take into account the pollen count, and pollutant concentrations. The implications of the results will be discussed

  4. Atmospheric pressure plasma polymers for tuned QCM detection of protein adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, G B; Asandulesa, M; Topala, I; Pohoata, V; Dumitrascu, N; Barboiu, M

    2014-03-15

    Our efforts have been concentrated in preparing plasma polymeric thin layers at atmospheric pressure grown on Quartz Crystal Microbalance-QCM electrodes for which the non-specific absorption of proteins can be efficiently modulated, tuned and used for QCM biosensing and quantification. Plasma polymerization reaction at atmospheric pressure has been used as a simple and viable method for the preparation of QCM bioactive surfaces, featuring variable protein binding properties. Polyethyleneglycol (ppEG), polystyrene (ppST) and poly(ethyleneglycol-styrene) (ppST-EG) thin-layers have been grown on QCM electrodes. These layers were characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Contact angle measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The plasma ppST QCM electrodes present a higher adsorption of Concanavalin A (ConA) and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) proteins when compared with the commercial coated polystyrene (ppST) ones. The minimum adsorption was found for ppEG, surface, known by their protein anti-fouling properties. The amount of adsorbed proteins can be tuned by the introduction of PEG precursors in the plasma discharge during the preparation of ppST polymers. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Glycan Reader is improved to recognize most sugar types and chemical modifications in the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Jun; Lee, Jumin; Patel, Dhilon S; Ma, Hongjing; Lee, Hui Sun; Jo, Sunhwan; Im, Wonpil

    2017-10-01

    Glycans play a central role in many essential biological processes. Glycan Reader was originally developed to simplify the reading of Protein Data Bank (PDB) files containing glycans through the automatic detection and annotation of sugars and glycosidic linkages between sugar units and to proteins, all based on atomic coordinates and connectivity information. Carbohydrates can have various chemical modifications at different positions, making their chemical space much diverse. Unfortunately, current PDB files do not provide exact annotations for most carbohydrate derivatives and more than 50% of PDB glycan chains have at least one carbohydrate derivative that could not be correctly recognized by the original Glycan Reader. Glycan Reader has been improved and now identifies most sugar types and chemical modifications (including various glycolipids) in the PDB, and both PDB and PDBx/mmCIF formats are supported. CHARMM-GUI Glycan Reader is updated to generate the simulation system and input of various glycoconjugates with most sugar types and chemical modifications. It also offers a new functionality to edit the glycan structures through addition/deletion/modification of glycosylation types, sugar types, chemical modifications, glycosidic linkages, and anomeric states. The simulation system and input files can be used for CHARMM, NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, GENESIS, LAMMPS, Desmond, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. Glycan Fragment Database in GlycanStructure.Org is also updated to provide an intuitive glycan sequence search tool for complex glycan structures with various chemical modifications in the PDB. http://www.charmm-gui.org/input/glycan and http://www.glycanstructure.org. wonpil@lehigh.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  6. The Role of the Glutathione System in Oxidative Modification of Proteins and Dysregulation of Apoptosis in Jurkat Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosareva, O L; Stepovaya, E A; Ryazantseva, N V; Shakhristova, E V; Egorova, M Yu; Novitsky, V V

    2017-12-01

    We compared changes in the redox status and intensity of oxidative modification of proteins in intact Jurkat tumor cells and cells cultured with buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of the key enzyme of glutathione synthesis γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase. The glutathione system components play a role in modulation of the content of protein-bound glutathione, protein carbonyl derivatives, bityrosine, and oxidized tryptophan, and in dysregulation of apoptosis in Jurkat tumor cells. Inhibition of de novo synthesis of glutathione in Jurkat tumor cells was followed by accumulation of hydroxyl radical, a reduction in the level of protein-bound glutathione and oxidized tryptophan, and a rise in the concentration of protein carbonyl derivatives. These changes were accompanied by activation of programmed cell death.

  7. Diverse and divergent protein post-translational modifications in two growth stages of a natural microbial community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhou [ORNL; Wang, Yingfeng [ORNL; Yao, Qiuming [University of Missouri, Columbia; Justice, Nicholas B. [University of California, Berkeley; Ahn, Tae-Hyuk [ORNL; Xu, Dong [University of Missouri, Columbia; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Banfield, Jillian F. [University of California, Berkeley; Pan, Chongle [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Detailed characterization of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins in microbial communities remains a significant challenge. Here we directly identify and quantify a broad range of PTMs (hydroxylation, methylation, citrullination, acetylation, phosphorylation, methylthiolation, S-nitrosylation and nitration) in a natural microbial community from an acid mine drainage site. Approximately 29% of the identified proteins of the dominant Leptospirillum group II bacteria are modified, and 43% of modified proteins carry multiple PTM types. Most PTM events, except S-nitrosylations, have low fractional occupancy. Notably, PTM events are detected on Cas proteins involved in antiviral defense, an aspect of Cas biochemistry not considered previously. Further, Cas PTM profiles from Leptospirillum group II differ in early versus mature biofilms. PTM patterns are divergent on orthologues of two closely related, but ecologically differentiated, Leptospirillum group II bacteria. Our results highlight the prevalence and dynamics of PTMs of proteins, with potential significance for ecological adaptation and microbial evolution.

  8. The yeast SR-like protein Npl3 links chromatin modification to mRNA processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica A Moehle

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic gene expression involves tight coordination between transcription and pre-mRNA splicing; however, factors responsible for this coordination remain incompletely defined. Here, we explored the genetic, functional, and biochemical interactions of a likely coordinator, Npl3, an SR-like protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that we recently showed is required for efficient co-transcriptional recruitment of the splicing machinery. We surveyed the NPL3 genetic interaction space and observed a significant enrichment for genes involved in histone modification and chromatin remodeling. Specifically, we found that Npl3 genetically interacts with both Bre1, which mono-ubiquitinates histone H2B as part of the RAD6 Complex, and Ubp8, the de-ubiquitinase of the SAGA Complex. In support of these genetic data, we show that Bre1 physically interacts with Npl3 in an RNA-independent manner. Furthermore, using a genome-wide splicing microarray, we found that the known splicing defect of a strain lacking Npl3 is exacerbated by deletion of BRE1 or UBP8, a phenomenon phenocopied by a point mutation in H2B that abrogates ubiquitination. Intriguingly, even in the presence of wild-type NPL3, deletion of BRE1 exhibits a mild splicing defect and elicits a growth defect in combination with deletions of early and late splicing factors. Taken together, our data reveal a connection between Npl3 and an extensive array of chromatin factors and describe an unanticipated functional link between histone H2B ubiquitination and pre-mRNA splicing.

  9. Silk-fibronectin protein alloy fibres support cell adhesion and viability as a high strength, matrix fibre analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Matthew M.; Li, David; Gyune Rim, Nae; Backman, Daniel; Smith, Michael L.; Wong, Joyce Y.

    2017-04-01

    Silk is a natural polymer with broad utility in biomedical applications because it exhibits general biocompatibility and high tensile material properties. While mechanical integrity is important for most biomaterial applications, proper function and integration also requires biomaterial incorporation into complex surrounding tissues for many physiologically relevant processes such as wound healing. In this study, we spin silk fibroin into a protein alloy fibre with whole fibronectin using wet spinning approaches in order to synergize their respective strength and cell interaction capabilities. Results demonstrate that silk fibroin alone is a poor adhesive surface for fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells in the absence of serum. However, significantly improved cell attachment is observed to silk-fibronectin alloy fibres without serum present while not compromising the fibres’ mechanical integrity. Additionally, cell viability is improved up to six fold on alloy fibres when serum is present while migration and spreading generally increase as well. These findings demonstrate the utility of composite protein alloys as inexpensive and effective means to create durable, biologically active biomaterials.

  10. Endothelial Cell Lining of PET Vascular Prostheses: Modification with Degradable Polyester-based Copolymers and Adhesive Protein Multi-layers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chlupáč, Jaroslav; Filová, Elena; Riedel, Tomáš; Brynda, Eduard; Pamula, E.; Bačáková, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2014), s. 1000139 ISSN 2157-7552 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/10/1106; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1857; GA MZd(CZ) NT11270; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0029 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : blood vessel prosthesis * polyethylene terephthalate * poly (L-lactide-co-glycolide) * endothelial cells Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V)

  11. Cellular prion protein is required for neuritogenesis: fine-tuning of multiple signaling pathways involved in focal adhesions and actin cytoskeleton dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alleaume-Butaux A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aurélie Alleaume-Butaux,1,2 Caroline Dakowski,1,2 Mathéa Pietri,1,2 Sophie Mouillet-Richard,1,2 Jean-Marie Launay,3,4 Odile Kellermann,1,2 Benoit Schneider1,2 1INSERM, UMR-S 747, 2Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S 747, 3Public Hospital of Paris, Department of Biochemistry, INSERM UMR-S 942, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris, France; 4Pharma Research Department, Hoffmann La Roche Ltd, Basel, Switzerland Abstract: Neuritogenesis is a dynamic phenomenon associated with neuronal differentiation that allows a rather spherical neuronal stem cell to develop dendrites and axon, a prerequisite for the integration and transmission of signals. The acquisition of neuronal polarity occurs in three steps: (1 neurite sprouting, which consists of the formation of buds emerging from the postmitotic neuronal soma; (2 neurite outgrowth, which represents the conversion of buds into neurites, their elongation and evolution into axon or dendrites; and (3 the stability and plasticity of neuronal polarity. In neuronal stem cells, remodeling and activation of focal adhesions (FAs associated with deep modifications of the actin cytoskeleton is a prerequisite for neurite sprouting and subsequent neurite outgrowth. A multiple set of growth factors and interactors located in the extracellular matrix and the plasma membrane orchestrate neuritogenesis by acting on intracellular signaling effectors, notably small G proteins such as RhoA, Rac, and Cdc42, which are involved in actin turnover and the dynamics of FAs. The cellular prion protein (PrPC, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored membrane protein mainly known for its role in a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases, has emerged as a central player in neuritogenesis. Here, we review the contribution of PrPC to neuronal polarization and detail the current knowledge on the signaling pathways fine-tuned by PrPC to promote neurite sprouting, outgrowth, and maintenance. We emphasize that Pr

  12. A Comparative `Bottom Up' Proteomics Strategy for the Site-specific Identification and Quantification of Protein Modifications By Electrophilic Lipids

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Bingnan; Hare, Michael; Wickramasekara, Samanthi; Fang, Yi; Maier, Claudia S.

    2012-01-01

    We report a mass spectrometry-based comparative “bottom up” proteomics approach that combines d0/d4-succinic anhydride labeling with commercially available hydrazine (Hz)-functionalized beads (Affi-gel Hz beads) for detection, identification and relative quantification of site-specific oxylipid modifications in biological matrices. We evaluated and applied this robust and simple method for the quantitative analysis of oxylipid protein conjugates in cardiac mitochondrial proteome samples isola...

  13. A comparative 'bottom up' proteomics strategy for the site-specific identification and quantification of protein modifications by electrophilic lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bingnan; Hare, Michael; Wickramasekara, Samanthi; Fang, Yi; Maier, Claudia S

    2012-10-22

    We report a mass spectrometry-based comparative "bottom up" proteomics approach that combines d(0)/d(4)-succinic anhydride labeling with commercially available hydrazine (Hz)-functionalized beads (Affi-gel Hz beads) for detection, identification and relative quantification of site-specific oxylipid modifications in biological matrices. We evaluated and applied this robust and simple method for the quantitative analysis of oxylipid protein conjugates in cardiac mitochondrial proteome samples isolated from 3- and 24-month-old rat hearts. The use of d(0)/d(4)-succinic anhydride labeling, Hz-bead based affinity enrichment, nanoLC fractionation and MALDI-ToF/ToF tandem mass spectrometry yielded relative quantification of oxylipid conjugates with residue-specific modification information. Conjugation of acrolein (ACR), 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal (HHE), 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and 4-oxo-2-noneal (ONE) to cysteine, histidine and lysine residues were identified. HHE conjugates were the predominant subset of Michael-type adducts detected in this study. The HHE conjugates showed higher levels in mitochondrial preparations from young heart congruent with previous findings by others that the n-3/n-6 PUFA ratio is higher in young heart mitochondrial membranes. Although this study focuses on protein adducts of reactive oxylipids, the method might be equally applicable to protein carbonyl modifications caused by metal catalyzed oxidation reactions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Comparative `Bottom Up' Proteomics Strategy for the Site-specific Identification and Quantification of Protein Modifications By Electrophilic Lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bingnan; Hare, Michael; Wickramasekara, Samanthi; Fang, Yi; Maier, Claudia S.

    2012-01-01

    We report a mass spectrometry-based comparative “bottom up” proteomics approach that combines d0/d4-succinic anhydride labeling with commercially available hydrazine (Hz)-functionalized beads (Affi-gel Hz beads) for detection, identification and relative quantification of site-specific oxylipid modifications in biological matrices. We evaluated and applied this robust and simple method for the quantitative analysis of oxylipid protein conjugates in cardiac mitochondrial proteome samples isolated from 3- and 24-month-old rat hearts. The use of d0/d4-succinic anhydride labeling, Hz-bead based affinity enrichment, nanoLC fractionation and MALDI-ToF/ToF tandem mass spectrometry yielded relative quantification of oxylipid conjugates with residue-specific modification information. Conjugation of acrolein (ACR), 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal (HHE), 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and 4-oxo-2-noneal (ONE) to cysteine, histidine and lysine residues were identified. HHE conjugates were the predominant subset of Michael-type adducts detected in this study. The HHE conjugates showed higher levels in mitochondrial preparations from young heart congruent with previous findings by others that the n-3/n-6 PUFA ratio is higher in young heart mitochondrial membranes. Although this study focuses on protein adducts of reactive oxylipids the method might be equally applicable to protein carbonyl modifications caused by metal catalyzed oxidation reactions. PMID:22842153

  15. Multiple {gamma}-glutamylation: A novel type of post-translational modification in a diapausing Artemia cyst protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Mai [Bioscience Course, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Ikeda, Yuka [Institute of High Polymer Research, Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Shinshu University, 3-15-1, Tokida, Ueda 386-8567 (Japan); Kanzawa, Hideaki [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Sakamoto, Mika [Bioscience Course, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Goto, Mina [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Tsunasawa, Susumu [Analytical and Measuring Instruments Division, Shimadzu Corporation, Nishinokyo Kuwabaracho 1, Nakagyo-Ku, Kyoto 604-8511 (Japan); Uchiumi, Toshio, E-mail: uchiumi@bio.sc.niigata-u.ac.jp [Bioscience Course, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Odani, Shoji [Bioscience Course, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)

    2010-03-26

    A highly hydrophilic, glutamate-rich protein was identified in the aqueous phenol extract from the cytosolic fraction of brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) diapausing cysts and termed Artemia phenol soluble protein (PSP). Mass spectrometric analysis revealed the presence of many protein peaks around m/z 11,000, separated by 129 atomic mass units; this value corresponds to that of glutamate, which is strongly suggestive of heterogeneous polyglutamylation. Polyglutamylation has long been known as the functionally important post-translational modification of tubulins, which carry poly(L-glutamic acid) chains of heterogeneous length branching off from the main chain at the {gamma}-carboxy groups of a few specific glutamate residues. In Artemia PSP, however, Edman degradation of enzymatic peptides revealed that at least 13, and presumably 16, glutamate residues were modified by the attachment of a single L-glutamate, representing a hitherto undescribed type of post-translational modification: namely, multiple {gamma}-glutamylation or the addition of a large number of glutamate residues along the polypeptide chain. Although biological significance of PSP and its modification is yet to be established, suppression of in vitro thermal aggregation of lactate dehydrogenase by glutamylated PSP was observed.

  16. Multiple γ-glutamylation: A novel type of post-translational modification in a diapausing Artemia cyst protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Mai; Ikeda, Yuka; Kanzawa, Hideaki; Sakamoto, Mika; Goto, Mina; Tsunasawa, Susumu; Uchiumi, Toshio; Odani, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    A highly hydrophilic, glutamate-rich protein was identified in the aqueous phenol extract from the cytosolic fraction of brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) diapausing cysts and termed Artemia phenol soluble protein (PSP). Mass spectrometric analysis revealed the presence of many protein peaks around m/z 11,000, separated by 129 atomic mass units; this value corresponds to that of glutamate, which is strongly suggestive of heterogeneous polyglutamylation. Polyglutamylation has long been known as the functionally important post-translational modification of tubulins, which carry poly(L-glutamic acid) chains of heterogeneous length branching off from the main chain at the γ-carboxy groups of a few specific glutamate residues. In Artemia PSP, however, Edman degradation of enzymatic peptides revealed that at least 13, and presumably 16, glutamate residues were modified by the attachment of a single L-glutamate, representing a hitherto undescribed type of post-translational modification: namely, multiple γ-glutamylation or the addition of a large number of glutamate residues along the polypeptide chain. Although biological significance of PSP and its modification is yet to be established, suppression of in vitro thermal aggregation of lactate dehydrogenase by glutamylated PSP was observed.

  17. Comparative proteome analysis between C . briggsae embryos and larvae reveals a role of chromatin modification proteins in embryonic cell division

    KAUST Repository

    An, Xiaomeng

    2017-06-21

    Caenorhabditis briggsae has emerged as a model for comparative biology against model organism C. elegans. Most of its cell fate specifications are completed during embryogenesis whereas its cell growth is achieved mainly in larval stages. The molecular mechanism underlying the drastic developmental changes is poorly understood. To gain insights into the molecular changes between the two stages, we compared the proteomes between the two stages using iTRAQ. We identified a total of 2,791 proteins in the C. briggsae embryos and larvae, 247 of which undergo up- or down-regulation between the two stages. The proteins that are upregulated in the larval stages are enriched in the Gene Ontology categories of energy production, protein translation, and cytoskeleton; whereas those upregulated in the embryonic stage are enriched in the categories of chromatin dynamics and posttranslational modification, suggesting a more active chromatin modification in the embryos than in the larva. Perturbation of a subset of chromatin modifiers followed by cell lineage analysis suggests their roles in controlling cell division pace. Taken together, we demonstrate a general molecular switch from chromatin modification to metabolism during the transition from C. briggsae embryonic to its larval stages using iTRAQ approach. The switch might be conserved across metazoans.

  18. Sensitive Western-Blot Analysis of Azide-Tagged Protein Post Translational Modifications Using Thermoresponsive Polymer Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong; Zhang, Wanjun; Zhang, Zheng; Chen, Mingli; Wang, Jianhua; Qian, Xiaohong; Qin, Weijie

    2018-02-06

    Western-blot (WB) is a powerful analytical technique for protein identification in complex biological samples and has been widely used in biological studies for decades. Detection specificity and sensitivity of WB largely relies on quality of the antibodies and performance of the conjugated HRP. However, the application of WB analysis for the detection of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) is hampered by the low abundance of protein PTMs and by the limited availability of antibodies that specifically differentiate various kinds of PTMs from their protein substrates. Therefore, new recognition mechanisms and signal amplification strategies for WB analysis of protein PTMs is in high demand. In this work, we prepared a soluble polymer that detects various azide-tagged PTM proteins in WB analysis using triarylphosphine and HRP modified thermoresponsive polymer. Specific and efficient detection of azide-tagged PTM protein is achieved via the bioorthogonal reaction between azide and triarylphosphine. More importantly, the chemiluminiscent signal in the WB analysis is largely amplified by the temperature induced self-assembly of numerous thermoresponsive polymer chains carrying multiple HRPs. As a result, approximately 100 times more sensitive detection than commercial antibodies is achieved by this method using standard PTM proteins. Though, this new reagent does not directly detect native PTMs in cell, tissue or blood samples, it still has important application potential in protein PTM studies, considering the wide availability of azide-tagging techniques to a variety of PTMs.

  19. The membrane protein melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) is a novel tumor marker that stimulates tumorigenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Tang, X; Weng, W; Qiao, Y; Lin, J; Liu, W; Liu, R; Ma, L; Yu, W; Yu, Y; Pan, Q; Sun, F

    2015-11-19

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) is overexpressed and has an oncogenic role in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, whether membrane protein can serve not only as a tumor marker that reflects YAP function but also as a therapeutic target that stimulates tumorigenesis in HCC remains unknown. Here we report that the membrane protein melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) was under positive regulation by YAP and was highly elevated in HCC cells. Within the MCAM promoter, we found the presence of a cAMP Response Element (CRE; -32 to -25 nt), which is conserved among species and is essential for YAP- and CREB-dependent regulation. Moreover, the interaction between CREB and YAP at the CRE site was dependent on PTPIY-WW domain interactions. However, MCAM expression was low and could not be regulated by YAP in breast and colon cancer cells because of the low levels of the acetyltransferase p300. In HCC cells, high levels of p300 facilitated the binding of YAP to the MCAM promoter, which in turn enhanced histone acetylation and polymerase II recruitment through the dissociation of the deacetylase Sirt1. These results suggest that MCAM is an HCC-specific target of YAP. In clinical serum samples, we found that the serum levels of MCAM were highly elevated in patients with HCC compared with healthy controls and with patients with cirrhosis, hepatitis, colon cancer and breast cancer. MCAM levels were shown to be a slightly better indicator than serum alpha-fetoprotein for predicting HCC. We further demonstrated that MCAM is essential for the survival and transformation of HCC. Mechanistically, MCAM induced translation initiation and the transcriptional activities of c-Jun/c-Fos. In addition, AKT activation had an essential role in the MCAM-promoted binding of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E to c-Jun/c-Fos mRNA. In conclusion, we demonstrated that MCAM may be a potential tumor marker and therapeutic target for the diagnosis and treatment of HCC.

  20. Proteolytic cleavage of vascular adhesion protein-1 induced by vascular endothelial growth factor in retinal capillary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shiho; Murata, Miyuki; Noda, Kousuke; Matsuda, Takashi; Saito, Michiyuki; Saito, Wataru; Kanda, Atsuhiro; Ishida, Susumu

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the mechanism of soluble vascular adhesion protein-1 (sVAP-1) accumulation induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the vitreous of patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR). Experimental. Protein levels of sVAP-1 and N epsilon-(hexanoyl)lysine (HEL), an oxidative stress marker, in the vitreous samples from patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) with or without intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) injection were determined by ELISA. The effect of VEGF on both mRNA expression of Vap-1 and secretion of sVAP-1 in rat retinal capillary endothelial cells (TR-iBRB2) was analyzed by real-time PCR and western blotting, respectively. In addition, the impact of VEGF on production and activation ratios of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 was examined by gelatin zymography. Hydrogen peroxide production and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were assessed in the supernatants of TR-iBRB2 cells treated with VEGF. IVB injection decreased vitreous levels of sVAP-1 and HEL in patients with PDR. VEGF stimulation released sVAP-1 protein from TR-iBRB2 cells as a consequence of membrane-anchored VAP-1 shedding by MMP-2 and MMP-9. In addition, VEGF increased hydrogen peroxide generation and ROS augmentation through spermine oxidation by sVAP-1 as semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) in the supernatant of cultured endothelial cells. The current data demonstrate that proangiogenic factor VEGF induces sVAP-1 release from retinal capillary endothelial cells and facilitates hydrogen peroxide generation via enzymatic property of sVAP-1, followed by the increase of oxidative stress, one of the crucial factors in the pathogenesis of DR.

  1. The neuroplastin adhesion molecules are accessory proteins that chaperone the monocarboxylate transporter MCT2 to the neuronal cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieangela C Wilson

    Full Text Available The neuroplastins np65 and np55 are two synapse-enriched immunoglobulin (Ig superfamily adhesion molecules that contain 3 and 2 Ig domains respectively. Np65 is implicated in long term, activity dependent synaptic plasticity, including LTP. Np65 regulates the surface expression of GluR1 receptor subunits and the localisation of GABA(A receptor subtypes in hippocampal neurones. The brain is dependent not only on glucose but on monocarboxylates as sources of energy. The. monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs 1-4 are responsible for the rapid proton-linked translocation of monocarboxylates including pyruvate and lactate across the plasma membrane and require association with either embigin or basigin, proteins closely related to neuroplastin, for plasma membrane expression and activity. MCT2 plays a key role in providing lactate as an energy source to neurons.Here we use co-transfection of neuroplastins and monocarboxylate transporters into COS-7 cells to demonstrate that neuroplastins can act as ancillary proteins for MCT2. We also show that Xenopus laevis oocytes contain endogenous neuroplastin and its knockdown with antisense RNA reduces the surface expression of MCT2 and associated lactate transport. Immunocytochemical studies show that MCT2 and the neuroplastins are co-localised in rat cerebellum. Strikingly neuroplastin and MCT2 are enriched in the same parasagittal zebrin II-negative stripes.These data strongly suggest that neuroplastins act as key ancillary proteins for MCT2 cell surface localisation and activity in some neuronal populations, thus playing an important role in facilitating the uptake of lactate for use as a respiratory fuel.

  2. S-(2-Succinyl)cysteine: a novel chemical modification of tissue proteins by a Krebs cycle intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Nathan L; Wang, Yuping; Blatnik, Matthew; Frizzell, Norma; Walla, Michael D; Lyons, Timothy J; Alt, Nadja; Carson, James A; Nagai, Ryoji; Thorpe, Suzanne R; Baynes, John W

    2006-06-01

    S-(2-Succinyl)cysteine (2SC) has been identified as a chemical modification in plasma proteins, in the non-mercaptalbumin fraction of human plasma albumin, in human skin collagen, and in rat skeletal muscle proteins and urine. 2SC increases in human skin collagen with age and is increased in muscle protein of diabetic vs. control rats. The concentration of 2SC in skin collagen and muscle protein correlated strongly with that of the advanced glycation/lipoxidation end-product (AGE/ALE), N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML). 2SC is formed by a Michael addition reaction of cysteine sulfhydryl groups with fumarate at physiological pH. Fumarate, but not succinate, inactivates the sulfhydryl enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in vitro, in concert with formation of 2SC. 2SC is the first example of spontaneous chemical modification of protein by a metabolic intermediate in the Krebs cycle. These observations identify fumarate as an endogenous electrophile and suggest a role for fumarate in regulation of metabolism.

  3. Modification of the endogenous NO level influences apple embryos dormancy by alterations of nitrated and biotinylated protein patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasuska, Urszula; Ciacka, Katarzyna; Orzechowski, Sławomir; Fettke, Joerg; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2016-10-01

    NO donors and Arg remove dormancy of apple embryos and stimulate germination. Compounds lowering NO level (cPTIO, L -NAME, CAN) strengthen dormancy. Embryo transition from dormancy state to germination is linked to increased nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-like activity. Germination of embryos is associated with declined level of biotin containing proteins and nitrated proteins in soluble protein fraction of root axis. Pattern of nitrated proteins suggest that storage proteins are putative targets of nitration. Nitric oxide (NO) acts as a key regulatory factor in removal of seed dormancy and is a signal necessary for seed transition from dormant state into germination. Modulation of NO concentration in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) embryos by NO fumigation, treatment with NO donor (S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine, SNAP), application of 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO), N ω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), canavanine (CAN) or arginine (Arg) allowed us to investigate the NO impact on seed dormancy status. Arg analogs and NO scavenger strengthened embryo dormancy by lowering reactive nitrogen species level in embryonic axes. This effect was accompanied by strong inhibition of NOS-like activity, without significant influence on tissue NO2 (-) concentration. Germination sensu stricto of apple embryos initiated by dormancy breakage via short term NO treatment or Arg supplementation were linked to a reduced level of biotinylated proteins in root axis. Decrease of total soluble nitrated proteins was observed at the termination of germination sensu stricto. Also modulation of NO tissue status leads to modification in nitrated protein pattern. Among protein bands that correspond to molecular mass of approximately 95 kDa, storage proteins (legumin A-like and seed biotin-containing protein) were identified, and can be considered as good markers for seed dormancy status. Moreover, pattern of nitrated proteins suggest that

  4. Tissue- and cell type-specific modification of prion protein (PrP)-like protein Doppel, which affects PrP endoproteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Onodera, Takashi

    2011-01-07

    A prion protein (PrP)-like protein, Doppel (Dpl) is a homologue of cellular PrP (PrP(C)). Immunoblotting revealed heterogeneous glycosylation patterns of Dpl and PrP(C) in several cell lines and tissues, including brain and testis. To investigate whether the glycosylation and modification of Dpl and PrP(C) could influence each other, PrP gene (Prnp)-deficient neuronal cells, transfected with Prnp and/or the Dpl gene (Prnd), were analyzed by deglycosylation with peptide N-glycosidase F. The modification of Dpl was not influenced by PrP(C), whereas an N-terminally truncated fragment of PrP(C) was reduced by Dpl expression. These results indicated that Dpl was glycosylated in a cell type- and tissue-specific manner regardless of PrP(C), while PrP(C) endoproteolysis was modulated by Dpl expression. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ion induced modification of polymers at energies between 100 keV and 1 GeV applied for optical waveguides and improved metal adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueck, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    Polymers are a class of materials widely used for a broad field of applications. Ion irradiation ranging from several eV to GeV is a quite efficient tool to modify the properties of polymers like wettability, optical properties, adhesion between metal and polymer surfaces. In this paper ion induced chemical changes of polymers will be discussed in relation to the modified macroscopic properties. In the field of optical telecommunication, polymers are discussed as a new class of materials for the fabrication of passive optical devices. Ion irradiation is a promising method to generate structures with a modified index of refraction, which is necessary for the guidance of light with different wavelengths in optical devices. Modified optical properties of different polymers under ion irradiation will be discussed. Analytical investigations like infrared measurements and measurement of the outgassing reaction products during irradiation will be discussed to interpret the chemical changes of the polymers. Metallization of polymers is of interest in several fields of application like for multilayer systems in microtechnology or casings for radiation shielding for example. Ion beam mixing at low energies is a promising method to improve the metal/polymer adhesion. Also ion irradiation at high energies applied to a metal/polymer multilayer can improve the adhesion of a metal layer to a polymer surface, if not sufficient. Different metal/polymer systems will be presented as well as specific applications

  6. Adrm1, a putative cell adhesion regulating protein, is a novel proteasome-associated factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jakob Ploug; Lauridsen, Anne-Marie; Kristensen, Poul

    2006-01-01

    . Adrm1 has been described as an interferon-gamma-inducible, heavily glycosylated membrane protein of 110 kDa. However, we found Adrm1 in mouse tissues only as a 42 kDa peptide, corresponding to the mass of the non-glycosylated peptide chain, and it could not be induced in HeLa cells with interferon....... Adrm1 was present almost exclusively in soluble 26 S proteasomes, albeit a small fraction was membrane-associated, like proteasomes. Adrm1 was found in cells in amounts equimolar with S6a, a 26 S proteasome subunit. HeLa cells contain no pool of free Adrm1 but recombinant Adrm1 could bind to pre......-existing 26 S proteasomes in cell extracts. Adrm1 may be distantly related to the yeast proteasome subunit Rpn13, mutants of which are reported to display no obvious phenotype. Accordingly, knock-down of Adrm1 in HeLa cells had no effect on the amount of proteasomes, or on degradation of bulk cell protein...

  7. Folliculin, the product of the Birt-Hogg-Dube tumor suppressor gene, interacts with the adherens junction protein p0071 to regulate cell-cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug A Medvetz

    Full Text Available Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD is a tumor suppressor gene syndrome associated with fibrofolliculomas, cystic lung disease, and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma. In seeking to elucidate the pathogenesis of BHD, we discovered a physical interaction between folliculin (FLCN, the protein product of the BHD gene, and p0071, an armadillo repeat containing protein that localizes to the cytoplasm and to adherens junctions. Adherens junctions are one of the three cell-cell junctions that are essential to the establishment and maintenance of the cellular architecture of all epithelial tissues. Surprisingly, we found that downregulation of FLCN leads to increased cell-cell adhesion in functional cell-based assays and disruption of cell polarity in a three-dimensional lumen-forming assay, both of which are phenocopied by downregulation of p0071. These data indicate that the FLCN-p0071 protein complex is a negative regulator of cell-cell adhesion. We also found that FLCN positively regulates RhoA activity and Rho-associated kinase activity, consistent with the only known function of p0071. Finally, to examine the role of Flcn loss on cell-cell adhesion in vivo, we utilized keratin-14 cre-recombinase (K14-cre to inactivate Flcn in the mouse epidermis. The K14-Cre-Bhd(flox/flox mice have striking delays in eyelid opening, wavy fur, hair loss, and epidermal hyperplasia with increased levels of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 activity. These data support a model in which dysregulation of the FLCN-p0071 interaction leads to alterations in cell adhesion, cell polarity, and RhoA signaling, with broad implications for the role of cell-cell adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of human disease, including emphysema and renal cell carcinoma.

  8. Recruitment of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin to β1 integrin promotes cancer cell migration via mitogen activated protein kinase activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohannessian Arthur

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrin-extracellular matrix interactions activate signaling cascades such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK. Integrin binding to extracellular matrix increases tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK. Inhibition of FAK activity by expression of its carboxyl terminus decreases cell motility, and cells from FAK deficient mice also show reduced migration. Paxillin is a focal adhesion protein which is also phosphorylated on tyrosine. FAK recruitment of paxillin to the cell membrane correlates with Shc phosphorylation and activation of MAPK. Decreased FAK expression inhibits papilloma formation in a mouse skin carcinogenesis model. We previously demonstrated that MAPK activation was required for growth factor induced in vitro migration and invasion by human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC lines. Methods Adapter protein recruitment to integrin subunits was examined by co-immunoprecipitation in SCC cells attached to type IV collagen or plastic. Stable clones overexpressing FAK or paxillin were created using the lipofection technique. Modified Boyden chambers were used for invasion assays. Results In the present study, we showed that FAK and paxillin but not Shc are recruited to the β1 integrin cytoplasmic domain following attachment of SCC cells to type IV collagen. Overexpression of either FAK or paxillin stimulated cancer cell migration on type IV collagen and invasion through reconstituted basement membrane which was dependent on MAPK activity. Conclusions We concluded that recruitment of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin to β1 integrin promoted cancer cell migration via the mitogen activated protein kinase pathway.

  9. Detection of circulating methylated opioid binding protein/cell adhesion molecule-like gene as a biomarker for ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feng; Ma, Min; Tao, Guohua; Chen, Xiang; Xie, Wei; Wang, Ying; Cao, Xingjian

    2014-01-01

    Hypermethylation of the opioid binding protein/cell adhesion molecule-like (OPCML) gene is frequently observed in ovarian carcinoma. We evaluated the detection of circulating hypermethylated OPCML for detecting ovarian carcinoma and assessing its prognosis. We studied 85 tissue samples including 45 ovarian cancer tissues and 40 normal ovarian tissues and blood samples from 45 ovarian cancer patients and 20 healthy individuals. Bisulfite sequencing and methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme-PCR (MSRE-PCR) were used to detect the frequency of OPCML hypermethylation. We detected that the frequency of OPCML hypermethylation for tissue and serum samples in ovarian carcinoma were 86.7% (39/45) and 80.0% (36/45), respectively, but none was detected in ovarian tissue and serum of healthy individuals. The frequency of OPCML hypermethylation in endometrioid carcinoma, serous cystadenocarcinoma, mucinous cystadenocarcinoma, clear cell carcinoma, and undifferentiated carcinoma were 80.0%, 85.5%, 50.0%, 80.0%, and 100%, respectively (p > 0.05). The frequencies of OPCML hypermethylation in patients were also different in terms of tumor differentiation degree. We detected hypermethylated OPCML in the sera of 50% of well differentiated, 62.5% of moderately differentiated, 93.1% of poorly differentiated tumors (p ovarian carcinoma diagnosis.

  10. Heat shock protein 90β stabilizes focal adhesion kinase and enhances cell migration and invasion in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Xiangyang [Center for Experimental Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, 17 Yongwai Street, Donghu District, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330047 (China); Wang, Yao [Center for Experimental Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, 17 Yongwai Street, Donghu District, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Liu, Chengmei [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330047 (China); Lu, Quqin [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Liu, Tao [Center for Experimental Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, 17 Yongwai Street, Donghu District, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Chen, Guoan [Department of Hematology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Rao, Hai [Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Luo, Shiwen, E-mail: shiwenluo@ncu.edu.cn [Center for Experimental Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, 17 Yongwai Street, Donghu District, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China)

    2014-08-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) acts as a regulator of cellular signaling and may promote cell spreading, motility, invasion and survival in malignancy. Elevated expression and activity of FAK frequently correlate with tumor cell metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer. However, the mechanisms by which the turnover of FAK is regulated remain elusive. Here we report that heat shock protein 90β (HSP90β) interacts with FAK and the middle domain (amino acids 233–620) of HSP90β is mainly responsible for this interaction. Furthermore, we found that HSP90β regulates FAK stability since HSP90β inhibitor 17-AAG triggers FAK ubiquitylation and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation. Moreover, disrupted FAK-HSP90β interaction induced by 17-AAG contributes to attenuation of tumor cell growth, migration, and invasion. Together, our results reveal how HSP90β regulates FAK stability and identifies a potential therapeutic strategy to breast cancer. - Highlights: • HSP90β protects FAK from degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK attenuates tumorigenesis of breast cancer cells. • Genetic repression of HSP90β or FAK inhibits tumor cell migration and proliferation. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK interferes cell invasion and cytoskeleton.

  11. Heat shock protein 90β stabilizes focal adhesion kinase and enhances cell migration and invasion in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Xiangyang; Wang, Yao; Liu, Chengmei; Lu, Quqin; Liu, Tao; Chen, Guoan; Rao, Hai; Luo, Shiwen

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) acts as a regulator of cellular signaling and may promote cell spreading, motility, invasion and survival in malignancy. Elevated expression and activity of FAK frequently correlate with tumor cell metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer. However, the mechanisms by which the turnover of FAK is regulated remain elusive. Here we report that heat shock protein 90β (HSP90β) interacts with FAK and the middle domain (amino acids 233–620) of HSP90β is mainly responsible for this interaction. Furthermore, we found that HSP90β regulates FAK stability since HSP90β inhibitor 17-AAG triggers FAK ubiquitylation and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation. Moreover, disrupted FAK-HSP90β interaction induced by 17-AAG contributes to attenuation of tumor cell growth, migration, and invasion. Together, our results reveal how HSP90β regulates FAK stability and identifies a potential therapeutic strategy to breast cancer. - Highlights: • HSP90β protects FAK from degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK attenuates tumorigenesis of breast cancer cells. • Genetic repression of HSP90β or FAK inhibits tumor cell migration and proliferation. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK interferes cell invasion and cytoskeleton

  12. Proteins Play Important Role in Intercellular Adhesion Affecting on Fruit Textural Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahadur Adhikari, Khem; Shomer, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    strengthening was exempli ed in Medjoul date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) fruit, as a model. Fruit mesocarp sensitively responded to culture environment which was assayed in vitro at pH 3.5(pKa) and pH 6.5(> pKa) in presence of organic acid molecules. The max penetration force, as a measure of ICA strength, of p......H 3.5 (pKa) incubated mesocarp (~10.5 N) was signi cantly higher than that of pH 6.5 (> pKa) incubated fruits (~2 N). The protein bands at ~29 kDa, ~75 kDa, ~32 kDa and 87 kDa were exclusively or prominently found in ICA strengthened fruits (pH 3.5pKa) compared to texturally injured fruits (pH 6.......5 > pKa)....

  13. Adhesive Bond Stiffness of Staphylococcus aureus with and without Proteins That Bind to an Adsorbed Fibronectin Film

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olsson, Adam L. J.; Sharma, Prashant K.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    Staphylococcus aureus is known to cause biomaterial-associated infections of implants and devices once it has breached the skin and mucosal barriers. Adhesion is the initial step in the development of a biomaterial-associated infection, and strategies to prevent staphylococcal adhesion and thus

  14. Protein Expression Modifications in Phage-Resistant Mutants of Aeromonas salmonicida after AS-A Phage Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Moreirinha

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of infections by pathogenic bacteria is one of the main sources of financial loss for the aquaculture industry. This problem often cannot be solved with antibiotic treatment or vaccination. Phage therapy seems to be an alternative environmentally-friendly strategy to control infections. Recognizing the cellular modifications that bacteriophage therapy may cause to the host is essential in order to confirm microbial inactivation, while understanding the mechanisms that drive the development of phage-resistant strains. The aim of this work was to detect cellular modifications that occur after phage AS-A treatment in A. salmonicida, an important fish pathogen. Phage-resistant and susceptible cells were subjected to five successive streak-plating steps and analysed with infrared spectroscopy, a fast and powerful tool for cell study. The spectral differences of both populations were investigated and compared with a phage sensitivity profile, obtained through the spot test and efficiency of plating. Changes in protein associated peaks were found, and these results were corroborated by 1-D electrophoresis of intracellular proteins analysis and by phage sensitivity profiles. Phage AS-A treatment before the first streaking-plate step clearly affected the intracellular proteins expression levels of phage-resistant clones, altering the expression of distinct proteins during the subsequent five successive streak-plating steps, making these clones recover and be phenotypically more similar to the sensitive cells.

  15. Strain-specific diversity of mucus-binding proteins in the adhesion and aggregation properties of Lactobacillus reuteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Donald A; Jeffers, Faye; Parker, Mary L; Vibert-Vallet, Amandine; Bongaerts, Roy J; Roos, Stefan; Walter, Jens; Juge, Nathalie

    2010-11-01

    Mucus-binding proteins (MUBs) have been revealed as one of the effector molecules involved in mechanisms of the adherence of lactobacilli to the host; mub, or mub-like, genes are found in all of the six genomes of Lactobacillus reuteri that are available. We recently reported the crystal structure of a Mub repeat from L. reuteri ATCC 53608 (also designated strain 1063), revealing an unexpected recognition of immunoglobulins. In the current study, we explored the diversity of the ATCC 53608 mub gene, and MUB expression levels in a large collection of L. reuteri strains isolated from a range of vertebrate hosts. This analysis revealed that the MUB was only detectable on the cell surface of two highly related isolates when using antibodies that were raised against the protein. There was considerable variation in quantitative mucus adhesion in vitro among L. reuteri strains, and mucus binding showed excellent correlation with the presence of cell-surface ATCC 53608 MUB. ATCC 53608 MUB presence was further highly associated with the autoaggregation of L. reuteri strains in washed cell suspensions, suggesting a novel role of this surface protein in cell aggregation. We also characterized MUB expression in representative L. reuteri strains. This analysis revealed that one derivative of strain 1063 was a spontaneous mutant that expressed a C-terminally truncated version of MUB. This frameshift mutation was caused by the insertion of a duplicated 13 nt sequence at position 4867 nt in the mub gene, producing a truncated MUB also lacking the C-terminal LPxTG region, and thus unable to anchor to the cell wall. This mutant, designated 1063N (mub-4867(i)), displayed low mucus-binding and aggregation capacities, further providing evidence for the contribution of cell-wall-anchored MUB to such phenotypes. In conclusion, this study provided novel information on the functional attributes of MUB in L. reuteri, and further demonstrated that MUB and MUB-like proteins

  16. Haemophilus influenzae P4 Interacts With Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promoting Adhesion and Serum Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu-Ching; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Singh, Birendra; Hallgren, Oskar; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Hood, Derek; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-15

    Interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM) is one of the successful colonization strategies employed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Here we identified Haemophilus lipoprotein e (P4) as a receptor for ECM proteins. Purified recombinant P4 displayed a high binding affinity for laminin (Kd = 9.26 nM) and fibronectin (Kd = 10.19 nM), but slightly less to vitronectin (Kd = 16.51 nM). A P4-deficient NTHi mutant showed a significantly decreased binding to these ECM components. Vitronectin acquisition conferred serum resistance to both P4-expressing NTHi and Escherichia coli transformants. P4-mediated bacterial adherence to pharynx, type II alveolar, and bronchial epithelial cells was mainly attributed to fibronectin. Importantly, a significantly reduced bacterial infection was observed in the middle ear of the Junbo mouse model when NTHi was devoid of P4. In conclusion, our data provide new insight into the role of P4 as an important factor for Haemophilus colonization and subsequent respiratory tract infection. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, an immunogenic Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus adhesion protein and protective antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Wei, Zigong; Liu, Xiaohong; Xiao, Pingping; Lu, Zhaohui; Chen, Yaosheng

    2013-04-01

    Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus (Streptococcus zooepidemicus, SEZ) is an important pathogen associated with opportunistic infections of a wide range of species, including pigs and humans. The absence of a suitable vaccine makes it difficult to control SEZ infection. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) has been previously identified as an immunogenic protein using immunoproteomic techniques. In the present study, we confirmed that the sequence of GAPDH was highly conserved with other Streptococcus spp. The purified recombinant GAPDH could elicit a significant humoral antibody response in mice and confer significant protection against challenge with a lethal dose of SEZ. GAPDH could adhere to the Hep-2 cells, confirmed by flow cytometry, and inhibit adherence of SEZ to Hep-2 cells in an adherence inhibition assay. In addition, real-time PCR demonstrated that GAPDH was induced in vivo following infection of mice with SEZ. These suggest that GAPDH could play an important role in the pathogenesis of SEZ infection and could be a target for vaccination against SEZ.

  18. Rhenium-188-labeled anti-neural cell adhesion molecule antibodies with 2-iminothiolane modification for targeting small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, M N; Hosono, M; Mishra, A K; Faivre-Chauvet, A; Gautherot, E; Barbet, J; Knapp, F F; Chatal, J F

    2000-06-01

    We have evaluated the potential of 188Re-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) modified with 2-iminothiolane (2IT) for targeting small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Radiolabeled MAbs NK1NBL1 and C218 recognizing neural cell adhesion molecule were injected i.v. into athymic mice inoculated with human SCLC tumors, and the biodistribution was examined. NK1NBL1 localized in the tumors better than C218. 188Re-labeled MAbs cleared from the blood faster than 125I-labeled counterparts, resulting in higher tumor-to-blood ratios. In conclusion, the 188Re-labeled MAbs are attractive candidates for imaging and therapy of SCLC.

  19. Copper modulates zinc metalloproteinase-dependent ectodomain shedding of key signaling and adhesion proteins and promotes the invasion of prostate cancer epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Parr-Sturgess, Catherine A.; Tinker, Claire L.; Hart, Claire A.; Brown, Michael D.; Clarke, Noel W.; Parkin, Edward T.

    2012-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc metalloproteinases (ZMPs) that catalyze the "ectodomain shedding" of a range of cell surface proteins including signaling and adhesion molecules. These "sheddases" are associated with the invasion and metastasis of a range of cancers. Increased serum and tumor tissue levels of copper are also observed in several cancers, although little is known about how the metal might promote disease progression at t...

  20. Protein structural changes in keratin fibers induced by chemical modification using 2-iminothiolane hydrochloride: a Raman spectroscopic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuhara, Akio

    2005-11-01

    For the purpose of investigating in detail the influence of chemical modification using 2-iminothiolane hydrochloride (2-IT) on keratin fibers, the structure of cross-sections at various depths of white human hair, treated with 2-IT and then oxidized, was directly analyzed without isolating the cuticle and cortex, using Raman spectroscopy. In particular, the beta-sheet and/or random coil content (beta/R) and the alpha-helix (alpha) content in human hair fibers were estimated by amide I band analysis. The S-S band intensity, amide III (unordered) band intensity, and beta/R content existing from the cuticle region to the center of cortex region of virgin white human hair remarkably increased by performing the chemical modification using 2-IT. On the other hand, not only the S-S band intensity, but also S-O band intensity existing throughout the cortex region of the bleached (damaged) white human hair increased by performing chemical modification using 2-IT. In particular, beta/R content existing throughout the cortex region of the bleached white human hair decreased, while the skeletal C-C stretch (alpha) band intensity at 935 cm(-1) and the alpha content remarkably increased. This indicates a secondary structural change from the random coil form to the alpha-helix form in the proteins existing throughout the cortex region. From these experiments, we concluded that the formation of new disulfide (-SS-) groups resulting from chemical modification using 2-IT induced the secondary structural changes of proteins existing throughout the cortex region. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  1. First study on gene expression of cement proteins and potential adhesion-related genes of a membranous-based barnacle as revealed from Next-Generation Sequencing technology

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Hsiu Chin

    2013-12-12

    This is the first study applying Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology to survey the kinds, expression location, and pattern of adhesion-related genes in a membranous-based barnacle. A total of 77,528,326 and 59,244,468 raw sequence reads of total RNA were generated from the prosoma and the basis of Tetraclita japonica formosana, respectively. In addition, 55,441 and 67,774 genes were further assembled and analyzed. The combined sequence data from both body parts generates a total of 79,833 genes of which 47.7% were shared. Homologues of barnacle cement proteins - CP-19K, -52K, and -100K - were found and all were dominantly expressed at the basis where the cement gland complex is located. This is the main area where transcripts of cement proteins and other potential adhesion-related genes were detected. The absence of another common barnacle cement protein, CP-20K, in the adult transcriptome suggested a possible life-stage restricted gene function and/or a different mechanism in adhesion between membranous-based and calcareous-based barnacles. © 2013 © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

  2. Protein modification and replicative senescence of WI-38 human embryonic fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Emad K; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Roepstorff, Peter

    2010-01-01

    reflects a preferential accumulation of damaged proteins within the mitochondria during cellular senescence. Accumulation of AGE-modified proteins could be explained by the senescence-associated decreased activity of glyoxalase-I, the major enzyme involved in the detoxification of the glycating agents...... methylglyoxal and glyoxal, in both cytosol and mitochondria. This finding suggests a role of detoxification systems in the age-related build-up of damaged proteins. Moreover, the oxidized protein repair system methionine sulfoxide reductase was more affected in the mitochondria than in the cytosol during......Summary Oxidized proteins as well as proteins modified by the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and by glycation (AGE) have been shown to accumulate with aging in vivo and during replicative senescence in vitro. To better understand the mechanisms by which these damaged proteins...

  3. Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase A (MsrA and Its Function in Ubiquitin-Like Protein Modification in Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Fu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA is an antioxidant enzyme found in all domains of life that catalyzes the reduction of methionine-S-sulfoxide (MSO to methionine in proteins and free amino acids. We demonstrate that archaeal MsrA has a ubiquitin-like (Ubl protein modification activity that is distinct from its stereospecific reduction of MSO residues. MsrA catalyzes this Ubl modification activity, with the Ubl-activating E1 UbaA, in the presence of the mild oxidant dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO and in the absence of reductant. In contrast, the MSO reductase activity of MsrA is inhibited by DMSO and requires reductant. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS analysis reveals that MsrA-dependent Ubl conjugates are associated with DNA replication, protein remodeling, and oxidative stress and include the Ubl-modified MsrA, Orc3 (Orc1/Cdc6, and Cdc48d (Cdc48/p97 AAA+ ATPase. Overall, we found archaeal MsrA to have opposing MSO reductase and Ubl modifying activities that are associated with oxidative stress responses and controlled by exposure to mild oxidant.

  4. Loss of the adaptor protein ShcA in endothelial cells protects against monocyte macrophage adhesion, LDL-oxydation, and atherosclerotic lesion formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaoude, Antoine Abou; Badiqué, Lise; Mlih, Mohamed; Awan, Sara; Guo, Sunning; Lemle, Alexandre; Abboud, Clauda; Foppolo, Sophie; Host, Lionel; Terrand, Jérôme; Justiniano, Hélène; Herz, Joachim; Matz, Rachel L; Boucher, Philippe

    2018-03-14

    ShcA is an adaptor protein that binds to the cytoplasmic tail of receptor tyrosine kinases and of the Low Density Lipoprotein-related receptor 1 (LRP1), a trans-membrane receptor that protects against atherosclerosis. Here, we examined the role of endothelial ShcA in atherosclerotic lesion formation. We found that atherosclerosis progression was markedly attenuated in mice deleted for ShcA in endothelial cells, that macrophage content was reduced at the sites of lesions, and that adhesion molecules such as the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were severely reduced. Our data indicate that transcriptional regulation of ShcA by the zinc-finger E-box-binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1) and the Hippo pathway effector YAP, promotes ICAM-1 expression independently of p-NF-κB, the primary driver of adhesion molecules expressions. In addition, ShcA suppresses endothelial Akt and nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expressions. Thus, through down regulation of eNOS and ZEB1-mediated ICAM-1 up regulation, endothelial ShcA promotes monocyte-macrophage adhesion and atherosclerotic lesion formation. Reducing ShcA expression in endothelial cells may represent an obvious therapeutic approach to prevent atherosclerosis.

  5. Enhanced protein adsorption and cellular adhesion using transparent titanate nanotube thin films made by a simple and inexpensive room temperature process: application to optical biochips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nador, Judit; Orgovan, Norbert; Fried, Miklos; Petrik, Peter; Sulyok, Attila; Ramsden, Jeremy J; Korosi, Laszlo; Horvath, Robert

    2014-10-01

    A new type of titanate nanotube (TNT) coating is investigated for exploitation in biosensor applications. The TNT layers were prepared from stable but additive-free sols without applying any binding compounds. The simple, fast spin-coating process was carried out at room temperature, and resulted in well-formed films around 10nm thick. The films are highly transparent as expected from their nanostructure and may, therefore, be useful as coatings for surface-sensitive optical biosensors to enhance the specific surface area. In addition, these novel coatings could be applied to medical implant surfaces to control cellular adhesion. Their morphology and structure was characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and their chemical state by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For quantitative surface adhesion studies, the films were prepared on optical waveguides. The coated waveguides were shown to still guide light; thus, their sensing capability remains. Protein adsorption and cell adhesion studies on the titanate nanotube films and on smooth control surfaces revealed that the nanostructured titanate enhanced the adsorption of albumin; furthermore, the coatings considerably enhanced the adhesion of living mammalian cells (human embryonic kidney and preosteoblast). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Y-box-binding protein-1 (YB-1) promotes cell proliferation, adhesion and drug resistance in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Xiaobing; Wu, Yaxun [Department of Pathology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Yuchan [Department of Pathogen, Medical College, Nantong University, Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory for Inflammation and Molecular Drug Target, Nantong University, Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Zhu, Xinghua; Yin, Haibing [Department of Pathology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China); He, Yunhua [Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory for Inflammation and Molecular Drug Target, Nantong University, Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Li, Chunsun; Liu, Yushan; Lu, Xiaoyun; Chen, Yali; Shen, Rong [Department of Pathology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China); Xu, Xiaohong, E-mail: xuxiaohongnantong@126.com [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China); He, Song, E-mail: hesongnt@126.com [Department of Pathology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-08-15

    YB-1 is a multifunctional protein, which has been shown to correlate with resistance to treatment of various tumor types. This study investigated the expression and biologic function of YB-1 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the expression statuses of YB-1 and pYB-1{sup S102} were reversely correlated with the clinical outcomes of DLBCL patients. In addition, we found that YB-1 could promote the proliferation of DLBCL cells by accelerating the G1/S transition. Ectopic expression of YB-1 could markedly increase the expression of cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and cyclin E. Furthermore, we found that adhesion of DLBCL cells to fibronectin (FN) could increase YB-1 phosphorylation at Ser102 and pYB-1{sup S102} nuclear translocation. In addition, overexpression of YB-1 could increase the adhesion of DLBCL cells to FN. Intriguingly, we found that YB-1 overexpression could confer drug resistance through cell-adhesion dependent and independent mechanisms in DLBCL. Silencing of YB-1 could sensitize DLBCL cells to mitoxantrone and overcome cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) phenotype in an AKT-dependent manner. - Highlights: • The expression statuses of YB-1 and pYB-1{sup S102} are reversely correlated with outcomes of DLBCL patients. • YB-1 promotes cell proliferation by accelerating G1/S transition in DLBCL. • YB-1 confers drug resistance to mitoxantrone in DLBCL.

  7. PIAS proteins are involved in the SUMO-1 modification, intracellular translocation and transcriptional repressive activity of RET finger protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Tetsuo; Shimono, Yohei; Kawai, Kumi; Murakami, Hideki; Urano, Takeshi; Niwa, Yasumasa; Goto, Hidemi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2005-01-01

    Ret finger protein (RFP) is a nuclear protein that is highly expressed in testis and in various tumor cell lines. RFP functions as a transcriptional repressor and associates with Enhancer of Polycomb 1 (EPC1), a member of the Polycomb group proteins, and Mi-2β, a main component of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex. We show that RFP binds with PIAS (protein inhibitor of activated STAT) proteins, PIAS1, PIAS3, PIASxα and PIASy at their carboxyl-terminal region and is covalently modified by SUMO-1 (sumoylation). PIAS proteins enhance the sumoylation of RFP in a dose-dependent manner and induce the translocation of RFP into nuclear bodies reminiscent of the PML bodies. In addition, co-expression of PIAS proteins or SUMO-1 strengthened the transcriptional repressive activity of RFP. Finally, our immunohistochemical results show that RFP, SUMO-1 and PIASy localize in a characteristic nuclear structure juxtaposed with the inner nuclear membrane (XY body) of primary spermatocytes in mouse testis. These results demonstrate that the intracellular location and the transcriptional activity of RFP are modified by PIAS proteins which possess SUMO E3 ligase activities and suggest that they may play a co-operative role in spermatogenesis

  8. The expanding field of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions. 'Protein Modifications: Beyond the Usual Suspects' Review Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakmé, Antoinette; Wong, Heng-Kuan; Dantzer, Françoise; Schreiber, Valérie

    2008-11-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification of proteins that is mediated by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). Although the existence and nature of the nucleic acid-like molecule poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) has been known for 40 years, understanding its biological functions--originally thought to be only the regulation of chromatin superstructure when DNA is broken--is still the subject of intense research. Here, we review the mechanisms controlling the biosynthesis of this complex macromolecule and some of its main biological functions, with an emphasis on the most recent advances and hypotheses that have developed in this rapidly growing field.

  9. Early cytoskeletal protein modifications precede overt structural degeneration in the DBA/2J mouse model of glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Nicole Wilson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Axonal transport deficits precede structural loss in glaucoma and other neurodegenerations. Impairments in structural support, including modified cytoskeletal proteins and microtubule-destabilizing elements, could be initiating factors in glaucoma pathogenesis. We investigated the time course of changes in protein levels and post-translational modifications in the DBA/2J mouse model of glaucoma. Using anterograde tract tracing of the retinal projection, we assessed major cytoskeletal and transported elements as a function of transport integrity in different stages of pathological progression. Using capillary-based electrophoresis, single- and multiplex immunosorbent assays, and immunofluorescence, we quantified hyperphosphorylated neurofilament-heavy chain, phosphorylated tau (ptau, calpain-mediated spectrin breakdown product (145/150kDa, β –tubulin, and amyloid-β42 proteins based on age and transport outcome to the superior colliculus (SC, the main retinal target in mice. Phosphorylated neurofilament-heavy chain (pNF-H was elevated within the optic nerve (ON and SC of 8-10 month-old DBA/2J mice, but was not evident in the retina until 12-15 months, suggesting that cytoskeletal modifications first appear in the distal retinal projection. As expected, higher pNF-H levels in the SC and retina were correlated with axonal transport deficits. Elevations in hyperphosphorylated tau (ptau occurred in ON and SC between 3-8 month of age while retinal ptau accumulations occurred at 12-15 months in DBA/2J mice. In vitro co-immunoprecipitation experiments suggested increased affinity of ptau for the retrograde motor complex protein, dynactin. We observed a transport-related decrease of β-tubulin in ON of 10-12 month-old DBA/2J mice, suggesting destabilized microtubule array. Elevations in calpain-mediated spectrin breakdown product were seen in ON and SC at the earliest age examined, well before axonal transport loss is evident. Finally, transport

  10. Hydrophilic modification gigaporous resins with poly(ethylenimine) for high-throughput proteins ion-exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongyue; Li, Qiang; Gao, Yang; Li, Juan; Huang, Yongdong; Song, Cui; Zhou, Weiqing; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2014-05-23

    High hydrophilicity of gigaporous microspheres based on a copolymer of poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-co-divinyl benzene (PGMA-DVB) was successfully realized through coating the branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) in PGMA-DVB microspheres. PEI with various molecules weights and different branching agents were identified in terms of protein recovery as evaluation approach. For this evaluation, PEI600 (Mw=600) and poly (ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (PEGDE, Mw=400) were used as modification agent and branching agent, respectively. The modified microspheres showed good permeability and revealed a certain mechanical strength. After modification, the protein recovery increased from 40% to >90%. The protein recovery increased with the branched generations and the first and second generations could give the protein recovery of 93% and 96%, respectively. Meanwhile, the ionic capacity also showed a rising trend in the range of 0.11-0.32mmol/mL with the branched generations. But the dynamic binding capacity of protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA as the model protein) increased at first and then decreased. Analysis of the dry microspheres structure by mercury intrusion method as well as observation of the branched PEI on PGMA-DVB membrane in aqueous solution indicated that excess PEI chains with the extended state in the second generation would block the small pores and decrease the accessible surface area. Therefore, the protein capacity on the second generation, on the contrary, was lower than that on the first generation. Meanwhile, it was found that the PEI chains in the modified microspheres changed their construction from the extended to the collapsed state with increase of NaCl concentration. And the corresponding pore size of the modified microspheres increased with salt concentration through low-field nuclear magnetic resonance. Dynamic binding capacity of proteins on the modified supports did not significantly change with increase of the flow rate. The media showed

  11. Trimethyloxonium modification of batrachotoxin-activated Na channels alters functionally important protein residues.

    OpenAIRE

    Cherbavaz, D B

    1995-01-01

    The extracellular side of single batrachotoxin-activated voltage-dependent Na channels isolated from rat skeletal muscle membranes incorporated into neutral planar lipid bilayers were treated in situ with the carboxyl methylating reagent, trimethyloxonium (TMO). These experiments were designed to determine whether TMO alters Na channel function by a general through-space electrostatic mechanism or by methylating specific carboxyl groups essential to channel function. TMO modification reduced ...

  12. Adhesive Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2003-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well...... to rewriting on arbitrary adhesive categories....

  13. Modifications in structure and interaction of nanoparticle-protein-surfactant complexes in electrolyte solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehan, Sumit; Kumar, S.; Aswal, V. K.; Schweins, R.

    2016-05-01

    SANS experiments of three-component system of anionic silica nanoparticles, anionic BSA protein and anionic SDS surfactants have been carried out without and with electrolyte in aqueous solution. In both the cases, the interaction of surfactant with protein results in formation of bead-necklace structure of protein-surfactant complexes in solution. These protein-surfactant complexes interact very differently with nanoparticles in absence and presence of electrolyte. In absence of electrolyte, nanoparticles remain in dispersed phase in solution, whereas with the addition of electrolyte the nanoparticles fractal aggregates are formed. SANS describes the phase behavior to be governed by competition of electrostatic and depletion interactions among the components solution.

  14. Rhenium-188-labeled anti-neural cell adhesion molecule antibodies with 2-iminothiolane modification for targeting small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosono, Masako N. [Osaka City Univ. (Japan); Hosono, Makoto; Mishra, A.K.; Faivre-Chauvet, A.; Gautherot, E.; Barbet, J.; Knapp, F.F.R. Jr; Chatal, J.F.

    2000-06-01

    We have evaluated the potential of {sup 188}Re-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) modified with 2-iminothiolane (2IT) for targeting small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Radiolabeled MAbs NK1NBL1 and C218 recognizing neural cell adhesion molecule were injected i.v. into athymic mice inoculated with human SCLC tumors, and the biodistribution was examined. NK1NBL1 localized in the tumors better than C218. {sup 188}Re-labeled MAbs cleared from the blood faster than {sup 125}I-labeled counterparts, resulting in higher tumor-to-blood ratios. In conclusion, the {sup 188}Re-labeled MAbs are attractive candidates for imaging and therapy of SCLC. (author)

  15. Proteomic assessment of sulfur mustard-induced protein adducts and other protein modifications in human epidermal keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mol, Marijke A.E.; Berg, Roland M. van den; Benschop, Henk P.

    2008-01-01

    Although some toxicological mechanisms of sulfur mustard (HD) have been uncovered, new knowledge will allow for advanced insight in the pathways that lead towards epidermal-dermal separation in skin. In the present investigation, we aimed to survey events that occur at the protein level in human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK) during 24 h after exposure to HD. By using radiolabeled 14 C-HD, it was found that proteins in cultured HEK are significant targets for alkylation by HD. HD-adducted proteins were visualized by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Several type I and II cytokeratins, actin, stratifin (14-3-3σ) and galectin-7 were identified. These proteins are involved in the maintenance of the cellular cytoskeleton. Their alkylation may cause changes in the cellular architecture and, in direct line with that, be determinative for the onset of vesication. Furthermore, differential proteomic analysis was applied to search for novel features of the cellular response to HD. Partial breakdown of type I cytokeratins K14, K16 and K17 as well as the emergence of new charge variants of the proteins heat shock protein 27 and ribosomal protein P0 were observed. Studies with caspase inhibitors showed that caspase-6 is probably responsible for the breakdown of type I cytokeratins in HEK. The significance of the results is discussed in terms of toxicological relevance and possible clues for therapeutic intervention

  16. Dietary protein restriction causes modification in aluminum-induced alteration in glutamate and GABA system of rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee Ajay K

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alteration of glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate system have been reported to be associated with neurodegenerative disorders and have been postulated to be involved in aluminum-induced neurotoxicity as well. Aluminum, an well known and commonly exposed neurotoxin, was found to alter glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate levels as well as activities of associated enzymes with regional specificity. Protein malnutrition also reported to alter glutamate level and some of its metabolic enzymes. Thus the region-wise study of levels of brain glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate system in protein adequacy and inadequacy may be worthwhile to understand the mechanism of aluminum-induced neurotoxicity. Results Protein restriction does not have any significant impact on regional aluminum and γ-aminobutyrate contents of rat brain. Significant interaction of dietary protein restriction and aluminum intoxication to alter regional brain glutamate level was observed in the tested brain regions except cerebellum. Alteration in glutamate α-decarboxylase and γ-aminobutyrate transaminase activities were found to be significantly influenced by interaction of aluminum intoxication and dietary protein restriction in all the tested brain regions. In case of regional brain succinic semialdehyde content, this interaction was significant only in cerebrum and thalamic area. Conclusion The alterations of regional brain glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate levels by aluminum are region specific as well as dependent on dietary protein intake. The impact of aluminum exposure on the metabolism of these amino acid neurotransmitters are also influenced by dietary protein level. Thus, modification of dietary protein level or manipulation of the brain amino acid homeostasis by any other means may be an useful tool to find out a path to restrict amino acid neurotransmitter alterations in aluminum-associated neurodisorders.

  17. Site-specific modification of genome with cell-permeable Cre fusion protein in preimplantation mouse embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyoungmi; Kim, Hwain; Lee, Daekee

    2009-01-01

    Site-specific recombination (SSR) by Cre recombinase and its target sequence, loxP, is a valuable tool in genetic analysis of gene function. Recently, several studies reported successful application of Cre fusion protein containing protein transduction peptide for inducing gene modification in various mammalian cells including ES cell as well as in the whole animal. In this study, we show that a short incubation of preimplantation mouse embryos with purified cell-permeable Cre fusion protein results in efficient SSR. X-Gal staining of preimplantation embryos, heterozygous for Gtrosa26 tm1Sor , revealed that treatment of 1-cell or 2-cell embryos with 3 μM of Cre fusion protein for 2 h leads to Cre-mediated excision in 70-85% of embryos. We have examined the effect of the concentration of the Cre fusion protein and the duration of the treatment on embryonic development, established a condition for full term development and survival to adulthood, and demonstrated the germ line transmission of excised Gtrosa26 allele. Potential applications and advantages of the highly efficient technique described here are discussed.

  18. Dissecting the Wnt secretion pathway: key questions on the modification and intracellular trafficking of Wnt proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harterink, M.; Korswagen, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    The Wnt family of signalling proteins has essential functions in development and adult tissue homoeostasis throughout the animal kingdom. Although signalling cascades triggered by Wnt proteins have been extensively studied, much remains to be learned about how Wnts are produced and secreted. Over

  19. Modifications of fungal membrane proteins profile under pathogenicity induction: A proteomic analysis of Botrytis cinerea membranome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liñeiro, Eva; Chiva, Cristina; Cantoral, Jesús M; Sabidó, Eduard; Fernández-Acero, Francisco Javier

    2016-09-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a model fungus for the study of phytopathogenicity that exhibits a wide arsenal of tools to infect plant tissues. Most of these factors are related to signal transduction cascades, in which membrane proteins play a key role as a bridge between environment and intracellular molecular processes. This work describes the first description of the membranome of Botrytis under different pathogenicity conditions induced by different plant-based elicitors: glucose and tomato cell wall (TCW). A discovery proteomics analysis of membrane proteins was carried out by mass spectrometry. A total of 2794 proteins were successfully identified, 46% of them were classified as membrane proteins based on the presence of transmembrane regions and lipidation. Further analyses showed significant differences in the membranome composition depending on the available carbon source: 804 proteins were exclusively identified when the fungus was cultured with glucose as a sole carbon source, and 251 proteins were exclusively identified with TCW. Besides, among the 1737 common proteins, a subset of 898 proteins presented clear differences in their abundance. GO enrichment and clustering interaction analysis revealed changes in the composition of membranome with increase of signalling function in glucose conditions and carbohydrate degradation process in TCW conditions. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003099 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD003099). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Effects of Industrial Heating Processes of Milk-Based Enteral Formulas on Site-Specific Protein Modifications and Their Relationship to in Vitro and in Vivo Protein Digestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yasuaki; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2015-08-05

    Heat treatments are applied to milk and dairy products to ensure their microbiological safety and shelf lives. Types of heating processes may have different effects on protein modifications, leading to different protein digestibility. In this study, milk-based liquid nutritional formulas (simulating enteral formulas) were subjected to steam injection ultra-high-temperature treatment or in-can sterilization, and the formulas were investigated by proteomic methods and in vitro and in vivo digestion assays. Proteomic analyses revealed that in-can sterilization resulted in higher signals for N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine and dephosphorylation of Ser residues in major milk proteins than in steam-injected formula, reflecting the more severe thermal process of in-can sterilization. In vitro and in vivo digestion assays indicated that steam injection improved protein digestibility, supposedly by denaturation, while the improvement seemed to be overwhelmed by formation of aggregates that showed resistance to digestion in in-can sterilized formula. Adverse effects of heat treatment on protein digestibility are more likely to be manifested in milk-based formulas than in cow's milk. Although the differences might be of limited significance in terms of amino acid bioavailability, these results emphasize the importance of protein quality of raw materials and selection of heating processes.

  1. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins and characterization of their post-translational modifications in proteome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roepstorff, P; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2001-01-01

    for more than 425.000 protein sequences. However, the cellular functions are determined by the set of proteins expressed in the cell--the proteome. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics have become important tools in correlating the proteome with the genome. The current......High-throughput DNA sequencing has resulted in increasing input in protein sequence databases. Today more than 20 genomes have been sequenced and many more will be completed in the near future, including the largest of them all, the human genome. Presently, sequence databases contain entries...... dominant strategies for identification of proteins from gels based on peptide mass spectrometric fingerprinting and partial sequencing by mass spectrometry are described. After identification of the proteins the next challenge in proteome analysis is characterization of their post...

  2. KirrelL, a member of the Ig-domain superfamily of adhesion proteins, is essential for fusion of primary mesenchyme cells in the sea urchin embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettensohn, Charles A; Dey, Debleena

    2017-01-15

    In the sea urchin embryo, primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) adhere to one another and fuse via filopodia, forming cable-like structures within which skeletal rods are deposited. Although this process was first described more than a century ago, molecules that participate in PMC adhesion and fusion have not been identified. Here we show that KirrelL, a PMC-specific, Ig domain-containing transmembrane protein, is essential for PMC fusion, probably by mediating filopodial adhesions that are a pre-requisite for subsequent membrane fusion. We show that KirrelL is not required for PMC specification, migration, or for direct filopodial contacts between PMCs. In the absence of KirrelL, however, filopodial contacts do not result in fusion. kirrelL is a member of a family of closely related, intronless genes that likely arose through an echinoid-specific gene expansion, possibly via retrotransposition. Our findings are significant in that they establish a direct linkage between the transcriptional network deployed in the PMC lineage and an effector molecule required for a critically important PMC morphogenetic process. In addition, our results point to a conserved role for Ig domain-containing adhesion proteins in facilitating cell fusion in both muscle and non-muscle cell lineages during animal development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. DDB2 (damaged-DNA binding 2) protein: a new modulator of nanomechanical properties and cell adhesion of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieux, Claire; Bacharouche, Jalal; Soussen, Charles; Hupont, Sébastien; Razafitianamaharavo, Angélina; Klotz, Rémi; Pannequin, Rémi; Brie, David; Bécuwe, Philippe; Francius, Grégory; Grandemange, Stéphanie

    2016-03-07

    DDB2, known for its role in DNA repair, was recently shown to reduce mammary tumor invasiveness by inducing the transcription of IκBα, an inhibitor of NF-κB activity. Since cellular adhesion is a key event during the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) leading to the invasive capacities of breast tumor cells, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of DDB2 in this process. Thus, using low and high DDB2-expressing MDA-MB231 and MCF7 cells, respectively, in which DDB2 expression was modulated experimentally, we showed that DDB2 overexpression was associated with a decrease of adhesion abilities on glass and plastic areas of breast cancer cells. Then, we investigated cell nanomechanical properties by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results revealed significant changes in the Young's Modulus value and the adhesion force in MDA-MB231 and MCF7 cells, whether DDB2 was expressed or not. The cell stiffness decrease observed in MDA-MB231 and MCF7 expressing DDB2 was correlated with a loss of the cortical actin-cytoskeleton staining. To understand how DDB2 regulates these processes, an adhesion-related gene PCR-Array was performed. Several adhesion-related genes were differentially expressed according to DDB2 expression, indicating that important changes are occurring at the molecular level. Thus, this work demonstrates that AFM technology is an important tool to follow cellular changes during tumorigenesis. Moreover, our data revealed that DDB2 is involved in early events occurring during metastatic progression of breast cancer cells and will contribute to define this protein as a new marker of metastatic progression in this type of cancer.

  4. DDB2 (damaged-DNA binding 2) protein: a new modulator of nanomechanical properties and cell adhesion of breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieux, Claire; Bacharouche, Jalal; Soussen, Charles; Hupont, Sébastien; Razafitianamaharavo, Angélina; Klotz, Rémi; Pannequin, Rémi; Brie, David; Bécuwe, Philippe; Francius, Grégory; Grandemange, Stéphanie

    2016-02-01

    DDB2, known for its role in DNA repair, was recently shown to reduce mammary tumor invasiveness by inducing the transcription of IκBα, an inhibitor of NF-κB activity. Since cellular adhesion is a key event during the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) leading to the invasive capacities of breast tumor cells, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of DDB2 in this process. Thus, using low and high DDB2-expressing MDA-MB231 and MCF7 cells, respectively, in which DDB2 expression was modulated experimentally, we showed that DDB2 overexpression was associated with a decrease of adhesion abilities on glass and plastic areas of breast cancer cells. Then, we investigated cell nanomechanical properties by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results revealed significant changes in the Young's Modulus value and the adhesion force in MDA-MB231 and MCF7 cells, whether DDB2 was expressed or not. The cell stiffness decrease observed in MDA-MB231 and MCF7 expressing DDB2 was correlated with a loss of the cortical actin-cytoskeleton staining. To understand how DDB2 regulates these processes, an adhesion-related gene PCR-Array was performed. Several adhesion-related genes were differentially expressed according to DDB2 expression, indicating that important changes are occurring at the molecular level. Thus, this work demonstrates that AFM technology is an important tool to follow cellular changes during tumorigenesis. Moreover, our data revealed that DDB2 is involved in early events occurring during metastatic progression of breast cancer cells and will contribute to define this protein as a new marker of metastatic progression in this type of cancer.

  5. The Study of Posttranslational Modifications of Tau Protein by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Phosphorylation of Tau Protein by ERK2 Recombinant Kinase and Rat Brain Extract, and Acetylation by Recombinant Creb-Binding Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Haoling; Despres, Clément; Prabakaran, Sudhakaran; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Chambraud, Béatrice; Gunawardena, Jeremy; Lippens, Guy; Smet-Nocca, Caroline; Landrieu, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can be used as an analytical tool to investigate posttranslational modifications of protein. NMR is a valuable tool to map the interaction regions of protein partners. Here, we present protocols that have been developed in the course of our studies of the neuronal Tau protein. Tau is found aggregated in the neurons of Alzheimer's disease patients. Development of the disease is accompanied by increased, abnormal phosphorylation and acetylation of Tau. We have used NMR to investigate how these posttranslational modifications of Tau affect the interactions with its partners. We present here detailed protocols of in vitro phosphorylation of Tau by recombinant kinase, ERK2, or kinase activity of rat brain extracts, and acetylation by recombinant Creb-binding protein (CBP) acetyltransferase. The analytical characterization of the modified Tau by NMR spectroscopy is additionally described.

  6. Modification of heterotrimeric G-proteins in Swiss 3T3 cells stimulated with Pasteurella multocida toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca C Babb

    Full Text Available Many bacterial toxins covalently modify components of eukaryotic signalling pathways in a highly specific manner, and can be used as powerful tools to decipher the function of their molecular target(s. The Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT mediates its cellular effects through the activation of members of three of the four heterotrimeric G-protein families, G(q, G(12 and G(i. PMT has been shown by others to lead to the deamidation of recombinant Gα(i at Gln-205 to inhibit its intrinsic GTPase activity. We have investigated modification of native Gα subunits mediated by PMT in Swiss 3T3 cells using 2-D gel electrophoresis and antibody detection. An acidic change in the isoelectric point was observed for the Gα subunit of the G(q and G(i families following PMT treatment of Swiss 3T3 cells, which is consistent with the deamidation of these Gα subunits. Surprisingly, PMT also induced a similar modification of Gα(11, a member of the G(q family of G-proteins that is not activated by PMT. Furthermore, an alkaline change in the isoelectric point of Gα(13 was observed following PMT treatment of cells, suggesting differential modification of this Gα subunit by PMT. G(s was not affected by PMT treatment. Prolonged treatment with PMT led to a reduction in membrane-associated Gα(i, but not Gα(q. We also show that PMT inhibits the GTPase activity of G(q.

  7. Dynamic Regulation of a Cell Adhesion Protein Complex Including CADM1 by Combinatorial Analysis of FRAP with Exponential Curve-Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai-Yageta, Mika; Maruyama, Tomoko; Suzuki, Takashi; Ichikawa, Kazuhisa; Murakami, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Protein components of cell adhesion machinery show continuous renewal even in the static state of epithelial cells and participate in the formation and maintenance of normal epithelial architecture and tumor suppression. CADM1 is a tumor suppressor belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecule and forms a cell adhesion complex with an actin-binding protein, 4.1B, and a scaffold protein, MPP3, in the cytoplasm. Here, we investigate dynamic regulation of the CADM1-4.1B-MPP3 complex in mature cell adhesion by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis. Traditional FRAP analysis were performed for relatively short period of around 10min. Here, thanks to recent advances in the sensitive laser detector systems, we examine FRAP of CADM1 complex for longer period of 60 min and analyze the recovery with exponential curve-fitting to distinguish the fractions with different diffusion constants. This approach reveals that the fluorescence recovery of CADM1 is fitted to a single exponential function with a time constant (τ) of approximately 16 min, whereas 4.1B and MPP3 are fitted to a double exponential function with two τs of approximately 40-60 sec and 16 min. The longer τ is similar to that of CADM1, suggesting that 4.1B and MPP3 have two distinct fractions, one forming a complex with CADM1 and the other present as a free pool. Fluorescence loss in photobleaching analysis supports the presence of a free pool of these proteins near the plasma membrane. Furthermore, double exponential fitting makes it possible to estimate the ratio of 4.1B and MPP3 present as a free pool and as a complex with CADM1 as approximately 3:2 and 3:1, respectively. Our analyses reveal a central role of CADM1 in stabilizing the complex with 4.1B and MPP3 and provide insight in the dynamics of adhesion complex formation. PMID:25780926

  8. Dynamic regulation of a cell adhesion protein complex including CADM1 by combinatorial analysis of FRAP with exponential curve-fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai-Yageta, Mika; Maruyama, Tomoko; Suzuki, Takashi; Ichikawa, Kazuhisa; Murakami, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Protein components of cell adhesion machinery show continuous renewal even in the static state of epithelial cells and participate in the formation and maintenance of normal epithelial architecture and tumor suppression. CADM1 is a tumor suppressor belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecule and forms a cell adhesion complex with an actin-binding protein, 4.1B, and a scaffold protein, MPP3, in the cytoplasm. Here, we investigate dynamic regulation of the CADM1-4.1B-MPP3 complex in mature cell adhesion by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis. Traditional FRAP analysis were performed for relatively short period of around 10 min. Here, thanks to recent advances in the sensitive laser detector systems, we examine FRAP of CADM1 complex for longer period of 60 min and analyze the recovery with exponential curve-fitting to distinguish the fractions with different diffusion constants. This approach reveals that the fluorescence recovery of CADM1 is fitted to a single exponential function with a time constant (τ) of approximately 16 min, whereas 4.1B and MPP3 are fitted to a double exponential function with two τs of approximately 40-60 sec and 16 min. The longer τ is similar to that of CADM1, suggesting that 4.1B and MPP3 have two distinct fractions, one forming a complex with CADM1 and the other present as a free pool. Fluorescence loss in photobleaching analysis supports the presence of a free pool of these proteins near the plasma membrane. Furthermore, double exponential fitting makes it possible to estimate the ratio of 4.1B and MPP3 present as a free pool and as a complex with CADM1 as approximately 3:2 and 3:1, respectively. Our analyses reveal a central role of CADM1 in stabilizing the complex with 4.1B and MPP3 and provide insight in the dynamics of adhesion complex formation.

  9. An integrated top-down and bottom-up strategy for characterization protein isoforms and modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Si; Tolic, Nikola; Tian, Zhixin; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2011-04-15

    Bottom-up and top-down strategies are two commonly used methods for mass spectrometry (MS) based protein identification; each method has its own advantages and disadvantages. In this chapter, we describe an integrated top-down and bottom-up approach facilitated by concurrent liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis and fraction collection for comprehensive high-throughput intact protein profiling. The approach employs a high resolution reversed phase (RP) LC separation coupled with LC eluent fraction collection and concurrent on-line MS with a high field (12 Tesla) Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. Protein elusion profiles and tentative modified protein identification are made using detected intact protein mass in conjunction with bottom-up protein identifications from the enzymatic digestion and analysis of corresponding LC fractions. Specific proteins of biological interest are incorporated into a target ion list for subsequent off-line gas-phase fragmentation that uses an aliquot of the original collected LC fraction, an aliquot of which was also used for bottom-up analysis.

  10. Targeted modification of storage protein content resulting in improved amino acid composition of barley grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sikdar, Md. Shafiqul Islam; Bowra, S; Schmidt, Daiana

    2016-01-01

    silencing technology directed towards C-hordein we obtained transgenic barley lines with up to 94.7 % reduction in the levels of C-hordein protein relative to the parental line. The composition of the prolamin fraction of the barley parental line cv. Golden Promise was resolved using SDS-PAGE...... electrophoresis, the protein band were excised and the proteins identified by quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Subsequent SDS-PAGE separation and analysis of the prolamin fraction of the transgenic lines revealed a reduction in the amounts of C-hordeins and increases in the content of other hordein...

  11. Cell adhesion down-regulates the expression of vacuolar protein sorting 4B (VPS4B) and contributes to drug resistance in multiple myeloma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jie; Ji, Lili; Wang, Yuchan; Huang, Yuejiao; Yin, Haibing; He, Yunhua; Liu, Jing; Miao, Xiaobing; Wu, Yaxun; Xu, Xiaohong; He, Song; Cheng, Chun

    2015-07-01

    The expression and biologic function of the gene encoding vacuolar protein sorting 4B (VPS4B) in human multiple myeloma (MM) were investigated in this study. We determined that VPS4B expression is decreased in adherent MM cells and that knockdown of VPS4B expression induces cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) in MM. This induced CAM-DR phenotype manifested through down-regulation of cell apoptosis and requires phosphorylation of AKT and Erk. Finally, VPS4B expression was positively correlated with cell proliferation. Our findings support a role for VPS4B in MM cell proliferation, adhesion, and drug resistance, and pave the way for a novel therapeutic approach targeting this molecule.

  12. All mammalian Hedgehog proteins interact with cell adhesion molecule, down-regulated by oncogenes (CDO) and brother of CDO (BOC) in a conserved manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavran, Jennifer M; Ward, Matthew D; Oladosu, Oyindamola O; Mulepati, Sabin; Leahy, Daniel J

    2010-08-06

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling proteins stimulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue patterning at multiple points in animal development. A single Hh homolog is present in Drosophila, but three Hh homologs, Sonic Hh, Indian Hh, and Desert Hh, are present in mammals. Distribution, movement, and reception of Hh signals are tightly regulated, and abnormal Hh signaling is associated with developmental defects and cancer. In addition to the integral membrane proteins Patched and Smoothened, members of the Drosophila Ihog family of adhesion-like molecules have recently been shown to bind Hh proteins with micromolar affinity and positively regulate Hh signaling. Cell adhesion molecule-related, down-regulated by oncogenes (CDO) and Brother of CDO (BOC) are the closest mammalian relatives of Drosophila Ihog, and CDO binds Sonic Hh with micromolar affinity and positively regulates Hh signaling. Despite these similarities, structural and biochemical studies have shown that Ihog and CDO utilize nonorthologous domains and completely different binding modes to interact with cognate Hh proteins. We report here biochemical and x-ray structural studies of Sonic, Indian, and Desert Hh proteins both alone and complexed with active domains of CDO and BOC. These results show that all mammalian Hh proteins bind CDO and BOC in the same manner. We also show that interactions between Hh proteins and CDO are weakened at low pH. Formation of Hh-mediated Hh oligomers is thought to be an important feature of normal Hh signaling, but no conserved self-interaction between Hh proteins is apparent from inspection of 14 independent Hh-containing crystal lattices.

  13. Modification by Ubiquitin-Like Proteins: Significance in Apoptosis and Autophagy Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monde Ntwasa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin-like proteins (Ubls confer diverse functions on their target proteins. The modified proteins are involved in various biological processes, including DNA replication, signal transduction, cell cycle control, embryogenesis, cytoskeletal regulation, metabolism, stress response, homeostasis and mRNA processing. Modifiers such as SUMO, ATG12, ISG15, FAT10, URM1, and UFM have been shown to modify proteins thus conferring functions related to programmed cell death, autophagy and regulation of the immune system. Putative modifiers such as Domain With No Name (DWNN have been identified in recent times but not fully characterized. In this review, we focus on cellular processes involving human Ubls and their targets. We review current progress in targeting these modifiers for drug design strategies.

  14. Identification and modification of dynamical regions in proteins for alteration of enzyme catalytic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pratul K.

    2013-04-09

    A method for analysis, control, and manipulation for improvement of the chemical reaction rate of a protein-mediated reaction is provided. Enzymes, which typically comprise protein molecules, are very efficient catalysts that enhance chemical reaction rates by many orders of magnitude. Enzymes are widely used for a number of functions in chemical, biochemical, pharmaceutical, and other purposes. The method identifies key protein vibration modes that control the chemical reaction rate of the protein-mediated reaction, providing identification of the factors that enable the enzymes to achieve the high rate of reaction enhancement. By controlling these factors, the function of enzymes may be modulated, i.e., the activity can either be increased for faster enzyme reaction or it can be decreased when a slower enzyme is desired. This method provides an inexpensive and efficient solution by utilizing computer simulations, in combination with available experimental data, to build suitable models and investigate the enzyme activity.

  15. The Src homology 2 protein Shb promotes cell cycle progression in murine hematopoietic stem cells by regulation of focal adhesion kinase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, Karin; Heffner, Garrett; Wenzel, Pamela L.; Curran, Matthew; Grawé, Jan; McKinney-Freeman, Shannon L.; Daley, George Q.; Welsh, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The widely expressed adaptor protein Shb has previously been reported to contribute to T cell function due to its association with the T cell receptor and furthermore, several of Shb's known interaction partners are established regulators of blood cell development and function. In addition, Shb deficient embryonic stem cells displayed reduced blood cell colony formation upon differentiation in vitro. The aim of the current study was therefore to explore hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function in the Shb knockout mouse. Shb deficient bone marrow contained reduced relative numbers of long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs) that exhibited lower proliferation rates. Despite this, Shb knockout LT-HSCs responded promptly by entering the cell cycle in response to genotoxic stress by 5-fluorouracil treatment. In competitive LT-HSC transplantations, Shb null cells initially engrafted as well as the wild-type cells but provided less myeloid expansion over time. Moreover, Shb knockout bone marrow cells exhibited elevated basal activities of focal adhesion kinase/Rac1/p21-activated kinase signaling and reduced responsiveness to Stem Cell Factor stimulation. Consequently, treatment with a focal adhesion kinase inhibitor increased Shb knockout LT-HSC proliferation. The altered signaling characteristics thus provide a plausible mechanistic explanation for the changes in LT-HSC proliferation since these signaling intermediates have all been shown to participate in LT-HSC cell cycle control. In summary, the loss of Shb dependent signaling in bone marrow cells, resulting in elevated focal adhesion kinase activity and reduced proliferative responses in LT-HSCs under steady state hematopoiesis, confers a disadvantage to the maintenance of LT-HSCs over time. -- Highlights: • Shb is an adaptor protein operating downstream of tyrosine kinase receptors. • Shb deficiency reduces hematopoietic stem cell proliferation. • The proliferative effect of Shb occurs via increased

  16. The Src homology 2 protein Shb promotes cell cycle progression in murine hematopoietic stem cells by regulation of focal adhesion kinase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Karin [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala 751 23 (Sweden); Heffner, Garrett; Wenzel, Pamela L.; Curran, Matthew [HHMI, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, 02115 MA (United States); Grawé, Jan [Department of Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala 75185 (Sweden); McKinney-Freeman, Shannon L. [Department of Hematology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105 (United States); Daley, George Q. [HHMI, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, 02115 MA (United States); Welsh, Michael, E-mail: michael.welsh@mcb.uu.se [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala 751 23 (Sweden)

    2013-07-15

    The widely expressed adaptor protein Shb has previously been reported to contribute to T cell function due to its association with the T cell receptor and furthermore, several of Shb's known interaction partners are established regulators of blood cell development and function. In addition, Shb deficient embryonic stem cells displayed reduced blood cell colony formation upon differentiation in vitro. The aim of the current study was therefore to explore hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function in the Shb knockout mouse. Shb deficient bone marrow contained reduced relative numbers of long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs) that exhibited lower proliferation rates. Despite this, Shb knockout LT-HSCs responded promptly by entering the cell cycle in response to genotoxic stress by 5-fluorouracil treatment. In competitive LT-HSC transplantations, Shb null cells initially engrafted as well as the wild-type cells but provided less myeloid expansion over time. Moreover, Shb knockout bone marrow cells exhibited elevated basal activities of focal adhesion kinase/Rac1/p21-activated kinase signaling and reduced responsiveness to Stem Cell Factor stimulation. Consequently, treatment with a focal adhesion kinase inhibitor increased Shb knockout LT-HSC proliferation. The altered signaling characteristics thus provide a plausible mechanistic explanation for the changes in LT-HSC proliferation since these signaling intermediates have all been shown to participate in LT-HSC cell cycle control. In summary, the loss of Shb dependent signaling in bone marrow cells, resulting in elevated focal adhesion kinase activity and reduced proliferative responses in LT-HSCs under steady state hematopoiesis, confers a disadvantage to the maintenance of LT-HSCs over time. -- Highlights: • Shb is an adaptor protein operating downstream of tyrosine kinase receptors. • Shb deficiency reduces hematopoietic stem cell proliferation. • The proliferative effect of Shb occurs via

  17. System in biology leading to cell pathology: stable protein-protein interactions after covalent modifications by small molecules or in transgenic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Halina Z

    2011-01-19

    in disease development. In the knockout cells, incorrect interactions between proteins were observed without the protein modification by small molecules, indicating the abnormality of the protein network in the transgenic system. The irreversible protein-protein interactions lead to protein aggregation and cell degeneration, which are observed in all aging-associated diseases.

  18. Plasma surface modification of poly (L-lactic acid) and poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) films for improvement of nerve cells adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khorasani, M.T.; Mirzadeh, H.; Irani, S.

    2008-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) plasma treatment in O 2 was applied to modify the surface of poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly (D,L-lactic acid-coglycolic acid) (PLGA) as biodegradable polymers. The surface structure, morphology, wettability and surface chemistry of treated films were characterized by water drop contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscope (SEM), optical invert microscope, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and ATIR-FTIR spectroscopy. The cell affinity of the oxygen plasma treated film was evaluated by nervous tissue B65 cell culture in stationary conditions. The results showed that the hydrophilicity increased greatly after O 2 plasma treatment. The results showed that improved cell adhesion was attributed to the combination of surface chemistry and surface wettability during plasma treatment. Cell culture results showed that B65 nervous cell attachment and growth on the plasma treated PLLA was much higher than an unmodified sample and PLGA. Surface hydrophilicity and chemical functional groups with high polar component play an important role in enhancing cell attachment and growth

  19. Changes of Serum Intercellular Adhesion Molecule – 1, Vascular Adhesion Molecule-1 and C – Reactive Protein in Middle-Aged Men with Heart Failure after Eight Weeks of Aerobic Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda Haghir

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The evidence has shown that expansion of cardiovascular disease has inflammation base, and general inflammation (systemic plays a pivotal role in the development of atherosclerosis. The purpose of this research was evaluation of changes in intercellular adhesion molecule – 1, vascular adhesion molecule-1 and C – reactive protein in middle-aged men with heart failure after eight weeks of aerobic exercise. Methods: Twenty four middle-aged men with heart failure were selected as volunteers, and were divided into two groups; the aerobic training and the control groups. Aerobic training program was eight weeks, three times per week with the intensity of 40%-70% maximum heart rate. Fasting blood samples were taken from all subjects before and after eight weeks of aerobic exercise. . Data were analyzed by paired sample t-test and independent sample t-test at a significance levels of P<0.05. Results: In the aerobic training group, comparison within groups showed, serum levels of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and CRP (respectively P=0.001, P=0.001 and P=0.001 were significantly reduced. There was a significant reduction in comparison between groups only for VCAM-1 (P=0.001 and CRP (P=0.002. Conclusion: Aerobic exercise with reducing levels of inflammatory markers ICAM-1 and CRP may play an important role in the prevention and control of cardiovascular diseases in middle-aged men with heart failure.

  20. Modification of gene duplicability during the evolution of protein interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo D'Antonio

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Duplications of genes encoding highly connected and essential proteins are selected against in several species but not in human, where duplicated genes encode highly connected proteins. To understand when and how gene duplicability changed in evolution, we compare gene and network properties in four species (Escherichia coli, yeast, fly, and human that are representative of the increase in evolutionary complexity, defined as progressive growth in the number of genes, cells, and cell types. We find that the origin and conservation of a gene significantly correlates with the properties of the encoded protein in the protein-protein interaction network. All four species preserve a core of singleton and central hubs that originated early in evolution, are highly conserved, and accomplish basic biological functions. Another group of hubs appeared in metazoans and duplicated in vertebrates, mostly through vertebrate-specific whole genome duplication. Such recent and duplicated hubs are frequently targets of microRNAs and show tissue-selective expression, suggesting that these are alternative mechanisms to control their dosage. Our study shows how networks modified during evolution and contributes to explaining the occurrence of somatic genetic diseases, such as cancer, in terms of network perturbations.

  1. Transient conformational modification of immunoglobulin G during purification by protein A affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Pete; Nian, Rui; Leong, Denise; Hoi, Aina

    2015-05-22

    Exposure of three native IgG1 monoclonal antibodies to 100mM acetate, pH 3.5 had no significant effect on their hydrodynamic size (11.5±0.5nm), while elution from protein A with the same buffer created a conformation of 5.5±1.0nm. Formation of the reduced-size conformation was preceded by the known destabilization of the second constant domain of the heavy chain (Cγ2) by contact with protein A, then compounded by exposure to low pH, creating extended flexibility in the hinge-Cγ2 region and allowing the Fab region to fold over the Fc region. The reduced-size conformation was necessary for complete elution. It persisted unchanged for at least 7 days under elution conditions. Physiological conditions restored native size, and it was maintained on re-exposure to 100mM acetate, pH 3.5. Protein A-mediated destabilization and subsequent restoration of native size did not create aggregates, but the reduced-size conformation was more susceptible to aggregation by secondary stress than native antibody. Protein A-mediated formation of the reduced-size conformation is probably universal during purification of human IgG1 antibodies, and may occur with other subclasses and IgG from other species, as well as Fc-fusion proteins. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN RENAL REMODELING AND VASCULAR ADHESION-1 PROTEIN (VAP-1 IN CHRONIC PRIMARY GLOMERULONEPHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Z. Gadaborsheva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal. Determination of the relationship between the concentration of VAP-1 and the clinical and morphological parameters of the structural reorganization of the renal tissue.Materials and methods. The study included 80 patients with primary chronic glomerulonephritis in the period of exacerbation. The predominant morphological variants were IgA-nephropathy (42 patients and focal-segmental glomerulosclerosis (16 patients. All patients underwent general clinical examination, with the establishment of stages of CKD, and nephrobiopsy was performed. Based on the results of morphological analysis, the parameters of remodeling of renal tissue were taken into account. A blood sample was taken to study the concentration of Vascular Adhesion-1 protein (VAP-1. Nine months after the patients were admitted to the study and treated according to standard therapy, several indicators were re-recorded.Results. It was found that the age, duration of the disease, urea, proteinuria of a single and a daily portion of urine were inversely proportional to the level of VAP-1. Moreover, a signifi cant difference was found between the groups of patients ranked by median VAP-1, by prevalence in the group ofpatients with higher VAP-1 concentration of nephritic syndrome, IgA nephropathy, cases with mesangium expansion, mesangial and endothelial hypercellularity, endothelial swelling, IgA immune deposits In mesangium and capillary loops.Conclusion. As a result of the study, the prognostic signifi cance of VAP-1 concentration in patients with chronic glomerulonephritis was demonstrated. The formulas and the table of risk stratifi cation for the development of morphological reconstruction of kidney tissue are presented. It was found that the concentration of VAP-1 is statistically signifi cantly increased in the early stages of glomerulonephritis, with the predominance of infl ammatory and proliferative changes. At the stage of fi brous restructuring of renal

  3. Serum Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 Predicts End-Stage Renal Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Yuan Li

    Full Text Available Diabetes is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD worldwide. Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1 participates in inflammation and catalyzes the deamination of primary amines into aldehydes, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonia, both of which are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. We have shown that serum VAP-1 is higher in patients with diabetes and in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, and can predict cardiovascular mortality in subjects with diabetes. In this study, we investigated if serum VAP-1 can predict ESRD in diabetic subjects.In this prospective cohort study, a total of 604 type 2 diabetic subjects were enrolled between 1996 to 2003 at National Taiwan University Hospital, Taiwan, and were followed for a median of 12.36 years. The development of ESRD was ascertained by linking our database with the nationally comprehensive Taiwan Society Nephrology registry. Serum VAP-1 concentrations at enrollment were measured by time-resolved immunofluorometric assay.Subjects with serum VAP-1 in the highest tertile had the highest incidence of ESRD (p<0.001. Every 1-SD increase in serum VAP-1 was associated with a hazard ratio of 1.55 (95%CI 1.12-2.14, p<0.01 for the risk of ESRD, adjusted for smoking, history of cardiovascular disease, body mass index, hypertension, HbA1c, duration of diabetes, total cholesterol, use of statins, ankle-brachial index, estimated GFR, and proteinuria. We developed a risk score comprising serum VAP-1, HbA1c, estimated GFR, and proteinuria, which could predict ESRD with good performance (area under the ROC curve = 0.9406, 95%CI 0.8871-0.9941, sensitivity = 77.3%, and specificity = 92.8%. We also developed an algorithm based on the stage of CKD and a risk score including serum VAP-1, which can stratify these subjects into 3 categories with an ESRD risk of 0.101%/year, 0.131%/year, and 2.427%/year, respectively.In conclusion, serum VAP-1 can predict ESRD and is a useful biomarker to

  4. Stoichiometric and irreversible cysteine-selective protein modification using carbonylacrylic reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardim, Barbara; Cal, Pedro M. S. D.; Matos, Maria J.; Oliveira, Bruno L.; Martínez-Sáez, Nuria; Albuquerque, Inês S.; Perkins, Elizabeth; Corzana, Francisco; Burtoloso, Antonio C. B.; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.

    2016-10-01

    Maleimides remain the reagents of choice for the preparation of therapeutic and imaging protein conjugates despite the known instability of the resulting products that undergo thiol-exchange reactions in vivo. Here we present the rational design of carbonylacrylic reagents for chemoselective cysteine bioconjugation. These reagents undergo rapid thiol Michael-addition under biocompatible conditions in stoichiometric amounts. When using carbonylacrylic reagents equipped with PEG or fluorophore moieties, this method enables access to protein and antibody conjugates precisely modified at pre-determined sites. Importantly, the conjugates formed are resistant to degradation in plasma and are biologically functional, as demonstrated by the selective imaging and detection of apoptotic and HER2+ cells, respectively. The straightforward preparation, stoichiometric use and exquisite cysteine selectivity of the carbonylacrylic reagents combined with the stability of the products and the availability of biologically relevant cysteine-tagged proteins make this method suitable for the routine preparation of chemically defined conjugates for in vivo applications.

  5. Modification of nanoelectrode ensembles by thiols and disulfides to prevent non specific adsorption of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestrini, M.; Schiavuta, P.; Scopece, P.; Pecchielan, G.; Moretto, L.M.; Ugo, P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Complex nanostructures are built on the gold surface of ensembles of nanoelectrodes. → Gold surface of nanoelectrodes was functionalized with SAM of organic sulphurs. → The polycarbonate surrounding nanoelectrodes was functionalized with proteins. → SAMs protect the nanoelectrodes from undesired proteins adsorption. - Abstract: The possibility to functionalize selectively with thiols or disulfides the surface of the gold nanoelectrodes of polycarbonate templated nanoelectrode ensembles (NEEs) is studied. It is shown that the Au nanoelectrodes can be coated by a self assembled monolayer (SAM) of thioctic acid (TA) or 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic (MES) acid. The study of the electrochemical behavior of SAM-modified NEEs by cyclic voltammetry (CV) at different solution pH, using ferrocenecarboxylate as an anionic redox probe (FcCOO - ) and (ferrocenylmethyl)trimethylammonium (FA + ) as a cationic redox probe, demonstrate that the SAM-modified nanoelectrodes are permselective, in that only cationic or neutral probes can access the SAM-coated nanoelectrode surface. CV, AFM and FTIR-ATR data indicate that proteins such as casein or bovine serum albumin, which are polyanionic at pH 7, adsorb on the surface of NEEs untreated with thiols, tending to block the electron transfer of the ferrocenyl redox probes. On the contrary, the pre-treatment of the NEE with an anionic SAM protects the nanoelectrodes from protein fouling, allowing the detection of well shaped voltammetric patterns for the redox probe. Experimental results indicate that, in the case of MES treated NEEs, the protein is bound only onto the polycarbonate surface which surrounds the nanoelectrodes, while the tips of the gold nanoelectrodes remain protein free.

  6. Modification of nanoelectrode ensembles by thiols and disulfides to prevent non specific adsorption of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvestrini, M. [Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, University Ca' Foscari of Venice, Santa Marta 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Schiavuta, P.; Scopece, P. [Associazione CIVEN, via delle Industrie 5, 30175 Marghera - Venice (Italy); Pecchielan, G.; Moretto, L.M. [Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, University Ca' Foscari of Venice, Santa Marta 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Ugo, P., E-mail: ugo@unive.it [Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, University Ca' Foscari of Venice, Santa Marta 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy)

    2011-09-01

    Highlights: > Complex nanostructures are built on the gold surface of ensembles of nanoelectrodes. > Gold surface of nanoelectrodes was functionalized with SAM of organic sulphurs. > The polycarbonate surrounding nanoelectrodes was functionalized with proteins. > SAMs protect the nanoelectrodes from undesired proteins adsorption. - Abstract: The possibility to functionalize selectively with thiols or disulfides the surface of the gold nanoelectrodes of polycarbonate templated nanoelectrode ensembles (NEEs) is studied. It is shown that the Au nanoelectrodes can be coated by a self assembled monolayer (SAM) of thioctic acid (TA) or 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic (MES) acid. The study of the electrochemical behavior of SAM-modified NEEs by cyclic voltammetry (CV) at different solution pH, using ferrocenecarboxylate as an anionic redox probe (FcCOO{sup -}) and (ferrocenylmethyl)trimethylammonium (FA{sup +}) as a cationic redox probe, demonstrate that the SAM-modified nanoelectrodes are permselective, in that only cationic or neutral probes can access the SAM-coated nanoelectrode surface. CV, AFM and FTIR-ATR data indicate that proteins such as casein or bovine serum albumin, which are polyanionic at pH 7, adsorb on the surface of NEEs untreated with thiols, tending to block the electron transfer of the ferrocenyl redox probes. On the contrary, the pre-treatment of the NEE with an anionic SAM protects the nanoelectrodes from protein fouling, allowing the detection of well shaped voltammetric patterns for the redox probe. Experimental results indicate that, in the case of MES treated NEEs, the protein is bound only onto the polycarbonate surface which surrounds the nanoelectrodes, while the tips of the gold nanoelectrodes remain protein free.

  7. Posttranslational modifications, localization, and protein interactions of optineurin, the product of a glaucoma gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Ying

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glaucoma is a major blinding disease. The most common form of this disease, primary open angle glaucoma (POAG, is genetically heterogeneous. One of the candidate genes, optineurin, is linked principally to normal tension glaucoma, a subtype of POAG. The present study was undertaken to illustrate the basic characteristics of optineurin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Lysates from rat retinal ganglion RGC5 cells were subjected to N- or O-deglycosylation or membrane protein extraction. The phosphorylation status was evaluated after immunoprecipitation. It was found that while phosphorylated, optineurin was neither N- nor O-glycosylated, and was by itself not a membrane protein. RGC5 and human retinal pigment epithelial cells were double stained with anti-optineurin and anti-GM130. The endogenous optineurin exhibited a diffuse, cytoplasmic distribution, but a population of the protein was associated with the Golgi apparatus. Turnover experiments showed that the endogenous optineurin was relatively short-lived, with a half-life of approximately 8 hours. Native blue gel electrophoresis revealed that the endogenous optineurin formed homohexamers. Optineurin also interacted with molecules including Rab8, myosin VI, and transferrin receptor to assemble into supermolecular complexes. When overexpressed, optineurin-green fluorescence protein (GFP fusion protein formed punctate structures termed "foci" in the perinuclear region. Treatment of nocadazole resulted in dispersion of the optineurin foci. In addition, tetracycline-regulated optineurin-GFPs expressing RGC5 stable cell lines were established for the first time. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study provides new information regarding basic characteristics of optineurin that are important for future efforts in defining precisely how optineurin functions normally and how mutations may result in pathology. The inducible optineurin-GFP-expressing cell lines are also anticipated to

  8. Isoenergic modification of whey protein structure by denaturation and crosslinking using transglutaminase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Emil G. P.; Koutina, Glykeria; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2018-01-01

    Transglutaminase (TG) catalyzes formation of covalent bonds between lysine and glutamine side chains and has applications in manipulation of food structure. Physical properties of a whey protein mixture (SPC) denatured either at elevated pH or by heat-treatment and followed by TG catalyzed......, thus heating caused the largest exposure of the hydrophobic core of SPC proteins, which was decreased by crosslinking. The particle size of the treated SPC samples increased upon crosslinking by TG. Moreover, the particle morphology depended on the type of denaturing treatment, thus heat-treated SPC...

  9. ChIP-seq Data Processing for PcG Proteins and Associated Histone Modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanovic, Ozren; van Heeringen, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin Immunoprecipitation followed by massively parallel DNA sequencing (ChIP-sequencing) has emerged as an essential technique to study the genome-wide location of DNA- or chromatin-associated proteins, such as the Polycomb group (PcG) proteins. After being generated by the sequencer, raw ChIP-seq sequence reads need to be processed by a data analysis pipeline. Here we describe the computational steps required to process PcG ChIP-seq data, including alignment, peak calling, and downstream analysis.

  10. Extraction and Characterization of Extracellular Proteins and Their Post-Translational Modifications from Arabidopsis thaliana Suspension Cell Cultures and Seedlings: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Ghahremani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Proteins secreted by plant cells into the extracellular space, consisting of the cell wall, apoplastic fluid, and rhizosphere, play crucial roles during development, nutrient acquisition, and stress acclimation. However, isolating the full range of secreted proteins has proven difficult, and new strategies are constantly evolving to increase the number of proteins that can be detected and identified. In addition, the dynamic nature of the extracellular proteome presents the further challenge of identifying and characterizing the post-translational modifications (PTMs of secreted proteins, particularly glycosylation and phosphorylation. Such PTMs are common and important regulatory modifications of proteins, playing a key role in many biological processes. This review explores the most recent methods in isolating and characterizing the plant extracellular proteome with a focus on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, highlighting the current challenges yet to be overcome. Moreover, the crucial role of protein PTMs in cell wall signalling, development, and plant responses to biotic and abiotic stress is discussed.

  11. Tandem affinity purification of histones, coupled to mass spectrometry, identifies associated proteins and new sites of post-translational modification in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, M Luz; Sendra, Ramon; Pamblanco, Mercè

    2016-03-16

    Histones and their post-translational modifications contribute to regulating fundamental biological processes in all eukaryotic cells. We have applied a conventional tandem affinity purification strategy to histones H3 and H4 of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mass spectrometry analysis of the co-purified proteins revealed multiple associated proteins, including core histones, which indicates that tagged histones may be incorporated to the nucleosome particle. Among the many other co-isolated proteins there are histone chaperones, elements of chromatin remodeling, of nucleosome assembly/disassembly, and of histone modification complexes. The histone chaperone Rtt106p, two members of chromatin assembly FACT complex and Psh1p, an ubiquitin ligase, were the most abundant proteins obtained with both H3-TAP and H4-TAP, regardless of the cell extraction medium stringency. Our mass spectrometry analyses have also revealed numerous novel post-translational modifications, including 30 new chemical modifications in histones, mainly by ubiquitination. We have discovered not only new sites of ubiquitination but that, besides lysine, also serine and threonine residues are targets of ubiquitination on yeast histones. Our results show the standard tandem affinity purification procedure is suitable for application to yeast histones, in order to isolate and characterize histone-binding proteins and post-translational modifications, avoiding the bias caused by histone purification from a chromatin-enriched fraction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Biophysical analysis of the effect of chemical modification by 4-oxononenal on the structure, stability, and function of binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinen D Shah

    Full Text Available Binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP is a molecular chaperone important for the folding of numerous proteins, which include millions of immunoglobulins in human body. It also plays a key role in the unfolded protein response (UPR in the endoplasmic reticulum. Free radical generation is a common phenomenon that occurs in cells under healthy as well as under stress conditions such as ageing, inflammation, alcohol consumption, and smoking. These free radicals attack the cell membranes and generate highly reactive lipid peroxidation products such as 4-oxononenal (4-ONE. BiP is a key protein that is modified by 4-ONE. In this study, we probed how such chemical modification affects the biophysical properties of BiP. Upon modification, BiP shows significant tertiary structural changes with no changes in its secondary structure. The protein loses its thermodynamic stability, particularly, that of the nucleotide binding domain (NBD where ATP binds. In terms of function, the modified BiP completely loses its ATPase activity with decreased ATP binding affinity. However, modified BiP retains its immunoglobulin binding function and its chaperone activity of suppressing non-specific protein aggregation. These results indicate that 4-ONE modification can significantly affect the structure-function of key proteins such as BiP involved in cellular pathways, and provide a molecular basis for how chemical modifications can result in the failure of quality control mechanisms inside the cell.

  13. Exploiting the MDM2-CK1α Protein-Protein Interface to Develop Novel Biologics That Induce UBL-Kinase-Modification and Inhibit Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huart, Anne-Sophie; MacLaine, Nicola J.; Narayan, Vikram; Hupp, Ted R.

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions forming dominant signalling events are providing ever-growing platforms for the development of novel Biologic tools for controlling cell growth. Casein Kinase 1 α (CK1α) forms a genetic and physical interaction with the murine double minute chromosome 2 (MDM2) oncoprotein resulting in degradation of the p53 tumour suppressor. Pharmacological inhibition of CK1 increases p53 protein level and induces cell death, whilst small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of CK1α stabilizes p53 and induces growth arrest. We mapped the dominant protein-protein interface that stabilizes the MDM2 and CK1α complex in order to determine whether a peptide derived from the core CK1α-MDM2 interface form novel Biologics that can be used to probe the contribution of the CK1-MDM2 protein-protein interaction to p53 activation and cell viability. Overlapping peptides derived from CK1α were screened for dominant MDM2 binding sites using (i) ELISA with recombinant MDM2; (ii) cell lysate pull-down towards endogenous MDM2; (iii) MDM2-CK1α complex-based competition ELISA; and (iv) MDM2-mediated ubiquitination. One dominant peptide, peptide 35 was bioactive in all four assays and its transfection induced cell death/growth arrest in a p53-independent manner. Ectopic expression of flag-tagged peptide 35 induced a novel ubiquitin and NEDD8 modification of CK1α, providing one of the first examples whereby NEDDylation of a protein kinase can be induced. These data identify an MDM2 binding motif in CK1α which when isolated as a small peptide can (i) function as a dominant negative inhibitor of the CK1α-MDM2 interface, (ii) be used as a tool to study NEDDylation of CK1α, and (iii) reduce cell growth. Further, this approach provides a technological blueprint, complementing siRNA and chemical biology approaches, by exploiting protein-protein interactions in order to develop Biologics to manipulate novel types of signalling pathways such as cross-talk between

  14. Simple Protein Modification Using Zwitterionic Polymer to Mitigate the Bioactivity Loss of Conjugated Insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jinbing; Lu, Yang; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Hui; Wang, Zhigang; Cao, Zhiqiang

    2017-06-01

    Polymer-protein conjugation has been extensively explored toward a better protein drug with improved pharmacokinetics. However, a major problem with polymer-protein conjugation is that the polymers drastically reduce the bioactivity of the modified protein. There is no perfect solution to prevent the bioactivity loss, no matter the polymer is conjugated in a non-site specific way, or a more complex site-specific procedure. Here the authors report for the first time that when zwitterionic carboxybetaine polymer (PCB) is conjugated to insulin through simple conventional coupling chemistry. The resulting PCB-insulin does not show a significant reduction of in vitro bioactivity. The obtained PCB-insulin shows two significant advantages as a novel pharmaceutical agent. First, its therapeutic performance is remarkable. For PCB-insulin, there is a 24% increase of in vivo pharmacological activity of lowering blood glucose compared with native insulin. Such uncommonly seen increase has rarely been reported and is expected to be due to both the improved pharmacokinetics and retained bioactivity of PCB-insulin. Second, the production is simple from manufacturing standpoints. Conjugation procedure involves only one-step coupling reaction without complex site-specific linkage technique. The synthesized PCB-insulin conjugates do not require chromatographic separation to purify and obtain particular isoforms. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Beyond citrullination: other post-translational protein modifications in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trouw, Leendert A.; Rispens, Theo; Toes, Rene E. M.

    2017-01-01

    The presence of autoantibodies is one of the hallmarks of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the past few decades, rheumatoid factors (autoantibodies that recognize the Fc-tail of immunoglobulins) as well as anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) have been studied intensively. ACPAs recognize

  16. Covalent modification of cytoskeletal proteins in neuronal cells by tryptamine-4,5-dione

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoji Kato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin, 5-hydroxytryptamine, is a systemic bioactive amine that acts in the gut and brain. As a substrate of myeloperoxidase in vitro, serotonin is oxidized to tryptamine-4,5-dione (TD, which is highly reactive with thiols. In this work, we successively prepared a monoclonal antibody to quinone-modified proteins and found that the antibody preferentially recognizes the TD–thiol adduct. Using the antibody, we observed that the chloride ion, the predominant physiological substrate for myeloperoxidase in vivo, is not competitive toward the enzyme catalyzed serotonin oxidation process, suggesting that serotonin is a plausible physiological substrate for the enzyme in vivo. Immunocytochemical analyses revealed that TD staining was observed in the cytosol of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells while blot analyses showed that some cellular proteins were preferentially modified. Pull-down analyses confirmed that the cytoskeletal proteins tubulins, vimentin, and neurofilament-L were modified. When pure tubulins were exposed to micromolar levels of synthetic TD, self-polymerization was initially enhanced and then suppressed. These results suggest that serotonin oxidation by myeloperoxidase or the action of other oxidants could cause functional alteration of cellular proteins, which may be related to neurodegeneration processes or irritable bowel syndrome.

  17. Modification of local diets to improve vitamin A, iron and protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The created recipes based on locally available and affordable ingredients have a potential to meet RDAs of vitamin A, iron and protein for children aged 6 to 23 months in the banana-based system and other communities in Africa with the same settings. The communities need to establish home gardens so as to use ...

  18. DNA modifications by platinum antitumor drugs and its recognition by DNA-binding proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brabec, Viktor

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 271, Suppl. 1 (2004), s. 90 ISSN 0014-2956. [Meeting of the Federation of the European Biochemical Societies /29./. 26.06.2004-01.07.2004, Warsaw] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/02/1552 Keywords : platinum drugs * DNA-protein interaction * NF-kappaB Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  19. Charge modification of plasma and milk proteins results in antiviral active compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, P J; Harmsen, M C; Kuipers, M E; Van Dijk, A A; Van Der Strate, B W; Van Berkel, P H; Nuijens, J H; Smit, C; Witvrouw, M; De Clercq, E; de Béthune, M P; Pauwels, R; Meijer, D K

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that acylated plasma and milk proteins with increased negative charge, derived from various animal and human sources, are potent anti-HIV compounds. The antiviral effects seemed to correlate positively with the number of negative charges introduced into the various

  20. Glycoproteomic analysis of seven major allergenic proteins reveals novel post-translational modifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Adnan; Carlsson, Michael C; Mathiesen, Caroline Benedicte K

    2015-01-01

    characterization by bottom-up analysis. In addition, top-down mass spectrometry is utilized for targeted analysis of individual proteins, revealing hitherto unknown PTMs of HDM allergens. We demonstrate the presence of lysine-linked polyhexose glycans and asparagine-linked N-acetylhexosamine glycans on HDM...

  1. c-Yes regulates cell adhesion at the apical ectoplasmic specialization-blood-testis barrier axis via its effects on protein recruitment and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D.

    2013-01-01

    During spermatogenesis, extensive restructuring takes place at the cell-cell interface since developing germ cells migrate progressively from the basal to the adluminal compartment of the seminiferous epithelium. Since germ cells per se are not motile cells, their movement relies almost exclusively on the Sertoli cell. Nonetheless, extensive exchanges in signaling take place between these cells in the seminiferous epithelium. c-Yes, a nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase belonging to the Src family kinases (SFKs) and a crucial signaling protein, was recently shown to be upregulated at the Sertoli cell-cell interface at the blood-testis barrier (BTB) at stages VIII–IX of the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. It was also highly expressed at the Sertoli cell-spermatid interface known as apical ectoplasmic specialization (apical ES) at stage V to early stage VIII of the epithelial cycle during spermiogenesis. Herein, it was shown that the knockdown of c-Yes by RNAi in vitro and in vivo affected both Sertoli cell adhesion at the BTB and spermatid adhesion at the apical ES, causing a disruption of the Sertoli cell tight junction-permeability barrier function, germ cell loss from the seminiferous epithelium, and also a loss of spermatid polarity. These effects were shown to be mediated by changes in distribution and/or localization of adhesion proteins at the BTB (e.g., occludin, N-cadherin) and at the apical ES (e.g., nectin-3) and possibly the result of changes in the underlying actin filaments at the BTB and the apical ES. These findings implicate that c-Yes is a likely target of male contraceptive research. PMID:23169788

  2. Evaluation of C-Reactive Protein, Endothelin-1, Adhesion Molecule(s, and Lipids as Inflammatory Markers in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala El-Mesallamy

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared lipids, the product of lipid peroxidation malondialdehyde (MDA, the acute phase reactant high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP, endothelin-1 (ET-1, P-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 between healthy controls, subjects with ischemic heart disease (IHD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM subjects who did not perform coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery as well as type 2 DM subjects who performed CABG. HbA1c, lipids, MDA, hsCRP, ET-1, P-selectin, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 levels were significantly higher in the diabetic groups than in either healthy controls or IHD subjects. In the diabetic groups, there was a negative association among hsCRP and HDL-C. ET-1, ICAM-1 levels and TAG were positively correlated, as do the association between P-selectin, VCAM-1 and HbA1c%. Also a positive relation was found among hsCRP levels and ICAM-1, as well as MDA and ET-1. P-selectin and ICAM-1 were significantly positively correlated. This study indicates that increased level of oxidative stress marker, proinflammatory markers and their downstream effectors adhesion molecules occurs in type 2 DM.

  3. Baicalein suppresses 17-β-estradiol-induced migration, adhesion and invasion of breast cancer cells via the G protein-coupled receptor 30 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Dandan; Li, Zheng; Zhu, Zhuxia; Chen, Huamei; Zhao, Lujun; Wang, Xudong; Chen, Yan

    2015-04-01

    Flavonoids are structurally similar to steroid hormones, particularly estrogens, and therefore have been studied for their potential effects on hormone-dependent cancers. Baicalein is the primary flavonoid derived from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi. In the present study, we investigated the effects of baicalein on 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced migration, adhesion and invasion of MCF-7 and SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells. The results demonstrated that baicalein suppressed E2-stimulated wound-healing migration and cell‑Matrigel adhesion, and ameliorated E2-promoted invasion across a Matrigel-coated Transwell membrane. Furthermore, baicalein interfered with E2-induced novel G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30)-related signaling, including a decrease in tyrosine phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as well as phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and serine/threonine kinase Akt, without affecting GPR30 expression. The results also showed that baicalein suppressed the expression of GPR30 target genes, cysteine-rich 61 (CYR61) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) induced by E2. Furthermore, baicalein prevented GPR30-related signaling activation and upregulation of CYR61 and CTGF mRNA levels induced by G1, a specific GPR 30 agonist. The results suggest that baicalein inhibits E2-induced migration, adhesion and invasion through interfering with GPR30 signaling pathway activation, which indicates that it may act as a therapeutic candidate for the treatment of GPR30-positive breast cancer metastasis.

  4. The focal adhesion-associated proteins DOCK5 and GIT2 comprise a rheostat in control of epithelial invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, Scott R; Köllmann, C P; van Lidth de Jeude, J F

    2017-01-01

    protrusions and nascent cell-substratum adhesions. We further demonstrate that GIT2 inhibits the interaction of DOCK5 with Crk. Moreover, we show that depletion of GIT2 promotes DOCK5-dependent activation of the Crk-p130Cas signaling cascade to promote Rac1-mediated lamellipodial protrusion and FA turnover...

  5. Caenorhabditis elegans UNC-98, a C2H2 Zn finger protein, is a novel partner of UNC-97/PINCH in muscle adhesion complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Kristina B; Flaherty, Denise B; Miller, Rachel K; Qadota, Hiroshi; Tinley, Tina L; Moerman, Donald G; Benian, Guy M

    2003-06-01

    To further understand the assembly and maintenance of the muscle contractile apparatus, we have identified a new protein, UNC-98, in the muscle of Caenorhabditis elegans. unc-98 mutants display reduced motility and a characteristic defect in muscle structure. We show that the major defect in the mutant muscle is in the M-lines and dense bodies (Z-line analogs). Both functionally and compositionally, nematode M-lines and dense bodies are analogous to focal adhesions of nonmuscle cells. UNC-98 is a novel 310-residue polypeptide consisting of four C2H2 Zn fingers and several possible nuclear localization signal and nuclear export signal sequences. By use of UNC-98 antibodies and green fluorescent protein fusions (to full-length UNC-98 and UNC-98 fragments), we have shown that UNC-98 resides at M-lines, muscle cell nuclei, and possibly at dense bodies. Furthermore, we demonstrated that 1) the N-terminal 106 amino acids are both necessary and sufficient for nuclear localization, and 2) the C-terminal (fourth) Zn finger is required for localization to M-lines and dense bodies. UNC-98 interacts with UNC-97, a C. elegans homolog of PINCH. We propose that UNC-98 is both a structural component of muscle focal adhesions and a nuclear protein that influences gene expression.

  6. Post-translational modification directs nuclear and hyphal tip localization of Candida albicans mRNA-binding protein Slr1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyachet, Chaiyaboot; Beißel, Christian; Li, Xiang; Lorrey, Selena; Mackenzie, Olivia; Martin, Patrick M; O'Brien, Katharine; Pholcharee, Tossapol; Sim, Sue; Krebber, Heike; McBride, Anne E

    2017-05-01

    The morphological transition of the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans from budding to hyphal growth has been implicated in its ability to cause disease in animal models. Absence of SR-like RNA-binding protein Slr1 slows hyphal formation and decreases virulence in a systemic candidiasis model, suggesting a role for post-transcriptional regulation in these processes. SR (serine-arginine)-rich proteins influence multiple steps in mRNA metabolism and their localization and function are frequently controlled by modification. We now demonstrate that Slr1 binds to polyadenylated RNA and that its intracellular localization is modulated by phosphorylation and methylation. Wildtype Slr1-GFP is predominantly nuclear, but also co-fractionates with translating ribosomes. The non-phosphorylatable slr1-6SA-GFP protein, in which six serines in SR/RS clusters are substituted with alanines, primarily localizes to the cytoplasm in budding cells. Intriguingly, hyphal cells display a slr1-6SA-GFP focus at the tip near the Spitzenkörper, a vesicular structure involved in molecular trafficking to the tip. The presence of slr1-6SA-GFP hyphal tip foci is reduced in the absence of the mRNA-transport protein She3, suggesting that unphosphorylated Slr1 associates with mRNA-protein complexes transported to the tip. The impact of SLR1 deletion on hyphal formation and function thus may be partially due to a role in hyphal mRNA transport. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Lebesgue

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc versus the non-adhesive part (the stem, and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue. This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article “Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach” (Lebesgue et al., 2016 [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold, likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives.

  8. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    2016-06-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article "Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach" (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives.

  9. Contribution of High-Pressure-Induced Protein Modifications to the Microenvironment and Functional Properties of Rabbit Meat Sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Siwen; Yu, Xiaobo; Yang, Huijuan; Xu, Xinglian; Ma, Hanjun; Zhou, Guanghong

    2017-06-01

    Rabbit meat batters were subjected to high pressure (HP, 100 to 300 MPa for 3, 9, or 15 min) to elucidate their effects on proteins structures, the microenvironment, and the resulting functionalities of the subsequently heated products. To determine these effects, we investigated structural and microenvironmental changes using Raman spectroscopy and also expressible moisture content, textural characteristics, and dynamic rheological properties of batters during heating (20 to 80 °C). Untreated samples served as controls. Analysis of specific Raman spectral regions demonstrated that applications of HP to rabbit meat batters tended to induce the transformation of the all-gauche S-S conformation to gauche-gauche-trans in the batter system. HP treatment higher than 100 MPa for 9 min promoted secondary structural rearrangements, and molecular polarity enhancement in the proteins prior to cooking. Also, increases of O-H stretching intensities of rabbit meat sausages were obtained by HP treatment, denoting the strengthening of water-holding capacity. These HP-induced alterations resulted in improved texture and, perhaps, improved juiciness of rabbit meat sausages (P < 0.05), however they had relatively poorer rheological properties than the controls. Nevertheless, HP treatment, especially 200 MPa for 9 or 15 min, was an effective technique for improving the functionalities of gel-type products through modification of meat proteins. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  10. Post-translational modifications of plant cell wall proteins and peptides: A survey from a proteomics point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canut, Hervé; Albenne, Cécile; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2016-08-01

    Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs) and peptides are important players in cell walls contributing to their assembly and their remodeling during development and in response to environmental constraints. Since the rise of proteomics technologies at the beginning of the 2000's, the knowledge of CWPs has greatly increased leading to the discovery of new CWP families and to the description of the cell wall proteomes of different organs of many plants. Conversely, cell wall peptidomics data are still lacking. In addition to the identification of CWPs and peptides by mass spectrometry (MS) and bioinformatics, proteomics has allowed to describe their post-translational modifications (PTMs). At present, the best known PTMs consist in proteolytic cleavage, N-glycosylation, hydroxylation of P residues into hydroxyproline residues (O), O-glycosylation and glypiation. In this review, the methods allowing the capture of the modified proteins based on the specific properties of their PTMs as well as the MS technologies used for their characterization are briefly described. A focus is done on proteolytic cleavage leading to protein maturation or release of signaling peptides and on O-glycosylation. Some new technologies, like top-down proteomics and terminomics, are described. They aim at a finer description of proteoforms resulting from PTMs or degradation mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics--a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. M13 bacteriophage display framework that allows sortase-mediated modification of surface-accessible phage proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Gaelen T; Cragnolini, Juan J; Popp, Maximilian W; Allen, Mark A; Dougan, Stephanie K; Spooner, Eric; Ploegh, Hidde L; Belcher, Angela M; Guimaraes, Carla P

    2012-07-18

    We exploit bacterial sortases to attach a variety of moieties to the capsid proteins of M13 bacteriophage. We show that pIII, pIX, and pVIII can be functionalized with entities ranging from small molecules (e.g., fluorophores, biotin) to correctly folded proteins (e.g., GFP, antibodies, streptavidin) in a site-specific manner, and with yields that surpass those of any reported using phage display technology. A case in point is modification of pVIII. While a phage vector limits the size of the insert into pVIII to a few amino acids, a phagemid system limits the number of copies actually displayed at the surface of M13. Using sortase-based reactions, a 100-fold increase in the efficiency of display of GFP onto pVIII is achieved. Taking advantage of orthogonal sortases, we can simultaneously target two distinct capsid proteins in the same phage particle and maintain excellent specificity of labeling. As demonstrated in this work, this is a simple and effective method for creating a variety of structures, thus expanding the use of M13 for materials science applications and as a biological tool.

  12. Protein Modification with Amphiphilic Block Copoly(2-oxazoline)s as a New Platform for Enhanced Cellular Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Tong, Jing

    2010-08-02

    Several homopolymers, random copolymers and block copolymers based on poly(2-oxazoline)s (POx) were synthesized and conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) using biodegradable and nonbiodegradable linkers. These conjugates were characterized by amino group titration, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), isoelectric focusing, enzymatic activity assay and conformation analysis. The conjugates contained on average from about one to two polymer chains per enzyme. From 70% to 90% of enzymatic activity was retained in most cases. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis revealed that HRP modification affected the secondary structure of the apoprotein but did not affect the tertiary structure and heme environment. Enhanced cellular uptake was found in the conjugates of two block copolymers using both MDCK cells and Caco-2 cells, but not in the conjugates of random copolymer and homopolymer. Conjugation with a block copolymer of 2-methyl-2-oxazoline and 2-butyl-2-oxazoline led to the highest cellular uptake as compared to other conjugates. Our data indicates that modification with amphiphilic POx has the potential to modulate and enhance cellular delivery of proteins.

  13. Allenamides as orthogonal handles for selective modification of cysteine in peptides and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ata; Xing, Bengang; Loh, Teck-Peng

    2014-07-14

    In this study, a remarkably simple and direct strategy has been successfully developed to selectively label target cysteine residues in fully unprotected peptides and proteins. The strategy is based on the reaction between allenamides and the cysteine thiol, and proceeds swiftly in aqueous medium with excellent selectivity and quantitative conversion, thus forming a stable and irreversible conjugate. The combined simplicity and mildness of the process project allenamide as robust and versatile handles to target cysteines and has potential use in biological systems. Additionally, fluorescent-labeling studies demonstrated that the installation of a C-terminal allenamide moiety onto various molecules of interest may supply a new methodology towards the site-specific labeling of cysteine-containing proteins. Such a new labeling strategy may thus open a window for its application in the field of life sciences. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Oxidative modifications, mitochondrial dysfunction, and impaired protein degradation in Parkinson's disease: how neurons are lost in the Bermuda triangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkus, Kristen A; Tsika, Elpida; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2009-06-05

    While numerous hypotheses have been proposed to explain the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, the theory of oxidative stress has received considerable support. Although many correlations have been established and encouraging evidence has been obtained, conclusive proof of causation for the oxidative stress hypothesis is lacking and potential cures have not emerged. Therefore it is likely that other factors, possibly in coordination with oxidative stress, contribute to neuron death. Using Parkinson's disease (PD) as the paradigm, this review explores the hypothesis that oxidative modifications, mitochondrial functional disruption, and impairment of protein degradation constitute three interrelated molecular pathways that execute neuron death. These intertwined events are the consequence of environmental exposure, genetic factors, and endogenous risks and constitute a "Bermuda triangle" that may be considered the underlying cause of neurodegenerative pathogenesis.

  15. Oxidative modifications, mitochondrial dysfunction, and impaired