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Sample records for adhesion dynamics determines

  1. Determination of Water Diffusion Coefficients and Dynamics in Adhesive/ Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Resin Composite Joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chao; WANG Zhi; WANG Jing; SU Tao

    2007-01-01

    To determinate the water diffusion coefficients and dynamics in adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis(EDX) is used to establish the content change of oxygen in the adhesive in adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints. As water is made up of oxygen and hydrogen, the water diffusion coefficients and dynamics in adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints can be obtained from the change in the content of oxygen in the adhesive during humidity aging, via EDX analysis. The authors have calculated the water diffusion coefficients and dynamics in the adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints with the aid of both energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The determined results with EDX analysis are almost the same as those determined with elemental analysis and the results also show that the durability of the adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints subjected to silane coupling agent treatment is better than those subjected to sand paper burnishing treatment and chemical oxidation treatment.

  2. Coupling of cytoplasm and adhesion dynamics determines cell polarization and locomotion

    CERN Document Server

    Bock, Martin; Möhl, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Observations of single epidermal cells on flat adhesive substrates have revealed two distinct morphological and functional states, namely a non-migrating symmetric unpolarized state and a migrating asymmetric polarized state. These states are characterized by different spatial distributions and dynamics of important biochemical cell components: F-actin and myosin-II form the contractile part of the cytoskeleton, and integrin receptors in the plasma membrane connect F-actin filaments to the substratum. In this way, focal adhesion complexes are assembled, which determine cytoskeletal force transduction and subsequent cell locomotion. So far, physical models have reduced this phenomenon either to gradients in regulatory control molecules or to different mechanics of the actin filament system in different regions of the cell. Here we offer an alternative and self-organizational model incorporating polymerization, pushing and sliding of filaments, as well as formation of adhesion sites and their force dependent ki...

  3. Adhesion Dynamics in Probing Micro- and Nanoscale Thin Solid Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling He

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on modeling the probe dynamics in scratching and indenting thin solid films at micro- and nanoscales. The model identifies bifurcation conditions that define the stick-slip oscillation patterns of the tip. It is found that the local energy fluctuations as a function of the inelastic deformation, defect formation, material properties, and contact parameters determine the oscillation behavior. The transient variation of the localized function makes the response nonlinear at the adhesion junction. By quantifying the relation between the bifurcation parameters and the oscillation behavior, this model gives a realistic representation of the complex adhesion dynamics. Specifically, the model establishes the link between the stick-slip behavior and the inelastic deformation and the local potentials. This model justifies the experimental observations and the molecular dynamics simulation of the adhesion and friction dynamics in both the micro- and nanoscale contact.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Adhesion at Epoxy Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.; Clancy, Thomas C.; Hinkley, J. A.; Gates. T. S.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of moisture on adhesives used in aerospace applications can be modeled with chemically specific techniques such as molecular dynamics simulation. In the present study, the surface energy and work of adhesion are calculated for epoxy surfaces and interfaces, respectively, by using molecular dynamics simulation. Modifications are made to current theory to calculate the work of adhesion at the epoxy-epoxy interface with and without water. Quantitative agreement with experimental values is obtained for the surface energy and work of adhesion at the interface without water. The work of adhesion agrees qualitatively with the experimental values for the interface with water: the magnitude is reduced 15% with respect to the value for the interface without water. A variation of 26% in the magnitude is observed depending on the water configuration at a concentration of 1.6 wt%. The methods and modifications to the method that are employed to obtain these values are expected to be applicable for other epoxy adhesives to determine the effects of moisture uptake on their work of adhesion.

  5. Nonlinear adhesion dynamics of confined lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Tung; Le Goff, Thomas; Pierre-Louis, Olivier

    Lipid membranes, which are ubiquitous objects in biological environments are often confined. For example, they can be sandwiched between a substrate and the cytoskeleton between cell adhesion, or between other membranes in stacks, or in the Golgi apparatus. We present a study of the nonlinear dynamics of membranes in a model system, where the membrane is confined between two flat walls. The dynamics derived from the lubrication approximation is highly nonlinear and nonlocal. The solution of this model in one dimension exhibits frozen states due to oscillatory interactions between membranes caused by the bending rigidity. We develope a kink model for these phenomena based on the historical work of Kawasaki and Otha. In two dimensions, the dynamics is more complex, and depends strongly on the amount of excess area in the system. We discuss the relevance of our findings for experiments on model membranes, and for biological systems. Supported by the grand ANR Biolub.

  6. Mechanosensitivity and compositional dynamics of cell–matrix adhesions

    OpenAIRE

    Schiller, Herbert B.; Fässler, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the compositional dynamics of cell–matrix adhesions and discusses the most prevalent functional domains in adhesome proteins. It also reviews the current literature and concepts about mechanosensing mechanisms that operate at the adhesion site.

  7. Understanding dynamic changes in live cell adhesion with neutron reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghans, Ann

    Understanding the structure and functionality of biological systems on a nanometer-resolution and short temporal scales is important for solving complex biological problems, developing innovative treatment, and advancing the design of highly functionalized biomimetic materials. For example, adhesion of cells to an underlying substrate plays a crucial role in physiology and disease development, and has been investigated with great interest for several decades. In the talk, we would like to highlight recent advances in utilizing neutron scattering to study bio-related structures in dynamic conditions (e . g . under the shear flow) including in-situ investigations of the interfacial properties of living cells. The strength of neutron reflectometry is its non-pertubative nature, the ability to probe buried interfaces with nanometer resolution and its sensitivity to light elements like hydrogen and carbon. That allows us to study details of cell - substrate interfaces that are not accessible with any other standard techniques. We studied the adhesion of human brain tumor cells (U251) to quartz substrates and their responses to the external mechanical forces. Such cells are isolated within the central nervous system which makes them difficult to reach with conventional therapies and therefore making them highly invasive. Our results reveal changes in the thickness and composition of the adhesion layer (a layer between the cell lipid membrane and the quartz substrate), largely composed of hyaluronic acid and associated proteoglycans, when the cells were subjected to shear stress. Further studies will allow us to determine more conditions triggering changes in the composition of the bio-material in the adhesion layer. This, in turn, can help to identify changes that correlate with tumor invasiveness, which can have significant medical impact for the development of targeted anti-invasive therapies.

  8. INITIAL MICROBIAL ADHESION IS A DETERMINANT FOR THE STRENGTH OF BIOFILM ADHESION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUSSCHER, HJ; VANDERMEI, HC; Bos, R.R.M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a hypothesis on the importance of initial microbial adhesion in the overall process of biofilm formation. The hypothesis is based on the realization that dynamic shear conditions exist in many environments, such as in the oral cavity, or on rocks and ship hulls. Recognizing that

  9. The capillary adhesion technique: a versatile method for determining the liquid adhesion force and sample stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gandyra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel, practical technique for the concerted, simultaneous determination of both the adhesion force of a small structure or structural unit (e.g., an individual filament, hair, micromechanical component or microsensor to a liquid and its elastic properties. The method involves the creation and development of a liquid meniscus upon touching a liquid surface with the structure, and the subsequent disruption of this liquid meniscus upon removal. The evaluation of the meniscus shape immediately before snap-off of the meniscus allows the quantitative determination of the liquid adhesion force. Concurrently, by measuring and evaluating the deformation of the structure under investigation, its elastic properties can be determined. The sensitivity of the method is remarkably high, practically limited by the resolution of the camera capturing the process. Adhesion forces down to 10 µN and spring constants up to 2 N/m were measured. Three exemplary applications of this method are demonstrated: (1 determination of the water adhesion force and the elasticity of individual hairs (trichomes of the floating fern Salvinia molesta. (2 The investigation of human head hairs both with and without functional surface coatings (a topic of high relevance in the field of hair cosmetics was performed. The method also resulted in the measurement of an elastic modulus (Young’s modulus for individual hairs of 3.0 × 105 N/cm2, which is within the typical range known for human hair. (3 Finally, the accuracy and validity of the capillary adhesion technique was proven by examining calibrated atomic force microscopy cantilevers, reproducing the spring constants calibrated using other methods.

  10. Dynamic monitoring of changes in endothelial cell-substrate adhesiveness during leukocyte adhesion by microelectrical impedance assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yakun Ge; Tongle Deng; Xiaoxiang Zheng

    2009-01-01

    Adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells in inflammation processes leads to changes of endothelial cell-substrate adhesiveness, and understanding of such changes will provide us with important information of inflammation processes. In this study, we used a non-invasive biosensor system referred to as real-time cell electronic sensor (RT-CES) system to monitor the changes in endothelial cell-substrate adhesiveness induced by human monoblastic cell line U937 cell adhesion in a dynamic and quantitative manner. This assay, which is based on cell-substrate impedance readout, is able to monitor transient changes in cell-substrate adhesiveness as a result of U937 cell adhesion. The U937 cell adhesion to endothelial cells was induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in a dose-dependent manner. Although the number of adherent U937 cells to the endothelial cells was verified by a standard assay, the adhesiveness of endothelial cells after addition of U937 cells was monitored by the RT-CES system. Furthermore, focal adhesion kinase protein decrease and F-actin rearrangement in endothelial cells were observed after addition of U937 cells. Our results indicated that the adhesion of U937 cells to LPS-treated endothelial cells reduced the cell adhesiveness to the substrate, and such reduction might facilitate infiltration of leukocytes.

  11. Accurate Method for Determining Adhesion of Cantilever Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalske, T.A.; de Boer, M.P.

    1999-01-08

    Using surface micromachined samples, we demonstrate the accurate measurement of cantilever beam adhesion by using test structures which are adhered over long attachment lengths. We show that this configuration has a deep energy well, such that a fracture equilibrium is easily reached. When compared to the commonly used method of determining the shortest attached beam, the present method is much less sensitive to variations in surface topography or to details of capillary drying.

  12. Statics and dynamics of adhesion between two soap bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, S; Debrégeas, G

    2007-10-01

    An original set-up is used to study the adhesive properties of two hemispherical soap bubbles put into contact. The contact angle at the line connecting the three films is extracted by image analysis of the bubbles profiles. After the initial contact, the angle rapidly reaches a static value slightly larger than the standard 120 degrees angle expected from Plateau rule. This deviation is consistent with previous experimental and theoretical studies: it can be quantitatively predicted by taking into account the finite size of the Plateau border (the liquid volume trapped at the vertex) in the free energy minimization. The visco-elastic adhesion properties of the bubbles are further explored by measuring the deviation Delta theta (d)(t) of the contact angle from the static value as the distance between the two bubbles supports is sinusoidally modulated. It is found to linearly increase with Delta r(c) / r(c) , where r(c) is the radius of the central film and Delta r(c) the amplitude of modulation of this length induced by the displacement of the supports. The in-phase and out-of-phase components of Delta theta (d)(t) with the imposed modulation frequency are systematically probed, which reveals a transition from a viscous to an elastic response of the system with a crossover pulsation of the order 1rad x s(-1). Independent interfacial rheological measurements, obtained from an oscillating bubble experiment, allow us to develop a model of dynamic adhesion which is confronted to our experimental results. The relevance of such adhesive dynamic properties to the rheology of foams is briefly discussed using a perturbative approach to the Princen 2D model of foams.

  13. Analysis of Adhesive Characteristics of Asphalt Based on Atomic Force Microscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meng; Yi, Junyan; Feng, Decheng; Huang, Yudong; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-05-18

    Asphalt binder is a very important building material in infrastructure construction; it is commonly mixed with mineral aggregate and used to produce asphalt concrete. Owing to the large differences in physical and chemical properties between asphalt and aggregate, adhesive bonds play an important role in determining the performance of asphalt concrete. Although many types of adhesive bonding mechanisms have been proposed to explain the interaction forces between asphalt binder and mineral aggregate, few have been confirmed and characterized. In comparison with chemical interactions, physical adsorption has been considered to play a more important role in adhesive bonding between asphalt and mineral aggregate. In this study, the silicon tip of an atomic force microscope was used to represent silicate minerals in aggregate, and a nanoscale analysis of the characteristics of adhesive bonding between asphalt binder and the silicon tip was conducted via an atomic force microscopy (AFM) test and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results of the measurements and simulations could help in better understanding of the bonding and debonding procedures in asphalt-aggregate mixtures during hot mixing and under traffic loading. MD simulations on a single molecule of a component of asphalt and monocrystalline silicon demonstrate that molecules with a higher atomic density and planar structure, such as three types of asphaltene molecules, can provide greater adhesive strength. However, regarding the real components of asphalt binder, both the MD simulations and AFM test indicate that the colloidal structural behavior of asphalt also has a large influence on the adhesion behavior between asphalt and silicon. A schematic model of the interaction between asphalt and silicon is presented, which can explain the effect of aging on the adhesion behavior of asphalt.

  14. Influence of the work of adhesion on the dynamic wetting of chemically heterogeneous surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Santanu; Sedev, Rossen; Priest, Craig; Ralston, John

    2008-11-18

    The velocity dependence of the dynamic contact angle for a glycerol-water mixture wetting two different chemically heterogeneous surfaces (mixed thiols on gold and partially methylated titania, 16 samples in all) was studied. The molecular kinetic theory (MKT) of wetting was used to interpret the dynamic contact angle data. The equilibrium displacement frequency ( K 0) was predominantly determined by the viscous contribution from the bulk liquid, with a minor contribution from the surface. The mean distance between surface sites (lambda) decreased with increasing work of adhesion. The contact line friction coefficient zeta 0 was found to vary exponentially with the work of adhesion, enabling the unit flow volume of the liquid to be obtained.

  15. Stimuli-Responsive Reversible Two-Level Adhesion from a Structurally Dynamic Shape-Memory Polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michal, Brian T; Spencer, Emily J; Rowan, Stuart J

    2016-05-01

    A shape-memory adhesive has been prepared that exhibits two levels of reversible adhesion. The adhesive is a semicrystalline cross-linked polymer that contains dynamic disulfide bonds. Melting of the crystalline regions via heat causes a drop in the modulus of the material facilitating wetting of the substrate as well as enhancing the surface contact area with the substrate, which result in the formation of an adhesive bond. Exposure to higher heat or UV light results in dynamic exchange of the disulfide bonds, which yields a further drop in the modulus/viscosity that improves surface wetting/contact and strengthens the adhesive bond. This improvement in adhesion is shown to apply over different substrates, contact forces, and deformation modes. Furthermore, the adhesive acts as a thermal shape-memory material and can be used to create joints that can reposition themselves upon application of heat.

  16. Dynamic interplay between adhesive and lateral E-cadherin dimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Laur, Oscar Y; Troyanovsky, Regina B;

    2002-01-01

    M. The disappearance of adhesive dimers was counterbalanced by an increase in Trp156-dependent lateral dimers. Increasing the calcium concentration to a normal level rapidly restored the original balance between adhesive and lateral dimers. We also present evidence that E-cadherin dimers in vivo have a short lifetime...

  17. Triggering cell adhesion, migration or shape change with a dynamic surface coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Stijn F M; Maiuri, Paolo; Marie, Emmanuelle; Tribet, Christophe; Piel, Matthieu

    2013-03-25

    There's an APP for that: cell-repellent APP (azido-[polylysine-g-PEG]) is used to create substrates for spatially controlled dynamic cell adhesion. The simple addition of a functional peptide to the culture medium rapidly triggers cell adhesion. This highly accessible yet powerful technique allows diverse applications, demonstrated through tissue motility assays, patterned coculturing and triggered cell shape change.

  18. Adhesion of different Candida spp. to plastic: XTT formazan determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawser, S

    1996-01-01

    Adhesion of synchronized yeast-phase Candida cells to tissue culture plastic was investigated using the tetrazolium salt, XTT. The procedure permits the direct enumeration of adherent yeasts following the metabolic conversion of the XTT tetrazolium salt, to its reduced formazan form, by mitochondrial dehydrogenases. Using this procedure, the formation of XTT formazan by Candida cells was typically related to the inoculum size. The adhesion of Candida yeast-phase cells from different Candida spp. to plastic was of the following order: C. krusei (n = 5) > C. albicans (n = 10) > C. glabrata (n = 6). Furthermore, preliminary experiments with several other species indicated that C. tropicalis (n = 2) may adhere as well as C. albicans and that one strain each of C. guilliermondii and C. parapsilosis appear to adhere to plastic in a similar fashion to C. glabrata. The data indicate the utility of the XTT tetrazolium based assay in enumerating the adhesion of different Candida spp. to plastic.

  19. Dynamic cell adhesion and migration on nanoscale grooved substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, E; te Riet, J; Domanski, M; Luttge, R; Figdor, C G; Gardeniers, J G E; Walboomers, X F; Jansen, J A

    2012-01-01

    Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to initiate and increase cell locomotion and coverage with cells, and thus achieve an enhanced wound healing response around an implantable material. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate how MC3T3-E1 osteoblast initial adhesion and directional migration are influenced by nanogrooves with pitches ranging from 150 nm up to 1000 nm. In this study, we used a multi-patterned substrate with five different groove patterns and a smooth area with either a concentric or radial orientation. Initial cell adhesion measurements after 10 s were performed using atomic force spectroscopy-assisted single-cell force spectroscopy, and demonstrated that nascent cell adhesion was highly induced by a 600 nm pitch and reduced by a 150 nm pitch. Addition of RGD peptide significantly reduced adhesion, indicating that integrins and cell adhesive proteins (e.g. fibronectin or vitronectin) are key factors in specific cell adhesion on nanogrooved substrates. Also, cell migration was highly dependent on the groove pitch; the highest directional migration parallel to the grooves was observed on a 600 nm pitch, whereas a 150 nm pitch restrained directional cell migration. From this study, we conclude that grooves with a pitch of 600 nm may be favourable to enhance fast wound closure, thereby promoting tissue regeneration.

  20. Determination of adhesion forces between smooth and structured solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, H.R.; Gelinck, E.R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Surfaces tend to be made smoother in order to gain flatness or in order to fulfill the need for more precise and reproducible positioning of parts. Adhesion or even sticking of the surfaces is a major showstopper for these applications. There are several measures that can be taken in order to reduce

  1. Dynamic Response of Metal-Polymer Bilayers - Viscoelasticity, Adhesion and Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    stretch of two at a strain rate of 103 s_1 a pulse duration of 2 ms is required! Recently, Youssef and Gupta [8] have developed a laser ablation based...Dynamic Response of Metal -Polymer Bilayers and Failure Viscoelasticity, Adhesion Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER N00014-09-1-0541 5c...Contract Number N00014-09-1-0541 Title of Research Dynamic Response of Metal -Polymer Bilayers - Viscoelasticity, Adhesion and Failure Principal

  2. Dynamic cell adhesion and migration on nanoscale grooved substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Lamers

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to initiate and increase cell locomotion and coverage with cells, and thus achieve an enhanced wound healing response around an implantable material. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate how MC3T3-E1 osteoblast initial adhesion and directional migration are influenced by nanogrooves with pitches ranging from 150 nm up to 1000 nm. In this study, we used a multi-patterned substrate with five different groove patterns and a smooth area with either a concentric or radial orientation. Initial cell adhesion measurements after 10 s were performed using atomic force spectroscopy-assisted single-cell force spectroscopy, and demonstrated that nascent cell adhesion was highly induced by a 600 nm pitch and reduced by a 150 nm pitch. Addition of RGD peptide significantly reduced adhesion, indicating that integrins and cell adhesive proteins (e.g. fibronectin or vitronectin are key factors in specific cell adhesion on nanogrooved substrates. Also, cell migration was highly dependent on the groove pitch; the highest directional migration parallel to the grooves was observed on a 600 nm pitch, whereas a 150 nm pitch restrained directional cell migration. From this study, we conclude that grooves with a pitch of 600 nm may be favourable to enhance fast wound closure, thereby promoting tissue regeneration.

  3. The non-equilibrium thermodynamics and kinetics of focal adhesion dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph E Olberding

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We consider a focal adhesion to be made up of molecular complexes, each consisting of a ligand, an integrin molecule, and associated plaque proteins. Free energy changes drive the binding and unbinding of these complexes and thereby controls the focal adhesion's dynamic modes of growth, treadmilling and resorption. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have identified a competition among four thermodynamic driving forces for focal adhesion dynamics: (i the work done during the addition of a single molecular complex of a certain size, (ii the chemical free energy change associated with the addition of a molecular complex, (iii the elastic free energy change associated with deformation of focal adhesions and the cell membrane, and (iv the work done on a molecular conformational change. We have developed a theoretical treatment of focal adhesion dynamics as a nonlinear rate process governed by a classical kinetic model. We also express the rates as being driven by out-of-equilibrium thermodynamic driving forces, and modulated by kinetics. The mechanisms governed by the above four effects allow focal adhesions to exhibit a rich variety of behavior without the need to introduce special constitutive assumptions for their response. For the reaction-limited case growth, treadmilling and resorption are all predicted by a very simple chemo-mechanical model. Treadmilling requires symmetry breaking between the ends of the focal adhesion, and is achieved by driving force (i above. In contrast, depending on its numerical value (ii causes symmetric growth, resorption or is neutral, (iii causes symmetric resorption, and (iv causes symmetric growth. These findings hold for a range of conditions: temporally-constant force or stress, and for spatially-uniform and non-uniform stress distribution over the FA. The symmetric growth mode dominates for temporally-constant stress, with a reduced treadmilling regime. SIGNIFICANCE: In addition to explaining focal adhesion

  4. Dynamic Cell Adhesion and Migration on Nanoscale Grooved Substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, E.; Riet, te J.; Domanski, M.; Luttge, R.; Figdor, C.G.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to init

  5. Dynamic cell adhesion and migration on nanoscale grooved substrates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, E.; Riet, J. te; Domanski, M.; Luttge, R.; Figdor, C.G.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to init

  6. Discrete Particle Dynamics Simulations of Adhesive Systems with Thermostatting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Flint; Lechman, Jeremy; Hewson, John

    2012-02-01

    Aggregation/coagulation/flocculation processes are ubiquitous in modern industry from fields as diverse as waste water treatment, the food industry, algae biofuel production, and materials processing where control of the size and morphology of aggregates is paramount to the application of interest. Population balance models have historically been used with success in predicting aggregation kinetics and size distributions for these processes. However, even the most robust population balance schemes can lack an exact description of the underlying physical processes governing attractive or adhesive particulate matter suspended in a background medium, including finite aggregate strength and yield stress, restructuring length and time scales, and response to hydrodynamic forces. In order to elucidate these phenomena, We develop and use a JKR type model for simulating adhesive particulate matter in a background medium varying from dilute gas to liquid. We evaluate the time and length scales for restructuring/fragmentation that result from this model as a function of aggregate size and fractal dimension. We additionally introduce a method for pairwise thermostatting of the adhesive potential and discuss the applicability of this model to various adhesive systems.

  7. The Effect of Water on the Work of Adhesion at Epoxy Interfaces by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkley, J.A.; Frankland, S.J.V.; Clancy, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation can be used to explore the detailed effects of chemistry on properties of materials. In this paper, two different epoxies found in aerospace resins are modeled using molecular dynamics. The first material, an amine-cured tetrafunctional epoxy, represents a composite matrix resin, while the second represents a 177 C-cured adhesive. Surface energies are derived for both epoxies and the work of adhesion values calculated for the epoxy/epoxy interfaces agree with experiment. Adding water -- to simulate the effect of moisture exposure -- reduced the work of adhesion in one case, and increased it in the other. To explore the difference, the various energy terms that make up the net work of adhesion were compared and the location of the added water was examined.

  8. The Molecular Architecture of Cell Adhesion: Dynamic Remodeling Revealed by Videonanoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnauld eSergé

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The plasma membrane delimits the cell, which is the basic unit of living organisms, and is also a privileged site for cell communication with the environment. Cell adhesion can occur through cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts. Adhesion proteins such as integrins and cadherins also constitute receptors for inside-out and outside-in signaling within proteolipidic platforms. Adhesion molecule targeting and stabilization relies on specific features such as preferential segregation by the sub-membrane cytoskeleton meshwork and within membrane proteolipidic microdomains. This review presents an overview of the recent insights brought by the latest developments in microscopy, to unravel the molecular remodeling occurring at cell contacts. The dynamic aspect of cell adhesion was recently highlighted by super-resolution videomicroscopy, also named videonanoscopy. By circumventing the diffraction limit of light, nanoscopy has allowed the monitoring of molecular localization and behavior at the single-molecule level, on fixed and living cells. Accessing molecular-resolution details such as quantitatively monitoring components entering and leaving cell contacts by lateral diffusion and reversible association has revealed an unexpected plasticity. Adhesion structures can be highly specialized, such as focal adhesion in motile cells, as well as immune and neuronal synapses. Spatiotemporal reorganization of adhesion molecules, receptors and adaptors directly relates to structure/function modulation. Assembly of these supramolecular complexes is continuously balanced by dynamic events, remodeling adhesions on various timescales, notably by molecular conformation switches, lateral diffusion within the membrane and endo/exocytosis. Pathological alterations in cell adhesion are involved in cancer evolution, through cancer stem cell interaction with stromal niches, growth, extravasation and metastasis.

  9. The Molecular Architecture of Cell Adhesion: Dynamic Remodeling Revealed by Videonanoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergé, Arnauld

    2016-01-01

    The plasma membrane delimits the cell, which is the basic unit of living organisms, and is also a privileged site for cell communication with the environment. Cell adhesion can occur through cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts. Adhesion proteins such as integrins and cadherins also constitute receptors for inside-out and outside-in signaling within proteolipidic platforms. Adhesion molecule targeting and stabilization relies on specific features such as preferential segregation by the sub-membrane cytoskeleton meshwork and within membrane proteolipidic microdomains. This review presents an overview of the recent insights brought by the latest developments in microscopy, to unravel the molecular remodeling occurring at cell contacts. The dynamic aspect of cell adhesion was recently highlighted by super-resolution videomicroscopy, also named videonanoscopy. By circumventing the diffraction limit of light, nanoscopy has allowed the monitoring of molecular localization and behavior at the single-molecule level, on fixed and living cells. Accessing molecular-resolution details such as quantitatively monitoring components entering and leaving cell contacts by lateral diffusion and reversible association has revealed an unexpected plasticity. Adhesion structures can be highly specialized, such as focal adhesion in motile cells, as well as immune and neuronal synapses. Spatiotemporal reorganization of adhesion molecules, receptors, and adaptors directly relates to structure/function modulation. Assembly of these supramolecular complexes is continuously balanced by dynamic events, remodeling adhesions on various timescales, notably by molecular conformation switches, lateral diffusion within the membrane and endo/exocytosis. Pathological alterations in cell adhesion are involved in cancer evolution, through cancer stem cell interaction with stromal niches, growth, extravasation, and metastasis.

  10. Effects of adhesion dynamics and substrate compliance on the shape and motility of crawling cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falko Ziebert

    Full Text Available Computational modeling of eukaryotic cells moving on substrates is an extraordinarily complex task: many physical processes, such as actin polymerization, action of motors, formation of adhesive contacts concomitant with both substrate deformation and recruitment of actin etc., as well as regulatory pathways are intertwined. Moreover, highly nontrivial cell responses emerge when the substrate becomes deformable and/or heterogeneous. Here we extended a computational model for motile cell fragments, based on an earlier developed phase field approach, to account for explicit dynamics of adhesion site formation, as well as for substrate compliance via an effective elastic spring. Our model displays steady motion vs. stick-slip transitions with concomitant shape oscillations as a function of the actin protrusion rate, the substrate stiffness, and the rates of adhesion. Implementing a step in the substrate's elastic modulus, as well as periodic patterned surfaces exemplified by alternating stripes of high and low adhesiveness, we were able to reproduce the correct motility modes and shape phenomenology found experimentally. We also predict the following nontrivial behavior: the direction of motion of cells can switch from parallel to perpendicular to the stripes as a function of both the adhesion strength and the width ratio of adhesive to non-adhesive stripes.

  11. Sticky Bacteria: Adhesion-Detachment Based Microbial Aggregation Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sircar, Sarthok

    2013-01-01

    We present a mechanistic model for the adherence of two spherical flocs in quiescent flow conditions. Adhesion forces arise via the binding ligands as well as the attractive/repulsive surface potential in an ionic medium via the DLVO theory. The reversible binding kinetics are assumed to follow the standard model for linear springs \\cite{Dembo1988}. The collision factor and the floc aggregate number density is studied as a function of various surface/fluid parameters. It is seen that large floc aggregates are possible with more tensile ligands due to efficient inter-floc collisions (measured via the collision factor). Our results quantify how fluid drag and strong electrolytic composition of the surrounding fluid favor floc formation as well.

  12. Lateral shear forces applied to cells with single elastic micropillars to influence focal adhesion dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heil, Patrick; Spatz, Joachim P, E-mail: spatz@mf.mpg.d [Department of New Materials and Biosystems, Max Planck Institute for Metals Research, Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Biophysical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-05-19

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are important adhesion sites between eukaryotic cells and the extracellular matrix, their size depending on the locally applied force. To quantitatively study the mechanosensitivity of FAs, we induce their growth and disassembly by varying the distribution of intracellular stress. We present a novel method for micromanipulation of living cells to explore the dynamics of focal adhesion (FA) assembly under force. Fibroblasts are sheared laterally to their adhesion surface with single PDMS micropillars in order to apply laterally stretch or compression to focal adhesions. This allows for measuring the shear force exerted by the micropillar and correlates it with FA length and growth velocity. Furthermore, we analyze the resulting dynamics of FA molecules (paxillin) and compare intensity profiles along FAs before and after the application of external force. The responses of stretched and relaxed FAs differ fundamentally: relaxed and compressed FAs disassemble isotropically and show no length variation while stretched FAs grow unisotropically in the direction of the applied force and show protein influx only at their front.

  13. Bidirectional control of the inner dynamics of focal adhesions promotes cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Focal adhesions (FA) are bidirectional mechanical biosensors that allow cells to integrate intracellular and extracellular cues. Their function is tightly regulated by changes in molecular composition and also by variation in the spatio-temporal dynamics of FA components within this structure. A closely regulated turnover of FA proteins within FA sites allows cells to respond appropriately to their environment, thereby impacting on cell shape and function. FA protein dynamics are linked to FA...

  14. Adhesion energies of Cr thin films on polyimide determined from buckling: Experiment and model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordill, M.J., E-mail: megan.cordill@oeaw.ac.at [Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Austrian Academy of Sciences and Department of Material Physics, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Leoben 8700 (Austria); Fischer, F.D. [Institute of Mechanics, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Leoben 8700 (Austria); Rammerstorfer, F.G. [Institute of Lightweight Design and Structural Biomechanics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna 1040 (Austria); Dehm, G. [Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Austrian Academy of Sciences and Department of Material Physics, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Leoben 8700 (Austria)

    2010-09-15

    For the realization of flexible electronic devices, the metal-polymer interfaces upon which they are based need to be optimized. These interfaces are prone to fracture in such systems and hence form a weak point. In order to quantify the interfacial adhesion, novel mechanical tests and modeling approaches are required. In this study, a tensile testing approach that induces buckling of films by lateral contraction of the substrate is employed to cause delamination of the film. Based on a newly developed energy balance model, the adhesion energy of Cr films on polyimide substrates is determined by measuring the buckle geometry induced by the tensile test. The obtained minimum values for the adhesion energy (about 4.5 J m{sup -2}) of 50-190 nm thick films compare well to those found in the literature for metal films on polymer substrates.

  15. Adhesion Detection Analysis by Modeling Rail Wheel Set Dynamics under the Assumption of Constant Creep Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfiqar Ali Soomro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion level control is very necessary to avoid slippage of rail wheelset and track from derailment for smoothing running of rail vehicle. In this paper the proper dynamics of wheelset for velocities acting in three dimensions of wheelset and rail track has been discussed along with creep forces on each wheel in longitudinal, lateral and spin directions has been enumerated and computed for suitable modeling. The concerned results have been simulated by Matlab code to observe the correlation of this phenomenon to compare creepage and creep forces for detecting adhesion level. This adhesion identification is recognized by applying coulomb’s law for sliding friction by comparing tangential and normal forces through co-efficient of friction

  16. Light-melt adhesive based on dynamic carbon frameworks in a columnar liquid-crystal phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shohei; Nobusue, Shunpei; Tsuzaka, Eri; Yuan, Chunxue; Mori, Chigusa; Hara, Mitsuo; Seki, Takahiro; Camacho, Cristopher; Irle, Stephan; Yamaguchi, Shigehiro

    2016-07-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) provides a suitable platform to exploit structural motions of molecules in a condensed phase. Amplification of the structural changes enables a variety of technologies not only in LC displays but also in other applications. Until very recently, however, a practical use of LCs for removable adhesives has not been explored, although a spontaneous disorganization of LC materials can be easily triggered by light-induced isomerization of photoactive components. The difficulty of such application derives from the requirements for simultaneous implementation of sufficient bonding strength and its rapid disappearance by photoirradiation. Here we report a dynamic molecular LC material that meets these requirements. Columnar-stacked V-shaped carbon frameworks display sufficient bonding strength even during heating conditions, while its bonding ability is immediately lost by a light-induced self-melting function. The light-melt adhesive is reusable and its fluorescence colour reversibly changes during the cycle, visualizing the bonding/nonbonding phases of the adhesive.

  17. Adhesion determination of dental porcelain to zirconia using the Schwickerath test: strength vs. fracture energy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosyfaki, P; Swain, M V

    2014-11-01

    Two approaches to measure the fracture energy to delaminate four different porcelains from zirconia substrates are compared using Schwickerath adhesion strength test specimens. In all instances it was possible to stably extend the crack along or adjacent to the porcelain-zirconia interface. The fracture energy expended to delaminate the porcelain was found by determining the work of fracture upon loading to 12 N and then unloading. Additional tests were undertaken on specimens notched along the interface, which enabled the compliance of the cracked Schwickerath specimens to be calibrated. The strain energy and deflection of the Schwickerath specimen as a function of crack length were derived. On this basis a simple expression was determined for the strain energy release rate or interfacial fracture toughness from the minima in the force-displacement curves. Consequently two measures of the adhesion energy were determined, the work of fracture and the strain energy release rate. It was found that the ranking for the four porcelains bonded to zirconia differed depending upon the approach. The work of fracture was substantially different from the strain energy release rate for three of the porcelain-zirconia systems and appears to be directly related to the residual stresses present in the bonded structures. The relative merits of the strain energy release rate, work of fracture vs. the stress to initiate cracking in the case of the Schwickerath adhesion test, are discussed. The advantage of this test is that it enables three estimates of the adhesion for porcelain veneers bonded to zirconia.

  18. Adhesion dynamics of porcine esophageal fibroblasts on extracellular matrix protein-functionalized poly(lactic acid)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Ning; Gong Yingxue; Chan, Vincent; Liao Kin [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Chian, Kerm Sin [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)], E-mail: askliao@ntu.edu.sg

    2008-03-01

    Effective attachment of esophageal cells on biomaterials is one important requirement in designing engineered esophagus substitute for esophageal cancer treatment. In this study, poly(lactic acid) (PLA) was subjected to surface modification by coupling extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins on its surface to promote cell adhesion. Two typical ECM proteins, collagen type I (COL) and fibronectin (FN), were immobilized on the PLA surface with the aid of glutaraldehyde as a cross linker between aminolyzed PLA and ECM proteins. By using confocal reflectance interference contrast microscopy (C-RICM) integrating with phase contrast microscopy, the long-term adhesion dynamics of porcine esophageal fibroblasts (PEFs) on four types of surfaces (unmodified PLA, PLA-COOH, PLA-COL and PLA-FN) was investigated during 24 h of culture. It is demonstrated by C-RICM results that PEFs form strong adhesion contact on all four types of surfaces at different stages of cell seeding. Among the four surfaces, PEFs on the PLA-FN surface reach the maximum adhesion energy (9.5 x 10{sup -7} J m{sup -2}) in the shortest time (20 min) during the initial stage of cell seeding. After adhesion energy reaches the maximum value, PEFs maintain their highly deformed geometries till they reached a steady state after 20 h of culture. F-actin immunostaining results show that the evolvement of spatial organization of F-actin is tightly correlated with the formation of adhesion contact and cell spreading. Furthermore, the cell attachment ratio of PEFs on PLA in 2 h is only 26% compared with 88% on PLA-FN, 73% on PLA-COL and 36% on PLA-COOH. All the results demonstrate the effect of surface functionalization on the biophysical responses of PEFs in cell adhesion. Fibronectin-immobilized PLA demonstrates promising potential for application as an engineered esophagus substitute.

  19. Assessment of Fevicol (adhesive Drying Process through Dynamic Speckle Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Z. Ansari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic laser speckle (or biospeckle analysis is a useful measurement tool to analyze micro-motion on a sample surface via temporal statistics based on a sequence of speckle images. The aim of this work was to evaluate the use of dynamic speckles as an alternative tool to monitoring Fevicol drying process. Experimental demonstration of intensity-based algorithm to monitor Fevicol drying process is reported. The experiment was explored with the technique called Inertia Moment of co-occurrence matrix. The results allowed verifying the drying process and it was possible to observe different activity stages during the drying process. Statistical Tukey test at 5% significance level allowed differentiating different stages of drying. In conclusion, speckle activity, measured by the Inertia Moment, can be used to monitor drying processes of the Fevicol.

  20. Polymer nanocomposite hydrogels exhibiting both dynamic restructuring and unusual adhesive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian; Yuan, Du; Fan, Xiaoshan; Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; He, Chaobin

    2013-06-11

    Polymer nanocomposite (NC) hydrogels exhibiting both dynamic restructuring and unusual adhesive properties in wet and dry states have been prepared in an efficient and straightforward way via free radical polymerization of poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate (PEG) in the presence of silane-modified sodium montmorillonite (NaMMT). The dynamic restructuring of the NC gel has been demonstrated by almost instant recovery of mechanical properties, such as storage modulus, loss modulus, and damping tan δ (at 0.025 strain) by 60-110% after being stressed to the point of gel failure. Furthermore, the dry NC gel showed exceptional thermal and mechanical stability during a heating and cooling cycle between 25 and 110 °C, with only slightly decreases followed by at least 30% increases in both moduli, while tan δ remained nearly unchanged. The NC gel in dry state could repeatedly adhere to various surfaces such as steel, glass, plastic, etc., and detach from the surface without being broken and leaving little contamination behind. This unique adhesive characteristic was characterized by high storage modulus, loss modulus (kPa), and tan δ (>0.6) corresponding to high cohesive, adhesive, and tacking properties of pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs). Finally, a reversible network structure formed by PEO interpenetrating within 3-dimentional (3-D) silica network was proposed to be responsible for the dynamic restructuring and the unique adhesive behaviors observed in the NC gel, and the 3-D network structure was investigated by XRD, FTIR, and DSC measurements. For this 3-D network structure, we suggest that the flexibility of PEO could allow PEO side chains to contact with various surfaces by either PEO segments or methoxy end groups via weak physical interactions, such as van der Waals interactions or hydrogen bonding, whereas the reversible network structure contributes to the recovery of strength and shape after the gel failure.

  1. Intermittent stick-slip dynamics during the peeling of an adhesive tape from a roller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Dalbe, Marie-Julie; Guerra, Claudia; Cohen, Caroline; Ciccotti, Matteo; Santucci, Stéphane; Vanel, Loïc

    2013-02-01

    We study experimentally the fracture dynamics during the peeling at a constant velocity of a roller adhesive tape mounted on a freely rotating pulley. Thanks to a high speed camera, we measure, in an intermediate range of peeling velocities, high frequency oscillations between phases of slow and rapid propagation of the peeling fracture. This so-called stick-slip regime is well known as the consequence of a decreasing fracture energy of the adhesive in a certain range of peeling velocity coupled to the elasticity of the peeled tape. Simultaneously with stick slip, we observe low frequency oscillations of the adhesive roller angular velocity which are the consequence of a pendular instability of the roller submitted to the peeling force. The stick-slip dynamics is shown to become intermittent due to these slow pendular oscillations which produce a quasistatic oscillation of the peeling angle while keeping constant the peeling fracture velocity (averaged over each stick-slip cycle). The observed correlation between the mean peeling angle and the stick-slip amplitude questions the validity of the usually admitted independence with the peeling angle of the fracture energy of adhesives.

  2. Static vs dynamic settlement and adhesion of diatoms to ship hull coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargiel, Kelli A; Swain, Geoffrey W

    2014-01-01

    Many experiments utilize static immersion tests to evaluate the performance of ship hull coatings. These provide valuable data; however, they do not accurately represent the conditions both the hull and fouling organisms encounter while a ship is underway. This study investigated the effect of static and dynamic immersion on the adhesion and settlement of diatoms to one antifouling coating (BRA 640), four fouling-release coatings (Intersleek(®) 700, Intersleek(®) 900, Hempasil X3, and Dow Corning 3140) and one standard surface (Intergard(®) 240 Epoxy). Differences in community composition were observed between the static and dynamic treatments. Achnanthes longipes was present on all coatings under static immersion, but was not present under dynamic immersion. This was also found for diatoms in the genera Bacillaria and Gyrosigma. Melosira moniformis was the only diatom present under dynamic conditions, but not static conditions. Several common fouling diatom genera were present on panels regardless of treatment: Amphora, Cocconeis, Entomoneis Cylindrotheca, Licmophora, Navicula, Nitzschia, Plagiotropis, and Synedra. Biofilm adhesion, diatom abundance and diatom diversity were found to be significantly different between static and dynamic treatments; however, the difference was dependent on coating and sampling date. Several coatings (Epoxy, DC 3140 and IS 700) had significantly higher biofilm adhesion on dynamically treated panels on at least one of the four sampling dates, while all coatings had significantly higher diatom abundance on at least one sampling date. Diversity was significantly greater on static panels than dynamic panels for Epoxy, IS 700 and HX3 at least once during the sampling period. The results demonstrate how hydrodynamic stress will significantly influence the microfouling community. Dynamic immersion testing is required to fully understand how antifouling surfaces will respond to biofilm formation when subjected to the stresses experienced

  3. Conformational Dynamics of the Focal Adhesion Targeting Domain Control Specific Functions of Focal Adhesion Kinase in Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kadaré, Gress

    2015-01-02

    Focal adhesion (FA) kinase (FAK) regulates cell survival and motility by transducing signals from membrane receptors. The C-terminal FA targeting (FAT) domain of FAK fulfils multiple functions, including recruitment to FAs through paxillin binding. Phosphorylation of FAT on Tyr925 facilitates FA disassembly and connects to the MAPK pathway through Grb2 association, but requires dissociation of the first helix (H1) of the four-helix bundle of FAT. We investigated the importance of H1 opening in cells by comparing the properties of FAK molecules containing wild-type or mutated FAT with impaired or facilitated H1 openings. These mutations did not alter the activation of FAK, but selectively affected its cellular functions, including self-association, Tyr925 phosphorylation, paxillin binding, and FA targeting and turnover. Phosphorylation of Tyr861, located between the kinase and FAT domains, was also enhanced by the mutation that opened the FAT bundle. Similarly phosphorylation of Ser910 by ERK in response to bombesin was increased by FAT opening. Although FAK molecules with the mutation favoring FAT opening were poorly recruited at FAs, they efficiently restored FA turnover and cell shape in FAK-deficient cells. In contrast, the mutation preventing H1 opening markedly impaired FAK function. Our data support the biological importance of conformational dynamics of the FAT domain and its functional interactions with other parts of the molecule.

  4. ADHESION EFFECTS WITHIN THE HARD MATTER – SOFT MATTER INTERFACE: MOLECULAR DYNAMICS

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In the present study three soft matter – hard matter systems consisting of different nanomaterials and organic molecules were studied using the steered molecular dynamics approach in order to reveal regularities in the formation of organic-inorganic hybrids and the stability of multimolecular complexes, as well as to analyze the energy aspects of adhesion between bio-molecules and layered ceramics. The combined process free energy estimation (COPFEE) procedure was used for quantitative and qu...

  5. SPH modeling of adhesion in fast dynamics: Application to the Cold Spray process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profizi, Paul; Combescure, Alain; Ogawa, Kahuziro

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to show, in a specific case, the importance of modeling adhesive forces when simulating the bouncing of very small particles impacting a substrate at high speed. The implementation of this model into a fast-dynamics SPH code is described. Taking the example of an impacted elastic cylinder, we show that the adhesive forces, which are surface forces, play a significant role only if the particles are sufficiently small. The effect of the choice of the type of interaction law in the cohesive zone is studied and some conclusions on the relevance of the modeling of the adhesive forces for fast-dynamics impacts are drawn. Then, the adhesion model is used to simulate the Cold Spray process. An aluminum particle is projected against a substrate made of the same material at a velocity ranging from 200 to 1000 m ṡs-1. We study the effects of the various modeling assumptions on the final result: bouncing or sticking. Increasingly complex models are considered. At a 200 m ṡs-1 impact velocity, elastic behavior is assumed, the substrate being simply supported at its base and supplied with absorbing boundaries. The same absorbing boundaries are also used for all the other simulations. Then, plasticity is introduced and the impact velocity is increased up to 1000 m ṡs-1. At the highest velocities, the resulting strains are very significant. The calculations show that if the adhesion model is appropriately chosen, it is possible to reproduce the experimental observations: the particles stick to the substrate in a range of impact velocities surrounded by two velocity ranges in which the particles bounce.

  6. Neutrophil surface adhesion molecule and toll like receptor dynamics in crossbred cows suffering from Staphylococcus aureus subclinical and clinical mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Kumar Swain

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Host elicits stage specific expression of surface adhesion molecules and TLR2 and TLR4 as dynamic host innate immune response against Staphylococcal mastitis. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2016; 3(2.000: 99-105

  7. Influence of Copolyester Composition on Adhesion to Soda-Lime Glass via Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Ben; Hofmann, John; Pasquinelli, Melissa A

    2016-06-01

    Copolyesters are a subset of polymers that have the desirable properties of strength and clarity while retaining chemical resistance, and are thus potential candidates for enhancing the impact resistance of soda-lime glass. Adhesion between the polymer and the glass relates to the impact performance of the system, as well as the longevity of the bond between the polymer and the glass under various conditions. Modifying the types of diols and diacids present in the copolyester provides a method for fine-tuning the physical properties of the polymer. In this study, we used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to examine the influence of the chemical composition of the polymers on adhesion of polymer film laminates to two soda-lime glass surfaces, one tin-rich and one oxygen-rich. By calculating properties such as adhesion energies and contact angles, these results provide insights into how the polymer-glass interaction is impacted by the polymer composition, temperature, and other factors such as the presence of free volume or pi stacking. These results can be used to optimize the adhesion of copolyester films to glass surfaces.

  8. A dynamic cell adhesion surface regulates tissue architecture in growth plate cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romereim, Sarah M; Conoan, Nicholas H; Chen, Baojiang; Dudley, Andrew T

    2014-05-01

    The architecture and morphogenetic properties of tissues are founded in the tissue-specific regulation of cell behaviors. In endochondral bones, the growth plate cartilage promotes bone elongation via regulated chondrocyte maturation within an ordered, three-dimensional cell array. A key event in the process that generates this cell array is the transformation of disordered resting chondrocytes into clonal columns of discoid proliferative cells aligned with the primary growth vector. Previous analysis showed that column-forming chondrocytes display planar cell divisions, and the resulting daughter cells rearrange by ∼90° to align with the lengthening column. However, these previous studies provided limited information about the mechanisms underlying this dynamic process. Here we present new mechanistic insights generated by application of a novel time-lapse confocal microscopy method along with immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. We show that, during cell division, daughter chondrocytes establish a cell-cell adhesion surface enriched in cadherins and β-catenin. Rearrangement into columns occurs concomitant with expansion of this adhesion surface in a process more similar to cell spreading than to migration. Column formation requires cell-cell adhesion, as reducing cadherin binding via chelation of extracellular calcium inhibits chondrocyte rearrangement. Importantly, physical indicators of cell polarity, such as cell body alignment, are not prerequisites for oriented cell behavior. Our results support a model in which regulation of adhesive surface dynamics and cortical tension by extrinsic signaling modifies the thermodynamic landscape to promote organization of daughter cells in the context of the three-dimensional growth plate tissue.

  9. Alterations in ovarian cancer cell adhesion drive taxol resistance by increasing microtubule dynamics in a FAK-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrail, Daniel J; Khambhati, Niti N; Qi, Mark X; Patel, Krishan S; Ravikumar, Nithin; Brandenburg, Chandler P; Dawson, Michelle R

    2015-04-17

    Chemorefractory ovarian cancer patients show extremely poor prognosis. Microtubule-stabilizing Taxol (paclitaxel) is a first-line treatment against ovarian cancer. Despite the close interplay between microtubules and cell adhesion, it remains unknown if chemoresistance alters the way cells adhere to their extracellular environment, a process critical for cancer metastasis. To investigate this, we isolated Taxol-resistant populations of OVCAR3 and SKOV3 ovarian cancer cell lines. Though Taxol-resistant cells neither effluxed more drug nor gained resistance to other chemotherapeutics, they did display increased microtubule dynamics. These changes in microtubule dynamics coincided with faster attachment rates and decreased adhesion strength, which correlated with increased surface β1-integrin expression and decreased focal adhesion formation, respectively. Adhesion strength correlated best with Taxol-sensitivity, and was found to be independent of microtubule polymerization but dependent on focal adhesion kinase (FAK), which was up-regulated in Taxol-resistant cells. FAK inhibition also decreased microtubule dynamics to equal levels in both populations, indicating alterations in adhesive signaling are up-stream of microtubule dynamics. Taken together, this work demonstrates that Taxol-resistance dramatically alters how ovarian cancer cells adhere to their extracellular environment causing down-stream increases in microtubule dynamics, providing a therapeutic target that may improve prognosis by not only recovering drug sensitivity, but also decreasing metastasis.

  10. Decipher the dynamic coordination between enzymatic activity and structural modulation at focal adhesions in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaoying; Seong, Jihye; Wang, Yi; Chang, Shiou-Chi; Eichorst, John Paul; Ouyang, Mingxing; Li, Julie Y.-S.; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

    2014-07-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are dynamic subcellular structures crucial for cell adhesion, migration and differentiation. It remains an enigma how enzymatic activities in these local complexes regulate their structural remodeling in live cells. Utilizing biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we developed a correlative FRET imaging microscopy (CFIM) approach to quantitatively analyze the subcellular coordination between the enzymatic Src activation and the structural FA disassembly. CFIM reveals that the Src kinase activity only within the microdomain of lipid rafts at the plasma membrane is coupled with FA dynamics. FA disassembly at cell periphery was linearly dependent on this raft-localized Src activity, although cells displayed heterogeneous levels of response to stimulation. Within lipid rafts, the time delay between Src activation and FA disassembly was 1.2 min in cells seeded on low fibronectin concentration ([FN]) and 4.3 min in cells on high [FN]. CFIM further showed that the level of Src-FA coupling, as well as the time delay, was regulated by cell-matrix interactions, as a tight enzyme-structure coupling occurred in FA populations mediated by integrin αvβ3, but not in those by integrin α5β1. Therefore, different FA subpopulations have distinctive regulation mechanisms between their local kinase activity and structural FA dynamics.

  11. Angiogenin enhances cell migration by regulating stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saisai Wei

    Full Text Available Angiogenin (ANG acts on both vascular endothelial cells and cancer cells, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we carried out a co-immunoprecipitation assay in HeLa cells and identified 14 potential ANG-interacting proteins. Among these proteins, β-actin, α-actinin 4, and non-muscle myosin heavy chain 9 are stress fiber components and involved in cytoskeleton organization and movement, which prompted us to investigate the mechanism of action of ANG in cell migration. Upon confirmation of the interactions between ANG and the three proteins, further studies revealed that ANG co-localized with β-actin and α-actinin 4 at the leading edge of migrating cells. Down-regulation of ANG resulted in fewer but thicker stress fibers with less dynamics, which was associated with the enlargements of focal adhesions. The focal adhesion kinase activity and cell migration capacity were significantly decreased in ANG-deficient cells. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the existence of ANG in the cytoplasm optimizes stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion formation to accommodate cell migration. The finding that ANG promoted cancer cell migration might provide new clues for tumor metastasis research.

  12. A reagent-based dynamic trigger for cell adhesion, shape change, or cocultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Stijn F M; Maiuri, Paolo; Piel, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    The described protocol is a simple and easily implemented method for making dynamic micropatterns for cell culture. It is based on the use of a surface coating material (azido-PLL-g-PEG (APP)) that initially repels cells, but which can be made strongly adherent by addition of a small functional peptide (BCN-RGD) to the cell culture medium. The method can be applied to trigger the adhesion, migration, or shape change of single cells or of populations of cells, and it can be used to create patterned cocultures. The entire process can be subdivided into three main parts. The first part describes the creation of patterned APP substrates. The second part describes cell seeding and "click" triggering of cell adhesion; the final part describes variations that allow the overlay of multiple patterns or the creation of patterned cocultures. The APP coating of substrates and the triggering of adhesion only involves treating the surface with aqueous stock solutions, allowing any biology lab to adopt this technique.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Roller Nanoimprint Process: Adhesion and Other Mechanical Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Te-Hua

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molecular dynamics simulations using tight-binding many body potential are carried out to study the roller imprint process of a gold single crystal. The effect of the roller tooth’s taper angle, imprint depth, imprint temperature, and imprint direction on the imprint force, adhesion, stress distribution, and strain are investigated. A two-stage roller imprint process was obtained from an imprint force curve. The two-stage imprint process included the imprint forming with a rapid increase of imprint force and the unloading stage combined with the adhesion stage. The results show that the imprint force and adhesion rapidly increase with decreasing taper angle and increasing imprint depth. The magnitude of the maximum imprint force and the time at which this maximum occurs are proportional to the imprint depth, but independent of the taper angle. In a comparison of the imprint mechanisms with a vertical imprint case, while high stress and strain regions are concentrated below the mold for vertical imprint, they also occur around the mold in the case of roller imprint. The regions were only concentrated on the substrate atoms underneath the mold in vertical imprint. Plastic flow increased with increasing imprint temperature.

  14. Modulating cell adhesion dynamics on carbon nanotube monolayer engineered with extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ning; Wong, Chee C; Gong, Ying X; Tan, Samuel C W; Chan, Vincent; Liao, Kin

    2010-04-01

    Although it has been demonstrated that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may have potentials for tissue engineering applications because of their unparalleled physical properties, little has been known on the cell adhesion mechanisms on model CNT monolayer pertaining to the design of novel cell therapeutics device. In this study, the adhesion dynamics of primary porcine esophageal fibroblasts (PEFs) on CNT monolayer were elucidated with confocal reflectance interference contrast microscopy (C-RICM) integrating with phase contrast microscopy. Moreover, CNT monolayer (CNT-ML) was functionalized with two typical extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins including collagen type I (COL) and fibronectin (FN) in order to promote its biocompatibility. First, it is shown by atomic force microscopy that the topographical features of CNT-ML were dependent on the types of immobilized ECM protein. Second, significant time lag in adhesion contact evolution (around 10 min) for PEFs was found on both CNT-ML and CNT-COL compared to the negligible time lag on CNT-FN. It was found that adhesion energy of PEFs on the CNT-COL and CNT-FN surfaces reached steady state at 60 and 30 min after cell seeding compared to 70 min on CNT-ML surface. At steady state, the adhesion energy of PEFs on the CNT-COL and CNT-FN surfaces was about twice as much than that on the CNT-ML surface. Moreover, immobilization of collagen or fibronectin on CNT monolayer led to an increase in seeding efficiency and proliferation rate of PEFs. Scanning electron microscopy and immunostaining together demonstrated that PEFs displayed an elongated morphology and highly polarized actin network on both CNT-COL and CNT-FN surfaces, whereas PEFs displayed nonuniform cell morphology and actin organization on the CNT-ML surface. Overall, our results demonstrated that the biophysical responses and biological behavior of PEFs on unmodified or functionalized CNT monolayer were different. Functionalization of CNT through extracellular matrix

  15. Two new methods to determine the adhesion by means of internal friction in materials covered with films; Dos nuevos metodos para determinar la adhesion mediante friccion interna en materiales recubiertos con peliculas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colorado, H. A.; Ghilarducci, A. A.; Salva, H. R.

    2006-07-01

    Two new models are proposed to determine the adhesion energy be means of the internal friction technique (IF) in thin films layered materials. for the first method is necessary to determine enthalpy by means of the IF technique, for which the adhesion work has been determined with experimental data. In the second method are necessary to perform IF tests at constant temperature. (Author)

  16. Crack propagation through adhesive interface in glass driven by dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hwun

    Dynamic crack behaviors at glass interfaces were investigated to understand dynamic failure mechanisms of glass. To produce highly intensive and rapidly increasing loading, glass specimens jointed with epoxy adhesive in edge-to-edge configurations were impacted on their notched edges with plastic projectiles. Cracks developed from the notch and propagated into the interfaces between glass plates at the maximum speed. The patterns of crack propagation through the interfaces were observed to depend on the interface's conditions. Crack propagation stops at the interface where no adhesive was applied. The crack penetrates through the interface where two glass plates were bonded directly without any space. If the interface has finite thickness of an adhesive layer, a crack passing through the interface branches into multiple cracks immediately when it extends to the second glass plate. Both of the slow crack speed in the epoxy adhesive and resistance for crack initiation in the second glass account for the delay in crack propagation at the interface. The surface conditions of glass at the interface affect the resistance for crack initiation. Mirror-like polished surfaces have better resistance than rough surfaces trimmed by a water jet. If the polished surface is etched with hydrofluoric acid to remove surface flaws, the glass surfaces have higher strength and resistance for damage. This etched glass even ceases crack propagation completely with a sufficiently thick adhesive layer. Crack branching has been an open topic. Exact explanation has not been given yet. As the consistent shape of crack branching are created with the proposed method, diagnostics experiments were conducted to reveal the nature of crack branching. To investigate interaction between stress propagation and crack branching, stress histories synchronizing with high speed images were measured. Two types of specimen were used to vary stress distribution during crack propagation. The apex angle of

  17. Mapping the dynamics and nanoscale organization of synaptic adhesion proteins using monomeric streptavidin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamma, Ingrid; Letellier, Mathieu; Butler, Corey; Tessier, Béatrice; Lim, Kok-Hong; Gauthereau, Isabel; Choquet, Daniel; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Park, Sheldon; Sainlos, Matthieu; Thoumine, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The advent of super-resolution imaging (SRI) has created a need for optimized labelling strategies. We present a new method relying on fluorophore-conjugated monomeric streptavidin (mSA) to label membrane proteins carrying a short, enzymatically biotinylated tag, compatible with SRI techniques including uPAINT, STED and dSTORM. We demonstrate efficient and specific labelling of target proteins in confined intercellular and organotypic tissues, with reduced steric hindrance and no crosslinking compared with multivalent probes. We use mSA to decipher the dynamics and nanoscale organization of the synaptic adhesion molecules neurexin-1β, neuroligin-1 (Nlg1) and leucine-rich-repeat transmembrane protein 2 (LRRTM2) in a dual-colour configuration with GFP nanobody, and show that these proteins are diffusionally trapped at synapses where they form apposed trans-synaptic adhesive structures. Furthermore, Nlg1 is dynamic, disperse and sensitive to synaptic stimulation, whereas LRRTM2 is organized in compact and stable nanodomains. Thus, mSA is a versatile tool to image membrane proteins at high resolution in complex live environments, providing novel information about the nano-organization of biological structures. PMID:26979420

  18. Dynamic Wettability of Different Adhesives on Wheat Straw Surface Modified by Cold Oxygen Plasma Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehui Yang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of cold oxygen plasma treatment on the exterior and interior surfaces and wettability of wheat straw were investigated. The wheat straw was treated with oxygen plasma for 150 s, and the radio-frequency power was set at 100 W. The surface wettability was evaluated by measuring the contact angles and the K values of urea-formaldehyde, phenol-formaldehyde, and methylene diphenyl diisocyanate resins. Specimens with different gluing surfaces were bonded together with urea-formaldehyde and phenol-formaldehyde and then hot-pressed to assess bonding strength. Results indicate that the dynamic wettability and the shear strength of wheat straw were remarkably improved after it was exposed to the cold oxygen plasma. Additionally, the adhesive type and the wheat straw surface characteristics had significant effects on the dynamic wettability and bonding strength of both untreated and plasma-treated wheat straw.

  19. Simultaneous determination of protein structure and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Best, Robert B.; DePristo, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    We present a protocol for the experimental determination of ensembles of protein conformations that represent simultaneously the native structure and its associated dynamics. The procedure combines the strengths of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-for obtaining experimental information at ...

  20. A role for the juxtamembrane cytoplasm in the molecular dynamics of focal adhesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haguy Wolfenson

    Full Text Available Focal adhesions (FAs are specialized membrane-associated multi-protein complexes that link the cell to the extracellular matrix and play crucial roles in cell-matrix sensing. Considerable information is available on the complex molecular composition of these sites, yet the regulation of FA dynamics is largely unknown. Based on a combination of FRAP studies in live cells, with in silico simulations and mathematical modeling, we show that the FA plaque proteins paxillin and vinculin exist in four dynamic states: an immobile FA-bound fraction, an FA-associated fraction undergoing exchange, a juxtamembrane fraction experiencing attenuated diffusion, and a fast-diffusing cytoplasmic pool. The juxtamembrane region surrounding FAs displays a gradient of FA plaque proteins with respect to both concentration and dynamics. Based on these findings, we propose a new model for the regulation of FA dynamics in which this juxtamembrane domain acts as an intermediary layer, enabling an efficient regulation of FA formation and reorganization.

  1. Dynamic Control of Synaptic Adhesion and Organizing Molecules in Synaptic Plasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudenko, Gabby [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Boulevard Rm. 5.114B, Galveston, TX 77555, USA

    2017-01-01

    Synapses play a critical role in establishing and maintaining neural circuits, permitting targeted information transfer throughout the brain. A large portfolio of synaptic adhesion/organizing molecules (SAMs) exists in the mammalian brain involved in synapse development and maintenance. SAMs bind protein partners, formingtrans-complexes spanning the synaptic cleft orcis-complexes attached to the same synaptic membrane. SAMs play key roles in cell adhesion and in organizing protein interaction networks; they can also provide mechanisms of recognition, generate scaffolds onto which partners can dock, and likely take part in signaling processes as well. SAMs are regulated through a portfolio of different mechanisms that affect their protein levels, precise localization, stability, and the availability of their partners at synapses. Interaction of SAMs with their partners can further be strengthened or weakened through alternative splicing, competing protein partners, ectodomain shedding, or astrocytically secreted factors. Given that numerous SAMs appear altered by synaptic activity, in vivo, these molecules may be used to dynamically scale up or scale down synaptic communication. Many SAMs, including neurexins, neuroligins, cadherins, and contactins, are now implicated in neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental diseases, such as autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder and studying their molecular mechanisms holds promise for developing novel therapeutics.

  2. Neutrophil adhesion and crawling dynamics on liver sinusoidal endothelial cells under shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hao; Li, Ning; Du, Yu; Tong, Chunfang; Lü, Shouqin; Hu, Jinrong; Zhang, Yan; Long, Mian

    2017-02-01

    Neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte, PMN) recruitment in the liver sinusoid takes place in almost all liver diseases and contributes to pathogen clearance or tissue damage. While PMN rolling unlikely appears in liver sinusoids and Mac-1 or CD44 is assumed to play respective roles during in vivo local or systematic inflammatory stimulation, the regulating mechanisms of PMN adhesion and crawling dynamics are still unclear from those in vivo studies. Here we developed a two-dimensional in vitro sinusoidal model with primary liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and Kupffer cells (KCs) to investigate TNF-α-induced PMN recruitment under shear flow. Our data demonstrated that LFA-1 dominates the static or shear resistant adhesion of PMNs while Mac-1 decelerates PMN crawling on LSEC monolayer. Any one of LFA-1, Mac-1, and CD44 molecules is not able to work effectively for mediating PMN transmigration across LSEC monolayer. The presence of KCs only affects the randomness of PMN crawling. These findings further the understandings of PMN recruitment under shear flow in liver sinusoids.

  3. Climbing Robot for Ferromagnetic Surfaces with Dynamic Adjustment of the Adhesion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel F. Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a climbing robot with wheeled locomotion and adhesion through permanent magnets, developed with the intention of being used in the inspection of different types of man-made ferromagnetic structures, such as towers for wind turbines, fuel storage tanks, and ship hulls. In this paper are presented the main considerations thought for its project, as well as several constructive aspects, among which are detailed its mechanical and electrical construction, the implemented control architecture, and the human-machine interface developed for the manual and automatic control of the vehicle while in operation. Although it can be manually controlled, the vehicle is designed to have a semiautonomous behavior, allowing a remote inspection process controlled by a technician, this way reducing the risks associated with the human inspection of tall structures and ATEX places. The distinguishing characteristic of this robot is its dynamic adjustment system of the permanent magnets in order to assure the machine adhesion to the surfaces, even when crossing slightly irregular and curved surfaces with a large radius.

  4. Pulse voltage determination for electrostatic micro manipulation considering surface conductivity and adhesion of glass particle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Fujiwara

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A model with surface conductivity and adhesional force is proposed to investigate the mechanism for electrostatic micro manipulation of a dielectric object using a single probe. The manipulation system consists of three elements: a conductive probe as a manipulator, a conductive plate as a substrate, and a dielectric particle as the target object for manipulation. The particle can be successfully picked up/placed if a rectangular pulse voltage is applied between the probe and the plate. The reliability of the picking up/placing operation is improved by applying a pulse voltage that is determined by a theoretical model considering surface conductivity and adhesion. To verify the theoretical prediction, manipulation experiment is conducted using soda-lime glass particles with radii of 20 μm and 40 μm.

  5. DYNAMIC ADHESIVE WETTABILITY OF POPLAR VENEER WITH COLD OXYGEN PLASMA TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Tang,

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Effects of cold oxygen plasma treatment on activating the surface of poplar veneers and improving its wettability were investigated. The veneers were treated with cold oxygen plasma for 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 min, and aged in air for 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. The dynamic adhesive wettability of veneers was assessed using the contact angle, K-value analysis, and surface free energy. The shear strength of three-layer panels produced from untreated and cold oxygen plasma treated veneers was examined. The results showed that the wettability of veneer was significantly improved after cold oxygen plasma treatment, leading to the enhancement of shear strength of panels. The optimized treatment time should be 7 min. Aging effect of treated veneers showed that the veneer surface wettability degraded within the first 7 days and thereafter changed slightly.

  6. Interactions between MUC1 and p120 catenin regulate dynamic features of cell adhesion, motility and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Yi, Chunhui; Wen, Yunfei; Radhakrishnan, Prakash; Tremayne, Jarrod R.; Dao, Thongtan; Johnson, Keith R.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms by which MUC1 and p120 catenin contribute to progression of cancers from early transformation to metastasis are poorly understood. Here we show that p120 catenin ARM domains 1, 3–5 and 8 mediate interactions between p120 catenin and MUC1, and that these interactions modulate dynamic properties of cell adhesion, motility and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells. We also show that different isoforms of p120 catenin when co-expressed with MUC1 create cells that exhibit distinct patterns of motility in culture (motility independent of cell adhesion, motility within a monolayer while exchanging contacts with other cells, and unified motility while maintaining static epithelial contacts) and patterns of metastasis. The results provide new insight into the dynamic interplay between cell adhesion and motility and the relationship of these to the metastatic process. PMID:24371222

  7. Adhesion in hydrogel contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, J. R.; Jay, G. D.; Kim, K.-S.; Bothun, G. D.

    2016-05-01

    A generalized thermomechanical model for adhesion was developed to elucidate the mechanisms of dissipation within the viscoelastic bulk of a hyperelastic hydrogel. Results show that in addition to the expected energy release rate of interface formation, as well as the viscous flow dissipation, the bulk composition exhibits dissipation due to phase inhomogeneity morphological changes. The mixing thermodynamics of the matrix and solvent determines the dynamics of the phase inhomogeneities, which can enhance or disrupt adhesion. The model also accounts for the time-dependent behaviour. A parameter is proposed to discern the dominant dissipation mechanism in hydrogel contact detachment.

  8. mDia2 regulates actin and focal adhesion dynamics and organization in the lamella for efficient epithelial cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupton, Stephanie L; Eisenmann, Kathryn; Alberts, Arthur S; Waterman-Storer, Clare M

    2007-10-01

    Cell migration requires spatial and temporal regulation of filamentous actin (F-actin) dynamics. This regulation is achieved by distinct actin-associated proteins, which mediate polymerization, depolymerization, severing, contraction, bundling or engagement to the membrane. Mammalian Diaphanous-related (mDia) formins, which nucleate, processively elongate, and in some cases bundle actin filaments, have been extensively studied in vitro, but their function in the cell has been less well characterized. Here we study the role of mDia2 activity in the dynamic organization of F-actin in migrating epithelial cells. We find that mDia2 localizes in the lamella of migrating epithelial cells, where it is involved in the formation of a stable pool of cortical actin and in maintenance of polymerization-competent free filament barbed ends at focal adhesions. Specific inhibition of mDia2 alters focal adhesion turnover and reduces migration velocity. We suggest that the regulation of filament assembly dynamics at focal adhesions may be necessary for the formation of a stable pool of cortical lamella actin and the proper assembly and disassembly dynamics of focal adhesions, making mDia2 an important factor in epithelial cell migration.

  9. Control of high affinity interactions in the talin C terminus: how talin domains coordinate protein dynamics in cell adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmel, Mirko; Ritter, Anett; Rothemund, Sven; Pauling, Björg V; Rottner, Klemens; Gingras, Alexandre R; Ziegler, Wolfgang H

    2009-05-15

    In cell-extracellular matrix junctions (focal adhesions), the cytoskeletal protein talin is central to the connection of integrins to the actin cytoskeleton. Talin is thought to mediate this connection via its two integrin, (at least) three actin, and several vinculin binding sites. The binding sites are cryptic in the head-to-rod autoinhibited cytoplasmic form of the protein and require (stepwise) conformational activation. This activation process, however, remains poorly understood, and there are contradictory models with respect to the determinants of adhesion site localization. Here, we report turnover rates and protein-protein interactions in a range of talin rod domain constructs varying in helix bundle structure. We conclude that several bundles of the C terminus cooperate to regulate targeting and concomitantly tailor high affinity interactions of the talin rod in cell adhesions. Intrinsic control of ligand binding activities is essential for the coordination of adhesion site function of talin.

  10. Variability in primary productivity determines metapopulation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Néstor; Román, Jacinto; Delibes, Miguel

    2016-04-13

    Temporal variability in primary productivity can change habitat quality for consumer species by affecting the energy levels available as food resources. However, it remains unclear how habitat-quality fluctuations may determine the dynamics of spatially structured populations, where the effects of habitat size, quality and isolation have been customarily assessed assuming static habitats. We present the first empirical evaluation on the effects of stochastic fluctuations in primary productivity--a major outcome of ecosystem functions--on the metapopulation dynamics of a primary consumer. A unique 13-year dataset from an herbivore rodent was used to test the hypothesis that inter-annual variations in primary productivity determine spatiotemporal habitat occupancy patterns and colonization and extinction processes. Inter-annual variability in productivity and in the growing season phenology significantly influenced habitat colonization patterns and occupancy dynamics. These effects lead to changes in connectivity to other potentially occupied habitat patches, which then feed back into occupancy dynamics. According to the results, the dynamics of primary productivity accounted for more than 50% of the variation in occupancy probability, depending on patch size and landscape configuration. Evidence connecting primary productivity dynamics and spatiotemporal population processes has broad implications for metapopulation persistence in fluctuating and changing environments.

  11. Fermion Determinant with Dynamical Chiral Symmetry Breaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Qin; YANG Hua; WANG Qing

    2002-01-01

    One-loop fermion determinant is discussed for the case in which the dynamical chiral symmetry breakingcaused by momentum-dependent fermion self-energy ∑(p2) takes place. The obtained series generalizes the heat kernelexpansion for hard fermion mass.

  12. Characterization of cohesion, adhesion and creep-properties of dynamically loaded coatings through the impact tester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzakis, K.D.; Michailidis, N.; Lontos, A.; Siganos, A.; Hadjiyiannis, S.; Giannopoulos, G.; Maliaris, G. [Aristoteles Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece). Lab. for Machine Tools and Mfg. Engineering; Erkens, G. [CemeCon GmbH, Wuerselen (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    The coating impact test, in combination with finite elements method (FEM) simulation, is successfully used to characterize the fatigue performance of coatings. Critical values for stress components, responsible for distinctive fatigue failure modes of the coating, are obtained and the fatigue limits of various coatings are illustrated in form of generally applicable Smith and Woehler diagrams, determined through a developed evaluation software. This software takes into account the impact test experimental data, as well as coating and substrate constitutive laws. Herewith coating adhesive and cohesive failure modes are elucidated and a cutting performance prediction of coated tools can be carried out. On the other hand, creep phenomena of plasma sprayed coatings are quantitatively interpreted. (orig.)

  13. Dynamics of spider glue adhesion: effect of surface energy and contact area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Chen, Yizhou; Blackledge, Todd; Dhinojwala, Ali

    Spider glue is a unique biological adhesive which is humidity responsive such that the adhesion continues to increase upto 100% relative humidity (RH) for some species. This is unlike synthetic adhesives that significantly drop in adhesion with an increase in humidity. However, most of adhesion data reported in literature have used clean hydrophilic glass substrate, unlike the hydrophobic, and charged insect cuticle surface that adheres to spider glue in nature. Previously, we have reported that the spider glue viscosity changes over five orders of magnitude with humidity. Here, we vary the surface energy and surface charge of the substrate to test the change in Larnioides cornutus spider glue adhesion with humidity. We find that an increase in both surface energy and surface charge density increases the droplet spreading and there exists an optimum droplet contact area where adhesion is maximized. Moreover, spider glue droplets act as reusable adhesive for low energy hydrophobic surface at the optimum humidity. These results explain why certain prey are caught more efficiently by spiders in their habitat. The mechanism by which spider species tune its glue adhesion for local prey capture can inspire new generation smart adhesives.

  14. Structural determinants of adhesion by Protocadherin-19 and implications for its role in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Sharon R.; Jontes, James D.; Sotomayor, Marcos

    2016-10-26

    Non-clustered δ-protocadherins are homophilic cell adhesion molecules essential for the development of the vertebrate nervous system, as several are closely linked to neurodevelopmental disorders. Mutations inprotocadherin-19(PCDH19) result in a female-limited, infant-onset form of epilepsy (PCDH19-FE). Over 100 mutations inPCDH19have been identified in patients with PCDH19-FE, about half of which are missense mutations in the adhesive extracellular domain. Neither the mechanism of homophilic adhesion by PCDH19, nor the biochemical effects of missense mutations are understood. Here we present a crystallographic structure of the minimal adhesive fragment of the zebrafish Pcdh19 extracellular domain. This structure reveals the adhesive interface for Pcdh19, which is broadly relevant to both non-clustered δ and clustered protocadherin subfamilies. In addition, we show that several PCDH19-FE missense mutations localize to the adhesive interface and abolish Pcdh19 adhesion inin vitroassays, thus revealing the biochemical basis of their pathogenic effects during brain development.

  15. Integrin-linked kinase regulates oligodendrocyte cytoskeleton, growth cone, and adhesion dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, John-Paul; Cummings, Sarah E; O'Meara, Ryan W; Kothary, Rashmi

    2016-02-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK), a focal adhesion protein, brokers the link between cytoskeleton, cell membrane, and extracellular environment. Here, we demonstrate a role for ILK in laminin-2-mediated adhesion in primary murine oligodendrocytes (OLs) - with ILK loss leading to severe defects in process branching and outgrowth. These defects were partially recovered when the ILK-depleted OLs were instead grown on the non-integrin-activating substrate poly-l-lysine. Intriguingly, ILK loss on the neutral poly-l-lysine substrate led to swelling at the tips of OL processes, which we identified as enlarged growth cones. Employing the bloated ILK-depleted growth cones as template, we demonstrate the appearance of distinct cytoskeletal domains within OL growth cones bearing classic neuronal growth cone architecture. Further, microtubule organization was severely perturbed following ILK loss, with centripetal microtubule looping and failure to bundle occurring in a laminin-2-independent manner. Together, our work highlights differences in specific aspects of OL biology as driven by laminin-2-dependent or independent ILK governed mechanisms. We also reinforce the idea of OLs as growth cone bearing cells and describe the neuronal-like cytoskeleton therein. Finally, we demonstrate a role for ILK in OL growth cone maturation through microtubule regulation, the loss of which translates to decreased process length and myelin production capacity. We describe herein how different substrates fundamentally alter the oligodendrocyte's response to loss of integrin-linked kinase (ILK). On laminin-2 (Ln-2), ILK-depleted oligodendrocytes appear stunted and malformed, while on the non-integrin-activating substrate PLL branching and membrane formation are restored. We also reinforce the idea of oligodendrocytes as growth cone-bearing cells, detailing the growth cone's cytoskeletal architecture. Strikingly, loss of ILK on poly-l-lysine leads to growth cone swelling, the structure's size and

  16. Universal relationships to determine adhesion energy from vesicle-substrate interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Irajizad, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion molecules play an integral role in diverse biological functions ranging from cellular growth to transport. Estimation of their binding affinity, therefore, becomes important to quantify their biophysical impact on these phenomena. In this paper, we use curvature elasticity to present non-intuitive, yet remarkably simple, universal relationships to tease out adhesion energy from vesicle-substrate experiments. Our study reveals that the inverse of the height, exponential of the contact area, and the force required to detach the vesicle from the substrate vary linearly with the square root of the adhesion energy. We validate the modeling predictions with experimental data from two previous studies.

  17. Evaluation and criterion determination of the low-k thin film adhesion by the surface acoustic waves with cohesive zone model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xia; Qi, Haiyang; Sui, Xiaole; Kikkawa, Takamaro

    2017-03-01

    The cohesive zone model (CZM) is introduced in the surface acoustic wave (SAW) technique to characterize the interfacial adhesion property of the low-k thin film deposited on the Silicon substrate. The ratio of the two parameters in the CZM, the maximum normal traction and normal interface characteristic length, is derived to evaluate the interfacial adhesion properties quantitatively. In this study, the adhesion criterion to judge the adhesion property is newly proposed by the CZM-SAW technique. The criterion determination processes of two kinds of film, dense and porous Black Diamond with different film thicknesses, are presented in this paper. The interfacial adhesion properties of the dense and porous Black Diamond films with different thicknesses are evaluated by the CZM-SAW technique quantitatively and nondestructively. The quantitative adhesion properties are obtained by fitting the experimental dispersion curves with maximum frequency up to 220 MHz with the theoretical ones. Results of the nondestructive CZM-SAW technique and the destructive nanoscratch exhibit the same trend in adhesion properties, which means that the CZM-SAW technique is a promising method for determining the interfacial adhesion. Meanwhile, the adhesion properties of the detected samples are judged by the determined criterion. The test results show that different test film materials with different film thicknesses ranging from 300 nm to 1000 nm are in different adhered conditions. This paper exhibits the advantage of the CZM-SAW technique which can be a universal method to characterize the film adhesion.

  18. Dynamic adhesion of eryptotic erythrocytes to endothelial cells via CXCL16/SR-PSOX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borst, Oliver; Abed, Majed; Alesutan, Ioana; Towhid, Syeda T; Qadri, Syed M; Föller, Michael; Gawaz, Meinrad; Lang, Florian

    2012-02-15

    Suicidal death of erythrocytes, or eryptosis, is characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling leading to phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface. Eryptosis is triggered by increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity, which may result from treatment with the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin or from energy depletion by removal of glucose. The present study tested the hypothesis that phosphatidylserine exposure at the erythrocyte surface fosters adherence to endothelial cells of the vascular wall under flow conditions at arterial shear rates and that binding of eryptotic cells to endothelial cells is mediated by the transmembrane CXC chemokine ligand 16 (CXCL16). To this end, human erythrocytes were exposed to energy depletion (for 48 h) or treated with the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin (1 μM for 30 min). Phosphatidylserine exposure was quantified utilizing annexin-V binding, cell volume was estimated from forward scatter in FACS analysis, and erythrocyte adhesion to human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) was determined in a flow chamber model. As a result, both, ionomycin and glucose depletion, triggered eryptosis and enhanced the percentage of erythrocytes adhering to HUVEC under flow conditions at arterial shear rates. The adhesion was significantly blunted in the presence of erythrocyte phosphatidylserine-coating annexin-V (5 μl/ml), of a neutralizing antibody against endothelial CXCL16 (4 μg/ml), and following silencing of endothelial CXCL16 with small interfering RNA. The present observations demonstrate that eryptotic erythrocytes adhere to endothelial cells of the vascular wall in part by interaction of phosphatidylserine exposed at the erythrocyte surface with endothelial CXCL16.

  19. Amino-terminal domain of classic cadherins determines the specificity of the adhesive interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Troyanovsky, R B; Laur, O Y

    2000-01-01

    Classic cadherins are transmembrane receptors involved in cell type-specific calcium-dependent intercellular adhesion. The specificity of adhesion is mediated by homophilic interactions between cadherins extending from opposing cell surfaces. In addition, classic cadherins can self......-associate forming lateral dimers. Whereas it is widely excepted that lateral dimerization of cadherins is critical for adhesion, details of this process are not known. Yet, no evidence for physical association between different classic cadherins in cells expressing complex cadherin patterns has been reported....... To study lateral and adhesive intercadherin interactions, we examined interactions between two classic cadherins, E- and P-cadherins, in epithelial A-431 cells co-producing both proteins. We showed that these cells exhibited heterocomplexes consisting of laterally assembled E- and P...

  20. Using engineered single-chain antibodies to correlate molecular binding properties and nanoparticle adhesion dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Jered B; Pepper, Lauren R; Boder, Eric T; Hammer, Daniel A

    2011-11-15

    Elucidation of the relationship between targeting molecule binding properties and the adhesive behavior of therapeutic or diagnostic nanocarriers would aid in the design of optimized vectors and lead to improved efficacy. We measured the adhesion of 200-nm-diameter particles under fluid flow that was mediated by a diverse array of molecular interactions, including recombinant single-chain antibodies (scFvs), full antibodies, and the avidin/biotin interaction. Within the panel of scFvs, we used a family of mutants that display a spectrum of binding kinetics, allowing us to compare nanoparticle adhesion to bond chemistry. In addition, we explored the effect of molecular size by inserting a protein linker into the scFv fusion construct and by employing scFvs that are specific for targets with vastly different sizes. Using computational models, we extracted multivalent kinetic rate constants for particle attachment and detachment from the adhesion data and correlated the results to molecular binding properties. Our results indicate that the factors that increase encounter probability, such as adhesion molecule valency and size, directly enhance the rate of nanoparticle attachment. Bond kinetics had no influence on scFv-mediated nanoparticle attachment within the kinetic range tested, however, but did appear to affect antibody/antigen and avidin/biotin mediated adhesion. We attribute this finding to a combination of multivalent binding and differences in bond mechanical strength between recombinant scFvs and the other adhesion molecules. Nanoparticle detachment probability correlated directly with adhesion molecule valency and size, as well as the logarithm of the affinity for all molecules tested. On the basis of this work, scFvs can serve as viable targeting receptors for nanoparticles, but improvements to their bond mechanical strength would likely be required to fully exploit their tunable kinetic properties and maximize the adhesion efficiency of nanoparticles that

  1. Atomic force microscope adhesion measurements and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations at different humidities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppä, Jeremias; Reischl, Bernhard; Sairanen, Hannu; Korpelainen, Virpi; Husu, Hannu; Heinonen, Martti; Raiteri, Paolo; Rohl, Andrew L.; Nordlund, Kai; Lassila, Antti

    2017-03-01

    Due to their operation principle atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are sensitive to all factors affecting the detected force between the probe and the sample. Relative humidity is an important and often neglected—both in experiments and simulations—factor in the interaction force between AFM probe and sample in air. This paper describes the humidity control system designed and built for the interferometrically traceable metrology AFM (IT-MAFM) at VTT MIKES. The humidity control is based on circulating the air of the AFM enclosure via dryer and humidifier paths with adjustable flow and mixing ratio of dry and humid air. The design humidity range of the system is 20–60 %rh. Force–distance adhesion studies at humidity levels between 25 %rh and 53 %rh are presented and compared to an atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The uncertainty level of the thermal noise method implementation used for force constant calibration of the AFM cantilevers is 10 %, being the dominant component of the interaction force measurement uncertainty. Comparing the simulation and the experiment, the primary uncertainties are related to the nominally 7 nm radius and shape of measurement probe apex, possible wear and contamination, and the atomistic simulation technique details. The interaction forces are of the same order of magnitude in simulation and measurement (5 nN). An elongation of a few nanometres of the water meniscus between probe tip and sample, before its rupture, is seen in simulation upon retraction of the tip in higher humidity. This behaviour is also supported by the presented experimental measurement data but the data is insufficient to conclusively verify the quantitative meniscus elongation.

  2. Noise and determinism in synchronized sheep dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenfell, B. T.; Wilson, K.; Finkenstädt, B. F.; Coulson, T. N.; Murray, S.; Albon, S. D.; Pemberton, J. M.; Clutton-Brock, T. H.; Crawley, M. J.

    1998-08-01

    A major debate in ecology concerns the relative importance of intrinsic factors and extrinsic environmental variations in determining population size fluctuations. Spatial correlation of fluctuations in different populations caused by synchronous environmental shocks,, is a powerful tool for quantifying the impact of environmental variations on population dynamics,. However, interpretation of synchrony is often complicated by migration between populations,. Here we address this issue by using time series from sheep populations on two islands in the St Kilda archipelago. Fluctuations in the sizes of the two populations are remarkably synchronized over a 40-year period. A nonlinear time-series model shows that a high and frequent degree of environmental correlation is required to achieve this level of synchrony. The model indicates that if there were less environmental correlation, population dynamics would be much less synchronous than is observed. This is because of a threshold effect that is dependent on population size; the threshold magnifies random differences between populations. A refined model showsthat part of the required environmental synchronicity can be accounted for by large-scale weather variations. These results underline the importance of understanding the interaction between intrinsic and extrinsic influences on population dynamics.

  3. A short-time scale colloidal system reveals early bacterial adhesion dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Beloin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of bacteria on abiotic surfaces has important public health and sanitary consequences. However, despite several decades of study of bacterial adhesion to inert surfaces, the biophysical mechanisms governing this process remain poorly understood, due, in particular, to the lack of methodologies covering the appropriate time scale. Using micrometric colloidal surface particles and flow cytometry analysis, we developed a rapid multiparametric approach to studying early events in adhesion of the bacterium Escherichia coli. This approach simultaneously describes the kinetics and amplitude of early steps in adhesion, changes in physicochemical surface properties within the first few seconds of adhesion, and the self-association state of attached and free-floating cells. Examination of the role of three well-characterized E. coli surface adhesion factors upon attachment to colloidal surfaces--curli fimbriae, F-conjugative pilus, and Ag43 adhesin--showed clear-cut differences in the very initial phases of surface colonization for cell-bearing surface structures, all known to promote biofilm development. Our multiparametric analysis revealed a correlation in the adhesion phase with cell-to-cell aggregation properties and demonstrated that this phenomenon amplified surface colonization once initial cell-surface attachment was achieved. Monitoring of real-time physico-chemical particle surface properties showed that surface-active molecules of bacterial origin quickly modified surface properties, providing new insight into the intricate relations connecting abiotic surface physicochemical properties and bacterial adhesion. Hence, the biophysical analytical method described here provides a new and relevant approach to quantitatively and kinetically investigating bacterial adhesion and biofilm development.

  4. Receptor-mediated membrane adhesion of lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles studied by dissipative particle dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenlong; Gorfe, Alemayehu A.

    2014-12-01

    Lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles represent a novel class of targeted drug delivery platforms that combine the advantages of liposomes and biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles. However, the molecular details of the interaction between LPHs and their target cell membranes remain poorly understood. We have investigated the receptor-mediated membrane adhesion process of a ligand-tethered LPH nanoparticle using extensive dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. We found that the spontaneous adhesion process follows a first-order kinetics characterized by two distinct stages: a rapid nanoparticle-membrane engagement, followed by a slow growth in the number of ligand-receptor pairs coupled with structural re-organization of both the nanoparticle and the membrane. The number of ligand-receptor pairs increases with the dynamic segregation of ligands and receptors toward the adhesion zone causing an out-of-plane deformation of the membrane. Moreover, the fluidity of the lipid shell allows for strong nanoparticle-membrane interactions to occur even when the ligand density is low. The LPH-membrane avidity is enhanced by the increased stability of each receptor-ligand pair due to the geometric confinement and the cooperative effect arising from multiple binding events. Thus, our results reveal the unique advantages of LPH nanoparticles as active cell-targeting nanocarriers and provide some general principles governing nanoparticle-cell interactions that may aid future design of LPHs with improved affinity and specificity for a given target of interest.

  5. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-07

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing.

  6. Dynamic bio-adhesion of polymer nanoparticles on MDCK epithelial cells and its impact on bio-membranes, endocytosis and paracytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bing; Yuan, Lan; Dai, Wenbing; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Fang, Weigang; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays, concern about the use of nanotechnology for biomedical application is unprecedentedly increasing. In fact, nanosystems applied for various potential clinical uses always have to cross the primary biological barrier consisting of epithelial cells. However, little is really known currently in terms of the influence of the dynamic bio-adhesion of nanosystems on bio-membranes as well as on endocytosis and transcytosis. This was investigated here using polymer nanoparticles (PNs) and MDCK epithelial cells as the models. Firstly, the adhesion of PNs on cell membranes was found to be time-dependent with a shift of both location and dispersion pattern, from the lateral adhesion of mainly mono-dispersed PNs initially to the apical coverage of the PN aggregate later. Then, it was interesting to observe in this study that the dynamic bio-adhesion of PNs only affected their endocytosis but not their transcytosis. It was important to find that the endocytosis of PNs was not a constant process. A GM1 dependent CDE (caveolae dependent endocytosis) pathway was dominant in the preliminary stage, followed by the co-existence of a CME (clathrin-mediated endocytosis) pathway for the PN aggregate at a later stage, in accordance with the adhesion features of PNs, suggesting the modification of PN adhesion patterns on the endocytosis pathways. Next, the PN adhesion was noticed to affect the structure of cell junctions, via altering the extra- and intra-cellular calcium levels, leading to the enhanced paracellular transport of small molecules, but not favorably enough for the obviously increased passing of PNs themselves. Finally, FRAP and other techniques all demonstrated the obvious impact of PN adhesion on the membrane confirmation, independent of the adhesion location and time, which might lower the threshold for the internalization of PNs, even their aggregates. Generally, these findings confirm that the transport pathway mechanism of PNs through epithelial cells is rather

  7. Dynamic interplay between adhesion surfaces in carcinomas:Cell-cell and cell-matrix crosstalk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yvonne E Smith; Sri HariKrishna Vellanki; Ann M Hopkins

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling and communication between adhesion sites involve mechanisms which are required for cellular functions during normal development and homeostasis; however these cellular functions and mechanisms are often deregulated in cancer. Aberrant signaling at cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion sites often involves downstream mediators including Rho GTPases and tyrosine kinases. This review discusses these molecules as putative mediators of cellular crosstalk between cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion sites, in addition to their attractiveness as therapeutic targets in cancer. Interestingly, inter-junctional crosstalk mechanisms are frequently typified by the way in which bacterial and viral pathogens opportunistically infect or intoxicate mammalian cells. This review therefore also discusses the concept of learning from pathogen-host interaction studies to better understand coordinated communication between cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion sites, in addition to highlighting the potential therapeutic usefulness of exploiting pathogens or their products to tap into inter-junctional crosstalk. Taken together, we feel that increased knowledge around mechanisms of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion site crosstalk and consequently a greater understanding of their therapeutic targeting offers a unique opportunity to contribute to the emerging molecular revolution in cancer biology.

  8. Determining gastric cancer resectability by dynamic MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Zilai; Zhang, Huan; Du, Lianjun; Ding, Bei; Song, Qi; Ling, Huawei; Huang, Baisong; Chen, Kemin [Jiaotong University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Yan, Chao [Jiaotong University, Department of Surgery, Shanghai (China)

    2010-03-15

    Multi-detector row CT (MDCT) has been widely used to detect primary lesions and to evaluate TNM staging. In this study we evaluated the accuracy of dynamic MDCT in the preoperative determination of the resectability of gastric cancer. MDCT was used to image 350 cases of gastric cancer diagnosed by biopsy before surgery. MDCT findings regarding TNM staging and resectability were correlated with surgical and pathological findings. The accuracy of MDCT for staging gastric cancer was high, especially for tumour stage T1 (94.3%), lymph node stage N2 (87.3%), and for predicting distant metastases (>96.6%). When resectability was considered to be the outcome, the total accuracy of MDCT was 87.4%, sensitivity was 89.7% and specificity was 76.7%. Results showed high sensitivity for identifying peritoneal seeding (90.0%) and for predicting liver metastasis (80.0%). Dynamic enhanced MDCT is useful for TNM staging of gastric cancers and for predicting tumour respectability preoperatively. (orig.)

  9. [Adhesive cutaneous pharmaceutical forms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafiţanu, E; Matei, I; Mungiu, O C; Pavelescu, M; Mîndreci, I; Apostol, I; Ionescu, G

    1989-01-01

    The adhesive cutaneous pharmaceutical forms aimed to local action release the drug substance in view of a dermatological, traumatological, antirheumatic, cosmetic action. Two such preparations were obtained and their stability, consistency and pH were determined. The "in vitro" tests of their bioavailability revealed the dynamics of calcium ions release according to the associations of each preparation. The bioavailability determined by evaluating the pharmacological response demonstrated the antiinflammatory action obtained by the association of calcium ions with the components extracted from poplar muds. The therapeutical efficiency of the studied preparations has proved in the treatment of some sport injuries.

  10. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Pppp... - Determination of Weight Volatile Matter Content and Weight Solids Content of Reactive Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Content and Weight Solids Content of Reactive Adhesives A Appendix A to Subpart PPPP of Part 63 Protection... Reactive Adhesives 1.0Applicability and Principle 1.1Applicability: This method applies to the... reactive adhesives. Reactive adhesives are composed, in large part, of monomers that react during...

  11. Fibroblast growth factor-regulated palmitoylation of the neural cell adhesion molecule determines neuronal morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Dityateva, Galina; Ruonala, Mika O; Fukata, Masaki; Fukata, Yuko; Kobe, Fritz; Wouters, Fred S; Delling, Markus; Bredt, David S; Schachner, Melitta; Dityatev, Alexander

    2008-09-03

    During development of the nervous system, short- and long-range signals cooperate to promote axonal growth, guidance, and target innervation. Particularly, a short-range signal transducer, the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), stimulates neurite outgrowth via mechanisms that require posttranslational modification of NCAM and signaling via receptors to a long-range messenger, the fibroblast growth factor (FGF). In the present study we further characterized a mechanism which regulates the functional interplay between NCAM and FGF receptor(s). We show that activation of FGF receptor(s) by FGF2 leads to palmitoylation of the two major transmembrane NCAM isoforms, NCAM140 and NCAM180, translocation of NCAM to GM1 ganglioside-containing lipid rafts, and stimulation of neurite outgrowth of hippocampal neurons. Ablation of NCAM, mutation of NCAM140 or NCAM180 palmitoylation sites, or pharmacological suppression of NCAM signaling inhibited FGF2-stimulated neurite outgrowth. Of the 23 members of the aspartate-histidine-histidine-cysteine (DHHC) domain containing proteins, DHHC-7 most strongly stimulated palmitoylation of NCAM, and enzyme activity was enhanced by FGF2. Thus, our study uncovers a molecular mechanism by which a growth factor regulates neuronal morphogenesis via activation of palmitoylation, which in turn modifies subcellular location and thus signaling via an adhesion molecule.

  12. β-Catenin-regulated myeloid cell adhesion and migration determine wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini-Nik, Saeid; Cambridge, Elizabeth; Yu, Winston; Guo, Anne; Whetstone, Heather; Nadesan, Puviindran; Poon, Raymond; Hinz, Boris; Alman, Benjamin A

    2014-06-01

    A β-catenin/T cell factor-dependent transcriptional program is critical during cutaneous wound repair for the regulation of scar size; however, the relative contribution of β-catenin activity and function in specific cell types in the granulation tissue during the healing process is unknown. Here, cell lineage tracing revealed that cells in which β-catenin is transcriptionally active express a gene profile that is characteristic of the myeloid lineage. Mice harboring a macrophage-specific deletion of the gene encoding β-catenin exhibited insufficient skin wound healing due to macrophage-specific defects in migration, adhesion to fibroblasts, and ability to produce TGF-β1. In irradiated mice, only macrophages expressing β-catenin were able to rescue wound-healing deficiency. Evaluation of scar tissue collected from patients with hypertrophic and normal scars revealed a correlation between the number of macrophages within the wound, β-catenin levels, and cellularity. Our data indicate that β-catenin regulates myeloid cell motility and adhesion and that β-catenin-mediated macrophage motility contributes to the number of mesenchymal cells and ultimate scar size following cutaneous injury.

  13. A method to determine Young's modulus of soft gels for cell adhesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoling Peng; Jianyong Huang; Lei Qin; Chunyang Xiong; Jing Fang

    2009-01-01

    A convenient technique is reported in this note for measuring elastic modulus of extremely soft material for cellular adhesion. Specimens of bending cylinder under gravity are used to avoid contact problem between testing device and sample, and a beam model is presented for evaluating the curvatures of gel beams with large elastic deformation. A self-adaptive algorithm is also proposed to search for the best estimation of gels' elastic moduli by comparing the experimental bending curvatures with those computed from the beam model with preestimated moduli. Application to the measurement of the property of polyacrylamide gels indicates that the material compliance varies with the concentrations of bis-acrylamide, and the gels become softer after being immersed in a culture medium for a period of time, no matter to what extent they are polymerized.

  14. Ovarian Cancer Cell Adhesion/Migration Dynamics on Micro-Structured Laminin Gradients Fabricated by Multiphoton Excited Photochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruei-Yu He

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Haptotaxis, i.e., cell migration in response to adhesive gradients, has been previously implicated in cancer metastasis. A better understanding of cell migration dynamics and their regulation could ultimately lead to new drug targets, especially for cancers with poor prognoses, such as ovarian cancer. Haptotaxis has not been well-studied due to the lack of biomimetic, biocompatible models, where, for example, microcontact printing and microfluidics approaches are primarily limited to 2D surfaces and cannot produce the 3D submicron features to which cells respond. Here we used multiphoton excited (MPE phototochemistry to fabricate nano/microstructured gradients of laminin (LN as 2.5D models of the ovarian basal lamina to study the haptotaxis dynamics of a series of ovarian cancer cells. Using these models, we found that increased LN concentration increased migration speed and also alignment of the overall cell morphology and their cytoskeleton along the linear axis of the gradients. Both these metrics were enhanced on LN compared to BSA gradients of the same design, demonstrating the importance of both topographic and ECM cues on the adhesion/migration dynamics. Using two different gradient designs, we addressed the question of the roles of local concentration and slope and found that the specific haptotactic response depends on the cell phenotype and not simply the gradient design. Moreover, small changes in concentration strongly affected the migration properties. This work is a necessary step in studying haptotaxis in more complete 3D models of the tumor microenvironment for ovarian and other cancers.

  15. Dynamic and Static Interactions between p120 Catenin and E-Cadherin Regulate the Stability of Cell-Cell Adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiyama, Noboru; Lee, Seung-Hye; Liu, Shuang; Li, Guang-Yao; Smith, Matthew J.; Reichardt, Louis F.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko (OCI); (UCSF)

    2010-04-26

    The association of p120 catenin (p120) with the juxtamembrane domain (JMD) of the cadherin cytoplasmic tail is critical for the surface stability of cadherin-catenin cell-cell adhesion complexes. Here, we present the crystal structure of p120 isoform 4A in complex with the JMD core region (JMD{sub core}) of E-cadherin. The p120 armadillo repeat domain contains modular binding pockets that are complementary to electrostatic and hydrophobic properties of the JMD{sub core}. Single-residue mutations within the JMD{sub core}-binding site of p120 abolished its interaction with E- and N-cadherins in vitro and in cultured cells. These mutations of p120 enabled us to clearly differentiate between N-cadherin-dependent and -independent steps of neuronal dendritic spine morphogenesis crucial for synapse development. NMR studies revealed that p120 regulates the stability of cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion by associating with the majority of the JMD, including residues implicated in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and Hakai-dependent ubiquitination of E-cadherin, through its discrete dynamic and static binding sites.

  16. Measurement of particle trajectories, dynamics, surface adhesion and detachment in near-wall shear flows using 3D velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Schmidt, Brian; Lawrence, Michael; Breuer, Kenneth

    2007-11-01

    Three-dimensional total internal reflection velocimetry (3D-TIRV) is used to measure the trajectories of fluorescent tracer particles within 200 nm of a wall. Diffusion and shear-induced motion can result in mean velocity measurement errors, and by taking measurements using different particle sizes and sampling times, we quantify these effects and compare with theory. We also use 3D-TIRV to observe and characterize the adhesion, surface rolling and release dynamics of particles that can adhere to the surface through the action of biological binding proteins. Particles coated with P-Selectin are allowed to adhere to and detach from a PSGL-1-coated microchannel surface, modeling the interaction between leukocytes (white blood cells) and blood vessels, respectively. Binding affinities, bond strengths and hydrodynamic interactions are inferred from the trajectory data.

  17. A family of ROP proteins that suppresses actin dynamics, and is essential for polarized growth and cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, Graham M; Baskin, Tobias I; Bezanilla, Magdalena

    2015-07-15

    In plants, the ROP family of small GTPases has been implicated in the polarized growth of tip-growing cells, such as root hairs and pollen tubes; however, most of the data derive from overexpressing ROP genes or constitutively active and dominant-negative isoforms, whereas confirmation by using loss-of-function studies has generally been lacking. Here, in the model moss Physcomitrella patens, we study ROP signaling during tip growth by using a loss-of-function approach based on RNA interference (RNAi) to silence the entire moss ROP family. We find that plants with reduced expression of ROP genes, in addition to failing to initiate tip growth, have perturbed cell wall staining, reduced cell adhesion and have increased actin-filament dynamics. Although plants subjected to RNAi against the ROP family also have reduced microtubule dynamics, this reduction is not specific to loss of ROP genes, as it occurs when actin function is compromised chemically or genetically. Our data suggest that ROP proteins polarize the actin cytoskeleton by suppressing actin-filament dynamics, leading to an increase in actin filaments at the site of polarized secretion.

  18. Determinants of Welfare Dynamics in Rural Nicaragua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kristian Thor

    2011-01-01

    welfare dynamics in rural Nicaragua, as initially poor households face a higher probability of being poor in the subsequent period compared with non-poor households. It is also found that household composition, access to non-agriculture wage income and ownership of productive assets are important factors...... in explaining poverty movements. Moreover, climate-related shocks such as droughts and pest attacks not only have persistent and adverse impacts on household consumption, but also affect households’ productive asset holdings, which could affect their income-generating potential in the longer term....

  19. Sialosyl-fucosyl Poly-LacNAc without the sialosyl-Lex epitope as the physiological myeloid cell ligand in E-selectin-dependent adhesion: studies under static and dynamic flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, K; Stroud, M R; Hakomori, S

    1997-10-14

    The majority of E- and P-selectin ligands in leukocytes and myelocytic or monocytic leukemia cells are carried by transmembrane glycoproteins having a tandem repeat mucin-like domain through which O-linked carbohydrate ligands are carried. However, determination of structure and adhesive function of carbohydrates in glycoproteins is extremely difficult because of the extensive structural heterogeneity and the scarcity of material for functional analysis. We have overcome this difficulty through use of poly-LacNAc gangliosides isolated from a large quantity of ( approximately 1.2 L packed) HL60 cells [Stroud, M. R., Handa, K., Salyan, M. E. K., Ito, K., Levery, S. B., Hakomori, S., Reinhold, B. B., & Reinhold, V. N. (1996) Biochemistry 35, 758-769, 770-778]. We identified two major types of poly-LacNAc gangliosides without the sialosyl-Lex epitope as being capable of binding to E-selectin: (i) those having a single alpha1-->3 fucosylation at internal GlcNAcs but not at the penultimate GlcNAc and (ii) those having double alpha1-->3 fucosylation at internal GlcNAcs, excluding the penultimate GlcNAc. Gangliosides from group i above did not show any adhesion under static conditions, but showed strong adhesion under dynamic flow conditions. Gangliosides from group ii above showed adhesion under both static and dynamic conditions, as did sialosyl-Lex (SLex)-containing structures in previous studies. However, SLex-containing poly-LacNAc gangliosides are virtually absent or present in only trace quantities in leukocytes and HL60 cells. Poly-LacNAc gangliosides from groups i and ii above, lacking SLex structure, are the major membrane components of leukocytes and HL60 cells. These carbohydrates, bound to lipid or to protein, may therefore be the physiological epitope for E-selectin-dependent binding of these cells, particularly under dynamic flow conditions.

  20. Cell adhesion-dependent membrane trafficking of a binding partner for the ebolavirus glycoprotein is a determinant of viral entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, Derek; Schornberg, Kathryn L; Shoemaker, Charles J; Delos, Sue E; Stantchev, Tzanko S; Clouse, Kathleen A; Broder, Christopher C; White, Judith M

    2010-09-21

    Ebolavirus is a hemorrhagic fever virus associated with high mortality. Although much has been learned about the viral lifecycle and pathogenesis, many questions remain about virus entry. We recently showed that binding of the receptor binding region (RBR) of the ebolavirus glycoprotein (GP) and infection by GP pseudovirions increase on cell adhesion independently of mRNA or protein synthesis. One model to explain these observations is that, on cell adhesion, an RBR binding partner translocates from an intracellular vesicle to the cell surface. Here, we provide evidence for this model by showing that suspension 293F cells contain an RBR binding site within a membrane-bound compartment associated with the trans-Golgi network and microtubule-organizing center. Consistently, trafficking of the RBR binding partner to the cell surface depends on microtubules, and the RBR binding partner is internalized when adherent cells are placed in suspension. Based on these observations, we reexamined the claim that lymphocytes, which are critical for ebolavirus pathogenesis, are refractory to infection because they lack an RBR binding partner. We found that both cultured and primary human lymphocytes (in suspension) contain an intracellular pool of an RBR binding partner. Moreover, we identified two adherent primate lymphocytic cell lines that bind RBR at their surface and strikingly, support GP-mediated entry and infection. In summary, our results reveal a mode of determining viral entry by a membrane-trafficking event that translocates an RBR binding partner to the cell surface, and they suggest that this process may be operative in cells important for ebolavirus pathogenesis (e.g., lymphocytes and macrophages).

  1. Spatial organization of adhesion: force-dependent regulation and function in tissue morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papusheva, Ekaterina; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2010-08-18

    Integrin- and cadherin-mediated adhesion is central for cell and tissue morphogenesis, allowing cells and tissues to change shape without loosing integrity. Studies predominantly in cell culture showed that mechanosensation through adhesion structures is achieved by force-mediated modulation of their molecular composition. The specific molecular composition of adhesion sites in turn determines their signalling activity and dynamic reorganization. Here, we will review how adhesion sites respond to mecanical stimuli, and how spatially and temporally regulated signalling from different adhesion sites controls cell migration and tissue morphogenesis.

  2. Inverse analysis determining interfacial properties between metal film and ceramic substrate with an adhesive layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haifeng Zhao; Yueguang Wei

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, peel tests and inverse analysis were performed to determine the interfacial mechanical parameters for the metal film/ceramic system with an epoxy interface layer between film and ceramic. Al films with a series of thicknesses between 20 and 250μm and three peel angles of 90°,135°and 180°were considered. A finite element model with the cohesive zone elements was used to simulate the peeling process. The finite element results were taken as the training data of a neural network in the inverse analysis. The interfacial cohesive energy and the separation strength can be determined based on the inverse analysis and peel experimental result

  3. MVL-PLA2, a snake venom phospholipase A2, inhibits angiogenesis through an increase in microtubule dynamics and disorganization of focal adhesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Bazaa

    Full Text Available Integrins are essential protagonists of the complex multi-step process of angiogenesis that has now become a major target for the development of anticancer therapies. We recently reported and characterized that MVL-PLA2, a novel phospholipase A2 from Macrovipera lebetina venom, exhibited anti-integrin activity. In this study, we show that MVL-PLA2 also displays potent anti-angiogenic properties. This phospholipase A2 inhibited adhesion and migration of human microvascular-endothelial cells (HMEC-1 in a dose-dependent manner without being cytotoxic. Using Matrigel and chick chorioallantoic membrane assays, we demonstrated that MVL-PLA2, as well as its catalytically inactivated form, significantly inhibited angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. We have also found that the actin cytoskeleton and the distribution of alphav beta3 integrin, a critical regulator of angiogenesis and a major component of focal adhesions, were disturbed after MVL-PLA2 treatment. In order to further investigate the mechanism of action of this protein on endothelial cells, we analyzed the dynamic instability behavior of microtubules in living endothelial cells. Interestingly, we showed that MVL-PLA2 significantly increased microtubule dynamicity in HMEC-1 cells by 40%. We propose that the enhancement of microtubule dynamics may explain the alterations in the formation of focal adhesions, leading to inhibition of cell adhesion and migration.

  4. Polarity determination in breast tissue: Desmosomal adhesion, myoepit helial cells, and laminin 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissell, Mina J.; Bilder, David

    2003-06-05

    In all epithelial organs, apicobasal polarity determines functional integrity and contributes to the maintenance of tissue and organ specificity. In the breast, the functional unit is a polar double-layered tube consisting of luminal epithelial cells surrounded by myoepithelial cells and a basement membrane. It is far from clear how this double-layered structure is established and how polarity is maintained. Two recent papers have shed some light onto this intriguing problem in mammary gland biology. The results point to desmosomes and laminin 1 as having crucial roles. However, some questions remain.

  5. Dry-Surface Simulation Method for the Determination of the Work of Adhesion of Solid-Liquid Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Frédéric; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2015-08-01

    We introduce a methodology, referred to as the dry-surface method, to calculate the work of adhesion of heterogeneous solid-liquid interfaces by molecular simulation. This method employs a straightforward thermodynamic integration approach to calculate the work of adhesion as the reversible work to turn off the attractive part of the actual solid-liquid interaction potential. It is formulated in such a way that it may be used either to evaluate the ability of force fields to reproduce reference values of the work of adhesion or to optimize force-field parameters with reference values of the work of adhesion as target quantities. The methodology is tested in the case of water on a generic model of nonpolar substrates with the structure of gold. It is validated through a quantitative comparison to phantom-wall calculations and against a previous characterization of the thermodynamics of the gold-water interface. It is found that the work of adhesion of water on nonpolar substrates is a nonlinear function of the microscopic solid-liquid interaction energy parameter. We also comment on the ability of mean-field approaches to predict the work of adhesion of water on nonpolar substrates. In addition, we discuss in detail the information on the solid-liquid interfacial thermodynamics delivered by the phantom-wall approach. We show that phantom-wall calculations yield the solid-liquid interfacial tension relative to the solid surface tension rather than the absolute solid-liquid interfacial tension as previously believed.

  6. Adhesive Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2003-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well...... to rewriting on arbitrary adhesive categories....

  7. A stochastic phase-field model determined from molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    von Schwerin, Erik

    2010-03-17

    The dynamics of dendritic growth of a crystal in an undercooled melt is determined by macroscopic diffusion-convection of heat and by capillary forces acting on the nanometer scale of the solid-liquid interface width. Its modelling is useful for instance in processing techniques based on casting. The phase-field method is widely used to study evolution of such microstructural phase transformations on a continuum level; it couples the energy equation to a phenomenological Allen-Cahn/Ginzburg-Landau equation modelling the dynamics of an order parameter determining the solid and liquid phases, including also stochastic fluctuations to obtain the qualitatively correct result of dendritic side branching. This work presents a method to determine stochastic phase-field models from atomistic formulations by coarse-graining molecular dynamics. It has three steps: (1) a precise quantitative atomistic definition of the phase-field variable, based on the local potential energy; (2) derivation of its coarse-grained dynamics model, from microscopic Smoluchowski molecular dynamics (that is Brownian or over damped Langevin dynamics); and (3) numerical computation of the coarse-grained model functions. The coarse-grained model approximates Gibbs ensemble averages of the atomistic phase-field, by choosing coarse-grained drift and diffusion functions that minimize the approximation error of observables in this ensemble average. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2010.

  8. Determining of the CME dynamics by digital image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigozo, Nivaor R.; Dal Lago, Alisson; Schuch, Nelson Jorge

    We have developed a new technique to detection of Coronal Mass Eject (CME) by used image processing. This is technique permit determined the CME dynamic (distance, velocity and acceleration radial, and distance, velocity and acceleration expansion). The CME dynamic is determined by selection a direction radial in a given LASCO image, which starts just before the occulter (close to the center) and extends to the extremity of the image. By tacking a series of image and extracting the same direction radial, for each of them and placing them side by side. It is possible to have a time history of any moving feature inside this direction. This technique allows you to choose the number of directions that will be used in CME detecting, i.e., in determining its dynamics.

  9. Light-curing efficiency of dental adhesives by gallium nitride violet-laser diode determined in terms of ultimate micro-tensile strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Kato, Junji; De Munck, Jan; Hatayama, Hitoshi; Haruyama, Akiko; Yoshinari, Masao; Takase, Yasuaki; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Tsunoda, Masatake

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether violet-laser diode (VLD) can be used as light-curing source. The ultimate (micro-)tensile strength (μTS) of three adhesives was determined when cured by VLD in comparison with curing by two different types of commercial LED light-curing units. One VLD (VLM 500) and two LED units (Curenos and G-Light Prima) were used to cure the adhesive resin of the two-step self-etch adhesives Clearfil SE Bond, Tokuso Mac Bond II, and FL-Bond II. A 0.6-mm thick acrylic mould was filled with adhesive resin and cured for 60 s. After 24-h water storage, specimens were trimmed into an hourglass shape with a width of 1.2 mm at the narrowest part, after which the μTS was determined (n=10). In addition, the light transmittance of each adhesive was characterized using a UV-vis-NIR spectrometer. No significant difference in curing efficiency between VLD and LED were observed for both Tokuso Mac Bond II and FL-Bond II (p>0.05). For Clearfil SE Bond, the μTS of VLD-cured specimens was higher than that of the specimens cured by the LED Curenos unit (p<0.05). Spectrometry revealed that this marked difference must be attributed to a different light transmittance of Clearfil SE Bond for visible blue light versus for the lower area of UV and visible violet light. In conclusion, A GaN-based violet laser diode can be used as light-curing source to initiate polymerization of dental resins.

  10. Development of a torsion pendulum and its application to measuring the dynamic modulus of adhesives from pre-gelation to the cured state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H.; Adams, R. D.; da Silva, L. F. M.

    2014-05-01

    The fact that adhesive modulus increases enormously during the cure process from zero to the order of a few GPa makes it difficult or impossible for any commercially available modulus measurement instrument to be used. In order to develop an apparatus to measure how the mechanical properties of the tested adhesive change with time so that the cure process can be monitored and internal residual cured stress can be calculated, a variety of existing methods and apparatuses have been looked at and some tested. A novel form of torsional pendulum for measuring the change of adhesive modulus with time and temperature has been developed. The novelty of the apparatus lies in using a low torsional stiffness soft rubber membrane to physically hold the sample in a uniaxial geometry. It was possible to oscillate the specimen over a range of frequencies, so that the measured dynamic shear modulus range of tested adhesives can be extended to the range of 0.005 MPa to over 1 GPa.

  11. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-03-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level.

  12. Bacillus cereus Adhesion to Simulated Intestinal Mucus Is Determined by Its Growth on Mucin, Rather Than Intestinal Environmental Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsilia, Varvara; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Rajkovic, Andreja; Heyndrickx, Marc; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2015-11-01

    Adhesion of pathogenic bacteria to intestinal mucus, the protective layer of the gastrointestinal epithelium, is often considered a virulence factor. The ability of food-poisoning Bacillus cereus strains to attach to mucus and the factors affecting this interaction have not yet been investigated. Therefore, the role of adhesion in pathogenesis of B. cereus still remains unknown. In the present study, an in vitro assay based on mucin agar was used to simulate adhesion of B. cereus to mucus. Bacterial-associated factors (e.g., strain specificity and microbial competition) known to influence adhesion to different surfaces and a variety of environmental conditions (e.g., pH and oxygen) encountered in the gastrointestinal tract were investigated. The effect of these parameters on B. cereus NVH 0500/00 mucin adhesion was generally limited even in the presence of microbial competition. This suggests that B. cereus NVH 0500/00 is a versatile pathogen. Inoculation of 4 to 5 log colony-forming units (CFU) per milliliter. B. cereus NVH 0500/00 resulted in 5-6 log CFU/mL mucin-associated bacteria after a short incubation period. This indicates that this pathogenic strain could grow in the presence of mucin agar. This growth may potentially mask the effect of the studied conditions. Yet, extensive attachment of B. cereus to mucin is not necessarily a prerequisite for virulence, because other pathogenic strains do not adhere with the same efficiency to mucin. Nevertheless, adhesion may contribute to the disease by providing close contact to nutrient sources, such as mucin, which would not only result in bacterial proliferation, but also in disruption of the protective host mucus surface.

  13. Characterization of fatigue damage in adhesively bonded lap joints through dynamic, full-spectral interrogation of fiber Bragg grating sensors: 1. Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S.; Shin, P.; Peters, K.; Zikry, M. A.; Stan, N.; Chadderdon, S.; Selfridge, R.; Schultz, S.

    2014-02-01

    In this study we measure the in situ response of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor embedded in the adhesive layer of a single composite lap joint, subjected to harmonic excitation after fatigue loading. After a fully reversed cyclic fatigue loading is applied to the composite lap joint, the full-spectral response of the sensor is interrogated at 100 kHz during two loading conditions: with and without an added harmonic excitation. The full-spectral information avoided dynamic measurement errors often experienced using conventional peak wavelength and edge filtering techniques. The short-time Fourier transform (STFT) is computed for the extracted peak wavelength information to reveal time-dependent frequencies and amplitudes of the dynamic FBG sensor response. The dynamic response of the FBG sensor indicated a transition to strong nonlinear dynamic behavior as fatigue-induced damage progressed. The ability to measure the dynamic response of the lap joint through sensors embedded in the adhesive layer can provide in situ monitoring of the lap joint condition.

  14. IGF-1 Receptor and adhesion signaling: an important axis in determining cancer cell phenotype and therapy resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orla T Cox

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available IGF-1R expression and activation levels generally cannot be correlated in cancer cells, suggesting that cellular proteins may modulate IGF-1R activity. Strong candidates for such modulation are found in cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion signaling complexes. Activated IGF-1R is present at focal adhesions, where it can stabilize β1 integrin and participate in signaling complexes that promote invasiveness associated with epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT, and resistance to therapy. Whether IGF-1R contributes to EMT or to non-invasive tumor growth may be strongly influenced by the degree of ECM engagement and the presence or absence of key proteins in IGF-1R-cell adhesion complexes. One such protein is PDLIM2, which promotes both cell polarization and EMT by regulating the stability of transcription factors including NFκB, STATs and beta catenin. PDLIM2 exhibits tumor suppressor activity, but is also highly expressed in certain invasive cancers. It is likely that distinct adhesion complex proteins modulate IGF-1R signaling during cancer progression or adaptive responses to therapy. Thus, identifying the key modulators will be important for developing effective therapeutic strategies and predictive biomarkers.

  15. Strong adhesion and friction coupling in hierarchical carbon nanotube arrays for dry adhesive applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shihao; Xia, Zhenhai; Gao, Xiaosheng

    2012-04-01

    The adhesion and friction coupling of hierarchical carbon nanotube arrays was investigated with a hierarchical multiscale modeling approach. At device level, vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNT) arrays with laterally distributed segments on top were analyzed via finite element methods to determine the macroscopic adhesion and friction force coupling. At the nanoscale, molecular dynamics simulation was performed to explore the origin of the adhesion enhancement due to the existence of the laterally distributed CNTs. The results show interfacial adhesion force is drastically promoted by interfacial friction force when a single lateral CNT is being peeled from an amorphous carbon substrate. By fitting with experiments, we find that under shearing loadings the maximum interfacial adhesion force is increased by a factor of ~5, compared to that under normal loadings. Pre-existing surface asperities of the substrate have proven to be the source of generating large interfacial friction, which in turn results in an enhanced adhesion. The critical peeling angles derived from the continuum and nano- levels are comparable to those of geckos and other synthetic adhesives. Our analysis indicates that the adhesion enhancement factor of the hierarchically structured VA-CNT arrays could be further increased by uniformly orienting the laterally distributed CNTs on top. Most importantly, a significant buckling of the lateral CNT at peeling front is captured on the molecular level, which provides a basis for the fundamental understanding of local deformation, and failure mechanisms of nanofibrillar structures. This work gives an insight into the durability issues that prevent the success of artificial dry adhesives.

  16. Adhesive Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2004-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well to rewrit...

  17. Satellite Aerodynamics and Density Determination from Satellite Dynamic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    The aerodynamic drag and lift properties of a satellite are first expressed as a function of two parameters associated with gas-surface interaction at the satellite surface. The dynamic response of the satellite as it passes through the atmosphere is then expressed as a function of the two gas-surface interaction parameters, the atmospheric density, the satellite velocity, and the satellite orientation to the high speed flow. By proper correlation of the observed dynamic response with the changing angle of attack of the satellite, it is found that the two unknown gas-surface interaction parameters can be determined. Once the gas-surface interaction parameters are known, the aerodynamic properties of the satellite at all angles of attack are also determined.

  18. INDIRECT DETERMINATION METHOD OF DYNAMIC FORCEBY USING CEPSTRUM ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴淼; 魏任之

    1996-01-01

    The dynamic load spectrum is one of the most important basis of design and dynamic characteristics analysis of machines. But it is difficult to measure it on many occasions, especially for mining machines, due to their bad working circumstances and high cost of measurements. For such situation, the load spectrum has to be obtained by indirect determination methods. A new method to identify the load spectrum, cepstrum analysis method, was presented in this paper.This method can be used to eliminate the filtering influence of transfer function to the response signals so that the load spectrum can be determined indirectly. The experimental and engineering actual examples indicates that this method has the advantages that the calculation is simple and the measurement is easy.

  19. Dynamic regulation of a cell adhesion protein complex including CADM1 by combinatorial analysis of FRAP with exponential curve-fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai-Yageta, Mika; Maruyama, Tomoko; Suzuki, Takashi; Ichikawa, Kazuhisa; Murakami, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Protein components of cell adhesion machinery show continuous renewal even in the static state of epithelial cells and participate in the formation and maintenance of normal epithelial architecture and tumor suppression. CADM1 is a tumor suppressor belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecule and forms a cell adhesion complex with an actin-binding protein, 4.1B, and a scaffold protein, MPP3, in the cytoplasm. Here, we investigate dynamic regulation of the CADM1-4.1B-MPP3 complex in mature cell adhesion by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis. Traditional FRAP analysis were performed for relatively short period of around 10 min. Here, thanks to recent advances in the sensitive laser detector systems, we examine FRAP of CADM1 complex for longer period of 60 min and analyze the recovery with exponential curve-fitting to distinguish the fractions with different diffusion constants. This approach reveals that the fluorescence recovery of CADM1 is fitted to a single exponential function with a time constant (τ) of approximately 16 min, whereas 4.1B and MPP3 are fitted to a double exponential function with two τs of approximately 40-60 sec and 16 min. The longer τ is similar to that of CADM1, suggesting that 4.1B and MPP3 have two distinct fractions, one forming a complex with CADM1 and the other present as a free pool. Fluorescence loss in photobleaching analysis supports the presence of a free pool of these proteins near the plasma membrane. Furthermore, double exponential fitting makes it possible to estimate the ratio of 4.1B and MPP3 present as a free pool and as a complex with CADM1 as approximately 3:2 and 3:1, respectively. Our analyses reveal a central role of CADM1 in stabilizing the complex with 4.1B and MPP3 and provide insight in the dynamics of adhesion complex formation.

  20. A novel dynamic layer-by-layer assembled nano-scale biointerface: functionality tests with platelet adhesion and aggregate morphology influenced by adenosine diphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Melanie G; Lopez, Juan M; Paun, Mihaela; Jones, Steven A

    2013-11-01

    An improved biointerface was developed, dynamic layer-by-layer self-assembly surface (d-LbL), and utilized as a biologically-active substrate for platelet adhesion and aggregation. Possible clinical applications for this research include improved anti-coagulation surfaces. This work demonstrated the functionality of d-LbL biointerfaces in the presence of platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) with the addition of 20 μM adenosine diphosphate (ADP), a thrombus activator. The surface morphology of the experimental control, plain PRP, was compared to PRP containing additional ADP (PRP + ADP) and resulted in an expected increase of platelet adhesions along the fibrinogen d-LbL substrate. The d-LbL process was used to coat glass slides with fibrinogen, Poly (sodium 4-styrene-sulfonate), and Poly (diallydimethlyammonium chloride). Slides were exposed to PRP under flow and static conditions with and without 20 μM of ADP. Fluorescence microscopy (FM), phase contrast microscopy (PCM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) were used to evaluate platelet adhesions under the influence of varied shear conditions. PCM images illustrated differences between the standard LbL and d-LbL substrates. FM images provided percent surface coverage values. For high-shear conditions, percent surface coverage values increased when using ADP whereas plain PRP exposure displayed no significant increase. AFM scans also displayed higher mean peak height values and unique surface characteristics for PRP + ADP as opposed to plain PRP. FE-SEM images revealed platelet adhesions along the biointerface and unique characteristics of the d-LbL surface. In conclusion, PRP + ADP was more effective at increasing platelet aggregation, especially under high shear conditions, providing further validation of the improved biointerface.

  1. A system dynamics model to determine products mix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahtab Hajghasem

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an implementation of system dynamics model to determine appropriate product mix by considering various factors such as labor, materials, overhead, etc. for an Iranian producer of cosmetic and sanitary products. The proposed model of this paper considers three hypotheses including the relationship between product mix and profitability, optimum production capacity and having minimum amount of storage to take advantage of low cost production. The implementation of system dynamics on VENSIM software package has confirmed all three hypotheses of the survey and suggested that in order to reach better mix product, it is necessary to reach optimum production planning, take advantage of all available production capacities and use inventory management techniques.

  2. Clustering determines the dynamics of complex contagions in multiplex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuang, Yong; Yağan, Osman

    2016-01-01

    We present the mathematical analysis of generalized complex contagions in clustered multiplex networks for susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR)-like dynamics. The model is intended to understand diffusion of influence, or any other spreading process implying a threshold dynamics, in setups of interconnected networks with significant clustering. The contagion is assumed to be general enough to account for a content-dependent linear threshold model, where each link type has a different weight (for spreading influence) that may depend on the content (e.g., product, rumor, political view) that is being spread. Using the generating functions formalism, we determine the conditions, probability, and expected size of the emergent global cascades. This analysis provides a generalization of previous approaches and is specially useful in problems related to spreading and percolation. The results present non trivial dependencies between the clustering coefficient of the networks and its average degree. In particular, sev...

  3. Platelet adhesion: structural and functional diversity of short dystrophin and utrophins in the formation of dystrophin-associated-protein complexes related to actin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecedo, Doris; Martínez-Rojas, Dalila; Chávez, Oscar; Martínez-Pérez, Francisco; García-Sierra, Francisco; Rendon, Alvaro; Mornet, Dominique; Mondragón, Ricardo

    2005-12-01

    Platelets are dynamic cell fragments that modify their shape during activation. Utrophin and dystrophins are minor actin-binding proteins present in muscle and non-muscle cytoskeleton. In the present study, we characterised the pattern of Dp71 isoforms and utrophin gene products by immunoblot in human platelets. Two new dystrophin isoforms were found, Dp71f and Dp71 d, as well as the Up71 isoform and the dystrophin-associated proteins, alpha and beta -dystrobrevins. Distribution of Dp71d/Dp71delta110m, Up400/Up71 and dystrophin-associated proteins in relation to the actin cytoskeleton was evaluated by confocal microscopy in both resting and platelets adhered on glass. Formation of two dystrophin-associated protein complexes (Dp71d/Dp71delta110m approximately DAPC and Up400/Up71 approximately DAPC) was demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation and their distribution in relation to the actin cytoskeleton was characterised during platelet adhesion. The Dp71d/Dp71delta100m approximately DAPC is maintained mainly at the granulomere and is associated with dynamic structures during activation by adhesion to thrombin-coated surfaces. Participation of both Dp71d/Dp71delta110m approximately DAPC and Up400/Up71 approximately DAPC in the biological roles of the platelets is discussed.

  4. Control of high affinity interactions in the talin C terminus: how talin domains coordinate protein dynamics in cell adhesions.

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In cell-extracellular matrix junctions (focal adhesions), the cytoskeletal protein talin is central to the connection of integrins to the actin cytoskeleton. Talin is thought to mediate this connection via its two integrin, (at least) three actin, and several vinculin binding sites. The binding sites are cryptic in the head-to-rod autoinhibited cytoplasmic form of the protein and require (stepwise) conformational activation. This activation process, however, remains poorly understood, and the...

  5. Clustering determines the dynamics of complex contagions in multiplex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yong; Arenas, Alex; Yaǧan, Osman

    2017-01-01

    We present the mathematical analysis of generalized complex contagions in a class of clustered multiplex networks. The model is intended to understand spread of influence, or any other spreading process implying a threshold dynamics, in setups of interconnected networks with significant clustering. The contagion is assumed to be general enough to account for a content-dependent linear threshold model, where each link type has a different weight (for spreading influence) that may depend on the content (e.g., product, rumor, political view) that is being spread. Using the generating functions formalism, we determine the conditions, probability, and expected size of the emergent global cascades. This analysis provides a generalization of previous approaches and is especially useful in problems related to spreading and percolation. The results present nontrivial dependencies between the clustering coefficient of the networks and its average degree. In particular, several phase transitions are shown to occur depending on these descriptors. Generally speaking, our findings reveal that increasing clustering decreases the probability of having global cascades and their size, however, this tendency changes with the average degree. There exists a certain average degree from which on clustering favors the probability and size of the contagion. By comparing the dynamics of complex contagions over multiplex networks and their monoplex projections, we demonstrate that ignoring link types and aggregating network layers may lead to inaccurate conclusions about contagion dynamics, particularly when the correlation of degrees between layers is high.

  6. [Simultaneous determination of 23 ester compounds in cigarette water-borne adhesives by liquid-liquid extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Shuguo; Kong, Bo; Tuo, Suxing; Dai, Yunhui; Wu, Mingjian; Tan, Liquan; Liu, Wei

    2013-10-01

    A method of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with liquid-liquid extraction has been developed for the simultaneous determination of 23 ester compounds including acetate esters, acrylic esters, metacrylic acid esters and phthalate acid esters in cigarette water-borne adhesives. After dispersed in water, the sample was extracted by n-hexane solution containing phenyl ethyl propionate as internal standard substance. Then, the solution was centrifuged and filtrated through a 0.45 microm organic membrane filter. Finally, the solution was separated on a DB-WAXETR column (60 m x 0.25 mm x 0.25 microm), and detected with MS in selected ion monitoring mode, and quantified by internal standard method. The results showed a good linear correlation in the range of 0.4-50.0 mg/L. The recoveries of the ester compounds spiked in the sample were 81.8%-109.1%, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 5) were less than 4%. The limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantification (LOQs were in the ranges of 0.02-0.76 mg/kg and 0.04-2.52 mg/kg, respectively. The method is simple, time-saving, and has high sensitivity and good reproducibility. It can be applied to the determination of the 23 ester compounds in cigarette water-borne adhesives.

  7. Determination of dynamic fracture toughness using a new experimental technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cady Carl M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In other studies dynamic fracture toughness has been measured using Charpy impact and modified Hopkinson Bar techniques. In this paper results will be shown for the measurement of fracture toughness using a new test geometry. The crack propagation velocities range from ∼0.15 mm/s to 2.5 m/s. Digital image correlation (DIC will be the technique used to measure both the strain and the crack growth rates. The boundary of the crack is determined using the correlation coefficient generated during image analysis and with interframe timing the crack growth rate and crack opening can be determined. A comparison of static and dynamic loading experiments will be made for brittle polymeric materials. The analysis technique presented by Sammis et al. [1] is a semi-empirical solution, however, additional Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics analysis of the strain fields generated as part of the DIC analysis allow for the more commonly used method resembling the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD experiment. It should be noted that this technique was developed because limited amounts of material were available and crack growth rates were to fast for a standard CTOD method.

  8. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  9. Stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by surface wrinkling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hoon Eui; Kwak, Moon Kyu; Suh, Kahp Y

    2010-02-16

    We introduce a simple yet robust method of fabricating a stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by combining replica molding and surface wrinkling. By utilizing a thin, wrinkled polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sheet with a thickness of 1 mm with built-in micropillars, active, dynamic control of normal and shear adhesion was achieved. Relatively strong normal (approximately 10.8 N/cm(2)) and shear adhesion (approximately 14.7 N/cm(2)) forces could be obtained for a fully extended (strained) PDMS sheet (prestrain of approximately 3%), whereas the forces could be rapidly reduced to nearly zero once the prestrain was released (prestrain of approximately 0.5%). Moreover, durability tests demonstrated that the adhesion strength in both the normal and shear directions was maintained over more than 100 cycles of attachment and detachment.

  10. Stretchable, Adhesion-Tunable Dry Adhesive by Surface Wrinkling

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Hoon Eui

    2010-02-16

    We introduce a simple yet robust method of fabricating a stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by combining replica molding and surface wrinkling. By utilizing a thin, wrinkled polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sheet with a thickness of 1 mm with built-in micropillars, active, dynamic control of normal and shear adhesion was achieved. Relatively strong normal (∼10.8 N/cm2) and shear adhesion (∼14.7 N/cm2) forces could be obtained for a fully extended (strained) PDMS sheet (prestrain of∼3%), whereas the forces could be rapidly reduced to nearly zero once the prestrain was released (prestrain of ∼0.5%). Moreover, durability tests demonstrated that the adhesion strength in both the normal and shear directions was maintained over more than 100 cycles of attachment and detachment. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  11. Three-phase hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction combined with HPLC-UV for the determination of isothiazolinone biocides in adhesives used for food packaging materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosero-Moreano, Milton; Canellas, Elena; Nerín, Cristina

    2014-02-01

    The present study deals with the development of a liquid microextraction procedure for enhancing the sensitivity of the determination of 2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one and 5-chloro-2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one in adhesives. The procedure involves a three-phase hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction using a semipermeable polypropylene membrane, which contained 1-octanol as the organic phase in the pores of the membrane. The donor and acceptor phases are aqueous acidic and alkaline media, respectively, and the final liquid phase (acceptor) is analyzed by HPLC coupled with diode array detection. The most appropriate conditions were extraction time 20 min, stirring speed 1400 rpm, extraction temperature 50°C. The quantification limits of the method were 0.123 and 0.490 μg/g for 2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one and 5-chloro-2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one, respectively. Three different adhesive samples were successfully analyzed. The procedure was compared to direct analysis using ultra high pressure liquid chromatography coupled with TOF-MS, where the identification of the compounds and the quantification values were confirmed.

  12. Dynamic change of Adamalysin 19 (ADAM19) in human placentas and its effects on cell invasion and adhesion in human trophoblastic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SANG; QingXiang; Amy

    2009-01-01

    Human ADAM19 is a recently identified member of the ADAM family.It is highly expressed in human placentas,but its dynamic change and function at the human feto-maternal interface during placentation remain to be elucidated.In this present study,the spatial and temporal expression and cellular localization of ADAM19 in normal human placentas were first demonstrated,and the effects of ADAM19 on trophoblast cell adhesion and invasion were further investigated by using a human choriocarcinoma cell line(JEG-3) as an in vitro model.The data demonstrated that ADAM19 was widely distributed in villous cytotrophoblast cells,syncytiotrophoblast cells,column trophoblasts,and villous capillary endothelial cells during early pregnancy.The mRNA and protein level of ADAM19 in placentas was high at gestational weeks 8-9,but diminished significantly at mid-and term pregnancy.In JEG-3 cells,the overexpression of ADAM19 led to diminished cell invasion,as well as increases in cell adhesiveness and the expression of E-cadherin,with no changes in β-catenin expression observed.These data indicate that ADAM19 may participate in the coordinated regulation of human trophoblast cell behaviors during the process of placentation.

  13. Determining habitat quality for species that demonstrate dynamic habitat selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerens, James; Frederick, Peter C; Noonburg, Erik G; Gawlik, Dale E.

    2015-01-01

    Determining habitat quality for wildlife populations requires relating a species' habitat to its survival and reproduction. Within a season, species occurrence and density can be disconnected from measures of habitat quality when resources are highly seasonal, unpredictable over time, and patchy. Here we establish an explicit link among dynamic selection of changing resources, spatio-temporal species distributions, and fitness for predictive abundance and occurrence models that are used for short-term water management and long-term restoration planning. We used the wading bird distribution and evaluation models (WADEM) that estimate (1) daily changes in selection across resource gradients, (2) landscape abundance of flocks and individuals, (3) conspecific foraging aggregation, and (4) resource unit occurrence (at fixed 400 m cells) to quantify habitat quality and its consequences on reproduction for wetland indicator species. We linked maximum annual numbers of nests detected across the study area and nesting success of Great Egrets (Ardea alba), White Ibises (Eudocimus albus), and Wood Storks (Mycteria americana) over a 20-year period to estimated daily dynamics of food resources produced by WADEM over a 7490 km2 area. For all species, increases in predicted species abundance in March and high abundance in April were strongly linked to breeding responses. Great Egret nesting effort and success were higher when birds also showed greater conspecific foraging aggregation. Synthesis and applications: This study provides the first empirical evidence that dynamic habitat selection processes and distributions of wading birds over environmental gradients are linked with reproductive measures over periods of decades. Further, predictor variables at a variety of temporal (daily-multiannual) resolutions and spatial (400 m to regional) scales effectively explained variation in ecological processes that change habitat quality. The process used here allows managers to develop

  14. DETERMINATION OF BONDING PERFORMANCES OF MODIFIED POLYVINYLACETATE (PVAc AND KLEBIT 303 (K.303 ADHESIVES IN DIFFERENT HOT-SURROUNDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa ALTINOK

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, performances of woods bonded with polyvinylacetate (PVAc and Klebit 303 (K.303 thermoplastics glues and PVAc+UF and K.303+UF thermoset glues that were modified with Urea-fomaldehyde were investiguted at various temperatures. In total, 320 experimental samples were investigated at various temperatures which were prepared from pine wood (Pinus sylvestris L., beech wood (Fagus orientalis L. and were bonded with PVAc, K.303, PVAc+UF, K.303+UF glues. After these experimental samples were held for two hours at 20 °C, 40 °C, 60 °C, 80 °C temperature, tensile test was applied according TS EN 205. It was found that the adhesion performance of unmodified PVAc and K.303 bonded samples decreases when temperature increases, moreover, this retuction is smaller in samples bonded with PVAc+UF and K.303+UF in comparison to unmodified glues and in samples of beech wood in comparison to pine wood.

  15. Determining equilibrium constants for dimerization reactions from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jong, Djurre H; Schäfer, Lars V; De Vries, Alex H; Marrink, Siewert J; Berendsen, Herman J C; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2011-07-15

    With today's available computer power, free energy calculations from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations "via counting" become feasible for an increasing number of reactions. An example is the dimerization reaction of transmembrane alpha-helices. If an extended simulation of the two helices covers sufficiently many dimerization and dissociation events, their binding free energy is readily derived from the fraction of time during which the two helices are observed in dimeric form. Exactly how the correct value for the free energy is to be calculated, however, is unclear, and indeed several different and contradictory approaches have been used. In particular, results obtained via Boltzmann statistics differ from those determined via the law of mass action. Here, we develop a theory that resolves this discrepancy. We show that for simulation systems containing two molecules, the dimerization free energy is given by a formula of the form ΔG ∝ ln(P(1) /P(0) ). Our theory is also applicable to high concentrations that typically have to be used in molecular dynamics simulations to keep the simulation system small, where the textbook dilute approximations fail. It also covers simulations with an arbitrary number of monomers and dimers and provides rigorous error estimates. Comparison with test simulations of a simple Lennard Jones system with various particle numbers as well as with reference free energy values obtained from radial distribution functions show full agreement for both binding free energies and dimerization statistics.

  16. Dynamic determination reserves of the underground gas storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭羽非

    2004-01-01

    One of the key problems in the use of underground gas storage is frequent leakage. It can lead to the actual gas storage amount being less than that accounted for. Combining numerical simulation and parameter auto fit, this paper ascertains the dynamic variation of the pressure in the storage reservoir, adjusts the actual injecting and producing gas to fit the accounted pressure with the tested pressure, obtains the gas leakage of the storage, and then determines the difference between accounted amount and leakage amount. The result is the actual reserves of the storage. The simulation result shows that the method presented can provide a theoretic foundation for estimating the leakage amount, thereby ensuring the actual reserves, searching the leakage route,and reducing leakage by adjusting the storage method.

  17. Determination of Reference Chemical Potential Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnadeo Jatkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method implementing molecular dynamics (MD simulations for calculating the reference properties of simple gas hydrates has been proposed. The guest molecules affect interaction between adjacent water molecules distorting the hydrate lattice, which requires diverse values of reference properties for different gas hydrates. We performed simulations to validate the experimental data for determining Δ0, the chemical potential difference between water and theoretical empty cavity at the reference state, for structure II type gas hydrates. Simulations have also been used to observe the variation of the hydrate unit cell volume with temperature. All simulations were performed using TIP4P water molecules at the reference temperature and pressure conditions. The values were close to the experimental values obtained by the Lee-Holder model, considering lattice distortion.

  18. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... is the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental parameters......, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to significantly...

  19. An improved layer-by-layer self-assembly technique to generate biointerfaces for platelet adhesion studies: Dynamic LbL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Juan Manuel

    sequentially at selected surface locations to generate a composite overlap of presumed platelet adhesion as a function of fibrinogen distribution. The method was unable to distinguish the surface from the adhered cells. The surface inhomogeneity and porosity retained a large amount of acridine orange stain, even in the absence of platelets, and components in the platelet-rich plasma (PRP) were found to fix acridine orange in a mode that fluoresced in the FITC imaging FM. Both of these problems obfuscated the platelet adhesion FM results when using s-LbL surfaces and acridine orange staining of platelets. A dynamic process (d-LbL) was developed in which a solution of the molecule to be layered was constantly washed over the surface, and was constantly mixed to maintain a more homogeneous distribution of solute relative to the surface during the layering process. The d-LbL surfaces were tested as described above, and found to reduce the size and number of regions of anomalous acridine orange pooling trapped by the surface, providing a greater consistency and reliability in identifying platelets. The improved surface was then used in a series of platelet adhesion experiments under static and dynamic flow conditions, and with and without the chemical additive L-arginine. The complex microcharmel system used in prior studies was replaced with a simpler system involving fewer nuisance variables for these tests. The tests were performed on both collagen and fibrinogen surfaces. Collagen has been used as a thrombogenic surface in multiple studies in the literature, but produces additional variables in thrombogenesis control that are avoided when fibrinogen is used. In these tests, fibrinogen was found to be as thrombogenic as collagen, and platelet coverage of both biointerfaces was reduced by L-arginine in a manner similar to previously reported work. The simpler system differed from the previous microchannel system in important factors: (1) It exposed the platelets to much lower

  20. GPS-Based Reduced Dynamic Orbit Determination Using Accelerometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanHelleputte, Tom; Visser, Pieter

    2007-01-01

    Currently two gravity field satellite missions, CHAMP and GRACE, are equipped with high sensitivity electrostatic accelerometers, measuring the non-conservative forces acting on the spacecraft in three orthogonal directions. During the gravity field recovery these measurements help to separate gravitational and non-gravitational contributions in the observed orbit perturbations. For precise orbit determination purposes all these missions have a dual-frequency GPS receiver on board. The reduced dynamic technique combines the dense and accurate GPS observations with physical models of the forces acting on the spacecraft, complemented by empirical accelerations, which are stochastic parameters adjusted in the orbit determination process. When the spacecraft carries an accelerometer, these measured accelerations can be used to replace the models of the non-conservative forces, such as air drag and solar radiation pressure. This approach is implemented in a batch least-squares estimator of the GPS High Precision Orbit Determination Software Tools (GHOST), developed at DLR/GSOC and DEOS. It is extensively tested with data of the CHAMP and GRACE satellites. As accelerometer observations typically can be affected by an unknown scale factor and bias in each measurement direction, they require calibration during processing. Therefore the estimated state vector is augmented with six parameters: a scale and bias factor for the three axes. In order to converge efficiently to a good solution, reasonable a priori values for the bias factor are necessary. These are calculated by combining the mean value of the accelerometer observations with the mean value of the non-conservative force models and empirical accelerations, estimated when using these models. When replacing the non-conservative force models with accelerometer observations and still estimating empirical accelerations, a good orbit precision is achieved. 100 days of GRACE B data processing results in a mean orbit fit of

  1. Empirical determinants of measles metapopulation dynamics in England and Wales.

    OpenAIRE

    Finkenstädt, B; Grenfell, B.

    1998-01-01

    A key issue in metapopulation dynamics is the relative impact of internal patch dynamics and coupling between patches. This problem can be addressed by analysing large spatiotemporal data sets, recording the local and global dynamics of metapopulations. In this paper, we analyse the dynamics of measles meta-populations in a large spatiotemporal case notification data set, collected during the pre-vaccination era in England and Wales. Specifically, we use generalized linear statistical models ...

  2. Adhesive plasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  3. Dynamic characteristics of rocks and method of their determine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoslav Schügerl

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents selected problems of the research of the influence of technical vibrations on rocks. The vibrations are the products of the technological procedure, such as mining blasting, ramming of the piles, using of the drilling-equipment or vibration machines. The vibrations could be also evocated by road or train traffic. The most important dynamic characteristics of rocks are dynamic modulus of elasticity Edyn; dynamic modulus of deformation Edef, dyn; dynamic shear-modulus Gdyn; and especially dynamic Poisson´s ratio νdyn. These parameters were obtained by laboratory testing of conglomerate samples.

  4. Switching stiction and adhesion of a liquid on a solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Stijn F. L.; Hemmi, Adrian; Muff, Stefan; Gröning, Oliver; de Feyter, Steven; Osterwalder, Jürg; Greber, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    When a gecko moves on a ceiling it makes use of adhesion and stiction. Stiction—static friction—is experienced on microscopic and macroscopic scales and is related to adhesion and sliding friction. Although important for most locomotive processes, the concepts of adhesion, stiction and sliding friction are often only empirically correlated. A more detailed understanding of these concepts will, for example, help to improve the design of increasingly smaller devices such as micro- and nanoelectromechanical switches. Here we show how stiction and adhesion are related for a liquid drop on a hexagonal boron nitride monolayer on rhodium, by measuring dynamic contact angles in two distinct states of the solid-liquid interface: a corrugated state in the absence of hydrogen intercalation and an intercalation-induced flat state. Stiction and adhesion can be reversibly switched by applying different electrochemical potentials to the sample, causing atomic hydrogen to be intercalated or not. We ascribe the change in adhesion to a change in lateral electric field of in-plane two-nanometre dipole rings, because it cannot be explained by the change in surface roughness known from the Wenzel model. Although the change in adhesion can be calculated for the system we study, it is not yet possible to determine the stiction at such a solid-liquid interface using ab initio methods. The inorganic hybrid of hexagonal boron nitride and rhodium is very stable and represents a new class of switchable surfaces with the potential for application in the study of adhesion, friction and lubrication.

  5. GMT-PP复合材料的界面粘结状况与动态疲劳关系研究%RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN INTERFACIAL ADHESION AND DYNAMIC FATIGUE OF GMT-PP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余剑英; 周祖福; 晏石林

    2001-01-01

    The fatigue behaviour of continuous-glass-fibre-mat reinforced polypropylene composites (GMT-PPs) with different interfacial adhesion is investigated by dynamic fatigue tests. The results show that the effect of the interfacial adhesion on the fatigue performance of GMT-PPs is obvious and the improved interfacial adhesion results in an improved fatigue performance. Through the observation of SEM, it is found that the failure modes are different in static tension and dynamic tension for GMT-PPs with strong interfaces. The failure mode of the former is the matrix failure, while that of the latter is the interfacial debonding failure, which means that fatigue loading has a more damaging effect on the interfacial adhesion than on the polymeric matrix. The stronger the interfacial adhesion, the more difficult the interfacial debonding, thus GMT-PPs with well interfacial adhesion has the better the fatigue performance.%采用动态疲劳试验研究了不同界面粘结状况的GMT-PP复合材料的疲劳行为.结果表明:GMT-PP界面粘结状况对其拉伸疲劳性能有明显的影响,界面粘结的改善有利于抗疲劳性的提高.进而通过扫描电镜的观察发现具有良好界面粘结的GMT-PP在静态拉伸时破坏形式为基体破坏,而动态拉伸疲劳破坏则以界面脱粘为主.由于界面粘结强度越高,界面脱粘过程越慢,因而,材料的抗疲劳性越好.

  6. Adhesion and cohesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Fraunhofer, J Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed.

  7. Adhesion and Cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Anthony von Fraunhofer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed.

  8. Role of finite populations in determining evolutionary dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Tane S.; Payne, Karl A.; Moseley, L. Leo

    2008-02-01

    The connection between the finite size of an evolving population and its dynamical behavior is examined through analytical and computational studies of a simple model of evolution. The infinite population limit of the model is shown to be governed by a special case of the quasispecies equations. A flat fitness landscape yields identical results for the dynamics of infinite and finite populations. On the other hand, a monotonically increasing fitness landscape shows “epochs” in the dynamics of finite populations that become more pronounced as the rate of mutation decreases. The details of the dynamics are profoundly different for any two simulation runs in that events arising from the stochastic noise in the pseudorandom number sequence are amplified. As the population size is increased or, equivalently, the mutation rate is increased, these epochs become smaller but do not entirely disappear.

  9. Empirical determinants of measles metapopulation dynamics in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenstädt, B; Grenfell, B

    1998-02-07

    A key issue in metapopulation dynamics is the relative impact of internal patch dynamics and coupling between patches. This problem can be addressed by analysing large spatiotemporal data sets, recording the local and global dynamics of metapopulations. In this paper, we analyse the dynamics of measles meta-populations in a large spatiotemporal case notification data set, collected during the pre-vaccination era in England and Wales. Specifically, we use generalized linear statistical models to quantify the relative importance of local influences (birth rate and population size) and regional coupling on local epidemic dynamics. Apart from the proportional effect of local population size on case totals, the models indicate patterns of local and regional dynamic influences which depend on the current state of epidemics. Birth rate and geographic coupling are not associated with the size of major epidemics. By contrast, minor epidemics--and especially the incidence of local extinction of infection--are influenced both by birth rate and geographical coupling. Birth rate at a lag of four years provides the best fit, reflecting the delayed recruitment of susceptibles to school cohorts. A hierarchical index of spatial coupling to large centres provides the best spatial model. The model also indicates that minor epidemics and extinction patterns are more strongly influenced by this regional effect than the local impact of birth rate.

  10. Determination of molecular species of calcium salts of MDP produced through decalcification of enamel and dentin by MDP-based one-step adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Yoko; Nishiyama, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Enamel and dentin particles were added to an experimental 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP)-based one-step adhesive to react for 30 s. After enamel and dentin reactants were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P NMR) techniques, curve-fitting analysis was performed on the (31)P NMR spectra of enamel and dentin reactants. By varying the molar ratio of calcium chloride to MDP, a series of three types of MDP-Ca salts were synthesized. The molecular species of calcium salts of MDP (MDP-Ca salts) produced by decalcification of enamel or dentin were determined based on the XRD and (31)P NMR analysis results of these three types of synthesized MDP-Ca salts. Curve-fitting analysis showed that enamel and dentin developed several types of MDP-Ca salts and amorphous dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) during decalcification. The molecular species of MDP-Ca salts produced by enamel and dentin were mono-calcium salts of MDP monomer and MDP dimer. In addition, dentin produced a di-calcium of MDP dimer.

  11. Bioassay-Guided Isolation and HPLC Determination of Bioactive Compound That Relate to the Antiplatelet Activity (Adhesion, Secretion, and Aggregation from Solanum lycopersicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fuentes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In seeking the functionality of foodstuff applicable to medicine, ripe tomato fruits were found to show an antiplatelet activity. Therefore, the bioactive compound was isolated, structurally identified, and studied for an inhibitory effects on platelet adhesion, secretion, and aggregation. The concentration of adenosine in ripe tomato fruits (pulp and skin extracts and its processing by-products (paste and pomace was determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. According to platelet aggregation inhibition induced by ADP, the total extract residual was fractionated by liquid-liquid separation, obtaining aqueous, ethyl acetate and petroleum ether extracts. The aqueous extract was subjected to repeated permeation over sephadex LH-20 and semipreparative TLC. The isolate finally obtained was identified as adenosine on the basis of ESI-MS, 1H NMR, HPLC, and UV spectra. Adenosine concentration dependently (2.3–457 μM platelet aggregation inhibited induced by ADP. Also, adenosine present inhibition of platelet secretion and thrombus formation under flow conditions. The quantitative HPLC analysis revealed significant amounts of adenosine in ripe tomato fruits and its processing by-products. From these results, extracts/fractions of ripe tomato fruits and their processing by-products may be referred to as functional food and functional ingredients containing a compound that inhibits platelet function with a potent preventive effect on thrombus formation, as those that occur in stroke.

  12. Dynamics of Actin Stress Fibers and Focal Adhesions during Slow Migration in Swiss 3T3 Fibroblasts: Intracellular Mechanism of Cell Turning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiko Sugawara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the mechanism regulating the spontaneous change in polarity that leads to cell turning, we quantitatively analyzed the dynamics of focal adhesions (FAs coupling with the self-assembling actin cytoskeletal structure in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. Fluorescent images were acquired from cells expressing GFP-actin and RFP-zyxin by laser confocal microscopy. On the basis of the maximum area, duration, and relocation distance of FAs extracted from the RFP-zyxin images, the cells could be divided into 3 regions: the front region, intermediate lateral region, and rear region. In the intermediate lateral region, FAs appeared close to the leading edge and were stabilized gradually as its area increased. Simultaneously, bundled actin stress fibers (SFs were observed vertically from the positions of these FAs, and they connected to the other SFs parallel to the leading edge. Finally, these connecting SFs fused to form a single SF with matured FAs at both ends. This change in SF organization with cell retraction in the first cycle of migration followed by a newly formed protrusion in the next cycle is assumed to lead to cell turning in migrating Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts.

  13. New Dynamic Spin Rig Capabilities Used to Determine Rotating Blade Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenza, Andrew J.

    2004-01-01

    The Dynamic Spin Rig Facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center is used to determine the structural response of rotating engine components without the effects of aerodynamic loading. Recently, this rig's capabilities were enhanced through the replacement of grease-lubricated ball bearings with magnetic bearings. Magnetic bearings offer a number of advantages--the most important here being that they not only fully support the rotor system, but excite it as well. Three magnetic bearings support the rotor and provide five axes of controlled motion: an x- and y-axis translation at each of two radial bearings and a z-axis translation in the vertical or axial direction. Sinusoidal excitation (most commonly used) can be imparted on the rotor through the radial magnetic bearings in either a fixed or rotating frame of reference. This excitation is added directly to the magnetic bearing control output. Since the rotor is fully levitated, large translations and rotations of the rotor system can be achieved. Some of the capabilities of this excitation system were determined and reported. The accelerations obtained at the tip of a titanium flat plate test article versus the swept sine excitation sent to both radial bearings in phase and perpendicular to the plane containing the two blades are shown. Recent tests required the excitation of fundamental bending and torsional blade resonances at rotor speeds up to 10,000 rpm. Successful fixed synchronous rotation of the excitation signal provided the best detectable blade resonant vibrations at excitation frequencies up to 1100 Hz for the particular blades of interest. A noncontacting laser measurement system was used to collect blade-tip motions. From these data, the amplitude and frequency of the motion could be determined as well as the blade damping properties. Damping could be determined using two methods: (1) free decay and (2) curve fitting the vibration amplitude as a function of frequency in and around the resonance of

  14. Determining Equilibrium Constants for Dimerization Reactions from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Djurre H.; Schafer, Lars V.; De Vries, Alex H.; Marrink, Siewert J.; Berendsen, Herman J. C.; Grubmueller, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    With today's available computer power, free energy calculations from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations "via counting" become feasible for an increasing number of reactions. An example is the dimerization reaction of transmembrane alpha-helices. If an extended simulation of the two helices c

  15. Brownian dynamics determine universality of charge transport in ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangoro, Joshua R [ORNL; Iacob, Ciprian [University of Leipzig; Mierzwa, Michal [University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka, Katowice, Poland; Paluch, Marian [University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka, Katowice, Poland; Kremer, Friedrich [University of Leipzig

    2012-01-01

    Broadband dielectric spectroscopy is employed to investigate charge transport in a variety of glass-forming ionic liquids over wide frequency, temperature and pressure ranges. Using a combination of Einstein, Einstein-Smoluchowski, and Langevin relations, the observed universal scaling of charge transport in ionic liquids is traced back to the dominant role of Brownian dynamics.

  16. Dynamics of epileptic phenomena determined from statistics of ictal transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suffczynski, P.; Silva, F.H.L. da; Parra, J.; Velis, D.N.; Bouwman, B.M.; Rijn, C.M. van; Hese, P. van; Boon, P.; Khosravani, H.; Derchansky, M.; Carlen, P.; Kalitzin, S.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the dynamical scenarios of transitions between normal and paroxysmal state in epilepsy. We assume that some epileptic neural network are bistable i.e., they feature two operational states, ictal and interictal that co-exist. The transitions between these two states may

  17. Cellular prion protein is required for neuritogenesis: fine-tuning of multiple signaling pathways involved in focal adhesions and actin cytoskeleton dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alleaume-Butaux A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aurélie Alleaume-Butaux,1,2 Caroline Dakowski,1,2 Mathéa Pietri,1,2 Sophie Mouillet-Richard,1,2 Jean-Marie Launay,3,4 Odile Kellermann,1,2 Benoit Schneider1,2 1INSERM, UMR-S 747, 2Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S 747, 3Public Hospital of Paris, Department of Biochemistry, INSERM UMR-S 942, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris, France; 4Pharma Research Department, Hoffmann La Roche Ltd, Basel, Switzerland Abstract: Neuritogenesis is a dynamic phenomenon associated with neuronal differentiation that allows a rather spherical neuronal stem cell to develop dendrites and axon, a prerequisite for the integration and transmission of signals. The acquisition of neuronal polarity occurs in three steps: (1 neurite sprouting, which consists of the formation of buds emerging from the postmitotic neuronal soma; (2 neurite outgrowth, which represents the conversion of buds into neurites, their elongation and evolution into axon or dendrites; and (3 the stability and plasticity of neuronal polarity. In neuronal stem cells, remodeling and activation of focal adhesions (FAs associated with deep modifications of the actin cytoskeleton is a prerequisite for neurite sprouting and subsequent neurite outgrowth. A multiple set of growth factors and interactors located in the extracellular matrix and the plasma membrane orchestrate neuritogenesis by acting on intracellular signaling effectors, notably small G proteins such as RhoA, Rac, and Cdc42, which are involved in actin turnover and the dynamics of FAs. The cellular prion protein (PrPC, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored membrane protein mainly known for its role in a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases, has emerged as a central player in neuritogenesis. Here, we review the contribution of PrPC to neuronal polarization and detail the current knowledge on the signaling pathways fine-tuned by PrPC to promote neurite sprouting, outgrowth, and maintenance. We emphasize that Pr

  18. Mechanisms of adhesion in geckos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autumn, Kellar; Peattie, Anne M

    2002-12-01

    The extraordinary adhesive capabilities of geckos have challenged explanation for millennia, since Aristotle first recorded his observations. We have discovered many of the secrets of gecko adhesion, yet the millions of dry, adhesive setae on the toes of geckos continue to generate puzzling new questions and valuable answers. Each epidermally-derived, keratinous seta ends in hundreds of 200 nm spatular tips, permitting intimate contact with rough and smooth surfaces alike. Prior studies suggested that adhesive force in gecko setae was directly proportional to the water droplet contact angle (θ) , an indicator of the free surface energy of a substrate. In contrast, new theory suggests that adhesion energy between a gecko seta and a surface (W(GS)) is in fact proportional to (1 + cosθ), and only for θ > 60°. A reanalysis of prior data, in combination with our recent study, support the van der Waals hypothesis of gecko adhesion, and contradict surface hydrophobicity as a predictor of adhesion force. Previously, we and our collaborators measured the force production of a single seta. Initial efforts to attach a seta failed because of improper 3D orientation. However, by simulating the dynamics of gecko limbs during climbing (based on force plate data) we discovered that, in single setae, a small normal preload, combined with a 5 μm displacement yielded a very large adhesive force of 200 microNewton (μN), 10 times that predicted by whole-animal measurements. 6.5 million setae of a single tokay gecko attached maximally could generate 130 kg force. This raises the question of how geckos manage to detach their feet in just 15 ms. We discovered that simply increasing the angle that the setal shaft makes with the substrate to 30° causes detachment. Understanding how simultaneous attachment and release of millions of setae are controlled will require an approach that integrates levels ranging from molecules to lizards.

  19. Advanced adhesives in electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, C

    2011-01-01

    Adhesives are widely used in the manufacture of electronic devices to act as passive and active components. Recently there has been considerable interest in the use of conductive adhesives. This book reviews key types of conductive adhesives, processing methods, properties and the way they can be modelled as well as potential applications.$bAdhesives for electronic applications serve important functional and structural purposes in electronic components and packaging, and have developed significantly over the last few decades. Advanced adhesives in electronics reviews recent developments in adhesive joining technology, processing and properties. The book opens with an introduction to adhesive joining technology for electronics. Part one goes on to cover different types of adhesive used in electronic systems, including thermally conductive adhesives, isotropic and anisotropic conductive adhesives and underfill adhesives for flip-chip applications. Part two focuses on the properties and processing of electronic ...

  20. Dynamic determinants of the uncontrolled manifold during human quiet stance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Suzuki

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Human postural sway during stance arises from coordinated multi-joint movements. Thus, a sway trajectory represented by a time-varying postural vector in the multiple-joint-angle-space tends to be constrained to a low-dimensional subspace. It has been proposed that the subspace corresponds to a manifold defined by a kinematic constraint, such that the position of the center of mass (CoM of the whole body is constant in time, referred to as the kinematic uncontrolled manifold (kinematic-UCM. A control strategy related to this hypothesis (CoM-control-strategy claims that the central nervous system (CNS aims to keep the posture close to the kinematic-UCM using a continuous feedback controller, leading to sway patterns that mostly occur within the kinematic-UCM, where no corrective control is exerted. An alternative strategy proposed by the authors (intermittent control-strategy claims that the CNS stabilizes posture by intermittently suspending the active feedback controller, in such a way to allow the CNS to exploit a stable manifold of the saddle-type upright equilibrium in the state-space of the system, referred to as the dynamic-UCM, when the state point is on or near the manifold. Although the mathematical definitions of the kinematic- and dynamic-UCM are completely different, both UCMs play similar roles in the stabilization of multi-joint upright posture. The purpose of this study was to compare the dynamic performance of the two control strategies. In particular, we considered a double-inverted-pendulum-model of postural control, and analyzed the two UCMs defined above. We first showed that the geometric configurations of the two UCMs are almost identical. We then investigated whether the UCM-component of experimental sway could be considered as passive dynamics with no active control, and showed that such UCM-component mainly consists of high frequency oscillations above 1 Hz, corresponding to anti-phase coordination between the ankle and

  1. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Lebesgue

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc versus the non-adhesive part (the stem, and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue. This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article “Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach” (Lebesgue et al., 2016 [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold, likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives.

  2. Focal Adhesion Induction at the Tip of a Functionalized Nanoelectrode

    OpenAIRE

    Fuentes, Daniela E.; Bae, Chilman; Peter J Butler

    2011-01-01

    Cells dynamically interact with their physical micro-environment through the assembly of nascent focal contacts and focal adhesions. The dynamics and mechanics of these contact points are controlled by transmembrane integrins and an array of intracellular adaptor proteins. In order to study the mechanics and dynamics of focal adhesion assembly, we have developed a technique for the timed induction of a nascent focal adhesion. Bovine aortic endothelial cells were approached at the apical surfa...

  3. Computational Chemistry of Adhesive Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation is intended to determine the electrical mechanical, and chemical properties of adhesive bonds at the molecular level. The initial determinations will be followed by investigations of the effects of environmental effects on the chemistry and properties of the bond layer.

  4. Determination of Scaling Parameter and Dynamical Resonances in Complex-Rotated Hamiltonian Ⅱ: Numerical Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zong-Liang; ZHAO Fang; LI Shao-Hua; ZHAO Mei-Shan; CHEN Chang-Yong

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the determination of a unique scaling parameter in complex scaling analysis and with accurate calculation of dynamics resonances. In the preceding paper we have presented a theoretical analysis and provided a formalism for dynamical resonance calculations. In this paper we present accurate numerical results for two non-trivial dynamical processes, namely, models of diatomie molecular predissoeiation and of barrier potential scattering for resonances. The results presented in this paper confirm our theoretical analysis, remove a theoretical ambiguity on determination of the complex scaling parameter, and provide an improved understanding for dynamical resonance calculations in rigged Hilbert space.

  5. The F-Landscape: Dynamically Determining The Multiverse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianjun; Maxin, James A.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.; Walker, Joel W.

    2012-09-01

    We evolve our Multiverse Blueprints to characterize our local neighborhood of the String Landscape and the Multiverse of plausible string, M- and F-theory vacua. Building upon the tripodal foundations of (i) the Flipped SU(5) Grand Unified Theory (GUT), (ii) extra TeV-Scale vector-like multiplets derived out of F-theory, and (iii) the dynamics of No-Scale supergravity, together dubbed No-Scale F-SU(5), we demonstrate the existence of a continuous family of solutions which might adeptly describe the dynamics of distinctive universes. This Multiverse landscape of F-SU(5) solutions, which we shall refer to as the F-Landscape, accommodates a subset of universes compatible with the presently known experimental uncertainties of our own universe. We show that by secondarily minimizing the minimum of the scalar Higgs potential of each solution within the F-Landscape, a continuous hypervolume of distinct minimum minimorum can be engineered which comprise a regional dominion of universes, with our own universe cast as the bellwether. We conjecture that an experimental signal at the LHC of the No-Scale F-SU(5) framework's applicability to our own universe might sensibly be extrapolated as corroborating evidence for the role of string, M- and F-theory as a master theory of the Multiverse, with No-Scale supergravity as a crucial and pervasive reinforcing structure.

  6. The F-Landscape: Dynamically Determining the Multiverse

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Tianjun; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V; Walker, Joel W

    2011-01-01

    We evolve our Multiverse Blueprints to characterize our local neighborhood of the String Landscape and the Multiverse of plausible string, M- and F-theory vacua. Building upon the tripodal foundations of i) the Flipped SU(5) Grand Unified Theory (GUT), ii) extra TeV-Scale vector-like multiplets derived out of F-theory, and iii) the dynamics of No-Scale Supergravity, together dubbed No-Scale F-SU(5), we demonstrate the existence of a continuous family of solutions which might adeptly describe the dynamics of distinctive universes. This Multiverse landscape of F-SU(5) solutions, which we shall refer to as the F-Landscape, accommodates a subset of universes compatible with the presently known experimental uncertainties of our own universe. We show that by secondarily minimizing the minimum of the scalar Higgs potential of each solution within the F-Landscape, a continuous hypervolume of distinct minimum minimorum can be engineered which comprise a regional dominion of universes, with our own universe cast as the...

  7. Adhesion in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2014-01-01

    This comprehensive book will provide both fundamental and applied aspects of adhesion pertaining to microelectronics in a single and easily accessible source. Among the topics to be covered include; Various theories or mechanisms of adhesionSurface (physical or chemical) characterization of materials as it pertains to adhesionSurface cleaning as it pertains to adhesionWays to improve adhesionUnraveling of interfacial interactions using an array of pertinent techniquesCharacterization of interfaces / interphasesPolymer-polymer adhesionMetal-polymer adhesion  (metallized polymers)Polymer adhesi

  8. Analysis and Report on SD2000: A Workshop to Determine Structural Dynamics Research for the Millenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    This ONR grant was to facilitate the meeting of an international group of researchers to examine the future of structural dynamics . A group of about...promptly dismissed it as an intellectual pursuit not useful in structural dynamics . In reflecting back over his career, he now views this as a mistake...smart materials, mechatronics, etc.) and determining the appropriate interaction between these new advances and structural dynamics was one of the

  9. Determining tumor blood flow parameters from dynamic image measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libertini, Jessica M.

    2008-11-01

    Many recent cancer treatments focus on preventing angiogenesis, the process by which a tumor promotes the growth of large and efficient capillary beds for the increased nourishment required to support the tumor's rapid growth[l]. To measure the efficacy of these treatments in a timely fashion, there is an interest in using data from dynamic sequences of contrast-enhanced medical imaging, such as MRI and CT, to measure blood flow parameters such as perfusion, permeability-surface-area product, and the relative volumes of the plasma and extracellular-extravascular space. Starting with a two compartment model presented by the radiology community[2], this work challenges the application of a simplification to this problem, which was originally developed to model capillary reuptake[3]. While the primary result of this work is the demonstration of the inaccuracy of this simplification, the remainder of the paper is dedicated to presenting alternative methods for calculating the perfusion and plasma volume coefficients. These methods are applied to model data sets based on real patient data, and preliminary results are presented.

  10. Determining tumor blood flow parameters from dynamic image measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libertini, Jessica M [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02906 (United States)], E-mail: Jessica_Libertini@brown.edu

    2008-11-01

    Many recent cancer treatments focus on preventing angiogenesis, the process by which a tumor promotes the growth of large and efficient capillary beds for the increased nourishment required to support the tumor's rapid growth. To measure the efficacy of these treatments in a timely fashion, there is an interest in using data from dynamic sequences of contrast-enhanced medical imaging, such as MRI and CT, to measure blood flow parameters such as perfusion, permeability-surface-area product, and the relative volumes of the plasma and extracellular-extravascular space. Starting with a two compartment model presented by the radiology community, this work challenges the application of a simplification to this problem, which was originally developed to model capillary reuptake. While the primary result of this work is the demonstration of the inaccuracy of this simplification, the remainder of the paper is dedicated to presenting alternative methods for calculating the perfusion and plasma volume coefficients. These methods are applied to model data sets based on real patient data, and preliminary results are presented.

  11. Experimental determination of the dynamics of an acoustically levitated sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, Nicolás, E-mail: nico@fisica.edu.uy [Centro Universitario de Paysandú, Universidad de la República, Paysandú (Uruguay); Andrade, Marco A. B. [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Canetti, Rafael [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de la República, Montevideo (Uruguay); Adamowski, Julio C. [Department of Mechatronics and Mechanical Systems Engineering, Escola Politécnica, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-11-14

    Levitation of solids and liquids by ultrasonic standing waves is a promising technique to manipulate materials without contact. When a small particle is introduced in certain areas of a standing wave field, the acoustic radiation force pushes the particle to the pressure node. This movement is followed by oscillations of the levitated particle. Aiming to investigate the particle oscillations in acoustic levitation, this paper presents the experimental and numerical characterization of the dynamic behavior of a levitated sphere. To obtain the experimental response, a small sphere is lifted by the acoustic radiation force. After the sphere lift, it presents a damped oscillatory behavior, which is recorded by a high speed camera. To model this behavior, a mass-spring-damper system is proposed. In this model, the acoustic radiation force that acts on the sphere is theoretically predicted by the Gor'kov theory and the viscous forces are modeled by two damping terms, one term proportional to the square of the velocity and another term proportional to the particle velocity. The proposed model was experimentally verified by using different values of sound pressure amplitude. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows that the model can accurately describe the oscillatory behavior of the sphere in an acoustic levitator.

  12. Determination of the viscoelastic properties of elastomeric materials by the dynamic indentation method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriend, Nathalie M.; Kren, Alexander P.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the dynamic indentation test method, which is not often used, is discussed. The goal of the paper is to consider the possibility of applying a dynamic indentation test method to investigate rubber materials. The basic equations for the determination of the viscoelastic characteristics

  13. A dynamical phyllotaxis model to determine floral organ number.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho S Kitazawa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available How organisms determine particular organ numbers is a fundamental key to the development of precise body structures; however, the developmental mechanisms underlying organ-number determination are unclear. In many eudicot plants, the primordia of sepals and petals (the floral organs first arise sequentially at the edge of a circular, undifferentiated region called the floral meristem, and later transition into a concentric arrangement called a whorl, which includes four or five organs. The properties controlling the transition to whorls comprising particular numbers of organs is little explored. We propose a development-based model of floral organ-number determination, improving upon earlier models of plant phyllotaxis that assumed two developmental processes: the sequential initiation of primordia in the least crowded space around the meristem and the constant growth of the tip of the stem. By introducing mutual repulsion among primordia into the growth process, we numerically and analytically show that the whorled arrangement emerges spontaneously from the sequential initiation of primordia. Moreover, by allowing the strength of the inhibition exerted by each primordium to decrease as the primordium ages, we show that pentamerous whorls, in which the angular and radial positions of the primordia are consistent with those observed in sepal and petal primordia in Silene coeli-rosa, Caryophyllaceae, become the dominant arrangement. The organ number within the outmost whorl, corresponding to the sepals, takes a value of four or five in a much wider parameter space than that in which it takes a value of six or seven. These results suggest that mutual repulsion among primordia during growth and a temporal decrease in the strength of the inhibition during initiation are required for the development of the tetramerous and pentamerous whorls common in eudicots.

  14. Cell adhesion in embryo morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Vanessa; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2012-02-01

    Visualizing and analyzing shape changes at various scales, ranging from single molecules to whole organisms, are essential for understanding complex morphogenetic processes, such as early embryonic development. Embryo morphogenesis relies on the interplay between different tissues, the properties of which are again determined by the interaction between their constituent cells. Cell interactions, on the other hand, are controlled by various molecules, such as signaling and adhesion molecules, which in order to exert their functions need to be spatiotemporally organized within and between the interacting cells. In this review, we will focus on the role of cell adhesion functioning at different scales to organize cell, tissue and embryo morphogenesis. We will specifically ask how the subcellular distribution of adhesion molecules controls the formation of cell-cell contacts, how cell-cell contacts determine tissue shape, and how tissue interactions regulate embryo morphogenesis.

  15. CFD Based Determination of Dynamic Stability Derivatives in Yaw for a Bird

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. A. Moelyadi; G. Sachs

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic yaw stability derivatives of a gull bird are determined using Computational Fluid Dynamics(CFD) method. Two kinds of motions are applied for calculating the dynamic yaw stability derivatives CNr and CNβ. The first one relates to a lateral translation and, separately, to a yaw rotation. The second one consists of a combined translational and rotational motion. To determine dynamic yaw stability derivatives, the simulation of an unsteady flow with a bird model showing a harmonic motion is performed. The flow solution for each time step is obtained by solving unsteady Euler equations based on a finite volume approach for a small reduced frequency. Then, an evaluation of unsteady forces and moments for one cycle is conducted using harmonic Fourier analysis. The results of the dynamic yaw stability derivatives for both simulations of the model show a good agreement.

  16. Foreign material in postoperative adhesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Luijendijk; D.C.D. de Lange (Diederik); C.C. Wauters; W.C.J. Hop (Wim); J.J. Duron; J.L. Pailler; B.R. Camprodon; L. Holmdahl; H.J. van Geldorp; J. Jeekel (Hans)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: The authors determined the prevalence of foreign body granulomas in intra-abdominal adhesions in patients with a history of abdominal surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In a cross-sectional, multicenter, multinational study, adult patients with a hist

  17. The evolution of adhesiveness as a social adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Thomas; Doulcier, Guilhem; De Monte, Silvia

    2015-11-27

    Cellular adhesion is a key ingredient to sustain collective functions of microbial aggregates. Here, we investigate the evolutionary origins of adhesion and the emergence of groups of genealogically unrelated cells with a game-theoretical model. The considered adhesiveness trait is costly, continuous and affects both group formation and group-derived benefits. The formalism of adaptive dynamics reveals two evolutionary stable strategies, at each extreme on the axis of adhesiveness. We show that cohesive groups can evolve by small mutational steps, provided the population is already endowed with a minimum adhesiveness level. Assortment between more adhesive types, and in particular differential propensities to leave a fraction of individuals ungrouped at the end of the aggregation process, can compensate for the cost of increased adhesiveness. We also discuss the change in the social nature of more adhesive mutations along evolutionary trajectories, and find that altruism arises before directly beneficial behavior, despite being the most challenging form of cooperation.

  18. The determination of the attitude and attitude dynamics of TeamSat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Riis, Troels

    1999-01-01

    , in space, multiple autonomous processes intended for spacecraft applications such as autonomous star identification, attitude determination and identification and tracking of non-stellar objects, imaging and real-time compression of image and science data for further ground analysis. AVS successfully...... determined the attitude and attitude dynamics of TeamSat....

  19. In situ structure and dynamics of DNA origami determined through molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2013-12-10

    The DNA origami method permits folding of long single-stranded DNA into complex 3D structures with subnanometer precision. Transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and recently cryo-EM tomography have been used to characterize the properties of such DNA origami objects, however their microscopic structures and dynamics have remained unknown. Here, we report the results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations that characterized the structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects in unprecedented microscopic detail. When simulated in an aqueous environment, the structures of DNA origami objects depart from their idealized targets as a result of steric, electrostatic, and solvent-mediated forces. Whereas the global structural features of such relaxed conformations conform to the target designs, local deformations are abundant and vary in magnitude along the structures. In contrast to their free-solution conformation, the Holliday junctions in the DNA origami structures adopt a left-handed antiparallel conformation. We find the DNA origami structures undergo considerable temporal fluctuations on both local and global scales. Analysis of such structural fluctuations reveals the local mechanical properties of the DNA origami objects. The lattice type of the structures considerably affects global mechanical properties such as bending rigidity. Our study demonstrates the potential of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to play a considerable role in future development of the DNA origami field by providing accurate, quantitative assessment of local and global structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects.

  20. Inflammation determines the pro-adhesive properties of high extracellular d-glucose in human endothelial cells in vitro and rat microvessels in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Azcutia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hyperglycemia is acknowledged as an independent risk factor for developing diabetes-associated atherosclerosis. At present, most therapeutic approaches are targeted at a tight glycemic control in diabetic patients, although this fails to prevent macrovascular complications of the disease. Indeed, it remains highly controversial whether or not the mere elevation of extracellular D-glucose can directly promote vascular inflammation, which favors early pro-atherosclerotic events. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In the present work, increasing extracellular D-glucose from 5.5 to 22 mmol/L was neither sufficient to induce intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 expression, analyzed by flow cytometry, nor to promote leukocyte adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC in vitro, measured by flow chamber assays. Interestingly, the elevation of D-glucose levels potentiated ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression and leukocyte adhesion induced by a pro-inflammatory stimulus, such as interleukin (IL-1beta (5 ng/mL. In HUVEC, high D-glucose augmented the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2 and nuclear transcription factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB elicited by IL-1beta, measured by Western blot and electromobility shift assay (EMSA, respectively, but had no effect by itself. Both ERK 1/2 and NF-kappaB were necessary for VCAM-1 expression, but not for ICAM-1 expression. In vivo, leukocyte trafficking was evaluated in the rat mesenteric microcirculation by intravital microscopy. In accordance with the in vitro data, the acute intraperitoneal injection of D-glucose increased leukocyte rolling flux, adhesion and migration, but only when IL-1beta was co-administered. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that the elevation of extracellular D-glucose levels is not sufficient to promote vascular inflammation, and they highlight the pivotal role of a pro-inflammatory environment in diabetes, as

  1. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  2. Image analysis of blood platelets adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krízová, P; Rysavá, J; Vanícková, M; Cieslar, P; Dyr, J E

    2003-01-01

    Adhesion of blood platelets is one of the major events in haemostatic and thrombotic processes. We studied adhesion of blood platelets on fibrinogen and fibrin dimer sorbed on solid support material (glass, polystyrene). Adhesion was carried on under static and dynamic conditions and measured as percentage of the surface covered with platelets. Within a range of platelet counts in normal and in thrombocytopenic blood we observed a very significant decrease in platelet adhesion on fibrin dimer with bounded active thrombin with decreasing platelet count. Our results show the imperative use of platelet poor blood preparations as control samples in experiments with thrombocytopenic blood. Experiments carried on adhesive surfaces sorbed on polystyrene showed lower relative inaccuracy than on glass. Markedly different behaviour of platelets adhered on the same adhesive surface, which differed only in support material (glass or polystyrene) suggest that adhesion and mainly spreading of platelets depends on physical quality of the surface. While on polystyrene there were no significant differences between fibrin dimer and fibrinogen, adhesion measured on glass support material markedly differed between fibrin dimer and fibrinogen. We compared two methods of thresholding in image analysis of adhered platelets. Results obtained by image analysis of spreaded platelets showed higher relative inaccuracy than results obtained by image analysis of platelets centres and aggregates.

  3. Molecular dynamics investigations on the interfacial energy and adhesive strength between C{sub 60}-filled carbon nanotubes and metallic surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Jenn-Kun [Department of Greenergy, National University of Tainan, Tainan 70005, Taiwan (China); Huang, Pei-Hsing, E-mail: phh@mail.npust.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung 912, Taiwan (China); Wu, Wei-Te; Hsu, Yi-Cheng [Department of Biomechatronics Engineering, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung 912, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-15

    The mechanical and adhesive properties of C{sub 60}@(10,10) carbon nanopeapods (CNPs) adhering to gold surfaces are investigated by atomistic simulations. The effects of C{sub 60} fill density, tube length, surrounding temperature, and peeling velocity on the adhesion behavior are studied. Results show that the interfacial binding energy of CNPs (which depends on the C{sub 60} fill density and temperature) is 2.0∼4.4% higher than that of (10,10) single-walled CNTs and 3.4∼4.7% lower than that of (5,5)@(10,10) double-walled CNTs (DWCNTs). Despite their lower interfacial binding energy, CNPs have a higher adhesive strength than that of DWCNTs (1.53 nN vs. 1.4 nN). Distinct from the inner tubes of DWCNTs, which have continuum mechanical properties, the discrete C{sub 60} molecules that fill CNPs exhibit unique composite mechanical properties, with high flexibility and bend-buckling resistance. The bend-buckling forces for CNPs filled with a low/medium fill density of C{sub 60} are approximately constant. When the fill density is 1 C{sub 60} molecule per nanometer length, the bend-buckling force dramatically increases. - Highlights: • Adhesion and peeling behaviors of CNPs on metallic substrates are investigated. • Effects of C60 density, CNP length, temperature, and peeling velocity are studied. • CNPs have a higher adhesive strength than that of DWCNTs (1.53 nN vs. 1.4 nN). • Discrete C{sub 60} molecules that fill CNPs exhibit unique composite mechanical properties.

  4. Photochemically reversible liquefaction and solidification of multiazobenzene sugar-alcohol derivatives and application to reworkable adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Haruhisa; Kanazawa, Satoshi; Okuyama, Yoko; Yoshida, Masaru; Kihara, Hideyuki; Nagai, Hideki; Norikane, Yasuo; Azumi, Reiko

    2014-05-28

    Multiazobenzene compounds, hexakis-O-[4-(phenylazo)phenoxyalkylcarboxyl]-D-mannitols and hexakis-O-[4-(4-hexylphenylazo)phenoxyalkylcarboxyl]-D-mannitols, exhibit photochemically reversible liquefaction and solidification at room temperature. Their photochemical and thermal phase transitions were investigated in detail through thermal analysis, absorption spectroscopy, and dynamic viscoelasticity measurements, and were compared with those of other sugar-alcohol derivatives. Tensile shear strength tests were performed to determine the adhesions of the compounds sandwiched between two glass slides to determine whether the compounds were suitable for application as adhesives. The adhesions were varied by alternately irradiating the compounds with ultraviolet and visible light to photoinduce phase transitions. The azobenzene hexyl tails, lengths of the methylene spacers, and differences in the sugar-alcohol structures affected the photoresponsive properties of the compounds.

  5. Particle adhesion and removal

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive and easily accessible reference source covering all important aspects of particle adhesion and removal.  The core objective is to cover both fundamental and applied aspects of particle adhesion and removal with emphasis on recent developments.  Among the topics to be covered include: 1. Fundamentals of surface forces in particle adhesion and removal.2. Mechanisms of particle adhesion and removal.3. Experimental methods (e.g. AFM, SFA,SFM,IFM, etc.) to understand  particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions.4. Mechanics of adhesion of micro- and  n

  6. Understanding adhesive dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrow, Michael

    2010-03-01

    This review paper firstly provides an outline of the development of resin-based adhesives. A simple classification method is described based on whether an acid etching agent requiring a washing and drying step is used. These systems are called etch and rinse systems. The other adhesives that do not have the washing and drying steps are referred to as self-etching adhesives. The advantages and disadvantages of these groups of adhesives are discussed. Methods of adhering to the tooth surface are provided, especially where the resin-based adhesive reliability is difficult to control.

  7. Properties of Nano SiO2 Modified PVF Adhesive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN He-sheng; SUN Zhen-ya; XUE Li-hui

    2004-01-01

    Some properties of nano SiO2 modified PVF adhesive were studied. The experimental results show that nano SiO2 can improve the properties of PVF adhesive very well. Meanwhile the modification mechanism of nano SiO2 to PVF adhesive and the applications of this adhesive in paper-plastic composite, concrete and fireproof paint were discussed by using IR and XRD determination.

  8. Fracture mechanics characterisation of medium-size adhesive joint specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Jacobsen, T.K.

    2004-01-01

    Medium-size specimens (adhesive layer were tested in four point bending to determine their load carrying capacity. Specimens having different thickness were tested. Except for onespecimen, the cracking occurred as cracking...... along the adhesive layer; initially cracking occurred along the adhesive/laminate interface, but after some crack extension the cracking took place inside the laminate (for one specimen the later part of thecracking occurred unstably along the adhesive/ laminate interface). Crack bridging by fibres...

  9. Candida albicans Amphotericin B-Tolerant Persister Formation is Closely Related to Surface Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Li, Zhigang; Chu, Haoyue; Guo, Jing; Jiang, Guangshui; Qi, Qingguo

    2016-02-01

    Candida albicans persisters have so far been observed only in biofilm environment; the biofilm element(s) that trigger(s) persister formation are still unknown. In this study, we tried to further elucidate the possible relationship between C. albicans persisters and the early phases of biofilm formation, especially the surface adhesion phase. Three C. albicans strains were surveyed for the formation of persisters. We tested C. albicans persister formation dynamically at different time points during the process of adhesion and biofilm formation. The number of persister cells was determined based on an assessment of cell viability after amphotericin B treatment and colony-forming unit assay. None of the planktonic cultures contained persisters. Immediately following adhesion of C. albicans cells to the surface, persister cells emerged and the proportion of persisters reached a peak of 0.2-0.69 % in approximately 2-h biofilm. As the biofilm matured, the proportion of persisters decreased and was only 0.01-0.02 % by 24 h, while the number of persisters remained stable with no significant change. Persisters were not detected in the absence of an attachment surface which was pre-coated. Persisters were also absent in biofilms that were scraped to disrupt surface adhesion prior to amphotericin B treatment. These results indicate that C. albicans antifungal-tolerant persisters are produced mainly in surface adhesion phase and surface adhesion is required for the emergence and maintenance of C. albicans persisters.

  10. Adhesion property of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR-based adhesives containing calcium carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The adhesion property (i.e. viscosity, loop tack and peel strength of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR 25 and ENR 50 grade-based pressure-sensitive adhesive was studied in the presence of calcium carbonate. The range of calcium carbonate loaded was from 10 to 50 parts per hundred parts of rubber (phr. Coumarone-indene resin was used as the tackifier and its concentration was fixed at 80 phr. Toluene was chosen as the solvent throughout the investigation. The substrates (PET film/paper were coated with the adhesive using a SHEEN hand coater at a coating thickness of 60 µm. Viscosity of the adhesive was measured by a HAAKE Rotary Viscometer whereas loop tack and peel strength were determined by a Llyod Adhesion Tester operating at 30 cm/min. Results show that viscosity of ENR-based adhesives increases gradually with increase in calcium carbonate loading due to the concentration effect of the filler. However, for loop tack and peel strength, it passes through a maximum at 30 phr calcium carbonate, an observation which is attributed to the optimum wettability of adhesive on the substrate at this adhesive composition. ENR 25-based adhesive consistently exhibits higher adhesion property than ENR 50 for all calcium carbonate loadings studied.

  11. Highly compliant shape memory polymer gels for tunable damping and reversible adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrozek, Randy A.; Berg, Michael C.; Gold, Christopher S.; Leighliter, Brad; Morton, Jeffrey T.; Lenhart, Joseph L.

    2016-02-01

    Materials that can dynamically change their properties to better adapt to the local environment have potential utility in robotics, aerospace, and coatings. For some of these applications, most notably robotics, it is advantageous for these responsive materials to be highly compliant in an effort to provide dynamic changes in adhesion and mechanical damping within a broad temperature operational environment. In this report, non-aqueous, highly compliant shape-memory polymer gels are developed by incorporating a low density of chemical cross-links into a physically cross-linked thermoplastic elastomer gel. Chemical cross-linkers were evaluated by varying there size and degree of functionality to determine the impact on the mechanical and adhesive properties. As a result of the chemical cross-linking, the gels exhibit modulus plateaus around room temperature and at elevated temperatures above 100 °C, where the thermoplastic elastomer gel typically melts. The materials were designed so that moduli in the plateaued regions were above and below the Dahlquist criteria of 4 × 104 Pa, respectively, where materials with a modulus below this value typically exhibit an increase in adhesion. The shape memory polymer gels were also integrated into fiber-reinforced composites to determine the temperature-dependent changes in mechanical damping. It is anticipated that this work will provide insight into materials design to provide dynamic changes in adhesion and damping to improve robotic appendage manipulation and platform mobility.

  12. The Sal-like 4 - integrin α6β1 network promotes cell migration for metastasis via activation of focal adhesion dynamics in basal-like breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itou, Junji; Tanaka, Sunao; Li, Wenzhao; Iida, Atsuo; Sehara-Fujisawa, Atsuko; Sato, Fumiaki; Toi, Masakazu

    2017-01-01

    During metastasis, cancer cell migration is enhanced. However, the mechanisms underlying this process remain elusive. Here, we addressed this issue by functionally analyzing the transcription factor Sal-like 4 (SALL4) in basal-like breast cancer cells. Loss-of-function studies of SALL4 showed that this transcription factor is required for the spindle-shaped morphology and the enhanced migration of cancer cells. SALL4 also up-regulated integrin gene expression. The impaired cell migration observed in SALL4 knockdown cells was restored by overexpression of integrin α6 and β1. In addition, we clarified that integrin α6 and β1 formed a heterodimer. At the molecular level, loss of the SALL4 - integrin α6β1 network lost focal adhesion dynamics, which impairs cell migration. Over-activation of Rho is known to inhibit focal adhesion dynamics. We observed that SALL4 knockdown cells exhibited over-activation of Rho. Aberrant Rho activation was suppressed by integrin α6β1 expression, and pharmacological inhibition of Rho activity restored cell migration in SALL4 knockdown cells. These results indicated that the SALL4 - integrin α6β1 network promotes cell migration via modulation of Rho activity. Moreover, our zebrafish metastasis assays demonstrated that this gene network enhances cell migration in vivo. Our findings identify a potential new therapeutic target for the prevention of metastasis, and provide an improved understanding of cancer cell migration.

  13. Regulation of Cell Adhesion Strength by Peripheral Focal Adhesion Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrices is a tightly regulated process that involves the complex interplay between biochemical and mechanical events at the cell-adhesive interface. Previous work established the spatiotemporal contributions of adhesive components to adhesion strength and identified a nonlinear dependence on cell spreading. This study was designed to investigate the regulation of cell-adhesion strength by the size and position of focal adhesions (FA). The cell-adhesive interfac...

  14. Adhesion hysteresis of silane coated microcantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; KNAPP,JAMES A.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.; SRINIVASAN,U.; MABOUDIAN,R.

    2000-04-17

    The authors have developed a new experimental approach for measuring hysteresis in the adhesion between micromachined surfaces. By accurately modeling the deformations in cantilever beams that are subject to combined interfacial adhesion and applied electrostatic forces, they determine adhesion energies for advancing and receding contacts. They draw on this new method to examine adhesion hysteresis for silane coated micromachined structures and found significant hysteresis for surfaces that were exposed to high relative humidity (RH) conditions. Atomic force microscopy studies of these surfaces showed spontaneous formation of agglomerates that they interpreted as silages that have irreversibly transformed from uniform surface layers at low RH to isolated vesicles at high RH. They used contact deformation models to show that the compliance of these vesicles could reasonably account for the adhesion hysteresis that develops at high RH as the surfaces are forced into contact by an externally applied load.

  15. Determination of metal ions by fluorescence anisotropy exhibits a broad dynamic range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Richard B.; Maliwal, Badri P.; Fierke, Carol A.

    1998-05-01

    Recently, we have shown that metal ions free in solution may be determined at low levels by fluorescence anisotropy (polarization) measurements. Anisotropy measurements enjoy the advantages of wavelength ratiometric techniques for determining metal ions such as calcium, because anisotropy measurements are ratiometric as well. Furthermore, fluorescence anisotropy may be imaged in the microscope. An advantage of anisotropy not demonstrated for wavelength ratiometric approaches using indicators such as Fura-2 and Indo-1 is that under favorable circumstances anisotropy-based determinations exhibit a much broader dynamic range in metal ion concentration. Determinations of free Zn(II) in the picomolar range are demonstrated.

  16. The six determinants of gait and the inverted pendulum analogy: A dynamic walking perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Arthur D

    2007-08-01

    We examine two prevailing, yet surprisingly contradictory, theories of human walking. The six determinants of gait are kinematic features of gait proposed to minimize the energetic cost of locomotion by reducing the vertical displacement of the body center of mass (COM). The inverted pendulum analogy proposes that it is beneficial for the stance leg to behave like a pendulum, prescribing a more circular arc, rather than a horizontal path, for the COM. Recent literature presents evidence against the six determinants theory, and a simple mathematical analysis shows that a flattened COM trajectory in fact increases muscle work and force requirements. A similar analysis shows that the inverted pendulum fares better, but paradoxically predicts no work or force requirements. The paradox may be resolved through the dynamic walking approach, which refers to periodic gaits produced almost entirely by the dynamics of the limbs alone. Demonstrations include passive dynamic walking machines that descend a gentle slope, and active dynamic walking robots that walk on level ground. Dynamic walking takes advantage of the inverted pendulum mechanism, but requires mechanical work to transition from one pendular stance leg to the next. We show how the step-to-step transition is an unavoidable energetic consequence of the inverted pendulum gait, and gives rise to predictions that are experimentally testable on humans and machines. The dynamic walking approach provides a new perspective, focusing on mechanical work rather than the kinematics or forces of gait. It is helpful for explaining human gait features in a constructive rather than interpretive manner.

  17. Pathophysiology and prevention of postoperative peritoneal adhesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Willy Arung1; Michel Meurisse; Olivier Detry

    2011-01-01

    Peritoneal adhesions represent an important clinical challenge in gastrointestinal surgery. Peritoneal adhesions are a consequence of peritoneal irritation by infection or surgical trauma, and may be considered as the pathological part of healing following any peritoneal injury, particularly due to abdominal surgery. The balance between fibrin deposition and degradation is critical in determining normal peritoneal healing or adhesion formation. Postoperative peritoneal adhesions are a major cause of morbidity resulting in multiple complications, many of which may manifest several years after the initial surgical procedure. In addition to acute small bowel obstruction, peritoneal adhesions may cause pelvic or abdominal pain, and infertility. In this paper, the authors reviewed the epidemiology, pathogenesis and various prevention strategies of adhesion formation, using Medline and PubMed search. Several preventive agents against postoperative peritoneal adhesions have been investigated. Their role aims in activating fibrinolysis, hampering coagulation, diminishing the inflammatory response, inhibiting collagen synthesis or creating a barrier between adjacent wound surfaces. Their results are encouraging but most of them are contradictory and achieved mostly in animal model. Until additional findings from future clinical researches, only a meticulous surgery can be recommended to reduce unnecessary morbidity and mortality rates from these untoward effects of surgery. In the current state of knowledge, pre-clinical or clinical studies are still necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of the several proposed prevention strategies of postoperative peritoneal adhesions.

  18. Measurement of single-cell adhesion strength using a microfluidic assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Kevin V; Williamson, Kyle B; Masters, Kristyn S; Turner, Kevin T

    2010-06-01

    Despite the importance of cell adhesion in numerous physiological, pathological, and biomaterial-related responses, our understanding of adhesion strength at the cell-substrate interface and its relationship to cell function remains incomplete. One reason for this deficit is a lack of accessible experimental approaches that quantify adhesion strength at the single-cell level and facilitate large numbers of tests. The current work describes the design, fabrication, and use of a microfluidic-based method for single-cell adhesion strength measurements. By applying a monotonically increasing flow rate in a microfluidic channel in combination with video microscopy, the adhesion strength of individual NIH3T3 fibroblasts cultured for 24 h on various surfaces was measured. The small height of the channel allows high shear stresses to be generated under laminar conditions, allowing strength measurements on well-spread, strongly adhered cells that cannot be characterized in most conventional assays. This assay was used to quantify the relationship between morphological characteristics and adhesion strength for individual well-spread cells. Cell adhesion strength was found to be positively correlated with both cell area and circularity. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to examine the role of cell geometry in determining the actual stress applied to the cell. Use of this method to examine adhesion at the single-cell level allows the detachment of strongly-adhered cells under a highly-controllable, uniform loading to be directly observed and will enable the characterization of biological events and relationships that cannot currently be achieved using existing methods.

  19. Vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness and adhesion to collagen I modified by vasoactive agonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongkui Hong

    Full Text Available In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs integrin-mediated adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM proteins play important roles in sustaining vascular tone and resistance. The main goal of this study was to determine whether VSMCs adhesion to type I collagen (COL-I was altered in parallel with the changes in the VSMCs contractile state induced by vasoconstrictors and vasodilators. VSMCs were isolated from rat cremaster skeletal muscle arterioles and maintained in primary culture without passage. Cell adhesion and cell E-modulus were assessed using atomic force microscopy (AFM by repetitive nano-indentation of the AFM probe on the cell surface at 0.1 Hz sampling frequency and 3200 nm Z-piezo travelling distance (approach and retraction. AFM probes were tipped with a 5 μm diameter microbead functionalized with COL-I (1 mg\\ml. Results showed that the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II (ANG-II; 10-6 significantly increased (p<0.05 VSMC E-modulus and adhesion probability to COL-I by approximately 35% and 33%, respectively. In contrast, the vasodilator adenosine (ADO; 10-4 significantly decreased (p<0.05 VSMC E-modulus and adhesion probability by approximately -33% and -17%, respectively. Similarly, the NO donor (PANOate, 10-6 M, a potent vasodilator, also significantly decreased (p<0.05 the VSMC E-modulus and COL-I adhesion probability by -38% and -35%, respectively. These observations support the hypothesis that integrin-mediated VSMC adhesion to the ECM protein COL-I is dynamically regulated in parallel with VSMC contractile activation. These data suggest that the signal transduction pathways modulating VSMC contractile activation and relaxation, in addition to ECM adhesion, interact during regulation of contractile state.

  20. Computational fluid dynamics vs. inverse dynamics methods to determine passive drag in two breaststroke glide positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, L; Mantha, V R; Silva, A J; Fernandes, R J; Marinho, D A; Vilas-Boas, J P; Machado, L; Rouboa, A

    2015-07-16

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) plays an important role to quantify, understand and "observe" the water movements around the human body and its effects on drag (D). We aimed to investigate the flow effects around the swimmer and to compare the drag and drag coefficient (CD) values obtained from experiments (using cable velocimetry in a swimming pool) with those of CFD simulations for the two ventral gliding positions assumed during the breaststroke underwater cycle (with shoulders flexed and upper limbs extended above the head-GP1; with shoulders in neutral position and upper limbs extended along the trunk-GP2). Six well-trained breaststroke male swimmers (with reasonable homogeneity of body characteristics) participated in the experimental tests; afterwards a 3D swimmer model was created to fit within the limits of the sample body size profile. The standard k-ε turbulent model was used to simulate the fluid flow around the swimmer model. Velocity ranged from 1.30 to 1.70 m/s for GP1 and 1.10 to 1.50 m/s for GP2. Values found for GP1 and GP2 were lower for CFD than experimental ones. Nevertheless, both CFD and experimental drag/drag coefficient values displayed a tendency to jointly increase/decrease with velocity, except for GP2 CD where CFD and experimental values display opposite tendencies. Results suggest that CFD values obtained by single model approaches should be considered with caution due to small body shape and dimension differences to real swimmers. For better accuracy of CFD studies, realistic individual 3D models of swimmers are required, and specific kinematics respected.

  1. Nanocapillary Adhesion between Parallel Plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Robbins, Mark O

    2016-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study capillary adhesion from a nanometer scale liquid bridge between two parallel flat solid surfaces. The capillary force, Fcap, and the meniscus shape of the bridge are computed as the separation between the solid surfaces, h, is varied. Macroscopic theory predicts the meniscus shape and the contribution of liquid/vapor interfacial tension to Fcap quite accurately for separations as small as two or three molecular diameters (1-2 nm). However, the total capillary force differs in sign and magnitude from macroscopic theory for h ≲ 5 nm (8-10 diameters) because of molecular layering that is not included in macroscopic theory. For these small separations, the pressure tensor in the fluid becomes anisotropic. The components in the plane of the surface vary smoothly and are consistent with theory based on the macroscopic surface tension. Capillary adhesion is affected by only the perpendicular component, which has strong oscillations as the molecular layering changes.

  2. A Unified Approach to Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion Control with Parameter Determination by Eigenvalue Assignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chi Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a unified approach to nonlinear dynamic inversion control algorithm with the parameters for desired dynamics determined by using an eigenvalue assignment method, which may be applied in a very straightforward and convenient way. By using this method, it is not necessary to transform the nonlinear equations into linear equations by feedback linearization before beginning control designs. The applications of this method are not limited to affine nonlinear control systems or limited to minimum phase problems if the eigenvalues of error dynamics are carefully assigned so that the desired dynamics is stable. The control design by using this method is shown to be robust to modeling uncertainties. To validate the theory, the design of a UAV control system is presented as an example. Numerical simulations show the performance of the design to be quite remarkable.

  3. Sex ratio selection and multi-factorial sex determination in the housefly : A dynamic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozielska, M.A.; Pen, I.R.; Beukeboom, L.W.; Weissing, F.J.

    2006-01-01

    Sex determining (SD) mechanisms are highly variable between different taxonomic groups and appear to change relatively quickly during evolution. Sex ratio selection could be a dominant force causing such changes. We investigate theoretically the effect of sex ratio selection on the dynamics of a mul

  4. Determination of thermal inactivation kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes in chicken meat by isothermal and dynamic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this research is to determine the thermal inactivation kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes in chicken breast meat using both isothermal and dynamic conditions. A four-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes was inoculated to chicken breast meat. Isothermal studies were performed by sub...

  5. Upper Limb Asymmetries in the Perception of Proprioceptively Determined Dynamic Position Sense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Daniel J.; Brown, Susan H.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies of position-related proprioceptive sense have provided evidence of a nonpreferred left arm advantage in right-handed individuals. The present study sought to determine whether similar asymmetries might exist in "dynamic position" sense. Thirteen healthy, right-handed adults were blindfolded and seated with arms placed on…

  6. Electro-dry-adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Menon, Carlo

    2012-03-27

    This work presents novel conductive bioinspired dry adhesives with mushroom caps that enable the use of a synergistic combination of electrostatic and van der Waals forces (electro-dry-adhesion). An increase in shear adhesion bond strength of up to 2046% on a wide range of materials is measured when a maximum electrical field of 36.4 V μm(-1) is applied. A suction effect, due to the shape of the dry adhesive fibers, on overall adhesion was not noted for electro-dry-adhesives when testing was performed at both atmospheric and reduced pressure. Utilization of electrostatics to apply a preloading force to dry adhesive fiber arrays allows increased adhesion even after electrostatic force generation has been halted by ensuring the close contact necessary for van der Waals forces to be effective. A comparison is made between self-preloading of the electro-dry-adhesives and the direct application of a normal preloading pressure resulting in nearly the same shear bond strength with an applied voltage of 3.33 kV on the same sample.

  7. Adhesives, silver amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The most recent advancement in silver amalgam is use of resin formulations to bond metal to tooth both chemically &/or physically, Since, historically, amalgam has been used successfully without adhesion to tooth, obvious clinical question is: Why is bonding now desirable? Two major clinical reasons to bond are: (1) Adhesive can increase fracture resistance of amalgam restored teeth & decrease cusp fractures; & (2) Seal provided by adhesive can greatly decrease, & often eliminate post-operative sensitivity. Following report summarizes CRA laboratory study of shear bond strength & sealing capability of 23 commercial adhesives used to bond 2 types of silver amalgam to tooth structure.

  8. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  9. More automation, more adhesives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Jens-Peter

    2012-07-01

    Although aluminium has become established as an absorber plate material, it is still seldom used for piping. Moreover, adhesive processes are becoming increasingly important in collector production. (orig.)

  10. Thickness determination in textile material design: dynamic modeling and numerical algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dinghua; Ge, Meibao

    2012-03-01

    Textile material design is of paramount importance in the study of functional clothing design. It is therefore important to determine the dynamic heat and moisture transfer characteristics in the human body-clothing-environment system, which directly determine the heat-moisture comfort level of the human body. Based on a model of dynamic heat and moisture transfer with condensation in porous fabric at low temperature, this paper presents a new inverse problem of textile thickness determination (IPTTD). Adopting the idea of the least-squares method, we formulate the IPTTD into a function minimization problem. By means of the finite-difference method, quasi-solution method and direct search method for one-dimensional minimization problems, we construct iterative algorithms of the approximated solution for the IPTTD. Numerical simulation results validate the formulation of the IPTTD and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed numerical algorithms.

  11. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N.; Patil, Navinkumar J.; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives.

  12. Testing Object-Oriented Programs using Dynamic Aspects and Non-Determinism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achenbach, Michael; Ostermann, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    without parameterization or generation of tests. It also eases modelling naturally non-deterministic program features like IO or multi-threading in integration tests. Dynamic AOP facilitates powerful design adaptations without exposing test features, keeping the scope of these adaptations local to each...... test. We also combine non-determinism and dynamic aspects in a new approach to testing multi-threaded programs using co-routines.......The implementation of unit tests with mock objects and stubs often involves substantial manual work. Stubbed methods return simple default values, therefore variations of these values require separate test cases. The integration of mock objects often requires more infrastructure code and design...

  13. Determination of Mean Inner Potential by Electron Holography Along with Electron Dynamic Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王岩国; 刘红荣; 杨奇斌; 张泽

    2003-01-01

    Off-axis electron holography in a field-emission-gun transmission electron microscope and electron dynamic simulation is used to determine the mean inner potential of copper. The phase shift of object wave versus specimen thickness is calculated up to 30 nm using electron dynamic formula, and the sample thickness is decided by match of the experimental and calculated phase shift. Based on the measured phase shift, the calculated mean inner potential of Cu is 21.2 V, which agrees with the reported values within the experimental error.

  14. Experimental determination of dynamic characteristics of the VentrAssist implantable rotary blood pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Michael K H; Zhang, Nong; Tansley, Geoff D; Qian, Yi

    2004-12-01

    The VentrAssist implantable rotary blood pump, intended for long-term ventricular assist, is under development and is currently being tested for its rotor-dynamic stability. The pump consists of a shaftless impeller, which also acts as the rotor of the brushless DC motor. The impeller remains passively suspended in the pump cavity by hydrodynamic forces, which result from the small clearances between the outside surfaces of the impeller and the pump cavity. These small clearances range from approximately 50 microm to 230 microm in size in the version of pump reported here. This article presents experimental investigation into the dynamic characteristics of the impeller-bearing-pump housing system of the rotary blood pump for increasing pump speeds at different flow rates. The pump was mounted on a suspension system consisting of a platform and springs, where the natural frequency and damping ratio for the suspension system were determined. Real-time measurements of the impeller's displacement were performed using Hall effect sensors. A vertical disturbance force was exerted onto the pump housing, causing the impeller to be displaced in vertical direction from its dynamic equilibrium position within the pump cavity. The impeller displacement was represented by a decaying sine wave, which indicated the impeller restoring to its equilibrium position. From the decaying sine wave the natural frequency and stiffness coefficient of the system were determined. Furthermore, the logarithmic decrement method was used to determine the damping ratio and eventually the damping coefficient of the system. Results indicate that stiffness and damping coefficients increased as flow rate and pump speed increased, representing an increase in stability with these changing conditions. However, pump speed had a greater influence on the stiffness and damping coefficients than flow rate did, which was evident through dynamic analysis. Overall the experimental method presented in this

  15. Loss of cofilin 1 disturbs actin dynamics, adhesion between enveloping and deep cell layers and cell movements during gastrulation in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Wei Lin

    Full Text Available During gastrulation, cohesive migration drives associated cell layers to the completion of epiboly in zebrafish. The association of different layers relies on E-cadherin based cellular junctions, whose stability can be affected by actin turnover. Here, we examined the effect of malfunctioning actin turnover on the epibolic movement by knocking down an actin depolymerizing factor, cofilin 1, using antisense morpholino oligos (MO. Knockdown of cfl1 interfered with epibolic movement of deep cell layer (DEL but not in the enveloping layer (EVL and the defect could be specifically rescued by overexpression of cfl1. It appeared that the uncoordinated movements of DEL and EVL were regulated by the differential expression of cfl1 in the DEL, but not EVL as shown by in situ hybridization. The dissociation of DEL and EVL was further evident by the loss of adhesion between layers by using transmission electronic and confocal microscopy analyses. cfl1 morphants also exhibited abnormal convergent extension, cellular migration and actin filaments, but not involution of hypoblast. The cfl1 MO-induced cell migration defect was found to be cell-autonomous in cell transplantation assays. These results suggest that proper actin turnover mediated by Cfl1 is essential for adhesion between DEL and EVL and cell movements during gastrulation in zebrafish.

  16. Influence of nanofillers on the thermal and mechanical behavior of DGEBA-based adhesives for bonded-in timber connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Z.; Ansell, M. P.; Smedley, D.

    2006-09-01

    Results of an experimental investigation into the thermal behavior and mechanical properties of a room-temperature-cured epoxy adhesive (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A, DGEBA) cross-linked with polyetheramines and filled with different fillers, namely nanosilica, liquid rubber (CTBN), and clay, are reported. The nanosilica and liquid rubber increased the flexural strength and elastic modulus of the adhesive systems; the addition of clay particles raised the elastic modulus significantly, but embrittled the adhesive. Establishing a correct cure time is very important for bonded-in timber structures, as it will affect the bond strength. A study on the effect of cure time on the flexural strength was carried out, from which it follows that the adhesives should be cured for at least 20 days at room temperature. The damping characteristics and the glass-transition temperature of the adhesives were determined by using a dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. The results showed that the filled adhesives had a higher storage modulus, which was in agreement with the elastic moduli determined from static bending tests. The introduction of the fillers increased its glass-transition temperature considerably.

  17. Resolving fundamental limits of adhesive bonding in microfabrication.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Jessica S.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Emerson, John Allen; Adkins, Douglas Ray; Kent, Michael Stuart; Read, Douglas H.; Giunta, Rachel Knudsen; Lamppa, Kerry P.; Kawaguchi, Stacie; Holmes, Melissa A.

    2004-04-01

    As electronic and optical components reach the micro- and nanoscales, efficient assembly and packaging require the use of adhesive bonds. This work focuses on resolving several fundamental issues in the transition from macro- to micro- to nanobonding. A primary issue is that, as bondline thicknesses decrease, knowledge of the stability and dewetting dynamics of thin adhesive films is important to obtain robust, void-free adhesive bonds. While researchers have studied dewetting dynamics of thin films of model, non-polar polymers, little experimental work has been done regarding dewetting dynamics of thin adhesive films, which exhibit much more complex behaviors. In this work, the areas of dispensing small volumes of viscous materials, capillary fluid flow, surface energetics, and wetting have all been investigated. By resolving these adhesive-bonding issues, we are allowing significantly smaller devices to be designed and fabricated. Simultaneously, we are increasing the manufacturability and reliability of these devices.

  18. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach...... that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  19. Tissue adhesives in otorhinolaryngology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider, Gerlind

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of medical tissue adhesives has a long history without finding an all-purpose tissue adhesive for clinical daily routine. This is caused by the specific demands which are made on a tissue adhesive, and the different areas of application. In otorhinolaryngology, on the one hand, this is the mucosal environment as well as the application on bones, cartilage and periphery nerves. On the other hand, there are stressed regions (skin, oral cavity, pharynx, oesophagus, trachea and unstressed regions (middle ear, nose and paranasal sinuses, cranial bones. But due to the facts that adhesives can have considerable advantages in assuring surgery results, prevention of complications and so reduction of medical costs/treatment expenses, the search for new adhesives for use in otorhinolaryngology will be continued intensively. In parallel, appropriate application systems have to be developed for microscopic and endoscopic use.

  20. Dynamic capabilities for cooperation in Brazilian multinational and factors determining its management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Rezende da Costa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the context of emerging companies’ growth, current challenges depend on the local generation of product and process innovations, as well as dynamic capability to generate innovative solutions cooperatively and new globe business models. The objective of this study is to analyse the determining managerial factors for the dynamic capability of cooperation in Brazilian multinationals (BMNs. A survey was conducted with a sample of 60 BMNs, and a structured questionnaire and statistical tests with factorial analysis and Cronbach's alpha were used. The aggregate analysis of the results indicates that BMNs are going through a transitional process between the operational capability of cooperation and the capability for dynamic cooperation, which are relevant to the continuous adaptation of already-established cooperative management routines and the evaluation and incorporation of the relational capability of management practices that consider systemic flows, open innovation and integrate strategic intentionality into cooperative processes.

  1. Determination of dynamic performance of freight cars taking into account technical condition of side bearers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Myamlin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The railway transport plays an important role in social and economic life of the country and carries out the large containment of transportation activities. The transport industry should migrate towards innovation changes and increase its significance as an important transit subsystem on the way of renovation of both the infrastructure and the strategy of all transportation process components including the interaction with other transport modes. At present the life sets strategic challenges for the railway branch, and the basic goals among them are as follows: high-speed train traffic development, increase of the weight of freight trains, new rolling stock development etc. Due to the urgency of this subject, the researchers should cope with the task devoted to one of aspects of improving the freight transportation efficiency, namely to the study of effects of various factors and characteristics of technical conditions of the freight cars running gears (which are unavoidable to arise during operation on their basic dynamic indices. The deviations of technical conditions of running gears from the normal state of the wedge system of bogie swing suspension also play an important role among them. The purpose of the paper is to investigate the influence of different factors of the technical conditions of freight car running gears (size deviation in both the bearers and the wedge system during operation on their basic indices – coefficients of horizontal and vertical dynamics, vehicle body acceleration, frame strength, and derailment stability coefficient. Methodology. The study was conducted by numerical integration and mathematical modeling of the freight car dynamic loading using the software package “Dynamics of Rail Vehicles” (“DYNRAIL”. Findings. As a result of the research for freight car dynamic coefficients determination taking into account technical conditions of the side bearers, the dependencies of the basic freight cars

  2. Climate effects and feedback structure determining weed population dynamics in a long-term experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Mauricio; Navarrete, Luis; González-Andujar, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Pest control is one of the areas in which population dynamic theory has been successfully applied to solve practical problems. However, the links between population dynamic theory and model construction have been less emphasized in the management and control of weed populations. Most management models of weed population dynamics have emphasized the role of the endogenous process, but the role of exogenous variables such as climate have been ignored in the study of weed populations and their management. Here, we use long-term data (22 years) on two annual weed species from a locality in Central Spain to determine the importance of endogenous and exogenous processes (local and large-scale climate factors). Our modeling study determined two different feedback structures and climate effects in the two weed species analyzed. While Descurainia sophia exhibited a second-order feedback and low climate influence, Veronica hederifolia was characterized by a first-order feedback structure and important effects from temperature and rainfall. Our results strongly suggest the importance of theoretical population dynamics in understanding plant population systems. Moreover, the use of this approach, discerning between the effect of exogenous and endogenous factors, can be fundamental to applying weed management practices in agricultural systems and to controlling invasive weedy species. This is a radical change from most approaches currently used to guide weed and invasive weedy species managements.

  3. Climate Effects and Feedback Structure Determining Weed Population Dynamics in a Long-Term Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Mauricio; Navarrete, Luis; González-Andujar, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Pest control is one of the areas in which population dynamic theory has been successfully applied to solve practical problems. However, the links between population dynamic theory and model construction have been less emphasized in the management and control of weed populations. Most management models of weed population dynamics have emphasized the role of the endogenous process, but the role of exogenous variables such as climate have been ignored in the study of weed populations and their management. Here, we use long-term data (22 years) on two annual weed species from a locality in Central Spain to determine the importance of endogenous and exogenous processes (local and large-scale climate factors). Our modeling study determined two different feedback structures and climate effects in the two weed species analyzed. While Descurainia sophia exhibited a second-order feedback and low climate influence, Veronica hederifolia was characterized by a first-order feedback structure and important effects from temperature and rainfall. Our results strongly suggest the importance of theoretical population dynamics in understanding plant population systems. Moreover, the use of this approach, discerning between the effect of exogenous and endogenous factors, can be fundamental to applying weed management practices in agricultural systems and to controlling invasive weedy species. This is a radical change from most approaches currently used to guide weed and invasive weedy species managements. PMID:22272362

  4. Towards wafer scale inductive determination of magnetostatic and dynamic parameters of magnetic thin films and multilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Sievers, Sibylle; Nass, Paul; Serrano-Guisan, Santiago; Pasquale, Massimo; Schumacher, Hans Werner

    2013-01-01

    We investigate an inductive probe head suitable for non-invasive characterization of the magnetostatic and dynamic parameters of magnetic thin films and multilayers on the wafer scale. The probe is based on a planar waveguide with rearward high frequency connectors that can be brought in close contact to the wafer surface. Inductive characterization of the magnetic material is carried out by vector network analyzer ferromagnetic resonance. Analysis of the field dispersion of the resonance allows the determination of key material parameters such as the saturation magnetization MS or the effective damping parameter Meff. Three waveguide designs are tested. The broadband frequency response is characterized and the suitability for inductive determination of MS and Meff is compared. Integration of such probes in a wafer prober could in the future allow wafer scale in-line testing of magnetostatic and dynamic key material parameters of magnetic thin films and multilayers.

  5. Determination of Inelastic Mean Free Path by Electron Holography Along with Electron Dynamic Calculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王岩国; 刘红荣; 杨奇斌; 张泽

    2003-01-01

    Off-axis electron holography in a field emission gun transmission-electron microscope and electron dynamic calculation are used to determine the absorption coefficient and inelastic mean free path (IMFP) of copper.Dependence of the phase shift of the exit electron wave on the specimen thickness is established by electron dynamic simulation. The established relationship makes it possible to determine the specimen thickness with the calculated phase shift by match of the phase shift measured in the reconstructed phase image. Based on the measured amplitudes in reconstructed exit electron wave and reference wave in the vacuum, the examined IMFP of electron with energy of 200kV in Cu is obtained to be 96nm.

  6. Specific determination of benzene in urine using dynamic headspace and mass-selective detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungkvist, G; Lärstad, M; Mathiasson, L

    1999-01-08

    A method for the determination of benzene in urine was developed, based on dynamic headspace and preconcentration of the analyte on a solid sorbent. The subsequent analysis by thermal desorption of the sorbent, capillary gas chromatography and mass-selective detection ascertained a low limit of detection (6.5 ng/l) and a highly specific determination. The limit of detection is an order of magnitude lower than that reported earlier and allows reliable quantitation of occupational exposure and of most environmental exposures. Samples could be stored frozen for at least a month without significant loss.

  7. Factors determining the diurnal dynamics of blooming of chosen plant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożena Denisow

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper attempts to synthesize the determinants which may influence the diurnal rhythm of blooming. Additionally, I tried to explore and bring together topics that concern blooming and have always been considered separately because of their origin in different disciplines. The following species were included: Hydrangea arborescens L. subsp. discolor (Raf., H. paniculata Sieb., Viburnum opulus L., Chaenomeles japonica Lindl., Knautia arvensis L., Adonis vernalis L., Aster saggitifolius Willd., Taraxacum officinale L. Chelidonium majus L. The taxons were observed in Lublin (51008' - 51018' N and 21027' - 21041' E in the years 2001-2007. The blooming of species was determined at least for two vegetation seasons. During observations all flowers developed in one-hour intervals were counted. The diurnal dynamics of blooming differs among species and is modified by different endogenous and exogenous factors. The endogenous determinants of diurnal dynamics of blooming are morphological diversity of flowers (fertility or sterility within species or heterostyly. The different pattern of blooming succour different mechanisms which prevent self-pollination (Chaenomeles japonica Lindl., Knautia arvensis L.. The abiotic factors, such as day length and temperature during the vegetation season, influence the change in the process of diurnal dynamics of blooming (e. g. Taraxacum officinale, Chelidonium majus.

  8. Isolation and biochemical characterization of underwater adhesives from diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Nicole; Kröger, Nils; Harrington, Matthew J; Brunner, Eike; Paasch, Silvia; Buhmann, Matthias T

    2014-01-01

    Many aquatic organisms are able to colonize surfaces through the secretion of underwater adhesives. Diatoms are unicellular algae that have the capability to colonize any natural and man-made submerged surfaces. There is great technological interest in both mimicking and preventing diatom adhesion, yet the biomolecules responsible have so far remained unidentified. A new method for the isolation of diatom adhesive material is described and its amino acid and carbohydrate composition determined. The adhesive materials from two model diatoms show differences in their amino acid and carbohydrate compositions, but also share characteristic features including a high content of uronic acids, the predominance of hydrophilic amino acid residues, and the presence of 3,4-dihydroxyproline, an extremely rare amino acid. Proteins containing dihydroxyphenylalanine, which mediate underwater adhesion of mussels, are absent. The data on the composition of diatom adhesives are consistent with an adhesion mechanism based on complex coacervation of polyelectrolyte-like biomolecules.

  9. Multitechnique monitoring of fatigue damage in adhesively bonded composite lap-joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpenko, Oleksii; Koricho, Ermias; Khomenko, Anton; Dib, Gerges; Haq, Mahmoodul; Udpa, Lalita

    2015-03-01

    The requirement for reduced structural weight has driven the development of adhesively bonded joints. However, a major issue preventing their full acceptance is the initiation of premature failure in the form of a disbond between adherends, mainly due to fatigue, manufacturing flaws or impact damage. This work presents the integrated approach for in-situ monitoring of degradation of the adhesive bond in the GFRP composite lap-joint using ultrasonic guided waves and dynamic measurements from strategically embedded FBG sensors. Guided waves are actuated with surface mounted piezoelectric elements and mode tuning is used to provide high sensitivity to the degradation of the adhesive layer parameters. Composite lap-joints are subjected to fatigue loading, and data from piezoceramic transducers are collected at regular intervals to evaluate the progression of damage. Results demonstrate that quasi-static loading affects guided wave measurements considerably, but FBG sensors can be used to monitor the applied load levels and residual strains in the adhesive bond. The proposed technique shows promise for determining the post-damage stiffness of adhesively bonded joints.

  10. Microtubule-dependent modulation of adhesion complex composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel H J; Humphries, Jonathan D; Byron, Adam; Millon-Frémillon, Angélique; Humphries, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    The microtubule network regulates the turnover of integrin-containing adhesion complexes to stimulate cell migration. Disruption of the microtubule network results in an enlargement of adhesion complex size due to increased RhoA-stimulated actomyosin contractility, and inhibition of adhesion complex turnover; however, the microtubule-dependent changes in adhesion complex composition have not been studied in a global, unbiased manner. Here we used label-free quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics to determine adhesion complex changes that occur upon microtubule disruption with nocodazole. Nocodazole-treated cells displayed an increased abundance of the majority of known adhesion complex components, but no change in the levels of the fibronectin-binding α5β1 integrin. Immunofluorescence analyses confirmed these findings, but revealed a change in localisation of adhesion complex components. Specifically, in untreated cells, α5-integrin co-localised with vinculin at peripherally located focal adhesions and with tensin at centrally located fibrillar adhesions. In nocodazole-treated cells, however, α5-integrin was found in both peripherally located and centrally located adhesion complexes that contained both vinculin and tensin, suggesting a switch in the maturation state of adhesion complexes to favour focal adhesions. Moreover, the switch to focal adhesions was confirmed to be force-dependent as inhibition of cell contractility with the Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor, Y-27632, prevented the nocodazole-induced conversion. These results highlight a complex interplay between the microtubule cytoskeleton, adhesion complex maturation state and intracellular contractile force, and provide a resource for future adhesion signaling studies. The proteomics data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001183.

  11. Fast-Curing Epoxy and Acrylate Adhesive Development for Adverse Marine Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    the bulk properties of the adhesive. Water contact can reduce the glass transition temperature, induce cracks, or initiate hydrolysis in which the...bond strengths in acrylate adhesives with high solvent content (9, 10). It was noted that these adhesives repelled water from the surface of wet...Hydrophobic solvents were tested to determine their ability to repel water from the adhesive bonding area and in order to improve adhesion. An initial water

  12. The role of adhesion energy in controlling cell-cell contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maître, Jean-Léon; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2011-10-01

    Recent advances in microscopy techniques and biophysical measurements have provided novel insight into the molecular, cellular and biophysical basis of cell adhesion. However, comparably little is known about a core element of cell-cell adhesion--the energy of adhesion at the cell-cell contact. In this review, we discuss approaches to understand the nature and regulation of adhesion energy, and propose strategies to determine adhesion energy between cells in vitro and in vivo.

  13. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  14. Lactobacillus Adhesion to Mucus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell L. Van Tassell

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mucus provides protective functions in the gastrointestinal tract and plays an important role in the adhesion of microorganisms to host surfaces. Mucin glycoproteins polymerize, forming a framework to which certain microbial populations can adhere, including probiotic Lactobacillus species. Numerous mechanisms for adhesion to mucus have been discovered in lactobacilli, including partially characterized mucus binding proteins. These mechanisms vary in importance with the in vitro models studied, which could significantly affect the perceived probiotic potential of the organisms. Understanding the nature of mucus-microbe interactions could be the key to elucidating the mechanisms of probiotic adhesion within the host.

  15. Using weigh-in-motion data to determine bridge dynamic amplification factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalin Jan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic component of bridge traffic loading is commonly taken into account with a Dynamic Amplification Factor (DAF – the ratio between the maximum dynamic and static load effects on a bridge. In the design codes, this factor is generally higher than in reality. While this is fine for new bridges that must account for various risks during their life-time, it imposes unnecessary conservativism into assessment of the existing well defined bridges. Therefore, analysis of existing bridges should apply more realistic DAF values. One way of obtaining them experimentally is by bridge weigh-in-motion (B-WIM measurements, which use an existing instrumented bridge or culvert to weigh all crossing vehicles at highway speeds. The B-WIM system had been equipped with two methods of obtaining an approximation to the static response of the. The first method uses the sum of influence lines. This method relies on accurate axle identification, the failure of which can have a large influence on the DAF value. The other method uses a pre-determined low-pass filter to remove the dynamic component of the measured signal; however an expert is needed to set the filter parameters. A new approach that tries to eliminate these two drawbacks has been developed. In this approach the parameters for the filter are determined automatically by fitting the filtered response to the sum of the influence lines. The measurement of DAF on a typical bridge site agrees with experiments performed in the ARCHES [1] project: dynamic amplification decreases as static loading increases.

  16. Sticking around: an up-close look at drop adhesion

    CERN Document Server

    Paxson, Adam T

    2013-01-01

    We present a fluid dynamics video showing the adhesion of a drop to a superhydrophobic surface. We use environmental scanning electron microscopy to observe depinning events at the microscale. As the drop moves along the surface, the advancing portion of the contact line simply lies down onto the upcoming roughness features, contributing negligibly to adhesion. After measuring the local receding contact angle of capillary bridges formed on a micropillar array, we find that these depinning events follow the Gibbs depinning criterion. We further extend this technique to two-scale hierarchical structures to reveal a self-similar depinning mechanism in which the adhesion of the entire drop depends only on the pinning at the very smallest level of roughness hierarchy. With this self-similar depinning mechanism we develop a model to predict the adhesion of drops to superhydrophobic surfaces that explains both the low adhesion on sparsely structured surfaces and the surprisingly high adhesion on surfaces whose featu...

  17. Friction and adhesion of hierarchical carbon nanotube structures for biomimetic dry adhesives: multiscale modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shihao; Jiang, Haodan; Xia, Zhenhai; Gao, Xiaosheng

    2010-09-01

    With unique hierarchical fibrillar structures on their feet, gecko lizards can walk on vertical walls or even ceilings. Recent experiments have shown that strong binding along the shear direction and easy lifting in the normal direction can be achieved by forming unidirectional carbon nanotube array with laterally distributed tips similar to gecko's feet. In this study, a multiscale modeling approach was developed to analyze friction and adhesion behaviors of this hierarchical fibrillar system. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube array with laterally distributed segments at the end was simulated by coarse grained molecular dynamics. The effects of the laterally distributed segments on friction and adhesion strengths were analyzed, and further adopted as cohesive laws used in finite element analysis at device scale. The results show that the laterally distributed segments play an essential role in achieving high force anisotropy between normal and shear directions in the adhesives. Finite element analysis reveals a new friction-enhanced adhesion mechanism of the carbon nanotube array, which also exists in gecko adhesive system. The multiscale modeling provides an approach to bridge the microlevel structures of the carbon nanotube array with its macrolevel adhesive behaviors, and the predictions from this modeling give an insight into the mechanisms of gecko-mimicking dry adhesives.

  18. Determination of thermal/dynamic characteristics of lava flow from surface thermal measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Melnik, Oleg; Korotkii, Alexander; Tsepelev, Igor; Kovtunov, Dmitry

    2016-04-01

    Rapid development of ground based thermal cameras, drones and satellite data allows getting repeated thermal images of the surface of the lava flow. Available instrumentation allows getting a large amount of data during a single lava flow eruption. These data require development of appropriate quantitative techniques to link subsurface dynamics with observations. We present a new approach to assimilation of thermal measurements at lava's surface to the bottom of the lava flow to determine lava's thermal and dynamic characteristics. Mathematically this problem is reduced to solving an inverse boundary problem. Namely, using known conditions at one part of the model boundary we determine the missing condition at the remaining part of the boundary. Using an adjoint method we develop a numerical approach to the mathematical problem based on the determination of the missing boundary condition and lava flow characteristics. Numerical results show that in the case of smooth input data lava temperature and velocity can be determined with a high accuracy. A noise imposed on the smooth input data results in a less accurate solution, but still acceptable below some noise level. The proposed approach to assimilate measured data brings an opportunity to estimate thermal budget of the lava flow.

  19. Determination of the experimental equilibrium structure of solid nitromethane using path-integral molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Anthony M.; Habershon, Scott; Morrison, Carole A.; Rankin, David W. H.

    2010-03-01

    Path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations with an empirical interaction potential have been used to determine the experimental equilibrium structure of solid nitromethane at 4.2 and 15 K. By comparing the time-averaged molecular structure determined in a PIMD simulation to the calculated minimum-energy (zero-temperature) molecular structure, we have derived structural corrections that describe the effects of thermal motion. These corrections were subsequently used to determine the equilibrium structure of nitromethane from the experimental time-averaged structure. We find that the corrections to the intramolecular and intermolecular bond distances, as well as to the torsion angles, are quite significant, particularly for those atoms participating in the anharmonic motion of the methyl group. Our results demonstrate that simple harmonic models of thermal motion may not be sufficiently accurate, even at low temperatures, while molecular simulations employing more realistic potential-energy surfaces can provide important insight into the role and magnitude of anharmonic atomic motions.

  20. Tracheomalacia in adults with cystic fibrosis: determination of prevalence and severity with dynamic cine CT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDermott, Shaunagh

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the prevalence and severity of tracheomalacia in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) by using dynamic cine multidetector computed tomography (CT) and to correlate these findings with pulmonary function test (PFT) results and the severity of parenchymal lung disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this institutional review board-approved HIPAA-compliant study, 40 patients with CF (22 men, 18 women; mean age, 28 years +\\/- 8 [standard deviation]; age range, 18-54 years) prospectively underwent PFTs, standard thin-section CT, and two dynamic cine multidetector CT acquisitions. Ten control subjects underwent dynamic cine multidetector CT. After standard thin-section CT was completed, dynamic cine multidetector CT was performed during a forced expiratory maneuver and during coughing. Dynamic cine multidetector CT images in nine patients were excluded. Maximal inspiratory, dynamic expiratory, and end-expiratory tracheal luminal areas were compared (Student t test) and correlated (Spearman rank) with PFT results and severity of parenchymal lung disease. RESULTS: Mean predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)) was 70.6% +\\/- 20.7, and mean Bhalla CT score was 41.8% +\\/- 13.6. In patients with CF, dynamic cine mean tracheal cross-sectional area reduction was 51.7% +\\/- 18.4 (range, 9%-89%) for forced expiratory maneuvers and 68.8% +\\/- 11.7 (range, 18%-88%) for coughing (P = .001). Tracheomalacia was demonstrated in 24 (69%) patients and no control subjects during forced expiratory maneuvers (P = .001) and in 10 (29%) patients and one (10%) control subject during coughing. For end-expiration images, mean tracheal luminal reduction was 16.1% +\\/- 14.0% (range, 0.0%-53.0%), with one patient demonstrating tracheal luminal reduction of more than 50%. There was no correlation between tracheal cross-sectional luminal reduction and either predicted FEV(1) or CT Bhalla score. CONCLUSION: Tracheomalacia depicted at dynamic cine multidetector CT is a

  1. Bioinspired pressure actuated adhesive system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paretkar, D.R.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Schneider, A.S.; Martina, D.; Creton, C.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a dry synthetic adhesive system inspired by gecko feet adhesion that can switch reversibly from adhesion to non-adhesion with applied pressure as external stimulus. Micropatterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with pillars of 30 µm length and 10 µm diameter were fabricated using

  2. Determination of Quantum Chemistry Based Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Aromatic Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations for model molecules can be used to parameterize force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of polymers. Emphasis in our research group is on using quantum chemistry-based force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of organic polymers in the melt and glassy states, but the methodology is applicable to simulations of small molecules, multicomponent systems and solutions. Special attention is paid to deriving reliable descriptions of the non-bonded and electrostatic interactions. Several procedures have been developed for deriving and calibrating these parameters. Our force fields for aromatic polyimide simulations will be described. In this application, the intermolecular interactions are the critical factor in determining many properties of the polymer (including its color).

  3. Aggregate size and structure determination of nanomaterials in physiological media: importance of dynamic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrooz, A. R. M. Nabiul; Hussain, Saber M.; Saleh, Navid B.

    2014-12-01

    Most in vitro nanotoxicological assays are performed after 24 h exposure. However, in determining size and shape effect of nanoparticles in toxicity assays, initial characterization data are generally used to describe experimental outcome. The dynamic size and structure of aggregates are typically ignored in these studies. This brief communication reports dynamic evolution of aggregation characteristics of gold nanoparticles. The study finds that gradual increase in aggregate size of gold nanospheres (AuNS) occurs up to 6 h duration; beyond this time period, the aggregation process deviates from gradual to a more abrupt behavior as large networks are formed. Results of the study also show that aggregated clusters possess unique structural conformation depending on nominal diameter of the nanoparticles. The differences in fractal dimensions of the AuNS samples likely occurred due to geometric differences, causing larger packing propensities for smaller sized particles. Both such observations can have profound influence on dosimetry for in vitro nanotoxicity analyses.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of peeling a DNA molecule on substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinghua Shi; Yong Kong; Yapu Zhao; Huajian Gao

    2005-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to study adhesion and peeling of a short fragment of single strand DNA (ssDNA) molecule from a graphite surface. The critical peel-off force is found to depend on both the peeling angle and the elasticity of ssDNA. For the short ssDNA strand under investigation, we show that the simulation results can be explained by a continuum model of an adhesive elastic band on substrate. The analysis suggests that it is often the peak value, rather than the mean value, of adhesion energy which determines the peeling of a nanoscale material.

  5. Using entropy maximization to understand the determinants of structural dynamics beyond native contact topology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy R Lezon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Comparison of elastic network model predictions with experimental data has provided important insights on the dominant role of the network of inter-residue contacts in defining the global dynamics of proteins. Most of these studies have focused on interpreting the mean-square fluctuations of residues, or deriving the most collective, or softest, modes of motions that are known to be insensitive to structural and energetic details. However, with increasing structural data, we are in a position to perform a more critical assessment of the structure-dynamics relations in proteins, and gain a deeper understanding of the major determinants of not only the mean-square fluctuations and lowest frequency modes, but the covariance or the cross-correlations between residue fluctuations and the shapes of higher modes. A systematic study of a large set of NMR-determined proteins is analyzed using a novel method based on entropy maximization to demonstrate that the next level of refinement in the elastic network model description of proteins ought to take into consideration properties such as contact order (or sequential separation between contacting residues and the secondary structure types of the interacting residues, whereas the types of amino acids do not play a critical role. Most importantly, an optimal description of observed cross-correlations requires the inclusion of destabilizing, as opposed to exclusively stabilizing, interactions, stipulating the functional significance of local frustration in imparting native-like dynamics. This study provides us with a deeper understanding of the structural basis of experimentally observed behavior, and opens the way to the development of more accurate models for exploring protein dynamics.

  6. Adaptive SLICE method: an enhanced method to determine nonlinear dynamic respiratory system mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhanqi; Guttmann, Josef; Möller, Knut

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce and evaluate the adaptive SLICE method (ASM) for continuous determination of intratidal nonlinear dynamic compliance and resistance. The tidal volume is subdivided into a series of volume intervals called slices. For each slice, one compliance and one resistance are calculated by applying a least-squares-fit method. The volume window (width) covered by each slice is determined based on the confidence interval of the parameter estimation. The method was compared to the original SLICE method and evaluated using simulation and animal data. The ASM was also challenged with separate analysis of dynamic compliance during inspiration. If the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the respiratory data decreased from +∞ to 10 dB, the relative errors of compliance increased from 0.1% to 22% for the ASM and from 0.2% to 227% for the SLICE method. Fewer differences were found in resistance. When the SNR was larger than 40 dB, the ASM delivered over 40 parameter estimates (42.2 ± 1.3). When analyzing the compliance during inspiration separately, the estimates calculated with the ASM were more stable. The adaptive determination of slice bounds results in consistent and reliable parameter values. Online analysis of nonlinear respiratory mechanics will profit from such an adaptive selection of interval size.

  7. Dynamics of Determining Motives in Choosing the Medical Profession by Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kloktunova N.A.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to study motivation of students of medical schools in choice of profession of the doctor and dynamics of defining motives in educational space of university. Material and methods: 497 students of the 1 st course took part in comparative research (356 students of medical faculty and 141 students of pediatric faculty and 382 students of the 6th course (270 students of medical faculty and 112 students of pediatric faculty of Saratov state medical university n.a. V. I. Razumovsky. In research methods of questioning and statistical data processing have been used. Results: The comparative analysis of the maximum and minimum values of the main types of motivation in professional field choice allowed to determine leading motives in medical students, and also to reveal their dynamics connected with various stages of professionalizing in the course of receiving medical education. Conclusion: Professional self-determination of the student of medical school has a multi-vector focus of structure of motivation. Determination by internal motives is supplemented with influence of external motivation, both positive, and negative value. In students of the 6th course indicators of motives included «Prestige», «Opportunity to help people», «Possibility of use of professional skills out of work».

  8. Bond strength of adhesives to dentin contaminated with smoker's saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, Lilliam M; Oguri, Makoto; O'Keefe, Kathy; Dusevish, Vladimir; Spencer, Paulette; Powers, John M; Marshall, Grayson W

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of contamination with smoker's and non-smoker's saliva on the bond strength of resin composite to superficial dentin using different adhesive systems. The interfacial structure between the resin and dentin was evaluated for each treatment using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Freshly extracted human molars were ground with 600-grit SiC paper to expose the superficial dentin. Adhesives [One-Up-Bond-F-Plus (OUFP) and Adper-Prompt-L-Pop (APLP)] and resin composite (TPHSpectrum) were bonded to the dentin (n = 8/group, 180 total specimens) under five surface conditions: control (adhesive applied following manufacturers' instructions); saliva, then 5-s air dry, then adhesive; adhesive, saliva, 5-s air dry; adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry (ASW group); and adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry, reapply adhesive (ASWA group). After storage in water at 37 degrees C for 24 h, the specimens were debonded under tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. ESEM photomicrographs of the dentin/adhesive interfaces were taken. Mean bond strength ranged from 8.1 to 24.1 MPa. Fisher's protected least significant difference (P = 0.05) intervals for critical adhesive, saliva, and surface condition differences were 1.3, 1.3, and 2.1 MPa, respectively. There were no significant differences in bond strength to dentin between contamination by smoker's and nonsmoker's saliva, but bond strengths were significantly different between adhesive systems, with OUFP twice as strong as APLP under almost all conditions. After adhesive application and contamination with either smoker's or nonsmoker's saliva followed by washing and reapplication of the adhesive (ASWA group), the bond strength of both adhesive systems was the same as that of the control group.

  9. Immediate postarousal sleep dynamics: an important determinant of sleep stability in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Magdy; Hanly, Patrick J

    2016-04-01

    Arousability from sleep is increasingly recognized as an important determinant of the clinical spectrum of sleep disordered breathing (SDB). Patients with SDB display a wide range of arousability. The reason for these differences is not known. We hypothesized that differences in the speed with which sleep deepens following arousals/awakenings (postarousal sleep dynamics) is a major determinant of these differences in arousability in patients with SDB. We analyzed 40 preexisting clinical polysomnography records from patients with a range of SDB severity (apnea-hypopnea index 5-135/h). Sleep depth was determined every 3 s using the odds ratio product (ORP) method, a continuous index of sleep depth (0 = deep sleep, 2.5 = full wakefulness) that correlates strongly (r = 0.98) with arousability (Younes M, Ostrowski M, Soiferman M, Younes H, Younes M, Raneri J, and Hanly P. Sleep 38: 641-654, 2015). Time course of ORP was determined from end of arousal until the next arousal. All arousals were analyzed (142 ± 65/polysomnogram). ORP increased from 0.58 ± 0.32 during sleep to 1.67 ± 0.35 during arousals. ORP immediately (first 9 s) following arousals/awakenings (ORP-9) ranged from 0.21(very deep sleep) to 1.71 (highly arousable state) in different patients. In patients with high ORP-9, sleep deepened slowly (over minutes) beyond 9 s but only if no arousals/awakenings recurred. ORP-9 correlated strongly with average non-rapid eye movement sleep depth (r = 0.87, P sleep architecture. We conclude that postarousal sleep dynamics are highly variable among patients with sleep-disordered breathing and largely determine average sleep depth and continuity.

  10. Contact angle hysteresis, adhesion, and marine biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Donald L; Brady, Robert F; Lam, Karen; Schmidt, Dale C; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2004-03-30

    Adhesive and marine biofouling release properties of coatings containing surface-oriented perfluoroalkyl groups were investigated. These coatings were prepared by cross-linking a copolymer of 1H,1H,2H,2H-heptadecafluorodecyl acrylate and acrylic acid with a copolymer of poly(2-isopropenyl-2-oxazoline) and methyl methacrylate at different molar ratios. The relationships between contact angle, contact angle hysteresis, adhesion, and marine biofouling were studied. Adhesion was determined by peel tests using pressure-sensitive adhesives. The chemical nature of the surfaces was studied by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Resistance to marine biofouling of an optimized coating was studied by immersion in seawater and compared to previous, less optimized coatings. The adhesive release properties of the coatings did not correlate well with the surface energies of the coatings estimated from the static and advancing contact angles nor with the amount of fluorine present on the surface. The adhesive properties of the surfaces, however, show a correlation with water receding contact angles and contact angle hysteresis (or wetting hysteresis) resulting from surface penetration and surface reconstruction. Coatings having the best release properties had both the highest cross-link density and the lowest contact angle hysteresis. An optimized coating exhibited unprecedented resistance to marine biofouling. Water contact angle hysteresis appears to correlate with marine biofouling resistance.

  11. Cell-Substrate Adhesion by Amoeboid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanders, Bret; Panta, Krishna

    Amoeboid migration is a rapid (10 μm min-1) mode of migration that some tumor cells exhibit. To permit such rapid movement, the adhesive contacts between the cell and the substrate must be relatively short-lived and weak. In this study, we investigate the basic adhesive character of amoeboid cells (D. discoideum) in contact with silanized glass substrates. We observe the initiation and spreading of the adhesive contacts that these cells establish as they settle under gravity onto the substrate and relax towards mechanical equilibrium. The use of interference reflection microscopy and cellular tethering measurements have allowed us to determine the basic adhesive properties of the cell: the membrane-medium interfacial energy; the bending modulus; the equilibrium contact angle; and the work of adhesion. We find the time scale on which settling occurs to be longer than expected. Implications of these results on adhesion and migration will be discussed. The authors are grateful for support from NSF (CBET-1451903) and NIH (1R21EY026392).

  12. HAb18G/CD147 regulates vinculin-mediated focal adhesion and cytoskeleton organization in cultured human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liang

    Full Text Available Focal adhesions (FAs, integrin-mediated macromolecular complexes located at the cell membrane extracellular interface, have been shown to regulate cell adhesion and migration. Our previous studies have indicated that HAb18G/CD147 (CD147 is involved in cytoskeleton reorganization and FA formation in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cells. However, the precise mechanisms underlying these processes remain unclear. In the current study, we determined that CD147 was involved in vinculin-mediated FA focal adhesion formation in HCC cells. We also found that deletion of CD147 led to reduced vinculin-mediated FA areas (P<0.0001, length/width ratios (P<0.0001, and mean intensities (P<0.0001. CD147 promoted lamellipodia formation by localizing Arp2/3 to the leading edge of the cell. Deletion of CD147 significantly reduced the fluorescence (t1/2 recovery times (22.7±3.3 s of vinculin-mediated focal adhesions (P<0.0001. In cell-spreading assays, CD147 was found to be essential for dynamic focal adhesion enlargement and disassembly. Furthermore, the current data showed that CD147 reduced tyrosine phosphorylation in vinculin-mediated focal adhesions, and enhanced the accumulation of the acidic phospholipid phosphatidylinositol-4, 5-bisphosphate (PIP2. Together, these results revealed that CD147 is involved in vinculin-mediated focal adhesion formation, which subsequently promotes cytoskeleton reorganization to facilitate invasion and migration of human HCC cells.

  13. Role of the first coordination shell in determining the equilibrium structure and dynamics of simple liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren; Dyre, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    . Lett. 103, 170601 (2009);10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.170601 J. Chem. Phys. 134, 214503 (2011)10.1063/1.3592709] . We present simulations of the standard Lennard-Jones liquid at several condensed-fluid state points, including a fairly low density state and a very high density state, as well as simulations......The traditional view that the physical properties of a simple liquid are determined primarily by its repulsive forces was recently challenged by Berthier and Tarjus, who showed that in some cases ignoring the attractions leads to large errors in the dynamics [L. Berthier and G. Tarjus, Phys. Rev...

  14. Dry adhesives with sensing features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, J.; Menon, C.

    2013-08-01

    Geckos are capable of detecting detachment of their feet. Inspired by this basic observation, a novel functional dry adhesive is proposed, which can be used to measure the instantaneous forces and torques acting on an adhesive pad. Such a novel sensing dry adhesive could potentially be used by climbing robots to quickly realize and respond appropriately to catastrophic detachment conditions. The proposed torque and force sensing dry adhesive was fabricated by mixing Carbon Black (CB) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to form a functionalized adhesive with mushroom caps. The addition of CB to PDMS resulted in conductive PDMS which, when under compression, tension or torque, resulted in a change in the resistance across the adhesive patch terminals. The proposed design of the functionalized dry adhesive enables distinguishing an applied torque from a compressive force in a single adhesive pad. A model based on beam theory was used to predict the change in resistance across the terminals as either a torque or compressive force was applied to the adhesive patch. Under a compressive force, the sensing dry adhesive was capable of measuring compression stresses from 0.11 Pa to 20.9 kPa. The torque measured by the adhesive patch ranged from 2.6 to 10 mN m, at which point the dry adhesives became detached. The adhesive strength was 1.75 kPa under an applied preload of 1.65 kPa for an adhesive patch with an adhesive contact area of 7.07 cm2.

  15. A Dynamic Analysis of the Determinants of the Greek Credit Default Swaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Rosario CORREIA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. There is a consensus in finance literature that credit default swap spreads can be used to calculate the default probability of a government bond. The question is therefore what determines the credit default swap spreads and also what is a good indicator that predicts the future behaviour of this security spreads. In this paper, we investigate several variables which have been used in the past to predict the CDS spreads. We do this by analysing the behaviour of credit swaps spreads of Greek sovereign debt over the recent financial crisis. We take into account the changes on the data generating process as the crisis evolves. Moreover, we also investigate which part of the dynamic process of CDS spreads is explained by each possible determinant. In order to do so, we use a time-frequency approach. As it turns out, some determinants are better in explaining the short term behaviour of the CDS spreads whilst others explain the long term behaviour. We can also say by how many months one factor determines the behaviour of the CDS spreads for Greek sovereign debt. With this information we are able to determine the probability of default and what it depends upon..Keywords. Eurozone crisis, Government default, Greek default, Credit default swap, Default probability.JEL. C22, C58, G14, G15, H63, H68.

  16. Crack Propagation in a Toughened Epoxy Adhesive under Repeated Impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian A. Ashcroft

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adhesives are being increasingly used in structural applications, especially in aerospace, automotive and naval structures, making their structural integrity an important issue. In-service loading histories of such structures usually contain low-energy impacts, repetition of which can significantly affect their performance. This paper deals with the behaviour of the toughened epoxy adhesive FM73 under repeated impacts, known as impact fatigue. Izod impact fatigue tests were performed on FM73 specimens in order to study the evolution of damage and to characterise this via measurable parameters, such as the maximum force and the contact time. A finite element model was developed to simulate the impact tests and this was used to calculate the dynamic strain energy release rate, which was compared with that determined using a simple analytical method. A relationship between the maximum dynamic strain energy release rate and impact fatigue crack growth rate was established that was used as the basis of an impact fatigue crack growth law.

  17. DETERMINATION OF PROMINENCE PLASMA {beta} FROM THE DYNAMICS OF RISING PLUMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillier, Andrew [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Hillier, Richard [Department of Aeronautics, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Tripathi, Durgesh, E-mail: andrew@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2012-12-20

    Observations by the Hinode satellite show in great detail the dynamics of rising plumes, dark in chromospheric lines, in quiescent prominences that propagate from large ({approx}10 Mm) bubbles that form at the base of the prominences. These plumes present a very interesting opportunity to study magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) phenomena in quiescent prominences, but obstacles still remain. One of the biggest issues is that of the magnetic field strength, which is not easily measurable in prominences. In this paper we present a method that may be used to determine a prominence's plasma {beta} when rising plumes are observed. Using the classic fluid dynamic solution for flow around a circular cylinder with an MHD correction, the compression of the prominence material can be estimated. This has been successfully confirmed through simulations; application to a prominence gave an estimate of the plasma {beta} as {beta} = 0.47 {+-} 0.079 to 1.13 {+-} 0.080 for the range {gamma} = 1.4-1.7. Using this method it may be possible to estimate the plasma {beta} of observed prominences, therefore helping our understanding of a prominence's dynamics in terms of MHD phenomena.

  18. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-07-01

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion.Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice

  19. PREFACE: Structure and dynamics determined by neutron and x-ray scattering Structure and dynamics determined by neutron and x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2011-06-01

    Neutron and x-ray scattering have emerged as powerful methods for the determination of structure and dynamics. Driven by emerging new, powerful neutron and synchrotron radiation sources, the continuous development of new instrumentation and novel scattering techniques gives rise to exciting possibilities. For example, in situ observations become possible via a high neutron or x-ray flux at the sample and, as a consequence, morphological transitions with small time constants can be detected. This special issue covers a broad range of different materials from soft to hard condensed matter. Hence, different material classes such as colloids, polymers, alloys, oxides and metals are addressed. The issue is dedicated to the 60th birthday of Professor Winfried Petry, scientific director of the Research Neutron Source Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM-II), Germany, advisor at the physics department for the Bayerische Elite-Akademie, chair person of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Metall- und Materialphysik of the German Physical Society (DPG) and a member of the professional council of the German Science Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG). We would like to acknowledge and thank all contributors for their submissions, which made this special issue possible in the first place. Moreover, we would like to thank the staff at IOP Publishing for helping us with the administrative aspects and for coordinating the refereeing process, and Valeria Lauter for the beautiful cover artwork. Finally, to the readers, we hope that you find this special issue a valuable resource that provides insights into the present possibilities of neutron and x-ray scattering as powerful tools for the investigation of structure and dynamics. Structure and dynamics determined by neutron and x-ray scattering contents In situ studies of mass transport in liquid alloys by means of neutron radiography F Kargl, M Engelhardt, F Yang, H Weis, P Schmakat, B Schillinger, A Griesche and A Meyer Magnetic spin

  20. The role of self-determined motivation in job search: A dynamic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Motta Veiga, Serge P; Gabriel, Allison S

    2016-03-01

    Job search is a dynamic self-regulated process during which job seekers need to stay motivated to secure a job. However, past research has taken a relatively static approach to examining motivation during the job search, in addition to ignoring how the quality of one's motivation--ranging from autonomous to controlled--can influence job search processes. Adopting a within-person perspective, the current study extends self-determination theory (SDT) to the job search context to investigate (a) when autonomous and controlled motivations are more or less prevalent and (b) whether they influence job search effort through metacognitive strategies in differing ways depending upon the amount of time elapsed in the search. In a weekly study of new labor market entrants (Level-2 n = 149; Level-1 n = 691), results indicated that autonomous motivation decreased until the midpoint of the job search and then plateaued, whereas controlled motivation remained stable. Results also showed that autonomous motivation had a consistent, positive relation with metacognitive strategies, whereas the relation between controlled motivation and such strategies was negative early in the job search, but became positive as the job search progressed. Finally, the effects of motivation on job search effort occurred via metacognitive strategies differentially depending upon the time elapsed in the search. Combined, we provide a first glimpse into the dynamics of self-determined motivation on job search processes.

  1. Determining the number of kanbans for dynamic production systems: An integrated methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Uzun Araz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Just-in-time (JIT is a management philosophy that reduces the inventory levels and eliminates manufacturing wastes by producing only the right quantity at the right time. A kanban system is one of the key elements of JIT philosophy. Kanbans are used to authorize production and to control movement of materials in JIT systems. In Kanban systems, the efficiency of the manufacturing system depends on several factors such as number of kanbans, container size etc. Hence, determining the number of kanbans is a critical decision in Kanban systems. The aim of this study is to develop a methodology that can be used in order to determine the number of kanbans in a dynamic production environment. In this methodology, the changes in system state is monitored in real time manner, and the number of the kanbans are dynamically re-arranged. The proposed methodology integrates simulation, neural networks and Mamdani type fuzzy inference system. The methodology is modelled in simulation environment and applied on a hypothetic production system. We also performed several comparisons for different control policies to show the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  2. The interaction of intrinsic dynamics and network topology in determining network burst synchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiteri, Chris; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2011-01-01

    The pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC), within the mammalian respiratory brainstem, represents an ideal system for investigating the synchronization properties of complex neuronal circuits via the interaction of cell-type heterogeneity and network connectivity. In isolation, individual respiratory neurons from the pre-BötC may be tonically active, rhythmically bursting, or quiescent. Despite this intrinsic heterogeneity, coupled networks of pre-BötC neurons en bloc engage in synchronized bursting that can drive inspiratory motor neuron activation. The region's connection topology has been recently characterized and features dense clusters of cells with occasional connections between clusters. We investigate how the dynamics of individual neurons (quiescent/bursting/tonic) and the betweenness centrality of neurons' positions within the network connectivity graph interact to govern network burst synchrony, by simulating heterogeneous networks of computational model pre-BötC neurons. Furthermore, we compare the prevalence and synchrony of bursting across networks constructed with a variety of connection topologies, analyzing the same collection of heterogeneous neurons in small-world, scale-free, random, and regularly structured networks. We find that several measures of network burst synchronization are determined by interactions of network topology with the intrinsic dynamics of neurons at central network positions and by the strengths of synaptic connections between neurons. Surprisingly, despite the functional role of synchronized bursting within the pre-BötC, we find that synchronized network bursting is generally weakest when we use its specific connection topology, which leads to synchrony within clusters but poor coordination across clusters. Overall, our results highlight the relevance of interactions between topology and intrinsic dynamics in shaping the activity of networks and the concerted effects of connectivity patterns and dynamic heterogeneities.

  3. Inverse Force Determination on a Small Scale Launch Vehicle Model Using a Dynamic Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Christina L.; Powell, Jessica M.; Ross, James C.

    2017-01-01

    A launch vehicle can experience large unsteady aerodynamic forces in the transonic regime that, while usually only lasting for tens of seconds during launch, could be devastating if structural components and electronic hardware are not designed to account for them. These aerodynamic loads are difficult to experimentally measure and even harder to computationally estimate. The current method for estimating buffet loads is through the use of a few hundred unsteady pressure transducers and wind tunnel test. Even with a large number of point measurements, the computed integrated load is not an accurate enough representation of the total load caused by buffeting. This paper discusses an attempt at using a dynamic balance to experimentally determine buffet loads on a generic scale hammer head launch vehicle model tested at NASA Ames Research Center's 11' x 11' transonic wind tunnel. To use a dynamic balance, the structural characteristics of the model needed to be identified so that the natural modal response could be and removed from the aerodynamic forces. A finite element model was created on a simplified version of the model to evaluate the natural modes of the balance flexures, assist in model design, and to compare to experimental data. Several modal tests were conducted on the model in two different configurations to check for non-linearity, and to estimate the dynamic characteristics of the model. The experimental results were used in an inverse force determination technique with a psuedo inverse frequency response function. Due to the non linearity, the model not being axisymmetric, and inconsistent data between the two shake tests from different mounting configuration, it was difficult to create a frequency response matrix that satisfied all input and output conditions for wind tunnel configuration to accurately predict unsteady aerodynamic loads.

  4. Magnetic field switchable dry adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Bovero, Enrico; Menon, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    A magnetic field controllable dry adhesive device is manufactured. The normal adhesion force can be increased or decreased depending on the presence of an applied magnetic field. If the magnetic field is present during the entire normal adhesion test cycle which includes both applying a preloading force and measuring the pulloff pressure, a decrease in adhesion is observed when compared to when there is no applied magnetic field. Similarly, if the magnetic field is present only during the preload portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, a decrease in adhesion is observed because of an increased stiffness of the magnetically controlled dry adhesive device. When the applied magnetic field is present during only the pulloff portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, either an increase or a decrease in normal adhesion is observed depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field.

  5. A Dynamic Analysis on Determining of Housing Demand: A Comparison for Turkey, Hungary, and UK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Selahattin Bekmez; Ash Ozpolat

    2014-01-01

    Housing is both good and investment assets so that it plays an important role in the economy. Housing also can be characterized the most complex economic good because of its durability, heterogeneity, locational fixity, the possibility to raise loans against housing collateral, and the effect on well-developed secondary markets. On the other hand, income distribution, socio-economic justice, and regional disparities imply that housing market is an important concept for social and cultural transformation. In this study, the determinants of housing demand were compared for countries. These countries are selected according to economic situation: Turkey, Hungary, and United Kingdom. As a scope of this, the dynamic relationship between the housing demand and variables determining the housing demand in Turkey, Hungary, and UK has been analyzed. The model estimated uses quarterly data from January 2002 to January 2014. Building permits has been considered as housing demand. The other variables used for determining the housing demand are GDP, monetary aggregate, interest rate, and share prices. The long term relationship among variables has been analyzed with Vector Autoregressive Model (VAR) as impulse response and variance decomposition. The findings indicate that determining of housing demand changes according to economic and financial components such as government policies, mortgage system, consumer choice, tax, and subsidy in selected countries. All variables play an important role in housing demand, although the level of their impacts varies.

  6. ζ-potential determination using a ZetaMeter-Dynamic Speckle assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Peña, Rolando J.; Sánchez-Muñoz, Orlando L.; Martínez-Celorio, René A.; Cibrián, Rosa M.; Salvador-Palmer, Rosario; Salgado, Jesús

    2012-10-01

    Electrophoretic mobility and ζ-potential are important physical parameters for the characterization of micro- and nanosystems. In this communication we describe a new method for determining the ζ-potential through the assembly of two well known techniques: free electrophoresis and Dynamic Speckle. When coherent light passes through a fluid having scattering centres, the far field interference originates a speckled image. If the scattering centres are contained within the cylindrical electrophoresis cell of a ZetaMeter and are forced to move in an orderly way under the action of an external electric field, the time variation of the light intensity in the far field speckle images follows a temporal autocorrelation function g(τ). The corresponding correlation time can then be obtained and related with the velocity, from which the electrophoretic mobility and the ζ-potential of the scattering centres can be determined. We have applied this method to microparticles, like natural air-floated silica and two classes of bioceramics, hydroxyapatite and biphasic calcium phosphate. For comparison, we analysed the same samples in parallel using a commercial Zetasizer Nano from Malvern Instruments. The values of ζ-potential determined using the two techniques were the same within ~3% error. These results validate our new method as a useful and efficient alternative for ζ-potential determination of particles, at least within the micrometer scale.

  7. Regulation of cell adhesion strength by peripheral focal adhesion distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elineni, Kranthi Kumar; Gallant, Nathan D

    2011-12-21

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrices is a tightly regulated process that involves the complex interplay between biochemical and mechanical events at the cell-adhesive interface. Previous work established the spatiotemporal contributions of adhesive components to adhesion strength and identified a nonlinear dependence on cell spreading. This study was designed to investigate the regulation of cell-adhesion strength by the size and position of focal adhesions (FA). The cell-adhesive interface was engineered to direct FA assembly to the periphery of the cell-spreading area to delineate the cell-adhesive area from the cell-spreading area. It was observed that redistributing the same adhesive area over a larger cell-spreading area significantly enhanced cell-adhesion strength, but only up to a threshold area. Moreover, the size of the peripheral FAs, which was interpreted as an adhesive patch, did not directly govern the adhesion strength. Interestingly, this is in contrast to the previously reported functional role of FAs in regulating cellular traction where sizes of the peripheral FAs play a critical role. These findings demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, that two spatial regimes in cell-spreading area exist that uniquely govern the structure-function role of FAs in regulating cell-adhesion strength.

  8. Adhesive particle shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  9. Improving adhesion of seasonings to crackers with hydrocolloid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Matthew E; Barringer, Sheryl A

    2013-11-01

    Food powders were applied on crackers that had been coated using water, oil, emulsion, sucrose, or hydrocolloid solutions. The hydrocolloids that were used include gellan gum, kappa-carrageenan, methylcellulose, gum karaya, gum tragacanth, gum arabic, guar gum, modified starch, and maltodextrin. Solutions of similar hydrophobicity to the powder gave the greatest adhesion. NaCl, barbecue (BBQ), ranch, and sour cream & onion (SC&O) seasoning showed greatest adhesion with water, cheese powder with an emulsion of 12.5% to 25% oil, and cocoa powder with oil. For NaCl, BBQ, ranch, and SC&O seasoning, hydrocolloids improved the adhesion over using water alone, with gellan gum providing the greatest adhesion. Hydrocolloid structural differences, including the presence or absence of branching, substitution of sugar units, and molecular weight affect water binding and thickening of the hydrocolloid spray that seemed to be significant factors affecting adhesion of powders to the target surface. For cheese powder, hydrocolloids were capable of replacing the oil within an emulsion while improving or maintaining the same level of adhesion, with gum arabic providing the greatest adhesion. For cocoa powder, hydrocolloid solutions were ineffective adhesives due to differences in hydrophilicity that result in insolubility. The effect of hydrocolloid concentration on adhesion was dependent both on the hydrocolloid type and the concentration that is sprayable, with 0.5% being the optimum concentration for most gums. Adhesion using sucrose solutions was determined by particle size and relative hydrophobicity. Increasing sucrose concentration decreased adhesion of smaller particles, but increased adhesion of larger particles. Adhesion of NaCl significantly increased with decreasing NaCl size using oil, water, and sucrose solutions.

  10. Temperature Effects on Adhesive Bond Strengths and Modulus for Commonly Used Spacecraft Structural Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Cassandra E.; Oakes, Eric J.; Hill, Jennifer R.; Aldi, Dominic; Forsberg, Gustaf A.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to observe how changes in temperature and substrate material affected the strength and modulus of an adhesive bondline. Seven different adhesives commonly used in aerospace bonded structures were tested. Aluminum, titanium and Invar adherends were cleaned and primed, then bonded using the manufacturer's recommendations. Following surface preparation, the coupons were bonded with the adhesives. The single lap shear coupons were then pull tested per ASTM D 1002 Standard Test Method for Apparent Shear Strength of Single- Lap-Joint over a temperature range from -150 deg C up to +150 deg C. The ultimate strength was calculated and the resulting data were converted into B-basis design allowables. Average and Bbasis results were compared. Results obtained using aluminum adherends are reported. The effects of using different adherend materials and temperature were also studied and will be reported in a subsequent paper. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to study variations in adhesive modulus with temperature. This work resulted in a highly useful database for comparing adhesive performance over a wide range of temperatures, and has facilitated selection of the appropriate adhesive for spacecraft structure applications.

  11. Repeated origin and loss of adhesive toepads in geckos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Gamble

    Full Text Available Geckos are well known for their extraordinary clinging abilities and many species easily scale vertical or even inverted surfaces. This ability is enabled by a complex digital adhesive mechanism (adhesive toepads that employs van der Waals based adhesion, augmented by frictional forces. Numerous morphological traits and behaviors have evolved to facilitate deployment of the adhesive mechanism, maximize adhesive force and enable release from the substrate. The complex digital morphologies that result allow geckos to interact with their environment in a novel fashion quite differently from most other lizards. Details of toepad morphology suggest multiple gains and losses of the adhesive mechanism, but lack of a comprehensive phylogeny has hindered efforts to determine how frequently adhesive toepads have been gained and lost. Here we present a multigene phylogeny of geckos, including 107 of 118 recognized genera, and determine that adhesive toepads have been gained and lost multiple times, and remarkably, with approximately equal frequency. The most likely hypothesis suggests that adhesive toepads evolved 11 times and were lost nine times. The overall external morphology of the toepad is strikingly similar in many lineages in which it is independently derived, but lineage-specific differences are evident, particularly regarding internal anatomy, with unique morphological patterns defining each independent derivation.

  12. Adhesive Contact in Animal: Morphology, Mechanism and Bio-Inspired Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aihong Ji; Longbao Han; Zhendong Dai

    2011-01-01

    Many animals possess adhesive pads on their feet,which are able to attach to various substrates while controlling adhesive forces during locomotion.This review article studies the morphology of adhesive devices in animals,and the physical mechanisms of wet adhesion and dry adhesion.The adhesive pads are either ‘smooth' or densely covered with special adhesive setae.Smooth pads adhere by wet adhesion,which is facilitated by fluid secreted from the pads,whereas hairy pads can adhere by dry adhesion or wet adhesion.Contact area,distance between pad and substrate,viscosity and surface tension of the liquid filling the gap between pad and substrate are the most important factors which determine the wet adhesion.Dry adhesion was found only in hairy pads,which occurs in geckos and spiders.It was demonstrated that van der Waals interaction is the dominant adhesive force in geckos' adhesion.The bio-inspired applications derived from adhesive pads are also reviewed.

  13. Room Temperature Characteristics of Polymer-Based Low Ice Adhesion Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiwei; Vågenes, Elisabeth T.; Delabahan, Chrisrosemarie; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2017-02-01

    Ice adhesion is mainly dictated by surface properties, and water wettability is frequently correlated with ice adhesion strength. However, these established correlations are limited to high ice adhesion and become invalid when the ice adhesion strength is low. Here we carried out an experimental study to explore the relationships between low ice adhesion strength and room temperature surface properties. A variety of room temperature properties of 22 polymer-based hydrophilic and hydrophobic samples consisting of both low and high ice adhesion surfaces were analysed. The properties investigated include water adhesion force, water wettability, roughness, elastic modulus and hardness. Our results show that low ice adhesion strength does not correlate well with water contact angle and its variants, surface roughness and hardness. Low elastic modulus does not guarantee low ice adhesion, however, surfaces with low ice adhesion always show low elastic modulus. Low ice adhesion (below 60 kPa) of tested surfaces may be determinative of small water adhesion force (from 180 to 270 μN). Therefore, measurement of water adhesion force may provide an effective strategy for screening anti-icing or icephobic surfaces, and surfaces within specific values of water adhesion force will possibly lead to a low ice adhesion.

  14. What physiological changes and cerebral traces tell us about adhesion to fiction during theater-watching?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Noëlle Metz-Lutz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Live theater is typically designed to alter the state of mind of the audience. Indeed, the perceptual inputs issuing from a live theatrical performance are intended to represent something else, and the actions, emphasised by the writing and staging, are the key prompting the adhesion of viewers to fiction, i.e. their belief that it is real. This phenomenon raises the issue of the cognitive processes governing access to a fictional reality during live theater and of their cerebral underpinnings. To get insight into the physiological substrates of adhesion we recreated the peculiar context of watching live drama in a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment, with simultaneous recording of heart activity. The instants of adhesion were defined as the co-occurrence of theatrical events determined a priori by the stage director and the spectators’ offline reports of moments when fiction acted as reality. These data served to specify, for each spectator, individual fMRI time-series, used in a random-effect group analysis to define the pattern of brain response to theatrical events. The changes in this pattern related to subjects’ adhesion to fiction, were investigated using a region of interest analysis. The results showed that adhesion to theatrical events correlated with increased activity in the left BA47 and pSTS, together with a decrease in dynamic heart rate variability, leading us to discuss the hypothesis of subtle changes in the subjects’ state of awareness, enabling them to mentally dissociate physical and mental (drama-viewing experiences, to account for the phenomenon of adhesion to dramatic fiction.

  15. Shear adhesion strength of thermoplastic gecko-inspired synthetic adhesive exceeds material limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Andrew G; Fearing, Ronald S

    2011-09-20

    Natural gecko array wearless dynamic friction has recently been reported for 30,000 cycles on a smooth substrate. Following these findings, stiff polymer gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives have been proposed for high-cycle applications such as robot feet. Here we examine the behavior of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and polypropylene (PP) microfiber arrays during repeated cycles of engagement on a glass surface, with a normal preload of less than 40 kPa. We find that fiber arrays maintained 54% of the original shear stress of 300 kPa after 10,000 cycles, despite showing a marked plastic deformation of fiber tips. This deformation could be due to shear-induced plastic creep of the fiber tips from high adhesion forces, adhesive wear, or thermal effects. We hypothesize that a fundamental material limit has been reached for these fiber arrays and that future gecko synthetic adhesive designs must take into account the high adhesive forces generated to avoid damage. Although the synthetic material and natural gecko arrays have a similar elastic modulus, the synthetic material does not show the same wear-free dynamic friction as the gecko.

  16. Evaluation of bond strength and thickness of adhesive layer according to the techniques of applying adhesives in composite resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes, Fernando Carlos Hueb; da Silva, Stella Borges; Valentino, Thiago Assunção; Oliveira, Maria Angélica Hueb de Menezes; Rastelli, Alessandra Nara de Souza; Conçalves, Luciano de Souza

    2013-01-01

    Adhesive restorations have increasingly been used in dentistry, and the adhesive system application technique may determine the success of the restorative procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the application technique of two adhesive systems (Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Scotchbond MultiPurpose) on the bond strength and adhesive layer of composite resin restorations. Eight human third molars were selected and prepared with Class I occlusal cavities. The teeth were restored with composite using various application techniques for both adhesives, according to the following groups (n = 10): group 1 (control), systems were applied and adhesive was immediately light activated for 20 seconds without removing excesses; group 2, excess adhesive was removed with a gentle jet of air for 5 seconds; group 3, excess was removed with a dry microbrushtype device; and group 4, a gentle jet of air was applied after the microbrush and then light activation was performed. After this, the teeth were submitted to microtensile testing. For the two systems tested, no statistical differences were observed between groups 1 and 2. Groups 3 and 4 presented higher bond strength values compared with the other studied groups, allowing the conclusion that excess adhesive removal with a dry microbrush could improve bond strength in composite restorations. Predominance of adhesive fracture and thicker adhesive layer were observed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in groups 1 and 2. For groups 3 and 4, a mixed failure pattern and thinner adhesive layer were verified. Clinicians should be aware that excess adhesive may negatively affect bond strength, whereas a thin, uniform adhesive layer appears to be favorable.

  17. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-01-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structur...

  18. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  19. Physiochemical properties of Caulobacter crescentus holdfast: a localized bacterial adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, Cécile; Ma, Xiang; Licata, Nicholas A; Neves, Bernardo R A; Setayeshgar, Sima; Brun, Yves V; Dragnea, Bogdan

    2013-09-12

    To colonize surfaces, the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus employs a polar polysaccharide, the holdfast, located at the end of a thin, long stalk protruding from the cell body. Unlike many other bacteria which adhere through an extended extracellular polymeric network, the holdfast footprint area is tens of thousands times smaller than that of the total bacterium cross-sectional surface, making for some very demanding adhesion requirements. At present, the mechanism of holdfast adhesion remains poorly understood. We explore it here along three lines of investigation: (a) the impact of environmental conditions on holdfast binding affinity, (b) adhesion kinetics by dynamic force spectroscopy, and (c) kinetic modeling of the attachment process to interpret the observed time-dependence of the adhesion force at short and long time scales. A picture emerged in which discrete molecular units called adhesins are responsible for initial holdfast adhesion, by acting in a cooperative manner.

  20. Multibody simulation of adhesion pili

    CERN Document Server

    Zakrisson, Johan; Servin, Martin; Axner, Ove; Lacoursiere, Claude; Andersson, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    We present a coarse grained rigid multibody model of a subunit assembled helix-like polymer, e.g., adhesion pili expressed by bacteria, that is capable of describing the polymers force-extension response. With building blocks representing individual subunits the model appropriately describes the complex behavior of pili expressed by the gram-negative uropathogenic Escherichia coli bacteria under the action of an external force. Numerical simulations show that the dynamics of the model, which include both the effects of unwinding and rewinding, are in good quantitative agreement with the characteristic force-extension response as observed experimentally for type 1 and P pili. By tuning the model, it is also possible to reproduce the force-extension response in the presence of anti-shaft antibodies, which dramatically changes the mechanical properties. Thus, the model and the results in this work give enhanced understanding of how a pilus unwinds under action of external forces and provide new perspective of th...

  1. Determination of the protonation state of the Asp dyad: conventional molecular dynamics versus thermodynamic integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinfeng; Zhu, Yali; Sun, Bin; Yao, Yuan; Liu, Junjun

    2016-03-01

    The protonation state of the Asp dyad is important as it can reveal enzymatic mechanisms, and the information this provides can be used in the development of drugs for proteins such as memapsin 2 (BACE-1), HIV-1 protease, and rennin. Conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been successfully used to determine the preferred protonation state of the Asp dyad. In the present work, we demonstrate that the results obtained from conventional MD simulations can be greatly influenced by the particular force field applied or the values used for control parameters. In principle, free-energy changes between possible protonation states can be used to determine the protonation state. We show that protonation state prediction by the thermodynamic integration (TI) method is insensitive to force field version or to the cutoff for calculating nonbonded interactions (a control parameter). In the present study, the protonation state of the Asp dyad predicted by TI calculations was the same regardless of the force field and cutoff value applied. Contrary to the intuition that conventional MD is more efficient, our results clearly show that the TI method is actually more efficient and more reliable for determining the protonation state of the Asp dyad.

  2. Determination of boron over a large dynamic range by prompt-gamma activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, R.K. [University of Texas at Austin, Nuclear Engineering Teaching Lab., Pickle Research Campus, R-9000 Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Landsberger, S. [University of Texas at Austin, Nuclear Engineering Teaching Lab., Pickle Research Campus, R-9000 Austin, TX 78712 (United States)], E-mail: s.landsberger@mail.utexas.edu

    2009-02-15

    An evaluation of the PGAA method for the determination of boron across a wide dynamic range of concentrations was performed for trace levels up to 5 wt.% boron. This range encompasses a transition from neutron transparency to significant self- shielding conditions. To account for self-shielding, several PGAA techniques were employed. First, a calibration curve was developed in which a set of boron standards was tested and the count rate to boron mass curve was determined. This set of boron measurements was compared with an internal standard self-shielding correction method and with a method for determining composition using PGAA peak ratios. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are analyzed. The boron concentrations of several laboratory-grade chemicals and standard reference materials were measured with each method and compared. The evaluation of the boron content of nanocrystalline transition metals prepared with a boron-containing reducing agent was also performed with each of the methods tested. Finally, the k{sub 0} method was used for non-destructive measurement of boron in catalyst materials for the characterization of new non-platinum fuel cell catalysts.

  3. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects.

  4. Adhesive tape exfoliation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Single-crystal graphite can be cleaved by the use of an adhesive tape. This was also the initial route for obtaining graphene, a one-layer thick graphite slab. In this letter a few simple and fun considerations are presented in an attempt to shed some light on why this procedure is successful...

  5. Dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy techniques for size determination of polyurethane nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giehl Zanetti-Ramos, Betina [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas (Brazil)], E-mail: betinagzramos@pq.cnpq.br; Beddin Fritzen-Garcia, Mauricia [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas (Brazil); Schweitzer de Oliveira, Cristian; Avelino Pasa, Andre [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos e Superficie, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Soldi, Valdir [Grupo de Estudos em Materiais Polimericos, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Borsali, Redouane [Centre de Recherche sur les Macromolecules Vegetales CERMAV/CNRS, 38041 - Grenoble (France); Creczynski-Pasa, Tania Beatriz [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas (Brazil)

    2009-03-01

    Nanoparticles have applications in various industrial fields principally in drug delivery. Nowadays, there are several processes for manufacturing colloidal polymeric systems and methods of preparation as well as of characterization. In this work, Dynamic Light Scattering and Atomic Force Microscopy techniques were used to characterize polyurethane nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were prepared by miniemulsion technique. The lipophilic monomers, isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) and natural triol, were emulsified in water containing surfactant. In some formulations the poly(ethylene glycol) was used as co-monomer to obtain the hydrophilic and pegylated nanoparticles. Polyurethane nanoparticles observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) were spherical with diameter around 209 nm for nanoparticles prepared without PEG. From AFM imaging two populations of nanoparticles were observed in the formulation prepared with PEG (218 and 127 nm) while dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements showed a monodisperse size distribution around 250 nm of diameters for both formulations. The polydispersity index of the formulations and the experimental procedures could influence the particle size determination with these techniques.

  6. Determination of Original Infection Source of H7N9 Avian Influenza by Dynamical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Jin, Zhen; Sun, Gui-Quan; Sun, Xiang-Dong; Wang, You-Ming; Huang, Baoxu

    2014-05-01

    H7N9, a newly emerging virus in China, travels among poultry and human. Although H7N9 has not aroused massive outbreaks, recurrence in the second half of 2013 makes it essential to control the spread. It is believed that the most effective control measure is to locate the original infection source and cut off the source of infection from human. However, the original infection source and the internal transmission mechanism of the new virus are not totally clear. In order to determine the original infection source of H7N9, we establish a dynamical model with migratory bird, resident bird, domestic poultry and human population, and view migratory bird, resident bird, domestic poultry as original infection source respectively to fit the true dynamics during the 2013 pandemic. By comparing the date fitting results and corresponding Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) values, we conclude that migrant birds are most likely the original infection source. In addition, we obtain the basic reproduction number in poultry and carry out sensitivity analysis of some parameters.

  7. Inquiring the niche determinants of social media websites in dynamically mobile hypercompetitive communication era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Cheng Huang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research cross-employs the information communication distribution transaction and analytic network process models to effectively institute the hierarchical evaluated model and utilizes, in specific, fuzzy theory and the grey relation analysis approaches of multiple criteria decision-making methodology into the weight measurements of expert’s questionnaires from three analytical perspectives (user’s satisfaction, corporate commitment, and social trust of relationship quality in order to explore the niche determinants of the social media websites in the contemporarily hypercompetitive and dynamic online era. Consequently, as for the measured consequences after a series of complicated and systematical calculations, the most valuable findings in this research are (1 the technological interfaces of social media websites is a positive niche in the dynamically mobile hypercompetitive communication era and (2 the “social media websites” is in a position of becoming one of the social media mainstreams in the online technology field based on the measured weights from the detailed survey data collected from experts in this research.

  8. Biological adhesion of Parthenocissus tricuspidata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Tianxian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parthenocissus tricuspidata is a climbing plant of the grape family. It can climb with its adhesive discs on different substrates such as stone mountains, roadside stone banks, exterior walls of buildings, thereby withstanding strong winds and storms without detachment. The details about the adhesion process of Parthenocissus tricuspidata are not yet entirely understood. We studied the component-structure-property relationship of the adhesive discs in detail and propose a twostage model to describe the biological adhesion: (i structural contact and (ii adhesive action. These two stages and their variations play an important role for the attaching of the adhesive disc to different structural surfaces. We believe that in Parthenocissus tricuspidata different mechanisms work together to allow the adhesive disc to climb on various vertical substrates and reveal strong adhesive properties.

  9. System Dynamics Modeling for Determining Optimal Ship Sizes and Types in Coastal Liner Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-il Park

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of determining the required ship investment for deployment is an ongoing problem faced by governments and ship operators. The nature of ship investment is capital-intensive and the return on investment is often take long time. This paper attempts to establish system dynamics modeling (SDM to simulate and solve this problem in order to help ship operators make effective strategic decisions. A case study of coastal liner services between Incheon and Baengnyeong Island in South Korea was performed. Using scenario analysis, the possible ship sizes (small: 350 tons; large: 2,500 tons and types (new or used were considered by comparing potential revenue with costs. The results indicated that putting a used large-sized ship into operation would accommodate the increasing passenger and cargo volumes, and improve customer services.

  10. High frequency dynamics of BMG determined by synchrotron radiation: A microscopic picture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, Jorge, E-mail: jserrano@fa.upc.ed [Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Avda. del Canal Olimpic 15, Castelldefels (Spain); Dept. de Fisica Aplicada, EPSC, Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Avda. del Canal Olimpic 15, 08860 Castelldefels (Spain); Pineda, Eloi [Dept. de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, ESAB, Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Avda. del Canal Olimpic 15, 08860 Castelldefels (Spain); Bruna, Pere [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada, EPSC, Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Avda. del Canal Olimpic 15, 08860 Castelldefels (Spain); Labrador, Ana [LLS, BM16-ESRF, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Le Tacon, Mathieu; Krisch, Michael; Monaco, Giulio [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Crespo, Daniel [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada, EPSC, Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Avda. del Canal Olimpic 15, 08860 Castelldefels (Spain)

    2010-04-16

    Mechanical properties are becoming the focus in research on bulk metallic glasses (BMG), as they are the limiting factor for structural applications. A wide range of experimental techniques gives complementary macroscopic data that are often difficult to correlate with the microscopic structural knowledge of the same materials. Recently, high resolution inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) was applied to determine the high frequency dynamics of BMG [T. Scopigno, J.-B. Suck, R. Angelini, F. Albergamo, G. Ruocco, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 (2006) 135501]. This technique offers a new approach to the mechanic properties helping to bridge the gap between the microscopic and the macroscopic picture. Here we will present results of IXS experiments on bulk metallic glasses with different fragility values, obtained at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble (France).

  11. Analysis of the surface effects on adhesion in MEMS structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, F.; Pustan, M.; Bîrleanu, C.; Müller, R.; Voicu, R.; Baracu, A.

    2015-12-01

    One of the main failure causes in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is stiction. Stiction is the adhesion of contacting surfaces due to surface forces. Adhesion force depends on the operating conditions and is influenced by the contact area. In this study, the adhesion force between MEMS materials and the AFM tips is analyzed using the spectroscopy in point mode of the AFM. The aim is to predict the stiction failure mode in MEMS. The investigated MEMS materials are silicon, polysilicon, platinum, aluminum, and gold. Three types of investigations were conducted. The first one aimed to determine the variation of the adhesion force with respect to the variation of the roughness. The roughness has a strong influence on the adhesion because the contact area between components increases if the roughness decreases. The second type of investigation aimed to determine the adhesion force in multiple points of each considered sample. The values obtained experimentally for the adhesion force were also validated using the JKR and DMT models. The third type of investigation was conducted with the purpose of determining the influence of the temperature on the adhesion force.

  12. The electron beam cure of epoxy paste adhesives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J.D. [Air Force Advanced Composites Program office, McClellan AFB, CA (United States); Janke, C.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology; Lopata, V.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1998-07-01

    Recently developed epoxy paste adhesives were electron beam cured and experimentally explored to determine their suitability for use in an aerospace-quality aircraft component. There were two major goals for this program. The first was to determine whether the electron beam-curable past adhesives were capable of meeting the requirements of the US Air Force T-38 supersonic jet trainer composite windshield frame. The T-38 windshield frame`s arch is currently manufactured by bonding thin stainless steel plies using an aerospace-grade thermally-cured epoxy film adhesive. The second goal was to develop the lowest cost hand layup and debulk process that could be used to produce laminated steel plies with acceptable properties. The laminate properties examined to determine adhesive suitability include laminate mechanical and physical properties at room, adhesive tack, out-time capability, and the debulk requirements needed to achieve these properties. Eighteen past adhesives and four scrim cloths were experimentally examined using this criteria. One paste adhesive was found to have suitable characteristics in each of these categories and was later chosen for the manufacture of the T-38 windshield frame. This experimental study shows that by using low-cost debulk and layup processes, the electron beam-cured past adhesive mechanical and physical properties meet the specifications of the T-38 composite windshield frame.

  13. Molecular determinants of epidermal growth factor binding: a molecular dynamics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Sanders

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family that plays a role in multiple cellular processes. Activation of EGFR requires binding of a ligand on the extracellular domain to promote conformational changes leading to dimerization and transphosphorylation of intracellular kinase domains. Seven ligands are known to bind EGFR with affinities ranging from sub-nanomolar to near micromolar dissociation constants. In the case of EGFR, distinct conformational states assumed upon binding a ligand is thought to be a determining factor in activation of a downstream signaling network. Previous biochemical studies suggest the existence of both low affinity and high affinity EGFR ligands. While these studies have identified functional effects of ligand binding, high-resolution structural data are lacking. To gain a better understanding of the molecular basis of EGFR binding affinities, we docked each EGFR ligand to the putative active state extracellular domain dimer and 25.0 ns molecular dynamics simulations were performed. MM-PBSA/GBSA are efficient computational approaches to approximate free energies of protein-protein interactions and decompose the free energy at the amino acid level. We applied these methods to the last 6.0 ns of each ligand-receptor simulation. MM-PBSA calculations were able to successfully rank all seven of the EGFR ligands based on the two affinity classes: EGF>HB-EGF>TGF-α>BTC>EPR>EPG>AR. Results from energy decomposition identified several interactions that are common among binding ligands. These findings reveal that while several residues are conserved among the EGFR ligand family, no single set of residues determines the affinity class. Instead we found heterogeneous sets of interactions that were driven primarily by electrostatic and Van der Waals forces. These results not only illustrate the complexity of EGFR dynamics but also pave the way for structure-based design of

  14. Application of Vehicle Dynamic Modeling in Uavs for Precise Determination of Exterior Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaghani, M.; Skaloud, J.

    2016-06-01

    Advances in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and especially micro aerial vehicle (MAV) technology together with increasing quality and decreasing price of imaging devices have resulted in growing use of MAVs in photogrammetry. The practicality of MAV mapping is seriously enhanced with the ability to determine parameters of exterior orientation (EO) with sufficient accuracy, in both absolute and relative senses (change of attitude between successive images). While differential carrier phase GNSS satisfies cm-level positioning accuracy, precise attitude determination is essential for both direct sensor orientation (DiSO) and integrated sensor orientation (ISO) in corridor mapping or in block configuration imaging over surfaces with low texture. Limited cost, size, and weight of MAVs represent limitations on quality of onboard navigation sensors and puts emphasis on exploiting full capacity of available resources. Typically short flying times (10-30 minutes) also limit the possibility of estimating and/or correcting factors such as sensor misalignment and poor attitude initialization of inertial navigation system (INS). This research aims at increasing the accuracy of attitude determination in both absolute and relative senses with no extra sensors onboard. In comparison to classical INS/GNSS setup, novel approach is presented here to integrated state estimation, in which vehicle dynamic model (VDM) is used as the main process model. Such system benefits from available information from autopilot and physical properties of the platform in enhancing performance of determination of trajectory and parameters of exterior orientation consequently. The navigation system employs a differential carrier phase GNSS receiver and a micro electro-mechanical system (MEMS) grade inertial measurement unit (IMU), together with MAV control input from autopilot. Monte-Carlo simulation has been performed on trajectories for typical corridor mapping and block imaging. Results reveal

  15. Spiders Tune Glue Viscosity to Maximize Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Zhang, Ci; Diaz, Candido; Opell, Brent D; Blackledge, Todd A; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Adhesion in humid conditions is a fundamental challenge to both natural and synthetic adhesives. Yet, glue from most spider species becomes stickier as humidity increases. We find the adhesion of spider glue, from five diverse spider species, maximizes at very different humidities that matches their foraging habitats. By using high-speed imaging and spreading power law, we find that the glue viscosity varies over 5 orders of magnitude with humidity for each species, yet the viscosity at maximal adhesion for each species is nearly identical, 10(5)-10(6) cP. Many natural systems take advantage of viscosity to improve functional response, but spider glue's humidity responsiveness is a novel adaptation that makes the glue stickiest in each species' preferred habitat. This tuning is achieved by a combination of proteins and hygroscopic organic salts that determines water uptake in the glue. We therefore anticipate that manipulation of polymer-salts interaction to control viscosity can provide a simple mechanism to design humidity responsive smart adhesives.

  16. Adhesion molecules in experimental phacoanaphylactic endophthalmitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, G O; Lee, S; Mulligan, M S; Wolter, J R; Smith, C W; Ward, P A; Marak, G E

    1992-11-01

    Intraocular accumulation of inflammatory neutrophils is an important feature of experimental phacoanaphylactic endophthalmitis (EPE). Increasing evidence suggests that localization of neutrophils to the site of inflammation requires the participation of neutrophil and endothelial adhesion molecules. These studies were undertaken to determine if blocking of adhesion molecules on neutrophils (CD18) or endothelium (ELAM-1) could attenuate EPE in Lewis rats. Treatment of experimental animals with anti-CD18 or anti-ELAM-1 significantly suppressed intraocular neutrophil accumulation, retinal hemorrhage, and vasculitis, and attenuated retinal edema formation by 48% and 70%, respectively. These observations demonstrate that antibodies directed against adhesion molecules on the neutrophil (CD18) or the vascular endothelial cell (ELAM-1) exhibit potent anti-inflammatory effects, resulting in a striking amelioration of injury in EPE in rats.

  17. Polyethyleneimine patterns obtained by laser-transfer assisted by a Dynamic Release Layer onto Themanox soft substrates for cell adhesion study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, V.; Mattle, T.; Palla Papavlu, A.; Rusen, L.; Luculescu, C.; Lippert, T.; Dinescu, M.

    2013-08-01

    The use of LIFT (Laser Induced Forward Transfer) for localized and high spatial resolution printing of many types of functional organic and inorganic, biological or synthetic materials onto substrates is an effective method in various domains (electronics, sensors, and surface biofunctionalization). Although extensive research has been dedicated to the LIFT process in the last years, there is an increasing interest for combining the advantages of this technique with specific materials characteristics for obtaining localized structures or for creating physical guidance structures that could be used as biological scaffolds. Within this context, we aim to study a new aspect related to combining the advantages of Dynamic Release Layer assisted LIFT (DRL-LIFT) with a soft substrate (i.e. Thermanox) for obtaining surface functionalization with micro and nano "porous" polymeric structures. The structures obtained with different topographical properties were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, optical and fluorescence microscopy. Subsequently, the structures were used as a base for cellular behavior study platforms. Preliminary in vitro tests involving two types of cells, fibroblast and oligodendrocytes, were performed on these LIFT printed platforms.

  18. Polyethyleneimine patterns obtained by laser-transfer assisted by a Dynamic Release Layer onto Themanox soft substrates for cell adhesion study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinca, V., E-mail: dinali@nipne.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-16, RO-077125 Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Mattle, T. [Paul Scherrer Institute, General Energy Research Department, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Palla Papavlu, A.; Rusen, L.; Luculescu, C. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-16, RO-077125 Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Lippert, T. [Paul Scherrer Institute, General Energy Research Department, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Dinescu, M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-16, RO-077125 Magurele, Bucharest (Romania)

    2013-08-01

    The use of LIFT (Laser Induced Forward Transfer) for localized and high spatial resolution printing of many types of functional organic and inorganic, biological or synthetic materials onto substrates is an effective method in various domains (electronics, sensors, and surface biofunctionalization). Although extensive research has been dedicated to the LIFT process in the last years, there is an increasing interest for combining the advantages of this technique with specific materials characteristics for obtaining localized structures or for creating physical guidance structures that could be used as biological scaffolds. Within this context, we aim to study a new aspect related to combining the advantages of Dynamic Release Layer assisted LIFT (DRL-LIFT) with a soft substrate (i.e. Thermanox) for obtaining surface functionalization with micro and nano “porous” polymeric structures. The structures obtained with different topographical properties were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, optical and fluorescence microscopy. Subsequently, the structures were used as a base for cellular behavior study platforms. Preliminary in vitro tests involving two types of cells, fibroblast and oligodendrocytes, were performed on these LIFT printed platforms.

  19. Work of adhesion and separation between soft elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Nanshu

    2015-03-01

    The JKR (Johnson-Kendall-Roberts) method is widely used to measure the work of adhesion between soft materials. In this paper, the JKR theory is summarized and three dimensionless parameters are proposed to design a proper JKR experiment. The work of adhesion and the work of separation between two commonly used soft elastomers PDMS (Sylgard 184) and Ecoflex 0300 are obtained with the measured pull-in and pull-off forces using a dynamical mechanical analyzer (DMA). The effect of crosslinking density and solvent extraction are examined. It is found that the pull-in adhesion stays more or less constant for all contact pairs we measured. While the effect of crosslinking density is not significant for pristine PDMS, it is very obvious that the higher self-adhesion can be found in less crosslinked PDMS after solvent extraction. Such an effect is even more drastic for PDMS-to-Ecoflex adhesion. A unified adhesion mechanism is proposed to explain these complex adhesion behaviors. It is concluded that the chain-matrix interaction is the most effective adhesion mechanism compared to chain-chain or matrix-matrix interactions and the three interactions are exclusive to each other. This work is supported by the NSF CMMI award under Grant No. 1301335.

  20. Temporal dynamics and determinants of whole brain tissue volume changes during recovery from alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazdzinski, Stefan; Durazzo, Timothy C; Meyerhoff, Dieter J

    2005-06-01

    Brain shrinkage and its partial reversibility with abstinence is a common neuroimaging finding in alcohol dependent individuals. We used an automated three-dimensional whole brain magnetic resonance imaging method (boundary shift integral) in 23 alcohol dependent individuals to measure the temporal dynamics of cerebral tissue and spinal fluid volume changes over a 12-month interval and to examine the major determinants of brain tissue change rates during abstinence and non-abstinence. We found more rapid brain tissue gain during the first month of sobriety than in the following months. The most rapid volume recovery was observed in abstinent individuals with the greatest baseline brain shrinkage and drinking severity. The rapid reversal of brain volume gains in non-abstinent individuals and tissue volume changes are modulated by duration of abstinence and non-abstinence periods, as well as recency of non-abstinence. Age, family history density of alcoholism, relapse severity, and duration or age of onset of heavy drinking were not major determinants of brain shrinkage and brain volume recovery rates. Treatment providers may use this tangible information to reinforce the biomedical benefits of sobriety. Previous quantitative measurements of brain volumes in alcohol dependent individuals performed after several weeks of abstinence likely underestimated the full extent of chronic alcohol-associated brain shrinkage.

  1. An independent determination of Fomalhaut b's orbit and the dynamical effects on the outer dust belt

    CERN Document Server

    Beust, Hervé; Bonsor, Amy; Graham, J; Kalas, Paul; Lebreton, J; Lagrange, Anne-Marie; Ertel, Steve; Faramaz, Virginie; Thebault, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The nearby star Fomalhaut harbours a cold, moderately eccentric dust belt with a sharp inner edge near 133 au. A low-mass, common proper motion companion (Fom b), was discovered near the inner edge and was identified as a planet candidate that could account for the belt morphology. However, the most recent orbit determination based on four epochs of astrometry over eight years reveals a highly eccentric orbit that appears to cross the belt in the sky plane projection. We perform here a full orbital determination based on the available astrometric data to independently validate the orbit estimates previously presented. Adopting our values for the orbital elements and their associated uncertainties, we then study the dynamical interaction between the planet and the dust ring, to check whether the proposed disk sculpting scenario by Fom b is plausible. We used a dedicated MCMC code to derive the statistical distributions of the orbital elements of Fom b. Then we used symplectic N-body integration to investigate ...

  2. Using Maximal Isometric Force to Determine the Optimal Load for Measuring Dynamic Muscle Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiering, Barry A.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Bentley, Jason R.; Nash, Roxanne E.; Sinka, Joseph; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2009-01-01

    Maximal power output occurs when subjects perform ballistic exercises using loads of 30-50% of one-repetition maximum (1-RM). However, performing 1-RM testing prior to power measurement requires considerable time, especially when testing involves multiple exercises. Maximal isometric force (MIF), which requires substantially less time to measure than 1-RM, might be an acceptable alternative for determining the optimal load for power testing. PURPOSE: To determine the optimal load based on MIF for maximizing dynamic power output during leg press and bench press exercises. METHODS: Twenty healthy volunteers (12 men and 8 women; mean +/- SD age: 31+/-6 y; body mass: 72 +/- 15 kg) performed isometric leg press and bench press movements, during which MIF was measured using force plates. Subsequently, subjects performed ballistic leg press and bench press exercises using loads corresponding to 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, and 60% of MIF presented in randomized order. Maximal instantaneous power was calculated during the ballistic exercise tests using force plates and position transducers. Repeated-measures ANOVA and Fisher LSD post hoc tests were used to determine the load(s) that elicited maximal power output. RESULTS: For the leg press power test, six subjects were unable to be tested at 20% and 30% MIF because these loads were less than the lightest possible load (i.e., the weight of the unloaded leg press sled assembly [31.4 kg]). For the bench press power test, five subjects were unable to be tested at 20% MIF because these loads were less than the weight of the unloaded aluminum bar (i.e., 11.4 kg). Therefore, these loads were excluded from analysis. A trend (p = 0.07) for a main effect of load existed for the leg press exercise, indicating that the 40% MIF load tended to elicit greater power output than the 60% MIF load (effect size = 0.38). A significant (p . 0.05) main effect of load existed for the bench press exercise; post hoc analysis indicated that the effect of

  3. Polymerization contraction stress in dentin adhesives bonded to dentin and enamel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hashimoto; A.J. de Gee; A.J. Feilzer

    2008-01-01

    Objective In a previous study on of polymerization contraction stress determinations of adhesives bonded to dentin a continuous decline of stress was observed after the adhesives had been light-cured. The decline was ascribed to stress relief caused by diffusion into the adhesive layer of water and/

  4. Regulation of cadherin-mediated adhesion in morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbiner, Barry M

    2005-08-01

    Cadherin cell-adhesion proteins mediate many facets of tissue morphogenesis. The dynamic regulation of cadherins in response to various extracellular signals controls cell sorting, cell rearrangements and cell movements. Cadherins are regulated at the cell surface by an inside-out signalling mechanism that is analogous to the integrins in platelets and leukocytes. Signal-transduction pathways impinge on the catenins (cytoplasmic cadherin-associated proteins), which transduce changes across the membrane to alter the state of the cadherin adhesive bond.

  5. Rheology and adhesion of poly(acrylic acid)/laponite nanocomposite hydrogels as biocompatible adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Muxian; Li, Li; Sun, Yimin; Xu, Jun; Guo, Xuhong; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2014-02-18

    Biocompatible nanocomposite hydrogels (NC gels) consisting of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and nanosized clay (Laponite) were successfully synthesized by in situ free-radical polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) in aqueous solutions of Laponite. The obtained NC gels were uniform and transparent. Their viscosity, storage modulus G', and loss modulus G″ increased significantly upon increasing the content of Laponite and the dose of AA, while exhibiting a maximum with increasing the neutralization degree of AA. They showed tunable adhesion by changing the dose of Laponite and monomer as well as the neutralization degree of AA, as determined by 180° peel strength measurement. The maximal adhesion was shown when reaching a balance between cohesion and fluidity. A homemade Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) instrument was employed to study the surface adhesion behavior of the NC gels. The combination of peel strength, rheology, and JKR measurements offers the opportunity of insight into the mechanism of adhesion of hydrogels. The NC gels with tunable adhesion should be ideal candidates for dental adhesive, wound dressing, and tissue engineering.

  6. Simple method of dynamic Young’s modulus determination in lime and cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosell, J. R.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work explains a simple method to determine the dynamic Young module (MOE by inducing a set of small mechanical perturbation to samples of lime and cement mortars and correlating the results obtained with results determined using other techniques and methods. The procedure described herein follows the instructions stated in the UNE-EN ISO 12680-1 standard for refractory products although in this study the instructions are applied to standardized RILEM 4x4x16 cm test samples made of lime and cement mortars. In addition, MOE determinations are obtained by using ultrasonic impulse velocity while static Young's modulus determinations are obtained by performing conventional bending tests. The ability of this procedure to correlate with results from other techniques, along with its simplicity, suggests that it can be widely adapted to determine the deformability of mortars under load using standardized samples.

    El presente trabajo muestra un método simple para determinar el módulo de Young dinámico (MOE a partir de pequeñas perturbaciones mecánicas producidas a probetas de mortero de cal y de cemento, correlacionando los resultados obtenidos con las correspondientes mediciones realizadas con otras técnicas. El procedimiento sigue básicamente las instrucciones fijadas en la norma UNE-EN ISO 12680-1 de productos refractarios, pero aplicándolo a probetas normalizadas RILEM 4x4x16 de morteros confeccionados con cal y cemento. Paralelamente se realizan determinaciones del MOE a partir de la velocidad de paso de impulsos ultrasónicos y determinaciones del módulo de Young estático a partir de ensayos de flexión convencionales. La simplicidad del método aplicado y la correlación de los resultados obtenidos con las variables medidas permiten concluir que esta metodología es de aplicación directa para determinar la deformabilidad bajo carga de los morteros a partir de probetas normalizadas.

  7. INVESTIGATION OF THE STRUCTURE OF ADHESIVE JOINTS WITH A MICROTOMOGRAPHY METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chauzov K. V.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The article provides a comparative analysis of two methods for assessing the structure of adhesive joint: optical microscopy and microtomography. Comparative analysis of the accuracy of measurement was shown; we have also built the graphs of the thickness of adhesive joint. The depth of penetration adhesive into the wood was determined. The structure of adhesive joint for two types of binders was studied

  8. The role of adhesion energy in controlling cell–cell contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maître, Jean-Léon; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in microscopy techniques and biophysical measurements have provided novel insight into the molecular, cellular and biophysical basis of cell adhesion. However, comparably little is known about a core element of cell–cell adhesion—the energy of adhesion at the cell–cell contact. In this review, we discuss approaches to understand the nature and regulation of adhesion energy, and propose strategies to determine adhesion energy between cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21807491

  9. Localized Modeling of Biochemical and Flow Interactions during Cancer Cell Adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Behr

    Full Text Available This work focuses on one component of a larger research effort to develop a simulation tool to model populations of flowing cells. Specifically, in this study a local model of the biochemical interactions between circulating melanoma tumor cells (TC and substrate adherent polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN is developed. This model provides realistic three-dimensional distributions of bond formation and attendant attraction and repulsion forces that are consistent with the time dependent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD framework of the full system model which accounts local pressure, shear and repulsion forces. The resulting full dynamics model enables exploration of TC adhesion to adherent PMNs, which is a known participating mechanism in melanoma cell metastasis. The model defines the adhesion molecules present on the TC and PMN cell surfaces, and calculates their interactions as the melanoma cell flows past the PMN. Biochemical rates of reactions between individual molecules are determined based on their local properties. The melanoma cell in the model expresses ICAM-1 molecules on its surface, and the PMN expresses the β-2 integrins LFA-1 and Mac-1. In this work the PMN is fixed to the substrate and is assumed fully rigid and of a prescribed shear-rate dependent shape obtained from micro-PIV experiments. The melanoma cell is transported with full six-degrees-of-freedom dynamics. Adhesion models, which represent the ability of molecules to bond and adhere the cells to each other, and repulsion models, which represent the various physical mechanisms of cellular repulsion, are incorporated with the CFD solver. All models are general enough to allow for future extensions, including arbitrary adhesion molecule types, and the ability to redefine the values of parameters to represent various cell types. The model presented in this study will be part of a clinical tool for development of personalized medical treatment programs.

  10. On higher ground: how well can dynamic body acceleration determine speed in variable terrain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen R Bidder

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Animal travel speed is an ecologically significant parameter, with implications for the study of energetics and animal behaviour. It is also necessary for the calculation of animal paths by dead-reckoning. Dead-reckoning uses heading and speed to calculate an animal's path through its environment on a fine scale. It is often used in aquatic environments, where transmission telemetry is difficult. However, its adoption for tracking terrestrial animals is limited by our ability to measure speed accurately on a fine scale. Recently, tri-axial accelerometers have shown promise for estimating speed, but their accuracy appears affected by changes in substrate and surface gradients. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate four metrics of acceleration; Overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA, vectorial dynamic body acceleration (VDBA, acceleration peak frequency and acceleration peak amplitude, as proxies for speed over hard, soft and inclined surfaces, using humans as a model species. RESULTS: A general linear model (GLM showed a significant difference in the relationships between the metrics and speed depending on substrate or surface gradient. When the data from all surface types were considered together, VeDBA had the highest coefficient of determination. CONCLUSIONS: All of the metrics showed some variation in their relationship with speed according to the surface type. This indicates that changes in the substrate or surface gradient during locomotion by animals would produce errors in speed estimates, and also in dead-reckoned tracks if they were calculated from speeds based entirely on a priori calibrations. However, we describe a method by which the relationship between acceleration metrics and speed can be corrected ad hoc, until tracks accord with periodic ground truthed positions, obtained via a secondary means (e.g. VHF or GPS telemetry. In this way, dead-reckoning provides a means to obtain fine scale movement data

  11. Management of adhesive capsulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stupay KL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kristen L Stupay,1 Andrew S Neviaser2 1Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is a condition of capsular contracture that reduces both active and passive glenohumeral motion. The cause of adhesive capsulitis is not known but it is strongly associated with endocrine abnormalities such as diabetes. Diverse terminology and the absence of definitive criteria for diagnosis make evaluating treatment modalities difficult. Many treatment methods have been reported, most with some success, but few have been proved to alter the natural course of this disease. Most afflicted patients will achieve acceptable shoulder function without surgery. Those who remain debilitated after 8–12 months are reasonable candidates for invasive treatments. Here, the various treatment methods and the data to support their use are reviewed. Keywords: frozen shoulder, stiff shoulder, periarthritis, painful shoulder 

  12. Dynamic rupture simulation with an experimentally-determined friction law leads to slip-pulse propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.; Reches, Z.

    2013-12-01

    We simulate the dynamic rupture along a vertical, strike-slip fault in an elastic half-space. The fault has frictional properties that were determined in high-velocity, rotary shear apparatus Sierra-White granite. The experimental fault was abruptly loaded by a massive flywheel, which is assumed to simulate the loading of a fault patch during an earthquake, and termed Earthquake-Like-Slip Event (ELSE) (Chang et al., 2012). The experiments revealed systematic alteration between slip-weakening and slip-strengthening (Fig. 1A), and were considered as proxies of fault-patch behavior during earthquakes of M = 4-8. We used the friction-distance relations of these experiments to form an empirical slip-dependent friction model, ELSE-model (Fig. 1B). For the dynamic rupture simulation, we used the program of Ampuero (2002) (2D spectral boundary integral elements) designed for anti-plane (mode III) shear fracturing. To compare with published works, the calculations used a crust with mechanical properties and stress state of Version 3 benchmark of SCEC (Harris et al., 2004). The calculations with a fault of ELSE-model friction revealed: (1) Rupture propagation in a slip-pulse style with slip cessation behind the pulse; (2) Systematic decrease of slip distance away from the nucleation zone; and (3) Spontaneous arrest of the dynamic rupture without a barrier. These features suggest a rupture of a self-healing slip-pulse mode (Fig. 1C), in contrast to rupturing of a fault with linear slip-weakening friction (Fig. 1B) (Rojas et al., 2008) in crack-like mode and no spontaneous arrest. We deduce that the slip-pulse in our simulation results from the fast recovery of shear strength as observed in ELSE experiments, and argue that incorporating this experimentally-based friction model to rupture modeling produces realistic propagation style of earthquake rupture. Figure 1 Fault patch behavior during an earthquake. (A) Experimental evolution of frictional stress, slip velocity, and

  13. Syndecans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Chen, L; Woods, A

    2001-01-01

    Now that transmembrane signaling through primary cell-matrix receptors, integrins, is being elucidated, attention is turning to how integrin-ligand interactions can be modulated. Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans implicated as coreceptors in a variety of physiological processes, including...... cell adhesion, migration, response to growth factors, development, and tumorigenesis. This review will describe this family of proteoglycans in terms of their structures and functions and their signaling in conjunction with integrins, and indicate areas for future research....

  14. Adhesion Development and the Expression of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Svinarich

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was conducted to determine whether nitric oxide (NO, a potent vasodilator and inhibitor of thrombus formation, is involved in the formation and maintenance of adhesions.

  15. Determination of Activation Energy of Relaxation Events in Composite Solid Propellants by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. K Bihari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The shelf life of a composite solid propellant is one of the critical aspects for the usage of solid propellants. To assess the ageing behavior of the composite solid propellant, the activation energy is a key parameter. The activation energy is determined by analysis of visco-elastic response of the composite solid propellant when subjected to sinusoidal excitation. In the present study, dynamic mechanical analyzer was used to characterize six different types of propellants based on hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene, aluminium, ammonium perchlorate cured with toluene diisocyanate having burning rates varying from 5 mm/s to 25 mm/s at 7000 kPa. Each propellant sample was given a multi-frequency strain of 0.01 percent at three discrete frequencies (3.5 Hz, 11 Hz, 35 Hz in the temperature range -80 °C to + 80 °C. It was observed that all the propellants have shown two relaxation events (α- and β- transition in the temperature range -80 °C to +80 °C. The α-transition was observed between -66 °C and -51 °C and β-transition between 7 °C and 44 °C for the propellants studied. The activation energy for both transitions was determined by Arrhenius plot from dynamic properties measured at different frequencies and also by time temperature superposition principle using Williams-Landel-Ferry and Arrhenius temperature dependence equations. The data reveal that the activation energy corresponding to α-transition varies from 90 kJ/mol to 125 kJ/mol for R-value between 0.7 to 0.9 while for β-transition the values are from 75 kJ/mol to 92 kJ/mol. The activation energy corresponding to β-transition may be used to predict the useful life of solid propellant.Defence Science Journal, 2014, 64(2, pp. 173-178. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.64.3818

  16. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-08-14

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion.

  17. Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion on hydrophobic and hydrophilic textured biomaterial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li-Chong; Siedlecki, Christopher A

    2014-06-01

    It is of great interest to use nano- or micro-structured surfaces to inhibit microbial adhesion and biofilm formation and thereby to prevent biomaterial-associated infection, without modification of the surface chemistry or bulk properties of the materials and without use of the drugs. Our previous study showed that a submicron textured polyurethane surface can inhibit staphylococcal bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. To further understand the effect of the geometry of textures on bacterial adhesion as well as the underlying mechanism, in this study, submicron and micron textured polyurethane surfaces featuring ordered arrays of pillars were fabricated and modified to have different wettabilities. All the textured surfaces were originally hydrophobic and showed significant reductions in Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A adhesion in phosphate buffered saline or 25% platelet poor plasma solutions under shear, as compared to smooth surfaces. After being subjected to an air glow discharge plasma treatment, all polyurethane surfaces were modified to hydrophilic, and reductions in bacterial adhesion on surfaces were subsequently found to be dependent on the size of the patterns. The submicron patterned surfaces reduced bacterial adhesion, while the micron patterned surfaces led to increased bacterial adhesion. The extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from the S. epidermidis cell surfaces were extracted and purified, and were coated on a glass colloidal surface so that the adhesion force and separation energy in interactions of the EPS and the surface could be measured by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. These results were consistent with the bacterial adhesion observations. Overall, the data suggest that the increased surface hydrophobicity and the decreased availability of the contact area contributes to a reduction in bacterial adhesion to the hydrophobic textured surfaces, while the availability of the contact area is the primary determinant factor

  18. Preparation of an Adhesive in Emulsion for Maxillofacial Prosthetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-García, Judith A.; Ortega, Alejandra; Barceló-Santana, Federico H.; Palacios-Alquisira, Joaquín

    2010-01-01

    Maxillofacial prostheses is a dental medicine specialty aimed at restoring anatomical facial defects caused by cancer, trauma or congenital malformations through an artificial device, which is commonly attached to the skin with the help of an adhesive. The purpose of our research was to develop a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) based on acrylic monomers, characterizing and determining its drying kinetics, that is to say the time it takes to lose 50 to 90% of its moisture. The adhesive synthesis was realized by means of emulsion polymerization; the composition of formulations was: (AA-MMA-EA) and (AA-MMA-2EHA) with different molar ratios. The formulation based on (AA-MMA-2EHA) with 50 w% of solids, presented good adhesive properties such as tack, bond strength, and short drying time. We propose this formulation as a PSA, because it offers an alternative for systemically compromised patients, by less irritation compared to organic solvent-based adhesives. PMID:21152308

  19. Regulation of embryonic cell adhesion by the cadherin cytoplasmic domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, C

    1992-04-17

    Differential adhesion between embryonic cells has been proposed to be mediated by a family of closely related glycoproteins called the cadherins. The cadherins mediate adhesion in part through an interaction between the cadherin cytoplasmic domain and intracellular proteins, called the catenins. To determine whether these interactions could regulate cadherin function in embryos, a form of N-cadherin was generated that lacks an extracellular domain. Expression of this mutant in Xenopus embryos causes a dramatic inhibition of cell adhesion. Analysis of the mutant phenotype shows that at least two regions of the N-cadherin cytoplasmic domain can inhibit adhesion and that the mutant cadherin can inhibit catenin binding to E-cadherin. These results suggest that cadherin-mediated adhesion can be regulated by cytoplasmic interactions and that this regulation may contribute to morphogenesis when emerging tissues coexpress several cadherin types.

  20. Preparation of an Adhesive in Emulsion for Maxillofacial Prosthetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Palacios-Alquisira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Maxillofacial prostheses is a dental medicine specialty aimed at restoring anatomical facial defects caused by cancer, trauma or congenital malformations through an artificial device, which is commonly attached to the skin with the help of an adhesive. The purpose of our research was to develop a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA based on acrylic monomers, characterizing and determining its drying kinetics, that is to say the time it takes to lose 50 to 90% of its moisture. The adhesive synthesis was realized by means of emulsion polymerization; the composition of formulations was: (AA‑MMA‑EA and (AA‑MMA‑2EHA with different molar ratios. The formulation based on (AA‑MMA‑2EHA with 50 w% of solids, presented good adhesive properties such as tack, bond strength, and short drying time. We propose this formulation as a PSA, because it offers an alternative for systemically compromised patients, by less irritation compared to organic solvent-based adhesives.

  1. Vortices determine the dynamics of biodiversity in cyclical interactions with protection spillovers

    CERN Document Server

    Szolnoki, Attila

    2015-01-01

    If rock beats scissors and scissors beat paper, one might assume that rock beats paper too. But this is not the case for intransitive relationships that make up the famous rock-paper-scissors game. However, the sole presence of paper might prevent rock from beating scissors, simply because paper beats rock. This is the blueprint for the rock-paper-scissors game with protection spillovers, which has recently been introduced as a new paradigm for biodiversity in well-mixed microbial populations. Here we study the game in structured populations, demonstrating that protection spillovers give rise to spatial patterns that are impossible to observe in the classical rock-paper-scissors game. We show that the spatiotemporal dynamics of the system is determined by the density of stable vortices, which may ultimately transform to frozen states, to propagating waves, or to target waves with reversed propagation direction, depending further on the degree and type of randomness in the interactions among the species. If vo...

  2. Towards determining appropriate hydrodynamic conditions for in vitro in vivo correlations using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, Deirdre M; Healy, Anne Marie; Corrigan, Owen I

    2009-06-28

    One of the earliest level A in vitro dissolution in vivo absorption correlations (IVIVCs) was established by Levy and co-workers in 1965 using a beaker dissolution apparatus Levy et al., 1965. In the current work, the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package, Fluent((R)), was used to simulate the hydrodynamics within the Levy beaker apparatus and compare them to those within the paddle and basket apparatuses. In vitro velocity values relevant to in vivo dissolution, presented as apparent gastrointestinal fluid velocity (AGV) values, were calculated. The AGV values were estimated from IVIVCs of immediate release (IR) dosage forms in each apparatus and CFD simulations. The simulations from the Levy apparatus revealed complex hydrodynamics in the region of the stirrer blades, and radial inflow at the centre of the beaker base. The calculated AGV values ranged from 0.001 to 0.026ms(-1). In vitro fluid velocities should reflect in vivo dissolution rates affected by natural convection and gastrointestinal motility, in addition to local fluid velocity. The maximum CFD generated velocity at the base of the paddle apparatus at 20rpm was similar to the average maximum AGV value determined, suggesting use of agitation rates which are lower than those commonly used (e.g. 50rpm in the paddle apparatus) may be appropriate when attempting an IVIVC for IR dosage forms.

  3. Determination of benzene residues in recycled polyethylene terephthalate (PETE) by dynamic headspace-gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komolprasert, V; Hargraves, W A; Armstrong, D J

    1994-01-01

    A dynamic headspace-gas chromatography (HS/GC) method was developed to quantitate benzene in recycled PETE material derived from 21 PETE beverage bottles. The analytical system consisted of a purge-and-trap apparatus which was interfaced directly with a gas chromatograph/flame ionization detector. Cryofocusing and non-cryofocusing GC systems were used. The technique was applied to spiked PETE test samples which were prepared at various benzene concentrations ranging from 100 ppb to 117 ppm. The initial spiked benzene concentration in the PETE test samples was determined gravimetrically. The HS/GC technique was limited by the slow desorption rate of benzene from the PETE matrix; as a result, multipurges were performed at 60 degrees C. Regression analysis was done on the multipurge data to develop a desorption model which would predict the total amount of benzene in the PETE. The calculated results agreed with the experimental recoveries within +/- 10%. Recovery depended on the initial benzene level in the PETE and ranged from 70 to 90% after the first five purges.

  4. Absolute densities, masses, and radii of the WASP-47 system determined dynamically

    CERN Document Server

    Almenara, J M; Bonfils, X; Udry, S

    2016-01-01

    We present a self-consistent modelling of the available light curve and radial velocity data of WASP-47 that takes into account the gravitational interactions between all known bodies in the system. The joint analysis of light curve and radial velocity data in a multi-planetary system allows deriving absolute densities, radii, and masses without the use of theoretical stellar models. For WASP-47 the precision is limited by the reduced dynamical information that is due to the short time span of the K2 light curve. We achieve a precision of around 22% for the radii of the star and the transiting planets, between 40% and 60% for their masses, and between 1.5% and 38% for their densities. All values agree with previously reported measurements. When theoretical stellar models are included, the system parameters are determined with a precision that exceeds that achieved by previous studies, thanks to the self-consistent modelling of light curve and radial velocity data.

  5. Motivational dynamics of eating regulation: a self-determination theory perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verstuyf Joke

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Within Western society, many people have difficulties adequately regulating their eating behaviors and weight. Although the literature on eating regulation is vast, little attention has been given to motivational dynamics involved in eating regulation. Grounded in Self-Determination Theory (SDT, the present contribution aims to provide a motivational perspective on eating regulation. The role of satisfaction and thwarting of the basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness is introduced as a mechanism to (a explain the etiology of body image concerns and disordered eating and (b understand the optimal regulation of ongoing eating behavior for healthy weight maintenance. An overview of empirical studies on these two research lines is provided. In a final section, the potential relevance and value of SDT in relation to prevailing theoretical models in the domain of eating regulation is discussed. Although research on SDT in the domain of eating regulation is still in its early stages and more research is clearly needed, this review suggests that the SDT represents a promising framework to more thoroughly study and understand the motivational processes involved in eating regulation and associated problems.

  6. Absolute densities, masses, and radii of the WASP-47 system determined dynamically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almenara, J. M.; Díaz, R. F.; Bonfils, X.; Udry, S.

    2016-10-01

    We present a self-consistent modelling of the available light curve and radial velocity data of WASP-47 that takes into account the gravitational interactions between all known bodies in the system. The joint analysis of light curve and radial velocity data in a multi-planetary system allows deriving absolute densities, radii, and masses without the use of theoretical stellar models. For WASP-47 the precision is limited by the reduced dynamical information that is due to the short time span of the K2 light curve. We achieve a precision of around 22% for the radii of the star and the transiting planets, between 40% and 60% for their masses, and between 1.5% and 38% for their densities. All values agree with previously reported measurements. When theoretical stellar models are included, the system parameters are determined with a precision that exceeds that achieved by previous studies, thanks to the self-consistent modelling of light curve and radial velocity data.

  7. Determination of thermal properties pure ThO2 using classical molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Partha S.; Kaur, Karamvir; Ali, K.; Arya, A.; Dey, G. K.

    2016-05-01

    This paper calculates lattice thermal expansion (LTE), thermal conductivity (TC) and melting temperature (MT) of ThO2 using classical molecular dynamic simulations. In this study we consider two set of interatomic potential consisting of Coulomb-Buckingham (Buck) and Coulomb-Buckingham-Morse-Many body (BMM) potential form. The MD calculated LTE of 10.29 × 10-6 and 10.61 × 10-6 K-1 using BMM and Buck potential, respectively, is slightly higher than the experimentally determined values (9.54 - 9.86 × 10-6 K-1). The MD calculated TC values in the high temperature range (600 to 1200 K) accords very well with the experimental measurements and at the low temperature range (300-500 K) our results are slightly different from experimental results as our presumption that the dominant mechanism for phonon scattering is the Umklapp process. The MD calculated MT of ThO2 using Buck and BMM potential model is 3662.5±12.5 K and 3812.5±12.5 K, respectively, and these values are in reasonable agreement with previous experimental values.

  8. Transcription closed and open complex dynamics studies reveal balance between genetic determinants and co-factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Adrien; Shoaib, Muhammad; Anufrieva, Olga; Mutharasu, Gnanavel; Jahan Hoque, Rawnak; Yli-Harja, Olli; Kandhavelu, Meenakshisundaram

    2015-05-19

    In E. coli, promoter closed and open complexes are key steps in transcription initiation, where magnesium-dependent RNA polymerase catalyzes RNA synthesis. However, the exact mechanism of initiation remains to be fully elucidated. Here, using single mRNA detection and dual reporter studies, we show that increased intracellular magnesium concentration affects Plac initiation complex formation resulting in a highly dynamic process over the cell growth phases. Mg2+ regulates transcription transition, which modulates bimodality of mRNA distribution in the exponential phase. We reveal that Mg2+ regulates the size and frequency of the mRNA burst by changing the open complex duration. Moreover, increasing magnesium concentration leads to higher intrinsic and extrinsic noise in the exponential phase. RNAP-Mg2+ interaction simulation reveals critical movements creating a shorter contact distance between aspartic acid residues and Nucleotide Triphosphate residues and increasing electrostatic charges in the active site. Our findings provide unique biophysical insights into the balanced mechanism of genetic determinants and magnesium ion in transcription initiation regulation during cell growth.

  9. Motivational dynamics of eating regulation: a self-determination theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstuyf, Joke; Patrick, Heather; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Teixeira, Pedro J

    2012-03-02

    Within Western society, many people have difficulties adequately regulating their eating behaviors and weight. Although the literature on eating regulation is vast, little attention has been given to motivational dynamics involved in eating regulation. Grounded in Self-Determination Theory (SDT), the present contribution aims to provide a motivational perspective on eating regulation. The role of satisfaction and thwarting of the basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness is introduced as a mechanism to (a) explain the etiology of body image concerns and disordered eating and (b) understand the optimal regulation of ongoing eating behavior for healthy weight maintenance. An overview of empirical studies on these two research lines is provided. In a final section, the potential relevance and value of SDT in relation to prevailing theoretical models in the domain of eating regulation is discussed. Although research on SDT in the domain of eating regulation is still in its early stages and more research is clearly needed, this review suggests that the SDT represents a promising framework to more thoroughly study and understand the motivational processes involved in eating regulation and associated problems.

  10. Determination of Consumer Behaviour Dynamics Relating to Food Products: “Trakya Region Example”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.H. Inan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it has been determined the dynamics of consumer behaviours of individuals who live in rural and urban areas concerning food products and it analyses the effective factors on consumers food consumption choice in families, based in Trakya Region (Tekirdag, Edirne, Kırklareli. The study was conducted with a total of 770 households 385 people in towns and 385 people in rural areas, 770 people in total of which 385 was from rural areas, and 385 from urban areas.The effective factors on consumer behaviour when purchasing food products have been evaluated by Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA and T-Test and Factor Analysis Methods in rural and urban areas in Trakya Region.This study indicates that families who live in urban areas of Trakya Region give more importance to food consumption compared to the ones living in rural areas. Also families living in urban and rural areas are concerned about “the Foot-and-Mouth Disease Mad Cow (BSE and Avian Influenza”.

  11. Determination of the Optimal Fourier Number on the Dynamic Thermal Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzgevičius, P.; Burlingis, A.; Norvaišienė, R.

    2016-12-01

    This article represents the result of experimental research on transient heat transfer in a multilayered (heterogeneous) wall. Our non-steady thermal transmission simulation is based on a finite-difference calculation method. The value of a Fourier number shows the similarity of thermal variation in conditional layers of an enclosure. Most scientists recommend using no more than a value of 0.5 for the Fourier number when performing calculations on dynamic (transient) heat transfer. The value of the Fourier number is determined in order to acquire reliable calculation results with optimal accuracy. To compare the results of simulation with experimental research, a transient heat transfer calculation spreadsheet was created. Our research has shown that a Fourier number of around 0.5 or even 0.32 is not sufficient ({≈ }17 % of oscillation amplitude) for calculations of transient heat transfer in a multilayered wall. The least distorted calculation results were obtained when the multilayered enclosure was divided into conditional layers with almost equal Fourier number values and when the value of the Fourier number was around 1/6, i.e., approximately 0.17. Statistical deviation analysis using the Statistical Analysis System was applied to assess the accuracy of the spreadsheet calculation and was developed on the basis of our established methodology. The mean and median absolute error as well as their confidence intervals has been estimated by the two methods with optimal accuracy ({F}_{oMDF}= 0.177 and F_{oEPS}= 0.1633 values).

  12. Microtensile bond strength of etch and rinse versus self-etch adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, Ibrahim M; Samra, Nagia R; Badawi, Manal F

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of the etch and rinse adhesive versus one-component or two-component self-etch adhesives. Twelve intact human molar teeth were cleaned and the occlusal enamel of the teeth was removed. The exposed dentin surfaces were polished and rinsed, and the adhesives were applied. A microhybride composite resin was applied to form specimens of 4 mm height and 6 mm diameter. The specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the adhesive interface to produce dentin-resin composite sticks, with an adhesive area of approximately 1.4 mm(2). The sticks were subjected to tensile loading until failure occurred. The debonded areas were examined with a scanning electron microscope to determine the site of failure. The results showed that the microtensile bond strength of the etch and rinse adhesive was higher than that of one-component or two-component self-etch adhesives. The scanning electron microscope examination of the dentin surfaces revealed adhesive and mixed modes of failure. The adhesive mode of failure occurred at the adhesive/dentin interface, while the mixed mode of failure occurred partially in the composite and partially at the adhesive/dentin interface. It was concluded that the etch and rinse adhesive had higher microtensile bond strength when compared to that of the self-etch adhesives.

  13. Spectroscopic and morphologic characterization of the dentin/adhesive interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemor, R. M.; Kruger, Michael B.; Wieliczka, David M.; Swafford, Jim R.; Spencer, Paulette

    1999-01-01

    The potential environmental risks associated with mercury release have forced many European countries to ban the use of dental amalgam. Alternative materials such as composite resins do not provide the clinical function for the length of time characteristically associated with dental amalgam. The weak link in the composite restoration is the dentin/adhesive bond. The purpose of this study was to correlate morphologic characterization of the dentin/adhesive bond with chemical analyses using micro- Fourier transform infrared and micro-Raman spectroscopy. A commercial dental adhesive was placed on dentin substrates cut from extracted, unerupted human third molars. Sections of the dentin/adhesive interface were investigated using infrared radiation produced at the Aladdin synchrotron source; visible radiation from a Kr+ laser was used for the micro-Raman spectroscopy. Sections of the dentin/adhesive interface, differentially stained to identify protein, mineral, and adhesive, were examined using light microscopy. Due to its limited spatial resolution and the unknown sample thickness the infrared results cannot be used quantitatively in determining the extent of diffusion. The results from the micro-Raman spectroscopy and light microscopy indicate exposed protein at the dentin/adhesive interface. Using a laser that reduces background fluorescence, the micro-Raman spectroscopy provides quantitative chemical and morphologic information on the dentin/adhesive interface. The staining procedure is sensitive to sites of pure protein and thus, complements the Raman results.

  14. Physics of cell elasticity, shape and adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, S. A.; Gov, N.; Nicolas, A.; Schwarz, U. S.; Tlusty, T.

    2005-07-01

    We review recent theoretical work that analyzes experimental measurements of the shape, fluctuations and adhesion properties of biological cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of the cytoskeleton and cell elasticity and we contrast the shape and adhesion of elastic cells with fluid-filled vesicles. In red blood cells (RBC), the cytoskeleton consists of a two-dimensional network of spectrin proteins. Our analysis of the wavevector and frequency dependence of the fluctuation spectrum of RBC indicates that the spectrin network acts as a confining potential that reduces the fluctuations of the lipid bilayer membrane. However, since the cytoskeleton is only sparsely connected to the bilayer, one cannot regard the composite cytoskeleton-membrane as a polymerized object with a shear modulus. The sensitivity of RBC fluctuations and shapes to ATP concentration may reflect topological defects induced in the cytoskeleton network by ATP. The shapes of cells that adhere to a substrate are strongly determined by the cytoskeletal elasticity that can be varied experimentally by drugs that depolymerize the cytoskeleton. This leads to a tension-driven retraction of the cell body and a pearling instability of the resulting ray-like protrusions. Recent experiments have shown that adhering cells exert polarized forces on substrates. The interactions of such “force dipoles” in either bulk gels or on surfaces can be used to predict the nature of self-assembly of cell aggregates and may be important in the formation of artificial tissues. Finally, we note that cell adhesion strongly depends on the forces exerted on the adhesion sites by the tension of the cytoskeleton. The size and shape of the adhesion regions are strongly modified as the tension is varied and we present an elastic model that relates this tension to deformations that induce the recruitment of new molecules to the adhesion region. In all these examples, cell shape and adhesion differ from vesicle shape and

  15. Adhesion of PBO Fiber in Epoxy Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The high mechanical and thermal performance of poly p-phenylene- 2, 6-benzobisoxazole ( PBO ) fiber provides great potential applications as reinforcement fibers for composites. A composite of PBO fiber and epoxy resin has excellent electrical insulation properties, therefore, it is considered to be the best choice for the reinforcement in high magnetic field coils for pulsed magnetic fields up to 100 T.However, poor adhesion between PBO fiber and matrix is found because of the chemically inactive and/or relatively smooth surface of the reinforcement fiber preventing efficient chemical bonding in the interface, which is a challenging issue to improve mechanical properties. Here, we report the surface modification of PBO fibers by ultraviolet (UV)irradiation, O2 and NH3 plasma, as well as acidic treatments. The interfacial adhesion strength values of all the treatments show the similar level as determined for aramid fibers by pull-out tests, a significant impact on fibermatrix-adhesion was not achieved. The surface free energy and roughness are increased for both sized and extracted fibers after plasma treatments together with maleic anhydride grafting. The sized fiber shows marginal improvement in adhesion strength and no change in fiber tensile strength because of the barrier effect of the finish.For the extracted fiber, different surface treatments either show no apparent effect or cause reduction in adhesion strength. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) topography analysis of the fracture surfaces proved adhesive failure at the fiber surface. The fiber surface roughness is increased and more surface flaws are induced, which could result in coarse interface structures when the treated fiber surface has no adequate wetting and functional groups. The adhesion failure is further confirmed by similar adhesion strength and compression shear strength values when the fiber was embedded in various epoxy resins with different temperature behavior. The tensile strength of fiber

  16. The nanoscale architecture of force-bearing focal adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoorn, Hedde; Harkes, Rolf; Spiesz, Ewa M; Storm, Cornelis; van Noort, Danny; Ladoux, Benoit; Schmidt, Thomas

    2014-08-13

    The combination of micropillar array technology to measure cellular traction forces with super-resolution imaging allowed us to obtain cellular traction force maps and simultaneously zoom in on individual focal adhesions with single-molecule accuracy. We achieved a force detection precision of 500 pN simultaneously with a mean single-molecule localization precision of 30 nm. Key to the achievement was a two-step etching process that provided an integrated spacer next to the micropillar array that permitted stable and reproducible observation of cells on micropillars within the short working distance of a high-magnification, high numerical aperture objective. In turn, we used the technology to characterize the super-resolved structure of focal adhesions during force exertion. Live-cell imaging on MCF-7 cells demonstrated the applicability of the inverted configuration of the micropillar arrays to dynamics measurements. Forces emanated from a molecular base that was localized on top of the micropillars. What appeared as a single adhesion in conventional microscopy were in fact multiple elongated adhesions emanating from only a small fraction of the adhesion on the micropillar surface. Focal adhesions were elongated in the direction of local cellular force exertion with structural features of 100-280 nm in 3T3 Fibroblasts and MCF-7 cells. The combined measure of nanoscale architecture and force exerted shows a high level of stress accumulation at a single site of adhesion.

  17. TECHNIQUE FOR DETERMINATION OF SURFACE FRACTAL DIMENSION AND MORPHOLOGY OF MESOPOROUS TITANIA USING DYNAMIC FLOW ADSORPTION AND ITS CHARACTERIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    Tursiloadi, Silvester

    2010-01-01

    A technique to determine the surface fractal dimension of mesoporous TiO­2 using a dynamic flow adsorption instrument is described. Fractal dimension is an additional technique to characterize surface morphology. Surface fractal dimension, a quantitative measurement of surface ruggedness, can be determined by adsorbing a homologous series of adsorbates onto an adsorbent sample of mesoporous TiO­2. Titania wet gel prepared by hydrolysis of Ti-alkoxide was immersed in the flow of supercritical ...

  18. Adhesive tape exfoliation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    cleaving of a single chunk of graphite. For both cases, parallel and serial exfoliation, it is investigated how many generations of cleavages are needed. An approximate model with the probability distribution expressed as a simple closed form is presented and compared with the simulations.......Single-crystal graphite can be cleaved by the use of an adhesive tape. This was also the initial route for obtaining graphene, a one-layer thick graphite slab. In this letter a few simple and fun considerations are presented in an attempt to shed some light on why this procedure is successful...

  19. Polymerization behavior within adhesive layer of one- and two-step self-etch adhesives: a micro-Raman spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakano, Wakae; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Prasansuttiporn, Taweesak; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the polymerization behavior within the adhesive layer of one- and two-step self-etch adhesives at the dentincomposite interface. Dentin surfaces were applied with Clearfil S(3) Bond (TS), Clearfil S(3) Bond Plus (TSP) and Clearfil SE Bond (SE), and then placed with a light-curing resin composite. After water storage for 24 h, the bonded teeth were sectioned and polished perpendicular to the adhesive interface, and the degree of conversion (DC) of the adhesive layer between the dentin and composite were determined using micro-Raman analysis. For all the adhesives, the DCs of the adhesive layers significantly decreased near the adhesive-composite join (padhesive-composite join (Pitf), TS was significantly lower than TSP and SE (padhesive could not reach maximum DC even after polymerization of the overlying resin composite.

  20. Syndecan proteoglycans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Oh, E S; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that a family of transmembrane proteoglycans, the syndecans, have important roles in cell adhesion. They participate through binding of matrix ligand to their glycosaminoglycan chains, clustering, and the induction of signaling cascades to modify the internal microfilament...... organization. Syndecans can modulate the type of adhesive responses induced by other matrix ligand-receptor interactions, such as those involving the integrins, and so contribute to the control of cell morphology, adhesion and migration....

  1. Adhesion properties of gecko setae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Ginel; Peattie, Anne; Daniels, Roxanne; Full, Robert; Kenny, Thomas

    2005-03-01

    Millions of keratin hairs on gecko feet, called setae, act as a spectacular dry adhesive. Each seta branches into hundreds of smaller fibers that terminate in spatula-shaped ends. Morphological differences between the setae from different gecko species are suspected to affect both single-seta and whole-animal adhesion properties. Single-seta adhesive force measurements made using a MEMS piezoresistive cantilever capable of two-axis measurements are presented.

  2. The Impact of the Gas Distribution on the Determination of Dynamical Masses of Galaxies Using Unresolved Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Blok, W. J. G.; Walter, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    Dynamical mass (M dyn) is a key property of any galaxy, yet a determination of M dyn is not straightforward if spatially resolved measurements are not available. This situation occurs in single-dish H I observations of the local universe, but also frequently in high-redshift observations. M dyn meas

  3. Determination of the Orientation and Dynamics of Ergosterol in Model Membranes Using Uniform 13C Labeling and Dynamically Averaged 13C Chemical Shift Anisotropies as Experimental Restraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubias, O.; Jolibois, F.; Massou, S.; Milon, A.; Réat, V.

    2005-01-01

    A new strategy was established to determine the average orientation and dynamics of ergosterol in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine model membranes. It is based on the analysis of chemical shift anisotropies (CSAs) averaged by the molecular dynamics. Static 13C CSA tensors were computed by quantum chemistry, using the gauge-including atomic-orbital approach within Hartree-Fock theory. Uniformly 13C-labeled ergosterol was purified from Pichia pastoris cells grown on labeled methanol. After reconstitution into dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipids, the complete 1H and 13C assignment of ergosterol's resonances was performed using a combination of magic-angle spinning two-dimensional experiments. Dynamically averaged CSAs were determined by standard side-band intensity analysis for isolated 13C resonances (C3 and ethylenic carbons) and by off-magic-angle spinning experiments for other carbons. A set of 18 constraints was thus obtained, from which the sterol's molecular order parameter and average orientation could be precisely defined. The validity of using computed CSAs in this strategy was verified on cholesterol model systems. This new method allowed us to quantify ergosterol's dynamics at three molar ratios: 16 mol % (Ld phase), 30 mol % (Lo phase), and 23 mol % (mixed phases). Contrary to cholesterol, ergosterol's molecular diffusion axis makes an important angle (14°) with the inertial axis of the rigid four-ring system. PMID:15923221

  4. Water droplet excess free energy determined by cluster mitosis using guided molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Gabriel V; Hunt, Patricia A; Müller, Erich A; Jackson, George; Ford, Ian J

    2015-12-28

    Atmospheric aerosols play a vital role in affecting climate by influencing the properties and lifetimes of clouds and precipitation. Understanding the underlying microscopic mechanisms involved in the nucleation of aerosol droplets from the vapour phase is therefore of great interest. One key thermodynamic quantity in nucleation is the excess free energy of cluster formation relative to that of the saturated vapour. In our current study, the excess free energy is extracted for clusters of pure water modelled with the TIP4P/2005 intermolecular potential using a method based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and the Jarzynski relation. The change in free energy associated with the "mitosis" or division of a cluster of N water molecules into two N/2 sub-clusters is evaluated. This methodology is an extension of the disassembly procedure used recently to calculate the excess free energy of argon clusters [H. Y. Tang and I. J. Ford, Phys. Rev. E 91, 023308 (2015)]. Our findings are compared to the corresponding excess free energies obtained from classical nucleation theory (CNT) as well as internally consistent classical theory (ICCT). The values of the excess free energy that we obtain with the mitosis method are consistent with CNT for large cluster sizes but for the smallest clusters, the results tend towards ICCT; for intermediate sized clusters, we obtain values between the ICCT and CNT predictions. Furthermore, the curvature-dependent surface tension which can be obtained by regarding the clusters as spherical droplets of bulk density is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cluster size for the studied range. The data are compared to other values reported in the literature, agreeing qualitatively with some but disagreeing with the values determined by Joswiak et al. [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 4267 (2013)] using a biased mitosis approach; an assessment of the differences is the main motivation for our current study.

  5. Determining dynamic parameters of different-scale ionospheric irregularities over northern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afraimovich, E. L.; Lipko, Y. V. Y. V.; Vugmeister, B. O.

    2000-01-01

    In 1995-1996, observations were carried out at Norilsk (geomagnetic latitude and longitude 64.2 degN and 160.4 degE) to determine dynamic parameters of irregularities in the high-latitude ionosphere. The short-baseline spaced-receiver method that has been implemented at the ionospheric facility of the Norilsk Integrated Magnetic-Ionospheric Station, provides a means of simultaneously measuring parameters of small-scale irregularities (spatial scale of 3-5 km) by the Similar-Fading Method (SFM), as well as of medium-scale irregularities (time scale of 10-30 min, spatial scale of hundreds of kilometres) by the Statistical Angle-of-arrival and Doppler Method (SADM). About 20 h of the observational data for the F2-layer under quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp = 3) and about 15 h for the sporadic E-layer (Kp ~ 3) were processed. It has been found that the propagation directions and velocities of different-scale irregularities do not coincide. Small-scale irregularities of the F2-layer travel predominantly eastward or westward. The velocity of the F2-layer irregularities is about 100 m/s, and under disturbed conditions it is up to 200-250 m/s. Small-scale irregularities of the sporadic E-layer travel mostly in the northward direction. It is confirmed that the Es-layer is characterised by high velocities of the irregularities (as high as 1000 m/s). Medium-scale irregularities with periods in the range of 10-30 min travel mostly in a southward direction with velocities of 20-40 m/s.

  6. Water droplet excess free energy determined by cluster mitosis using guided molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Gabriel V.; Hunt, Patricia A.; Müller, Erich A.; Jackson, George; Ford, Ian J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a vital role in affecting climate by influencing the properties and lifetimes of clouds and precipitation. Understanding the underlying microscopic mechanisms involved in the nucleation of aerosol droplets from the vapour phase is therefore of great interest. One key thermodynamic quantity in nucleation is the excess free energy of cluster formation relative to that of the saturated vapour. In our current study, the excess free energy is extracted for clusters of pure water modelled with the TIP4P/2005 intermolecular potential using a method based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and the Jarzynski relation. The change in free energy associated with the "mitosis" or division of a cluster of N water molecules into two N/2 sub-clusters is evaluated. This methodology is an extension of the disassembly procedure used recently to calculate the excess free energy of argon clusters [H. Y. Tang and I. J. Ford, Phys. Rev. E 91, 023308 (2015)]. Our findings are compared to the corresponding excess free energies obtained from classical nucleation theory (CNT) as well as internally consistent classical theory (ICCT). The values of the excess free energy that we obtain with the mitosis method are consistent with CNT for large cluster sizes but for the smallest clusters, the results tend towards ICCT; for intermediate sized clusters, we obtain values between the ICCT and CNT predictions. Furthermore, the curvature-dependent surface tension which can be obtained by regarding the clusters as spherical droplets of bulk density is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cluster size for the studied range. The data are compared to other values reported in the literature, agreeing qualitatively with some but disagreeing with the values determined by Joswiak et al. [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 4267 (2013)] using a biased mitosis approach; an assessment of the differences is the main motivation for our current study.

  7. Viral and epidemiological determinants of the invasion dynamics of novel dengue genotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Lourenço

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue has become a major concern for international public health. Frequent epidemic outbreaks are believed to be driven by a complex interplay of immunological interactions between its four co-circulating serotypes and large fluctuations in mosquito densities. Viral lineage replacement events, caused for example by different levels of cross-protection or differences in viral fitness, have also been linked to a temporary change in dengue epidemiology. A major replacement event was recently described for South-East Asia where the Asian-1 genotype of dengue serotype 2 replaced the resident Asian/American type. Although this was proposed to be due to increased viral fitness in terms of enhanced human-to-mosquito transmission, no major change in dengue epidemiology could be observed. METHODS/RESULTS: Here we investigate the invasion dynamics of a novel, advantageous dengue genotype within a model system and determine the factors influencing the success and rate of fixation as well as their epidemiological consequences. We find that while viral fitness overall correlates with invasion success and competitive exclusion of the resident genotype, the epidemiological landscape plays a more significant role for successful emergence. Novel genotypes can thus face high risks of stochastic extinction despite their fitness advantage if they get introduced during episodes of high dengue prevalence, especially with respect to that particular serotype. CONCLUSION: The rarity of markers for positive selection has often been explained by strong purifying selection whereby the constraints imposed by dengue's two-host cycle are expected to result in a high rate of deleterious mutations. Our results demonstrate that even highly beneficial mutants are under severe threat of extinction, which would suggest that apart from purifying selection, stochastic effects and genetic drift beyond seasonal bottlenecks are equally important in shaping dengue's viral

  8. Water droplet excess free energy determined by cluster mitosis using guided molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, Gabriel V.; Müller, Erich A.; Jackson, George [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hunt, Patricia A. [Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Ford, Ian J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-28

    Atmospheric aerosols play a vital role in affecting climate by influencing the properties and lifetimes of clouds and precipitation. Understanding the underlying microscopic mechanisms involved in the nucleation of aerosol droplets from the vapour phase is therefore of great interest. One key thermodynamic quantity in nucleation is the excess free energy of cluster formation relative to that of the saturated vapour. In our current study, the excess free energy is extracted for clusters of pure water modelled with the TIP4P/2005 intermolecular potential using a method based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and the Jarzynski relation. The change in free energy associated with the “mitosis” or division of a cluster of N water molecules into two N/2 sub-clusters is evaluated. This methodology is an extension of the disassembly procedure used recently to calculate the excess free energy of argon clusters [H. Y. Tang and I. J. Ford, Phys. Rev. E 91, 023308 (2015)]. Our findings are compared to the corresponding excess free energies obtained from classical nucleation theory (CNT) as well as internally consistent classical theory (ICCT). The values of the excess free energy that we obtain with the mitosis method are consistent with CNT for large cluster sizes but for the smallest clusters, the results tend towards ICCT; for intermediate sized clusters, we obtain values between the ICCT and CNT predictions. Furthermore, the curvature-dependent surface tension which can be obtained by regarding the clusters as spherical droplets of bulk density is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cluster size for the studied range. The data are compared to other values reported in the literature, agreeing qualitatively with some but disagreeing with the values determined by Joswiak et al. [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 4267 (2013)] using a biased mitosis approach; an assessment of the differences is the main motivation for our current study.

  9. Climate warming and agricultural stressors interact to determine stream macroinvertebrate community dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piggott, Jeremy J; Townsend, Colin R; Matthaei, Christoph D

    2015-05-01

    Global climate change is likely to modify the ecological consequences of currently acting stressors, but potentially important interactions between climate warming and land-use related stressors remain largely unknown. Agriculture affects streams and rivers worldwide, including via nutrient enrichment and increased fine sediment input. We manipulated nutrients (simulating agricultural run-off) and deposited fine sediment (simulating agricultural erosion) (two levels each) and water temperature (eight levels, 0-6°C above ambient) simultaneously in 128 streamside mesocosms to determine the individual and combined effects of the three stressors on macroinvertebrate community dynamics (community composition and body size structure of benthic, drift and insect emergence assemblages). All three stressors had pervasive individual effects, but in combination often produced additive or antagonistic outcomes. Changes in benthic community composition showed a complex interplay among habitat quality (with or without sediment), resource availability (with or without nutrient enrichment) and the behavioural/physiological tendency to drift or emerge as temperature rose. The presence of sediment and raised temperature both resulted in a community of smaller organisms. Deposited fine sediment strongly increased the propensity to drift. Stressor effects were most prominent in the benthic assemblage, frequently reflected by opposite patterns in individuals quitting the benthos (in terms of their propensity to drift or emerge). Of particular importance is that community measures of stream health routinely used around the world (taxon richness, EPT richness and diversity) all showed complex three-way interactions, with either a consistently stronger temperature response or a reversal of its direction when one or both agricultural stressors were also in operation. The negative effects of added fine sediment, which were often stronger at raised temperatures, suggest that streams already

  10. Dynamics and molecular determinants of cytoplasmic lipid droplet clustering and dispersion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Orlicky

    Full Text Available Perilipin-1 (Plin1, a prominent cytoplasmic lipid droplet (CLD binding phosphoprotein and key physiological regulator of triglyceride storage and lipolysis in adipocytes, is thought to regulate the fragmentation and dispersion of CLD that occurs in response to β-adrenergic activation of adenylate cyclase. Here we investigate the dynamics and molecular determinants of these processes using cell lines stably expressing recombinant forms of Plin1 and/or other members of the perilipin family. Plin1 and a C-terminal CLD-binding fragment of Plin1 (Plin1CT induced formation of single dense CLD clusters near the microtubule organizing center, whereas neither an N-terminal CLD-binding fragment of Plin1, nor Plin2 or Plin3 induced clustering. Clustered CLD coated by Plin1, or Plin1CT, dispersed in response to isoproterenol, or other agents that activate adenylate cyclase, in a process inhibited by the protein kinase A inhibitor, H89, and blocked by microtubule disruption. Isoproterenol-stimulated phosphorylation of CLD-associated Plin1 on serine 492 preceded their dispersion, and live cell imaging showed that cluster dispersion involved initial fragmentation of tight clusters into multiple smaller clusters, which then fragmented into well-dispersed individual CLD. siRNA knockdown of the cortical actin binding protein, moesin, induced disaggregation of tight clusters into multiple smaller clusters, and inhibited the reaggregation of dispersed CLD into tight clusters. Together these data suggest that the clustering and dispersion processes involve a complex orchestration of phosphorylation-dependent, microtubule-dependent and independent, and microfilament dependent steps.

  11. Hydrogen dynamics in soil organic matter as determined by 13C and 2H labeling experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Alexia; Hatté, Christine; Pastor, Lucie; Thiry, Yves; Siclet, Françoise; Balesdent, Jérôme

    2016-12-01

    Understanding hydrogen dynamics in soil organic matter is important to predict the fate of 3H in terrestrial environments. One way to determine hydrogen fate and to point out processes is to examine the isotopic signature of the element in soil. However, the non-exchangeable hydrogen isotopic signal in soil is complex and depends on the fate of organic compounds and microbial biosyntheses that incorporate water-derived hydrogen. To decipher this complex system and to understand the close link between hydrogen and carbon cycles, we followed labeled hydrogen and labeled carbon throughout near-natural soil incubations. We performed incubation experiments with three labeling conditions: 1 - 13C2H double-labeled molecules in the presence of 1H2O; 2 - 13C-labeled molecules in the presence of 2H2O; 3 - no molecule addition in the presence of 2H2O. The preservation of substrate-derived hydrogen after 1 year of incubation (ca. 5 % in most cases) was lower than the preservation of substrate-derived carbon (30 % in average). We highlighted that 70 % of the C-H bonds are broken during the degradation of the molecule, which permits the exchange with water hydrogen. Added molecules are used more for trophic resources. The isotopic composition of the non-exchangeable hydrogen was mainly driven by the incorporation of water hydrogen during microbial biosynthesis. It is linearly correlated with the amount of carbon that is degraded in the soil. The quantitative incorporation of water hydrogen in bulk material and lipids demonstrates that non-exchangeable hydrogen exists in both organic and mineral-bound forms. The proportion of the latter depends on soil type and minerals. This experiment quantified the processes affecting the isotopic composition of non-exchangeable hydrogen, and the results can be used to predict the fate of tritium in the ecosystem or the water deuterium signature in organic matter.

  12. Mesoscopic Modeling of Blood Clotting: Coagulation Cascade and Platelets Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Alireza; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    The process of clot formation and growth at a site on a blood vessel wall involve a number of multi-scale simultaneous processes including: multiple chemical reactions in the coagulation cascade, species transport and flow. To model these processes we have incorporated advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) of multiple species into an extended version of Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method which is considered as a coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics method. At the continuum level this is equivalent to the Navier-Stokes equation plus one advection-diffusion equation for each specie. The chemistry of clot formation is now understood to be determined by mechanisms involving reactions among many species in dilute solution, where reaction rate constants and species diffusion coefficients in plasma are known. The role of blood particulates, i.e. red cells and platelets, in the clotting process is studied by including them separately and together in the simulations. An agonist-induced platelet activation mechanism is presented, while platelets adhesive dynamics based on a stochastic bond formation/dissociation process is included in the model.

  13. Experimental and Numerical Failure Analysis of Adhesive Composite Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Asgari Mehrabadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the first section of this work, a suitable data reduction scheme is developed to measure the adhesive joints strain energy release rate under pure mode-I loading, and in the second section, three types of adhesive hybrid lap-joints, that is, Aluminum-GFRP (Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastic, GFRP-GFRP, and Steel-GFRP were employed in the determination of adhesive hybrid joints strengths and failures that occur at these assemblies under tension loading. To achieve the aims, Double Cantilever Beam (DCB was used to evaluate the fracture state under the mode-I loading (opening mode and also hybrid lap-joint was employed to investigate the failure load and strength of bonded joints. The finite-element study was carried out to understand the stress intensity factors in DCB test to account fracture toughness using J-integral method as a useful tool for predicting crack failures. In the case of hybrid lap-joint tests, a numerical modeling was also performed to determine the adhesive stress distribution and stress concentrations in the side of lap-joint. Results are discussed in terms of their relationship with adhesively bonded joints and thus can be used to develop appropriate approaches aimed at using adhesive bonding and extending the lives of adhesively bonded repairs for aerospace structures.

  14. Pressure sensitive adhesives from renewable resources

    OpenAIRE

    Maaßen, Wiebke

    2015-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) represent an important segment of the adhesives market. In this work, novel insights into the adhesive performance of bio-based pressure sensitive adhesives are presented. Three different homopolymers based on fatty acids derived from native vegetable oils as renewable feedstock were characterized in terms of their mechanical and adhesive properties.

  15. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, A. R.; Afendi, Mohd; Majid, M. S. Abdul

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding.

  16. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-01

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate.

  17. Adhesion and anti-adhesion of viscous fluids on solid surfaces--a study of ink transfer mechanism in waterless offset printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wei; Mao, Yu; Murray, Gerard; Tian, Junfei

    2008-02-15

    The transfer of a liquid under dynamic conditions onto a solid surface relies on wetting/adhesion under transient external forces. We found the phenomena associated with forced wetting and dewetting could not be explained by thermodynamic approaches which are based on surface energy and work of adhesion. This is because these approaches do not take account of the dynamic nature of the forced wetting and dewetting. This study uses ink transfer in waterless offset printing as an example to present a new understanding of adhesion and anti-adhesion of a liquid to a solid surface under dynamic conditions. We focus on the adhesion strength, instead of work of adhesion, at the ink-plate interface and experimentally quantified ink adhesion forces on the image and non-image areas of the printing plate. Based on adhesion force measurements we proposed that the formation of a weak boundary layer and/or the softening the non-image area due to solvent swelling are likely to be the mechanisms that causes ink refusal on the non-image area. AFM images are presented to show changes of the non-image surface before and after contacting with ink.

  18. Focal Adhesion Induction at the Tip of a Functionalized Nanoelectrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Daniela E; Bae, Chilman; Butler, Peter J

    2011-12-01

    Cells dynamically interact with their physical micro-environment through the assembly of nascent focal contacts and focal adhesions. The dynamics and mechanics of these contact points are controlled by transmembrane integrins and an array of intracellular adaptor proteins. In order to study the mechanics and dynamics of focal adhesion assembly, we have developed a technique for the timed induction of a nascent focal adhesion. Bovine aortic endothelial cells were approached at the apical surface by a nanoelectrode whose position was controlled with a resolution of 10s of nanometers using changes in electrode current to monitor distance from the cell surface. Since this probe was functionalized with fibronectin, a focal contact formed at the contact location. Nascent focal adhesion assembly was confirmed using time-lapse confocal fluorescent images of red fluorescent protein (RFP) - tagged talin, an adapter protein that binds to activated integrins. Binding to the cell was verified by noting a lack of change of electrode current upon retraction of the electrode. This study demonstrates that functionalized nanoelectrodes can enable precisely-timed induction and 3-D mechanical manipulation of focal adhesions and the assay of the detailed molecular kinetics of their assembly.

  19. HPLC法测定镇江橡胶膏中士的宁及马钱子碱的含量%Determination of Strychnine and Brucine in Zhenjiang Adhesive Plaster by HPLC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈清华; 耿秋霞; 汤小伟

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To establish a method for the determination of strychnine and brucine in the Zhenjiang Adhesive Plaster. Methods: The HPLC method was carried out on a column Kromasil-C18 (4.6 mmx250 mm, 5 μm) at the temperature of 30t, the mobile phase was composed of A-B (11 :89) ( A for acetonitrile, B for water-acetic acid-triethylamine (230:2.4:0.3) ), the flow rate was at 1.0 mL·min-1, the UV detection wavelength was at 254 nm. Results: The calibration curves of strychnine and brucine were in good linearities over the ranges of 0.0885~1.327 μg (r =0.9997) and 0.0522-0.782 μg (r =0.9960), respectively, and the average recoveries were 99.6% and 98.2%, respectively. Conclusion: This method is accurate, rapid, reproducible and suitable for the quality control of this preparation.%目的:建立镇江橡胶膏中士的宁及马钱子碱含量测定方法.方法:采用HPLC法,色谱柱为Kromasil-C18 (4.6 mm×250 mm,5μm),流动相为A-B (11:89)[A为乙腈,B由水-冰醋酸-三乙胺(230:2.4:0.3)组成],检测波长254 nm,流速1.0mL·min-1,柱温30C.结果:士的宁、马钱子碱分别在0.0885~1.327 μg(r=0.9997)、0.0522~0.782 μg(r=0.9960)范围内线性关系良好,平均回收率分别为99.6%、98.2%.结论:该方法准确、快速、重现性好,能有效控制本品质量.

  20. Determination of dynamic heights in the Bay of Bengal from XBT profiles and climatological salinities

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ali, M.M.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Araligidad, N.; Reddy, G.V.; Salgaonkar, G.

    Dynamic height (DH) computations are necessary for the estimation of geostrophic currents, heat transport studies, identification of eddies and to validate the altimeter sea surface height (SSH) observations. To compute DHs we need the temperature...

  1. Determining the Role of Dynamic Hyperinflation in Patients with Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klooster, Karin; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; Hartman, Jorine E.; Sciurba, Frank C.; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dynamic hyperinflation due to increased respiratory frequency during exercise is associated with limitations in exercise capacity in patients with moderately severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Objectives: The present study assessed whether the manually paced tachypnea (

  2. ANALYSIS OF METHOD FOR DETERMINING AZIMUTH OF PRINCIPAL AXIS OF INERTIA BASED ON DYNAMIC BALANCE MEASUREMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jun; GUAN Yingzi; QI Naiming

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic balance quality of a rotating object is an important factor to maintain the stability and accuracy for motion. The azimuth of the principal axis of inertia is a major sign of dynamic balance. A usual method is measuring moment of inertia matrix relative to some base coordinates on a rotary inertia machine so as to calculate the azimuth of principal axis of inertia. By using the measured unbalance results on the two trimmed planes on a vertical hard bearing double-plane dynamic balancing machine, the dimension and direction of couple unbalance can be found. An azimuth angle formula for the principal axis of inertia is derived and is solved by using unbalance quantities. The experiments indicate that method based on dynamic balancing measurement is proved rational and effective and has a fine precision.

  3. The effect of piroxicam on the formation of postoperative, intraabdominal adhesion in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maghsoudi Hemmat

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Peritoneal adhesions are fibrous bands of tissues formed between organs that are normally separated and/or between organs and the internal body wall after peritoneal injury. Antiinflammatory agents were used to reduce the initial inflammatory response to tissue injury and, hence, the subsequent formation of adhesion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of intraperitoneal instillation of piroxicam on intraperitoneal adhesions. Methods: Eighty Wistar rats were subjected to standardized lesion by using the scraping model and were randomly divided into four groups. Group I (control received no treatment; groups II, III, and IV received 10-12.5 mL of 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 mg/mL piroxicam solution, respectively, after surgery. On the 14th postoperative day, the adhesion intensity score, inflammatory cell reaction, and the number of adhesion bands were determined. Results: There were no rats with grade 0 adhesions in the control group. There were 10 rats (50% with grade 2 and eight rats (40% with grade 3 adhesions. The adhesion intensity ( P < 0.0001 and the number of adhesion bands ( P < 0.001 were significantly lower in groups III and IV. No significant difference was observed in the adhesion intensity or the number of adhesion bands between groups I and II. Conclusions: Intraperitoneal instillation of piroxicam solution might be useful for preventing peritoneal adhesions.

  4. Cleaning properties of dry adhesives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.; P.; DíAZ; TéLLEZ; D.; SAMEOTO; C.; MENON

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a study into the cleaning properties of synthetic dry adhesives. We have manufactured the adhesive micro-fibres through a low-cost, high yield fabrication method using Sylgard 184 Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as the structural material. We deliberately contaminated the adhesive samples with different sized particles in the micro and macro scales and tested different cleaning methods for their efficacy with respect to each particle size. We investigated different cleaning methods, which included the use of wax moulding, vibration and pressure sensitive adhesives. For adhesion testing we used a custom system with a linear stage and a force sensor indenting a hemispherical probe into the adhesive surface and measuring the pull-off force. To characterize the cleaning efficacy we visually inspected each sample in a microscope and weighed the samples with a microgram-accuracy analytical balance. Results showed that the moulding method induced adhesion recovery in a greater percentage than the other cleaning methods and even helped with the recovery of collapsed posts in some cases. On the other hand pressure sensitive adhesives seem to have the upper hand with regards to certain particle sizes that can potentially pose problems with the moulding method.

  5. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  6. Analysis of dynamic and static filtration and determination of MUD cake parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcada, L.A.; Scheid, C.M.; Araujo, C.A.O. de [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica], e-mail: calcada@ufrrj.br; Waldmann, A.T.A.; Martins, A.L. [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (CENPES/PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    2011-07-15

    Drilling operations around the world employ a concept called overbalance. During this process, it is well known that dynamic and static filtration can occur. Thin filter cakes and low fluid-invasion rates are extremely desirable to promote optimal logging conditions and permeability return. The aim of this work was to compare the different behavior between dynamic and static filtration in drilling wells. To investigate the filtration process of Newtonian suspensions, we built a dynamic and static filtration loop with which we acquired experimental filtration volume data as a function of time. The filtration loop included a tank mixer where a Newtonian aqueous calcium carbonate polydisperse suspension was homogenized. The suspension was pumped through tubes to a dynamic or a static filtration cell. We validated a theoretical model based on Darcy's law and on mass conservation proposed by Ferreira and Massarani (2005). That model predicted mud cake buildup and filtrate flow rate for Newtonian suspensions. Relying on both models and the experimental data, filter cake parameters were calculated. We discuss, based on these parameters, the effects of the filtration configuration in dynamic and static modes. Finally, we generalized Ferreira and Massarani's model (2005) for procedures involving non-Newtonian suspensions. This new model can predict dynamic filtration and fluid invasion for non-Newtonian suspensions as drilling fluids. (author)

  7. Environmental factors that determine the occurrence and seasonal dynamics of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimasa YAMAMOTO

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the seasonal dynamics of two populations of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae Ralfs ex Bornet & Flahault var. flos-aquae and four populations of A. flos-aquae var. klebahnii Elenkin in eutrophic water bodies over 1 year from February 2006 to January 2007. The growth of A. flos-aquae var. flos-aquae was promoted at high temperatures even if in one case the biomass development was very low when other co-occurring cyanoprokaryotes (Anabaena spp. and Microcystis spp. were abundant. In contrast, the highest density of the other population of A. flos-aquae var. flos-aquae was observed in August when the population density of M. aeruginosa (Kützing Kützing reached an annual peak. A. flos-aquae var. flos-aquae usually bloomed in summer but could also tolerate low temperatures in the winter, and was present in relatively high densities. The populations of A. flos-aquae var. klebahnii observed in this study can be divided into three groups based on preferred temperature; three populations increased in winter, and the other increased in summer. Large biomasses of the low-temperature-adapted A. flos-aquae were observed mainly during winter when population densities of co-occurring cyanoprokaryotes (Anabaena spp., Microcystis spp. and Planktothrix raciborskii (Woloszynska Anagnostidis & Komárek were relatively low or almost absent. The increase in or existence of cooccurring cyanoprokaryotes during the summer resulted in a decrease of the A. flos-aquae population density. It was revealed that high temperatures (20-25 °C are suitable for maintaining A. flos-aquae var. klebahnii strains isolated from the study ponds, implying that low-temperature-adapted A. flos-aquae can grow over a wide range of water temperatures. The high-temperatureadapted A. flos-aquae var. klebahnii co-existed with M. aeruginosa during summer; however, its peak population density was significantly lower than those in previous years when M. aeruginosa was absent

  8. Impact of static and dynamic A-form heterogeneity on the determination of RNA global structural dynamics using NMR residual dipolar couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musselman, Catherine [University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, Biophysics Research Division, and Program in Bioinformatics (United States); Pitt, Stephen W. [Johnson and Johnson Inc (United States); Gulati, Kush; Foster, Lesley L.; Andricioaei, Ioan; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M. [University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, Biophysics Research Division, and Program in Bioinformatics (United States)], E-mail: hashimi@umich.edu

    2006-12-15

    We examined how static and dynamic deviations from the idealized A-form helix propagate into errors in the principal order tensor parameters determined using residual dipolar couplings (rdcs). A 20-ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the HIV-1 transactivation response element (TAR) RNA together with a survey of spin relaxation studies of RNA dynamics reveals that pico-to-nanosecond local motions in non-terminal Watson-Crick base-pairs will uniformly attenuate base and sugar one bond rdcs by {approx}7%. Gaussian distributions were generated for base and sugar torsion angles through statistical comparison of 40 RNA X-ray structures solved to <3.0 A resolution. For a typical number ({>=}11) of one bond C-H base and sugar rdcs, these structural deviations together with rdc uncertainty (1.5 Hz) lead to average errors in the magnitude and orientation of the principal axis of order that are <9% and <4 deg., respectively. The errors decrease to <5% and <4 deg. for {>=}17 rdcs. A protocol that allows for estimation of error in A-form order tensors due to both angular deviations and rdc uncertainty (Aform-RDC) is validated using theoretical simulations and used to analyze rdcs measured previously in TAR in the free state and bound to four distinct ligands. Results confirm earlier findings that the two TAR helices undergo large changes in both their mean relative orientation and dynamics upon binding to different targets.

  9. Investigating On-Orbit Attitude Determination Anomalies for the Solar Dynamics Observatory Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vess, Melissa F.; Starin, Scott R.; Chia-Kuo, Alice Liu

    2011-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) was launched on February 11, 2010 from Kennedy Space Center on an Atlas V launch vehicle into a geosynchronous transfer orbit. SDO carries a suite of three scientific instruments, whose observations are intended to promote a more complete understanding of the Sun and its effects on the Earth's environment. After a successful launch, separation, and initial Sun acquisition, the launch and flight operations teams dove into a commissioning campaign that included, among other things, checkout and calibration of the fine attitude sensors and checkout of the Kalman filter (KF) and the spacecraft s inertial pointing and science control modes. In addition, initial calibration of the science instruments was also accomplished. During that process of KF and controller checkout, several interesting observations were noticed and investigated. The SDO fine attitude sensors consist of one Adcole Digital Sun Sensor (DSS), two Galileo Avionica (GA) quaternion-output Star Trackers (STs), and three Kearfott Two-Axis Rate Assemblies (hereafter called inertial reference units, or IRUs). Initial checkout of the fine attitude sensors indicated that all sensors appeared to be functioning properly. Initial calibration maneuvers were planned and executed to update scale factors, drift rate biases, and alignments of the IRUs. After updating the IRU parameters, the KF was initialized and quickly reached convergence. Over the next few hours, it became apparent that there was an oscillation in the sensor residuals and the KF estimation of the IRU bias. A concentrated investigation ensued to determine the cause of the oscillations, their effect on mission requirements, and how to mitigate them. The ensuing analysis determined that the oscillations seen were, in fact, due to an oscillation in the IRU biases. The low frequencies of the oscillations passed through the KF, were well within the controller bandwidth, and therefore the spacecraft was actually

  10. Mobile and immobile adhesion of staphylococcal strains to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, Niels P.; Kaper, Hans J.; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis adheres to hydrophilic glass and hydrophobic dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS)-coated glass in similar numbers, but in different modes. Real-time observation of staphylococcal adhesion under a shear rate of 15 s(-1) revealed different adhesion dynamics on both substrata. The nu

  11. Universal adhesives: the next evolution in adhesive dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Every so often a new material, technique, or technological breakthrough spurs a paradigm shift in the way dentistry is practiced. The development and evolution of reliable enamel and dentin bonding agents is one such example. Indeed, the so-called "cosmetic revolution" in dentistry blossomed in large part due to dramatic advances in adhesive technology. It is the ability to bond various materials in a reasonably predictable fashion to both enamel and dentin substrates that enables dentists to routinely place porcelain veneers, direct and indirect composites, and a plethora of other restorative and esthetic materials. In fact, the longevity and predictability of many (if not most) current restorative procedures is wholly predicated on the dentist's ability to bond various materials to tooth tissues. Adhesive systems have progressed from the largely ineffective systems of the 1970s and early 1980s to the relatively successful total- and self-etching systems of today. The latest players in the adhesive marketplace are the so-called "universal adhesives." In theory, these systems have the potential to significantly simplify and expedite adhesive protocols and may indeed represent the next evolution in adhesive dentistry. But what defines a universal system, and are all these new systems truly "universal" and everything they are claimed to be? This article will examine the origin, chemistry, strengths, weaknesses, and clinical relevance of this new genre of dental adhesives.

  12. A gecko-inspired double-sided adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengzhi; Gu, Ping; Wu, Xiaoping

    2013-12-21

    Geckos' outstanding abilities to adhere to various surfaces are widely credited to the large actual contact areas of the fibrillar and hierarchical structures on their feet. These special features regulate the essential structural compliance for every attachment and thus provide robust yet reversible adhesions. Inspired by gecko's feet and our commonly used double-faced tape, we have successfully fabricated a gecko-inspired double-sided dry adhesive by using porous anodic alumina template assisted nano-wetting on a stiff polymer. It was determined that the obtained 2-sided structure showed largely decreased effective stiffness compared with its 1-sided counterpart, which favored better compliance and interfacial integrity. We also demonstrated that the repeatable double-sided adhesive improved the macroscopic normal and shear adhesion capacities over the widely-studied 1-side structure by ~50% and ~85%, respectively. By using the synthetic double-sided adhesive, the usage of traditional pressure-sensitive/chemical adhesives could be well avoided. Besides, the double-sided nanostructures showed great potential in finding new interesting properties and practical applications for the synthetic dry adhesives.

  13. 笔记本电脑外壳组装用丙烯酸酯结构胶的热压参数确定%Determination of heat-setting parameters of acrylic structural adhesives of laptop shell casing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜美娜; 聂琦思; 黄海江

    2015-01-01

    The acrylic structural adhesives have been wideused in the manufacturing of laptops. We in detail discussed the heat-setting parameters for TS 823-i acrylic adhesive and the effects of the heat-setting temperature, heat-setting time and space between substrates, etc. on the dise pushing force.%丙烯酸酯结构胶在笔记本电脑制造行业有广泛的应用。针对其中热压工艺详细说明和确定了TS823-i的热压参数,并讨论了热压温度、热压时间、间隙等工艺对盘刀推力大小的影响。

  14. Contact solid-phase microextraction with uncoated glass and polydimethylsiloxane-coated fibers versus solvent sampling for the determination of hydrocarbons in adhesion secretions of Madagascar hissing cockroaches Gromphadorrhina portentosa (Blattodea) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Heike; Schmitt, Christian; Betz, Oliver; Albert, Klaus; Lämmerhofer, Michael

    2015-04-03

    Molecular profiles of adhesion secretions of Gromphadorrhina portentosa (Madagascar hissing cockroach, Blattodea) were investigated by gas chromatography mass spectrometry with particular focus on a comprehensive analysis of linear and branched hydrocarbons. For this purpose, secretions from the tarsi (feet), possibly contributing to adhesion on smooth surfaces, and control samples taken from the tibiae (lower legs), which contain general cuticular hydrocarbons that are supposed to be not involved in the biological adhesion function, were analyzed and their molecular fingerprints compared. A major analytical difficulty in such a study constitutes the representative, spatially controlled, precise and reproducible sampling from a living insect as well as the minute quantities of insect secretions on both tarsi and tibiae. Thus, three different in vivo sampling methods were compared in terms of sampling reproducibility and extraction efficiency by replicate measurement of samples from tarsi and tibiae. While contact solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber showed higher peak intensities, a self-made uncoated glass fiber had the best repeatability in contact-SPME sampling. Chromatographic profiles of these two contact-SPME sampling methods were statistically not significantly different. Inter-individual variances were larger than potentially existing minor differences in molecular patterns of distinct sampling methods. Sampling by solvent extraction was time consuming, showed lower sensitivities and was less reproducible. In general, sampling by contact-SPME with a cheap glass fiber turned out to be a viable alternative to PDMS-SPME sampling. Hydrocarbon patterns of the tarsal adhesion secretions were qualitatively similar to those of epicuticular hydrocarbon profiles of the tibiae. However, hydrocarbons were in general less abundant in tarsal secretions than secretions from tibiae.

  15. Obtaining Arbitrary Prescribed Mean Field Dynamics for Recurrently Coupled Networks of Type-I Spiking Neurons with Analytically Determined Weights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilten eNicola

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental question in computational neuroscience is how to connect a network of spiking neurons to produce desired macroscopic or mean field dynamics. One possible approach is through the Neural Engineering Framework (NEF. The NEF approach requires quantities called decoders which are solved through an optimization problem requiring large matrix inversion. Here, we show how a decoder can be obtained analytically for type I and certain type II firing rates as a function of the heterogeneity of its associated neuron. These decoders generate approximants for functions that converge to the desired function in mean-squared error like 1/N, where N is the number of neurons in the network. We refer to these decoders as scale-invariant decoders due to their structure. These decoders generate weights for a network of neurons through the NEF formula for weights. These weights force the spiking network to have arbitrary and prescribed mean field dynamics. The weights generated with scale-invariant decoders all lie on low dimensional hypersurfaces asymptotically. We demonstrate the applicability of these scale-invariant decoders and weight surfaces by constructing networks of spiking theta neurons that replicate the dynamics of various well known dynamical systems such as the neural integrator, Van der Pol system and the Lorenz system. As these decoders are analytically determined and non-unique, the weights are also analytically determined and non-unique. We discuss the implications for measured weights of neuronal networks

  16. Impairment of benthic diatom adhesion and photosynthetic activity by 2E,4E-decadienal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leflaive, Joséphine; Ten-Hage, Loïc

    2011-11-01

    Within biofilms, microorganisms are exposed to a wide range of chemicals released by phototrophic organisms. Those chemicals are likely to influence the dynamics and functioning of biofilms. 2E,4E-decadienal (DD) is a polyunsaturated aldehyde produced by diatoms which is known to induce adverse effects in many aquatic organisms. It has been shown to inhibit the adhesion and motility of one benthic diatom. The aim of this article was to determine if the effects of DD on diatom adhesion were widespread and if it could affect biofilm formation and functioning. The adhesion of 5 of 10 benthic diatom strains was strongly inhibited at 2.5 μg ml(-1) DD. This indicates a high variability in diatom sensitivity to DD. Several experiments in microcosms showed that the presence of DD diffusing from a substrate decreased biofilm formation. This effect was dose-dependent and persisted for 72 h, though the molecule is highly volatile. Using a PHYTO-PAM fluorometer, we also showed that the effective quantum efficiency of charge separation of PSII of biofilms exposed to DD was negatively affected. This indicates a decrease in the efficiency of the photochemical processes. All these results suggest that the presence of DD-producing strains may have a significant impact on the composition and physiology of biofilms.

  17. Bacterial monitoring with adhesive sheet in the international space station-"Kibo", the Japanese experiment module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichijo, Tomoaki; Hieda, Hatsuki; Ishihara, Rie; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Nasu, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Microbiological monitoring is important to assure microbiological safety, especially in long-duration space habitation. We have been continuously monitoring the abundance and diversity of bacteria in the International Space Station (ISS)-"Kibo" module to accumulate knowledge on microbes in the ISS. In this study, we used a new sampling device, a microbe-collecting adhesive sheet developed in our laboratory. This adhesive sheet has high operability, needs no water for sampling, and is easy to transport and store. We first validated the adhesive sheet as a sampling device to be used in a space habitat with regard to the stability of the bacterial number on the sheet during prolonged storage of up to 12 months. Bacterial abundance on the surfaces in Kibo was then determined and was lower than on the surfaces in our laboratory (10(5) cells [cm(2)](-1)), except for the return air grill, and the bacteria detected in Kibo were human skin microflora. From these aspects of microbial abundance and their phylogenetic affiliation, we concluded that Kibo has been microbiologically well maintained; however, microbial abundance may increase with the prolonged stay of astronauts. To ensure crew safety and understand bacterial dynamics in space habitation environments, continuous bacterial monitoring in Kibo is required.

  18. Role of attractive forces in determining the equilibrium structure and dynamics of simple liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2015-01-01

    condensed fluids, even the attractive forces outside the FCS play a role. The changes in the distribution caused by neglecting the attractive forces, lead to a too high pressure. The weak long-range attractions damp the dynamics and the diffusion of the particles in gas-, super critical fluid- and in liquid......Molecular Dynamics simulations of a Lennard-Jones system with different range of attraction show that the attractive forces modify the radial distribution of the particles. For condensed liquids only, the forces within the the first coordination shell (FCS) are important, but for gases and moderate...

  19. DETERMINATION OF FRICTION PERFORMANCE INFLUENCE IN THE SYSTEM "BODY–BOGIE" ON THE FREIGHT CAR DYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Myamlin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The main requirements for the design of a new generation of cars, according to the Program of rolling stock renovation, are the requirements reducing the operating costs and increasing the cost-effectiveness of their use, taking into account the achievements of scientific and technical thought. Due to the urgency of this subject the paper is devoted to the study of the friction coefficient influence in the bearing connection «center plate – center bowl – bearers»of freight cars on their main dynamic parameters – coefficients of horizontal and vertical dynamics, body acceleration, frame strength, derailment stability factor. Methodology. The study was conducted by numerical integration and mathematical modeling of the freight car dynamic loading using the software package «Dynamics of Rail Vehicles» («DYNRAIL». Findings. Investigations have shown that the safety movement parameters are influenced by both the friction parameters in bearing connection «center plate – center bowl – bearers» of freight cars in empty and loaded state with bogies TSNII-X3 (model 18-100. Effect have other components of freight car dynamics, namely: radii of curved track sections, height of outer rail, etc. Originality. The author investigated the friction influence on the car dynamic loading using new approaches to solving the problem of predicting the rolling stock dynamics. Prediction was carried out on the basis of significantly updated theoretical material that covers all history of the friction theory and includes the results of recent experimental studies because of the speed on the straights and curves of small-and medium-range sections of the road.Practical value. The obtained results have practical orientation. During the research and after modeling with the improved method of accounting of friction processes dependencies of main dynamic parameters of a four-freight gondola on the value of the friction coefficient in the "body

  20. Physics of adhesion and elasticity of biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, S. A.

    2006-03-01

    Forces exerted by adherent cells are important for many physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue formation. By pulling on their environment, cells sense rigidity gradients, boundaries and strains induced by the presence of other cells. Many cell types respond to these signals by actively adjusting the magnitude and direction of the adhesions that connect cells to surfaces or to each other. These adhesions are formed from membrane-bound integrin proteins and other cytoplasmic proteins that form condensed domains that grow in the direction of externally applied or internal, cytoskeletal forces. We present a model for the adsorption of adhesion proteins from the cell interior to the adhesion site and the resulting, force-sensitive anisotropic growth. The theory couples the mechanical forces to the non- linear adsorption dynamics and predicts the growth velocities of the back and front of the adhesion in qualitative agreement with experiment. The adhesion forces generated by a collection of cells in a tissue significantly alter the overall elastic response of the system. We model an ensemble of cells by an extension of the treatment of dielectric response of polar molecules to elastic interactions. By introducing the elastic analogy of the dielectric constant of the medium, we are able to predict the average cell polarization, their orientational order, and the effective material constants.

  1. Adhesive joint and composites modeling in SIERRA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Yuki; Brown, Arthur A.; Hammerand, Daniel Carl; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Chambers, Robert S.; Foulk, James W., III (.,; )

    2005-11-01

    Polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites play an important role in many Defense Program applications. Recently an advanced nonlinear viscoelastic model for polymers has been developed and incorporated into ADAGIO, Sandia's SIERRA-based quasi-static analysis code. Standard linear elastic shell and continuum models for fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composites have also been added to ADAGIO. This report details the use of these models for advanced adhesive joint and composites simulations carried out as part of an Advanced Simulation and Computing Advanced Deployment (ASC AD) project. More specifically, the thermo-mechanical response of an adhesive joint when loaded during repeated thermal cycling is simulated, the response of some composite rings under internal pressurization is calculated, and the performance of a composite container subjected to internal pressurization, thermal loading, and distributed mechanical loading is determined. Finally, general comparisons between the continuum and shell element approaches for modeling composites using ADAGIO are given.

  2. Transient torque determination in controlled drives. Contribution to the development of an equipment for dynamic operation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bargallo, R.; Llaverias, J.; Martin, H. [Dept. Electrotecnia, Barcelona (Spain)

    2000-08-01

    After the work developed on parameter determination of saturated induction machines, now it is considered the estimation of not measurable variables such as flux and electromagnetic torque. Flux recursive estimation including parameter determination of saturated systems, leads to a torque observer that allows its evaluation. Torque measurement in dynamic operation is difficult and expensive. Here it is presented the implementation of an equipment for drive testing, which allows to generate arbitrary torque variations on the shaft of the driven machine, and also to measure and calculate electromechanical or load torques, by means of state observers. This work represents a previous step to the obtainment of an instant torque measurer-calibrator system. (orig.)

  3. Determination of total selenium and Se-77 in isotopically enriched human samples by ICP-dynamic reaction cell-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Jens Jørgen; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Bügel, Susanne H.;

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes an analytical method for the simultaneous quantitative determination of total selenium (Se) and Se-77 in isotopically enriched human plasma, urine and faeces by inductively coupled plasma- dynamic reaction cell- mass spectrometry ( ICP- DRC- MS). The samples originated from...... and the digested faecal samples were diluted using an aqueous diluent containing 0.5% Triton X-100, 2% nitric acid and 3% methanol. Selenium was detected as Se-76, Se-77 and Se-80 by ICP- DRC- MS. Selenium originating from the natural isotope abundance yeast and other selenium sources from the diet was determined...

  4. Shearing Nanometer-Thick Confined Hydrocarbon Films: Friction and Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, I. M.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2016-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics (MD) friction and adhesion calculations for nanometer-thick confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths 20, 100 and 1400 carbon atoms. We study the dependency of the frictional shear stress on the confining pressure and sliding speed. We present results...

  5. Humidity Dependence of Adhesion for Silane Coated Microcantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; MAYER,THOMAS M.; CARPICK,ROBERT W.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.; SRINIVASAN,U.; MABOUDIAN,R.

    1999-11-09

    This study examines adhesion between silane-coated micromachined surfaces that are exposed to humid conditions. Our quantitative values for interfacial adhesion energies are determined from an in-situ optical measurement of deformations in partly-adhered cantilever beams. We coated micromachined cantilevers with either ODTS (C{sub 18}H{sub 37}SiCl{sub 3}) or FDTS (C{sub 8}F{sub 17}C{sub 2}H{sub 4}SiCl{sub 3}) with the objective of creating hydrophobic surfaces whose adhesion would be independent of humidity. In both cases, the adhesion energy is significantly lower than for uncoated, hydrophilic surfaces. For relative humidities (RH) less than 95% (ODTS) and 80% (FDTS) the adhesion energy was extremely low and constant. In fact, ODTS-coated beams exposed to saturated humidity conditions and long (48 hour) exposures showed only a factor of two increase in adhesion energy. Surprisingly, FDTS coated beams, which initially have a higher contact angle (115{degree}) with water than do ODTS coated beams (112{degree}), proved to be much more sensitive to humidity. The FDTS coated surfaces showed a factor of one hundred increase in adhesion energy after a seven hour exposure to 90% RH. Atomic force microscopy revealed agglomerated coating material after exposed to high RH, suggesting a redistribution of the monolayer film. This agglomeration was more prominent for FDTS than ODTS. These findings suggest a new mechanism for uptake of moisture under high humidity conditions. At high humidities, the silane coatings can reconfigure from a surface to a bulk phase leaving behind locally hydrophilic sites which increase the average measured adhesion energy. In order for the adhesion increase to be observed, a significant fraction of the monolayer must be converted from the surface to the bulk phase.

  6. Relationship between the adhesive properties of bacteria and their transport and colonization in the subsurface environment. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, M.

    1997-03-13

    The adhesion of bacteria to sediment particle or rock surfaces considerably effects their transport in subsurface environments. This research focuses on the macromolecular properties of bacteria that determine their adhesiveness and on the significance of adhesion in transport of subsurface bacteria. Specific objectives include (1) to obtain adhesion mutants of subsurface Pseudomonas species altered in surface adhesives; (2) to determine alterations in adhesives in selected mutants; (3) to evaluate the effect of adhesiveness on transport and long-term distribution and colonization of bacteria in porous media. Primary methods will be tranposon mutagenesis to generate adhesion mutants, biochemical analyses of cell surface polymers, and the use of laboratory columns containing subsurface materials to study the distribution and transport of bacteria along flow paths over time.

  7. Fractal dimensions of soy protein nanoparticle aggregates determined by dynamic mechanical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fractal dimension of the protein aggregates can be estimated by dynamic mechanical methods when the particle aggregates are imbedded in a polymer matrix. Nanocomposites were formed by mixing hydrolyzed soy protein isolate (HSPI) nanoparticle aggregates with styrene-butadiene (SB) latex, followe...

  8. Nascent chromatin capture proteomics determines chromatin dynamics during DNA replication and identifies unknown fork components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Lee, Sung-Po

    2014-01-01

    To maintain genome function and stability, DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin must be duplicated during cell division. Understanding how entire chromosomes are copied remains a major challenge. Here, we use nascent chromatin capture (NCC) to profile chromatin proteome dynamics durin...

  9. GABA[subscript A] Receptors Determine the Temporal Dynamics of Memory Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Gavan P.; Augustyn, Katarzyna A.; Richardson, Rick

    2008-01-01

    Four experiments studied the role of GABA[subscript A] receptors in the temporal dynamics of memory retention. Memory for an active avoidance response was a nonmonotonic function of the retention interval. When rats were tested shortly (2 min) or some time (24 h) after training, retention was excellent, but when they were tested at intermediate…

  10. Telomeric overhang length determines structural dynamics and accessibility to telomerase and ALT associated proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Helen; Kreig, Alex; Calvert, Jacob; Lormand, Justin; Kwon, Yongho; Daley, James M.; Sung, Patrick; Opresko, Patricia L.; Myong, Sua

    2014-01-01

    The G-rich single stranded DNA at the 3′ end of human telomeres can self-fold into G-quaduplex (GQ). However, telomere lengthening by telomerase or the recombination-based alternative lengthening of telomere (ALT) mechanism requires protein loading on the overhang. Using single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy we discovered that lengthening the telomeric overhang also increased the rate of dynamic exchanges between structural conformations. Overhangs with five to seven TTAGGG repeats, compared to four repeats, showed much greater dynamics and accessibility to telomerase binding and activity, and loading of the ALT-associated proteins RAD51, WRN and BLM. Although the eight repeats are highly dynamic, they can fold into two GQs, which limited protein accessibility. In contrast, the telomere-specific protein, POT1 is unique in that it binds independently of repeat number. Our results suggest that the telomeric overhang length and dynamics may contribute to the regulation of telomere extension via telomerase action and the ALT mechanism. PMID:24836024

  11. Photo-dynamical mass determination of the multi-planetary system K2-19

    CERN Document Server

    Barros, S C C; Demangeon, O; Tsantaki, M; Santerne, A; Armstrong, D J; Barrado, D; Brown, D; Deleuil, M; Lillo-Box, J; Osborn, H; Pollacco, D; Abe, L; Andre, P; Bendjoya, P; Boisse, I; Bonomo, A S; Bouchy, F; Bruno, G; Cerda, J Rey; Courcol, B; Díaz, R F; Hébrard, G; Kirk, J; Lachurié, J C; Lam, K W F; Martinez, P; McCormac, J; Moutou, C; Rajpurohit, A; Rivet, J -P; Spake, J; Suarez, O; Toublanc, D; Walker, S R

    2015-01-01

    K2-19 is the second multi-planetary system discovered with K2 observations. The system is composed of two Neptune size planets close to the 3:2 mean-motion resonance. To better characterise the system we obtained two additional transit observations of K2-19b and five additional radial velocity observations. These were combined with K2 data and fitted simultaneously with the system dynamics (photo-dynamical model) which increases the precision of the transit time measurements. The higher transit time precision allows us to detect the chopping signal of the dynamic interaction of the planets that in turn permits to uniquely characterise the system. Although the reflex motion of the star was not detected, dynamic modelling of the system allowed us to derive planetary masses of $M_b= 44 \\pm 12\\, M_{\\oplus}$ and $M_c = 15.9 \\pm 7.0\\, M_{\\oplus}$ for the inner and the outer planets respectively, leading to densities close to Uranus. We also show that our method allows the derivation of mass ratios using only the 80...

  12. Focal adhesion kinases in adhesion structures and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleniste, Pierre P; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases.

  13. TANNIN ADHESIVES AS AN ALTENATIVE TO THE SYNTHETIC PHENOLIC ADHESIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Çolak

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, increasing attention has been paid industrially to the use of tannin formaldehyde adhesives in production of wood based panel products such as particleboard, fiber board and plywood. The researches on the use of tannin extracts as a wood adhesive started in 1950, however, they proceeded very slowly since the problems associated with the application of them. The idea which tannin extract can be used replace the oil-based phenolic adhesive was the base of several studies after the oil crisis of the 1970s. In the past, the economical aspects were important in the researches on the tannin-based adhesives. Nowadays, however, both economical and ecological factors should have taken into consideration in wood bonding.

  14. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre P. Eleniste

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases.

  15. feedback between population and evolutionary dynamics determines the fate of social microbial populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Sanchez

    Full Text Available The evolutionary spread of cheater strategies can destabilize populations engaging in social cooperative behaviors, thus demonstrating that evolutionary changes can have profound implications for population dynamics. At the same time, the relative fitness of cooperative traits often depends upon population density, thus leading to the potential for bi-directional coupling between population density and the evolution of a cooperative trait. Despite the potential importance of these eco-evolutionary feedback loops in social species, they have not yet been demonstrated experimentally and their ecological implications are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the presence of a strong feedback loop between population dynamics and the evolutionary dynamics of a social microbial gene, SUC2, in laboratory yeast populations whose cooperative growth is mediated by the SUC2 gene. We directly visualize eco-evolutionary trajectories of hundreds of populations over 50-100 generations, allowing us to characterize the phase space describing the interplay of evolution and ecology in this system. Small populations collapse despite continual evolution towards increased cooperative allele frequencies; large populations with a sufficient number of cooperators "spiral" to a stable state of coexistence between cooperator and cheater strategies. The presence of cheaters does not significantly affect the equilibrium population density, but it does reduce the resilience of the population as well as its ability to adapt to a rapidly deteriorating environment. Our results demonstrate the potential ecological importance of coupling between evolutionary dynamics and the population dynamics of cooperatively growing organisms, particularly in microbes. Our study suggests that this interaction may need to be considered in order to explain intraspecific variability in cooperative behaviors, and also that this feedback between evolution and ecology can critically affect the

  16. feedback between population and evolutionary dynamics determines the fate of social microbial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Alvaro; Gore, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary spread of cheater strategies can destabilize populations engaging in social cooperative behaviors, thus demonstrating that evolutionary changes can have profound implications for population dynamics. At the same time, the relative fitness of cooperative traits often depends upon population density, thus leading to the potential for bi-directional coupling between population density and the evolution of a cooperative trait. Despite the potential importance of these eco-evolutionary feedback loops in social species, they have not yet been demonstrated experimentally and their ecological implications are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the presence of a strong feedback loop between population dynamics and the evolutionary dynamics of a social microbial gene, SUC2, in laboratory yeast populations whose cooperative growth is mediated by the SUC2 gene. We directly visualize eco-evolutionary trajectories of hundreds of populations over 50-100 generations, allowing us to characterize the phase space describing the interplay of evolution and ecology in this system. Small populations collapse despite continual evolution towards increased cooperative allele frequencies; large populations with a sufficient number of cooperators "spiral" to a stable state of coexistence between cooperator and cheater strategies. The presence of cheaters does not significantly affect the equilibrium population density, but it does reduce the resilience of the population as well as its ability to adapt to a rapidly deteriorating environment. Our results demonstrate the potential ecological importance of coupling between evolutionary dynamics and the population dynamics of cooperatively growing organisms, particularly in microbes. Our study suggests that this interaction may need to be considered in order to explain intraspecific variability in cooperative behaviors, and also that this feedback between evolution and ecology can critically affect the demographic fate of

  17. Determination of Dynamic Flexural Tensile Strength of Thermally Treated Laurentian Granite Using Semi-Circular Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tubing; Wang, Pin; Li, Xibing; Wu, Bangbiao; Tao, Ming; Shu, Ronghua

    2016-10-01

    To understand the effects of increasing temperature and loading rate on the flexural tensile strength of Laurentian granite, dynamic flexural tensile strength experiments were carried out by means of a semi-circular bend specimen with a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar system. The tests were performed at different loading rates, specimens were treated from room temperature up to 850 °C, and a high-speed camera was utilized to monitor the failure process of the specimen. For samples in the same temperature group, a loading rate dependence of the flexural tensile strength was observed; it increased consistently with the increase of loading rate. Temperature effects on rock mechanical properties were investigated from the microscopic viewpoint, and the dynamic flexural tensile strength decreased with the treatment temperature. A formula relating dynamic flexural tensile strength to loading rate and temperature is presented to quantify the results. It was found that the change regulation of the dynamic flexural tensile strength of rock is very similar to that of its crack growth along with the increase of loading rate, which indicates that the essence of rock failure is the initiation and propagation of the internal cracks. Compared with our earlier work on dynamic tensile tests using the Brazilian test, it was observed that the flexural tensile strength is higher than the tensile strength. Non-local failure theory can be adopted to explain this discrepancy at low temperature conditions, but it is no longer effective at high temperatures. Under high loading rates, rock failure is initiated at the centre of the half circular disc, and finally it is separated completely into two equal parts.

  18. Photovoltaic module with adhesion promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Grace

    2013-10-08

    Photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters and methods for fabricating photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters are described. A photovoltaic module includes a solar cell including a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a plurality of interspaced back-side contacts. A first glass layer is coupled to the first surface by a first encapsulating layer. A second glass layer is coupled to the second surface by a second encapsulating layer. At least a portion of the second encapsulating layer is bonded directly to the plurality of interspaced back-side contacts by an adhesion promoter.

  19. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Susan; Wang, Donghai; Zhong, Zhikai; Yang, Guang

    2008-08-26

    The, present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  20. Ultrastructural and Histochemical Characterization of the Zebra Mussel Adhesive Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsad, Nikrooz

    Since their accidental introduction into the Great Lakes in mid- to late-1980s, the freshwater zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, have colonized most lakes and waterways across eastern North America. Their rapid spread is partly attributed to their ability to tenaciously attach to hard substrates via an adhesive apparatus called the byssus, resulting in serious environmental and economic impacts. A detailed ultrastructural study of the byssus revealed a 10 nm adhesive layer at the attachment interface. Distributions of the main adhesive amino acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), and its oxidizing (cross-linking) enzyme, catechol oxidase, were determined histochemically. It was found that, upon aging, DOPA levels remained high in the portion of the byssus closest to the interface, consistent with an adhesive role. In contrast, reduced levels of DOPA corresponded well with high levels of catechol oxidase in the load-bearing component of the byssus, presumably forming cross-links and increasing the cohesive strength.

  1. Moisture contamination detection in adhesive bond using embedded FBG sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieloszyk, Magdalena; Ostachowicz, Wiesław

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents an application of embedded fibre Bragg grating (FBG) sensors for moisture contamination detection in an adhesive bond between two composite elements. FBG sensors are a great tool to Structural Health Monitoring of composite structures due to their high corrosion resistance as well as their small size and weight. Adhesive bonds are very popular in many industrial branches. One of the major problem limits the use of an adhesive joints is they sensitivity on water form ambient. Even the 1% of moisture affects an adhesive bond layer strength. FBG sensors can be use for detection of even a small amount of moisture concentration (1-3% of sample weight). It can be also used for determination of moisture concentration changes during both soaking and drying processes.

  2. Adhesion between coating layers based on epoxy and silicone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jacob R.; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Kiil, Søren

    2007-01-01

    The adhesion between a silicon tie-coat and epoxy primers, used in marine coating systems, has been studied in this work. Six epoxy coatings (with varying chain lengths of the epoxy resins), some of which have shown problems with adhesion to the tie-coat during service life, have been considered....... The experimental investigation includes measurements of the surface tension of the tie-coat and the critical surface tensions of the epoxies, topographic investigation of the surfaces of cured epoxy coatings via atomic force microscopy (AFM), and pull-off tests for investigating the strength of adhesion...... to the silicon/epoxy systems. Calculations for determining the roughness factor of the six epoxy coatings (based on the AFM topographies) and the theoretical work of adhesion have been carried out. The coating surfaces are also characterized based on the van Oss-Good theory. Previous studies on the modulus...

  3. Timescales and Frequencies of Reversible and Irreversible Adhesion Events of Single Bacterial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Michelle D; Zucker, Lauren I; Brown, Pamela J B; Kysela, David T; Brun, Yves V; Jacobson, Stephen C

    2015-12-15

    In the environment, most bacteria form surface-attached cell communities called biofilms. The attachment of single cells to surfaces involves an initial reversible stage typically mediated by surface structures such as flagella and pili, followed by a permanent adhesion stage usually mediated by polysaccharide adhesives. Here, we determine the absolute and relative timescales and frequencies of reversible and irreversible adhesion of single cells of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus to a glass surface in a microfluidic device. We used fluorescence microscopy of C. crescentus expressing green fluorescent protein to track the swimming behavior of individual cells prior to adhesion, monitor the cell at the surface, and determine whether the cell reversibly or irreversibly adhered to the surface. A fluorescently labeled lectin that binds specifically to polar polysaccharides, termed holdfast, discriminated irreversible adhesion events from reversible adhesion events where no holdfast formed. In wild-type cells, the holdfast production time for irreversible adhesion events initiated by surface contact (23 s) was 30-times faster than the holdfast production time that occurs through developmental regulation (13 min). Irreversible adhesion events in wild-type cells (3.3 events/min) are 15-times more frequent than in pilus-minus mutant cells (0.2 events/min), indicating the pili are critical structures in the transition from reversible to irreversible surface-stimulated adhesion. In reversible adhesion events, the dwell time of cells at the surface before departing was the same for wild-type cells (12 s) and pilus-minus mutant cells (13 s), suggesting the pili do not play a significant role in reversible adhesion. Moreover, reversible adhesion events in wild-type cells (6.8 events/min) occur twice as frequently as irreversible adhesion events (3.3 events/min), demonstrating that most cells contact the surface multiple times before transitioning from reversible to

  4. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organiza...

  5. Biomimetic emulsions reveal the effect of homeostatic pressure on cell-cell adhesion

    CERN Document Server

    Pontani, Lea-Laetitia; Viasnoff, Virgile; Brujic, Jasna

    2012-01-01

    Cell-cell contacts in tissues are continuously subject to mechanical forces due to homeostatic pressure and active cytoskeleton dynamics. While much is known about the molecular pathways of adhesion, the role of mechanics is less well understood. To isolate the role of pressure we present a dense packing of functionalized emulsion droplets in which surface interactions are tuned to mimic those of real cells. By visualizing the microstructure in 3D we find that a threshold compression force is necessary to overcome electrostatic repulsion and surface elasticity and establish protein-mediated adhesion. Varying the droplet interaction potential maps out a phase diagram for adhesion as a function of force and salt concentration. Remarkably, fitting the data with our theoretical model predicts binder concentrations in the adhesion areas that are similar to those found in real cells. Moreover, we quantify the adhesion size dependence on the applied force and thus reveal adhesion strengthening with increasing homeos...

  6. Evaluation of adhesive bond Young's modulus during crosslinking using a mechanical method and an ultrasound method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascaro, B.; Budzik, M. K.; Castaings, M.; Jumel, J.; Shanahan, M. E. R.

    2012-03-01

    The strength and stability of adhesive bonded structures are related to polymer curing, when crosslinking occurs and leads to adhesive strength, stiffness and durability. Depending on the resin and curing agent used, cure time can vary from minutes to weeks. Methods based on dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) or calorimetric techniques (DSC, DTA) are valuable for evaluating mechanical properties of adhesives, but are devoted specifically to the polymers alone, and not in situ in adhesive bonds. In this contribution, we have monitored - during crosslinking - the Young's modulus of a slow-curing DGEBA - PAMAM adhesive system, with two non-destructive, in situ, methods used for the characterisation of the adhesive in a bonded system. The first method is based on measurements obtained from strain gauges mounted on one bonded adherend. The second method uses an ultrasound technique based on the through-transmission. Both methods suggest the same curing kinetics.

  7. Cell membrane topology analysis by RICM enables marker-free adhesion strength quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Katharina; Rommel, Christina E; Hirschfeld-Warneken, Vera C; Spatz, Joachim P

    2013-12-01

    Reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) allows the visualization of the cell's adhesion topology on substrates. Here it is applied as a new label-free method to measure adhesion forces between tumor cells and their substrate without any external manipulation, i.e., the application of force or adjustments in the substrate elasticity. Malignant cancer transformation is closely associated with the down-regulation of adhesion proteins and the consequent reduction of adhesion forces. By analyzing the size and distribution of adhesion patches from a benign and a malignant human pancreatic tumor cell line, we established a model for calculating the adhesion strength based on RICM images. Further, we could show that the cell's spread area does not necessarily scale with adhesion strength. Despite the larger projected cell area of the malignant cell line, adhesion strength was clearly reduced. This underscores the importance of adhesion patch analysis. The calculated force values were verified by microfluidic detachment assays. Static and dynamic RICM measurements produce numerous adhesion-related parameters from which characteristic cell signatures can be derived. Such a cellular fingerprint can refine the process of categorizing cell lines according to their grade of differentiation.

  8. AFM measurements of adhesive forces between carbonaceous particles and the substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tianqi [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Peng, Wei, E-mail: pengwei@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Shen, Ke [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu, Suyuan, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Educations, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Adhesive force of spherical carbonaceous particle MCMBs and HTR-10 graphite matrix debris were measured for the first time. • The measured equivalent works of adhesion were much smaller than the ideal values. • The shape factor and the particle morphology reduce the adhesive force. • The adhesion effect does not change directly with the asperity size. - Abstract: Graphite dust is carbonaceous particles generated during operation of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTR). Graphite dust resuspension is the key behavior associated with HTR source term analyses and environmental safety assessment. The adhesive force is the key factor that determines the resuspension rate. The present study used an atomic force microscope (AFM) to measure the adhesive force between a single carbonaceous particle and the substrate. The measurements were performed on mica, graphite IG110 and Inconel 800H. The prepared “probe cantilevers” were mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB), fuel element debris from HTR-10 and graphite NBG18. The equivalent work of adhesion was derived from the measured adhesive force and calculated based on substrate profile approximation and the JKR theoretical model. The measured work was smaller than the ideal work of adhesion, most likely due to the rough particle morphology and the rough substrate surface. Additionally, a shape factor imposes a constraint on the lateral deformation of the particles. Furthermore, surface roughness could reduce the adhesive force some depending on the particle size. Once the particle was too small to be trapped into a trough, the adhesive force would not be further reduced.

  9. Bloodstain Pattern Analysis: implementation of a fluid dynamic model for position determination of victims

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Laan; K.G. de Bruin; D. Slenter; J. Wilhelm; M. Jermy; D. Bonn

    2015-01-01

    Bloodstain Pattern Analysis is a forensic discipline in which, among others, the position of victims can be determined at crime scenes on which blood has been shed. To determine where the blood source was investigators use a straight-line approximation for the trajectory, ignoring effects of gravity

  10. Determination of fault operation dynamical constraints for the design of wind turbine DFIG drives

    CERN Document Server

    Aguglia, Davide; Wamkeue, René; Cros, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient design tool for the estimation of the transient electromagnetic peak torque and transient rotor over-voltages of wind turbines (WT) doubly-fed induction generators (DFIG) during severe fault conditions on the grid side. This versatile and robust tool is well adapted to the implementation in a DFIG drives CAD environment using iterative optimization procedures. In such an application, it is used to compute the dynamical constraints function during the integrated design process of the whole drive including the generator, the gearbox and the power converters. Results show that it is necessary to take into account the dynamical constraints under fault operation, during the early steps of the system design process. Another application of the tool is also illustrated in the paper: the design of the protection system (i.e. the crowbar resistance) for a given generator, a given gearbox and a given power converter.

  11. LDA and molecular dynamics determination of Ag deposition onto (1 0 0) surfaces in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzone, A.M

    2003-03-20

    This study analyzes the effects of the surface morphology on the deposition of Ag onto Si using LDA and isothermal molecular dynamics. The (1 0 0) silicon surface has either a bulk termination or the dimerization pattern experimentally observed. Small clusters representing a section of these surfaces have been used in LDA calculations to find preferred adsorption sites. Isothermal molecular dynamics describe the motions of the diffusing adatoms in a temperature range from T=10 to 1000 K. Both calculations indicate that Ag and Si do not mix and the deposited structure is formed by linear chains located in the trench between surface atoms. However, MD calculations show that, due to the relaxation of the surface and to thermal lattice vibrations, the stable state of the deposited atoms may considerably differ from the one calculated from LDA. This result has both a practical and a methodological significance.

  12. Topological determinants of self-sustained activity in a simple model of excitable dynamics on graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fretter, Christoph; Lesne, Annick; Hilgetag, Claus C.; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2017-02-01

    Simple models of excitable dynamics on graphs are an efficient framework for studying the interplay between network topology and dynamics. This topic is of practical relevance to diverse fields, ranging from neuroscience to engineering. Here we analyze how a single excitation propagates through a random network as a function of the excitation threshold, that is, the relative amount of activity in the neighborhood required for the excitation of a node. We observe that two sharp transitions delineate a region of sustained activity. Using analytical considerations and numerical simulation, we show that these transitions originate from the presence of barriers to propagation and the excitation of topological cycles, respectively, and can be predicted from the network topology. Our findings are interpreted in the context of network reverberations and self-sustained activity in neural systems, which is a question of long-standing interest in computational neuroscience.

  13. Determination of the Preferred Structure, Dynamics, and Planarity of Substituted Anhydrides by Cp-Ftmw

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Timothy J.; Bailey, Josiah R.; Bird, Ryan G.; Pratt, David

    2016-06-01

    The planarity of five-membered rings is derived from a competition between ring-angle strain and stability of the torsional angles. The planar form maximizes the already stressed, smaller-than-normal, C-C bond angles, while puckering reduces the unfavorable eclipsed interactions. The structure, dynamics, and planarity of three anhydrides, succinic, methylsuccinic, and methylene (itaconic) anhydride, were studied and compared using chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy.

  14. Slow wave propagation in soft adhesive interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan K; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2016-11-16

    Stick-slip in sliding of soft adhesive surfaces has long been associated with the propagation of Schallamach waves, a type of slow surface wave. Recently it was demonstrated using in situ experiments that two other kinds of slow waves-separation pulses and slip pulses-also mediate stick-slip (Viswanathan et al., Soft Matter, 2016, 12, 5265-5275). While separation pulses, like Schallamach waves, involve local interface detachment, slip pulses are moving stress fronts with no detachment. Here, we present a theoretical analysis of the propagation of these three waves in a linear elastodynamics framework. Different boundary conditions apply depending on whether or not local interface detachment occurs. It is shown that the interface dynamics accompanying slow waves is governed by a system of integral equations. Closed-form analytical expressions are obtained for the interfacial pressure, shear stress, displacements and velocities. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves emerge naturally as wave solutions of the integral equations, with oppositely oriented directions of propagation. Wave propagation is found to be stable in the stress regime where linearized elasticity is a physically valid approximation. Interestingly, the analysis reveals that slow traveling wave solutions are not possible in a Coulomb friction framework for slip pulses. The theory provides a unified picture of stick-slip dynamics and slow wave propagation in adhesive contacts, consistent with experimental observations.

  15. Regulative mechanisms of chondrocyte adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Fehrenbach, Miriam;

    2006-01-01

    -matrix interaction, as well as collagen type II expression in the cartilage graft after two weeks of in vitro cultivation. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) treated chondrocytes showed increased adhesion to collagen types I and II, fibronectin, and fibrinogen. Attachment to these investigated proteins......%) increased. A cartilage construct was developed based on a clinically established collagen type I scaffold. In this matrix, more than 80% of the cells could be immobilized by mechanisms of adhesion, filtration, and cell entrapment. Confocal laser microscopy revealed focal adhesion sites as points of cell...... significantly enhanced cell proliferation. Matrix design in cartilage engineering must meet the biological demands of amplified cells, because adhesion of chondrocytes depends on their differentiation status and is regulated by bFGF....

  16. Adhesion Transition of Flexible Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Arthur; Lauga, Eric

    2009-03-01

    As forays into fabrication and self-assembly venture to increasingly small length scales, the role of adhesion events between material elements of the system must be closely scrutinized. This area of study is typically dominated by investigations into capillary adhesion, but relatively recent interest in carbon nanotubes and biomimetic devices have spurred interest in intermolecular forces as another source of micro- and nano-scale adhesion. We present here a far-field model for ``dry'' adhesion. We consider a small number N of flexible beams interacting with each other via a typical Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential, and describe the behavior of the system as the ratio of bending rigidity to beam-beam attraction is reduced. Applications ranging from fibrillar systems to the comparatively stiff carbon nanotubes are discussed.

  17. Determining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Andarzian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Wheat production in the south of Khuzestan, Iran is constrained by heat stress for late sowing dates. For optimization of yield, sowing at the appropriate time to fit the cultivar maturity length and growing season is critical. Crop models could be used to determine optimum sowing window for a locality. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the Cropping System Model (CSM-CERES-Wheat for its ability to simulate growth, development, grain yield of wheat in the tropical regions of Iran, and to study the impact of different sowing dates on wheat performance. The genetic coefficients of cultivar Chamran were calibrated for the CSM-CERES-Wheat model and crop model performance was evaluated with experimental data. Wheat cultivar Chamran was sown on different dates, ranging from 5 November to 9 January during 5 years of field experiments that were conducted in the Khuzestan province, Iran, under full and deficit irrigation conditions. The model was run for 8 sowing dates starting on 25 October and repeated every 10 days until 5 January using long-term historical weather data from the Ahvaz, Behbehan, Dezful and Izeh locations. The seasonal analysis program of DSSAT was used to determine the optimum sowing window for different locations as well. Evaluation with the experimental data showed that performance of the model was reasonable as indicated by fairly accurate simulation of crop phenology, biomass accumulation and grain yield against measured data. The normalized RMSE were 3%, 2%, 11.8%, and 3.4% for anthesis date, maturity date, grain yield and biomass, respectively. Optimum sowing window was different among locations. It was opened and closed on 5 November and 5 December for Ahvaz; 5 November and 15 December for Behbehan and Dezful;and 1 November and 15 December for Izeh, respectively. CERES-Wheat model could be used as a tool to evaluate the effect of sowing date on wheat performance in Khuzestan conditions. Further model evaluations

  18. Effects of wall shear stress and its gradient on tumor cell adhesion in curved microvessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, W W; Cai, B; Liu, Y; Fu, B M

    2012-05-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to vessel walls in the microcirculation is one critical step in cancer metastasis. In this paper, the hypothesis that tumor cells prefer to adhere at the microvessels with localized shear stresses and their gradients, such as in the curved microvessels, was examined both experimentally and computationally. Our in vivo experiments were performed on the microvessels (post-capillary venules, 30-50 μm diameter) of rat mesentery. A straight or curved microvessel was cannulated and perfused with tumor cells by a glass micropipette at a velocity of ~1mm/s. At less than 10 min after perfusion, there was a significant difference in cell adhesion to the straight and curved vessel walls. In 60 min, the averaged adhesion rate in the curved vessels (n = 14) was ~1.5-fold of that in the straight vessels (n = 19). In 51 curved segments, 45% of cell adhesion was initiated at the inner side, 25% at outer side, and 30% at both sides of the curved vessels. To investigate the mechanical mechanism by which tumor cells prefer adhering at curved sites, we performed a computational study, in which the fluid dynamics was carried out by the lattice Boltzmann method , and the tumor cell dynamics was governed by the Newton's law of translation and rotation. A modified adhesive dynamics model that included the influence of wall shear stress/gradient on the association/dissociation rates of tumor cell adhesion was proposed, in which the positive wall shear stress/gradient jump would enhance tumor cell adhesion while the negative wall shear stress/gradient jump would weaken tumor cell adhesion. It was found that the wall shear stress/gradient, over a threshold, had significant contribution to tumor cell adhesion by activating or inactivating cell adhesion molecules. Our results elucidated why the tumor cell adhesion prefers to occur at the positive curvature of curved microvessels with very low Reynolds number (in the order of 10(-2)) laminar flow.

  19. Determination of Fatty Acid Metabolism with Dynamic [11C]Palmitate Positron Emission Tomography of Mouse Heart In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinlin Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to establish a quantitative method for measuring fatty acid (FA metabolism with partial volume (PV and spill-over (SP corrections using dynamic [11C]palmitate positron emission tomographic (PET images of mouse heart in vivo. Twenty-minute dynamic [11C]palmitate PET scans of four 18- to 20-week-old male C57BL/6 mice under isoflurane anesthesia were performed using a Focus F-120 PET scanner. A model-corrected blood input function, by which the input function with SP and PV corrections and the metabolic rate constants (k1–k5 are simultaneously estimated from the dynamic [11C]palmitate PET images of mouse hearts in a four-compartment tracer kinetic model, was used to determine rates of myocardial fatty acid oxidation (MFAO, myocardial FA esterification, myocardial FA use, and myocardial FA uptake. The MFAO thus measured in C57BL/6 mice was 375.03 ± 43.83 nmol/min/g. This compares well to the MFAO measured in perfused working C57BL/6 mouse hearts ex vivo of about 350 nmol/g/min and 400 nmol/min/g. FA metabolism was measured for the first time in mouse heart in vivo using dynamic [11C]palmitate PET in a four-compartment tracer kinetic model. MFAO obtained with this model was validated by results previously obtained with mouse hearts ex vivo.

  20. A miniaturized, high frequency mechanical scanner for high speed atomic force microscope using suspension on dynamically determined points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herfst, Rodolf; Dekker, Bert; Witvoet, Gert; Crowcombe, Will; Lange, Dorus de [Department of Optomechatronics, Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, TNO, Delft (Netherlands); Sadeghian, Hamed, E-mail: hamed.sadeghianmarnani@tno.nl, E-mail: h.sadeghianmarnani@tudelft.nl [Department of Optomechatronics, Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, TNO, Delft (Netherlands); Department of Precision and Microsystems Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    One of the major limitations in the speed of the atomic force microscope (AFM) is the bandwidth of the mechanical scanning stage, especially in the vertical (z) direction. According to the design principles of “light and stiff” and “static determinacy,” the bandwidth of the mechanical scanner is limited by the first eigenfrequency of the AFM head in case of tip scanning and by the sample stage in terms of sample scanning. Due to stringent requirements of the system, simply pushing the first eigenfrequency to an ever higher value has reached its limitation. We have developed a miniaturized, high speed AFM scanner in which the dynamics of the z-scanning stage are made insensitive to its surrounding dynamics via suspension of it on specific dynamically determined points. This resulted in a mechanical bandwidth as high as that of the z-actuator (50 kHz) while remaining insensitive to the dynamics of its base and surroundings. The scanner allows a practical z scan range of 2.1 μm. We have demonstrated the applicability of the scanner to the high speed scanning of nanostructures.

  1. A miniaturized, high frequency mechanical scanner for high speed atomic force microscope using suspension on dynamically determined points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfst, Rodolf; Dekker, Bert; Witvoet, Gert; Crowcombe, Will; de Lange, Dorus; Sadeghian, Hamed

    2015-11-01

    One of the major limitations in the speed of the atomic force microscope (AFM) is the bandwidth of the mechanical scanning stage, especially in the vertical (z) direction. According to the design principles of "light and stiff" and "static determinacy," the bandwidth of the mechanical scanner is limited by the first eigenfrequency of the AFM head in case of tip scanning and by the sample stage in terms of sample scanning. Due to stringent requirements of the system, simply pushing the first eigenfrequency to an ever higher value has reached its limitation. We have developed a miniaturized, high speed AFM scanner in which the dynamics of the z-scanning stage are made insensitive to its surrounding dynamics via suspension of it on specific dynamically determined points. This resulted in a mechanical bandwidth as high as that of the z-actuator (50 kHz) while remaining insensitive to the dynamics of its base and surroundings. The scanner allows a practical z scan range of 2.1 μm. We have demonstrated the applicability of the scanner to the high speed scanning of nanostructures.

  2. Laser surface modification and adhesion

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a unique overview on laser techniques and applications for the purpose of improving adhesion by altering surface chemistry and topography/morphology of the substrate. It details laser surface modification techniques for a wide range of industrially relevant materials (plastics, metals, ceramics, composites) with the aim to improve and enhance their adhesion to other materials. The joining of different materials is of critical importance in the fabrication of many and varied products.

  3. Patterning of cell assemblies regulated by adhesion receptors of the cadherin superfamily.

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    During morphogenesis, cell-cell association patterns are dynamically altered. We are interested in how cell adhesion molecules can regulate the patterning of cellular assemblies. Cadherins, a group of cell-cell adhesion receptors, are crucial for the organized assembly of many cell types, but they also regulate dynamic aspects of cell association. For example, during neural crest emigration from the neural tube, the cadherin subtypes expressed by crest cells are switched from one subtype to a...

  4. Mouse lung adhesion assay for Bordetella pertussis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, K.A.; Freer, J.H. (Department of Microbiology, Alexander Stone Building, Bearsden, Glasgow, Scotland)

    1982-03-01

    The ability of Bordetella pertussis to adhere to cell surfaces has been demonstrated by adhesion to tissue culture cells and adhesion to chicken, hamster or rabbit trachea in organ culture. In this report a mouse lung assay for adhesion is described and the results obtained using two virulent strains of B. pertussis and their avirulent counterparts. These were a C modulation of one of the original virulent strains and a phase IV variant of the other virulent strain. Organisms were radiolabelled by adding 1 ..mu..Ci (37 K Bq) of (/sup 14/C)glutamic acid per 10 ml of culture medium before inoculation and incubation for 5 days. The lungs were washed by perfusion in situ with at least two volumes (1 ml) of sterile 1% (w/v) casamino acids. The percentage of the inoculated organisms retained in the lungs was determined, after removal of the lungs, by one of the following two methods: viable count or radioactive count. Results for both methods were expressed as the percentage of the inoculum retained in the lungs plus or minus one standard deviation.

  5. A feasibility study of using two-component polyurethane adhesive in constructing wooden structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Derikvand; Ghanbar Ebrahimi; Mehdi Tajvidi

    2014-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of using a two-component polyurethane (PUR) adhesive, with special waterproof properties, in constructing wooden structures. We designed and conducted tests to compare the shear strength and adhesion per-formance of PUR with polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) adhesive on block-shear specimens constructed of oriental beech (Fagus orientalis L.), fir (Abies alba Mill.), poplar (Populus deltoides Bartr.), white oak (Quercus alba L.), sycamore (Platanus orientalis L.) and white walnut (Juglans cinerea L.). The values of the percentage of wood failure were also determined in specimens constructed with each adhesive. The highest shear strength values of both adhesives were obtained in specimens constructed of beech, while the lowest shear strength values were obtained in fir and poplar specimens. Average shear strength of the PUR adhesive was 16.5%higher than that of the PVAc adhesive. Specimens constructed of fir, poplar and sycamore were characterised by the highest percentages of wood failure, whereas the lowest average percentages of wood failure were obtained in beech and oak specimens. With the exception of oak specimens, there was no statistically significant difference between per-centage of wood failure among the PUR and PVAc adhesives. Generally, the PUR adhesive showed an acceptable adhesion performance on wood materials used in our study.

  6. Starch transitions of different gluten free flour doughs determined by dynamic thermal mechanical analysis and differential scanning calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, R; Chenlo, F; Arufe, S

    2015-01-01

    Gluten-free flour doughs (three from different maize varieties and one from chestnut fruit) processed at the same consistency level (1.10 ± 0.07 N m) with different water absorption were used to determine the starch transitions by means of two different experimental techniques, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic thermal mechanical analysis (DMTA). The ranges of temperatures of gelatinization (G), amylopectin melting (M1), amylose-lipid complexes melting (M2) and amylose melting (M3) for all tested flour doughs were determined by both experimental techniques with acceptable agreement between them. The starch transitions in DMTA were determined by means of the elastic modulus (G, M1 and M2) or damping factor (G, M3) evolution with temperature. The temperatures and enthalpies of the transitions depended on water content, the nature and characteristics (mainly damaged starch) of the starch and the presence of other compounds (mainly lipid and sugars) in the flour doughs.

  7. Adhesion energy, surface traction and surface tension in liquid xenon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Mathew; G A Adebayo

    2011-12-01

    We calculated the adhesion energy, the surface traction and the surface energy of liquid xenon using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The value of the adhesion energy for liquid xenon at a reduced density of 0.630 was found to be 0.591 J/m2 and the surface traction has a peak at = 3.32 Å. It was observed that the attraction of the molecules in the liquid surface which produces a resistance to penetration decreases with temperature. This may be attributed to the greater average separation of molecules at higher temperature.

  8. 21 CFR 878.4010 - Tissue adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tissue adhesive. 878.4010 Section 878.4010 Food... DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4010 Tissue adhesive. (a) Tissue adhesive for the topical approximation of skin—(1) Identification. A tissue adhesive for the...

  9. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  10. Bank Specific and Macroeconomics Dynamic Determinants of Credit Risk in Islamic Banks and Conventional Banks

    OpenAIRE

    Waeibrorheem Waemustafa; Suriani Sukri

    2015-01-01

    The study analyzes macroeconomic and bank specific determinants of credit risk in Islamic and Conventional Banks. Multivariate Regression analysis is applied on the sample of 15 conventional banks and 13 Islamic Banks in Malaysia over the period between 2000 and 2010. The finding shows that the banks specific determinants of credit risk are uniquely influenced the credit risk formation of Islamic and Conventional banks. The study found that risky sector financing; regulatory capital (REGCAP) ...

  11. Cartilage proteoglycans inhibit fibronectin-mediated adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, A. M.; Pearlstein, E.; Weissmann, G.; Hoffstein, S. T.

    1981-09-01

    Normal tissues and organs show, on histological examination, a pattern of cellular and acellular zones that is characteristic and unique for each organ or tissue. This pattern is maintained in health but is sometimes destroyed by disease. For example, in mobile joints, the articular surfaces consist of relatively acellular hyaline cartilage, and the joint space is enclosed by a capsule of loose connective tissue with a lining of fibroblasts and macrophages. In the normal joint these cells are confined to the synovial lining and the articular surface remains acellular. In in vitro culture, macrophages and their precursor monocytes are very adhesive, and fibroblasts can migrate and overgrow surfaces such as collagen or plastic used for tissue culture. The fibroblasts adhere to collagen by means of fibronectin, which they synthesize and secrete1. Because the collagen of cartilage is capable of binding serum fibronectin2 and fibronectin is present in cartilage during its development3, these cells should, in theory, slowly migrate from the synovial lining to the articular surface. It is their absence from the articular cartilage in normal circumstances, and then presence in such pathological states as rheumatoid arthritis, that is striking. We therefore set out to determine whether a component of cartilage could prevent fibroblast adherence in a defined adhesion assay. As normal cartilage is composed of 50% proteoglycans and 50% collagen by dry weight4, we tested the possibility that the proteoglycans in cartilage inhibit fibroblast adhesion to collagen. We present here evidence that fibroblast spreading and adhesion to collagenous substrates is inhibited by cartilage proteoglycans.

  12. Bond strength of adhesive resin cement with different adhesive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzoni e Silva, Fabrizio; Pamato, Saulo; Kuga, Milton-Carlos; Só, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the immediate bond strength of a dual-cure adhesive resin cement to the hybridized dentin with different bonding systems. Material and Methods Fifty-six healthy human molars were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=8). After 3 longitudinal sections, the central cuts were included in PVC matrix and were submitted to dentin hybridization according to the groups: G1 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Apder™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE), G2 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Optibond™ FL, Kerr), G3 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (All-Bond 3®, Bisco), G4 - etch & rinse simplified system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE), G5 - self-etching system with one step (Bond Force, Tokuyama), G6 - universal system in moist dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE), G7 - universal system in dry dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then all groups received the cementing of a self-adhesive resin cement cylinder (Duo-link, Bisco) made from a polypropylene matrix. In the evaluation of bond strength, the samples were subjected to the microshear test and evaluated according to the fracture pattern by optical microscopy. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test suggests a statistically significant difference between groups (p=0,039), and Tukey for multiple comparisons, indicating a statistically significant difference between G3 and G4 (p<0.05). It was verified high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed failure and cohesive in dentin. Conclusions The technique and the system used to dentin hybridization are able to affect the immediate bond strength of resin cement dual adhesive. Key words:Adhesion, adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:28149471

  13. NEXT GENERATION OF TELESCOPES OR DYNAMICS REQUIRED TO DETERMINE IF EXO-MOONS HAVE PROGRADE OR RETROGRADE ORBITS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Karen M.; Fujii, Yuka [Earth-Life Science Institute (WPI-ELSI), Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Meguro district, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2014-08-20

    We survey the methods proposed in the literature for detecting moons of extrasolar planets in terms of their ability to distinguish between prograde and retrograde moon orbits, an important tracer of the moon formation channel. We find that most moon detection methods, in particular, sensitive methods for detecting moons of transiting planets, cannot observationally distinguishing prograde and retrograde moon orbits. The prograde and retrograde cases can only be distinguished where the dynamical evolution of the orbit due to, e.g., three body effects is detectable, where one of the two cases is dynamically unstable, or where new observational facilities, which can implement a technique capable of differentiating the two cases, come online. In particular, directly imaged planets are promising targets because repeated spectral and photometric measurements, which are required to determine moon orbit direction, could also be conducted with the primary interest of characterizing the planet itself.

  14. Structural Dynamics of Fe along the New \\textit{Ab Initio} Determined Hugoniot Curve from Warm to Hot Dense Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, Jiayu; Zhao, Zengxiu; Wu, Yanqun; Yuan, Jianmin

    2011-01-01

    A new determined principal Hugoniot curve of Fe in the temperature range of 0.1-100 eV from Ab initio is presented, and the structural dynamics along this curve is shown. All experiments are on top or above our Hugoniot data, which are along the lower envelop of the distribution of experiments. The present data are the converged limit for experiments to remove the external effects such as preheating. In particular, the experimental data on the bottom of the distribution below 10 Mbar can be considered nearly free of errors caused by the external effects compared with our data. The dynamics of ionic structures shows the stable existence of complex clusters with persisted time length of hundreds of femto-seconds from cold to hot dense matter.

  15. Pulsatile microfluidics as an analytical tool for determining the dynamic characteristics of microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Søren; Olesen, Laurits Højgaard; Bruus, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of all fluid dynamic time scales is needed to fully understand and hence exploit the capabilities of fluid flow in microfluidic systems. We propose the use of harmonically oscillating microfluidics as an analytical tool for the deduction of these time scales. Furthermore, we...... suggest the use of system-level equivalent circuit theory as an adequate theory of the behavior of the system. A novel pressure source capable of operation in the desired frequency range is presented for this generic analysis. As a proof of concept, we study the fairly complex system of water...

  16. Dynamical determination of the unification scale by gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    We propose a mechanism for generating the GUT scale dynamically from the Planck scale. The idea is that the GUT scale is fixed by the vacuum expectation value of a "GUT modulus" field whose potential is exactly flat in the supersymmetric limit. If supersymmetry is broken by gauge mediation, a potential for the GUT modulus is generated at 2 loops, and slopes away from the origin for a wide range of parameters. This potential is stabilized by Planck-suppressed operators in the Kahler potential,...

  17. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    2016-01-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the

  18. Effect of thermal aging on the tensile bond strength at reduced areas of seven current adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baracco, Bruno; Fuentes, M Victoria; Garrido, Miguel A; González-López, Santiago; Ceballos, Laura

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the micro-tensile bond strength (MTBS) to dentin of seven adhesive systems (total and self-etch adhesives) after 24 h and 5,000 thermocycles. Dentin surfaces of human third molars were exposed and bonded with two total-etch adhesives (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and XP Bond), two two-step self-etch adhesives (Adper Scotchbond SE and Filtek Silorane Adhesive System) and three one-step self-etch adhesives (G-Bond, Xeno V and Bond Force). All adhesive systems were applied following manufacturers' instructions. Composite buildups were constructed and the bonded teeth were then stored in water (24 h, 37 °C) or thermocycled (5,000 cycles) before being sectioned and submitted to MTBS test. Two-way ANOVA and subsequent comparison tests were applied at α = 0.05. Characteristic de-bonded specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After 24 h water storage, MTBS values were highest with XP Bond, Adper Scotchbond 1 XT, Filtek Silorane Adhesive System and Adper Scotchbond SE and lowest with the one-step self-etch adhesives Bond Force, Xeno V and G-Bond. After thermocycling, MTBS values were highest with XP Bond, followed by Filtek Silorane Adhesive System, Adper Scotchbond SE and Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and lowest with the one-step self-etch adhesives Bond Force, Xeno V and G-Bond. Thermal aging induced a significant decrease in MTBS values with all adhesives tested. The resistance of resin-dentin bonds to thermal-aging degradation was material dependent. One-step self-etch adhesives obtained the lowest MTBS results after both aging treatments, and their adhesive capacity was significantly reduced after thermocycling.

  19. Bond strength of adhesives to dentin contaminated with smoker’s saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, Makoto; O’Keefe, Kathy; Dusevish, Vladimir; Spencer, Paulette; Powers, John M.; Marshall, Grayson W.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of contamination with smoker’s and non-smoker’s saliva on the bond strength of resin composite to superficial dentin using different adhesive systems. The interfacial structure between the resin and dentin was evaluated for each treatment using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Freshly extracted human molars were ground with 600-grit SiC paper to expose the superficial dentin. Adhesives [One-Up-Bond-F-Plus (OUFP) and Adper-Prompt-L-Pop (APLP)] and resin composite (TPH-Spectrum) were bonded to the dentin (n = 8/group, 180 total specimens) under five surface conditions: control (adhesive applied following manufacturers’ instructions); saliva, then 5-s air dry, then adhesive; adhesive, saliva, 5-s air dry; adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry (ASW group); and adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry, reapply adhesive (ASWA group). After storage in water at 37°C for 24 h, the specimens were debonded under tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. ESEM photomicrographs of the dentin/adhesive interfaces were taken. Mean bond strength ranged from 8.1 to 24.1 MPa. Fisher’s protected least significant difference (P = 0.05) intervals for critical adhesive, saliva, and surface condition differences were 1.3, 1.3, and 2.1 MPa, respectively. There were no significant differences in bond strength to dentin between contamination by smoker’s and non-smoker’s saliva, but bond strengths were significantly different between adhesive systems, with OUFP twice as strong as APLP under almost all conditions. After adhesive application and contamination with either smoker’s or nonsmoker’s saliva followed by washing and reapplication of the adhesive (ASWA group), the bond strength of both adhesive systems was the same as that of the control group. PMID:20155506

  20. Zirconia enriched dental adhesive: A solution for OCT contrast enhancement. Demonstrative study by synchrotron radiation microtomography

    OpenAIRE

    Rominu, M.; A. MANESCU; Sinescu, C; Negrutiu, M.L.; Topala, F.; Rominu, R.O.; Bradu, Adrian; Jackson, David A; Giuliani, A.; Podoleanu, Adrian G.H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The major aim of this study was to prove the capability of the optical coherence tomography (OCT) method in visualizing the integrity of the adhesive fillings and of the interfaces between the adhesive, tooth structures and composite resin. As zirconium dioxide was added to the composition of the adhesive layer in order to strengthen the backscattered light in the OCT investigation, for a better visualization of the interfaces, the determination of a proper zirconia concentration wa...

  1. An Analytical Model for Predicting the Stress Distributions within Single-Lap Adhesively Bonded Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaocong He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical model for predicting the stress distributions within single-lap adhesively bonded beams under tension is presented in this paper. By combining the governing equations of each adherend with the joint kinematics, the overall system of governing equations can be obtained. Both the adherends and the adhesive are assumed to be under plane strain condition. With suitable boundary conditions, the stress distribution of the adhesive in the longitudinal direction is determined.

  2. Chromatin Dynamics During DNA Replication and Uncharacterized Replication Factors determined by Nascent Chromatin Capture (NCC) Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabert, Constance; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Lee, Sung-Bau; Kustatscher, Georg; Nakamura, Kyosuke; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Menard, Patrice; Mejlvang, Jakob; Rappsilber, Juri; Groth, Anja

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY To maintain genome function and stability, DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin must be duplicated during cell division. Understanding how entire chromosomes are copied remains a major challenge. Here, we use Nascent Chromatin Capture (NCC) to profile chromatin proteome dynamics during replication in human cells. NCC relies on biotin-dUTP labelling of replicating DNA, affinity-purification and quantitative proteomics. Comparing nascent chromatin with mature post-replicative chromatin, we provide association dynamics for 3995 proteins. The replication machinery and 485 chromatin factors like CAF-1, DNMT1, SUV39h1 are enriched in nascent chromatin, whereas 170 factors including histone H1, DNMT3, MBD1-3 and PRC1 show delayed association. This correlates with H4K5K12diAc removal and H3K9me1 accumulation, while H3K27me3 and H3K9me3 remain unchanged. Finally, we combine NCC enrichment with experimentally derived chromatin probabilities to predict a function in nascent chromatin for 93 uncharacterized proteins and identify FAM111A as a replication factor required for PCNA loading. Together, this provides an extensive resource to understand genome and epigenome maintenance. PMID:24561620

  3. Determining important regulatory relations of amino acids from dynamic network analysis of plasma amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikata, Nahoko; Maki, Yukihiro; Nakatsui, Masahiko; Mori, Masato; Noguchi, Yasushi; Yoshida, Shintaro; Takahashi, Michio; Kondo, Nobuo; Okamoto, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    The changes in the concentrations of plasma amino acids do not always follow the flow-based metabolic pathway network. We have previously shown that there is a control-based network structure among plasma amino acids besides the metabolic pathway map. Based on this network structure, in this study, we performed dynamic analysis using time-course data of the plasma samples of rats fed single essential amino acid deficient diet. Using S-system model (conceptual mathematical model represented by power-law formalism), we inferred the dynamic network structure which reproduces the actual time-courses within the error allowance of 13.17%. By performing sensitivity analysis, three of the most dominant relations in this network were selected; the control paths from leucine to valine, from methionine to threonine, and from leucine to isoleucine. This result is in good agreement with the biological knowledge regarding branched-chain amino acids, and suggests the biological importance of the effect from methionine to threonine.

  4. Role of dystrophins and utrophins in platelet adhesion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecedo, Doris; Mondragón, Ricardo; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Martínez-Pérez, Francisco; Martínez-Rojas, Dalila; Rendón, Alvaro

    2006-07-01

    Platelets are crucial at the site of vascular injury, adhering to the sub-endothelial matrix through receptors on their surface, leading to cell activation and aggregation to form a haemostatic plug. Platelets display focal adhesions as well as stress fibres to contract and facilitate expulsion of growth and pro-coagulant factors contained in the granules and to constrict the clot. The interaction of F-actin with different actin-binding proteins determines the properties and composition of the focal adhesions. Recently, we demonstrated the presence of dystrophin-associated protein complex corresponding to short dystrophin isoforms (Dp71d and Dp71) and the uthophin gene family (Up400 and Up71), which promote shape change, adhesion, aggregation, and granule centralisation. To elucidate participation of both complexes during the platelet adhesion process, their potential association with integrin beta-1 fraction and the focal adhesion system (alpha-actinin, vinculin and talin) was evaluated by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation assays. It was shown that the short dystrophin-associated protein complex participated in stress fibre assembly and in centralisation of cytoplasmic granules, while the utrophin-associated protein complex assembled and regulated focal adhesions. The simultaneous presence of dystrophin and utrophin complexes indicates complementary structural and signalling mechanisms to the actin network, improving the platelet haemostatic role.

  5. Adhesion quality of glued joints from different commercial wood species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Miguel do Nascimento

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effect of wood density, adhesive type and gluing pressure on the shear strength of glued joints of fourteen commercial wood species. Wood pieces were classified in three density classes (Class 1: less than 0.55 g cm-3; Class 2: from 0.55 to 0.75 g cm-3; and Class 3: greater than 0.75 g cm-3 and joints bonded with two adhesives: polyvinyl acetate (PVA and urea-formaldehyde (UF, under two different pressures: 6 and 12 kgf cm-2. Glued joints bonded with PVA adhesive presented higher shear strength than those bonded with UF adhesive. For percentage of wood failure, the PVA adhesive had the best performance, however, only Classes 1 and 2 reached the values required by ASTM 3110 standard. Glued joints from Class 3, bonded with UF adhesive, did not reach the values of solid wood. The gluing pressure of 12 kgf cm-2 was more efficient for Class 3, for both shear strength and percentage of wood failure.

  6. Platelet adhesion to polyurethane urea under pulsatile flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navitsky, Michael A; Taylor, Joshua O; Smith, Alexander B; Slattery, Margaret J; Deutsch, Steven; Siedlecki, Christopher A; Manning, Keefe B

    2014-12-01

    Platelet adhesion to a polyurethane urea surface is a precursor to thrombus formation within blood-contacting cardiovascular devices, and platelets have been found to adhere strongly to polyurethane surfaces below a shear rate of approximately 500 s(-1). The aim of the current work is to determine the properties of platelet adhesion to the polyurethane urea surface as a function of time-varying shear exposure. A rotating disk system was used to study the influence of steady and pulsatile flow conditions (e.g., cardiac inflow and sawtooth waveforms) for platelet adhesion to the biomaterial surface. All experiments were conducted with the same root mean square angular rotation velocity (29.63 rad/s) and waveform period. The disk was rotated in platelet-rich bovine plasma for 2 h, with adhesion quantified by confocal microscopy measurements of immunofluorescently labeled bovine platelets. Platelet adhesion under pulsating flow was found to decay exponentially with increasing shear rate. Adhesion levels were found to depend upon peak platelet flux and shear rate, regardless of rotational waveform. In combination with flow measurements, these results may be useful for predicting regions susceptible to thrombus formation within ventricular assist devices.

  7. Effect of water storage on the bonding effectiveness of 6 adhesives to Class I cavity dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Munck, Jan; Shirai, Kenichi; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Satoshi; Van Landuyt, Kirsten; Lambrechts, Paul; Suzuki, Kazuomi; Shintani, Hideaki; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2006-01-01

    Adhesive-dentin interfaces degrade with time. This study determined the effect water storage may have on the bonding effectiveness of adhesives to occlusal Class I cavity-bottom dentin. Six adhesives, all representing contemporary classes of adhesives, were applied: a 3-step (OptiBond FL, Kerr) and 2-step (Scotchbond 1*, 3M ESPE) etch-and-rinse adhesive, a 2-step (Clearfil SE, Kuraray) and 1-step (Adper prompt, 3M ESPE) self-etch adhesive and a 2-step (FujiBond LC, GC) and 1-step (Reactmer, Shofu) resin-modified glass-ionomer adhesive. Bonding effectiveness was assessed by microtensile bond strength testing (MTBS) and electron microscopy (Feg-SEM and TEM). The MTBS was determined after 1 day and 1 year water storage of the entire restored cavity (indirect exposure of the adhesive-dentin interface to water) and prepared microTBS-beams (direct exposure of the adhesive-dentin interface to water). The hypotheses tested were: (1) resin-dentin bonds formed at the bottom of Class I cavities resist 1-year water storage and (2) an adjacent composite-enamel bond protects the composite-dentin bond against degradation. Non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis analysis statistically analyzed the microTBSs. The first hypothesis was rejected, as only the microTBS of OptiBond FL and Clearfil SE did not significantly decrease after 1-year direct and/or indirect water storage. The second hypothesis was corroborated, as the bonding effectiveness of most simplified adhesives (Scotchbond 1, Adper Prompt, FujiBond LC and Reactmer) approached 0 (because of the frequent pre-testing failures) after 1-year direct water exposure. The second hypothesis concluded that the 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive must still be regarded the "gold standard." Though microTBS decreased significantly, Clearfil SE, as a 2-step self-etch adhesive, was the only simplified adhesive to perform reliably after 1-year direct water exposure.

  8. Amygdalin influences bladder cancer cell adhesion and invasion in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Makarević

    Full Text Available The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as well as tumor cell migration was examined. Effects of drug treatment on integrin α and β subtypes, on integrin-linked kinase (ILK and total and activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK were also determined. Integrin knock-down was carried out to evaluate integrin influence on migration and adhesion. A 24 h or 2 week amygdalin application distinctly reduced tumor cell adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 and RT112 cells. TCCSUP adhesion was also reduced, but migration was elevated under amygdalin. Integrin subtype expression was significantly and specifically altered by amygdalin depending on the cell line. ILK was moderately, and activated FAK strongly, lost in all tumor cell lines in the presence of amygdalin. Knock down of β1 integrin caused a significant decrease in both adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 cells, but a significant increase in TCCSUP adhesion. Knock down of β4 integrin caused a significant decrease in migration of RT112 cells. Since the different actions of amygdalin on the different cell lines was mirrored by β1 or β4 knock down, it is postulated that amygdalin influences adhesion and migratory properties of bladder cancer cells by modulating β1 or β4 integrin expression. The amygdalin induced increase in TCCSUP migratory behavior indicates that any anti-tumor benefits from amygdalin (seen with the other two cell lines may depend upon the cancer cell type.

  9. Amygdalin influences bladder cancer cell adhesion and invasion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Juengel, Eva; Kaulfuss, Silke; Tsaur, Igor; Nelson, Karen; Pfitzenmaier, Jesco; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2014-01-01

    The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml) was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as well as tumor cell migration was examined. Effects of drug treatment on integrin α and β subtypes, on integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and total and activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were also determined. Integrin knock-down was carried out to evaluate integrin influence on migration and adhesion. A 24 h or 2 week amygdalin application distinctly reduced tumor cell adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 and RT112 cells. TCCSUP adhesion was also reduced, but migration was elevated under amygdalin. Integrin subtype expression was significantly and specifically altered by amygdalin depending on the cell line. ILK was moderately, and activated FAK strongly, lost in all tumor cell lines in the presence of amygdalin. Knock down of β1 integrin caused a significant decrease in both adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 cells, but a significant increase in TCCSUP adhesion. Knock down of β4 integrin caused a significant decrease in migration of RT112 cells. Since the different actions of amygdalin on the different cell lines was mirrored by β1 or β4 knock down, it is postulated that amygdalin influences adhesion and migratory properties of bladder cancer cells by modulating β1 or β4 integrin expression. The amygdalin induced increase in TCCSUP migratory behavior indicates that any anti-tumor benefits from amygdalin (seen with the other two cell lines) may depend upon the cancer cell type.

  10. Demographic and Socio-economic Determinants of Birth Interval Dynamics in Manipur: A Survival Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanajaoba Singh N,

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The birth interval is a major determinant of levels of fertility in high fertility populations. A house-to-house survey of 1225 women in Manipur, a tiny state in North Eastern India was carried out to investigate birth interval patterns and its determinants. Using survival analysis, among the nine explanatory variables of interest, only three factors – infant mortality, Lactation and use of contraceptive devices have highly significant effect (P<0.01 on the duration of birth interval and only three factors – age at marriage of wife, parity and sex of child are found to be significant (P<0.05 on the duration variable.

  11. Supramolecular polymer adhesives: advanced materials inspired by nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzmann, Christian; Weder, Christoph; de Espinosa, Lucas Montero

    2016-01-21

    Due to their dynamic, stimuli-responsive nature, non-covalent interactions represent versatile design elements that can be found in nature in many molecular processes or materials, where adaptive behavior or reversible connectivity is required. Examples include molecular recognition processes, which trigger biological responses or cell-adhesion to surfaces, and a broad range of animal secreted adhesives with environment-dependent properties. Such advanced functionalities have inspired researchers to employ similar design approaches for the development of synthetic polymers with stimuli-responsive properties. The utilization of non-covalent interactions for the design of adhesives with advanced functionalities such as stimuli responsiveness, bonding and debonding on demand capability, surface selectivity or recyclability is a rapidly emerging subset of this field, which is summarized in this review.

  12. Motion of Elastic Microcapsules on Compliant Surfaces with Adhesive Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresov, Egor; Kolmakov, German; Balazs, Anna

    2011-03-01

    By integrating mesoscale models for hydrodynamics, micromechanics and adhesion, we examine the fluid driven motion of elastic microcapsules on compliant surfaces. The capsules, modeled as three-dimensional fluid-filled elastic shells, represent polymeric microcapsules or biological cells. Our combined integrated Lattice Boltzmann model/Lattice spring model (LBM/LSM) approach allows for a dynamic interaction between the elastic capsule's wall and surrounding fluid. To capture the interaction between the shell and the surface, we adopt the Bell model, used previously to describe the interaction of biological cell like leukocytes rolling on surfaces under the influence of an imposed shear. The surface of the microcapsule contains receptors with an affinity to adhesive ligands of the substrate. We examine how the parameters of adhesion and rigidity of the capsules and the substrate affect movement of the capsules. The findings provide guidelines for creating smart surfaces that could regulate the microcapsules' motion.

  13. Optimizing Adhesive Design by Understanding Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Daniel R; Crosby, Alfred J

    2015-12-23

    Adhesives have long been designed around a trade-off between adhesive strength and releasability. Geckos are of interest because they are the largest organisms which are able to climb utilizing adhesive toepads, yet can controllably release from surfaces and perform this action over and over again. Attempting to replicate the hierarchical, nanoscopic features which cover their toepads has been the primary focus of the adhesives field until recently. A new approach based on a scaling relation which states that reversible adhesive force capacity scales with (A/C)(1/2), where A is the area of contact and C is the compliance of the adhesive, has enabled the creation of high strength, reversible adhesives without requiring high aspect ratio, fibrillar features. Here we introduce an equation to calculate the compliance of adhesives, and utilize this equation to predict the shear adhesive force capacity of the adhesive based on the material components and geometric properties. Using this equation, we have investigated important geometric parameters which control force capacity and have shown that by controlling adhesive shape, adhesive force capacity can be increased by over 50% without varying pad size. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that compliance of the adhesive far from the interface still influences shear adhesive force capacity. Utilizing this equation will allow for the production of adhesives which are optimized for specific applications in commercial and industrial settings.

  14. Phylogenetic distribution and evolutionary dynamics of the sex determination genes doublesex and transformer in insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuverink, E.; Beukeboom, L. W.

    2014-01-01

    Sex determination in insects is characterized by a gene cascade that is conserved at the bottom but contains diverse primary signals at the top. The bottom master switch gene doublesex is found in all insects. Its upstream regulator transformer is present in the orders Hymenoptera, Coleoptera and Di

  15. Temporal Dynamics and Decomposition of Reciprocal Determinism: A Reply to Phillips and Orton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Albert

    1983-01-01

    In their analysis of reciprocal determinism, Phillips and Orton (TM 509 061) mistakenly assume that behavior, cognitive and other personal factors, and environmental events operate as a simultaneous wholistic interaction. Contrary to this belief, the interactants in triadic reciprocality work their mutual effects sequentially over variable time…

  16. Dynamics in cancer caregiver's health over time : Gender-specific patterns and determinants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, C; Triemstra, M; Sanderman, R; van den Bos, GAM

    2001-01-01

    This study examined patterns and determinants of three dimensions of caregiver's health of newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients, i.e. physical, mental and social functioning (N = 148). Physical functioning declined within a 6-month period in female caregivers, while no change was observed in m

  17. Determinants and Impacts Of Human Mobility Dynamics In The Western Highlands Of Cameroon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tankou, C.M.; Iongh, de H.H.; Persoon, G.; Bruijn, de M.E.; Snoo, de G.R.

    2014-01-01

    This study analyses human mobility among inhabitants of Cameroon‘s most populous region, the Western Highlands of Cameroon. In other to capture the impact of various determinants on human mobility, a comparative study was conducted through household and field surveys in three villages in the region

  18. Epidemiology, determinants and dynamics of cholera in Pakistan: gaps and prospects for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseer, Maliha; Jamali, Tanzil

    2014-11-01

    Cholera is one of the notifiable endemic diseases in Pakistan, but the reporting of cholera cases is still unsatisfactory. Most of the diagnosed cases are never reported to the relevant authorities. In the year 1993 - 2005, the country did not report any single case of cholera to the WHO. The objectives of this review were to understand the epidemiology and to identify the possible determinants of cholera infection in Pakistan. Medscape, Medline, PakMedinet and PubMed, was searched, using key words, epidemiology and determinants of cholera infection in Pakistan during 1995 - 2010. Morbidity and mortality due to cholera infection during 1995 - 2010, without any language restriction. Out of 27 articles published between 1995 - 2010, 17 articles were included in the review. Vibrio cholerae O139 identified as a major cause of infection in older age group, while O1 biotype of cholera as a predominant cause of cholera among young individuals. Mainly reported determinants of cholera in Pakistan include poor sanitation and hygiene practices, increased population density in urban areas, leading to rapid and unplanned urbanization of the major cities and climate change due to increased environmental pollution in Pakistan are plausible factors for endemicity of cholera in Pakistan. Cholera reporting as a notifiable disease to the relevant departments and timely action can prevent the risk of outbreaks. There is a need to identify specific behavioral and environmental determinants responsible for outbreaks and epidemics of cholera in Pakistan which can help to design appropriate preventive and control interventions.

  19. Potassium dynamics are attenuated in hyperkalemia and a determinant of QT adaptation in exercising hemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Cao Thach; Bundgaard, Henning; Ladefoged, Søren Daustrand;

    2013-01-01

    Disturbances in plasma potassium concentration (pK) are well known risk factors for the development of cardiac arrhythmia. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the effect of hemodialysis on exercise pK dynamics and QT hysteresis, and whether QT hysteresis is associated with the p......K decrease following exercise. Twenty-two end-stage renal disease patients exercised on a cycle ergometer with incremental work load before and after hemodialysis. ECG was recorded and pK was measured during exercise and recovery. During exercise, pK increased from 5.1 ± 0.2 to 6.1 ± 0.2 mM (mean ± SE; P...

  20. Dynamics of Soil Erosion in Xingguo County, China,Determined Using Remote Sensing and GIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Jian-Jun; ZHANG Tao-Lin; ZHAO Qi-Guo

    2005-01-01

    The spatial and temporal dynamics of soil erosion in Xingguo County, Jiangxi Province, China were studied using multi-period remote sensing images and GIS. The results indicated that the soil erosion status of the region has been improving, particularly since the 1980s, with the erosion rate showing an evident decline over the past 30 years. The improvement showed not only in the decline of eroded soil area, but also with the reduction in the extent of erosion. The extent of erosion mainly changed by one level, and the change primarily occurred with the severely or moderately eroded soil types. However, in general, soil erosion was still an overriding problem in the region with some areas becoming more serious, especially those with large quantities of granite.

  1. The dynamics of mergers and acquisitions: ancestry as the seminal determinant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Eduardo; Cockburn, Stuart P.; Jensen, Henrik J.; West, Geoffrey B.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms behind the complex landscape of corporate mergers and acquisitions is of crucial importance to economies across the world. Adapting ideas from the fields of complexity and evolutionary dynamics to analyse business ecosystems, we show here that ancestry, i.e. the cumulative sum of historical mergers across all ancestors, is the key characteristic to company mergers and acquisitions. We verify this by comparing an agent-based model to an extensive range of business data, covering the period from the 1830s to the present day and a range of industries and geographies. This seemingly universal mechanism leads to imbalanced business ecosystems, with the emergence of a few very large, but sluggish ‘too big to fail’ entities, and very small, niche entities, thereby creating a paradigm where a configuration akin to effective oligopoly or monopoly is a likely outcome for free market systems. PMID:25383025

  2. Blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) growth at various salinity regime determined by a Dynamic Energy Budget model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saurel, Camille; Maar, Marie; Landes, Anja

    such as food supply, temperature and salinity. In the Baltic Sea - highly disturbed eutrophied environment-mussel growth efficiency is limited due to the very low levels of salinity and in area where the salinity is below 8 psu, mussels appear on a dwarf form. The aim of the present study was to incorporate...... the effects of low salinity into an eco-physiological model of blue mussels and to identify areas suitable for cost-effective mussel production for mitigation culture. A standard Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) model was modified with respect to i) the morphological parameters (DW/WW-ratio, shape factor), ii......) change in ingestion rate and iii) metabolic costs due to osmotic regulatory mechanisms to adapt in different salinity environments. The modified DEB model was validated with experimental data from different locations in the Western Baltic Sea including the Limfjorden, with salinities ranging from 8...

  3. Dynamical behaviors determined by the Lyapunov function in competitive Lotka-Volterra systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ying; Yuan, Ruoshi; Ma, Yian

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical behaviors of the competitive Lotka-Volterra system even for 3 species are not fully understood. In this paper, we study this problem from the perspective of the Lyapunov function. We construct explicitly the Lyapunov function using three examples of the competitive Lotka-Volterra system for the whole state space: (1) the general 2-species case, (2) a 3-species model, and (3) the model of May-Leonard. The basins of attraction for these examples are demonstrated, including cases with bistability and cyclical behavior. The first two examples are the generalized gradient system, where the energy dissipation may not follow the gradient of the Lyapunov function. In addition, under a new type of stochastic interpretation, the Lyapunov function also leads to the Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution on the final steady state when multiplicative noise is added.

  4. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Williams, Scott; McCoy, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA gripper pad surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and

  5. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, L.; Bryan, T.; Williams, S.; McCoy, B.; MacLeod, T.

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and development

  6. Assessing the impact of modifications neoprene adhesives amine-containing compounds the mechanisms to improve adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    KABLOV V.F.; KEYBAL N.A.; S. N. Bondarenko; RUDENKO K.U.; Zaikov, G. E.

    2015-01-01

    Possible mechanisms for an increase in the adhesion parameters of neopren-based adhesive compositions modified with adhesion promoters on the basis of epoxy compounds and aniline derivatives are studied.

  7. Quantitative determination of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in milk by multiple dynamic headspace extraction and GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccioli, Paolo; Brancaleoni, Enzo; Frattoni, Massimiliano; Fedele, Vincenzo; Claps, Salvatore; Signorelli, Federica

    2004-01-01

    A method for the accurate determination of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in milk samples has been developed and tested. It combines multiple dynamic headspace extraction with GC-MS. Absolute amounts of VOC in the liquid phase are obtained by determining the first order kinetic dependence of the stepwise extraction of the analytes and internal standards from the liquid matrix. Compounds released from milk were collected on a train of traps filled with different solid sorbents to cover all components having a number of carbon atoms ranging from 4 to 15. They were analysed by GC-MS after thermal desorption of VOC from the collecting traps. Quantification of VOC in milk was performed using deuterated compounds as internal standards. The method was used to follow seasonal variations of monoterpenes in goat milk and to detect the impact of air pollution on the quality of milk.

  8. In Silico Determination of Gas Permeabilities by Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics: CO2 and He through PIM-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Frentrup

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the permeation dynamics of helium and carbon dioxide through an atomistically detailed model of a polymer of intrinsic microporosity, PIM-1, via non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD simulations. This work presents the first explicit molecular modeling of gas permeation through a high free-volume polymer sample, and it demonstrates how permeability and solubility can be obtained coherently from a single simulation. Solubilities in particular can be obtained to a very high degree of confidence and within experimental inaccuracies. Furthermore, the simulations make it possible to obtain very specific information on the diffusion dynamics of penetrant molecules and yield detailed maps of gas occupancy, which are akin to a digital tomographic scan of the polymer network. In addition to determining permeability and solubility directly from NEMD simulations, the results shed light on the permeation mechanism of the penetrant gases, suggesting that the relative openness of the microporous topology promotes the anomalous diffusion of penetrant gases, which entails a deviation from the pore hopping mechanism usually observed in gas diffusion in polymers.

  9. DETERMINATION OF PARTICLE DENSITY BY MERCURY POROSIMETRY FOR BIOMASS FLUID DYNAMIC STUDY IN MOVING BEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F. Saldarriaga

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the particle density is required to address the hydrodynamic study of a moving bed contactor. The measurement of this parameter is complicated when particles are irregularly shaped. In this study, two different techniques were use: compaction by mechanical compression and an alternative proposal, which contemplates the potential of mercury porosimetry for determining the surface and structural properties. It was observed that the results obtained by compacting in all cases are higher than expected. However, the values obtained by mercury porosimetry are more consistent with expected values. For example in the sawdust valued at 500kg/m3, very similar to the value of the original wood (502kg/m3. Values obtained by this procedure adequately represent the relationship between mass and volume of the particle and therefore are valid for hydrodynamic characterization of the biomass.

  10. Lap Shear and Impact Testing of Ochre and Beeswax in Experimental Middle Stone Age Compound Adhesives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P R B Kozowyk

    Full Text Available The production of compound adhesives using disparate ingredients is seen as some of the best evidence of advanced cognition outside of the use of symbolism. Previous field and laboratory testing of adhesives has shown the complexities involved in creating an effective Middle Stone Age glue using Acacia gum. However, it is currently unclear how efficient different adhesive recipes are, how much specific ingredients influence their performance, and how difficult it may have been for those ingredients to be combined to maximum effect. We conducted a series of laboratory-based lap shear and impact tests, following modern adhesion testing standards, to determine the efficacy of compound adhesives, with particular regard to the ingredient ratios. We tested rosin (colophony and gum adhesives, containing additives of beeswax and ochre in varying ratios. During both lap shear and impact tests compound rosin adhesives performed better than single component rosin adhesives, and pure acacia gum was the strongest. The large difference in performance between each base adhesive and the significant changes in performance that occur due to relatively small changes in ingredient ratios lend further support to the notion that high levels of skill and knowledge were required to consistently produce the most effective adhesives.

  11. Lap Shear and Impact Testing of Ochre and Beeswax in Experimental Middle Stone Age Compound Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozowyk, P R B; Langejans, G H J; Poulis, J A

    2016-01-01

    The production of compound adhesives using disparate ingredients is seen as some of the best evidence of advanced cognition outside of the use of symbolism. Previous field and laboratory testing of adhesives has shown the complexities involved in creating an effective Middle Stone Age glue using Acacia gum. However, it is currently unclear how efficient different adhesive recipes are, how much specific ingredients influence their performance, and how difficult it may have been for those ingredients to be combined to maximum effect. We conducted a series of laboratory-based lap shear and impact tests, following modern adhesion testing standards, to determine the efficacy of compound adhesives, with particular regard to the ingredient ratios. We tested rosin (colophony) and gum adhesives, containing additives of beeswax and ochre in varying ratios. During both lap shear and impact tests compound rosin adhesives performed better than single component rosin adhesives, and pure acacia gum was the strongest. The large difference in performance between each base adhesive and the significant changes in performance that occur due to relatively small changes in ingredient ratios lend further support to the notion that high levels of skill and knowledge were required to consistently produce the most effective adhesives.

  12. Exploring the formation of focal adhesions on patterned surfaces using super-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Fan-Ching; Kuo, Chiung Wen; Yang, Zong-Han; Chueh, Di-Yen; Chen, Peilin

    2011-10-17

    The formation of focal adhesions on various sizes of fibronectin patterns, ranging from 200 μm to 250 nm, was systematically investigated by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and super-resolution imaging. It was found that cells adhered to and spread on these micro/nanopatterns, forming focal adhesions. On a micrometer scale the shape of the focal adhesions was elongated. However, on the nanometer scale, the shape of focal adhesions became dotlike. To further explore the distribution of focal adhesion proteins formed on surfaces, a localization-based super-resolution imaging technique was employed in order to determine the position and density of vinculin proteins. A characteristic distance of 50 nm was found between vinculin molecules in the focal adhesions, which did not depend on the size of the fibronectin nanopatterns. This distance was found to be crucial for the formation of focal adhesions. In addition, the density of vinculin at the focal adhesions formed on the nanopatterns increased as the pattern size decreased. The density of the protein was found to be 425 ± 247, 584 ± 302, and 703 ± 305 proteins μm(-2) on the 600, 400, and 250 nm fibronectin patterns respectively. Whereas 226 ± 77 proteins μm(-2) was measured for the matured focal adhesions on homogeneous fibronectin coated substrates. The increase in vinculin density implies that an increase in mechanical load was applied to the focal adhesions formed on the smaller nanopatterns.

  13. Capillarity-based switchable adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Michael J; Steen, Paul H

    2010-02-23

    Drawing inspiration from the adhesion abilities of a leaf beetle found in nature, we have engineered a switchable adhesion device. The device combines two concepts: The surface tension force from a large number of small liquid bridges can be significant (capillarity-based adhesion) and these contacts can be quickly made or broken with electronic control (switchable). The device grabs or releases a substrate in a fraction of a second via a low-voltage pulse that drives electroosmotic flow. Energy consumption is minimal because both the grabbed and released states are stable equilibria that persist with no energy added to the system. Notably, the device maintains the integrity of an array of hundreds to thousands of distinct interfaces during active reconfiguration from droplets to bridges and back, despite the natural tendency of the liquid toward coalescence. We demonstrate the scaling of adhesion strength with the inverse of liquid contact size. This suggests that strengths approaching those of permanent bonding adhesives are possible as feature size is scaled down. In addition, controllability is fast and efficient because the attachment time and required voltage also scale down favorably. The device features compact size, no solid moving parts, and is made of common materials.

  14. Polyurethane adhesives in flat roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogárová Markéta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to stabilize individual layers of flat roofs, mainly because of wind suction. Apart from anchoring and surcharge, these layers can be secured by bonding. At present gluing is an indispensable and widely used stabilization method. On our market we can found many types of adhesives, most widely used are based on polyurethane. This paper focuses on problematic about stabilization thermal insulation from expanded polystyrene to vapor barrier from bitumen. One of the main issues is to calculate the exact amount of adhesive, which is required to guarantee the resistance against wind suction. In this problematic we can not find help neither in technical data sheets provided by the manufactures. Some of these data sheets contain at least information about amount of adhesive depending on location in roof plane and building height, but they do not specify the strength of such connection. It was therefore resorted to select several representatives polyurethane adhesives and their subsequent testing on specimens simulating the flat roof segment. The paper described the test methodology and results for two types of polyurethane adhesives.

  15. The influence of water on visible-light initiated free-radical/cationic ring-opening hybrid polymerization of methacrylate/epoxy: Polymerization kinetics, crosslinking structure and dynamic mechanical properties

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of water on the polymerization kinetics, crosslinking structure and dynamic mechanical properties of methacrylate/epoxy polymers cured by visible-light initiated free-radical/cationic ring-opening hybrid polymerization. Water-containing formulations were prepared by adding ~4–7 wt% D2O depending on the water miscibility of monomer resins. The water-containing adhesives were compared with the adhesives photo-cured in the absence of wat...

  16. Phylogenetic distribution and evolutionary dynamics of the sex determination genes doublesex and transformer in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuverink, E; Beukeboom, L W

    2014-01-01

    Sex determination in insects is characterized by a gene cascade that is conserved at the bottom but contains diverse primary signals at the top. The bottom master switch gene doublesex is found in all insects. Its upstream regulator transformer is present in the orders Hymenoptera, Coleoptera and Diptera, but has thus far not been found in Lepidoptera and in the basal lineages of Diptera. transformer is presumed to be ancestral to the holometabolous insects based on its shared domains and conserved features of autoregulation and sex-specific splicing. We interpret that its absence in basal lineages of Diptera and its order-specific conserved domains indicate multiple independent losses or recruitments into the sex determination cascade. Duplications of transformer are found in derived families within the Hymenoptera, characterized by their complementary sex determination mechanism. As duplications are not found in any other insect order, they appear linked to the haplodiploid reproduction of the Hymenoptera. Further phylogenetic analyses combined with functional studies are needed to understand the evolutionary history of the transformer gene among insects.

  17. Structural and dynamical aspects of the distant magnetotail determined from ISEE-3 plasma measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hones, E.W.; Zwicki, R.D.; Fritz, T.A.; Bame, S.J.

    1986-10-01

    Large lateral displacements of the magnetotail at ISEE-3 orbital distances can result from the angular variations of solar wind flow that occur frequently. To determine the tail's shape and structure from the ISEE-3 measurements it is desirable to determine quantitatively the tail's displacement during such measurements. Three-dimensional solar wind measurements by IMP-8 have been used together with a new coordinate system, the Geocentric Solar Wind (GSW) system, which reflects solar wind direction changes (as well as earth dipole motion), to estimate the location of ISEE-3 within the tail cross-section. Preliminary tests suggest that at least those changes of satellite location within the tail resulting from long term (few hour) solar wind changes can be determined by the method. Energetic ion spectra, measured in plasmoids by ISEE-3 in the distant tail and by ISEE-2 at the time of the plasmoid's departure from the near tail, have the same exponential form, distinctly different from the power law form that has earlier been ascribed to plasma sheet ion spectra. The ions are trapped in the closed loops of the plasmoid and the major anisotropy that they show is due to their convective motion with the moving plasmoid, not to field-aligned streaming.

  18. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling in focal adhesions decreases cell motility and proliferation.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    It has been proposed that the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) mediates focal adhesion formation through tyrosine phosphorylation during cell adhesion. We investigated the role of FAK in focal adhesion structure and function. Loading cells with a glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein (GST-Cterm) containing the FAK focal adhesion targeting sequence, but not the kinase domain, decreased the association of endogenous FAK with focal adhesions. This displacement of endogenous FAK in both BALB/c 3T3 ...

  19. Life-history and spatial determinants of somatic growth dynamics in Komodo dragon populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca J Laver

    Full Text Available Somatic growth patterns represent a major component of organismal fitness and may vary among sexes and populations due to genetic and environmental processes leading to profound differences in life-history and demography. This study considered the ontogenic, sex-specific and spatial dynamics of somatic growth patterns in ten populations of the world's largest lizard the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis. The growth of 400 individual Komodo dragons was measured in a capture-mark-recapture study at ten sites on four islands in eastern Indonesia, from 2002 to 2010. Generalized Additive Mixed Models (GAMMs and information-theoretic methods were used to examine how growth rates varied with size, age and sex, and across and within islands in relation to site-specific prey availability, lizard population density and inbreeding coefficients. Growth trajectories differed significantly with size and between sexes, indicating different energy allocation tactics and overall costs associated with reproduction. This leads to disparities in maximum body sizes and longevity. Spatial variation in growth was strongly supported by a curvilinear density-dependent growth model with highest growth rates occurring at intermediate population densities. Sex-specific trade-offs in growth underpin key differences in Komodo dragon life-history including evidence for high costs of reproduction in females. Further, inverse density-dependent growth may have profound effects on individual and population level processes that influence the demography of this species.

  20. A Direct Comparison between Static and Dynamic Melting Temperature Determinations below 100 GPa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yu-Huai; HUANG Hai-Jun; LIU Fu-Sheng; YANG Mei-Xia; JING Fu-Qian

    2005-01-01

    @@ A preliminary experiment of sound velocity measurements for porous iron with initial average density of 6.275 g/cm3 has been performed at pressures below 100 GPa, in order to clarify a long-standing problem that the static melting temperature Tm, mostly below 100 GPa due to its technical limitations, is notably lower than the extrapolated melting data inferred from the shock wave experiments made above 200 GPa, for the sake of making a direct comparison between the experimental static and dynamic melting temperatures in the same pressure region.With the lately proposed Hugoniot sound velocity data analysis technique [Chin. Phys. Lett. 22 (2005) 863], the results deduced from this Hugoniot sound velocity measurement is Tm = 3200 K at 87GPa and Tm = 3080 K at80 GPa, which are in good agreement with the two latest static data ofTm = 3510 K at 105 GPa and Tm = 2750 K at 58 GPa, which utilized modern improved double-side laser heating and in situ accurate x-ray diffraction techniques in experiments. It can be concluded that consensus Tm data would be obtained from static and shock wave experiments in the case that the recently improved techniques are adopted in investigations.

  1. Determination of optimum rotational speed of heterogeneous catalytic reactor using computational fluid dynamic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rungrote Kokoo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Solid suspension in a stirrer tank reactor is relevant in many chemical process industries. For a heterogeneous catalyticreactor, the degree of solid suspension is a crucial parameter in the design and scaling-up processes. The suspension of solid catalysts at a minimum impeller speed can reduce the operating cost of processes. To ensure optimum conditions for suspension, a 3D simulation technique by Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD was used to study flow characteristics in a heterogeneous catalytic reactor. A case study of a 200 milliliter cylindrical reactor was modeled together with equipped parts, i.e. a sampling port, 2 baffles, one thermocouple and a mechanical stirrer. The results show that the total velocity increases from the impeller’s center to the impeller’s tip and decreases from the impeller’s tip to the side wall of the reactor. The vertical velocity at the bottom of the impellers directs flow upward while the velocity at the top directs flow downward. These simulations provide a good preview of solid suspension without doing experiments. It is recommended that the vertical velocity at thebottom of the reactor is in the range between minimum fluidization velocity and terminal velocity to ensure solid suspension inthe system.

  2. Growth and structural determination of He bubbles in iron/chromium alloys using molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhishek, A.; Warrier, M.; Ganesh, R.; Caro, A.

    2016-04-01

    Helium(He) produced by transmutation process inside structural material due to neutron irradiation plays a vital role in the degradation of material properties. We have carried out Molecular dynamics(MD) simulations to study the growth of He bubble in Iron-Chromium alloy. Simulations are carried out at two different temperatures, viz. 0.1 K and 800 K, upto He bubble radius of 2.5 nm. An equation for variation of volume of He bubbles with the number of He atoms is obtained at both the temperatures. Bubble pressure and potential energy variation is obtained with increasing bubble radius. Dislocations are also found to be emitted after the bubble reaches a critical radius of 0.39 nm at 800 K. Separate MD simulations of He with pre-created voids are also carried out to study the binding energies of He and Vacancy (V) to Hem-Vn cluster. Binding energies are found to be in the range of 1-5.5 eV.

  3. Efficient Determination of Relative Entropy Using Combined Temperature and Hamiltonian Replica-Exchange Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sunhwan; Chipot, Christophe; Roux, Benoît

    2015-05-12

    The performance and accuracy of different simulation schemes for estimating the entropy inferred from free energy calculations are tested. The results obtained from replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations based on a simplified toy model are compared to exact numerically derived ones to assess accuracy and convergence. It is observed that the error in entropy estimation decreases by at least an order of magnitude and the quantities of interest converge much faster when the simulations are coupled via a temperature REMD algorithm and the trajectories from different temperatures are combined. Simulations with the infinite-swapping method and its variants show some improvement over the traditional nearest-neighbor REMD algorithms, but they are more computationally expensive. To test the methodologies further, the free energy profile for the reversible association of two methane molecules in explicit water was calculated and decomposed into its entropic and enthalpic contributions. Finally, a strategy based on umbrella sampling computations carried out via simultaneous temperature and Hamiltonian REMD simulations is shown to yield the most accurate entropy estimation. The entropy profile between the two methane molecules displays the characteristic signature of a hydrophobic interaction.

  4. A two-stage method to determine optimal product sampling considering dynamic potential market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhineng; Lu, Wei; Han, Bing

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops an optimization model for the diffusion effects of free samples under dynamic changes in potential market based on the characteristics of independent product and presents a two-stage method to figure out the sampling level. The impact analysis of the key factors on the sampling level shows that the increase of the external coefficient or internal coefficient has a negative influence on the sampling level. And the changing rate of the potential market has no significant influence on the sampling level whereas the repeat purchase has a positive one. Using logistic analysis and regression analysis, the global sensitivity analysis gives a whole analysis of the interaction of all parameters, which provides a two-stage method to estimate the impact of the relevant parameters in the case of inaccuracy of the parameters and to be able to construct a 95% confidence interval for the predicted sampling level. Finally, the paper provides the operational steps to improve the accuracy of the parameter estimation and an innovational way to estimate the sampling level.

  5. Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Lawrence E

    2001-01-01

    Beginning text presents complete theoretical treatment of mechanical model systems and deals with technological applications. Topics include introduction to calculus of vectors, particle motion, dynamics of particle systems and plane rigid bodies, technical applications in plane motions, theory of mechanical vibrations, and more. Exercises and answers appear in each chapter.

  6. Effect of Curing Procedure on the Properties of Copper-Powder-Filled Conductive Adhesives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Xiaoling; ZHANG Lulu; YOU Min; WU Jianhao; YU Haizhou; YANG Derong; MAO Yuping

    2008-01-01

    By means of testing the shear strength with single lap joint, measuring electrical resistivity for cured products and the curing strain with strain gauges, the effect of cure parameters on the properties of HT1012 conductive adhesive filled with copper powder was investigated, and the residual stress in the conductive adhesives was also estimated. The experimental results show that the properties such as shear strength of the adhesives, electrical resistivity of products as well as the residual stress of cured HT1012 copper-filled conductive adhesive were evidently affected by curing temperature and time. The diagrams of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) were also used to determine the properties. The higher mechanical property was achieved under the condition of curing the adhesive 3h at 60℃ as the density of the hydrogen links or linkages existed in the adhesive was relatively higher and the lower electrical resistivity occurred at 80℃.

  7. Dry-adhesives based on hierarchical poly(methyl methacrylate) electrospun fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Rahul; Baji, Avinash; Parveen, Hashina; Ranganath, Anupama Sargur

    2017-03-01

    Here, we combine electrospinning and replica-molding to produce hierarchical poly(methyl methacrylate) structures and investigate its adhesion behavior. Normal and shear adhesion of these biomimetic hierarchical structures was measured using nanoindentaton and a custom-built apparatus attached to Zwick tensile testing machine, respectively. Shear adhesion was measured by sliding the samples along the glass slide under a predefined normal preload. Normal adhesion was measured by indenting the surface of the sample with the help of a diamond indenter tip and retracting it back to determine the pull-off force needed to detach it from the sample. These experiments were also conducted on neat PMMA fibers to investigate the effect of hierarchy on the adhesion performance of the samples. Our results show that the shear adhesion strength and pull-off forces recorded for the hierarchical samples are higher than those recorded for neat fibers.

  8. Analysis of domain wall dynamics based on skewness of magnetic Barkhausen noise for applied stress determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Song; Tian, GuiYun; Dobmann, Gerd; Wang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Skewness of Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) signal is used as a new feature for applied stress determination. After experimental studies, skewness presents its ability for measuring applied tensile stress compared with conventional feature, meanwhile, a non-linear behavior of this new feature and an independence of the excitation conditions under compressive stress are found and discussed. Effective damping during domain wall motion influencing the asymmetric shape of the MBN statistical distribution function is discussed under compressive and tensile stress variation. Domain wall (DW) energy and distance between pinning edges of the DW are considered altering the characteristic relaxation time, which is the reason for the non-linear phenomenon of skewness.

  9. Determination of Scaling Parameter and Dynamical Resonances in Complex-Rotated Hamiltonian Ⅰ: Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Heng-Mei; ZHAO Fang; YUAN Hong-Chun; ZHAO Mei-Shan

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a theoretical analysis on the determination of the scaling parameter in the complex-rotated Hamiltonian, which has served as a basis for successful applications of the rigged Hilbert space theory for resonances. Based on the complex energy eigenvalue, E(θ) = En(θ) - iF(θ)/2, as a function of the scaling parameter The condition dER(θR)/ dθ = 0 is merely a consequence of the Virial theorem and θⅠ = θR is not a necessary condition for a resonance state. We also provide a harmonic approximation formalism for resonances in scattering over a potential barrier.

  10. A Dynamic Analysis of Capital Structure Determinants. Empirical Results for Romanian Capital Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Dragota

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of capital structure and its determinants represents an useful approach for the Romanian and foreign investors and for the companies, at the same time. The main conclusion for capital structure analysis was that Romanian listed companies sustained their assets, in this order, on equity, commercial debt and, finally, on financial debt. The four variables used in the regression model are significant. The pecking order theory seemed to be more appropriate for the Romanian capital market, but the signalling theory was not entirely rejected.

  11. Elastic properties determination of CuInSe2 polycrystalline thin films via a dynamic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadjoub, Z; Merdes, S; Hadjoub, I; Doghmane, A, E-mail: z_hadjoub@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire des Semi-Conducteurs, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Badji-Mokhtar, BP 12, Annaba, DZ-23000 (Algeria)

    2010-11-15

    Developing and using a simulation program based on the spectrum angular model, we first determine reflectance functions and acoustic signatures for bulk as well as for different thickness of CuInSe2 films. For bulk material, it is found that the longitudinal and Rayleigh modes are excited at incidence angles of 23.4{sup 0} and 47{sup 0}, respectively. This result reveals the great difficulties to characterize CuInSe2 with a conventional scanning acoustic microscope that uses a lens half- opening angle of 50{sup 0} and water as a coupling liquid. Hence, Freon is used as alternative coupling liquid. Consequently, the effect of thickness on reflection coefficient and acoustic signature variations are quantified for both bulk and thin material. It is shown that as the thickness increases: (i) the critical angle of mode excitation increases, (ii) the periods of acoustic signature curves decrease and (iii) the Rayleigh velocity, VR, mode shifts towards lower values. Hence, a velocity dispersion curve is established in terms of VR as a function of film thickness; it decreases initially from the velocity value of the glass substrate then saturates when it reaches that of CuInSe2. The importance of such curve lies in the possibility of velocity determination by just knowing the thickness, and vice versa. Moreover, elastic constants are straight forward deduced from such a velocity.

  12. Flood regime and leaf fall determine soil inorganic nitrogen dynamics in semiarid riparian forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, J J Follstad; Dahm, C N

    2008-04-01

    Flow regulation has reduced the exchange of water, energy, and materials between rivers and floodplains, caused declines in native plant populations, and advanced the spread of nonnative plants. Naturalized flow regimes are regarded as a means to restore degraded riparian areas. We examined the effects of flood regime (short [SIFI] vs. long [LIFI] inter-flood interval) on plant community and soil inorganic nitrogen (N) dynamics in riparian forests dominated by native Populus deltoides var. wislizenii Eckenwalder (Rio Grande cottonwood) and nonnative Tamarix chinensis Lour. (salt cedar) along the regulated middle Rio Grande of New Mexico. The frequency of inundation (every 2-3 years) at SIFI sites better reflected inundation patterns prior to the closure of an upstream dam relative to the frequency of inundation at LIFI sites (> or =10 years). Riparian inundation at SIFI sites varied from 7 to 45 days during the study period (April 2001-July 2004). SIFI vs. LIFI sites had higher soil moisture but greater groundwater table elevation fluctuation in response to flooding and drought. Rates of net N mineralization were consistently higher at LIFI vs. SIFI sites, and soil inorganic N concentrations were greatest at sites with elevated leaf-litter production. Sites with stable depth to ground water (approximately 1.5 m) supported the greatest leaf-litter production. Reduced leaf production at P. deltoides SIFI sites was attributed to drought-induced recession of ground water and prolonged inundation. We recommend that natural resource managers and restoration practitioners (1) utilize naturalized flows that help maintain riparian groundwater elevations between 1 and 3 m in reaches with mature P. deltoides or where P. deltoides revegetation is desired, (2) identify areas that naturally undergo long periods of inundation and consider restoring these areas to seasonal wetlands, and (3) use native xeric-adapted riparian plants to revegetate LIFI and SIFI sites where

  13. pKa values in proteins determined by electrostatics applied to molecular dynamics trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Tim; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2015-06-09

    For a benchmark set of 194 measured pKa values in 13 proteins, electrostatic energy computations are performed in which pKa values are computed by solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. In contrast to the previous approach of Karlsberg(+) (KB(+)) that essentially used protein crystal structures with variations in their side chain conformations, the present approach (KB2(+)MD) uses protein conformations from four molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 10 ns each. These MD simulations are performed with different specific but fixed protonation patterns, selected to sample the conformational space for the different protonation patterns faithfully. The root-mean-square deviation between computed and measured pKa values (pKa RMSD) is shown to be reduced from 1.17 pH units using KB(+) to 0.96 pH units using KB2(+)MD. The pKa RMSD can be further reduced to 0.79 pH units, if each conformation is energy-minimized with a dielectric constant of εmin = 4 prior to calculating the electrostatic energy. The electrostatic energy expressions upon which the computations are based have been reformulated such that they do not involve terms that mix protein and solvent environment contributions and no thermodynamic cycle is needed. As a consequence, conformations of the titratable residues can be treated independently in the protein and solvent environments. In addition, the energy terms used here avoid the so-called intrinsic pKa and can therefore be interpreted without reference to arbitrary protonation states and conformations.

  14. Towards the determination of Mytilus edulis food preferences using the dynamic energy budget (DEB) theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picoche, Coralie; Le Gendre, Romain; Flye-Sainte-Marie, Jonathan; Françoise, Sylvaine; Maheux, Frank; Simon, Benjamin; Gangnery, Aline

    2014-01-01

    The blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, is a commercially important species, with production based on both fisheries and aquaculture. Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) models have been extensively applied to study its energetics but such applications require a deep understanding of its nutrition, from filtration to assimilation. Being filter feeders, mussels show multiple responses to temporal fluctuations in their food and environment, raising questions that can be investigated by modeling. To provide a better insight into mussel-environment interactions, an experiment was conducted in one of the main French growing zones (Utah Beach, Normandy). Mussel growth was monitored monthly for 18 months, with a large number of environmental descriptors measured in parallel. Food proxies such as chlorophyll a, particulate organic carbon and phytoplankton were also sampled, in addition to non-nutritious particles. High-frequency physical data recording (e.g., water temperature, immersion duration) completed the habitat description. Measures revealed an increase in dry flesh mass during the first year, followed by a high mass loss, which could not be completely explained by the DEB model using raw external signals. We propose two methods that reconstruct food from shell length and dry flesh mass variations. The former depends on the inversion of the growth equation while the latter is based on iterative simulations. Assemblages of food proxies are then related to reconstructed food input, with a special focus on plankton species. A characteristic contribution is attributed to these sources to estimate nutritional values for mussels. M. edulis shows no preference between most plankton life history traits. Selection is based on the size of the ingested particles, which is modified by the volume and social behavior of plankton species. This finding reveals the importance of diet diversity and both passive and active selections, and confirms the need to adjust DEB models to different

  15. Bacterial Adhesion Forces to Ag-Impregnated Contact Lens Cases and Transmission to Contact Lenses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qu, Wenwen; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To measure adhesion forces of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Serratia marcescens to a rigid contact lens (CL), standard polypropylene, and Ag-impregnated lens cases using atomic force microscopy and determine bacterial transmission from lens case to CL. Methods: Adhesion

  16. Influence of surface roughness on streptococcal adhesion forces to composite resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, Li; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Ren, Yijin

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine streptococcal adhesion forces with composite resins with different surface roughness. METHODS: Polishing and grinding were applied to obtain smooth (roughness 20 nm), moderately rough (150 nm) and rough (350 nm) surfaces of two orthodontic, light-cured composites. Adhesion fo

  17. A method for predicting critical load evaluating adhesion of coatings in scratch testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xi-fang(陈溪芳); YAN Mi(严密); YANG De-ren(杨德人); HIROSE Yukio

    2003-01-01

    In this paper based on the experiment principle of evaluating adhesion property by scratch testing, the peeling mechanism of thin films is discussed by applying contact theory and surface physics theory. A mathematical model predicting the critical load is proposed for calculating critical load as determined by scratch testing. The factors for correctly evaluating adhesion of coatings according to the experimental data are discussed.

  18. Plasticizers increase adhesion of the deteriogenic fungus Aureobasidium pullulans to polyvinyl chloride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Webb, JS; Van der Mei, HC; Nixon, M; Eastwood, IM; Greenhalgh, M; Read, SJ; Robson, GD; Handley, PS

    1999-01-01

    Initial adhesion of fungi to plasticized polyvinyl chloride (pPVC) may determine subsequent colonization and biodeterioration processes. The deteriogenic fungus Aureobasidium pullulans was used to investigate the physicochemical nature of adhesion to both unplasticized PVC (uPVC) and pPVC containing

  19. On complex Langevin dynamics and zeroes of the measure II: Fermionic determinant

    CERN Document Server

    Aarts, G; Sexty, D; Stamatescu, I -O

    2016-01-01

    Lattice QCD at non-vanishing chemical potential is studied using the complex Langevin equation (CLE). One of the conditions for the correctness of the results of the CLE is that the zeroes of the measure coming from the fermionic determinant are outside of the distribution of the configurations, or at least in a region where support for the distribution is very much suppressed. We investigate this issue for Heavy Dense QCD (HDQCD) and full QCD at high temperatures. In HDQCD it is found that the configurations move closest to the zeroes of the measure around the critical chemical potential of the onset transition, where the sign problem is diminished, but results remain largely unaffected. In full QCD at high temperatures the investigation of the spectrum of the Dirac operator yields a similar observation: the results are unaffected by the issue of the poles.

  20. Determination and dynamics of ethylicin residues in cotton-field ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zilei; Zhang, Hong; Ding, Ruiyan; Wang, Wenzheng; Wang, Wenbo; Li, Huidong

    2012-10-01

    In this work, we developed an efficient method to determine the ethylicin content in soil, cotton plant and cotton seed, and we also studied the fate of ethylicin in the cotton field ecosystem. The residual ethylicin was analyzed by GC-ECD. The limit of quantification was 0.005 mg/kg for soil, 0.01 mg/kg for the plant and cotton seed. The kinetics study of ethylicin residue showed that the ethylicin concentration in plant and soil can be regressively quantified as C = 1.0762e(-0.2529t) and C = 0.5535e(-0.1333t), representing a half-live of 2.7 and 5.2 days, respectively. As a conclusion, a dosage of 354 g a.i. ha(-1) was recommended, which could be considered as safe to human beings and animals.