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Sample records for adherent cellular cultures

  1. Automated and Online Characterization of Adherent Cell Culture Growth in a Microfabricated Bioreactor

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    Jaccard, Nicolas; Macown, Rhys J.; Super, Alexandre; Griffin, Lewis D.; Veraitch, Farlan S.

    2014-01-01

    Adherent cell lines are widely used across all fields of biology, including drug discovery, toxicity studies, and regenerative medicine. However, adherent cell processes are often limited by a lack of advances in cell culture systems. While suspension culture processes benefit from decades of development of instrumented bioreactors, adherent cultures are typically performed in static, noninstrumented flasks and well-plates. We previously described a microfabricated bioreactor that enables a high degree of control on the microenvironment of the cells while remaining compatible with standard cell culture protocols. In this report, we describe its integration with automated image-processing capabilities, allowing the continuous monitoring of key cell culture characteristics. A machine learning–based algorithm enabled the specific detection of one cell type within a co-culture setting, such as human embryonic stem cells against the background of fibroblast cells. In addition, the algorithm did not confuse image artifacts resulting from microfabrication, such as scratches on surfaces, or dust particles, with cellular features. We demonstrate how the automation of flow control, environmental control, and image acquisition can be employed to image the whole culture area and obtain time-course data of mouse embryonic stem cell cultures, for example, for confluency. PMID:24692228

  2. Photosensitizer Adhered to Cell Culture Microplates Induces Phototoxicity in Carcinoma Cells

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    Verena Ziegler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro experiments in plastic receptacles are the basis of characterization of new photosensitizers (PSs for the photodynamic therapy. We recently reported that lipophilic PSs adhere to cell culture microplates in a kinetic-like manner (Engelhardt et al., 2011. In the current study, we examined the interaction and phototoxic effects of the microplate-adhered PS in cancer cells. Therefore, we preloaded microplates with hypericin, Foscan, PVP-hypericin, or aluminum (III phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate chloride (AlPCS4 for 24 hours and measured the PS distribution after addition of A431 human carcinoma cells: following another 24 hours up to 68% of hypericin were detected in the cell fraction. The hydrophilic PVP-hypericin and AlPCS4 also diffused into the cells, but the quantities of PS adherence were considerably lower. Microplate-adhered Foscan appeared not to be redistributed. In contrast to the hydrophilic PSs, the cellular phototoxicity of microplate-adhered lipophilic PS was high, independent of whether the PS (i was pre-loaded onto microplates or (ii added simultaneously with the cells or (iii one day after cell seeding. Based on these results, we suggest testing lipophilic PS dyes for their adherence to microplates. Furthermore, the ability of plastic materials to (reversibly store PSs might represent a new approach for the PS delivery or the development of antimicrobial coatings.

  3. Generation of a patterned co-culture system composed of adherent cells and immobilized nonadherent cells.

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    Yamazoe, Hironori; Ichikawa, Takashi; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko

    2016-02-01

    Patterned co-culture is a promising technique used for fundamental investigation of cell-cell communication and tissue engineering approaches. However, conventional methods are inapplicable to nonadherent cells. In this study, we aimed to establish a patterned co-culture system composed of adherent and nonadherent cells. Nonadherent cells were immobilized on a substrate using a cell membrane anchoring reagent conjugated to a protein, in order to incorporate them into the co-culture system. Cross-linked albumin film, which has unique surface properties capable of regulating protein adsorption, was used to control their spatial localization. The utility of our approach was demonstrated through the fabrication of a patterned co-culture consisting of micropatterned neuroblastoma cells surrounded by immobilized myeloid cells. Furthermore, we also created a co-culture system composed of cancer cells and immobilized monocytes. We observed that monocytes enhanced the drug sensitivity of cancer cells and its influence was limited to cancer cells located near the monocytes. Therefore, the incorporation of nonadherent cells into a patterned co-culture system is useful for creating culture systems containing immune cells, as well as investigating the influence of these immune cells on cancer drug sensitivity. Various methods have been proposed for creating patterned co-culture systems, in which multiple cell types are attached to a substrate with a desired pattern. However, conventional methods, including our previous report published in Acta Biomaterialia (2010, 6, 526-533), are unsuitable for nonadherent cells. Here, we developed a novel method that incorporates nonadherent cells into the co-culture system, which allows us to precisely manipulate and study microenvironments containing nonadherent and adherent cells. Using this technique, we demonstrated that monocytes (nonadherent cells) could enhance the drug sensitivity of cancer cells and that their influence had a

  4. Nanoscale E-Cadherin ligand patterns show threshold size for cellular adhesion and adherence junction formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Stine H; Pedersen, Gitte Albinus; Nejsum, Lene Niemann

    2012-01-01

    of adherence junctions in epithelial cells. Cells at 100 nm patterns show poor adhesion, while larger pattern sizes show both good adhesion, significant spreading and defined cortical actin. We estimate a threshold of 0.03μm2 for epithelial cellular attachment via E-Cadherin......The role of ligand spatial distribution on the formation of cadherin mediated cell-cell contacts is studied utilizing nanopatterns of E-cadherin ligands. Protein patches ranging in size from 100 nm to 800 nm prepared by colloidal lithography critically influence adhesion, spreading and formation...

  5. Cultural and clinical factors associated with antihypertensive medication adherence in Vietnamese policemen

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    Wen-Wen Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to characterize Vietnamese policemen with hypertension, to report the proportion of hypertension control and medication adherence in Vietnamese policemen, and to explore cultural and clinical factors related to antihypertensive medication adherence. A cross-sectional study design was used. A convenience sample of 100 policemen with hypertension was recruited in Vietnam. A total score of 80% or more on the Medication Adherence scale was defined as medication adherence. Medication adherence was reported in 64% of the participants, but hypertension control was found in only 53%. Medication adherence was higher in the participants with higher perceived susceptibility to hypertension-related complications, higher perceived benefit of Western anti-hypertensive medications, longer duration of time since diagnosis, and fewer prescribed blood pressure lowering medications. Vietnamese policemen are at high risk for poor medication adherence and hypertension management. Culturally and clinically appropriate nursing interventions for hypertension management in Vietnamese policemen are needed.

  6. Communication and culture: predictors of treatment adherence among Mexican immigrant patients.

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    Villagran, Melinda; Hajek, Christopher; Zhao, Xiaoquan; Peterson, Emily; Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine

    2012-04-01

    This study examined communication and culture in clinicians' interactions with Mexican immigrants in Texas. Specifically, we explore the unique interplay among levels of acculturation, beliefs about culturally-based medical practices, perceptions of medical encounters, and the likelihood of adherence to medical therapy recommendations from US providers. Results suggest that: (a) acculturation predicts perceptions of out-group membership in the patient-provider interaction; (b) beliefs about complementary and alternative medicine are negatively related to medical adherence; (c) quality of care mediates the relationship between physician accommodation and medical adherence; and (d) there exists a complex relationship between out-group perceptions and adherence.

  7. Agglomeration, sedimentation, and cellular toxicity of alumina nanoparticles in cell culture medium

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    Yoon, Dokyung [Sungkyunkwan University, SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT) (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Daekwang [Sungkyunkwan University, School of Mechanical Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Heon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moon Ki; Kim, Taesung [Sungkyunkwan University, SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT) (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Eung-Soo, E-mail: hesss@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology (Korea, Republic of); Baik, Seunghyun, E-mail: sbaik@me.skku.ac.kr [Sungkyunkwan University, SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT) (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    The cytotoxicity of alumina nanoparticles (NPs) was investigated for a wide range of concentration (25-200 {mu}g/mL) and incubation time (0-72 h) using floating cells (THP-1) and adherent cells (J774A.1, A549, and 293). Alumina NPs were gradually agglomerated over time although a significant portion of sedimentation occurred at the early stage within 6 h. A decrease of the viability was found in floating (THP-1) and adherent (J774A.1 and A549) cells in a dose-dependent manner. However, the time-dependent decrease in cell viability was observed only in adherent cells (J774A.1 and A549), which is predominantly related with the sedimentation of alumina NPs in cell culture medium. The uptake of alumina NPs in macrophages and an increased cell-to-cell adhesion in adherent cells were observed. There was no significant change in the viability of 293 cells. This in vitro test suggests that the agglomeration and sedimentation of alumina NPs affected cellular viability depending on cell types such as monocytes (THP-1), macrophages (J774A.1), lung carcinoma cells (A549), and embryonic kidney cells (293).

  8. Organizational culture affecting quality of care: guideline adherence in perioperative antibiotic use.

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    Ukawa, Naoto; Tanaka, Masayuki; Morishima, Toshitaka; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this work was to elucidate aspects of organizational culture associated with hospital performance in perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis using quantitative data in a multicenter and multidimensional study. Cross-sectional retrospective study using a survey data and administrative data. Eighty-three acute hospitals in Japan. A total of 4856 respondents in the organizational culture study, and 23 172 patients for the quality indicator analysis. Multilevel models of various cultural dimensions were used to analyze the association between hospital organizational culture and guideline adherence. The dependent variable was adherence or non-adherence to Japanese and CDC guidelines at the patient level and main independent variable was hospital groups categorized according to organizational culture score. Other control variables included hospital characteristics such as ownership, bed capacity, region and urbanization level of location. The multilevel analysis showed that hospitals with a high score in organizational culture were more likely to adhere to the Japanese and CDC guidelines when compared with lower scoring hospitals. In particular, the hospital group with high scores in the 'collaboration' and 'professional growth' dimensions had three times the odds for Japanese guideline adherence in comparison with low-scoring hospitals. Our study revealed that various aspects of organizational culture were associated with adherence to guidelines for perioperative antibiotic use. Hospital managers aiming to improve quality of care may benefit from improving hospital organizational culture. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  9. Adherence of oral "Streptococcus milleri" cells to surfaces in broth cultures.

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    Eifuku-Koreeda, H; Yakushiji, T; Kitada, K; Inoue, M

    1991-01-01

    Cells of representative strains of oral "Streptococcus milleri" firmly adhered to glass surfaces when grown in glucose broths as well as in fructose and sucrose broths. Cellular adherence occurred on saliva-coated glass surfaces as well as uncoated surfaces, but the cells of only a few (6 of 69) tested adherent strains agglutinated upon the addition of human whole-saliva supernatant. Thus, the firm adherence of growing "S. milleri" cells is independent of sucrose and salivary macromolecules. Two macroscopic forms of cell adherence were observed: one was a coarse-granule type and one was a tiny-granule type covered with a thin homogeneous membranous material. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that, in both types, a stringy substance interconnected the cells and connected the cells to glass surfaces, with amorphous flocklike materials present in the intercellular space. Of the 154 tested strains, 128 were adherent, of which 90 were firmly and extensively (+2 or +3) adherent. Most strains of the serovars f/F, g, h, i, j, g-, and gj- were extensively adherent. Generally, cells of the more strongly adherent strains were more hydrophobic and spontaneously aggregating. However, there also existed a few hydrophilic and nonaggregating but extensively adherent strains. The presence of trypsin or pronase completely inhibited the adherence of some strains (mostly nonaggregating) but did not at all inhibit that of others (mostly aggregating). The adhering groups did not significantly differ in their cell surface hydrophobicities. Therefore, at least two factors, one proteinaceous and one nonproteinaceous, appear to be principally involved in the firm surface adherence of "S. milleri." Images PMID:1937769

  10. Three-dimensional culture and bioreactors for cellular therapies.

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    Naing, M W; Williams, D J

    2011-04-01

    A bioreactor is defined as a specifically designed vessel to facilitate the growth of organisms and cells through application of physical and/or electrical stimulus. When cells with therapeutic potential were first discovered, they were initially cultured and expanded in two-dimensional (2-D) culture vessels such as plates or T-flasks. However, it was soon discovered that bioreactors could be used to expand and maintain cultures more easily and efficiently. Since then, bioreactors have come to be accepted as an indispensable tool to advance cell and tissue culture further. A wide array of bioreactors has been developed to date, and in recent years businesses have started supplying bioreactors commercially. Bioreactors in the research arena range from stirred tank bioreactors for suspension culture to those with various mechanical actuators that can apply different fluidic and mechanical stresses to tissues and three-dimensional (3-D) scaffolds. As regenerative medicine gains more traction in the clinic, bioreactors for use with cellular therapies are being developed and marketed. While many of the simpler bioreactors are fit for purpose, others fail to satisfy the complex requirements of tissues in culture. We have examined the use of different types of bioreactors in regenerative medicine and evaluated the application of bioreactors in the realization of emerging cellular therapies.

  11. Cellular Cytotoxicity of Antiglaucoma Drugs in Cultured Corneal Endothelial Cells

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    Kwou-Yeung Wu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the various antiglaucoma drugs including betaxolol, timolol, levobunolol, carteolol, brimonidine, dipivefrin, dorzolamide, brinzolamide, latanoprost, unoprostone, and pilocarpine were used to investigate the effects of cellular cytotoxicity in cultured bovine corneal endothelial cells. After exposure to the drugs in three dilutions, 1/100, 1/1,000, and 1/10,000, for 100 minutes, cells were estimated based on the release assay of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH enzyme. It was found that cellular LDH was significantly released in the medium only at 1/100th dilution of betaxolol, brimonidine, dorzolamide, dipivefrin, latanoprost and unoprostone to 130%, 123%, 145%, 157%, 128% and 237%, respectively, compared with controls upon exposure to drugs for 100 minutes. Moreover, benzalkonium chloride preservative at the concentrations ranging from 0.001 to 0.00001mg/mL did not affect cellular LDH release in bovine corneal endothelial cells. These results indicate that high concentrations of antiglaucoma drugs may induce cytotoxicity in corneal endothelial cells.

  12. Automated method for the rapid and precise estimation of adherent cell culture characteristics from phase contrast microscopy images.

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    Jaccard, Nicolas; Griffin, Lewis D; Keser, Ana; Macown, Rhys J; Super, Alexandre; Veraitch, Farlan S; Szita, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    The quantitative determination of key adherent cell culture characteristics such as confluency, morphology, and cell density is necessary for the evaluation of experimental outcomes and to provide a suitable basis for the establishment of robust cell culture protocols. Automated processing of images acquired using phase contrast microscopy (PCM), an imaging modality widely used for the visual inspection of adherent cell cultures, could enable the non-invasive determination of these characteristics. We present an image-processing approach that accurately detects cellular objects in PCM images through a combination of local contrast thresholding and post hoc correction of halo artifacts. The method was thoroughly validated using a variety of cell lines, microscope models and imaging conditions, demonstrating consistently high segmentation performance in all cases and very short processing times (microscopy image processing pipelines. Furthermore, PCM image segmentation was used to facilitate the interpretation and analysis of fluorescence microscopy data, enabling the determination of temporal and spatial expression patterns of a fluorescent reporter. We created a software toolbox (PHANTAST) that bundles all the algorithms and provides an easy to use graphical user interface. Source-code for MATLAB and ImageJ is freely available under a permissive open-source license. © 2013 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Cellular basis for tentacle adherence in the Portuguese man-of-war (Physalia physalis).

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    Cormier, S M; Hessinger, D A

    1980-01-01

    The fishing tentacles of Physalia physalis (Portuguese man-of-war) adhere to prey and human victims by the penetration of a barbed tubule connected to an intracellular nematocyst. The nematocyst is surrounded by a fibrillar system of microtubules and microfilaments that terminate in hemidesmosomal processes which anchor the nematocyst to the acellular mesoglea of the tentacle.

  14. Microfluidic bioreactors for culture of non-adherent cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Pranjul Jaykumar; Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Kwasny, Dorota

    2011-01-01

    was also verified with simulations. Finally, we present the application of this device for cytogenetic sample preparation, whereby we culture and arrest peripheral T-lymphocytes in metaphase and later fix them in the μBR. The expansion of T-lymphocytes from an unknown patient sample was quantified by means...... of CFSE staining and subsequent counting in a flow cytometer. To conclude on the applicability of μBR for genetic diagnostics, we prepare chromosome spreads on glass slides from the cultured samples, which is the primary step for metaphase FISH analysis....

  15. Cultural constructs, stage of change, and adherence to mammography among low-income African American women.

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    Steele-Moses, Susan K; Russell, Kathleen M; Kreuter, Matthew; Monahan, Patrick; Bourff, Sara; Champion, Victoria L

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the predictive relationships between cultural belief and stage of change and mammography adherence in low-income Midwestern African American urban women (N=321). Secondary analysis of questionnaire data measuring religiosity, racial pride, family collectivism, future and present time orientation, and stage of mammography screening adoption was conducted. Religiosity (OR=1.12; p=.002) and future time orientation (OR=1.12; p=.05) predicted mammography adherence with a positive association, while present time orientation (OR=0.91; p=.05) was significantly negatively associated. Religiosity (OR=1.11; p=.002) and future time orientation (OR=1.12; p=.05) were positive predictions of stage progression, whereas present time orientation (OR=0.90; p=.03) had a significant negative relationship. By identifying cultural variables that are related to mammography adherence in African American women, mammography-promoting interventions can be more effectively tailored.

  16. Development of a cell culture surface conversion technique using alginate thin film for evaluating effect upon cellular differentiation

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    Nakashima, Y., E-mail: yuta-n@mech.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 096-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamaguchi University, 2-16-1 Tokiwadai, Ube 755-8611 (Japan); Tsusu, K.; Minami, K. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamaguchi University, 2-16-1 Tokiwadai, Ube 755-8611 (Japan); Nakanishi, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 096-8555 (Japan)

    2014-06-15

    Here, we sought to develop a cell culture surface conversion technique that would not damage living cells. An alginate thin film, formed on a glass plate by spin coating of sodium alginate solution and dipping into calcium chloride solution, was used to inhibit adhesion of cells. The film could be removed by ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) at any time during cell culture, permitting observation of cellular responses to conversion of the culture surface in real time. Additionally, we demonstrated the validity of the alginate thin film coating method and the performance of the film. The thickness of the alginate thin film was controlled by varying the rotation speed during spin coating. Moreover, the alginate thin film completely inhibited the adhesion of cultured cells to the culture surface, irrespective of the thickness of the film. When the alginate thin film was removed from the culture surface by EDTA, the cultured cells adhered to the culture surface, and their morphology changed. Finally, we achieved effective differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotube cells by cell culture on the convertible culture surface, demonstrating the utility of our novel technique.

  17. Medication adherence in people of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds: a meta-analysis.

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    Manias, Elizabeth; Williams, Allison

    2010-06-01

    Medication adherence is of particular importance for people of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds due to language difficulties, lack of social and organizational supports, lack of access to healthcare resources, and disengagement with the health-care system. To evaluate the impact of interventions to improve medication adherence in people of CALD backgrounds through a systematic review and meta-analysis. A search was performed using the following databases: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature, EMBASE, Journals@Ovid, PsychInfo, PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus, and Web of Science. Databases were searched from January 1978 to October 2009. Forty-six articles reviewed were assessed as being relevant, which included 36 randomized controlled trials, 2 observational cohort studies, and 8 quasi-experimental studies. The most common method for assessing medication adherence was self-reporting measures, such as the Morisky Scale and its modifications. Few studies used combinations of adherence measures, and adherence involving a medication event monitoring system (MEMS) was used in only 6 studies. Individuals of CALD backgrounds were recruited with people of non-CALD backgrounds and subsequent analyses tended to be undertaken of the whole sample. Twenty studies showed statistically significant improvements in medication adherence, 15 of which were randomized controlled trials. Six of the successful interventions involved delivery by a bilingual person or the use of translated materials and 4 involved the use of a conceptual model. Meta-analyses demonstrated modest improvements in medication adherence. Relatively little high-quality work has been conducted on adherence-enhancing interventions for people of CALD backgrounds. Greater attention needs to be given to examining the needs of specific CALD population groups. Future researchers should consider rigorously testing interventions that take

  18. Cellular Changes of Stem Cells in 3-Dimensional Culture.

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    Green, Matthew P; Hou, Bo

    2017-11-01

    During various operations and procedures, such as distraction osteogenesis and orthodontics, skeletal tissues use mechanotransduction. Mechanotransduction is important for maintaining bone health and converting mechanical forces into biochemical signals. We hypothesized that cells put under mechanical stress would adapt and change morphologically and respond with a decrease in cellular proliferation to accommodate the stress differences. These differences will be measured at the molecular and genetic level. We also wanted to test the practicality of an in vitro 3-dimensional gel model system. We implemented a 3-dimensional cell culture model. The sample was composed of isolated mouse mesenchymal prefibroblast bone marrow cells from the femurs and tibias of 6- to 8-week-old wild-type C57BL6 mice. The cells were seeded on fibronectin-coated hydrogels along with fibrin and nodulin growth factors. The variables tested were a no-force model (control) and a force model. The force model required two 0.1-mm suture pins put through one 0.25-cm length of cell-gel matrix. After the experiments were run to completion, the samples were fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde and embedded in paraffin. Serial sections were cut at a thickness of 5 μm along the long axis for the force construct and encompassing the entire circular area of the control construct. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were computed, and the P value was set at 5%. There was a statistically significant difference between the 2 models. The force model had longer and straighter primary cilia, less apoptosis, and an increase in cell proliferation. In addition, the shape of the cells was markedly different after the experiment. The results of the study suggest cells put under tensile stress have the ability to mechanically sense the environment to provide improved adaptation. Our work also confirms the usefulness of the in vitro 3-dimensional gel model system to mimic in vivo applications. Published by Elsevier

  19. The influence of cultural and religious orientations on social support and its potential impact on medication adherence.

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    Hatah, Ernieda; Lim, Kien Ping; Ali, Adliah Mohd; Mohamed Shah, Noraida; Islahudin, Farida

    2015-01-01

    Social support can positively influence patients' health outcomes through a number of mechanisms, such as increases in patients' adherence to medication. Although there have been studies on the influence of social support on medication adherence, these studies were conducted in Western settings, not in Asian settings where cultural and religious orientations may be different. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of cultural orientation and religiosity on social support and its relation to patients' medication adherence. This was a cross-sectional study of patients with chronic diseases in two tertiary hospitals in Selangor, Malaysia. Patients who agreed to participate in the study were asked to answer questions in the following areas: 1) perceived group and higher authority cultural orientations; 2) religiosity: organizational and non-organizational religious activities, and intrinsic religiosity; 3) perceived social support; and 4) self-reported medication adherence. Patients' medication adherence was modeled using multiple logistic regressions, and only variables with a P-value of social support (r=0.181, P=0.003; r=0.230, Pinfluence patients' adherence to medications (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.05, P=0.002; OR 0.99, P=0.025; OR 1.19, P=0.038; and OR 9.08, Psocial support was not found to have significant influence on patients' medication adherence. Only age, duration of treatment, organizational religious activity, and disease type (human immunodeficiency virus) had significant influence on patients' adherence.

  20. Glioma stem cell lines expanded in adherent culture have tumor-specific phenotypes and are suitable for chemical and genetic screens.

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    Pollard, Steven M; Yoshikawa, Koichi; Clarke, Ian D; Danovi, Davide; Stricker, Stefan; Russell, Roslin; Bayani, Jane; Head, Renee; Lee, Marco; Bernstein, Mark; Squire, Jeremy A; Smith, Austin; Dirks, Peter

    2009-06-05

    Human brain tumors appear to have a hierarchical cellular organization suggestive of a stem cell foundation. In vitro expansion of the putative cancer stem cells as stable cell lines would provide a powerful model system to study their biology. Here, we demonstrate routine and efficient derivation of adherent cell lines from malignant glioma that display stem cell properties and initiate high-grade gliomas following xenotransplantation. Significantly, glioma neural stem (GNS) cell lines from different tumors exhibit divergent gene expression signatures and differentiation behavior that correlate with specific neural progenitor subtypes. The diversity of gliomas may, therefore, reflect distinct cancer stem cell phenotypes. The purity and stability of adherent GNS cell lines offer significant advantages compared to "sphere" cultures, enabling refined studies of cancer stem cell behavior. A proof-of-principle live cell imaging-based chemical screen (450 FDA-approved drugs) identifies both differential sensitivities of GNS cells and a common susceptibility to perturbation of serotonin signaling.

  1. What's in a setting?: Influence of organizational culture on provider adherence to clinical guidelines for treating tobacco use.

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    Hung, Dorothy Y; Leidig, Robynn; Shelley, Donna R

    2014-01-01

    Organizational culture is an important but underinvestigated feature of the work environment that can impact provider behavior, including adherence to clinical practice guidelines. There is substantial evidence that physician assistance to smokers can produce significant reductions in tobacco use. However, this evidence has not been well translated into practice, as only a small proportion of smokers receive recommended treatment during medical visits. This study examines organizational culture as a contextual feature of primary care clinics and its impact on adherence to evidence-based guidelines for treating tobacco use. Cross-sectional survey data were collected from 500 primary care providers in 60 community clinics located in New York City. Relationships between provider adherence to "5A" clinical guidelines, as recommended by the U.S. Public Health Service, and both provider and organizational covariates were described. We used hierarchical linear modeling to examine the associations between clinic culture and provider treatment patterns. Providers in clinics with stronger "group/clan," "hierarchical," and "rational" culture types, as compared with a "developmental" culture, reported greater adherence to 5A guidelines (p organizational culture can influence provider adherence to cessation treatment guidelines, even when controlling for other factors known to affect practice patterns. Specifically, cultures that emphasize human resources and performance standards are conducive to integrating 5A guidelines into routine practice. Understanding the role of organizational culture enables healthcare managers and practitioners to be strategic when implementing, and also sustaining, use of evidence-based guidelines.

  2. Paper/PMMA Hybrid 3D Cell Culture Microfluidic Platform for the Study of Cellular Crosstalk.

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    Lei, Kin Fong; Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Chen, Ming-Jie

    2017-04-19

    Studying cellular crosstalk is important for understanding tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, and therapeutic resistance. Moreover, a three-dimensional (3D) cell culture model can provide a more physiologically meaningful culture microenvironment. However, studying cellular crosstalk in a 3D cell culture model involves tedious processing. In this study, a paper/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) hybrid 3D cell culture microfluidic platform was successfully developed for the study of cellular crosstalk. The platform was a paper substrate with culture microreactors placed on a PMMA substrate with hydrogel-infused channels. Different types of cells were directly seeded and cultured in the microreactors. Aberrant cell proliferation of the affected cells was induced by secretions from transfected cells, and the proliferation ratios were investigated using a colorimetric method. The results showed that the responses of cellular crosstalk were different in different types of cells. Moreover, neutralizing and competitive assays were performed to show the functionality of the platform. Additionally, the triggered signaling pathways of the affected cells were directly analyzed by a subsequent immunoassay. The microfluidic platform provides a simple method for studying cellular crosstalk and the corresponding signaling pathways in a 3D culture model.

  3. A new in vitro model to study cellular responses after thermomechanical damage in monolayer cultures.

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    Hettler, Alice; Werner, Simon; Eick, Stefan; Laufer, Stefan; Weise, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Although electrosurgical instruments are widely used in surgery to cut tissue layers or to achieve hemostasis by coagulation (electrocautery), only little information is available concerning the inflammatory or immune response towards the debris generated. Given the elevated local temperatures required for successful electrocautery, the remaining debris is likely to contain a plethora of compounds entirely novel to the intracorporal setting. A very common in vitro method to study cell migration after mechanical damage is the scratch assay, however, there is no established model for thermomechanical damage to characterise cellular reactions. In this study, we established a new in vitro model to investigate exposure to high temperature in a carefully controlled cell culture system. Heatable thermostat-controlled aluminium stamps were developed to induce local damage in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The thermomechanical damage invoked is reproducibly locally confined, therefore allowing studies, under the same experimental conditions, of cells affected to various degrees as well as of unaffected cells. We show that the unaffected cells surrounding the thermomechanical damage zone are able to migrate into the damaged area, resulting in a complete closure of the 'wound' within 48 h. Initial studies have shown that there are significant morphological and biological differences in endothelial cells after thermomechanical damage compared to the mechanical damage inflicted by using the unheated stamp as a control. Accordingly, after thermomechanical damage, cell death as well as cell protection programs were activated. Mononuclear cells adhered in the area adjacent to thermomechanical damage, but not to the zone of mechanical damage. Therefore, our model can help to understand the differences in wound healing during the early phase of regeneration after thermomechanical vs. mechanical damage. Furthermore, this model lends itself to study the

  4. A new in vitro model to study cellular responses after thermomechanical damage in monolayer cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Hettler

    Full Text Available Although electrosurgical instruments are widely used in surgery to cut tissue layers or to achieve hemostasis by coagulation (electrocautery, only little information is available concerning the inflammatory or immune response towards the debris generated. Given the elevated local temperatures required for successful electrocautery, the remaining debris is likely to contain a plethora of compounds entirely novel to the intracorporal setting. A very common in vitro method to study cell migration after mechanical damage is the scratch assay, however, there is no established model for thermomechanical damage to characterise cellular reactions. In this study, we established a new in vitro model to investigate exposure to high temperature in a carefully controlled cell culture system. Heatable thermostat-controlled aluminium stamps were developed to induce local damage in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. The thermomechanical damage invoked is reproducibly locally confined, therefore allowing studies, under the same experimental conditions, of cells affected to various degrees as well as of unaffected cells. We show that the unaffected cells surrounding the thermomechanical damage zone are able to migrate into the damaged area, resulting in a complete closure of the 'wound' within 48 h. Initial studies have shown that there are significant morphological and biological differences in endothelial cells after thermomechanical damage compared to the mechanical damage inflicted by using the unheated stamp as a control. Accordingly, after thermomechanical damage, cell death as well as cell protection programs were activated. Mononuclear cells adhered in the area adjacent to thermomechanical damage, but not to the zone of mechanical damage. Therefore, our model can help to understand the differences in wound healing during the early phase of regeneration after thermomechanical vs. mechanical damage. Furthermore, this model lends itself

  5. Simplified microenvironments and reduced cell culture size influence the cell differentiation outcome in cellular microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Seguí, Santiago A; Ortuño, María José; Ventura, Francesc; Martínez, Elena; Samitier, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Cellular microarrays present a promising tool for multiplex evaluation of the signalling effect of substrate-immobilized factors on cellular differentiation. In this paper, we compare the early myoblast-to-osteoblast cell commitment steps in response to a growth factor stimulus using standard well plate differentiation assays or cellular microarrays. Our results show that restraints on the cell culture size, inherent to cellular microarrays, impair the differentiation outcome. Also, while cells growing on spots with immobilised BMP-2 are early biased towards the osteoblast fate, longer periods of cell culturing in the microarrays result in cell proliferation and blockage of osteoblast differentiation. The results presented here raise concerns about the efficiency of cell differentiation when the cell culture dimensions are reduced to a simplified microspot environment. Also, these results suggest that further efforts should be devoted to increasing the complexity of the microspots composition, aiming to replace signalling cues missing in this system.

  6. Patients' perceived cultural sensitivity of health care office staff and its association with patients' health care satisfaction and treatment adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Whitney; Tucker, Carolyn M; Roncoroni, Julia; Allan, Blake A; Nguyen, Phillip

    2013-11-01

    Research suggests that patients' interactions with their front desk office staff and patient-centered culturally sensitive health care are important factors in diverse patients' overall health care satisfaction. Yet, patient-centered culturally sensitive health care research has focused almost exclusively on provider care. This study tested the hypothesis that patient-perceived cultural sensitivity of front desk office staff has a significant positive association with patient treatment adherence and that this relationship is mediated by patient health care satisfaction. Study participants were a culturally diverse sample of 1,191 patients from health care sites across the U.S. Results of a meditational analysis supported the tested hypothesis. Patient health care satisfaction fully mediated the relationship between patient-perceived cultural sensitivity of front desk office staff and patient treatment adherence. The patient satisfaction and cultural sensitivity variables explained 10% of the variance in patient treatment adherence. Training front desk office staff in patient-centered culturally sensitive health care may improve patients' health care satisfaction and treatment adherence.

  7. Laminin-adherent versus suspension-non-adherent cell culture conditions for the isolation of cancer stem cells in the DAOY medulloblastoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rosa, Javier; Sáenz Antoñanzas, Ander; Shahi, Mehdi H; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rey, Juan A; Castresana, Javier S

    2016-09-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is a highly malignant tumor of childhood. MB seems to be initiated and maintained by a small group of cells, known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). The CSC hypothesis suggests that a subset of tumor cells is able to proliferate, sustain the tumor, and develop chemoresistance, all of which make of CSC an interesting target for new anticancer therapies. The MB cell line DAOY was cultured in suspension by a medullosphere traditional culturing method and in adherent conditions by laminin-pre-coated flasks and serum-free medium enriched with specific growth factors. An increase in the stem features was shown when cells were successively cultured in hypoxia conditions. By contrast, a reduction in these properties was appreciated when cells were exposed to differentiation conditions. In addition, the CD133+ and CD133- subpopulations were isolated from cells grown in laminin-pre-coated flasks, and in vitro experiments showed that the CD133+ fraction represented the stem population and it could have CSC with a higher probability than the CD133- fraction. We can conclude that the laminin culture method in adherent conditions and the medullosphere traditional culturing method in suspension are similarly good for obtaining stem-like cells in the DAOY cell line.

  8. Cultural competency assessment tool for hospitals: evaluating hospitals' adherence to the culturally and linguistically appropriate services standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Dreachslin, Janice L; Brown, Julie; Pradhan, Rohit; Rubin, Kelly L; Schiller, Cameron; Hays, Ron D

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. national standards for culturally and linguistically appropriate services (CLAS) in health care provide guidelines on policies and practices aimed at developing culturally competent systems of care. The Cultural Competency Assessment Tool for Hospitals (CCATH) was developed as an organizational tool to assess adherence to the CLAS standards. First, we describe the development of the CCATH and estimate the reliability and validity of the CCATH measures. Second, we discuss the managerial implications of the CCATH as an organizational tool to assess cultural competency. We pilot tested an initial draft of the CCATH, revised it based on a focus group and cognitive interviews, and then administered it in a field test with a sample of California hospitals. The reliability and validity of the CCATH were evaluated using factor analysis, analysis of variance, and Cronbach's alphas. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses identified 12 CCATH composites: leadership and strategic planning, data collection on inpatient population, data collection on service area, performance management systems and quality improvement, human resources practices, diversity training, community representation, availability of interpreter services, interpreter services policies, quality of interpreter services, translation of written materials, and clinical cultural competency practices. All the CCATH scales had internal consistency reliability of .65 or above, and the reliability was .70 or above for 9 of the 12 scales. Analysis of variance results showed that not-for-profit hospitals have higher CCATH scores than for-profit hospitals in five CCATH scales and higher CCATH scores than government hospitals in two CCATH scales. The CCATH showed adequate psychometric properties. Managers and policy makers can use the CCATH as a tool to evaluate hospital performance in cultural competency and identify and target improvements in hospital policies and practices that undergird the provision

  9. Comparative studies of cellular viability levels on 2D and 3D in vitro culture matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargotti, M; Lopez-Gonzalez, U; Byrne, H J; Casey, A

    2017-09-18

    In this study, the cellular viability and function of immortalized human cervical and dermal cells are monitored and compared in conventional 2D and two commercial 3D membranes, Collagen and Geltrex, of varying working concentration and volume. Viability was monitored with the aid of the Alamar Blue assay, cellular morphology was monitored with confocal microscopy, and cell cycle studies and cell death mechanism studies were performed with flow cytometry. The viability studies showed apparent differences between the 2D and 3D culture systems, the differences attributed in part to the physical transition from 2D to 3D environment causing alterations to effective resazurin concentration, uptake and conversion rates, which was dependent on exposure time, but also due to the effect of the membrane itself on cellular function. These effects were verified by flow cytometry, in which no significant differences in viable cell numbers between 2D and 3D systems were observed after 24 h culture. The results showed the observed effect was different after shorter exposure periods, was also dependent on working concentration of the 3D system and could be mediated by altering the culture vessel size. Cell cycle analysis revealed cellular function could be altered by growth on the 3D substrates and the alterations were noted to be dependent on 3D membrane concentration. The use of 3D culture matrices has been widely interpreted to result in "improved viability levels" or "reduced" toxicity or cellular "resistance" compared to cells cultured on traditional 2D systems. The results of this study show that cellular health and viability levels are not altered by culture in 3D environments, but their normal cycle can be altered as indicated in the cell cycle studies performed and such variations must be accounted for in studies employing 3D membranes for in vitro cellular screening.

  10. [Adherent and single-cell suspension culture of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells in serum-free medium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ding; Zhao, Liang; Tan, Wensong

    2011-04-01

    In recent years, there are tremendous economic and social losses across the world because of virus-related diseases. It is well known that Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells are easily handled, quickly amplified and efficiently infected with influenza virus. Therefore, they are considered as one of the most important cell lines for the production of influenza vaccine. In this work, we first developed a serum-free adherent culture process for MDCK cells with an in-house prepared serum-free medium MDCK-SFM. Next, we derived a cell line named ssf-MDCK, which was amenable for single-cell suspension culture in the serum-free medium. We found that during serum-free batch culture of MDCK cells, the peak viable cell density and maximum specific growth rate were 3.81 x 10(6) cells/mL and 0.056 h(-1), respectively; 3.6- and 1.6-fold increase compared with those in serum-containing adherent batch culture. In addition, we compared growth and metabolic characteristics of MDCK cells in serum-containing adherent culture, serum-free adherent culture and serum-free single-cell suspension culture. We found that less metabolic by-products were produced in both serum-free cultures. In serum-free single-cell suspension batch culture, the viable cell density was highest. These results are critical for establishing large-scale suspension culture of MDCK cells as subsequent well as large-scale influenza vaccine production.

  11. In vitro proliferation of haemopoietic cells in the presence of adherent cell layers. I. Culture conditions and strain dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimann, J.; Burger, H.

    1979-01-01

    The culture system, in which a marrow-derived adherent cell population, established in vitro, exerts a long-term promoting influence on proliferation of haemopoietic cells, is reproduced. Essential parameters of the system are investigated; it is confirmed that the system is critically dependent on

  12. Cross-cultural adaptation to Brazil of Medication Adherence Rating Scale for psychiatric patients

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    Icaro Carvalho Moreira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective The purpose of this research was to make a cross-cultural adaptation of the Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS for psychiatric patients to the Brazilian context. Methods The procedure consisted of four phases: translation of the original scale, back-translation, review by an Expert Committee and Pre-test study with a patients’ sample. Results The Expert Committee corrected the items’ translation when necessary and modified the scale administration format and its instructions from self-report to face-to-face interview form in order to ensure easy understanding by the target population. During Pre-test, the instructions and most of the items were properly understood by patients, with the exception of three of them which had to be changed in order to ensure better understanding. The Pre-test sample was composed by 30 psychiatric patients, with severe and persistent disorders mainly single (46.7%, female (60.0%, with a mean age of 43.8 years old and an average of five years of education. Conclusion The Brazilian version of MARS scale is now adapted to the Brazilian Portuguese language and culture and is easily understood by the psychiatric target population. It is necessary to do further research to evaluate the scale psychometric qualities of validity and reliability in order to use it in Brazil.

  13. Using Cultured Mammalian Neurons to Study Cellular Processes and Neurodegeneration: A Suite of Undergraduate Lab Exercises

    OpenAIRE

    Catlin, Rachel; Taylor, Abigail; Ditchek, Lisa; Burnett, Samantha; Khan, Showkhin; Todd, Olivia; Adams, Marguerite; Touhey, Eva; Wynkoop, Andrew; Ryan, James

    2016-01-01

    Cell culture is a powerful tool for exploring cellular function. Culturing primary neurons has revealed how neurons communicate in learning and memory (Kandel, 2006) and provided insights into the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease (Alberio et al., 2012; Trinchese, et al., 2004). Here we describe a series of four modular laboratory exercises to integrate this neuroscience technique in undergraduate teaching laboratories. First, we describe the...

  14. Micro 3D cell culture systems for cellular behavior studies: Culture matrices, devices, substrates, and in-situ sensing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jonghoon; Lee, Eun Kyu; Choo, Jaebum; Yuh, Junhan; Hong, Jong Wook

    2015-09-01

    Microfabricated systems equipped with 3D cell culture devices and in-situ cellular biosensing tools can be a powerful bionanotechnology platform to investigate a variety of biomedical applications. Various construction substrates such as plastics, glass, and paper are used for microstructures. When selecting a construction substrate, a key consideration is a porous microenvironment that allows for spheroid growth and mimics the extracellular matrix (ECM) of cell aggregates. Various bio-functionalized hydrogels are ideal candidates that mimic the natural ECM for 3D cell culture. When selecting an optimal and appropriate microfabrication method, both the intended use of the system and the characteristics and restrictions of the target cells should be carefully considered. For highly sensitive and near-cell surface detection of excreted cellular compounds, SERS-based microsystems capable of dual modal imaging have the potential to be powerful tools; however, the development of optical reporters and nanoprobes remains a key challenge. We expect that the microsystems capable of both 3D cell culture and cellular response monitoring would serve as excellent tools to provide fundamental cellular behavior information for various biomedical applications such as metastasis, wound healing, high throughput screening, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug discovery and development. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Numerical fluid-dynamic optimization of microchannel-provided porous scaffolds for the co-culture of adherent and non-adherent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantini, Marco; Fiore, Gianfranco B; Redaelli, Alberto; Soncini, Monica

    2009-03-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) techniques were used to optimize the microenvironment inside scaffolds for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) culture in a perfusion bioreactor. These matrices are meant to be seeded with adherent bone marrow stromal cells and then co-cultivated with HSCs; the scaffold micro-architecture and the fluid-dynamic conditions have to be optimized to avoid non-adherent stem cells being dragged away while ensuring adequate nutrient supply. The insertion of longitudinal microchannels was tested as a tool to improve perfusion in a homogeneous porous scaffold. Models of microchannel-provided scaffolds, characterized by different values of geometric parameters concerning pores and channels, were built, and numerical fluid-dynamic and oxygen-transfer analyses were carried out. The results of the computations indicated that the microchannels created preferential paths for culture medium flow, causing low shear stresses and drag forces within the pores; meanwhile, they improved oxygen delivery by forcing its penetration into the scaffold bulk. In particular, an 85% porous, 3-mm-thick scaffold with 175-microm-diameter pores was considered; at a constant average drag force guaranteeing stem cell suspension inside this porous bulk, the addition of approximately 260-microm-diameter, 700-microm-spaced channels resulted in 34% higher oxygen partial pressure at the exit (approximately 135 vs 101 mmHg), maintaining a wall shear stress median value of approximately 0.14 mPa. The present work demonstrates the capacity of microchannel-provided scaffolds to ensure suitable conditions for HSC culture and shows that CFD methods are a valuable tool to retrieve significant clues for the design of the culture environment.

  16. Attitudes to cosmetic surgery among ethnic minority groups in Britain: cultural mistrust, adherence to traditional cultural values, and ethnic identity salience as protective factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Viren; Hendrikse, Sinead

    2013-01-01

    Previous work has suggested that ethnic minority women have more negative attitudes to cosmetic surgery than British Whites, but reasons for this are not fully understood. To overcome this dearth in the literature, the present study asked 250 British Asian and 250 African Caribbean university students to complete measures of attitudes to cosmetic surgery, cultural mistrust, adherence to traditional cultural values, ethnic identity salience, self-esteem, and demographics. Preliminary analyses showed that there were significant between-group differences only on cultural mistrust and self-esteem, although effect sizes were small (d values = .21-.37). Further analyses showed that more negative attitudes to cosmetic surgery were associated with greater cultural mistrust, stronger adherence to traditional values, and stronger ethnic identity salience, although these relationships were weaker for African Caribbean women than for British Asians. These results are discussed in relation to perceptions of cosmetic surgery among ethnic minority women.

  17. [Spanish translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the ARMS-scale for measuring medication adherence in polypathological patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Bueno, Javier; Calvo-Cidoncha, Elena; Sevilla-Sánchez, Daniel; Espaulella-Panicot, Joan; Codina-Jané, Carles; Santos-Ramos, Bernardo

    2017-10-01

    Translate the ARMS scale into Spanish ensuring cross-cultural equivalence for measuring medication adherence in polypathological patients. Translation, cross-cultural adaptation and pilot testing. Secondary hospital. (i)Forward and blind-back translations followed by cross-cultural adaptation through qualitative methodology to ensure conceptual, semantic and content equivalence between the original scale and the Spanish version. (ii)Pilot testing in non-institutionalized polypathological patients to assess the instrument for clarity. The Spanish version of the ARMS scale has been obtained. Overall scores from translators involved in forward and blind-back translations were consistent with a low difficulty for assuring conceptual equivalence between both languages. Pilot testing (cognitive debriefing) in a sample of 40 non-institutionalized polypathological patients admitted to an internal medicine department of a secondary hospital showed an excellent clarity. The ARMS-e scale is a Spanish-adapted version of the ARMS scale, suitable for measuring adherence in polypathological patients. Its structure enables a multidimensional approach of the lack of adherence allowing the implementation of individualized interventions guided by the barriers detected in every patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. "Being dealt with as a whole person." Care seeking and adherence: the benefits of culturally competent care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilder, A J; Kennedy, C; Goldstone, I L; Ogden, R D; Hogg, R S; O'Shaughnessy, M V

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the relationship between identity and health care experiences (including antiretroviral therapy utilization) among HIV-positive sexual minority males. This qualitative study used grounded theory with data collection occurring through focus groups and interviews. A questionnaire was used to complete a demographic profile. The study included 47 HIV positive participants from three minorities: gay men, bisexual men and transgendered persons, gender identifying as female and or living as women. Sessions elicited information on: (1) general experiences with health care, (2) experiences with HIV antiretroviral therapies and issues surrounding access, and (3) adherence to these therapies and identity in relation to health care. These textual data revealed three themes: (1) the importance of sexual identity and its social and cultural context, (2) the differences in the health concerns between the sexual minorities and (3) a wide spectrum of experiences with the health care system that provide information surrounding the access to and adequacy of health care. Successful health care providers are aware of different issues that may play a role in the provision of health care to these sexual minorities. Providers awareness of sexual and social identity and the related different cultural values, beliefs and custom enhance care seeking and therapeutic adherence. For sexual minorities, primary care remains the most important entry point into the health care system. Cultural competence of care providers can foster patient's care seeking and adherence to treatment.

  19. Paper-based microreactor integrating cell culture and subsequent immunoassay for the investigation of cellular phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Kin Fong; Huang, Chia-Hao

    2014-12-24

    Investigation of cellular phosphorylation and signaling pathway has recently gained much attention for the study of pathogenesis of cancer. Related conventional bioanalytical operations for this study including cell culture and Western blotting are time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this work, a paper-based microreactor has been developed to integrate cell culture and subsequent immunoassay on a single paper. The paper-based microreactor was a filter paper with an array of circular zones for running multiple cell cultures and subsequent immunoassays. Cancer cells were directly seeded in the circular zones without hydrogel encapsulation and cultured for 1 day. Subsequently, protein expressions including structural, functional, and phosphorylated proteins of the cells could be detected by their specific antibodies, respectively. Study of the activation level of phosphorylated Stat3 of liver cancer cells stimulated by IL-6 cytokine was demonstrated by the paper-based microreactor. This technique can highly reduce tedious bioanalytical operation and sample and reagent consumption. Also, the time required by the entire process can be shortened. This work provides a simple and rapid screening tool for the investigation of cellular phosphorylation and signaling pathway for understanding the pathogenesis of cancer. In addition, the operation of the paper-based microreactor is compatible to the molecular biological training, and therefore, it has the potential to be developed for routine protocol for various research areas in conventional bioanalytical laboratories.

  20. Enhancement of SOX-2 expression and ROS accumulation by culture of A172 glioblastoma cells under non-adherent culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Chang-Nim; Yun, Hye Hyeon; Yoo, Hyung Jae; Park, Myung-Jin; Lee, Jeong-Hwa

    2015-08-01

    More efficient isolation and identification of cancer stem cells (CSCs) would help in determining their fundamental roles in tumor biology. The classical tool for this purpose is anchorage-independent tumorsphere culture. We compared the effects of differently textured culture plates and serum deprivation on the acquisition of CSC properties of A172 glioblastoma cells. Cells were cultured on standard polystyrene-treated plates, ultra-low attachment, poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-coated plates, and 1% agar-coated plates with 10% serum or in serum-free glioblastoma sphere medium (GBM). Based on mitochondrial reductase activity and subG1 proportions, non-adherent conditions had a greater impact on A172 cell viability than serum deprivation. Among the stemness-related genes, SOX-2 expression was significantly upregulated by serum deprivation under non-adherent conditions, while several epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related genes were less dependent on serum. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in A172 cells was significantly increased in GBM under non-adherent conditions. Despite the correlation between SOX-2 induction and ROS accumulation, treatment with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine did not prevent SOX-2 expression, suggesting that ROS accumulation is not an essential requirement for induction of SOX-2. Our results suggested that cultivation of cancer cells under conditions of serum deprivation in an anchorage-independent manner may enrich SOX-2-expressing CSC-like cells in vitro.

  1. Mammalian cellular culture models of Trypanosoma cruzi infection: a review of the published literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duran-Rehbein Gabriel Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular culture infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is a tool used to dissect the biological mechanisms behind Chagas disease as well as to screen potential trypanocidal compounds. Data on these models are highly heterogeneous, which represents a challenge when attempting to compare different studies. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the cell culture infectivity assays performed to date. Scientific journal databases were searched for articles in which cultured cells were infected with any Trypanosoma cruzi strain or isolate regardless of the study’s goal. From these articles the cell type, parasite genotype, culture conditions and infectivity results were extracted. This review represents an initial step toward the unification of infectivity model data. Important differences were detected when comparing the pathophysiology of Chagas disease with the experimental conditions used in the analyzed studies. While Trypanosoma cruzi preferentially infects stromal cells in vivo, most of the assays employ epithelial cell lines. Furthermore, the most commonly used parasite strain (Tulahuen-TcVI is associated with chagasic cardiomyopathy only in the Southern Cone of South America. Suggestions to overcome these discrepancies include the use of stromal cell lines and parasite genotypes associated with the known characteristics of the natural history of Chagas disease.

  2. Mammalian cellular culture models of Trypanosoma cruzi infection: a review of the published literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran-Rehbein, Gabriel Alberto; Vargas-Zambrano, Juan Camilo; Cuéllar, Adriana; Puerta, Concepción Judith; Gonzalez, John Mario

    2014-01-01

    Cellular culture infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is a tool used to dissect the biological mechanisms behind Chagas disease as well as to screen potential trypanocidal compounds. Data on these models are highly heterogeneous, which represents a challenge when attempting to compare different studies. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the cell culture infectivity assays performed to date. Scientific journal databases were searched for articles in which cultured cells were infected with any Trypanosoma cruzi strain or isolate regardless of the study's goal. From these articles the cell type, parasite genotype, culture conditions and infectivity results were extracted. This review represents an initial step toward the unification of infectivity model data. Important differences were detected when comparing the pathophysiology of Chagas disease with the experimental conditions used in the analyzed studies. While Trypanosoma cruzi preferentially infects stromal cells in vivo, most of the assays employ epithelial cell lines. Furthermore, the most commonly used parasite strain (Tulahuen-TcVI) is associated with chagasic cardiomyopathy only in the Southern Cone of South America. Suggestions to overcome these discrepancies include the use of stromal cell lines and parasite genotypes associated with the known characteristics of the natural history of Chagas disease. © G.A. Duran-Rehbein et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2014.

  3. Bovine oviductal monolayers cultured under three-dimension conditions secrete factors able to release spermatozoa adhering to the tubal reservoir in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtieri, R; Mollo, V; Braun, S; Barbato, V; Fiorentino, I; Talevi, R

    2013-02-01

    Different in vitro models have been developed to understand the interaction of gametes and embryos with the maternal reproductive tract. We recently showed that bovine oviductal monolayers three-dimensionally cultured in Gray's medium on collagen-coated microporous polycarbonate inserts under liquid-air interface conditions are well polarized, develop cilia, remain viable for at least 3 weeks postconfluence, and mantain the viability of bound spermatozoa significantly better than bidimensionally cultured monolayers. Herein, we used these culture conditions to understand whether: (1) spermatozoa adhering to three-dimensionally cultured oviductal monolayers can be released by heparin or penicillamine as previously shown with bidimensionally cultured oviductal monolayers and explants; and (2) media conditioned by three-dimensionally cultured oviductal monolayers were able to release spermatozoa adhering to oviductal explants. Findings demonstrated that (1) spermatozoa adhering to three-dimensionally cultured oviductal monolayers are readily released by heparin and penicillamine, (2) media conditioned by three-dimensionally cultured oviductal monolayers are able to release spermatozoa bound to oviductal explants, (3) do not depress sperm motility and viability, (4) they improve sperm kinetics, and (5) promote binding to the zona pellucida. In conclusion, in vitro data suggest that the release of spermatozoa adhering to the oviductal reservoir in vivo can be triggered by factors secreted by the oviduct itself that induce sperm capacitation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Rapid expansion of recycling stem cells in cultures of plastic-adherent cells from human bone marrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colter, David C.; Class, Reiner; DiGirolamo, Carla M.; Prockop, Darwin J.

    2000-01-01

    Cultures of plastic-adherent cells from bone marrow have attracted interest because of their ability to support growth of hematopoietic stem cells, their multipotentiality for differentiation, and their possible use for cell and gene therapy. Here we found that the cells grew most rapidly when they were initially plated at low densities (1.5 or 3.0 cells/cm2) to generate single-cell derived colonies. The cultures displayed a lag phase of about 5 days, a log phase of rapid growth of about 5 days, and then a stationary phase. FACS analysis demonstrated that stationary cultures contained a major population of large and moderately granular cells and a minor population of small and agranular cells here referred to as recycling stem cells or RS-1 cells. During the lag phase, the RS-1 cells gave rise to a new population of small and densely granular cells (RS-2 cells). During the late log phase, the RS-2 cells decreased in number and regenerated the pool of RS-1 cells found in stationary cultures. In repeated passages in which the cells were plated at low density, they were amplified about 109-fold in 6 wk. The cells retained their ability to generate single-cell derived colonies and therefore apparently retained their multipotentiality for differentiation. PMID:10725391

  5. When in Rome: the role of culture & context in adherence to robot recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, L.; Rau, P.-L.P.; Evers, V.; Robinson, B.K.; Hinds, P.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we sought to clarify the effects of users' cultural background and cultural context on human-robot team collaboration by investigating attitudes toward and the extent to which people changed their decisions based on the recommendations of a robot collaborator. We report the results of

  6. Biochemical and cellular properties of Gluconacetobacter xylinus cultures exposed to different modes of rotating magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fijałkowski Karol

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of a rotating magnetic field (RMF on cellular and biochemical properties of Gluconacetobacter xylinus during the process of cellulose synthesis by these bacteria. The application of the RMF during bacterial cellulose (BC production intensified the biochemical processes in G. xylinus as compared to the RMF-unexposed cultures. Moreover, the RMF had a positive impact on the growth of cellulose-producing bacteria. Furthermore, the application of RMF did not increase the number of mutants unable to produce cellulose. In terms of BC production efficacy, the most favorable properties were found in the setting where RMF generator was switched off for the first 72 h of cultivation and switched on for the further 72 h. The results obtained can be used in subsequent studies concerning the optimization of BC production using different types of magnetic fields including RMF, especially.

  7. Multiplex profiling of cellular invasion in 3D cell culture models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Burgstaller

    Full Text Available To-date, most invasion or migration assays use a modified Boyden chamber-like design to assess migration as single-cell or scratch assays on coated or uncoated planar plastic surfaces. Here, we describe a 96-well microplate-based, high-content, three-dimensional cell culture assay capable of assessing invasion dynamics and molecular signatures thereof. On applying our invasion assay, we were able to demonstrate significant effects on the invasion capacity of fibroblast cell lines, as well as primary lung fibroblasts. Administration of epidermal growth factor resulted in a substantial increase of cellular invasion, thus making this technique suitable for high-throughput pharmacological screening of novel compounds regulating invasive and migratory pathways of primary cells. Our assay also correlates cellular invasiveness to molecular events. Thus, we argue of having developed a powerful and versatile toolbox for an extensive profiling of invasive cells in a 96-well format. This will have a major impact on research in disease areas like fibrosis, metastatic cancers, or chronic inflammatory states.

  8. Amorphous calcium carbonate precipitation by cellular biomineralization in mantle cell cultures of Pinctada fucata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Xiang

    Full Text Available The growth of molluscan shell crystals is generally thought to be initiated from the extrapallial fluid by matrix proteins, however, the cellular mechanisms of shell formation pathway remain unknown. Here, we first report amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC precipitation by cellular biomineralization in primary mantle cell cultures of Pinctada fucata. Through real-time PCR and western blot analyses, we demonstrate that mantle cells retain the ability to synthesize and secrete ACCBP, Pif80 and nacrein in vitro. In addition, the cells also maintained high levels of alkaline phosphatase and carbonic anhydrase activity, enzymes responsible for shell formation. On the basis of polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, we observed intracellular crystals production by mantle cells in vitro. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses revealed the crystals to be ACC, and de novo biomineralization was confirmed by following the incorporation of Sr into calcium carbonate. Our results demonstrate the ability of mantle cells to perform fundamental biomineralization processes via amorphous calcium carbonate, and these cells may be directly involved in pearl oyster shell formation.

  9. In silico characterization of cell-cell interactions using a cellular automata model of cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Takanori; Kashitani, Kosuke; Miyake, Jun

    2017-07-14

    Cell proliferation is a key characteristic of eukaryotic cells. During cell proliferation, cells interact with each other. In this study, we developed a cellular automata model to estimate cell-cell interactions using experimentally obtained images of cultured cells. We used four types of cells; HeLa cells, human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells, rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and rat smooth muscle A7r5 cells. These cells were cultured and stained daily. The obtained cell images were binarized and clipped into squares containing about 104 cells. These cells showed characteristic cell proliferation patterns. The growth curves of these cells were generated from the cell proliferation images and we determined the doubling time of these cells from the growth curves. We developed a simple cellular automata system with an easily accessible graphical user interface. This system has five variable parameters, namely, initial cell number, doubling time, motility, cell-cell adhesion, and cell-cell contact inhibition (of proliferation). Within these parameters, we obtained initial cell numbers and doubling times experimentally. We set the motility at a constant value because the effect of the parameter for our simulation was restricted. Therefore, we simulated cell proliferation behavior with cell-cell adhesion and cell-cell contact inhibition as variables. By comparing growth curves and proliferation cell images, we succeeded in determining the cell-cell interaction properties of each cell. Simulated HeLa and HOS cells exhibited low cell-cell adhesion and weak cell-cell contact inhibition. Simulated MSCs exhibited high cell-cell adhesion and positive cell-cell contact inhibition. Simulated A7r5 cells exhibited low cell-cell adhesion and strong cell-cell contact inhibition. These simulated results correlated with the experimental growth curves and proliferation images. Our simulation approach is an easy method for evaluating the cell-cell interaction properties of cells.

  10. Differential adherence and expression of virulence traits by Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis in mono- and dual-species cultures in artificial saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, C L; Botelho, C M; Henriques, M; Oliveira, R

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate specific virulence factors of Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis clinical oral isolates in mono- and dual-species culture in the presence of artificial saliva. Two of the strains used in this study were isolated from co-infection (C. albicans AM and C. parapsilosis AM2), and the other two were isolated from single infection (C. albicans AC and C. parapsilosis AD). The number of adhered yeast cells was measured and their enzymatic activity was determined simultaneously. In mono-species culture, C. parapsilosis strains adhered to a higher extent to the surface in comparison with the C. albicans strains. In dual-species culture, the C. parapsilosis strains adhered more in the presence of C. albicans AM. Interestingly, C. albicans AM and C. parapsilosis AD adhered to a higher extent when compared with all other co-cultures. In dual-species culture, the enzymatic activity of C. parapsilosis strains in the presence of C. albicans AC was higher than in the presence of C. albicans AM. The virulence factors of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis differ from strain to strain and are influenced by the presence of other species in culture. To understand the expression of virulence factors in Candida dual-species systems.

  11. Cellular and molecular characterization of gametogenic progression in ex vivo cultured prepuberal mouse testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoler-Alcaraz, J; Fernández-Pérez, D; Larriba, E; Del Mazo, J

    2017-10-18

    Recently, an effective testis culture method using a gas-liquid interphase, capable of differentiate male germ cells from neonatal spermatogonia to spermatozoa has been developed. Nevertheless, this methodology needs deep analyses that allow future experimental approaches in basic, pathologic and/or reprotoxicologic studies. Because of this, we characterized at cellular and molecular levels the entire in vitro spermatogenic progression, in order to understand and evaluate the characteristics that define the spermatogenic process in ex vivo cultured testes compared to the in vivo development. Testicular explants of CD1 mice aged 6 and 10 days post-partum were respectively cultured during 55 and 89 days. Cytological and molecular approaches were performed, analyzing germ cell proportion at different time culture points, meiotic markers immunodetecting synaptonemal complex protein SYCP3 by immunocytochemistry and the relative expression of different marker genes along the differentiation process by Reverse Transcription - quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction. In addition, microRNA and piwi-interactingRNA profiles were also evaluated by Next Generation Sequencing and bioinformatic approaches. The method promoted and maintained the spermatogenic process during 89 days. At a cytological level we detected spermatogenic development delays of cultured explants compared to the natural in vivo process. The expression of different spermatogenic stages gene markers correlated with the proportion of different cell types detected in the cytological preparations. In vitro progression analysis of the different spermatogenic cell types, from both 6.5 dpp and 10.5 dpp testes explants, has revealed a relative delay in relation to in vivo process. The expression of the genes studied as biomarkers correlates with the cytologically and functional detected progression and differential expression identified in vivo. After a first analysis of deep sequencing data it has been observed

  12. Testing of a Model with Latino Patients That Explains the Links Among Patient-Perceived Provider Cultural Sensitivity, Language Preference, and Patient Treatment Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jessica D Jones; Wall, Whitney; Tucker, Carolyn M

    2016-03-01

    Disparities in treatment adherence based on race and ethnicity are well documented but poorly understood. Specifically, the causes of treatment nonadherence among Latino patients living in the USA are complex and include cultural and language barriers. The purpose of this study was to examine whether patients' perceptions in patient-provider interactions (i.e., trust in provider, patient satisfaction, and patient sense of interpersonal control in patient-provider interactions) mediate any found association between patient-perceived provider cultural sensitivity (PCS) and treatment adherence among English-preferred Latino (EPL) and Spanish-preferred Latino (SPL) patients. Data from 194 EPL patients and 361 SPL patients were obtained using questionnaires. A series of language-specific structural equation models were conducted to test the relationship between patient-perceived PCS and patient treatment adherence and the examined mediators of this relationship among the Latino patients. No significant direct effects of patient-perceived PCS on general treatment adherence were found. However, as hypothesized, several significant indirect effects emerged. Preferred language appeared to have moderating effects on the relationships between patient-perceived PCS and general treatment adherence. These results suggest that interventions to promote treatment adherence among Latino patients should likely include provider training to foster patient-defined PCS, trust in provider, and patient satisfaction with care. Furthermore, this training needs to be customized to be suitable for providing care to Latino patients who prefer speaking Spanish and Latino patients who prefer speaking English.

  13. Development of an Insert Co-culture System of Two Cellular Types in the Absence of Cell-Cell Contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Justine; Martinoli, Maria-Grazia

    2016-07-17

    The role of secreted soluble factors in the modification of cellular responses is a recurrent theme in the study of all tissues and systems. In an attempt to make straightforward the very complex relationships between the several cellular subtypes that compose multicellular organisms, in vitro techniques have been developed to help researchers acquire a detailed understanding of single cell populations. One of these techniques uses inserts with a permeable membrane allowing secreted soluble factors to diffuse. Thus, a population of cells grown in inserts can be co-cultured in a well or dish containing a different cell type for evaluating cellular changes following paracrine signaling in the absence of cell-cell contact. Such insert co-culture systems offer various advantages over other co-culture techniques, namely bidirectional signaling, conserved cell polarity and population-specific detection of cellular changes. In addition to being utilized in the field of inflammation, cancer, angiogenesis and differentiation, these co-culture systems are of prime importance in the study of the intricate relationships that exist between the different cellular subtypes present in the central nervous system, particularly in the context of neuroinflammation. This article offers general methodological guidelines in order to set up an experiment in order to evaluating cellular changes mediated by secreted soluble factors using an insert co-culture system. Moreover, a specific protocol to measure the neuroinflammatory effects of cytokines secreted by lipopolysaccharide-activated N9 microglia on neuronal PC12 cells will be detailed, offering a concrete understanding of insert co-culture methodology.

  14. Determinants of Adherence to Treatment in Hypertensive Patients of African Descent and the Role of Culturally Appropriate Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinema, Jennita G.; van Dijk, Nynke; Beune, Erik J. A. J.; Jaarsma, Debbie A. D. C.; van Weert, Henk C. P. M.; Haafkens, Joke A.

    2015-01-01

    Background In Western countries, better knowledge about patient-related determinants of treatment adherence (medication and lifestyle) is needed to improve treatment adherence and outcomes among hypertensive ethnic minority patients of African descent. Objective To identify patient-related

  15. Influence of organizational culture on provider adherence to the diabetic clinical practice guideline: using the competing values framework in Palestinian Primary Healthcare Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Mahmoud; Akbari Sari, Ali; Rashidian, Arash; Takian, Amirhossein; Abou-Dagga, Sanaa; Elsous, Aymen

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a serious chronic disease and an important public health issue. This study aimed to identify the predominant culture within the Palestinian Primary Healthcare Centers of the Ministry of Health (PHC-MoH) and the Primary Healthcare Centers of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (PHC-UNRWA) by using the competing values framework (CVF) and examining its influence on the adherence to the Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) for DM. A cross-sectional design was employed with a census sample of all the Palestinian family doctors and nurses (n=323) who work within 71 PHC clinic. A cross-cultural adaptation framework was followed to develop the Arabic version of the CVF questionnaire. The overall adherence level to the diabetic guideline was disappointingly suboptimal (51.5%, p<0.001; 47.3% in the PHC-MoH and 55.5% in the PHC-UNRWA). In the PHC-MoH, the clan/group culture was the most predominant (mean =41.13; standard deviation [SD] =8.92), followed by hierarchical (mean =33.14; SD=5.96), while in the PHC-UNRWA, hierarchical was the prevailing culture (mean =48.43; SD =12.51), followed by clan/group (mean =29.73; SD =8.37). Although a positively significant association between the adherence to CPG and the rational culture and a negatively significant association with the developmental archetype were detected in the PHC-MoH, no significant associations were found in the PHC-UNRWA. Our study demonstrates that the organizational culture has a marginal influence on the adherence to the diabetic guideline. Future research should preferably mix quantitative and qualitative approaches and explore the use of more sensitive instruments to measure such a complex construct and its effects on guideline adherence in small-sized clinics.

  16. Determinants of adherence to treatment in hypertensive patients of African descent and the role of culturally appropriate education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinema, Jennita G.; van Dijk, Nynke; Beune, Erik J. A. J.; Jaarsma, Debbie A. D. C.; van Weert, Henk C. P. M.; Haafkens, Joke A.

    2015-01-01

    In Western countries, better knowledge about patient-related determinants of treatment adherence (medication and lifestyle) is needed to improve treatment adherence and outcomes among hypertensive ethnic minority patients of African descent. To identify patient-related determinants of adherence to

  17. Why don't patients take their drugs? The role of communication, context and culture in patient adherence and the work of the pharmacist in HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Claire; Watermeyer, Jennifer; Evans, Melanie

    2011-06-01

    This study examined facilitators and barriers to adherence in four South African antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinic sites and explored context and communication factors in relation to the role of the pharmacist. Data were collected from interviews and narratives of patients and health professionals around the issues of adherence and qualitatively analysed using principles of Thematic Content Analysis. Findings confirm the complex interplay between illness, communication, sociocultural, economic, context and systemic issues. Analysis suggests adherence is multifaceted and reinforces the critical role of communication factors in achieving concordance between patient and pharmacist. Successful treatment of HIV/AIDS depends on pharmacists and healthcare teams understanding contextual and interactional factors which play a role in adherence. The findings reinforce the importance of embedding a patient-centred approach in the training and everyday practice of pharmacists. The value of qualitative methods in understanding barriers to adherence and the potential value of the cultural broker in intercultural settings is discussed. Some suggestions are made as to how adherence counselling can be made relevant and effective. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Extracellular mass transport considerations for space flight research concerning suspended and adherent in vitro cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, David M.; Benoit, Michael R.; Nelson, Emily S.; Hammond, Timmothy G.

    2004-01-01

    Conducting biological research in space requires consideration be given to isolating appropriate control parameters. For in vitro cell cultures, numerous environmental factors can adversely affect data interpretation. A biological response attributed to microgravity can, in theory, be explicitly correlated to a specific lack of weight or gravity-driven motion occurring to, within or around a cell. Weight can be broken down to include the formation of hydrostatic gradients, structural load (stress) or physical deformation (strain). Gravitationally induced motion within or near individual cells in a fluid includes sedimentation (or buoyancy) of the cell and associated shear forces, displacement of cytoskeleton or organelles, and factors associated with intra- or extracellular mass transport. Finally, and of particular importance for cell culture experiments, the collective effects of gravity must be considered for the overall system consisting of the cells, their environment and the device in which they are contained. This does not, however, rule out other confounding variables such as launch acceleration, on orbit vibration, transient acceleration impulses or radiation, which can be isolated using onboard centrifuges or vibration isolation techniques. A framework is offered for characterizing specific cause-and-effect relationships for gravity-dependent responses as a function of the above parameters.

  19. Influence of organizational culture on provider adherence to the diabetic clinical practice guideline: using the competing values framework in Palestinian Primary Healthcare Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radwan M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mahmoud Radwan,1 Ali Akbari Sari,1 Arash Rashidian,1 Amirhossein Takian,1 Sanaa Abou-Dagga,2 Aymen Elsous1 1Department of Health Management and Economics, School of Public Health, International Campus, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Department of Research Affairs and Graduates Studies, Islamic University of Gaza, Gaza Strip, Palestine Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM is a serious chronic disease and an important public health issue. This study aimed to identify the predominant culture within the Palestinian Primary Healthcare Centers of the Ministry of Health (PHC-MoH and the Primary Healthcare Centers of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (PHC-UNRWA by using the competing values framework (CVF and examining its influence on the adherence to the Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG for DM.Methods: A cross-sectional design was employed with a census sample of all the Palestinian family doctors and nurses (n=323 who work within 71 PHC clinic. A cross-cultural adaptation framework was followed to develop the Arabic version of the CVF questionnaire. Results: The overall adherence level to the diabetic guideline was disappointingly suboptimal (51.5%, p<0.001; 47.3% in the PHC-MoH and 55.5% in the PHC-UNRWA. In the PHC-MoH, the clan/group culture was the most predominant (mean =41.13; standard deviation [SD] =8.92, followed by hierarchical (mean =33.14; SD=5.96, while in the PHC-UNRWA, hierarchical was the prevailing culture (mean =48.43; SD =12.51, followed by clan/group (mean =29.73; SD =8.37. Although a positively significant association between the adherence to CPG and the rational culture and a negatively significant association with the developmental archetype were detected in the PHC-MoH, no significant associations were found in the PHC-UNRWA. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that the organizational culture has a marginal influence on the adherence to the diabetic guideline. Future research

  20. Hypergravity Loading the Cultured Osteoblasts: Modeling and Experimental Analysis of Cellular Morphology and the Cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searby, N. D.; Steele, C. R.; Globus, R. K.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Bone forming cells, osteoblasts, respond to various mechanical forces, including mechanical strain and fluid-induced shear stress. This study examined whether osteoblasts detect changes in gravity as a mechanical force, as assessed by cellular morphology and dimensions of the cytoskeletal network. We used modeling to evaluate how gravity influences cell morphology given theoretical differences in densities between the surrounding medium, cytoplasm, and nucleus. A mechanical model was built based on analysis of axisymmetric shell structures (Fast4 software) to study the effects of 10 times gravity (10G) on cell height. The model indicated 0.02% decrease in overall cell height when the medium was 10% denser than the nucleus or cytoplasm, 5.9 x 10(exp-5)% decrease when the nucleus was 10% denser than the cytoplasm or medium, and 1.3 x 10(exp-5)% decrease when the cell cytoplasm was 10% denser than the nucleus or medium. To experimentally evaluate the influence of gravity, cultured primary fetal rat osteoblasts were grown to near confluence and centrifuged at 10G for 3 hours. Actin, microtubules, and nuclei were fluorescently labeled and analyzed by confocal microscopy to determine overall microtubule and actin network height. Centrifugation led to an apparent reduction in height of both the microtubule (-16%) and the actin (-20%) networks relative to stationary controls. Thus, both modeling and experiments indicate that hypergravity reduces the height of the osteoblast cell layer and their microtubule and actin networks. This combination of modeling and experimental analyses will help us to better understand the mechanical loading of osteoblasts.

  1. Flexible Sheet-Type Sensor for Noninvasive Measurement of Cellular Oxygen Metabolism on a Culture Dish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Kojima

    Full Text Available A novel flexible sensor was developed for the noninvasive oxygen metabolism measurement of cultivated cells and tissues. This device is composed of a transparent double-layered polymer sheet of ethylene-vinyl alcohol (EVOH and poly(dimethylsiloxane (PDMS having an array of microhole structures of 90 μm diameter and 50 μm depth on its surface. All the microhole structures were equipped with a 1-μm-thick optical chemical sensing layer of platinum porphyrin-fluoropolymer on their bottom. The three-dimensional microstructures of the sensor were fabricated by a newly developed simple and low-cost production method named self-aligned hot embossing. The device was designed to be attached slightly above the cells cultivated on a dish to form a temporarily closed microspace over the target cells during measurement. Since the change in oxygen concentration is relatively fast in the microcompartmentalized culture medium, a rapid evaluation of the oxygen consumption rate is possible by measuring the phosphorescence lifetime of the platinum porphyrin-fluoropolymer. The combined use of the device and an automated optical measurement system enabled the high-throughput sensing of cellular oxygen consumption (100 points/min. We monitored the oxygen metabolism of the human breast cancer cell line MCF7 on a Petri dish and evaluated the oxygen consumption rate to be 0.72 ± 0.12 fmol/min/cell. Furthermore, to demonstrate the utility of the developed sensing system, we demonstrated the mapping of the oxygen consumption rate of rat brain slices and succeeded in visualizing a clear difference among the layer structures of the hippocampus, i.e., the cornu ammonis (CA1 and CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG.

  2. Using a Virtual Tissue Culture System to Assist Students in Understanding Life at the Cellular Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLauglin, Jacqueline S.; Seaquist, Stephen B.

    2008-01-01

    In every biology course ever taught in the nation's classrooms, and in every biology book ever published, students are taught about the "cell." The cell is as fundamental to biology as the atom is to chemistry. Truly, everything an organism does occurs fundamentally at the cellular level. Beyond memorizing the cellular definition, students are not…

  3. The Chinese Life-Steps Program: A Cultural Adaptation of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention to Enhance HIV Medication Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Chen, Wei-Ti; Simoni, Jane; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen; Zhang, Fujie; Zhou, Hongxin

    2013-01-01

    China is considered to be the new frontier of the global AIDS pandemic. Although effective treatment for HIV is becoming widely available in China, adherence to treatment remains a challenge. This study aimed to adapt an intervention promoting HIV-medication adherence--favorably evaluated in the West--for Chinese HIV-positive patients. The…

  4. Stochastic cellular automata model of cell migration, proliferation and differentiation: validation with in vitro cultures of muscle satellite cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garijo, N; Manzano, R; Osta, R; Perez, M A

    2012-12-07

    Cell migration and proliferation has been modelled in the literature as a process similar to diffusion. However, using diffusion models to simulate the proliferation and migration of cells tends to create a homogeneous distribution in the cell density that does not correlate to empirical observations. In fact, the mechanism of cell dispersal is not diffusion. Cells disperse by crawling or proliferation, or are transported in a moving fluid. The use of cellular automata, particle models or cell-based models can overcome this limitation. This paper presents a stochastic cellular automata model to simulate the proliferation, migration and differentiation of cells. These processes are considered as completely stochastic as well as discrete. The model developed was applied to predict the behaviour of in vitro cell cultures performed with adult muscle satellite cells. Moreover, non homogeneous distribution of cells has been observed inside the culture well and, using the above mentioned stochastic cellular automata model, we have been able to predict this heterogeneous cell distribution and compute accurate quantitative results. Differentiation was also incorporated into the computational simulation. The results predicted the myotube formation that typically occurs with adult muscle satellite cells. In conclusion, we have shown how a stochastic cellular automata model can be implemented and is capable of reproducing the in vitro behaviour of adult muscle satellite cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Real-time monitoring of cellular dynamics using a microfluidic cell culture system with integrated electrode array and potentiostat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zor, Kinga; Vergani, M.; Heiskanen, Arto

    2011-01-01

    A versatile microfluidic, multichamber cell culture and analysis system with an integrated electrode array and potentiostat suitable for electrochemical detection and microscopic imaging is presented in this paper. The system, which allows on-line electrode cleaning and modification, was developed...... for real-time monitoring of cellular dynamics, exemplified in this work by monitoring of redox metabolism inside living yeast cells and dopamine release from PC12 cells....

  6. A culturally adapted telecommunication system to improve physical activity, diet quality, and medication adherence among hypertensive African-Americans: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migneault, Jeffrey P; Dedier, Julien J; Wright, Julie A; Heeren, Timothy; Campbell, Marci Kramish; Morisky, Donald E; Rudd, Peter; Friedman, Robert H

    2012-02-01

    Hypertension is more prevalent and clinically severe among African-Americans than whites. Several health behaviors influence blood pressure (BP) control, but effective, accessible, culturally sensitive interventions that target multiple behaviors are lacking. We evaluated a culturally adapted, automated telephone system to help hypertensive, urban African-American adults improve their adherence to their antihypertensive medication regimen and to evidence-based guidelines for dietary behavior and physical activity. We randomized 337 hypertensive primary care patients to an 8-month automated, multi-behavior intervention or to an education-only control. Medication adherence, diet, physical activity, and BP were assessed at baseline and every 4 months for 1 year. Data were analyzed using longitudinal modeling. The intervention was associated with improvements in a measure of overall diet quality (+3.5 points, p telecommunications systems can promote self-management of diet and energy balance in urban African-Americans.

  7. Cultural adaptation of an evidence-based nursing intervention to improve medication adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ann B; Wang, Honghong; Burgess, Jane; Li, Xianhong; Danvers, Karina

    2013-04-01

    Adapting nursing interventions to suit the needs and culture of a new population (cultural adaptation) is an important early step in the process of implementation and dissemination. While the need for cultural adaptation is widely accepted, research-based strategies for doing so are not well articulated. Non-adherence to medications for chronic disease is a global problem and cultural adaptation of existing evidence-based interventions could be useful. This paper aims to describe the cultural adaptation of an evidence-based nursing intervention to improve medication adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS and to offer recommendations for adaptation of interventions across cultures and borders. SITE: The intervention, which demonstrated efficacy in a randomized controlled trial in North America, was adapted for the cultural and social context of Hunan Province, in south central China. The adaptation process was undertaken by intervention stakeholders including the original intervention study team, the proposed adaptation team, and members of a Community Advisory Board, including people living with HIV/AIDS, family members, and health care workers at the target clinical sites. The adaptation process was driven by quantitative and qualitative data describing the new population and context and was guided by principles for cultural adaptation drawn from prevention science research. The primary adaptation to the intervention was the inclusion of family members in intervention activities, in response to the cultural and social importance of the family in rural China. In a pilot test of the adapted intervention, self-reported medication adherence improved significantly in the group receiving the intervention compared to the control group (p=0.01). Recommendations for cultural adaptation of nursing interventions include (1) involve stakeholders from the beginning; (2) assess the population, need, and context; (3) evaluate the intervention to be adapted with attention to

  8. Different in vitro cellular responses to tamoxifen treatment in polydimethylsiloxane-based devices compared to normal cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingyu; Yu, Linfen; Grist, Samantha; Cheung, Karen C; Chen, David D Y

    2017-11-15

    Cell culture systems based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices offer great flexibility because of their simple fabrication and adaptability. PDMS devices also make it straightforward to set up parallel experiments and can facilitate process automation, potentially speeding up the drug discovery process. However, cells grown in PDMS-based systems can develop in different ways to those grown with conventional culturing systems because of the differences in the containers' surfaces. Despite the growing number of studies on microfluidic cell culture devices, the differences in cellular behavior in PDMS-based devices and normal cell culture systems are poorly characterized. In this work, we investigated the proliferation and autophagy of MCF7 cells cultured in uncoated and Parylene-C coated PDMS wells. Using a quantitative method combining solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry we developed, we showed that Tamoxifen uptake into the surfaces of uncoated PDMS wells can change the drug's effective concentration in the culture medium, affecting the results of Tamoxifen-induced autophagy and cytotoxicity assays. Such changes must be carefully analyzed before transferring in vitro experiments from a traditional culture environment to a PDMS-based microfluidic system. We also found that cells cultured in Parylene-C coated PDMS wells showed similar proliferation and drug response characteristics to cells cultured in standard polystyrene (PS) plates, indicating that Parylene-C deposition offers an easy way of limiting the uptake of small molecules into porous PDMS materials and significantly improves the performance of PDMS-based device for cell related research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. FETAL PORCINE VENTRAL MESENCEPHALON GRAFTS - DISSECTION PROCEDURE AND CELLULAR CHARACTERIZATION IN CULTURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANROON, WMC; COPRAY, JCVM; HOGENESCH, RI; KEMA, [No Value; MEYER, EM; MOLENAAR, G; LUGARD, C; STAAL, MJ; GO, KG

    The objective of this study was to develop an optimal dissection procedure for fetal porcine ventral mesencephalon (VM) grafts and to characterize the cellular composition of such an explant, in particular with respect to the dopaminergic and GABAergic components. We have used a monolayer cell

  10. Cellular Microenvironment Dictates Androgen Production by Murine Fetal Leydig Cells in Primary Culture1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Colleen M.; Muszynski, Jessica L.; Strotman, Lindsay N.; Lewis, Samantha R.; O'Connell, Rachel L.; Beebe, David J.; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Jorgensen, Joan S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the fact that fetal Leydig cells are recognized as the primary source of androgens in male embryos, the mechanisms by which steroidogenesis occurs within the developing testis remain unclear. A genetic approach was used to visualize and isolate fetal Leydig cells from remaining cells within developing mouse testes. Cyp11a1-Cre mice were bred to mT/mG dual reporter mice to target membrane-tagged enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) within steroidogenic cells, whereas other cells expressed membrane-tagged tandem-dimer tomato red. Fetal Leydig cell identity was validated using double-labeled immunohistochemistry against GFP and the steroidogenic enzyme 3beta-HSD, and cells were successfully isolated as indicated by qPCR results from sorted cell populations. Because fetal Leydig cells must collaborate with neighboring cells to synthesize testosterone, we hypothesized that the fetal Leydig cell microenvironment defined their capacity for androgen production. Microfluidic culture devices were used to measure androstenedione and testosterone production of fetal Leydig cells that were cultured in cell-cell contact within a mixed population, were isolated but remained in medium contact via compartmentalized co-culture with other testicular cells, or were isolated and cultured alone. Results showed that fetal Leydig cells maintained their identity and steroidogenic activity for 3–5 days in primary culture. Microenvironment dictated proficiency of testosterone production. As expected, fetal Leydig cells produced androstenedione but not testosterone when cultured in isolation. More testosterone accumulated in medium from mixed cultures than from compartmentalized co-cultures initially; however, co-cultures maintained testosterone synthesis for a longer time. These data suggest that a combination of cell-cell contact and soluble factors constitute the ideal microenvironment for fetal Leydig cell activity in primary culture. PMID:25143354

  11. Cellular microenvironment dictates androgen production by murine fetal Leydig cells in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Colleen M; Muszynski, Jessica L; Strotman, Lindsay N; Lewis, Samantha R; O'Connell, Rachel L; Beebe, David J; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Jorgensen, Joan S

    2014-10-01

    Despite the fact that fetal Leydig cells are recognized as the primary source of androgens in male embryos, the mechanisms by which steroidogenesis occurs within the developing testis remain unclear. A genetic approach was used to visualize and isolate fetal Leydig cells from remaining cells within developing mouse testes. Cyp11a1-Cre mice were bred to mT/mG dual reporter mice to target membrane-tagged enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) within steroidogenic cells, whereas other cells expressed membrane-tagged tandem-dimer tomato red. Fetal Leydig cell identity was validated using double-labeled immunohistochemistry against GFP and the steroidogenic enzyme 3beta-HSD, and cells were successfully isolated as indicated by qPCR results from sorted cell populations. Because fetal Leydig cells must collaborate with neighboring cells to synthesize testosterone, we hypothesized that the fetal Leydig cell microenvironment defined their capacity for androgen production. Microfluidic culture devices were used to measure androstenedione and testosterone production of fetal Leydig cells that were cultured in cell-cell contact within a mixed population, were isolated but remained in medium contact via compartmentalized co-culture with other testicular cells, or were isolated and cultured alone. Results showed that fetal Leydig cells maintained their identity and steroidogenic activity for 3-5 days in primary culture. Microenvironment dictated proficiency of testosterone production. As expected, fetal Leydig cells produced androstenedione but not testosterone when cultured in isolation. More testosterone accumulated in medium from mixed cultures than from compartmentalized co-cultures initially; however, co-cultures maintained testosterone synthesis for a longer time. These data suggest that a combination of cell-cell contact and soluble factors constitute the ideal microenvironment for fetal Leydig cell activity in primary culture. © 2014 by the Society for the Study of

  12. Enhanced cellular responses of human bone marrow stromal cells cultured on pretreated surface with allogenic platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung Han; Yoo, Jeong Joon; Kim, Ha Na; Nam, Jinwoo; Kim, Hee Joong

    2012-01-01

    The principal objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of surface pretreatment with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on the cellular functions of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs). The surfaces of tissue culture plates (TCPs) were pretreated by adding PRP followed by centrifugation to bring platelets closer to the surface, followed by incubation for 60 min at 37°C. Then, hBMSCs were seeded onto TCP and TCP pretreated with PRP (TCP-PRP), followed by culture in osteogenic medium. Cell attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation were evaluated. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM; JSM-7401F, JEOL Ltd., Japan) observations were conducted. The attachment of hBMSCs was significantly lower on TCP-PRP than on TCP. However, when the cell numbers were normalized with those observed on day 1 of culture, cellular proliferation on 5 days was significantly higher on TCP-PRP. Alkaline phosphatase activity, an index of early phase of osteoblastic differentiation, was significantly higher on TCP-PRP on day 14. Calcium deposition amount, an index of terminal osteoblastic differentiation, was also significantly higher on TCP-PRP on days 14 and 21. The results of von Kossa staining confirmed that, on day 21, the area of mineralized nodules was significantly larger on TCP-PRP. FE-SEM observation demonstrated that activated platelets and fibrin network covered the surface after PRP treatment. An increase in the number of hBMSCs and their cellular products was evident on the FE-SEM observation, and the fibrin network remained on day 21. Our results demonstrate that a PRP-treated surface enhanced early proliferation and late osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs.

  13. Hydrogen-rich PBS protects cultured human cells from ionizing radiation-induced cellular damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Liren

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyl radicals play an important role in ionizing radiation-induced cellular damage, while hydrogen can selectively reduce hydroxyl radicals in vitro. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that hydrogen-rich PBS may be an effective radioprotective agent in vitro. Compared to cells pretreated without hydrogen, we demonstrated that treating cells with hydrogen-rich PBS before irradiation could significantly inhibit IR-induced apoptosis, increase viability of human intestinal crypt cells, significantly increase endogenous antioxidant, and decrease malondialdehyde and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine concentrations of human lymphocyte AHH-1 cells. It is concluded that hydrogen has a potential as an effective and safe radioprotective agent.

  14. Cellular changes in motor neuron cell culture produced by cytotoxic cerebrospinal fluid from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Pinedo, U; Yáñez, M; Matías-Guiu, J; Galán, L; Guerrero-Sola, A; Benito-Martin, M S; Vela, A; Arranz-Tagarro, J A; García, A G

    2014-01-01

    The neurotoxic effects of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have been reported by various authors who have attributed this neurotoxicity to the glutamate in CSF-ALS. Cultures of rat embryonic cortical neurons were exposed to CSF from ALS patients during an incubation period of 24 hours. Optical microscopy was used to compare cellular changes to those elicited by exposure to 100μm glutamate, and confocal microscopy was used to evaluate immunohistochemistry for caspase-3, TNFα, and peripherin. In the culture exposed to CSF-ALS, we observed cells with nuclear fragmentation and scarce or null structural modifications to the cytoplasmic organelles or to plasma membrane maintenance. This did not occur in the culture exposed to glutamate. The culture exposed to CSF-ALS also demonstrated increases in caspase-3, TNFα, and in peripherin co-locating with caspase-3, but not with TNFα, suggesting that TNFα may play an early role in the process of apoptosis. CFS-ALS cytotoxicity is not related to glutamate. It initially affects the nucleus without altering the cytoplasmic membrane. It causes cytoplasmic apoptosis that involves an increase in caspase-3 co-located with peripherin, which is also overexpressed. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Cellular heredity in haploid cultures of somatic cells. Comprehensive report, April 1975--June 1977. [UV radiation

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    Freed, J.J.

    1977-07-01

    This report reviews genetic studies carried out since 1975 on a haploid cultured cell line from frog embryos (ICR 2A). Although a single chromosome set would be expected to facilitate recovery of recessive mutants, experiments suggested that cell culture variants might arise through processes more complex than the selection of simple mutational changes. Therefore, the objectives of the work reported here have been to throw light on just how cell culture variants arise in this system. First, we have continued to characterize the ICR 2A line, with emphasis on stability of karyotype and DNA content. Second, we have studied in detail the origin of two classes of drug-resistant variants. Bromodeoxyuridine resistance of the thymidine deficiency type has been shown to arise through sequential loss of two forms of thymidine-phosphorylating enzyme; loss of the second form of enzyme is complex, suggesting that changes more complex than simple recessive mutations may be involved. Another form of resistance, in which tolerance of high levels of bromodeoxyuridine is found in cells that continue to express thymidine kinase, remains under study. Variants resistant to microtubule inhibitors were isolated. It was found that these haploid strains have properties distinguishing them from analogous resistant strains isolated from diploid mammalian cell cultures in other laboratories. In order to understand better how mutagens are involved in the origin of cell culture variants, we have examined the effect of different forms of DNA repair on the frequency of drug-resistant colonies induced by ultraviolet radiation. Preliminary experiments suggest that the frequency of such colonies is greater when repair takes place through (presumably error-prone) dark repair than when (error-free) photoreversal is allowed to occur. Such experiments can determine whether new phenotypes arise from alterations in DNA, and thus whether, in a broad sense, they are likely to be mutational in nature.

  16. Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strains form Biofilm on Abiotic Surfaces Regardless of Their Adherence Pattern on Cultured Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebert F. Culler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the capacity of biofilm formation of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC strains on abiotic and biotic surfaces. Ninety-one aEPEC strains, isolated from feces of children with diarrhea, were analyzed by the crystal violet (CV assay on an abiotic surface after 24 h of incubation. aEPEC strains representing each HEp-2 cell type of adherence were analyzed after 24 h and 6, 12, and 18 days of incubation at 37°C on abiotic and cell surfaces by CFU/cm2 counting and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces occurred in 55 (60.4% of the aEPEC strains. There was no significant difference in biofilm biomass formation on an abiotic versus prefixed cell surface. The biofilms could be visualized by CLSM at various developmental stages. aEPEC strains are able to form biofilm on an abiotic surface with no association with their adherence pattern on HEp-2 cells with the exception of the strains expressing UND (undetermined adherence. This study revealed the capacity of adhesion and biofilm formation by aEPEC strains on abiotic and biotic surfaces, possibly playing a role in pathogenesis, mainly in cases of persistent diarrhea.

  17. Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strains form Biofilm on Abiotic Surfaces Regardless of Their Adherence Pattern on Cultured Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culler, Hebert F.; Mota, Cristiane M.; Abe, Cecilia M.; Elias, Waldir P.; Sircili, Marcelo P.; Franzolin, Marcia R.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the capacity of biofilm formation of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) strains on abiotic and biotic surfaces. Ninety-one aEPEC strains, isolated from feces of children with diarrhea, were analyzed by the crystal violet (CV) assay on an abiotic surface after 24 h of incubation. aEPEC strains representing each HEp-2 cell type of adherence were analyzed after 24 h and 6, 12, and 18 days of incubation at 37°C on abiotic and cell surfaces by CFU/cm2 counting and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces occurred in 55 (60.4%) of the aEPEC strains. There was no significant difference in biofilm biomass formation on an abiotic versus prefixed cell surface. The biofilms could be visualized by CLSM at various developmental stages. aEPEC strains are able to form biofilm on an abiotic surface with no association with their adherence pattern on HEp-2 cells with the exception of the strains expressing UND (undetermined adherence). This study revealed the capacity of adhesion and biofilm formation by aEPEC strains on abiotic and biotic surfaces, possibly playing a role in pathogenesis, mainly in cases of persistent diarrhea. PMID:24883330

  18. rhEPO Enhances Cellular Anti-oxidant Capacity to Protect Long-Term Cultured Aging Primary Nerve Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huqing; Fan, Jiaxin; Chen, Mengyi; Yao, Qingling; Gao, Zhen; Zhang, Guilian; Wu, Haiqin; Yu, Xiaorui

    2017-08-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) may protect the nervous system of animals against aging damage, making it a potential anti-aging drug for the nervous system. However, experimental evidence from natural aging nerve cell models is lacking, and the efficacy of EPO and underlying mechanism of this effect warrant further study. Thus, the present study used long-term cultured primary nerve cells to successfully mimic the natural aging process of nerve cells. Starting on the 11th day of culture, cells were treated with different concentrations of recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO). Using double immunofluorescence labeling, we found that rhEPO significantly improved the morphology of long-term cultured primary nerve cells and increased the total number of long-term cultured primary cells. However, rhEPO did not improve the ratio of nerve cells. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to measure nerve cell activity and showed that rhEPO significantly improved the activity of long-term cultured primary nerve cells. Moreover, Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)/propidium iodide (PI) double immunofluorescence labeling flow cytometry revealed that rhEPO reduced the apoptotic rate of long-term cultured primary nerve cells. Senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) immunohistochemistry staining showed that rhEPO significantly reduced the aging rate of long-term cultured primary nerve cells. Immunochemistry revealed that rhEPO enhanced intracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and glutathione (GSH) abundance and reduced the intracellular malondialdehyde (MDA) level. In addition, this effect depended on the dose, was maximized at a dose of 100 U/ml and was more pronounced than that of vitamin E. In summary, this study finds that rhEPO protects long-term cultured primary nerve cells from aging in a dose-dependent manner. The mechanism of this effect may be associated with the enhancement of the intracellular anti

  19. Exploring the cultural context of HIV stigma on antiretroviral therapy adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS in southwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoror, Titilayo A; Falade, Catherine O; Olorunlana, Adetayo; Walker, Ebunlomo M; Okareh, Oladapo T

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the cultural context of HIV stigma on antiretroviral therapy adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in southwest Nigeria. Using purposive sampling, participants were recruited through a community-based organization. Consenting PLWHA participated in in-depth interviews and focus group discussions that were audio-taped. Using Deacon's conceptual framework of stigma, four opinion guides facilitated the interviews and discussions. Interviews and discussions were conducted in three languages, and lasted from 45 min to 2 h. A total of 35 women and men participated in the study. Participants ranged in age from 22 to 58 years, with an average of 4 years since clinical diagnosis of HIV/AIDS. All participants were receiving ART, and self-reported high adherence level. Using thematic analysis, three themes emerged: life before ART, life after ART, and strategies used in ART adherence. In describing their lives before ART, participants reported experiencing self, anticipated and enacted stigmas due to their sickly appearance from HIV-related complications. After initiating ART, participants talked about friends and families "returning to them" and "apologizing for abandoning" them once they started "looking well." In response to anticipated stigma, many reported sticking to their medications. Drawing from the cultural milieu as part of their strategies, participants discussed the use of plastic bags for medications and àkònpó, as ways of diverting attention from their use of many medications. Implications for ART program policies and stigma interventions were discussed, along with limitation of a short-term ART study on stigma since long-term use of ART can contribute to stigma by way of lipoatrophy as PLWHA age.

  20. Alteration of cellular behavior and response to PI3K pathway inhibition by culture in 3D collagen gels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Fallica

    Full Text Available Most investigations into cancer cell drug response are performed with cells cultured on flat (2D tissue culture plastic. Emerging research has shown that the presence of a three-dimensional (3D extracellular matrix (ECM is critical for normal cell behavior including migration, adhesion, signaling, proliferation and apoptosis. In this study we investigate differences between cancer cell signaling in 2D culture and a 3D ECM, employing real-time, live cell tracking to directly observe U2OS human osteosarcoma and MCF7 human breast cancer cells embedded in type 1 collagen gels. The activation of the important PI3K signaling pathway under these different growth conditions is studied, and the response to inhibition of both PI3K and mTOR with PI103 investigated. Cells grown in 3D gels show reduced proliferation and migration as well as reduced PI3K pathway activation when compared to cells grown in 2D. Our results quantitatively demonstrate that a collagen ECM can protect U2OS cells from PI103. Overall, our data suggests that 3D gels may provide a better medium for investigation of anti-cancer drugs than 2D monolayers, therefore allowing better understanding of cellular response and behavior in native like environments.

  1. [Tissue culture of middle ear epithelium of the guinea pig--differences of the cellular growth activity in the middle ear cavity using collagen gel culture method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeno, S

    1990-12-01

    Primary tissue culture system from the middle ear and the tracheal epithelium of the guinea pig was established using collagen gel method. The cultured epithelium was studied by phase-contrast microscopy, light and scanning electron microscopy. The outgrowth area of the epithelium was quantitatively measured for period of up to ten days. In the middle ear cavity, the mucosal explants were sampled from various sites in order to compare their differential and proliferative activities. The mucosal explants attached on collagen substrates were composed of ciliated, non-ciliated, goblet and basal cells. This basic structure was similar to the natural middle ear epithelium. The ciliated cells showed well organized cilia. Most of the outgrowth cells devoid of fibroblastic cells in the monolayer were polygonal shaped with numerous microvilli. The morphology of the outgrowth cells changed from columnar or cuboidal to squamous shapes in the area away from the explants. There was a correlation between the distribution of the ciliated cells in the outgrowths and these in the explants. The explants with columnar or cuboidal ciliated epithelia sampled from the opening of the eustachian tube or its neighborhood formed more than eightfold outgrowth sheets in vitro. This is comparable to tracheal epithelia. On the other hand, the explants with simple squamous epithelia sampled from the area distal to the eustachian tube showed about fourfold proliferative activity. We concluded that this culture system would be useful for the study of cellular multiplication and differentiation mechanisms of the respiratory tract epithelium.

  2. Optical µ-Printing of Cellular-Scale Microscaffold Arrays for 3D Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Xia; Zhang, Kunyu; Wu, Jushuai; Wong, Dexter Siu-Hong; Feng, Qian; Bian, Liming; Zhang, A Ping

    2017-08-21

    Guiding cell culture via engineering extracellular microenvironment has attracted tremendous attention due to its appealing potentials in the repair, maintenance, and development of tissues or even whole organs. However, conventional biofabrication technologies are usually less productive in fabricating microscale three-dimensional (3D) constructs because of the strident requirements in processing precision and complexity. Here we present an optical µ-printing technology to rapidly fabricate 3D microscaffold arrays for 3D cell culture and cell-scaffold interaction studies on a single chip. Arrays of 3D cubic microscaffolds with cubical sizes matching the single-cell size were fabricated to facilitate cell spreading on suspended microbeams so as to expose both apical and basal cell membranes. We further showed that the increasing of the cubical size of the microscaffolds led to enhanced spreading of the seeded human mesenchymal stem cells and activation of mechanosensing signaling, thereby promoting osteogenesis. Moreover, we demonstrated that the spatially selective modification of the surfaces of suspended beams with a bioactive coating (gelatin methacrylate) via an in-situ printing process allowed tailorable cell adhesion and spreading on the 3D microscaffolds.

  3. Copper oxide nanoparticles stimulate glycolytic flux and increase the cellular contents of glutathione and metallothioneins in cultured astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulcke, Felix; Dringen, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs) are frequently used for industrial or medical applications and are known for their high toxic potential. As little is known so far on the consequences of an exposure of brain cells to such particles, we applied CuO-NPs to cultured primary rat astrocytes and investigated whether such particles affect cell viability and alter their metabolic properties. Astrocytes efficiently accumulated CuO-NPs in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The cells remained viable during a 24 h incubation with 100 µM copper in the form of CuO-NPs, while higher concentrations of CuO-NPs severely compromised the cell viability. Astrocytes that were exposed for 24 h to 100 µM CuO-NPs showed significantly enhanced extracellular lactate concentrations and increased cellular levels of glutathione and metallothioneins. The CuO-NP-induced increase in lactate release and metallothionein content were prevented by the presence of the membrane-permeable copper chelator tetrathiomolybdate, while this chelator increased already in the absence of CuO-NPs the cellular glutathione content. After removal of the CuO-NPs following a 24 h pre-incubation with 100 µM CuO-NPs, astrocytes maintained during a further 6 h incubation an elevated glycolytic lactate release and exported significantly more glutathione than control cells that had been pre-incubated without CuO-NPs. These data suggest that copper ions which are liberated from internalized CuO-NPs stimulate glycolytic flux as well as the synthesis of glutathione and metallothioneins in cultured viable astrocytes.

  4. Cellular track model of biological damage to mammalian cell cultures from galactic cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Katz, Robert; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Nealy, John E.; Shinn, Judy L.

    1991-02-01

    The assessment of biological damage from the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a current interest for exploratory class space missions where the highly ionizing, high-energy, high-charge ions (HZE) particles are the major concern. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values determined by ground-based experiments with HZE particles are well described by a parametric track theory of cell inactivation. Using the track model and a deterministic GCR transport code, the biological damage to mammalian cell cultures is considered for 1 year in free space at solar minimum for typical spacecraft shielding. Included are the effects of projectile and target fragmentation. The RBE values for the GCR spectrum which are fluence-dependent in the track model are found to be more severe than the quality factors identified by the International Commission on Radiological Protection publication 26 and seem to obey a simple scaling law with the duration period in free space.

  5. Direct Adherence of Fe(III Particles onto Sheaths of Leptothrix sp. Strain OUMS1 in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuki Kunoh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptothrix species, one of the Fe/Mn-oxidizing bacteria, oxidize Fe(II and produce extracellular, microtubuar, Fe-encrusted sheaths. Since protein(s involved in Fe(II oxidation is excreted from Leptothrix cells, the oxidation from Fe(II to Fe(III and subsequent Fe(III deposition to sheaths have been thought to occur in the vicinity or within the sheaths. Previously, Fe(III particles generated in MSVP medium amended with Fe(II salts by abiotic oxidation were directly recruited onto cell-encasing and/or -free sheaths of L. cholodnii SP-6. In this study, whether this direct Fe(III adherence to sheaths also occurs in silicon-glucose-peptone (SGP medium amended with Fe(0 (SGP + Fe was investigated using another strain of Leptothrix sp., OUMS1. Preparation of SGP + Fe with Fe powder caused turbidity within a few hours due to abiotic generation of Fe(III particles via Fe(II, and the medium remained turbid until day 8. When OUMS1 was added to SGP + Fe, the turbidity of the medium cleared within 35 h as Fe(III particles adhered to sheaths. When primitive sheaths, cell-killed, cell-free, or lysozyme/EDTA/SDS- and proteinase K-treated sheath remnants were mixed with Fe(III particles, the particles immediately adhered to each. Thus, vital activity of cells was not required for the direct Fe(III particle deposition onto sheaths regardless of Leptothrix strains.

  6. Human sepsis-associated Escherichia coli (SEPEC) is able to adhere to and invade kidney epithelial cells in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conceição, R.A. [Departamento de Genética, Evolução e Bioagentes, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ludovico, M.S. [Departamento de Microbiologia, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Andrade, C.G.T.J. [Departamento de Biologia Geral, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Yano, T. [Departamento de Genética, Evolução e Bioagentes, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-04-13

    The adhesins of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli are essential for mediating direct interactions between the microbes and the host cell surfaces that they infect. Using fluorescence microscopy and gentamycin protection assays, we observed that 49 sepsis-associated E. coli (SEPEC) strains isolated from human adults adhered to and invaded Vero cells in the presence of D-mannose (100%). In addition, bacteria concentrations of approximately 2 × 10{sup 7} CFU/mL were recovered from Vero cells following an invasion assay. Furthermore, PCR analysis of adhesin genes showed that 98.0% of these SEPEC strains tested positive for fimH, 69.4% for flu, 53.1% for csgA, 38.8% for mat, and 32.7% for iha. Analysis of the invasin genes showed that 16.3% of the SEPEC strains were positive for tia, 12.3% for gimB, and 10.2% for ibeA. Therefore, these data suggest that SEPEC adhesion to cell surfaces occurs through non-fimH mechanisms. Scanning electron microscopy showed the formation of microcolonies on the Vero cell surface. SEPEC invasiveness was also confirmed by the presence of intracellular bacteria, and ultrastructural analysis using electron transmission microscopy revealed bacteria inside the Vero cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that these SEPEC strains had the ability to adhere to and invade Vero cells. Moreover, these data support the theory that renal cells may be the predominant pathway through which SEPEC enters human blood vessels.

  7. Delineating cellular interactions between ciliates and fish by co-culturing Tetrahymena thermophila with fish cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Marcel D O; Bols, Niels C

    2014-10-01

    Although several species of Tetrahymena are often described as histophagous and opportunistic pathogens of fish, little is known about ciliate/fish cell interactions, but one approach for studying these is in vitro with cell lines. In this study, T. thermophila, B1975 (wild type) and NP1 (temperature sensitive mutant for phagocytosis) were cultured on monolayers of 3 fish epithelial cell lines, CHSE-214, RTgill-W1, and ZEB2J, and the rabbit kidney epithelial cell line, RK-13. Generally the ciliates flourished, whereas the monolayers died, being completely consumed over several days. The destruction of monolayers required that the ciliates could make contact with the animal cells through swimming, which appeared to dislodge or loosen cells so that they could be phagocytosed. The ciliates internalized into food vacuoles ZEB2J from cell monolayers as well as from cell suspensions. Phagocytosis was essential for monolayer destruction as monolayers remained intact under conditions where phagocytosis was impeded, such as 37°C for NP1 and 4°C for B1975. Monolayers of fish cells supported the proliferation of ciliates. Thus T. thermophila can 'eat' animal cells or be histophagous in vitro, with the potential to be histophagous in vivo. © 2014 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  8. Rhodiola rosea ability to enrich cellular antioxidant defences of cultured human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcabrini, Cinzia; De Bellis, Roberta; Mancini, Umberto; Cucchiarini, Luigi; Potenza, Lucia; De Sanctis, Roberta; Patrone, Vania; Scesa, Carla; Dachà, Marina

    2010-04-01

    Keratinocytes are cells strongly exposed to oxidative stress, but normally good equipped for antioxidant responses. However, it has long been suggested that exogenous antioxidants could play a useful role in minimizing the adverse skin responses associated with such oxidant species. In this work it was paid attention to the extract of Rhodiola rosea L. roots by using the phytocomplex as a whole because of the important activity of its composition and mutual distribution of its components. We have measured the protection afforded by the extract to reduced glutathione levels, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels in cultured human keratinocytes (NCTC 2544) exposed to different oxidative insults: Fe(II)/ascorbate, Fe(II)/H(2)O(2), and tert-butyl-hydroperoxide. We also have investigated the influence of the R. rosea extract on the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and on the activity of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase). Furthermore, we have demonstrated that R. rosea extract was able to increase in a time- and dose-dependent manner the activity of the trans plasma membrane oxido reductase activity as an indirect evaluation of the intracellular redox status and this effect was already evident with small concentration of the extract and in a long time. As a result, NCTC 2544 are able to better counteract to several oxidative insults if incubated with R. rosea extract demonstrating a very good antioxidant activity of this phytocomplex.

  9. Design, Surface Treatment, Cellular Plating, and Culturing of Modular Neuronal Networks Composed of Functionally Inter-connected Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanner, Sivan; Bisio, Marta; Cohen, Gilad; Goldin, Miri; Tedesco, Marieteresa; Hanein, Yael; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Barzilai, Ari; Chiappalone, Michela; Bonifazi, Paolo

    2015-04-15

    The brain operates through the coordinated activation and the dynamic communication of neuronal assemblies. A major open question is how a vast repertoire of dynamical motifs, which underlie most diverse brain functions, can emerge out of a fixed topological and modular organization of brain circuits. Compared to in vivo studies of neuronal circuits which present intrinsic experimental difficulties, in vitro preparations offer a much larger possibility to manipulate and probe the structural, dynamical and chemical properties of experimental neuronal systems. This work describes an in vitro experimental methodology which allows growing of modular networks composed by spatially distinct, functionally interconnected neuronal assemblies. The protocol allows controlling the two-dimensional (2D) architecture of the neuronal network at different levels of topological complexity. A desired network patterning can be achieved both on regular cover slips and substrate embedded micro electrode arrays. Micromachined structures are embossed on a silicon wafer and used to create biocompatible polymeric stencils, which incorporate the negative features of the desired network architecture. The stencils are placed on the culturing substrates during the surface coating procedure with a molecular layer for promoting cellular adhesion. After removal of the stencils, neurons are plated and they spontaneously redirected to the coated areas. By decreasing the inter-compartment distance, it is possible to obtain either isolated or interconnected neuronal circuits. To promote cell survival, cells are co-cultured with a supporting neuronal network which is located at the periphery of the culture dish. Electrophysiological and optical recordings of the activity of modular networks obtained respectively by using substrate embedded micro electrode arrays and calcium imaging are presented. While each module shows spontaneous global synchronizations, the occurrence of inter-module synchronization

  10. Milk digesta and milk protein fractions influence the adherence of Lactobacillus gasseri R and Lactobacillus casei FMP to human cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volstatova, Tereza; Havlik, Jaroslav; Potuckova, Miroslava; Geigerova, Martina

    2016-08-10

    Adhesion to the intestinal epithelium is considered an important feature of probiotic bacteria, which may increase their persistence in the intestine, allowing them to exert their beneficial health effect or promote the colonisation process. However, this feature might be largely dependent on the host specificity or diet. In the present study, we investigated the effect of selected milks and milk protein fractions on the ability of selected lactobacilli to adhere to the cells of an intestinal model based on co-culture Caco-2/HT29-MTX cell lines. Most milk digesta did not significantly affect bacterial adhesion except for UHT-treated milk and sheep milk. The presence of UHT-treated milk digesta reduced the adhesion of Lactobacillus gasseri R by 61% but not that of Lactobacillus casei FMP. However, sheep milk significantly increased the adherence of L. casei FMP (P milk in the development of microbiota or support of probiotic supplements. Based on our data, we conclude that the persistence of probiotic strains supplemented as part of dairy food or constitutional microbiota in the gut might be affected negatively or positively by the food matrix through complex strain or concentration dependent effects.

  11. Human sepsis-associated Escherichia coli (SEPEC is able to adhere to and invade kidney epithelial cells in culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Conceição

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The adhesins of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli are essential for mediating direct interactions between the microbes and the host cell surfaces that they infect. Using fluorescence microscopy and gentamycin protection assays, we observed that 49 sepsis-associated E. coli (SEPEC strains isolated from human adults adhered to and invaded Vero cells in the presence of D-mannose (100%. In addition, bacteria concentrations of approximately 2 x 10(7 CFU/mL were recovered from Vero cells following an invasion assay. Furthermore, PCR analysis of adhesin genes showed that 98.0% of these SEPEC strains tested positive for fimH, 69.4% for flu, 53.1% for csgA, 38.8% for mat, and 32.7% for iha. Analysis of the invasin genes showed that 16.3% of the SEPEC strains were positive for tia, 12.3% for gimB, and 10.2% for ibeA. Therefore, these data suggest that SEPEC adhesion to cell surfaces occurs through non-fimH mechanisms. Scanning electron microscopy showed the formation of microcolonies on the Vero cell surface. SEPEC invasiveness was also confirmed by the presence of intracellular bacteria, and ultrastructural analysis using electron transmission microscopy revealed bacteria inside the Vero cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that these SEPEC strains had the ability to adhere to and invade Vero cells. Moreover, these data support the theory that renal cells may be the predominant pathway through which SEPEC enters human blood vessels.

  12. A Simple Method for Establishing Adherent Ex Vivo Explant Cultures from Human Eye Pathologies for Use in Subsequent Calcium Imaging and Inflammatory Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veréb, Zoltán; Facskó, Andrea; Hawlina, Marko

    2014-01-01

    A novel, simple, and reproducible method for cultivating pathological tissues obtained from human eyes during surgery was developed using viscoelastic material as a tissue adherent to facilitate cell attachment and expansion and calcium imaging of cultured cells challenged by mechanical and acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation as well as inflammatory studies. Anterior lens capsule-lens epithelial cells (aLC-LECs) from cataract surgery and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) fibrovascular epiretinal membranes (fvERMs) from human eyes were used in the study. We hereby show calcium signaling in aLC-LECs by mechanical and acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation and indicate presence of ACh receptors in these cells. Furthermore, an ex vivo study model was established for measuring the inflammatory response in fvERMs and aLC-LECs upon TNFα treatment. PMID:25276840

  13. A Simple Method for Establishing Adherent Ex Vivo Explant Cultures from Human Eye Pathologies for Use in Subsequent Calcium Imaging and Inflammatory Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofija Andjelic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel, simple, and reproducible method for cultivating pathological tissues obtained from human eyes during surgery was developed using viscoelastic material as a tissue adherent to facilitate cell attachment and expansion and calcium imaging of cultured cells challenged by mechanical and acetylcholine (ACh stimulation as well as inflammatory studies. Anterior lens capsule-lens epithelial cells (aLC-LECs from cataract surgery and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR fibrovascular epiretinal membranes (fvERMs from human eyes were used in the study. We hereby show calcium signaling in aLC-LECs by mechanical and acetylcholine (ACh stimulation and indicate presence of ACh receptors in these cells. Furthermore, an ex vivo study model was established for measuring the inflammatory response in fvERMs and aLC-LECs upon TNFα treatment.

  14. Kruppel-Like Factor 4 Overexpression Initiates a Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial Transition and Redifferentiation of Human Pancreatic Cells following Expansion in Long Term Adherent Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R Muir

    Full Text Available A replenishable source of insulin-producing cells has the potential to cure type 1 diabetes. Attempts to culture and expand pancreatic β-cells in vitro have resulted in their transition from insulin-producing epithelial cells to mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs with high proliferative capacity but devoid of any hormone production. The aim of this study was to determine whether the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4, could induce a mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET of the cultured cells. Islet-enriched pancreatic cells, allowed to dedifferentiate and expand in adherent cell culture, were transduced with an adenovirus containing KLF4 (Ad-Klf4. Cells were subsequently analysed for changes in cell morphology by light microscopy, and for the presence of epithelial and pancreatic markers by immunocytochemistry and quantitative RT/PCR. Infection with Ad-Klf4 resulted in morphological changes, down-regulation of mesenchymal markers, and re-expression of both epithelial and pancreatic cell markers including insulin and transcription factors specific to β-cells. This effect was further enhanced by culturing cells in suspension. However, the effects of Ad-KLf4 were transient and this was shown to be due to increased apoptosis in Klf4-expressing cells. Klf4 has been recently identified as a pioneer factor with the ability to modulate the structure of chromatin and enhance reprogramming/transdifferentiation. Our results show that Klf4 may have a role in the redifferentiation of expanded pancreatic cells in culture, but before this can be achieved the off-target effects that result in increased apoptosis would need to be overcome.

  15. Assessment of cellular materials generated by co-cultured ‘inflamed’ and healthy periodontal ligament stem cells from patient-matched groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Hao-Ning [State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Department of Stomatology, The First Affiliated Hospital of the Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100048 (China); Xia, Yu [State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Department of Stomatology, The 309th Hospital of Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Beijing 100091 (China); Xu, Jie; Tian, Bei-Min; Zhang, Xi-Yu [State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Chen, Fa-Ming, E-mail: cfmsunhh@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)

    2016-08-01

    Recently, stem cells derived from the'inflamed’ periodontal ligament (PDL) tissue of periodontally diseased teeth (I-PDLSCs) have been increasingly suggested as a more readily accessible source of cells for regenerative therapies than those derived from healthy PDL tissue (H-PDLSCs). However, substantial evidence indicates that I-PDLSCs exhibit impaired functionalities compared with H-PDLSCs. In this study, patient-matched I-PDLSCs and H-PDLSCs were co-cultured at various ratios. Cellular materials derived from these cultures were investigated regarding their osteogenic potential in vitro and capacity to form new bone following in vivo transplantation. While patient-matched I-PDLSCs and H-PDLSCs could co-exist in co-culture systems, the proportion of I-PDLSCs tended to increase during in vitro incubation. Compared with H-PDLSC monoculture, the presence of I-PDLSCs in the co-cultures appeared to enhance the overall cell proliferation. Although not completely rescued, the osteogenic and regenerative potentials of the cellular materials generated by co-cultured I-PDLSCs and H-PDLSCs were significantly improved compared with those derived from I-PDLSC monocultures. Notably, cells in co-cultures containing either 50% I-PDLSCs plus 50% H-PDLSCs or 25% I-PDLSCs plus 75% H-PDLSCs expressed osteogenesis-related proteins and genes at levels similar to those expressed in H-PDLSC monocultures (P>0.05). Irrespective of the percentage of I-PDLSCs, robust cellular materials were obtained from co-cultures with 50% or more H-PDLSCs, which exhibited equivalent potential to form new bone in vivo compared with sheets generated by H-PDLSC monocultures. These data suggest that the co-culture of I-PDLSCs with patient-matched H-PDLSCs is a practical and effective method for increasing the overall osteogenic and regenerative potentials of resultant cellular materials. - Highlights: • Co-culturing H-PDLSCs with I-PDLSCs led to rapid cell expansion. • H-PDLSCs and I-PDLSCs co-cultured

  16. Blue LED light exposure develops intracellular reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, and subsequent cellular injuries in cultured bovine retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi-Ueda, T; Majima, H J; Watanabe, K; Ueda, T; Indo, H P; Suenaga, S; Hisamitsu, T; Ozawa, T; Yasuhara, H; Koide, R

    2013-10-01

    The effects of blue light emitter diode (LED) light exposure on retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE cells) were examined to detect cellular damage or change and to clarify its mechanisms. The RPE cells were cultured and exposed by blue (470 nm) LED at 4.8 mW/cm(2). The cellular viability was determined by XTT assay and cellular injury was determined by the lactate dehydrogenase activity in medium. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was determined by confocal laser microscope image analysis using dihydrorhodamine 123 and lipid peroxidation was determined by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal protein-adducts immunofluorescent staining (HNE). At 24 h after 50 J/cm(2) exposures, cellular viability was significantly decreased to 74% and cellular injury was significantly increased to 365% of control. Immediately after the light exposure, ROS generation was significantly increased to 154%, 177%, and 395% of control and HNE intensity was increased to 211%, 359%, and 746% of control by 1, 10, and 50 J/cm(2), respectively. These results suggest, at least in part, that oxidative stress is an early step leading to cellular damage by blue LED exposure and cellular oxidative damage would be caused by the blue light exposure at even lower dose (1, 10 J/cm(2)).

  17. Cellular forces : adhering, shaping, sensing and dividing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, Hedde van

    2014-01-01

    Life’s building block is a cell. Different cell types are differentiated by specific functional properties. A white blood cell, for instance, can get rid of bacteria and many muscle cells contract together for proper muscle function. Deformation and force exertion play important roles in these

  18. Mps1 (Monopolar Spindle 1 Protein Inhibition Affects Cellular Growth and Pro-Embryogenic Masses Morphology in Embryogenic Cultures of Araucaria angustifolia (Araucariaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackellinne C Douétts-Peres

    Full Text Available Somatic embryogenesis has been shown to be an efficient tool for studying processes based on cell growth and development. The fine regulation of the cell cycle is essential for proper embryo formation during the process of somatic embryogenesis. The aims of the present work were to identify and perform a structural and functional characterization of Mps1 and to analyze the effects of the inhibition of this protein on cellular growth and pro-embryogenic mass (PEM morphology in embryogenic cultures of A. angustifolia. A single-copy Mps1 gene named AaMps1 was retrieved from the A. angustifolia transcriptome database, and through a mass spectrometry approach, AaMps1 was identified and quantified in embryogenic cultures. The Mps1 inhibitor SP600125 (10 μM inhibited cellular growth and changed PEMs, and these effects were accompanied by a reduction in AaMps1 protein levels in embryogenic cultures. Our work has identified the Mps1 protein in a gymnosperm species for the first time, and we have shown that inhibiting Mps1 affects cellular growth and PEM differentiation during A. angustifolia somatic embryogenesis. These data will be useful for better understanding cell cycle control during somatic embryogenesis in plants.

  19. Neural patterning of human induced pluripotent stem cells in 3-D cultures for studying biomolecule-directed differential cellular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yuanwei; Bejoy, Julie; Xia, Junfei; Guan, Jingjiao; Zhou, Yi; Li, Yan

    2016-09-15

    Appropriate neural patterning of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) is critical to generate specific neural cells/tissues and even mini-brains that are physiologically relevant to model neurological diseases. However, the capacity of signaling factors that regulate 3-D neural tissue patterning in vitro and differential responses of the resulting neural populations to various biomolecules have not yet been fully understood. By tuning neural patterning of hiPSCs with small molecules targeting sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling, this study generated different 3-D neuronal cultures that were mainly comprised of either cortical glutamatergic neurons or motor neurons. Abundant glutamatergic neurons were observed following the treatment with an antagonist of SHH signaling, cyclopamine, while Islet-1 and HB9-expressing motor neurons were enriched by an SHH agonist, purmorphamine. In neurons derived with different neural patterning factors, whole-cell patch clamp recordings showed similar voltage-gated Na(+)/K(+) currents, depolarization-evoked action potentials and spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic currents. Moreover, these different neuronal populations exhibited differential responses to three classes of biomolecules, including (1) matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors that affect extracellular matrix remodeling; (2) N-methyl-d-aspartate that induces general neurotoxicity; and (3) amyloid β (1-42) oligomers that cause neuronal subtype-specific neurotoxicity. This study should advance our understanding of hiPSC self-organization and neural tissue development and provide a transformative approach to establish 3-D models for neurological disease modeling and drug discovery. Appropriate neural patterning of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) is critical to generate specific neural cells, tissues and even mini-brains that are physiologically relevant to model neurological diseases. However, the capability of sonic hedgehog-related small molecules to tune

  20. Effects of 5-fluorouracil in nuclear and cellular morphology, proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, cytoskeletal and caveolar distribution in primary cultures of smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Carvalho Filgueiras

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is one of the most prevalent types of cancer in the world and is one of the leading causes of cancer death. The anti-metabolite 5- fluorouracil (5-FU is widely used in the treatment of patients with colon cancer and other cancer types. 5-FU-based chemotherapy has been shown to be very efficient in the improvement of overall survival of the patients and for the eradication of the disease. Unfortunately, common side effects of 5-FU include severe alterations in the motility of the gastrointestinal tissues. Nevertheless, the molecular and cellular effects of 5-FU in smooth muscle cells are poorly understood. Primary smooth muscle cell cultures are an important tool for studies of the biological consequences of 5-FU at the cellular level. The avian gizzard is one of the most robust organs of smooth muscle cells. Here we studied the molecular and cellular effects of the chemotherapic drug 5-FU in a primary culture of chick gizzard smooth muscle cells. We found that treatment of smooth muscle cells with 5-FU inhibits cell proliferation by the arrest of cells in the G1 phase of cell cycle and induce apoptosis. 5-FU induced a decrease in the percentage of histone H3-positive cells. Treatment of cells with 5-FU induced changes in cellular and nuclear morphology, a decrease in the number of stress fibers and a major decrease in the number of caveolin-3 positive cells. Our results suggest that the disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and the reduction of caveolin-3 expression could explain the alterations in contractility observed in patients treated with 5-FU. These findings might have an impact in the understanding of the cellular effects of 5-FU in smooth muscle tissues and might help the improvement of new therapeutic protocols for the treatment of colon cancer.

  1. Production of Extra-Cellular Proteases from Marine Bacillus Sp. Cultured in Media Containing Ammonium Sulfate as the Sole Nitrogen Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seri Intan, M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Useful bacterial strains can be used to increase mineralize activity of an aquatic system. These bacteria can specifically degrade targeted compound by producing extra-cellular enzymes. Three species of Bacillus i.e. B. subtilis, B. pumilus and B. licheniformis acquired from shrimp ponds were tested for their ability to utilize ammonia and produce extracellular enzymes. These bacteria were grown in artificial seawater (30 ppt salinity and pH 7.6 supplemented with decreasing yeast extract concentration but increasing ammonium sulfate concentration. All three bacteria grew in artificial seawater containing only 0.01% yeast extract and 1% ammonium sulfate. However, only B. pumilus and B. licheniformis were able to grow in the medium containing only 1% ammonium sulfate as a sole energy source. Bacterialgrowth reduced when alkaline proteases activities was maximum from culture filtrates of all three bacterial cultures during 24 hour culturing in artificial seawater containing 0.01% yeast extract and 1% ammonium sulfate at 30 C when assayed at pH 9. Bacterial growth increased when acid proteases activities was maximum from culture filtrates of all three bacterial cultures during 48 hour culturing in artificial seawater containing 0.01% yeast extract and 1% ammoniumsulfate at 30 C when assayed at pH 5.

  2. Feasibility, Patient Acceptability, and Preliminary Efficacy of a Culturally Informed, Health Promotion Program to Improve Glaucoma Medication Adherence Among African Americans: "Glaucoma Management Optimism for African Americans Living with Glaucoma" (GOAL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreer, Laura E; Owsley, Cynthia; Campbell, Lisa; Gao, Liyan; Wood, Andy; Girkin, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    To examine the feasibility, patient acceptability, and preliminary effectiveness of a culturally informed, health promotion program designed to improve glaucoma medication adherence among African American's (AA's) with glaucoma. A sample of 11 AA glaucoma patients (mean age 61 years; 73% women and 27% men) completed a culturally informed and individually tailored, health promotion program developed for AAs titled, "Glaucoma Management Optimism for African Americans Living with Glaucoma" (GOAL)©. The aim of the brief 4-week program is to enhance glaucoma medication adherence through a combination of education, motivational interviewing (MI), and problem-solving training (PST). Feasibility was assessed on the basis of patient satisfaction with the program, number of sessions completed, and length of sessions. Preliminary efficacy was evaluated using a pre-post design to determine whether the program improved objective glaucoma medication adherence via an electronic Travalert dosing aid as well as satisfaction with aspects of glaucoma treatment, health beliefs about medications, glaucoma symptoms, emotional well-being, and intraocular pressure. Overall patient satisfaction and acceptability was high for the program, interactions with the health educator, program materials, and the length of sessions. Feasibility was also supported given the need for the program, success in recruitment/retention, and ease of implementing the program with AA glaucoma patients in clinic and/or over the telephone. In terms of preliminary efficacy, patients showed significant pre-post improvements in objective medication adherence rates by 15% (p = 0.03), self-efficacy for glaucoma management (p = 0.02), ease of use in administering eye drops (p = 0.03), glaucoma treatment satisfaction (p = 0.05), beliefs about the necessity of taking glaucoma medications (p = 0.05), and functional visual ocular symptoms (p = 0.03). (GOAL)© holds great promise toward improving

  3. 3-D measurement of osmotic dehydration of isolated and adhered PC-3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimori, Takashi; Takamatsu, Hiroshi

    2009-02-01

    Cell dehydration during freezing results from an elevated concentration of electrolytes in the extracellular medium that is deeply involved in cellular injury. We undertook real-time threedimensional (3-D) observation of osmotic dehydration of cells, motivated by a comparison of cellular responses between isolated cells in suspension and cultured cells adhering to a surface since several studies have suggested a difference in freeze tolerance between cell suspensions and monolayers. A laser confocal scanner was used with a perfusion microscope to capture sectional images of chloromethylbenzamido (DiI)-stained PC-3 cells that were exposed to an increase in NaCl concentration from 0.15 to 0.5M at 23 degrees C. Change in cell volume was determined from reconstructed 3-D images taken every 2.5s. When cells were exposed to an elevated NaCl concentration, isolated cells contracted and markedly distorted from their original spherical shape. In contrast, adhered cells showed only a reduction in height and kept their basal area constant. Apparent membrane hydraulic conductivity did not vary considerably between isolated and adhered cells, suggesting a negligible effect of the cytoskeletal structure on the rate of water transport. The surface area that contributed to water transport in adhered PC-3 cells was nearly equal to or slightly smaller than that present in isolated cells. Therefore, the similarity in properties and dimensions between isolated and adhered cells indicate that there will be similar extents of dehydration, resulting in a similar degree of supercooling during freezing.

  4. Effects of aluminum on DNA synthesis, cellular polyamines, polyamine biosynthetic enzymes and inorganic ions in cell suspension cultures of a woody plant, Catharanthus roseus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minocha, R.; Shortle, W.C. (USDA Forest Service, Durham (US)); Minocha, S.C.; Long, S.L. (Dept. of Plant Biology, Univ. of New Hamshire, Durham (US))

    1992-01-01

    Increased aluminium (Al) solubility in soil waters due to acid precipitation has aroused considerable interest in the problem of Al toxicity in plants. In the present study, an in vitro suspension culture system of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don was used to analyze the effects of aluminum on several biochemical processes in these cells. The aliphatic polyamines, spermine and spermidine, and their precusor, putrescine, have been implicated in a number of stress responses of plants. Addition of 0.2, 0.5 or 1.0 mM AlCl{sub 3} to cells cultured for 3 days caused a small but significant increase in cellular levels of putrescine at 4 h followed by a sharp decline by 16 h. There was no further decline in levels of putrescine during the next 32 h. Spermidine levels did not change appreciably compared to those in the control cultures. However, spermine levels increased by 2-3-fold at 24 and 48 h. Cellular activities of arginine decarboxylase (ADC; EC 4.1.1.19) and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC; EC 4.1.1.50) were both inhibited by 20-25% at 4 and 7 h. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC; EC 4.1.1.17) was less than 10% of ADC activity at all times. Whereas all concentrations of Al caused a slight decrease in total cell number, cell viability was affected only by 1.0 mM Al. There was a decrease in the cellular levels of Ca, Mg, Na, K, Mn, P and Fe in the cells treated with Al at 4 h, but a significant increase by 16 and 24 h. The results presented here suggest that both the absolute amounts of Al and the length of exposure to it are important for cell toxicity. (au).

  5. Long term ex-vivo culturing of Drosophila brain as a method to live image pupal brains: insights into the cellular mechanisms of neuronal remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana eRabinovich

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Holometabolous insects, including Drosophila melanogaster, undergo complete metamorphosis that includes a pupal stage. During metamorphosis, the Drosophila nervous system undergoes massive remodeling and growth, that include cell death and large-scale axon and synapse elimination as well as neurogenesis, developmental axon regrowth and formation of new connections. Neuronal remodeling is an essential step in the development of vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. Research on the stereotypic remodeling of Drosophila mushroom body (MB γ neurons has contributed to our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of remodeling but our knowledge of the cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. A major hurdle in understanding various dynamic processes that occur during metamorphosis is the lack of time-lapse resolution. The pupal case and opaque fat bodies that enwrap the central nervous system (CNS make live-imaging of the central brain in-vivo impossible. We have established an ex-vivo long-term brain culture system that supports the development and neuronal remodeling of pupal brains. By optimizing culture conditions and dissection protocols, we have observed development in culture at kinetics similar to what occurs in vivo. Using this new method, we have obtained the first time-lapse sequence of MB γ neurons undergoing remodeling in up to a single cell resolution. We found that axon pruning is initiated by blebbing, followed by one-two nicks that seem to initiate a more widely spread axon fragmentation. As such, we have set up some of the tools and methodologies needed for further exploration of the cellular mechanisms of neuronal remodeling, not limited to the MB. The long-term ex-vivo brain culture system that we report here could be used to study dynamic aspects of neurodevelopment of any Drosophila neuron.

  6. Determinants of Adherence to Living on Dialysis for Mexican Americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley A. Wells

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study explores perceptions that affect adherence behaviors among Mexican Americans living with dialysis. In-depth narrative interviews were conducted with 15 Mexican Americans with end-stage renal disease (ESRD living on dialysis, 15 family members, and 6 health care personnel who provided care to them. Four themes emerged: (a positive influences to adherence, (b obstacles to adherence, (c daily activity losses, and (d fears about living with dialysis. From the findings, the perceptions given for non-adherence with the dialysis regimen ranged from denial of the condition, lack of pre-education, to cultural factors. Those given for adherence included prolonged life, family, and hope of getting a transplant. Health care providers were the reminder to adhere. Several cultural factors influenced their adherence perceptions. Strategies to enhance adherence behaviors should focus on knowledge about dialysis, use of the collective efficacy of the family, and the inclusion of cultural values.

  7. Controls over δ44/40Ca and Sr/Ca variations in coccoliths: New perspectives from laboratory cultures and cellular models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía, Luz María; Paytan, Adina; Eisenhauer, Anton; Böhm, Florian; Kolevica, Ana; Bolton, Clara; Méndez-Vicente, Ana; Abrevaya, Lorena; Isensee, Kirsten; Stoll, Heather

    2018-01-01

    Coccoliths comprise a major fraction of the global carbonate sink. Therefore, changes in coccolithophores' Ca isotopic fractionation could affect seawater Ca isotopic composition, affecting interpretations of the global Ca cycle and related changes in seawater chemistry and climate. Despite this, a quantitative interpretation of coccolith Ca isotopic fractionation and a clear understanding of the mechanisms driving it are not yet available. Here, we address this gap in knowledge by developing a simple model (CaSri-Co) to track coccolith Ca isotopic fractionation during cellular Ca uptake and allocation to calcification. We then apply it to published and new δ 44 / 40 Ca and Sr/Ca data of cultured coccolithophores of the species Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica. We identify changes in calcification rates, Ca retention efficiency and solvation-desolvation rates as major drivers of the Ca isotopic fractionation and Sr/Ca variations observed in cultures. Higher calcification rates, higher Ca retention efficiencies and lower solvation-desolvation rates increase both coccolith Ca isotopic fractionation and Sr/Ca. Coccolith Ca isotopic fractionation is most sensitive to changes in solvation-desolvation rates. Changes in Ca retention efficiency may be a major driver of coccolith Sr/Ca variations in cultures. We suggest that substantial changes in the water structure strength caused by past changes in temperature could have induced significant changes in coccolithophores' Ca isotopic fractionation, potentially having some influence on seawater Ca isotopic composition. We also suggest a potential effect on Ca isotopic fractionation via modification of the solvation environment through cellular exudates, a hypothesis that remains to be tested.

  8. Histamine Induces Alzheimer's Disease-Like Blood Brain Barrier Breach and Local Cellular Responses in Mouse Brain Organotypic Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedeyn, Jonathan C.; Wu, Hao; Hobbs, Reilly D.; Levin, Eli C.; Nagele, Robert G.; Venkataraman, Venkat

    2015-01-01

    Among the top ten causes of death in the United States, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the only one that cannot be cured, prevented, or even slowed down at present. Significant efforts have been exerted in generating model systems to delineate the mechanism as well as establishing platforms for drug screening. In this study, a promising candidate model utilizing primary mouse brain organotypic (MBO) cultures is reported. For the first time, we have demonstrated that the MBO cultures exhibit increased blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability as shown by IgG leakage into the brain parenchyma, astrocyte activation as evidenced by increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neuronal damage-response as suggested by increased vimentin-positive neurons occur upon histamine treatment. Identical responses—a breakdown of the BBB, astrocyte activation, and neuronal expression of vimentin—were then demonstrated in brains from AD patients compared to age-matched controls, consistent with other reports. Thus, the histamine-treated MBO culture system may provide a valuable tool in combating AD. PMID:26697497

  9. Monitoring and manipulating cellular crosstalk during kidney fibrosis inside a 3D in vitro co-culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, Bramasta; Mohr, Manuel A; Ponti, Aaron; Emmert, Maximilian Y; Weibel, Franziska; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Moll, Solange; Certa, Ulrich; Prunotto, Marco; Pantazis, Periklis

    2017-11-03

    In pharmacological research the development of promising lead compounds requires a detailed understanding of the dynamics of disease progression. However, for many diseases, such as kidney fibrosis, gaining such understanding requires complex real-time, multi-dimensional analysis of diseased and healthy tissue. To allow for such studies with increased throughput we established a dextran hydrogel-based in vitro 3D co-culture as a disease model for kidney fibrosis aimed at the discovery of compounds modulating the epithelial/mesenchymal crosstalk. This platform mimics a simplified pathological renal microenvironment at the interface between tubular epithelial cells and surrounding quiescent fibroblasts. We combined this 3D technology with epithelial reporter cell lines expressing fluorescent biomarkers in order to visualize pathophysiological cell state changes resulting from toxin-mediated chemical injury. Epithelial cell damage onset was robustly detected by image-based monitoring, and injured epithelial spheroids induced myofibroblast differentiation of co-cultured quiescent human fibroblasts. The presented 3D co-culture system therefore provides a unique model system for screening of novel therapeutic molecules capable to interfere and modulate the dialogue between epithelial and mesenchymal cells.

  10. Vertically aligned patterned peptide nanowires for cellulars studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskin, Mehmet; Sasso, Luigi; Vedarethinam, Indumathi

    2012-01-01

    , our group has demonstrated that vertically aligned diphenylalanine based peptide nanowires (VAPNW) are an useful tool for cellular studies and sensor applications. To expand this study, we patterned VAPNWs into strips of various widths onto an electrode surface to evaluate these structures’ effects...... on cell growth and adherence using PC12 cells, which are neuronal stem cell models. With this method we are able to obtain important information about the cells’ preference for culture substrate, comparing the adhesion of cells to a forest of VAPNWs with standard protein substrate enhancers...

  11. Fermented sausage production using E. faecium as starter culture: Physicochemical and microbiological profile, sensorial acceptance and cellular viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharina Calochi Pires de Carvalho

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fermented sausages are defined as a mixture of lean meat and fat, curing salts, sucrose and spices, stuffed in a natural or artificial casing and submitted to fermentation and air-drying process. Starter culture and ripening process may affect the quality and acceptability of the final product. Current research evaluates the use of Enterococcus faecium as starter culture in fermented sausage production and its physicochemical and microbiological profile during maturation process, coupled to sausage sensory acceptance after ripening. Enterococcus faecium showed 10.9 log CFU g-1 and remained viable after the ripening period with 8.32 log CFU g-1. Fermented sausage was monitored during the ripening period by physicochemical (pH control, water activity and weight loss and microbiological (analysis of coagulase-positive Staphylococcus, coliforms and Salmonella spp. analyses. All tests complied with standards established by Brazilian legislation and did not interfere in final product quality. Results showed that E. faecium was resistant to curing salt and sodium chloride, maintaining its viability during ripening and conferring beneficial effects on fermented sausage technological characteristics. E. faecium also proved to be in vitro resistant to simulate passage through the human digestive tract. Fermented sausage containing E. faecium had better sensory acceptance than commercial sausage evaluated.

  12. In vitro co-culture systems for studying molecular basis of cellular interaction between Aire-expressing medullary thymic epithelial cells and fresh thymocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Kudoh, Jun; Yoshida, Tetsuhiko; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi

    2014-10-17

    We previously established three mouse cell lines (Aire(+)TEC1, Aire(+)TEC2 and Aire(+)DC) from the medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) and dendritic cells (mDCs). These cells constitutively expressed "autoimmune regulator (Aire) gene" and they exhibited various features of self antigen-presenting cells (self-APCs) present in the thymic medullary region. Here, we confirmed our previous observation that Aire(+) thymic epithelial cells adhere to fresh thymocytes and kill them by inducing apoptosis, thus potentially reproducing in vitro some aspects of the negative selection of T cells in vivo. In this system, a single Aire(+) cell appeared able to kill ∼30 thymocytes within 24 hrs. Moreover, we observed that ectopic expression of peripheral tissue-specific antigens (TSAs), and expression of several surface markers involved in mTEC development, increased as Aire(+) cell density increases toward confluency. Thus, these Aire(+) cells appear to behave like differentiating mTECs as if they pass through the developmental stages from intermediate state toward mature state. Surprisingly, an in vitro co-culture system consisting of Aire(+) cells and fractionated sub-populations of fresh thymocytes implied the possible existence of two distinct subtypes of thymocytes (named as CD4(+) killer and CD4(-) rescuer) that may determine the fate (dead or alive) of the differentiating Aire(+)mTECs. Thus, our in vitro co-culture system appears to mimic a part of "in vivo thymic crosstalk". © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Sustaining a “culture of silence” in the neonatal intensive care unit during nonemergency situations: A grounded theory on ensuring adherence to behavioral modification to reduce noise levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Swathi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to generate a substantive theory explaining how the staff in a resource-limited neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of a developing nation manage to ensure adherence to behavioral modification components of a noise reduction protocol (NsRP during nonemergency situations. The study was conducted after implementation of an NsRP in a level III NICU of south India. The normal routine of the NICU is highly dynamic because of various categories of staff conducting clinical rounds followed by care-giving activities. This is unpredictably interspersed with very noisy emergency management of neonates who suddenly fall sick. In-depth interviews were conducted with 36 staff members of the NICU (20 staff nurses, six nursing aides, and 10 physicians. Group discussions were conducted with 20 staff nurses and six nursing aides. Data analysis was done in line with the reformulated grounded theory approach, which was based on inductive examination of textual information. The results of the analysis showed that the main concern was to ensure adherence to behavioral modification components of the NsRP. This was addressed by using strategies to “sustain a culture of silence in NICU during nonemergency situations” (core category. The main strategies employed were building awareness momentum, causing awareness percolation, developing a sense of ownership, expansion of caring practices, evolution of adherence, and displaying performance indicators. The “culture of silence” reconditions the existing staff and conditions new staff members joining the NICU. During emergency situations, a “noisy culture” prevailed because of pragmatic neglect of behavioral modification when life support overrode all other concerns. In addition to this, the process of operant conditioning should be formally conducted once every 18 months. The results of this study may be adapted to create similar strategies and establish context specific NsRPs in NICUs

  14. Cellular responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at near-zero growth rates: transcriptome analysis of anaerobic retentostat cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boender, Léonie G M; van Maris, Antonius J A; de Hulster, Erik A F; Almering, Marinka J H; van der Klei, Ida J; Veenhuis, Marten; de Winde, Johannes H; Pronk, Jack T; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2011-12-01

    Extremely low specific growth rates (below 0.01 h(-1) ) represent a largely unexplored area of microbial physiology. In this study, anaerobic, glucose-limited retentostats were used to analyse physiological and genome-wide transcriptional responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to cultivation at near-zero specific growth rates. While quiescence is typically investigated as a result of carbon starvation, cells in retentostat are fed by small, but continuous carbon and energy supply. Yeast cells cultivated near-zero specific growth rates, while metabolically active, exhibited characteristics previously associated with quiescence, including accumulation of storage polymers and an increased expression of genes involved in exit from the cell cycle into G(0) . Unexpectedly, analysis of transcriptome data from retentostat and chemostat cultures showed, as specific growth rate was decreased, that quiescence-related transcriptional responses were already set in at specific growth rates above 0.025 h(-1) . These observations stress the need for systematic dissection of physiological responses to slow growth, quiescence, ageing and starvation and indicate that controlled cultivation systems such as retentostats can contribute to this goal. Furthermore, cells in retentostat do not (or hardly) divide while remaining metabolically active, which emulates the physiological status of metazoan post-mitotic cells. We propose retentostat as a powerful cultivation tool to investigate chronological ageing-related processes. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Store-Operated Ca2+ Entry Does Not Control Proliferation in Primary Cultures of Human Metastatic Renal Cellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Dragoni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE is activated following depletion of the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3-sensitive Ca2+ pool to regulate proliferation in immortalized cell lines established from either primary or metastatic lesions. The molecular nature of SOCE may involve both Stim1, which senses Ca2+ levels within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER Ca2+ reservoir, and a number of a Ca2+-permeable channels on the plasma membrane, including Orai1, Orai3, and members of the canonical transient receptor (TRPC1–7 family of ion channels. The present study was undertaken to assess whether SOCE is expressed and controls proliferation in primary cultures isolated from secondary lesions of heavily pretreated metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC patients. SOCE was induced following pharmacological depletion of the ER Ca2+ store, but not by InsP3-dependent Ca2+ release. Metastatic RCC cells express Stim1-2, Orai1–3, and TRPC1–7 transcripts and proteins. In these cells, SOCE was insensitive to BTP-2, 10 µM Gd3+ and Pyr6, while it was inhibited by 100 µM Gd3+, 2-APB, and carboxyamidotriazole (CAI. Neither Gd3+ nor 2-APB or CAI impaired mRCC cell proliferation. Consistently, no detectable Ca2+ signal was elicited by growth factor stimulation. Therefore, a functional SOCE is expressed but does not control proliferation of mRCC cells isolated from patients resistant to multikinase inhibitors.

  16. Cellular heredity in haploid cultures of somatic cells. Progress report, August 1977--August 1978. [Role of DNA repair mechanisms in uv mutagenesis in cultured frog and fish cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freed, J.J.

    1978-09-01

    Studies in progress on cultured frog and fish cells, exploring the relation between the frequency of mutation after ultraviolet irradiation and the pathway through which DNA repair takes place are reported. The rationale is that the mutation frequency induced by a uv exposure is determined not only by the dose delivered but by the fidelity of the DNA repair process. Since frog cells express photoreversal enzyme, whether repair takes place by error-free photoreversal or by other, error-prone, mechanisms can be determined experimentally. An important question is whether an inducible, error-prone mutagenic form of repair is demonstrable. During the past year, methods necessary to determine uv survival and mutation frequency over a range of uv exposures were worked out. Using these methods, we have tested for alteration of the uv survival curve by previous conditioning exposures in frog cells was studied and uv survival and photoreversal capacity in fish cells were determined. The relation between uv survival and induction of ouabain resistance by an alkylating agent (MNNG) was examined as a background for further studies with uv. A procedure intended to accomplish DNA-mediated transfer of frog DNA photolyase enzyme to Chinese hamster cells is described.

  17. Evaluation of biocompatibility of sodium perborate and 30% hydrogen peroxide using the analysis of the adherence capacity and morphology of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfora, Kattyenne Kabbaz; Santos, Maria do Carmo Moreira da Silva; Montes, Marcos Antonio Japiassú Resende; de Castro, Célia Maria Machado Barbosa

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of the most used bleaching materials for pulpless teeth, sodium perborate and 30% hydrogen peroxide, in an experimental model of macrophages, through analysis of the adherence index and the cellular morphology. Inflammatory macrophages were obtained from peritoneal washed of Wistar rats. The evaluation of the adherence capacity of these cells to the plastic surface was conducted in Eppendorf tubes containing RPMI, after treatment with the bleaching agents diluted in 1:10, 1:100 and 1:1000 for 15 and 30 min, and incubation at 37 degrees C and humidified atmosphere of 5% CO(2) in air. The cellular morphology was verified after incubation of the cells treated with the bleaching agents in culture plaques and compared with normal cells in culture medium. Results showed that sodium perborate neither increased the adherence index, nor altered the cellular morphology when compared to the control group. The distribution, cellular morphology, cytoplasmatic and nuclear characteristics, reproduced the aspects observed in normal macrophages. However, the treatment with 30% hydrogen peroxide presented an increase in adherence index when compared to the control group (RPMI), in all dilutions, according to Mann-Whitney test (n=08 and p=0.001 for dilutions 1:10 and 1:100, and n=08 and p=0.004 for dilution 1:1000). The morphology of the cells treated with this product presented structural alterations proportionally greater, depending on the dilution of this bleaching agent, and even in the highest dilution (1:1000) the cells presented very evident alterations. This irreversible cellular damage as well as the elevation of the adherence index, characterizes the aggressive potential of 30% hydrogen peroxide, regardless of its dilution. Sodium perborate, on the other hand, showed biocompatibitity, since, no morphological nor functional alteration was observed in macrophages.

  18. Linguistic and Cultural Adaptation of a Computer-Based Counseling Program (CARE+ Spanish) to Support HIV Treatment Adherence and Risk Reduction for People Living With HIV/AIDS: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Ann E; Chhun, Nok; Cleland, Charles M; Crespo-Fierro, Michele; Parés-Avila, José A; Lizcano, John A; Norman, Robert G; Shedlin, Michele G; Johnston, Barbara E; Sharp, Victoria L

    2016-07-13

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease in the United States disproportionately affects minorities, including Latinos. Barriers including language are associated with lower antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence seen among Latinos, yet ART and interventions for clinic visit adherence are rarely developed or delivered in Spanish. The aim was to adapt a computer-based counseling tool, demonstrated to reduce HIV-1 viral load and sexual risk transmission in a population of English-speaking adults, for use during routine clinical visits for an HIV-positive Spanish-speaking population (CARE+ Spanish); the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) was the theoretical framework guiding program development. A longitudinal randomized controlled trial was conducted from June 4, 2010 to March 29, 2012. Participants were recruited from a comprehensive HIV treatment center comprising three clinics in New York City. Eligibility criteria were (1) adults (age ≥18 years), (2) Latino birth or ancestry, (3) speaks Spanish (mono- or multilingual), and (4) on antiretrovirals. Linear and generalized mixed linear effects models were used to analyze primary outcomes, which included ART adherence, sexual transmission risk behaviors, and HIV-1 viral loads. Exit interviews were offered to purposively selected intervention participants to explore cultural acceptability of the tool among participants, and focus groups explored the acceptability and system efficiency issues among clinic providers, using the TAM framework. A total of 494 Spanish-speaking HIV clinic attendees were enrolled and randomly assigned to the intervention (arm A: n=253) or risk assessment-only control (arm B, n=241) group and followed up at 3-month intervals for one year. Gender distribution was 296 (68.4%) male, 110 (25.4%) female, and 10 (2.3%) transgender. By study end, 433 of 494 (87.7%) participants were retained. Although intervention participants had reduced viral loads, increased ART adherence and decreased sexual

  19. Chronic ethanol exposure alters the levels, assembly, and cellular organization of the actin cytoskeleton and microtubules in hippocampal neurons in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Ana M; Esteban-Pretel, Guillermo; Marín, María P; Ponsoda, Xavier; Ballestín, Raúl; Canales, Juan J; Renau-Piqueras, Jaime

    2010-12-01

    The organization and dynamics of microtubules (MTs) and the actin cytoskeleton are critical for the correct development and functions of neurons, including intracellular traffic and signaling. In vitro ethanol exposure impairs endocytosis, exocytosis, and nucleocytoplasmic traffic in astrocytes and alters endocytosis in cultured neurons. In astrocytes, these effects relate to changes in the organization and/or function of MTs and the actin cytoskeleton. To evaluate this possibility in hippocampal cultured neurons, we analyzed if chronic ethanol exposure affects the levels, assembly, and cellular organization of both cytoskeleton elements and the possible underlying mechanisms of these effects by morphological and biochemical methods. In the experiments described below, we provide the first evidence that chronic alcohol exposure decreases the amount of both filamentous actin and polymerized tubulin in neurons and that the number of MTs in dendrites lowers in treated cells. Alcohol also diminishes the MT-associated protein-2 levels, which mainly localizes in the somatodendritic compartment in neurons. Ethanol decreases the levels of total Rac, Cdc42, and RhoA, three small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) involved in the organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton and MTs. Yet when alcohol decreases the levels of the active forms (GTP bound) of Rac1 and Cdc42, it does not affect the active form of RhoA. We also investigated the levels of several effector and regulator molecules of these GTPases to find that alcohol induces heterogeneous results. In conclusion, our results show that MT, actin cytoskeleton organization, and Rho GTPase signaling pathways are targets for the toxic effects of ethanol in neurons.

  20. Cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Codd, E F

    1968-01-01

    Cellular Automata presents the fundamental principles of homogeneous cellular systems. This book discusses the possibility of biochemical computers with self-reproducing capability.Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of some theorems dealing with conditions under which universal computation and construction can be exhibited in cellular spaces. This text then presents a design for a machine embedded in a cellular space or a machine that can compute all computable functions and construct a replica of itself in any accessible and sufficiently large region of t

  1. Patient's adherence in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillisen, Adrian

    2007-11-01

    Nonadherence in asthma treatment results in increasing mortality, morbidity, and it is associated with increasing treatment costs. In asthma, adherence rates are often below 50%. Understanding of the needs and behaviors of asthma patients as well as treatment barriers to comply with asthma guidelines is important in developing programs to promote adherence. This article presents information on common types of nonadherence in asthma patients, the causes, and it reviews the literature on interventions to overcome these factors to maximize adherence rates. Although several interventions are effective in improving medication adherence in asthma, only few significantly enhance adherence rates and clinical outcomes of these patients. An improvement in treatment adherence is a complex task, requiring asthma self-management, education programs coupled with educational reinforcements, simplifying treatment planes and applications forms. Good communications skills among clinicians and patient education are also central for improving adherence. Methods to overcoming physician barriers ensure consistency in implementing guideline recommendations in practice.

  2. Constraining the mechanisms driving coccolith δ44/40Ca and Sr/Ca variations: new perspectives from cultures, cellular models, and the sediment record

    Science.gov (United States)

    María Mejía, Luz; Paytan, Adina; Eisenhauer, Anton; Kolevica, Ana; Bolton, Clara; Méndez-Vicente, Ana; Abrevaya, Lorena; Isensee, Kirsten; Stoll, Heather

    2017-04-01

    Coccoliths comprise a major fraction of the calcium carbonate (CaCO3) production, with contributions varying from 95% of the global carbonate sink during the Cenozoic, to 50% in the modern ocean. Therefore, significant changes in coccolith Ca isotopic fractionation could have affected past seawater Ca isotopic composition (δ44/40Ca), with potential important implications for the interpretation of the global Ca cycle and related changes in seawater chemistry. Here we evaluate the mechanisms driving coccolith Ca isotopic fractionation in a quantitative framework, by deriving a steady-state mass balance geochemical model (CaSri-Co), which assumes that fractionation is solely associated with desolvation (i.e. dehydration) of Ca during cellular transport through membranes. The application of the CaSri-Co model to previously published and to our new δ44/40Ca and Sr/Ca results from cultured coccolithophores (Emiliania huxleyi, Gephyrocapsa oceanica and Calcidiscus leptoporus) allowed us to identify calcification rates, Ca retention efficiency and water structure strength as main regulators of the Ca isotopic fractionation and Sr/Ca ratios of cultured coccolith calcite. Higher calcification rates, higher Ca retention efficiencies and higher water structure strength (slower Ca solvation-desolvation reactions) increase both coccolith Sr/Ca and Ca isotopic fractionation. The CaSri-Co model shows that coccolith Ca isotopic fractionation is especially sensitive to changes in water structure strength. On the other hand, Ca retention efficiency appears to be the main driver of the observed Sr/Ca trends, which results from the incomplete usage of the Sr transported to the calcification vesicle and subsequent Sr enrichment of the cytosol, while Ca inside the calcification vesicle is assumed to be completely utilized in the model. In this study we also measured δ44/40Ca and Sr/Ca in two coccolith size fraction from site 925 in the Western Equatorial Atlantic representing the last

  3. Inter-Cellular Exchange of Cellular Components via VE-Cadherin-Dependent Trans-Endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Takashi; Woolls, Melissa J.; Jin, Suk-Won

    2014-01-01

    Cell-cell communications typically involve receptor-mediated signaling initiated by soluble or cell-bound ligands. Here, we report a unique mode of endocytosis: proteins originating from cell-cell junctions and cytosolic cellular components from the neighboring cell are internalized, leading to direct exchange of cellular components between two adjacent endothelial cells. VE-cadherins form transcellular bridges between two endothelial cells that are the basis of adherence junctions. At such adherens junction sites, we observed the movement of the entire VE-cadherin molecule from one endothelial cell into the other with junctional and cytoplasmic components. This phenomenon, here termed trans-endocytosis, requires the establishment of a VE-cadherin homodimer in trans with internalization proceeding in a Rac1-, and actomyosin-dependent manner. Importantly, the trans-endocytosis is not dependent on any known endocytic pathway including clathrin-dependent endocytosis, macropinocytosis or phagocytosis. This novel form of cell-cell communications, leading to a direct exchange of cellular components, was observed in 2D and 3D-cultured endothelial cells as well as in the developing zebrafish vasculature. PMID:24603875

  4. Adherence to antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abimbola Farinde

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While major depression is considered a frequent mental illness there are ongoing reports of high non-adherence to antidepressant medications which places suffers at high risk for relapse, recurrence, or greater impairment,. The World Health Organization (WHO defines adherence as the extent to which a person′s behavior (e.g. taking medications can align with the agreed recommendations of a health care provider. Unfortunately while patient may recognize the importance of adherence to antidepressant medications the majority of patients do not adhere to their prescribed antidepressants. Some of the factors that may contribute to or lead to non-adherence include knowingly or unknowingly missing doses, taking extra doses, delaying administration times, or taking drug holidays. Pharmacists have the unique ability to deter non-adherence through the performance of continuous assessment and monitoring of adherence in this population given these accessibility. Additionally, pharmacists are able to develop therapeutic alliances with patients that can help to increase the likelihood of achieving positive patient outcomes. Antidepressant non-adherence can be viewed as a significant public health concern so it is important for patients to be educated about the importance of adherence, and health care professionals should be aware of factors or patient characteristics that can serve as barriers to non-adherence.

  5. Health Games - Modern Tools for Enhancing Patient Adherence

    OpenAIRE

    Sameer Bhaskar GOKHALE; Madhura Sameer GOKHALE

    2015-01-01

    Low patient adherence remains a major public health challenge globally and imposes a considerable economic burden on healthcare systems. It is critical to develop an effective intervention to improve patient adherence. Factors such as physician-patient relation, patient's health literacy, attitude, cultural variations, and patient’s involvement in decision making are responsible for improving adherence. Information technology has revolutionized almost all industries including healthcare but i...

  6. Adherence to ART in PLWHA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Women were less adhering than men and adherence was related to depression among drug users (10). A study in. Brazil showed the cumulative incidence of non- adherence to be 36.9% (11). Adherence among patients in Soweto, South Africa was 88% (12). In Cape Town;. 63% of patients maintained adherence levels of ...

  7. Identification of Molecular and Cellular Responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilms under Culture Conditions Relevant to Field Conditions for Bioreduction of Toxic Metals and Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judy D. Wall

    2011-06-09

    Our findings demonstrated that D. vulgaris surface-adhered populations produce extracellular structures, and that that the cells have altered carbon and energy flux compared to planktonic cells. Biofilms did not have greatly increased carbohydrate accumulation. Interestingly genes present on the native plasmid found in D. vulgaris Hildenborough were necessary for wild type biofilm formation. In addition, extracellular appendages dependent on functions or proteins encoded by flaG or fliA also contributed to biofilm formation. Studies with SRB biofilms have indicated that the reduction and precipitation of metals can occur within the biofilm matrix; however, little work has been done to elucidate the physiological state of surface-adhered cells during metal reduction (Cr6+, U6+) and how this process is affected by nutrient feed levels (i.e., the stimulant).

  8. Temporality and Patterns of ART Adherence in the Western Cape

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In an ethnographic study conducted over thirty months in South Africa's Western Cape Province ending in 2012, we explored ART adherence amongst almost 200 patients attending three clinics. This setting contained significant political, structural, economic and socio cultural barriers to the uptake of, and adherence to, ...

  9. Temporality and Patterns of ART Adherence in the Western Cape

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In an ethnographic study conducted over thirty months in South Africa's Western Cape. Province ending in 2012, we explored ART adherence amongst almost 200 patients attending three clinics. This setting contained significant political, structural, economic and socio-cultural barriers to the uptake of, and adherence to, ...

  10. Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Timothy B.; Melanie M. Domenech Rodríguez; Bernal, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the definitions, means, and research of adapting psychotherapy to clients' cultural backgrounds. We begin by reviewing the prevailing definitions of cultural adaptation and providing a clinical example. We present an original meta-analysis of 65 experimental and quasi-experimental studies involving 8,620 participants. The omnibus effect size of d = .46 indicates that treatments specifically adapted for clients of color were moderately more effective with that clientele...

  11. Simulation-assisted design of microfluidic sample traps for optimal trapping and culture of non-adherent single cells, tissues, and spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset, Nassim; Monet, Frédéric; Gervais, Thomas

    2017-03-21

    This work focuses on modelling design and operation of "microfluidic sample traps" (MSTs). MSTs regroup a widely used class of microdevices that incorporate wells, recesses or chambers adjacent to a channel to individually trap, culture and/or release submicroliter 3D tissue samples ranging from simple cell aggregates and spheroids, to ex vivo tissue samples and other submillimetre-scale tissue models. Numerous MST designs employing various trapping mechanisms have been proposed in the literature, spurring the development of 3D tissue models for drug discovery and personalized medicine. Yet, there lacks a general framework to optimize trapping stability, trapping time, shear stress, and sample metabolism. Herein, the effects of hydrodynamics and diffusion-reaction on tissue viability and device operation are investigated using analytical and finite element methods with systematic parametric sweeps over independent design variables chosen to correspond to the four design degrees of freedom. Combining different results, we show that, for a spherical tissue of diameter d tissue diameter: w = 2d. Furthermore, to sustain tissues without perfusion, available medium volume per trap needs to be 100× the tissue volume to ensure optimal metabolism for at least 24 hours.

  12. Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Coulangeon, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Il n’est sans doute pas de notion aussi vaste et aussi polysémique en sciences sociales que la notion de culture, qui renvoie alternativement à l’ensemble des symboles, des significations, des valeurs et des manières de faire propres à un groupe et au domaine spécialisé des activités expressives, savantes et populaires. La notion de culture est ainsi tout autant mobilisée dans l’exploration des grandes thématiques de la sociologie (stratification, inégalités, institutions, mouvements sociaux)...

  13. HIV Medication Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV Medication Adherence Last Reviewed: January 17, 2018 Key ...

  14. Cellular mechanotransduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang H. Goldmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion and cell–cell contacts are pre-requisites for proper metabolism, protein synthesis, cell survival, and cancer metastasis. Major transmembrane receptors are the integrins, which are responsible for cell matrix adhesions, and the cadherins, which are important for cell-cell adhesions.  Adherent cells are anchored via focal adhesions (FAs to the extracellular matrix, while cell-cell contacts are connected via focal adherens junctions (FAJs. Force transmission over considerable distances and stress focusing at these adhesion sites make them prime candidates for mechanosensors. Exactly which protein(s within FAs and FAJs or which membrane component of ion channels sense, transmit, and respond to mechano-chemical signaling is currently strongly debated and numerous candidates have been proposed.

  15. Variação da composição química do meio de cultura e da bioquímica celular de Phaeodactylum tricomutum (Bohlin, em cultivos estanques Long term changes in the culture medium composition and cellular biochemistry of Phacodactylum tricomutum (Bohlin, in batch cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Aidar

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available P. tricornutum was grown in batch cultures under 21ºC temperature and continuous irradiance of 183 µE.m-2 . s-1, provided by fluorescent light tubes. Cultures growth were followed by cell countings, "in vivo" fluorescence and cellular protein, carbohydrate and chlorophyll-α content. The maximum value of protein/carbohydrate ratio was found at the exponential phase and the minimum value at the stationary phase. This ratio characterizes the physiological stage of the culture. Cell uptake rates for nitrate, ammonium and phosphate from the media were higher during the lag-phase. Nitrite excretion by the cells were detected following nitrate uptake.

  16. Cultural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur F. LaPage

    1971-01-01

    A critical look at outdoor recreation research and some underlying premises. The author focuses on the concept of culture as communication and how it influences our perception of problems and our search for solutions. Both outdoor recreation and science are viewed as subcultures that have their own bodies of mythology, making recreation problems more difficult to...

  17. Cellular Interactions and Biological Responses to Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in HepG2 and BEAS-2B Cells: Role of Cell Culture Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT We have shown previously that the composition of the biological medium used in vitro can affect the cellular interaction and biological response of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) in human lung epithelial cells. However, it is unclear if these effects are co...

  18. cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  19. Piracy of decay-accelerating factor (CD55) signal transduction by the diffusely adhering strain Escherichia coli C1845 promotes cytoskeletal F-actin rearrangements in cultured human intestinal INT407 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, I; Servin, A L; Bernet-Camard, M F

    1998-09-01

    Diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC) C1845 (clinical isolate) harboring the fimbrial adhesin F1845 can infect cultured human differentiated intestinal epithelial cells; this process is followed by the disassembly of the actin network in the apical domain. The aim of this study was to examine the mechanism by which DAEC C1845 promotes F-actin rearrangements. For this purpose, we used a human embryonic intestinal cell line (INT407) expressing the membrane-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) protein-anchored decay-accelerating factor (DAF), the receptor of the F1845 adhesin. We show here that infection of INT407 cells by DAEC C1845 can provoke dramatic F-actin rearrangements without cell entry. Clustering of phosphotyrosines was observed, revealing that the DAEC C1845-DAF interaction involves the recruitment of signal transduction molecules. A pharmacological approach with a subset of inhibitors of signal transduction molecules was used to identify the cascade of signal transduction molecules that are coupled to the DAF, that are activated upon infection, and that promote the F-actin rearrangements. DAEC C1845-induced F-actin rearrangements can be blocked dose dependently by protein tyrosine kinase, phospholipase Cgamma, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, protein kinase C, and Ca2+ inhibitors. F-actin rearrangements and blocking by inhibitors were observed after infection of the cells with two E. coli recombinants carrying the plasmids containing the fimbrial adhesin F1845 or the fimbrial hemagglutinin Dr, belonging to the same family of adhesins. These findings show that the DAEC Dr family of pathogens promotes alterations in the intestinal cell cytoskeleton by piracy of the DAF-GPI signal cascade without bacterial cell entry.

  20. Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Dubois, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    Le découpage des spécialités sociologiques hésite habituellement entre une répartition thématique par domaines empiriquement distingués et un partage conceptuel reposant sur des orientations de recherche. La sociologie de la culture n'échappe pas à cette oscillation. De prime abord, elle couvre un secteur plus ou moins clairement délimité, qui englobe la sociologie de l'art et ce qui est socialement désigné comme relevant de la « vie culturelle ». Elle regroupe alors un ensemble de subdivisio...

  1. Cellular and molecular investigations of the adhesion and mechanics of Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskhan, Asma Omar

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to quantify the adherence and mechanical properties of an array of L. monocytogenes strains and their surface biopolymers. First, eight L. monocytogenes strains that represented the two major lineages of the species were compared for their adherence and mechanics at cellular and molecular levels. Our results indicated that strains of lineage' II were characterized by higher adhesion and Young's moduli, longer and more rigid surface biopolymers and lower specific and nonspecific forces when compared to lineage' I strains. Additionally, adherence and mechanical properties of eight L. monocytogenes epidemic and environmental strains were probed. Our results pointed to that environmental and epidemic strains representative of a given lineage were similar in their adherence and mechanical properties when investigated at a cellular level. However, when the molecular properties of the strains were considered, epidemic strains were characterized by higher specific and nonspecific forces, shorter, denser and more flexible biopolymers compared to environmental strains. Second, the role of environmental pH conditions of growth on the adhesion and mechanics of a pathogenic L. monocytogenes EGDe was investigated. Our results pointed to a transition in the adhesion energies for cells cultured at pH 7. In addition, when the types of molecular forces that govern the adhesion were quantified using Poisson statistical approach and using a new proposed method, specific hydrogen-bond energies dominated the bacterial adhesion process. Such a finding is instrumental to researchers designing methods to control bacterial adhesion. Similarly, bacterial cells underwent a transition in their mechanical properties. We have shown that cells cultured at pH 7 were the most rigid compared to those cultured in lower or higher pH conditions of growth. Due to transitions observed in adherence and mechanics when cells were cultured at pH 7, we hypothesized that

  2. Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Boas, Franz

    2003-01-01

    L’un des objets de l’enquête anthropologique, pour laquelle des éléments peuvent être obtenus par l’étude des sociétés existantes, est l’inter-dépendance des phénomènes culturels. Alors que dans l’étude des processus de diffusion et de développement parallèle les caractères et la distribution de traits singuliers sont communément les objets de l’analyse, nous sommes conduits, ici, à considérer la culture, dans toutes ses manifestations, comme un tout. Les inventions, la vie économique, la str...

  3. Modeling cell adhesion and proliferation: a cellular-automata based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, J; Garzón-Alvarado, D; Cerrolaza, M

    Cell adhesion is a process that involves the interaction between the cell membrane and another surface, either a cell or a substrate. Unlike experimental tests, computer models can simulate processes and study the result of experiments in a shorter time and lower costs. One of the tools used to simulate biological processes is the cellular automata, which is a dynamic system that is discrete both in space and time. This work describes a computer model based on cellular automata for the adhesion process and cell proliferation to predict the behavior of a cell population in suspension and adhered to a substrate. The values of the simulated system were obtained through experimental tests on fibroblast monolayer cultures. The results allow us to estimate the cells settling time in culture as well as the adhesion and proliferation time. The change in the cells morphology as the adhesion over the contact surface progress was also observed. The formation of the initial link between cell and the substrate of the adhesion was observed after 100 min where the cell on the substrate retains its spherical morphology during the simulation. The cellular automata model developed is, however, a simplified representation of the steps in the adhesion process and the subsequent proliferation. A combined framework of experimental and computational simulation based on cellular automata was proposed to represent the fibroblast adhesion on substrates and changes in a macro-scale observed in the cell during the adhesion process. The approach showed to be simple and efficient.

  4. adherence to antiretroviral regimens

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to macro- and microeconomic costs.' What soon became evident, however, was the vital importance of patient adherence with prescribed medication in order to garner the benefits that were so rapidly becoming available. As a result, much attention has recently been paid to this aspect of management. Both clinicians and ...

  5. Cultural Originality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anthropology: The Study of Social and. Cultural Originality. Prologue. I was invited to reflect on the theoretical foundations of anthropology, as prac- ticed in Africa 'over the last century', but found intellectual artisanship to be a more compelling topic. As Gupta and Ferguson (1997) point out, adherence to a particular logic of ...

  6. Effects of aluminum on DNA synthesis, cellular polyamines, polyamine biosynthetic enzymes and inorganic ions in cell suspension cultures of a woody plant, Catharanthus roseus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh Minocha; Subhash C. Minocha; Stephanie L. Long; Walter C. Shortle

    1992-01-01

    Increased aluminum (Al) solubility in soil waters due to acid precipitation has aroused considerable interest in the problem of Al toxicity in plants. In the present study, an in vitro suspension culture system of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don was used to analyze the effects of aluminum on several biochemical processes in these cells. The aliphatic...

  7. Health Games - Modern Tools for Enhancing Patient Adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Bhaskar GOKHALE

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Low patient adherence remains a major public health challenge globally and imposes a considerable economic burden on healthcare systems. It is critical to develop an effective intervention to improve patient adherence. Factors such as physician-patient relation, patient's health literacy, attitude, cultural variations, and patient’s involvement in decision making are responsible for improving adherence. Information technology has revolutionized almost all industries including healthcare but its use has not shown its full promise to boost adherence. Recent developments in smart phone market penetration, gamification, and easy to navigate user experience have made it possible for healthcare providers to effectively connect with patients using innovative ways enabled by technology. Leveraging on this fact, healthcare industry should be focusing on development and use of interactive health games. Indication-wise games can be developed in collaboration with physicians, academics, thought leaders and experienced media companies. In summary, gamification mayeffectively be used to improve patient adherence.

  8. Mortality salience increases adherence to salient norms and values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailliot, Matthew T; Stillman, Tyler F; Schmeichel, Brandon J; Maner, Jon K; Plant, E Ashby

    2008-07-01

    Four studies indicate that mortality salience increases adherence to social norms and values, but only when cultural norms and values are salient. In Study 1, mortality salience coupled with a reminder about cultural values of egalitarianism reduced prejudice toward Blacks among non-Black participants. In Studies 2 through 4, a mortality salience induction (e.g., walking through a cemetery) increased self-reported and actual helping behavior only when the cultural value of helping was salient. These results suggest that people may adhere to norms and values so as to manage awareness of death.

  9. Morality salience increases adherence to salient norms and values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gailliot, M.T.; Stillman, T.F.; Schmeichel, B.J.; Maner, J.K.; Plant, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    Four studies indicate that mortality salience increases adherence to social norms and values, but only when cultural norms and values are salient. In Study 1, mortality salience coupled with a reminder about cultural values of egalitarianism reduced prejudice toward Blacks among non-Black

  10. [Transcultural adaptation of scales for treatment adherence in hemodialysis: Renal Adherence Behaviour Questionnaire(RABQ) and Renal Adherence Attitudes Questionnaire(RAAQ)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Inês Maria de Jesus; Bandeira, Marina Bittencourt; Pinheiro, Hélady Sanders; Dutra, Nathália Dos Santos

    2015-10-01

    Treatment adherence in hemodialysis is important for guaranteeing better results for patients, but Brazil still lacks validated assessment tools for this purpose. The current study aimed to perform a cross-cultural adaptation of the Renal Adherence Behaviour Questionnaire (RABQ) and the Renal Adherence Attitudes Questionnaire (RAAQ). The two questionnaires were submitted to the following cross-cultural adaptation procedures: translation, back-translation, expert panel review, and pilot study. Changes were made in the items' wording and application, which requires a face-to-face interview. It was not necessary to change the choices of answers. The Brazilian versions of the RABQ and RAAQ showed semantic and cultural equivalence to the original versions and are easy for the target population to understand. The two scales still require validity and reliability studies before use in the field.

  11. Cellular conservation of endangered midget buffalo (Lowland Anoa, Bubalus quarlesi) by establishment of primary cultured cell, and its immortalization with expression of cell cycle regulators

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuda, Tomokazu; Iino, Yuuka; Eitsuka, Takahiro; ONUMA, Manabu; Katayama, Masafumi; Murata, Koichi; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Hara, Kumiko; Isogai, Emiko; Kiyono, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Lowland Anoa has become endangered due to hunting and human activity. Protection and breeding of endangered species in a controlled environment is the best way of conservation. However, it is not possible to adopt this approach for all endangered species because of the cost involved and the ever-increasing number of critically endangered species. In consideration of these limitations to the conventional conservation methods, we established a primary cell culture of endangered buffalo (Lowland...

  12. Biological responses of T cells encapsulated with polyelectrolyte-coated gold nanorods and their cellular activities in a co-culture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattanakull, Porntida; Killingsworth, Murray C.; Pissuwan, Dakrong

    2017-10-01

    Currently, human T cell therapy is of considerable scientific interest. In addition, cell encapsulation has become an attractive approach in biomedical applications. Here, we propose an innovative technique of single-cell encapsulation of human T cells using polyelectrolytes combined with gold nanorods. We have demonstrated encapsulation of human Jurkat T cells with poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS)-coated gold nanorods (PSS-GNRs). Other forms of encapsulation, using polyelectrolytes without GNRs, were also performed. After Jurkat T cells were encapsulated with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and/or PSS-GNRs or PSS, most cells survived and could proliferate. Jurkat T cells encapsulated with a double layer of PSS-GNR/PAH (PSS-GNR/PAH@Jurkat) showed the highest rate of cell proliferation when compared to 24-h encapsulated cells. With the exception of IL-6, no significant induction of inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-1β, and TNF-α) was observed. Interestingly, when encapsulated cells were co-cultured with THP-1 macrophages, co-cultures exhibited TNF-α production enhancement. However, the co-culture of THP-1 macrophage and PSS-GNR/PAH@Jurkat or PSS/PAH@Jurkat did not enhance TNF-α production. No significant inductions of IL-2, IL-1β, and IL-6 were detected. These data provide promising results, demonstrating the potential use of encapsulated PSS-GNR/PAH@Jurkat to provide a more inert T cell population for immunotherapy application and other biomedical applications.

  13. Biological responses of T cells encapsulated with polyelectrolyte-coated gold nanorods and their cellular activities in a co-culture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattanakull, Porntida; Killingsworth, Murray C.; Pissuwan, Dakrong

    2017-11-01

    Currently, human T cell therapy is of considerable scientific interest. In addition, cell encapsulation has become an attractive approach in biomedical applications. Here, we propose an innovative technique of single-cell encapsulation of human T cells using polyelectrolytes combined with gold nanorods. We have demonstrated encapsulation of human Jurkat T cells with poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS)-coated gold nanorods (PSS-GNRs). Other forms of encapsulation, using polyelectrolytes without GNRs, were also performed. After Jurkat T cells were encapsulated with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and/or PSS-GNRs or PSS, most cells survived and could proliferate. Jurkat T cells encapsulated with a double layer of PSS-GNR/PAH (PSS-GNR/PAH@Jurkat) showed the highest rate of cell proliferation when compared to 24-h encapsulated cells. With the exception of IL-6, no significant induction of inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-1β, and TNF-α) was observed. Interestingly, when encapsulated cells were co-cultured with THP-1 macrophages, co-cultures exhibited TNF-α production enhancement. However, the co-culture of THP-1 macrophage and PSS-GNR/PAH@Jurkat or PSS/PAH@Jurkat did not enhance TNF-α production. No significant inductions of IL-2, IL-1β, and IL-6 were detected. These data provide promising results, demonstrating the potential use of encapsulated PSS-GNR/PAH@Jurkat to provide a more inert T cell population for immunotherapy application and other biomedical applications.

  14. Inhibition of MMP-2-mediated cellular invasion by NF-κB inhibitor DHMEQ in 3D culture of breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells: A model for early phase of metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukaji, Tamami; Lin, Yinzhi; Okada, Shoshiro; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2017-03-25

    The three-dimensional (3D) culture of cancer cells provides an environmental condition closely related to the condition in vivo. It would especially be an ideal model for the early phase of metastasis, including the detachment and invasion of cancer cells from the primary tumor. In one hand, dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ), an NF-κB inhibitor, is known to inhibit cancer progression and late phase metastasis in animal experiments. In the present research, we studied the inhibitory activity on the 3D invasion of breast carcinoma cells. Breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells showed the most active invasion from spheroid among the cell lines tested. DHMEQ inhibited the 3D invasion of cells at the 3D-nontoxic concentrations. The PCR array analysis using RNA isolated from the 3D on-top cultured cells indicated that matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 expression is lowered by DHMEQ. Knockdown of MMP-2 and an MMP inhibitor, GM6001, both inhibited the invasion. DHMEQ was shown to inhibit the promoter activity of MMP-2 in the reporter assay. Thus, DHMEQ was shown to inhibit NF-κB/MMP-2-dependent cellular invasion in 3D-cultured MDA-MB-231 cells, suggesting that DHMEQ would inhibit the early phase of metastasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Patient adherence with COPD therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Rand

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Although there are very few published studies on adherence to treatment regimens in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, the evidence that exists suggests that, as with asthma therapy, adherence is poor. Patient beliefs about COPD, as well as their motivation and expectations about the likelihood of success of medical interventions, can influence adherence rates. Other critical factors include the patient's understanding of their illness and therapy, and the complexity of the prescribed treatment regimen. Incorrect inhaler technique is also a common failing. When prescribing in primary or specialist care, healthcare professionals should address adherence as a vital part of the patient consultation. Improved patient education may also increase adherence rates.

  16. Glutamate receptor activation in cultured cerebellar granule cells increases cytosolic free Ca2+ by mobilization of cellular Ca2+ and activation of Ca2+ influx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, P; Belhage, B; Frandsen, A

    1989-01-01

    The Ca2+ sensitive fluorescent probe, fura-2 has been used to monitor cytosolic free calcium levels in mature primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells during exposure to L-glutamate and other excitatory amino acids: quisqualate (QA) kainate (KA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). Glutamate...... at micromolar concentrations produced a prompt and dose-related increase in the intracellular concentration of free Ca2+, ([Ca2+]i), whereas QA, KA and NMDA had no effect. This increase was also seen in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, suggesting that L-glutamate promotes mobilization of Ca2+ from...

  17. High-throughput microcavitation bubble induced cellular mechanotransduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Jonathan Lee

    Focused pulsed laser irradiation allows for the deposition of energy with high spatial and temporal resolution. These attributes provide an optimal tool for non-contact manipulation in cellular biology such as laser microsurgery, cell membrane permeabilization, as well as targeted cell death. In this thesis we investigate the direct physical effects produced by laser- generated microcavitation bubbles in adherent cell cultures. We examine how variation in pulse durations (180 ps - 6ns) and pulse energy (0.5 - 40 mu;J) affect microcavitation bubble (mu;CB) generated cell lysis, necrosis, and molecular delivery. To compare the effects of pulse duration we employ classical fluid dynamics modeling to quantify the perturbation caused on cell populations from mu;CB generated microTsunamis (a transient microscale burst of hydrodynamic shear stress). Through time-resolved imaging we capture the mu;CB dynamics at various energies and pulse durations. Moreover, the mathematical modeling provides information regarding the cellular exposure to time varying shear stress and impulse as a function of radial location from the mu;CB center. We demonstrate that the resultant cellular effect can be predicted based on the total impulse across a two order of magnitude span of pulse duration and pulse energy. We also examine the region of cells beyond the zone of molecular delivery to investigate possible cellular reactions to mu;Tsunami exposure. Our studies have shown that cellular mechanotransduction occurs within cell populations spanning an area of up to 1 mm2 surrounding the mu;CB. Visualization of mechanotransduction is achieved through the visualization of intracellular calcium signaling via fluorescence microscopy that occurs due to the ability of the muTsunami generated shear stresses to stimulate G-protein coupled receptors at the apical cell surface. Moreover, we have shown that the observed signaling can be attenuated in a dose-dependent manner using 2-APB which is a known

  18. Spontaneously differentiated GATA6-positive human embryonic stem cells represent an important cellular step in human embryonic development; they are not just an artifact of in vitro culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Ho; Hong, Ki Sung; Mantel, Charlie; Broxmeyer, Hal E; Lee, Man Ryul; Kim, Kye-Seong

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we isolated and characterized spontaneously differentiated human embryonic stem cells (SD-hESCs) found in hESC colonies in comparison to the morphologically premature ESCs in the colonies to investigate the potential role of SD-hESCs in embryogenesis. SD-hESCs were distinguished from undifferentiated hESCs by their higher expression of GATA6, a marker for primitive endoderm and transthyretin, a marker visceral endoderm in embryoid bodies (EBs). SD-hESCs expressed OCT4 and NANOG, markers for pluripotent stem cells, at significantly lower levels than undifferentiated hESCs. EBs derived from isolated SD-hESCs were morphologically distinct from cells directly derived from the undifferentiated hESCs; they contained higher number of cysts compared to EBs from undifferentiated hESC-derived EBs (42% vs. 20%). Furthermore, the extracellular signal molecule, BMP2/4, induced a higher GATA4/6 expression and cystic EB formation than control and noggin-treated EBs. Since cystic formation in EBs play a role in primitive endoderm formation during embryogenesis, the SD-hESC may be a relevant cell type equipped to differentiate into primitive endoderm. Our results suggest that SD-ESCs generated during routine hESC culture are not just an artifact of in vitro culture and these cells could serve as a useful model to study the process of embryogenesis.

  19. Mechanism of cellular uptake of genotoxic silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Qingshan; Hondow, Nicole S; Krzemiński, Lukasz; Brown, Andy P; Jeuken, Lars J C; Routledge, Michael N

    2012-07-23

    Mechanisms for cellular uptake of nanoparticles have important implications for nanoparticulate drug delivery and toxicity. We have explored the mechanism of uptake of amorphous silica nanoparticles of 14 nm diameter, which agglomerate in culture medium to hydrodynamic diameters around 500 nm. In HT29, HaCat and A549 cells, cytotoxicity was observed at nanoparticle concentrations ≥ 1 μg/ml, but DNA damage was evident at 0.1 μg/ml and above. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed entry of the silica particles into A549 cells exposed to 10 μg/ml of nanoparticles. The particles were observed in the cytoplasm but not within membrane bound vesicles or in the nucleus. TEM of cells exposed to nanoparticles at 4°C for 30 minutes showed particles enter cells when activity is low, suggesting a passive mode of entry. Plasma lipid membrane models identified physical interactions between the membrane and the silica NPs. Quartz crystal microbalance experiments on tethered bilayer lipid membrane systems show that the nanoparticles strongly bind to lipid membranes, forming an adherent monolayer on the membrane. Leakage assays on large unilamellar vesicles (400 nm diameter) indicate that binding of the silica NPs transiently disrupts the vesicles which rapidly self-seal. We suggest that an adhesive interaction between silica nanoparticles and lipid membranes could cause passive cellular uptake of the particles.

  20. Mechanism of cellular uptake of genotoxic silica nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Qingshan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mechanisms for cellular uptake of nanoparticles have important implications for nanoparticulate drug delivery and toxicity. We have explored the mechanism of uptake of amorphous silica nanoparticles of 14 nm diameter, which agglomerate in culture medium to hydrodynamic diameters around 500 nm. In HT29, HaCat and A549 cells, cytotoxicity was observed at nanoparticle concentrations ≥ 1 μg/ml, but DNA damage was evident at 0.1 μg/ml and above. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed entry of the silica particles into A549 cells exposed to 10 μg/ml of nanoparticles. The particles were observed in the cytoplasm but not within membrane bound vesicles or in the nucleus. TEM of cells exposed to nanoparticles at 4°C for 30 minutes showed particles enter cells when activity is low, suggesting a passive mode of entry. Plasma lipid membrane models identified physical interactions between the membrane and the silica NPs. Quartz crystal microbalance experiments on tethered bilayer lipid membrane systems show that the nanoparticles strongly bind to lipid membranes, forming an adherent monolayer on the membrane. Leakage assays on large unilamellar vesicles (400 nm diameter indicate that binding of the silica NPs transiently disrupts the vesicles which rapidly self-seal. We suggest that an adhesive interaction between silica nanoparticles and lipid membranes could cause passive cellular uptake of the particles.

  1. Real-time monitoring of specific oxygen uptake rates of embryonic stem cells in a microfluidic cell culture device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Super, Alexandre; Jaccard, Nicolas; Cardoso Marques, Marco Paulo; Macown, Rhys Jarred; Griffin, Lewis Donald; Veraitch, Farlan Singh; Szita, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    Oxygen plays a key role in stem cell biology as a signaling molecule and as an indicator of cell energy metabolism. Quantification of cellular oxygen kinetics, i.e. the determination of specific oxygen uptake rates (sOURs), is routinely used to understand metabolic shifts. However current methods to determine sOUR in adherent cell cultures rely on cell sampling, which impacts on cellular phenotype. We present real-time monitoring of cell growth from phase contrast microscopy images, and of respiration using optical sensors for dissolved oxygen. Time-course data for bulk and peri-cellular oxygen concentrations obtained for Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and mouse embryonic stem cell (mESCs) cultures successfully demonstrated this non-invasive and label-free approach. Additionally, we confirmed non-invasive detection of cellular responses to rapidly changing culture conditions by exposing the cells to mitochondrial inhibiting and uncoupling agents. For the CHO and mESCs, sOUR values between 8 and 60 amol cell(-1) s(-1) , and 5 and 35 amol cell(-1) s(-1) were obtained, respectively. These values compare favorably with literature data. The capability to monitor oxygen tensions, cell growth, and sOUR, of adherent stem cell cultures, non-invasively and in real time, will be of significant benefit for future studies in stem cell biology and stem cell-based therapies. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. To adhere or not to adhere: Rates and reasons of medication adherence in hematological cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Alix E; Paul, Chris; Bryant, Jamie; Lynagh, Marita C; Rowlings, Philip; Enjeti, Anoop; Small, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    To conduct a comprehensive review to examine among hematological cancer patients: (1) rates of adherence to self-administered cancer treatments; and (2) factors impacting on their adherence. Fifty two eligible publications were identified. The majority focused on Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia (CML) (n=40) and Acute Lymphoid Leukaemia (ALL) (n=11) patients. Adherence rates varied and depended on the definition and measures used. Patient understanding about their disease and treatment, and forgetting to take their medication impacted on patients' level of adherence; while the use of reminders reduced forgetfulness. There is a lack of valid and reliable information relating to medication adherence of hematological cancer patients. Based on the limited data available we provide a profile of CML and ALL patients at potential risk of medication non-adherence, as well as a proposed checklist that can be used by health care providers in assessing and supporting patients in adhering to their medication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Adherence to oral antineoplastic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Olivera-Fernandez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral chemotherapy agents offer advantages including cost, patient comfort and potential improvement in quality of life versus intravenous drugs. However ensuring adherence and monitoring adverse effects is more difficult. The aim of this study was to examine the real adherence in patients with oral chemotherapy agents in our hospital, to assess the influence of patient and treatment characteristics, to identify reasons for non adherence, to identify pportunities for improvement pharmaceutical care and to assess the potential relation between adherence and treatment outcomes. Method: observational, prospective study for a period of four month, in the patients who were dispensing oral chemotherapy agents in outpatient setting. The medical prescriptions, medical history and patient interviews were used to collect data. Results: 141 patients were assessing. 72% were considered as fully adherent, while 28% reported some kind of non adherence. Adherence was influenced by time from diagnosis and adverse effects. No relationship between adherence and treatment outcomes was found. Conclusions: Adherence to oral chemotherapy was 72%, identifing opportunities for improvement pharmaceutical care to prevent adverse effects and to improve our patient adherence

  4. High-throughput optical screening of cellular mechanotransduction

    OpenAIRE

    Compton, JL; Luo, JC; Ma, H.; Botvinick, E; Venugopalan, V

    2014-01-01

    We introduce an optical platform for rapid, high-throughput screening of exogenous molecules that affect cellular mechanotransduction. Our method initiates mechanotransduction in adherent cells using single laser-microbeam generated microcavitation bubbles without requiring flow chambers or microfluidics. These microcavitation bubbles expose adherent cells to a microtsunami, a transient microscale burst of hydrodynamic shear stress, which stimulates cells over areas approaching 1 mm2. We demo...

  5. In vitro proliferation of haemopoietic cells in the presence of adherent cell layers. II. Differential effect of adherent cell layers derived from various organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimann, J.; Burger, H.

    1979-01-01

    Mouse bone marrow-derived adherent cell populations promoted proliferation of haemopoietic cells in vitro in a liquid culture system for at least 4 weeks. Adherent cell layers derived from other haemopoietic organs (foetal liver, adult spleen) and fibroblasts from embryonic tissues did not maintain

  6. Treatment Adherence in Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Emin Demirkol

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite developments in treatment options there is no significant increase in treatment adherence ratios. Inadherence in psychiatric disorders is higher than the other diseases. Loss of insight, drugs' side effects, sociodemographic features, personality traits are major factors affecting the treatment adherence. Determining and overcoming these factors for each disorder will help to improve adherence and reduce the treatment costs and hospitalization. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(1: 85-93

  7. Probing the Dynamics of Cellular Traction Forces with Magnetic Micropost Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Corinne; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    Mechanical forces on living cells are associated with changes in cellular function. For example, vascular smooth muscle cells are known to undergo a mechanical feedback response to increased stress, which can result in atherosclerosis. We have recently developed a magnetic micropost array, a novel device for measuring cellular traction forces that simultaneously enables the application of localized external forces to cells. The device consists of an array of micrometer scale elastomeric posts that act as force sensors for cells cultured on their tips. An external force is applied to the adherent surface of a cell via a magnetic torque on a cobalt nanowire embedded in a single post. Initial results showed an active and non-local cellular response to applied forces in mouse fibroblast cells.ootnotetextN. Sniadecki, et. al, Proc Natl Acad Sci, 104, 14553 (2007). We will present results on the spatially resolved dynamics of traction forces exerted by smooth muscle cells over time in response to constant and time-varying stimulation. The observation of biochemical and mechanical regulation of the subcellular redistribution of force may allow insights into cellular mechanotransduction and control of cell function.

  8. [Senescence and cellular immortality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentesaux, C; Riou, J-F

    2010-11-01

    Senescence was originally described from the observation of the limited ability of normal cells to grow in culture, and may be generated by telomere erosion, accumulation of DNA damages, oxidative stress and modulation of oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. Senescence corresponds to a cellular response aiming to control tumor progression by limiting cell proliferation and thus constitutes an anticancer barrier. Senescence is observed in pre-malignant tumor stages and disappears from malignant tumors. Agents used in standard chemotherapy also have the potential to induce senescence, which may partly explain their therapeutic activities. It is possible to restore senescence in tumors using targeted therapies that triggers telomere dysfunction or reactivates suppressor genes functions, which are essential for the onset of senescence.

  9. Adherence to disease management programs in patients with COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Johnson; Kong, David CM; Stewart, Kay

    2007-01-01

    The management of COPD is complex and patient adherence to treatment recommendations is known to be poor. In this paper the methods used for evaluating adherence in COPD are compared. Self-reporting has satisfactory reliability and offers a cheap, simple and easy method for assessing adherent behaviors. Unlike the objective measures of adherence such as electronic monitoring, self-reporting helps in identifying the reasons for nonadherence, which in turn would be useful in addressing adherence issues. Patients do not follow their treatment recommendations either intentionally or unintentionally. Intentional deviations are driven by patient beliefs and experiences about illness and treatment, which are in turn influenced by social and cultural factors. Unintentional deviations are often due to cognitive impairment and lack of routines. Factors associated with adherence in COPD have been explained using the Becker-Maiman model. Strategies for overcoming nonadherence have to be formulated based on the nature and reasons for nonadherence. In the event of unintentional nonadherence, the use of adherence aids like Dosette boxes, calendar packs and reminders should be promoted. Understanding patient beliefs and experiences, patient education focusing on the pathology of COPD and the role of treatment, periodic monitoring and reinforcement are critical for overcoming the barriers of intentional nonadherence. PMID:18229563

  10. Therapeutic Adherence in Smoking Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Salvador Manzano

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic adherence is a complex and multidimensional concept. The percentage of adherence to treatments involving a change in lifestyle, such as quitting smoking, is lower than in other disorders, a fact which has relevant clinical, psychological and economic consequences. This paper aims to review the associated factors with adherence to therapy in smoking treatment. Strategies to enhance therapeutic adherence involve the adequate choice of treatment, to know the smoker´s characteristics, breaking down organizational barriers in health system and the training of health professionals in communication skills with patients.

  11. The Impact of Metal Ion Exposure on the Cellular Behavior of Human Osteoblasts and PBMCs: In Vitro Analyses of Osteolytic Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika Jonitz-Heincke

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteolysis in the periprosthetic tissue can be caused by metallic wear particles and ions that can originate from implant surface corrosion. These products influence cellular behavior and stimulate the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of CoCr29Mo6 ions on cell survival, differentiation, and cytokine expression in human osteoblasts and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. Thus, we exposed cells with a mixture of 200 µg/L ion solution and determined cell viability and apoptosis/necrosis. Gene expression analyses of osteoblastic and osteoclastic differentiation markers as well as pro-osteolytic mediators (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, MCP-1, MMP1, TIMP1 were performed. These markers were also investigated in mixed cultures of adherent and non-adherent PBMCs as well as in co-cultures of human osteoblasts and PBMCs. The ion solution induced necrosis in osteoblasts and PBMCs in single cultures. All examined mediators were highly expressed in the co-culture of osteoblasts and PBMCs whereas in the single cell cultures only IL-6, IL-8, and MMP1 were found to be stimulated. While the applied concentration of the CoCr29Mo6 ion solutions had only marginal effects on human osteoblasts and PBMCs alone, the co-culture may provide a comprehensive model to study osteolytic processes in response to Co and Cr ions.

  12. Recommendations for improving ART adherence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article reports on the fi ndings of a study that aimed to explore experts' and patients' opinions and recommendations regarding adherence to antiretroviral medication. This study was prompted firstly by the lack of existing local research on adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and secondly by the importance of ...

  13. [Treatment adherence: a key element].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastida, Guillermo; Sánchez Montes, Cristina; Aguas, Mariam

    2011-12-01

    A substantial percentage of patients fail to follow health professionals' recommendations, which affects the management of chronic diseases, reducing the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions and increasing the costs of the disease. Lack of adherence is a multidimensional phenomenon and is influenced by numerous factors that should be identified. A multiplicity of measures is available to improve adherence, such as simplifying treatment administration, but none of these measures is effective when used alone. One way of tackling lack of adherence is by identifying patients' barriers to medication and involving them in decision making. Ulcerative colitis (UC) poses a risk for lack of treatment adherence. In this disease, poor adherence correlates with poor disease control (drug effectiveness) and with higher costs. As in other chronic diseases, the causes associated with poor adherence are multiple, including psychosocial factors, the physician-patient relationship and patients' prejudices toward medication. A single dose of aminosalycylates (5-ASA) should be recommended, as this dose is as safe and effective as other regimens. However, by itself, this recommendation does not seem to improve adherence. Identifying the scale of the problem and developing strategies to involve the patient in decision making is crucial to improve treatment adherence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Optimizing adherence to antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Seema; Reddy, K Srikanth; Dhayarkar, Sampada

    2011-12-01

    HIV has now become a manageable chronic disease. However, the treatment outcomes may get hampered by suboptimal adherence to ART. Adherence optimization is a concrete reality in the wake of 'universal access' and it is imperative to learn lessons from various studies and programmes. This review examines current literature on ART scale up, treatment outcomes of the large scale programmes and the role of adherence therein. Social, behavioural, biological and programme related factors arise in the context of ART adherence optimization. While emphasis is laid on adherence, retention of patients under the care umbrella emerges as a major challenge. An in-depth understanding of patients' health seeking behaviour and health care delivery system may be useful in improving adherence and retention of patients in care continuum and programme. A theoretical framework to address the barriers and facilitators has been articulated to identify problematic areas in order to intervene with specific strategies. Empirically tested objective adherence measurement tools and approaches to assess adherence in clinical/ programme settings are required. Strengthening of ART programmes would include appropriate policies for manpower and task sharing, integrating traditional health sector, innovations in counselling and community support. Implications for the use of theoretical model to guide research, clinical practice, community involvement and policy as part of a human rights approach to HIV disease is suggested.

  15. EAMJ May Adherence.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-05-05

    May 5, 2009 ... The aim of this study was to determine adherence levels among HIV/AIDS adult patients using timing of medications and keeping of clinic appointments for drug refills as key indicators of adherence. It also determined the association between the two indicators. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Study area and ...

  16. Cellular grafts in management of leucoderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mysore Venkataram

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular grafting methods constitute important advances in the surgical management of leucoderma. Different methods such as noncultured epidermal suspensions, melanocyte cultures, and melanocyte-keratinocyte cultures have all been shown to be effective. This article reviews these methods.

  17. Gadolinium induced effects on mammalian cell motility, adherence and chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Gabor; Baksa, Viktoria; Kiss, Alexandra; Turani, Melinda; Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2017-02-01

    The toxicity of gadolinium is reduced by chelating agents that render this heavy metal into contrast complexes used for medical magnetic resonance imaging. However, the dissociation of gadolinium chelates is known to generate Gd3+ ions, the cellular toxicity of which has not been tested in details. The cytotoxic effects of Gd(III) ions were evaluated by monitoring the proliferation, measuring the cellular motility and following chromatin changes in various cell lines upon Gd3+ treatment. Measurements applied long-term scanning microscopy and a perfusion platform that replaced the medium with test solutions, bypassed physical contact with the cell culture during experiments, and provided uninterrupted high time-resolution time-lapse photomicrography for an extended period of time. Genotoxicity specific chromatin changes characteristic to Gd(III) were distinguished in human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT), human limbal stem cells (HuLi), colorectal adenocarcinoma (CaCO2), murine squamous carcinoma (SCC) and Indian muntjac (IM) cell lines. Characteristic features of Gd(III) toxicity were: loss of cellular motility, irreversible attachment of cells to the growth surface and cell death. Injury-specific chromatin changes manifested at micromolar Gd3+ concentrations as premature chromatin condensation and highly condensed sticky chromatin patches. Gd(III) concentration- and cell type-dependent reduction of normal adherence, as well as premature chromatin condensation confirmed apoptosis. The risk related to the release of toxic Gd3+ ions from gadolinium complexes and their effects on mono- and multi-layer cellular barriers have to be reconsidered when these chelated complexes are used as contrasting agents especially in relation to possible blood-brain barrier damages.

  18. Cellular heredity in haploid cultures of somatic cells. Progress report, August 1978-September 1979. [Correlation between uv mutagenesis and DNA repair in cultured haploid frog cells (ICR 2A)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freed, J.J.

    1979-10-01

    During the past year we have continued our studies of the relation of ultraviolet mutagenesis to DNA repair in cultures of the haploid frog cell line ICR 2A. Our method of irradiation of cells in suspension was improved by construction of an improved detector with major sensitivity to the 254 nm Hg resonance line, to give better estimates of actual exposure of the cells. Using this method, dose-response and dose-fractionation studies on irradiation of ouabain resistance were carried out. The uv induction of this phenotype in the ICR 2A cell line was found to be less than that necessary for adequate analysis of dose-response curves. Cell fusion experiments using frog and mouse cells revealed an enhancement of mutagenesis in the mouse parent that will be explored in further work.

  19. Synoviocyte cultures from synovial fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Punzi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of the pathogenetic mechanisms of rheumatic diseases is in general carried out through “in vitro” systems based on cellular cultures models. The difficulties to achieve fresh human tissue prompted us to develop a simpler method to obtain fibroblast-like synovial cells from synovial fluid (SF. Methods: SF was collected from the knees of 5 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, 4 with osteoarthritis (OA and 5 with psoriatic arthritis (PsA. The pellet obtained after centrifugation was resuspended in DMEM/HamF12 containing 10% fetal calf serum, 1% peni-streptomicin, 4ng/ml of fibroblast grow factor and incubated at 37°C in T25 culture flasks. Synoviocytes were also obtained from fresh synovial membranes (SM by explants technique. Both types of cells were characterized by immunocytochemistry and their inflammatory response to synthetic monosodium urate crystals was studied through the measurement of nitric oxide (NO. Results: Adherent synoviocytes were obtained from the culture of 2/5 SF from RA, 4/4 SF from OA and 5/5 SF from PsA. Synoviocytes isolated from both SF and SM expressed surface antigens CD90, CD55, and the intracellular prolyl- 4-hydroxylase. Morphologically, the cells showed the typical spindle-shape fibroblast-like appearance. NO levels induced by UMS crystals in SF synoviocytes were similar to those obtained in SM synoviocytes. Conclusion: Adherent cells obtained from SF showed the phenotype and the reactivity of tissue synoviocytes. Due to the easy accessibility of SF, this method may represents an useful alternative when synovial tissues is not promptly available.

  20. [Synoviocyte cultures from synovial fluid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanu, A; Oliviero, F; Braghetto, L; Ramonda, R; Luisetto, R; Calabrese, F; Pozzuoli, A; Punzi, L

    2007-01-01

    The study of the pathogenetic mechanisms of rheumatic diseases is in general carried out through "in vitro" systems based on cellular cultures models. The difficulties to achieve fresh human tissue prompted us to develop a simpler method to obtain fibroblast-like synovial cells from synovial fluid (SF). SF was collected from the knees of 5 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 4 with osteoarthritis (OA) and 5 with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The pellet obtained after centrifugation was resuspended in DMEM/HamF12 containing 10% foetal calf serum, 1% peni-streptomycin, 4 ng/ml of fibroblast grow factor and incubated at 37 degrees C in T25 culture flasks. Synoviocytes were also obtained from fresh synovial membranes (SM) by explants technique. Both types of cells were characterized by immunocytochemistry and their inflammatory response to synthetic monosodium urate crystals was studied through the measurement of nitric oxide (NO). Adherent synoviocytes were obtained from the culture of 2/5 SF from RA, 4/4 SF from OA and 5/5 SF from PsA. Synoviocytes isolated from both SF and SM expressed surface antigens CD90, CD55, and the intracellular prolyl-4-hydroxylase. Morphologically, the cells showed the typical spindle-shape fibroblast-like appearance. NO levels induced by UMS crystals in SF synoviocytes were similar to those obtained in SM synoviocytes. Adherent cells obtained from SF showed the phenotype and the reactivity of tissue synoviocytes. Due to the easy accessibility of SF, this method may represents an useful alternative when synovial tissues is not promptly available.

  1. Quality of Life and Adherence to Antiretroviral Drugs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sitwala

    the public as a whole. Determination of medication adherence leads to development of innovative, effective interventions needed to facilitate behavior change, improve quality of life and prevent resistance to antiretroviral drugs. Conclusion: The World Health Organization has developed a comprehensive culturally sensitive.

  2. Motivational interviewing for medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Marissa C; Cannon-Breland, Michelle L

    2015-01-01

    To familiarize pharmacists with motivational interviewing as a way to engage patients in discussions about medication adherence. Motivational interviewing is a collaborative, patient-centered communications skill set that can increase behavior change by stimulating a patient's own internal motivation for change. Pharmacists using motivational interviewing can explore factors associated with medication nonadherence, assess patient ambivalence and/or resistance, and educate a patient to promote medication-adherent behaviors. Pharmacists can use motivational interviewing to effectively engage patients in a conversation that addresses medication adherence.

  3. Adherence of Acinetobacter baumannii to rat bladder tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, M; Ruiz, M; Bello, H; Dominguez, M; Martínez, M A; Pinto, M E; Gonzalez, G; Mella, S; Zemelman, R

    1998-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, an important nosocomial pathogen, causes severe infections in patients of intensive care units, but its pathogenic attributes are unknown. Previously, the adherence of A. baumannii to cell lines has been negative in the authors' laboratory. In this work, the adherence of strains of A. baumannii of various biotypes to small pieces of rat bladder tissue was investigated. Tissue pieces were submerged into cultures of A. baumannii and sessile cells were counted after removing planktonic bacteria. Fimbriae and sessile cells were examined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. In contrast to a uropathogenic strain of Escherichia coli, all cultures exhibited a mannose- and galactose-resistant agglutination of human group O red blood cells as well as mannose- and galactose-resistant adherence to the bladder tissue. Inhibition of exopolysaccharide synthesis did not modify adherence. Indeed, adherence, apparently unrelated to these fimbriae or to the exopolysaccharide, may be a factor contributing to the pathogenicity of A. baumannii in the urinary tract or in other tissues.

  4. The predictors to medication adherence among adults with diabetes in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haj Mohd, Mohammed M M; Phung, Hai; Sun, Jing; Morisky, Donald E

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic medical condition and adherence to medication in adults with diabetes is important. Identifying predictors to medication adherence in adults with diabetes would help identify vulnerable patients who are likely to benefit by improving their adherence levels. We conducted a cross-sectional study at the Dubai Police Health Centre between February 2015 and November 2015. Questionnaires were used to collect socio-demographic, clinical and disease related variables and the primary measure of outcome was adherence levels as measured by the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8©). Multivariate logistic regression was carried out to identify predictors to adherence. Four hundred and forty six patients were interviewed. Mean age 61 year +/- 11. 48.4 % were male. The mean time since diagnosis of diabetes was 3.2 years (Range 1-15 years). Two hundred and eighty eight (64.6 %) patients were considered non-adherent (MMAS-8© adherence score adherence (MMAS-8© adherence score 6 = adherence (MMAS-8© adherence scores medication respectively. The strongest predictor for adherence as predicted by the multi-logistic regression model was the patient's level of education. A technical diploma certificate as compared to a primary school level of education was the strongest predictor of adherence (OR = 66.1 CI: 6.93 to 630.43); p adherence with older patients reporting higher levels of adherence (OR = 1.113 (CI: 1.045 to 1.185; p = 0.001 for every year increase in age). The duration of diabetes was also a predictor of adherence (OR = 1.830 (CI: 1.270 to 2.636; p = 0.001 for every year increase in the duration of diabetes). Other predictors to medication adherence include Insulin use, ethnicity and certain cultural behaviours. A number of important predictors to medication adherence in diabetics were identified in this study. Such predictors could help develop policies for improving adherence in diabetics.

  5. Adherence treatment factors in hypertensive African American women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie N Fongwa

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Marie N Fongwa1, Lorraines S Evangelista1, Ron D Hays2, David S Martins3, David Elashoff4, Marie J Cowan1, Donald E Morisky51University of California Los Angeles School of Nursing, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2University of California Los Angeles School of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3To Help Everyone Clinic Inc. Los Angeles, CA, USA; 4University of California Los Angeles Public Health, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 5University of California Los Angeles School of Public Health, CA, USABackground: Hypertension among African American women is of epidemic proportions. Nonadherence to treatment contributes to uncontrolled blood pressure in this population. Factors associated with adherence to treatment in African American women are unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with adherence to hypertension treatment in African American women.Methods: Five audio-taped focus groups were conducted with hypertensive African American women, 35 years and older receiving treatment for hypertension from an inner-city free clinic. All transcripts from the tapes were analyzed for content describing adherence to treatment factors.Findings: Factors associated with adherence to treatment in hypertensive African American women were in three main categories including: beliefs about hypertension, facilitators of adherence to treatment, and barriers to adherence to treatment.Implications: The study supports the need for education on managing hypertension and medication side effects, early screening for depression in hypertensive African Americans, development of culturally sensitive hypertension educational material, and formation of support groups for promoting adherence to treatment among African American women with hypertension.Keywords: adherence, African American, hypertension treatment factors

  6. Adherence measures and their utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, J

    1984-12-01

    This article addresses the variety of adherence measures available to the researcher, with particular reference to the utility of markers. It is proposed that the generic nature of the research question will suggest both the adherence definition and the appropriate assessment methodology. Each measurement procedure offers somewhat different information and has unique advantages and disadvantages. It is suggested that markers are limited by the relatively short duration of the measurement period, the lack of quantitative data on adherence, and, with some, the potential for confounding influences on their specificity. The probable value of markers lies in validating the subject's recent self-report, determining recent medication ingestion, and estimating the probability of adherence over time.

  7. Primary culture and growth characteristics of four different species of lens epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Xia Ji

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore the primary culture conditions for four kinds of lens epithelial cells(LECsof rat, rabbit, dog, and human, and measure their growth characteristics. METHODS: The lens capsule or anterior capsular tissue of rat, rabbit, dog and patient were removed by different methods, and they were cut into tiny pieces for primary culture by modified tissue adherent method. The morphological features of four kinds of LECs were observed under an inverted microscope.RESULTS: Four kinds of LECs of rat, rabbit, dog and human could be cultured primarily by tissue adherent method. With the evolution of tissue source, the adherent capacity of LECs gradually strengthened, cells form were changed from irregular polygon to oval, nucleus rounded and cytoplasm enriched gradually. Four kinds of LECs had fibrotic changes after several passages.CONCLUSION: LECs of rat, rabbit, dog and human can be primarily cultured. This method lays the foundation for the mechanism research of caratact and related fields on the cellular and molecular levels.

  8. Tissue engineering of cultured skin substitutes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Horch, Raymund E; Kopp, Jürgen; Kneser, Ulrich; Beier, Justus; Bach, Alexander D

    2005-01-01

    .... Tissue‐engineered skin replacements: cultured autologous keratinocyte grafts, cultured allogeneic keratinocyte grafts, autologous/allogeneic composites, acellular biological matrices, and cellular...

  9. Medication Adherence Measures: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wai Yin; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    WHO reported that adherence among patients with chronic diseases averages only 50% in developed countries. This is recognized as a significant public health issue, since medication nonadherence leads to poor health outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Improving medication adherence is, therefore, crucial and revealed on many studies, suggesting interventions can improve medication adherence. One significant aspect of the strategies to improve medication adherence is to understand its magnitude. However, there is a lack of general guidance for researchers and healthcare professionals to choose the appropriate tools that can explore the extent of medication adherence and the reasons behind this problem in order to orchestrate subsequent interventions. This paper reviews both subjective and objective medication adherence measures, including direct measures, those involving secondary database analysis, electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices, pill count, and clinician assessments and self-report. Subjective measures generally provide explanations for patient's nonadherence whereas objective measures contribute to a more precise record of patient's medication-taking behavior. While choosing a suitable approach, researchers and healthcare professionals should balance the reliability and practicality, especially cost effectiveness, for their purpose. Meanwhile, because a perfect measure does not exist, a multimeasure approach seems to be the best solution currently. PMID:26539470

  10. Barriers to ART adherence & follow ups among patients attending ART centres in Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joglekar, N; Paranjape, R; Jain, R; Rahane, G; Potdar, R; Reddy, K S; Sahay, S

    2011-12-01

    Adherence to ART is a patient specific issue influenced by a variety of situations that a patient may encounter, especially in resource-limited settings. A study was conducted to understand factors and influencers of adherence to ART and their follow ups among patients attending ART centres in Maharashtra, India. Between January and March 2009, barriers to ART adherence among 32 patients at three selected ART centres functioning under national ART roll-out programme in Maharashtra, India, were studied using qualitative methods. Consenting patients were interviewed to assess barriers to ART adherence. Constant comparison method was used to identify grounded codes. Patients reported multiple barriers to ART adherence and follow up as (i) Financial barriers where the contributing factors were unemployment, economic dependency, and debt, (ii) social norm of attending family rituals, and fulfilling social obligations emerged as socio-cultural barriers, (iii) patients' belief, attitude and behaviour towards medication and self-perceived stigma were the reasons for sub-optimal adherence, and (iv) long waiting period, doctor-patient relationship and less time devoted in counselling at the center contributed to missed visits. Mainstreaming ART can facilitate access and address 'missed doses' due to travel and migration. A 'morning' and 'evening' ART centre/s hours may reduce work absenteeism and help in time management. Proactive 'adherence probing' and probing on internalized stigma might optimize adherence. Adherence probing to prevent transitioning to suboptimal adherence among patients stable on ART is recommended.

  11. Cultural Differences and Institutional Integration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guiso, Luigi; Herrera, Helios; Morelli, Massimo

    If citizens of different countries belonging to an economic union adhere to different and deeply rooted cultural norms, when these countries interact they may find it impossible to agree on efficient...

  12. Determinants of adherence to diabetes treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Amy T; Hoffman, Christina; Stevens, Adrienne; Douglas, Andrew; Bloomgarden, Zachary

    2015-11-01

    Understanding and improving medication adherence is crucial in diabetes management. Adherence to a diabetes regimen can improve glucose control and limit the development of complications. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the extent to which a variety of factors influence diabetes medication adherence. A medication adherence survey was made available on WebMD, a medical information website for patients and/or consumers. Respondents were residents of the US, ≥18 years old, and diagnosed with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus (self-reported). Behavioral adherence (self-reported doses missed per week) correlated with perceived adherence (patients' self-report of their overall impression of medication adherence, ranked 0-5; P Adherent patients (very few [0%-10%] issues with adherence) were more likely to report having received information from their physician. Mostly adherent patients (few [11%-26%] issues with adherence) were less likely to obtain information from their physician, but reported more medication self-titration. Somewhat non-adherent patients (some [27%-46%] adherence issues) reported more "self-consciousness factors" and hypoglycemia. Non-adherent patients (many [47%-88%] adherence issues) were more likely to report worries about medication side effects. Receiving information from a healthcare provider is associated with greater diabetes medication adherence, suggesting the importance of clinicians making time to provide patient education. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Wireless Cellular Mobile Communications

    OpenAIRE

    V. Zalud

    2002-01-01

    In this article is briefly reviewed the history of wireless cellular mobile communications, examined the progress in current second generation (2G) cellular standards and discussed their migration to the third generation (3G). The European 2G cellular standard GSM and its evolution phases GPRS and EDGE are described somewhat in detail. The third generation standard UMTS taking up on GSM/GPRS core network and equipped with a new advanced access network on the basis of code division multiple ac...

  14. Adherence with Preventive Medication in Childhood Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Burgess

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Suboptimal adherence with preventive medication is common and often unrecognised as a cause of poor asthma control. A number of risk factors for nonadherence have emerged from well-conducted studies. Unfortunately, patient report a physician's estimation of adherence and knowledge of these risk factors may not assist in determining whether non-adherence is a significant factor. Electronic monitoring devices are likely to be more frequently used to remind patients to take medication, as a strategy to motivate patients to maintain adherence, and a tool to evaluate adherence in subjects with poor disease control. The aim of this paper is to review non-adherence with preventive medication in childhood asthma, its impact on asthma control, methods of evaluating non-adherence, risk factors for suboptimal adherence, and strategies to enhance adherence.

  15. An antagonist of the platelet-activating factor receptor inhibits adherence of both nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae to cultured human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla SD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Shakti D Shukla,1,* Rory L Fairbairn,1,* David A Gell,1 Roger D Latham,1 Sukhwinder S Sohal,1,2 Eugene H Walters,1 Ronan F O’Toole11Breathe Well Centre, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia; 2School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Tasmania, Launceston, TAS, Australia*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: COPD is emerging as the third largest cause of human mortality worldwide after heart disease and stroke. Tobacco smoking, the primary risk factor for the development of COPD, induces increased expression of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr in the lung epithelium. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi and Streptococcus pneumoniae adhere to PAFr on the luminal surface of human respiratory tract epithelial cells.Objective: To investigate PAFr as a potential drug target for the prevention of infections caused by the main bacterial drivers of acute exacerbations in COPD patients, NTHi and S. pneumoniae.Methods: Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE. PAFr expression levels were determined using immunocytochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The epithelial cells were challenged with either NTHi or S. pneumoniae labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, and bacterial adhesion was measured using immunofluorescence. The effect of a well-evaluated antagonist of PAFr, WEB-2086, on binding of the bacterial pathogens to BEAS-2B cells was then assessed. In silico studies of the tertiary structure of PAFr and the binding pocket for PAF and its antagonist WEB-2086 were undertaken.Results: PAFr expression by bronchial epithelial cells was upregulated by CSE, and significantly associated with increased bacterial adhesion. WEB-2086 reduced the epithelial adhesion by both NTHi and S. pneumoniae to levels observed for non-CSE-exposed cells. Furthermore, it was nontoxic toward the bronchial epithelial

  16. Vaccine production: upstream processing with adherent or suspension cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genzel, Yvonne; Rödig, Jana; Rapp, Erdmann; Reichl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    The production of viral vaccines in cell culture can be accomplished with primary, diploid, or continuous (transformed) cell lines. Each cell line, each virus type, and each vaccine preparation require the specific design of upstream and downstream processing. Media have to be selected as well as production vessels, cultivation conditions, and modes of operation. Many viruses only replicate to high titers in adherently growing cells, but similar to processes established for recombinant protein production, an increasing number of suspension cell lines is being evaluated for future use. Here, we describe key issues to be considered for the establishment of large-scale virus production in bioreactors. As an example upstream processing of cell culture-derived influenza virus production is described in more detail for adherently growing and for suspension cells. In particular, use of serum-containing, serum-free, and chemically defined media as well as choice of cultivation vessel are considered.

  17. Antihypertensive Medications Adherence Among Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    way to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with hypertension.[1,2] Hypertension is the most common cardiovascular risk factor in Nigeria.[3] A large percentage of hypertensive subjects have poor blood pressure control due to many reasons.[2-4] One major reason is due to poor medication adherence. Treatment ...

  18. Probing Cellular Mechanoadaptation Using Cell-Substrate De-Adhesion Dynamics: Experiments and Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    S S, Soumya; Sthanam, Lakshmi Kavitha; Padinhateeri, Ranjith; Inamdar, Mandar M.; Sen, Shamik

    2014-01-01

    Physical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are known to regulate cellular processes ranging from spreading to differentiation, with alterations in cell phenotype closely associated with changes in physical properties of cells themselves. When plated on substrates of varying stiffness, fibroblasts have been shown to exhibit stiffness matching property, wherein cell cortical stiffness increases in proportion to substrate stiffness up to 5 kPa, and subsequently saturates. Similar mechanoadaptation responses have also been observed in other cell types. Trypsin de-adhesion represents a simple experimental framework for probing the contractile mechanics of adherent cells, with de-adhesion timescales shown to scale inversely with cortical stiffness values. In this study, we combine experiments and computation in deciphering the influence of substrate properties in regulating de-adhesion dynamics of adherent cells. We first show that NIH 3T3 fibroblasts cultured on collagen-coated polyacrylamide hydrogels de-adhere faster on stiffer substrates. Using a simple computational model, we qualitatively show how substrate stiffness and cell-substrate bond breakage rate collectively influence de-adhesion timescales, and also obtain analytical expressions of de-adhesion timescales in certain regimes of the parameter space. Finally, by comparing stiffness-dependent experimental and computational de-adhesion responses, we show that faster de-adhesion on stiffer substrates arises due to force-dependent breakage of cell-matrix adhesions. In addition to illustrating the utility of employing trypsin de-adhesion as a biophysical tool for probing mechanoadaptation, our computational results highlight the collective interplay of substrate properties and bond breakage rate in setting de-adhesion timescales. PMID:25197799

  19. Cellular contractility requires ubiquitin mediated proteolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Cinnamon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular contractility, essential for cell movement and proliferation, is regulated by microtubules, RhoA and actomyosin. The RhoA dependent kinase ROCK ensures the phosphorylation of the regulatory Myosin II Light Chain (MLC Ser19, thereby activating actomyosin contractions. Microtubules are upstream inhibitors of contractility and their depolymerization or depletion cause cells to contract by activating RhoA. How microtubule dynamics regulates RhoA remains, a major missing link in understanding contractility. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We observed that contractility is inhibited by microtubules not only, as previously reported, in adherent cells, but also in non-adhering interphase and mitotic cells. Strikingly we observed that contractility requires ubiquitin mediated proteolysis by a Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase. Inhibition of proteolysis, ubiquitination and neddylation all led to complete cessation of contractility and considerably reduced MLC Ser19 phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results imply that cells express a contractility inhibitor that is degraded by ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, either constitutively or in response to microtubule depolymerization. This degradation seems to depend on a Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase and is required for cellular contractions.

  20. Adherence to Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inadomi, John M.; Vijan, Sandeep; Janz, Nancy K.; Fagerlin, Angela; Thomas, Jennifer P.; Lin, Yunghui V.; Muñoz, Roxana; Lau, Chim; Somsouk, Ma; El-Nachef, Najwa; Hayward, Rodney A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite evidence that several colorectal cancer (CRC) screening strategies can reduce CRC mortality, screening rates remain low. This study aimed to determine whether the approach by which screening is recommended influences adherence. Methods We used a cluster randomization design with clinic time block as the unit of randomization. Persons at average risk for development of CRC in a racially/ethnically diverse urban setting were randomized to receive recommendation for screening by fecal occult blood testing (FOBT), colonoscopy, or their choice of FOBT or colonoscopy. The primary outcome was completion of CRC screening within 12 months after enrollment, defined as performance of colonoscopy, or 3 FOBT cards plus colonoscopy for any positive FOBT result. Secondary analyses evaluated sociodemographic factors associated with completion of screening. Results A total of 997 participants were enrolled; 58% completed the CRC screening strategy they were assigned or chose. However, participants who were recommended colonoscopy completed screening at a significantly lower rate (38%) than participants who were recommended FOBT (67%) (PChinese) completed screening more often than African Americans. Moreover, non-white participants adhered more often to FOBT, while white participants adhered more often to colonoscopy. Conclusions The common practice of universally recommending colonoscopy may reduce adherence to CRC screening, especially among racial/ethnic minorities. Significant variation in overall and strategy-specific adherence exists between racial/ethnic groups; however, this may be a proxy for health beliefs and/or language. These results suggest that patient preferences should be considered when making CRC screening recommendations. Trial Registration clinicals.gov Identifier: NCT00705731 PMID:22493463

  1. Response costs of mammography adherence: Iranian women?s perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Khodayarian, Mahsa; Mazloomi-Mahmoodabad, Seyed Saied; Lamyian, Minoor; Morowatisharifabad, Mohammad Ali; Tavangar, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mammography as the most common secondary prevention method has known to be helpful in detecting breast cancer at the early stages. Low level of participation among women toward mammography uptake due to cultural beliefs is a great concern. This study aimed at exploring the perceptions of women about response costs of mammography adherence (MA) in Yazd, Iran. Methods: A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was performed. Fourteen women,one oncology nurse, and a breast...

  2. Adherence of curli producing Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli to baby spinach leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellular appendages, such as curli fibers have been suggested to be involved in STEC persistence in fresh produce as these curli are critical in biofilm formation and adherence to animal cells. We determined the role of curli in attachment of STEC on spinach leaves. The curli expression by wild-ty...

  3. Adherence to treatment in a Western European paediatric population with haemophilia : reliability and validity of the VERITAS-Pro scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lock, J.; Raat, H.; Duncan, N.; Shapiro, A.; Beijlevelt, M.; Peters, M.; Tamminga, R. Y. J.; Leebeek, F. W. G.; Moll, H. A.; Cnossen, M. H.

    Treatment adherence in haemophilia is strongly associated with quality of life and the cost-benefit of treatment. Therefore, it is important to quantify and monitor it. This study aimed to validate a translation of the VERITAS-Pro cross-culturally and analyse treatment adherence in a Dutch

  4. Development of the Adherence Predictive Index (API for Medication Taking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon C Schommer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective for this study was to explore if characteristics of personality type using the Preferred Communication Style Questionnaire, in concert with the demographic characteristics of age, education, and race/ethnicity, are associated with, and help predict, individuals’ medication adherence behavior. Data were collected via an on-line survey, sent to a sample of adults residing in the United States, between April 28 and June 22, 2015. Out of 26,173 responses to the survey, 16,736 reported taking one or more medications and were eligible for inclusion in this study. The development of the Adherence Predictive Index (API used mean Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8 scores for each of eight personality types as a starting point. API scores were calculated by adding or subtracting specific values to each group’s mean MMAS-8 score based on personality type, age, education and race/ethnicity characteristics which were demonstrated to have significant effects on adherence. The weighting system was informed by linear regression, logistic regression, personality type literature, researcher experience, and previous qualitative and quantitative research. The resultant score was converted to an API score that ranged from 1 to 5 so that it would be feasible for health care providers to understand and use. The findings showed that an Adherence Predictive Index (API could be developed based upon a relatively small number of questions that focus on personality type and generational, educational, and cultural experiences. It was developed in order to be a component of a comprehensive program that has the goals of (1 identifying and describing specific behavioral strategies individuals are most likely to successfully employ, (2 motivating patients by using their preferred communication style, and (3 predicting each patient’s propensity to adhere. Future research is needed to evaluate the index’s validity, sensitivity, and effectiveness in

  5. Medication adherence : patient education, communication and behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    De Brincat, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Medication adherence usually refers to whether patients take their medications as prescribed, as well as whether they continue to take a prescribed medication. Medication non-adherence is a growing concern to pharmacists, healthcare systems, and other stakeholders (e.g. payers) because of mounting evidence that it is prevalent and associated with adverse outcomes and higher costs of care. To date, measurement of patient medication adherence and use of interventions to improve adherence are ra...

  6. Analytical Chemistry for Assessing Medication Adherence

    OpenAIRE

    Tanna, Sangeeta; Lawson, Graham

    2016-01-01

    The lack of adherence to medication is a growing public health problem worldwide and is costing many patients their chance to return to good health and healthcare systems billions of dollars. Analytical Chemistry for Assessing Medication Adherence introduces the concept of assessed medication adherence/compliance and reports international perspectives on medication adherence while highlighting its importance. It then describes the opportunities for analytical chemistry to assess medication ad...

  7. Heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Rose Qingyang

    2013-01-01

    A timely publication providing coverage of radio resource management, mobility management and standardization in heterogeneous cellular networks The topic of heterogeneous cellular networks has gained momentum in industry and the research community, attracting the attention of standardization bodies such as 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.16j, whose objectives are looking into increasing the capacity and coverage of the cellular networks. This book focuses on recent progresses,  covering the related topics including scenarios of heterogeneous network deployment, interference management i

  8. Nominal Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Bolognesi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of Nominal Computation Theory is concerned with the theory of Nominal Sets and its applications to Computer Science. We investigate here the impact of nominal sets on the definition of Cellular Automata and on their computational capabilities, with a special focus on the emergent behavioural properties of this new model and their significance in the context of computation-oriented interpretations of physical phenomena. A preliminary investigation of the relations between Nominal Cellular Automata and Wolfram's Elementary Cellular Automata is also carried out.

  9. The cultural divide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cellular metabolism can be considered to have two extremes: one is characterized by exponential growth (in 2D cultures) and the other by a dynamic equilibrium (in 3D cultures). We have analyzed the proteome and cellular architecture at these two extremes and found that they are dram......Introduction: Cellular metabolism can be considered to have two extremes: one is characterized by exponential growth (in 2D cultures) and the other by a dynamic equilibrium (in 3D cultures). We have analyzed the proteome and cellular architecture at these two extremes and found...... that they are dramatically different. Results: Structurally, actin organization is changed, microtubules are increased and keratins 8 and 18 decreased. Metabolically, glycolysis, fatty acid metabolism and the pentose phosphate shunt are increased while TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation is unchanged. Enzymes involved...

  10. Adherence to Cooperative Principles among Agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Abstract. This study assessed agricultural cooperatives' level of adherence to cooperative guiding principles in Oyo State, Nigeria. Multi stage sampling procedure was used to select 126 respondents for the study. Data on group characteristics, level of awareness, adherence and constraints to adherence to cooperative ...

  11. Social Support, Treatment Adherence and Outcome among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-02

    Jun 2, 2017 ... mulating evidences on causes of increasing prevalence of poor adherence among patients with chronic diseases including hypertension and diabetes, with a view to de- sign all-encompassing adherence-enhancing interven- tion to ensure full benefits of therapy.7,8. Myriads of factors affecting adherence ...

  12. Barriers and facilitators to antiretroviral medication adherence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medication adherence is a complex behaviour with multiple determinants. Understanding the barriers and facilitators of adherence is invaluable for programme improvement, which assists the foundation of adherence intervention strategies. A qualitative study was conducted in six selected hospitals of Addis Ababa in 2008, ...

  13. Adherence to Childhood Tuberculosis Treatment in Mozambique

    OpenAIRE

    López-Varela, Elisa; Sequera, Victor Guillermo; Alberto L. García-Basteiro; Augusto, Orvalho; Munguambe, Khatia; Sacarlal, Jahit; Alonso, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is limited literature regarding adherence rates for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) in children. We aimed to describe TB treatment outcomes and adherence as well as to evaluate associated factors to poor adherence in Mozambican children. METHODS: This is a sub-study of a community TB incidence study among children 3 weeks to treatment completion. RESULTS: Fif...

  14. Cellular magnesium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Andrea M P

    2011-08-01

    Magnesium, the second most abundant cellular cation after potassium, is essential to regulate numerous cellular functions and enzymes, including ion channels, metabolic cycles, and signaling pathways, as attested by more than 1000 entries in the literature. Despite significant recent progress, however, our understanding of how cells regulate Mg(2+) homeostasis and transport still remains incomplete. For example, the occurrence of major fluxes of Mg(2+) in either direction across the plasma membrane of mammalian cells following metabolic or hormonal stimuli has been extensively documented. Yet, the mechanisms ultimately responsible for magnesium extrusion across the cell membrane have not been cloned. Even less is known about the regulation in cellular organelles. The present review is aimed at providing the reader with a comprehensive and up-to-date understanding of the mechanisms enacted by eukaryotic cells to regulate cellular Mg(2+) homeostasis and how these mechanisms are altered under specific pathological conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Non-invasive, label-free cell counting and quantitative analysis of adherent cells using digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, A; Sebesta, M; Gustafsson, M; Gisselson, L; Wingren, A Gjörloff; Alm, K

    2008-11-01

    Manual cell counting is time consuming and requires a high degree of skill on behalf of the person performing the count. Here we use a technique that utilizes digital holography, allowing label-free and completely non-invasive cell counting directly in cell culture vessels with adherent viable cells. The images produced can provide both quantitative and qualitative phase information from a single hologram. The recently constructed microscope Holomonitor (Phase Holographic Imaging AB, Lund, Sweden) combines the commonly used phase contrast microscope with digital holography, the latter giving us the possibility of achieving quantitative information on cellular shape, area, confluence and optical thickness. This project aimed at determining the accuracy and repeatability of cell counting measurements using digital holography compared to the conventional manual cell counting method using a haemocytometer. The collected data were also used to determine cell size and cellular optical thickness. The results show that digital holography can be used for non-invasive automatic cell counting as precisely as conventional manual cell counting.

  16. Optimization by Response Surface Methodology of Confluent and Aligned Cellular Monolayers for Nerve Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofron, Celinda M.; Hoffman-Kim, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Anisotropic tissue structures provide guidance for navigating neurons in vitro and in vivo. Here we optimized the generation of comparable anisotropic monolayers of astrocytes, endothelial cells, and Schwann cells as a first step toward determining which properties of anisotropic cells are sufficient for nerve guidance. The statistical experimental design method Design of Experiments and the experimental analysis method Response Surface Methodology were applied to improve efficiency and utility. Factors investigated included dimensions of microcontact printed protein patterns, cell density, and culture duration. Protein patterning spacing had the strongest influence. When cells initially aligned at borders and proliferated to fill in spaces, space between stripes was most effective when it was comparable to cell size. Maximizing the area of adhesive molecule coverage was also important for confluence of these types of cells. When cells adhered and aligned over the width of a stripe and broadened to fill spaces, space width about half the cell width was most effective. These findings suggest that if the mechanism of alignment, alignment at borders or over the width of the stripe, is predetermined and the cell size determined, the optimal size of the micropatterning for aligned monolayers of other cell types can be predicted. This study also demonstrates the effective use of DOE and RSM to probe cellular responses to various and multiple factors toward determination of optimal conditions for a desired cellular response. PMID:20625538

  17. Hijacking cellular garbage cans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Sonja; Locker, Jacomine Krijnse

    2010-06-25

    Viruses are perfect opportunists that have evolved to modify numerous cellular processes in order to complete their replication cycle in the host cell. An article by Reggiori and coworkers in this issue of Cell Host & Microbe reveals how coronaviruses can divert a cellular quality control pathway that normally functions in degradation of mis-folded proteins to replicate the viral genome. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Modeling cellular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Matthäus, Franziska; Pahle, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    This contributed volume comprises research articles and reviews on topics connected to the mathematical modeling of cellular systems. These contributions cover signaling pathways, stochastic effects, cell motility and mechanics, pattern formation processes, as well as multi-scale approaches. All authors attended the workshop on "Modeling Cellular Systems" which took place in Heidelberg in October 2014. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  19. Factors influencing adherence to antiretroviral treatment in Nepal: a mixed-methods study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharada P Wasti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antiretroviral therapy (ART is a lifesaver for individual patients treated for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS. Maintaining optimal adherence to antiretroviral drugs is essential for HIV infection management. This study aimed to understand the factors influencing adherence amongst ART-prescribed patients and care providers in Nepal. METHODS: A cross-sectional mixed-methods study surveying 330 ART-prescribed patients and 34 in-depth interviews with three different types of stakeholders: patients, care providers, and key people at policy level. Adherence was assessed through survey self-reporting and during the interviews. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with adherence, supplemented with a thematic analysis of the interview transcripts. RESULTS: A total of 282 (85.5% respondents reported complete adherence, i.e. no missed doses in the four-weeks prior to interview. Major factors influencing adherence were: non-disclosure of HIV status (OR = 17.99, p = 0.014; alcohol use (OR = 12.89, p = 1 hour (OR = 2.84, p = 0.035. Similarly, lack of knowledge and negative perception towards ART medications also significantly affected non-adherence. Transport costs (for repeat prescription, followed by pills running out, not wanting others to notice, side-effects, and being busy were the most common reasons for non-adherence. The interviews also revealed religious or ritual obstacles, stigma and discrimination, ART-associated costs, transport problems, lack of support, and side-effects as contributing to non-adherence. CONCLUSION: Improving adherence requires a supportive environment; accessible treatment; clear instructions about regimens; and regimens tailored to individual patients' lifestyles. Healthcare workers should address some of the practical and cultural issues around ART medicine whilst policy-makers should develop

  20. Predictors of positive airway pressure therapy adherence in children: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFeo, Natalie; Meltzer, Lisa J; Beck, Suzanne E; Karamessinis, Laurie R; Cornaglia, Mary Anne; Traylor, Joel; Samuel, John; Gallagher, Paul R; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Beris, Heidi; Menello, Mary Kate; Marcus, Carole L

    2012-06-15

    Children with obstructive sleep apnea are increasingly being treated with positive airway pressure (PAP), particularly if they have underlying medical conditions. Although PAP is an effective treatment, its use is challenging due to poor adherence. We hypothesized that demographic, psychosocial, and polysomnographic parameters would be related to PAP adherence. We therefore prospectively collected data potentially pertaining to PAP adherence, and correlated it with PAP use. Fifty-six patients and their parents completed a series of psychosocial questionnaires prior to PAP initiation. Objective adherence data were obtained after 1 and 3 months of PAP use. The population was primarily obese; 23% had neurodevelopmental disabilities. PAP adherence varied widely, with PAP being worn 22 ± 8 nights in month-1, but mean use was only 3 ± 3 h/night. The greatest predictor of use was maternal education (p = 0.002 for nights used; p = 0.033 for mean h used/night). Adherence was lower in African American children vs other races (p = 0.021). In the typically developing subgroup, adherence correlated inversely with age. Adherence did not correlate with severity of apnea, pressure levels, or psychosocial parameters other than a correlation between family social support and nights of PAP use in month-3. PAP adherence in children and adolescents is related primarily to family and demographic factors rather than severity of apnea or measures of psychosocial functioning. Further research is needed to determine the relative contributions of maternal education, socioeconomic status and cultural beliefs to PAP adherence in children, in order to develop better adherence programs.

  1. Adherence and health care costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuga AO

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aurel O Iuga,1,2 Maura J McGuire3,4 1Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 2Johns Hopkins University, 3Johns Hopkins Community Physicians, 4Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Medication nonadherence is an important public health consideration, affecting health outcomes and overall health care costs. This review considers the most recent developments in adherence research with a focus on the impact of medication adherence on health care costs in the US health system. We describe the magnitude of the nonadherence problem and related costs, with an extensive discussion of the mechanisms underlying the impact of nonadherence on costs. Specifically, we summarize the impact of nonadherence on health care costs in several chronic diseases, such as diabetes and asthma. A brief analysis of existing research study designs, along with suggestions for future research focus, is provided. Finally, given the ongoing changes in the US health care system, we also address some of the most relevant and current trends in health care, including pharmacist-led medication therapy management and electronic (e-prescribing. Keywords: patient, medication, adherence, compliance, nonadherence, noncompliance, cost

  2. Affective temperaments and psychotropic adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Kimie; Terao, Takeshi; Katayama, Yosuke; Hoaki, Nobuhiko

    2013-09-25

    It is generally accepted that a range of factors affect adherence to psychotropic medications. In the present study, we focused on the influence of affective temperaments (i.e., depressive, hyperthymic, cyclothymic, irritable, and anxious temperaments) on treatment adherence. Thirty-eight psychiatric consecutive inpatients were instructed to perform Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego-Autoquestionnaire version (TEMPS-A) for affective temperaments, Drug attitude inventory-10 (DAI-10) for concordance and persistence, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for compliance. VAS scores for dose compliance were significantly and negatively associated with irritable temperament scores whereas DAI-10 scores were significantly and positively associated with male gender, depressive temperament scores and hyperthymic temperament scores. The main limitations of the study were the relatively small number of subjects and the lack of objective method of adherence. These findings suggest that patients with irritable temperament may be poor in their compliance with treatment, and that more education may be required for patients with irritable temperament in order to maintain good compliance. In contrast, men and patients with depressive or hyperthymic temperament have a relatively positive attitude towards medication. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The impact of microcarrier culture optimization on the glycosylation profile of a monoclonal antibody

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Costa, Ana Rita; Withers, Joanne; Rodrigues, Maria Elisa; McLoughlin, Niaobh; Henriques, Mariana; Oliveira, Rosário; Rudd, Pauline M; Azeredo, Joana

    2013-01-01

    .... Consequently, in this work, the glycosylation profile of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) produced by adherent CHO-K1 cells grown in Cytodex 3 was evaluated under different conditions, and compared to that obtained of typical adherent cultures...

  4. Role of Cellular Elements in Thrombus Formation and Dissolution

    OpenAIRE

    Wohner, N.

    2008-01-01

    Although fibrin forms the core matrix of thrombi, their structure depends also on the cellular elements embedded in its meshwork. Platelets are essential in the initial stages of thrombus formation, because they adhere and aggregate at sites of blood vessel wall injury and then serve as a surface for coagulation reactions, the overall rate of which determines the final structure of fibrin. In addition, platelets affect fibrinolysis through their proteins and phospholipids, which modulate plas...

  5. Phenotypic and functional changes in blood monocytes following adherence to endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Tso

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Blood monocytes are known to express endothelial-like genes during co-culture with endothelium. In this study, the time-dependent change in the phenotype pattern of primary blood monocytes after adhering to endothelium is reported using a novel HLA-A2 mistyped co-culture model. METHODS AND RESULTS: Freshly isolated human PBMCs were co-cultured with human umbilical vein endothelial cells or human coronary arterial endothelial cells of converse human leukocyte antigen A2 (HLA-A2 status. This allows the tracking of the PBMC-derived cells by HLA-A2 expression and assessment of their phenotype pattern over time. PBMCs that adhered to the endothelium at the start of the co-culture were predominantly CD11b+ blood monocytes. After 24 to 72 hours in co-culture, the endothelium-adherent monocytes acquired endothelial-like properties including the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, CD105, CD144 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. The expression of monocyte/macrophage lineage antigens CD14, CD11b and CD36 were down regulated concomitantly. The adherent monocytes did not express CD115 after 1 day of co-culture. By day 6, the monocyte-derived cells expressed vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 in response to tumour necrosis factor alpha. Up to 10% of the PBMCs adhered to the endothelium. These monocyte-derived cells contributed up to 30% of the co-cultured cell layer and this was dose-dependent on the PBMC seeding density. CONCLUSIONS: Human blood monocytes undergo rapid phenotype change to resemble endothelial cells after adhering to endothelium.

  6. Transient inter-cellular polymeric linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Siew-Min; He, Lijuan; Thuy Linh, Nguyen Thi; Tee, Yee-Han; Arooz, Talha; Tang, Guping; Tan, Choon-Hong; Yu, Hanry

    2007-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissue-engineered constructs with bio-mimicry cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions are useful in regenerative medicine. In cell-dense and matrix-poor tissues of the internal organs, cells support one another via cell-cell interactions, supplemented by small amount of the extra-cellular matrices (ECM) secreted by the cells. Here we connect HepG2 cells directly but transiently with inter-cellular polymeric linker to facilitate cell-cell interaction and aggregation. The linker consists of a non-toxic low molecular-weight polyethyleneimine (PEI) backbone conjugated with multiple hydrazide groups that can aggregate cells within 30 min by reacting with the aldehyde handles on the chemically modified cell-surface glycoproteins. The cells in the cellular aggregates proliferated; and maintained the cortical actin distribution of the 3D cell morphology while non-aggregated cells died over 7 days of suspension culture. The aggregates lost distinguishable cell-cell boundaries within 3 days; and the ECM fibers became visible around cells from day 3 onwards while the inter-cellular polymeric linker disappeared from the cell surfaces over time. The transient inter-cellular polymeric linker can be useful for forming 3D cellular and tissue constructs without bulk biomaterials or extensive network of engineered ECM for various applications.

  7. Influence of electric field on cellular migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guido, Isabella; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    Cells have the ability to detect continuous current electric fields (EFs) and respond to them with a directed migratory movement. Dictyostelium discoideum (D.d.) cells, a key model organism for the study of eukaryotic chemotaxis, orient and migrate toward the cathode under the influence of an EF. The underlying sensing mechanism and whether it is shared by the chemotactic response pathway remains unknown. Whereas genes and proteins that mediate the electric sensing as well as that define the migration direction have been previously investigated in D.d. cells, a deeper knowledge about the cellular kinematic effects caused by the EF is still lacking. Here we show that besides triggering a directional bias the electric field influences the cellular kinematics by accelerating the movement of cells along their path. We found that the migratory velocity of the cells in an EF increases linearly with the exposure time. Through the analysis of the PI3K and Phg2 distribution in the cytosol and of the cellular adherence to the substrate we aim at elucidating whereas this speed up effect in the electric field is due to either a molecular signalling or the interaction with the substrate. This work is part of the MaxSynBio Consortium which is jointly funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany and the Max Planck Society.

  8. Effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on the adherence of pathogenic bacteria to human epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faden, H.; Hong, J.J.; Ogra, P.L.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of RSV infection on the adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP), Haemophilus influenzae (HI) and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) to human epithelial cells was determined. RSV-infected Hep-2 cell cultures at different stages of expression of surface viral antigens and bacteria labeled with /sup 3/H-thymidine were employed to examine the kinetics of bacterial adherence to virus-infected cells. RSV infection did not alter the magnitude of adherence of HI or SA to HEp-2 cells. However, adherence of SP to HEp-2 cells was significantly (P < 0.01) enhanced by prior RSV infection. The degree of adherence was directly related to the amount of viral antigen expressed on the cell surface. The adherence was temperature dependent, with maximal adherence observed at 37/sup 0/C. Heat-inactivation of SP did not alter adherence characteristics. These data suggest that RSV infection increases adherence of SP to the surface of epithelial cells in vitro. Since attachment of bacteria to mucosal surfaces is the first step in many infections, it is suggested that viral infections of epithelial cells render them more susceptible to bacterial adherence. Thus, RSV infection in vivo may predispose children to SP infections, such as in otitis media, by increasing colonization with SP.

  9. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyi Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc. is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well.

  10. Medication Adherence in People With Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ju Young; Habermann, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder in the United States. Because there is no cure for PD currently, pharmacological therapy is the mainstay of PD symptom management. Despite the importance of medication adherence in PD, several studies have reported medication nonadherence and/or suboptimal adherence. This literature review provides an overview of medication adherence issues in people with PD. Articles were identified for this study using computerized database searches and journal hand searches. Of the 72 medication adherence articles reviewed, the following articles were eligible for this review: (a) 10 articles measuring medication adherence in people with PD, (b) four medication adherence intervention articles, and (c) six studies of medication adherence in hospitalized settings. The importance of adherence assessment and strategies in improving medication adherence are discussed with the goal of improving symptom management and clinical outcomes in people with PD. Because medication taking is a complex and multifaceted phenomena, patient-centered, theory-driven interventions are needed to improve medication adherence and quality of care and life in people with PD.

  11. Morbidly adherent placenta treatments and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailit, Jennifer L; Grobman, William A; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Reddy, Uma M; Wapner, Ronald J; Varner, Michael W; Leveno, Kenneth J; Iams, Jay D; Tita, Alan T N; Saade, George; Rouse, Dwight J; Blackwell, Sean C

    2015-03-01

    To describe recent maternal and neonatal delivery outcomes among women with a morbidly adherent placenta in major centers across the United States. This study reviewed a cohort of 115,502 women and their neonates born in 25 hospitals in the United States between March 2008 and February 2011 from the Assessment of Perinatal EXcellence data set. All cases of morbidly adherent placenta were identified. Maternal demographics, procedures undertaken, and maternal and neonatal outcomes were analyzed. There were 158 women with a morbidly adherent placenta (1/731 births, 95% confidence interval 1/632-866). Eighteen percent of women with a morbidly adherent placenta were nulliparous and 37% had no prior cesarean delivery. Only 53% (84/158) were suspected to have a morbidly adherent placenta before delivery. Women with a prenatally suspected morbidly adherent placenta experienced large blood loss (33%), hysterectomy (92%), and intensive care unit admission (39%) compared with 19%, 45%, and 22%, respectively, in those not suspected prenatally to have a morbidly adherent placenta (P<.05 for all). Eighteen percent of women with a morbidly adherent placenta were nulliparous. Half of the morbidly adherent placenta cases were suspected before delivery and outcomes were poorer in this group, probably because the more clinically significant morbidly adherent placentas are more likely to be suspected before delivery. : II.

  12. Wireless Cellular Mobile Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Zalud

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article is briefly reviewed the history of wireless cellularmobile communications, examined the progress in current secondgeneration (2G cellular standards and discussed their migration to thethird generation (3G. The European 2G cellular standard GSM and itsevolution phases GPRS and EDGE are described somewhat in detail. Thethird generation standard UMTS taking up on GSM/GPRS core network andequipped with a new advanced access network on the basis of codedivision multiple access (CDMA is investigated too. A sketch of theperspective of mobile communication beyond 3G concludes this article.

  13. Spheroid Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cesarz, Zoe; Tamama, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

      Compared with traditional 2D adherent cell culture, 3D spheroidal cell aggregates, or spheroids, are regarded as more physiological, and this technique has been exploited in the field of oncology...

  14. Cellular antioxidant activity of common fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Kelly L; Kang, Xinmei; He, Xiangjiu; Dong, Mei; Zhang, Qingyuan; Liu, Rui Hai

    2008-09-24

    Measurement of antioxidant activity using biologically relevant assays is important in the screening of fruits for potential health benefits. The cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assay quantifies antioxidant activity in cell culture and was developed to meet the need for a more biologically representative method than the popular chemistry antioxidant capacity measures. The objective of the study was to determine the cellular antioxidant activity, total phenolic contents, and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) values of 25 fruits commonly consumed in the United States. Pomegranate and berries (wild blueberry, blackberry, raspberry, and blueberry) had the highest CAA values, whereas banana and melons had the lowest. Apples were found to be the largest contributors of fruit phenolics to the American diet, and apple and strawberries were the biggest suppliers of cellular antioxidant activity. Increasing fruit consumption is a logical strategy to increase antioxidant intake and decrease oxidative stress and may lead to reduced risk of cancer.

  15. The New Cellular Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  16. Tuberculosis Treatment Adherence of Patients in Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    Krasniqi, Shaip; Jakupi, Arianit; Daci, Armond; Tigani, Bahri; Jupolli-Krasniqi, Nora; Pira, Mimoza; Zhjeqi, Valbona; Neziri, Burim

    2017-01-01

    Setting. The poor patient adherence in tuberculosis (TB) treatment is considered to be one of the most serious challenges which reflect the decrease of treatment success and emerging of the Multidrug Resistance-TB (MDR-TB). To our knowledge, the data about patients’ adherence to anti-TB treatment in our country are missing. Objective. This study was aimed to investigate the anti-TB treatment adherence rate and to identify factors related to eventual nonadherence among Kosovo TB patients. Desi...

  17. Improving hand hygiene adherence among nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harne-Britner, Sarah; Allen, Marianne; Fowler, Kimberly A

    2011-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study explored initial and sustained effects of educational and behavioral interventions on hand hygiene adherence and the relationships between hand hygiene adherence and health care-associated infections. Education paired with positive reinforcement behavioral interventions significantly improved hand hygiene adherence after the first month (χ² = 4.27; P = .039); however, the improvement was not sustained over 6 months. There were no significant differences in infection rates between the treatment and control groups.

  18. Predictors of Vitamin Adherence After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunil, Supreet; Santiago, Vincent A; Gougeon, Lorraine; Warwick, Katie; Okrainec, Allan; Hawa, Raed; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2017-02-01

    Vitamin supplementation in bariatric aftercare is essential to prevent nutrient deficiencies; however, rates of vitamin adherence have been as low as 30 % 6 months post-surgery. Preliminary literature suggests non-adherence to prescribed treatments can be linked to demographic and psychological factors. We aimed to determine the relationship between these factors to vitamin adherence in post-bariatric surgery patients. A total of 92 bariatric patients were assessed 6 months post-surgery. Patients were administered a questionnaire collecting demographic information, psychological scores, and self-reported adherence. Nutrient deficiencies were analyzed through serum vitamin levels measured 3 and 6 months after surgery. Wilcoxon rank-sum and chi-square tests were used for analysis. Non-adherence was associated with male sex and full-time employment (p = 0.027, p = 0.015). There were no differences with respect to living situation, education level, or relationship type. Non-adherent patients did not have significantly higher scores for generalized anxiety, depressive symptoms, or avoidant behaviors. However, non-adherent patients displayed greater attachment anxiety than their adherent counterparts (p = 0.0186). Non-adherence was also associated with lower vitamin B12 levels 6 months post-surgery (p = 0.001). Male gender and full-time work have previously been shown to be associated with non-adherence. This is the first study to demonstrate that attachment anxiety is associated with poor multivitamin adherence in the post-surgical bariatric population. This result is concordant with recent literature that has demonstrated attachment anxiety is associated with poor adherence to dietary recommendations in bariatric patients 6 months postoperatively. Presurgical screening for attachment anxiety could facilitate early interventions to promote better bariatric aftercare in this group.

  19. A risk stratification model for antihypertensive medication non-adherence among Chinese immigrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Wen Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to establish a risk stratification model for identifying Chinese immigrants at risk for non-adherence to antihypertensive medications. Questionnaires were self-administered to 200 Chinese immigrants in San Francisco, USA. Questionnaires included demographics, culture factors (e.g., Perceived Susceptibility in General, Perceived Benefits of Western Medication, Perceived Benefits of Chinese Herbs, and Health-Related Social Support, and medications adherence. Participants' mean age was 70.6 (±10.3 years. Three stratification factors were identified for non-adherence: Lower Perceived Susceptibility in General, lower Perceived Benefit of Western Medications, and longer Length of Stay in the United States. The probability of non-adherence was 77%, 62%, and 57% for lower perceived susceptibility, longer stay in the United States, and lower perceived benefits of Western medications, respectively. A combination of lower perceived susceptibility and lower perceived benefits of medication predicted 81% non-adherence and lower perceived susceptibility with longer stay in the United States predicted at 84%. All three factors combined predicted nearly 90%. Patients with all three factors had the highest risk for non-adherence. The second priority groups are patients with lower perceived susceptibility and those with lower perceived susceptibility combined with any of the other two factors. In the clinical setting, these three groups are a high priority for education on the importance of medication adherence.

  20. [Adhesion patterns in diffusely adherent Escherichia coli (DAEC) strains isolated from children with and without diarrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveros, Maribel; Barletta, Francesca; Cabello, Martín; Durand, David; Mercado, Erik H; Contreras, Carmen; Rivera, Fulton P; Mosquito, Susan; Lluque, Angela; Ochoa, Theresa J

    2011-03-01

    Diffusely adherent E. coli (DAEC) is the sixth recognized group of diarrheagenic E. coli. However, its association with diarrhea remains controversial. Variability in the adherence patterns of clinical strains is unknown. To compare the adherence patterns between strains isolated from children with and without diarrhea. A total of 31 DAEC strains were analyzed, 25 from children with diarrhea and 6 from asymptomatic (control) children, isolated from a cohort study of children under one year of age in the southern districts of Lima. DAEC were identified by PCR (daaD gene). The pattern and adherence score in HEp-2 cell culture were evaluated, Actin polimerization was determined by fluorescence actin staining (FAS) and motility was evaluated by conventional microbiology methods. Diffuse adherence pattern was found in 88% of diarrhea samples and in the total of control strains. The number of bacteria adhered per cell was significantly lower in diarrhea samples (p<0.05). However, actin polymerization was greater in diarrhea samples (60% vs. 17%). Motility test was positive in 60% of the diarrhea samples and in all control samples. Our findings suggest a difference between adherence patterns, actin polymerization and motility between DAEC strains corresponding to diarrhea and control groups. The significance of these results must be confirmed with a bigger number of strains and determining the presence of virulence genes in the strains.

  1. Medicine non-adherence in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allison Fiona; Manias, Elizabeth; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J; Crawford, Kimberley

    2014-06-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease, the relative shortage of kidney donors and the economic- and health-related costs of kidney transplant rejection make the prevention of adverse outcomes following transplantation a healthcare imperative. Although strict adherence to immunosuppressant medicine regimens is key to preventing kidney rejection, evidence suggests that adherence is sub-optimal. Strategies need to be developed to help recipients of kidney transplants adhere to their prescribed medicines. This review has found that a number of factors contribute to poor adherence, for example, attitudes towards medicine taking and forgetfulness. Few investigations have been conducted, however, on strategies to enhance medicine adherence in kidney transplant recipients. Strategies that may improve adherence include pharmacist-led interventions (incorporating counselling, medicine reviews and nephrologist liaison) and nurse-led interventions (involving collaboratively working with recipients to understand their routines and offering solutions to improve adherence). Strategies that have shown to have limited effectiveness include supplying medicines free of charge and providing feedback on a participant's medicine adherence without any educational or behavioural interventions. Transplantation is the preferred treatment option for people with end-stage kidney disease. Medicine non-adherence in kidney transplantation increases the risk of rejection, kidney loss and costly treatments. Interventions are needed to help the transplant recipient take all their medicines as prescribed to improve general well-being, medicine safety and reduce healthcare costs. © 2014 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  2. Encouraging CPAP adherence: it is everyone's job

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bollig, Suzanne M

    2010-01-01

    .... Patient adherence to prescribed CPAP is variable, however, leaving the undertreated OSA patient at risk of development or worsening of comorbid medical conditions, including hypertension and cardiovascular disease...

  3. Medication adherence among adult patients on hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmalik M Alkatheri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Medication adherence was assessed in 89 patients on hemodialysis (HD at the King Abdul Aziz Medical City using an Arabic version of the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MASS-8. The results of the study revealed that 31.46% and 40.45% of the participants showed low and medium adherence, respectively, while 28.09% showed high medication adherence. Accordingly, 71.91% of the patients visiting the dialysis unit were considered medication non-adherent. While being of older age (P = 0.012, being married (P = 0.012 increased the level of adherence, being of medium level of education (P = 0.024 decreased adherence levels. On the other hand, gender, presence of a care-giver, number of members in the household and employment status seems to have no effect on the level of medication adherence. These results call upon the practitioners in HD units to develop intervention programs that can increase the level of medication adherence.

  4. Visual Analog Scale of ART Adherence: Association With 3-Day Self-Report and Adherence Barriers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amico, K. Rivet; Fisher, William A; Cornman, Deborah H; Shuper, Paul A; Redding, Caroline G; Konkle-Parker, Deborah J; Barta, William; Fisher, Jeffrey D

    2006-01-01

    .... METHODS:HIV-infected patients (N = 147) at a southeastern US clinic completed a computerized assessment including an antiretroviral therapy adherence VAS, a modified version of the AACTG, and a measure of adherence...

  5. African Americans’ Perceptions of Adherence to Medications and Lifestyle Changes Prescribed to Treat Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M. Pettey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 80 million Americans have hypertension (HTN, and African Americans (AAs are disproportionately affected. AAs also have lower rates of adherence to HTN treatment. It is important to understand AAs’ perceptions of adherence to develop effective interventions. The aim of this study is to examine AAs’ perceptions of adherence to medications and lifestyle changes prescribed to treat HTN. In this qualitative study, we used purposive sampling to recruit Southern AAs with HTN aged 21 and older from a free, faith-based clinic. We recorded individual, in-person interviews about perceptions related to adherence to treatment of HTN and analyzed verbatim transcripts using content analysis and constant comparison. We also conducted medical record audits. Twenty-nine AAs participated (52% female, 38% were <50 years of age, 52% had taken anti-HTN medications for ≥5 years. Audits indicated that 65% had uncontrolled HTN during the previous year. Two main themes included causes of HTN and ways to improve blood pressure. Perceived causes of HTN included diet, stress, unhealthy actions, genes, and obesity. Ways to improve HTN included using cultural treatments “passed down,” increasing exercise, reducing stress, and losing weight. Many reported using home remedies to control HTN, including drinking pickle juice. More than half of this sample had uncontrolled HTN. They identified influences of culture on perceptions of adherence including causes and treatment of HTN, and possibly detrimental home remedies. It is imperative that clinicians identify culturally appropriate interventions for this high-risk group.

  6. Determinants of medication adherence to antihypertensive medications among a Chinese population using Morisky Medication Adherence Scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle K Y Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Poor adherence to medications is one of the major public health challenges. Only one-third of the population reported successful control of blood pressure, mostly caused by poor drug adherence. However, there are relatively few reports studying the adherence levels and their associated factors among Chinese patients. This study aimed to study the adherence profiles and the factors associated with antihypertensive drug adherence among Chinese patients. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in an outpatient clinic located in the New Territories Region of Hong Kong. Adult patients who were currently taking at least one antihypertensive drug were invited to complete a self-administered questionnaire, consisting of basic socio-demographic profile, self-perceived health status, and self-reported medication adherence. The outcome measure was the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8. Good adherence was defined as MMAS scores greater than 6 points (out of a total score of 8 points. RESULTS: From 1114 patients, 725 (65.1% had good adherence to antihypertensive agents. Binary logistic regression analysis was conducted. Younger age, shorter duration of antihypertensive agents used, job status being employed, and poor or very poor self-perceived health status were negatively associated with drug adherence. CONCLUSION: This study reported a high proportion of poor medication adherence among hypertensive subjects. Patients with factors associated with poor adherence should be more closely monitored to optimize their drug taking behavior.

  7. Plasmodium vivax adherence to placental glycosaminoglycans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesinee Chotivanich

    Full Text Available Plasmodium vivax infections seldom kill directly but do cause indirect mortality by reducing birth weight and causing abortion. Cytoadherence and sequestration in the microvasculature are central to the pathogenesis of severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria, but the contribution of cytoadherence to pathology in other human malarias is less clear.The adherence properties of P. vivax infected red blood cells (PvIRBC were evaluated under static and flow conditions.P. vivax isolates from 33 patients were studied. None adhered to immobilized CD36, ICAM-1, or thrombospondin, putative ligands for P. falciparum vascular cytoadherence, or umbilical vein endothelial cells, but all adhered to immobilized chondroitin sulphate A (CSA and hyaluronic acid (HA, the receptors for adhesion of P. falciparum in the placenta. PvIRBC also adhered to fresh placental cells (N = 5. Pre-incubation with chondroitinase prevented PvIRBC adherence to CSA, and reduced binding to HA, whereas preincubation with hyaluronidase prevented adherence to HA, but did not reduce binding to CSA significantly. Pre-incubation of PvIRBC with soluble CSA and HA reduced binding to the immobilized receptors and prevented placental binding. PvIRBC adhesion was prevented by pre-incubation with trypsin, inhibited by heparin, and reduced by EGTA. Under laminar flow conditions the mean (SD shear stress reducing maximum attachment by 50% was 0.06 (0.02 Pa but, having adhered, the PvIRBC could then resist detachment by stresses up to 5 Pa. At 37 °C adherence began approximately 16 hours after red cell invasion with maximal adherence at 30 hours. At 39 °C adherence began earlier and peaked at 24 hours.Adherence of P. vivax-infected erythrocytes to glycosaminoglycans may contribute to the pathogenesis of vivax malaria and lead to intrauterine growth retardation.

  8. Molecular and Cellular Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A small number of signaling pathways, no more than a dozen or so, form a control layer that is responsible for all signaling in and between cells of the human body. The signaling proteins belonging to the control layer determine what kinds of cells are made during development and how they function during adult life. Malfunctions in the proteins belonging to the control layer are responsible for a host of human diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancers. Most drugs target components in the control layer, and difficulties in drug design are intimately related to the architecture of the control layer. Molecular and Cellular Signaling provides an introduction to molecular and cellular signaling in biological systems with an emphasis on the underlying physical principles. The text is aimed at upper-level undergraduates, graduate students and individuals in medicine and pharmacology interested in broadening their understanding of how cells regulate and coordinate their core activities and how diseases ...

  9. Probabilistic cellular automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapie, Alexandru; Andreica, Anca; Giuclea, Marius

    2014-09-01

    Cellular automata are binary lattices used for modeling complex dynamical systems. The automaton evolves iteratively from one configuration to another, using some local transition rule based on the number of ones in the neighborhood of each cell. With respect to the number of cells allowed to change per iteration, we speak of either synchronous or asynchronous automata. If randomness is involved to some degree in the transition rule, we speak of probabilistic automata, otherwise they are called deterministic. With either type of cellular automaton we are dealing with, the main theoretical challenge stays the same: starting from an arbitrary initial configuration, predict (with highest accuracy) the end configuration. If the automaton is deterministic, the outcome simplifies to one of two configurations, all zeros or all ones. If the automaton is probabilistic, the whole process is modeled by a finite homogeneous Markov chain, and the outcome is the corresponding stationary distribution. Based on our previous results for the asynchronous case-connecting the probability of a configuration in the stationary distribution to its number of zero-one borders-the article offers both numerical and theoretical insight into the long-term behavior of synchronous cellular automata.

  10. Predictability in cellular automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapie, Alexandru; Andreica, Anca; Chira, Camelia; Giuclea, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Modelled as finite homogeneous Markov chains, probabilistic cellular automata with local transition probabilities in (0, 1) always posses a stationary distribution. This result alone is not very helpful when it comes to predicting the final configuration; one needs also a formula connecting the probabilities in the stationary distribution to some intrinsic feature of the lattice configuration. Previous results on the asynchronous cellular automata have showed that such feature really exists. It is the number of zero-one borders within the automaton's binary configuration. An exponential formula in the number of zero-one borders has been proved for the 1-D, 2-D and 3-D asynchronous automata with neighborhood three, five and seven, respectively. We perform computer experiments on a synchronous cellular automaton to check whether the empirical distribution obeys also that theoretical formula. The numerical results indicate a perfect fit for neighbourhood three and five, which opens the way for a rigorous proof of the formula in this new, synchronous case.

  11. Factors influencing medication adherence in South Asian people with cardiac disorders: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ens, T A; Seneviratne, C C; Jones, C; King-Shier, K M

    2014-11-01

    South Asians experience higher rates of cardiovascular disease than any other ethnic group. Some evidence suggests that South Asians may be less adherent to cardiac medication regimens than Whites residing in Canada. Identification of the key factors contributing to adherence may assist this growing population to optimize their cardiac health. To explore key factors associated with adherence to cardiac medications among South Asian people with cardiac disease. Ethnography was used to highlight population specific themes and domains related to medication adherence. Ethnographic observations were undertaken of patients, as well as their family (primary care) physicians and pharmacists (including their staff), while in physician offices and pharmacies. A purposive sample of patients (n=8), as well as physicians (n=3) and pharmacists (n=2) underwent in-depth interviews. Field note and interview data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using ethnographic domain and thematic analysis. The patients relied on family members for instrumental support in remaining adherent with their medications. Relationships with healthcare professionals who demonstrated clear communication and cultural awareness was associated with enhanced medication adherence. Memory mechanisms needed to be individualized and were generally 'low technology'. While prepackaging of medications enhanced adherence, patients who used them were less knowledgeable about their medications. Healthcare providers should understand the importance of including family members in the care of South Asian people with heart disease. They also need to appreciate that the quality of provider-patient relationships are important to South Asian patients and will influence adherence to healthcare regimens. Expanding the role of nurse in the primary healthcare team could provide a cost-effective means of enhancing medication adherence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Novel Aggregative Adherence Fimbria Variant of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønsson, Rie; Struve, Carsten; Boisen, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) organisms belong to a diarrheagenic pathotype known to cause diarrhea and can be characterized by distinct aggregative adherence (AA) in a stacked-brick pattern to cultured epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated 118 EAEC strains isolated from....... Transformation to a nonadherent E. coli HB101 and complementation of the nonadherent C338-14 mutant with the complete gene cluster restored the AA adhesion. Overall, we found the agg5A gene in 12% of the 118 strains isolated from Denmark, suggesting that this novel adhesin represents an important variant....

  13. Environment Aware Cellular Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2015-02-01

    The unprecedented rise of mobile user demand over the years have led to an enormous growth of the energy consumption of wireless networks as well as the greenhouse gas emissions which are estimated currently to be around 70 million tons per year. This significant growth of energy consumption impels network companies to pay huge bills which represent around half of their operating expenditures. Therefore, many service providers, including mobile operators, are looking for new and modern green solutions to help reduce their expenses as well as the level of their CO2 emissions. Base stations are the most power greedy element in cellular networks: they drain around 80% of the total network energy consumption even during low traffic periods. Thus, there is a growing need to develop more energy-efficient techniques to enhance the green performance of future 4G/5G cellular networks. Due to the problem of traffic load fluctuations in cellular networks during different periods of the day and between different areas (shopping or business districts and residential areas), the base station sleeping strategy has been one of the main popular research topics in green communications. In this presentation, we present several practical green techniques that provide significant gains for mobile operators. Indeed, combined with the base station sleeping strategy, these techniques achieve not only a minimization of the fossil fuel consumption but also an enhancement of mobile operator profits. We start with an optimized cell planning method that considers varying spatial and temporal user densities. We then use the optimal transport theory in order to define the cell boundaries such that the network total transmit power is reduced. Afterwards, we exploit the features of the modern electrical grid, the smart grid, as a new tool of power management for cellular networks and we optimize the energy procurement from multiple energy retailers characterized by different prices and pollutant

  14. Adherence to cooperative principles among agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agricultural cooperatives in the area largely adhered to the cooperatives principles. However, capacity building on innovative financial sourcing and loan recovery mechanisms should be embarked upon by management to enhance the adherence. Keywords: Cooperatives principles, loan recovery, agricultural cooperatives ...

  15. Factors influencing adherence to routine iron supplementation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anemia in pregnancy is a common problem especially in developing countries. and has been linked with feotal and maternal complications. Taking iron supplements could reduce anaemia in pregnancy but some pregnant women do not adhere to this. The study identified some factors associated with non adherence ...

  16. Establishment of primary cell culture from the temperate symbiotic cnidarian, Anemonia viridis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnay-Verdier, Stéphanie; Dall'osso, Diane; Joli, Nathalie; Olivré, Juliette; Priouzeau, Fabrice; Zamoum, Thamilla; Merle, Pierre-Laurent; Furla, Paola

    2013-10-01

    The temperate symbiotic sea anemone Anemonia viridis, a member of the Cnidaria phylum, is a relevant experimental model to investigate the molecular and cellular events involved in the preservation or in the rupture of the symbiosis between the animal cells and their symbiotic microalgae, commonly named zooxanthellae. In order to increase research tools for this model, we developed a primary culture from A. viridis animal cells. By adapting enzymatic dissociation protocols, we isolated animal host cells from a whole tentacle in regeneration state. Each plating resulted in a heterogeneous primary culture consisted of free zooxanthellae and many regular, small rounded and adherent cells (of 3-5 μm diameter). Molecular analyses conducted on primary cultures, maintained for 2 weeks, confirmed a specific signature of A. viridis cells. Further serial dilutions and micromanipulation allowed us to obtain homogenous primary cultures of the small rounded cells, corresponding to A. viridis "epithelial-like cells". The maintenance and the propagation over a 4 weeks period of primary cells provide, for in vitro cnidarian studies, a preliminary step for further investigations on cnidarian cellular pathways notably in regard to symbiosis interactions.

  17. Patient Adherence to Biologic Agents in Psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsu, Der Yi; Gniadecki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    treatment, and cause for treatment discontinuation] were obtained from the national database DERMBIO. Patients' attitudes and beliefs were measured using the Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS). RESULTS: A total of 93.5% of all patients had an MPR ≥0.8, indicating very good adherence. MPR......BACKGROUND: Low adherence to therapies in psoriasis decreases treatment outcomes and increases the total health care costs. In spite of the wide use of biologic agents, patients' adherence to these drugs has not been extensively investigated. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to measure adherence...... to the biologic drugs in a population of patients treated for psoriasis vulgaris using the medication possession ratio (MPR) index and to survey patients' attitudes to the treatment. METHODS: This is a single-center study on 247 patients with psoriasis vulgaris treated with adalimumab (n = 113), etanercept (n...

  18. Claustrophobia and adherence to CPAP treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasens, Eileen R; Pack, Allan I; Maislin, Greg; Dinges, David F; Weaver, Terri E

    2005-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of claustrophobia, an abnormal dread or fear of closed spaces, on adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. The design was a secondary analysis of data from a prospective study of participants (N = 153) that completed 3 months of CPAP therapy from seven sleep disorders centers in the United States and Canada. A 15-item subscale adapted from the Fear and Avoidance Scale measured claustrophobic tendencies pre-CPAP treatment and again after 3 months. An overt monitor attached to the CPAP machines recorded mask-on CPAP adherence. There was a statistically significant difference in claustrophobia scores by adherence group ( or = 5 hours) and time period (pre-CPAP and after 3 months CPAP). Poor CPAP adherence (claustrophobia score > or = 25. Identification of persons with increased claustrophobia tendencies and targeted interventions may increase adherence.

  19. Asthma and Adherence to Inhaled Corticosteroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bårnes, Camilla Boslev; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are the cornerstone of maintenance asthma therapy. However, in spite of this, adherence to ICS remains low. The aim of this systematic literature review was to provide an overview of the current knowledge of adherence to ICS, effects of poor adherence, and means...... was found to be between 22 and 63%, with improvement up to and after an exacerbation. Poor adherence was associated with youth, being African-American, having mild asthma, ... prescribed fixed-combination therapy (ICS and long-acting β2 agonists). Good adherence was associated with higher FEV1, a lower percentage of eosinophils in sputum, reduction in hospitalizations, less use of oral corticosteroids, and lower mortality rate. Overall, 24% of exacerbations and 60% of asthma...

  20. Improving adherence to PALS septic shock guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Raina; Melendez, Elliot; Stack, Anne; Capraro, Andrew; Monuteaux, Michael; Neuman, Mark I

    2014-05-01

    Few studies have demonstrated improvement in adherence to Pediatric Advanced Life Support guidelines for severe sepsis and septic shock. We sought to improve adherence to national guidelines for children with septic shock in a pediatric emergency department with poor guideline adherence. Prospective cohort study of children presenting to a tertiary care pediatric emergency department with septic shock. Quality improvement (QI) interventions, including repeated plan-do-study-act cycles, were used to improve adherence to a 5-component sepsis bundle, including timely (1) recognition of septic shock, (2) vascular access, (3) administration of intravenous (IV) fluid, (4) antibiotics, and (5) vasoactive agents. The intervention focused on IV fluid delivery as a key driver impacting bundle adherence, and adherence was measured using statistical process control methodology. Two-hundred forty-two patients were included: 126 subjects before the intervention (November 2009 to March 2011), and 116 patients during the QI intervention (October 2011 to May 2013). We achieved 100% adherence for all metrics, including (1) administration of 60 mL/kg IV fluid within 60 minutes (increased from baseline adherence rate of 37%), (2) administration of vasoactive agents within 60 minutes (baseline rate of 35%), and (3) 5-component bundle adherence (baseline rate of 19%). Improvement was sustained over 9 months. The number of septic shock cases between each death from this condition increased after implementation of the QI intervention. Using QI methodology, we have demonstrated improved adherence to national guidelines for severe sepsis and septic shock. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. Cosserat modeling of cellular solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onck, P.R.

    2002-01-01

    Cellular solids inherit their macroscopic mechanical properties directly from the cellular microstructure. However, the characteristic material length scale is often not small compared to macroscopic dimensions, which limits the applicability of classical continuum-type constitutive models. Cosserat

  2. Cellular communication through light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fels

    Full Text Available Information transfer is a fundamental of life. A few studies have reported that cells use photons (from an endogenous source as information carriers. This study finds that cells can have an influence on other cells even when separated with a glass barrier, thereby disabling molecule diffusion through the cell-containing medium. As there is still very little known about the potential of photons for intercellular communication this study is designed to test for non-molecule-based triggering of two fundamental properties of life: cell division and energy uptake. The study was performed with a cellular organism, the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. Mutual exposure of cell populations occurred under conditions of darkness and separation with cuvettes (vials allowing photon but not molecule transfer. The cell populations were separated either with glass allowing photon transmission from 340 nm to longer waves, or quartz being transmittable from 150 nm, i.e. from UV-light to longer waves. Even through glass, the cells affected cell division and energy uptake in neighboring cell populations. Depending on the cuvette material and the number of cells involved, these effects were positive or negative. Also, while paired populations with lower growth rates grew uncorrelated, growth of the better growing populations was correlated. As there were significant differences when separating the populations with glass or quartz, it is suggested that the cell populations use two (or more frequencies for cellular information transfer, which influences at least energy uptake, cell division rate and growth correlation. Altogether the study strongly supports a cellular communication system, which is different from a molecule-receptor-based system and hints that photon-triggering is a fine tuning principle in cell chemistry.

  3. Engineering Cellular Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds...... of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation....

  4. Review of cellular mechanotransduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning

    2017-06-01

    Living cells and tissues experience physical forces and chemical stimuli in the human body. The process of converting mechanical forces into biochemical activities and gene expression is mechanochemical transduction or mechanotransduction. Significant advances have been made in understanding mechanotransduction at the cellular and molecular levels over the last two decades. However, major challenges remain in elucidating how a living cell integrates signals from mechanotransduction with chemical signals to regulate gene expression and to generate coherent biological responses in living tissues in physiological conditions and diseases.

  5. Engineering Cellular Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay

    2016-01-01

    of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation.......Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds...

  6. Portrait of Candida albicans adherence regulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Finkel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell-substrate adherence is a fundamental property of microorganisms that enables them to exist in biofilms. Our study focuses on adherence of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans to one substrate, silicone, that is relevant to device-associated infection. We conducted a mutant screen with a quantitative flow-cell assay to identify thirty transcription factors that are required for adherence. We then combined nanoString gene expression profiling with functional analysis to elucidate relationships among these transcription factors, with two major goals: to extend our understanding of transcription factors previously known to govern adherence or biofilm formation, and to gain insight into the many transcription factors we identified that were relatively uncharacterized, particularly in the context of adherence or cell surface biogenesis. With regard to the first goal, we have discovered a role for biofilm regulator Bcr1 in adherence, and found that biofilm regulator Ace2 is a major functional target of chromatin remodeling factor Snf5. In addition, Bcr1 and Ace2 share several target genes, pointing to a new connection between them. With regard to the second goal, our findings reveal existence of a large regulatory network that connects eleven adherence regulators, the zinc-response regulator Zap1, and approximately one quarter of the predicted cell surface protein genes in this organism. This limited yet sensitive glimpse of mutant gene expression changes had thus defined one of the broadest cell surface regulatory networks in C. albicans.

  7. Adherence to Antihypertensive Medications in Iranian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azin Behnood-Rod

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Appropriate adherence to medication is still a challenging issue for hypertensive patients. We determined adherence to antihypertensive(s and its associated factors among 280 Iranian patients. Methods. They were recruited consecutively from private and university health centers and pharmacies in four cities. The validated Persian version of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8 was administered to measure adherence. Results. Mean (±SD overall MMAS-8 score was 5.75 (±1.88. About half of the sample (139 cases, 49.6% showed low adherence (MMAS-8 score < 6. There was a negative linear association between the MMAS-8 score and systolic BP (r=-0.231, P<0.001 as well as diastolic BP (r=-0.280, P<0.001. In linear regression model, overweight/obesity (B=-0.52, P=0.02, previous history of admission to emergency services due to hypertensive crisis (B=-0.79, P=0.001, and getting medication directly from drugstore without refill prescription in hand (B=-0.51, P=0.04 were factors recognized to have statistically significant association with the MMAS-8 score. Conclusion. Antihypertensive adherence was unsatisfactory. We suggest that health care providers pay special attention and make use of the aforementioned findings in their routine visits of hypertensive patients to recognize those who are vulnerable to poor adherence.

  8. Mobile Applications to Improve Medication Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Jamie; Farris, Karen B; Dorsch, Michael P

    2017-02-01

    Background and Introduction: Mobile applications are useful tools to improve medication adherence. As developers continue to improve the features of existing mobile applications, pharmacists should be aware of the current features that are available to patients. There are limited studies available that discuss which applications have the most desirable features. The aim of this study was to compare available mobile applications and identify ideal application features used to improve medication adherence. As of September 5, 2014, the search terms "medication adherence" and "medication reminder" generated a total of 225 hits. Ideal application features were used to create an Application Score Card to identify applications with the highest number of ideal features. We identified 30 applications that were written in English, medication related, last updated in 2014, and did not meet any exclusion criteria. The top five applications RxNetwork, Mango Health, MyMeds, C3HealthLink, and HuCare are discussed in detail. There are numerous studies looking at medication adherence. However, current literature regarding mobile applications to improve medication adherence is lacking. This article will provide pharmacists with a brief overview of the available mobile applications and features that could be used to improve patient adherence to medications. Existing mobile applications to improve medication adherence have ideal features that could help patients take medication as prescribed. Once further research is performed to establish their efficacy, pharmacists could begin to recommend mobile applications to their patients.

  9. Encouraging CPAP adherence: it is everyone's job.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig, Suzanne M

    2010-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a chronic disease treated effectively with the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Patient adherence to prescribed CPAP is variable, however, leaving the undertreated OSA patient at risk of development or worsening of comorbid medical conditions, including hypertension and cardiovascular disease. The severity of disease and the presence of daytime sleepiness appear to have some predictive quality for subsequent adherence, though a search for consistent predictive factors related to CPAP adherence has proven elusive. Other influences, such as sex, age, socioeconomic status, and personality traits are less robust predictors. The use of sophisticated therapy modalities such as auto-titration or bi-level PAP units has been shown to improve adherence in certain subsets of OSA patients. Adverse effects such as nasal congestion, dry mouth, or skin irritation occur in approximately 50% of CPAP users, and addressing these adverse effects may improve adherence in some patients. More encouraging, studies on the use of intensive patient education and behavioral interventions have shown more positive effects on adherence, leading to the conclusion that improvement in patient adherence to CPAP therapy requires a multi-layered approach, using combined technological, behavioral, and adverse-effect interventions.

  10. High-throughput optical screening of cellular mechanotransduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Jonathan L.; Luo, Justin C.; Ma, Huan; Botvinick, Elliot; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2014-09-01

    We introduce an optical platform for rapid, high-throughput screening of exogenous molecules that affect cellular mechanotransduction. Our method initiates mechanotransduction in adherent cells using single laser-microbeam generated microcavitation bubbles without requiring flow chambers or microfluidics. These microcavitation bubbles expose adherent cells to a microtsunami, a transient microscale burst of hydrodynamic shear stress, which stimulates cells over areas approaching 1 mm2. We demonstrate microtsunami-initiated mechanosignalling in primary human endothelial cells. This observed signalling is consistent with G-protein-coupled receptor stimulation, resulting in Ca2+ release by the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, we demonstrate the dose-dependent modulation of microtsunami-induced Ca2+ signalling by introducing a known inhibitor to this pathway. The imaging of Ca2+ signalling and its modulation by exogenous molecules demonstrates the capacity to initiate and assess cellular mechanosignalling in real time. We utilize this capability to screen the effects of a set of small molecules on cellular mechanotransduction in 96-well plates using standard imaging cytometry.

  11. Monitoring adherence to Standard Precautions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, K D; Beekmann, S E; Ferguson, K J; Vaughn, T E; Torner, J C; Woolson, R F; Doebbeling, B N

    2001-02-01

    Health care workers (HCWs) do not consistently follow Standard Precautions (SP). This is a serious problem because inadequate compliance is associated with increased blood exposure thus predisposing HCWs to bloodborne pathogen transmission. The primary goal of this study was to identify institutional factors associated with adequacy of HCW training to monitor coworkers' adherence to SP. Surveys were sent to all community hospital infection control practitioners (ICPs) in Iowa and Virginia. ICPs indicated on a 5-point Likert scale, ranging from strongly disagree to strongly agree, their assessment of HCW training adequacy. Data from another statewide survey of HCWs in Iowa were assessed to validate this outcome measure. Multiple logistic regression models were developed to identify predictors of assessed training adequacy. Independent variables included methods of education, training, approaches to SP compliance assessment, provision of SP reinforcement by clinical leaders, and organizational data. A total of 149 institutions (62%) participated. Models of training program adequacy varied across occupations. Management commitment to SP training programs, leadership support, frequency of providing bloodborne pathogen information, and safety climate were important institutional predictors of assessed adequacy of training. The outcome was validated by demonstrating an association between the ICPs' assessment of HCW training and workers who reported having sufficient information to comply with SP (P based on modifiable factors identified by this study may reduce bloodborne pathogen exposure among HCWs.

  12. Apa is a trimeric autotransporter adhesin of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae responsible for autoagglutination and host cell adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Longwen; Zhou, Liang; Sun, Changjiang; Feng, Xin; Du, ChongTao; Gao, Yu; Ji, Qun; Yang, Shuxin; Wang, Yu; Han, Wenyu; Langford, P R; Lei, Liancheng

    2012-10-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, and adherence to host cells is a key step in the pathogenic process. Although trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) were identified in many pathogenic bacteria in recent years, none in A. pleuropneumoniae have been characterized. In this study, we identified a TAA from A. pleuropneumoniae, Apa, and characterized the contribution of its amino acid residues to the adhesion process. Sequence analysis of the C-terminal amino acid residues of Apa revealed the presence of a putative translocator domain and six conserved HsfBD1-like or HsfBD2-like binding domains. Western blot analysis revealed that the 126 C-terminal amino acids of Apa could form trimeric molecules. By confocal laser scanning microscopy, one of these six domains (ApaBD3) was determined to mediate adherence to epithelial cells. Adherence assays and adherence inhibition assays using a recombinant E. coli- ApaBD3 strain which expressed ApaBD3 on the surface of E. coli confirmed that this domain was responsible for the adhesion activity. Moreover, cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays demonstrated that ApaBD3 mediated high-level adherence to epithelial cell lines. Intriguingly, autoagglutination was observed with the E. coli- ApaBD3 strain, and this phenomenon was dependent upon the association of the expressed ApaBD3 with the C-terminal translocator domain. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Medication adherence interventions that target subjects with adherence problems: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Vicki S; Ruppar, Todd M; Enriquez, Maithe; Cooper, Pam

    2016-01-01

    Inadequate medication adherence is a pervasive, under-recognized cause of poor health outcomes. Many intervention trials designed to improve medication adherence have targeted adults with adherence problems. No previous reviews have synthesized the effectiveness of medication adherence interventions focused on subjects with medication adherence difficulties. This systematic review and meta-analysis synthesized findings from medication adherence intervention studies conducted among adults with medication adherence difficulties. Primary research studies were eligible for inclusion if they tested an intervention designed to increase medication adherence among adults with documented adherence difficulties and reported medication adherence behavior outcomes. Comprehensive search strategies of 13 computerized databases, author and ancestry searches, and hand searches of 57 journals were used to locate eligible primary research. Participant demographics, intervention characteristics, and methodological features were reliably coded from reports along with medication adherence outcomes. Effect sizes for outcomes were calculated as standardized mean differences, and random effects models were used to estimate overall mean effects. Exploratory dichotomous and continuous variable moderator analyses were employed to examine potential associations between medication adherence effect size and sample, intervention, and methodological characteristics. Data were extracted from 53 reports of studies involving 8243 individual primary study participants. The overall standardized mean difference effect size for treatment vs. control subjects was 0.301. For treatment pre- vs. post-intervention comparisons, the overall effect size was 0.533. Significantly larger effect sizes were associated with interventions incorporating prompts to take medications than interventions lacking medication prompts (0.497 vs. 0.234). Larger effect sizes were also found for interventions that linked

  14. Medication Adherence Interventions That Target Subjects with Adherence Problems: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Vicki S.; Ruppar, Todd M.; Enriquez, Maithe; Cooper, Pam

    2015-01-01

    Background Inadequate medication adherence is a pervasive, under-recognized cause of poor health outcomes. Many intervention trials designed to improve medication adherence have targeted adults with adherence problems. No previous reviews have synthesized the effectiveness of medication adherence interventions focused on subjects with medication adherence difficulties. Objective This systematic review and meta-analysis synthesized findings from medication adherence intervention studies conducted among adults with medication adherence difficulties. Methods Primary research studies were eligible for inclusion if they tested an intervention designed to increase medication adherence among adults with documented adherence difficulties and reported medication adherence behavior outcomes. Comprehensive search strategies of 13 computerized databases, author and ancestry searches, and hand searches of 57 journals were used to locate eligible primary research. Participant demographics, intervention characteristics, and methodological features were reliably coded from reports along with medication adherence outcomes. Effect sizes for outcomes were calculated as standardized mean differences, and random effects models were used to estimate overall mean effects. Exploratory dichotomous and continuous variable moderator analyses were employed to examine potential associations between medication adherence effect size and sample, intervention, and methodological characteristics. Results Data were extracted from 53 reports of studies involving 8,243 individual primary study participants. The overall standardized mean difference effect size for treatment vs. control subjects was 0.301. For treatment pre- vs. post-intervention comparisons, the overall effect size was 0.533. Significantly larger effect sizes were associated with interventions incorporating prompts to take medications than interventions lacking medication prompts (0.497 vs. 0.234). Larger effect sizes were also found

  15. Morphology, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells cultured on titanium, tantalum, and chromium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiehler, Maik; Lind, Martin; Mygind, Tina; Baatrup, Anette; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza; Li, Haisheng; Foss, Morten; Besenbacher, Flemming; Kassem, Moustapha; Bünger, Cody

    2008-08-01

    Metallic implants are widely used in orthopedic surgery and dentistry. Durable osseous fixation of an implant requires that osteoprogenitor cells attach and adhere to the implant, proliferate, differentiate into osteoblasts, and produce mineralized matrix. In the present study, we investigated the interactions between human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and smooth surfaces of titanium (Ti), tantalum (Ta), and chromium (Cr). Mean cellular area was quantified using fluorescence microscopy (4 h). Cellular proliferation was assessed by (3)H-thymidine incorporation and methylene blue cell counting assays (4 days). Osteogenic differentiation response was quantified by cell-specific alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) assay (4 days), expression analysis of bone-related genes (4 days), and mineralization assay (21 days). Undifferentiated and osteogenically stimulated MSCs cultured on the different surfaces showed the same tendencies for proliferation and differentiation. MSCs exposed to Ti surfaces demonstrated enhanced proliferation compared with Ta and Cr surfaces. Cultivation of MSCs on Ta surfaces resulted in significantly increased mean cellular area and cell-specific ALP activity compared with the other surfaces tested. Cells cultured on Cr demonstrated reduced spreading and proliferation. In conclusion, Ta metal, as an alternative for Ti, can be considered as a promising biocompatible material, whereas further studies are needed to fully understand the role of Cr and its alloys in bone implants.

  16. Perfluorinated alginate for cellular encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattás-Asfura, Kerim M; Fraker, Christopher A; Stabler, Cherie L

    2012-08-01

    Molecules of pentadecafluorooctanoyl chloride (PFC) were grafted onto alginate (Alg) using a linear poly(ethylene glycol) linker and amide bonds. The resulting Alg-PFC material was characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopies. The degree of PFC functionalization significantly influenced the physical and chemical properties of Alg-PFC, particularly when the resulting polymer was ionically crosslinked into hydrogels. Alg-PFC hydrogel beads fabricated via Ba(2+) crosslinking were found to match the permeability properties of control alginate beads, except upon swelling over time in culture media. When used to encapsulate MIN6 cells, a beta cell line, Alg-PFC beads demonstrated enhanced cell proliferation over alginate control beads. These results indicate that Alg-PFC hydrogels retain some of the PFC's biological-relevant benefits, such as enhancement of mass transport and bioinertness, to enhance cellular viability within alginate three-dimensional hydrogel environments. We envision these functionalized hydrogels to be particularly useful in the encapsulation of cells with a high metabolic demand, such as pancreatic islets. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Adherence to physical and mental activity interventions: Coping plans as a mediator and prior adherence as a moderator.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, A.W.M.; Klusmann, V.; Schwarzer, R.; Heuser, I.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Adherence to behavioural intervention programmes is a necessary condition for beneficial outcomes to be achieved. This study tested whether social cognitive variables and coping plans predict adherence. Design and methods. Adherence was examined in a randomized controlled trial with

  18. Being as an iceberg: hypertensive treatment adherence experiences in southeast of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Dehghan Nayeri

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment adherence is often an important issue in the management of hypertension. Deep understanding of adherence behavior as well as its influential factors can expand knowledge about treatment adherence among hypertensives. Objective: The aim of this study was to explore patients, their families, and healthcare providers’ experiences about hypertension treatment adherence in southeast of Iran. Design: A qualitative study was conducted to explore the experience of patients, family members, and healthcare providers (n=18 by using a conventional content analysis. The purposive sampling method was used. Data were collected through semi-structured and deep interviews. Results: Data analysis showed that hypertensive treatment adherence in an Iranian context is like an iceberg with two subthemes. The first subtheme relates to the upper and clear part of this iceberg and it consists of two categories, including 1 healthy and 2 unhealthy regimens. The second subtheme associates with under-water and unanticipated part and it consists of four categories, including 1 the nature of disease and treatment, 2 the individual resources, 3 the healthcare organization, and 4 the socio-cultural environment. Conclusions: The treatment adherence features emerged in this study can be useful in designing and developing context-based hypertension interventions. Further qualitative and quantitative studies with a closer collaboration between the social, natural, and medical sciences in other Iranian populations are needed to confirm the findings.

  19. Adherence to the "Mediterranean Diet" in Spain and Its Relationship with Cardiovascular Risk (DIMERICA Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellán Alemán, José; Zafrilla Rentero, María Pilar; Montoro-García, Silvia; Mulero, Juana; Pérez Garrido, Alfonso; Leal, Mariano; Guerrero, Lucía; Ramos, Elena; Ruilope, Luis Miguel

    2016-10-28

    Nutritional studies focus on traditional cultural models and lifestyles in different countries. The aim of this study was to examine the adherence to the Mediterranean diet, life habits, and risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases among people living in different geographical regions in Spain. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in each region. The sampling scheme consisted of a random three-stage stratified sampling program according to geographic region, age, and gender. A total of 1732 subjects were asked to complete a questionnaire designed to assess their nutrient intake, dietary habits, and exercise. A diet score that assesses the adherence of participants to the Mediterranean diet (range 0-10) was also applied. Southeastern Spain had the lowest score for adherence to the Mediterranean diet because of the low consumption of fish and plant products. A lower adherence score to the Mediterranean diet was strongly associated with the prevalence of hypertension (p = 0.018). A low level of adherence to the Mediterranean diet is accompanied by a high prevalence of hypertension and, therefore, a raised cardiovascular risk in the country. The adherence score could help identify individuals at greater cardiovascular risk.

  20. Adherence inhibition of Streptococcus mutans on dental enamel surface using silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Cristóbal, L.F. [Doctorado Institucional en Ingeniería y Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Maestría en Ciencias Odontológicas en el Área de Odontología Integral Avanzada, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Martínez-Castañón, G.A., E-mail: mtzcastanon@fciencias.uaslp.mx [Doctorado Institucional en Ingeniería y Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Maestría en Ciencias Odontológicas en el Área de Odontología Integral Avanzada, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Téllez-Déctor, E.J. [Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad Veracruzana campus Río Blanco, Mariano Abasolo S/N. Col. Centro. Río Blanco, Veracruz (Mexico); and others

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the adherence capacity of Streptococcus mutans after being exposed to three different sizes of silver nanoparticles on healthy human dental enamel. Three different sizes of silver nanoparticles (9.3, 21.3 and 98 nm) were prepared, characterized and an adherence testing was performed to evaluate their anti-adherence activity on a reference strain of S. mutans on healthy dental enamel surfaces. Colony-Forming Unit count was made for adherence test and light microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to compare qualitative characteristics of S. mutans. 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups did not show differences between them but statistical differences were found when 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups were compared with 98 nm and negative control groups (p < 0.05). Microscopy analysis shows a better inhibition of S. mutans adherence in 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups than the 98 nm group when compared with control group. Silver nanoparticles showed an adherence inhibition on S. mutans and the anti-adherence capacity was better when silver nanoparticles were smaller. Highlights: ► We examined how SNP can affect cellular adhesion from S. mutans. ► Several techniques were applied to analyzed S. mutans biofilm on enamel. ► All SNP sizes had an adhesion inhibition of S. mutans. ► Smaller SNP showed a better adhesion inhibition than larger SNP. ► Inhibition effect of SNP could be related with adhesion inhibition from S. mutans.

  1. Assessing adherence and factors associated with adherence in young children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Scott W; Sly, Peter D; Morawska, Alina; Devadason, Sunalene G

    2008-06-01

    Adherence with preventive asthma medication by young children is an important factor when evaluating a suboptimal response to treatment. However, few data exist regarding the accuracy of subjective measures of adherence and factors associated with adherence in young children. Fifty-one asthmatic children aged 18 months to 7 years had their use of preventive asthma medication monitored using an electronic monitoring device (Smartinhaler) for 1 month. At a follow-up visit the child's parent was asked how often medication had been given and they also completed a confidential questionnaire that included questions about medication usage, barriers to optimal adherence and parenting. The treating physician made an estimate of the child's likely use of medication. The median use of medication as determined by the Smartinhaler was 70.5% (range 21.4-100%). The parents' verbal reports (85.1%) and questionnaire responses (84.2%) overestimated medication usage. The physician was not able to determine which parents correctly estimated their child's use of medication (P = 0.28). The child's age, level of parental education and annual family income did not influence adherence. Parents reported simply 'forgetting' or their child's 'reaction to being given medication' as the principal barriers to adherence. There was a significant association between how stressful the parent found parenting and adherence (P = 0.05). Adherence with preventive medication, even within the context of a research study, was generally low and highly variable. Subjective measures of adherence were found to overestimate adherence in young asthmatics.

  2. Antiretroviral medication adherence and persistence with respect to adherence tool usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrop, N J; Gill, M J

    2000-07-01

    Adherence to complex drug regimens over an extended period is a key factor in reaping the health benefits of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Forgetting a dose is the most commonly stated reason for suboptimal adherence, indicating a potential benefit of reminder devices. We examined antiretroviral drug adherence and duration of therapy with respect to adherence tool usage. Adherence was monitored for 12 months in a cohort of patients, using pharmacy refill data. Seventy-eight subjects were administered a questionnaire with regard to tool use at least once at 6 and/or 12 months; patients who replied to the questionnaire were eligible for this study. Persistence of remaining on therapy was obtained from the subjects, charts. The tools included individualized schedules, dosettes and electronic reminder devices, which were offered free of charge to all patients. Of the 64 subjects who entered this study, 60.9% (n = 39) used at least one adherence tool. The median adherence in those using tools was 95%; three quarters showed greater than 91% adherence. Adherence rates with respect to individual tools did not differ significantly for schedules and dosettes, with medians of 95% (n = 31) and 94% (n = 13), respectively. Median adherence with electronic reminders was 76% (n = 5). Seventy-four percent of patients remained on therapy after 12 months of study. Taking into consideration previous antiretroviral treatment, actual persistence at 12 months was 87%. Employing and individualizing strategies, including adherence tools, to enhance patient adherence to complex regimens in addition to counseling and follow-up, has resulted in good adherence rates and persistence.

  3. Comparative study of the radiobiological effects induced on adherent vs suspended cells by BNCT, neutrons and gamma rays treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansolino, L; Clerici, A M; Zonta, C; Dionigi, P; Mazzini, G; Di Liberto, R; Altieri, S; Ballarini, F; Bortolussi, S; Carante, M P; Ferrari, M; González, S J; Postuma, I; Protti, N; Santa Cruz, G A; Ferrari, C

    2015-12-01

    The present work is part of a preclinical in vitro study to assess the efficacy of BNCT applied to liver or lung coloncarcinoma metastases and to limb osteosarcoma. Adherent growing cell lines can be irradiated as adherent to the culture flasks or as cell suspensions, differences in radio-sensitivity of the two modalities of radiation exposure have been investigated. Dose related cell survival and cell cycle perturbation results evidenced that the radiosensitivity of adherent cells is higher than that of the suspended ones. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Culture.:'Culture.'

    OpenAIRE

    Thin, Neil; Biswas-Diener, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Although the most visible elements of culture are dress, cuisine and architecture, culture is a highly psychological phenomenon. Culture is a pattern of meaning for understanding how the world works. This knowledge is shared among a group of people and passed from one generation to the next. This module defines culture, addresses methodological issues, and introduces the idea that culture is a process. Understanding cultural processes can help people get along better with others and be more s...

  5. Integrated cellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jason C.

    The generation of new three-dimensional (3D) matrices that enable integration of biomolecular components and whole cells into device architectures, without adversely altering their morphology or activity, continues to be an expanding and challenging field of research. This research is driven by the promise that encapsulated biomolecules and cells can significantly impact areas as diverse as biocatalysis, controlled delivery of therapeutics, environmental and industrial process monitoring, early warning of warfare agents, bioelectronics, photonics, smart prosthetics, advanced physiological sensors, portable medical diagnostic devices, and tissue/organ replacement. This work focuses on the development of a fundamental understanding of the biochemical and nanomaterial mechanisms that govern the cell directed assembly and integration process. It was shown that this integration process relies on the ability of cells to actively develop a pH gradient in response to evaporation induced osmotic stress, which catalyzes silica condensation within a thin 3D volume surrounding the cells, creating a functional bio/nano interface. The mechanism responsible for introducing functional foreign membrane-bound proteins via proteoliposome addition to the silica-lipid-cell matrix was also determined. Utilizing this new understanding, 3D cellular immobilization capabilities were extended using sol-gel matrices endowed with glycerol, trehalose, and media components. The effects of these additives, and the metabolic phase of encapsulated S. cerivisiase cells, on long-term viability and the rate of inducible gene expression was studied. This enabled the entrapment of cells within a novel microfluidic platform capable of simultaneous colorimetric, fluorescent, and electrochemical detection of a single analyte, significantly improving confidence in the biosensor output. As a complementary approach, multiphoton protein lithography was utilized to engineer 3D protein matrices in which to

  6. Abrogation of E-cadherin-mediated cellular aggregation allows proliferation of pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells in shake flask bioreactors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Mohamet

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental requirement for the exploitation of embryonic stem (ES cells in regenerative medicine is the ability to reproducibly derive sufficient numbers of cells of a consistent quality in a cost-effective manner. However, undifferentiated ES cells are not ideally suited to suspension culture due to the formation of cellular aggregates, ultimately limiting scalability. Significant advances have been made in recent years in the culture of ES cells, including automated adherent culture and suspension microcarrier or embryoid body bioreactor culture. However, each of these methods exhibits specific disadvantages, such as high cost, additional downstream processes or reduced cell doubling times.Here we show that abrogation of the cell surface protein E-cadherin, using either gene knockout (Ecad-/- or the neutralising antibody DECMA-1 (EcadAb, allows culture of mouse ES cells as a near-single cell suspension in scalable shake flask culture over prolonged periods without additional media supplements. Both Ecad-/- and EcadAb ES cells exhibited adaptation phases in suspension culture, with optimal doubling times of 7.3 h±0.9 and 15.6 h±4.7 respectively and mean-fold increase in viable cell number of 95.1±2.0 and 16±0.9-fold over 48 h. EcadAb ES cells propagated as a dispersed cell suspension for 15 d maintained expression of pluripotent markers, exhibited a normal karyotype and high viability. Subsequent differentiation of EcadAb ES cells resulted in expression of transcripts and proteins associated with the three primary germ layers.This is the first demonstration of the culture of pluripotent ES cells as a near-single cell suspension in a manual fed-batch shake flask bioreactor and represents a significant improvement on current ES cell culture techniques. Whilst this proof-of-principle method would be useful for the culture of human ES and iPS cells, further steps are necessary to increase cell viability of hES cells in suspension.

  7. Self-reported adherence to a therapeutic regimen among patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Lai Wah; Twinn, Sheila F; Chan, Sally W C

    2010-04-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to examine self-reported adherence to a therapeutic regimen for continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Studies of patients' adherence during dialysis have primarily focused on haemodialysis and have frequently yielded inconsistent results, which are attributed to the inconsistent tools used to measure adherence. Levels of adherence to all four components of the therapeutic regimen (i.e. dietary and fluid restrictions, medication, and the dialysis regimen) among patients receiving peritoneal dialysis have not been examined, especially from a patient perspective. A total population sample was used. A cross-sectional survey was carried out by face-to-face interviews in 2005 in one renal clinic in Hong Kong. A total of 173 patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (56% of the total population) participated in the study. Patients perceived themselves as more adherent to medication (83%; 95% confidence interval 77-88%) and dialysis (93%; 95% confidence interval 88-96%) prescriptions than to fluid (64%; 95% confidence interval 56-71%) and dietary (38%; 95% confidence interval 30-45%) restrictions. Those who were male, younger or had received dialysis for 1-3 years saw themselves as more non-adherent compared with other patients. Healthcare professionals should take cultural issues into consideration when setting dietary and fluid restriction guidelines. Additional attention and support are required for patients who identify themselves as more non-adherent. To help patients live with end-stage renal disease and its treatment, qualitative research is required to understand how they go through the dynamic process of adherence.

  8. Factors that influence adherence to antiretroviral treatment in an urban population, Jakarta, Indonesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Rosamond Nony Weaver

    Full Text Available Although the number of people receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART in Indonesia has increased in recent years, little is known about the specific characteristics affecting adherence in this population. Indonesia is different from most of its neighbors given that it is a geographically and culturally diverse country, with a large Muslim population. We aimed to identify the current rate of adherence and explore factors that influence ART adherence.Data were collected from ART-prescribed outpatients on an HIV registry at a North Jakarta hospital in 2012. Socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics were explored as factors associated with adherence using logistics regression analyses. Chi squared test was used to compare the difference between proportions. Reasons for missing medication were analyzed descriptively.Two hundred and sixty-one patients participated, of whom 77% reported ART adherence in the last 3 months. The level of social support experienced was independently associated with adherence where some social support (p = 0.018 and good social support (p = 0.039 improved adherence compared to poor social support. Frequently cited reasons for not taking ART medication included forgetting to take medication (67%, busy with something else (63% and asleep at medication time (60%.This study identified that an increase in the level of social support experienced by ART-prescribed patients was positively associated with adherence. Social support may minimize the impact of stigma among ART prescribed patients. Based on these findings, if social support is not available, alternative support through community-based organizations is recommended to maximize treatment success.

  9. An ontology for factors affecting tuberculosis treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogundele OA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Olukunle Ayodeji Ogundele,1 Deshendran Moodley,1 Anban W Pillay,1 Christopher J Seebregts1,2 1UKZN/CSIR Meraka Centre for Artificial Intelligence Research and Health Architecture Laboratory, School of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, 2Jembi Health Systems NPC, Cape Town, South Africa Purpose: Adherence behavior is a complex phenomenon influenced by diverse personal, cultural, and socioeconomic factors that may vary between communities in different regions. Understanding the factors that influence adherence behavior is essential in predicting which individuals and communities are at risk of nonadherence. This is necessary for supporting resource allocation and intervention planning in disease control programs. Currently, there is no known concrete and unambiguous computational representation of factors that influence tuberculosis (TB treatment adherence behavior that is useful for prediction. This study developed a computer-based conceptual model for capturing and structuring knowledge about the factors that influence TB treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA.Methods: An extensive review of existing categorization systems in the literature was used to develop a conceptual model that captured scientific knowledge about TB adherence behavior in SSA. The model was formalized as an ontology using the web ontology language. The ontology was then evaluated for its comprehensiveness and applicability in building predictive models. Conclusion: The outcome of the study is a novel ontology-based approach for curating and structuring scientific knowledge of adherence behavior in patients with TB in SSA. The ontology takes an evidence-based approach by explicitly linking factors to published clinical studies. Factors are structured around five dimensions: factor type, type of effect, regional variation, cross-dependencies between factors, and treatment phase. The ontology is

  10. Cellular image classification

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Xiang; Lin, Feng

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces new techniques for cellular image feature extraction, pattern recognition and classification. The authors use the antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) in patient serum as the subjects and the Indirect Immunofluorescence (IIF) technique as the imaging protocol to illustrate the applications of the described methods. Throughout the book, the authors provide evaluations for the proposed methods on two publicly available human epithelial (HEp-2) cell datasets: ICPR2012 dataset from the ICPR'12 HEp-2 cell classification contest and ICIP2013 training dataset from the ICIP'13 Competition on cells classification by fluorescent image analysis. First, the reading of imaging results is significantly influenced by one’s qualification and reading systems, causing high intra- and inter-laboratory variance. The authors present a low-order LP21 fiber mode for optical single cell manipulation and imaging staining patterns of HEp-2 cells. A focused four-lobed mode distribution is stable and effective in optical...

  11. Inhibition of cholesterol recycling impairs cellular PrPSc propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Gilch, Sabine; Bach, Christian; Lutzny, Gloria; Vorberg, Ina; Sch?tzl, Hermann M.

    2009-01-01

    The infectious agent in prion diseases consists of an aberrantly folded isoform of the cellular prion protein (PrPc), termed PrPSc, which accumulates in brains of affected individuals. Studies on prion-infected cultured cells indicate that cellular cholesterol homeostasis influences PrPSc propagation. Here, we demonstrate that the cellular PrPSc content decreases upon accumulation of cholesterol in late endosomes, as induced by NPC-1 knock-down or treatment with U18666A. PrPc trafficking, lip...

  12. Genetic divergence in cellular resistance to heat shock in cattle: differences between breeds developed in temperate versus hot climates in responses of preimplantation embryos, reproductive tract tissues and lymphocytes to increased culture temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula-Lopes, F F; Chase, C C; Al-Katanani, Y M; Krininger, C E; Rivera, R M; Tekin, S; Majewski, A C; Ocon, O M; Olson, T A; Hansen, P J

    2003-02-01

    controlling resistance to cellular heat shock.

  13. The Patient's Perspective: Adherence or Non-adherence to Asthma Controller Therapy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Backer, V; Soes-Petersen, U

    2006-01-01

    )-guidelines' symptom severity classification, 85% should have been on ICS. Accidental and intentional non-adherence with ICS at least twice a week was reported by 27% and 24%, respectively. In case of deterioration, 60% of the patients preferred to take more reliever medication, instead of increasing the ICS dose....... Having a fixed daily routine with regard to medication and following the advice given by their doctor were the main reasons for adherence, whereas lack of perceived symptoms was the main reason for non-adherence. Non-adherence was associated with increasing disagreement with the statements......STUDY OBJECTIVE: Adherence with controller therapy poses a major challenge to the effective management of persistent asthma. The aim of this study was to explore the patient-related aspects of adherence among adult asthmatics. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: The participants (n = 509 adult asthmatics...

  14. Adherence to anti-depressant medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The study of medicine taking is controversial as it often reveals a discrepancy between healthcare professionals' advice and patients' actual behaviour. Qualitative researchers have examined depressed people's adherence to prescriptions of antidepressants by exploring the meaning they impute...

  15. Introducing the Adherence Strategy Engineering Framework (ASEF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Stefan Rahr; Toftegaard, Thomas Skjødeberg; Bertelsen, Olav W.

    2013-01-01

    resulting in reduced data quality and suboptimal treatment. Objectives: The aim of this paper is to introduce the Adherence Strategy Engineering Framework (ASEF) as a method for developing novel technology-based adherence strategies to assess and improve patient adherence levels in the unsupervised setting....... Methods: Key concepts related to self-care and adherence were defined, discussed, and implemented as part of the ASEF framework. ASEF was applied to seven self-care case studies, and the perceived usefulness and feasibility of ASEF was evaluated in a questionnaire study by the case study participants....... Finally, we reviewed the individual case studies usage of ASEF. Results: A range of central self-care concepts were defined and the ASEF methodological framework was introduced. ASEF was successfully used in seven case studies with a total of 25 participants. Of these, 16 provided answers...

  16. Adherence to Healthcare Waste Management Guidelines among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    %). Knowledge on waste segregation, waste separation then disposal and means of transports were statistically significant in relation to adherence. The type of incinerator and burning status, protection maintenance and supply of adequate ...

  17. The role of cellular environment in dynamic light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ran; Jeong, Kwan; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2011-03-01

    We have developed motility contrast imaging (MCI) as a coherence-domain volumetric imaging approach that uses subcellular dynamics as an endogenous imaging contrast agent of living tissue. Fluctuation spectroscopy analysis of dynamic light scattering (DLS) from 3-D tissue has identified functional frequency bands related to organelle transport, membrane undulations and cell shape change. In this paper, we track the behavior of dynamic light scattering as we bridge the gap between the two extremes of 2-D cell culture on the one hand, and 3-D tissue spheroids on the other. In a light backscattering geometry, we capture speckle from 2-D cell culture consisting of isolated cells or planar rafts of cells on cell-culture surfaces. DLS from that cell culture shows differences and lower sensitivity to intra-cellular dynamics compared with the 3-D tissue. The motility contrast is weak in this limit. As the cellular density increases to cover the surface, the motility contrast increases. As environmental perturbations or pharmaceuticals are applied, the fluctuation spectral response becomes more dramatic as the dimensionality of the cellular aggregations increases. We show that changing optical thickness of the cellular-to-tissue targets usually causes characteristic frequency shifts in the spectrograms, while changing cellular dimensionality causes characteristic frequencies to be enhanced or suppressed.

  18. Medication non-adherence in essential tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Elan D

    2015-02-01

    There are numerous studies of medication adherence in a variety of chronic diseases including Parkinson's disease; however, there are no such studies in patients with essential tremor (ET). This study aimed to (1) present self-report data on medication adherence in ET cases, (2) examine the demographic and clinical factors that might be associated with lower medication adherence. 151 ET cases were enrolled in a clinical-epidemiological study at Columbia University. An 11-item medication adherence questionnaire, modeled after the Morisky medication adherence questionnaire, was administered. Seventy-three (48.3%) of 151 cases were taking daily medication for ET. One-third (24/73; 32.9%) of cases reported that they sometimes forgot to take their medication, and 1 in 5 (15/73; 20.5%) reported missed doses within the past week. Most striking was that nearly 1 in 4 (17/73; 23.3%) reported that there were whole days in the past two weeks in which they had not taken their medication. A factor analysis revealed four factors that captured different aspects of non-adherence. Higher non-adherence was associated with more depressive symptoms, younger age, and less severe tremor but was not associated with type or number of ET medications. Approximately one in four ET patients reported whole days in the past two weeks in which they had not taken their medication. It is possible that this relatively high rate of non-adherence could be a function of the poor therapeutic efficacy of the medications currently available to treat ET. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Microbial adherence to cosmetic contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ka Yin; Cho, Pauline; Boost, Maureen

    2014-08-01

    To investigate whether cosmetic contact lenses (CCL) with surface pigments affect microbial adherence. Fifteen brands of CCL were purchased from optical, non-optical retail outlets, and via the Internet. A standardized rub-off test was performed on each CCL (five lenses per brand) to confirm the location of the pigments. The rub-off test comprised gentle rubbing on the surfaces of each CCL with wetted cotton buds for a maximum of 20 rubs per surface. A new set of CCL (five lenses per brand) were incubated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa overnight. Viable counts of adhered bacteria were determined by the number of colony-forming units (CFU) on agar media on each lens. The adherence of P. aeruginosa as well as Staphylococcus aureus and Serratia marcescens to three brands of CCL (A-C) (five lenses per brand) were also compared to their adherences on their clear counterparts. Only two of the 15 brands of CCL tested (brands B and C) had pigments that did not detach with the rub-off test. The remaining 13 brands of CCL all failed the rub-off test and these lenses showed higher P. aeruginosa adherence (8.7 × 10(5)-1.9 × 10(6) CFU/lens). Brands B and C lenses showed at least six times less bacterial adhesion than the other 13 brands. Compared to their clear counterparts, bacterial adherence to brands B and C lenses did not differ significantly, whereas brand A lenses showed significantly higher adherence. Surface pigments on CCL resulted in significantly higher bacterial adherence. Copyright © 2013 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Defining medication adherence in individual patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrison A

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alan Morrison, Melissa E Stauffer, Anna S Kaufman ScribCo, Effort, PA, USA Background: The classification of patients as adherent or non-adherent to medications is typically based on an arbitrary threshold for the proportion of prescribed doses taken. Here, we define a patient as pharmacokinetically adherent if the serum drug levels resulting from his/her pattern of medication-taking behavior remained within the therapeutic range.Methods: We used pharmacokinetic modeling to calculate serum drug levels in patients whose patterns of dosing were recorded by a medication event monitoring system. Medication event monitoring system data were from a previously published study of seven psoriasis patients prescribed 40 mg subcutaneous adalimumab at 14-day intervals for 1 year. Daily serum concentrations of adalimumab were calculated and compared with a known therapeutic threshold.Results: None of the seven patients took adalimumab precisely every 14 days. Three patients who took adalimumab at intervals of 6–26 days could be classified as pharmacokinetically adherent, because their daily adalimumab serum concentration never fell below the therapeutic threshold. The four other patients, who took adalimumab at intervals of 7–93 days, could be classified as pharmacokinetically non-adherent, because their adalimumab serum concentration fell below the therapeutic threshold on 3.5%–71.3% of days.Conclusion: Patients with varying patterns of adalimumab dosing could be classified as pharmacokinetically adherent or non-adherent according to whether or not their serum drug concentrations remained within the therapeutic range. Keywords: pharmacokinetic adherence, drug therapy/utilization, drug administration schedule, patient compliance, adalimumab, pharmacokinetics

  1. Self-reported adherence to anticoagulation and its determinants using the Morisky medication adherence scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellucci, Lana A; Shaw, Joseph; van der Salm, Katrien; Erkens, Petra; Le Gal, Gregoire; Petrcich, William; Carrier, Marc

    2015-10-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are used for treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF). Given the shorter half-life and lack of laboratory monitoring compared to vitamin-K antagonists (VKAs), adequate adherence to DOACs is important. Reported anticoagulation adherence is unclear in clinical practice. To assess self-reported anticoagulation adherence in a tertiary center anticoagulation clinic. Cross-sectional study of patients on oral anticoagulants (VKAs, rivaroxaban, dabigatran and apixaban). Anticoagulation adherence was assessed using the 4-item Morisky score. Baseline characteristics were evaluated for association with adherence. Five hundred patients completed the survey; 74% were on VKAs and 26% on DOACs: rivaroxaban 102 (79%); dabigatran 26 (19%); apixaban 2 (2%). Main indications for anticoagulation were VTE (72%) and AF (18%). Self-reported anticoagulation adherence using the 4-item Morisky scale was 56.2% for patients on VKAs and 57.1% for patients on DOACs. Predictors of anticoagulation adherence were age (OR=1.02; 95% CI:1.01-1.03), female gender (OR=1.58; 95% CI:1.10-2.27), use of additional oral medications (OR=2.78; 95% CI:1.67-4.63), and retired employment status (OR=2.31; 95% CI:1.51-3.55). In backward selection multivariate analyses age, female gender and use of other oral medications remained significantly associated with anticoagulation adherence. Self-reported anticoagulation adherence was similar between VKAs and DOACs. Until laboratory assays are universally available to evaluate DOAC adherence, physicians should emphasize the importance of anticoagulation adherence at each patient encounter. The Morisky scale provides simple assessment of anticoagulation adherence; however it has not yet been validation for this purpose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Weight-loss intervention adherence and factors promoting adherence: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemstra M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mark Lemstra,1 Yelena Bird,2 Chijioke Nwankwo,2 Marla Rogers,3 John Moraros2 1Alliance Wellness and Rehabilitation, Moose Jaw, 2School of Public Health, 3College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada Background: Adhering to weight loss interventions is difficult for many people. The majority of those who are overweight or obese and attempt to lose weight are simply not successful. The objectives of this study were 1 to quantify overall adherence rates for various weight loss interventions and 2 to provide pooled estimates for factors associated with improved adherence to weight loss interventions.Methods: We performed a systematic literature review and meta-analysis of all studies published between January 2004 and August 2015 that reviewed weight loss intervention adherence.Results: After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria and checking the methodological quality, 27 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The overall adherence rate was 60.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 53.6–67.2. The following three main variables were found to impact adherence: 1 supervised attendance programs had higher adherence rates than those with no supervision (rate ratio [RR] 1.65; 95% CI 1.54–1.77; 2 interventions that offered social support had higher adherence than those without social support (RR 1.29; 95% CI 1.24–1.34; and 3 dietary intervention alone had higher adherence than exercise programs alone (RR 1.27; 95% CI 1.19–1.35.Conclusion: A substantial proportion of people do not adhere to weight loss interventions. Programs supervising attendance, offering social support, and focusing on dietary modification have better adherence than interventions not supervising attendance, not offering social support, and focusing exclusively on exercise. Keywords: community based, obesity, social support, program adherence

  3. Antiretroviral therapy adherence and predictors to adherence in Albania: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Shane D; Rashidi, Vania; Sarnquist, Clea; Banushi, Vilson H; Hole, Michael K; Barbhaiya, Namrata J; Gashi, Valbona H; Osterberg, Lars; Maldonado, Yvonne; Harxhi, Arjan

    2014-07-14

    The possibility of an HIV/AIDS epidemic in southeastern Europe (SEE) is not improbable. Thus, an understanding of the current issues surrounding HIV/AIDS care, specifically antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, in countries within SEE is critical. This study was conducted to determine the ART adherence characteristics of Albania's HIV-positive population. This cross-sectional study reports initial demographic and adherence characteristics of patients receiving HIV/AIDS treatment in Albania. Retrospective review of pharmacy medications dispensed supplemented reported adherence behavior. Further, an adherence index was utilized to explore adherence more thoroughly. Patient-reported adherence and pharmacy review showed adherence levels of 98.9±4.4% and 97.7±4.7%, respectively. Assessment by adherence index revealed an index level of 91.7±6.7. Factors associated with a score of < 95 on the adherence index were: being partnered (OR = 0.29, 95% CI = 0.09 - 0.98), history of depression (OR = 0.24, 95% CI = 0.08 - 0.76), increased number of barriers to care (OR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.66 - 0.97), and increased number of current social and medical needs (OR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.58 - 0.91). Interventions aimed at reducing barriers to care, addressing current medical and social needs, and treating mental health issues may help improve adherence to ART in patients with HIV/AIDS in Albania. With little known about HIV/AIDS in SEE, this study provides guidance on how SEE countries can help prevent a possible rise in the prevalence of HIV given the close link of ART adherence and spread of HIV.

  4. Adaptation and evaluation of the measurement properties of the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrosa, Rafaela Batista dos Santos; Rodrigues, Roberta Cunha Matheus

    2016-01-01

    to undertake the cultural adaptation of, and to evaluate the measurement properties of, the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients, with outpatient monitoring at a teaching hospital. the process of cultural adaptation was undertaken in accordance with the international literature. The data were obtained from 147 CHD patients, through the application of the sociodemographic/clinical characterization instrument, and of the Brazilian versions of the Morisky Self-Reported Measure of Medication Adherence Scale, the General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale, and the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale. the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale presented evidence of semantic-idiomatic, conceptual and cultural equivalencies, with high acceptability and practicality. The floor effect was evidenced for the total score and for the domains of the scale studied. The findings evidenced the measure's reliability. The domains of the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale presented significant inverse correlations of moderate to strong magnitude between the scores of the Morisky scale, indicating convergent validity, although correlations with the measure of general self-efficacy were not evidenced. The validity of known groups was supported, as the scale discriminated between "adherents" and "non-adherents" to the medications, as well as to "sufficient dose" and "insufficient dose". the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale presented evidence of reliability and validity in coronary heart disease outpatients.

  5. Cockayne syndrome: a cellular sensitivity to ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmickel, R D; Chu, E H; Trosko, J E; Chang, C C

    1977-08-01

    Two unrelated children, a boy 2 1/2 years old and a girl 4 years old, were affected with the cachectic dwarfism of Cockayne syndrome. Fibroblast cultures derived from these patients exhibited increased sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) light, but not to x-irradiation, as measured by colony-forming ability. In both Cockayne fibroblast cultures, the rate of removal of thymidine dimer from the irradiated cellular DNA was normal. This demonstration of a cellular defect in Cockayne cells suggests that there may be an enzymatic defect in the repair of UV light-induced damage.

  6. Microbicide clinical trial adherence: insights for introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodsong, Cynthia; MacQueen, Kathleen; Amico, K Rivet; Friedland, Barbara; Gafos, Mitzy; Mansoor, Leila; Tolley, Elizabether; McCormack, Sheena

    2013-04-08

    After two decades of microbicide clinical trials it remains uncertain if vaginally- delivered products will be clearly shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection in women and girls. Furthermore, a microbicide product with demonstrated clinical efficacy must be used correctly and consistently if it is to prevent infection. Information on adherence that can be gleaned from microbicide trials is relevant for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, pre-licensure implementation trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery. Drawing primarily from data and experience that has emerged from the large-scale microbicide efficacy trials completed to-date, the paper identifies six broad areas of adherence lessons learned: (1) Adherence measurement in clinical trials, (2) Comprehension of use instructions/Instructions for use, (3) Unknown efficacy and its effect on adherence/Messages regarding effectiveness, (4) Partner influence on use, (5) Retention and continuation and (6) Generalizability of trial participants' adherence behavior. Each is discussed, with examples provided from microbicide trials. For each of these adherence topics, recommendations are provided for using trial findings to prepare for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery programs.

  7. Microbicide clinical trial adherence: insights for introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Woodsong

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available After two decades of microbicide clinical trials it remains uncertain if vaginally- delivered products will be clearly shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection in women and girls. Furthermore, a microbicide product with demonstrated clinical efficacy must be used correctly and consistently if it is to prevent infection. Information on adherence that can be gleaned from microbicide trials is relevant for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, pre-licensure implementation trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery. Drawing primarily from data and experience that has emerged from the large-scale microbicide efficacy trials completed to-date, the paper identifies six broad areas of adherence lessons learned: (1 Adherence measurement in clinical trials, (2 Comprehension of use instructions/Instructions for use, (3 Unknown efficacy and its effect on adherence/Messages regarding effectiveness, (4 Partner influence on use, (5 Retention and continuation and (6 Generalizability of trial participants' adherence behavior. Each is discussed, with examples provided from microbicide trials. For each of these adherence topics, recommendations are provided for using trial findings to prepare for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery programs.

  8. Stealth monitoring of adherence to topical medication: adherence is very poor in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejci-Manwaring, Jennifer; Tusa, Mark G; Carroll, Christie; Camacho, Fabian; Kaur, Mandeep; Carr, David; Fleischer, Alan B; Balkrishnan, Rajesh; Feldman, Steven R

    2007-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common problem for which topical agents are the primary treatment. When topical medications fail, further therapy may include systemic agents with the potential for greater toxicity. Adherence to topical treatment of atopic dermatitis has not been well characterized. Poor adherence to topical medication could account for failure of topical therapy. To determine adherence to topical treatment in patients with atopic dermatitis. Thirty-seven children were given 0.1% triamcinolone ointment and were counseled to use it twice daily. They were told to return in 4 weeks, at which time they were told to continue treatment for another 4 weeks. Electronic monitors were used to measure adherence over the entire 8 week study. Patients were not informed of the compliance monitoring until the end of the study. Twenty-six patients completed 8 weeks of treatment. Mean adherence from the baseline to the end of the study was 32%. Adherence was higher on or near office visit days and subsequently decreased rapidly. This study was limited by the large number of subjects who failed to return for follow-up appointments or withdrew from the study. Adherence to topical medications is very poor in a clinic population of children with atopic dermatitis. Office visits are one means to increase adherence. If adherence to topical treatment can be improved, exposure to more costly and potentially toxic systemic agents may be avoidable.

  9. Self-supporting nanoporous alumina membranes as substrates for hepatic cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoess, Andreas; Thormann, Annika; Friedmann, Andrea; Heilmann, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    Membranes made from nanoporous alumina exhibit interesting properties for their use in biomedical research. They show high porosity and the pore diameters can be easily adjusted in a reproducible manner. Nanoporous alumina membranes are thus ideal substrates for the cultivation of polar cells (e.g., hepatocytes) or the establishment of indirect co-cultures. The porous nature of the material allows supply of nutrients to both sides of adherent cells and the exchange of molecules across the membrane. However, it is well-known that surface features in the nanometer range affect cellular behavior. In this study, the response of HepG2 cells to nanoporous alumina membranes with three different pore diameters, ranging from 50 to 250 nm, has been evaluated. The cellular interactions with the nanoporous materials were assessed by investigating cell adhesion, morphology, and proliferation. Cell functionality was measured by means of albumin production. The membranes supported good cell adhesion and spreading. Compared to tissue culture plastic, the cells on the porous substrates developed distinct focal adhesion sites and actin stress fibers. Additionally, electron microscopical investigations revealed the penetration of cellular extensions into pores with diameters bigger than 200 nm. Furthermore, cell proliferation significantly increased with an increase in pore diameter, whereas the albumin production followed a reverse trend. Thus, it seems to be possible to direct cellular behavior of HepG2 cells growing on nanoporous alumina by changing the pore diameter of the material. Hence, nanoporous alumina membranes can be useful culture substrates to develop new approaches in the field of liver tissue engineering. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Predicting cellular growth from gene expression signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo M Airoldi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining balanced growth in a changing environment is a fundamental systems-level challenge for cellular physiology, particularly in microorganisms. While the complete set of regulatory and functional pathways supporting growth and cellular proliferation are not yet known, portions of them are well understood. In particular, cellular proliferation is governed by mechanisms that are highly conserved from unicellular to multicellular organisms, and the disruption of these processes in metazoans is a major factor in the development of cancer. In this paper, we develop statistical methodology to identify quantitative aspects of the regulatory mechanisms underlying cellular proliferation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that the expression levels of a small set of genes can be exploited to predict the instantaneous growth rate of any cellular culture with high accuracy. The predictions obtained in this fashion are robust to changing biological conditions, experimental methods, and technological platforms. The proposed model is also effective in predicting growth rates for the related yeast Saccharomyces bayanus and the highly diverged yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, suggesting that the underlying regulatory signature is conserved across a wide range of unicellular evolution. We investigate the biological significance of the gene expression signature that the predictions are based upon from multiple perspectives: by perturbing the regulatory network through the Ras/PKA pathway, observing strong upregulation of growth rate even in the absence of appropriate nutrients, and discovering putative transcription factor binding sites, observing enrichment in growth-correlated genes. More broadly, the proposed methodology enables biological insights about growth at an instantaneous time scale, inaccessible by direct experimental methods. Data and tools enabling others to apply our methods are available at http://function.princeton.edu/growthrate.

  11. Contributions of three glycosyltransferases to sucrose-dependent adherence of Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooshima, T; Matsumura, M; Hoshino, T; Kawabata, S; Sobue, S; Fujiwara, T

    2001-07-01

    Streptococcus mutans produces 3 types of glucosyltransferase (GTF), whose cooperative action is considered to be essential for its cellular adherence to the tooth surface. However, the precise mechanisms for synthesizing adhesive glucans and the specific roles of each GTF in cellular adherence to smooth surfaces have not been elucidated. In the present study, seven types of isogenic mutants of S. mutans MT8148 lacking GTFB, GTFC, and/or GTFD activities were constructed by inactivation of the genes encoding GTFB, GTFC, and/or GTFD. Furthermore, recombinant GTFB, GTFC, and GTFD were prepared from Escherichia coli cells harboring recombinant plasmids containing each of the gtf genes. Using these GTF-deficient mutants and rGTFs, we reconstituted sucrose-dependent adherence of S. mutans resting cells and examined the role of each GTF in vitro. The highest level of sucrose-dependent adherence was found at the ratio of 20 rGTFB:1 rGTFC:4 rGTFD in both the resting cells of GTF-deficient mutants and insoluble glucan synthesized by rGTFs. Moreover, when rGTFC and rGTFD were both present at concentrations of 1.5 mU and 6 mU, respectively, the insoluble glucan synthesized from sucrose by the rGTFs showed a high level of adhesiveness to smooth surfaces, even without rGTFB. These results suggest that the presence of all three GTFs at the optimum ratio is necessary for sucrose-dependent adherence of S. mutans, and that GTFC and GTFD may play significant roles in the synthesis of adhesive and insoluble glucan from sucrose.

  12. Analysis of the growth pattern of Vero cells cultured on dense and porous poly (L-Lactic Acid scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldo Rodrigues Santos Jr

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Poly (L-lactic acid (PLLA polymers are the most frequently used substrates for cell culture, tissue regeneration and orthopedic prostheses, mainly because of their atoxic characteristics and good biocompatibility. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether a higher density or different pore diameters (less than 45, 180-250, and 250-350 µm would change the growth pattern of cultured cells. The cells were found to adhere to and spread over all PLLA scaffolds studied. The cells also showed similar proliferation on dense and porous PLLA scaffolds, except for PLLA scaffolds with a smaller pore diameter. The cytochemical data showed high metabolic cellular activity on the various substrates. Overall, the results indicated satisfactory cell growth and proliferation on the different PLLA scaffolds studied, especially for those with pore diameters of 180-250 µm and 250-350 µm.

  13. Cellular regulation of the dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) mediates reuptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft and is a target for widely abused psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine. Nonetheless, little is known about the cellular distribution and trafficking of natively expressed DAT. DAT and its trafficking...... in heterologous cells and in cultured DA neurons. DAT has been shown to be regulated by the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R), the primary target foranti-psychotics, through a direct interaction. D2R is among other places expressed as an autoreceptor in DA neurons. Transient over-expression of DAT with D2R in HEK293...

  14. Conceptualisations of masculinity and self-reported medication adherence among HIV-positive Latino men in Los Angeles, California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, Frank H; Bogart, Laura M; Wagner, Glenn J; Klein, David J; Chen, Ying-Tung

    2014-06-01

    HIV-positive Latino men have been found to have poorer medication adherence compared to Whites. This study sought to identify how cultural conceptualisations of masculinity are associated with self-reported medication adherence among Latino men. A total of 208 HIV-positive men reported the number of doses of antiretroviral medication missed in the previous seven days (dichotomised at 100% adherence versus less). Conceptualisations of masculinity consisted of traditional machismo (e.g., power and aggressive attitudes, which are normally associated with negative stereotypes of machismo) and caballerismo (e.g., fairness, respect for elders and the importance of family). Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with adherence. The mean adherence was 97% (SD = 6.5%; range = 57-100%). In all, 77% of the participants reported 100% adherence in the previous seven days. Caballerismo was associated with a greater likelihood (OR = 1.77; 95% CI: 1.08-2.92; p = 0.03) and machismo with a lower likelihood (OR = 0.60; 95% CI: 0.38-0.95; p = 0.03) of medication adherence. In addition, higher medication side-effects were found to be associated with a lower likelihood (OR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.43-0.81; p = 0.001) of medication adherence. These findings reinforce the importance of identifying cultural factors that may affect medication adherence among HIV-positive Latino men resident in the USA.

  15. Effects of adherence to antiretroviral therapy on body mass index ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S.A. Olowookere

    2015-06-19

    Jun 19, 2015 ... ure, development of drug resistance and subsequent virological and immunological failure.4,5. Although .... adherence during counseling sessions, although 95% adher- ence is sufficient to suppress viral load to .... evaluation and adherence measurement by self report. In conclusion, P95% adherence to ...

  16. Personal barriers to antiretroviral therapy adherence: Case studies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Although good adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is essential for successful treatment outcomes, some patients may have specific personal barriers to ART adherence. Objectives: To study specific personal barriers to ART adherence. Methods: Quantitative data on patients' health status, ART adherence ...

  17. Practical and Conceptual Challenges in Measuring Antiretroviral Adherence

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, Karina M.; Arnsten, Julia H.

    2006-01-01

    Accurate measurement of antiretroviral adherence is essential for targeting and rigorously evaluating interventions to improve adherence and prevent viral resistance. Across diseases, medication adherence is an individual, complex, and dynamic human behavior that presents unique measurement challenges. Measurement of medication adherence is further complicated by the diversity of available measures, which have different utility in clinical and research settings. Limited understanding of how t...

  18. Advancing the Science and Practice of Medication Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirratt, Michael J; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Danila, Maria I; Hansen, Richard; Miller, Michael J; Gakumo, C Ann

    2018-02-01

    Medication adherence remains a significant unmet challenge for optimizing patient outcomes. Recent advances in the conceptualization, measurement, and support of medication adherence offer fresh opportunities to make a meaningful impact on adherence-related behavior and outcomes. These advances emphasize the multifaceted and dynamic nature of medication adherence, provide novel methods for monitoring medication adherence in clinical care, and articulate a set of multilevel strategies to more effectively improve and sustain medication adherence. Here, we offer recommendations for how clinicians can better engage with, and benefit from, these innovations to improve patient medication adherence and associated treatment outcomes.

  19. Adherence to antiepileptic therapy in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowmya Chinnaiyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Epilepsy is a neurological disorder affecting 70 million worldwide. The high incidence of relapse can be attributed to nonadherence, thus increasing the incidence of refractory epilepsy to 10%–20%. Aims: This study was planned to determine rate of adherence and factors affecting adherence using Antiepileptic Adherence Questionnaire and Baseline Adherence Questionnaire. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study was carried out at a rural hospital from May to September 2015. Patients of either gender aged 18–60 years, diagnosed with epilepsy were interviewed after they consented. Patient details, responses to questionnaires were collected and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: Among the participants, 67.8% were males and 32.2% were females with the mean age of 38.3 ± 13.9 years. The response rate was 75% (90/120. The majority were literate (64.4% and employed (58.9%. The duration of disease was <5 years in most individuals; 50% were highly, 21.1% moderately, and 28.9% nonadherent to treatment. Among the highly adherent, 66.7% never skipped medications because they had knowledge of the disease and treatment. More than 97% were satisfied with the social support, and 89% expressed that their family and friends reminded them to take medications. Patients who were nonadherent to treatment attributed it to the lack of knowledge of the disease (57% and treatment (96%. Reasons for nonadherence were patients assumed drug was harmful, felt cured of the disease, and wanted to avoid side effects. Conclusion: Nearly, 70% expressed the lack of satisfactory support from the social circle. We observed that nearly seventy percent epileptic patients were moderate-highly adherent. Nonadherence was attributed to patient feeling cured of disease and assuming medications to be harmful. Counseling of patients will help in adherence to treatment.

  20. Interventions to increase adherence to acne treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moradi Tuchayi S

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sara Moradi Tuchayi,1 Tiffany M Alexander,2 Anish Nadkarni,1 Steven R Feldman1,3,4 1Center for Dermatology Research, Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, 2Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, DC, 3Department of Public Health Sciences, 4Department of Pathology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Background: Adherence to acne medication is poor and is a major reason why treatment plans are ineffective. Recognizing solutions to nonadherence is critical. Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe the hurdles associated with acne nonadherence and to provide mechanisms on how to ameliorate them. Methods: PubMed database was searched. Of the 419 search results, 29 articles were reviewed to identify hurdles to adherence and corresponding solutions. Results: Hurdles to primary nonadherence where the medication is not even started, include lack of knowledge, confusion about usage, weak physician–patient relationship, fear of adverse reactions, and cost. Secondary nonadherence hurdles where the medication is started but is not taken as directed include lack of results, complex regimens, side effects, busy lifestyle, forgetfulness, inconvenience, and psychiatric comorbidity. Solutions to these hurdles include treatment simplification, technology, and dynamic education. Limitations: Adherence is affected by numerous factors, but available literature analyzing acne adherence and interventions to improve adherence to treatment is limited. Conclusion: There are several hurdles in adhering to acne treatment. Recognition of these hurdles and finding appropriate solutions may be as important to treatment outcomes as choosing the right medication to prescribe. Keywords: acne vulgaris, adherence, pathogenesis, treatment, quality of life, prevalence, physician–patient relationship, lifestyle, clinic visit, disease severity

  1. Factors affecting medication adherence in elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hyekyung; Kim, Yeonhee; Rhie, Sandy Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the functional health literacy (FHL) associated with medication adherence in elderly patients. The aim of this study was to examine the FHL among older adults and identify influencing factors that can predict medication adherence. This was a cross-sectional survey. Participants (n=160) aged 65 years and older were selected from outpatient clinics of 3 tertiary care hospitals, 6 community pharmacies, and 2 senior centers between November 1 and 30, 2014. The participants' FHL was measured using the Korean Functional Health Literacy Test, which consists of 15 items including 8 numeracy and 7 reading comprehension items. Medication adherence was measured by the Adherence to Refills and Medication Scale. Descriptive statistics, chi-square or Fisher's exact test, and multiple regression analyses were used to analyze the data. The mean score of the total FHL was 7.72±3.51 (range 0-15). The percentage of the total number of correct answers for the reading comprehension subtest and numeracy subtest were 48.1% and 54.4%, respectively. Among 160 participants, 52.5% showed low adherence to medication. The factors affecting medication adherence included the patient's degree of satisfaction with the service (β=-0.215, P =0.022), sufficient explanation of medication counseling (β=-0.335, P =0.000), education level (β=-0.153, P =0.045), health-related problems (β=-0.239, P =0.004), and dosing frequency (β=0.189, P =0.018). In this study, we found medication adherence of elderly patients was associated with education level, health-related problems, dosing frequency, satisfaction with patient counseling, and explanation of medication, but no association was found with FHL. Pharmacists should consider elderly patients' individual characteristics such as educational background and specific patient-related health problems, provide sufficient information and explanation of medication, and ensure patient satisfaction with the counseling.

  2. The function of medication beliefs as mediators between personality traits and adherence behavior in people with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axelsson M

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Malin Axelsson,1,2 Christina Cliffordson,2 Bo Lundbäck,1 Jan Lötvall11Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; 2Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, University West, Trollhättan, SwedenBackground: There is evidence that both personality traits and personal beliefs about medications affect adherence behavior. However, limited research exists on how personality and beliefs about asthma medication interact in influencing adherence behavior in people with asthma. To extend our knowledge in this area of adherence research, we aimed to determine the mediating effects of beliefs about asthma medication between personality traits and adherence behavior.Methods: Asthmatics (n=516 selected from a population-based study called West Sweden Asthma Study completed the Neuroticism, Extraversion and Openness to Experience Five-Factor Inventory, the Medication Adherence Report Scale, and the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire. Data were analyzed using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling.Results: Three of the five investigated personality traits – agreeableness, conscientiousness, and neuroticism – were associated with both concerns about asthma medication and adherence behavior. Concerns functioned as a partial mediator for the influencing effects of agreeableness, conscientiousness, and neuroticism on adherence behavior.Conclusion: The findings suggest that personality traits could be used to identify individuals with asthma who need support with their adherence behavior. Additionally, targeting concerns about asthma medication in asthmatics with low levels of agreeableness or conscientiousness or high levels of neuroticism could have a favorable effect on their adherence behavior.Keywords: adherence, individual differences, medication concerns, health behavior

  3. Cytokine-dependent long-term culture of highly enriched precursors of hematopoietic progenitor cells from human bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, J; Srour, E F; van Besien, K; Briddell, R A; Hoffman, R

    1990-09-01

    Human marrow cells positive for the CD34 antigen but not expressing HLA-DR, CD15, or CD71 antigens were isolated. In a liquid culture system supplemented with 48-hourly additions of recombinant interleukins IL-1 alpha, IL-3, IL-6, or granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), these cells were capable of sustaining in vitro hematopoiesis for up to eight weeks. The establishment of an adherent cell layer was never observed. Cultures containing no exogenous cytokine produced clonogenic cells for only 1 wk. IL-1 alpha and IL-6 were alone able to support hematopoiesis for 2 or 3 wk. Cells maintained with GM-CSF proliferated and contained assayable colony-forming cells for 3 or 4 wk, while maximal cellular expansion and generation of assayable progenitor cells occurred in the presence of IL-3 for 4-5 wk. When IL-3 was combined with IL-1 alpha or IL-6, hematopoiesis was sustained for 8 wks. Basophil numbers were markedly increased in the presence of IL-3. These studies indicate that marrow subpopulations can sustain hematopoiesis in vitro in the presence of repeated additions of cytokines. We conclude that a major function of marrow adherent cells in long-term cultures is that of providing cytokines which promote the proliferation and differentiation of primitive hematopoietic cells.

  4. Acinetobacter baumannii and A. pittii clinical isolates lack adherence and cytotoxicity to lung epithelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro-Díez, María; Navascués-Lejarza, Teresa; Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Navas, Jesús; Icardo, José Manuel; Acosta, Felix; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ramos-Vivas, José

    2016-09-01

    The molecular and genetic basis of Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter pittii virulence remains poorly understood, and there is still lack of knowledge in host cell response to these bacteria. In this study, we have used eleven clinical Acinetobacter strains (A. baumannii n = 5; A. pittii n = 6) to unravel bacterial adherence, invasion and cytotoxicity to human lung epithelial cells. Our results showed that adherence to epithelial cells by Acinetobacter strains is scarce and cellular invasion was not truly detected. In addition, all Acinetobacter strains failed to induce any cytotoxic effect on A549 cells. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Two-step protocol for preparing adherent cells for high-throughput flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Mandeep; Esau, Luke

    2015-09-01

    We have developed a simple, cost-effective, and labor-efficient two-step protocol for preparing adherent cells for high-throughput flow cytometry. Adherent cells were grown on microplates, detached with 2.9 mM EDTA (pH 6.14) added directly to wells containing cell culture medium, stained, and then analyzed on a flow cytometer. This protocol bypasses washing, centrifugation, and transfer between plates, reducing the cell loss that occurs in standard multistep protocols. The method has been validated using six adherent cell lines, four commercially available dyes, and two antibodies; the results have been confirmed using two different flow cytometry (FC) instruments. Our approach has been used for estimating apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential, reactive oxygen species, and autophagy in response to exposure to pure compounds as well as plant and bacterial extracts.

  6. Treatment adherence in patients with headache: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Rachelle R; Ryan, Jamie L; Hershey, Andrew D; Powers, Scott W; Aylward, Brandon S; Hommel, Kevin A

    2014-05-01

    To review and critically evaluate the extant research literature pertaining to adherence in youth and adults with headache and to provide recommendations for future research. This article provides the first systematic review of pediatric headache adherence and updates a previous review of treatment adherence in adults with headache. Systematic review of empirical literature. A literature search with no date restriction was conducted using PubMed and PsycINFO electronic databases and bibliographies of relevant articles. Adherence rates in adults with headache range considerably from 25% to 94% across treatment, assessment method, and definition of adherence utilized. Methods to assess adherence included retrospective prescription claims data, paper or electronic diaries, follow-up appointment attendance, written and verbal self-report of general adherence, verbal self-report of adherence over a specific amount of time via in person interview or telephone, validated adherence measures, adherence questionnaires without validation, and counselor ratings of homework. Each methodology and assessment tool demonstrated strengths and weaknesses. No studies have systematically examined medication adherence in children with headache, and the few available studies examining adherence to behavioral treatment have documented adherence rates ranging from 52% to 86%. Adherence research in adults with headache is growing, but studies demonstrate a number of methodological shortcomings. Adherence research in children with headache, and adherence intervention research in both adults and children, is scant. Future research should use objective measures of adherence, consider over-the-counter medications and medication overuse, examine demographic, psychological, and behavioral correlates of adherence, assess adherence to botulinum toxin type A, and examine the efficacy of adherence interventions in individuals with headache. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  7. Treatment Adherence Intervention Studies in Dermatology and Guidance on How to Support Adherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feldman, S.R.; Vrijens, B.; Gieler, U.; Piaserico, S.; Puig, L.; Kerkhof, P. van de

    2017-01-01

    Adequate adherence to prescribed treatment regimens can help to break the cycle of treatment failure, disease progression and subsequent treatment escalation. Unfortunately, adherence in the treatment of skin disorders such as acne, atopic dermatitis/eczema and psoriasis is often inadequate. A

  8. Ion channels involved in cell volume regulation: effects on migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death in non adherent EAT cells and adherent ELA cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2011-01-01

    This mini review outlines studies of cell volume regulation in two closely related mammalian cell lines: nonadherent Ehrlich ascites tumour cells (EATC) and adherent Ehrlich Lettre ascites (ELA) cells. Focus is on the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) that occurs after cell swelling, the volume regulatory ion channels involved, and the mechanisms (cellular signalling pathways) that regulate these channels. Finally, I shall also briefly review current investigations in these two cell lines that focuses on how changes in cell volume can regulate cell functions such as cell migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Measuring adherence to a women's walking program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, J; Chandler, P; Miller, A M

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the use of a self-report exercise log and a heart-rate monitor in the measurement of adherence to the dimensions of an exercise prescription and to propose an alternative way to define adherence to a 24-week home-based women's walking program, which reflects the dynamic process of behavior change. Adherence was measured with exercise logs, Polar Vantage XL Heart-Rate Monitors, and pre- to postintervention change in VO2 max. Of the dimensions of the exercise prescription, frequency of walks documented by both the heart-rate monitor and the exercise log had a higher correlation than duration and intensity of walking, with change in VO2 max suggesting that frequency was potentially the most predictive adherence measure. Examination of the total number of walks and the number and sequence of weeks without walks over the 24-week intervention revealed dynamic patterns of adherence suggesting variation in the degree of behavioral change.

  10. [Family adherence in serious mental disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Padilla, Ernesto; Obando Posada, Diana; Sarmiento Medina, Pedro

    2017-10-09

    Identify attitudes and behaviors that evidence and characterize family adherence to treatment in patients with severe mental disorder. Qualitative descriptive, from an interpretative social approach. Chia, Colombia, with professionals in the psychiatric and geriatric settings. Twelve professionals in psychiatry, nursing and psychology, with experience in care of patients with serious mental disorder and their families. Intentional sampling. Twelve semi-structured interviews were carried out. The analysis strategy was made from the procedures of constant comparison and open coding of the grounded theory. As validation strategies, triangulation was done between researchers and methods, as interviews and results survey. Two categories of family adherence were defined: family and treatment (treatment cooperation, knowledge about the disease and attention to the disease evolution), and family attitudes towards the patient (patient's care, patient's promotion of autonomy, and affective attachment with the patient). A third category showed aspects that diminished family adherence, such as lack or distortion of information regarding mental disorder, or family and patient endurance attitudes. Participants agree about the relevance of the construct named «family adherence», which describes the behaviors and attitudes of the family regarding the treatment of patients with severe mental disorder. Family adherence can be seen as active participation behavior, but also as a process of strengthening relationships, which can reduce the burden and suffering on family members, caregivers and patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Adipose-derived cellular therapies in solid organ and vascularized-composite allotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivers, Katlin B; Beare, Jason E; Chilton, Paula M; Williams, Stuart K; Kaufman, Christina L; Hoying, James B

    2017-10-01

    Controlling acute allograft rejection following vascularized composite allotransplantation requires strict adherence to courses of systemic immunosuppression. Discovering new methods to modulate the alloreactive immune response is essential for widespread application of vascularized composite allotransplantation. Here, we discuss how adipose-derived cellular therapies represent novel treatment options for immune modulation and tolerance induction in vascularized composite allotransplantation. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells are cultured from autologous or allogeneic adipose tissue and possess immunomodulatory qualities capable of prolonging allograft survival in animal models of vascularized composite allotransplantation. Similar immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory effects have been observed with noncultured adipose stromal-vascular-fraction-derived therapies, albeit publication of in-vivo stromal vascular fraction cell modulation in transplantation models is lacking. However, both stromal vascular fraction and adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell therapies have the potential to effectively modulate acute allograft rejection via recruitment and induction of regulatory immune cells. To date, most reports focus on adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells for immune modulation in transplantation despite their phenotypic plasticity and reliance upon culture expansion. Along with the capacity for immune modulation, the supplemental wound healing and vasculogenic properties of stromal vascular fraction, which are not shared by adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells, hint at the profound therapeutic impact stromal vascular fraction-derived treatments could have on controlling acute allograft rejection and tolerance induction in vascularized composite allotransplantation. Ongoing projects in the next few years will help design the best applications of these well tolerated and effective treatments that should reduce the risk/benefit ratio and allow more patients

  12. Hypertension control, predictors for medication adherence and gender differences in older Chinese immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Wen; Wallhagen, Margaret I; Froelicher, Erika S

    2008-02-01

    This paper is a report of a study to explore the relationship between demographic and cultural factors and antihypertensive medication adherence in older Chinese immigrants. Hypertension is a well-known controllable risk factor for cardiovascular diseases worldwide, but only 20-80% of patients who take antihypertensive medications adhere adequately to their treatment regimen. A cross-sectional study was conducted between 2002 and 2003, with a convenience sample of 75 older men and 69 older women (n = 144, response rate 80%). Medication adherence was defined as > or =80% of the total score on the Morisky scale. Age (75.2 +/- 5.7 vs. 75.9 +/- 7.0 years, P = 0.51) and length of stay in the United States of America (12.7 +/- 6.4 vs. 12.7 +/- 6.6 years, P = 0.97) were similar for men and women. More men were married (85% vs. 46%, P religion (49% vs. 70%, P = 0.01), and could speak no English (32% vs. 57%, P Chinese herbs to treat hypertension (4% vs.13%). Hypertension control was low for men and women (53% and 48%, P = 0.51). Adherence in men and women was 69% and 75% (P = 0.42) respectively. For men, shorter length of stay in the United States of America was negatively associated with non-adherence (OR = 0.16; 95% CI: 0.05, 0.57). No association between length of stay and non-adherence was found for women. More research, including gender-specific studies, is needed to understand better how to develop an effective and culturally sensitive strategy to help older Chinese immigrants manage their hypertension.

  13. Cellular kinetics of perivascular MSC precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, William C W; Park, Tea Soon; Murray, Iain R; Zimmerlin, Ludovic; Lazzari, Lorenza; Huard, Johnny; Péault, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) and MSC-like multipotent stem/progenitor cells have been widely investigated for regenerative medicine and deemed promising in clinical applications. In order to further improve MSC-based stem cell therapeutics, it is important to understand the cellular kinetics and functional roles of MSCs in the dynamic regenerative processes. However, due to the heterogeneous nature of typical MSC cultures, their native identity and anatomical localization in the body have remained unclear, making it difficult to decipher the existence of distinct cell subsets within the MSC entity. Recent studies have shown that several blood-vessel-derived precursor cell populations, purified by flow cytometry from multiple human organs, give rise to bona fide MSCs, suggesting that the vasculature serves as a systemic reservoir of MSC-like stem/progenitor cells. Using individually purified MSC-like precursor cell subsets, we and other researchers have been able to investigate the differential phenotypes and regenerative capacities of these contributing cellular constituents in the MSC pool. In this review, we will discuss the identification and characterization of perivascular MSC precursors, including pericytes and adventitial cells, and focus on their cellular kinetics: cell adhesion, migration, engraftment, homing, and intercellular cross-talk during tissue repair and regeneration.

  14. Cellular Kinetics of Perivascular MSC Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. W. Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs and MSC-like multipotent stem/progenitor cells have been widely investigated for regenerative medicine and deemed promising in clinical applications. In order to further improve MSC-based stem cell therapeutics, it is important to understand the cellular kinetics and functional roles of MSCs in the dynamic regenerative processes. However, due to the heterogeneous nature of typical MSC cultures, their native identity and anatomical localization in the body have remained unclear, making it difficult to decipher the existence of distinct cell subsets within the MSC entity. Recent studies have shown that several blood-vessel-derived precursor cell populations, purified by flow cytometry from multiple human organs, give rise to bona fide MSCs, suggesting that the vasculature serves as a systemic reservoir of MSC-like stem/progenitor cells. Using individually purified MSC-like precursor cell subsets, we and other researchers have been able to investigate the differential phenotypes and regenerative capacities of these contributing cellular constituents in the MSC pool. In this review, we will discuss the identification and characterization of perivascular MSC precursors, including pericytes and adventitial cells, and focus on their cellular kinetics: cell adhesion, migration, engraftment, homing, and intercellular cross-talk during tissue repair and regeneration.

  15. Free fall and cellular automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Arrighi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Three reasonable hypotheses lead to the thesis that physical phenomena can be described and simulated with cellular automata. In this work, we attempt to describe the motion of a particle upon which a constant force is applied, with a cellular automaton, in Newtonian physics, in Special Relativity, and in General Relativity. The results are very different for these three theories.

  16. The relationship of gender and gender identity to treatment adherence among individuals with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajatovic, Martha; Micula-Gondek, Weronika; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Bialko, Christopher

    2011-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that 46% to 48% of individuals with bipolar disorder (BD) are at least partially nonadherent with prescribed medication. Reports of whether male gender is a predictor of treatment nonadherence in BD have been inconsistent. The construct of gender may also be a matter of cultural orientation, and psychological gender, as a component of self-perception, may affect the experience of mental illness. Gender identity is the subjective experience of one's individuality as male or female. This cross-sectional study evaluated gender and gender identity among men and women with BD as they relate to self-reported medication treatment adherence. This secondary analysis of a larger study on treatment adherence evaluated men and women with BD being treated with mood-stabilizing medications in a community mental health clinic. Gender identity and treatment adherence were evaluated using the Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI) and the Tablets Routine Questionnaire, respectively. Other measures included assessing BD symptoms using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and mania symptoms using the Young Mania Rating Scale, as well as psychosocial support with the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List and locus of control with the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale. Mean age of the 70 men and 70 women with type I BD was 43.1 years for adherent patients and 40.8 years for nonadherent patients. Women with BD had mean scores on the BSRI consistent with general population norms, whereas men with BD had scores suggesting lower levels of self-perceived masculinity than population norms. There were no differences between men and women on adherence; however, men with high BSRI masculinity scores had less adherence than other men in the sample (P = 0.04). Lower scores on the "powerful others" dimension of locus of control were associated with lower adherence. For women, there was no relationship between BSRI masculinity scores and adherence. Gender identity in

  17. Cellular automata analysis and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hadeler, Karl-Peter

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on a coherent representation of the main approaches to analyze the dynamics of cellular automata. Cellular automata are an inevitable tool in mathematical modeling. In contrast to classical modeling approaches as partial differential equations, cellular automata are straightforward to simulate but hard to analyze. In this book we present a review of approaches and theories that allow the reader to understand the behavior of cellular automata beyond simulations. The first part consists of an introduction of cellular automata on Cayley graphs, and their characterization via the fundamental Cutis-Hedlund-Lyndon theorems in the context of different topological concepts (Cantor, Besicovitch and Weyl topology). The second part focuses on classification results: What classification follows from topological concepts (Hurley classification), Lyapunov stability (Gilman classification), and the theory of formal languages and grammars (Kůrka classification). These classifications suggest to cluster cel...

  18. MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Howard; Venkatesan, Sivarama

    2012-01-01

    As the theoretical foundations of multiple-antenna techniques evolve and as these multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) techniques become essential for providing high data rates in wireless systems, there is a growing need to understand the performance limits of MIMO in practical networks. To address this need, MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks presents a systematic description of MIMO technology classes and a framework for MIMO system design that takes into account the essential physical-layer features of practical cellular networks. In contrast to works that focus on the theoretical performance of abstract MIMO channels, MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks emphasizes the practical performance of realistic MIMO systems. A unified set of system simulation results highlights relative performance gains of different MIMO techniques and provides insights into how best to use multiple antennas in cellular networks under various conditions. MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks describes single-user,...

  19. MSAT and cellular hybrid networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowsky, Patrick W., II

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation is developing both the Communications Ground Segment and the Series 1000 Mobile Phone for American Mobile Satellite Corporation's (AMSC's) Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system. The success of the voice services portion of this system depends, to some extent, upon the interoperability of the cellular network and the satellite communication circuit switched communication channels. This paper will describe the set of user-selectable cellular interoperable modes (cellular first/satellite second, etc.) provided by the Mobile Phone and described how they are implemented with the ground segment. Topics including roaming registration and cellular-to-satellite 'seamless' call handoff will be discussed, along with the relevant Interim Standard IS-41 Revision B Cellular Radiotelecommunications Intersystem Operations and IOS-553 Mobile Station - Land Station Compatibility Specification.

  20. [A treatment-adherence study based on diabetic patients' behaviour in Cartagena, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alayón, Alicia N; Mosquera-Vásquez, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Ascertaining levels of self-reported adherence and metabolic control (from a bio-psychosocial perspective) aimed at putting forward culturally-sensitive strategies leading to better results being achieved by diabetes programmes. A descriptive study was conducted, involving 131 diabetic patients who were affiliated to one of the largest health insuring entities in the city of Cartagena, Colombia. Interviews were held for ascertaining the levels of self-reported adherence; glucosylated haemoglobin A1c was measured to evaluate metabolic control. The average adherence score obtained on a scale from 0 to 7 was of 4.6 (3.8-5.4 95 %CI). The highest scores were 6.6 for non-tobacco use (5.5-7.8 95 %CI) and 6.2 for medication (5.9-6.6 95 %CI). The lowest ones were 0.4 for self-monitoring (0.4-0.5 95 %CI), 3.4 for physical exercise (2.8-4.0 95 %CI) and 4.4 for consuming vegetables (3.7-5.2 95 %CI). The desired metabolic control was achieved in 58 % of patients; however, these results were not consistent with self-reported adherence. The authors recommend independently evaluating adherence for each pattern to strengthen non-pharmacological treatment as part of diabetes' programmes and to implement relevant action for achieving greater accessibility to such programmes.

  1. [Effect of autoinducer 2 on Riemerell antatipestifer adherence and invasion to Vero cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Han, Xiangan; Liu, Rui; Bai, Hao; Dong, Hongliang; Ding, Chan; Liu, Haiwen; Yu, Shengqing

    2013-03-04

    Autoinducer 2 (AI-2), used to communicate among bacterial species, regulates numerous physiological functions of bacteria. In this study, we studied the effect of AI-2 on adherence and invasion of Riemerella antatipestifer (RA) strain CH3 to Vero cells and transcriptional levels of virulence-related and metabolism-related genes were investigated. To verify whether the adherence and invasion of CH3 was affected by AI-2, we added different concentrations of AI-2 to the cocultures of Vero cells and CH3 and then calculated adherence percentages and invasion percentages of tested groups. We further added AI-2 (184.0 micromol/L) to the tryptone soya broth culture of CH3 and then detected the effect of transcriptional levels of related genes of CH3 using real-time PCR. The adherence of CH3 to Vero cells was decreased most to 62% with 18.4 micromol/L AI-2 and the invasion of CH3 to Vero cells was increased most to 194% with 184.0 micromol/L AI-2. The result of real-time PCR shows that AI-2 increased transcriptional levels of some virulence-related genes and decreased transcriptional levels of some metabolism-related genes. These results suggest that AI-2 affected adherence and invasion of CH3 to Vero cells. Moreover, AI-2 could regulate some genes of CH3 to modulate particular physiological behaviors.

  2. Adherence of Bordetella bronchiseptica to swine nasal epithelial cells and its possible role in virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokomizo, Y; Shimizu, T

    1979-07-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica phase I organisms adhered well to swine nasal epithelial cells cultured in vitro, while phase III variants exhibited feeble adherence to the same cells. Similarly, firm attachment of phase I organisms and poor adhesion of phase III organisms to nasal epithelium were demonstrated in experimentally infected piglets. Electron microscopic observations of nasal mucosa infected with phase I organisms showed preferential adherence to the cilia of nasal epithelial cells; the association of bacteria and cilia appeared to be mediated by fuzzy or string-like surface appendages which extended out from the bacterial cell wall. The ability to attach to epithelial cells was significantly reduced by heating the bacteria at 100 degrees C for 1 h or by pretreatment with 1 per cent formalin. Trypsin digestion treatment did not greatly reduce the adherence. Rabbit antisera to living or formalinised phase I organisms markedly impaired the attachment of the bacteria. However, antisera to heated phase I organisms or living phase III organisms did not show inhibitory effects. These data indicate that the heat labile surface component which is specific to phase I organisms may function in the adherence of the bacteria to swine nasal epithelium.

  3. Late Adherent Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Form Bone and Restore the Hematopoietic Microenvironment In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica Fernandes Vianna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs are a valuable resource for skeletal regenerative medicine because of their osteogenic potential. In spite of the very general term “stem cell,” this population of cells is far from homogeneous, and different BMSCs clones have greatly different phenotypic properties and, therefore, potentially different therapeutic potential. Adherence to a culture flask surface is a primary defining characteristic of BMSCs. We hypothesized that based on the adherence time we could obtain an enriched population of cells with a greater therapeutic potential. We characterized two populations of bone marrow-derived cells, those that adhered by three days (R-cells and those that did not adhere by three days but did by six days (L-cells. Clones derived from L-cells could be induced into adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation in vitro. L-cells appeared to have greater proliferative capacity, as manifested by larger colony diameter and clones with higher CD146 expression. Only clones from L-cells developed bone marrow stroma in vivo. We conclude that the use of late adherence of BMSCs is one parameter that can be used to enrich for cells that will constitute a superior final product for cell therapy in orthopedics.

  4. Barriers and facilitators of adherence to antidepressants among outpatients with major depressive disorder: A qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Ching Ho

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges in treating major depressive disorder (MDD is patients' non-adherence to medication. This study aimed to explore the barriers and facilitators of patients' adherence to antidepressants among outpatients with MDD.Semi-structured and individual in-depth interviews were conducted among patients with MDD who were taking antidepressants, in the psychiatric clinic of a government-run hospital in Malaysia. Participants were purposively sampled from different genders and ethnicities. Interviews were conducted using a validated topic guide, and responses were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, checked, and analyzed using the grounded theory approach.A total of 30 patients were interviewed. Forty different themes and sub-themes were identified which were conceptually divided into two distinct categories related to barriers and facilitators to adherence. The barriers were: patient-specific, medication-specific, healthcare provision and system, social-cultural, and logistics. The facilitators were: having insight, perceived health benefits, regular activities, patient-provider relationship, reminders, and social support networks.Patient-specific barriers and medication side effects were the major challenges for adhering to treatment. Perceived health benefits and having insight on the need for treatment were the most frequently cited facilitators. Targeted interventions should be developed to address the key barriers, and promote measures to facilitate adherence in this group of patients.

  5. Biomimetic substrate control of cellular mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andalib, Mohammad Nahid; Dzenis, Yuris; Donahue, Henry J; Lim, Jung Yul

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular mechanophysical signals from both static substrate cue and dynamic mechanical loading have strong potential to regulate cell functions. Most of the studies have adopted either static or dynamic cue and shown that each cue can regulate cell adhesion, spreading, migration, proliferation, lineage commitment, and differentiation. However, there is limited information on the integrative control of cell functions by the static and dynamic mechanophysical signals. For example, a majority of dynamic loading studies have tested mechanical stimulation of cells utilizing cultures on flat surfaces without any surface modification. While these approaches have provided significant information on cell mechanotransduction, obtained outcomes may not correctly recapitulate complex cellular mechanosensing milieus in vivo. Several pioneering studies documented cellular response to mechanical stimulations upon cultures with biomimetic substrate modifications. In this min-review, we will highlight key findings on the integrative role of substrate cue (topographic, geometric, etc.) and mechanical stimulation (stretch, fluid shear) in modulating cell function and fate. The integrative approaches, though not fully established yet, will help properly understand cell mechanotransduction under biomimetic mechanophysical environments. This may further lead to advanced functional tissue engineering and regenerative medicine protocols.

  6. Adherence and intracellular parasitism of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in Vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, S A; Monteiro da Silva, J L; Giannini, M J

    2000-07-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a dimorphic fungus known to produce invasive systemic disease in humans. The 43-kDa glycoprotein of P. brasiliensis is the major diagnostic antigen of paracoccidioidomycosis and may act as a virulence factor, since it is a receptor for laminin.Very little is known about early interactions between this fungus and the host cells, so we developed in vitro a model system employing cultured mammalian cells (Vero cells), in order to investigate the factors and virulence mechanisms of P.brasiliensis related to the adhesion and invasion process. We found that there is a permanent interaction after 30 min of contact between the fungus and the cells. The yeasts multiply in the cells for between 5 and 24 h. Different strains of P. brasiliensis were compared, and strain 18 (high virulence) was the most strongly adherent, followed by strain 113 (virulent), 265 (considered of low virulence) and 113M (mutant obtained by ultraviolet radiation, deficient in gp43). P. brasiliensis adhered to the epithelial cells by a narrow tube, while depressions were noticed in the cell surface, suggesting an active cavitation process. An inhibition assay was performed and it was verified that anti-gp43 serum and a pool of sera from individuals with paracoccidioidomycosis were able to inhibit the adhesion of P. brasiliensis to the Vero cells. Glycoprotein 43 (gp43) antiserum abolished 85% of the binding activity of P. brasiliensis. This fungus can also invade the Vero cells, and intraepithelial parasitism could be an escape mechanism in paracoccidioidomycosis.

  7. Unique functions of hydroxyapatite with mutans streptococci adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Tadayoshi; Fujimaru, Takeshi; Ishizak, Tsutomu; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Kageyama, Masato; Ikemi, Takuji; Hanada, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Haruo; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2010-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is used as a construction material for artificial supplementation of enamel tooth surfaces to improve oral hygiene. This study examined in vitro HA interactions with mutans streptococci (MS) and bacterial adherence to small (nanosize) crystal form of HA beads having a protean hexagonal structure. The adsorption and physical effects of HA employed in vivo is also described. [3H-thymidine]-labeled streptococci were incubated with HA noncoated or coated with salivary components or salivary agglutinin peptide (SRCRP2), a receptor for streptococcal surface proteins. Bacterial adhesion activities on HA were measured by uptake of [3H-thymidine]. Application of HA paste in an individual tray was tried on the tooth surface, and its effects on the colony ratio of MS/total streptococci (TS) in saliva were analyzed by culture technique. The adhesion assay showed that the binding of streptococci to HA was inhibited by coating with salivary components, whereas coating with SRCRP2 had nearly no influence on binding with or without Ca+. Further, treatment with HA decreased the adherence of Streptococci mutans to roughened enamel surfaces by one-third. In vivo application of a HA dentifrice to individual teeth demonstrated that the colony number ratio of MS/TS slowly decreased. MS adhesion to HA was restricted by both salivary components, except for SRCRP2, and the physical effects of HA; in addition, the material itself has a unique effect for removing MS from the oral cavity.

  8. Improving medication adherence in patients with hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Ulla; Kjeldsen, Lene Juel; Pottegård, Anton

    2015-01-01

    medication adherence in hypertensive patients. Motivational interviewing was a key element of the intervention. METHODS: Patients (N=532) were recruited from 3 hospital outpatient clinics and randomized to usual care or a 6-month pharmacist intervention comprising collaborative care, medication review......BACKGROUND: and Purpose: In patients with hypertension, medication adherence is often suboptimal, thereby increasing the risk of ischemic heart disease and stroke. In a randomized trial, we investigated the effectiveness of a multifaceted pharmacist intervention in a hospital setting to improve......, tailored adherence counselling including motivational interviewing and telephone follow-ups. The primary outcome was composite medication possession ratio (MPR) to antihypertensive and lipid-lowering agents, at one-year follow-up, assessed by analyzing pharmacy records. Secondary outcomes at 12 months...

  9. [Effect of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 on Adherence Between Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Endothelial Progenitor Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun; Xia, Jie; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Xiao-Yi; Hou, Ji-Xue; Chen, Xue-Ling; Wu, Xiang-Wei

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the effects of intercellular adhesion molecule-1(ICAM-1) on the adherence between mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). MSC and EPC were isolated, cultured and expanded from the 6-8 weeks aged C57BL/6 murine bone marrow by in vitro. Immuno-fluorescence was used to detect the expression of ICAM-1 in MSC group, EPC group and co-cultured MSC and EPC group. The mRNA and protein levels of ICAM-1 were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot respectively, then, the ICAM-1 adherence between MSC and EPC was observed by adding different concentration of neutralizing antibody. The expression of ICAM-1 on surface of MSC and EPC could be detected by cell immunofluorescence method. According to results of the semiquantitative fluorescene detection, the fluorescence strength of MSC+EPC co-cultured group (89.02 ± 24.52) was higher than that of MSC group (31.25 ± 2.95) and EPC group (34.32 ± 5.02), and there was statistical difference between them (P 0.05). RT-PCR detection showed that the expression levels of ICAM-1 in MSC+EPC co-cultured group were higher than that in MSC group and that in EPC group (P adhesion capability of MSC and EPC was gradually decreasing. The ICAM-1 can mediate the adherence process between MSC and EPC.

  10. Haemagglutinins and adherence properties to HeLa and intestine 407 cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podschun, R; Heineken, P; Sonntag, H G

    1987-03-01

    The occurrence of haemagglutination (HA) and adherence properties were examined in 50 strains of K. pneumoniae and 17 K. oxytoca strains isolated from humans. All isolates except three exhibited HA activity. Mannose-sensitive haemagglutinins (MSHA) were expressed by the majority of K. pneumoniae strains, but only by one K. oxytoca isolate. Mannose-resistant haemagglutination (MRHA) to human or guinea pig erythrocytes could not be detected; haemagglutinins of the MR/K type were found in both species with similar frequencies. Adhesive properties could be demonstrated in K. pneumoniae as often as in K. oxytoca: About half of the strains adhered to two human cell lines: HeLa and Intestine 407. The incidence of HA activity was similar in adhering and nonadhering strains. A correlation between MSHA, MR/K-HA and adherence to tissue-cultured cells could not be detected.

  11. Quantifying the global cellular thiol-disulfide status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rosa E; Roth, Doris; Winther, Jakob R

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the redox status of protein thiols is of central importance to protein structure and folding and that glutathione is an important low-molecular-mass redox regulator. However, the total cellular pools of thiols and disulfides and their relative abundance have never been...... determined. In this study, we have assembled a global picture of the cellular thiol-disulfide status in cultured mammalian cells. We have quantified the absolute levels of protein thiols, protein disulfides, and glutathionylated protein (PSSG) in all cellular protein, including membrane proteins. These data...... cell types. However, when cells are exposed to a sublethal dose of the thiol-specific oxidant diamide, PSSG levels increase to >15% of all protein cysteine. Glutathione is typically characterized as the "cellular redox buffer"; nevertheless, our data show that protein thiols represent a larger active...

  12. Medication non-adherence and uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriegbaum, Margit; Lau, Sofie Rosenlund

    2017-01-01

    . This applied to information from both mass media and from general practitioners. There was no clear pattern of information seeking and statin non-adherence. CONCLUSIONS: The article point to the impact of information-seeking on the decision to take cholesterol-lowering medication. This included contributions......BACKGROUND: Statins are widely prescribed to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, statin non-adherence is very high. PURPOSE: The aim of this paper was to investigate reasons for stopping statin treatment in the general population and to study how aspects of information...

  13. Factors affecting medication adherence in elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin HK

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hyekyung Jin,1 Yeonhee Kim,2 Sandy Jeong Rhie1,3 1College of Pharmacy, 2Center for Excellence in Teaching & Learning, 3Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea Background: Little is known about the functional health literacy (FHL associated with medication adherence in elderly patients. The aim of this study was to examine the FHL among older adults and identify influencing factors that can predict medication adherence. Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey. Participants (n=160 aged 65 years and older were selected from outpatient clinics of 3 tertiary care hospitals, 6 community pharmacies, and 2 senior centers between November 1 and 30, 2014. The participants’ FHL was measured using the Korean Functional Health Literacy Test, which consists of 15 items including 8 numeracy and 7 reading comprehension items. Medication adherence was measured by the Adherence to Refills and Medication Scale. Descriptive statistics, chi-square or Fisher’s exact test, and multiple regression analyses were used to analyze the data. Results: The mean score of the total FHL was 7.72±3.51 (range 0–15. The percentage of the total number of correct answers for the reading comprehension subtest and numeracy subtest were 48.1% and 54.4%, respectively. Among 160 participants, 52.5% showed low adherence to medication. The factors affecting medication adherence included the patient’s degree of satisfaction with the service (β=-0.215, P=0.022, sufficient explanation of medication counseling (β=-0.335, P=0.000, education level (β=-0.153, P=0.045, health-related problems (β=-0.239, P=0.004, and dosing frequency (β=0.189, P=0.018. Conclusion: In this study, we found medication adherence of elderly patients was associated with education level, health-related problems, dosing frequency, satisfaction with patient counseling, and explanation of medication, but no association was found with FHL. Pharmacists

  14. Community health workers adherence to referral guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lal, Sham; Ndyomugenyi, Richard; Paintain, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    and symptoms. CHW treatment registers were reviewed to identify children eligible for referral according to training guidelines (temperature of ≥38.5 °C), to assess whether CHWs adhered to the guidelines and referred them. Factors associated with adherence were examined with logistic regression models. Results...... to the referral guideline. Methods A secondary analysis was undertaken of data collected during two cluster-randomized trials conducted between January 2010 and July 2011, one in a moderate-to-high malaria transmission setting and the other in a low malaria transmission setting. All CHWs were trained to prescribe...

  15. In vitro modulation of the behavior of adhering macrophages by medications is biomaterial-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utomo, Lizette; Boersema, Geesien S A; Bayon, Yves; Lange, Johan F; van Osch, Gerjo J V M; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Yvonne M

    2017-03-07

    After implantation of a biomaterial, an inflammatory response involving macrophages is induced. The behavior of macrophages depends on their phenotype, and by directing macrophage polarization unwanted effects may be avoided. In this study, the possibility to modulate the behavior of macrophages activated by biomaterials was assessed in an in vitro model. Primary human monocytes were seeded on polyethylene terephthalate, polypropylene and polylactic acid yarns, and treated with medications frequently used by patients: rapamycin, dexamethasone, celecoxib or pravastatin. Modulation of the adhering macrophages with rapamycin resulted in a generally pro-inflammatory effect. Dexamethasone caused an overall anti-inflammatory effect on the macrophages cultured on either material, while celecoxib only affected macrophages adhering to polyethylene terephthalate and polylactic acid. Pravastatin increased the pro-inflammatory genes of macrophages cultured on polypropylene and polylactic acid. Pairwise comparison revealed that macrophages adhering to polylactic acid seemed to be more susceptible to phenotype modulation than when adhering to polypropylene or polyethylene terephthalate. The data show that macrophages activated by the biomaterials can be modulated, yet the degree of the modulatory capacity depends on the type of material. Combined, this model provides insights into the possibility of using a medication in combination with a biomaterial to direct macrophage behavior and thereby possibly avoid unwanted effects after implantation.

  16. Stable cellular senescence is associated with persistent DDR activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Fumagalli

    Full Text Available The DNA damage response (DDR is activated upon DNA damage generation to promote DNA repair and inhibit cell cycle progression in the presence of a lesion. Cellular senescence is a permanent cell cycle arrest characterized by persistent DDR activation. However, some reports suggest that DDR activation is a feature only of early cellular senescence that is then lost with time. This challenges the hypothesis that cellular senescence is caused by persistent DDR activation. To address this issue, we studied DDR activation dynamics in senescent cells. Here we show that normal human fibroblasts retain DDR markers months after replicative senescence establishment. Consistently, human fibroblasts from healthy aged donors display markers of DDR activation even three years in culture after entry into replicative cellular senescence. However, by extending our analyses to different human cell strains, we also observed an apparent DDR loss with time following entry into cellular senescence. This though correlates with the inability of these cell strains to survive in culture upon replicative or irradiation-induced cellular senescence. We propose a model to reconcile these results. Cell strains not suffering the prolonged in vitro culture stress retain robust DDR activation that persists for years, indicating that under physiological conditions persistent DDR is causally involved in senescence establishment and maintenance. However, cell strains unable to maintain cell viability in vitro, due to their inability to cope with prolonged cell culture-associated stress, show an only-apparent reduction in DDR foci which is in fact due to selective loss of the most damaged cells.

  17. Investigating acculturation orientations of patients with an immigration background and doctors in Canada: implications for medical advice adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittal, Amanda; Hanke, Katja; Lippke, Sonia

    2017-05-01

    Increased immigration requires successful interaction of different cultures in various life domains, such as health. This study investigates acculturation orientation (AO) of immigrant patients and doctors native to the country, as a potential factor related to perceived medical advice adherence. N = 171 immigrant patients (M = 54.38 years, SD = 17.94, range = 23-96, 74.3 % female) and their N = 12 doctors (M = 38.88 years, SD = 13.42, range = 27-66, 83 % female) from a hospital in Montreal, Canada, participated in a paper-based survey to assess AOs, patients' perceived expectations of their doctor (regarding adopting the new culture or keeping their previous culture), doctors' actual expectations, perceived quality of care and perceived adherence. AO of patients significantly related to perceived adherence, via a path model involving perceptions of doctors' expectations and perceived quality of care. Integration was positively related to perceived adherence, while Marginalization was negatively related to it. Doctors' AOs were not significant. Patient perceptions seem to be a significant factor to be considered when striving to improve immigrant medical advice adherence.

  18. Adherence logger for a dry powder inhaler: a new device for medical adherence research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogen, Daniel; Apter, Andrea J

    2004-10-01

    Adherence to inhaled steroid regimens is frequently poor. Finding ways to improve adherence depends on the ability to measure time and date of inhaler use reliably and to detect deliberate dose dumping. There is no such monitor for the popular new dry powder inhalers. To develop and test an electronic monitor for a dry powder inhaler that will provide information on the time and date of use. An electronic adherence monitor for the Advair Diskus dry powder inhaler was developed and tested. In this device, inhaler use is determined by detecting and recording the motion of the drug delivery lever in the inhaler with a magnetic sensor. An additional electronic interface and software were also developed to allow the adherence data to be uploaded to a computer for display and analysis. System and reliability tests involving multiple-day and repeated-use tests of the adherence monitor demonstrate the overall performance and reliability of the device, and specifically its ability to record the time and date of dose delivery. In the repeated-use test, 300 successive actuations of the dose delivery lever were correctly sensed and recorded without error. The simple-to-use, low-cost, reusable adherence monitor accurately records time and date of inhaler use and thus allows clinical monitoring and adherence studies in patients using the Advair Diskus dry powder inhaler. The same technology should be adaptable to other dry powder inhalers, including the Pulmicort Tubuhaler and the Symbicort Tubuhaler.

  19. Emerging Forms of Cultural Capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prieur, Annick; Savage, Mike

    Distinction about the significance and content of emerging forms of cultural capital in different Western societies. Among the claims to be discussed are the following: - the claim about a decline in the adherence to traditional highbrow or classic high culture - the claim about increased omnivorousness and......This paper reviews recent European studies to assess whether cultural capital now has the same characteristics – or may be rather the same functions - as when Distinction was written. The paper will examine empirical applications of the concept of cultural capital in leading European studies...... – and hence are highly appropriate for direct comparisons with that study. This paper will begin by raising general issues regarding the meaning of the concept, and about how one may make assessments and claims about cultural capital. Here we consider how the legitimacy of certain cultural competencies...

  20. Patients with COPD have low adherence to inhaled medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Toettenborg, Sandra; Topp, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Medicine adherence in patients with obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), has not been studied in Denmark. Studies from other countries, however, unequivocally report low prevalence of patients who follow their doctor's advice and have sufficient adherence to inhaled medicine. In this review we...... describe results of previous studies on prevalence of adherence to inhaled medicine in COPD, and define characteristics of the patients and treatment associated with degree of adherence. We conclude that health professionals should always consider non-adherence, strive to simplify regiments......, and that there is an urgent need of studies aiming at improving adherence in patients with COPD....

  1. Adherence to Diabetes Medication in Individuals with Schizophrenia: A Systematic Review of Rates and Determinants of Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczynski, Paul; Patel, Hiren; Ganguli, Rohan

    2017-01-01

    Despite the importance of medication adherence for the effective treatment of type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM), little research has examined adherence with diabetes medication treatment in schizophrenia. The purpose of this systematic review was to: 1) evaluate rates of adherence and determinants of adherence with medication for T2DM in individuals with schizophrenia; and, where possible, 2) examine the relationship between medication adherence and glycemic control. Studies were included if they presented information on dosing regimens and adherence or compliance rates for T2DM and included samples where at least 50% of the participants were individuals with schizophrenia. Six studies were included in this review that predominantly examined men over the age of 50 years. Studies confirmed that many individuals with schizophrenia were not adhering to their diabetes medication as adherence rates ranged from 51-85%. Two studies that compared medication adherence in individuals with and without schizophrenia found those with the mental illness had higher rates of adherence. One study reported that blood glucose control levels were not statistically different between those who did and did not adhere to their medication, indicating more research is necessary in this area. Factors that improved adherence included disease and medical service and medication-related factors. Interventions to increase diabetes medication adherence in schizophrenia need to address disease and medical service and medication-related factors. Further research needs to examine diabetes medication adherence in women, younger individuals, and those recently diagnosed with diabetes as these individuals have been underrepresented in the literature.

  2. Indicators of adherence to physiotherapy attendance among Saudi female patients with mechanical low back pain: a clinical audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Eisa Einas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among current musculoskeletal interventions used to treat low back pain (LBP, physiotherapy exercise has the highest evidence of effectiveness in avoiding recurrence and chronic disability. However, effectiveness of physiotherapy is thought to be directly related to the patients' adherence to physiotherapy. Since adherence is reported to be directly influenced by socio-cultural factors, this study was conducted to investigate factors related to patients' adherence in a group of Saudi female patients with LBP. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted on female LBP patients referred to the department of physiotherapy at a local tertiary hospital over a 12 month period. A total of 98 charts were reviewed. Two physiotherapists specialized in musculoskeletal rehabilitation collected information from the medical files. Data were classified in three categories: patients' personal demographics, patients' medical condition and history, and type of physiotherapy administered. Contingency tables and chi-square test were computed to test for differences in proportions. Spearman rank correlation coefficient was calculated to examine relationships among variables. Results Subjects who attended their scheduled appointments were classified as adherent (40%, and those who failed to attend 2 consecutive scheduled appointments and got discharged were classified as non-adherent (60%. Factors that significantly correlated with adherence included: age (r = 0.7, p Conclusion This study reveals an alarming level of non-adherence to physiotherapy among patients with LBP. It remains unclear as to what level of adherence is required to achieve beneficial effect of treatment. It is quite evident however, that early withdrawal from treatment would not allow the therapeutic benefits of the treatment to be realized. Future research should be directed toward developing strategies to improve adherence.

  3. Telephone interventions for adherence to colpocytological examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Marques Lima

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to test the effects of behavioral and educational intervention by telephone on adherence of women with inappropriate periodicity to colpocytological examination. Method: quasi-experimental study with a sample of 524 women, selected with the following inclusion criteria: be aged between 25 and 64 years, have initiated sexual activity, have inappropriate periodicity of examination and have mobile or landline phone. The women were divided into two groups for application of behavioral and educational intervention by telephone. It was used an intervention script according to the principles of Motivational Interviewing. Results: on comparing the results before and after the behavioral and educational interventions, it was found that there was a statistically significant change (p = 0.0283 with increase of knowledge of women who participated in the educational intervention. There was no change in the attitude of women of any of the groups and there was an increase of adherence to colpocytological examination in both groups (p < 0.0001, with greater adherence of women participating in the behavioral group (66.8%. Conclusion: the behavioral and educational interventions by phone were effective in the adherence of women to colpocytological examination, representing important strategies for permanent health education and promotion of care for the prevention of cervical cancer.

  4. Tuberculosis Treatment Adherence of Patients in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaip Krasniqi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Setting. The poor patient adherence in tuberculosis (TB treatment is considered to be one of the most serious challenges which reflect the decrease of treatment success and emerging of the Multidrug Resistance-TB (MDR-TB. To our knowledge, the data about patients’ adherence to anti-TB treatment in our country are missing. Objective. This study was aimed to investigate the anti-TB treatment adherence rate and to identify factors related to eventual nonadherence among Kosovo TB patients. Design. This study was conducted during 12 months, and the survey was a descriptive study using the standardized questionnaires with total 324 patients. Results. The overall nonadherence for TB patient cohort was 14.5%, 95% CI (0.109–0.188. Age and place of residence are shown to have an effect on treatment adherence. Moreover, the knowledge of the treatment prognosis, daily dosage, side effects, and length of treatment also play a role. This was also reflected in knowledge regarding compliance with regular administration of TB drugs, satisfaction with the treatment, interruption of TB therapy, and the professional monitoring in the administration of TB drugs. Conclusion. The level of nonadherence TB treatment in Kosovar patients is not satisfying, and more health care worker’s commitments need to be addressed for improvement.

  5. Adherence to methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Henning; Eriksen, Stine A; Christensen, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To study adherence to methotrexate (MTX) and factors of importance thereof in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Patients with a hospital diagnosis of RA (ICD10 codes M05.X or M06.X) after January 1, 1997, and aged ≥18 years at the date of first diagnosis...

  6. Dietary and fluid adherence among haemodialysis patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Psychology, Stellenbosch University. M.R. Moosa. MB ChB, FCP ... purpose of this paper was to determine the applicability of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) in predicting dietary and fluid adherence among a sample of ... behaviour and the evaluations of these outcomes), the individual's perception of ...

  7. Hypertension guideline adherence of private practitioners and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hypertension remains a healthcare problem in South Africa. When prescribing evidence-based, cost-effective anti-hypertensive treatment, guideline adherence is essential. The Joint National Committee's Sixth Report (JNC VI) built its evidence-based review on the outcome of clinical trials. The objective of this ...

  8. Factors Associated With Poor Medication Adherence In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: 237 adult patients aged 18 and above with previous diagnosis of essential hypertension receiving out patient care in the University Teaching Hospital ... Multivariable analysis showed that; participants were more likely to be non-adherent by self-report if they had attained a primary level of education, had missed ...

  9. Treatment adherence following national antiretroviral rollout in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The national antiretroviral (ARV) programme in South Africa commenced in 2004. ARV drugs became readily available to all South Africans due to the concerted efforts of 'access to all' campaigns. This study investigates medication adherence among a sample of South Africans after the ARV rollout in order to gain insight ...

  10. Tuberculosis Treatment Adherence of Patients in Kosovo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasniqi, Shaip; Jakupi, Arianit; Daci, Armond; Tigani, Bahri; Jupolli-Krasniqi, Nora; Pira, Mimoza; Zhjeqi, Valbona

    2017-01-01

    Setting The poor patient adherence in tuberculosis (TB) treatment is considered to be one of the most serious challenges which reflect the decrease of treatment success and emerging of the Multidrug Resistance-TB (MDR-TB). To our knowledge, the data about patients' adherence to anti-TB treatment in our country are missing. Objective This study was aimed to investigate the anti-TB treatment adherence rate and to identify factors related to eventual nonadherence among Kosovo TB patients. Design This study was conducted during 12 months, and the survey was a descriptive study using the standardized questionnaires with total 324 patients. Results The overall nonadherence for TB patient cohort was 14.5%, 95% CI (0.109–0.188). Age and place of residence are shown to have an effect on treatment adherence. Moreover, the knowledge of the treatment prognosis, daily dosage, side effects, and length of treatment also play a role. This was also reflected in knowledge regarding compliance with regular administration of TB drugs, satisfaction with the treatment, interruption of TB therapy, and the professional monitoring in the administration of TB drugs. Conclusion The level of nonadherence TB treatment in Kosovar patients is not satisfying, and more health care worker's commitments need to be addressed for improvement. PMID:29230326

  11. factors influencing adherence to routine iron supplementation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fineprint

    2016-06-01

    Jun 1, 2016 ... ABSTRACT. Anemia in pregnancy is a common problem especially in developing countries. and has been linked with feotal and maternal complications. Taking iron supplements could reduce anaemia in pregnancy but some pregnant women do not adhere to this. The study identified some factors ...

  12. Patient Medication Knowledge Governing Adherence to Asthma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Asthma is a chronic disease and often requires complex management. This study was undertaken in four pharmacies–V-Ninat Pharmacy, Videc Chemists, Tomabel Pharmacy and Josbet Chemists, all in Isolo, Lagos, to determine the level of adherence to the anti-asthmatic drugs by asthmatic patients who participated in the ...

  13. Patient Medication Knowledge Governing Adherence to Asthma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samuel Olaleye

    ABSTRACT: Asthma is a chronic disease and often requires complex management. This study was undertaken in four pharmacies–V-Ninat Pharmacy, Videc Chemists, Tomabel Pharmacy and Josbet Chemists, all in Isolo, Lagos, to determine the level of adherence to the anti-asthmatic drugs by asthmatic patients who ...

  14. Psoriasis: improving adherence to topical therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feldman, S.R.; Horn, E.J.; Balkrishnan, R.; Basra, M.K.; Finlay, A.Y.; McCoy, D.; Menter, A.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de

    2008-01-01

    Topical therapy has an important role in psoriasis treatment. It is efficacious and has a favorable safety profile as demonstrated in clinical trials. However, poor treatment outcomes from topical therapy regimens likely result from poor adherence and ineffective use of the medication. The

  15. Staff Knowledge, Adherence to Infection Control Recommendations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: We evaluated hemodialysis (HD) staff knowledge, adherence to infection control recommendations and seroconversion rates for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) in 13 centers that continuously provided HD services in Khartoum State between June 2009 and November 2010. Methods: The ...

  16. Sociodemographic factors influencing adherence to antenatal iron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While univariate analysis revealed the percent distributions of all variables, bivariate analysis was used to examine the relationships between individual independent variables and adherence to iron supplementation. Chi-square tests of independence were conducted for categorical variables, with the significance level set ...

  17. Adherence to traditional Indian customs surrounding birth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract CustOITlS traditionally followed by Indian women during pregnancy, birth and early parenthood have been ... Results indicate that while SOITle traditional. custOITlS are still adhered to by most Indian ..... sertation, University of rbe Witwatersrand, 1976. 5. Cherry R. The changing family: a srudy of the Indian family in.

  18. Social Support, Treatment Adherence and Outcome among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-02

    Jun 2, 2017 ... SUMMARY. Objectives: To evaluate available and desired sources and types of social-support among hypertensive and type-2- diabetes (T2D) patients. Associations of medication adherence and clinical outcome with access to most available social-support and medicine affordability were subsequently ...

  19. Determinants of patient's adherence to hypertension medications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects and Methods: A cross‑sectional study was conducted in a rural area of the Ardabil city in 2013. This study was ... Respondents with regular physical activity and nonsmokers were more adherent to hypertension medication when compared to respondents with sedentary lifestyle and smoking (P < 0.01). Based on ...

  20. Adherence to traditional Indian customs surrounding birth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Customs traditionally followed by Indian women during pregnancy, birth and early parenthood have been documented. An exploratory investigation of the extent to which some of these traditional beliefs, customs and practices are currently adhered to was undertaken by interviewing Indian mothers living in Johannesburg ...

  1. Dietary and fluid adherence among haemodialysis patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective There has been considerable debate about the extent to which social cognitive models of health behaviour apply in developing countries. The purpose of this paper was to determine the applicability of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) in predicting dietary and fluid adherence among a sample of ...

  2. Systems biology of cellular rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbeter, A; Gérard, C; Gonze, D; Leloup, J-C; Dupont, G

    2012-08-31

    Rhythms abound in biological systems, particularly at the cellular level where they originate from the feedback loops present in regulatory networks. Cellular rhythms can be investigated both by experimental and modeling approaches, and thus represent a prototypic field of research for systems biology. They have also become a major topic in synthetic biology. We review advances in the study of cellular rhythms of biochemical rather than electrical origin by considering a variety of oscillatory processes such as Ca++ oscillations, circadian rhythms, the segmentation clock, oscillations in p53 and NF-κB, synthetic oscillators, and the oscillatory dynamics of cyclin-dependent kinases driving the cell cycle. Finally we discuss the coupling between cellular rhythms and their robustness with respect to molecular noise.

  3. A Course in Cellular Bioengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    1989-01-01

    Gives an overview of a course in chemical engineering entitled "Cellular Bioengineering," dealing with how chemical engineering principles can be applied to molecular cell biology. Topics used are listed and some key references are discussed. Listed are 85 references. (YP)

  4. When are cellular automata random?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, J. B.; Ahnert, S. E.; Fink, T. M. A.

    2008-12-01

    A random cellular automaton is one in which a cell's behaviour is independent of its previous states. We derive analytical conditions which must be satisfied by random cellular automata and find deterministic and probabilistic cellular automata that satisfy these conditions. Many random cellular automata are seen to have a flow as they are updated through time. We define a correlation current that describes this flow and develop an analytical expression for its size. We compare results from this analytical expression with those from simulation. The randomness in a cell comes from randomness in adjacent cells or from the stochastic nature of update rules. We give an expression for how much randomness comes from each of these two sources.

  5. Psychosocial influencers and mediators of treatment adherence in haemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun Soo; Park, Ji Suk; Seo, Wha Sook

    2013-09-01

    This article is a report of the development and testing of the hypothetical model that illustrates relationships between treatment adherence and its psychosocial influencing factors and to elucidate the direct and indirect (mediating) effects of factors on treatment adherence. Poor adherence has been consistently reported in haemodialysis patients. Much research has showed various influencing factors of adherence, but these studies have failed to identify consistent influencing factors. This study was performed using a non-experimental, cross-sectional design. The study subjects were 150 end-stage renal failure patients on haemodialysis at a university hospital located in Incheon, South Korea. Data were collected over 10 months (June 2010-April 2011). The hypothetical model provided a good fit with data. Haemodialysis-related knowledge, perceived barrier to adherence, self-efficacy on adherence, and healthcare provider support had significant effects on adherence. Self-efficacy was found to mediate barrier-adherence and family support-adherence relationships. Self-efficacy in combination with barrier, family support, and healthcare provider support was found to mediate the depression-adherence relationship. Strategies aimed at the development of successful adherence interventions should focus on reducing perceived barriers and enhancing self-efficacy and knowledge. It can be suggested that efforts to improve the healthcare provider-patient relationship would enhance adherence. In depressive patients, strategies that promote self-efficacy and the support of family or healthcare providers could diminish the negative impact of depression on adherence. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Procefual Non Uniform Cellular Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Jonchier, Théo; Salvati, Marc; Derouet-Jourdan, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Procedural cellular textures have been widely used in movie production to reproduce various natural and organic looks. The advantage of procedural texture is to trade memory for computer power and obtain potentially unlimited resolution. In this paper, we propose to compute non-uniform density cellular noise by using a procedural quad-tree. We will explain how to efficiently traverse the tree recursively (CPU) and iteratively (CPU and GPU).

  7. Analysis of the Adherence of Dental Pulp Stem Cells on Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Silk Fibroin-Based Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecci-Lloret, María Pilar; Vera-Sánchez, Mar; Aznar-Cervantes, Salvador; García-Bernal, David; Sánchez, Ricardo Oñate; Pecci-Lloret, Miguel Ramón; Moraleda, José María; Cenis, José Luis; Rodríguez-Lozano, Francisco Javier

    2017-06-01

    Among various biomaterials used as scaffolds in tissue engineering, silk fibroin is a highly attractive material. A scaffold should be biocompatible and nontoxic, with optimal physical features and mechanical properties. For this reason, tissue-engineering approaches in regenerative medicine have focused on investigating the biocompatibility of possible biomaterials by analyzing cell-scaffold interaction properties. The aim of the present study was to examine the biocompatibility of silk fibroin as a film (two-dimensional [2D]) and a scaffold (three-dimensional [3D]) after being cellularized with human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). Human dental pulp stem cells were isolated from healthy patients aged between 18 and 31 years. Further, silk fibroin-based 2D films and 3D scaffolds were prepared. Human dental pulp stem cells were directly seeded onto the biomaterial surfaces and their proliferation, adherence, and cell morphology were analyzed after 24, 120, and 168 hours. Additionally, the characteristics of the silk fibroin 2D films and 3D scaffolds before and after cell seeding were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. After the initial 24 hours, silk fibroin-based 3D scaffolds displayed more adhered cells with a suitable fibroblastic morphology than those displayed on the 2D films. After longer culture times, hDPSCs proliferated sufficiently to cover the entire surface of the 3D silk fibroin scaffold, whereas the 2D films were only partially covered. Our results indicate the good in vitro biocompatibility of silk fibroin-based biomaterials, especially when 3D scaffolds rather than 2D films are used.

  8. Bacterial adherence to anodized titanium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peremarch, C Perez-Jorge; Tanoira, R Perez; Arenas, M A; Matykina, E; Conde, A; De Damborenea, J J; Gomez Barrena, E; Esteban, J, E-mail: cperemarch@fjd.es

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate Staphylococcus sp adhesion to modified surfaces of anodized titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). Surface modification involved generation of fluoride-containing titanium oxide nanotube films. Specimens of Ti-6Al-4V alloy 6-4 ELI-grade 23- meets the requirements of ASTM F136 2002A (AMS 2631B class A1) were anodized in a mixture of sulphuric/hydrofluoric acid at 20 V for 5 and 60 min to form a 100 nm-thick porous film of 20 nm pore diameter and 230 nm-thick nanotube films of 100 nm in diameter. The amount of fluorine in the oxide films was of 6% and of 4%, respectively. Collection strains and six clinical strains each of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis were studied. The adherence study was performed using a previously published protocol by Kinnari et al. The experiments were performed in triplicates. As a result, lower adherence was detected for collection strains in modified materials than in unmodified controls. Differences between clinical strains were detected for both species (p<0.0001, Kruskal-Wallis test), although global data showed similar results to that of collection strains (p<0.0001, Kruskal-Wallis test). Adherence of bacteria to modified surfaces was decreased for both species. The results also reflect a difference in the adherence between S. aureus and S. epidermidis to the modified material. As a conclusion, not only we were able to confirm the decrease of adherence in the modified surface, but also the need to test multiple clinical strains to obtain more realistic microbiological results due to intraspecies differences.

  9. Cellular lysis in Bacillus subtilis; the affect of multiple extracellular protease deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephenson, K; Bron, S; Harwood, CR

    Cellular lysis properties of strains of Bacillus subtilis deficient in the synthesis of extracellular proteases was investigated. In all cases, extracellular protease deficiency was found to increase the extent of cellular lysis of batch cultured strains following the transition to stationary phase,

  10. A cellular tensegrity model to analyse the structural viscoelasticity of the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañadas, Patrick; Laurent, Valerie M; Oddou, Christian; Isabey, Daniel; Wendling, Sylvie

    2002-09-21

    This study describes the viscoelastic properties of a refined cellular-tensegrity model composed of six rigid bars connected to a continuous network of 24 viscoelastic pre-stretched cables (Voigt bodies) in order to analyse the role of the cytoskeleton spatial rearrangement on the viscoelastic response of living adherent cells. This structural contribution was determined from the relationships between the global viscoelastic properties of the tensegrity model, i.e., normalized viscosity modulus (eta(*)), normalized elasticity modulus (E(*)), and the physical properties of the constitutive elements, i.e., their normalized length (L(*)) and normalized initial internal tension (T(*)). We used a numerical method to simulate the deformation of the structure in response to different types of loading, while varying by several orders of magnitude L(*) and T(*). The numerical results obtained reveal that eta(*) remains almost independent of changes in T(*) (eta(*) proportional, variant T(*+0.1)), whereas E(*) increases with approximately the square root of the internal tension T(*) (from E(*) proportional, variant T(*+0.3) to E(*) proportional, variant T(*+0.7)). Moreover, structural viscosity eta(*) and elasticity E(*) are both inversely proportional to the square of the size of the structure (eta(*) proportional, variant L(*-2) and E(*) proportional, variant L(*-2)). These structural properties appear consistent with cytoskeleton (CSK) mechanical properties measured experimentally by various methods which are specific to the CSK micromanipulation in living adherent cells. Present results suggest, for the first time, that the effect of structural rearrangement of CSK elements on global CSK behavior is characterized by a faster cellular mechanical response relatively to the CSK element response, which thus contributes to the solidification process observed in adherent cells. In extending to the viscoelastic properties the analysis of the mechanical response of the cellular

  11. Treatment non-adherence among patients with poorly controlled ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-01

    Mar 1, 2014 ... as possible barriers to medication adherence include practical (145; 40.1%), ... approach as a reasonable strategy in resolving non-adherence ..... Eat moderate quantity of carbohydrate-containing food. 9 .... meta-analysis.

  12. Adherence to clusters of health behaviors and successful aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruchno, Rachel; Wilson-Genderson, Maureen

    2012-12-01

    Analyses examine the extent to which adherence to recommendations regarding health behaviors cluster among older adults, whether people who adhere to multiple health behaviors are more likely to age successfully than those who adhere to fewer health behaviors, and whether some health behavior clusters are more closely associated with successful aging than others. Cross-sectional data were collected using structured telephone interviews from 5,688 persons aged 50 to 74 living in New Jersey. Prevalence odds ratio analyses indicated that differential cluster patterns exist. Logistic regression revealed that as the number of adherent behaviors increased so did the likelihood of aging successfully and that adherence to some health behavior clusters was more closely associated with successful aging than adherence to others. Although adherence to more health behaviors was associated with a greater likelihood of successful aging, it is possible to age successfully by adhering to specific clusters of health behaviors.

  13. Treatment non-adherence among patients with poorly controlled ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-01

    adherence among patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes in am- bulatory .... diet and exercise (5; 3.0%). Patterns of medication non-adherence behavior among patients are shown in Table 2. African Health sciences Vol 14 No.

  14. Activation of adherent vascular neutrophils in the lung during acute endotoxemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laskin Jeffrey D

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutrophils constitute the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. Whereas these cells readily undergo apoptosis under homeostatic conditions, their survival is prolonged during inflammatory reactions and they become biochemically and functionally activated. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of acute endotoxemia on the response of a unique subpopulation of neutrophils tightly adhered to the lung vasculature. Methods Rats were treated with 5 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (i.v. to induce acute endotoxemia. Adherent neutrophils were isolated from the lung vasculature by collagenase digestion and sequential filtering. Agarose gel electrophoresis, RT-PCR, western blotting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays were used to evaluate neutrophil activity. Results Adherent vascular neutrophils isolated from endotoxemic animals exhibited decreased apoptosis when compared to cells from control animals. This was associated with a marked increase in expression of the anti-apoptotic protein, Mcl-1. Cells isolated 0.5–2 hours after endotoxin administration were more chemotactic than cells from control animals and expressed increased tumor necrosis factor-alpha and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA and protein, demonstrating that they are functionally activated. Endotoxin treatment of the animals also induced p38 and p44/42 mitogen activated protein kinases in the adherent lung neutrophils, as well as nuclear binding activity of the transcription factors, NF-κB and cAMP response element binding protein. Conclusion These data demonstrate that adherent vascular lung neutrophils are highly responsive to endotoxin and that pathways regulating apoptosis and cellular activation are upregulated in these cells.

  15. Treatment adherence in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease: the collective impact of barriers to adherence and anxiety/depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Wendy N; Denson, Lee A; Baldassano, Robert N; Hommel, Kevin A

    2012-04-01

    Knowledge of factors impacting adolescents' ability to adhere to their inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) regimen is limited. The current study examines the collective impact of barriers to adherence and anxiety/depressive symptoms on adolescent adherence to the IBD regimen. Adolescents (n = 79) completed measures of barriers to adherence, adherence, and anxiety/depressive symptoms at one of two specialty pediatric IBD clinics. Most adolescents reported barriers to adherence and 1 in 8 reported borderline or clinically elevated levels of anxiety/depressive symptoms. Anxiety/depressive symptoms moderated the relationship between barriers to adherence and adherence. Post hoc probing revealed a significant, additive effect of higher anxiety/depressive symptoms in the barriers-adherence relationship, with adherence significantly lower among adolescents with higher barriers and higher anxiety/depressive symptoms. In order to optimize adherence in adolescents, interventions should target not only barriers to adherence but also any anxiety/depressive symptoms that may negatively impact efforts to adhere to recommended treatment.

  16. Selection of culturable environmental microbial strains for cellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cell retention was quantified by counting viable cells using polyurethane foam as material support. The degree of hydrophobicity varied from moderately hydrophobic to hydrophilic, while the adhesion to polystyrene and production of exopolysaccharides and amyloid fibers ranged from strong to negative. The results of ...

  17. Enhanced adherence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius sequence type 71 to canine and human corneocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latronico, Francesca; Moodley, Arshnee; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2014-01-01

    characterized with respect to genetic background and cell wall-anchored protein (CWAP) gene content. Seventy-seven strain-corneocyte combinations were tested using both exponential- and stationary-phase cultures. Negative binomial regression analysis of counts of bacterial cells adhering to corneocytes revealed...

  18. Development and pilot testing of an intervention to promote care engagement and adherence among HIV-positive Kenyan MSM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graham, Susan M.; Micheni, Murugi; Kombo, Bernadette; van der Elst, Elisabeth M.; Mugo, Peter M.; Kivaya, Esther; Aunon, Frances; Kutner, Bryan; Sanders, Eduard J.; Simoni, Jane M.

    2015-01-01

    In many African settings, MSM are a stigmatized group whose access to and engagement in HIV care may be challenging. Our aim was to design a targeted, culturally appropriate intervention to promote care engagement and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence for MSM in coastal Kenya, and describe

  19. Diet and Exercise Adherence and Practices among Medically Underserved Patients with Chronic Disease: Variation across Four Ethnic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzech, Kathryn M.; Vivian, James; Huebner Torres, Cristina; Armin, Julie; Shaw, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    Many factors interact to create barriers to dietary and exercise plan adherence among medically underserved patients with chronic disease, but aspects related to culture and ethnicity are underexamined in the literature. Using both qualitative ("n" = 71) and quantitative ("n" = 297) data collected in a 4-year, multimethod study…

  20. A holistic conceptual framework model to describe medication adherence in and guide interventions in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaam, Myriam; Awaisu, Ahmed; Mohamed Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham; Kheir, Nadir

    2017-05-10

    Nonadherence to medications in patients with diabetes, which results in poor treatment outcomes and increased healthcare costs, is commonly reported globally. Factors associated with medication adherence have also been widely studied. However, a clear and comprehensive, disease-specific conceptual framework model that captures all possible factors has not been established. This study aimed to develop a conceptual framework that addresses the complex network of barriers to medication adherence in patients with diabetes. Fourteen databases and grey literature sources were systematically searched for systematic reviews reporting barriers to medication adherence in patients with diabetes. A thematic approach was used to categorize all identified barriers from the reviews and to create a matrix representing the complex network and relations of the different barriers. Eighteen systematic reviews were identified and used for the development of the conceptual framework. Overall, six major themes emerged: patient-, medication-, disease-, provider-, system-, and societal-related factors. Each of these themes was further classified into different sub-categories. It was noted that most interactions were identified to be within the patient-related factors, which not only interact with other themes but also within the same theme. Patient's demographics as well as cultural beliefs were the most notable factors in terms of interactions with other categories and themes. The intricate network and interaction of factors identified between different themes and within individual themes indicate the complexity of the problem of adherence. This framework will potentially enhance the understanding of the complex relation between different barriers for medication adherence in diabetes and will facilitate design of more effective interventions. Future interventions for enhancing medication adherence should look at the overall factors and target multiple themes of barriers to improve patient

  1. Improved assay for quantitating adherence of ruminal bacteria to cellulose.

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, M A; White, B A; Hespell, R B

    1989-01-01

    A quantitative technique suitable for the determination of adherence of ruminal bacteria to cellulose was developed. This technique employs adherence of cells to cellulose disks and alleviates the problem of nonspecific cell entrapment within cellulose particles. By using this technique, it was demonstrated that the adherence of Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD1 to cellulose was inhibited by formaldehyde, methylcellulose, and carboxymethyl cellulose. Adherence was unaffected by acid hydrolysates ...

  2. Comprehensive efforts to increase adherence to statin therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vonbank, Alexander; Agewall, Stefan; Kjeldsen, Keld Per

    2017-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that statin therapy improves cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, statin adherence is far from optimal regarding initiation, execution and persistence of treatment over time.26 Poor adherence to statin therapy is associated with a significantly...... increased risk of cardiovascular events and mortality. Evidence-based steps to improve adherence are available and should be taken in order to improve patient outcomes. Reinforcing statin adherence appears to have at least as strong beneficial effects as introducing a new drug....

  3. Factors associated with treatment adherence of Brazilian patients undergoing hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Nakao, Renata Tamie; Gorayeb, Ricardo; da Costa, José Abrão Cardeal

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate patients’ adherence to hemodialysis (HD) and its relationship to psychosocial variables. Methods: Participated in the study 64 adult patients undergoing HD, assessed in regard to depression, anxiety, social support, disease and treatment knowledge, and adherence. Results: It was found association between sex and adherence to HD, to diet and to medication, as well as between schooling and overall adherence. There is association between disease knowledge and depression, w...

  4. Hyper bio assembler for 3D cellular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Arai, Fumihito; Yamato, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Hyper Bio Assembler for Cellular Systems is the first book to present a new methodology for measuring and separating target cells at high speed and constructing 3D cellular systems in vitro. This book represents a valuable resource for biologists, biophysicists and robotic engineers, as well as researchers interested in this new frontier area, offering a better understanding of the measurement, separation, assembly, analysis and synthesis of complex biological tissue, and of the medical applications of these technologies. This book is the outcome of the new academic fields of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology’s Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research in Japan.

  5. Medication Adherence in Psychopharmacologically Treated Adults with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safren, Steven A.; Duran, Petra; Yovel, Iftah; Perlman, Carol A.; Sprich, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: One of the potential causes of residual symptoms of ADHD in adults can be difficulties with consistent adherence to medications. Method: This formative study examined self-reported medication adherence in adults with ADHD with clinically significant symptoms despite medication treatment. Results: Mean adherence for the two-week period…

  6. Practical and conceptual challenges in measuring antiretroviral adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Karina M; Arnsten, Julia H

    2006-12-01

    Accurate measurement of antiretroviral adherence is essential for targeting and rigorously evaluating interventions to improve adherence and prevent viral resistance. Across diseases, medication adherence is an individual, complex, and dynamic human behavior that presents unique measurement challenges. Measurement of medication adherence is further complicated by the diversity of available measures, which have different utility in clinical and research settings. Limited understanding of how to optimize existing adherence measures has hindered progress in adherence research in HIV and other diseases. Although self-report is the most widely used adherence measure and the most promising for use in clinical care and resource-limited settings, adherence researchers have yet to develop evidence-based standards for self-reported adherence. In addition, the use of objective measures, such as electronic drug monitoring or pill counts, is limited by poor understanding of the source and magnitude of error biasing these measures. To address these limitations, research is needed to evaluate methods of combining information from different measures. The goals of this review are to describe the state of the science of adherence measurement, to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of common adherence measurement methods, and to recommend directions for improving antiretroviral adherence measurement in research and clinical care.

  7. Evaluation of Adherence to Diabetic Treatment in Northern Region ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine medication adherence and predictors of suboptimal adherence in patients with diabetes type 2, and to address the factors that are associated with treatment non-adherence in Northern Region of United Arab Emirates (UAE). Methods: This cross-sectional study involved 200 type 2 diabetes mellitus ...

  8. Self-reported adherence to treatment: A study of socioeconomic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Adherence to treatment is important and relevant in HIV treatment. Previous studies in sub Sahara Africa and south western Nigeria reported that psychiatric morbidity influence treatment adherence. The present study was to examine treatment adherence among the male and the female patients with HIV infection ...

  9. Non-adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Non-adherence reduces the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy. Knowledge of factors associated with non-adherence would assist clinicians and program planners to design and implement interventions to improve adherence and therefore treatment outcomes. Objective: To determine the prevalence and ...

  10. 77 FR 20637 - Request for Information on Prescription Medication Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Request for Information on Prescription Medication Adherence AGENCY: Department of Health... potential solutions associated with the public health problem of prescription medication non-adherence in..., health care providers, and industry and private organizations in efforts to improve medication adherence...

  11. Comparing Adherence in Cardiac Clinic Versus General Outpatient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dear Sir,. We read the article titled “antihypertensive medications adherence among Nigerian hypertensive subjects in a specialist clinic compared to a general outpatient clinic.”[1]. The study discusses the role of special clinic on adherence to medication among hypertensive patients. Adherence to medication has impact ...

  12. HIV disclosure and other factors that impact on adherence to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some authors argue that there are no predictors of adherence to medication, while others proffer indicators of likely adherence. These contextual factors are wide-ranging and may be interdependent. There are few studies of adherence in resource-poor settings. Of these, many were linked to particular trials whose ...

  13. Evaluation of factors affecting adherence to asthma controller ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adherence to asthma treatment was rated using Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed for the identification of factors associated with adherence to asthma treatment. Results: Among the 201 asthma patients included, 133 (66.2%) were female. The mean age of ...

  14. A Matter of Trust: Patient Barriers to Primary Medication Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polinski, J. M.; Kesselheim, A. S.; Frolkis, J. P.; Wescott, P.; Allen-Coleman, C.; Fischer, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Primary medication adherence occurs when a patient properly fills the first prescription for a new medication. Primary adherence only occurs about three-quarters of the time for antihypertensive medications. We assessed patients' barriers to primary adherence and attributes of patient-provider discussions that might improve primary adherence…

  15. Perceived barriers to guideline adherence: a survey among general practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lugtenberg, M.; Burgers, J.S.; Besters, C.F.; Han, D.; Westert, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite considerable efforts to promote and support guideline use, adherence is often suboptimal. Barriers to adherence vary not only across guidelines but also across recommendations within guidelines. The aim of this study was to assess the perceived barriers to guideline adherence

  16. Evaluation of patients\\' adherence to chemotherapy for breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study aimed to establish the common reasons for non-adherence to drug treatment among breast cancer patients at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria over a ten-year period (Jan 1993 - Dec 2002). Patients\\' adherence and reasons for non-adherence to chemotherapy were ...

  17. Patterns and obstacles to oral antidiabetic medications adherence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data concerning adherence to drugs was assessed using measure treatment adherence scale (MTA). Results: a total of 372 (55.59 % males and 44.41% females) patients with type-2 diabetes fulfilled the inclusion criteria and included in the study. Among the participants, 26.1% were found to have good adherence, 47.9% ...

  18. Personal barriers to antiretroviral therapy adherence: case studies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Abstract. Background: Although good adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is essential for successful treatment outcomes, some patients may have specific personal barriers to ART adherence. Objectives: To study specific personal barriers to ART adherence. Methods: Quantitative data on patients' health status, ART ...

  19. Adhesion Forces and Composition of Planktonic and Adhering Oral Microbiomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, S. W.; Chen, Y.; Maitra, A.; van den Heuvel, E. R.; Slomp, A. M.; Busscher, H. J.; van der Mei, H. C.

    The oral microbiome consists of a planktonic microbiome residing in saliva and an adhering microbiome (the biofilm adhering to oral hard and soft tissues). Here we hypothesized that possible differences in microbial composition of the planktonic and adhering oral microbiome on teeth can be related

  20. Antiretroviral drug adherence by HIV infected children attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was recommended that caregivers of the HIV infected children should be educated on importance of strict adherence to prescribed doses of ARVs to the children. Future research should explore using multiple measures of adherence and reasons for non-adherence among HIV infecting children. Conclusion: The drug ...

  1. Understanding how adherence goals promote adherence behaviours: a repeated measure observational study with HIV seropositive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Gareth

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extent to which patients follow treatments as prescribed is pivotal to treatment success. An exceptionally high level (> 95% of HIV medication adherence is required to suppress viral replication and protect the immune system and a similarly high level (> 80% of adherence has also been suggested in order to benefit from prescribed exercise programmes. However, in clinical practice, adherence to both often falls below the desirable level. This project aims to investigate a wide range of psychological and personality factors that may lead to adherence/non-adherence to medical treatment and exercise programmes. Methods HIV positive patients who are referred to the physiotherapist-led 10-week exercise programme as part of the standard care are continuously recruited. Data on social cognitive variables (attitude, intention, subjective norms, self-efficacy, and outcome beliefs about the goal and specific behaviours, selected personality factors, perceived quality of life, physical activity, self-reported adherence and physical assessment are collected at baseline, at the end of the exercise programme and again 3 months later. The project incorporates objective measures of both exercise (attendance log and improvement in physical measures such as improved fitness level, weight loss, improved circumferential anthropometric measures and medication adherence (verified by non-invasive hair analysis. Discussion The novelty of this project comes from two key aspects, complemented with objective information on exercise and medication adherence. The project assesses beliefs about both the underlying goal such as following prescribed treatment; and about the specific behaviours such as undertaking the exercise or taking the medication, using both implicit and explicit assessments of patients’ beliefs and attitudes. We predict that i the way people think about the underlying goal of their treatments explains medication and exercise

  2. The origins of cellular life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonin, Eugene V

    2014-07-01

    All life on earth can be naturally classified into cellular life forms and virus-like selfish elements, the latter being fully dependent on the former for their reproduction. Cells are reproducers that not only replicate their genome but also reproduce the cellular organization that depends on semipermeable, energy-transforming membranes and cannot be recovered from the genome alone, under the famous dictum of Rudolf Virchow, Omnis cellula e cellula. In contrast, simple selfish elements are replicators that can complete their life cycles within the host cell starting from genomic RNA or DNA alone. The origin of the cellular organization is the central and perhaps the hardest problem of evolutionary biology. I argue that the origin of cells can be understood only in conjunction with the origin and evolution of selfish genetic elements. A scenario of precellular evolution is presented that involves cohesion of the genomes of the emerging cellular life forms from primordial pools of small genetic elements that eventually segregated into hosts and parasites. I further present a model of the coevolution of primordial membranes and membrane proteins, discuss protocellular and non-cellular models of early evolution, and examine the habitats on the primordial earth that could have been conducive to precellular evolution and the origin of cells.

  3. Continuum representations of cellular solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, M.K.

    1993-09-01

    Cellular materials consist of interconnected struts or plates which form cells. The struts or plates are constructed from a variety of metals, polymers, ceramics and wood products. Cellular materials are often used in impact limiters for shipping containers to protect the contents from accidental impact events. These materials exhibit a variety of complex behavior when subjected to crushing loads. This research focuses on the development of continuum representations of cellular solids that can be used in the finite element analysis of shipping container accidents. A significant portion of this work is the development of a new methodology to relate localized deformations to appropriate constitutive descriptions. This methodology provides the insight needed to select constitutive descriptions for cellular solids that capture the localized deformations that are observed experimentally. Constitutive relations are developed for two different cellular materials, aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. These constitutive relations are based on plasticity and continuum damage theories. Plasticity is used to describe the permanent deformation exhibited by both aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. Continuum damage is needed to capture the change in elastic parameters due to cracking of the polyurethane cell wall materials. The new constitutive description of polyurethane foam is implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes, and analytical and numerical predictions are compared with available experimental data.

  4. Adherence to the “Mediterranean Diet” in Spain and Its Relationship with Cardiovascular Risk (DIMERICA Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Abellán Alemán

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nutritional studies focus on traditional cultural models and lifestyles in different countries. The aim of this study was to examine the adherence to the Mediterranean diet, life habits, and risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases among people living in different geographical regions in Spain. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in each region. The sampling scheme consisted of a random three-stage stratified sampling program according to geographic region, age, and gender. A total of 1732 subjects were asked to complete a questionnaire designed to assess their nutrient intake, dietary habits, and exercise. A diet score that assesses the adherence of participants to the Mediterranean diet (range 0–10 was also applied. Results: Southeastern Spain had the lowest score for adherence to the Mediterranean diet because of the low consumption of fish and plant products. A lower adherence score to the Mediterranean diet was strongly associated with the prevalence of hypertension (p = 0.018. Conclusions: A low level of adherence to the Mediterranean diet is accompanied by a high prevalence of hypertension and, therefore, a raised cardiovascular risk in the country. The adherence score could help identify individuals at greater cardiovascular risk.

  5. Adherence to the “Mediterranean Diet” in Spain and Its Relationship with Cardiovascular Risk (DIMERICA Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellán Alemán, José; Zafrilla Rentero, María Pilar; Montoro-García, Silvia; Mulero, Juana; Pérez Garrido, Alfonso; Leal, Mariano; Guerrero, Lucía; Ramos, Elena; Ruilope, Luis Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nutritional studies focus on traditional cultural models and lifestyles in different countries. The aim of this study was to examine the adherence to the Mediterranean diet, life habits, and risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases among people living in different geographical regions in Spain. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in each region. The sampling scheme consisted of a random three-stage stratified sampling program according to geographic region, age, and gender. A total of 1732 subjects were asked to complete a questionnaire designed to assess their nutrient intake, dietary habits, and exercise. A diet score that assesses the adherence of participants to the Mediterranean diet (range 0–10) was also applied. Results: Southeastern Spain had the lowest score for adherence to the Mediterranean diet because of the low consumption of fish and plant products. A lower adherence score to the Mediterranean diet was strongly associated with the prevalence of hypertension (p = 0.018). Conclusions: A low level of adherence to the Mediterranean diet is accompanied by a high prevalence of hypertension and, therefore, a raised cardiovascular risk in the country. The adherence score could help identify individuals at greater cardiovascular risk. PMID:27801819

  6. Colonization of bone matrices by cellular components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchelkunova, E. I.; Voropaeva, A. A.; Korel, A. V.; Mayer, D. A.; Podorognaya, V. T.; Kirilova, I. A.

    2017-09-01

    Practical surgery, traumatology, orthopedics, and oncology require bioengineered constructs suitable for replacement of large-area bone defects. Only rigid/elastic matrix containing recipient's bone cells capable of mitosis, differentiation, and synthesizing extracellular matrix that supports cell viability can comply with these requirements. Therefore, the development of the techniques to produce structural and functional substitutes, whose three-dimensional structure corresponds to the recipient's damaged tissues, is the main objective of tissue engineering. This is achieved by developing tissue-engineering constructs represented by cells placed on the matrices. Low effectiveness of carrier matrix colonization with cells and their uneven distribution is one of the major problems in cell culture on various matrixes. In vitro studies of the interactions between cells and material, as well as the development of new techniques for scaffold colonization by cellular components are required to solve this problem.

  7. The cellular history of the glomerulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Charles R P

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge about the structure and functions of the cells of the glomeruli has accumulated slowly over the past 350 years. Marcello Malpighi originated the work, but it failed to progress far until Schleiden and Schwann developed their cellular theory in 1839. William Bowman linked the glomeruli to the tubules, described the parietal epithelial cells, the basement membranes, and (with Robert Todd) apparently first identified endothelial cells. Electron microscopy contributed especially to an understanding of epithelial and endothelial cell structure. Axel Key first described mesangial cells, but acceptance of these fell into abeyance for many years until Yamada incontrovertibly demonstrated their existence. Techniques such as tissue culture and molecular biological investigations have, more recently, provided much information about glomerular cell function. Progress has, throughout, depended upon the discovery of ever more powerful methods of microscopy, the development of ancillary experimental methods, the formulation of persuasive explanations for observations, and the suggestion of succinct terminology to describe the features observed.

  8. Pneumococcal Replicative State in Relation to its Adherence Capacity to A549-cell Line: A Preliminary in vitro Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Desa, M. N.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was to compare the replication capacity of pneumococcal isolates (serotypes 1, 7F, 19F and 23F with their adherence pattern to monolayer cells (A549. For standardization purposes, all isolates showed a normal growth curve in both bacteriological (THB + 0.5% yeast extract with and without 2% FBS and cell culture media (RPMI + 2% FBS. In the former media, a shorter lag phase was observed for isolate serotypes 1 and 7F in presence of serum while in the later; growth yield was lower for all isolates with stationary phase approaching OD600 of 0.01 as compared to 1.0 in bacteriological media. In the replicative analysis at different growth phases of the isolates in cell culture media, growth capacity at 3 h post-incubation was frequently twice as that at 1 h, and that at early-log phase was frequently higher than that at mid-log phase at both post-incubation times. Adherence was frequently the least at early-log phase although the isolates were in the most active state of replication to increase the number of pneumococcal cells to adhere. At mid- and late-log phases, pneumococcal adherence was frequently higher although the replication was reduced. This study marks the potential correlation between pneumococcal growth fitness and adherence capacity whereby the later may not be superior during the early growth phase.

  9. [Cellular phones and cancer: current status].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonna, Anne

    2005-07-01

    Evaluation of the impact of new technologies on the human body is essential in order to impose regulations to limit health risks. The appearance and evolution of cellular phones have been one of the fastest in the history of innovation. Research reported worldwide has tried to evaluate any potential link between adverse health effects and the mobile phone and its broadcasting stations. This article gives an overview of current research knowledge on the impact of radiofrequency waves on health. Epidemiologic, cellular and animal studies have been carried out, but none of them have reached definitive conclusions. Although some biological effects on cell culture have been observed, their link with human cancer development is far from established. Most of the animal studies show negative results. Epidemiologic studies lack a sufficient perspective to be able to evaluate the effect of evolving technologies used today. High levels of concern by the public have urged mobile phone operators, manufacturers and governmental authorities to finance a number of scientific projects aimed at defining adapted and effective regulations.

  10. Barriers to adherence in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnballe, Vibeke; Schiøtz, Peter Oluf

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of the present study was to explore barriers to treatment adherence perceived by young CF patients and their parents and to identify what kind of support the young patients and their parents request from the CF center. Methods: A questionnaire survey of a cohort of young...... Danish patients with cystic fibrosis aged 14 to 25 years and their parents. Conclusions: The present study showed that the majority of adolescents with CF and their parents experienced barriers to treatment adherence. Patients and parents agreed that the three most common barriers encountered lack...... of time, forgetfulness and unwillingness to take medication in public. A significant, positive correlation was found between the number of barriers and the perceived treatment burden. Additionally, we found that almost half of the adolescents and half of the parents conveyed a desire for more information...

  11. An ingestible sensor for measuring medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafezi, Hooman; Robertson, Timothy L; Moon, Greg D; Au-Yeung, Kit-Yee; Zdeblick, Mark J; Savage, George M

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and performance of the first integrated-circuit microsensor developed for daily ingestion by patients. The ingestible sensor is a device that allows patients, families, and physicians to measure medication ingestion and adherence patterns in real time, relate pharmaceutical compliance to important physiologic metrics, and take appropriate action in response to a patient's adherence pattern and specific health metrics. The design and theory of operation of the device are presented, along with key in-vitro and in-vivo performance results. The chemical, toxicological, mechanical, and electrical safety tests performed to establish the device's safety profile are described in detail. Finally, aggregate results from multiple clinical trials involving 412 patients and 5656 days of system usage are presented to demonstrate the device's reliability and performance as part of an overall digital health feedback system.

  12. Glucose significantly enhances enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli adherence to intestinal epithelial cells through its effects on heat-labile enterotoxin production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prageeth Wijemanne

    Full Text Available The present study tested whether exposure of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC to glucose at different concentrations in the media results in increased bacterial adherence to host cells through increased heat-labile enterotoxin (LT production, thereby suggesting the effects are physiological. Porcine-origin ETEC strains grown in Casamino acid yeast extract medium containing different concentrations of glucose were washed and inoculated onto IPEC-J2 porcine intestinal epithelial cells to test for effects on adherence and host cell cAMP concentrations. Consistent with previous studies, all LT+ strains had higher ETEC adherence to IPEC-J2 cells than did LT- strains. Adherence of the LT- but not the LT+ strains was increased by pre-incubating the IPEC-J2 cells with LT and decreased by co-incubation with GM1 ganglioside in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05. To determine whether the glucose concentration of the cell culture media has an effect on adherence, IPEC-J2 cells were inoculated with LT+ or LT- strains in cell culture media containing a final glucose concentration of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0%, and incubated for 4 h. Only media containing 0.25% glucose resulted in increased adherence and cAMP levels, and this was limited to IPEC-J2 cells inoculated with LT+ strains. This study supports the hypothesis that glucose, at a concentration optimal for LT expression, enhances bacterial adherence through the promotion of LT production. Hence, these results establish the physiological relevance of the effects of glucose on LT production and provide a basis for how glucose intake may influence the severity of ETEC infection.

  13. Response costs of mammography adherence: Iranian women's perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodayarian, Mahsa; Mazloomi-Mahmoodabad, Seyed Saied; Lamyian, Minoor; Morowatisharifabad, Mohammad Ali; Tavangar, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Mammography as the most common secondary prevention method has known to be helpful in detecting breast cancer at the early stages. Low level of participation among women toward mammography uptake due to cultural beliefs is a great concern. This study aimed at exploring the perceptions of women about response costs of mammography adherence (MA) in Yazd, Iran. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was performed. Fourteen women,one oncology nurse, and a breast cancer survivor were purposefully interviewed. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by directed content analysis method based on protection motivation theory (PMT). One main theme was emerged from the analysis namely called "response costs".Two main categories were also emerged from the data; (1) psychological barriers with six subcategories including "embarrassment," "worry about being diagnosed with cancer," "preoccupation with underlying disease," "misconception about mammography," "need for an accompanying person," and "internalizing the experiences of the others," and (2) maladaptive coping modes which encompassed three subcategories: "religious faith," "fatalism," and"avoidance and denial." Useful information was provided about the response costs of mammography utilization based on the perceptions of women. Cognitive barriers may be decreased by conducting modifications in women's awareness and attitude toward MA as well as changing the national health system infrastructures. Incorporating religious and cultural belief systems into MA educational programs through motivational messages is recommended.

  14. Response costs of mammography adherence: Iranian women’s perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodayarian, Mahsa; Mazloomi-Mahmoodabad, Seyed Saied; Lamyian, Minoor; Morowatisharifabad, Mohammad Ali; Tavangar, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mammography as the most common secondary prevention method has known to be helpful in detecting breast cancer at the early stages. Low level of participation among women toward mammography uptake due to cultural beliefs is a great concern. This study aimed at exploring the perceptions of women about response costs of mammography adherence (MA) in Yazd, Iran. Methods: A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was performed. Fourteen women,one oncology nurse, and a breast cancer survivor were purposefully interviewed. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by directed content analysis method based on protection motivation theory (PMT). Results: One main theme was emerged from the analysis namely called "response costs".Two main categories were also emerged from the data; (1) psychological barriers with six subcategories including "embarrassment," "worry about being diagnosed with cancer," "preoccupation with underlying disease," "misconception about mammography," "need for an accompanying person," and "internalizing the experiences of the others," and (2) maladaptive coping modes which encompassed three subcategories: "religious faith," "fatalism," and"avoidance and denial." Conclusion: Useful information was provided about the response costs of mammography utilization based on the perceptions of women. Cognitive barriers may be decreased by conducting modifications in women’s awareness and attitude toward MA as well as changing the national health system infrastructures. Incorporating religious and cultural belief systems into MA educational programs through motivational messages is recommended. PMID:27386423

  15. A cellular automata model of bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Scoy, Gabrielle K; George, Estee L; Opoku Asantewaa, Flora; Kerns, Lucy; Saunders, Marnie M; Prieto-Langarica, Alicia

    2017-04-01

    Bone remodeling is an elegantly orchestrated process by which osteocytes, osteoblasts and osteoclasts function as a syncytium to maintain or modify bone. On the microscopic level, bone consists of cells that create, destroy and monitor the bone matrix. These cells interact in a coordinated manner to maintain a tightly regulated homeostasis. It is this regulation that is responsible for the observed increase in bone gain in the dominant arm of a tennis player and the observed increase in bone loss associated with spaceflight and osteoporosis. The manner in which these cells interact to bring about a change in bone quality and quantity has yet to be fully elucidated. But efforts to understand the multicellular complexity can ultimately lead to eradication of metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis and improved implant longevity. Experimentally validated mathematical models that simulate functional activity and offer eventual predictive capabilities offer tremendous potential in understanding multicellular bone remodeling. Here we undertake the initial challenge to develop a mathematical model of bone formation validated with in vitro data obtained from osteoblastic bone cells induced to mineralize and quantified at 26 days of culture. A cellular automata model was constructed to simulate the in vitro characterization. Permutation tests were performed to compare the distribution of the mineralization in the cultures and the distribution of the mineralization in the mathematical models. The results of the permutation test show the distribution of mineralization from the characterization and mathematical model come from the same probability distribution, therefore validating the cellular automata model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of medication adherence on blood pressure control and risk factors for antihypertensive medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Zhao; Bin, Wang; Weilin, Qi; Aifang, Yang

    2015-02-01

    We aim to investigate a range of risk factors associated with medication adherence among Chinese hypertensive patients. We also aim to investigate the association between medication adherence and blood pressure control. A cross-sectional study was conducted among Chinese hypertensive patients in a comprehensive teaching hospital in Shanghai, China, using a validated scale, a self-designed questionnaire and patients' medical records. Of the 232 eligible participants, 61 (26.3%), 51 (22.0%) and 120 (51.7%) showed low, medium and high adherence, respectively. Adjusted for socio-demographic, clinical and patient-related factors, antihypertensive medication adherence was significantly associated with better systolic blood pressure control (P=0.001), whereas the association with diastolic blood pressure control was relatively weak (P=0.334). In the multivariate analysis, patients with longer duration of drug use [P=0.012, odds ratio (OR)=0.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.25-0.84], combination of antiplatelet agents (0.002, 0.38, 0.20-0.71), less concerns of medical cost (0.001, 0.18, 0.02-0.51), more availability of professional guidance (0.002, 0.34, 0.17-0.66) and more availability of family support (0.036, 0.51, 0.27-0.96) were more likely to adhere to their drug regimens. The rate of suboptimal medication adherence among Chinese hypertensive patients is quite high. Interventions could focus upon the risk factors to improve antihypertensive medication adherence in clinical practice. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Can adherence to antihypertensive therapy be used to promote adherence to statin therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H Chapman

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Richard H Chapman1, Elise M Pelletier1, Paula J Smith1, Craig S Roberts21US Health Economics and Outcomes Research, IMS Health, Falls Church, VA, USA; 2Global Outcomes Research, Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USAObjective: To compare adherence with statin therapy in patients switching to single-pill amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium with patients adding a separate statin to their amlodipine regimen.Methods: We identified hypertensive patients prescribed amlodipine who switched to amlodipine/atorvastatin (switch or added a statin to their amlodipine regimen (add-on from July 2004 to June 2007. Propensity score matching (1 switch:3 add-on was applied based on ‘nearest neighbor’ approach. The primary adherence measure was patients with proportion of days covered (PDC ≥0.80 at 180 days; secondary measures included mean PDC and persistence. A sensitivity analysis was performed, accounting for total statin/amlodipine exposure.Results: Among 4556 matched patients (n = 1139 switch; n = 3417 add-on, mean age was 53.9 years and 52.1% were male. After 180 days, adherence with statin therapy was higher for the switch vs add-on cohort (50.8% vs 44.3%; P < 0.001. After adjusting for pre-index amlodipine adherence, the switch cohort was more likely to be adherent than the add-on cohort (odds ratio: 1.64 [95% confidence interval: 1.42 to 1.89]. Persistence was higher in the switch than the add-on cohort (127.6 vs 117 days; P < 0.001.Conclusion: Hypertensive patients taking amlodipine who initiated statin therapy via single-pill amlodipine/atorvastatin were more likely to remain adherent to their statin than patients adding a separate statin to their antihypertensive regimen.Keywords: adherence, amlodipine, atorvastatin, cardiovascular disease, persistence, single-pill

  18. What the newspapers say about medication adherence: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfellow, Nicola A; Almomani, Basima A; Hawwa, Ahmed F; McElnay, James C

    2013-10-02

    This study investigates the coverage of adherence to medicine by the UK and US newsprint media. Adherence to medicine is recognised as an important issue facing healthcare professionals and the newsprint media is a key source of health information, however, little is known about newspaper coverage of medication adherence. A search of the newspaper database Nexis®UK from 2004-2011 was performed. Content analysis of newspaper articles which referenced medication adherence from the twelve highest circulating UK and US daily newspapers and their Sunday equivalents was carried out. A second researcher coded a 15% sample of newspaper articles to establish the inter-rater reliability of coding. Searches of newspaper coverage of medication adherence in the UK and US yielded 181 relevant articles for each country. There was a large increase in the number of scientific articles on medication adherence in PubMed® over the study period, however, this was not reflected in the frequency of newspaper articles published on medication adherence. UK newspaper articles were significantly more likely to report the benefits of adherence (p = 0.005), whereas US newspaper articles were significantly more likely to report adherence issues in the elderly population (p = 0.004) and adherence associated with diseases of the central nervous system (p = 0.046). The most commonly reported barriers to adherence were patient factors e.g. poor memory, beliefs and age, whereas, the most commonly reported facilitators to adherence were medication factors including simplified regimens, shorter treatment duration and combination tablets. HIV/AIDS was the single most frequently cited disease (reported in 20% of newspaper articles). Poor quality reporting of medication adherence was identified in 62% of newspaper articles. Adherence is not well covered in the newspaper media despite a significant presence in the medical literature. The mass media have the potential to help educate and shape the public

  19. Effect of temperature on platelet adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braune, S; Fröhlich, G M; Lendlein, A; Jung, F

    2016-01-01

    Thrombogenicity is one of the main parameters tested in vitro to evaluate the hemocompatibility of artificial surfaces. While the influence of the temperature on platelet aggregation has been addressed by several studies, the temperature influence on the adherence of platelets to body foreign surfaces as an important aspect of biomedical device handling has not yet been explored. Therefore, we analyzed the influence of two typically applied incubation-temperatures (22°C and 37°C) on the adhesion of platelets to biomaterials. Thrombogenicity of three different polymers - medical grade poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) - were studied in an in vitro static test. Platelet adhesion was studied with stringently characterized blood from apparently healthy subjects. Collection of whole blood and preparation of platelet rich plasma (PRP) was carried out at room temperature (22°C). PRP was incubated with the polymers either at 22°C or 37°C. Surface adherent platelets were fixed, fluorescently labelled and assessed by an image-based approach. Differences in the density of adherent platelets after incubation at 22°C and 37°C occurred on PDMS and PET. Similar levels of adherent platelets were observed on the very thrombogenic PTFE. The covered surface areas per single platelet were analyzed to measure the state of platelet activation and revealed no differences between the two incubation temperatures for any of the analyzed polymers. Irrespective of the observed differences between the low and medium thrombogenic PDMS and PET and the higher variability at 22°C, the thrombogenicity of the three investigated polymers was evaluated being comparable at both incubation temperatures.

  20. Aging, Cellular Senescence, and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Judith

    2014-01-01

    For most species, aging promotes a host of degenerative pathologies that are characterized by debilitating losses of tissue or cellular function. However, especially among vertebrates, aging also promotes hyperplastic pathologies, the most deadly of which is cancer. In contrast to the loss of function that characterizes degenerating cells and tissues, malignant (cancerous) cells must acquire new (albeit aberrant) functions that allow them to develop into a lethal tumor. This review discusses the idea that, despite seemingly opposite characteristics, the degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies of aging are at least partly linked by a common biological phenomenon: a cellular stress response known as cellular senescence. The senescence response is widely recognized as a potent tumor suppressive mechanism. However, recent evidence strengthens the idea that it also drives both degenerative and hyper-plastic pathologies, most likely by promoting chronic inflammation. Thus, the senescence response may be the result of antagonistically pleiotropic gene action. PMID:23140366

  1. Associations between patients' adherence and GPs' attitudes towards risk, statin therapy and management of non-adherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfoed, Benedicte L; Paulsen, Maja S; Christensen, Palle M

    2016-01-01

    : To estimate associations between GPs' attitudes towards risk, statin therapy and management of non-adherence and their patients' adherence, and to identify subgroups of GPs with poor patient adherence. METHODS: All Danish GPs were invited to participate in an online survey. We asked whether they regarded...

  2. Oxytocin conditions trait-based rule adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jörg; De Dreu, Carsten K W

    2017-03-01

    Rules, whether in the form of norms, taboos or laws, regulate and coordinate human life. Some rules, however, are arbitrary and adhering to them can be personally costly. Rigidly sticking to such rules can be considered maladaptive. Here, we test whether, at the neurobiological level, (mal)adaptive rule adherence is reduced by oxytocin-a hypothalamic neuropeptide that biases the biobehavioural approach-avoidance system. Participants (N = 139) self-administered oxytocin or placebo intranasally, and reported their need for structure and approach-avoidance sensitivity. Next, participants made binary decisions and were given an arbitrary rule that demanded to forgo financial benefits. Under oxytocin, participants violated the rule more often, especially when they had high need for structure and high approach sensitivity. Possibly, oxytocin dampens the need for a highly structured environment and enables individuals to flexibly trade-off internal desires against external restrictions. Implications for the treatment of clinical disorders marked by maladaptive rule adherence are discussed. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Assessment of adherence to tuberculosis drug regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalili H.

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: Tuberculosis is curable if patients take sufficient uninterrupted therapy. Most experts acknowledge importance of patient adherence in efforts to control of the disease. This cross-sectional study was designed to evaluate the rate of compliance to anti-tuberculosis regimens by means of urine tests in newly diagnosed tuberculosis patients.Method: Investigation was carried out in Tehran University of Medical Sciences Teaching Hospitals, Tehran, IRAN. Fifty patients completed the study. The patients' urine samples were obtained at 0, 1, 2, 4 and 6 months of the study. Simple chemical methods were used to detect Isoniazid, Rifampin, and pyrazinamide, the three main drugs in tuberculosis treatment regimens. Urine tests at months of 0 and l of the study were considered as control tests.Results: After the first month, the patients' compliance was about 96%. At months of second, fourth and sixth, the whole adherence rates were 56 %, 76% and 81% respectively. Conclusion: About 30% of patients were non-compliant with treatment regimen which was more frequent than presumed; therefore detection of non-adherent patients is an essential subject in developing countries.

  4. Mediterranean diet adherence and prostate cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Guarnido, Olga; Álvarez-Cubero, María Jesus; Saiz, Maria; Lozano, David; Rodrigo, Lourdes; Pascual, Manrique; Cozar, Jose Manuel; Rivas, Ana

    2014-10-31

    Countries following the traditional Mediterranean Diet, particularly Southern European countries, have lower prostate cancer incidence and mortality compared to other European regions. The beneficial effect has been attributed to a specific eating pattern. The purpose of this review is to examine the evidence to date on the effects of adherence to a Mediterranean Diet on prostate cancer risk; and to identify which elements of the Mediterranean diet are likely to protect against prostate cancer. The search for articles came from extensive research in the following databases: PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science. We used the search terms "Mediterranean diet", "adherence", "fruit and vegetable", "olive oil", "fish" "legume", "cereal" "alcohol" "milk", "dairy product","prostate cancer", and combinations, such as "Mediterranean diet and prostate cancer" or "Olive oil and prostate cancer". There is strong evidence supporting associations between foods that are typical of a Mediterranean eating pattern and reduced prostate cancer risk. However, there are few studies that have assessed the effect of the Mediterranean diet on cancer prostate incidence. Recent data do not support associations to adherence to a Mediterranean Diet and risk of prostate cancer or disease progression. However, Mediterranean eating pattern after diagnosis of nonmetastatatic cancer was associated with lower overall mortality. Further large-scale studies are required to clarify the effect of Mediterranean diet on prostate health, in order to establish the role of this diet in the prevention of prostate cancer. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  5. Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to the Gastric Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marguerite Clyne

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial adhesion to the intestinal epithelium is a critical initial step in the pathogenesis of many enteric diseases. Helicobacter pylori is a duodenal pathogen that adheres to the gastric epithelium and causes gastritis and peptic ulceration. The mechanism by which H pylori causes disease has not yet been elucidated but adherence to the gastric mucosa is thought to be an important virulence determinant of the organism. What is known about adherence of H pylori to the gastric mucosa is summarized. Topics discussed are the mechanism of H pylori adherence; in vitro and in vivo models of H pylori infection; and adherence and potential adhesins and receptors for H pylori.

  6. Cellular structures with interconnected microchannels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaefer, Robert Shahram; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Williams, Brian

    2018-01-30

    A method for fabricating a cellular tritium breeder component includes obtaining a reticulated carbon foam skeleton comprising a network of interconnected ligaments. The foam skeleton is then melt-infiltrated with a tritium breeder material, for example, lithium zirconate or lithium titanate. The foam skeleton is then removed to define a cellular breeder component having a network of interconnected tritium purge channels. In an embodiment the ligaments of the foam skeleton are enlarged by adding carbon using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) prior to melt-infiltration. In an embodiment the foam skeleton is coated with a refractory material, for example, tungsten, prior to melt infiltration.

  7. Cellular uptake of metallated cobalamins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Mai Thanh Quynh; Stürup, Stefan; Lambert, Ian Henry

    2016-01-01

    Cellular uptake of vitamin B12-cisplatin conjugates was estimated via detection of their metal constituents (Co, Pt, and Re) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Vitamin B12 (cyano-cob(iii)alamin) and aquo-cob(iii)alamin [Cbl-OH2](+), which differ in the β-axial ligands (CN......(-) and H2O, respectively), were included as control samples. The results indicated that B12 derivatives delivered cisplatin to both cellular cytosol and nuclei with an efficiency of one third compared to the uptake of free cisplatin cis-[Pt(II)Cl2(NH3)2]. In addition, uptake of charged B12 derivatives...

  8. Social Networks and Treatment Adherence Among Latino Offenders With Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eno Louden, Jennifer; Manchak, Sarah M

    2017-07-06

    Mental health treatment adherence is often required for offenders with mental illness supervised on probation and parole. However, research on offenders with mental illness has largely overlooked cultural and ethnic responsivity factors that may affect adherence to treatment. Latinos are a quickly growing subgroup of offenders whose social networks differ in meaningful ways from European Americans' (e.g., size, composition, centrality of family). Social networks are known to relate to both clinical and criminal justice outcomes for offenders with mental illness, and there are features of nonoffender Latinos' social networks that suggest that findings distilled from work with non-Latino offenders may not apply to them. The present study examined the social networks of 86 Latino probationers with serious mental illness to (a) describe the size and composition of these networks and (b) to determine which factors of social networks are related to treatment adherence. The authors found that Latino offenders' social networks are small (∼6 individuals), consisting primarily of family and professionals such as treatment providers and probation officers. Supportive relationships with nonprofessionals and treatment providers was related to lower likelihood of missing treatment appointments, whereas social control and pressure from family and friends to attend treatment was not related to treatment adherence. Findings are discussed within the context of improved practices for community corrections and mental health agencies in working with Latino offenders with mental illness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Inhibition of Adherence of Mycobacterium avium to Plumbing Surface Biofilms of Methylobacterium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Egea, Mari Carmen; Ji, Pan; Pruden, Amy; Falkinham Iii, Joseph O

    2017-09-14

    Both Mycobacterium spp. and Methylobacterium spp. are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens that are found on pipe surfaces in households. However, examination of data published in prior microbiological surveys indicates that Methylobacterium spp. and Mycobacterium spp. tend not to coexist in the same household plumbing biofilms. That evidence led us to test the hypothesis that Methylobacterium spp. in biofilms could inhibit the adherence of Mycobacterium avium. Measurements of adherence of M. avium cells to stainless steel coupons using both culture and PCR-based methods showed that the presence of Methylobacterium spp. biofilms substantially reduced M. avium adherence and vice versa. That inhibition of M. avium adherence was not reduced by UV-irradiation, cyanide/azide exposure, or autoclaving of the Methylobacterium spp. biofilms. Further, there was no evidence of the production of anti-mycobacterial compounds by biofilm-grown Methylobacterium spp. cells. The results add to understanding of the role of microbial interactions in biofilms as a driving force in the proliferation or inhibition of opportunistic pathogens in premise plumbing, and provide a potential new avenue by which M. avium exposures may be reduced for at-risk individuals.

  10. Inhibition of Adherence of Mycobacterium avium to Plumbing Surface Biofilms of Methylobacterium spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Carmen Muñoz Egea

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Both Mycobacterium spp. and Methylobacterium spp. are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens that are found on pipe surfaces in households. However, examination of data published in prior microbiological surveys indicates that Methylobacterium spp. and Mycobacterium spp. tend not to coexist in the same household plumbing biofilms. That evidence led us to test the hypothesis that Methylobacterium spp. in biofilms could inhibit the adherence of Mycobacterium avium. Measurements of adherence of M. avium cells to stainless steel coupons using both culture and PCR-based methods showed that the presence of Methylobacterium spp. biofilms substantially reduced M. avium adherence and vice versa. That inhibition of M. avium adherence was not reduced by UV-irradiation, cyanide/azide exposure, or autoclaving of the Methylobacterium spp. biofilms. Further, there was no evidence of the production of anti-mycobacterial compounds by biofilm-grown Methylobacterium spp. cells. The results add to understanding of the role of microbial interactions in biofilms as a driving force in the proliferation or inhibition of opportunistic pathogens in premise plumbing, and provide a potential new avenue by which M. avium exposures may be reduced for at-risk individuals.

  11. Distinct mechanical behavior of HEK293 cells in adherent and suspended states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Ali Haghparast

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical features of individual animal cells have been regarded as indicators of cell type and state. Previously, we investigated the surface mechanics of cancer and normal stromal cells in adherent and suspended states using atomic force microscopy. Cancer cells possessed specific mechanical and actin cytoskeleton features that were distinct from normal stromal cells in adherent and suspended states. In this paper, we report the unique mechanical and actin cytoskeletal features of human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells. Unlike normal stromal and cancer cells, the surface stiffness of adherent HEK293 cells was very low, but increased after cell detachment from the culture surface. Induced actin filament depolymerization revealed that the actin cytoskeleton was the underlying source of the stiffness in suspended HEK293 cells. The exclusive mechanical response of HEK293 cells to perturbation of the actin cytoskeleton resembled that of adherent cancer cells and suspended normal stromal cells. Thus, with respect to their special cell-surface mechanical features, HEK293 cells could be categorized into a new class distinct from normal stromal and cancer cells.

  12. "Aroeira" (Myracrodruon urundeuva) methanol extract: the relationship between chemical compounds and cellular effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Alessandra Cury; Souza, Leonardo Perez; Saldanha, Luiz Leonardo; Pieroni, Laís Goyos; Matos, Adriana Arruda; Oliveira, Flávia Amadeu de; Vilegas, Wagner; Damante, Carla Andreotti; Dokkedal, Anne Lígia; Oliveira, Rodrigo Cardoso de

    2016-11-01

    "Aroeira" [Myracrodruon urundeuva Allemão (Anacardiaceae)] is a tree whose leaves have been studied for therapeutic purposes in medicine and dentistry. The study chemically identifies the leaf extract of aroeira and determines its effect on human gingival fibroblasts. An 80% methanol leave extract was obtained by maceration and chemically identified through flow-injection analysis-electrospray ionization-ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry (FIA-ESI-IT-MSn). Cytotoxicity of the aroeira's methanol extract was evaluated in lineage of fibroblasts. Adherent cells were treated with different concentrations of aroeira's methanol extract in the medium: 0.1, 1, 10, 100 and 1000 μg/mL. Control cells were cultivated in the medium only. Analyses were done at 24, 48, 72 and 96 h of culture by neutral red assay; and at 24, 48 and 96 h by crystal violet assay. FIA-ESI-IT-MS analysis determined the presence of compounds, for the first time in the species: quercetin-O-glucuronide and quercetin-O-deoxyhexose-O-glucose in the extract. On one hand, neutral red and crystal violet assay showed a reduction (to 50% up until 100%) of cellular viability of groups of 100 and 1000 μg/mL compared with control at 96 h (p < 0.05). On the other hand, lower concentrations (0.1; 1 and 10 μg/mL) of the extract were similar to that of the control at 96 h (p < 0.05), in general. In view of the results, we can conclude that the extract of aroeira presents tannins and flavonoids. Furthermore, the extract is capable of modulating the viability of human gingival fibroblasts according to its concentration.

  13. Medication adherence and glycemic control among newly diagnosed diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lee-Kai; Sun, Yan; Heng, Bee Hoon; Chew, Daniel Ek Kwang; Chong, Phui-Nah

    2017-01-01

    Poor medication adherence can have negative consequences for the patients, the provider, the physician, and the sustainability of the healthcare system. To our knowledge, the association between medication adherence and glycemic control among newly diagnosed diabetes patients has not been studied. This study aims to bridge the gap. This is a retrospective cohort study of 2463 patients managed in the National Healthcare Group in Singapore with newly diagnosed diabetes. Patients were followed up for the first two years from their first medication dispensed for measuring medication adherence, proportion of days covered (PDC); and for another three years for investigating outcomes of glycemic control, emergency department visit, and hospitalization. Multivariable regressions were performed to study the association between medication adherence and the outcomes as well as the risk factors of poor adherence. The prevalence of medication adherence (PDC≥80%) was 65.0% (95% CI 63.1% to 66.9%) among newly diagnosed diabetes patients in Singapore. Male, Indian, or patients without hypertension or dyslipidemia were associated with poorer medication adherence. The HbA1c level of poor adherent patients (PDC adherent patients (PDC=100%). The medication adherence in the early stage of diabetes is important for maximizing the effectiveness of pharmaceutical therapy. Health policies or interventions targeting the improvement of medication adherence among newly diagnosed diabetes patients are in need.

  14. Evaluation of medication adherence in Lebanese hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassine, Mohammad; Al-Hajje, Amal; Awada, Sanaa; Rachidi, Samar; Zein, Salam; Bawab, Wafa; Bou Zeid, Mayssam; El Hajj, Maya; Salameh, Pascale

    2016-09-01

    Controlling hypertension is essential in cardiovascular diseases. Poor medication adherence is associated with poor disease outcomes, waste of healthcare resources, and contributes to reduced blood pressure control. This study evaluates treatment adherence to antihypertensive therapy in Lebanese hypertensive patients by estimating the proportion of adherent hypertensive patients using a validated tool and investigates what factors predict this behavior. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was conducted on a random sample of 210 hypertensive outpatients selected from clinics located in tertiary-care hospitals and from private cardiology clinics located in Beirut. Adherence level was measured using a validated 8-item Modified Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMMAS). Among 210 patients, 50.5% showed high adherence, 27.1% medium adherence, and 22.4% low adherence to medication. Mean MMMAS score was 6.59±2.0. In bivariate analyses, having controlled blood pressure (p=0.003) and taking a combination drug (p=0.023) were predictors of high adherence. Forgetfulness (padherence after multiple liner regression. Logistic regression results showed that calcium channel blockers (p=0.030) were associated with increased adherence levels. In conclusion, developing multidisciplinary intervention programs to address the factors identified, in addition to educational strategies targeting healthcare providers, are necessary to enhance patient adherence. Copyright © 2015 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sharia Adherence Mosque Survey: Correlations between Sharia Adherence and Violent Dogma in U.S. Mosques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mordechai Kedar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A random survey of 100 representative mosques in the U.S. was conducted to measure the correlation between Sharia adherence and dogma calling for violence against non-believers.  Of the 100 mosques surveyed, 51% had texts on site rated as severely advocating violence; 30% had texts rated as moderately advocating violence; and 19% had no violent texts at all.  Mosques that presented as Sharia adherent were more likely to feature violence-positive texts on site than were their non-Sharia-adherent counterparts.  In 84.5% of the mosques, the imam recommended studying violence-positive texts.  The leadership at Sharia-adherent mosques was more likely to recommend that a worshipper study violence-positive texts than leadership at non-Sharia-adherent mosques.  Fifty-eight percent of the mosques invited guest imams known to promote violent jihad.  The leadership of mosques that featured violence-positive literature was more likely to invite guest imams who were known to promote violent jihad than was the leadership of mosques that did not feature violence-positive literature on mosque premises.  

  16. Pediatric psychologist use of adherence assessments and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yelena P; Rohan, Jennifer M; Martin, Staci; Hommel, Kevin; Greenley, Rachel Neff; Loiselle, Kristin; Ambrosino, Jodie; Fredericks, Emily M

    2013-07-01

    To document current clinical practices for medical regimen adherence assessment and intervention in the field of pediatric psychology. 113 members of the Society of Pediatric Psychology completed an anonymous online survey that assessed use of adherence assessments and interventions in clinical practice, barriers and facilitators to their use, and preferred resources for obtaining information on adherence assessments and interventions. Respondents reported using a range of adherence assessment and intervention strategies, some of which are evidence-based. Barriers to implementing these clinical strategies included time constraints and lack of familiarity with available clinical tools. Respondents reported that education about effective clinical tools would facilitate their use of adherence assessments and interventions. Future research and clinical efforts in adherence should consider developing practical tools for clinical practice, making accessible resources to promote dissemination of these tools, and increase understanding of clinician implementation of adherence assessments and interventions.

  17. Adherence to inhaled therapy, mortality and hospital admission in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, J; Anderson, J A; Calverley, P M A

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about adherence to inhaled medication in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the impact on mortality and morbidity. METHODS: Data on drug adherence from a randomised double-blind trial comparing inhaled salmeterol 50 microg + fluticasone propionate 500...... as an ancillary study. RESULTS: Of the 4880 patients (79.8%) with good adherence defined as >80% use of study medication, 11.3% died compared with 26.4% of the 1232 patients (20.2%) with poor adherence. The annual rates of hospital admission for exacerbations were 0.15 and 0.27, respectively. The association...... was more pronounced in patients with good adherence than in those with poor adherence. CONCLUSION: Adherence to inhaled medication is significantly associated with reduced risk of death and admission to hospital due to exacerbations in COPD. Further research is needed to understand these strong...

  18. Pediatric Psychologist Use of Adherence Assessments and Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohan, Jennifer M.; Martin, Staci; Hommel, Kevin; Greenley, Rachel Neff; Loiselle, Kristin; Ambrosino, Jodie; Fredericks, Emily M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To document current clinical practices for medical regimen adherence assessment and intervention in the field of pediatric psychology. Methods 113 members of the Society of Pediatric Psychology completed an anonymous online survey that assessed use of adherence assessments and interventions in clinical practice, barriers and facilitators to their use, and preferred resources for obtaining information on adherence assessments and interventions. Results Respondents reported using a range of adherence assessment and intervention strategies, some of which are evidence-based. Barriers to implementing these clinical strategies included time constraints and lack of familiarity with available clinical tools. Respondents reported that education about effective clinical tools would facilitate their use of adherence assessments and interventions. Conclusions Future research and clinical efforts in adherence should consider developing practical tools for clinical practice, making accessible resources to promote dissemination of these tools, and increase understanding of clinician implementation of adherence assessments and interventions. PMID:23658375

  19. Cellular Automata and the Humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Ernest

    1994-01-01

    The use of cellular automata to analyze several pre-Socratic hypotheses about the evolution of the physical world is discussed. These hypotheses combine characteristics of both rigorous and metaphoric language. Since the computer demands explicit instructions for each step in the evolution of the automaton, such models can reveal conceptual…

  20. Auxin and Cellular Elongation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Silvia Melina; Barbez, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Auxin is a crucial growth regulator in plants. However, a comprehensive understanding of how auxin induces cell expansion is perplexing, because auxin acts in a concentration- and cell type-dependent manner. Consequently, it is desirable to focus on certain cell types to exemplify the underlying growth mechanisms. On the other hand, plant tissues display supracellular growth (beyond the level of single cells); hence, other cell types might compromise the growth of a certain tissue. Tip-growing cells do not display neighbor-induced growth constraints and, therefore, are a valuable source of information for growth-controlling mechanisms. Here, we focus on auxin-induced cellular elongation in root hairs, exposing a mechanistic view of plant growth regulation. We highlight a complex interplay between auxin metabolism and transport, steering root hair development in response to internal and external triggers. Auxin signaling modules and downstream cascades of transcription factors define a developmental program that appears rate limiting for cellular growth. With this knowledge in mind, the root hair cell is a very suitable model system in which to dissect cellular effectors required for cellular expansion. PMID:26787325

  1. Analysis of cellular manufacturing systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heragu, Sunderesh; Zijm, Willem H.M.; Meng, Gang; Heragu, S.S.; van Ommeren, Jan C.W.; van Houtum, Geert-Jan

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present an open queuing network modeling approach to estimate performance measures of a cellular manufacturing layout. It is assumed a layout and production data for a planning period of specified length are available. The production data takes into account, processing and handling

  2. Cellular Concrete Bricks with Recycled Expanded Polystyrene Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Bosco Hernández-Zaragoza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular concrete bricks were obtained by using a lightweight mortar with recycled expanded polystyrene aggregate instead of sandy materials. After determining the block properties (absorption, compressive strength, and tensile stresses, it was found that this brick meets the requirements of the masonry standards used in Mexico. The obtained material is lighter than the commercial ones, which facilitates their rapid elaboration, quality control, and transportation. It is less permeable, which helps prevent moisture formation retaining its strength due to the greater adherence shown with dry polystyrene. It was more flexible, which makes it less vulnerable to cracking walls due to soil displacements. Furthermore, it is economical, because it uses recyclable material and has properties that prevent deterioration increasing its useful life. We recommend the use of the fully dry EP under a dry environment to obtain the best properties of brick.

  3. Role of cellular elements in thrombus formation and dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohner, N

    2008-07-01

    Although fibrin forms the core matrix of thrombi, their structure depends also on the cellular elements embedded in its meshwork. Platelets are essential in the initial stages of thrombus formation, because they adhere and aggregate at sites of blood vessel wall injury and then serve as a surface for coagulation reactions, the overall rate of which determines the final structure of fibrin. In addition, platelets affect fibrinolysis through their proteins and phospholipids, which modulate plasmin activity. Leukocytes form mixed aggregates with platelets and thus influence the structure of thrombi. After activation they secrete different proteases (elastase, cathepsin G, matrix metalloproteinases) that enhance the von Willebrand factor-dependent platelet adhesion. Leukocyte-derived enzymes, first of all elastase, effect fibrinolysis by direct digestion of fibrin or indirectly modulate it by partial degradation of zymogens and inhibitors of coagulation and fibrinolytic proteases.

  4. CELLULAR RESPONSES TO EGG-OIL (CHARISMON©

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Bereiter-Hahn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Egg-oil (Charismon© is known for its beneficial action in wound healing and other skin irritancies and its antibacterial activity. The physiological basis for these actions has been investigated using cells in culture: HaCaT-cells (immortalized human keratinocytes, human endothelial cells in culture (HUVEC, peripheral blood mononuclear lymphocytes (PBML and a full thickness human skin model (FTSM. Emphasis was on the influence of egg-oil on cell migration and IL-8 production in HaCaT cells, respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential, reactive oxygen (ROS production and proliferation in HUVEC and HaCaT cells, cytokine and interleukin production in PBML and UV-light induced damage of FTSM. IL-8 production by HaCaT cells is stimulated by egg-oil whilst in phythemagglutinin-activated PBMLs production of the interleukins IL-2, IL-6, IL-10 and IFN-γ and TFN-α is reduced. ROS-production after H2O2 stimulation first is enhanced but later on reduced. Respiration becomes activated due to partial uncoupling of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and proliferation of HaCaT and HUVEC is reduced. Recovery of human epidermis cells in FTSM after UV-irradiation is strongly supported by egg-oil. These results support the view that egg-oil acts through reduction of inflammatory processes and ROS production. Both these processes are equally important in cellular aging as in healing of chronic wounds.

  5. Intrinsic Factors of Non-adherence to Breast and Cervical Cancer Screenings Among Latinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorogastua, Karent; Erwin, Deborah; Thelemaque, Linda; Pulley, LeaVonne; Jandorf, Lina

    2016-12-01

    Although adhering to regular screenings can improve timely diagnosis and survivorship, Latinas continue to exhibit the lowest breast and cervical cancer screening rates in the country. Initiatives have generally addressed extrinsic factors to combat disparities. However, the answer to increasing screening adherence among Latina women might lie in equally addressing intrinsic factors as well extrinsic factors. Social Cognitive Theory provided the foundation for the design of Esperanza y Vida, a culturally tailored outreach program that educated Latinas on breast and cervical cancer. Non-adherent participants were offered navigation and followed-up to reassess screening behavior. The objective of this manuscript is to outline the salient culture-related intrinsic factors reported by a sample of Latina women from New York and Arkansas in response to open-ended questions asked at 8 months post-educational intervention and navigation services. In turn, the findings are incorporated in an effort to recommend future steps for effective interventions. Content analysis was used to guide the qualitative data analysis. The most salient barriers reported were related to Systems, Organization and Logistics, Time, being Decidedly Unscreened, and Contrary Beliefs or Confusion.

  6. Hag mediates adherence of Moraxella catarrhalis to ciliated human airway cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balder, Rachel; Krunkosky, Thomas M; Nguyen, Chi Q; Feezel, Lacey; Lafontaine, Eric R

    2009-10-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a human pathogen causing otitis media in infants and respiratory infections in adults, particularly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The surface protein Hag (also designated MID) has previously been shown to be a key adherence factor for several epithelial cell lines relevant to pathogenesis by M. catarrhalis, including NCIH292 lung cells, middle ear cells, and A549 type II pneumocytes. In this study, we demonstrate that Hag mediates adherence to air-liquid interface cultures of normal human bronchial epithelium (NHBE) exhibiting mucociliary activity. Immunofluorescent staining and laser scanning confocal microscopy experiments demonstrated that the M. catarrhalis wild-type isolates O35E, O12E, TTA37, V1171, and McGHS1 bind principally to ciliated NHBE cells and that their corresponding hag mutant strains no longer associate with cilia. The hag gene product of M. catarrhalis isolate O35E was expressed in the heterologous genetic background of a nonadherent Haemophilus influenzae strain, and quantitative assays revealed that the adherence of these recombinant bacteria to NHBE cultures was increased 27-fold. These experiments conclusively demonstrate that the hag gene product is responsible for the previously unidentified tropism of M. catarrhalis for ciliated NHBE cells.

  7. Phase Space Invertible Asynchronous Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Wacker

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available While for synchronous deterministic cellular automata there is an accepted definition of reversibility, the situation is less clear for asynchronous cellular automata. We first discuss a few possibilities and then investigate what we call phase space invertible asynchronous cellular automata in more detail. We will show that for each Turing machine there is such a cellular automaton simulating it, and that it is decidable whether an asynchronous cellular automaton has this property or not, even in higher dimensions.

  8. Pinpointing differences in cisplatin-induced apoptosis in adherent and non-adherent cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tastesen, Hanne Sørup; Holm, Jacob Bak; Poulsen, Kristian Arild

    2010-01-01

    Platinum compounds are used in the treatment of cancer. We demonstrate that cisplatin-induced (10 µM) apoptosis (caspase-3 activity) is pronounced within 18 hours in non-adherent Ehrlich ascites tumour cells (EATC), whereas there is no increase in caspase-3 activity in the adherent Ehrlich Lettré...... to a significant increase in apoptosis in ELA following cisplatin exposure. We find that cytosolic accumulation of cisplatin is similar in EATC and ELA. However, the nuclear accumulation and DNA-binding of cisplatin is significant lower in ELA compared to EATC. We suggest three putative reasons for the observed...

  9. Imaging of Cellular Oxidoreductase Activity Suggests Mixotrophic Metabolisms in Thiomargarita spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Jake V; Flood, Beverly E; Ricci, Elizabeth; Delherbe, Nathalie

    2017-11-07

    The largest known bacteria, Thiomargarita spp., have yet to be isolated in pure culture, but their large size allows for individual cells to be monitored in time course experiments or to be individually sorted for omics-based investigations. Here we investigated the metabolism of individual cells of Thiomargarita spp. by using a novel application of a tetrazolium-based dye that measures oxidoreductase activity. When coupled with microscopy, staining of the cells with a tetrazolium-formazan dye allows metabolic responses in Thiomargarita spp. to be to be tracked in the absence of observable cell division. Additionally, the metabolic activity of Thiomargarita sp. cells can be differentiated from the metabolism of other microbes in specimens that contain adherent bacteria. The results of our redox dye-based assay suggest that Thiomargarita is the most metabolically versatile under anoxic conditions, where it appears to express cellular oxidoreductase activity in response to the electron donors succinate, acetate, citrate, formate, thiosulfate, H2, and H2S. Under hypoxic conditions, formazan staining results suggest the metabolism of succinate and likely acetate, citrate, and H2S. Cells incubated under oxic conditions showed the weakest formazan staining response, and then only to H2S, citrate, and perhaps succinate. These results provide experimental validation of recent genomic studies of Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii that suggest metabolic plasticity and mixotrophic metabolism. The cellular oxidoreductase response of bacteria attached to the exterior of Thiomargarita also supports the possibility of trophic interactions between these largest of known bacteria and attached epibionts.IMPORTANCE The metabolic potential of many microorganisms that cannot be grown in the laboratory is known only from genomic data. Genomes of Thiomargarita spp. suggest that these largest of known bacteria are mixotrophs, combining lithotrophic metabolism with organic carbon

  10. Adaptation and evaluation of the measurement properties of the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Batista dos Santos Pedrosa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to undertake the cultural adaptation of, and to evaluate the measurement properties of, the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale in coronary heart disease (CHD patients, with outpatient monitoring at a teaching hospital. Method: the process of cultural adaptation was undertaken in accordance with the international literature. The data were obtained from 147 CHD patients, through the application of the sociodemographic/clinical characterization instrument, and of the Brazilian versions of the Morisky Self-Reported Measure of Medication Adherence Scale, the General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale, and the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale. Results: the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale presented evidence of semantic-idiomatic, conceptual and cultural equivalencies, with high acceptability and practicality. The floor effect was evidenced for the total score and for the domains of the scale studied. The findings evidenced the measure's reliability. The domains of the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale presented significant inverse correlations of moderate to strong magnitude between the scores of the Morisky scale, indicating convergent validity, although correlations with the measure of general self-efficacy were not evidenced. The validity of known groups was supported, as the scale discriminated between "adherents" and "non-adherents" to the medications, as well as to "sufficient dose" and "insufficient dose". Conclusion: the Brazilian version of the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale presented evidence of reliability and validity in coronary heart disease outpatients.

  11. Explant cultures of human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Herman; Barrett, L.A.; Jackson, F.E.

    1978-01-01

    . The ability to maintain colonic mucosa in culture was subject to both intra- and interindividual variation. Cultured human colonic mucosa also activated a chemical procarcinogen, benzo[a]pyrene, into metabolites which bound to cellular DNA. A 100-fold interindividual variation in this binding was observed.......Human colonic epithelium has been cultured as explants in a chemically defined medium for periods of 1 to 20 days. The viability of the explants was shown by the preservation of the ultrastructural features of the colonic epithelial cells and by active incorporation of radioactive precursors...... into cellular DNA and protein. A progressive decrease in the number of goblet cells, decrease in the depth of the crypts, and a change from a columnar to a cuboidal epithelium were observed. After 20 days in culture the colonic mucosa consisted of a single layer of cuboidal epithelial cells and a few glands...

  12. Persisting with prevention: The importance of adherence for HIV prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayes Richard J

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only four out of 31 completed randomized controlled trials (RCTs of HIV prevention strategies against sexual transmission have shown significant efficacy. Poor adherence may have contributed to the lack of effect in some of these trials. In this paper we explore the impact of various levels of adherence on measured efficacy within an RCT. Analysis We used simple quantitative methods to illustrate the impact of various levels of adherence on measured efficacy by assuming a uniform population in terms of sexual behavior and the binomial model for the transmission probability per partnership. At 100% adherence the measured efficacy within an RCT is a reasonable approximation of the true biological efficacy. However, as adherence levels fall, the efficacy measured within a trial substantially under-estimates the true biological efficacy. For example, at 60% adherence, the measured efficacy can be less than half of the true biological efficacy. Conclusion Poor adherence during a trial can substantially reduce the power to detect an effect, and improved methods of achieving and maintaining high adherence within trials are needed. There are currently 12 ongoing HIV prevention trials, all but one of which require ongoing user-adherence. Attention must be given to methods of maximizing adherence when piloting and designing RCTs and HIV prevention programmes.

  13. Aging, neurocognition, and medication adherence in HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettenhofer, Mark L; Hinkin, Charles H; Castellon, Steven A; Durvasula, Ramani; Ullman, Jodi; Lam, Mona; Myers, Hector; Wright, Matthew J; Foley, Jessica

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the hypothesis that poor adherence to highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) would be more strongly related to cognitive impairment among older than among younger HIV-seropositive adults. A volunteer sample of 431 HIV-infected adult patients prescribed self-administered HAART was recruited from community agencies and university-affiliated infectious disease clinics in the Los Angeles area. Neurocognitive measures included tests of attention, information processing speed, learning/memory, verbal fluency, motor functioning, and executive functioning. Medication adherence was measured using microchip-embedded pill bottle caps (Medication Event Monitoring System) and self-report. Latent/structural analysis techniques were used to evaluate factor models of cognition and adherence. Mean adherence rates were higher among older (>or=50 years) than younger (<50 years) HIV-positive adults. However, latent/structural modeling demonstrated that neurocognitive impairment was associated with poorer medication adherence among older participants only. When cognitive subdomains were examined individually, executive functioning, motor functioning, and processing speed were most strongly related to adherence in this age group. CD4 count and drug problems were also more strongly associated with adherence among older than younger adults. Older HIV-positive individuals with neurocognitive impairment or drug problems are at increased risk of suboptimal adherence to medication. Likewise, older adults may be especially vulnerable to immunological and neurocognitive dysfunction under conditions of suboptimal HAART adherence. These findings highlight the importance of optimizing medication adherence rates and evaluating neurocognition in the growing population of older HIV-infected patients.

  14. OBTENTION OF RABIES ANTIGEN THROUGH BHK21 CELLS ADHERED TO MICROCARRIERS

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    FRAZATTI GALLINA Neuza M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Four rabies antigen batches were produced from virus suspensions resulting from BHK21 cells adhered to microcarriers (Cytodex 1, inoculated and cultured in a bioreactor. In parallel the methodology of production of rabies virus through cultures of BHK21 cells in monolayers in bottles was used. The results obtained showed that infecting titles were 106.69 DL50/mL and 107.28 DL50/mL for suspensions cultured in bottles and in the bioreactor, respectively. The viral suspension volumes collected were on average 11,900 per batch from the bioreactor and 800mL per bottle. Ten horses were immunized with the antigen produced in the bioreactor. The means of antirabies antibody titers found were 240 and 212 IU/mL after the initial and the first booster doses, respectively. Rabies antigen with satisfactory infecting titers can be obtained on a large scale by culturing in a bioreactor inoculated BHK21 cells adhered to microcarriers.

  15. Patient adherence to medical treatment: a review of reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heerdink Rob

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients' non-adherence to medical treatment remains a persistent problem. Many interventions to improve patient adherence are unsuccessful and sound theoretical foundations are lacking. Innovations in theory and practice are badly needed. A new and promising way could be to review the existing reviews of adherence to interventions and identify the underlying theories for effective interventions. That is the aim of our study. Methods The study is a review of 38 systematic reviews of the effectiveness of adherence interventions published between 1990 and 2005. Electronic literature searches were conducted in Medline, Psychinfo, Embase and the Cochrane Library. Explicit inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. The scope of the study is patient adherence to medical treatment in the cure and care sector. Results Significant differences in the effectiveness of adherence interventions were found in 23 of the 38 systematic reviews. Effective interventions were found in each of four theoretical approaches to adherence interventions: technical, behavioural, educational and multi-faceted or complex interventions. Technical solutions, such as a simplification of the regimen, were often found to be effective, although that does not count for every therapeutic regimen. Overall, our results show that, firstly, there are effective adherence interventions without an explicit theoretical explanation of the operating mechanisms, for example technical solutions. Secondly, there are effective adherence interventions, which clearly stem from the behavioural theories, for example incentives and reminders. Thirdly, there are other theoretical models that seem plausible for explaining non-adherence, but not very effective in improving adherence behaviour. Fourthly, effective components within promising theories could not be identified because of the complexity of many adherence interventions and the lack of studies that explicitly compare

  16. Objective Assessment Method for RNAV STAR Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Michael; Matthews, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    Flight crews and air traffic controllers have reported many safety concerns regarding area navigation standard terminal arrival routes (RNAV STARs). Specifically, optimized profile descents (OPDs). However, our information sources to quantify these issues are limited to subjective reporting and time consuming case-by-case investigations. This work is a preliminary study into the objective performance of instrument procedures and provides a framework to track procedural concepts and assess design specifications. We created a tool and analysis methods for gauging aircraft adherence as it relates to RNAV STARs. This information is vital for comprehensive understanding of how our air traffic behaves. In this study, we mined the performance of 24 major US airports over the preceding three years. Overlaying 4D radar track data onto RNAV STAR routes provided a comparison between aircraft flight paths and the waypoint positions and altitude restrictions. NASA Ames Supercomputing resources were utilized to perform the data mining and processing. We assessed STARs by lateral transition path (full-lateral), vertical restrictions (full-lateral/full-vertical), and skipped waypoints (skips). In addition, we graphed frequencies of aircraft altitudes relative to the altitude restrictions. Full-lateral adherence was always greater than Full-lateral/ full- vertical, as it is a subset, but the difference between the rates was not consistent. Full-lateral/full-vertical adherence medians of the 2016 procedures ranged from 0% in KDEN (Denver) to 21% in KMEM (Memphis). Waypoint skips ranged from 0% to nearly 100% for specific waypoints. Altitudes restrictions were sometimes missed by systematic amounts in 1,000 ft. increments from the restriction, creating multi-modal distributions. Other times, altitude misses looked to be more normally distributed around the restriction. This tool may aid in providing acceptability metrics as well as risk assessment information.

  17. The thorny path linking cellular senescence to organismalaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, Christopher K.; Mian, Saira; Campisi, Judith

    2005-08-09

    Half a century is fast approaching since Hayflick and colleagues formally described the limited ability of normal human cells to proliferate in culture (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961). This finding--that normal somatic cells, in contrast to cancer cells, cannot divide indefinitely--challenged the prevailing idea that cells from mortal multicellular organisms were intrinsically ''immortal'' (Carrell, 1912). It also spawned two hypotheses, essential elements of which persist today. The first held that the restricted proliferation of normal cells, now termed cellular senescence, suppresses cancer (Hayflick, 1965; Sager, 1991; Campisi, 2001). The second hypothesis, as explained in the article by Lorenzini et al., suggested that the limited proliferation of cells in culture recapitulated aspects of organismal aging (Hayflick, 1965; Martin, 1993). How well have these hypotheses weathered the ensuing decades? Before answering this question, we first consider current insights into the causes and consequences of cellular senescence. Like Lorenzini et al., we limit our discussion to mammals. We also focus on fibroblasts, the cell type studied by Lorenzini et al., but consider other types as well. We suggest that replicative capacity in culture is not a straightforward assessment, and that it correlates poorly with both longevity and body mass. We speculate this is due to the malleable and variable nature of replicative capacity, which renders it an indirect metric of qualitative and quantitative differences among cells to undergo senescence, a response that directly alters cellular phenotype and might indirectly alter tissue structure and function.

  18. Cross cultural dimensions to the learning and practice of learning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper focused on the question of cultural dimension to learning and the practice of learning in different schools. It can be argues that values mould a culture and this influences the interactions through their adherence to the daily practices. Thus the different schools experience different kinds of conflicts between their ...

  19. Determining the Cross-Talk between Smooth Muscle Cells and Macrophages on a Cobalt-Chromium Stent Material Surface using an In Vitro Post-Implantation Co-Culture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jordan A; Lamichhane, Sujan; Vierhout, Thomas; Engebretson, Daniel

    2017-10-19

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and macrophages are important cellular components involved in the development of complications following the implantation of cardiovascular devices. This leads to various disorders such as restenosis, chronic inflammation, and may ultimately result in device failure. In this study, we developed a post-implant stent co-culture model using different ratios of SMCs and macrophages seeded on to cobalt-chromium alloy. The macrophages had an increased affinity to the co-culture surfaces, which resulted in decreased SMC attachment to the alloy surfaces at the initial time point. Once adhered, the macrophages spread freely and displayed advanced stages of inflammation at 48 h when co-cultured with SMCs. This resulted in an increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-8) by 48 h in the co-culture samples with the greatest increase observed with the high number of macrophages. Therefore, the increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines promoted the growth of SMCs in co-culture to a greater extent than when the SMCs were culture alone. Thus, this study demonstrated the constant cross-talk between SMCs and macrophages occurring on the post-implant stent surface. Similar co-culture models can be used to test the biocompatibility of drugs and biomaterials at possible post-implantation scenarios. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. [E-health and treatment adherence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbets, Emmanuel

    2016-10-01

    The medico-economic implications of poor drug compliance are such that improving the adherence could have a considerable impact in terms of public health. Technological tools from the digital revolution are now at the service of health: the connected health. There are already numerous, more or less sophisticated, and many more are under development. Data from the literature suggest that these tools could provide real benefits including improving patient compliance. The digital revolution has changed our daily lives. It will certainly revolutionize the practice of medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Improving adherence and outcomes in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi R

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Renu Joshi, Disha Joshi, Pramil Cheriyath Department of Endocrinology, Pinnacle Health Hospitals, Harrisburg, PA, USA Objective: Nonadherence in diabetes is a problem leading to wasted resources and preventable deaths each year. Remedies for diminishing nonadherence are many but marginally effective, and outcomes remain suboptimal. Aim: The aim of this study was to test a new iOS “app”, PatientPartner. Derived from complexity theory, this novel technology has been extensively used in other fields; this is the first trial in a patient population. Methods: Physicians referred patients who were “severely non-adherent” with HbA1c levels >8. After consent and random assignment (n=107, subjects in the intervention group were immersed in the 12-min PatientPartner game, which assesses and trains subjects on parameters of thinking that are critical for good decision making in health care: information management, stress coping, and health strategies. The control group did not play PatientPartner. All subjects were called each week for 3 weeks and self-reported on their medication adherence, diet, and exercise. Baseline and 3-month post-intervention HbA1c levels were recorded for the intervention group.Results: Although the control group showed no difference on any measures at 3 weeks, the intervention group reported significant mean percentage improvements on all measures: medication adherence (57%, standard deviation [SD] 18%–96%, SD 9, diet (50%, SD 33%–75%, SD 28, and exercise (29%, SD 31%–43%, SD 33. At 3 months, the mean HbA1c levels in the intervention group were significantly lower (9.6 than baseline (10.7. Conclusion: Many programs to improve adherence have been proved to be expensive and marginally effective. Therefore, improvements from the single use of a 12-min-long “app” are noteworthy. This is the first ever randomized, controlled trial to demonstrate that an “app” can impact the gold standard biological marker, HbA1c

  2. The effect of Nepeta cataria extract on adherence and enzyme production of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nostro, A; Cannatelli, M A; Crisafi, G; Alonzo, V

    2001-12-01

    Nepeta cataria L., commonly known as catnip, is a perennial herb with a considerable folkloric reputation. A diethyl ether extract of this plant has been shown to have antimicrobial activity against fungi and Gram-positive bacteria. The aim of this work was to study the activity of N. cataria extract on 44 Staphylococcus aureus strains, some resistant to methicillin, and S. aureus 6538P (American Type Culture Collection) by evaluating the effect of subminimum inhibitory concentrations on coagulase, DNAse, thermonuclease and lipase production, and on in-vitro adherence. DNAse, thermonuclease and lipase were inhibited by concentrations equal to 1/2 and 1/4 MIC. A reduction of adherence was also observed.

  3. Infection with human coronavirus NL63 enhances streptococcal adherence to epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golda, Anna; Malek, Natalia; Dudek, Bartosz; Zeglen, Slawomir; Wojarski, Jacek; Ochman, Marek; Kucewicz, Ewa; Zembala, Marian

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of augmented bacterial pathogenicity in post-viral infections is the first step in the development of an effective therapy. This study assessed the effect of human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63) on the adherence of bacterial pathogens associated with respiratory tract illnesses. It was shown that HCoV-NL63 infection resulted in an increased adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae to virus-infected cell lines and fully differentiated primary human airway epithelium cultures. The enhanced binding of bacteria correlated with an increased expression level of the platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R), but detailed evaluation of the bacterium–PAF-R interaction revealed a limited relevance of this process. PMID:21325482

  4. Reversibly assembled cellular composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Kenneth C; Gershenfeld, Neil

    2013-09-13

    We introduce composite materials made by reversibly assembling a three-dimensional lattice of mass-produced carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composite parts with integrated mechanical interlocking connections. The resulting cellular composite materials can respond as an elastic solid with an extremely large measured modulus for an ultralight material (12.3 megapascals at a density of 7.2 milligrams per cubic centimeter). These materials offer a hierarchical decomposition in modeling, with bulk properties that can be predicted from component measurements and deformation modes that can be determined by the placement of part types. Because site locations are locally constrained, structures can be produced in a relative assembly process that merges desirable features of fiber composites, cellular materials, and additive manufacturing.

  5. Cellular multiplets in directional solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopczynski, P.; Rappel, W.; Karma, A. [Department of Physics and Center for Interdisciplinary Research on Complex Systems, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    1997-02-01

    We report the existence of new branches of steady state cellular structures in directional solidification. These structures consist of repeating cellular subunits, or multiplets, each containing a set of distinct cells separated by unequal grooves. A detailed numerical study of the symmetric model of directional solidification reveals that all multiplets bifurcate off the main singlet solution branch in two sets. Two points on the main branch, one corresponding to the onset of the Eckhaus instability at small cell spacing and the other to a fold of this branch at large spacing, are argued to be separate accumulation points for each set of multiplets. The set of structures bifurcating near the fold are morphologically similar to experimentally observed multiplets. In contrast, those bifurcating near the Eckhaus instability do not resemble experimental shapes. Furthermore, they are argued to be generically unstable. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Cellular IRES-mediated translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Translation of cellular mRNAs via initiation at internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) has received increased attention during recent years due to its emerging significance for many physiological and pathological stress conditions in eukaryotic cells. Expression of genes bearing IRES elements in their mRNAs is controlled by multiple molecular mechanisms, with IRES-mediated translation favored under conditions when cap-dependent translation is compromised. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the field and future directions that may bring us closer to understanding the complex mechanisms that guide cellular IRES-mediated expression. We present examples in which the competitive action of IRES-transacting factors (ITAFs) plays a pivotal role in IRES-mediated translation and thereby controls cell-fate decisions leading to either pro-survival stress adaptation or cell death. PMID:21220943

  7. Accurate reporting of adherence to inhaled therapies in adults with cystic fibrosis: methods to calculate normative adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoo ZH

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zhe Hui Hoo,1,2 Rachael Curley,1,2 Michael J Campbell,1 Stephen J Walters,1 Daniel Hind,3 Martin J Wildman1,2 1School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR, University of Sheffield, 2Sheffield Adult Cystic Fibrosis Centre, Northern General Hospital, 3Sheffield Clinical Trials Research Unit, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK Background: Preventative inhaled treatments in cystic fibrosis will only be effective in maintaining lung health if used appropriately. An accurate adherence index should therefore reflect treatment effectiveness, but the standard method of reporting adherence, that is, as a percentage of the agreed regimen between clinicians and people with cystic fibrosis, does not account for the appropriateness of the treatment regimen. We describe two different indices of inhaled therapy adherence for adults with cystic fibrosis which take into account effectiveness, that is, “simple” and “sophisticated” normative adherence. Methods to calculate normative adherence: Denominator adjustment involves fixing a minimum appropriate value based on the recommended therapy given a person’s characteristics. For simple normative adherence, the denominator is determined by the person’s Pseudomonas status. For sophisticated normative adherence, the denominator is determined by the person’s Pseudomonas status and history of pulmonary exacerbations over the previous year. Numerator adjustment involves capping the daily maximum inhaled therapy use at 100% so that medication overuse does not artificially inflate the adherence level. Three illustrative cases: Case A is an example of inhaled therapy under prescription based on Pseudomonas status resulting in lower simple normative adherence compared to unadjusted adherence. Case B is an example of inhaled therapy under-prescription based on previous exacerbation history resulting in lower sophisticated normative adherence compared to unadjusted adherence and simple normative adherence

  8. Xtoys: Cellular automata on xwindows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creutz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Physics Dept.

    1995-08-15

    Xtoys is a collection of xwindow programs for demonstrating simulations of various statistical models. Included are xising, for the two dimensional Ising model, xpotts, for the q-state Potts model, xautomalab, for a fairly general class of totalistic cellular automata, xsand, for the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfield model of self organized criticality, and xfires, a simple forest fire simulation. The programs should compile on any machine supporting xwindows.

  9. Melanoma Screening with Cellular Phones

    OpenAIRE

    Massone, Cesare; Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer; Ahlgrimm-Siess, Verena; Gabler, Gerald; Ebner, Christoph; Peter Soyer, H.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mobile teledermatology has recently been shown to be suitable for teledermatology despite limitations in image definition in preliminary studies. The unique aspect of mobile teledermatology is that this system represents a filtering or triage system, allowing a sensitive approach for the management of patients with emergent skin diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we investigated the feasibility of teleconsultation using a new generation of cellular phones in p...

  10. Aging, Cellular Senescence, and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Campisi, Judith

    2012-01-01

    For most species, aging promotes a host of degenerative pathologies that are characterized by debilitating losses of tissue or cellular function. However, especially among vertebrates, aging also promotes hyperplastic pathologies, the most deadly of which is cancer. In contrast to the loss of function that characterizes degenerating cells and tissues, malignant (cancerous) cells must acquire new (albeit aberrant) functions that allow them to develop into a lethal tumor. This review discusses ...

  11. Cellular Senescence: A Translational Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkland, James L.; Tamara Tchkonia

    2017-01-01

    Cellular senescence entails essentially irreversible replicative arrest, apoptosis resistance, and frequently acquisition of a pro-inflammatory, tissue-destructive senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Senescent cells accumulate in various tissues with aging and at sites of pathogenesis in many chronic diseases and conditions. The SASP can contribute to senescence-related inflammation, metabolic dysregulation, stem cell dysfunction, aging phenotypes, chronic diseases, geriatric sy...

  12. Cellular automata : dynamics, simulations, traces

    OpenAIRE

    Guillon, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    A cellular automaton is a discrete dynamical system which can model objects that evolve parallelly and asynchronously : the space is divided into cells, each of which has a state evolving according to some single local rule and a finite number of neighboring cells. Though this system can easily be formalized, very complex behaviors can appear ; it turns out to be a powerful computational model. That complexity can be studied with respect to various theories : topology, measure, decidability, ...

  13. Cellular Adhesion and Adhesion Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    SELLER, Zerrin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, cell adhesion and cell adhesion molecules have been shown to be important for many normal biological processes, including embryonic cell migration, immune system functions and wound healing. It has also been shown that they contribute to the pathogenesis of a large number of common human disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and tumor cell metastasis in cancer. In this review, the basic mechanisms of cellular adhesion and the structural and functional features of adhes...

  14. Adherence and viability of intestinal bacteria to differentiated Caco-2 cells quantified by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grootaert, Charlotte; Boon, Nico; Zeka, Fjoralba; Vanhoecke, Barbara; Bracke, Marc; Verstraete, Willy; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2011-07-01

    Recent developments in host-microbe research give rise to a growing demand for rapid and accurate methods to quantify bacterial adhesion to epithelial cells. Here, we describe a new flow cytometric method to determine the amount and viability of gut bacteria, adhered to a monolayer of differentiated cells. The latter is a more relevant epithelium model than the suspended eukaryotic cells currently used in flow cytometric protocols. During the development of the method, we monitored the adhesion potential of six bacterial species and an intestinal microbial community to Caco-2 cells. The combination of SYBR Green I/propidium iodide was more efficient than carboxyfluorescein diacetate to stain the bacterial cells. In addition, a better separation between the Caco-2 background signal and viable and dead bacteria was obtained. A precise amount of Triton X-100 was used to detach adhered bacteria from Caco-2 cells and cell debris. Yet, a limited decrease in viability was observed for the intestinal microbial community treated with Triton X-100. The flow cytometric lower detection limit for pure bacterial cultures was 3.0-4.0log/mL, whereas a 5.0-5.5log/mL detection limit was obtained in the presence of Caco-2 cell background. The latter was sufficient to quantify adhered bacteria. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of a flow cytometric protocol that quantifies adhesion of both pure and mixed gut microbial cultures to a differentiated monolayer of Caco-2 cells and that allows to distinguish between viable and dead adhered bacteria. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Biofilm formation and adherence characteristics of an Elizabethkingia meningoseptica isolate from Oreochromis mossambicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenia Hafizah Y

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elizabethkingia spp. are opportunistic pathogens often found associated with intravascular device-related bacteraemias and ventilator-associated pneumonia. Their ability to exist as biofilm structures has been alluded to but not extensively investigated. Methods The ability of Elizabethkingia meningoseptica isolate CH2B from freshwater tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus and E. meningoseptica strain NCTC 10016T to adhere to abiotic surfaces was investigated using microtiter plate adherence assays following exposure to varying physico-chemical challenges. The role of cell-surface properties was investigated using hydrophobicity (bacterial adherence to hydrocarbons, autoaggregation and coaggregation assays. The role of extracellular components in adherence was determined using reversal or inhibition of coaggregation assays in conjunction with Listeria spp. isolates, while the role of cell-free supernatants, from diverse bacteria, in inducing enhanced adherence was investigated using microtitre plate assays. Biofilm architecture of isolate CH2B alone as well as in co-culture with Listeria monocytogenes was investigated using flow cells and microscopy. Results E. meningoseptica isolates CH2B and NCTC 10016T demonstrated stronger biofilm formation in nutrient-rich medium compared to nutrient-poor medium at both 21 and 37°C, respectively. Both isolates displayed a hydrophilic cell surface following the bacterial adherence to xylene assay. Varying autoaggregation and coaggregation indices were observed for the E. meningoseptica isolates. Coaggregation by isolate CH2B appeared to be strongest with foodborne pathogens like Enterococcus, Staphylococcus and Listeria spp. Partial inhibition of coaggregation was observed when isolate CH2B was treated with heat or protease exposure, suggesting the presence of heat-sensitive adhesins, although sugar treatment resulted in increased coaggregation and may be associated with a lactose

  16. Influence of psychosocial work environment on adherence to workplace exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lars L

    2011-02-01

    Physical exercise can reduce the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders, but adherence to exercise is challenging for many employees. This study determines prognostic factors for adherence to workplace exercise. In Copenhagen, 132 office workers with neck/shoulder pain were randomized to 2 or 12 minutes of exercise five days a week. Low, medium, and high adherence was defined as performing less than 10, 10-30, or more than 30 exercise sessions during the subsequent 10 weeks. Odds ratios (OR) for adherence were modeled by logistic regression. Lower adherence to the 10-week exercise program was predicted by poorer psychosocial work environment and lower exercise self-efficacy. A longer exercise program was not associated with lower adherence. Concurrent strategies to improve psychosocial work environment and individual exercise beliefs should be considered when implementing exercise at the workplace.

  17. Adherence to internet-based mobile-supported stress management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarski, A C; Lehr, D.; Berking, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nonadherence to treatment is a prevalent issue in Internet interventions. Guidance from health care professionals has been found to increase treatment adherence rates in Internet interventions for a range of physical and mental disorders. Evaluating different guidance formats of varying...... of this study was to investigate the influence of different guidance formats (content-focused guidance, adherence-focused guidance, and administrative guidance) on adherence and to identify predictors of nonadherence in an Internet-based mobile-supported stress management intervention (ie, GET.ON Stress...... (content-focused guidance vs waitlist control, adherence-focused guidance vs waitlist control, administrative guidance vs waitlist control). Adherence was defined by the number of completed treatment modules (0-7). An ANOVA was performed to compare the adherence rates from the different guidance formats...

  18. Poison control center communication and impact on patient adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Lee; Matwin, Sonia; Jasti, Srichand; Williamson, Jacquee; Crouch, Barbara; Caravati, Martin; Dudley, William

    2008-02-01

    This project explored the communication processes associated with poison control center calls. In this preliminary study, we adapted the Roter Interaction Analysis System to capture staff-caller dialogue. This involved case selection, wherein adherence and non-adherence cases were selected; call linkage to medical records, where case records were linked with voice recordings; and application of Roter Interaction Analysis System to calls. Results indicate that communications are predominantly provider-driven. Patient age and percentage of staff partnership statements were significantly associated with adherence at the 0.05 level. Increases in age were associated with decreases in adherence to recommendations (p < 0.001). Increases in percentage of staff partnership statements (over all staff talk) were associated with increases in adherence (p = 0.013). This line of research could lead to evidence-based guidelines for effective staff-caller communication, increased adherence rates, and improved health outcomes.

  19. Gamification of Medication Adherence in Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahim, Mohammad Izzat; Thomas, Rhys Huw

    2017-11-01

    Adherence to medication regimens is a crucial factor in seizure-freedom and well-being for people with epilepsy. In contrast, taking medication inconsistently increases the risk of not only seizures and their adverse effects, but drug side-effects and unnecessary modifications to treatment plans. Epilepsy is prevalent across all age groups and we have been slow to utilise both the technologies and psychologies derived from computer gaming. Gaming has broken through to the mainstream and is no longer the preserve of younger males, mirroring the adoption of smart-phones. 'Gamification' motivates users into engaging in an activity with a higher intensity and duration. Introducing gaming elements into a non-gaming context has the potential to transform routine tasks into more enjoyable and motivating experiences. This has been exploited by marketing executives, but also has clear uses in a healthcare setting too. We discuss how previously published frameworks could be employed to help people with epilepsy adhere to medication regimens to create a patient-focussed, modifiable and fun experience. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Urine culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture and sensitivity - urine ... when urinating. You also may have a urine culture after you have been treated for an infection. ... when bacteria or yeast are found in the culture. This likely means that you have a urinary ...